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Sample records for 13c high-resolution solid-state

  1. Conformational transitions and fibrillation mechanism of human calcitonin as studied by high-resolution solid-state 13C NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Kamihira, M.; Naito, A.; Tuzi, S.; Nosaka, A. Y.; Saitô, H.

    2000-01-01

    Conformational transitions of human calcitonin (hCT) during fibril formation in the acidic and neutral conditions were investigated by high-resolution solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. In aqueous acetic acid solution (pH 3.3), a local alpha-helical form is present around Gly10 whereas a random coil form is dominant as viewed from Phe22, Ala26, and Ala31 in the monomer form on the basis of the 13C chemical shifts. On the other hand, a local beta-sheet form as viewed from Gly10 and Phe22, and both beta-sheet and random coil as viewed from Ala26 and Ala31 were detected in the fibril at pH 3.3. The results indicate that conformational transitions from alpha-helix to beta-sheet, and from random coil to beta-sheet forms occurred in the central and C-terminus regions, respectively, during the fibril formation. The increased 13C resonance intensities of fibrils after a certain delay time suggests that the fibrillation can be explained by a two-step reaction mechanism in which the first step is a homogeneous association to form a nucleus, and the second step is an autocatalytic heterogeneous fibrillation. In contrast to the fibril at pH 3.3, the fibril at pH 7.5 formed a local beta-sheet conformation at the central region and exhibited a random coil at the C-terminus region. Not only a hydrophobic interaction among the amphiphilic alpha-helices, but also an electrostatic interaction between charged side chains can play an important role for the fibril formation at pH 7.5 and 3.3 acting as electrostatically favorable and unfavorable interactions, respectively. These results suggest that hCT fibrils are formed by stacking antiparallel beta-sheets at pH 7.5 and a mixture of antiparallel and parallel beta-sheets at pH 3.3. PMID:10850796

  2. High-resolution solid-state 13C CP MAS NMR spectra of some β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes with nitriles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, M.; McDowell, C. A.

    1983-11-01

    β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes of 3-aminobenzonitrile, 4-aminobenzonitrile, and adamantane-1-carbonitrile were studied by means of high-resolution solid-state CP MAS 13C NMR spectroscopy. The interactions between the host and guest molecules are discussed.

  3. Detection of tannins in modern and fossil barks and in plant residues by high-resolution solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.A.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Bark samples isolated from brown coal deposits in Victoria, Australia, and buried wood from Rhizophora mangle have been studies by high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Dipolar dephasing 13C NMR appears to be a useful method of detecting the presence of tannins in geochemical samples including barks, buried woods, peats and leaf litter. It is shown that tannins are selectively preserved in bark during coalification to the brown coal stage. ?? 1988.

  4. Effects of post-reactor functionalization on the phase behaviour of an ethylene-1-octene copolymer studied using solid-state high resolution 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Calucci, Lucia; Cicogna, Francesca; Forte, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    The effects of post-reactor functionalization with naphthoate-TEMPO on the structure and morphology of an ethylene-1-octene copolymer were investigated by means of solid-state NMR techniques and DSC measurements. Selective (13)C MAS experiments allowed the orthorhombic and the monoclinic crystalline phases and two amorphous phases with different degree of mobility to be detected and quantified. (13)C and (1)H relaxation time measurements and spin diffusion experiments gave insight into the polymer dynamics within the different phases, the crystalline domain dimensions, and the rate of chain diffusion between amorphous and crystalline phases. Comparison of the results obtained for the pristine copolymer and the functionalized samples clearly indicated that the functionalization procedure causes redistribution within the crystalline and the amorphous phases with no relevant change in the degree of crystallinity or in the crystalline domain average size, and slows down chain diffusion. PMID:23942957

  5. Solid-state {sup 19}F and {sup 13}C NMR of room temperature fluorinated graphite and samples thermally treated under fluorine: Low-field and high-resolution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudet, J.; Dubois, M.; Guerin, K.; Pinheiro, J.P.; Hamwi, A.; Stone, W.E.E.; Pirotte, P.; Masin, F. . E-mail: fmasin@ulb.ac.be

    2005-04-15

    Room temperature graphite fluorides consisting of raw material and samples post-treated in pure fluorine atmosphere in the temperature range 100-500 deg. C have been studied by solid-state NMR. Several NMR approaches have been used, both high and low-field {sup 19}F, {sup 19}F MAS and {sup 13}C MAS with {sup 19}F to {sup 13}C cross polarization. The modifications, in the graphitic lattice, of the catalytic iodine fluorides products have been examined. A transformation of the C-F bond character from semi-ionic to covalent has been found to occur at a post-treatment temperature close to 400 deg. C. It is shown that covalency increases with temperature.

  6. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  7. 2H-DNP-enhanced 2H–13C solid-state NMR correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Andreas, Loren B.; Smith, Albert A.

    2015-01-01

    Perdeuteration of biological macromolecules for magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy can yield high-resolution 2H–13C correlation spectra and the method is therefore of great interest for the structural biology community. Here we demonstrate that the combination of sample deuteration and dynamic nuclear polarization yields resolved 2H–13C correlation spectra with a signal enhancement of ε ≥ 700 compared to a spectrum recorded with microwaves off and otherwise identical conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first time that 2H-DNP has been employed to enhance MAS-NMR spectra of a biologically relevant system. The DNP process is studied using several polarizing agents and the technique is applied to obtain 2H–13C correlation spectra of U-[2H, 13C] proline. PMID:20458422

  8. Quantification of protein secondary structure by (13)C solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Forato, Lucimara Aparecida; Bernardes Filho, Rubens; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution (13)C solid-state NMR stands out as one of the most promising techniques to solve the structure of insoluble proteins featuring biological and technological importance. The simplest nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method to quantify the secondary structure of proteins uses the areas of carbonyl and alpha carbon peaks. The quantification obtained by fitting procedures depends on the assignment of the peaks to the structure, type of line shape, number of peaks to be used, and other parameters that are set by the operator. In this paper, we demonstrate that the analysis of (13)C NMR spectra by a pattern recognition method-based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) regression, which does not depend on the operator-shows higher correlation coefficients for α-helix and β-sheet (0.96 and 0.91, respectively) than Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method. Therefore, the use of (13)C solid-state NMR spectra and SVD is a simple and reliable method for quantifying the secondary structures of insoluble proteins in solid-state. PMID:27068694

  9. High-resolution magic-angle spinning (13)C spectroscopy of brain tissue at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxia; Chen, Lei; Gao, Hongchang; Zeng, Danlin; Yue, Yong; Liu, Maili; Lei, Hao; Deng, Feng; Ye, Chaohui

    2006-03-01

    High-resolution magic-angle spinning (MAS) (1)H and (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has recently been applied to study the metabolism in intact biological tissue samples. Because of the low natural abundance and the low gyromagnetic ratio of the (13)C nuclei, signal enhancement techniques such as cross-polarization (CP) and distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT) are often employed in MAS (13)C MRS to improve the detection sensitivity. In this study, several sensitivity enhancement techniques commonly used in liquid- and solid-state NMR, including CP, DEPT and nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE), were combined with MAS to acquire high-resolution (13)C spectra on intact rat brain tissue at natural abundance, and were compared for their performances. The results showed that different signal enhancement techniques are sensitive to different classes of molecules/metabolites, depending on their molecular weights and mobility. DEPT was found to enhance the signals of low-molecular weight metabolites exclusively, while the signals of lipids, which often are associated with membranes and have relatively lower mobility, were highly sensitive to CP enhancement. PMID:16477685

  10. 1H to 13C Energy Transfer in Solid State NMR Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berns, Anne E.; Conte, Pellegrino

    2010-05-01

    Cross polarization (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) 13C-NMR spectroscopy is a solid state NMR technique widely used to study chemical composition of organic materials with low or no solubility in the common deuterated solvents used to run liquid state NMR experiments. Based on the magnetization transfer from abundant nuclei (with spin of 1 -2) having a high gyromagnetic ratio (γ), such as protons, to the less abundant 13C nuclei with low γ values, 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy is often applied in environmental chemistry to obtain quantitative information on the chemical composition of natural organic matter (NOM) (Conte et al., 2004), although its quantitative assessment is still matter of heavy debates. Many authors (Baldock et al., 1997; Conte et al., 1997, 2002; Dria et al., 2002; Kiem et al., 2000; Kögel-Knabner, 2000; Preston, 2001), reported that the application of appropriate instrument setup as well as the use of special pulse sequences and correct spectra elaboration may provide signal intensities that are directly proportional to the amount of nuclei creating a NMR signal. However, many other papers dealt with the quantitative unsuitability of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Among those, Mao et al. (2000), Smernik and Oades (2000 a,b), and Preston (2001) reported that cross-polarized NMR techniques may fail in a complete excitation of the 13C nuclei. In fact, the amount of observable carbons via 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy appeared, in many cases, lower than that measured by a direct observation of the 13C nuclei. As a consequence, cross-polarized NMR techniques may provide spectra where signal distribution may not be representative of the quantitative distribution of the different natural organic matter components. Cross-polarization is obtained after application of an initial 90° x pulse on protons and a further spin lock pulse (along the y axis) having a fixed length (contact time) for both nuclei (1H and 13C) once the Hartmann-Hahn condition is matched

  11. High resolution 1H solid state NMR studies of polyethyleneterephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, T. T. P.; Gerstein, B. C.; Ryan, L. M.; Taylor, R. E.; Dybowski, D. R.

    1980-12-01

    Molecular motions and spatial properties of the solid polymer polyethyleneterephthalate have been investigated using high resolution 1H solid state NMR techniques. The longitudinal spin relaxation time T1ρ of protons (1H) in the rotating frame was measured for a spin locking field ranging from 5 to 20 G. The decay of the 1H magnetization indicated the existence of two distinct T1ρ's and their field dependence shows that they are associated with two mobile phases of the polymer. The 1H magnetization also relaxes under the dipolar narrowed Carr-Purcell (DNCP) multipulse sequence with two dintinct T1y relaxation times. The ratios T1y's and T1ρ's deviate significantly from the expected theoretical values. The combined experiment with magic angle spinning and the DNCP sequence followed by homonuclear dipolar decoupling reveals the individual T1y relaxation of the resolved methylene and aromatic protons. These two species of protons were found to relax with the same T1y's, thus implying that spin diffusion must have taken place under the homonuclear dipolar decoupling multipulse. The qualitative description of spin diffusion under homonuclear decoupling is given. The combined experiment with spin locking and the DNCP sequence yields the correspondence between the two T1ρ's and the two T1y's. The long T1ρ corresponds to the short T1y whereas the short T1ρ corresponds to the long T1y. Communication between the two spatial phases via spin diffusion was also observed in this experiment by monitoring the recovery of the 1H magnitization associated with the short T1ρ after it has been eliminated during the spin locking. The total 1H magnetization is allowed to equilibrate in the laboratory frame for a variable time much shorter than T1 after the spin locking field has been turned off. The spatial relationship between the two phases is discussed.

  12. Dipolar-coupling-mediated total correlation spectroscopy in solid-state 13C NMR: Selection of individual 13C- 13C dipolar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spano, Justin; Wi, Sungsool

    2010-06-01

    Herein is described a useful approach in solid-state NMR, for selecting homonuclear 13C- 13C spin pairs in a multiple- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupled spin system. This method builds upon the zero-quantum (ZQ) dipolar recoupling method introduced by Levitt and coworkers (Marin-Montesinos et al., 2006 [30]) by extending the originally introduced one-dimensional (1D) experiment into a two-dimensional (2D) method with selective irradiation scheme, while moving the 13C- 13C mixing scheme from the transverse to the longitudinal mode, together with a dramatic improvement in the proton decoupling efficiency. Selective spin-pair recoupling experiments incorporating Gaussian and cosine-modulated Gaussian pulses for inverting specific spins were performed, demonstrating the ability to detect informative, simplified/individualized, long-range 13C- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupling interactions more accurately by removing less informative, stronger, short-range 13C- 13C interactions from 2D correlation spectra. The capability of this new approach was demonstrated experimentally on uniformly 13C-labeled Glutamine and a tripeptide sample, GAL.

  13. Comprehensive signal assignment of 13C-labeled lignocellulose using multidimensional solution NMR and 13C chemical shift comparison with solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-09-17

    A multidimensional solution NMR method has been developed using various pulse programs including HCCH-COSY and (13)C-HSQC-NOESY for the structural characterization of commercially available (13)C labeled lignocellulose from potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), chicory (Cichorium intybus), and corn (Zea mays). This new method allowed for 119 of the signals in the (13)C-HSQC spectrum of lignocelluloses to be assigned and was successfully used to characterize the structures of lignocellulose samples from three plants in terms of their xylan and xyloglucan structures, which are the major hemicelluloses in angiosperm. Furthermore, this new method provided greater insight into fine structures of lignin by providing a high resolution to the aromatic signals of the β-aryl ether and resinol moieties, as well as the diastereomeric signals of the β-aryl ether. Finally, the (13)C chemical shifts assigned in this study were compared with those from solid-state NMR and indicated the presence of heterogeneous dynamics in the polysaccharides where rigid cellulose and mobile hemicelluloses moieties existed together. PMID:24010724

  14. 1H and 13C Solid-state NMR of Gossypium barbadense (Pima) Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interaction of water with cellulose and its influence on the nuclear spin dynamics in G. barbadense (Pima) cotton were investigated by 1H and 13C solid-state NMR techniques. 1H spin diffusion results from a Goldman-Shen experiment indicate that the water is multilayered. 1H MAS experiments pro...

  15. 1H and 13C Solid-state NMR of G. barbadense (Pima) Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interaction of water with cellulose and its influence on the nuclear spin dynamics in G. barbadense (Pima) cotton were investigated with 1H and 13C solid-state NMR techniques. 1H spin diffusion results from a Goldman-Shen experiment indicate that the water is multilayered. 1H MAS experiment...

  16. Benchmarks for the 13C NMR chemical shielding tensors in peptides in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernek, Jiří; Pawlak, Tomasz; Potrzebowski, Marek J.

    2012-02-01

    The benchmark set is proposed, which comprises 126 principal elements of chemical shielding tensors, and the respective isotropic chemical shielding values, of all 42 13C nuclei in crystalline Tyr-D-Ala-Phe and Tyr-Ala-Phe tripeptides with known, but highly dissimilar structures. These data are obtained by both the NMR measurements and the density functional theory in the pseudopotential plane-wave scheme. Using the CASTEP program, several computational strategies are employed, for which the level of agreement between calculations and experiment is established. This set is mainly intended for the validation of methods capable of predicting the 13C NMR parameters in solid-state systems.

  17. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  18. (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR studies on albendazole and cyclodextrin albendazole complexes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M João G; García, A; Leonardi, D; Salomon, Claudio J; Lamas, M Celina; Nunes, Teresa G

    2015-06-01

    (13)C and (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were recorded from albendazole (ABZ) and from ABZ:β-cyclodextrin, ABZ:methyl-β-cyclodextrin, ABZ:hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and ABZ:citrate-β-cyclodextrin, which were prepared by the spray-drying technique. ABZ signals were typical of a crystalline solid for the pure drug and of an amorphous compound obtained from ABZ:cyclodextrin samples. Relevant spectral differences were correlated with chemical interaction between ABZ and cyclodextrins. The number and type of complexes revealed a strong dependence on the cyclodextrin group substituent. Solid-state NMR data were consistent with the presence of stable inclusion complexes. PMID:25843843

  19. Solid state 13C NMR characterisation study on fourth generation Ziegler-Natta catalysts.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Harri; Liitiä, Tiina; Virkkunen, Ville; Leinonen, Timo; Helaja, Tuulamari; Denifl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this study, solid state (13)C NMR spectroscopy was utilised to characterize and identify the metal-ester coordination in active fourth generation (phthalate) Ziegler-Natta catalysts. It is known that different donors affect the active species in ZN catalysts. However, there is still limited data available of detailed molecular information how the donors and the active species are interplaying. One of the main goals of this work was to get better insight into the interactions of donor and active species. Based on the anisotropy tensor values (δ(11), δ(22), δ(33)) from low magic-angle spinning (MAS) (13)C NMR spectra in combination with chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) calculations (δ(aniso) and η), both the coordinative metal (Mg/Ti) and the symmetry of this interaction between metal and the internal donor in the active catalyst (MgCl(2)/TiCl(4)/electron donor) system could be identified. PMID:22425229

  20. Quantifying the chemical composition of soil organic carbon with solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, J. A.; Sanderman, J.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) to biological decomposition and mineralisation to CO2 is defined at least partially by its chemical composition. Highly aromatic charcoal-like SOC components are more stable to biological decomposition than other forms of carbon including cellulose. Solid-state 13C NMR has gained wide acceptance as a method capable of defining SOC chemical composition and mathematical fitting processes have been developed to estimate biochemical composition. Obtaining accurate estimates depends on an ability to quantitatively detect all carbon present in a sample. Often little attention has been paid to defining the proportion of organic carbon present in a soil that is observable in solid-state 13C NMR analyses of soil samples. However, if such data is to be used to inform carbon cycling studies, it is critical that quantitative assessments of SOC observability be undertaken. For example, it is now well established that a significant discrimination exists against the detection of the low proton content polyaromatic structures typical of charcoal using cross polarisation 13C NMR analyses. Such discrimination does not exist where direct polarisation analyses are completed. In this study, the chemical composition of SOC as defined by cross polarisation and direct polarisation13C NMR analyses will be compared for Australian soils collected from under a diverse range of agricultural managements and climatic conditions. Results indicate that where significant charcoal C contents exist, it is highly under-represented in the acquired CP spectra. For some soils, a discrimination against alkyl carbon was also evident. The ability to derive correction factors to compensate for such discriminations will be assessed and presented.

  1. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  2. Characterisation of coke from FCC catalysts by solid state {sup 13}C NMR and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, J.M.; McGhee, B.; Snape, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    Coke has been concentrated by demineralisation from deactivated FCC catalysts from both refinery operations with actual feeds and MAT tests using n-hexadecane to facilitate detailed characterisation by solid state {sup 13}C NMR and mass spectrometry. All the catalysts investigated contained about 1% w/w carbon. As for solid fuels, the use of a low-field spectrometer for solid state {sup 13}C NMR in conjunction with the single pulse excitation (SPE or Bloch decay) technique has enabled quantitative carbon skeletal parameters to be obtained for the cokes. Internal standard measurements demonstrated that most of the carbon was observed by SPE and, therefore, NMR-invisible graphitic layers are not thought to be major structural features of the cokes. Differences in feedstock composition were reflected in the structure of the refinery cokes with the aromatic nuclei from a residue feed (5% Conradson carbon) corresponding to 15-20 peri-condensed aromatic rings and being more highly condensed than those from a hydrotreated vacuum gas oil. Mass spectrometry (EI, CI and FIMS) has confirmed that the refinery cokes are highly condensed, but those obtained from n-hexadecane in the MAT tests displayed significant aliphatic character.

  3. Study of hydrogen in coals, polymers, oxides, and muscle water by nuclear magnetic resonance; extension of solid-state high-resolution techniques. [Hydrogen molybdenum bronze

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.

    1981-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been an important analytical and physical research tool for several decades. One area of NMR which has undergone considerable development in recent years is high resolution NMR of solids. In particular, high resolution solid state /sup 13/C NMR spectra exhibiting features similar to those observed in liquids are currently achievable using sophisticated pulse techniques. The work described in this thesis develops analogous methods for high resolution /sup 1/H NMR of rigid solids. Applications include characterization of hydrogen aromaticities in fossil fuels, and studies of hydrogen in oxides and bound water in muscle.

  4. Molecular structure of crude beeswax studied by solid-state 13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2004-01-01

    13C Solid-state NMR experiments were performed to investigate the structure of beeswax in the native state (crude beeswax) for the first time. From quantitative direct polarization 13C MAS NMR spectrum, it was found that the fraction of internal-chain methylene (int-(CH2)) component compared to other components of crude beeswax was over 95%. The line shape of the int-(CH2) carbon resonance region was comprehensively analyzed in terms of NMR chemical shift. The 13C broad peak component covering from 31 to 35ppm corresponds to int-(CH2) carbons with trans conformation in crystalline domains, whereas the sharp signal at 30.3 ppm corresponds to gauche conformation in the non-crystalline domain. From peak deconvolution of the aliphatic region, it was found that over 85% of the int-(CH2) has a crystal structure and several kinds of molecular packing for int-(CH2), at least three, exist in the crystalline domain. Abbreviation: NMR nuclear magnetic resonance int-(CH2) internal-chain methylene CP cross-polarization MAS magic angle spinning PMID:15861244

  5. High-Resolution 3D Structure Determination of Kaliotoxin by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Korukottu, Jegannath; Schneider, Robert; Vijayan, Vinesh; Lange, Adam; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy can provide structural information of proteins that cannot be studied by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to determine a protein structure by solid-state NMR to a resolution comparable to that by solution NMR. Using an iterative assignment and structure calculation protocol, a large number of distance restraints was extracted from 1H/1H mixing experiments recorded on a single uniformly labeled sample under magic angle spinning conditions. The calculated structure has a coordinate precision of 0.6 Å and 1.3 Å for the backbone and side chain heavy atoms, respectively, and deviates from the structure observed in solution. The approach is expected to be applicable to larger systems enabling the determination of high-resolution structures of amyloid or membrane proteins. PMID:18523586

  6. 13C solid-state NMR analysis of heterogeneous structure of beeswax in native state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2005-12-01

    I investigated the molecular structure of natural wax from Japanese bees (Apis cerana japonica) in its native state (neither purified nor recrystallized) by 13C and 1H solid-state NMR. Two strong 13C peaks at 32.9 and 34.0 ppm were attributed to signals from internal-chain methylene carbons [int-(CH2)] in two types of crystal form. The peak at 32.9 ppm was assigned to an orthorhombic crystal form, and that at 34.0 ppm was assigned to a triclinic or monoclinic form. In both crystalline regions, bi-exponential decay of 13C spin-lattice relaxation [T1(C)] for the crystalline peaks due to chain diffusion was observed. 1H spin-lattice relaxation [T1(H)] values for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the crystalline and amorphous regions were identical; this was interpreted as being due to averaging of the T1(H) relaxation rates via spin diffusion. In contrast, although the T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) decay curves for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the amorphous and orthorhombic forms were almost identical, those of the triclinic or monoclinic forms were different. This unhomogeneous character of T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) was interpreted as resulting from differences in the molecular composition of each crystal form. Moreover, two components with long and short 1H spin-spin relaxation [T2(H)] values, arising from the mobile and rigid phases, respectively, were observed at above about -30 °C.

  7. Quantitative solid-state 13C NMR with signal enhancement by multiple cross polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    A simple new method is presented that yields quantitative solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) 13C NMR spectra of organic materials with good signal-to-noise ratios. It achieves long (>10 ms) cross polarization (CP) from 1H without significant magnetization losses due to relaxation and with a moderate duty cycle of the radio-frequency irradiation, by multiple 1-ms CP periods alternating with 1H spin-lattice relaxation periods that repolarize the protons. The new method incorporates previous techniques that yield less distorted CP/MAS spectra, such as a linear variation (“ramp”) of the radio-frequency field strength, and it overcomes their main limitation, which is T1ρ relaxation of the spin-locked 1H magnetization. The ramp of the radio-frequency field strength and the asymptotic limit of cross polarization makes the spectral intensity quite insensitive to the exact field strengths used. The new multiCP pulse sequence is a “drop-in” replacement for previous CP methods and produces no additional data-processing burden. Compared to the only reliable quantitative 13C NMR method for unlabeled solids previously available, namely direct-polarization NMR, the measuring time is reduced by more than a factor of 50, enabling higher-throughput quantitative NMR studies. The new multiCP technique is validated with 14-kHz MAS on amino-acid derivatives, plant matter, a highly aromatic humic acid, and carbon materials made by low-temperature pyrolysis.

  8. Characterization of Stratum Corneum Molecular Dynamics by Natural-Abundance 13C Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bouwstra, Joke A.; Sparr, Emma; Topgaard, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Despite the enormous potential for pharmaceutical applications, there is still a lack of understanding of the molecular details that can contribute to increased permeability of the stratum corneum (SC). To investigate the influence of hydration and heating on the SC, we record the natural-abundance 13C signal of SC using polarization transfer solid-state NMR methods. Resonance lines from all major SC components are assigned. Comparison of the signal intensities obtained with the INEPT and CP pulse sequences gives information on the molecular dynamics of SC components. The majority of the lipids are rigid at 32°C, and those lipids co-exist with a small pool of mobile lipids. The ratio between mobile and rigid lipids increases with hydration. An abrupt change of keratin filament dynamics occurs at RH = 80–85%, from completely rigid to a structure with rigid backbone and mobile protruding terminals. Heating has a strong effect on the lipid mobility, but only a weak influence on the keratin filaments. The results provide novel molecular insight into how the SC constituents are affected by hydration and heating, and improve the understanding of enhanced SC permeability, which is associated with elevated temperatures and SC hydration. PMID:23626744

  9. Solid-state 13C NMR study of cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Marumo, Kazuhiro; Kang, Sungmin; Deguchi, Kenzo; Nakai, Toshihito; Shimizu, Tadashi; Watanabe, Junji

    2013-12-19

    We investigated the structural behavior of cholesteric liquid crystals of 4-(hexyloxy)-4'-cyanobiphenyl (6OCB) in an 11.7 T magnetic field by solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance. Five 6OCB cholesteric liquid crystal systems were prepared with 4-methoxyphenyl 3,4-O-isopropylidene-2,6-bis-O-(4-methylbenzoyl)-β-d-galactopyranoside (CR), in which 6OCB was doped with 0.51, 1.00, 2.34, 5.60, and 6.47 mol % CR, giving products with helical twisting powers (HTPs) of 0.28, 0.54, 1.27, 3.05, and 3.52 μm(-1), respectively. Analyses of the alignment-induced shifts showed that the liquid crystals directors in pure 6OCB and 6OCB doped with 0.51 and 1.00 mol % CR become aligned with the 11.7 T magnetic field direction. However, 6OCB doped with 2.34, 5.60, and 6.47 mol % CR retained their cholesteric structures when the magnetic field was applied. The critical HTP value for resisting realignment by magnetic field was estimated to be approximately 1.27 μm(-1). A biaxiality of the phase was partially considered during spectral simulations, although the molecular shape of 6OCB can be defined as cylinderical when it is rotating rapidly. Our current understanding is that the order parameters in the cholesteric structures are not uniform; i.e., the molecular directors already aligned almost perpendicular to the magnetic field are significantly perturbed by the external field. PMID:24188010

  10. Investigation of a naphthalene pitch by high-resolution solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Yang, B; Hu, J; Hu, H; Li, L; Qiu, J; Zeng, F; Ye, C

    1996-04-01

    The possibility of applying the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique to a study of char is explored with a naphthalene-derived pitch. It is shown that a 13C DNP enhancement factor of about 10(2) is obtained when the polarization is directly transferred from the unpaired electrons to the 13C nuclei. An undistorted spectrum with an enhancement factor of 8 is obtained by the DNP cross-polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP-CP-MAS NMR) method. With such a high increase in S/N, it is possible to measure the 13C polarization time (Tp) and the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the system in a reasonable experimental time. The resultant values are Tp = 19 s and T1 = 38 s, respectively. Based on the DNP enhancement as a function of the microwave frequency, it is found that the predominant DNP mechanism in the pitch is the solid-state effect. PMID:8784951

  11. Solid-State 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Cellulose in the Cell Walls of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, R. H.; Davies, L. M.; Harris, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance was used to characterize the molecular ordering of cellulose in a cell-wall preparation containing mostly primary walls obtained from the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. Proton and 13C spin relaxation time constants showed that the cellulose was in a crystalline rather than a paracrystalline state or amorphous state. Cellulose chains were distributed between the interiors (40%) and surfaces (60%) of crystallites, which is consistent with crystallite cross-sectional dimensions of about 3 nm. Digital resolution enhancement revealed signals indicative of triclinic and monoclinic crystalline forms of cellulose mixed in similar proportions. Of the five nuclear spin relaxation processes used, proton rotating-frame relaxation provided the clearest distinction between cellulose and other cell-wall components for purposes of editing solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. PMID:12226303

  12. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26460094

  13. High-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiments on highly radioactive ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnan, Ian; Cho, Herman; Weber, William J.; Scheele, Randall D.; Johnson, Nigel R.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2004-12-01

    A triple-containment magic-angle spinning rotor insert system has been developed and a sample handling procedure formulated for safely analyzing highly radioactive solids by high-resolution solid-state NMR. The protocol and containment system have been demonstrated for magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments on ceramic samples containing 5-10 wt % 239Pu and 238Pu at rotation speeds of 3500 Hz. The technique has been used to demonstrate that MAS NMR experiments can be used to measure amorphous atomic number fractions produced by accelerated internal radiation damage. This will allow incorporated α-emitters with short half-lives to be used to model the long-term radiation tolerance of potential ceramic radioactive waste forms. This is an example of MAS NMR spectroscopy on samples containing fissionable isotopes.

  14. High-resolution vector microwave magnetometry based on solid-state spins in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Yuan, Zhenheng; Huang, Pu; Rong, Xing; Wang, Mengqi; Xu, Xiangkun; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Shi, Fazhan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the microwave field is crucial for many developments in microwave technology and related applications. However, measuring microwave fields with high sensitivity and spatial resolution under ambient conditions remains elusive. In this work, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a scheme to measure both the strength and orientation of the microwave magnetic field by utilizing the quantum coherent dynamics of nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond. An angular resolution of 5.7 mrad and a sensitivity of 1.0 μT Hz−1/2 are achieved at a microwave frequency of 2.6000 GHz, and the microwave magnetic field vectors generated by a copper wire are precisely reconstructed. The solid-state microwave magnetometry with high resolution and wide frequency range that can work under ambient conditions proposed here enables unique potential applications over other state-of-art microwave magnetometry. PMID:25799155

  15. Chemical structural studies of natural lignin by dipolar dephasing solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Two natural lignins, one from a gymnosperm wood the other from angiosperm wood, were examined by conventional solid-state and dipolar dephasing 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. The results obtained from both techniques show that the structure of natural lignins is consistent with models of softwood and hardwood lignin. The dipolar dephasing NMR data provide a measure of the degree of substitution on aromatic rings which is consistent with the models. ?? 1987.

  16. Solid-state 13C NMR analysis of Lower Cretaceous Baganuur (Mongolia) lignite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdenetsogt, B.; Lee, I.; Lee, S.; Ko, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The transformation of plant matter into peat and coal has two steps, called the biochemical and geochemical stages of coalification. Biochemical coalification begins with the accumulation of dead vegetable matter and ends at the rank of subbituminous coal. The rank of Baganuur lignite ranges from lignite to subbituminous coal. It is transition between biochemical and physico-chemical coalification stages. The changes of chemical structure of coal during the transition between above mentioned two stages were studied by solid state CP/MAS 13C NMR. The most predominant alteration is the disappearance of the resonances from oxygenated aliphatic carbons (63 ppm), protonated aromatic carbons (114 ppm), oxygen-substituted aromatic carbons (144 ppm) and carbonyl carbons (195 ppm). In addition, the intensity of resonances from methoxyl carbons (56 ppm) and oxygenated aliphatic carbons (72 ppm) decreased. While the intensities of resonance from aliphatic (30 ppm), protonated aromatic (125 ppm) and carboxyl carbon (174 ppm) increased or remained almost constant. The relative percent of O-substituted aromatic carbons decreased by ~25% mainly due to the intensity loss of the peak at 144 ppm, indicating removal of O-containing functional groups substituted to aromatic carbons. It is consistent with the decreased relative percent (~75%) of the peak at 114 ppm from protonated aromatic carbons nearby oxygen-substituted aromatic carbons. In addition, the resonance from 125 ppm was shifted to 128 ppm and its relative area increased by ~20%, indicating replacement of O-substituent of aromatic rings by hydrogen or carbon. Protonated aromatic carbons at least two bond away from an oxygen-substituted aromatic carbons give a resonance at 125 ppm and carbon-substituted aromatic carbons give a resonance at 130-132 ppm. With the increase relative percent of C-substituted aromatic carbons, their resonance were overlapped with protonated aromatic carbons and shifted to higher ppm. A decreasing

  17. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  18. Simultaneous cross polarization to 13C and 15N with 1H detection at 60 kHz MAS solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bibhuti B.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe high resolution MAS solid-state NMR experiments that utilize 1H detection with 60 kHz magic angle spinning; simultaneous cross-polarization from 1H to 15N and 13C nuclei; bidirectional cross-polarization between 13C and 15N nuclei; detection of both amide nitrogen and aliphatic carbon 1H; and measurement of both 13C and 15N chemical shifts through multi-dimensional correlation experiments. Three-dimensional experiments correlate amide 1H and alpha 1H selectively with 13C or 15N nuclei in a polypeptide chain. Two separate three-dimensional spectra correlating 1Hα/13Cα/1HN and 1HN/15N/1Hα are recorded simultaneously in a single experiment, demonstrating that a twofold savings in experimental time is potentially achievable. Spectral editing using bidirectional coherence transfer pathways enables simultaneous magnetization transfers between 15N, 13Cα(i) and 13C‧(i-1), facilitating intra- and inter-residue correlations for sequential resonance assignment. Non-uniform sampling is integrated into the experiments, further reducing the length of experimental time.

  19. Solid-state (13)C NMR and synchrotron SAXS/WAXS studies of uniaxially-oriented polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Afeworki, Mobae; Brant, Pat; Lustiger, Arnold; Norman, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We report solid-state (13)C NMR and synchrotron wide-and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments (WAXS, SAXS) on metallocene linear low density polyethylene films (e.g., Exceed™ 1018 mLLDPE; nominally 1MI, 0.918 density ethylene-hexene metallocene copolymer) as a function of uniaxial draw ratio, λ. Combined, these experiments provide an unambiguous, quantitative molecular view of the orientation of both the crystalline and amorphous phases in the samples as a function of draw. Together with previously reported differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), gas transport measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), optical birefringence, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) as well as other characterization techniques, this study of the state of orientation in both phases provides insight concerning the development of unusually high barrier properties of the most oriented samples (λ=10). In this work, static (non-spinning) solid-state NMR measurements indicate that in the drawn Exceed(TM) films both the crystalline and amorphous regions are highly oriented. In particular, chemical shift data show the amorphous phase is comprised increasingly of so-called "taut tie chains" (or tie chains under any state of tautness) in the mLLDPE with increasing draw ratio - the resonance lines associated with the amorphous phase shift to where the crystalline peaks are observed. In the sample with highest total draw (λ=10), virtually all of the chains in the non-crystalline region have responded and aligned in the machine (draw) direction. Both monoclinic and orthorhombic crystalline peaks are observed in high-resolution, solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR measurements of the oriented PE films. The orientation is comparable to that obtained for ultra-high molecular weight HDPE fibers described as "ultra-oriented" in the literature. Furthermore, the presence of a monoclinic peak in cold-drawn samples suggests that there is an appreciable internal stress associated

  20. Differentiation of histidine tautomeric states using (15)N selectively filtered (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-08-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional (15)N selectively filtered (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all (13)C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When (15)N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the (13)C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of (13)C, (15)N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture. PMID:25026459

  1. Differentiation of Histidine Tautomeric States using 15N Selectively Filtered 13C Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-01-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all 13C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When 15N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the 13C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of 13C,15N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture. PMID:25026459

  2. Solid-State Selective 13C Excitation and Spin Diffusion NMR to Resolve Spatial Dimensions in Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, M.; Katahira, R.; Gjersing, E.; Davis, M. F.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2012-02-15

    The average spatial dimensions between major biopolymers within the plant cell wall can be resolved using a solid-state NMR technique referred to as a {sup 13}C cross-polarization (CP) SELDOM (selectively by destruction of magnetization) with a mixing time delay for spin diffusion. Selective excitation of specific aromatic lignin carbons indicates that lignin is in close proximity to hemicellulose followed by amorphous and finally crystalline cellulose. {sup 13}C spin diffusion time constants (T{sub SD}) were extracted using a two-site spin diffusion theory developed for {sup 13}C nuclei under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. These time constants were then used to calculate an average lower-limit spin diffusion length between chemical groups within the plant cell wall. The results on untreated {sup 13}C enriched corn stover stem reveal that the lignin carbons are, on average, located at distances {approx}0.7-2.0 nm from the carbons in hemicellulose and cellulose, whereas the pretreated material had larger separations.

  3. Differentiation of histidine tautomeric states using 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-08-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all 13C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When 15N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the 13C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of 13C, 15N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture.

  4. Characterisation of black carbon-rich samples by 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Etelvino H.; Hayes, Michael H. B.; Deazevedo, Eduardo R.; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2006-09-01

    There are difficulties in quantifying and characterising the organic matter (OM) in soils that contain significant amounts of partially oxidised char or charcoal materials. The anthropogenic black carbon (BC), such as that found in the Terra Preta de Índio soils of the Amazon region, is a good example of the OM that is difficult to analyse in such soils. 13C direct polarisation/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at high MAS frequency, 1H-13C cross polarisation (CP)/MAS with total suppression of spinning sidebands (TOSS), and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filter nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been applied successfully for quantifying the different components of OM. However, because pyrogenic materials present strong local magnetic susceptibility heterogeneities, the use of CSA-filter and TOSS make the pulse sequences very sensitive to imperfections in the π pulses. In this study, the DP/MAS pulse sequence was replaced by a CP with a radio frequency ramp—variable amplitude CP (VACP)—VACP/MAS pulse sequence, and composite π pulses were used in the CSA-filter and TOSS pulse sequences. In that way, the component functionalities in a humic acid from a BC soil were successfully determined. The spectrometer time needed was greatly decreased by employing this VACP/MAS technique. This development provides an accurate method for characterising BC-rich samples from different origins.

  5. Characterisation of black carbon-rich samples by (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Etelvino H; Hayes, Michael H B; Deazevedo, Eduardo R; Bonagamba, Tito J

    2006-09-01

    There are difficulties in quantifying and characterising the organic matter (OM) in soils that contain significant amounts of partially oxidised char or charcoal materials. The anthropogenic black carbon (BC), such as that found in the Terra Preta de Indio soils of the Amazon region, is a good example of the OM that is difficult to analyse in such soils. (13)C direct polarisation/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at high MAS frequency, (1)H-(13)C cross polarisation (CP)/MAS with total suppression of spinning sidebands (TOSS), and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filter nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been applied successfully for quantifying the different components of OM. However, because pyrogenic materials present strong local magnetic susceptibility heterogeneities, the use of CSA-filter and TOSS make the pulse sequences very sensitive to imperfections in the pi pulses. In this study, the DP/MAS pulse sequence was replaced by a CP with a radio frequency ramp--variable amplitude CP (VACP)--VACP/MAS pulse sequence, and composite pi pulses were used in the CSA-filter and TOSS pulse sequences. In that way, the component functionalities in a humic acid from a BC soil were successfully determined. The spectrometer time needed was greatly decreased by employing this VACP/MAS technique. This development provides an accurate method for characterising BC-rich samples from different origins. PMID:16688435

  6. Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of coalified gymnosperm xylem tissue from Australian brown coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Lerch, H. E., III; Bates, A.L.; Verheyen, T.V.

    1989-01-01

    We report here on the use of solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to contrast the average chemical composition of modern degraded gymnosperm woods with fossil gymnosperm woods from Australian brown coals (Miocene). We first established the quantitative nature of the NMR techniques for these samples so that the conventional solid-state 13C NMR spectra and the dipolar dephasing NMR spectra could be used with a high degree of reliability to depict average chemical compositions. The NMR results provide some valuable insights about the early coalification of xylem tissue from gymnosperms. Though the cellulosic components of wood are degraded to varying degrees during peatification and ensuing coalification, it is unlikely that they play a major role in the formation of aromatic structures in coalified woods. The NMR data show that gynmosperm lignin, the primary aromatic contribution to the coal, is altered in part by demethylation of guaiacyl-units to catechol-like structures. The dipolar dephasing NMR data indicate that the lignin also becomes more cross-linked or condensed. ?? 1989.

  7. Solid-state 13C NMR study of the mobility of polysaccharides in the cell walls of two apple cultivars of different firmness.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jovyn K T; Zujovic, Zoran D; Smith, Bronwen G; Johnston, Jason W; Schröder, Roswitha; Melton, Laurence D

    2014-03-11

    Solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to compare differences in mobility of the cell wall polysaccharides of 'Scifresh' and 'Royal Gala' apples after 20 weeks of storage. The texture of 'Scifresh' apples was markedly firmer than that of 'Royal Gala' at the end of storage. In a novel approach Two Pulse Phase Modulation (TPPM) decoupling was combined with cross polarisation (CP) and single pulse excitation (SPE) experiments. The resulting high resolution solid-state SPE spectra, unprecedented for apple cell walls, allowed a detailed insight into the physical and chemical properties of very mobile polysaccharides such as the arabinan and galactan side chains of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I). NMR showed that the cellulose rigidity was the same in the two cultivars, while arabinans were more mobile than galactans in both. Unexpectedly, arabinans in 'Scifresh' cell walls were more mobile than those in 'Royal Gala' which was unforeseen considering the greater firmness of the 'Scifresh' cultivar. PMID:24423413

  8. Multidimensional solid-state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of pectic polysaccharides in uniformly 13C-labeled Arabidopsis primary cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2012-07-08

    Plant cell wall (CW) polysaccharides are responsible for the mechanical strength and growth of plant cells; however, the high-resolution structure and dynamics of the CW polysaccharides are still poorly understood because of the insoluble nature of these molecules. Here, we use 2D and 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to investigate the structural role of pectins in the plant CW. Intact and partially depectinated primary CWs of Arabidopsis thaliana were uniformly labeled with 13C and their NMR spectra were compared. Recent 13C resonance assignment of the major polysaccharides in Arabidopsis thaliana CWs allowed us to determine the effects of depectination on the intermolecular packing and dynamics of the remaining wall polysaccharides. 2D and 3D correlation spectra show the suppression of pectin signals, confirming partial pectin removal by chelating agents and sodium carbonate. Importantly, higher cross peaks are observed in 2D and 3D 13C spectra of the depectinated CW, suggesting higher rigidity and denser packing of the remaining wall polysaccharides compared with the intact CW. 13C spin–lattice relaxation times and 1H rotating-frame spin–lattice relaxation times indicate that the polysaccharides are more rigid on both the nanosecond and microsecond timescales in the depectinated CW. Taken together, these results indicate that pectic polysaccharides are highly dynamic and endow the polysaccharide network of the primary CW with mobility and flexibility, which may be important for pectin functions. This study demonstrates the capability of multidimensional SSNMR to determine the intermolecular interactions and dynamic structures of complex plant materials under near-native conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. 13C Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and µ-Raman Spectroscopic Characterization of Sicilian Amber.

    PubMed

    Barone, Germana; Capitani, Donatella; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Proietti, Noemi; Raneri, Simona; Longobardo, Ugo; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2016-08-01

    (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and µ-Raman spectroscopy were applied to characterize Sicilian amber samples. The main goal of this work was to supply a complete study of simetite, highlighting discriminating criteria useful to distinguish Sicilian amber from fossil resins from other regions and laying the foundations for building a spectroscopic database of Sicilian amber. With this aim, a private collection of unrefined simetite samples and fossil resins from the Baltic region and Dominican Republic was analyzed. Overall, the obtained spectra permitted simetite to be distinguished from the other resins. In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectroscopic data, allowing the clustering of simetite samples with respect to the Baltic and Dominican samples and to group the simetite samples in two sets, depending on their maturity. Finally, the analysis of loadings allowed for a better understanding of the spectral features that mainly influenced the discriminating characteristics of the investigated ambers. PMID:27340217

  10. Solid-state 13C NMR studies of a large fossil gymnosperm from the Yallourn Open Cut, Latrobe Valley, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    A series of samples taken from the cross section of a 3-m-diameter fossilized gymnospermous log (Araucariaceae) in the Yallourn Seam of the Australian brown coals was examined by solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate chemical changes related to the combined processes of peatification and coalification. The results show that cellulosic materials were degraded and lost on the periphery of the log, however, the degree of such degradation in the central core is substantially less. The lignin is uniformly altered by coalification reactions to a macromolecular substance displaying decreased aryl ether linkages but significantly greater amounts of carbon linkages compared to modern lignin. Changes in the methoxyl carbon contents of lignin in cross section reveal demethylation reactions, but these do not appear to be related to degree of carbon linking. Both the degredation of cellulosic materials and demethylation of lignin appear to be early diagenetic processes occurring during peatification independently of the coalification reactions. ?? 1989.

  11. Hydrothermal carbon from biomass: structural differences between hydrothermal and pyrolyzed carbons via 13C solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Falco, Camillo; Perez Caballero, Fernando; Babonneau, Florence; Gervais, Christel; Laurent, Guillaume; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; Baccile, Niki

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to better describe the structure of the hydrothermal carbon (HTC) process and put it in relationship with the more classical pyrolytic carbons. Indeed, despite the low energetic impact and the number of applications described so far for HTC, very little is known about the structure, reaction mechanism, and the way these materials relate to coals. Are HTC and calcination processes equivalent? Are the structures of the processed materials related to each other in any way? Which is the extent of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) inside HTC? In this work, the effect of hydrothermal treatment and pyrolysis are compared on glucose, a good model carbohydrate; a detailed single-quantum double-quantum (SQ-DQ) solid state (13)C NMR study of the HTC and calcined HTC is used to interpret the spectral region corresponding to the signal of furanic and arene groups. These data are compared to the spectroscopic signatures of calcined glucose, starch, and xylose. A semiquantitative analysis of the (13)C NMR spectra provides an estimation of the furanic-to-arene ratio which varies from 1:1 to 4:1 according to the processing conditions and carbohydrate employed. In addition, we formulate some hypothesis, validated by DFT (density functional theory) modeling associated with (13)C NMR chemical shifts calculations, about the possible furan-rich structural intermediates that occur in the coalification process leading to condensed polyaromatic structures. In combination with a broad parallel study on the HTC processing conditions effect on glucose, cellulose, and raw biomass (Falco, C.; Baccile, N.; Titirici, M.-M. Green Chem., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1GC15742F), we propose a broad reaction scheme and in which we show that, through HTC, it is possible to tune the furan-to-arene ratio composing the aromatic core of the produced HTC carbons, which is not possible if calcination is used alone, in the temperature range below 350 °C. PMID:22050004

  12. Development of High Resolution Solid-State Track Detector for Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, S.; Doke, T.; Hareyama, M.; Hasebe, N.; Ota, S.; Sakurai, K.; Sato, M.; Yasuda, N.; Nakamura, S.; Kamei, T.; Tawara, H.; Ogura, K.

    The observation of trans-iron nuclei in galactic cosmic rays (Z?30) requires a high performance cosmic ray detector telescope with a very large exposure area because of their extremely low fluxes. It is realized by the use of solid-state track detector of CR-39, which has an advantage of easy extension of exposure area. The verification of mass and nuclear charge identifications with CR-39 solid-state track detector newly developed for the observation of heavy cosmic ray particles has been made using Fe ions from NIRS-HIMAC. Mass and charge resolutions for Fe nuclei are found to be ~0.22 amu and 0.22 cu in rms, respectively. Moreover, it is necessary to raise the Z/??detection threshold in order to suppress background tracks produced by galactic cosmic rays with Z/?<30. The new track detectors of copolymers of CR-39 and DAP (diallyl phthalate) have been developed and verified their performances. From the point of view of stability for the cosmic ray exposure environment such as temperature and vacuum in space, newly BP-1 glass detector with high sensitivity is also currently under development. The combination of such solid-state track detector with the high speed scanning system enables us to realize a large-scaled observation for trans-iron galactic cosmic rays.

  13. High-resolution (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy pattern recognition of fish oil capsules.

    PubMed

    Aursand, Marit; Standal, Inger B; Axelson, David E

    2007-01-10

    13C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy, in conjunction with multivariate analysis of commercial fish oil-related health food products, have been used to provide discrimination concerning the nature, composition, refinement, and/or adulteration or authentication of the products. Supervised (probabilistic neural networks, PNN) and unsupervised (principal component analysis, PCA; Kohonen neural networks; generative topographic mapping, GTM) pattern recognition techniques were used to visualize and classify samples. Simple PCA score plots demonstrated excellent, but not totally unambiguous, class distinctions, whereas Kohonen and GTM visualization provided better results. Quantitative class predictions with accuracies >95% were achieved with PNN analysis. Trout, salmon, and cod oils were completely and correctly classified. Samples reported to be salmon oils and cod liver oils did not cluster with true salmon and cod liver oil samples, indicating mislabeling or adulteration. PMID:17199311

  14. Structural characterization of ion-vapor deposited hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings by solid state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jiao; Kato, Takahisa; Watanabe, Sadayuki; Hayashi, Hideo; Kawaguchi, Masahiro

    2014-01-07

    In the present study, unique structural heterogeneity was observed in ion-vapor deposited a-C:H coatings by performing {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CPMAS experiments on solid state nuclear magnetic resonance devices. Two distinct types of sp{sup 2} C clusters were discovered: one of them denoted as sp{sup 2} C′ in content of 3–12 at. % was non-protonated specifically localized in hydrogen-absent regions, while the other dominant one denoted as sp{sup 2} C″ was hydrogenated or at least proximate to proton spins. On basis of the notably analogous variation of sp{sup 2} C′ content and Raman parameters as function of substrate bias voltage in the whole range of 0.5 kV–3.5 kV, a model of nano-clustering configuration was proposed that the sp{sup 2} C′ clusters were embedded between sp{sup 2} C″ clusters and amorphous sp{sup 3} C matrix as trapped interfaces or boundaries where the sp{sup 2} carbon bonds were highly distorted. Continuous increase of bias voltage would promote the nano-clustering and re-ordering of dominant sp{sup 2} C″ clusters, thus results in a marked decrease of interspace and a change of the content of sp{sup 2} C′ clusters. Further investigation on the {sup 13}C magnetization recovery showed typical stretched-exponential approximation due to the prominent presence of paramagnetic centers, and the stretched power α varied within 0.6–0.9 from distinct types of sp{sup 2} C clusters. Differently, the magnetization recovery of {sup 1}H showed better bi-exponential approximation with long and short T{sub 1}(H) fluctuated within 40–60 ms and 0.1–0.3 ms approximately in content of 80% ± 5% and 20% ± 5%, respectively, varying with various bias voltages. Meanwhile, the interrupted {sup 13}C saturation recovery with an interval of short T{sub 1}(H) showed that most of quick-relaxing protons were localized in sp{sup 2} C″ clusters. Such a short T{sub 1}(H) was only possibly resulted from a relaxation mechanism

  15. High Resolution Spectrum of the 13C12C12C Lowest Bending Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, C. P.; Lutter, V.; Kötting, J.; Krieg, J.; Thorwirth, S.; Schlemmer, S.; Giesen, T. F.; Harding, M. E.; Vazquez, J.

    2012-06-01

    Linear C_3 is a floppy molecule which possesses an extremely low lying bending mode, ν_2, at roughly 60 cm-1 or 1.9 THz. Based on highly accurate laboratory data C_3 has been detected in various astronomical sources most recently with the HIFI instrument aboard the Herschel satellite. Although C_3 turns out to be quite abundant in interstellar environments which makes a search for 13C substituted isotopologs feasible, other isotopologs could not be detected so far, because no accurate transition frequencies have been available for these species in this frequency range. Relative abundance ratios of C_3 isotopologs might give important hints on its building mechanism and further constraints for chemical networks. In this work, the spectrum of the ν_2 lowest bending mode of 13CCC has been investigated. We used laser ablation of 13C enriched carbon samples to record absorption spectra in a supersonic jet expansion. The radiation in our setup is generated by a synthesizer referenced to a Rubidium standard in combination with a frequency multiplier chain and detected by a liquid Helium cooled InSb bolometer. The laboratory search has been supported by high-level coupled-cluster calculations, which turns out to compare very favorably with obtained experimental molecular parameters. Schmuttenmaer, C. A., Cohen, R. C., Pugliano, N., Heath, et al., Science 249, 897-900 (1990) Giesen, T. F., van Orden, A. O., Cruzan, J. D., and Provencal, R. A., et al., Astrophys. J. 551, L181-L184 (2001) Gendriesch, R. and Pehl, K. and Giesen, T. and Winnewisser, G. and Lewen, F., Z. Naturforsch. 58a, 129-138 (2003) Van Orden, A., Cruzan, J. D., Provencal, R. A., et al. in Proc. Airborne Astronomy Symp., ASP Conf. Ser. 73, 67 (1995) ernicharo, J. and Goicoechea, J. R. and Caux, E., Astrophys. J. Lett. 534, L199-L202 (2000) Mookerjea, B., Giesen, T., Stutzki, J., Cernicharo, J., et al., Astron. Astrophys. 521, L13 (2010)

  16. Soil organic matter dynamics as characterized with 1H and 13C solid-state NMR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Alex; Schwarz, Jette; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele E.

    2010-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is a complex and heterogeneous matter. Characterization by solid-state NMR methods on 1H and 13C nuclei is therefore demanding. Our goal is to obtain information on the dynamic behaviour of soil samples and to study the influence of external parameters on both structure and dynamics. We regard water molecules to be the pivotal agent of soil dynamics by generating a network between organic matter via intermolecular hydrogen bonding, which leads to cross linking of organic matter and increases its rigidity. Although 1H solid-state NMR on non-rotating samples are not so commonly used for soil characterization, they enable the differentiation of proton mobilities via their linewidths which are resulting from differences in the dipole-dipole coupling strengths. Therefore, even weak molecular interactions such as hydrogen bonding can be differentiated and changes due to heat treatments and the short and long term behaviour followed. Though in principle a simple technique, static 1H measurements are complicated by several means, one of them is the high abundance in almost all matter including probe head material that has to be excluded for analysis. Finally, we selected 1H DEPTH [1] and Hahn-echo sequences to distinguish different mobilities in soil, mainly free moving water and water fixed in the soil matrix. After decomposition using Gaussian and Lorentzian lineshapes, the relative amounts of mobile and rigid water molecules can be obtained. By heating the samples above 100°C in sealed glass tubes, the proposed water network is destroyed and able to rebuild after cooling. This long term behaviour is studied on the course of months. Furthermore, the instant changes before and after heating are shown for a series of soil samples to characterize soils based on this water network model. To combine the information obtained on the 1H mobility with focus on water dynamics, 13C 2D WISE (wideline separation) measurements were done. This method yields 1

  17. Identification of Li-Ion Battery SEI Compounds through (7)Li and (13)C Solid-State MAS NMR Spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huff, Laura A; Tavassol, Hadi; Esbenshade, Jennifer L; Xing, Wenting; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-13

    Solid-state (7)Li and (13)C MAS NMR spectra of cycled graphitic Li-ion anodes demonstrate SEI compound formation upon lithiation that is followed by changes in the SEI upon delithiation. Solid-state (13)C DPMAS NMR shows changes in peaks associated with organic solvent compounds (ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate, EC/DMC) upon electrochemical cycling due to the formation of and subsequent changes in the SEI compounds. Solid-state (13)C NMR spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time measurements of lithiated Li-ion anodes and reference poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) powders, along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry results, indicate that large-molecular-weight polymers are formed in the SEI layers of the discharged anodes. MALDI-TOF MS and NMR spectroscopy results additionally indicate that delithiated anodes exhibit a larger number of SEI products than is found in lithiated anodes. PMID:26653886

  18. Structure and dynamics of homoleptic beryllocenes: a solid-state 9Be and 13C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Macdonald, Charles L B; Schurko, Robert W

    2004-11-19

    The correlation between anisotropic 9Be NMR (quadrupolar and chemical shielding) interactions and the structure and dynamics in [Cp2Be], [Cp2*Be], and [(C5Me4H)2Be] is examined by solid-state 9Be NMR spectroscopy, as well as by ab initio and hybrid density functional theory calculations. The 9Be quadrupole coupling constants in the three compounds correspond well to the relative degrees of spherical ground-state electronic symmetry of the environment about beryllium. Theoretical computations of NMR interaction tensors are in excellent agreement with experimental values and aid in understanding the origins of NMR interaction tensors and their correlation to molecular symmetry. Variable-temperature (VT) 9Be and 13C NMR experiments reveal a highly fluxional structure in the condensed phase of [Cp2Be]. In particular, the pathway by which the Cp rings of [Cp2Be] 'invert' coordination modes is examined in detail using hybrid density functional theory in order to inspect variations of the 9Be NMR interaction tensors. The activation energy for the 'inversion' process is found to be 36.9 kJ mol(-1) from chemical exchange analysis of 13C VT CP/MAS NMR spectra. The low-temperature (ca. -100 degrees C) X-ray crystal structures of all three compounds have been collected and refined, and are in agreement with previously reported structures. In addition, the structure of the same Cp2Be crystal was determined at 20 degrees C and displays features consistent with increased intramolecular motion, supporting observations by 9Be VT NMR spectroscopy. PMID:15484199

  19. Hydration properties of regioselectively etherified celluloses monitored by 2H and 13C solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Schöbitz, Michael; Schaller, Jens

    2012-06-20

    The hydration properties of 2,3-O-hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and 2,3-O-hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) were analyzed by multi-nuclear solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy. By 13C single-pulse (SP) MAS and cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, differences between the immobile regions and all parts of the polysaccharides were detected as a function of hydration. Complementary information about the water environments was observed by 2H MAS NMR. By this approach it was demonstrated that side chains in 2,3-O-HPC and 2,3-O-HEC were easier to hydrate than the cellulose backbone. Furthermore the motion of water was more restricted (slower) in 2,3-O-HPC than in 2,3-O-HEC. For both polysaccharides the hydration could be explained by a two-step process: in step one increased ordering of the immobile regions occurs after which the entire polymer is hydrated in step two. PMID:24750769

  20. Solid-state 13C NMR studies of dissolved organic matter in pore waters from different depositional environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in pore waters from sediments of a number of different depositional environments was isolated by ultrafiltration using membranes with a nominal molecular weight cutoff of 500. This > 500 molecular weight DOM represents 70-98% of the total DOM in these pore waters. We determined the gross chemical structure of this material using both solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Our results show that the DOM in these pore waters appears to exist as two major types: one type dominated by carbohydrates and paraffinic structures and the second dominated by paraffinic and aromatic structures. We suggest that the dominance of one or the other structural type of DOM in the pore water depends on the relative oxidizing/reducing nature of the sediments as well as the source of the detrital organic matter. Under dominantly anaerobic conditions carbohydrates in the sediments are degraded by bacteria and accumulate in the pore water as DOM. However, little or no degradation of lignin occurs under these conditions. In contrast, sediments thought to be predominantly aerobic in character have DOM with diminished carbohydrate and enhanced aromatic character. The aromatic structures in the DOM from these sediments are thought to arise from the degradation of lignin. The large amounts of paraffinic structures in both types of DOM may be due to the degradation of unidentified paraffinic materials in algal or bacterial remains. ?? 1987.

  1. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and elemental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, S.M.; Chen, C.R.; Xu, Z.H.; Nelson, P.N.; Boyd, S.E.; Meszaros, I.; Chan, K.Y.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state {sup 13}C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  2. Quantitative solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometric analyses of wood xylen: effect of increasing carbohydrate content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    Isolated lignin with a low carbohydrate content was spiked with increasing amounts of alpha-cellulose, and then analysed by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using cross-polarization with magic angle spinning (CPMAS) and dipolar dephasing methods in order to assess the quantitative reliability of CPMAS measurement of carbohydrate content and to determine how increasingly intense resonances for carbohydrate carbons affect calculations of the degree of lignin's aromatic ring substitution and methoxyl carbon content. Comparisons were made of the carbohydrate content calculated by NMR with carbohydrate concentrations obtained by phenol-sulfuric acid assay and by the calculation from the known amounts of cellulose added. The NMR methods used in this study yield overestimates for carbohydrate carbons due to resonance area overlap from the aliphatic side chain carbons of lignin. When corrections are made for these overlapping resonance areas, the NMR results agree very well with results obtained by other methods. Neither the calculated methoxyl carbon content nor the degree of aromatic ring substitution in lignin, both calculated from dipolar dephasing spectra, change with cellulose content. Likewise, lignin methoxyl content does not correlate with cellulose abundance when measured by integration of CPMAS spectra. ?? 1992.

  3. Natural abundance high-resolution solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Apperley, David C.

    1994-08-01

    We report for the first time an approach for natural abundance solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy involving magic angle sample spinning (MAS), high-power 1 H decoupling (HPPD) and 1 H- 2 H cross polarization (CP). Taking tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silane (TTMSS), adamantane, 1-chloroadamantane, hexamethylbenzene (HMB), 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (DMPD) and 2-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (HMPD) as examples, it has been shown that the combination of HPPD and MAS can be applied readily to study rotator phase solids, allowing isotropic peaks arising from chemically inequivalent 2 H nuclei to be resolved. For natural abundance samples of TTMSS and chloroadamantane, it has been shown that 2 H CP/HPPD/MAS NMR experiments, involving polarization transfer from 1 H to 2 H, may provide considerable sensitivity enhancement in comparison with single pulse experiments.

  4. Natural abundance high-resolution solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Apperley, David C.

    1994-08-01

    We report for the first time an approach for natural abundance solid state 2H NMR spectroscopy involving magic angle sample spinning (MAS), high-power 1H decoupling (HPPD) and 1H- 2H cross polarization (CP). Taking tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silane (TTMSS), adamantane, 1-chloroadamantane, hexamethylbenzene (HMB), 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (DMPD) and 2-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (HMPD) as examples, it has been shown that the combination of HPPD and MAS can be applied readily to study rotator phase solids, allowing isotropic peaks arising from chemically inequivalent 2H nuclei to be resolved. For natural abundance samples of TTMSS and chloroadamantane, it has been shown that 2H CP/HPPD/MAS NMR experiments, involving polarization transfer from 1H to 2H, may provide considerable sensitivity enhancement in comparison with single pulse experiments.

  5. Comparison of celery (Apium graveolens L.) collenchyma and parenchyma cell wall polysaccharides enabled by solid-state (13)C NMR.

    PubMed

    Zujovic, Zoran; Chen, Da; Melton, Laurence D

    2016-02-01

    Collenchyma cells with their thickened walls are one of specific mechanical support tissues for plants, while parenchyma cells are thin walled and serve multiple functions. The parenchyma tissue is what you enjoy eating, while collenchyma, because of its fibrous nature, is not so attractive. Celery is a useful model for comparing the cell walls (CWs) of the two cell types such as collenchyma and parenchyma. However, to date, the structural characteristics of collenchyma and parenchyma cell walls from the same plant have not been compared. Monosaccharide composition suggested the collenchyma cell walls contained less pectin but more hemicellulose in comparison to parenchyma. High-resolution solid-state NMR spectra of highly mobile pectins revealed that the arabinan signals were more evident in the collenchyma spectrum, while galactan showed a much stronger resonance in the parenchyma spectrum. In addition, methyl esterified and non-esterified galacturonic acid signals were observed in parenchyma CWs, but only the latter one appeared in the collenchyma. The ratio of cellulose surface/interior obtained from CP/MAS spectra for collenchyma suggested the cellulose microfibrils were ~2.4 nm, while in the parenchyma, these were somewhat larger. X-ray diffraction indicated the size of the cellulose microfibrils were the same for both types of CWs. PMID:26717549

  6. Characterization of pyrogenic organic matter by 2-dimenstional HETeronucleus CORelation solid-state 13C NMR (HETCOR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, increasing evidences are provided that the common view of charcoal as a polyaromatic network is too much simplified. Experiments with model compounds indicated that it represents a heterogeneous mixture of thermally altered biomacromolecules with N, O and likely also S substitutions as common features. If produced from a N-rich feedstock, the so called black nitrogen (BN) has to be considered as an integral part of the aromatic charcoal network. In order to study this network one-dimensional (1D) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is often applied. However, this technique suffers from broad resonance lines and low resolution. Applying 2D techniques can help but until recently, this was unfeasible for natural organic matter (NOM) due to sensitivity problems and the high complexity of the material. On the other hand, during the last decade, the development of stronger magnetic field instruments and advanced pulse sequences has put them into reach for NOM research. Although 2D NMR spectroscopy has many different applications, all pulse sequences are based on the introduction of a preparation time during which the magnetization of a spin system is adjusted into a state appropriate to whatever properties are to be detected in the indirect dimension. Then, the spins are allowed to evolve with the given conditions and after their additional manipulation during a mixing period the modulated magnetization is detected. Assembling several 1D spectra with incrementing evolution time creates a data set which is two-dimensional in time (t1, t2). Fourier transformation of both dimensions leads to a 2D contour plot correlating the interactions detected in the indirect dimension t1 with the signals detected in the direct dimension t2. The so called solid-state heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR spectroscopy represents a 2D technique allows the determination which protons are interacting with which carbons. In the present work this

  7. Develop Solid State Laser Sources for High Resolution Video Projection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brickeen, B.K.

    2000-10-24

    Magic Lantern and Honeywell FM and T worked together to develop lower-cost, visible light solid-state laser sources to use in laser projector products. Work included a new family of video displays that use lasers as light sources. The displays would project electronic images up to 15 meters across and provide better resolution and clarity than movie film, up to five times the resolution of the best available computer monitors, up to 20 times the resolution of television, and up to six times the resolution of HDTV displays. The products that could be developed as a result of this CRADA could benefit the economy in many ways, such as: (1) Direct economic impact in the local manufacture and marketing of the units. (2) Direct economic impact in exports and foreign distribution. (3) Influencing the development of other elements of display technology that take advantage of the signals that these elements allow. (4) Increased productivity for engineers, FAA controllers, medical practitioners, and military operatives.

  8. Chemical structures of swine-manure chars produced under different carbonization conditions investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two types of swine manure chars, hydrothermally-produced hydrochar and slow-pyrolysis pyrochar, and their raw swine manure solid were characterized using advanced 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Compared with the parent raw swine manure, both hydrochars and pyrochar di...

  9. Differences between Lignin in Unprocessed Wood, Milled Wood, Mutant Wood, and Extracted Lignin Detected by 13C Solid-State NMR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been applied to an array of intact and isolated wood samples in order to identify potential structural changes induced by tree age, milling, lignin extraction, or naturally occurring mutations. Included in this study were mature loblolly pine mil...

  10. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin–epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time 13C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio

    2015-01-01

    Summary The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  11. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin-epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time (13)C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization.

    PubMed

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio; Mele, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  12. High-Resolution NMR of Quadrupolar Nuclei in the Solid State

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, Sheryl Lee

    1995-11-30

    This dissertation describes recent developments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for the most part involving the use of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) NMR to study quadrupolar nuclei. Chapter 1 introduces some of the basic concepts and theory that will be referred to in later chapters, such as the density operator, product operators, rotations, coherence transfer pathways, phase cycling, and the various nuclear spin interactions, including the quadrupolar interaction. Chapter 2 describes the theory behind motional averaging experiments, including DAS, which is a technique where a sample is spun sequentially about two axis oriented at different angles with respect to the external magnetic field such that the chemical shift and quadrupolar anisotropy are averaged to zero. Work done on various rubidium-87 salts is presented as a demonstration of DAS. Chapter 3 explains how to remove sidebands from DAS and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments, which result from the time-dependence of the Hamiltonian under sample spinning conditions, using rotor-synchronized {pi}-pulses. Data from these experiments, known as DAH-180 and MAH-180, respectively, are presented for both rubidium and lead salts. In addition, the applicability of this technique to double rotation (DOR) experiments is discussed. Chapter 4 concerns the addition of cross-polarization to DAS (CPDAS). The theory behind spin locking and cross polarizing quadrupolar nuclei is explained and a method of avoiding the resulting problems by performing cross polarization at 0{sup o} (parallel) with respect to the magnetic field is presented. Experimental results are shown for a sodium-23 compound, sodium pyruvate, and for oxygen-17 labeled L-akmine. In Chapter 5, a method for broadening the Hartmann-Hahn matching condition under MAS, called variable effective field cross-polarization (VEFCI?), is presented, along with experimental work on adamantane and polycarbonate.

  13. High resolution analysis of the ethylene-1-13C spectrum in the 8.4-14.3 um region

    SciTech Connect

    Flaud, Jean Marie; Lafferty, Walter J.; Sams, Robert L.; Devi, V. M.

    2010-01-29

    Fourier transform spectra of mono-13C ethylene have been recorded in the 8.4-14.3- μm spectral region (700 cm-1 to 1190 cm-1) using a Bruker 120 HR interferometer at a resolution of 0.0017 cm-1 allowing the extensive study of the set of resonating states {101, 81, 71,41,61}. Due to the high resolution available as well as the extended spectral range involved in this study, a much larger set of line assignments are now available. The present analysis has leads to the determination of more accurate spectroscopic constants including interaction constants than were obtained in earlier studies. In particular, the following band centers were derived: ν0(ν10) = 825.40602(30) cm-1, ν0(ν8) = 932.19572(15) cm-1, ν0(ν7) = 937.44452(10) cm-1, ν0(ν4) = 1025.6976(14) cm-1. Finally a synthetic spectrum was generated leading to the assignment of a number of 13C12CH4 lines observed through an earlier heterodyne spectroscopic study.

  14. New room temperature high resolution solid-state detector (CdZnTe) for hard x rays and gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Amyelizabeth C.; Desai, Upendra D.

    1993-01-01

    The new CdZnTe high 'Z' material represents a significant improvement in detectors for high energy photons. With the thicknesses available, photons up to 100 keV can be efficiently detected. This material has a wide band gap of 1.5 - 2.2 eV which allows it to operate at room temperature while providing high spectral resolution. Results of resolution evaluations are presented. This detector can be used for high resolution spectral measurements of photons in x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, offering a significant reduction in the weight, power, and volume of the detector system compared to more conventional detector types such as scintillation counters. In addition, the detector will have the simplicity and reliability of solid-state construction. The CdZnTe detector, as a new development, has not yet been evaluated in space. The Get Away Special program can provide this opportunity.

  15. The structural properties of the transmembrane segment of the integral membrane protein phospholamban utilizing (13)C CPMAS, (2)H, and REDOR solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karp, Ethan S; Tiburu, Elvis K; Abu-Baker, Shadi; Lorigan, Gary A

    2006-06-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the secondary structure of the transmembrane peptide phospholamban (TM-PLB), a sarcoplasmic Ca(2+) regulator. (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning spectra of (13)C carbonyl-labeled Leu39 of TM-PLB exhibited two peaks in a pure 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer, each due to a different structural conformation of phospholamban as characterized by the corresponding (13)C chemical shift. The addition of a negatively charged phospholipid (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG)) to the POPC bilayer stabilized TM-PLB to an alpha-helical conformation as monitored by an enhancement of the alpha-helical carbonyl (13)C resonance in the corresponding NMR spectrum. (13)C-(15)N REDOR solid-state NMR spectroscopic experiments revealed the distance between the (13)C carbonyl carbon of Leu39 and the (15)N amide nitrogen of Leu42 to be 4.2+/-0.2A indicating an alpha-helical conformation of TM-PLB with a slight deviation from an ideal 3.6 amino acid per turn helix. Finally, the quadrupolar splittings of three (2)H labeled leucines (Leu28, Leu39, and Leu51) incorporated in mechanically aligned DOPE/DOPC bilayers yielded an 11 degrees +/-5 degrees tilt of TM-PLB with respect to the bilayer normal. In addition to elucidating valuable TM-PLB secondary structure information, the solid-state NMR spectroscopic data indicates that the type of phospholipids and the water content play a crucial role in the secondary structure and folding of TM-PLB in a phospholipid bilayer. PMID:16839519

  16. High-resolution solid-state NMR study of the occurrence and thermal transformations of silicon-containing species in biomass materials

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, J.C.C.; Emmerich, F.G.; Bonagamba, T.J.

    2000-03-01

    The occurrence of silicon in two kinds of biomass (rice hulls and endocarp of babassu coconut) and the thermal transformations taking place in these materials under heat treatments are studied here. The authors report also the production, characterization, and study of carbonaceous materials with high SiC content through the carbothermal reduction of silica, using these natural precursors. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si room temperature high-resolution solid-state NMR measurements are used in the characterization and study of the materials as well as the process of SiC formation. Important conclusions about the nature of silicon in these types of biomass and the effects of heat treatments on the structure of silicon-containing species are derived from the results presented. It is shown that silicon in these materials occurs in two distinct forms: amorphous hydrated silica and organically bound silicon species. The influence of spin-lattice relaxation dynamics on the NMR spectra is discussed, evidencing the role played by the paramagnetic defects produced in the materials through pyrolysis.

  17. Quantification of peptide m/z distributions from 13C-labeled cultures with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Allen, Doug K; Goldford, Joshua; Gierse, James K; Mandy, Dominic; Diepenbrock, Christine; Libourel, Igor G L

    2014-02-01

    Isotopic labeling studies of primary metabolism frequently utilize GC/MS to quantify (13)C in protein-hydrolyzed amino acids. During processing some amino acids are degraded, which reduces the size of the measurement set. The advent of high-resolution mass spectrometers provides a tool to assess molecular masses of peptides with great precision and accuracy and computationally infer information about labeling in amino acids. Amino acids that are isotopically labeled during metabolism result in labeled peptides that contain spatial and temporal information that is associated with the biosynthetic origin of the protein. The quantification of isotopic labeling in peptides can therefore provide an assessment of amino acid metabolism that is specific to subcellular, cellular, or temporal conditions. A high-resolution orbital trap was used to quantify isotope labeling in peptides that were obtained from unlabeled and isotopically labeled soybean embryos and Escherichia coli cultures. Standard deviations were determined by estimating the multinomial variance associated with each element of the m/z distribution. Using the estimated variance, quantification of the m/z distribution across multiple scans was achieved by a nonlinear fitting approach. Observed m/z distributions of uniformly labeled E. coli peptides indicated no significant differences between observed and simulated m/z distributions. Alternatively, amino acid m/z distributions obtained from GC/MS were convolved to simulate peptide m/z distributions but resulted in distinct profiles due to the production of protein prior to isotopic labeling. The results indicate that peptide mass isotopologue measurements faithfully represent mass distributions, are suitable for quantification of isotope-labeling-based studies, and provide additional information over existing methods. PMID:24387081

  18. Mechanism of formation of humus coatings on mineral surfaces 3. Composition of adsorbed organic acids from compost leachate on alumina by solid-state 13C NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Llaguno, E.C.; Leenheer, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The adsorption of compost leachate DOC on alumina is used as a model for elucidation of the mechanism of formation of natural organic coatings on hydrous metal oxide surfaces in soils and sediments. Compost leachate DOC is composed mainly of organic acid molecules. The solid-state 13C NMR spectra of these organic acids indicate that they are very similar in composition to aquatic humic substances. Changes in the solid-state 13C NMR spectra of compost leachate DOC fractions adsorbed on alumina indicate that the DOC molecules are most likely adsorbed on metal oxide surfaces through a combination of polar and hydrophobic interaction mechanisms. This combination of polar and hydrophobic mechanism leads to the formation of bilayer coatings of the leachate molecules on the oxide surfaces.

  19. Solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy of adduction products of 2,5-hexanedione with ribonuclease, albumin, and rat neurofilament protein.

    PubMed

    Yan, B; DeCaprio, A P; Zhu, M; Bank, S

    1996-10-21

    The Paal-Knorr condensation reaction between the gamma-diketone 2,5-hexanedione (2,5-HD) and epsilon-amine moieties of proteins of various molecular weight, including ribonuclease (RNase), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and rat neurofilament (NF), has been investigated by solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy. These proteins all reacted with 2,5-HD with the formation of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole (2,5-DMP) derivatives. The size and complexity of the protein affected the rate of formation of 2,5-DMP derivatives. Using the selective reducing reagent NaCNBH3, the Paal-Knorr reaction intermediates were trapped by conversion into amines, which were identified by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The secondary autoxidation reaction following the formation of 2,5-DMP derivatives was also studied by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. PMID:8950225

  20. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  1. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions. PMID:27187211

  2. High-resolution δ 13C intratooth profiles in bovine enamel: Implications for mineralization pattern and isotopic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazzo, Antoine; Balasse, Marie; Patterson, William P.

    2005-07-01

    We present the first high-resolution carbon isotope and carbonate content profiles generated through the thickness of enamel from a steer fed C 3- then C 4-dominant food. Carbonate contents decrease by ˜2 wt% from the enamel surface to the innermost enamel layer, and each carbon isotope profile shows a mixture of enamel portions mineralized over several months. Downward and outward increasing contribution of C 4 food to the enamel δ 13C values reveal two components of the mineralization gradient: a vertical component from the tip of the tooth crown to the neck, and a horizontal component from the enamel-dentine junction to the outer enamel. We use our results to infer mineralization parameters for bovines and to calculate expected isotopic attenuations for an array of environmental inputs and microsampling strategies, using the model developed by Passey and Cerling [ Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 66 (2002) 3225-3234]. Although it seems unlikely that any strategy will perfectly isolate discrete time slices, sampling the innermost enamel layer might offer the advantage of significantly reducing the isotope damping that would become independent of the structure of the input signal.

  3. Low-temperature solid-state /sup 13/C NMR studies of the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.O.; Palings, I.; Copie, V.; Raleigh, D.P.; Courtin, J.; Pardoen, J.A.; Lugtenburg, J.; Mathies, R.A.; Griffin, R.G.

    1987-03-24

    Magic angle sample spinning (MASS) /sup 13/C NMR spectra have been obtained of bovine rhodopsin regenerated with retinal prosthetic groups isotopically enriched with /sup 13/C at C-5 and C-14. In order to observe the /sup 13/C retinal chromophore resonances, it was necessary to employ low temperatures (-15 ..-->.. -35/sup 0/C) to restrict rotational diffusion of the protein. The isotropic chemical shift and principal values of the chemical shift tensor of the /sup 13/C-5 label indicate that the retinal chromophore is in the twisted 6-s-cis conformation in rhodopsin, in contrast to the planar 6-s-trans confirmation found in bacteriorhodopsin. The /sup 13/C-14 isotropic shift and shift tensor principal values show that the Schiff base C=N bond is anti. Furthermore, the /sup 13/C-14 chemical shift (121.2 ppm) is within the range of values (120-123 ppm) exhibited by protonated (C=N anti) Schiff base model compounds, indicating that the C=N linkage is protonated. The results are discussed with regard to the mechanism of wavelength regulation in rhodopsin.

  4. Characterization of a Mixture of CO2 Adsorption Products in Hyperbranched Aminosilica Adsorbents by (13)C Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Mehta, Anil K; Conradi, Mark S; Jones, Christopher W; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-11-17

    Hyperbranched amine polymers (HAS) grown from the mesoporous silica SBA-15 (hereafter "SBA-15-HAS") exhibit large capacities for CO2 adsorption. We have used static in situ and magic-angle spinning (MAS) ex situ (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the adsorption of CO2 by SBA-15-HAS. (13)C NMR distinguishes the signal of gas-phase (13)CO2 from that of the chemisorbed species. HAS polymers possess primary, secondary, and tertiary amines, leading to multiple chemisorption reaction outcomes, including carbamate (RnNCOO(-)), carbamic acid (RnNCOOH), and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) moieties. Carbamates and bicarbonate fall within a small (13)C chemical shift range (162-166 ppm), and a mixture was observed including carbamic acid and carbamate, the former disappearing upon evacuation of the sample. By examining the (13)C-(14)N dipolar coupling through low-field (B0 = 3 T) (13)C{(1)H} cross-polarization MAS NMR, carbamate is confirmed through splitting of the (13)C resonance. A third species that is either bicarbonate or a second carbamate is evident from bimodal T2 decay times of the ∼163 ppm peak, indicating the presence of two species comprising that single resonance. The mixture of products suggests that (1) the presence of amines and water leads to bicarbonate being present and/or (2) the multiple types of amine sites in HAS permit formation of chemically distinct carbamates. PMID:26477882

  5. Calcium silicate hydrates investigated by solid-state high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Meducin, Fabienne . E-mail: meducin@cnrs-orleans.fr; Bresson, Bruno; Lequeux, Nicolas; Noirfontaine, Marie-Noelle de; Zanni, Helene

    2007-05-15

    This work focuses on phases formed during cement hydration under high pressure and temperature: portlandite Ca(OH){sub 2} (CH); hillebrandite Ca{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2} ({beta}-dicalcium silicate hydrate); calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H); jaffeite Ca{sub 6}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})(OH){sub 6} (tricalcium silicate hydrate); {alpha}-C{sub 2}SH Ca{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2} ({alpha}-dicalcium silicate hydrate); xonotlite Ca{sub 6}(Si{sub 6}O{sub 17})(OH){sub 2} and kilchoanite Ca{sub 6}(SiO{sub 4})(Si{sub 3}O{sub 10}). Portlandite and hillebrandite were synthesized and characterised by high resolution solid-state {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. In addition, information from the literature concerning the last five phases was gathered. In certain cases, a schematic 3D-structure could be determined. These data allow identification of the other phases present in a mixture. Their morphology was also observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

  6. Global Fold of Human Cannabinoid Type 2 Receptor Probed by Solid-State 13C-, 15N-MAS NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tomohiro; Vukoti, Krishna; Lynch, Diane L.; Hurst, Dow P.; Grossfield, Alan; Pitman, Michael C.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Yeliseev, Alexei A.; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The global fold of human cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor in the agonist-bound active state in lipid bilayers was investigated by solid-state 13C- and 15N magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, in combination with chemical-shift prediction from a structural model of the receptor obtained by microsecond-long molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Uniformly 13C-, and 15N-labeled CB2 receptor was expressed in milligram quantities by bacterial fermentation, purified, and functionally reconstituted into liposomes. 13C MAS NMR spectra were recorded without sensitivity enhancement for direct comparison of Cα, Cβ, and C=O bands of superimposed resonances with predictions from protein structures generated by MD. The experimental NMR spectra matched the calculated spectra reasonably well indicating agreement of the global fold of the protein between experiment and simulations. In particular, the 13C chemical shift distribution of Cα resonances was shown to be very sensitive to both the primary amino acid sequence and the secondary structure of CB2. Thus the shape of the Cα band can be used as an indicator of CB2 global fold. The prediction from MD simulations indicated that upon receptor activation a rather limited number of amino acid residues, mainly located in the extracellular loop 2 and the second half of intracellular loop 3, change their chemical shifts significantly (≥1.5 ppm for carbons and ≥5.0 ppm for nitrogens). Simulated two-dimensional 13Cα(i)-13C=O(i) and 13C=O(i)-15NH(i+1) dipolar-interaction correlation spectra provide guidance for selective amino-acid labeling and signal assignment schemes to study the molecular mechanism of activation of CB2 by solid-state MAS NMR. PMID:23999926

  7. A Boreal high-resolution d13C-carb record of the Albian-Cenomanian transition from NW Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, André; Erbacher, Jochen; Heldt, Matthias; Wilmsen, Markus; Lübke, Nathalie; Heimhofer, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    The upper Albian of the central NW German Basin is represented by a monotonous (marly) claystone succession of several hundred meters thickness, which becomes siliceous in the topmost Albian (Flammenmergel facies) and shows a gradual increase in carbonate content during the early to middle Cenomanian. Here we present a new ~160-m-thick composite record spanning the uppermost Albian to middle Cenomanian based on two cored drill sites at Anderten, east of Hannover (Germany). We successfully correlated the long-term d13C record to other European reference sections in England (Speeton; Mitchell et al., 1996) and Italy (Contessa - Stoll and Schrag, 2000) as well as to records from the NW German Basin (Wunstorf - Mitchell et al., 1996; Konrad 101 - unpublished). Based on the observed pattern we are able to identify the d13C expression of (1) the Oceanic Anoxic Event 1d, (2) the Albian-Cenomanian boundary, (3) possibly the Lower Cenomanian Event(s) (LCE) and, finally, (4) the Mid-Cenomanian Event (MCE) I close to the top of the record. Chemostratigraphic age assignments are supported by biostratigraphic results. Calcareous nannofossils indicate an extended CC9 zone up to the lowermost CC10 (UC0-UC3 according to Burnett et al., 1998) as indicated by the FAD of Microrhabdulus decoratus at the top. Moreover, previously described influxes of Rotalipora aff. reicheli and the occurrence of the ostracod Neocythere steghausi support a mid-Cenomanian age for the upper part of the studied succession. Due to both moderately well preserved microfossils and high sedimentation rates the drilled succession can be considered as a potential reference for the Albian-Cenomanian transition in the Boreal realm. References: Burnett, J. (1998). Upper Cretaceous Calcareous Nannofossil Biostratigraphy, 132-199. - in: Bown, P. (Ed.) Calcareous Nannofossil Biostratigraphy (Kluwer Academic Publishers). Mitchell, S., Paul, C., Gale, A. (1996). Carbon isotopes and sequence stratigraphy. Geol. Soc

  8. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Investigation of the Phase Transition in Decamethylferrocene-Acenaphthenequinone Charge-Transfer Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hideaki; Kuwahara, Daisuke; Mochida, Tomoyuki

    2009-10-01

    A charge-transfer complex composed of decamethylferrocene (D) and acenaphthenequinone (A) was prepared. The material was a 1:1 neutral complex with a mixed-stack structure and exhibited a phase transition at -16 °C. High-resolution 13C and 1H NMR spectroscopy revealed that an inclination of A with respect to D occurs below the phase-transition temperature. The 1H spin-diffusion rates of the complex undergoing high-speed magic-angle spinning (MAS) were measured to determine the shortest 1H-1H distance r between D and A. To analyze the experimental results, we derived the analytical expression of the spin-diffusion rate Wz for a homonuclear multispin system undergoing MAS. It was found that Wz for the complex is proportional only to 1/r6 under high-speed MAS conditions. On the basis of this relationship and the crystal structure at 20 °C, it was determined that the shortest 1H-1H distance r at -27.7 °C (below the phase transition temperature) is 0.4 Å shorter than that at 20 °C. Given this information, a plausible model of the low-temperature structure is discussed.

  9. A New Tool for NMR Crystallography: Complete (13)C/(15)N Assignment of Organic Molecules at Natural Isotopic Abundance Using DNP-Enhanced Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Märker, Katharina; Pingret, Morgane; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Gasparutto, Didier; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2015-11-01

    NMR crystallography of organic molecules at natural isotopic abundance (NA) strongly relies on the comparison of assigned experimental and computed NMR chemical shifts. However, a broad applicability of this approach is often hampered by the still limited (1)H resolution and/or difficulties in assigning (13)C and (15)N resonances without the use of structure-based chemical shift calculations. As shown here, such difficulties can be overcome by (13)C-(13)C and for the first time (15)N-(13)C correlation experiments, recorded with the help of dynamic nuclear polarization. We present the complete de novo (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment at NA of a self-assembled 2'-deoxyguanosine derivative presenting two different molecules in the asymmetric crystallographic unit cell. This de novo assignment method is exclusively based on aforementioned correlation spectra and is an important addition to the NMR crystallography approach, rendering firstly (1)H assignment straightforward, and being secondly a prerequisite for distance measurements with solid-state NMR. PMID:26485326

  10. Solid-state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of simultaneously metabolized acetate and phenol in a soil Pseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Heiman, A.S.; Copper, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was made of the concentration-dependent primary and secondary substrate relationships in the simultaneous metabolism of the ubiquitous pollutant phenol and the naturally occurring substrate acetate by a Pseudomonas sp. soil isolate capable of utilizing either substance as a sole source of carbon and energy. In addition to conventional analytical techniques, solid-state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to follow the cellular distribution of (1-/sup 13/C)acetate in the presence of unlabeled phenol. These results suggest that, when phenol is present as the primary substrate, acetate is preferentially shuttled into fatty acyl chain synthesis, whereas phenol carbon is funnelled into the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Thus, simultaneous use of a xenobiotic compound and a natural substrate apparently does occur, and the relative concentrations of the two substrates do influence the rate and manner in which the compounds are utilized. These results also demonstrate the unique advantage of using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques combined with /sup 13/C labeling of specific sites in substrates when doing microbial degradation studies. In this work, the entire cellular biomass was examined directly without extensive extraction, fractionation, or isolation of subcellular units; thus, there is no uncertainty about chemical alteration of substrate metabolites as a result of these often harsh treatments.

  11. Solid-state and solution /sup 13/C NMR in the conformational analysis of methadone-hydrochloride and related narcotic analgesics

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, S.C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Solid state and solution /sup 13/C NMR have been used to study the conformations of the racemic mixtures and single enantiomers of methadone hydrochloride, alpha and beta methadol hydrochloride, and alpha and beta acetylmethadol hydrochloride. The NMR spectra acquired for the compounds as solids, and in polar and nonpolar solvents are compared, in order to determine the conformation of the molecules in solution. To determine the reliability of assigning solution conformations by comparing solution and solid state chemical shift data, three bond coupling constants measured in solution are compared with those calculated from X-ray data. The conformations of the racemic mixture and plus enantiomer of methadone hydrochloride have been shown to be very similar in the solid state, where minor differences in conformation can be seen by comparing NMR spectra obtained for the solids. Also shown is that the molecules of methadone hydrochloride have conformations in polar and in nonpolar solvents which are very similar to the conformation of the molecules in the solid state.

  12. The study of a monocotyledon abscission zone using microscopic, chemical, enzymatic and solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR analyses.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J; Davies, H A; Heyes, S J; Osborne, D J

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated distinguishing features in cells of the abscission zone of a monocotyledon fruit, the oil palm Elaeis guineensis. The cell walls of the abscission zone and the subtending mesocarp and pedicel have been analysed by light and transmission electron microscopy, by chemical methods and by solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. Results show that these abscission zone cells have specific characteristics which include high levels of unmethylated pectin in the walls and an inducible (x35) polygalacturonase enzyme expression. Together these findings help to explain the localised precision of cell separation events. PMID:11219806

  13. High resolution (13)C MRI with hyperpolarized urea: in vivo T(2) mapping and (15)N labeling effects.

    PubMed

    Reed, Galen D; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Koelsch, Bertram L; Van Criekinge, Mark; Smith, Kenneth J; Hong Shang; Larson, Peder E Z; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-02-01

    (13)C steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging and effective spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping were performed using hyperpolarized [(13)C] urea and [(13) C,(15)N2] urea injected intravenously in rats. (15)N labeling gave large T2 increases both in solution and in vivo due to the elimination of a strong scalar relaxation pathway. The T2 increase was pronounced in the kidney, with [(13) C,(15) N2] urea giving T2 values of 6.3±1.3 s in the cortex and medulla, and 11±2 s in the renal pelvis. The measured T2 in the aorta was 1.3±0.3 s. [(13)C] urea showed shortened T2 values in the kidney of 0.23±0.03 s compared to 0.28±0.03 s measured in the aorta. The enhanced T2 of [(13)C,(15)N2] urea was utilized to generate large signal enhancement by SSFP acquisitions with flip angles approaching the fully refocused regime. Projection images at 0.94 mm in-plane resolution were acquired with both urea isotopes, with [(13)C,(15) N2] urea giving a greater than four-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio over [(13)C] urea. PMID:24235273

  14. Use of solid-state 13C NMR in structural studies of humic acids and humin from Holocene sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; VanderHart, D.L.; Earl, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    13C NMR spectra of solid humic substances in Holocene sediments have been obtained using cross polarization with magic-angle sample spinning techniques. The results demonstrate that this technique holds great promise for structural characterizations of complex macromolecular substances such as humin and humic acids. Quantifiable distinctions can be made between structural features of aquatic and terrestrial humic substances. The aliphatic carbons of the humic substances are dominant components suggestive of input from lipid-like materials. An interesting resemblance is also noted between terrestrial humic acid and humin spectra. ?? 1980.

  15. The T1 ρ13C spin-lattice relaxation time of interpenetrating networks by solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Schueneman, G. T.; Novak, B. M.

    1999-02-01

    Poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) interpenetrated with 5% SiO 2 (PHEMA-IPN) were studied by 13C CP/MAS NMR. From these results, the structure of two polymers were verified by 13C NMR. Spin-lattice relaxation times for the polymer carbons in the rotating frame, T1 ρ, have been measured as a function of temperature. The T1 ρ spin-lattice relaxation times of the α-quarternary and carbonyl in the PHEMA and PHEMA-IPN undergo slow motions, i.e., motions on the slow side of the T1 ρ minimum, while those of the 1-,2-, β-methylene, and 3-methyl undergo fast motions, i.e., motions on the fast side of the T1 ρ minimum. From these T1 ρ spin-lattice relaxation times, we discuss the mobility, the correlation time, and activation energy for the PHEMA and PHEMA-IPN, respectively. The activation energies for the PHEMA-IPN were found to be generally higher than those of PHEMA. The higher activation energy for the side-chain 2-methylene in the PHEMA-IPN is attributed to bonding between the SiO 2 and the hydroxyl group of the PHEMA.

  16. Photochemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Observed by Solid-State NMR in a Uniformly (13)C-Isotope-Labeled Photosynthetic Reaction Center.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shubhajit; Bode, Bela E; Matysik, Jörg; Alia, A

    2015-10-29

    A sample of solubilized and quinone-depleted reaction centers from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter (R.) sphaeroides wild type has been prepared entirely (13)C and (15)N isotope labeled at all positions of the protein as well as of the cofactors. In this sample, the occurrence of the solid-state photo-CIDNP (photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization) effect has been probed by (13)C solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR under illumination. Under continuous illumination, signal intensities are modified by the three-spin mixing (TSM) mechanism. Time-resolved illumination experiments reveal the occurrence of light-induced nuclear polarization on the time scale of hundreds of microseconds, initially dominated by the transient polarization of the singlet branch of the radical-pair mechanism. A first kinetic analysis shows that the lifetime of the polarization from the singlet branch, indicated by the enhanced absorptive intensities of the signals from aliphatic carbons, is significantly extended. Upon arrival of the polarization from the triplet decay branch, emissive polarization caused by the TSM mechanism is observed. Also, this arrival is significantly delayed. The decay of TSM polarization occurs in two steps, assigned to intra- and intermolecular spin diffusion. PMID:26110356

  17. Solid-State (13)C NMR Delineates the Architectural Design of Biopolymers in Native and Genetically Altered Tomato Fruit Cuticles.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Matas, Antonio J; Isaacson, Tal; Kehlet, Cindie; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Stark, Ruth E

    2016-01-11

    Plant cuticles on outer fruit and leaf surfaces are natural macromolecular composites of waxes and polyesters that ensure mechanical integrity and mitigate environmental challenges. They also provide renewable raw materials for cosmetics, packaging, and coatings. To delineate the structural framework and flexibility underlying the versatile functions of cutin biopolymers associated with polysaccharide-rich cell-wall matrices, solid-state NMR spectra and spin relaxation times were measured in a tomato fruit model system, including different developmental stages and surface phenotypes. The hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of the cutin ensures compatibility with the underlying polysaccharide cell walls; the hydroxy fatty acid structures of outer epidermal cutin also support deposition of hydrophobic waxes and aromatic moieties while promoting the formation of cell-wall cross-links that rigidify and strengthen the cuticle composite during fruit development. Fruit cutin-deficient tomato mutants with compromised microbial resistance exhibit less efficient local and collective biopolymer motions, stiffening their cuticular surfaces and increasing their susceptibility to fracture. PMID:26652188

  18. Roles of Arginine and Lysine Residues in the Translocation of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide from 13C, 31P and 19F Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yongchao; Doherty, Tim; Waring, Alan J.; Ruchala, Piotr; Hong, Mei

    2009-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small cationic peptides that cross the cell membrane while carrying macromolecular cargoes. We use solid-state NMR to investigate the structure and lipid interaction of two cationic residues, Arg10 and Lys13, in the CPP penetratin. 13C chemical shifts indicate that Arg10 adopts a rigid β-strand conformation in the liquid-crystalline state of anionic lipid membranes. This behavior contrasts with all other residues observed so far in this peptide, which adopt a dynamic β-turn conformation with coil-like chemical shifts at physiological temperature. Low-temperature 13C-31P distances between the peptide and the lipid phosphates indicate that both the Arg10 guanidinium Cζ and the Lys13 Cε lie in close proximity to the lipid 31P (4.0 - 4.2 Å), proving the existence of charge-charge interaction for both Arg10 and Lys13 in the gel-phase membrane. However, since lysine substitution in CPPs are known to reduce their translocation ability, we propose that low temperature stabilizes both lysine and arginine interactions with the phosphates, whereas at high temperature the lysine-phosphate interaction is much weaker than the arginine-phosphate interaction. This is supported by the unusually high rigidity of the Arg10 sidechain and its β-strand conformation at high temperature. The latter is proposed to be important for ion pair formation by allowing close approach of the lipid headgroups to guanidinium sidechains. 19F and 13C spin diffusion experiments indicate that penetratin is oligomerized into β-sheets in gel-phase membranes. These solid-state NMR data indicate that guanidinium-phosphate interactions exist in penetratin, and guanidinium groups play a stronger structural role than ammonium groups in the lipid-assisted translocation of CPPs across liquid-crystalline cell membranes. PMID:19364134

  19. Recoupling of chemical shift anisotropies in solid-state NMR under high-speed magic-angle spinning and in uniformly 13C-labeled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Jerry C. C.; Tycko, Robert

    2003-05-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of recoupling chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) interactions in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) under high-speed magic-angle spinning (MAS) while retaining a static CSA powder pattern line shape and simultaneously attenuating homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions. CSA recoupling is accomplished by a rotation-synchronized radio-frequency pulse sequence with symmetry properties that permit static CSA line shapes to be obtained. We suggest a specific recoupling sequence, which we call ROCSA, for which the scaling factors for CSA and homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions are 0.272 and approximately 0.05, respectively. This sequence is suitable for high-speed 13C MAS NMR experiments on uniformly 13C-labeled organic compounds, including biopolymers. We demonstrate the ROCSA sequence experimentally by measuring the 13C CSA patterns of the uniformly labeled, polycrystalline compounds L-alanine and N-acetyl-D,L-valine at MAS frequencies of 11 and 20 kHz. We also present experimental data for amyloid fibrils formed by a 15-residue fragment of the β-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, in which four amino acid residues are uniformly labeled, demonstrating the applicability to biochemical systems of high molecular weight and significant complexity. Analysis of the CSA patterns in the amyloid fibril sample demonstrates the utility of ROCSA measurements as probes of peptide and protein conformation in noncrystalline solids.

  20. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively 13C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  1. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively (13)C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved. PMID:25625825

  2. Molecular organization in the native state of woody tissue: Studies of tertiary structure using the Raman microprobe Solid State [sup 13]C NMR and biomimetic tertiary aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Atalla, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    A number of new approaches to the study of native wood tissue complementary to our earlier Raman spectroscopy including solid state [sup 13]C NMR and X-ray diffractometry. A wide variety of native cellulosic tissues were examined which led to the generation of biomimetic tertiary aggregates which simulate states of aggregation characteristic of cell walls. We have also explored charge transport characteristics of lignified tissue. Our Raman spectroscopic studies have advanced our understanding of key spectral features and confirmed the variability of the patterns of orientation of lignin reported earlier. A major effort was dedicated to assessing the contributions of electronic factors such as conjugation and the resonance Raman effect to enhancement of the spectra features associated with lignin. We have now established a solid foundation for spectral mapping of different regions in cell walls.

  3. Solid state structure of new 5-[2-(N,N-diethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarins by X-ray and 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowska, Kinga; Hejchman, Elżbieta; Dobrzycki, Łukasz; Maciejewska, Dorota

    2015-05-01

    5-[2-(N,N-diethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (1) and 6-acetyl-5-[2-(N,N-diethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (2) were synthesized in a traditional way and microwave-assisted synthesis. Crystals of 2 in form of hydrochloride salt (3) were investigated using single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. In the crystal lattice of 3 there is only one type of strong hydrogen bond present involving protonated amino group and chloride anion. The whole structure is dominated by weak C-H…Cl-, C-H…O contacts. There is also visible aggregation of cations in stacks due to π-π interactions. The solid state structures of 1 and 2 derived from 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra were also proposed.

  4. The interplay between the solid effect and the cross effect mechanisms in solid state 13C DNP at 95 GHz using trityl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debamalya; Shimon, Daphna; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2013-05-01

    The 13C solid state Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) mechanism using trityl radicals (OX63) as polarizers was investigated in the temperature range of 10-60 K. The solutions used were 6 M 13C urea in DMSO/H2O (50% v/v) with 15 mM and 30 mM OX63. The measurements were carried out at ˜3.5 T, which corresponds to Larmor frequencies of 95 GHz and 36 MHz for the OX63 and the 13C nuclei, respectively. Measurements of the 13C signal intensity as a function of the microwave (MW) irradiation frequency yielded 13C DNP spectra with temperature dependent lineshapes for both samples. The maximum enhancement for the 30 mM sample was reached at 40 K, while that of the 15 mM sample at 20-30 K. Furthermore, the lineshapes observed showed that both the cross effect (CE) and the solid effect (SE) DNP mechanisms are active in this temperature range and that their relative contribution is temperature dependent. Simulations of the spectra with the relative contributions of the CE and SE mechanisms as a fit parameter revealed that for both samples the CE contribution decreases with decreasing temperature while the SE contribution increases. In addition, for the 15 mM sample the contributions of the two mechanisms are comparable from 20 K to 60 K while for the 30 mM the CE dominates in this range, as expected from the higher concentration. The steep decrease of the CE contribution towards low temperatures is however unexpected. The temperature dependence of the OX63 longitudinal relaxation, DNP buildup times and 13C spin lattice relaxation times did not reveal any obvious correlation with the DNP temperature dependence. A similar behavior of the CE and SE mechanism was observed for 1H DNP with the nitroxide radical TEMPOL as a polarizer. This suggests that this effect is a general phenomenon involving a temperature dependent competition between the CE and SE mechanisms, the source of which is, however, still unknown.

  5. SMI: a new method to allow low cost, high resolution micro-machining using UV solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, David; Myles, David; Rumsby, Phil

    2015-07-01

    A new solid state laser based mask projection technique for micro-structuring materials is introduced and results obtained with a pilot system are shown. Details of the proposed architecture of production tools using the new technology are given. Advantages of the new method over conventional excimer laser based mask projection systems are summarized.

  6. Short hydrogen bonds in salts of dicarboxylic acids; structural correlations from solid-state 13C and 2H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalsbeek, Nicoline; Schaumburg, Kjeld; Larsen, Sine

    1993-10-01

    Solid-state 13C and 2H NMR spectra are found to very suitable for characterizing the short Osbnd H...O hydrogen bonds observed in acid salts of dicarboxylic acids. The majority of the investigated compounds are acid salts of malonic, succinic and tartaric acid with monovalent cations derived from alkali metals and small aliphatic amines. They include systems with symmetric and asymmetric hydrogen bonds. Accurate structural information about their geometry is available from low-temperature X-ray diffraction data. The 13C chemical shifts of the C atoms in the different carboxy groups display a linear variation with the absolute difference between the two Csbnd O bond lengths. Theoretical ab initio calculations for model systems showed that the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant NQCC for 2H increases with increasing asymmetry of the hydrogen-bonded system. NQCC values for 2H in the short symmetric hydrogen-bonded systems are in the range 53-59 kHz compared with the larger values of up to 166kHz found in systems with longer asymmetric hydrogen bonds. The 2H NQCC values display a perfect linear dependence on the asymmetry of the hydrogen bond. 2H NQCC decreases with decreasing temperature in the symmetric hydrogen bonds showing that the corresponding potential has a single well.

  7. Solid state structure by X-ray and 13C CP/MAS NMR of new 5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowska, Kinga; Maciejewska, Dorota; Dobrzycki, Łukasz; Socha, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (1) and 6-acetyl-5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (2), structurally related, were synthesized using both conventional and microwave-assisted approach. An impact of acetyl groups on the molecular structure of coumarin derivatives has been examined. Crystals of 2 were investigated using single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. Compound 2 crystallizes forming two polymorphs (denoted as 2_1 and 2_2), both belonging to P21/c space group. Both polymorphs are comparably stable and can be formed simultaneously during crystallization process. The solid state structure was also analysed using the fully resolved 13C CP/MAS NMR. The double signals with the intensity ratio of about 1:1 which were observed in the 13C CP/MAS NMR spectrum of compound 1 must arise due to the presence of two conformers of 1. In contrast, NMR spectrum recorded for powder mixture of two polymorphs of compound 2 displays no signal splitting. This is related to structural similarities of molecules in both polymorphs.

  8. Using magnetic coupling to implement 1H, 19F, 13C experiments in routine high resolution NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Paul; Finnigan, Jim; Marsden, Brian; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2015-12-01

    We report in this paper the design of 1H, 19F, 13C circuitry using magnetic coupling which can do on demand experiments where one of the three nuclei is observed and the other two are decoupled. The implementation of this circuitry in routine NMR probes is compared with capacitive coupling methods where it was found that by using magnetic coupling the performance of the routine NMR probe was not impacted by the addition of this circuitry. It is surmised that using this type of circuitry would be highly desirable for those chemists doing routine 19F NMR.

  9. Tracing bacterial metabolism using multi-nuclear (1H, 2H, and 13C) Solid State NMR: Realizing an Idea Initiated by James Scott

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G.; Fogel, M. L.; Jin, K.; Griffen, P.; Steele, A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 6 years ago, while at the Geophysical Laboratory, James Scott became interested in the application of Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to study bacterial metabolism. As often happens, other experiments intervened and the NMR experiments were not pursued. We have revisited Jame's question and find that using a multi-nuclear approach (1H, 2H, and 13C Solid State NMR) on laboratory cell culture has some distinct advantages. Our experiments involved batch cultures of E. coli (MG1655) harvested at stationary phase. In all experiments the growth medium consisted of MOPS medium for enterobacteria, where the substrate is glucose. In one set of experiments, 10 % of the water was D2O; in another 10 % of the glucose was per-deuterated. The control experiment used both water and glucose at natural isotopic abundance. A kill control of dead E. coli immersed in pure D2O for an extended period exhibited no deuterium incorporation. In both deuterium enriched experiments, considerable incorporation of deuterium into E. coli's biomolecular constituents was detected via 2H Solid State NMR. In the case of the D2O enriched experiment, 58 % of the incorporated deuterium is observed in a sharp peak at a frequency of 0.31 ppm, consistent with D incorporation in the cell membrane lipids, the remainder is observed in a broad peak at a higher frequency (centered at 5.4 ppm, but spanning out to beyond 10 ppm) that is consistent with D incorporation into predominantly DNA and RNA. In the case of the D-glucose experiments, 61 % of the deuterium is observed in a sharp resonance peak at 0.34 ppm, also consistent with D incorporation into membrane lipids, the remainder of the D is observed at a broad resonance peak centered at 4.3 ppm, consistent with D enrichment in glycogen. Deuterium abundance in the E. coli cells grown in 10 % D2O is nearly 2X greater than that grown with 10 % D-glucose. Very subtle differences are observed in both the 1H and 13C solid-state

  10. The Application of High-Resolution Electron Microscopy to Problems in Solid State Chemistry: The Exploits of a Peeping TEM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyring, LeRoy

    1980-01-01

    Describes methods for using the high-resolution electron microscope in conjunction with other tools to reveal the identity and environment of atoms. Problems discussed include the ultimate structure of real crystalline solids including defect structure and the mechanisms of chemical reactions. (CS)

  11. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of (13)C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our (13)C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the (13)C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the (13)C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in (13)C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  12. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of 13C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our 13C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the 13C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the 13C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in 13C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  13. High-resolution {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of phase transition of Rb,Cs-intercalated single-walled nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhrara, M.; Saih, Y.; Waagberg, T.; Goze-Bac, C.; Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-09-01

    We present 13 C high-resolution magic-angle-turning (MAT) and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance data of Cs and Rb intercalated single walled carbon nanotubes. We find two distinct phases at different intercalation levels. A simple charge transfer is applicable at low intercalation level. The new phase at high intercalation level is accompanied by a hybridization of alkali (s) orbitals with the carbon (sp2) orbitals of the single walled nanotubes, which indicate bundle surface sites is the most probable alkali site.

  14. Chemical and nanometer-scale structure of kerogen and its change during thermal maturation investigated by advanced solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, J.; Fang, X.; Lan, Y.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Xu, L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used advanced and quantitative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate structural changes in a series of type II kerogen samples from the New Albany Shale across a range of maturity (vitrinite reflectance R0 from 0.29% to 1.27%). Specific functional groups such as CH3, CH2, alkyl CH, aromatic CH, aromatic C-O, and other nonprotonated aromatics, as well as "oil prone" and "gas prone" carbons, have been quantified by 13C NMR; atomic H/C and O/C ratios calculated from the NMR data agree with elemental analysis. Relationships between NMR structural parameters and vitrinite reflectance, a proxy for thermal maturity, were evaluated. The aromatic cluster size is probed in terms of the fraction of aromatic carbons that are protonated (???30%) and the average distance of aromatic C from the nearest protons in long-range H-C dephasing, both of which do not increase much with maturation, in spite of a great increase in aromaticity. The aromatic clusters in the most mature sample consist of ???30 carbons, and of ???20 carbons in the least mature samples. Proof of many links between alkyl chains and aromatic rings is provided by short-range and long-range 1H-13C correlation NMR. The alkyl segments provide most H in the samples; even at a carbon aromaticity of 83%, the fraction of aromatic H is only 38%. While aromaticity increases with thermal maturity, most other NMR structural parameters, including the aromatic C-O fractions, decrease. Aromaticity is confirmed as an excellent NMR structural parameter for assessing thermal maturity. In this series of samples, thermal maturation mostly increases aromaticity by reducing the length of the alkyl chains attached to the aromatic cores, not by pronounced growth of the size of the fused aromatic ring clusters. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Multifrequency Ultra-High Resolution Miniature Scanning Microscope Using Microchannel And Solid-State Sensor Technologies And Method For Scanning Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A miniature, ultra-high resolution, and color scanning microscope using microchannel and solid-state technology that does not require focus adjustment. One embodiment includes a source of collimated radiant energy for illuminating a sample, a plurality of narrow angle filters comprising a microchannel structure to permit the passage of only unscattered radiant energy through the microchannels with some portion of the radiant energy entering the microchannels from the sample, a solid-state sensor array attached to the microchannel structure, the microchannels being aligned with an element of the solid-state sensor array, that portion of the radiant energy entering the microchannels parallel to the microchannel walls travels to the sensor element generating an electrical signal from which an image is reconstructed by an external device, and a moving element for movement of the microchannel structure relative to the sample. Discloses a method for scanning samples whereby the sensor array elements trace parallel paths that are arbitrarily close to the parallel paths traced by other elements of the array.

  16. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Bulk chemical characterization using solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, Ronald; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Hedges, John I.

    1990-07-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of mangrove ( Rhizophora mangle) leaves during decomposition in tropical estuarine waters were characterized using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and elemental (CHNO) analysis. Carbohydrates were the most abundant components of the leaves accounting for about 50 wt% of senescent tissues. Tannins were estimated to account for about 20 wt% of leaf tissues, and lipid components, cutin, and possibly other aliphatic biopolymers in leaf cuticles accounted for about 15 wt%. Carbohydrates were generally less resistant to decomposition than the other constituents and decreased in relative concentration during decomposition. Tannins were of intermediate resistance to decomposition and remained in fairly constant proportion during decomposition. Paraffinic components were very resistant to decomposition and increased in relative concentration as decomposition progressed. Lignin was a minor component of all leaf tissues. Standard methods for the colorimetric determination of tannins (Folin-Dennis reagent) and the gravimetric determination of lignin (Klason lignin) were highly inaccurate when applied to mangrove leaves. The N content of the leaves was particularly dynamic with values ranging from 1.27 wt% in green leaves to 0.65 wt% in senescent yellow leaves attached to trees. During decomposition in the water the N content initially decreased to 0.51 wt% due to leaching, but values steadily increased thereafter to 1.07 wt% in the most degraded leaf samples. The absolute mass of N in the leaves increased during decomposition indicating that N immobilization was occurring as decomposition progressed.

  17. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Bulk chemical characterization using solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benner, R.; Hatcher, P.G.; Hedges, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) leaves during decomposition in tropical estuarine waters were characterized using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and elemental (CHNO) analysis. Carbohydrates were the most abundant components of the leaves accounting for about 50 wt% of senescent tissues. Tannins were estimated to account for about 20 wt% of leaf tissues, and lipid components, cutin, and possibly other aliphatic biopolymers in leaf cuticles accounted for about 15 wt%. Carbohydrates were generally less resistant to decomposition than the other constituents and decreased in relative concentration during decomposition. Tannins were of intermediate resistance to decomposition and remained in fairly constant proportion during decomposition. Paraffinic components were very resistant to decomposition and increased in relative concentration as decomposition progressed. Lignin was a minor component of all leaf tissues. Standard methods for the colorimetric determination of tannins (Folin-Dennis reagent) and the gravimetric determination of lignin (Klason lignin) were highly inaccurate when applied to mangrove leaves. The N content of the leaves was particularly dynamic with values ranging from 1.27 wt% in green leaves to 0.65 wt% in senescent yellow leaves attached to trees. During decomposition in the water the N content initially decreased to 0.51 wt% due to leaching, but values steadily increased thereafter to 1.07 wt% in the most degraded leaf samples. The absolute mass of N in the leaves increased during decomposition indicating that N immobilization was occurring as decomposition progressed. ?? 1990.

  18. Development of a fast solid-state high-resolution density profile reflectometer system on the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. W.; Doyle, E. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Peebles, W. A.; Rettig, C. L.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    A new fast-sweep, broadband frequency-modulated reflectometer on the DIII-D tokamak has produced routine, reliable density profiles with high spatial (⩽1 cm) and temporal resolution (˜100 μs). The system utilizes a solid-state microwave source and an active quadrupler, covering the full Q-band (33-50 GHz) and providing high output power (20-60 mW). The rf source frequency is linearized using an arbitrary function generator and the temperature of the source is actively controlled to reduce rf frequency drifts. The system hardware allows the rf frequency to be swept fullband in 10 μs, but, due to digitization limits, the sweep time used currently is 75-100 μs. The reliability of the reconstructed profiles was improved by a combination of fast frequency sweep, which reduces density fluctuation effects on the measurements, and advanced signal analysis based on digital complex demodulation, which improves phase accuracy. The fast-sweep system has resolved fast-changing edge density profiles during edge localized modes with unprecedented resolution.

  19. High-resolution paramagnetically enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins at fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Ward, Meaghan E; Wang, Shenlin; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Hutchins, Howard; Fey, Michael; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) is well suited for the study of membrane proteins in membrane mimetic and native membrane environments. These experiments often suffer from low sensitivity, due in part to the long recycle delays required for magnetization and probe recovery, as well as detection of low gamma nuclei. In ultrafast MAS experiments sensitivity can be enhanced through the use of low power sequences combined with paramagnetically enhanced relaxation times to reduce recycle delays, as well as proton detected experiments. In this work we investigate the sensitivity of (13)C and (1)H detected experiments applied to 27 kDa membrane proteins reconstituted in lipids and packed in small 1.3 mm MAS NMR rotors. We demonstrate that spin diffusion is sufficient to uniformly distribute paramagnetic relaxation enhancement provided by either covalently bound or dissolved CuEDTA over 7TM alpha helical membrane proteins. Using paramagnetic enhancement and low power decoupling in carbon detected experiments we can recycle experiments ~13 times faster than under traditional conditions. However, due to the small sample volume the overall sensitivity per unit time is still lower than that seen in the 3.2 mm probe. Proton detected experiments, however, showed increased efficiency and it was found that the 1.3 mm probe could achieve sensitivity comparable to that of the 3.2 mm in a given amount of time. This is an attractive prospect for samples of limited quantity, as this allows for a reduction in the amount of protein that needs to be produced without the necessity for increased experimental time. PMID:24338448

  20. Chemical structures of coal lithotypes before and after CO2 adsorption as investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cao, X.; Mastalerz, Maria; Chappell, M.A.; Miller, L.F.; Li, Y.; Mao, J.

    2011-01-01

    Four lithotypes (vitrain, bright clarain, clarain, and fusain) of a high volatile bituminous Springfield Coal from the Illinois Basin were characterized using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR techniques included quantitative direct polarization/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS), cross polarization/total sideband suppression (CP/TOSS), dipolar dephasing, CHn selection, and recoupled C-H long-range dipolar dephasing techniques. The lithotypes that experienced high-pressure CO2 adsorption isotherm analysis were also analyzed to determine possible changes in coal structure as a result of CO2 saturation at high pressure and subsequent evacuation. The main carbon functionalities present in original vitrain, bright clarain, clarain and fusain were aromatic carbons (65.9%-86.1%), nonpolar alkyl groups (9.0%-28.9%), and aromatic C-O carbons (4.1%-9.5%). Among these lithotypes, aromaticity increased in the order of clarain, bright clarain, vitrain, and fusain, whereas the fraction of alkyl carbons decreased in the same order. Fusain was distinct from other three lithotypes in respect to its highest aromatic composition (86.1%) and remarkably small fraction of alkyl carbons (11.0%). The aromatic cluster size in fusain was larger than that in bright clarain. The lithotypes studied responded differently to high pressure CO2 saturation. After exposure to high pressure CO2, vitrain and fusain showed a decrease in aromaticity but an increase in the fraction of alkyl carbons, whereas bright clarain and clarain displayed an increase in aromaticity but a decrease in the fraction of alkyl carbons. Aromatic fused-rings were larger for bright clarain but smaller for fusain in the post-CO2 adsorption samples compared to the original lithotypes. These observations suggested chemical CO2-coal interactions at high pressure and the selectivity of lithotypes in response to CO2 adsorption. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Solid state 13C NMR analysis of shales and coals from Laramide Basins. Final report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.; Jiao, Z.S.; Zhao, Hanqing; Surdam, R.C.

    1998-12-31

    This Western Research Institute (WRI) jointly sponsored research (JSR) project augmented and complemented research conducted by the University of Wyoming Institute For Energy Research for the Gas Research Institute. The project, {open_quotes}A New Innovative Exploitation Strategy for Gas Accumulations Within Pressure Compartments,{close_quotes} was a continuation of a project funded by the GRI Pressure Compartmentalization Program that began in 1990. That project, {open_quotes}Analysis of Pressure Chambers and Seals in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana,{close_quotes} characterized a new class of hydrocarbon traps, the discovery of which can provide an impetus to revitalize the domestic petroleum industry. In support of the UW Institute For Energy Research`s program on pressure compartmentalization, solid-state {sup 13}C NMR measurements were made on sets of shales and coals from different Laramide basins in North America. NMR measurements were made on samples taken from different formations and depths of burial in the Alberta, Bighorn, Denver, San Juan, Washakie, and Wind River basins. The carbon aromaticity determined by NMR was shown to increase with depth of burial and increased maturation. In general, the NMR data were in agreement with other maturational indicators, such as vitrinite reflectance, illite/smectite ratio, and production indices. NMR measurements were also obtained on residues from hydrous pyrolysis experiments on Almond and Lance Formation coals from the Washakie Basin. These data were used in conjunction with mass and elemental balance data to obtain information about the extent of carbon aromatization that occurs during artificial maturation. The data indicated that 41 and 50% of the original aliphatic carbon in the Almond and Lance coals, respectively, aromatized during hydrous pyrolysis.

  2. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Meng, Wei; He, Zhongqi; Feng, Weiying; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P

    2016-02-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O-C-O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes. PMID:26624522

  3. UV-laser microdissection system - A novel approach for the preparation of high-resolution stable isotope records (δ13C/δ18O) from tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollaen, Karina; Helle, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Intra-annual stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) studies of tree rings at various incremental resolutions have been attempting to extract valuable seasonal climatic and environmental information or assessing plant ecophysiological processes. For preparing high-resolution isotope samples normally wood segments or cores are mechanically divided in radial direction or cut in tangential direction. After mechanical dissection, wood samples are ground to a fine powder and either cellulose is extracted or bulk wood samples are analyzed. Here, we present a novel approach for the preparation of high-resolution stable isotope records from tree rings using an UV-laser microdissection system. Firstly, tree-ring cellulose is directly extracted from wholewood cross-sections largely leaving the wood anatomical structure intact and saving time as compared to the classical procedure. Secondly, micro-samples from cellulose cross-sections are dissected with an UV-Laser dissection microscope. Tissues of interest from cellulose cross-sections are identified and marked precisely with a screen-pen and dissected via an UV-laser beam. Dissected cellulose segments were automatically collected in capsules and are prepared for stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) analysis. The new techniques facilitate inter- and intra-annual isotope analysis on tree-ring and open various possibilities for comparisons with wood anatomy in plant eco-physiological studies. We describe the design and the handling of this novel methodology and discuss advantages and constraints given by the example of intra-annual oxygen isotope analysis on tropical trees.

  4. Metal Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical CO2 and H2O Using Solid State 29Si, 13C NMR Spectroscop

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Sears, Jesse A.; Wang, Chong M.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2010-03-11

    Ex situ solid state NMR was used for the first time to study fundamental mineral carbonation processes and reaction extent relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) using a model silicate mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4)+supercriticalCO2 with and without H2O. Run conditions were 80 C and 96 atm. 29Si NMR clearly shows that in the absence of CO2, the role of H2O is to hydrolyze surface Mg-O-Si bonds to produce dissolved Mg2+, and mono- and oligomeric hydroxylated silica species. Surface hydrolysis products contain only Q0 (Si(OH)4) and Q1(Si(OH)3OSi) species. An equilibrium between Q0, Q1 and Mg2+ with a saturated concentration equivalent to less than 3.2% of the Mg2SiO4 conversion is obtained at a reaction time of up to 7 days. Using scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is observed within 7 days. Using both scCO2 and H2O, the surface reaction products for silica are mainly Q3 (SiOH(OSi)3) species accompanied by a lesser amount of Q2 (Si(OH)2(OSi)2) and Q4 (Si(OSi)4). However, no Q0 and Q1 were detected, indicating the carbonic acid formation/deprotonation and magnesite (MgCO3) precipitation reactions are faster than the forsterite hydrolysis process. Thus it can be concluded that the Mg2SiO4 hydrolysis process is the rate limiting step of the overall mineral carbonation process. 29Si NMR combined with XRD, TEM, SAED and EDX further reveal that the reaction is a surface reaction with the Mg2SiO4 crystallite in the core and with condensed Q2-Q4 species forming amorphous surface layers. 13C MAS NMR identified a possible reaction intermediate as (MgCO3)4-Mg(OH)2-5H2O. However, at long reaction times only crystallite magnesite MgCO3 products are observed.

  5. Development of DNP-Enhanced High-Resolution Solid-State NMR System for the Characterization of the Surface Structure of Polymer Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Fumitaka; Idehara, Toshitaka; Fujii, Yutaka; Ogawa, Isamu; Horii, Akifumi; Entzminger, George; Doty, F. David

    2012-07-01

    A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (DNP/CP/MAS) NMR system has been developed by combining a 200 MHz Chemagnetics CMX-200 spectrometer operating at 4.7 T with a high-power 131.5 GHz Gyrotron FU CW IV. The 30 W sub-THz wave generated in a long pulse TE _{{41}}^{{(1)}} mode with a frequency of 5 Hz was successfully transmitted to the modified Doty Scientific low-temperature CP/MAS probe through copper smooth-wall circular waveguides. Since serious RF noises on NMR signals by arcing in the electric circuit of the probe and undesired sample heating were induced by the continuous sub-THz wave pulse irradiation with higher powers, the on-off sub-THz wave pulse irradiation synchronized with the NMR detection was developed and the appropriate setting of the irradiation time and the cooling time corresponding to the non-irradiation time was found to be very effective for the suppression of the arcing and the sample heating. The attainable maximum DNP enhancement was more than 30 folds for C1 13 C-enriched D-glucose dissolved in the frozen medium containing mono-radical 4-amino-TEMPO. The first DNP/CP/MAS 13 C NMR spectra of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sub-micron particles were obtained at the dispersed state in the same frozen medium, indicating that DNP-enhanced 1H spins effectively diffuse from the medium to the PMMA particles through their surface and are detected as high-resolution 13 C spectra in the surficial region to which the 1H spins reach. On the basis of these results, the possibility of the DNP/CP/MAS NMR characterization of the surface structure of nanomaterials including polymer materials was discussed.

  6. Determination of methyl 13C-15N dipolar couplings in peptides and proteins by three-dimensional and four-dimensional magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmus, Jonathan J.; Nadaud, Philippe S.; Höfer, Nicole; Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2008-02-01

    We describe three- and four-dimensional semiconstant-time transferred echo double resonance (SCT-TEDOR) magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments for the simultaneous measurement of multiple long-range N15-Cmethyl13 dipolar couplings in uniformly C13, N15-enriched peptides and proteins with high resolution and sensitivity. The methods take advantage of C13 spin topologies characteristic of the side-chain methyl groups in amino acids alanine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, threonine, and valine to encode up to three distinct frequencies (N15-Cmethyl13 dipolar coupling, N15 chemical shift, and Cmethyl13 chemical shift) within a single SCT evolution period of initial duration ˜1/JCC1 (where JCC1≈35Hz, is the one-bond Cmethyl13-C13 J-coupling) while concurrently suppressing the modulation of NMR coherences due to C13-C13 and N15-C13 J-couplings and transverse relaxation. The SCT-TEDOR schemes offer several important advantages over previous methods of this type. First, significant (approximately twofold to threefold) gains in experimental sensitivity can be realized for weak N15-Cmethyl13 dipolar couplings (corresponding to structurally interesting, ˜3.5Å or longer, distances) and typical Cmethyl13 transverse relaxation rates. Second, the entire SCT evolution period can be used for Cmethyl13 and/or N15 frequency encoding, leading to increased spectral resolution with minimal additional coherence decay. Third, the experiments are inherently "methyl selective," which results in simplified NMR spectra and obviates the use of frequency-selective pulses or other spectral filtering techniques. Finally, the N15-C13 cross-peak buildup trajectories are purely dipolar in nature (i.e., not influenced by J-couplings or relaxation), which enables the straightforward extraction of N15-Cmethyl13 distances using an analytical model. The SCT-TEDOR experiments are demonstrated on a uniformly C13, N15-labeled peptide, N-acetyl-valine, and a 56

  7. High Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of Mg12C12CD, Mg13C13CH and Mg12C_4H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forthomme, D.; Linton, C.; Tokaryk, D. W.; Adam, A. G.; Granger, A. D.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon and magnesium are abundant elements in the interstellar medium, so it is possible that carbon chain molecules containing a magnesium atom may exist in this environment. With this in mind, radical molecules of the form MgC2nH (n = 1,2,3) have been frequent subjects of both experimental and theoretical studies In this presentation we will discuss our high-resolution experiments of the ~A2Π-~X2Σ+ transitions in the isotopologues Mg12C12CD and Mg13C13CH, which complement our earlier investigation of this spectrum in Mg12C12CH^b. The data permit us to determine the lengths of individual bonds to high precision. In addition, we have expanded on previous studies of the ~A2Π-~X2Σ+ transition of Mg12C_4H, conducted at medium resolution. The parameters obtained from our high-resolution spectra are compared with those obtained from theoretical structure calculations. H. Ding, C. Apetrei, L. Chacaga, J. P. Maier, Astrophys. J. 677 (2008) 348-352 D. W. Tokaryk, A. G. Adam, W. S. Hopkins, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 230 (2005) 54-61 D. E. Woon, Chem. Phys. Lett. 274 (1997) 299-305 C. A. Thompson and L. Andrews, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 118 (1996) 10242-10249 X. Guo, J. Zhang, J. Li, L. Jiang, J. Zhang, Chem. Phys 360 (2009) 27-31 E. Chasovskikh, E. B. Jochnowitz, J. P. Maier, J. Phys. Chem. A. 112 (2008) 8686-8689.

  8. The guest ordering and dynamics in urea inclusion compounds studied by solid-state 1H and 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaorong; Müller, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Urea inclusion compounds with different guest species were studied by 13C CP MAS and 1H MAS NMR spectroscopy. It is possible to arrange the asymmetric guest species in three different ways: head-head, head-tail and tail-tail. 13C CP MAS NMR studies indicate that the preference arrangement is determined by the interaction strength of the end functional groups. 13C relaxation experiments are used to study the dynamic properties of urea inclusion compounds. 13C relaxation studies on urea inclusion compounds with n-alkane or decanoic acid show that the 13C T1 and 13C T1ρ values exhibit the position dependence towards the center of the chain, indicating internal chain mobility. The analysis of variable-temperature 13C T1ρ experiments on urea inclusion compounds with hexadecane and pentadecane, for the first time, suggests that chain fluctuations and lateral motion of n-alkane guests may contribute to the 13C T1ρ relaxation.

  9. High-resolution isotopic records ( δ 18O and δ 13C) and cathodoluminescence study of lucinid shells from methane seeps of the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietard, Cécile; Pierre, Catherine

    2008-08-01

    We present high-resolution isotopic records and cathodoluminescence studies of recently dead and live bivalve specimens from cold seeps, in an attempt to reconstruct environmental conditions during organism growth, and thereby the possible variability of fluid-venting activity at the seafloor. Shells of the burrowing lucinid Myrtea aff. amorpha were collected at three localities near actively venting methane seeps in the Eastern Mediterranean deep sea, using the Nautile submersible during two French oceanographic cruises: from the Kazan mud volcano, in the vicinity of the Anaximander mounts (MEDINAUT cruise, 1998), and from the central pockmark province and the Amon mud volcano of the Nile deep-sea fan (NAUTINIL cruise, 2003). The oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of 18 shells from the various localities, and also from different sites at the same locality show a rather strong scatter (1.8 < δ 18O‰ < 3.4; -10.2 < δ 13C‰ < 2.2), and values lower than those expected for carbonate precipitated at equilibrium with present-day bottom waters. This means that warm methane-rich fluids were mixed with bottom seawater during precipitation of shell carbonates. We have tried to determine ontogenetic age of two shells by using cathodoluminescence as a sclerochronological proxy, because the direct counting of carbonate increments was not possible in these specimens. There is a relatively good correspondence between cathodoluminescence trends and oxygen isotope profiles that might support the link between manganese incorporation during growth and temperature. Eight specimens of lucinid shells were selected for high-resolution isotopic profiling. A few shells exhibit decreasing δ 18O and δ 13C values from the umbo to the actively growing ventral shell margin, which can be attributed to the commonly observed physiologically controlled deceleration of growth with increasing organism age, this metabolic effect corresponding to the increase of incorporation of respiratory

  10. Determination of the tautomeric equilibria of pyridoyl benzoyl β-diketones in the liquid and solid state through the use of deuterium isotope effects on (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Borisov, Eugeny V; Lindon, John C

    2015-02-01

    The tautomeric equilibria for 2-pyridoyl-, 3-pyridoyl-, and 4-pyridoyl-benzoyl methane have been investigated using deuterium isotope effects on (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts both in the liquid and the solid state. Equilibria are established both in the liquid and the solid state. In addition, in the solution state the 2-bond and 3-bond J((1)H-(13)C) coupling constants have been used to confirm the equilibrium positions. The isotope effects due to deuteriation at the OH position are shown to be superior to chemical shift in determination of equilibrium positions of these almost symmetrical -pyridoyl-benzoyl methanes. The assignments of the NMR spectra are supported by calculations of the chemical shifts at the DFT level. The equilibrium positions are shown to be different in the liquid and the solid state. In the liquid state the 4-pyridoyl derivative is at the B-form (C-1 is OH), whereas the 2-and 3-pyridoyl derivatives are in the A-form. In the solid state all three compounds are on the B-form. The 4-pyridoyl derivative shows unusual deuterium isotope effects in the solid, which are ascribed to a change of the crystal structure of the deuteriated compound. PMID:24070650

  11. A Novel High-Resolution and Sensitivity-Enhanced Three-Dimensional Solid-State NMR Experiment Under Ultrafast Magic Angle Spinning Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Although magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR is a powerful technique to obtain atomic-resolution insights into the structure and dynamics of a variety of chemical and biological solids, poor sensitivity has severely limited its applications. In this study, we demonstrate an approach that suitably combines proton-detection, ultrafast-MAS and multiple frequency dimensions to overcome this limitation. With the utilization of proton-proton dipolar recoupling and double quantum (DQ) coherence excitation/reconversion radio-frequency pulses, very high-resolution proton-based 3D NMR spectra that correlate single-quantum (SQ), DQ and SQ coherences of biological solids have been obtained successfully for the first time. The proposed technique requires a very small amount of sample and does not need multiple radio-frequency (RF) channels. It also reveals information about the proximity between a spin and a certain other dipolar-coupled pair of spins in addition to regular SQ/DQ and SQ/SQ correlations. Although (1)H spectral resolution is still limited for densely proton-coupled systems, the 3D technique is valuable to study dilute proton systems, such as zeolites, small molecules, or deuterated samples. We also believe that this new methodology will aid in the design of a plethora of multidimensional NMR techniques and enable high-throughput investigation of an exciting class of solids at atomic-level resolution. PMID:26138791

  12. High-resolution nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of alpha-lytic protease in solid state. Direct comparison of enzyme structure in solution and in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Huang, T H; Bachovchin, W W; Griffin, R G; Dobson, C M

    1984-12-01

    Histidine enriched in 15N in the imidazole nitrogens was incorporated into the catalytic triad of alpha-lytic protease, and high-resolution solid-state 15N NMR spectra of lyophilized enzyme powders were recorded. The lyophilized powders were prepared from aqueous solutions with pH values ranging from 4.9 to 9.3. The behavior of the 15N resonances as a function of "pH" in these solid samples closely parallels that observed previously in the corresponding solution-state study, with the exception that in the powders proton exchange at His-57 is slow on the NMR time scale whereas in solutions it is fast. Thus, the 15N isotropic shifts demonstrate that the N pi-H tautomer of His-57 predominates in powders prepared at high pH and that N pi(H) participates in a strong hydrogen bond, as the hydrogen-bond donor, in powders prepared at both high pH and low pH. The simplest interpretation of these results is that the active site catalytic triad structure of Asp-His-Ser is maintained in these lyophilized powders. Because Asp-102 and His-57 are sequentially separated, their interaction in these lyophilized powders suggests that the tertiary structures of alpha-lytic protease in the powder and in solution are very similar. The 15N isotropic shifts further indicate that His-57 located within the intact triad in lyophilized enzyme powders has what can be taken as a normal "pKa" for a histidyl residue, undergoing a transition from the protonated to the neutral state with a midpoint between pH 6.0 and 7.0. PMID:6395886

  13. Quantitative (13)C Solid-State NMR Spectra by Multiple-Contact Cross-polarization for Drug Delivery: From Active Principles to Excipients and Drug Carriers.

    PubMed

    Saïdi, Fadila; Taulelle, Francis; Martineau, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    In this contribution, we present an analysis of the main parameters influencing the efficiency of the (1)H → (13)C multiple-contact cross-polarization nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment in the context of solid pharmaceutical materials. Using the optimum experimental conditions, quantitative (13)C NMR spectra are then obtained for porous metal-organic frameworks (potential drug carriers) and for components present in drug formulations (active principle ingredient and excipients, amorphous or crystalline). Finally, we show that mixtures of components can also be quantified with this method and, hence, that it represents an ideal tool for quantification of pharmaceutical formulations by (13)C cross-polarization under magic-angle spinning NMR in the industry as it is robust and easy to set up, much faster than direct (13)C polarization and is efficient for samples at natural abundance. PMID:27372550

  14. Restraints on backbone conformations in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins from quantitative amide 15N–15N and carbonyl 13C–13C dipolar recoupling data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent structural studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) rely principally on two sources of structural restraints: (i) restraints on backbone conformation from isotropic 15N and 13C chemical shifts, based on empirical correlations between chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles; (ii) restraints on inter-residue proximities from qualitative measurements of internuclear dipole–dipole couplings, detected as the presence or absence of inter-residue crosspeaks in multidimensional spectra. We show that site-specific dipole–dipole couplings among 15N-labeled backbone amide sites and among 13C-labeled backbone carbonyl sites can be measured quantitatively in uniformly-labeled proteins, using dipolar recoupling techniques that we call 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE (BAckbone REcoupling), and that the resulting data represent a new source of restraints on backbone conformation. 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE data can be incorporated into structural modeling calculations as potential energy surfaces, which are derived from comparisons between experimental 15N and 13C signal decay curves, extracted from crosspeak intensities in series of two-dimensional spectra, with numerical simulations of the 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE measurements. We demonstrate this approach through experiments on microcrystalline, uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled protein GB1. Results for GB1 show that 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE restraints are complementary to restraints from chemical shifts and inter-residue crosspeaks, improving both the precision and the accuracy of calculated structures. PMID:22449573

  15. Direct Detection of Supramolecular Reaction Centers in the Methanol-to-Olefins Conversion over Zeolite H-ZSM-5 by (13)C-(27)Al Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Qiang; Xu, Jun; Qi, Guodong; Gao, Pan; Wang, Weiyu; Zou, Yunyun; Feng, Ningdong; Liu, Xiaolong; Deng, Feng

    2016-02-12

    Hydrocarbon-pool chemistry is important in methanol to olefins (MTO) conversion on acidic zeolite catalysts. The hydrocarbon-pool (HP) species, such as methylbenzenes and cyclic carbocations, confined in zeolite channels during the reaction are essential in determining the reaction pathway. Herein, we experimentally demonstrate the formation of supramolecular reaction centers composed of organic hydrocarbon species and the inorganic zeolite framework in H-ZSM-5 zeolite by advanced (13)C-(27)Al double-resonance solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Methylbenzenes and cyclic carbocations located near Brønsted acid/base sites form the supramolecular reaction centers in the zeolite channel. The internuclear spatial interaction/proximity between the (13)C nuclei (associated with HP species) and the (27) Al nuclei (associated with Brønsted acid/base sites) determines the reactivity of the HP species. The closer the HP species are to the zeolite framework Al, the higher their reactivity in the MTO reaction. PMID:26732748

  16. Contradictions about Fine Structures in Meson Spectra and Proposed High-Resolution Hadron Spectrometer Using ``Interactive'' Solid-State Hydrogen Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglich, Bogdan C.

    2004-08-01

    High resolution has been discouraged in meson spectrometry for 4 decades by the Doctrine of Experiments Incompatible with Theory (DEIT). DEIT a priori rejects narrow hadron resonances on the paradigm that only broad hadron peaks, Γ⩾ 100 MeV, can exist — in spite of the accumulated evidence to the contrary. The facts are: Mesons 2 orders of magnitude narrower than `allowed' for hadrons, have been confirmed; a new one was announced at this conference. Narrow meson structures have been repeatedly reported at high momentum transfer, |t| >0.2, while they are absent at the low transfer, |t| ˜0.01, where 99% of the experiments are performed. Modification of meson mass and width as a function of the density of nuclear matter in which they are produced, have been recently reported. We postulate for meson spectra: (1) Intrinsic (`true') width, Γ, is different from the observable (`apparent') width, Γ': Γ< Γ' (2) Γ of all meson states are narrow and can be observed only at or near the maximum |t| reachable in the reaction, and (3) Γ of all meson resonances are subject to broadening as |t| decreases. Since both Γ' and the production σ are inversely proportional to |t|, most of the observed spectra are produced at the lowest |t| <0.01 and thus the peaks appear broad. We have conceptually designed a novel type hadron spectrometer with an order of magnitude better resolution (0.1 MeV). It would operate at 2 orders of magnitude higher |t| (0.3< |t| <1 (GeV/c)2, than most experiments to date (|t| <0.01). Mesons in the mass region 0.5 solid state hydrogen target' consisting of an array of plastic scintillator fibers, CH; collisions with C are electronically rejected. Missing mass of P is measured in the region of the maximum recoil angle. Story of the suppression by DEIT for 17 years of the observation of a theoretically unexplained narrow peak, which turned out to be ω→2π, and the related

  17. Probing the atomic structure of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1): Insights from high-resolution solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. Y.; Lee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Probing the structural disorder in multi-component silicate glasses and melts with varying composition is essential to reveal the change of macroscopic properties in natural silicate melts. While a number of NMR studies for the structure of multi-component silicate glasses and melts including basaltic and andesitic glasses have been reported (e.g., Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2014, 26, 42), many challenges still remain. The composition of multi-component basaltic melts vary with temperature, pressure, and melt fraction (Kushiro, Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci., 2001, 71, 107). Especially, the eutectic point (the composition of first melt) of nepheline-forsterite-quartz (the simplest model of basaltic melts) moves with pressure from silica-saturated to highly undersaturated and alkaline melts. The composition of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1, the xenolith from Kilbourne Hole) also vary with pressure. In this study we report experimental results for the effects of composition on the atomic structure of Na2O-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (NMAS) glasses in nepheline (NaAlSiO4)-forsterite (Mg2SiO4)-quartz (SiO2) eutectic composition and basaltic glasses generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1) using high-resolution multi-nuclear solid-state NMR. The Al-27 3QMAS (triple quantum magic angle spinning) NMR spectra of NMAS glasses in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition show only [4]Al. The Al-27 3QMAS NMR spectra of KLB-1 basaltic glasses show mostly [4]Al and a non-negligible fraction of [5]Al. The fraction of [5]Al, the degree of configurational disorder, increases from 0 at XMgO [MgO/(MgO+Al2O3)]=0.55 to ~3% at XMgO=0.79 in KLB-1 basaltic glasses while only [4]Al are observed in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition. The current experimental results provide that the fraction of [5]Al abruptly increases by the effect of

  18. Distinguishing tautomerism in the crystal structure of (Z)-N-(5-ethyl-2,3-di-hydro-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylidene) -4-methylbenzenesulfonamide using DFT-D calculations and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaozhou; Bond, Andrew D.; Johansson, Kristoffer E.; Van de Streek, Jacco

    2014-08-01

    The crystal structure of (Z)-N-(5-ethyl-2,3-di-hydro-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylidene) -4-methylbenzenesulfonamide contains an imine tautomer, rather than the previously reported amine tautomer. The tautomers can be distinguished using dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations and by comparison of calculated and measured {sup 13}C solid-state NMR spectra. The crystal structure of the title compound, C{sub 11}H{sub 13}N{sub 3}O{sub 2}S{sub 2}, has been determined previously on the basis of refinement against laboratory powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) data, supported by comparison of measured and calculated {sup 13}C solid-state NMR spectra [Hangan et al. (2010 ▶). Acta Cryst. B66, 615–621]. The mol@@ecule is tautomeric, and was reported as an amine tautomer [systematic name: N-(5-ethyl-1,3,4-thia@@diazol-2-yl)-p-toluene@@sulfonamide], rather than the correct imine tautomer. The protonation site on the mol@@ecule’s 1,3,4-thia@@diazole ring is indicated by the inter@@molecular contacts in the crystal structure: N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds are established at the correct site, while the alternative protonation site does not establish any notable inter molecular inter@@actions. The two tautomers provide essentially identical Rietveld fits to laboratory PXRD data, and therefore they cannot be directly distinguished in this way. However, the correct tautomer can be distinguished from the incorrect one by previously reported qu@@anti@@tative criteria based on the extent of structural distortion on optimization of the crystal structure using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations. Calculation of the {sup 13}C SS-NMR spectrum based on the correct imine tautomer also provides considerably better agreement with the measured {sup 13}C SS-NMR spectrum.

  19. (1)H-(13)C-(29)Si triple resonance and REDOR solid-state NMR-A tool to study interactions between biosilica and organic molecules in diatom cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wisser, Dorothea; Brückner, Stephan I; Wisser, Florian M; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Getzschmann, Jürgen; Kaskel, Stefan; Brunner, Eike

    2015-01-01

    Triple resonance solid-state NMR experiments using the spin combination (1)H-(13)C-(29)Si are still rarely found in the literature. This is due to the low natural abundance of the two heteronuclei. Such experiments are, however, increasingly important to study hybrid materials such as biosilica and others. A suitable model substance, ideally labeled with both (13)C and (29)Si, is thus very useful to optimize the experiments before applying them to studies of more complex samples such as biosilica. Tetraphenoxysilane could be synthesized in an easy, two-step synthesis including double isotope labelling. Using tetraphenoxysilane, we established a (1)H-(13)C-(29)Si double CP-based HETCOR experiment and applied it to diatom biosilica from the diatom species Thalassiosira pseudonana. Furthermore, we carried out (1)H-(13)C{(29)Si} CP-REDOR experiments in order to estimate the distance between the organic matrix and the biosilica. Our experiments on diatom biosilica strongly indicate a close contact between polyamine-containing parts of the organic matrix and the silica. This corroborates the assumption that the organic matrix is essential for the control of the cell wall formation. PMID:25638422

  20. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Byg, Inge; Damager, Iben; Diaz, Jerome; Engelsen, Søren B; Ulvskov, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by (13)C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by (2)H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose-galacturonic acid (Rha-GalA) backbone in RG-I. Potential food ingredient uses of RG-I by tailoring of its structure are discussed. PMID:21462966

  1. Quantitative comparison of structure and dynamics of elastin following three isolation schemes by 13C solid state NMR and MALDI mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, A.; Louis, M.; Dhital, B.; Ho, H. P.; Chang, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Methods for isolating elastin from fat, collagen, and muscle, commonly used in the design of artificial elastin based biomaterials, rely on exposing tissue to harsh pH levels and temperatures that usually denature many proteins. At present, a quantitative measurement of the modifications to elastin following isolation from other extracellular matrix constituents has not been reported. Using magic angle spinning 13C NMR spectroscopy and relaxation methodologies, we have measured the modification in structure and dynamics following three known purification protocols. Our experimental data reveal that the 13C spectra of the hydrated samples appear remarkably similar across the various purification methods. Subtle differences in the half maximum widths were observed in the backbone carbonyl suggesting possible structural heterogeneity across the different methods of purification. Additionally, small differences in the relative signal intensities were observed between purified samples. Lyophilizing the samples results in a reduction of backbone motion and reveals additional differences across the purification methods studied. These differences were most notable in the alanine motifs indicating possible changes in cross-linking or structural rigidity. The measured correlation times of glycine and proline moieties are observed to also vary considerably across the different purification methods, which may be related to peptide bond cleavage. Lastly, the relative concentration of desmosine cross-links in the samples quantified by MALDI mass spectrometry is reported. PMID:25592991

  2. Development of qualitative and quantitative analysis methods in pharmaceutical application with new selective signal excitation methods for 13 C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using 1 H T1rho relaxation time.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Mamiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Most pharmaceutical drug substances and excipients in formulations exist in a crystalline or amorphous form, and an understanding of their state during manufacture and storage is critically important, particularly in formulated products. Carbon 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is useful for studying the chemical and physical state of pharmaceutical solids in a formulated product. We developed two new selective signal excitation methods in (13) C solid-state NMR to extract the spectrum of a target component from such a mixture. These methods were based on equalization of the proton relaxation time in a single domain via rapid intraproton spin diffusion and the difference in proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame ((1) H T1rho) of individual components in the mixture. Introduction of simple pulse sequences to one-dimensional experiments reduced data acquisition time and increased flexibility. We then demonstrated these methods in a commercially available drug and in a mixture of two saccharides, in which the (13) C signals of the target components were selectively excited, and showed them to be applicable to the quantitative analysis of individual components in solid mixtures, such as formulated products, polymorphic mixtures, or mixtures of crystalline and amorphous phases. PMID:23147444

  3. Rovibrational constants of the ground state and v8 = 1 state of 13C2HD3 by high-resolution FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, L. L.; Tan, T. L.

    2016-06-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of the c-type ν8 band of 13C2HD3 was recorded for the first time at a unapodized resolution of 0.0063 cm-1 in the wavenumber region of 830-1000 cm-1. Through the fitting of a total of 1057 assigned infrared transitions using Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation, rovibrational constants for the upper state (v8 = 1) up to five quartic centrifugal distortion terms were derived for the first time with a root-mean-square (rms) deviation of 0.00073 cm-1. The band center of ν8 of 13C2HD3 was found to be 913.011021(55) cm-1. Ground state rovibrational constants up to five quartic terms of 13C2HD3 were also determined from a fit of 453 ground state combination-differences from the present infrared measurements with an rms deviation of 0.00072 cm-1 for the first time. The uncertainty of the measured infrared lines was estimated to be ±0.0012 cm-1. From the ground state rotational constants, the inertial defect of 13C2HD3 was calculated to be 0.06973(16) uÅ2, showing the high planarity of the molecule.

  4. Use of solid waste for chemical stabilization: Adsorption isotherms and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR study of hazardous organic compounds sorbed on coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.; Lane, D.C.; Rovani, J.F.; Cox, J.D.; Clark, J.A.; Miknis, F.P.

    1993-09-01

    Adsorption of hazardous organic compounds on the Dave Johnston plant fly ash is described. Fly ash from Dave Johnston and Laramie River power plants were characterized using elemental, x-ray, and {sup 29}Si NMR; the Dave Johnston (DJ) fly ash had higher quartz contents, while the Laramie River fly ash had more monomeric silicate anions. Adsorption data for hydroaromatics and chlorobenzenes indicate that the adsorption capacity of DJ coal fly ash is much less than that of activated carbon by a factor of >3000; but it is needed to confirm that solid-gas and solid-liquid equilibrium isotherms can indeed be compared. However, for pyridine, pentachlorophenol, naphthalene, and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, the DJ fly ash appears to adsorb these compounds nearly as well as activated carbon. {sup 13}C NMR was used to study the adsorption of hazardous org. cpds on coal fly ash; the nuclear spin relaxation times often were very long, resulting in long experimental times to obtain a spectrum. Using a jumbo probe, low concentrations of some hazardous org. cpds could be detected; for pentachlorophenol adsorbed onto fly ash, the chemical shift of the phenolic carbon was changed. Use of NMR to study the adsorption needs further study.

  5. Rovibrational constants of the ground state and v9 = 1 state of 13C2D4 by high-resolution Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T. L.; Gabona, M. G.; Woo, J. Q.; Ng, L. L.; Wong, Andy; McNaughton, Don

    2016-03-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) rovibrational spectrum of the b-type ν9 band of 13C2D4 was recorded at a unapodized resolution of 0.0063 cm-1 in the 2230-2450 cm-1 region. By assigning and fitting a total of 1171 rotationally resolved infrared transitions of the ν9 band and using the Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation, rovibrational constants for the upper state (v9 = 1) up to five quartic centrifugal distortion terms were derived for the first time. The root-mean-square (rms) deviation of the infrared fit was 0.00043 cm-1. The ground state constants of 13C2D4 were determined with higher accuracy than previously by fitting 1485 ground state combination-differences (GSCDs) from the present and previous infrared measurements, with rms deviation of 0.00034 cm-1. The band center of ν9 band of 13C2D4 was determined to be at 2324.3593 cm-1. The equilibrium state rovibrational constants up to all 5 quartic terms were derived from theoretical harmonic calculations at three levels of theory: B3LYP/cc-pVTZ, MP2/cc-pVTZ, and CCSD/cc-pVTZ using the principal axis coordinate system. These constants agreed reasonably well with the ground state constants of 13C2D4 derived from the present experimental GSCD fit. Furthermore, all 3 rotational constants of the upper state (v9 = 1) and of the ground state of 13C2D4 were obtained from anharmonic calculations using B3LYP and MP2 levels with the cc-pVTZ basis set. The calculated rotational constants were found to agree with those derived experimentally within 0.40%.

  6. Exploring late Miocene climate stability: constraining background variability using high-resolution benthic δ18O and δ13C records from Site U1338

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, A.; John, C. M.; Lee, G.; Shevenell, A.

    2012-12-01

    The late Miocene (11.61 - 5.33 Ma) was one of the more stable climatic periods of the Cenozoic. Superimposed on this stable background climate, a number of threshold events occurred, including the late Miocene Carbon Isotope Shift (CIS, 7.6-6.6 Ma) and the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.96-5.33 Ma). The goal of our study is to constrain the background climate cyclicity during the late Miocene. A better knowledge of the background cyclicity in the Earth's climate system is required to advance understanding of, and to successfully model, climate variability. Improving understanding of how changes in background climate variability affect important parameters and fluxes, such as ice volume and the carbon pump, is crucial for explaining the occurrence of threshold events such as the CIS and MSC during an otherwise climatically stable period. The study site is located in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (IODP Site U1338, Expedition 321). U1338 was chosen, as the equatorial Pacific is an important component of the global climate system, representing half of the total tropical ocean and a quarter of the global ocean. We present δ18O and δ13C records from 3.5 to 8.5 Ma using the benthic foraminiferal species Cibicidoides mundulus, with a resolution of 3-4 kyr, which resolves all Milankovitch scale cycles. We present a revised shipboard age model, generated from new biostratigraphic age constraints based on planktic foraminiferal datums. Benthic δ18O records at IODP Site U1338 reflect the stable nature of the late Miocene climate accurately, with long-term trends showing low-amplitude (0.2‰) variations. Superimposed on this are higher-amplitude short-term fluctuations (0.3-0.4‰). Deep-sea benthic foraminferal δ18O records both temperature and the δ18O composition of global deep seawater (δ18Odsw). δ18Odsw largely reflects glacio-eustatic change. Our benthic δ18O implies that long-term trends in ice volume were minimal during the late Miocene. However, the short

  7. Analysis of the Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared Spectrum of trans-Hexatriene-1-13C1; a Semiexperimental Equilibrium Structure for the C6 Backbone for trans-Hexatriene

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Norman C.; Tian, Hengfeng; Blake, Thomas A.

    2012-03-29

    trans-Hexatriene-1-13C1 (tHTE-1-13C1) has been synthesized, and its high-resolution (0.0015 cm-1) infrared spectrum has been recorded. The rotational structure in the C-type bands for v26 at 1011 cm-1 and v30 at 894 cm-1 has been analyzed. To the 1458 ground state combination differences from these bands, ground state rotational constants were fitted to a Watson-type Hamiltonian to give A0 = 0.8728202(9), B0 = 0.0435868(4), and C0 = 0.0415314(2) cm-1. Upper state rotational constants for the v30 band were also fitted. Predictions of the ground state rotational constants for t-HTE-1-13C1 from a B3LYP/cc-pVTZ model with scale factors based on the normal species were in excellent agreement with observations. Similar good agreement was found between predicted and observed ground state rotational constants for the three 13C1 isotopologues of cis-hexatriene (cHTE), as determined from microwave spectroscopy. Equilibrium rotational constants for tHTE and its three 13C1 isotopologues, of which two were predicted, were used to find a semiexperimental equilibrium structure for the C6 backbone of tHTE. This structure shows increased structural effects of pi-electron delocalization in comparison with butadiene.

  8. Solid-state 13C NMR study of banana liquid crystals - 3: Alkyl-tail-group packing environments of an acute-angle bent-core molecule in the hexagonal columnar and cubic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosu, Hiromichi; Endo, Yumi; Kimura, Saori; Hashimoto, Tomoko; Harada, Motoi; Lee, Eun-Woo; Sone, Masato; Watanabe, Junji; Kang, Sungmin

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements were performed on the hexagonal columnar and cubic phases of an acute-angle banana-shaped molecule, N(1,7)-S30. In the hexagonal columnar phase, three peaks appear at the NMR chemical shifts assigned to the internal methylene carbons of alkyl tails, indicating that the two alkyl tails have different packing structures, and one of the tails has two different conformations within a single molecule. Combined cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning and pulse saturation transfer/magic-angle spinning measurements show that one of the alkyl chains is located inside and the other is located outside the columnar structure. In the cubic phase, pulse saturation transfer/magic-angle spinning measurement shows that only one peak appears at the NMR chemical shifts assigned to the internal methylene carbons of alkyl tails, indicating that both of the alkyl chains are located outside the cubic structure.

  9. A study of conformational stability of poly(L-alanine), poly(L-valine), and poly(L-alanine)/poly(L-valine) blends in the solid state by (13)C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Murata, Katsuyoshi; Kuroki, Shigeki; Kimura, Hideaki; Ando, Isao

    2002-06-01

    13C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR and (1)H T(1rho) experiments of poly(L-alanine) (PLA), poly(L-valine) (PLV), and PLA/PLV blends have been carried out in order to elucidate the conformational stability of the polypeptides in the solid state. These were prepared by adding a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) solution of the polymer with a 2.0 wt/wt % of sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) to alkaline water. From these experimental results, it is clarified that the conformations of PLA and PLV in their blends are strongly influenced by intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions that cause their miscibility at the molecular level. PMID:11948439

  10. Accurate measurement of methyl 13C chemical shifts by solid-state NMR for the determination of protein side chain conformation: the influenza a M2 transmembrane peptide as an example.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mei; Mishanina, Tatiana V; Cady, Sarah D

    2009-06-10

    The use of side chain methyl (13)C chemical shifts for the determination of the rotameric conformation of Val and Leu residues in proteins by solid-state NMR spectroscopy is described. Examination of the solution NMR stereospecifically assigned methyl groups shows significant correlation between the difference in the two methyl carbons' chemical shifts and the side chain conformation. It is found that alpha-helical and beta-sheet backbones cause different side chain methyl chemical shift trends. In alpha-helical Leu's, a relatively large absolute methyl (13)C shift difference of 2.89 ppm is found for the most populated mt rotamer (chi(1) = -60 degrees, chi(2) = 180 degrees), while a much smaller value of 0.73 ppm is found for the next populated tp rotamer (chi(1) = 180 degrees, chi(2) = 60 degrees). For alpha-helical Val residues, the dominant t rotamer (chi(1) = 180 degrees) has more downfield Cgamma2 chemical shifts than Cgamma1 by 1.71 ppm, while the next populated m rotamer (chi(1) = -60 degrees) shows the opposite trend of more downfield Cgamma1 chemical shift by 1.23 ppm. These significantly different methyl (13)C chemical shifts exist despite the likelihood of partial rotameric averaging at ambient temperature. We show that these conformation-dependent methyl (13)C chemical shifts can be utilized for side chain structure determination once the methyl (13)C resonances are accurately measured by double-quantum (DQ) filtered 2D correlation experiments, most notably the dipolar DQ to single-quantum (SQ) correlation technique. The advantage of the DQ-SQ correlation experiment over simple 2D SQ-SQ correlation experiments is demonstrated on the transmembrane peptide of the influenza A M2 proton channel. The methyl chemical shifts led to predictions of the side chain rotameric states for several Val and Leu residues in this tetrameric helical bundle. The predicted Val rotamers were further verified by dipolar correlation experiments that directly measure the chi(1

  11. Secondary Structure, Backbone Dynamics, and Structural Topology of Phospholamban and Its Phosphorylated and Arg9Cys-Mutated Forms in Phospholipid Bilayers Utilizing 13C and 15N Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phospholamban (PLB) is a membrane protein that regulates heart muscle relaxation rates via interactions with the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA). When PLB is phosphorylated or Arg9Cys (R9C) is mutated, inhibition of SERCA is relieved. 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy is utilized to investigate conformational changes of PLB upon phosphorylation and R9C mutation. 13C=O NMR spectra of the cytoplasmic domain reveal two α-helical structural components with population changes upon phosphorylation and R9C mutation. The appearance of an unstructured component is observed on domain Ib. 15N NMR spectra indicate an increase in backbone dynamics of the cytoplasmic domain. Wild-type PLB (WT-PLB), Ser16-phosphorylated PLB (P-PLB), and R9C-mutated PLB (R9C-PLB) all have a very dynamic domain Ib, and the transmembrane domain has an immobile component. 15N NMR spectra indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of R9C-PLB adopts an orientation similar to P-PLB and shifts away from the membrane surface. Domain Ib (Leu28) of P-PLB and R9C-PLB loses the alignment. The R9C-PLB adopts a conformation similar to P-PLB with a population shift to a more extended and disordered state. The NMR data suggest the more extended and disordered forms of PLB may relate to inhibition relief. PMID:24511878

  12. New High-Resolution δ13C and δ18O Records for the Late Paleocene (59-56 Ma) from Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 22, Site 215, Central Indian Ocean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorou, M. C.; Pekar, S. F.; Ramirez, J.

    2012-12-01

    High-resolution benthic foraminiferal stable isotope records were developed from upper Paleocene strata from Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 22 Site 215 to investigate paleoceanographic changes during the lead up to the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Site 215 was drilled at a depth of 5,309 meters (paleodepth of ~3,300 meters) and is located in the Central Indian Basin, west of Ninetyeast Ridge (8°07.30'S, 86°47.50'E). Late Paleocene strata are composed of nannofossil ooze recovered at relatively shallow depths (between 82 and 149 mbsf). This resulted in excellent preservation of the foraminiferal tests. Stable isotope records were developed using benthic foraminiferal species Cibicidoides dayi, C. hyphalus, and Oridorsalis umbonatus, with the δ18O data corrected for vital effects for each genus. Age resolution between samples range from 5 to 10 kyr. As seen in other isotopic records, a long-term decrease in both δ13C and δ18O occurs between 58 to 56 Ma, leading up to the PETM. A number of δ13C excursions of up to 1 ‰ occur between 56.0 and 56.5 Ma, of which two coincide with δ18O excursions of up to 0.6‰ or about 2.5°C. These δ13C excursions occur at approximately 20 kyr intervals, which we interpret could be related to the precessional cycle. Comparing to the other high-resolution isotopic record from Site 1209, δ13C isotopes are heavier at Site 215 than at Site 1209 between 58 and 56.5 Ma, becoming lighter between 56.5 and 56 Ma. This suggests a change in the source of deep-waters during this time interval. We speculate that deep-water production switched from a Southern Ocean to possibly a northern hemisphere source.

  13. High resolution infrared and Raman spectra of {sup 13}C{sup 12}CD{sub 2}: The CD stretching fundamentals and associated combination and hot bands

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lonardo, G.; Fusina, L. Canè, E.; Tamassia, F.; Martínez, R. Z.; Bermejo, D.

    2015-09-07

    Infrared and Raman spectra of mono {sup 13}C fully deuterated acetylene, {sup 13}C{sup 12}CD{sub 2}, have been recorded and analysed to obtain detailed information on the C—D stretching fundamentals and associated combination, overtone, and hot bands. Infrared spectra were recorded at an instrumental resolution ranging between 0.006 and 0.01 cm{sup −1} in the region 1800–7800 cm{sup −1}. Sixty new bands involving the ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 3} C—D stretching modes also associated with the ν{sub 4} and ν{sub 5} bending vibrations have been observed and analysed. In total, 5881 transitions have been assigned in the investigated spectral region. In addition, the Q branch of the ν{sub 1} fundamental was recorded using inverse Raman spectroscopy, with an instrumental resolution of about 0.003 cm{sup −1}. The transitions relative to each stretching mode, i.e., the fundamental band, its first overtone, and associated hot and combination bands involving bending states with υ{sub 4} + υ{sub 5} up to 2 were fitted simultaneously. The usual Hamiltonian appropriate to a linear molecule, including vibration and rotation l-type and the Darling–Dennison interaction between υ{sub 4} = 2 and υ{sub 5} = 2 levels associated with the stretching states, was adopted for the analysis. The standard deviation for each global fit is ≤0.0004 cm{sup −1}, of the same order of magnitude of the measurement precision. Slightly improved parameters for the bending and the ν{sub 2} manifold have been also determined. Precise values of spectroscopic parameters deperturbed from the resonance interactions have been obtained. They provide quantitative information on the anharmonic character of the potential energy surface, which can be useful, in addition to those reported in the literature, for the determination of a general anharmonic force field for the molecule. Finally, the obtained values of the Darling–Dennison constants can be valuable for understanding energy flows

  14. High-resolution aluminum-27 solid-state magic-angle sample-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of AlCl sub 3 -tetrahydrofuran complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Oc Hee; Oldfield, E. )

    1990-09-19

    The authors have obtained {sup 27}Al solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of several AlCl{sub 3}-THF complexes, using magic-angle sample-spinning (MASS) NMR at high field. The authors results suggest that the isotropic chemical shifts ({delta}{sub i}) occur in relatively well defined regions for 4-, 5-, and 6-coordinate species (AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, {approximately} 103 ppm; AlCl{sub 3}{center dot}THF, {approximately} 99 ppm; trans-AlCl{sub 3}{center dot}2THF, {approximately} 60 ppM; trans-(AlCl{sub 2}(THF){sub 4}){sup +}, {approximately} 14 ppM), as found previously with aluminum oxo compounds. They also find that theoretically calculated average nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (e{sup 2}qQ/h) (trans-(AlCl{sub 2}(THF){sub 4}){sup +}, {approximately} 6.3 MHz; trans-AlCl{sub 3}{center dot}2THF, {approximately} 4.6 MHz; AlCl{sub 3}{center dot}THF, {approximately} 3.0 MHz; AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, 0 MHz) are in good accord with experimentally determined nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, determined from computer simulations of the MASS NMR spectra (trans-(AlCl{sub 2}(THF){sub 4}){sup +}, 6.4 MHz; trans-AlCl{sub 3}{center dot}2THF, 4.9 MHz; AlCl{sub 3}{center dot}THF, 4.7 MHz; AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, 0.3 MHz). Both {sup 27}Al {delta}{sub i} and e{sup 2}qQ/h determinations appear to be useful as probes of structure in these systems, and thus offer a facile means of monitoring various solid-state reactions. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Experimental (X-ray, (13)C CP/MAS NMR, IR, RS, INS, THz) and Solid-State DFT Study on (1:1) Co-Crystal of Bromanilic Acid and 2,6-Dimethylpyrazine.

    PubMed

    Łuczyńska, Katarzyna; Drużbicki, Kacper; Lyczko, Krzysztof; Dobrowolski, Jan Cz

    2015-06-01

    A combined structural, vibrational spectroscopy, and solid-state DFT study of the hydrogen-bonded complex of bromanilic acid with 2,6-dimethylpyrazine is reported. The crystallographic structure was determined by means of low-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction, which reveals the molecular units in their native protonation states, forming one-dimensional infinite nets of moderate-strength O···H-N hydrogen bonds. The nature of the crystallographic forces, stabilizing the studied structure, has been drawn by employing the noncovalent interactions analysis. It was found that, in addition to the hydrogen bonding, the intermolecular forces are dominated by stacking interactions and C-H···O contacts. The thermal and calorimetric analysis was employed to probe stability of the crystal phase. The structural analysis was further supported by a computationally assisted (13)C CP/MAS NMR study, providing a complete assignment of the recorded resonances. The vibrational dynamics was explored by combining the optical (IR, Raman, TDs-THz) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy techniques with the state-of-the-art solid-state density functional theory (DFT) computations. Despite the quasi-harmonic approximation assumed throughout the study, an excellent agreement between the theoretical and experimental data was achieved over the entire spectral range, allowing for a deep and possibly thorough understanding of the vibrational characteristics of the system. Particularly, the significant influence of the long-range dipole coupling on the IR spectrum has been revealed. On the basis of a wealth of information gathered, the recent implementation of a dispersion-corrected linear-response scheme has been extensively examined. PMID:25961154

  16. High-resolution structure of the Shigella type-III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Kumar Vasa, Suresh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the type-III secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4 Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent data set of 691 ssNMR constraints and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N terminus, which occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation.

  17. High-resolution structure of a Shigella type III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state NMR (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the Type-III Secretion System (T3SS) needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4 Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent dataset of 691 ssNMR constraints and STEM measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N-terminus, that occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation. PMID:25264107

  18. Transformation of 17β-estradiol in humic acid solution by ε-MnO2 nanorods as probed by high-resolution mass spectrometry combined with (13)C labeling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Liang, Shangtao; Kang, Fuxing; Gao, Yanzheng; Huang, Qingguo

    2016-07-01

    Steroidal estrogens (SEs), widespread in aquatic systems, have a potential to disrupt the endocrine system of wildlife species and humans. In our experiments, the performance of ε-MnO2 nanorods in transforming 17β-estradiol (E2) was investigated, and the effect of humic acid (HA) on the reaction behaviors was systematically characterized. Reconfiguration of humic molecules was also investigated by high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). Results indicated that ε-MnO2 nanomaterials ensured efficient removal of E2 from the aqueous solution. The presence of HA hindered the transformation of E2, while enhanced the cross-coupling between E2 and humic molecules. In particular, we used a mixture of un-labeled E2 and (13)C3-labeled E2 at a 1: 1 set ratio (w/w) to probe the reaction products via high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The combination of HRMS and (13)C3-labeling revealed the intermediate products including estrone (E1), and hydroxylated, quinone-like, and ring-opened species, as well as E2 dimer and trimer. More importantly, possible cross-coupling products between E2 and HA were also identified. A reaction mechanism including two-electron oxidation and single-electron oxidation was proposed. The applied analytical approach using HRMS along with (13)C3-labeling for reaction-product identification is crucial to understanding the role of HA in the transformation of SEs. PMID:27086077

  19. Examination of the structure in solid state of amino analogs of 4,4‧-[1,5-pentanediylbis(oxy)]bisbenzonitrile by means of X-ray diffraction, 13C CP/MAS NMR, and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewska, Dorota; Wolska, Irena; Żabiński, Jerzy

    2008-05-01

    A single crystal of X-ray diffraction structures is presented for 4,4'-[1,5-(3-oxapentanediylbis(amino))]bisbenzonitrile 2 and 4,4'-[1,5-( N-methyl-3-azapentane-diylbis(oxy))]bisbenzonitrile 3. The molecular structures of these derivatives differ especially in conformations of the central linker: in 2 this linker adopts a trans/ gauche conformation, whereas in 3 - a fully extended conformation. The N atoms in various positions of the aliphatic linker change dramatically the molecular packing mode of both bisnitriles. But in both cases the nitrile groups take part in intermolecular hydrogen bonds: a type of N sbnd H···N in 2 and of C sbnd H···N in 3. Various conformations of both molecules were reflected in 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra in solid state as single and double resonance patterns for 2 and 3, respectively. A preliminary anticancer assay against 60 cell lines of 3 reveals strong growth inhibition of leukemia, melanoma, and renal cancer cells.

  20. Model-free estimation of the effective correlation time for C-H bond reorientation in amphiphilic bilayers: 1H-13C solid-state NMR and MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Tiago Mendes; Ollila, O. H. Samuli; Pigliapochi, Roberta; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Topgaard, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give atomically detailed information on structure and dynamics in amphiphilic bilayer systems on timescales up to about 1 μs. The reorientational dynamics of the C-H bonds is conventionally verified by measurements of 13C or 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) longitudinal relaxation rates R1, which are more sensitive to motional processes with correlation times close to the inverse Larmor frequency, typically around 1-10 ns on standard NMR instrumentation, and are thus less sensitive to the 10-1000 ns timescale motion that can be observed in the MD simulations. We propose an experimental procedure for atomically resolved model-free estimation of the C-H bond effective reorientational correlation time τe, which includes contributions from the entire range of all-atom MD timescales and that can be calculated directly from the MD trajectories. The approach is based on measurements of 13C R1 and R1ρ relaxation rates, as well as 1H-13C dipolar couplings, and is applicable to anisotropic liquid crystalline lipid or surfactant systems using a conventional solid-state NMR spectrometer and samples with natural isotopic composition. The procedure is demonstrated on a fully hydrated lamellar phase of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine, yielding values of τe from 0.1 ns for the methyl groups in the choline moiety and at the end of the acyl chains to 3 ns for the g1 methylene group of the glycerol backbone. MD simulations performed with a widely used united-atom force-field reproduce the τe-profile of the major part of the acyl chains but underestimate the dynamics of the glycerol backbone and adjacent molecular segments. The measurement of experimental τe-profiles can be used to study subtle effects on C-H bond reorientational motions in anisotropic liquid crystals, as well as to validate the C-H bond reorientation dynamics predicted in MD simulations of amphiphilic bilayers such as lipid membranes.

  1. Optimized strategy of 1H and 13C solid-state NMR methods to investigate water dynamics in soil organic matter as well as the influence of crystallinity of poly(methylene) segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertmer, Marko; Jaeger, Alexander; Schwarz, Jette; Schaumann, Gabriele

    2010-05-01

    Water plays a crucial role in soil organic matter (SOM) having various different functions such as transport of material, elution of ,e. g., pollutants in soil, and also the sequestration of humic substances. Furthermore, the generation and quantification of hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions in soil has several effects on SOM which can also include the storage amount and time of certain material, especially chemical pollutants. The importance of water in soil is also documented by the multitude of scientific approaches to characterize soils including diffusion NMR to study the water channel structure in soil. Our focus is on the study of water dynamics and soil structure to elucidate mechanisms of physicochemical aging. The approach uses the application of various solid-state NMR techniques - including 1H and 13C NMR - to get a multitude of information on SOM. In non-rotating samples, 1H lines are usually very broad and unstructured. Nevertheless, this rather simple technique allows for a differentiation of 1H containing chemicals based on their dynamics in soil. This includes rather solid soil components and solid as well as mobile water molecules. Based on an optimized 1H solid-state NMR strategy to study soil material together with a straightforward lineshape analysis, a series of soils and peats are characterized. Although even 1H NMR with sample spinning (MAS) often gives only limited information on different structures, we present results on the application of 2D 1H-1H phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg sequences (PMLG), that show already at medium spinning speeds the separation of functional groups. Their quantification can be correlated with sample composition, type of sample conditioning, and other parameters such as cation type or concentration and heat treatment. We are especially interested to correlate NMR data with DSC measurements based on a certain heat treatment of the soils. Our proposed model describes the presence of water in soil as a matrix

  2. High Resolution δ18O and δ13C Records of AMS 14C Dated Stalagmites From Jinlun and Yilingyan Caves in Guangxi, China: Climate Variability and Controlling Factors in the Monsoonal Region During the Past 2300 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. C.; Lien, W. Y.; Mii, H. S.; Jiang, G. H.; Chou, C. Y.; Chou, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Jinlun Cave in Mashan County and Yilingyan Cave in Wuming County are ~120km and ~60km north of Nanning in Guangxi Province under influence of both Indian Monsoon and North Western Pacific Monsoon. Several stalagmites have been dated by AMS 14C dating method since 230Th/U is not applicable due to very low U contents. Twenty (20) AMS 14C dates on Stalagmite JL20131005-10 (10-cm long) show "Bomb carbon curve", spanning the past 60 years. Lamination counting further confirms the chronology. Thirty nine (39) AMS 14C dates on Stalagmite JL20131005-12 (33-cm long) reveal 2300-year continuous growth. Stalagmite YLY20130727-12 (10-cm long) from Yilingyan Cave covers a continuous record of past 2300 years. All studied stalagmites in the caves contain low dead carbon fractions. The annual resolution δ18O and δ13C records obtained from the stalagmites allow us to compare the stalagmite δ18O records with the instrumental rainfall and temperature records, Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), and Sunspot variation, etc. The δ18O and δ13C records exhibit relatively good correlation throughout the time, indicating climatic control on vegetation change. Based on the high-resolution δ18O and δ13C records, we interpret that dry climatic conditions and poor vegetation coverage during periods of AD1880~1850, 1700~1600, 1460~1320, 1210~1280, 860~750, 540~420, 300~220, and AD100~0 shown by increased δ18O and δ13C. The δ18O and δ13C were strongly depleted during the Medieval Warm Period (MWP between AD900 and AD1100) and Current Warm Period (CWP, since AD1900), reflecting strongly increased East Asian Summer Monsoon. After AD1900, the δ13C decreased about 6‰, perhaps indicating human impact on surface vegetation. The δ18O records from the study area are comparable to the published WX42B δ18O record of Wanxiang Cave (Zhang et al., 2008) except for the period of AD1400~1850. Our study suggests that AMS 14C dating is an alternative method for

  3. Solid state parameters, structure elucidation, High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction (HRXRD), phase matching, thermal and impedance analysis on L-Proline trichloroacetate (L-PTCA) NLO single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaiselvi, P.; Raj, S. Alfred Cecil; Jagannathan, K.; Vijayan, N.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Kalainathan, S.

    2014-11-01

    Nonlinear optical single crystal of L-Proline trichloroacetate (L-PTCA) was successfully grown by Slow Evaporation Solution Technique (SEST). The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis to confirm the structure. From the single crystal XRD data, solid state parameters were determined for the grown crystal. The crystalline perfection has been evaluated using high resolution X-ray diffractometer. The frequencies of various functional groups were identified from FTIR spectral analysis. The percentage of transmittance was obtained from UV Visible spectral analysis. TGA-DSC measurements indicate the thermal stability of the crystal. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss and ac conductivity were measured by the impedance analyzer. The DC conductivity was calculated by the cole-cole plot method.

  4. Investigation of reaction mechanisms of drug degradation in the solid state: a kinetic study implementing ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry for thermally stressed thyroxine.

    PubMed

    Neu, Volker; Bielow, Chris; Schneider, Peter; Reinert, Knut; Stuppner, Hermann; Huber, Christian G

    2013-02-19

    A reaction scheme was derived for the thermal degradation of thyroxine in the solid state, using data obtained from ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS). To study the reaction mechanism and kinetics of the thermal degradation of the pharmaceutical in the solid state, a workflow was developed by generating compound-specific, time-dependent degradation or formation curves of at least 13 different degradation products. Such curves allowed one to distinguish between first- and second-generation degradation products, as well as impurities resulting from chemical synthesis. The structures of the degradation products were derived from accurate molecular masses and multistage mass spectrometry. Deiodination and oxidative side chain degradation were found to be the major degradation reactions, resulting in the formation of deiodinated thyroxines, as well as acetic acid, benzoic acid, formaldehyde, acetamide, hydroxyacetic acid, oxoacetic acid, hydroxyacetamide, or oxoacetamide derivatives of thyroxine or deiodinated thyroxine. Upon additional structural verification of mass spectrometric data using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, this comprehensive body of data sheds light on an elaborate, radical-driven reaction scheme, explaining the presence or formation of impurities in thermally stressed thyroxine. PMID:23311729

  5. Model-free estimation of the effective correlation time for C–H bond reorientation in amphiphilic bilayers: {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C solid-state NMR and MD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Tiago Mendes; Ollila, O. H. Samuli; Pigliapochi, Roberta; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Topgaard, Daniel

    2015-01-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give atomically detailed information on structure and dynamics in amphiphilic bilayer systems on timescales up to about 1 μs. The reorientational dynamics of the C–H bonds is conventionally verified by measurements of {sup 13}C or {sup 2}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) longitudinal relaxation rates R{sub 1}, which are more sensitive to motional processes with correlation times close to the inverse Larmor frequency, typically around 1-10 ns on standard NMR instrumentation, and are thus less sensitive to the 10-1000 ns timescale motion that can be observed in the MD simulations. We propose an experimental procedure for atomically resolved model-free estimation of the C–H bond effective reorientational correlation time τ{sub e}, which includes contributions from the entire range of all-atom MD timescales and that can be calculated directly from the MD trajectories. The approach is based on measurements of {sup 13}C R{sub 1} and R{sub 1ρ} relaxation rates, as well as {sup 1}H−{sup 13}C dipolar couplings, and is applicable to anisotropic liquid crystalline lipid or surfactant systems using a conventional solid-state NMR spectrometer and samples with natural isotopic composition. The procedure is demonstrated on a fully hydrated lamellar phase of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine, yielding values of τ{sub e} from 0.1 ns for the methyl groups in the choline moiety and at the end of the acyl chains to 3 ns for the g{sub 1} methylene group of the glycerol backbone. MD simulations performed with a widely used united-atom force-field reproduce the τ{sub e}-profile of the major part of the acyl chains but underestimate the dynamics of the glycerol backbone and adjacent molecular segments. The measurement of experimental τ{sub e}-profiles can be used to study subtle effects on C–H bond reorientational motions in anisotropic liquid crystals, as well as to validate the C–H bond reorientation dynamics predicted in MD

  6. Formation of carboxylic acids from alcohols and olefins in zeolite H-ZSM-5 under mild conditions via trapping of alkyl carbenium ions with carbon monoxide: An in situ {sup 13}C solid state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, A.G.; Luzgin, M.V.; Romannikov, V.N.; Sidelnikov, V.N.; Zamaraev K.I.

    1996-12-01

    Using in situ {sup 13}C solid state MAS NMR (for some reagents in combination with ex situ GC-MS), it is shown that butyl alcohols and olefins (ethene, isobutene, octene-1) undergo carbonylation to form carboxylic acids (the Koch reaction) with high conversion on zeolite H-ZSM-5 at 296-373 K. The reactions proceed without application of pressurized conditions, just upon coadsorption of CO and alcohols or CO, H{sub 2}O, and olefins on zeolite. The observed Koch reaction under mild conditions provides strong evidence for the formation of alkyl carbenium ions from alcohols and olefins on the zeolites as crucial reaction intermediates. Of the family of carbenium ions, CO reacts selectively with tertiary cations to produce tertiary carboxylic acids, unless the carbonylated molecule is too large for more bulky tertiary moieties to be accommodated and carbonylated in the narrow pores of H-ZSM05. Thus, t-BuOH, i-BuOH, and isobutene produce trimethylacetic acid with high selectivity and conversion, while ethene transforms selectively into 2-methyl-2-ethyl butyric acid. Reaction of octene-1 molecules with CO and H{sub 2}O results in acids of the C{sub 8}H{sub 17}COOH and C{sub 16}H{sub 33}COOH families with predominantly linear hydrocarbon chains. The data obtained may open up new possibilities in using solid acids in organic synthesis as carbonylation catalysts under mild conditions i.e., low temperature and normal atmospheric pressure. 55 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Solid state 13C-NMR, infrared, X-ray powder diffraction and differential thermal studies of the homologous series of some mono-valent metal (Li, Na, K, Ag) n-alkanoates: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter N.; Ellis, Henry A.; White, Nicole A. S.

    2015-06-01

    A comparative study of the molecular packing, lattice structures and phase behaviors of the homologous series of some mono-valent metal carboxylates (Li, Na, K and Ag) is carried out via solid state FT-infrared and 13C-NMR spectroscopes, X-rays powder diffraction, density measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing light microscopy and variable temperature infrared spectroscopy. It is proposed that, for lithium, sodium and potassium carboxylates, metal-carboxyl coordination is via asymmetric chelating bidentate bonding with extensive intermolecular interactions to form tetrahedral metal centers, irrespective of chain length. However, for silver n-alkanoates, carboxyl moieties are bound to silver ions via syn-syn type bridging bidentate coordination to form dimeric units held together by extensive head group inter-molecular interactions. Furthermore, the fully extended hydrocarbon chains which are crystallized in the all-trans conformation are tilted at ca. 30°, 27°, 15° and 31° with respect to a normal to the metal plane, for lithium, sodium, silver and potassium carboxylates, respectively. All compounds are packed as lamellar bilayer structures, however, lithium compounds are crystallized in a triclinic crystal system whilst silver, sodium and potassium n-alkanoates are all monoclinic with possible P1 bravais lattice. Odd-even alternation observed in various physical features is associated with different inter-planar spacing between closely packed layers in the bilayer which are not in the same plane; a phenomenon controlled by lattice packing symmetry requirements. All compounds, except silver carboxylates, show partially reversibly first order pre-melting transitions; the number of which increases with increasing chain length. These transitions are associated, for the most part, with lamellar collapse followed by increased gauche-trans isomerism in the methylene group assembly, irrespective of chain length. It is proposed that the absence of

  8. Continuous high-resolution measurements of dissolved CH4, CO2 and δ13C-CO2 in surface water during the SWERUS-C3 expedition in the East Siberian Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geibel, Marc Christoph; Magnus Mörth, Carl; Humborg, Christoph; Semiletov, Igor

    2015-04-01

    The carbon budget in the Arctic is still unknown. Especially the fate of CH4 from subsea permafrost on the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) is unclear. In July-September 2014 the joined SWERUS-C3 expedition on board the Swedish icebreaker ODEN was undertaken. Among its goals was to get a better insight into the fate of carbon in the Arctic, to document possible CH4 release from subsea permafrost and deep sea and to understand mechanisms and magnitudes of CH4 release to the atmosphere. During the first leg of the expedition the in situ concentration of dissolved CH4, CO2 as well as the δ13C signature of CO2 were determined. Measurements were made continuously with a Water Equilibration Gas Analyzer System (WEGAS) that was specifically developed at Stockholm University for the determination of gases dissolved in water. The aim of this study was to quantify the concentration of dissolved CO2 and CH4 in the surface water of the East Siberian Arctic Ocean (ESAO) as well as the contribution of terrestrial organic matter respiration to the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Combined with continuous high-precision atmospheric measurements that were performed during the SWERUS-C3 expedition, the WEGAS dataset will allow to calculate accurate high-resolution CH4 fluxes and thus give a better insight into the current outgassing of CH4 to the atmosphere. Together with measurements of δ13C of inorganic carbon that was sampled during the expedition, the isotopic composition of the dissolved organic carbon pool will allow to quantify the of terrestrial carbon contribution to total respiration in the ESAO.

  9. Ground-fire effects on the composition of dissolved and total organic matter in forest floor and soil solutions from Scots pine forests in Germany: new insights from solid state 13C NMR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näthe, Kerstin; Michalzik, Beate; Levia, Delphis; Steffens, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Fires represent an ecosystem disturbance and are recognized to seriously pertubate the nutrient budgets of forested ecosystems. While the effects of fires on chemical, biological, and physical soil properties have been intensively studied, especially in Mediterranean areas and North America, few investigations examined the effects of fire-induced alterations in the water-bound fluxes and the chemical composition of dissolved and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC, POC, DN, PN). The exclusion of the particulate organic matter fraction (0.45 μm < POM < 500 μm) potentially results in misleading inferences and budgeting gaps when studying the effects of fires on nutrient and energy fluxes. To our best knowledge, this is the first known study to present fire-induced changes on the composition of dissolved and total organic matter (DOM, TOM) in forest floor (FF) and soil solutions (A, B horizon) from Scots pine forests in Germany. In relation to control sites, we test the effects of low-severity fires on: (1) the composition of DOM and TOM in forest floor and soil solutions; and (2) the translocated amount of particulate in relation to DOC and DN into the subsoil. The project aims to uncover the mechanisms of water-bound organic matter transport along an ecosystem profile and its compositional changes following a fire disturbance. Forest floor and soil solutions were fortnightly sampled from March to December 2014 on fire-manipulated and control plots in a Scots pine forest in Central Germany. Shortly after the experimental duff fire in April 2014 pooled solutions samples were taken for solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy to characterize DOM (filtered solution < 0.8μm pore size) and TOM in unfiltered solutions. Independent from fire manipulation, the composition of TOM was generally less aromatic (aromaticity index [%] according to Hatcher et al., 1981) with values between 18 (FF) - 25% (B horizon) than the DOM fraction with 23 (FF) - 27% (B horizon). For DOM

  10. Solid-state distortions of nominally square-planar palladium and platinum (R sub 3 P) sub 2 MX sub 2 complexes as determined by a combination of sup 13 C( sup 1 H) and sup 31 P( sup 31 H) NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, J.A.; Nelson, J.H. ); O'Donnell, D.J.; Pamer, A.R. )

    1989-06-28

    Phosphorus-31 and carbon-13 NMR spectra have been obtained for a series of 20 (R{sub 3}P){sub 2}MX{sub 2} complexes (R{sub 3}P = MePh{sub 2}P and Me{sub 2}PhP; M = Pd, Pt; X = Cl, Br, I, CN, N{sub 3}) in the solid state by cross-polarization and magic-angle-spinning (CP/MAS) techniques. Comparison of these data with spectral data obtained at 300 K in CDCl{sub 3} solutions was made in order to investigate the influence of local symmetry on {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C chemical shifts in the solid state. It was found that most of these compounds, which have regular square-planar geometries in solution, are distorted in the solid state. The solid-state distortions are evidenced by additional {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C resonances in the CP/MAS spectra as compared to the solution spectra. The nature and degree of these distortions are discussed. 25 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Effect of iron content on the structure and disorder of iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses: A high-resolution 29Si and 17O solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyo-Im; Sur, Jung Chul; Lee, Sung Keun

    2016-01-01

    Despite its geochemical importance and implications for the properties of natural magmatic melts, understanding the detailed structure of iron-bearing silicate glasses remains among the outstanding problems in geochemistry. This is mainly because solid-state NMR techniques, one of the most versatile experimental methods to probe the structure of oxide glasses, cannot be fully utilized for exploring the structural details of iron-bearing glasses as the unpaired electrons in Fe induce strong local magnetic fields that mask the original spectroscopic features (i.e., paramagnetic effect). Here, we report high-resolution 29Si and 17O solid-state NMR spectra of iron-bearing sodium silicate glasses (Na2O-Fe2O3-SiO2, Fe3+/ΣFe = 0.89 ± 0.04, thus containing both ferric and ferrous iron) with varying XFe2O3 [=Fe2O3/(Na2O + Fe2O3)], containing up to 22.9 wt% Fe2O3. This compositional series involves Fe-Na substitution at constant SiO2 contents of 66.7 mol% in the glasses. For both nuclides, the NMR spectra exhibit a decrease in the signal intensities and an increase in the peak widths with increasing iron concentration partly because of the paramagnetic effect. Despite the intrinsic difficulties that result from the pronounced paramagnetic effect, the 29Si and 17O NMR results yield structural details regarding the effect of iron content on Q speciation, spatial distribution of iron, and the extent of polymerization in the iron-bearing silicate glasses. The 29Si NMR spectra show an apparent increase in highly polymerized Q species with increasing XFe2O3 , suggesting an increase in the degree of melt polymerization. The 17O 3QMAS NMR spectra exhibit well-resolved non-bridging oxygen (NBO, Na-O-Si) and bridging oxygen (BO, Si-O-Si) peaks with varying iron concentration. By replacing Na2O with Fe2O3 (and thus with increasing iron content), the fraction of Na-O-Si decreases. Quantitative consideration of this effect confirms that the degree of polymerization is likely to

  12. Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet absorbance detection-high-resolution-mass spectrometry combined with automated data processing for studying the kinetics of oxidative thermal degradation of thyroxine in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Neu, Volker; Bielow, Chris; Reinert, Knut; Huber, Christian G

    2014-12-01

    Levothyroxine as active pharmaceutical ingredient of formulations used for the treatment of hypothyroidism is distributed worldwide and taken by millions of people. An important issue in terms of compound stability is its capability to react with ambient oxygen, especially in case of long term compound storage at elevated temperature. In this study we demonstrate that ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to UV spectrometry and high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-UV-HRMS) represent very useful approaches to investigate the influence of ambient oxygen on the degradation kinetics of levothyroxine in the solid state at enhanced degradation conditions. Moreover, the impurity pattern of oxidative degradation of levothyroxine is elucidated and classified with respect to degradation kinetics at different oxygen levels. Kinetic analysis of thyroxine bulk material at 100 °C reveals bi-phasic degradation kinetics with a distinct change in degradation phases dependent on the availability of oxygen. The results clearly show that contact of the bulk material to ambient oxygen is a key factor for fast compound degradation. Furthermore, the combination of time-resolved HRMS data and automated data processing is shown to allow insights into the kinetics and mechanism of impurity formation on individual compound basis. By comparing degradation profiles, four main classes of profiles linked to reaction pathways of thyroxine degradation were identifiable. Finally, we show the capability of automated data processing for the matching of different stressing conditions, in order to extract information about mechanistic similarities. As a result, degradation kinetics is influenced by factors like availability of oxygen, stressing time, or stressing temperature, while the degradation mechanisms appear to be conserved. PMID:25456598

  13. Comparison of structure in solid state of new 1,5- bis(4-cyano-2,6-dimethoxyphenoxy)alkanes by means of 13C CP/MAS NMR and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żabiński, Jerzy; Wolska, Irena; Maciejewska, Dorota

    2007-05-01

    The synthesis and structural studies in solid state of new 1,5- bis(4-cyano-2,6-dimethoxyphenoxy)-3-oxapentane 1 and 1,5- bis(4-cyano-2,6-methoxyphenoxy)pentane 2 are presented. The observed complicated network of intermolecular interaction with participation of nitrile groups could play a role in their interaction with the biological target. In vitro screen against 60 human tumor cell lines revealed that compound 1 has promising growth inhibitory power GI 50 against SR (leukemia) and HOP-92 (non-small lung cancer) equal to 4.33 ×10 -6 and 1.03 ×10 -5 M, respectively.

  14. Study of wheat high molecular weight 1Dx5 subunit by (13)C and (1)H solid-state NMR. II. Roles of nonrepetitive terminal domains and length of repetitive domain.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Enrica; Gilbert, Simon M; Tatham, Arthur S; Shewry, Peter R; Naito, Akira; Okuda, Kanna; Saitô, Hazime; Gil, Ana M

    2002-10-15

    This work follows a previous article that addressed the role of disulfide bonds in the behavior of the 1Dx5 subunit upon hydration. Here the roles of nonrepetitive terminal domains present and the length of the central repetitive domain in the hydration of 1Dx5 are investigated. This was achieved by comparing the hydration behavior of suitable model samples determined by (13)C- and (1)H-NMR: an alkylated 1Dx5 subunit (alk1Dx5), a recombinant 58-kDa peptide corresponding to the central repetitive domain of 1Dx5 (i.e., lacking the terminal domains), and two synthetic peptides (with 6 and 21 amino acid residues) based on the consensus repeat motifs of the central domain. The (13)C cross-polarization and magic angle spinning (MAS) experiments recorded as a function of hydration gave information about the protein or peptide fractions resisting plasticization. Conversely, (13)C single pulse excitation and (1)H-MAS gave information on the more plasticized segments. The results are consistent with the previous proposal of a hydrated network held by hydrogen-bonded glutamines and possibly hydrophobic interactions. The nonrepetitive terminal domains were found to induce water insolubility and a generally higher network hindrance. Shorter chain lengths were shown to increase plasticization and water solubility. However, at low water contents, the 21-mer peptide was characterized by higher hindrance in the megahertz and kilohertz frequency ranges compared to the longer peptide; and a tendency for a few hydrogen-bonded glutamines and hydrophobic residues to remain relatively hindered was still observed, as for the protein and large peptide. It is suggested that this ability is strongly dependent on the peptide primary structure. PMID:12209466

  15. High-resolution solid-state NMR study of the effect of composition on network connectivity and structural disorder in multi-component glasses in the diopside and jadeite join: Implications for structure of andesitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun Young; Lee, Sung Keun

    2014-12-01

    The structural evolution of andesitic melts with varying compositions remains one of the unsolved questions in high-temperature geochemistry and petrology. In this article, we report the structural details of model andesitic glasses [CaO-MgO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMNAS)] in the diopside (CaMgSi2O6) and jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) join using high-resolution, multi-nuclear, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The 27Al NMR spectra of CMNAS glasses confirm that [4]Al is dominant. While a minor fraction of [5]Al is observed, its presence is only prevalent in the glasses with higher Ca-Mg content. Topological disorder in the glass network also tends to increase with Ca-Mg content as evidenced by the increase in the quadrupolar coupling constant (Cq) of [4]Al for glasses with increasing diopside contents (XDiopside). Despite the complex nature of the glasses studied here (with five oxide components), the 17O 3QMAS NMR spectra resolve diverse bridging oxygens (BOs) and non-bridging oxygens (NBOs), from which the degree of Al avoidance among framework cations (Si and Al) and preferential proximity among non-network cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) and each oxygen site can be estimated: presence of Al-O-Al in jadeite glass implies a violation of the Al-avoidance rule in the glasses and the decrease in the fraction of NBOs with increasing XDiopside is consistent with a decrease in their viscosity. Analysis of the peak position of {Ca, Mg}-mixed NBOs, along with the absence of Na-NBO peak, and the peak shape of Si-O-Al reveals preferential partitioning of Ca2+ and Mg2 into NBOs and the proximity of Na+ to BOs. The fraction of highly coordinated Al has been linked to thermodynamic and transport properties of the melts. Considering all the experimental Al coordination environments available in the literature, together with the current experimental studies, we attempt to establish the relationship between the fractions of highly coordinated Al and composition, particularly average

  16. Optimization of amino acid type-specific 13C and 15N labeling for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins by solution- and solid-state NMR with the UPLABEL algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hefke, Frederik; Bagaria, Anurag; Reckel, Sina; Ullrich, Sandra Johanna; Dötsch, Volker; Glaubitz, Clemens; Güntert, Peter

    2011-02-01

    We present a computational method for finding optimal labeling patterns for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins and other large proteins that cannot be assigned by conventional strategies. Following the approach of Kainosho and Tsuji (Biochemistry 21:6273-6279 (1982)), types of amino acids are labeled with (13)C or/and (15)N such that cross peaks between (13)CO(i - 1) and (15)NH(i) result only for pairs of sequentially adjacent amino acids of which the first is labeled with (13)C and the second with (15)N. In this way, unambiguous sequence-specific assignments can be obtained for unique pairs of amino acids that occur exactly once in the sequence of the protein. To be practical, it is crucial to limit the number of differently labeled protein samples that have to be prepared while obtaining an optimal extent of labeled unique amino acid pairs. Our computer algorithm UPLABEL for optimal unique pair labeling, implemented in the program CYANA and in a standalone program, and also available through a web portal, uses combinatorial optimization to find for a given amino acid sequence labeling patterns that maximize the number of unique pair assignments with a minimal number of differently labeled protein samples. Various auxiliary conditions, including labeled amino acid availability and price, previously known partial assignments, and sequence regions of particular interest can be taken into account when determining optimal amino acid type-specific labeling patterns. The method is illustrated for the assignment of the human G-protein coupled receptor bradykinin B2 (B(2)R) and applied as a starting point for the backbone assignment of the membrane protein proteorhodopsin. PMID:21170670

  17. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  18. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1983-08-09

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

  19. Analysis of commercial proanthocyanidins. Part 4: solid state (13)C NMR as a tool for in situ analysis of proanthocyanidin tannins, in heartwood and bark of quebracho and acacia, and related species.

    PubMed

    Reid, David G; Bonnet, Susan L; Kemp, Gabre; van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2013-10-01

    (13)C NMR is an effective method of characterizing proanthocyanidin (PAC) tannins in quebracho (Schinopsis lorentzii) heartwood and black wattle (Acacia mearnsii) bark, before and after commercial extraction. The B-rings of the constituent flavan-3-ols, catechols (quebracho) or pyrogallols (wattle), are recognized in unprocessed source materials by "marker" signals at ca. 118 or 105ppm, respectively. NMR allows the minimum extraction efficiency to be calculated; ca. 30%, and ca. 80%, for quebracho heartwood and black wattle bark, respectively. NMR can also identify PAC tannin (predominantly robinetinidin), and compare tannin content, in bark from other acacia species; tannin content decreases in the order A. mearnsii, Acacia pycnantha (87% of A. mearnsii), Acacia dealbata and Acacia decurrens (each 74%) and Acacia karroo (30%). Heartwood from an underexploited PAC tannin source, Searsia lancea, taxonomically close to quebracho, shows abundant profisetinidin and catechin PACs. NMR offers the advantage of being applicable to source materials in their native state, and has potential applications in optimizing extraction processes, identification of tannin sources, and characterization of tannin content in cultivar yield improvement programmes. PMID:23838626

  20. Multiple Locations of Peptides in the Hydrocarbon Core of Gel-Phase Membranes Revealed by Peptide 13C to Lipid 2H Rotational-Echo Double-Resonance Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Membrane locations of peptides and proteins are often critical to their functions. Solid-state rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance is applied to probe the locations of two peptides via peptide 13CO to lipid 2H distance measurements. The peptides are KALP, an α-helical membrane-spanning peptide, and HFP, the β-sheet N-terminal fusion peptide of the HIV gp41 fusion protein that plays an important role in HIV–host cell membrane fusion. Both peptides are shown to have at least two distinct locations within the hydrocarbon core of gel-phase membranes. The multiple locations are attributed to snorkeling of lysine side chains for KALP and to the distribution of antiparallel β-sheet registries for HFP. The relative population of each location is also quantitated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clear experimental support of multiple peptide locations within the membrane hydrocarbon core. These data are for gel-phase membranes, but the approach should work for liquid-ordered membranes containing cholesterol and may be applicable to liquid-disordered membranes with appropriate additional analysis to take into account protein and lipid motion. This paper also describes the methodological development of 13CO–2H REDOR using the lyophilized I4 peptide that is α-helical and 13CO-labeled at A9 and 2Hα-labeled at A8. The I4 spins are well-approximated as an ensemble of isolated 13CO–2H spin pairs each separated by 5.0 Å with a 37 Hz dipolar coupling. A pulse sequence with rectangular 100 kHz 2H π pulses results in rapid and extensive buildup of REDOR (ΔS/S0) with a dephasing time (τ). The buildup is well-fit by a simple exponential function with a rate of 24 Hz and an extent close to 1. These parameter values reflect nonradiative transitions between the 2H spin states during the dephasing period. Each spin pair spends approximately two-thirds of its time in the 13CO–2H (m = ±1) states and approximately one-third of

  1. Degradation of mangrove tissues by arboreal termites (Nasutitermes acajutlae) and their role in the mangrove C cycle (Puerto Rico): Chemical characterization and organic matter provenance using bulk δ13C, C/N, alkaline CuO oxidation-GC/MS, and solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vane, Christopher H.; Kim, Alexander W.; Moss-Hayes, Vicky; Snape, Colin E.; Diaz, Miguel Castro; Khan, Nicole S.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Horton, Benjamin P.

    2013-08-01

    Arboreal termites are wood decaying organisms that play an important role in the first stages of C cycling in mangrove systems. The chemical composition of Rhizophora mangle, Avicennia germinans, and Laguncularia racemosa leaf, stem, and pneumatophore tissues as well as associated sediments was compared to that of nests of the termite Nasutitermes acajutlae. Nests gave δ13C values of -26.1 to -27.2‰ (±0.1) and C/N of 43.3 (±2.0) to 98.6 (±16.2) which were similar to all stem and pneumatophores but distinct from mangrove leaves or sediments. Organic matter processed by termites yielded lignin phenol concentrations (Λ, lambda) that were 2-4 times higher than stem or pneumatophores and 10-20 times higher than that of leaves or sediments, suggesting that the nests were more resistant to biodegradation than the mangrove vegetation source. 13C NMR revealed that polysaccharide content of mangrove tissues (50-69% C) was higher than that of the nests (46-51% C). Conversely, lignin accounted for 16.2-19.6% C of nest material, a threefold increase relative to living mangrove tissues; a similar increase in aromatic methoxyl content was also observed in the nests. Lipids (aliphatic and paraffinic moieties) were also important but rather variable chemical components of all three mangrove species, representing between 13.5 and 28.3% of the C content. Termite nests contained 3.14 Mg C ha-1 which represents approximately 2% of above ground C storage in mangroves, a value that is likely to increase upon burial due to their refractory chemical composition.

  2. Magnetic susceptibility effects on 13C MAS NMR spectra of carbon materials and graphite.

    PubMed

    Freita, J C; Emmerich, F G; Cernicchiaro, G R; Sampaio, L C; Bonagamba, T J

    2001-01-01

    13C high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study carbon materials prepared through the thermal decomposition of four different organic precursors (rice hulls, endocarp of babassu coconut, peat, and PVC). For heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) above about 600 C, all materials presented 13C NMR spectra composed of a unique resonance line associated with carbon atoms in aromatic planes. With increasing HTT a continuous broadening of this resonance and a diamagnetic shift in its central frequency were verified for all samples. The evolution of the magnitude and anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of the heat-treated carbon samples with HTT explains well these findings. It is shown that these results are better understood when a comparison is made with the features of the 13C NMR spectrum of polycrystalline graphite, for which the magnetic susceptibility effect is also present and is much more pronounced. PMID:11529420

  3. Molecular indicators for palaeoenvironmental change in a Messinian evaporitic sequence (Vena del Gesso, Italy). II: High-resolution variations in abundances and 13C contents of free and sulphur-bound carbon skeletons in a single marl bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenig, F.; Damste, J. S.; Frewin, N. L.; Hayes, J. M.; De Leeuw, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    The extractable organic matter of 10 immature samples from a marl bed of one evaporitic cycle of the Vena del Gesso sediments (Gessoso-solfifera Fm., Messinian, Italy) was analyzed quantitatively for free hydrocarbons and organic sulphur compounds. Nickel boride was used as a desulphurizing agent to recover sulphur-bound lipids from the polar and asphaltene fractions. Carbon isotopic compositions (delta vs PDB) of free hydrocarbons and of S-bound hydrocarbons were also measured. Relationships between these carbon skeletons, precursor biolipids, and the organisms producing them could then be examined. Concentrations of S-bound lipids and free hydrocarbons and their delta values were plotted vs depth in the marl bed and the profiles were interpreted in terms of variations in source organisms, 13 C contents of the carbon source, and environmentally induced changes in isotopic fractionation. The overall range of delta values measured was 24.7%, from -11.6% for a component derived from green sulphur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae) to -36.3% for a lipid derived from purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae). Deconvolution of mixtures of components deriving from multiple sources (green and purple sulphur bacteria, coccolithophorids, microalgae and higher plants) was sometimes possible because both quantitative and isotopic data were available and because either the free or S-bound pool sometimes appeared to contain material from a single source. Several free n-alkanes and S-bound lipids appeared to be specific products of upper-water-column primary producers (i.e. algae and cyanobacteria). Others derived from anaerobic photoautotrophs and from heterotrophic protozoa (ciliates), which apparently fed partly on Chlorobiaceae. Four groups of n-alkanes produced by algae or cyanobacteria were also recognized based on systematic variations of abundance and isotopic composition with depth. For hydrocarbons probably derived from microalgae, isotopic variations are well correlated with

  4. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported. PMID:24746715

  5. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique. PMID:16332107

  6. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  7. Solid-state NMR and Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    The native environment for a membrane protein is a phospholipid bilayer. Because the protein is immobilized on NMR timescales by the interactions within a bilayer membrane, solid-state NMR methods are essential to obtain high-resolution spectra. Approaches have been developed for both unoriented and oriented samples, however, they all rest on the foundation of the most fundamental aspects solid-state NMR, and the chemical shift and homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Solid-state NMR has advanced sufficiently to enable the structures of membrane proteins to be determined under near-native conditions in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:25681966

  8. Solid-state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1981-01-07

    A solid state optical microscope is described wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. Means for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions are provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  9. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  10. Solid-state configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, K. G.

    1980-01-01

    Two prototype solid-state phased array systems concepts developed for the solar power satellite (SPS) are described. In both concepts, the beam was centered on the rectenna by means of phase conjugation of a pilot signal emanating from the ground. Also discussed are results of solid state studies.

  11. (13)C NMR Studies, Molecular Order, and Mesophase Properties of Thiophene Mesogens.

    PubMed

    Veeraprakash, B; Lobo, Nitin P; Narasimhaswamy, T

    2015-12-01

    Three-ring mesogens with a core comprising thiophene linked to one phenyl ring directly and to the other via flexible ester are synthesized with terminal alkoxy chains to probe the mesophase properties and find the molecular order. The phenyl thiophene link in the core offers a comparison of the mesophase features with the molecular shape of the mesogen. The synthesized mesogens display enantiotropic polymesomorphism and accordingly nematic, smectic A, smectic C and smectic B mesophases are perceived depending upon the terminal chain length. For some of the homologues, monotropic higher order smectic phases such as smectic F and crystal E are also witnessed. The existence of polymesomorphism are originally observed by HOPM and DSC and further confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction studies. For the C8 homologue, high resolution solid state (13)C NMR spectroscopy is employed to find the molecular structure in the liquid crystalline phase and using the 2D SLF technique, the (13)C-(1)H dipolar couplings are extracted to calculate the order parameter. By comparing the ratio of local order of thiophene as well as phenyl rings, we establish the bent-core shape of the mesogen. Importantly, for assigning the carbon chemical shifts of the core unit of aligned C8 mesogen, the (13)C NMR measured in mesophase of the synthetic intermediate is employed. Thus, the proposed approach addresses the key step in the spectral assignment of target mesogens with the use of (13)C NMR data of mesomorphic intermediate. PMID:26551439

  12. Cellular Solid-State NMR Investigation of a Membrane Protein Using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Caporini, Marc A.; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    While an increasing number of structural biology studies successfully demonstrate the power of high-resolution structures and dynamics of membrane proteins in fully understanding their function, there is considerable interest in developing NMR approaches to obtain such information in a cellular setting. As long as the proteins inside the living cell tumble rapidly in the NMR timescale, recently developed in-cell solution NMR approaches can be applied towards the determination of 3D structural information. However, there are numerous challenges that need to be overcome to study membrane proteins inside a cell. Research in our laboratory is focused on developing a combination of solid-state NMR and biological approaches to overcome these challenges with a specific emphasis on obtaining high-resolution structural insights into electron transfer biological processes mediated by membrane-bound proteins like mammalian cytochrome b5, cytochrome P450 and cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using the signal-enhancement rendered by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy for in-cell studies on a membrane-anchored protein. Our experimental results obtained from 13C-labeled membrane-anchored cytochrome b5 in native Escherichia coli cells show a ~16-fold DNP signal enhancement (ε). Further, results obtained from a 2D 13C/13C chemical shift correlation MAS experiment demonstrates that it is highly possible to suppress the background signals from other cellular contents for high-resolution structural studies on membrane proteins. We believe that this study would pave new avenues for high-resolution 3D structural studies on a variety of membrane-associated proteins and their complexes in the cellular context to fully understand their functional roles in physiological processes. PMID:25017802

  13. The Organic Solid State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Dwaine O.; Wlygul, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews interesting and useful electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of the organic solid state. Offers speculation as to areas of fruitful research. Discusses organic superconductors, conducting organic polymers, organic metals, and traces recent history of creation of organic metals. (JM)

  14. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  15. The effect of sample hydration on 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Wilson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fulvic acids, two of which have been well studied by a number of other groups (Armadale and Suwannee river fulvic acids) have been examined by high resolution solid-state 13C-NMR techniques to delineate the effect of absorbed water. Two main effects of absorbed water were observed: (1) changes in spin lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame and cross polarization times and (2) total loss of signal so that some fulvic acid is effectively in solution. These results suggest that discrepancies in the literature concerning observed relative signal intensities from different structural groups are due to absorbed water and emphasize the necessity for proper precautionary drying before spectroscopic analysis. ?? 1991.

  16. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  17. Solid-State Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutliff, Ronald D.; And Others

    This self-study course is designed to familiarize Marine Corps enlisted personnel with the principles of solid-state devices and their functions. The course contains four study units. Each study unit begins with a general objective, which is a statement of what the student should learn from the unit. The study units are divided into numbered work…

  18. Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-03-30

    The article discusses solid state lighting technologies. This topic was covered in two previous ASHRAE Journal columns (2010). This article covers advancements in technologies and the associated efficacies. The life-cycle, energy savings and market potential of these technologies are addressed as well.

  19. Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Titan-CW Ti:sapphire (titanium-doped sapphire) tunable laser is an innovation in solid-state laser technology jointly developed by the Research and Solid State Laser Divisions of Schwartz Electro-optics, Inc. (SEO). SEO is producing the laser for the commercial market, an outgrowth of a program sponsored by Langley Research Center to develop Ti:sapphire technology for space use. SEO's Titan-CW series of Ti:sapphire tunable lasers have applicability in analytical equipment designed for qualitative analysis of carbohydrates and proteins, structural analysis of water, starch/sugar analyses, and measurements of salt in meat. Further applications are expected in semiconductor manufacture, in medicine for diagnosis and therapy, and in biochemistry.

  20. Solid State Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaver, David C.

    1996-01-01

    This report covers in detail the research work of the Solid State Division at Lincoln Laboratory for the period 1 May - 31 July 1996. The topics covered are Electrooptical Devices, Quantum Electronics, Materials Research, Submicrometer Technology, High Speed Electronics, Microelectronics, and Analog Device Technology. Funding is provided primarily by the Air Force, with additional Support provided by the Army, DARPA, Navy, BMDO, NASA, and NIST.

  1. Solid State Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaver, David C.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers in detail the research work of the Solid State Division at Lincoln Laboratory for the period 1 May-31 July 1995. The topics covered are: Electrooptical Devices, Quantum Electronics, Materials Research, Submicrometer Technology, High Speed Electronics, Microelectronics, and analog device technology. Funding is provided primarily by the Air Force, with additional Support provided by the Army, ARPA, Navy, BMDO, NASA and NIST.

  2. Tunable solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerling, R.; Budgor, A.B.; Pinto, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on solid state lasers. Topics considered at the conference included transition-metal-doped lasers, line-narrowed alexandrite lasers, NASA specification, meteorological lidars, laser materials spectroscopy, laser pumped single pass gain, vibronic laser materials growth, crystal growth methods, vibronic laser theory, cross-fertilization through interdisciplinary fields, and laser action of color centers in diamonds.

  3. Solid state research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWhorter, Alan L.

    1995-02-01

    This report covers in detail the research work of the Solid State Division at Lincoln Laboratory for the period 1 May through 31 July 1994. The topics covered are Electrooptical Devices, Quantum Electronics, Materials Research, Submicrometer Technology, High Speed Electronics, Microelectronics, and Analog Device Technology. Funding is provided primarily by the Air Force, with additional support provided by the Army, ARPA, Navy, BMDO, NASA, and NIST.

  4. Solid state research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaver, David C.

    1994-11-01

    This report covers in detail the research work of the Solid State Division at Lincoln Laboratory for the period 1 August through 31 October 1994. The topics covered are Electrooptical Devices, Quantum Electronics, Materials Research, Submicrometer Technology, High Speed Electronics, Microelectronics, and Analog Device Technology. Funding is provided primarily by the Air Force, with additional support provided by the Army, ARPA, Navy, BMDO, NASA, and NIST.

  5. Solid-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy of fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, R.; Haddon, R.C.; Dabbagh, G.; Glarum, S.H.; Douglass, D.C.; Mujsce, A.M. )

    1991-01-24

    The authors report solid-state {sup 13}C NMR measurements on powder samples of C{sub 60} and of a mixture of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70}. The NMR results show that, at 296 K, C{sub 60} molecules rotate rapidly and isotropically in the solid state, while C{sub 70} molecules rotate somewhat more anisotropically. These results are consistent with the proposed spherical geometry of C{sub 60} and prolate spheroidal geometry of C{sub 70}. The rotational correlation time of C{sub 60} molecules in the solid state becomes greater than 50 {mu}s at about 100 K.

  6. Solid state thermal engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wayman, C.M.

    1981-01-27

    An improved solid state thermal engine utilizes as a drive member a braided belt fabricated from a memory alloy such as nickel-titanium and nickel-titanium ternary alloys, copper-zinc and copper-zinc ternary alloys, and the like. The braided belt is mounted on a set of pulleys to provide passage through a hot zone where the belt contracts and develops tension, and through a cold zone where it relaxes and stretches. Since more energy is delivered by contraction than is required for relaxation, positive work output results with an efficiency of between onefifth and one-third of the carnot cycle.

  7. Solid state devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Solid State Device research program is directed toward developing innovative devices for space remote and in-situ sensing, and for data processing. Innovative devices can result from the standard structures in innovative materials such as low and high temperature superconductors, strained layer superlattices, or diamond films. Innovative devices can also result from innovative structures achieved using electron tunneling or nanolithography in standard materials. A final step is to use both innovative structures and innovative materials. A new area of emphasis is the miniaturization of sensors and instruments molded by using the techniques of electronic device fabrication to micromachine silicon into micromechanical and electromechanical sensors and actuators.

  8. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Chung, Brandon W.; Raistrick, Ian D.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  9. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  10. Atomic resolution protein structure determination by three-dimensional transferred echo double resonance solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Wylie, Benjamin J.; Franks, W. Trent; Shah, Gautam J.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2009-01-01

    We show that quantitative internuclear 15N–13C distances can be obtained in sufficient quantity to determine a complete, high-resolution structure of a moderately sized protein by magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The three-dimensional ZF-TEDOR pulse sequence is employed in combination with sparse labeling of 13C sites in the β1 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G (GB1), as obtained by bacterial expression with 1,3-13C or 2-13C-glycerol as the 13C source. Quantitative dipolar trajectories are extracted from two-dimensional 15N–13C planes, in which ∼750 cross peaks are resolved. The experimental data are fit to exact theoretical trajectories for spin clusters (consisting of one 13C and several 15N each), yielding quantitative precision as good as 0.1 Å for ∼350 sites, better than 0.3 Å for another 150, and ∼1.0 Å for 150 distances in the range of 5–8 Å. Along with isotropic chemical shift-based (TALOS) dihedral angle restraints, the distance restraints are incorporated into simulated annealing calculations to yield a highly precise structure (backbone RMSD of 0.25±0.09 Å), which also demonstrates excellent agreement with the most closely related crystal structure of GB1 (2QMT, bbRMSD 0.79±0.03 Å). Moreover, side chain heavy atoms are well restrained (0.76±0.06 Å total heavy atom RMSD). These results demonstrate for the first time that quantitative internuclear distances can be measured throughout an entire solid protein to yield an atomic-resolution structure. PMID:19739873

  11. Solid state heat engine

    SciTech Connect

    Cory, J.S.

    1981-12-15

    A compact solid state turbine heat engine can be devised by pairing the nitinol elements. Each element is characterized by being in thermal contact with at least one hot water and one cold water bath and mechanically coupled to at least one driven pulley and driver pulley. A second nitinol element is similarly configured with a driver pulley, driven pulley, hot and cold water bath. The driver pulley associated with the first nitinol element is mechanically coupled to the driven pulley of the second nitinol element. Similarly, the driver pulley of the second nitinol element is mechanically coupled to the driven pulley of the first nitinol element. The paired nitinol elements form a compound solid state turbine engine wherein each nitinol element lies in a single plane and wherein the engine may be combined with a plurality of such pairs for increased power output. The nitinol elements may also incorporate a snubber to limit the strain on the element and the engine may further incorporate a variable radius pulley to increase the efficiency of mechanical conversion.

  12. Packaging of solid state devices

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.

    2006-01-03

    A package for one or more solid state devices in a single module that allows for operation at high voltage, high current, or both high voltage and high current. Low thermal resistance between the solid state devices and an exterior of the package and matched coefficient of thermal expansion between the solid state devices and the materials used in packaging enables high power operation. The solid state devices are soldered between two layers of ceramic with metal traces that interconnect the devices and external contacts. This approach provides a simple method for assembling and encapsulating high power solid state devices.

  13. Solid state power controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The rationale, analysis, design, breadboarding and testing of the incremental functional requirements are reported that led to the development of prototype 1 and 5 Amp dc and 1 Amp ac solid state power controllers (SSPC's). The SSPC's are to be considered for use as a replacement of electro-mechanical relays and circuit breakers in future spacecraft and aircraft. They satisfy the combined function of both the relay and circuit breaker and can be remotely controlled by small signals, typically 10 mA, 5 to 28 Vdc. They have the advantage over conventional relay/circuit breaker systems in that they can be located near utilization equipment and the primary ac or dc bus. The low level control, trip indication and status signals can be circuited by small guage wire for control, computer interface, logic, electrical multiplexing, unboard testing, and power management and distribution purposes. This results in increased system versatility at appreciable weight saving and increased reliability.

  14. Solid state television camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and tests of a solid state television camera using a new charge-coupled imaging device are reported. An RCA charge-coupled device arranged in a 512 by 320 format and directly compatible with EIA format standards was the sensor selected. This is a three-phase, sealed surface-channel array that has 163,840 sensor elements, which employs a vertical frame transfer system for image readout. Included are test results of the complete camera system, circuit description and changes to such circuits as a result of integration and test, maintenance and operation section, recommendations to improve the camera system, and a complete set of electrical and mechanical drawing sketches.

  15. Solid state rapid thermocycling

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2014-05-13

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A solid state heat exchanger with a first well and second well is coupled to a power module. A thermoelectric element is coupled to the first well, the second well, and the power module, is configured to transfer thermal energy from the first well to the second well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a first direction, and is configured to transfer thermal energy from the second well to the first well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a second direction. A controller may be coupled to the thermoelectric elements, and may switch the direction of current flowing through the thermoelectric element in response to a determination by sensors coupled to the wells that the amount of thermal energy in the wells falls below or exceeds a pre-determined threshold.

  16. A Solid State Pyranometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, Anca Laura; Paulescu, Marius; Ercuta, Aurel

    2015-12-01

    The construction of a solid state device-based pyranometer designated to broadband irradiance measurements is presented in this paper. The device is built on the physical basis that the temperature difference between two bodies of identical shape and external surface area, identically exposed to the incident radiation, but having different absorption and heat transfer coefficients (e.g. one body is painted white and the other is painted black), is proportional to the incident irradiance. This proportionality may be put in evidence if the two bodies consisting of identical arrays of correspondingly painted semiconductor diodes, due to the thermal behaviour of their p-n junction. It is theoretically predicted and experimentally confirmed that the voltage drop across a diode passed through a constant forward current linearly decreases with the temperature of the junction. In other words, a signal proportional to the irradiance of the light source may be obtained via conventional analog electronics. The calibration of the apparatus, as performed by means of a professional device (LP PYRA 03), indicates a good linearity.

  17. Solid state power controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Solid state power controllers (SSPC's) are to be considered for use as replacements of electromechanical relays and circuit breakers in future spacecraft and aircraft. They satisfy the combined function of both the relay and circuit breaker and can be remotely controlled by small signals, typically 10 mA, 5 to 28 v(dc). They have the advantage over conventional relay/circuit breaker systems in that they can be located near the utilization equipment and the primary ac or dc bus. The low level control, trip indication and status signals can be circuited by small gauge wire for control, computer interface, logic, electrical multiplexing, onboard testing, power management, and distribution purposes. This results in increased system versatility at appreciable weight saving and increased reliability. Conventional systems require the heavy gage load wiring and the control wiring to be routed from the bus to the load to other remote relay contacts, switches, sensors, etc. and to the circuit breaker located in the flight engineer's compartment for purposes of manual reset.

  18. Solid state laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rines, Glen A. (Inventor); Moulton, Peter F. (Inventor); Harrison, James (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength-tunable, injection-seeded, dispersion-compensated, dispersively-pumped solid state laser includes a lasing medium; a highly reflective mirror; an output coupler; at least one isosceles Brewster prism oriented to the minimum deviation angle between the medium and the mirror for directing light of different wavelengths along different paths; means for varying the angle of the highly reflective mirror relative to the light from at least one Brewster angle for selecting a predetermined laser operating wavelength; a dispersion compensation apparatus associated with the lasing medium; a laser injection seeding port disposed between the dispersion compensation apparatus and one of the mirror and coupler and including a reflective surface at an acute non-Brewster angle to the laser beam for introducing a seed input; a dispersion compensation apparatus associated with the laser medium including opposite chirality optical elements; the lasing medium including a pump surface disposed at an acute angle to the laser beam to define a discrete path for the pumping laser beam separate from the pumped laser beam.

  19. Distinguishing Polymorphs of the Semiconducting Pigment Copper Phthalocyanine by Solid-state NMR and Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shaibat, Medhat A.; Casabianca, Leah B.; Siberio-Pérez, Diana Y.; Matzger, Adam J; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2010-01-01

    Cu(II)(phthalocyanine) (CuPc) is broadly utilized as an archetypal molecular semiconductor and is the most widely used blue printing pigment. CuPc crystallizes in six different forms; the chemical and physical properties are substantially modulated by its molecular packing among these polymorphs. Despite the growing importance of this system, spectroscopic identification of different polymorphs for CuPc has posed difficulties. This study presents the first example of spectroscopic distinction of α- and β-forms of CuPc, the most widely used polymorphs, by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and Raman spectroscopy. 13C high-resolution SSNMR spectra of α- and β-CuPc using very-fast magic angle spinning (VFMAS) at 20 kHz show that hyperfine shifts sensitively reflect polymorphs of CuPc. The experimental results were confirmed by ab initio chemical shift calculations. 13C and 1H SSNMR relaxation times of α- and β-CuPc under VFMAS also showed marked differences, presumably because of the difference in electronic spin correlation times in the two forms. Raman spectroscopy also provided another reliable method of differentiation between the two polymorphs. PMID:20225842

  20. High resolution imaging of boron carbide microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Aselage, T.; Van Deusen, S.B.

    1985-08-01

    Two samples of boron carbide have been examined using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A hot-pressed B/sub 13/C/sub 2/ sample shows a high density of variable width twins normal to (10*1). Subtle shifts or offsets of lattice fringes along the twin plane and normal to approx.(10*5) were also observed. A B/sub 4/C powder showed little evidence of stacking disorder in crystalline regions.

  1. High resolution imaging of boron carbide microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, I.D.R.; Aselage, T.; Van Deusen, S.B.

    1986-04-15

    Two samples of boron carbide have been examined using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A hot-pressed B/sub 13/C/sub 2/ sample shows a high density of variable width twins normal to (10*1). Subtle shifts or offsets of lattice fringes along the twin plane and normal to approx.(10*5) were also observed. A B/sub 4/C powder showed little evidence of stacking disorder in crystalline regions.

  2. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cardiac metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seeholzer, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques for following the metabolic fate of compounds specifically labeled with /sup 13/C. The goals of the present study are: (1) to develop reliable quantitative procedures for measuring the /sup 13/C enrichment of specific carbon sites in compounds enriched by the metabolism of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates in rat heart, and (2) to use these quantitative measurements of fractional /sup 13/C enrichment within the context of a mathematical flux model describing the carbon flow through the TCA cycle and ancillary pathways, as a means for obtaining unknown flux parameters. Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with various combinations of glucose, acetate, pyruvate, and propionate to achieve steady state flux conditions, followed by perfusion with the same substrates labeled with /sup 13/C in specific carbon sites. The hearts were frozen at different times after addition of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates and neutralized perchloric acid extracts were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The fractional /sup 13/C enrichment (F.E.) of individual carbon sites in different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for saturation and nuclear Overhauser effects. These F.E. measurements by /sup 13/C NMR were validated by the analysis of /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H scalar coupling patterns observed in /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the extracted metabolites. The results obtained from perfusion of hearts glucose plus either (2-/sup 13/C) acetate or (3-/sup 13/C) pyruvate are similar to those obtained by previous investigators using /sup 14/C-labeled substrates.

  3. High-resolution spectroscopy of the {A}^{1}{\\rm{\\Pi }}(v^{\\prime} =0{--}10){--}{X}^{1}{{\\rm{\\Sigma }}}^{+}(v^{\\prime\\prime} =0) bands in 13C18O: term values, ro-vibrational oscillator strengths and Hönl–London corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, J. L.; Eidelsberg, M.; Heays, A. N.; Gavilan, L.; Federman, S. R.; Stark, G.; Lyons, J. R.; de Oliveira, N.; Joyeux, D.

    2016-08-01

    Our knowledge of astronomical environments containing CO depends on accurate molecular data to reproduce and interpret observations. The constant improvement in UV space instrumentation, both in sensitivity and resolution, requires increasingly detailed laboratory data. Following a long-term experimental campaign at the SOLEIL Synchrotron facility, we have acquired complete datasets on the CO isotopologues in the vacuum ultraviolet. Absorption spectra were recorded using the Fourier-transform spectrometer installed on the DESIRS beamline, providing a resolving power R > 106 in the 8–12 eV range. Such resolution allows the analysis of individual line positions and strengths in electronic transitions and the location of perturbations. We continue our previous work on A–X bands of 12C16O and 13C16O, reporting here measurements for the 13C18O isotopologue. Gas column densities in the differentially-pumped system were calibrated using the B {}1{{{Σ }}}+–X {}1{{{Σ }}}+({v}\\prime =0,v\\prime\\prime =0) band. Absorption bands are analyzed by synthesizing line and band profiles and fitting them to measured spectra. New results for A {}1{{\\Pi }}({v}\\prime =0{--}10)–X {}1{{{Σ }}}+(v\\prime\\prime =0) bands include precise line assignments, term values, band-integrated oscillator strengths as well as individual ro-vibrational oscillator strengths and Hönl–London corrections. For ({v}\\prime =1) our results are compared with earlier studies. The interpretation of mixed perturbing bands, complementing an earlier study, is also presented as well as precise line assignments and term values for the B {}1{{{Σ }}}+–X {}1{{{Σ }}}+(0–0) band calibrator, and the nearby B–X (1–0) and C {}1{{{Σ }}}+–X {}1{{{Σ }}}+(0–0) bands.

  4. Rapid acquisition of multidimensional solid-state NMR spectra of proteins facilitated by covalently bound paramagnetic tags.

    PubMed

    Nadaud, Philippe S; Helmus, Jonathan J; Sengupta, Ishita; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2010-07-21

    We describe a condensed data collection approach that facilitates rapid acquisition of multidimensional magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectra of proteins by combining rapid sample spinning, optimized low-power radio frequency pulse schemes and covalently attached paramagnetic tags to enhance protein (1)H spin-lattice relaxation. Using EDTA-Cu(2+)-modified K28C and N8C mutants of the B1 immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G as models, we demonstrate that high resolution and sensitivity 2D and 3D SSNMR chemical shift correlation spectra can be recorded in as little as several minutes and several hours, respectively, for samples containing approximately 0.1-0.2 micromol of (13)C,(15)N- or (2)H,(13)C,(15)N-labeled protein. This mode of data acquisition is naturally suited toward the structural SSNMR studies of paramagnetic proteins, for which the typical (1)H longitudinal relaxation time constants are inherently a factor of at least approximately 3-4 lower relative to their diamagnetic counterparts. To illustrate this, we demonstrate the rapid site-specific determination of backbone amide (15)N longitudinal paramagnetic relaxation enhancements using a pseudo-3D SSNMR experiment based on (15)N-(13)C correlation spectroscopy, and we show that such measurements yield valuable long-range (15)N-Cu(2+) distance restraints which report on the three-dimensional protein fold. PMID:20583834

  5. Magic-Angle Spinning Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Nanodisc– Embedded Human CYP3A4†

    PubMed Central

    Kijac, Aleksandra; Li, Ying; Sligar, Stephen G.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 contributes to the metabolism of approximately 50% of commercial drugs by oxidizing a large number of structurally diverse substrates. Like other endoplasmic reticulum-localized P450s, CYP3A4 contains a membrane-anchoring N-terminal helix and a significant number of hydrophobic domains, important for the interaction between CYP3A4 and the membrane. Although the membrane affects specificity of CYP3A4 ligand binding, the structural details of the interaction have not been revealed so far because x-ray crystallography studies are available only for the soluble domain of CYP3A4. Here we report sample preparation and initial magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) of CYP3A4 (Δ3−12) embedded in a nanoscale membrane bilayer, or Nanodisc. The growth protocol yields ∼2.5 mg of the enzymatically active, uniformly 13C, 15N-enriched CYP3A4 from a liter of growth medium. Polyethylene glycol 3350-precipitated CYP3A4 in Nanodiscs yields spectra of high resolution and sensitivity, consistent with a folded, homogeneous protein. CYP3A4 in Nanodiscs remains enzymatically active throughout the precipitation protocol as monitored by bromocriptine binding. The 13C line widths measured from 13C-13C 2D chemical shift correlation spectra are ∼0.5 ppm. The secondary structure distribution within several amino acid types determined from 13C chemical shifts is consistent with the ligand-free x-ray structures. These results demonstrate that MAS SSNMR can be performed on Nanodisc-embedded membrane proteins in a folded, active state. The combination of SSNMR and Nanodisc methodologies opens up new possibilities for obtaining structural information on CYP3A4 and other integral membrane proteins with full retention of functionality. PMID:17985934

  6. On the solid-state NMR spectra of naproxen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernek, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Two previous measurements of the 13C and 1H NMR isotropic chemical shifts in crystalline naproxen, which is an important pharmaceutical compound, are confronted with the results obtained from several theoretical approaches capable of the proper treatment of solid-phase effects. In the underlying geometrical optimizations, two crystal structures are considered. The agreement between the data sets is quantified, including an evaluation of the similarity between the experimental solid-state NMR spectra. The 13C-1H heteronuclear correlations are analyzed, and their various assignments are discussed employing the statistical treatment of the differences between the measured and theoretical isotropic chemical shifts.

  7. High power solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, H.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the following subjects: trends in materials processing with laser radiation; slabs and high power systems; glasses and new crystals; solid state lasers at HOYA Corp.; lamps, resonators and transmission; glasses as active materials for high average power solid state lasers; flashlamp pumped GGG-crystals; alexandrite lasers; designing telescope resonators; mode operation of neodymium: YAG lasers; intracavity frequency doubling with KTP crystal and thermal effects in cylinder lasers.

  8. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  9. High-resolution echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1979-01-01

    High resolution computer aided ultrasound system provides two-and three-dimensional images of beating heart from many angles. System provides means for determining whether small blood vessels around the heart are blocked or if heart wall is moving normally without interference of dead and noncontracting muscle tissue.

  10. High-resolution headlamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gut, Carsten; Cristea, Iulia; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    The following article shall describe how human vision by night can be influenced. At first, front lighting systems that are already available on the market will be described, followed by their analysis with respect to the positive effects on traffic safety. Furthermore, how traffic safety by night can be increased since the introduction of high resolution headlamps shall be discussed.

  11. Ultrastable reference pulser for high-resolution spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, R.; Lenkszus, F. R.; Sifter, L. L.; Strauss, M. G.

    1970-01-01

    Solid-state double-pulse generator for a high resolution semiconductor detector meets specific requirements for resolution /0.05 percent/, amplitude range /0.1-13 MeV/, and repetition rate /0.1-1000 pulses per second/. A tag pulse is generated in coincidence with each reference pulse.

  12. Rotary resonance recoupling of 13C- 1H dipolar interactions in magic angle spinning 13C NMR of dynamic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchin, Simon J.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Aliev, Abil E.; Apperley, David C.

    2000-06-01

    Rotary resonance recoupling of heteronuclear 13C- 1H dipolar interactions in magic angle spinning solid state 13C NMR spectra (recorded under conditions of 1H decoupling at frequency ν1 and magic angle spinning at frequency νr) has been studied for three examples of molecular solids (adamantane, ferrocene and hexamethylbenzene) in which substantial molecular motion is known to occur. It is shown that when rotary resonance conditions are satisfied (i.e. ν1/νr= n, for n=1 or 2), the recoupling can lead to motionally averaged Pake-like powder patterns from which information on 13C- 1H internuclear distances and/or molecular motion can be derived.

  13. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation spectroscopy with magic angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Rosay, Melanie; Weis, Volker; Kreischer, Kenneth E; Temkin, Richard J; Griffin, Robert G

    2002-04-01

    The sensitivity of solid-state NMR experiments can be enhanced with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a technique that transfers the high Boltzmann polarization of unpaired electrons to nuclei. Signal enhancements of up to 23 have been obtained for magic angle spinning (MAS) experiments at 5 T and 85-90 K using a custom-designed high-power gyrotron. The extended stability of MAS/DNP experiments at low temperature is demonstrated with (1)H-driven (13)C spin-diffusion experiments on the amino acid proline. These (13)C-(13)C chemical shift correlation spectra are the first two-dimensional MAS/DNP experiments performed at high field (>1.4 T). PMID:11916398

  14. High-Resolution Views of Io's Emakong Patera: Latest Galileo Imaging Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. A.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Davies, A. G.; Greeley, R.; Head, J. W., III

    2002-01-01

    This presentation will discuss analyses of the latest Galileo SSI (solid state imaging) high-resolution images of the Emakong lava channels and flow field on Jupiter's moon Io. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Sensitivity and resolution enhanced solid-state NMR for paramagnetic systems and biomolecules under very fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Sudhakar; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2013-09-17

    Recent research in fast magic angle spinning (MAS) methods has drastically improved the resolution and sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy of biomolecules and materials in solids. In this Account, we summarize recent and ongoing developments in this area by presenting (13)C and (1)H solid-state NMR (SSNMR) studies on paramagnetic systems and biomolecules under fast MAS from our laboratories. First, we describe how very fast MAS (VFMAS) at the spinning speed of at least 20 kHz allows us to overcome major difficulties in (1)H and (13)C high-resolution SSNMR of paramagnetic systems. As a result, we can enhance both sensitivity and resolution by up to a few orders of magnitude. Using fast recycling (∼ms/scan) with short (1)H T1 values, we can perform (1)H SSNMR microanalysis of paramagnetic systems on the microgram scale with greatly improved sensitivity over that observed for diamagnetic systems. Second, we discuss how VFMAS at a spinning speed greater than ∼40 kHz can enhance the sensitivity and resolution of (13)C biomolecular SSNMR measurements. Low-power (1)H decoupling schemes under VFMAS offer excellent spectral resolution for (13)C SSNMR by nominal (1)H RF irradiation at ∼10 kHz. By combining the VFMAS approach with enhanced (1)H T1 relaxation by paramagnetic doping, we can achieve extremely fast recycling in modern biomolecular SSNMR experiments. Experiments with (13)C-labeled ubiquitin doped with 10 mM Cu-EDTA demonstrate how effectively this new approach, called paramagnetic assisted condensed data collection (PACC), enhances the sensitivity. Lastly, we examine (13)C SSNMR measurements for biomolecules under faster MAS at a higher field. Our preliminary (13)C SSNMR data of Aβ amyloid fibrils and GB1 microcrystals acquired at (1)H NMR frequencies of 750-800 MHz suggest that the combined use of the PACC approach and ultrahigh fields could allow for routine multidimensional SSNMR analyses of proteins at the 50-200 nmol level. Also, we briefly discuss the

  16. Solid State NMR and Protein-Protein Interactions in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy has evolved rapidly in recent years into an excellent tool for the characterization of membrane proteins and their complexes. In the past few years it has also become clear that the structure of membrane proteins, especially helical membrane proteins is determined, in part, by the membrane environment. Therefore, the modeling of this environment by a liquid crystalline lipid bilayer for solid state NMR has generated a unique tool for the characterization of native conformational states, local and global dynamics, and high resolution structure for these proteins. Protein-protein interactions can also benefit from this solid state NMR capability to characterize membrane proteins in a native-like environment. These complexes take the form of oligomeric structures and hetero-protein interactions both with water soluble proteins and other membrane proteins. PMID:24034903

  17. Solid state NMR and protein-protein interactions in membranes.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A

    2013-12-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy has evolved rapidly in recent years into an excellent tool for the characterization of membrane proteins and their complexes. In the past few years it has also become clear that the structure of membrane proteins, especially helical membrane proteins is determined, in part, by the membrane environment. Therefore, the modeling of this environment by a liquid crystalline lipid bilayer for solid state NMR has generated a unique tool for the characterization of native conformational states, local and global dynamics, and high-resolution structure for these proteins. Protein-protein interactions can also benefit from this solid state NMR capability to characterize membrane proteins in a native-like environment. These complexes take the form of oligomeric structures and hetero-protein interactions both with water-soluble proteins and other membrane proteins. PMID:24034903

  18. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, Glenn W.; Fuller, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  19. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1993-04-06

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock, pulse train, and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train (as seen in diagram on patent). The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  20. Ultra high resolution tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  1. High-Resolution Autoradiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towe, George C; Gomberg, Henry J; Freemen, J W

    1955-01-01

    This investigation was made to adapt wet-process autoradiography to metallurgical samples to obtain high resolution of segregated radioactive elements in microstructures. Results are confined to development of the technique, which was perfected to a resolution of less than 10 microns. The radioactive samples included carbon-14 carburized iron and steel, nickel-63 electroplated samples, a powder product containing nickel-63, and tungsten-185 in N-155 alloy.

  2. The development of solid-state NMR of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Most biological functions are carried out in supramolecular assemblies. As a result of their slow reorientation in solution, these assemblies have been resistant to the widely employed solution NMR approaches. The development of solid-state NMR to first of all overcome the correlation time problem and then obtain informative high-resolution spectra of proteins in supramolecular assemblies, such as virus particles and membranes, is described here. High resolution solid-state NMR is deeply intertwined with the history of NMR, and the seminal paper was published in 1948. Although the general principles were understood by the end of the 1950s, it has taken more than fifty years for instrumentation and experimental methods to become equal to the technical problems presented by the biological assemblies of greatest interest. It is now possible to obtain atomic resolution structures of viral coat proteins in virus particles and membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers by oriented sample solid-state NMR methods. The development of this aspect of the field of solid-state NMR is summarized in this review article. PMID:26069880

  3. Modern solid state laser materials

    SciTech Connect

    Krupke, W.F.

    1984-06-20

    This document contains visual aids used in an invited talk entitled Modern Solid State Laser Materials, presented at the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) held in Anaheim, California, on June 20, 1984. Interest at LLNL in solid state lasers focuses on evaluating the potential of solid state laser media for high average power applications, including inertial fusion power production. This talk identifies the relevant bulk material parameters characterizing average power capacity and uses chromium and neodymium co-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Nd:Cr:GSGG) as an example of a laser material with improved laser properties relative to Nd:YAG (plausible large-scale growth, more efficient spectral coupling to xenon flashlamp radiation, reduced stimulated emission cross section, adequate thermal shock and optical damage threshold parameters, etc.). Recently measured spectroscopic, kinetic, and thermo-mechanical properties of Nd:Cr:GSGG are given.

  4. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids. PMID:26203019

  5. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  6. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  7. Solid-state lithium battery

    SciTech Connect

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  8. Conformational distribution of baclofen analogues by 1H and 13C NMR analysis and ab initio HF MO STO-3G or STO-3G* calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccher, Claude; Berthelot, Pascal; Debaert, Michel; Vermeersch, Gaston; Guyon, René; Pirard, Bernard; Vercauteren, Daniel P.; Dory, Magdalena; Evrard, Guy; Durant, François

    1993-12-01

    The conformations of 3-(substituted furan-2-yl) and 3-(substituted thien-2-yl)-γ-aminobutyric acid 1-9 in solution (D 2O) are estimated from high-resolution (300 MHz) 1H NMR coupling data. Conformations and populations of conformers are calculated by means of a modified Karplus-like relationship for the vicinal coupling constants. The results are compared with X-ray crystallographic investigations (torsion angles) and ab initio HF MO ST-3G or STO-3G* calculations. 1H NMR spectral analysis shows how 1-9 in solution retain the preferred g- conformation around the C3C4 bond, as found in the solid state, while a partial rotation is set up around the C2C3 bond: the conformations about C2C3 are all highly populated in solution. The 13C spin-lattice relaxation times are also discussed.

  9. High resolution infrared measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, B.; Cawley, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Sample ground based cloud radiance data from a high resolution infrared sensor are shown and the sensor characteristics are presented in detail. The purpose of the Infrared Analysis Measurement and Modeling Program (IRAMMP) is to establish a deterministic radiometric data base of cloud, sea, and littoral terrain clutter to be used to advance the design and development of Infrared Search and Track (IRST) systems as well as other infrared devices. The sensor is a dual band radiometric sensor and its description, together with that of the Data Acquisition System (DAS), are given. A schematic diagram of the sensor optics is shown.

  10. Chemical shift referencing in MAS solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcombe, Corey R.; Zilm, Kurt W.

    2003-06-01

    Solid state 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra are typically referenced externally using a probe which does not incorporate a field frequency lock. Solution NMR shifts on the other hand are more often determined with respect to an internal reference and using a deuterium based field frequency lock. Further differences arise in solution NMR of proteins and nucleic acids where both 13C and 1H shifts are referenced by recording the frequency of the 1H resonance of DSS (sodium salt of 2,2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulphonic acid) instead of TMS (tetramethylsilane). In this note we investigate the difficulties in relating shifts measured relative to TMS and DSS by these various approaches in solution and solids NMR, and calibrate adamantane as an external 13C standard for solids NMR. We find that external chemical shift referencing of magic angle spinning spectra is typically quite reproducible and accurate, with better than ±0.03 ppm accuracy being straight forward to achieve. Solid state and liquid phase NMR shifts obtained by magic angle spinning with external referencing agree with those measured using typical solution NMR hardware with the sample tube aligned with the applied field as long as magnetic susceptibility corrections and solvent shifts are taken into account. The DSS and TMS reference scales for 13C and 1H are related accurately using MAS NMR. Large solvent shifts for the 13C resonance in TMS in either deuterochloroform or methanol are observed, being +0.71 ppm and -0.74 ppm from external TMS, respectively. The ratio of the 13C resonance frequencies for the two carbons in solid adamantane to the 1H resonance of TMS is reported.

  11. Chemical shift referencing in MAS solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Morcombe, Corey R; Zilm, Kurt W

    2003-06-01

    Solid state 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra are typically referenced externally using a probe which does not incorporate a field frequency lock. Solution NMR shifts on the other hand are more often determined with respect to an internal reference and using a deuterium based field frequency lock. Further differences arise in solution NMR of proteins and nucleic acids where both 13C and 1H shifts are referenced by recording the frequency of the 1H resonance of DSS (sodium salt of 2,2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulphonic acid) instead of TMS (tetramethylsilane). In this note we investigate the difficulties in relating shifts measured relative to TMS and DSS by these various approaches in solution and solids NMR, and calibrate adamantane as an external 13C standard for solids NMR. We find that external chemical shift referencing of magic angle spinning spectra is typically quite reproducible and accurate, with better than +/-0.03 ppm accuracy being straight forward to achieve. Solid state and liquid phase NMR shifts obtained by magic angle spinning with external referencing agree with those measured using typical solution NMR hardware with the sample tube aligned with the applied field as long as magnetic susceptibility corrections and solvent shifts are taken into account. The DSS and TMS reference scales for 13C and 1H are related accurately using MAS NMR. Large solvent shifts for the 13C resonance in TMS in either deuterochloroform or methanol are observed, being +0.71 ppm and -0.74 ppm from external TMS, respectively. The ratio of the 13C resonance frequencies for the two carbons in solid adamantane to the 1H resonance of TMS is reported. PMID:12810033

  12. Influence of 13C isotopic labeling location of 13C DNP of acetate using TEMPO free radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Lumata, Lloyd

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) via the dissolution method enhances the liquid-state magnetic resonance (NMR or MRI) signals of insensitive nuclear spins by at least 10,000-fold. The basis for all these signal enhancements at room temperature is the polarization transfer from the electrons to nuclear spins at cryogenic temperature and high magnetic field. In this work, we have studied the influence of the location of 13C isotopic labeling on the DNP of sodium acetate at 3.35 T and 1.4 K using a wide ESR linewidth free radical 4-oxo-TEMPO. The carbonyl [1-13C]acetate spins produced a polarization level that is almost twice that of the methyl [2-13C]acetate spins. On the other hand, the polarization of the methyl 13C spins doubled to reach the level of [1-13C]acetate when the methyl group was deuterated. Meanwhile, the solid-state nuclear relaxation of these samples are the same and do not correlate with the polarization levels. These behavior implies that the nuclear relaxation for these samples is dominated by the contribution from the free radicals and the polarization levels can be explained by a thermodynamic picture of DNP.

  13. Solid-state radioluminescent compositions

    DOEpatents

    Clough, Roger L.; Gill, John T.; Hawkins, Daniel B.; Renschler, Clifford L.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Smith, Henry M.

    1991-01-01

    A solid state radioluminescent composition for light source comprises an optically clear polymer organic matrix containing tritiated organic materials and dyes capable of "red" shifting primary scintillation emissions from the polymer matrix. The tritiated organic materials are made by reducing, with tritium, an unsaturated organic compound that prior to reduction contains olefinic or alkynylic bonds.

  14. High resolution Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abreu, Vincent J.; Hays, Paul B.; Barnes, John E.

    1989-01-01

    A high resolution lidar system was implemented to measure winds in the lower atmosphere. The wind speed along the line of sight was determined by measuring the Doppler shift of the aerosol backscattered laser signal. The system in its present configuration is stable, and behaves as indicated by theoretical simulations. This system was built to demonstrate the capabilities of the detector system as a prototype for a spaceborne lidar. The detector system investigated consisted of a plane Fabry-Perot etalon, and a 12-ring anode detector. This system is generically similar to the Fabry-Perot interferometer developed for passive wind measurements on board the Dynamics Explorer satellite. That this detector system performs well in a lidar configuration was demonstrated.

  15. Very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronson, A. I.

    1974-01-01

    A primary sensor used in environmental and earth-resource observation, the Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR) was designed for use on the ITOS D series spacecraft. The VHRR provides a 0.47 mile resolution made possible with a mercury-cadmium-telluride detector cooled to approximately 105 K by a passive radiator cooler. The components of this system are described. The optical subsystem of the VHRR consists of a scanning mirror, a Dall-Kirkham telescope, a dichroic beam splitter, relay lenses, spectral filters, and an IR detector. Signal electronics amplify and condition the signals from the infrared and visible light detector. Sync generator electronics provides the necessary time signals. Scan-drive electronics is used for commutation of the motor winding, velocity, and phase control. A table lists the performance parameters of the VHRR.

  16. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks.

  17. Sensitivity and resolution enhancement of oriented solid-state NMR: application to membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, T; Mote, Kaustubh R; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2013-11-01

    Oriented solid-state NMR (O-ssNMR) spectroscopy is a major technique for the high-resolution analysis of the structure and topology of transmembrane proteins in native-like environments. Unlike magic angle spinning (MAS) techniques, O-ssNMR spectroscopy requires membrane protein preparations that are uniformly oriented (mechanically or magnetically) so that anisotropic NMR parameters, such as dipolar and chemical shift interactions, can be measured to determine structure and orientation of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers. Traditional sample preparations involving mechanically aligned lipids often result in short relaxation times which broaden the (15)N resonances and encumber the manipulation of nuclear spin coherences. The introduction of lipid bicelles as membrane mimicking systems has changed this scenario, and the more favorable relaxation properties of membrane protein (15)N and (13)C resonances make it possible to develop new, more elaborate pulse sequences for higher spectral resolution and sensitivity. Here, we describe our recent progress in the optimization of O-ssNMR pulse sequences. We explain the theory behind these experiments, demonstrate their application to small and medium size proteins, and describe the technical details for setting up these new experiments on the new generation of NMR spectrometers. PMID:24160761

  18. Solid-state membrane module

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Taylor, Dale M.

    2011-06-07

    Solid-state membrane modules comprising at least one membrane unit, where the membrane unit has a dense mixed conducting oxide layer, and at least one conduit or manifold wherein the conduit or manifold comprises a dense layer and at least one of a porous layer and a slotted layer contiguous with the dense layer. The solid-state membrane modules may be used to carry out a variety of processes including the separating of any ionizable component from a feedstream wherein such ionizable component is capable of being transported through a dense mixed conducting oxide layer of the membrane units making up the membrane modules. For ease of construction, the membrane units may be planar.

  19. Solid-state membrane module

    SciTech Connect

    Hinklin, Thomas Ray; Lewinsohn, Charles Arthur

    2015-06-30

    A module for separating oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture comprising planar solid-state membrane units, each membrane unit comprising planar dense mixed conducting oxides layers, planar channel-free porous support layers, and one or more planar intermediate support layers comprising at least one channeled porous support layer. The porosity of the planar channeled porous support layers is less than the porosity of the planar channel-free porous support layers.

  20. Solid state electrochemical current source

    DOEpatents

    Potanin, Alexander Arkadyevich; Vedeneev, Nikolai Ivanovich

    2002-04-30

    A cathode and a solid state electrochemical cell comprising said cathode, a solid anode and solid fluoride ion conducting electrolyte. The cathode comprises a metal oxide and a compound fluoride containing at least two metals with different valences. Representative compound fluorides include solid solutions of bismuth fluoride and potassium fluoride; and lead fluoride and potassium fluoride. Representative metal oxides include copper oxide, lead oxide, manganese oxide, vanadium oxide and silver oxide.

  1. Radiation sensitive solid state switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutto, R. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A mechanically operable solid state switch suited for use in achieving a variable circuit-switching function is described. This switch is characterized by an annular array of photoresponsive switching devices, disposed in communication with an included source of radiation, and a plurality of interchangeable, mechanically operable interrupter disks. Each disk has a predetermined pattern of transparent and opaque portions. Operative displacement of each disk serves to make and break selected electrical circuits through the photo responsive devices of said array.

  2. Solid-State Nuclear Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    A strategy for "Solid-State" Nuclear Power is proposed to guide development of technologies and systems into the second 50 years of nuclear spaceflight. The strategy emphasizes a simple and highly integrated system architecture with few moving parts or fluid loops; the leverage of modern advances in materials, manufacturing, semiconductors, microelectromechanical and nanotechnology devices; and the targeted advancement of high temperature nuclear fuels, materials and static power conversion to enable high performance from simple system topologies.

  3. Solid-state NMR study of fluorinated steroids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Jay; Lin, Su-Ching; Huang, Shing-Jong; Ching, Wei-Min; Hung, Chen-Hsiung; Tzou, Der-Lii M

    2014-02-01

    Solid-state {(1)H}(13)C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectroscopy was performed to analyze two fluorinated steroids, i.e., betamethasone (BMS) and fludrocortisone acetate (FCA), that have fluorine attached to C9, as well as two non-fluorinated analogs, i.e., prednisolone (PRD) and hydrocortisone 21-acetate (HCA). The (13)C signals of BMS revealed multiplet patterns with splittings of 16-215Hz, indicating multiple ring conformations, whereas the (13)C signals of FCA, HCA, and PRD exhibited only singlet patterns, implying a unique conformation. In addition, BMS and FCA exhibited substantial deviation (>3.5ppm) in approximately half of the (13)C signals and significant deviation (>45ppm) in the (13)C9 signal compared to PRD and HCA, respectively. In this study, we demonstrate that fluorinated steroids, such as BMS and FCA, have steroidal ring conformation(s) that are distinct from non-fluorinated analogs, such as PRD and HCA. PMID:24316163

  4. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünken, S.; Schlemmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limitations of conventional absorption spectroscopy. Throughout this review examples demonstrating the strong interplay between laboratory and observational studies will be given.

  5. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  6. Solid state amorphization kinetic of alpha lactose upon mechanical milling.

    PubMed

    Caron, Vincent; Willart, Jean-François; Lefort, Ronan; Derollez, Patrick; Danède, Florence; Descamps, Marc

    2011-11-29

    It has been previously reported that α-lactose could be totally amorphized by ball milling. In this paper we report a detailed investigation of the structural and microstructural changes by which this solid state amorphization takes place. The investigations have been performed by Powder X-ray Diffraction, Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((13)C CP-MAS) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The results reveal the structural complexity of the material in the course of its amorphization so that it cannot be considered as a simple mixture made of a decreasing crystalline fraction and an increasing amorphous fraction. Heating this complexity can give rise to a fully nano-crystalline material. The results also show that chemical degradations upon heating are strongly connected to the melting process. PMID:21983262

  7. Nanoparticle size and shape characterization with Solid State Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandivada, Santoshi; Benamara, Mourad; Li, Jiali

    2015-03-01

    Solid State Nanopores are widely used in a variety of single molecule studies including DNA and biomolecule detection based on the principle of Resistive Pulse technique. This technique is based on electrophoretically driving charged particles through 35-60 nm solid state nanopores. The translocation of these particles produces current blockage events that provide an insight to the properties of the translocation particles and the nanopore. In this work we study the current blockage events produced by ~ 30nm negatively charged PS nanoparticles through Silicon Nitride solid state nanopores. We show how the current blockage amplitudes and durations are related to the ratio of the volume of the particle to the volume of the pore, the shape of the particle, charge of the particle and the nanopore surface, salt concentration, solution pH, and applied voltage. The solid-state nanopores are fabricated by a combination of Focus Ion Beam and low energy Ion beams in silicon nitride membranes. High resolution TEM is used to measure the 3D geometry of the nanopores and a finite element analysis program (COMSOL) is used to simulate the experimental results.

  8. Solid-State Personal Dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2005-01-01

    This document is a web site page, and a data sheet about Personal protection (i.e., space suits) presented to the Radiation and Micrometeoroid Mitigation Technology Focus Group meeting. The website describes the work of the PI to improve solid state personal radiation dosimetry. The data sheet presents work on the active personal radiation detection system that is to provide real-time local radiation exposure information during EVA. Should undue exposure occur, knowledge of the dynamic intensity conditions during the exposure will allow more precise diagnostic assessment of the potential health risk to the exposed individual.

  9. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOEpatents

    Cogan, S.F.; Rauh, R.D.

    1990-07-03

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counter electrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films. 4 figs.

  10. Solid state nuclear track detection

    SciTech Connect

    Durrani, S.A.; Bull, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a basic work on the technique variously known as 'nuclear track analysis', 'track-etch technique', or 'solid state nuclear tract detection'. This has greatly expanded in range, scope and depth since the early 1960's, soon after its discovery, until there is hardly a field now in which it has not found an actual or potential use. Such applications range from archaeology, geology, space physics, medicine and biology to reactor physics and nuclear physics-to name but a few.

  11. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOEpatents

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Rauh, R. David

    1993-12-07

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  12. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOEpatents

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Rauh, R. David

    1993-01-01

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  13. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOEpatents

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Rauh, R. David

    1990-01-01

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  14. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  15. Solid State Memory Study Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, R.

    1994-01-01

    Existing and future solid state nonvolatile memory technologies are described and evaluated in this report. Solid state memory technologies can offer size, speed, power, weight, and ruggedness advantages over conventional moving media storage technologoies such as disk or tape. This technology list is a broad sampling of past, present, emerging, and future solid state memory technologies.

  16. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  17. Solid-state proton conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Jewulski, J.R.; Osif, T.L.; Remick, R.J.

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this program was to survey the field of solid-state proton conductors (SSPC), identify conductors that could be used to develop solid-state fuel cells suitable for use with coal derived fuel gases, and begin the experimental research required for the development of these fuel cells. This document covers the following topics: the history of developments and current status of the SSPC, including a review of proton conducting electrolyte structures, the current status of the medium temperature SSPC development, electrodes for moderate temperature (SSPC) fuel cell, basic material and measurement techniques applicable for SSPC development, modeling and optimization studies. Correlation and optimization studies, to include correlation studies on proton conduction and oxide cathode optimization for the SSPC fuel cell. Experiments with the SSPC fuel cells including the fabrication of the electrolyte disks, apparatus for conducting measurements, the strontium-cerium based electrolyte, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with solid foil electrodes, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with porous electrodes, and conduction mechanisms. 164 refs., 27 figs., 13 tabs.

  18. Contamination and solid state welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Bernice E.

    2007-05-01

    Since sensitivity to contamination is one of the verities of solid state joining, there is a need for assessing contamination of the part(s) to be joined, preferably nondestructively while it can be remedied. As the surfaces that are joined in pinch welds are inaccessible and thus provide a greater challenge, most of the discussion is of the search for the origin and effect of contamination on pinch welding and ways to detect and mitigate it. An example of contamination and the investigation and remediation of such a system is presented. Suggestions are made for techniques for nondestructive evaluation of contamination of surfaces for other solid state welds as well as for pinch welds. Surfaces that have good visual access are amenable to inspection by diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Although other techniques are useful for specific classes of contaminants (such as hydrocarbons), DRIFT can be used most classes of contaminants. Surfaces such as the interior of open tubes or stems that are to be pinch welded can be inspected using infrared reflection spectroscopy. It must be demonstrated whether or not this tool can detect graphite based contamination, which has been seen in stems. For tubes with one closed end, the technique that should be investigated is emission infrared spectroscopy.

  19. Solid state Raman image amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmes, Lonnie K.; Murray, James T.; Austin, William L.; Powell, Richard C.

    1998-07-01

    Lite Cycles has developed a new type of eye-safe, range-gated, lidar sensing element based on Solid-state Raman Image Amplification (SSRIA) in a solid-state optical crystal. SSRIA can amplify low-level infrared images with gains greater than 106 with the addition of only quantum-limited noise. The high gains from SSRIA can compensate for low quantum efficiency detectors and can reduce the need for detector cooling. The range-gate of SSRIA is controlled by the pulsewidth of the pump laser and can be as short as 30 - 100 cm for nanosecond pulses and less than 5 mm if picosecond pulses are used. SSRIA results in higher SNR images throughout a broad range of incident light levels, in contrast to the increasing noise factor with reduced gain in image intensified CCDs. A theoretical framework for the optical resolution of SSRIA is presented and it is shown that SSRIA can produce higher resolution than ICCDs. SSRIA is also superior in rejecting unwanted sunlight background, further increasing image SNR, and can be used for real-time optical signal processing. Applications for military use include eye-safe imaging lidars that can be used for autonomous vehicle identification and targeting.

  20. Solid-state array cameras.

    PubMed

    Strull, G; List, W F; Irwin, E L; Farnsworth, D L

    1972-05-01

    Over the past few years there has been growing interest shown in the rapidly maturing technology of totally solid-state imaging. This paper presents a synopsis of developments made in this field at the Westinghouse ATL facilities with emphasis on row-column organized monolithic arrays of diffused junction phototransistors. The complete processing sequence applicable to the fabrication of modern highdensity arrays is described from wafer ingot preparation to final sensor testing. Special steps found necessary for high yield processing, such as surface etching prior to both sawing and lapping, are discussed along with the rationale behind their adoption. Camera systems built around matrix array photosensors are presented in a historical time-wise progression beginning with the first 50 x 50 element converter developed in 1965 and running through the most recent 400 x 500 element system delivered in 1972. The freedom of mechanical architecture made available to system designers by solid-state array cameras is noted from the description of a bare-chip packaged cubic inch camera. Hybrid scan systems employing one-dimensional line arrays are cited, and the basic tradeoffs to their use are listed. PMID:20119094

  1. Solid-State Recorders Enhance Scientific Data Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Under Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Goddard Space Flight Center, SEAKR Engineering Inc., of Centennial, Colorado, crafted a solid-state recorder (SSR) to replace the tape recorder onboard a Spartan satellite carrying NASA's Inflatable Antenna Experiment. Work for that mission and others has helped SEAKR become the world leader in SSR technology for spacecraft. The company has delivered more than 100 systems, more than 85 of which have launched onboard NASA, military, and commercial spacecraft including imaging satellites that provide much of the high-resolution imagery for online mapping services like Google Earth.

  2. Chemical structure of soil organic matter in slickspots as investigated by advanced solid-state NMR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slickspot soils are saline, and knowledge of their humic chemistry would contribute to our limited understanding how salinity affects soil C and N stocks. We characterized humic acids (HAs) from slickspot soils with solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Expanding on previous use of cross...

  3. Investigation of Moisture Interaction with Cellulose Using Solid-State NMR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interaction of water with cellulose and its influence on the nuclear spin dynamics in Gossypium barbadense (Pima) cotton were investigated by 1H and 13C solid-state NMR techniques. 1H spin diffusion results indicate that water is present in multiple layers within the cotton fiber, each layer bei...

  4. The first high resolution direct NMR observation of an f-block element

    SciTech Connect

    Avent, A.G.; Edelman, M.A.; Lappert, M.F.; Lawless, G.A. )

    1989-04-26

    The last decade has seen a dramatic increase in the importance of the organometallic chemistry of the lanthanide elements. In particular, iodides, cyclopentadienyls, and bis(trimethylsilyl)amides of Sm(II), Eu(II), or Yb(II), due to their unique reactivity (e.g., as selective reducing agents), have attracted much attention. Yet high resolution, solution-state NMR, one of the organometallic chemists most informative tools, has not previously been applied to the direct observation of an f-block element, excluding complexes of the f{sup 0} La(III). The reason for this neglect is probably because the majority of complexes (except those of La(III), Yb(II), and Lu(III)) are paramagnetic, and many of the NMR-active f-block nuclei have large quadrupole moments. Yet for certain of these elements spin-{1/2} isotopes exist, and the range of diamagnetic compounds is rapidly increasing. As a case in point, {sup 171}Yb is a spin-{1/2}nucleus, with a natural abundance of 14.27% and a moderately sized, positive gyromagnetic ratio (4.4712 {times} 10{sup 7} rad T{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}); these features combine to give a receptivity four times greater than that of {sup 13}C. Three solid-state, wide-line studies of this nucleus have appeared. The authors now report {sup 171}Yb chemical shift solution NMR data for the series of Yb(II) complexes.

  5. Solid State Lighting Program (Falcon)

    SciTech Connect

    Meeks, Steven

    2012-06-30

    Over the past two years, KLA-Tencor and partners successfully developed and deployed software and hardware tools that increase product yield for High Brightness LED (HBLED) manufacturing and reduce product development and factory ramp times. This report summarizes our development effort and details of how the results of the Solid State Light Program (Falcon) have started to help HBLED manufacturers optimize process control by enabling them to flag and correct identified killer defect conditions at any point of origin in the process manufacturing flow. This constitutes a quantum leap in yield management over current practice. Current practice consists of die dispositioning which is just rejection of bad die at end of process based upon probe tests, loosely assisted by optical in-line monitoring for gross process deficiencies. For the first time, and as a result of our Solid State Lighting Program, our LED manufacturing partners have obtained the software and hardware tools that optimize individual process steps to control killer defects at the point in the processes where they originate. Products developed during our two year program enable optimized inspection strategies for many product lines to minimize cost and maximize yield. The Solid State Lighting Program was structured in three phases: i) the development of advanced imaging modes that achieve clear separation between LED defect types, improves signal to noise and scan rates, and minimizes nuisance defects for both front end and back end inspection tools, ii) the creation of defect source analysis (DSA) software that connect the defect maps from back-end and front-end HBLED manufacturing tools to permit the automatic overlay and traceability of defects between tools and process steps, suppress nuisance defects, and identify the origin of killer defects with process step and conditions, and iii) working with partners (Philips Lumileds) on product wafers, obtain a detailed statistical correlation of automated

  6. Inexpensive solid state radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, Karen; Hastings, Peter; Harrison, R. Giles; Nicoll, Keri

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of environmental radioactivity is of interest both within the geosciences community and to groups such as the emergency services who need to quickly assess the safety of an environment. Here we present a light weight and inexpensive detector based on solid state technology, that can be easily worn or carried, or used disposably. It responds to gamma radiation and other radioactive particles such as those from space weather and cosmic rays. Unlike traditional technology such as the Geiger counter, the detector can operate at low voltage without the need for step-up circuitry, and it can also distinguish different particle energies. It is suitable for monitoring background radioactivity from cosmic rays and radon as well as responding to higher radioactivity levels. We anticipate that the device will have a broad range of end users, from terrestrial to space applications.

  7. A compact solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Bhabana; Park, Eric D.; Stebbins, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    A compact laser producing green wavelength with a volume of < 8 cm3 and a weight of < 80 g finds its application in many fields from military to space based. We built a small solid-state laser that produces 1 mJ of energy per-pulse at a 1 - 20 Hz repetition rate. The laser is passively Q-switched using a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber to generate pulses <10 ns. A nonlinear crystal doubles the frequency to generate light at 523 nm. The laser is side-pumped by a single bar diode laser using a unique pump cavity to homogenize the pump intensity in the laser rod. The laser components can easily be modified to change the output wavelength from UV to mid IR.

  8. Study of solid state photomultiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, K. M.; Laviolette, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Available solid state photomultiplier (SSPM) detectors were tested under low-background, low temperature conditions to determine the conditions producing optimal sensitivity in a space-based astronomy system such as a liquid cooled helium telescope in orbit. Detector temperatures varied between 6 and 9 K, with background flux ranging from 10 to the 13th power to less than 10 to the 6th power photons/square cm-s. Measured parameters included quantum efficiency, noise, dark current, and spectral response. Experimental data were reduced, analyzed, and combined with existing data to build the SSPM data base included herein. The results were compared to analytical models of SSPM performance where appropriate models existed. Analytical models presented here were developed to be as consistent with the data base as practicable. Significant differences between the theory and data are described. Some models were developed or updated as a result of this study.

  9. Spin dynamics in the modulation frame: application to homonuclear recoupling in magic angle spinning solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    De Paëpe, Gaël; Lewandowski, Józef R; Griffin, Robert G

    2008-03-28

    We introduce a family of solid-state NMR pulse sequences that generalizes the concept of second averaging in the modulation frame and therefore provides a new approach to perform magic angle spinning dipolar recoupling experiments. Here, we focus on two particular recoupling mechanisms-cosine modulated rotary resonance (CMpRR) and cosine modulated recoupling with isotropic chemical shift reintroduction (COMICS). The first technique, CMpRR, is based on a cosine modulation of the rf phase and yields broadband double-quantum (DQ) (13)C recoupling using >70 kHz omega(1,C)/2pi rf field for the spinning frequency omega(r)/2=10-30 kHz and (1)H Larmor frequency omega(0,H)/2pi up to 900 MHz. Importantly, for p>or=5, CMpRR recouples efficiently in the absence of (1)H decoupling. Extension to lower p values (3.513)C recoupling and (1)H decoupling. The second technique, COMICS, involves low power (13)C irradiation that induces simultaneous recoupling of the (13)C DQ dipolar and isotropic chemical shift terms. In contrast to CMpRR, where the DQ bandwidth (approximately 30 kHz at omega(0,H)/2pi=750 MHz) covers the entire (13)C spectral width, COMICS recoupling, through the reintroduction of the isotropic chemical shift, is selective with respect to the carrier frequency, having a typical bandwidth of approximately 100 Hz. This approach is intended as a general frequency selective method circumventing dipolar truncation (supplementary to R(2) experiments). These new gamma-encoded sequences with attenuated rf requirements extend the applicability of homonuclear recoupling techniques to new regimes--high spinning and Larmor frequencies--and therefore should be of major

  10. Structure of a protein determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Federica; van Rossum, Barth; Diehl, Annette; Schubert, Mario; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2002-11-01

    The determination of a representative set of protein structures is a chief aim in structural genomics. Solid-state NMR may have a crucial role in structural investigations of those proteins that do not easily form crystals or are not accessible to solution NMR, such as amyloid systems or membrane proteins. Here we present a protein structure determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR. Almost complete 13C and 15N resonance assignments for a micro-crystalline preparation of the α-spectrin Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain formed the basis for the extraction of a set of distance restraints. These restraints were derived from proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) spectra of biosynthetically site-directed, labelled samples obtained from bacteria grown using [1,3-13C]glycerol or [2-13C]glycerol as carbon sources. This allowed the observation of long-range distance correlations up to ~7Å. The calculated global fold of the α-spectrin SH3 domain is based on 286 inter-residue 13C-13C and six 15N-15N restraints, all self-consistently obtained by solid-state MAS NMR. This MAS NMR procedure should be widely applicable to small membrane proteins that can be expressed in bacteria.

  11. Exploration of structure and function in biomolecules through solid-state NMR and computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heider, Elizabeth M.

    Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations are powerful analysis tools. Leveraged independently, each method yields important nuclear and molecular information. Used in concert, SSNMR and computational techniques provide complementary data about the structure of solids. These methods are particularly useful in characterizing the structures of microcrystalline organic compounds and revealing mechanisms of biological activity. Such applications may possess special relevance in analysis of pharmaceutical products; 90% of all pharmaceuticals are marketed as solids and bioactivity is strongly linked with molecular conformation. Accordingly, this dissertation employs both SSNMR and quantum mechanical computation to study three bioactive molecules: citrinin, two forms of Atrasentan (Abt-627), and paclitaxel (Taxol RTM). First, a computational study is utilized to determine the mechanism for unusual antioxidant activity in citrinin. Here, molecular geometries and bond dissociation enthalpies (BDE) of the citrinin O--H groups are calculated from first principles (ab initio). The total molecular Hamiltonian is determined by approximating the individual contributors to energy including electronic energy and contributions from modes of molecular vibration. This study of citrinin clearly identifies specific reaction sites in the active form, establishing the central role of intramolecular hydrogen bonding in this activity. Notably, it is discovered that citrinin itself is not the active species. Instead, a pair of hydrated Michael addition products of citrinin act as radical scavengers via O--H bond dissociation. Next, two separate compounds of the anticancer drug Abt-627 (form I and form II) are examined via SSNMR. The three principal values of the 13C diagonalized chemical shift tensor are acquired through the high resolution 2D experiment, FIREMAT. Isotropic chemical shift assignments are made utilizing both dipolar

  12. Comparison of the solution and crystal structures of staphylococcal nuclease with /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N chemical shifts used as structural fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, H.B.R.; Sparks, S.W.; Torchia, D.A.

    1988-09-01

    The authors report high-resolution /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N NMR spectra of crystalline staphylococcal nuclease (Nase) complexed to thymidine 3',5'-diphosphate and Ca/sup 2+/. High sensitivity and resolution are obtained by applying solid-state NMR techniques-high power proton decoupling and cross-polarization magic angle sample spinning (CPMASS)-to protein samples that have been efficiently synthesized and labeled by an overproducing strain of Escherichia coli. A comparison of CPMASS and solution spectra of Nase labeled with either (methyl-/sup 13/C)methionine or (/sup 15/)valine shows that the chemical shifts in the crystalline and solution states are virtually identical. This result is strong evidence that the protein conformations in the solution and crystalline states are nearly the same. Because of the close correspondence of the crystal and solution chemical shifts, sequential assignments obtained in solution apply to the crystal spectra. It should therefore be possible to study the molecular structure and dynamics of many sequentially assigned atomic sites in Nase crystals. Similar experiments are applicable to the growing number of proteins that can be obtained from efficient expression systems.

  13. Solid-state NMR as a probe of anion binding: molecular dynamics and associations in a [5]polynorbornane bisurea host complexed with terephthalate.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Aditya; Hook, James M; Robson, Ryan N; Gunzelmann, Daniel; Pfeffer, Frederick M; O'Dell, Luke A

    2015-09-14

    A range of solid-state NMR techniques is used to characterise a molecular host:guest complex consisting of a [5]polynorbornane bisurea host binding a terephthalate dianion guest. Detailed information is obtained on the molecular dynamics and associations from the point of view of both the host and guest molecules. The formation of the complex in the solid state is confirmed using (1)H 2D exchange NMR, and the 180° flipping of the (2)H-labelled terephthalate guest and its eventual expulsion from the complex at elevated temperatures are quantified using variable-temperature (2)H spin-echo experiments. Two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C HETCOR spectra obtained under fast magic angle spinning conditions (60 kHz) show a high resolution despite the poor crystallinity of the solid complex, and clearly reveal changes in the rigidity of the host molecule when complexed. Short-range intra- and intermolecular (1)H-(1)H proximities are also detected using 2D SQ-DQ correlation methods, providing insight into the molecular packing in the solid phase. PMID:26239510

  14. Preparation of RNA samples with narrow line widths for solid state NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Bardaro, Michael F.; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P.

    2012-10-01

    Solid state NMR can provide detailed structural and dynamic information on biological systems that cannot be studied under solution conditions, and can investigate motions which occur with rates that cannot be fully studied by solution NMR. This approach has successfully been used to study proteins, but the application of multidimensional solid state NMR to RNA has been limited because reported line widths have been too broad to execute most multidimensional experiments successfully. A reliable method to generate spectra with narrow line widths is necessary to apply the full range of solid state NMR spectroscopic approaches to RNA. Using the HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA as a model, we present an approach based on precipitation with polyethylene glycol that improves the line width of 13C signals in TAR from >6 ppm to about 1 ppm, making solid state 2D NMR studies of selectively enriched RNAs feasible at ambient temperature.

  15. Solid-state rechargeable magnesium battery

    DOEpatents

    Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Liu, Tianbiao; Li, Guosheng

    2016-09-06

    Embodiments of a solid-state electrolyte comprising magnesium borohydride, polyethylene oxide, and optionally a Group IIA or transition metal oxide are disclosed. The solid-state electrolyte may be a thin film comprising a dispersion of magnesium borohydride and magnesium oxide nanoparticles in polyethylene oxide. Rechargeable magnesium batteries including the disclosed solid-state electrolyte may have a coulombic efficiency .gtoreq.95% and exhibit cycling stability for at least 50 cycles.

  16. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1984-09-28

    A solid state radiative heat pump operable at room temperature (300 K) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of change carriers as compared equilibrium. In one form of the invention an infrared semiconductor photodiode is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention, a homogenous semiconductor is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-refection layer is coated into the active surface of the semiconductor, the anti-reflection layer having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor. In the second method, a passive layer is speaced trom the active surface of the semiconductor by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler with a paraboloid reflecting surface surface is in contact with the active surface of the semiconductor, the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  17. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1986-01-01

    A solid state radiative heat pump (10, 50, 70) operable at room temperature (300.degree. K.) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of charge carriers as compared to thermal equilibrium. In one form of the invention (10, 70) an infrared semiconductor photodiode (21, 71) is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention (50), a homogeneous semiconductor (51) is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation through the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-reflection layer (19) is coated into the active surface (13) of the semiconductor (11), the anti-reflection layer (19) having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor (11). In the second method, a passive layer (75) is spaced from the active surface (73) of the semiconductor (71) by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler (91) with a paraboloid reflecting surface (92) is in contact with the active surface (13, 53) of the semiconductor (11, 51), the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  18. XANES: Solid state mineral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Researchers in the field of mineral physics have become aware of new analytical techniques for studying the electronic structure of solids; one such technique is the X ray absorption fine structure (XFAS) method. In this technique the fine structure of the X ray K-edge, for example, can b e employed as a critical probe of t h e intricacies of a crystal structure (P. A. Lee, P. H. Citrin, P. Eisenberger, and B. M. Kincaid, Rev. Mod. Phys., 53, 799, 1981).A similar, related technique, X ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), is a relatively unknown method of studying the electronic structure of solids. XANES is new, and due to its complex nature, data on all but very simple solids have not yet been applied rigorously. Among the first XANES results on minerals is the recent study reported by G. Knapp, B. Veal, H. Pan, and T. Klipper (Solid State Comm. 44, 1343, 1982) on perovskites, magnesiowustites, and other 3d oxides in the zircon and spinel groups. The interpretation of these results is still semiquantitative, being based on ground state and basic selection rule considerations. The results show, however, a strong correlation between near-edge spectra and crystal structure.

  19. Solid state safety jumper cables

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-02-23

    Solid state jumper cables for connecting two batteries in parallel, having two bridge rectifiers for developing a reference voltage, a four-input decoder for determining which terminals are to be connected based on a comparison of the voltage at each of the four terminals to the reference voltage, and a pair of relays for effecting the correct connection depending on the determination of the decoder. No connection will be made unless only one terminal of each battery has a higher voltage than the reference voltage, indicating positive'' terminals, and one has a lower voltage than the reference voltage, indicating negative'' terminals, and that, therefore, the two high voltage terminals may be connected and the two lower voltage terminals may be connected. Current flows once the appropriate relay device is closed. The relay device is preferably a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) combined with a series array of photodiodes that develop MOSFET gate-closing potential when the decoder output causes an LED to light.

  20. Solid state photochemistry of polycarbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Rembaum, A.; Moacanin, J.

    1978-01-01

    The quantum yield of photoFries rearrangement in a polycarbonate film has been analyzed as a function of temperature and humidity on the basis of previously reported (Koyler and Mann, 1977) experimental data. Results indicate that in the homogeneous amorphous phase, photoFries rearrangement is a concerted process proceeding either from the pi star reversed arrow n singlet, in which case it must be subject to considerable self quenching, or from a triplet, presumably the first triplet since the lifetime of higher triplets is expected to be very short in the solid phase. If the parent excited state is the first triplet, chain scission is possibly an independent process, probably occurring from the pi star reversed arrow n singlet. Evidence of chain scission on photodegradation in the solid state includes loss of C-O and C-C bond intensities revealed in the Fourier transform infrared spectra, gel permeation chromotography elution profiles of degraded film samples dissolved in CHCl3, and a decrease in tensile strength and T sub g as photodegradation proceeds. Chain scission is apparently inhibited as photoFries products accumulate.

  1. Solid state safety jumper cables

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Solid state jumper cables for connecting two batteries in parallel, having two bridge rectifiers for developing a reference voltage, a four-input decoder for determining which terminals are to be connected based on a comparison of the voltage at each of the four terminals to the reference voltage, and a pair of relays for effecting the correct connection depending on the determination of the decoder. No connection will be made unless only one terminal of each battery has a higher voltage than the reference voltage, indicating "positive" terminals, and one has a lower voltage than the reference voltage, indicating "negative" terminals, and that, therefore, the two high voltage terminals may be connected and the two lower voltage terminals may be connected. Current flows once the appropriate relay device is closed. The relay device is preferably a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) combined with a series array of photodiodes that develop MOSFET gate-closing potential when the decoder output causes an LED to light.

  2. 13C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The many advantages of 13C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, 13C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semi-automated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE datasets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures. PMID:25932900

  3. Solid state NMR strategy for characterizing native membrane protein structures.

    PubMed

    Murray, Dylan T; Das, Nabanita; Cross, Timothy A

    2013-09-17

    Unlike water soluble proteins, the structures of helical transmembrane proteins depend on a very complex environment. These proteins sit in the midst of dramatic electrical and chemical gradients and are often subject to variations in the lateral pressure profile, order parameters, dielectric constant, and other properties. Solid state NMR is a collection of tools that can characterize high resolution membrane protein structure in this environment. Indeed, prior work has shown that this complex environment significantly influences transmembrane protein structure. Therefore, it is important to characterize such structures under conditions that closely resemble its native environment. Researchers have used two approaches to gain protein structural restraints via solid state NMR spectroscopy. The more traditional approach uses magic angle sample spinning to generate isotropic chemical shifts, much like solution NMR. As with solution NMR, researchers can analyze the backbone chemical shifts to obtain torsional restraints. They can also examine nuclear spin interactions between nearby atoms to obtain distances between atomic sites. Unfortunately, for membrane proteins in lipid preparations, the spectral resolution is not adequate to obtain complete resonance assignments. Researchers have developed another approach for gaining structural restraints from membrane proteins: the use of uniformly oriented lipid bilayers, which provides a method for obtaining high resolution orientational restraints. When the bilayers are aligned with respect to the magnetic field of the NMR spectrometer, researchers can obtain orientational restraints in which atomic sites in the protein are restrained relative to the alignment axis. However, this approach does not allow researchers to determine the relative packing between helices. By combining the two approaches, we can take advantage of the information acquired from each technique to minimize the challenges and maximize the quality of the

  4. Measuring doubly 13C-substituted ethane by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clog, M.; Ling, C.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is present in non-negligible amounts in most natural gas reservoirs and is used to produce ethylene for petrochemical industries. It is one of the by-products of lipid metabolism and is the arguably simplest molecule that can manifest multiple 13C substitutions. There are several plausible controls on the relative abundances of 13C2H6 in natural gases: thermodynamically controlled homogeneous isotope exchange reactions analogous to those behind carbonate clumped isotope thermometry; inheritance from larger biomolecules that under thermal degradation to produce natural gas; mixing of natural gases that differ markedly in bulk isotopic composition; or combinations of these and/or other, less expected fractionations. There is little basis for predicting which of these will dominate in natural samples. Here, we focus on an analytical techniques that will provide the avenue for exploring these phenomena. The method is based on high-resolution gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometry, using the Thermo 253-Ultra (a new prototype mass spectrometer). This instrument achieves the mass resolution (M/Δ M) up to 27,000, permitting separation of the isobaric interferences of potential contaminants and isotopologues of an analtye or its fragments which share a cardinal mass. We present techniques to analyze several isotopologues of molecular and fragment ions of C2H6. The critical isobaric separations for our purposes include: discrimination of 13C2H6 from 13C12CDH5 at mass 32 and separation of the 13CH3 fragment from 12CH4 at mass 16, both requiring at least a mass resolution of 20000 to make an adequate measurement. Other obvious interferences are either cleanly separated (e.g., O2, O) or accounted for by peak-stripping (CH3OH on mass 32 and NH2 on mass 16). We focus on a set of measurements which constrain: the doubly-substituted isotopologue, 13C2H6, and the 13CH3/12CH3 ratio of the methyl fragment, which constrains the bulk δ 13C. Similar methods can be

  5. Spin-coated and PECVD low dielectric constant porous organosilicate films studied by 1D and 2D solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Gerbaud, Guillaume; Hediger, Sabine; Bardet, Michel; Favennec, Laurent; Zenasni, Aziz; Beynet, Julien; Gourhant, Olivier; Jousseaume, Vincent

    2009-11-14

    In the research field of the sub-65 nm semiconductor industry, organosilicate SiOCH films with low dielectric constant (k < 2.4) need to be developed in order to improve the performance of integrated circuits [International Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), San Jose, CA, 2004]. One way to produce SiOCH films of low dielectric constant is to introduce pores into the film. This is usually obtained in two steps. Firstly, co-deposition of a matrix precursor, with a sacrificial organic porogen, either by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or spin-coating. Secondly, application of a specific thermal treatment to remove the porogen and create the porosity. This last step can be improved by adding to the thermal process a super-critical CO(2) treatment, an UV irradiation or an electronic bombardment (e-beam). In this study, the two deposition processes as well as the various treatments applied to eliminate the porogens were evaluated and compared using high-resolution solid-state NMR. For this purpose, hybrid (containing porogens) and porous films were extensively characterized on the basis of their (1)H, (13)C and (29)Si high-resolution NMR spectra. Information was obtained concerning the crosslinking of the Si skeleton. Spectral features could be correlated to the processes used. Isotropic chemical shift analyses and 2D correlation NMR experiments were used to show the existence and nature of the interactions between the matrix precursor and the organic porogen. PMID:19851550

  6. New guidelines for δ13C measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Gehre, Matthias; Groning, Manfred; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Toman, Blaza; Verkouteren, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Consistency of δ13C measurements can be improved 39−47% by anchoring the δ13C scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in 13C/12C. It is recommended thatδ13C values of both organic and inorganic materials be measured and expressed relative to VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on a scale normalized by assigning consensus values of −46.6‰ to L-SVEC lithium carbonate and +1.95‰ to NBS 19 calcium carbonate. Uncertainties of other reference material values on this scale are improved by factors up to two or more, and the values of some have been notably shifted:  the δ13C of NBS 22 oil is −30.03%.

  7. Solid State Reactor Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, G.T.

    2004-03-10

    The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas of research

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  9. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-06-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ, ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1-40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1-40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16-21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1-40 fibrils in 4 h or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples.

  10. /sup 13/C spin diffusion of adamantane

    SciTech Connect

    Bronniman, C.E.; Szeverenyi, N.M.; Maciel, G.E.

    1983-10-15

    Two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy of natural abundance /sup 13/C--/sup 13/C spin diffusion in solid adamantane illustrates the influence that /sup 13/C--/sup 1/H dipole--dipole coupling exerts on /sup 13/C spin diffusion by determining spectral overlap in the /sup 13/C system. 2D /sup 13/C spectra were obtained for several values of mixing time tau/sub m/ and compared with spectra calculated in the limit of nearest-neighbor coupling. Good agreement is obtained for short tau/sub m/, during which the equilibration of neighboring spins dominates. For longer tau/sub m/, slower spin diffusion that is not acounted for by the simple model is seen; after nearest-neighbor spins equilibrate, communication over larger distances produces further mixing. It is possible to modify spin diffusion rates by altering experimental conditions, e.g., magic-angle spinning, low-power /sup 1/H decoupling, or spin locking /sup 13/C in the rotating frame during tau/sub m/.

  11. Solid state recorders for airborne reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klang, Mark R.

    2003-08-01

    Solid state recorders have become the recorder of choice for meeting airborne ruggedized requirements for reconnaissance and flight test. The cost of solid state recorders have decreased over the past few years that they are now less expense than the traditional high speed tape recorders. CALCULEX, Inc manufactures solid state recorders called MONSSTR (Modular Non-volatile Solid State Recorder). MONSSTR is being used on many different platforms such as F/A-22, Global Hawk, F-14, F-15, F-16, U-2, RF-4, and Tornado. This paper will discuss the advantages of using solid state recorders to meet the airborne reconnaissance requirement and the ability to record instrumentation data. The CALCULEX recorder has the ability to record sensor data and flight test data in the same chassis. This is an important feature because it eliminates additional boxes on the aircraft. The major advantages to using a solid state recorder include; reliability, small size, light weight, and power. Solid state recorders also have a larger storage capacity and higher bandwidth capability than other recording devices.

  12. The Galileo Solid-State Imaging experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belton, M.J.S.; Klaasen, K.P.; Clary, M.C.; Anderson, J.L.; Anger, C.D.; Carr, M.H.; Chapman, C.R.; Davies, M.E.; Greeley, R.; Anderson, D.; Bolef, L.K.; Townsend, T.E.; Greenberg, R.; Head, J. W., III; Neukum, G.; Pilcher, C.B.; Veverka, J.; Gierasch, P.J.; Fanale, F.P.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Masursky, H.; Morrison, D.; Pollack, James B.

    1992-01-01

    The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment on the Galileo Orbiter spacecraft utilizes a high-resolution (1500 mm focal length) television camera with an 800 ?? 800 pixel virtual-phase, charge-coupled detector. It is designed to return images of Jupiter and its satellites that are characterized by a combination of sensitivity levels, spatial resolution, geometric fiedelity, and spectral range unmatched by imaging data obtained previously. The spectral range extends from approximately 375 to 1100 nm and only in the near ultra-violet region (??? 350 nm) is the spectral coverage reduced from previous missions. The camera is approximately 100 times more sensitive than those used in the Voyager mission, and, because of the nature of the satellite encounters, will produce images with approximately 100 times the ground resolution (i.e., ??? 50 m lp-1) on the Galilean satellites. We describe aspects of the detector including its sensitivity to energetic particle radiation and how the requirements for a large full-well capacity and long-term stability in operating voltages led to the choice of the virtual phase chip. The F/8.5 camera system can reach point sources of V(mag) ??? 11 with S/N ??? 10 and extended sources with surface brightness as low as 20 kR in its highest gain state and longest exposure mode. We describe the performance of the system as determined by ground calibration and the improvements that have been made to the telescope (same basic catadioptric design that was used in Mariner 10 and the Voyager high-resolution cameras) to reduce the scattered light reaching the detector. The images are linearly digitized 8-bits deep and, after flat-fielding, are cosmetically clean. Information 'preserving' and 'non-preserving' on-board data compression capabilities are outlined. A special "summation" mode, designed for use deep in the Jovian radiation belts, near Io, is also described. The detector is 'preflashed' before each exposure to ensure the photometric linearity

  13. Recent developments in solid-state magic-angle spinning, nuclear magnetic resonance of fully and significantly isotopically labelled peptides and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Straus, Suzana K

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, a large number of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed and applied to the study of fully or significantly isotopically labelled ((13)C, (15)N or (13)C/(15)N) biomolecules. In the past few years, the first structures of (13)C/(15)N-labelled peptides, Gly-Ile and Met-Leu-Phe, and a protein, Src-homology 3 domain, were solved using magic-angle spinning NMR, without recourse to any structural information obtained from other methods. This progress has been made possible by the development of NMR experiments to assign solid-state spectra and experiments to extract distance and orientational information. Another key aspect to the success of solid-state NMR is the advances made in sample preparation. These improvements will be reviewed in this contribution. Future prospects for the application of solid-state NMR to interesting biological questions will also briefly be discussed. PMID:15306412

  14. Advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer development program is considered. The program covered the design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was also developed for use on the program.

  15. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  16. Monitoring Cocrystal Formation via In Situ Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Mandala, Venkata S; Loewus, Sarel J; Mehta, Manish A

    2014-10-01

    A detailed understanding of the mechanism of organic cocrystal formation remains elusive. Techniques that interrogate a reacting system in situ are preferred, though experimentally challenging. We report here the results of a solid-state in situ NMR study of the spontaneous formation of a cocrystal between a pharmaceutical mimic (caffeine) and a coformer (malonic acid). Using (13)C magic angle spinning NMR, we show that the formation of the cocrystal may be tracked in real time. We find no direct evidence for a short-lived, chemical shift-resolved amorphous solid intermediate. However, changes in the line width and line center of the malonic acid methylene resonance, in the course of the reaction, provide subtle clues to the mode of mass transfer that underlies cocrystal formation. PMID:26278442

  17. In vivo13C spectroscopy in the rat brain using hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjańska, Małgorzata; Iltis, Isabelle; Shestov, Alexander A.; Deelchand, Dinesh K.; Nelson, Christopher; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2010-10-01

    The low sensitivity of 13C spectroscopy can be enhanced using dynamic nuclear polarization. Detection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and its metabolic products has been reported in kidney, liver, and muscle. In this work, the feasibility of measuring 13C signals of hyperpolarized 13C metabolic products in the rat brain in vivo following the injection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate is investigated. Injection of [2- 13C]pyruvate led to the detection of [2- 13C]lactate, but no other downstream metabolites such as TCA cycle intermediates were detected. Injection of [1- 13C]pyruvate enabled the detection of both [1- 13C]lactate and [ 13C]bicarbonate. A metabolic model was used to fit the hyperpolarized 13C time courses obtained during infusion of [1- 13C]pyruvate and to determine the values of VPDH and VLDH.

  18. Solid-state NMR studies of theophylline co-crystals with dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Sokal, Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-11-01

    In this work, three polycrystalline materials containing co-crystals of theophylline with malonic, maleic, and glutaric acids were studied using (13)C, (15)N and (1)H solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The NMR assignments were supported by gauge including projector augmented waves (GIPAW) calculations of chemical shielding, performed using X-ray determined geometry. The experimental (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR results and the calculated isotropic chemical shifts were in excellent agreement. A rapid and convenient method for theophylline co-crystals crystal structure analysis has been proposed for co-crystals, which are potentially new APIs. PMID:25194346

  19. Fractional deuteration applied to biomolecular solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nand, Deepak; Cukkemane, Abhishek; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2012-02-01

    Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance can provide detailed insight into structural and dynamical aspects of complex biomolecules. With increasing molecular size, advanced approaches for spectral simplification and the detection of medium to long-range contacts become of critical relevance. We have analyzed the protonation pattern of a membrane-embedded ion channel that was obtained from bacterial expression using protonated precursors and D(2)O medium. We find an overall reduction of 50% in protein protonation. High levels of deuteration at H(α) and H(β) positions reduce spectral congestion in ((1)H,(13)C,(15)N) correlation experiments and generate a transfer profile in longitudinal mixing schemes that can be tuned to specific resonance frequencies. At the same time, residual protons are predominantly found at amino-acid side-chain positions enhancing the prospects for obtaining side-chain resonance assignments and for detecting medium to long-range contacts. Fractional deuteration thus provides a powerful means to aid the structural analysis of complex biomolecules by solid-state NMR. PMID:22105305

  20. Solid-state diffusion in amorphous zirconolite

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.; Zarkadoula, E.; Todorov, I. T.; Geisler, T.; Brazhkin, V. V.

    2014-11-14

    We discuss how structural disorder and amorphization affect solid-state diffusion, and consider zirconolite as a currently important case study. By performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we disentangle the effects of amorphization and density, and show that a profound increase of solid-state diffusion takes place as a result of amorphization. Importantly, this can take place at the same density as in the crystal, representing an interesting general insight regarding solid-state diffusion. We find that decreasing the density in the amorphous system increases pre-factors of diffusion constants, but does not change the activation energy in the density range considered. We also find that atomic species in zirconolite are affected differently by amorphization and density change. Our microscopic insights are relevant for understanding how solid-state diffusion changes due to disorder and for building predictive models of operation of materials to be used to encapsulate nuclear waste.

  1. Standards Development for Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-16

    To accelerate the development and implementation of needed standards for solid-state lighting products, DOE works closely with a network of standards-setting organizations and offers technical assistance and support

  2. Solid-state light sources getting smart.

    PubMed

    Schubert, E Fred; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2005-05-27

    More than a century after the introduction of incandescent lighting and half a century after the introduction of fluorescent lighting, solid-state light sources are revolutionizing an increasing number of applications. Whereas the efficiency of conventional incandescent and fluorescent lights is limited by fundamental factors that cannot be overcome, the efficiency of solid-state sources is limited only by human creativity and imagination. The high efficiency of solid-state sources already provides energy savings and environmental benefits in a number of applications. However, solid-state sources also offer controllability of their spectral power distribution, spatial distribution, color temperature, temporal modulation, and polarization properties. Such "smart" light sources can adjust to specific environments and requirements, a property that could result in tremendous benefits in lighting, automobiles, transportation, communication, imaging, agriculture, and medicine. PMID:15919985

  3. Concepts for future solid state lighting solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Malm, N.; Wirth, R.; Illek, S.; Steegmüller, U.

    2010-08-01

    In this contribution the relevant technological aspects of LED-based lamps for solid state lighting are discussed. In addition to general energy efficiency considerations improvements in LED chip technology and white light generation are presented.

  4. Solution and Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Characterization of Efavirenz.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Eduardo Gomes Rodrigues de; Carvalho, Erika Martins de; San Gil, Rosane Aguiar da Silva; Santos, Tereza Cristina Dos; Borré, Leandro Bandeira; Santos-Filho, Osvaldo Andrade; Ellena, Javier

    2016-09-01

    Samples of efavirenz (EFZ) were evaluated to investigate the influence of the micronization process on EFZ stability. A combination of X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, FTIR, observations of isotropic chemical shifts of (1)H in distinct solvents, their temperature dependence and spin-lattice relaxation time constants (T1), solution (1D and 2D) (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and solid-state (13)C NMR (CPMAS NMR) provides valuable structural information and structural elucidation of micronized EFZ and heptane-recrystallized polymorphs (EFZ/HEPT). This study revealed that the micronization process did not affect the EFZ crystalline structure. It was observed that the structure of EFZ/HEPT is in the same form as that obtained from ethyl acetate/hexane, as shown in the literature. A comparison of the solid-state NMR spectra revealed discrepancies regarding the assignments of some carbons published in the literature that have been resolved. PMID:26886313

  5. Grating enhanced solid-state laser amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Erlandson, Alvin C.; Britten, Jerald A.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and parasitic oscillation modes in a high average power laser is introduced. Such an invention, as disclosed herein, uses diffraction gratings to increase gain, stored energy density, and pumping efficiency of solid-state laser gain media, such as, but not limited to rods, disks and slabs. By coupling predetermined gratings to solid-state gain media, such as crystal or ceramic laser gain media, ASE and parasitic oscillation modes can be effectively suppressed.

  6. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines—independent of their ability to crystallize— and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies. PMID:25960310

  7. Solid-State 17O NMR of Paramagnetic Coordination Compounds**

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor V.; Khade, Rahul L.; Yang, Liu; Rorick, Amber; Zhang, Yong; He, Peng; Huang, Yining; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that high-quality solid-state 17O (I = 5/2) NMR spectra can be successfully obtained for paramagnetic coordination compounds in which oxygen atoms are directly bonded to the paramagnetic metal centers. For complexes containing V(III) (S = 1), Cu(II) (S = 1/2), and Mn(III) (S = 2) metal centers, the 17O isotropic paramagnetic shifts were found to span a range of more than 10000 ppm. In several cases, high-resolution 17O NMR spectra were recorded under very fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions at 21.1 T. Quantum chemical computations using density functional theory (DFT) qualitatively reproduced the experimental 17O hyperfine shift tensors. PMID:25694203

  8. Parallel β-Sheet Structure of Alanine Tetrapeptide in the Solid State As Studied by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo; Naito, Akira

    2016-09-01

    The structural analysis of alanine oligopeptides is important for understanding the crystalline region in silks from spiders and wild silkworms and also the mechanism of cellular toxicity of human diseases arising from expansion in polyalanine sequences. The atomic-level structures of alanine tripeptide and tetrapeptide with antiparallel β-sheet structures (AP-Ala3 and AP-Ala4, respectively) together with alanine tripeptide with parallel β-sheet structures (P-Ala3) have been determined, but alanine tetrapeptide with a parallel β-sheet structure (P-Ala4) has not been reported yet. In this article, first, we established the preparation protocol of P-Ala4 from more stable AP-Ala4. Second, complete assignments of the (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H solid-state NMR spectra were performed with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled Ala4 samples using several solid-state NMR techniques. Then, the structural constraints were obtained, for example, the amide proton peaks of P-Ala4 in the (1)H double-quantum magic-angle spinning NMR spectrum were heavily overlapped and observed at about 7.4 ppm, which was a much higher field than that of 8.7-9.1 ppm observed for AP-Ala4, indicating that the intermolecular hydrogen-bond lengths across strands (N-H···O═C) were considerably longer for P-Ala4, that is, 2.21-2.34 Å, than those reported for AP-Ala4, that is, 1.8-1.9 Å. The structural model was proposed for P-Ala4 by NMR results and MD calculations. PMID:27482868

  9. Measurements of 13C multiple-quantum coherences in amyloid fibrils under magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Chou, Fang-Chieh; Tsai, Tim W T; Cheng, Hsin-Mei; Chan, Jerry C C

    2012-06-21

    The excitation and detection of high-order multiple quantum coherences among (13)C nuclear spins are demonstrated in the samples of [1-(13)C]-L-alanine and (13)C labeled amyloid fibrils at a spinning frequency of 20 kHz. The technique is based on the double-quantum average Hamiltonian prepared by the DRAMA-XY4 pulse sequence. Empirically, we find that multiple supercycles are required to suppress the higher-order effects for real applications. Measurements for the fibril samples formed by the polypeptides of PrP(113-127) provide the first solid-state NMR evidence for the stacking of multiple β-sheet layers at the structural core of amyloid fibrils. PMID:22632418

  10. Femtosecond all-solid-state laser for refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zickler, Leander; Han, Meng; Giese, G.'nter; Loesel, Frieder H.; Bille, Josef F.

    2003-06-01

    Refractive surgery in the pursuit of perfect vision (e.g. 20/10) requires firstly an exact measurement of abberations induced by the eye and then a sophisticated surgical approach. A recent extension of wavefront measurement techniques and adaptive optics to ophthalmology has quantitatively characterized the quality of the human eye. The next milestone towards perfect vision is developing a more efficient and precise laser scalpel and evaluating minimal-invasive laser surgery strategies. Femtosecond all-solid-state MOPA lasers based on passive modelocking and chirped pulse amplification are excellent candidates for eye surgery due to their stability, ultra-high intensity and compact tabletop size. Furthermore, taking into account the peak emission in the near IR and diffraction limited focusing abilities, surgical laser systems performing precise intrastromal incisions for corneal flap resection and intrastromal corneal reshaping promise significant improvement over today's Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK) and Laser Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis (LASIK) techniques which utilize UV excimer lasers. Through dispersion control and optimized regenerative amplification, a compact femtosecond all-solid-state laser with pulsed energy well above LIOB threshold and kHz repetition rate is constructed. After applying a pulse sequence to the eye, the modified corneal morphology is investigated by high resolution microscopy (Multi Photon/SHG Confocal Microscope).

  11. Diamond deposition and defect chemistry studied via solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Karen K.

    1994-06-01

    Diamond defects were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). While maintaining the macroscopic integrity of the films, concentrations between 0.001 and 1.0 at.% H were measured, among the lowest ever reported by solid-state 1H NMR. These concentrations were correlated to infrared absorption in the 8 to 10 micron region and to thermal conductivity. Despite the low concentrations, Multiple Quantum NMR reveals a high degree of hydrogen clustering consistent with grain boundary passivation. Most hydrogen is rigidly held, but some, probably in -OCH3 and -NCH3 defects, undergoes rotation at room temperature. Similar results were obtained for hot-filament, microwave-plasma and DC arc-jet films, suggesting a common surface chemistry, but no hydrogen was detected in an as-deposited combustion film. 13C NMR provided the first quantitative determination of non-diamond bonded carbon defects, providing a benchmark for Raman spectroscopy, the primary characterization method for diamond. Selective 13C labeling demonstrated heterogeneous reactions involving carbon occur at the hot-filament. With high-speed magic-angle-spinning 19F NMR, CFx (x=1-3) functionalities were resolved on the surface of plasma-treated diamond powder. Understanding these defects impacts the understanding of film growth mechanisms and structure-property relationships for CVD diamond.

  12. Chemical structure and heterogeneity differences of two lignins from loblolly pine as investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advanced solid-state NMR was employed to investigate differences in chemical structure and heterogeneity between milled wood lignin (MWL) and residual enzyme lignin (REL). Wiley and conventional milled woods were also studied. The advanced NMR techniques included 13C quantitative direct polarization...

  13. Dephosphorylation and biodistribution of 1-13C-phospholactate in vivo†

    PubMed Central

    Shchepin, Roman V.; Pham, Wellington; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a new approach for the delivery of a metabolic contrast agent for in vivo molecular imaging. The use of a phosphate-protecting group that facilitates parahydrogen-induced polarization of 1-13C-phospholactate potentially enables the in vivo administration of a hydrogenated hyperpolarized adduct. When injected, nonhyperpolarized 1-13C-phospholactate is retained in the vasculature during its metabolic conversion to 1-13C-lactate by blood phosphatases as demonstrated here using a mucin 1 mouse model of breast cancer and ex vivo high-resolution 13C NMR. This multisecond process is a suitable mechanism for the delivery of relatively short-lived 13C and potentially 15N hyperpolarized contrast agents using –OH phosphorylated small molecules, which is demonstrated here for the first time as an example of 1-13C-phospholactate. Through this approach, DL-1-13C-lactate is taken up by tissues and organs including the liver, kidneys, brain, heart, and tumors according to a timescale amenable to hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24995802

  14. Structural analysis of geochemical samples by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Role of paramagnetic material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vassallo, A.M.; Wilson, M.A.; Collin, P.J.; Oades, J.M.; Waters, A.G.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    An examination of coals, coal tars, a fulvic acid, and soil fractions by solid-state 13C NMR spectrometry has demonstrated widely differing behavior regarding quantitative representation in the spectrum. Spin counting experiments on coal tars and the fulvic acid show that almost all the sample carbon is observed in both solution and solid-state NMR spectra. Similar experiments on two coals (a lignite and a bituminous coal) show that most (70-97%) of the carbon is observed; however, when the lignite is ion exchanged with 3% (w/w) Fe3+, the fraction of carbon observed drops to below 10%. In additional experiments signal intensity from soil samples is enhanced by a simple dithionite treatment. This is illustrated by 13C, 27Al, and 29Si solid-state NMR experiments on soil fractions. ?? 1987 American Chemical Society.

  15. High Resolution Global View of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Io, the most volcanic body in the solar system is seen in the highest resolution obtained to date by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The smallest features that can be discerned are 2.5 kilometers in size. There are rugged mountains several kilometers high, layered materials forming plateaus, and many irregular depressions called volcanic calderas. Several of the dark, flow-like features correspond to hot spots, and may be active lava flows. There are no landforms resembling impact craters, as the volcanism covers the surface with new deposits much more rapidly than the flux of comets and asteroids can create large impact craters. The picture is centered on the side of Io that always faces away from Jupiter; north is to the top.

    Color images acquired on September 7, 1996 have been merged with higher resolution images acquired on November 6, 1996 by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The color is composed of data taken, at a range of 487,000 kilometers, in the near-infrared, green, and violet filters and has been enhanced to emphasize the extraordinary variations in color and brightness that characterize Io's face. The high resolution images were obtained at ranges which varied from 245,719 kilometers to 403,100 kilometers.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  16. Investigations of adsorption sites on oxide surfaces using solid-state NMR and TPD-IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, Rebecca A.

    diameters and thermal histories. The bulk structural features in both compositions of glass fibers were identified using high-resolution 29Si, 27Al, and 11B magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopic measurements. In multi-component glasses, the determination of silicon, aluminum, and boron distributions becomes difficult due to the competitive nature of the network-modifying oxides among the network-forming oxides. In pure silicates, 29Si MAS NMR can often resolve resonances arising from silicate tetrahedron having varying numbers of bridging oxygens. In aluminoborosilicate glasses, aluminum is present in four-, five-, and six- coordination with oxygen as neighbors. The speciation of the aluminum can be determined using 27Al MAS NMR. The fraction of tetrahedral boron species in the glass fibers were measured using 11B MAS NMR, which is typically used to study the short-range structure of borate containing glasses such as alkali borate, borosilicate, and aluminoborosilicate glasses. While solid-state NMR is a powerful tool for elucidating bonding environments and coordination changes in the glass structure, it cannot quantitatively probe low to moderate surface area samples due to insufficient spins. Chemical probes either physisorbed or chemisorbed to the fiber's surface can increase the surface selectivity of NMR for analysis of samples with low surface areas and provide information about the local molecular structure of the reactive surface site. Common chemical probe molecules contain NMR active nuclei such as 19F or may be enriched with 13C. A silyating agent, (3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)dimethylchlorosilane (TFS), reacts with reactive surface hydroxyls, which can be quantified by utilizing the NMR active nucleus (19F) contained in the probe molecule. The observed 19F MAS NMR peak area is integrated and compared against a standard of known fluorine spins (concentration), allowing the number of reactive hydroxyl sites to be quantified. IGC is a method used to study the

  17. Analysing Groundwater Using the 13C Isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Sadek

    The stable isotope of the carbon atom (13C) give information about the type of the mineralisation of the groundwater existing during the water seepage and about the recharge conditions of the groundwater. The concentration of the CO2(aq.) dissolved during the infiltration of the water through the soil's layers has an effect on the mineralisation of this water. The type of the photosynthesis's cycle (C-3 or C-4 carbon cycle) can have a very important role to determine the conditions (closed or open system) of the mineralisation of groundwater. The isotope 13C of the dissolved CO2 in water give us a certain information about the origin and the area of pollution of water. The proportion of the biogenic carbon and its percentage in the mineralisation of groundwater is determined by using the isotope 13C.

  18. States of 13C with abnormal radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demyanova, A. S.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Danilov, A. N.; Goncharov, S. A.; Belyaeva, T. L.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Burtebaev, N.; Trzaska, W.; Heikkinen, P.; Tyurin, G. P.; Janseitov, D.; Gurov, Yu. B.

    2016-05-01

    Differential cross-sections of the elastic and inelastic 13C + α scattering were measured at E(α) = 90 MeV. The root mean-square radii() of 13C nucleus in the states: 8.86 (1/2-), 3.09 (1/2+) and 9.90 (3/2-) MeV were determined by the Modified diffraction model (MDM). The radii of the first two levels are enhanced compared to that of the ground state of 13C, confirming the suggestion that the 8.86 MeV state is an analogue of the Hoyle state in 12C and the 3.09 MeV state has a neutron halo. Some indications to the abnormally small size of the 9.90 MeV state were obtained.

  19. Advanced Solid-State 13C NMR Analysis of Organic Matter in a Nebraska Corn Soil Amended with Cattle Manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Annual application of cattle manure in a farmer's field in eastern Nebraska for four years caused improved soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) supply and increased corn yield in less productive portions of the field. As a first step toward identifying the soil processes that led to these changes, t...

  20. Modular nonvolatile solid state recorder (MONSSTR) update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klang, Mark R.; Small, Martin B.; Beams, Tom

    2001-12-01

    Solid state recorders have begun replacing traditional tape recorders in fulfilling the requirement to record images on airborne platforms. With the advances in electro-optical, IR, SAR, Multi and Hyper-spectral sensors and video recording requirements, solid state recorders have become the recorder of choice. Solid state recorders provide the additional storage, higher sustained bandwidth, less power, less weight and smaller footprint to meet the current and future recording requirements. CALCULEX, Inc., manufactures a non-volatile flash memory solid state recorder called the MONSSTR (Modular Non-volatile Solid State Recorder). MONSSTR is being used to record images from many different digital sensors on high performance aircraft such as the RF- 4, F-16 and the Royal Air Force Tornado. MONSSTR, with its internal multiplexer, is also used to record instrumentation data. This includes multiple streams of PCM and multiple channels of 1553 data. Instrumentation data is being recorded by MONSSTR systems in a range of platforms including F-22, F-15, F-16, Comanche Helicopter and US Navy torpedos. MONSSTR can also be used as a cockpit video recorder. This paper will provide an update of the MONSSTR.

  1. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra of 13C-glycolaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haykal, I.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) is the simplest sugar and an important intermediate in the path toward forming more complex biologically relevant molecules. Astronomical surveys of interstellar molecules, such as those available with the very sensitive ALMA telescope, require preliminary laboratory investigations of the microwave and submillimeter-wave spectra of molecular species including new isotopologs - to identify these in the interstellar media. Aims: To achieve the detection of the 13C isotopologs of glycolaldehyde in the interstellar medium, their rotational spectra in the millimeter and submillimeter-wave regions were studied. Methods: The spectra of 13CH2OHCHO and CH2OH13CHO were recorded in the 150-945 GHz spectral range in the laboratory using a solid-state submillimeter-wave spectrometer in Lille. The observed line frequencies were measured with an accuracy of 30 kHz up to 700 GHz and of 50 kHz above 700 GHz. We analyzed the spectra with a standard Watson Hamiltonian. Results: About 10 000 new lines were identified for each isotopolog. The spectroscopic parameters were determined for the ground- and the three lowest vibrational states up to 945 and 630 GHz. Previous microwave assignments of 13CH2OHCHO were not confirmed. Conclusions: The provided line-lists and sets of molecular parameters meet the needs for a first astrophysical search of 13C-glycolaldehydes. Full Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A96

  2. High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna (HRSRA) for the purpose of tracking ground terminals and space craft communication applications. The present invention provides an alternative to using gimbaled parabolic dish antennas and direct radiating phased arrays. When compared to a gimbaled parabolic dish, the HRSRA offers the advantages of vibration free steering without incurring appreciable cost or prime power penalties. In addition, it offers full beam steering at a fraction of the cost of direct radiating arrays and is more efficient.

  3. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-01-01

    Earth resources observed in greater detail. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, undergoing development for use in NASA's Earth Observing System, measures reflectance of Earth's surface in visible and near-infrared wavelengths. From an orbit around Earth, instrument scans surface of Earth in 200 wavelength bands simultaneously. Produces images enabling identification of minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland waters, changes in spectra associated with biochemistry of plant canopies, compositions of atmospheric aerosols, sizes of grains in snow, and contamination of snow by impurities that absorb visible light.

  4. Driver circuit for solid state light sources

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Fred; Denvir, Kerry; Allen, Steven

    2016-02-16

    A driver circuit for a light source including one or more solid state light sources, a luminaire including the same, and a method of so driving the solid state light sources are provided. The driver circuit includes a rectifier circuit that receives an alternating current (AC) input voltage and provides a rectified AC voltage. The driver circuit also includes a switching converter circuit coupled to the light source. The switching converter circuit provides a direct current (DC) output to the light source in response to the rectified AC voltage. The driver circuit also includes a mixing circuit, coupled to the light source, to switch current through at least one solid state light source of the light source in response to each of a plurality of consecutive half-waves of the rectified AC voltage.

  5. Is solid state the future of lighting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.

    2004-01-01

    The rapid pace of solid state technological development over the past four decades has resulted in almost universal acceptance of the phrase "Moore's Law," whether it is used accurately to refer to the exponential increase in computer processor power or to refer to some more amorphous scope of rapid change. More recent breakthroughs in LED science and engineering have precipitated a vigorous discussion of the depth and pace with which solid state light sources will penetrate the $50-billion world-wide lighting market. This discussion has not two perspectives but many, and each perspective can provide valuable insight into key issues that will determine the role that solid state technology will play in the lighting market of 2020 and beyond.

  6. Solid state recording current meter conversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Wang, Lichen

    1985-01-01

    The authors describe the conversion of an Endeco-174 current meter to a solid-state recording current meter. A removable solid-state module was designed to fit in the space originally occupied by an 8-track tape cartridge. The module contains a CPU and 128 kilobytes of nonvolatile CMOS memory. The solid-state module communicates with any terminal or computer using an RS-232C interface at 4800 baud rate. A primary consideration for conversion was to keep modifications of the current meter to a minimum. The communication protocol was designed to emulate the Endeco tape translation unit, thus the need for a translation unit was eliminated and the original data reduction programs can be used without any modification. After conversion, the data recording section of the current meter contains no moving parts; the storage capacity of the module is equivalent to that of the original tape cartridge.

  7. Protect motors with solid-state overloads

    SciTech Connect

    Forsell, K.A. )

    1993-03-01

    Magnetic motor starters that rely on bimetal or melting alloy overload protection do not provide the flexibility of solid-state overload technology. The point is best illustrated by the number of different overload relay trip curves that describe tripping time as a function of motor current. Solid-state overloads have a trip curve for a cold start with three-phase current, and a family of trip curves for three-phase conditions where the overload and motor are already warm. An overload relay can also be described by its single-phase trip-time curves for cold and warm initial states. All thermal overloads have single phase trip curves that are similar in shape to their three-phase curves. Slower response to phase loss for motor loads less than locked rotor is inherent in thermal overload relay design. The paper describes the power source problem; single-phase problems; thermal overloads versus solid state; and thermal NEMA overload.

  8. Monolithic solid-state lasers for spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yu, Anthony W.; Stephen, Mark A.; Merritt, Scott; Glebov, Leonid; Glebova, Larissa; Ryasnyanskiy, Aleksandr; Smirnov, Vadim; Mu, Xiaodong; Meissner, Stephanie; Meissner, Helmuth

    2015-02-01

    A new solution for building high power, solid state lasers for space flight is to fabricate the whole laser resonator in a single (monolithic) structure or alternatively to build a contiguous diffusion bonded or welded structure. Monolithic lasers provide numerous advantages for space flight solid-state lasers by minimizing misalignment concerns. The closed cavity is immune to contamination. The number of components is minimized thus increasing reliability. Bragg mirrors serve as the high reflector and output coupler thus minimizing optical coatings and coating damage. The Bragg mirrors also provide spectral and spatial mode selection for high fidelity. The monolithic structure allows short cavities resulting in short pulses. Passive saturable absorber Q-switches provide a soft aperture for spatial mode filtering and improved pointing stability. We will review our recent commercial and in-house developments toward fully monolithic solid-state lasers.

  9. The High Resolution Hurricane Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripoli, G. J.

    2009-09-01

    It has been suggested that an answer to the hurricane intensity forecast problem is to use very high cloud-resolving resolution in operational forecast models. In consideration of this hypothesis, the United States National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration commissioned a major study to take place over the past 1.5 years whereby the hypothesis would be tested with 6 different hurricane models featuring different dynamics cores and different physics. These models included the GFDL hurricane, Navy COAMPS, the WRF-ARW, WRF-AHW, WRF-NMM, and the UW-NMS. The experiment design was to choose and optimal mix of historic hurricanes where good observations of intensity at land fall existed and run 5 day model forecasts with 3 different resolutions of about 9-12 km (low resolution), 3-4 km (medium resolution) and 1-1.5 km (high resolution) and document how much the forecast improved in each case. The project focused on 10 storms over 2-12, 1-5 day forecast periods, for a total of 67 simulations. Not all groups completed all 67 simulations, but there were sufficient results to reach a stunning conclusion. The results of these tests suggested that little or no improvement in intensity prediction was achieved with high resolution.

  10. Solid State Lasers from an Efficiency Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    2007-01-01

    Solid state lasers have remained a vibrant area of research because several major innovations expanded their capability. Major innovations are presented with emphasis focused on the laser efficiency. A product of efficiencies approach is developed and applied to describe laser performance. Efficiency factors are presented in closed form where practical and energy transfer effects are included where needed. In turn, efficiency factors are used to estimate threshold and slope efficiency, allowing a facile estimate of performance. Spectroscopic, thermal, and mechanical data are provided for common solid state laser materials.

  11. Absolute partial decay-branch measurements in 13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheldon, C.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Kokalova, Tz.; Malcolm, J. D.; Ziman, V. A.; Faestermann, Th.; Wirth, H.-F.; Hertenberger, R.; Lutter, R.

    2012-10-01

    The 9Be(6Li,d)13C* reaction at a beam energy of 42 MeV has been investigated using a large-acceptance silicon-strip detector array and the high-resolution Q3D magnetic spectrograph. The Q3D facilitated the unambiguous determination of the reaction channel via identification of the deuteron ejectile, thereby providing the spectrum of excited states in 13C in the range from 10.7 to 15.0 MeV. The silicon array was used to detect and identify the 13C recoil-breakup products with efficiencies of up to 49%. The results obtained for the absolute partial branching ratios represent the first complete measurements for states in this energy region and allow the extraction of reduced widths. The quantities measured for Γn0/Γtot and Γn1/Γtot are 0.91±0.11 and ≤0.13 (10.753 MeV), 0.51±0.04 and 0.51±0.04 (10.818 MeV), 0.68±0.03 and 0.42±0.02 (10.996 MeV), 0.49±0.08 and 0.71±0.11 (11.848 MeV), and 0.49±0.08 and 0.53±0.08 (12.130 MeV), respectively. For the two observed higher-lying energy levels, Γα0/Γtot and Γn1/Γtot have been measured as 0.54±0.02 and 0.45±0.02 (13.760 MeV) and 0.94±0.03 and 0.13±0.02 (14.582 MeV), respectively. The consequences for the proposed molecular structures in 13C are explored following the extraction of reduced widths.

  12. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c] And [2h3, 13c]Methyl Aryl Sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-03-30

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2,.sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to the labeled compounds of [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide and [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide.

  13. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed – neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins. PMID:24412099

  14. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Timothy A.; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins.

  15. Solid state NMR: The essential technology for helical membrane protein structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Cross, Timothy A; Ekanayake, Vindana; Paulino, Joana; Wright, Anna

    2014-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of helical membrane proteins has been very challenging on multiple fronts. The expression and purification of these proteins while maintaining functionality has consumed countless graduate student hours. Sample preparations have depended on whether solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy was to be performed - neither have been easy. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that membrane mimic environments influence the structural result. Indeed, in these recent years we have rediscovered that Nobel laureate, Christian Anfinsen, did not say that protein structure was exclusively dictated by the amino acid sequence, but rather by the sequence in a given environment (Anfinsen, 1973) [106]. The environment matters, molecular interactions with the membrane environment are significant and many examples of distorted, non-native membrane protein structures have recently been documented in the literature. However, solid-state NMR structures of helical membrane proteins in proteoliposomes and bilayers are proving to be native structures that permit a high resolution characterization of their functional states. Indeed, solid-state NMR is uniquely able to characterize helical membrane protein structures in lipid environments without detergents. Recent progress in expression, purification, reconstitution, sample preparation and in the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of both oriented samples and magic angle spinning samples has demonstrated that helical membrane protein structures can be achieved in a timely fashion. Indeed, this is a spectacular opportunity for the NMR community to have a major impact on biomedical research through the solid-state NMR spectroscopy of these proteins. PMID:24412099

  16. Dynamic nuclear polarization of carbonyl and methyl 13C spins in acetate using trityl OX063

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Lumata, Lloyd

    2015-03-01

    Hyperpolarization via dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a physics technique that amplifies the magnetic resonance signals by several thousand-fold for biomedical NMR spectroscopy and imaging (MRI). Herein we have investigated the effect of carbon-13 isotopic location on the DNP of acetate (one of the biomolecules commonly used for hyperpolarization) at 3.35 T and 1.4 K using a narrow ESR linewidth free radical trityl OX063. We have found that the carbonyl 13C spins yielded about twice the polarization produced in methyl 13C spins. Deuteration of the methyl group, beneficial in the liquid-state, did not produce an improvement in the polarization level at cryogenic conditions. Concurrently, the solid-state nuclear relaxation of these samples correlate with the polarization levels achieved. These results suggest that the location of the 13C isotopic labeling in acetate has a direct impact on the solid-state polarization achieved and is mainly governed by the nuclear relaxation leakage factor.

  17. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 A ring TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron registered accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  18. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 Å TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron® accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  19. High Resolution Thermometry for EXACT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, J. S.; Nash, A. E.; Larson, M.; Mulders, N.

    2000-01-01

    High Resolution Thermometers (HRTs) based on SQUID detection of the magnetization of a paramagnetic salt or a metal alloy has been commonly used for sub-nano Kelvin temperature resolution in low temperature physics experiments. The main applications to date have been for temperature ranges near the lambda point of He-4 (2.177 K). These thermometers made use of materials such as Cu(NH4)2Br4 *2H2O, GdCl3, or PdFe. None of these materials are suitable for EXACT, which will explore the region of the He-3/He-4 tricritical point at 0.87 K. The experiment requirements and properties of several candidate paramagnetic materials will be presented, as well as preliminary test results.

  20. High Resolution Neutral Atom Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucay, Igal; Castillo-Garza, Rodrigo; Stratis, Georgios; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a high resolution neutral atom microscope based on metastable atom electron spectroscopy (MAES). When a metastable atom of a noble gas is near a solid, a surface electron will tunnel to an empty energy level of the metastable atom, thereby ejecting the excited electron from the atom. The emitted electrons carry information regarding the local topography and electronic, magnetic, and chemical structures of most hard materials. Furthermore, using a chromatic aberration corrected magnetic hexapole lens we expect to attain a spatial resolution below 10 nm. We will use this microscope to investigate how local phenomena can give rise to macroscopic effects in materials that cannot be probed using a scanning tunneling microscope, namely insulating transition metal oxides.

  1. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Dieckman, Stephen L.; Ellingson, William A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  2. Nanoscale solid-state cooling: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar; Zebarjadi, Mona; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in nanoscale solid-state cooling are reviewed. This includes both theoretical and experimental studies of different physical concepts, as well as nanostructured material design and device configurations. We primarily focus on thermoelectric, thermionic and thermo-magnetic coolers. Particular emphasis is given to the concepts based on metal–semiconductor superlattices, graded materials, non-equilibrium thermoelectric devices, Thomson coolers, and photon assisted Peltier coolers as promising methods for efficient solid-state cooling. Thermomagnetic effects such as magneto–Peltier and Nernst–Ettingshausen cooling are briefly described and recent advances and future trends in these areas are reviewed. The ongoing progress in solid-state cooling concepts such as spin-calorimetrics, electrocalorics, non-equilibrium/nonlinear Peltier devices, superconducting junctions and two-dimensional materials are also elucidated and practical achievements are reviewed. We explain the thermoreflectance thermal imaging microscopy and the transient Harman method as two unique techniques developed for characterization of thermoelectric microrefrigerators. The future prospects for solid-state cooling are briefly summarized.

  3. Technique for improving solid state mosaic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saboe, J. M.

    1969-01-01

    Method identifies and corrects mosaic image faults in solid state visual displays and opto-electronic presentation systems. Composite video signals containing faults due to defective sensing elements are corrected by a memory unit that contains the stored fault pattern and supplies the appropriate fault word to the blanking circuit.

  4. Self-protecting solid state isolated switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, A. C.; Gooder, S. T.

    1974-01-01

    Solid state switch has following capabilities: (1) Hybrid or IC from compatible with direct mounting on solar array substrate; (2) Continuous signal is not required to hold it in either on or off state; (3) Separate signal lines for on and off control; (4) Electrically isolated from input signals; and (5) Current surges will not cause switch failure.

  5. Solar-pumped solid state Nd lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Zapata, L.

    1985-01-01

    Solid state neodymium lasers are considered candidates for space-based polar-pumped laser for continuous power transmission. Laser performance for three different slab laser configurations has been computed to show the excellent power capability of such systems if heat problems can be solved. Ideas involving geometries and materials are offered as potential solutions to the heat problem.

  6. Solid-state NMR for bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria associate with surfaces and one another by elaborating an extracellular matrix to encapsulate cells, creating communities termed biofilms. Biofilms are beneficial in some ecological niches, but also contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative measurements are needed to define the composition and architecture of bacterial biofilms to help drive the development of strategies to interfere with biofilm assembly. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely suited to the examination of insoluble and complex macromolecular and whole-cell systems. This article highlights three examples that implement solid-state NMR to deliver insights into bacterial biofilm composition and changes in cell-wall composition as cells transition to the biofilm lifestyle. Most recently, solid-state NMR measurements provided a total accounting of the protein and polysaccharide components in the extracellular matrix of an Escherichia coli biofilm and transformed our qualitative descriptions of matrix composition into chemical parameters that permit quantitative comparisons among samples. We present additional data for whole biofilm samples (cells plus the extracellular matrix) that complement matrix-only analyses. The study of bacterial biofilms by solid-state NMR is an exciting avenue ripe with many opportunities and we close the article by articulating some outstanding questions and future directions in this area.

  7. Nanoscale solid-state cooling: a review.

    PubMed

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar; Zebarjadi, Mona; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in nanoscale solid-state cooling are reviewed. This includes both theoretical and experimental studies of different physical concepts, as well as nanostructured material design and device configurations. We primarily focus on thermoelectric, thermionic and thermo-magnetic coolers. Particular emphasis is given to the concepts based on metal-semiconductor superlattices, graded materials, non-equilibrium thermoelectric devices, Thomson coolers, and photon assisted Peltier coolers as promising methods for efficient solid-state cooling. Thermomagnetic effects such as magneto-Peltier and Nernst-Ettingshausen cooling are briefly described and recent advances and future trends in these areas are reviewed. The ongoing progress in solid-state cooling concepts such as spin-calorimetrics, electrocalorics, non-equilibrium/nonlinear Peltier devices, superconducting junctions and two-dimensional materials are also elucidated and practical achievements are reviewed. We explain the thermoreflectance thermal imaging microscopy and the transient Harman method as two unique techniques developed for characterization of thermoelectric microrefrigerators. The future prospects for solid-state cooling are briefly summarized. PMID:27519021

  8. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    An accessory for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  9. The Pythagorean Theorem and the Solid State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Brenda S.; Splittgerber, Allan G.

    2005-01-01

    Packing efficiency and crystal density can be calculated from basic geometric principles employing the Pythagorean theorem, if the unit-cell structure is known. The procedures illustrated have applicability in courses such as general chemistry, intermediate and advanced inorganic, materials science, and solid-state physics.

  10. Density functional theory in the solid state

    PubMed Central

    Hasnip, Philip J.; Refson, Keith; Probert, Matt I. J.; Yates, Jonathan R.; Clark, Stewart J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) has been used in many fields of the physical sciences, but none so successfully as in the solid state. From its origins in condensed matter physics, it has expanded into materials science, high-pressure physics and mineralogy, solid-state chemistry and more, powering entire computational subdisciplines. Modern DFT simulation codes can calculate a vast range of structural, chemical, optical, spectroscopic, elastic, vibrational and thermodynamic phenomena. The ability to predict structure–property relationships has revolutionized experimental fields, such as vibrational and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, where it is the primary method to analyse and interpret experimental spectra. In semiconductor physics, great progress has been made in the electronic structure of bulk and defect states despite the severe challenges presented by the description of excited states. Studies are no longer restricted to known crystallographic structures. DFT is increasingly used as an exploratory tool for materials discovery and computational experiments, culminating in ex nihilo crystal structure prediction, which addresses the long-standing difficult problem of how to predict crystal structure polymorphs from nothing but a specified chemical composition. We present an overview of the capabilities of solid-state DFT simulations in all of these topics, illustrated with recent examples using the CASTEP computer program. PMID:24516184

  11. Solid state lasers - The next 10 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-10-01

    Major advances in solid state laser technology historically have been preceded by advances in pumping technology. The helical lamp used to pump the early ruby lasers was superseded by the linear flashlamp now used to pump Nd:YAG lasers. The next advance in pumping technology is the diode laser array. The improvements in power and efficiency of the diode laser coupled with the fortuitous spectral overlap of the diode laser emission wavelength with the Nd ion absorption bands near 805 nm have led to a revolution in solid state laser capability. Progress has been rapid with new ions and wavelengths reported in the near infrared from 946 nm to 2010 nm. Frequency extension via nonlinear interactions has led to green and blue sources of coherent radiation. Linewidths of less than 10 kHz have been demonstrated. Overall electrical efficiencies of greater than 10% have been achieved. As diode laser sources decrease in cost, high average power diode laser pumped solid state laser sources will become available. Power levels exceeding 1 kW appear possible. Potential applications of these compact all solid state laser sources to spectroscopy, quantum noise limited sensors, astronomy, and materials processing will be discussed.

  12. SPS solid state antenna power combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzsimmons, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    Solid state dc-rf converters offer potential improvements in reliability, mass and low voltage operation, provided that anticipated efficiencies in excess of 80 percent can be realized. Field effect transistors offer the greatest potential in the SPS frequency band at 2.45 GHz. To implement this approach it is essential that means be found to sum the power of many relatively low power solid state sources in a low-loss manner, and that means be provided to properly control the phase of the outputs of the large number of solid state sources required. To avoid the power combining losses associated with circuit hybrids it was proposed that the power from multiple solid state amplifiers be combined by direct coupling of each amplifier's output to the radiating antenna structure. The selected power-combining antenna consists of a unique printed (metalized) microstrip circuit on a ceramic type dielectric substrate which is backed by a shallow lightweight aluminum cavity which sums the power of four microwave sources. The antenna behaves like two one-half wavelength slot-line antennas coupled together via their common cavity structure.

  13. Solid state, S-band, power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digrindakis, M.

    1973-01-01

    The final design and specifications for a solid state, S-band, power amplifier is reported. Modifications from a previously proposed design were incorporated to improve efficiency and meet input overdrive and noise floor requirements. Reports on the system design, driver amplifier, power amplifier, and voltage and current limiter are included along with a discussion of the testing program.

  14. Light activated solid-state opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Petr, R.A.; Kachen, G.I.; Reilly, J.P.; Schaefer, R.B. ); Heyse, M.W. )

    1993-01-01

    Light-activated solid-state opening switches are shown to be a viable approach for switching inductive circuits. Measured photoswitch performance indicates that light-activated opening switches have the power density ratings needed to develop compact inductive power systems.

  15. Light activated solid-state opening switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petr, R. A.; Kachen, G. I.; Reilly, J. P.; Schaefer, R. B.; Heyse, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    The paper shows light-activated solid-state opening switches to be a viable approach for switching inductive circuits. Measured photoswitch performance indicates that light-activated opening switches have the power density ratings required to develop compact inductive power systems.

  16. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  17. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  18. HRSC: High resolution stereo camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Basilevsky, A.T.; Dumke, A.; Van Gasselt, S.; Giese, B.; Hauber, E.; Head, J. W., III; Heipke, C.; Hoekzema, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Greeley, R.; Gwinner, K.; Kirk, R.; Markiewicz, W.; McCord, T.B.; Michael, G.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Murray, J.B.; Oberst, J.; Pinet, P.; Pischel, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Willner, K.

    2009-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express has delivered a wealth of image data, amounting to over 2.5 TB from the start of the mapping phase in January 2004 to September 2008. In that time, more than a third of Mars was covered at a resolution of 10-20 m/pixel in stereo and colour. After five years in orbit, HRSC is still in excellent shape, and it could continue to operate for many more years. HRSC has proven its ability to close the gap between the low-resolution Viking image data and the high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images, leading to a global picture of the geological evolution of Mars that is now much clearer than ever before. Derived highest-resolution terrain model data have closed major gaps and provided an unprecedented insight into the shape of the surface, which is paramount not only for surface analysis and geological interpretation, but also for combination with and analysis of data from other instruments, as well as in planning for future missions. This chapter presents the scientific output from data analysis and highlevel data processing, complemented by a summary of how the experiment is conducted by the HRSC team members working in geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry and spectrophotometry. Many of these contributions have been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals and special issues. They form a cross-section of the scientific output, either by summarising the new geoscientific picture of Mars provided by HRSC or by detailing some of the topics of data analysis concerning photogrammetry, cartography and spectral data analysis.

  19. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  20. Conformational isomerism in solid state of AMG 853--structure studies using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Y-H; Nagapudi, Karthik; Wu, Tian; Peterson, Matthew L; Jona, Janan; Staples, Richard J; Stephens, Peter W

    2015-07-01

    Investigation of an additional resonance peak in the (19) F solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of AMG 853, a dual antagonist of DP and CRTH2 previously in clinical development for asthma, has led to the identification of two conformational isomers coexisting in the crystal lattice in a continuous composition range between 89.7%:10.3% and 96.5%:3.5%. These two isomers differ in the chloro-flurorophenyl moiety orientation-the aromatic ring is flipped by 180° in these two isomers. The level of the minor isomer is directly measured through integration of the two peaks in the (19) F solid-state NMR spectrum. The values obtained from the NMR data are in excellent agreement with the degree of disorder of the fluorine atom in the crystal structure, refined using both single-crystal and high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data. PMID:25912152

  1. 13C-labelled microdialysis studies of cerebral metabolism in TBI patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Keri L.H.; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Gallagher, Clare N.; Grice, Peter; Howe, Duncan J.; Mason, Andrew; Timofeev, Ivan; Helmy, Adel; Murphy, Michael P.; Menon, David K.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Sutherland, Garnette R.; Pickard, John D.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Human brain chemistry is incompletely understood and better methodologies are needed. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes metabolic perturbations, one result of which includes increased brain lactate levels. Attention has largely focussed on glycolysis, whereby glucose is converted to pyruvate and lactate, and is proposed to act as an energy source by feeding into neurons’ tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, generating ATP. Also reportedly upregulated by TBI is the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) that does not generate ATP but produces various molecules that are putatively neuroprotective, antioxidant and reparative, in addition to lactate among the end products. We have developed a novel combination of 13C-labelled cerebral microdialysis both to deliver 13C-labelled substrates into brains of TBI patients and recover the 13C-labelled metabolites, with high-resolution 13C NMR analysis of the microdialysates. This methodology has enabled us to achieve the first direct demonstration in humans that the brain can utilise lactate via the TCA cycle. We are currently using this methodology to make the first direct comparison of glycolysis and the PPP in human brain. In this article, we consider the application of 13C-labelled cerebral microdialysis for studying brain energy metabolism in patients. We set this methodology within the context of metabolic pathways in the brain, and 13C research modalities addressing them. PMID:24361470

  2. Proton-detected 2D radio frequency driven recoupling solid-state NMR studies on micelle-associated cytochrome-b5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Im, Sangchoul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-05-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is increasingly used in the high-resolution structural studies of membrane-associated proteins and peptides. Most such studies necessitate isotopically labeled (13C, 15N and 2H) proteins/peptides, which is a limiting factor for some of the exciting membrane-bound proteins and aggregating peptides. In this study, we report the use of a proton-based slow magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiment that exploits the unaveraged 1H-1H dipolar couplings from a membrane-bound protein. We have shown that the difference in the buildup rates of cross-peak intensities against the mixing time - obtained from 2D 1H-1H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments on a 16.7-kDa micelle-associated full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5) - can provide insights into protein dynamics and could be useful to measure 1H-1H dipolar couplings. The experimental buildup curves compare well with theoretical simulations and are used to extract relaxation parameters. Our results show that due to fast exchange of amide protons with water in the soluble heme-containing domain of cyb5, coherent 1H-1H dipolar interactions are averaged out for these protons while alpha and side chain protons show residual dipolar couplings that can be obtained from 1H-1H RFDR experiments. The appearance of resonances with distinct chemical shift values in 1H-1H RFDR spectra enabled the identification of residues (mostly from the transmembrane region) of cytb5 that interact with micelles.

  3. Proton-Detected 2D Radio Frequency Driven Recoupling Solid-state NMR Studies on Micelle-associated Cytochrome-b5

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Im, Sangchoul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is increasingly used in the high-resolution structural studies of membrane-associated proteins and peptides. Most such studies necessitate isotopically labeled (13C, 15N and 2H) proteins/peptides, which is a limiting factor for some of the exciting membrane-bound proteins and aggregating peptides. In this study, we report the use of a proton-based slow magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiment that exploits the unaveraged 1H-1H dipolar couplings from a membrane-bound protein. We have shown that the difference in the buildup rates of cross peak intensities against the mixing time - obtained from 2D 1H-1H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments on a 16.7-kDa micelle-associated full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5) - can provide insights into protein dynamics and could be useful to measure 1H-1H dipolar couplings. The experimental buildup curves compare well with theoretical simulations and are used to extract relaxation parameters. Our results show that due to fast exchange of amide protons with water in the soluble heme-containing domain of cyb5, coherent 1H-1H dipolar interactions are averaged out for these protons while alpha and side chain protons show residual dipolar couplings that can be obtained from 1H-1H RFDR experiments. The appearance of resonances with distinct chemical shift values in 1H-1H RFDR spectra enabled the identification of residues (mostly from the transmembrane region) of cytb5 that interact with micelles. PMID:24657390

  4. Investigating Protostellar Carbon Reservoirs with High-Resolution Spectroscopy Toward Massive Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. L.; Blake, G. A.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Lockwood, A. C.

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution CO spectra toward massive YSOs reveal less dispersion in [12C16O]/[13C16O] gas compared to low-mass YSOs, while these ratios may be similarly affected by CO ice. Our new data suggest that CO2 may not originate from a CO reservoir.

  5. Coordinated garbage collection for raid array of solid state disks

    DOEpatents

    Dillow, David A; Ki, Youngjae; Oral, Hakki S; Shipman, Galen M; Wang, Feiyi

    2014-04-29

    An optimized redundant array of solid state devices may include an array of one or more optimized solid-state devices and a controller coupled to the solid-state devices for managing the solid-state devices. The controller may be configured to globally coordinate the garbage collection activities of each of said optimized solid-state devices, for instance, to minimize the degraded performance time and increase the optimal performance time of the entire array of devices.

  6. On The Potential of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Diamonds in Solid-State and Dissolution (13) C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Christian O; Akbey, Ümit; Aussenac, Fabien; Olsen, Greg L; Feintuch, Akiva; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a versatile option to improve the sensitivity of NMR and MRI. This versatility has elicited interest for overcoming potential limitations of these techniques, including the achievement of solid-state polarization enhancement at ambient conditions, and the maximization of (13) C signal lifetimes for performing in vivo MRI scans. This study explores whether diamond's (13) C behavior in nano- and micro-particles could be used to achieve these ends. The characteristics of diamond's DNP enhancement were analyzed for different magnetic fields, grain sizes, and sample environments ranging from cryogenic to ambient temperatures, in both solution and solid-state experiments. It was found that (13) C NMR signals could be boosted by orders of magnitude in either low- or room-temperature solid-state DNP experiments by utilizing naturally occurring paramagnetic P1 substitutional nitrogen defects. We attribute this behavior to the unusually long electronic/nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times characteristic of diamond, coupled with a time-independent cross-effect-like polarization transfer mechanism facilitated by a matching of the nitrogen-related hyperfine coupling and the (13) C Zeeman splitting. The efficiency of this solid-state polarization process, however, is harder to exploit in dissolution DNP-enhanced MRI contexts. The prospects for utilizing polarized diamond approaching nanoscale dimensions for both solid and solution applications are briefly discussed. PMID:27416769

  7. Accurate determinations of one-bond 13C-13C couplings in 13C-labeled carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azurmendi, Hugo F.; Freedberg, Darón I.

    2013-03-01

    Carbon plays a central role in the molecular architecture of carbohydrates, yet the availability of accurate methods for 1DCC determination has not been sufficiently explored, despite the importance that such data could play in structural studies of oligo- and polysaccharides. Existing methods require fitting intensity ratios of cross- to diagonal-peaks as a function of the constant-time (CT) in CT-COSY experiments, while other methods utilize measurement of peak separation. The former strategies suffer from complications due to peak overlap, primarily in regions close to the diagonal, while the latter strategies are negatively impacted by the common occurrence of strong coupling in sugars, which requires a reliable assessment of their influence in the context of RDC determination. We detail a 13C-13C CT-COSY method that combines a variation in the CT processed with diagonal filtering to yield 1JCC and RDCs. The strategy, which relies solely on cross-peak intensity modulation, is inspired in the cross-peak nulling method used for JHH determinations, but adapted and extended to applications where, like in sugars, large one-bond 13C-13C couplings coexist with relatively small long-range couplings. Because diagonal peaks are not utilized, overlap problems are greatly alleviated. Thus, one-bond couplings can be determined from different cross-peaks as either active or passive coupling. This results in increased accuracy when more than one determination is available, and in more opportunities to measure a specific coupling in the presence of severe overlap. In addition, we evaluate the influence of strong couplings on the determination of RDCs by computer simulations. We show that individual scalar couplings are notably affected by the presence of strong couplings but, at least for the simple cases studied, the obtained RDC values for use in structural calculations were not, because the errors introduced by strong couplings for the isotropic and oriented phases are very

  8. Structural heterogeneity in microcrystalline ubiquitin studied by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Lakomek, Nils-Alexander; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Shi, Chaowei; Giller, Karin; Wolff, Sebastian; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-01-01

    By applying [1-13C]- and [2-13C]-glucose labeling schemes to the folded globular protein ubiquitin, a strong reduction of spectral crowding and increase in resolution in solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectra could be achieved. This allowed spectral resonance assignment in a straightforward manner and the collection of a wealth of long-range distance information. A high precision solid-state NMR structure of microcrystalline ubiquitin was calculated with a backbone rmsd of 1.57 to the X-ray structure and 1.32 Å to the solution NMR structure. Interestingly, we can resolve structural heterogeneity as the presence of three slightly different conformations. Structural heterogeneity is most significant for the loop region β1-β2 but also for β-strands β1, β2, β3, and β5 as well as for the loop connecting α1 and β3. This structural polymorphism observed in the solid-state NMR spectra coincides with regions that showed dynamics in solution NMR experiments on different timescales. PMID:25644665

  9. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of {sup 29}Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The {sup 29}Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  10. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state [sup 13]C and [sup 29]Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS [sup 13]C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of [sup 29]Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The [sup 29]Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  11. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  12. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  13. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  14. High resolution auditory perception system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Iftekhar; Ghatol, Ashok

    2005-04-01

    Blindness is a sensory disability which is difficult to treat but can to some extent be helped by artificial aids. The paper describes the design aspects of a high resolution auditory perception system, which is designed on the principle of air sonar with binaural perception. This system is a vision substitution aid for enabling blind persons. The blind person wears ultrasonic eyeglasses which has ultrasonic sensor array embedded on it. The system has been designed to operate in multiresolution modes. The ultrasonic sound from the transmitter array is reflected back by the objects, falling in the beam of the array and is received. The received signal is converted to a sound signal, which is presented stereophonically for auditory perception. A detailed study has been done as the background work required for the system implementation; the appropriate range analysis procedure, analysis of space-time signals, the acoustic sensors study, amplification methods and study of the removal of noise using filters. Finally the system implementation including both the hardware and the software part of it has been described. Experimental results on actual blind subjects and inferences obtained during the study have also been included.

  15. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Alan G.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometry has been revolutionized by access to instruments of increasingly high mass-resolving power. For small molecules up to ˜400 Da (e.g., drugs, metabolites, and various natural organic mixtures ranging from foods to petroleum), it is possible to determine elemental compositions (CcHhNnOoSsPp…) of thousands of chemical components simultaneously from accurate mass measurements (the same can be done up to 1000 Da if additional information is included). At higher mass, it becomes possible to identify proteins (including posttranslational modifications) from proteolytic peptides, as well as lipids, glycoconjugates, and other biological components. At even higher mass (˜100,000 Da or higher), it is possible to characterize posttranslational modifications of intact proteins and to map the binding surfaces of large biomolecule complexes. Here we review the principles and techniques of the highest-resolution analytical mass spectrometers (time-of-flight and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass analyzers) and describe some representative high-resolution applications.

  16. C-H and C-C clumping in ethane by high-resolution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clog, M. D.; Eiler, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is an important natural compound, and its geochemistry can be studied through 13C-13C, 13C-D and/or D-D clumping. Such measurements are potentially important both as a stepping stone towards the study of more complex organic molecules and, in its own regard, to understand processes controlling the generation, migration and destruction of natural gas. Isotopic clumping on C-C and C-H bonds could be influenced by thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, diffusion or gas mixing. Previous work showed that 13C-D clumping in methane generally reflects equilibrium and provides a measure of formation temperature (Stolper et al 2014a), whereas 13C-13C clumping in ethane is likely most controlled by chemical-kinetic processes and/or inheritance from the isotopic structure of source organic compounds (Clog et al 2014). 13C-D clumping in ethane has the potential to provide a thermometer for its synthesis, as it does for methane. However, the difference in C-H bond dissociation energy for these two compounds may suggest a lower 'blocking temperature' for this phenomenon in ethane (the blocking temperature for methane is ≥~250 C in geological conditions). We present analytical techniques to measure both 13C-13C and 13C-D clumping in ethane, using a novel two-instrument technique, including both the Thermo 253-Ultra and the Thermo DFS. In this method, the Ultra is used to measure the relative abundances of combinations nearly isobaric isotopologues: (13C12CH6 + 12C2DH5)/12C2H6 and (13C2H6 + 12C13CDH5)/12C2H6, free of other isobaric interferences like O2. The DFS, a very high resolution single-collector instrument, is then used to measure the ratios of isotopologues of ethane at a single cardinal mass: 12C2DH5/13C12CH6, and 12C13CDH5/13C2H6, with precisions of ~1 permil. Those 4 measurements allow us to calculate the bulk isotopic composition (D and 13C) as well as the abundance of 13C2H6 and 13C12CDH5. We also present progress on the development of software tools

  17. Quantification of peptide m/z distributions from 13C-labeled cultures with high resolution mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the introduction of orbital trap mass spectrometers molecular masses can be determined with great precision and accuracy. In addition, orbital trap spectrometers (Orbitraps) are sensitive and possess a linear dynamic range of multiple orders of magnitude. These qualities make the Orbitrap well-...

  18. The T1 ρ13C spin-lattice relaxation time of helical polyguanidines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, A. R.; Stewart, J. R.; Novak, B. M.

    1999-03-01

    The solid state dynamics of three helical polyguanidines differing only in their stereochemistry was investigated by 13C CP/MAS NMR. From these studies, the structures of the polyguanidines were confirmed, and the 13C spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame were measured. The relaxation times of all the polyguanidines indicated that they undergo fast motions, i.e. motions on the fast side of the T1 ρ minimum. The main chain carbon of polyguanidine I-( R/ S), with equal amounts of ( R) and ( S) chiral side chains, has higher activation energy, 10.7 kJ/mol, than the analogous polymers with enantiomerically pure side chains ( I-( R) and I-( S)), 5.1 kJ/mol.

  19. Hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride thin films studied by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, W. J.; Malyarenko, D. I.; Kraft, O.; Hoatson, G. L.; Reilly, A. C.; Holloway, B. C.

    2002-10-01

    The chemical bonding of hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films was examined using solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. The films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests reveal a recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. This combination of low modulus and high strength means the material can be regarded as hard and elastic; the material gives when pressed on and recovers its shape when the load is released. The 13C NMR results conclusively demonstrate that hard and elastic a-CNx has an sp2 carbon bonded structure and that sp3 hybridized carbons are absent. Our results stand in contrast with earlier work that proposed that the interesting mechanical properties of hard and elastic a-CNx were due, in part, to sp3 bonded carbon.

  20. Evolution of a solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, R. M.; Parker, J. M.; Allen, K. L.; Allmon, R. W.; Alviso, K. F.; Barty, C. P. J.; Bhachu, B. S.; Boley, C. D.; Burnham, A. K.; Combs, R. L.; Cutter, K. P.; Fochs, S. N.; Gonzales, S. A.; Hurd, R. L.; LaFortune, K. N.; Manning, W. J.; McClelland, M. A.; Merrill, R. D.; Molina, L.; Parks, C. W.; Pax, P. H.; Posey, A. S.; Rotter, M. D.; Roy, B. M.; Rubenchik, A. M.; Soules, T. F.; Webb, D. E.

    2007-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been developing compact solid state lasers since the 1990's. One of the first lasers to be developed utilized flashlamp pumped architecture and neodymium glass as the laser gain media. In the early 2000's, a diode pumped version of the original flashlamp pumped laser was designed and built, responding to the requirements that a laser system for the military be compact in both size and weight while creating significant power (~100 kW) for the missions envisioned. This paper will discuss the evolution of solid state lasers at LLNL and provide a glimpse into the types of capabilities that could be achieved in the near future.

  1. Solid state mechanochemical processes for better electroceramics.

    PubMed

    Mamoru, Senna

    2014-01-01

    The present short overview focuses on the renovation of solid state processes toward phase pure and well-crystallized complex oxides centered on the electroceramic materials. Elevation of the reactivity and preservation of stoichiometry of the starting mixture or precursor are of universal importance. Mechanical activation, being considered as versatile, may also need reconsideration in view of contamination and process rationalization. After briefly reviewing mechanochemical processes for direct synthesis of complex oxides, solid state processes toward well crystallized fine particles of complex oxides are discussed by starting from mechanochemically derived precursors with subsequent optimized calcination. Case studies were cited from literatures for complex oxides, including author's own experimental studies mainly with BaBi(2)Ta(2)O(9) (BBT), Ba(Mg(1/3)Ta(2/3))O(3) (BMT) and KNbO(3) (KN). The substances discussed are mostly associated with ferroelectric materials, with a few exceptions of iron-containing magnetic materials. PMID:25286196

  2. III-Nitride full-scale high-resolution microdisplays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Jacob; Li, J.; Lie, D. Y. C.; Bradford, Charles; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2011-07-01

    We report the realization and properties of a high-resolution solid-state self-emissive microdisplay based on III-nitride semiconductor micro-size light emitting diodes (µLEDs) capable of delivering video graphics images. The luminance level of III-nitride microdisplays is several orders of magnitude higher than those of liquid crystal and organic-LED displays. The pixel emission intensity was almost constant over an operational temperature range from 100 to -100 °C. The outstanding performance is a direct attribute of III-nitride semiconductors. An energy efficient active drive scheme is accomplished by hybrid integration between µLED arrays and Si CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) active matrix integrated circuits. These integrated devices could play important roles in emerging fields such as biophotonics and optogenetics, as well as ultra-portable products such as next generation pico-projectors.

  3. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations continue of diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser oscillators and nonlinear processes using them as sources. Diode laser array pumped Nd:YAG and Nd:glass lasers have been demonstrated. Theoretical studies of non-planar oscillators have been advanced, producing new designs which should be more resistant to feedback and offer better frequency stability. A monolithic, singly resonant Optical Parametric Oscillator in MgO:LiNbO3 has been operated.

  4. Solid state lithium-iodine primary battery

    SciTech Connect

    Sekido, S.; Ninomiya, Y.; Sotomura, T.

    1984-01-10

    A solid-state primary cell comprising a lithium anode, an iodine cathode containing a charge transfer complex and a solid lithium iodide electrolyte doped with a 1-normal-alkyl-pyridinium iodide. The anode surface can be coated with LiOH or Li/sub 3/N. The iodine cathode comprises a complex of iodine and 1-normal-alkyl-pyridinium iodide and preferably contains titanium dioxide powder, alumina gel powder or silica gel powder admixed with the complex.

  5. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser oscillators and nonlinear processes were investigated. A new generation on nonplanar oscillator was fabricated, and it is anticipated that passive linewidths will be pushed to the kilohertz regime. A number of diode-pumped laser transitions were demonstrated in the rod configuration. Second-harmonic conversion efficiencies as high as 15% are routinely obtained in a servo-locked external resonant doubling crystal at 15 mW cw input power levels at 1064 nm.

  6. Pulsed solid state lasers for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertesz, Ivan; Danileiko, A. Y.; Denker, Boris I.; Kroo, Norbert; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.

    1994-02-01

    The effect on living tissues of different pulsed solid state lasers: Nd:YAG ((lambda) equals 1.06 micrometers ) Er:glass (1.54 micrometers ), Ho:YAG (2.1 micrometers ) and Er:YAG (2.94 micrometers ) is compared with the continuous wave Nd:YAG- and CO2-lasers used in operating theaters. Portable Er:glass- and Er:YAG-lasers are developed for surgery/cosmetics and HIV-safe blood testing.

  7. Solid-state-laser-rod holder

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.; Barnes, N.P.; Griggs, J.E.

    1981-08-11

    The disclosure relates to a solid state laser rod holder comprising Invar, copper tubing, and epoxy joints. Materials and coefficients of expansion of the components of the holder combine with the rod to produce a joint which will give before the rod itself will. The rod may be lased at about 70 to 80/sup 0/K and returned from such a temperature to room temperature repeatedly without its or the holder's destruction.

  8. Solid State Processing of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Jurgen

    1998-03-01

    Glasses are generally produced from the undercooled liquid state by rapid quenching methods or quasi-statically at slow cooling by the effective control of heterogeneous nucleation. For metallic systems, the latter method has recently led to the development of multicomponent metallic glasses with large glass forming ability and a wide supercooled liquid region before crystallization. Large-scale bulk samples can now be produced by conventional casting techniques. These materials exhibit advanced engineering properties such as excellent wear behavior, almost theoretical strength and good corrosion resistance, and are highly processable at temperatures above the glass transition temperature. As an alternative to quenching or casting techniques, glass formation can also be achieved by solid state processing without passing through the liquid state. Therefore, mechanical alloying as a special form of solid state reaction technique and subsequent consolidation of the resulting powders above the glass transition temperature can be used to prepare bulk metallic glasses through the powder metallurgy route. This paper surveys results of studies regarding the factors governing glass formation by solid state processing. The thermal stability of mechanically alloyed powders is compared with data for melt quenched samples, showing that basically the same glassy state can be reached approaching it from the liquid or the solid state. Special emphasis is given to the glass forming ranges achievable by the different techniques, and to preparation of nanostructured composite materials based on glassy alloys. The results are discussed with respect to the influence of processing conditions, impurity effects and heterogeneous nucleation of crystalline phases. Examples for consolidated bulk samples from mechanically alloyed powders are presented and compared with data for cast bulk specimens.

  9. Solid state synthesis of poly(dichlorophosphazene)

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Christopher W.; Hneihen, Azzam S.; Peterson, Eric S.

    2001-01-01

    A method for making poly(dichlorophosphazene) using solid state reactants is disclosed and described. The present invention improves upon previous methods by removing the need for chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents, eliminating complicated equipment and simplifying the overall process by providing a "single pot" two step reaction sequence. This may be accomplished by the condensation reaction of raw materials in the melt phase of the reactants and in the absence of an environmentally damaging solvent.

  10. SPS solid state antenna power combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzsimmons, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    A concept for a solar power satellite antenna power combiner which utilizes solid state dc-rf converters is described. To avoid the power combining losses associated with circuit hybrids it is proposed that the power from multiple solid state amplifiers be combined by direct coupling of each amplifier's output to the radiating antenna structure. The selected power-combining antenna consists of a printed (metalized) microstrip circuit on a ceramic type dielectric substrate which is backed by a shallow lightweight aluminum cavity which sums the power of four microwave sources. The antenna behaves like two one-half wavelength slot-line antennas coupled together via their common cavity structure. A significant feature of the antenna configuration selected is that the radiated energy is summed to yield a single radiated output phase which represents the average insertion phase of the four power amplifiers. This energy may be sampled and, by comparison with the input signal, one can phase error correct to maintain the insertion phase of all solid state power combining modules at exactly the same value. This insures that the insertion phase of each SPS power combining antenna module is identical. An experiment verification program is described.

  11. Polymorphs of Theophylline Characterized by DNP Enhanced Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Pinon, Arthur C; Rossini, Aaron J; Widdifield, Cory M; Gajan, David; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-11-01

    We show how dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to characterize polymorphs and solvates of organic solids. We applied DNP to three polymorphs and one hydrated form of the asthma drug molecule theophylline. For some forms of theophylline, sample grinding and impregnation with the radical-containing solution, which are necessary to prepare the samples for DNP, were found to induce polymorphic transitions or desolvation between some forms. We present protocols for sample preparation for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) DNP experiments that avoid the polymorphic phase transitions in theophylline. These protocols include cryogrinding, grinding under inert atmosphere, and the appropriate choice of the impregnating liquid. By applying these procedures, we subsequently demonstrate that two-dimensional correlation experiments, such as (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N HETCOR or (13)C-(13)C INADEQUATE, can be obtained at natural isotopic abundance in reasonable times, thus enabling more advanced structural characterization of polymorphs. PMID:26393368

  12. High-resolution slug testing.

    PubMed

    Zemansky, G M; McElwee, C D

    2005-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) variation has important ramifications for ground water flow and the transport of contaminants in ground water. The delineation of the nature of that variation can be critical to complete characterization of a site and the planning of effective and efficient remedial measures. Site-specific features (such as high-conductivity zones) need to be quantified. Our alluvial field site in the Kansas River valley exhibits spatial variability, very high conductivities, and nonlinear behavior for slug tests in the sand and gravel aquifer. High-resolution, multilevel slug tests have been performed in a number of wells that are fully screened. A general nonlinear model based on the Navier-Stokes equation, nonlinear frictional loss, non-Darcian flow, acceleration effects, radius changes in the wellbore, and a Hvorslev model for the aquifer has been used to analyze the data, employing an automated processing system that runs within the Excel spreadsheet program. It is concluded that slug tests can provide the necessary data to identify the nature of both horizontal and vertical K variation in an aquifer and that improved delineation or higher resolution of K structure is possible with shorter test intervals. The gradation into zones of higher conductivity is sharper than seen previously, and the maximum conductivity observed is greater than previously measured. However, data from this project indicate that well development, the presence of fines, and the antecedent history of the well are important interrelated factors in regard to slug-test response and can prevent obtaining consistent results in some cases. PMID:15819943

  13. Global high resolution climate reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert-Frisius, Martina; Feser, Frauke; Zahn, Matthias; von Storch, Hans; Rast, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    Long-term reanalysis products represent an important data source for numerous climate studies. However, their coarse spatial resolution for data sets spanning the last more than 50 years and well known inhomogeneities in space and time make it difficult to derive changes in meteorological variables over time. We therefore use spectral nudging technique to down-scale the global reanalysis data to a finer resolution with a general global circulation model. With this technique the new calculated higher resolved global model fields are attracted to the large-scale state of the coarse resolution reanalysis. Besides the conservation of large-scale atmospheric information and the resulting finer topography, a surplus in contents of information in meteorological phenomena of small spatial extensions is expected. Following this strategy a simulation with the global high-resolution atmospheric model ECHAM6 (T255L95), developed by MPI-M Hamburg, will be started by spectrally nudging NCEP1 reanalysis for the time period from 1948 until 2013. Selected wavelengths of more than 1000 km of vorticity, divergence, temperature and the logarithm of the surface pressure will be imposed onto the simulated GCM counterparts at levels above 750 hPa. SST and sea ice distribution are taken from the NCEP1 data set. These simulations enable the investigation of long-term changes in meteorological phenomena; the focus is put here on intense storms. Various horizontal wavelength selections and associated vertical profiles in the strength of nudging were tested. The temporarily best configuration resulted in large time correlations for 2m-temperature and 10m wind speed at several selected locations in Germany in comparison to observations. Correlations were highest for extra-tropical regions, while over the western part of the Pacific and Indian Ocean relative low time correlations were found. In a continuing study meteorological quantities at different levels and the influences of the nudging

  14. Practising high-resolution anoscopy.

    PubMed

    Palefsky, Joel M

    2012-12-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing in the general population among both men and women. The incidence is particularly high among men who have sex with men and HIV-infected men and women. Anal cancer is similar to cervical cancer and is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV). Anal cancer is potentially preventable through primary prevention with HPV vaccination or secondary prevention. Secondary prevention is modelled after cervical cancer, where cytology is used as a screening tool to identify women who need colposcopy. Colposcopy includes magnification of the cervix, which, along with acetic acid and Lugol's solution, is used to visualise and biopsy potentially precancerous lesions, enabling treatment before progression to cervical cancer. Anal cancer is likely preceded by high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), and a colposcope with acetic acid and Lugol's solution may similarly be used to visualise HGAIN to permit biopsy and treatment in an effort to prevent anal cancer. To distinguish it from cervical colposcopy, this technique is called high-resolution anoscopy (HRA). Many of the features that distinguish low-grade AIN from HGAIN are similar to those of the cervix, but HRA poses several additional challenges compared with cervical colposcopy. These include uneven topography; obscuring of lesions due to haemorrhoids, folds, stool or mucus; or lesions being located at the base of folds and anal glands. Consequently, a long learning curve is typically required before becoming fully competent in this technique. The technique of HRA, its uses and challenges in prevention of anal cancer are described in this article. PMID:23380236

  15. Protein structure by solid-state NMR of oriented systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    A method for determining protein backbone structure from angular information obtainable by solid state NMR spectroscopy is presented. Various spin interactions including quadrupole, dipole, and chemical shift interactions and nuclei including /sup 14/N, /sup 15/N, /sup 13/C, and /sup 2/H may be observed. Angularly dependent measurements can be made when the sample has at least one direction of order along the externally applied magnetic field. Several NMR parameters are used to determine the orientation of each peptide plane with respect to the magnetic field vector, B/sub O/, to within a few symmetry related possibilities. The computer program Totlink can then be used to perform the necessary coordinate transformations and to evaluate the possible backbone structures and select for the most chemically reasonable. Experimental /sup 14/N NMR structural studies of the model peptides n-acetyl-d,l-valine, n-acetyl-l-valyl-l-leucine, and l-alanyl-glycyl-glycine and preliminary /sup 14/N NMR results on a large single crystal of orthorhombic lysozyme are presented.

  16. Chemical shift changes and line narrowing in 13C NMR spectra of hydrocarbon clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Kida, Masato; Sakagami, Hirotoshi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Nagao, Jiro

    2013-05-23

    The solid-state (13)C NMR spectra of various guest hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, propane, adamantane) in clathrate hydrates were measured to elucidate the local structural environments around hydrocarbon molecules isolated in guest-host frameworks of clathrate hydrates. The results show that, depending on the cage environment, the trends in the (13)C chemical shift and line width change as a function of temperature. Shielding around the carbons of the guest normal alkanes in looser cage environments tends to decrease with increasing temperature, whereas shielding in tighter cage environments tends to increase continuously with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the (13)C NMR line widths suggest, because of the reorientation of the guest alkanes, that the local structures in structure II are more averaged than those in structure I. The differences between structures I and II tend to be very large in the lower temperature range examined in this study. The (13)C NMR spectra of adamantane guest molecules in structure H hydrate show that the local structures around adamantane guests trapped in structure H hydrate cages are averaged at the same level as in the α phase of solid adamantane. PMID:23607335

  17. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  18. Impact of Ho(3+)-doping on (13)C dynamic nuclear polarization using trityl OX063 free radical.

    PubMed

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Martins, André; Fidelino, Leila; Khemtong, Chalermchai; Song, Likai; Sherry, A Dean; Lumata, Lloyd

    2016-08-21

    We have investigated the effects of Ho-DOTA doping on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of [1-(13)C] sodium acetate using trityl OX063 free radical at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. Our results indicate that addition of 2 mM Ho-DOTA on 3 M [1-(13)C] sodium acetate sample in 1 : 1 v/v glycerol : water with 15 mM trityl OX063 improves the DNP-enhanced (13)C solid-state nuclear polarization by a factor of around 2.7-fold. Similar to the Gd(3+) doping effect on (13)C DNP, the locations of the positive and negative (13)C maximum polarization peaks in the (13)C microwave DNP sweep are shifted towards each other with the addition of Ho-DOTA on the DNP sample. W-band electron spin resonance (ESR) studies have revealed that while the shape and linewidth of the trityl OX063 ESR spectrum was not affected by Ho(3+)-doping, the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of trityl OX063 was prominently reduced at cryogenic temperatures. The reduction of trityl OX063 electron T1 by Ho-doping is linked to the (13)C DNP improvement in light of the thermodynamic picture of DNP. Moreover, the presence of Ho-DOTA in the dissolution liquid at room temperature has negligible reduction effect on liquid-state (13)C T1, in contrast to Gd(3+)-doping which drastically reduces the (13)C T1. The results here suggest that Ho(3+)-doping is advantageous over Gd(3+) in terms of preservation of hyperpolarized state-an important aspect to consider for in vitro and in vivo NMR or imaging (MRI) experiments where a considerable preparation time is needed to administer the hyperpolarized (13)C liquid. PMID:27424954

  19. Solid state structural and theoretical investigations of a biologically active chalcone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Asghar; Gökce, Halil; Bahceli, Semiha; Bolte, Michael; Naseer, Muhammad Moazzam

    2016-05-01

    The computational methods are presently emerging as an efficient and reliable tool for predicting structural properties of biologically important compounds. In the present manuscript, the solid state structural and theoretical investigations of a biologically active chalcone i-e (E)-3-(4-(hexyloxy)phenyl)-1-phenylprop-2-en-1-one (6c) have been reported. The solid state structure of 6c was measured by X-ray crystallographic technique whereas the optimized molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, the simulated UV-vis spectra (in gas and in methanol solvent), 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift (in gas and in chloroform solvent) values, HOMO-LUMO analysis, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surface and thermodynamic parameters were calculated by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in ground state. The results of the theoretical investigations were found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  20. CARBON-13 NMR OR SOLID STATE HYDROCARBONS AND RELATED SUBSTANCES-FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, David M.

    2007-08-16

    CARBON-13 NMR OR SOLID STATE HYDROCARBONS AND RELATED SUBSTANCES-FINAL REPORT Abstract: During recent years we have been engaged in SSNMR (Solid State NMR) structural studies of unusual tetracyanoethylene compounds with unusually long bonds between four carbons centered on two electrons. The chemical shift tensors reflect these unusual atomic arrangements. Quantum chemistry predicts the strange tensor shifts. The three dimensional molecular structure may be determined in this manner. Despite significant advances in structural determination from powder diffraction data, NMR shift tensors argument the structural accuracy and also suggest initial trial structures. Mixtures of polymorphs are difficult to analyze with diffraction methods whereas the SSNMR methods are able to characterize such mixtures in one another’s presence. Spectroscopic developments in our laboratory include SSNMR INADEQUATE and FIREMAT methods. We have used these methods to study the 13C and 15N NMR explosive CL-20.

  1. Application and Reliability of Solid-State NMR in Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2010-05-01

    For the characterization of soil organic matter, a suite of analytical approaches are available. Chemical degradative methods involve an extraction scheme with which the soluble part of the mixture is isolated and analyzed by colorimetrical or chromatographic means. Macromolecular structures can be subjected to thermolytic or combined thermochemolytic degradation. Because secondary reactions (rearrangement, cracking, hydrogenation and polymerization) in a heterogeneous mixture cannot be excluded, it is obvious that conclusions regarding the original structure in the macromolecular phase have to be drawn with caution. A powerful alternative represents solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, allowing the examination of the bulk sample without major pre-treatment In environmental sciences, this technique mostly involves the isotope 13C to study the chemical composition of organic matter in soils, sediments or compost to study the temporal development of humic material or chemical alterations due to variation in environmental parameters. Due to its low sensibility solid-state 15N NMR studies on such samples are only found occasionally. The emphasis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy is not only to determine the gross chemical composition of the material under study via a chemical shift assignment but also a quantitative correlation between the different signal intensities and the relative contribution of the respective C or N types to the total organic C or N content. However, despite increasing popularity, this approach is still viewed as mysterious techniques, in particular with respect to quantification. Accordingly, the purpose of this review is to give a short overview on the possibilities and limitations of this technique in environmental science and in particular for the study of soil organic matter. In general, solid-state 13C NMR spectra of soil organic matter are obtained with the cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) technique. This

  2. 13C NMR study of the generation of C2- and C3-deuterated lactic acid by tumoral pancreatic islet cells exposed to D-[1-13C]-, D-[2-13C]- and D-[6-13C]-glucose in 2H2O.

    PubMed

    Willem, R; Biesemans, M; Kayser, F; Malaisse, W J

    1994-03-01

    Tumoral pancreatic islet cells of the RIN5mF line were incubated for 120 min in media prepared in 2H2O and containing D-[1-13C]glucose, D-[2-13C]glucose, and D-[6-13C]glucose. The generation of C2- and C3-deuterated lactic acid was assessed by 13C NMR. The interpretation of experimental results suggests that a) the efficiency of deuteration on the C1 of D-fructose 6-phosphate does not exceed about 47% and 4% in the phosphoglucoisomerase and phosphomannoisomerase reactions, respectively; b) approximately 38% of the molecules of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate generated from D-glucose escape deuteration in the sequence of reactions catalyzed by triose phosphate isomerase and aldolase; and c) about 41% of the molecules of pyruvate generated by glycolysis are immediately converted to lactate, the remaining 59% of pyruvate molecules undergoing first a single or double back-and-forth interconversion with L-alanine. It is proposed that this methodological approach, based on high resolution 13C NMR spectroscopy, may provide novel information on the regulation of back-and-forth interconversion of glycolytic intermediates in intact cells as modulated, for instance, by enzyme-to-enzyme tunneling. PMID:8057796

  3. High-Resolution Intravital Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Volker; Pollok, Karolin; Rinnenthal, Jan-Leo; Oehme, Laura; Günther, Robert; Spiecker, Heinrich; Radbruch, Helena; Gerhard, Jenny; Sporbert, Anje; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Hauser, Anja E.; Niesner, Raluca

    2012-01-01

    Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy - the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning) while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs) of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and developmental biology

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Solid State Physics: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakoby, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    There's a wealth of excellent textbooks on solid state physics. The author of the present book is well aware of this fact and does not attempt to write just another one. Rather, he has provided a very compact introduction to solid state physics for third-year students. As we are faced with the continuous appearance interdisciplinary fields and associated study curricula in natural and engineering sciences (biophysics, mechatronics, etc), a compact text in solid state physics would be appreciated by students of these disciplines as well. The book features 11 chapters where each is provided with supplementary discussion questions and problems. The first chapters deal with a review of chemical bonding mechanisms, crystal structures and mechanical properties of solids, which are brief but by no means superficial. The following, somewhat more detailed chapter on thermal properties of lattices includes a nice introduction to phonons. The foundations of solid state electronics are treated in the next three chapters. Here the author first discusses the classical treatment of electronic behaviour in metals (Drude model) and continues with a quantum-theoretical approach starting with the free-electron model and leading to the band structures in conductive solids. The next chapter is devoted to semiconductors and ends with a brief but, with respect to the topical scope, adequate discussion of semiconductor devices. The classical topics of magnetic and dielectric behaviour are treated in the sequel. The book closes with a chapter on superconductivity and a brief chapter covering the modern topics of quantum confinement and aspects of nanoscale physics. In my opinion, the author has succeeded in creating a very concise yet not superficial textbook. The account presented often probes subjects deep enough to lay the basis for a thorough understanding, preparing the reader for more specialized textbooks. For instance, I think that this book may serve as an excellent first

  5. Towards hyperpolarized 13C-succinate imaging of brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Pratip; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Perman, William H.; Harris, Kent C.; Lin, Alexander P.; Norton, Valerie A.; Tan, Chou T.; Ross, Brian D.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2007-05-01

    We describe a novel 13C enriched precursor molecule, sodium 1- 13C acetylenedicarboxylate, which after hydrogenation by PASADENA (Parahydrogen and Synthesis Allows Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment) under controlled experimental conditions, becomes hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate. Fast in vivo 3D FIESTA MR imaging demonstrated that, following carotid arterial injection, the hyperpolarized 13C-succinate appeared in the head and cerebral circulation of normal and tumor-bearing rats. At this time, no in vivo hyperpolarized signal has been localized to normal brain or brain tumor. On the other hand, ex vivo samples of brain harvested from rats bearing a 9L brain tumor, 1 h or more following in vivo carotid injection of hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate, contained significant concentrations of the injected substrate, 13C sodium succinate, together with 13C maleate and succinate metabolites 1- 13C-glutamate, 5- 13C-glutamate, 1- 13C-glutamine and 5- 13C-glutamine. The 13C substrates and products were below the limits of NMR detection in ex vivo samples of normal brain consistent with an intact blood-brain barrier. These ex vivo results indicate that hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate may become a useful tool for rapid in vivo identification of brain tumors, providing novel biomarkers in 13C MR spectral-spatial images.

  6. Nondestructive high-resolution solid-state NMR of rotating thin films at the magic-angle.

    PubMed

    Inukai, Munehiro; Noda, Yasuto; Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2011-12-01

    We present a new approach to nondestructive magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for thin films. In this scheme, the sample put on the top of a rotor is spun using the conventional MAS system, and the NMR signals are detected with an additional coil. Stable spinning of disk-shaped samples with diameters of 7 mm and 12 mm at 14.2 and 7 kHz are feasible. We present 7Li MAS NMR experiments of a thin-film sample of LiCoO2 with a thickness of 200 nm. Taking advantage of the nondestructive feature of the experiment, we also demonstrate ex situ experiments, by tracing conformation change upon annealing for various durations. This approach opens the door for in situ MAS NMR of thin-film devices as well. PMID:21958755

  7. Nondestructive high-resolution solid-state NMR of rotating thin films at the magic-angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inukai, Munehiro; Noda, Yasuto; Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2011-12-01

    We present a new approach to nondestructive magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for thin films. In this scheme, the sample put on the top of a rotor is spun using the conventional MAS system, and the NMR signals are detected with an additional coil. Stable spinning of disk-shaped samples with diameters of 7 mm and 12 mm at 14.2 and 7 kHz are feasible. We present 7Li MAS NMR experiments of a thin-film sample of LiCoO 2 with a thickness of 200 nm. Taking advantage of the nondestructive feature of the experiment, we also demonstrate ex situ experiments, by tracing conformation change upon annealing for various durations. This approach opens the door for in situ MAS NMR of thin-film devices as well.

  8. Modification of solid state CdZnTe (CZT) radiation detectors with high sensitivity or high resolution operation

    DOEpatents

    Washington, II, Aaron L; Duff, Martine C; Teague, Lucile C; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael

    2014-11-11

    An apparatus and process is provided to illustrate the manipulation of the internal electric field of CZT using multiple wavelength light illumination on the crystal surface at RT. The control of the internal electric field is shown through the polarization in the IR transmission image under illumination as a result of the Pockels effect.

  9. Interference of homonuclear decoupling and exchange in the solid-state NMR of perfluorocyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Deborah E.; Hazendonk, Paul; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2003-04-01

    We observe an interference between RF irradiation used for homonuclear decoupling of 19F and conformational exchange in the 13C spectrum of perfluorocyclohexane. We show that these effects can be readily reproduced in simulation, and characterise their dependence on the various NMR and experimental parameters. Their application to observing exchange rates on the kHz timescale is evaluated with respect to T1 ρ measurements and the connections between the two approaches established. The implications for experiments that use homonuclear decoupling of 1H to resolve 1J CH couplings in the solid-state are also evaluated in detail.

  10. Comparisons of lipid dynamics and packing in fully interdigitated monoarachidoylphosphatidylcholine and non-interdigitated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers: cross polarization/magic angle spinning 13C-NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, W G; Chi, L M

    1990-07-24

    molecules may occur in the interdigitated bilayer, whereas intramolecular exchange between two conformations of the glycerol backbone in DPPC become possible at temperatures close to the pretransition temperature. Without isotope enrichment, we conclude that high-resolution solid-state 13C-NMR is indeed a useful technique which can be employed to study the packing and dynamics of phospholipids. PMID:2116171

  11. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, K.M.; Peramunage, D.

    1998-06-16

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2} and LiV{sub 2}O{sub 5} and their derivatives. 5 figs.

  12. High Speed Solid State Circuit Breaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podlesak, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Fort Monmouth, NJ, has developed and is installing two 3.3 MW high speed solid state circuit breakers at the Army's Pulse Power Center. These circuit breakers will interrupt 4160V three phase power mains in no more than 300 microseconds, two orders of magnitude faster than conventional mechanical contact type circuit breakers. These circuit breakers utilize Gate Turnoff Thyristors (GTO's) and are currently utility type devices using air cooling in an air conditioned enclosure. Future refinements include liquid cooling, either water or two phase organic coolant, and more advanced semiconductors. Each of these refinements promises a more compact, more reliable unit.

  13. Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, W; Albrecht, G; Trenholme, J; Newton, M

    2007-04-19

    Beginning in the early 1970s, a number of research and development efforts were undertaken at U.S. National Laboratories with a goal of developing high power lasers whose characteristics were suitable for investigating the feasibility of laser-driven fusion. A number of different laser systems were developed and tested at ever larger scale in pursuit of the optimum driver for laser fusion experiments. Each of these systems had associated with it a unique pulsed power option. A considerable amount of original and innovative engineering was carried out in support of these options. Ultimately, the Solid-state Laser approach was selected as the optimum driver for the application. Following this, the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Rochester undertook aggressive efforts directed at developing the technology. In particular, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a series of laser systems beginning with the Cyclops laser and culminating in the present with the National Ignition Facility were developed and tested. As a result, a large amount of design information for solid-state laser pulsed power systems has been documented. Some of it is in the form of published papers, but most of it is buried in internal memoranda, engineering reports and LLNL annual reports. One of the goals of this book is to gather this information into a single useable format, such that it is easily accessed and understood by other engineers and physicists for use with future designs. It can also serve as a primer, which when seriously studied, makes the subsequent reading of original work and follow-up references considerably easier. While this book deals only with the solid-state laser pulsed power systems, in the bibliography we have included a representative cross section of papers and references from much of the very fine work carried out at other institutions in support of different laser approaches. Finally, in recent years, there has

  14. Solid-state turn coordinator display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, B. D.; Crouch, R. K.; Kelly, W. L., IV

    1975-01-01

    A solid state turn coordinator display which employs light emitting diodes (LED's) as the display medium was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of such displays for aircraft applications. The input to the display is supplied by a fluidic inertial rate sensor used in an aircraft wing leveler system. The display is composed of the LED radial display face and the electronics necessary to address and drive the individual lines of LED's. Three levels of brightness are provided to compensate for the different amounts of ambient light present in the cockpit.

  15. Entanglement and Squeezing in Solid State Circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Yihuo; Gui Lulong

    2008-11-07

    We investigate the dynamics of a system consisting of a Cooper-pair box and two superconducting transmission line resonators. There exist both linear and nonlinear interactions in such a system. We show that single-photon entanglement state can be generated in a simple way in the linear interaction regime. In nonlinear interaction regime, we derive the Hamiltonian of degenerate three-wave mixing and propose a scheme for generating squeezed state of microwave using the three-wave mixing in solid state circuits. In the following, we design a system for generating squeezed states of nanamechanical resonator.

  16. High temperature solid state storage cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rea, Jesse R.; Kallianidis, Milton; Kelsey, G. Stephen

    1983-01-01

    A completely solid state high temperature storage cell comprised of a solid rechargeable cathode such as TiS.sub.2, a solid electrolyte which remains solid at the high temperature operating conditions of the cell and which exhibits high ionic conductivity at such elevated temperatures such as an electrolyte comprised of lithium iodide, and a solid lithium or other alkali metal alloy anode (such as a lithium-silicon alloy) with 5-50% by weight of said anode being comprised of said solid electrolyte.

  17. Solid state transport-based thermoelectric converter

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhiyu

    2010-04-13

    A solid state thermoelectric converter includes a thermally insulating separator layer, a semiconducting collector and an electron emitter. The electron emitter comprises a metal nanoparticle layer or plurality of metal nanocatalyst particles disposed on one side of said separator layer. A first electrically conductive lead is electrically coupled to the electron emitter. The collector layer is disposed on the other side of the separator layer, wherein the thickness of the separator layer is less than 1 .mu.m. A second conductive lead is electrically coupled to the collector layer.

  18. Energy compensated solid state gamma dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, F.; Clapp, A.; Entine, G.; Kronenberg, S.

    1988-02-01

    Solid state semiconductor detectors using pulse mode detection are attractive candidates for real time dosimetry systems. Their high atomic number relative to that of tissue gives a nonlinear response as a function of the photon energy over the range from 30 keV to 10 MeV. An analytical model of a silicon PIN diode has been developed, including the photoelectric and Compton interactions as well as the ejection of the secondary electrons from the sensitive volume. The authors tested a nonlinear pulse height compensation algorithm using calibrated gamma and x-ray fluxes, and find that this approach improves the dose accuracy.

  19. Fast-neutron solid-state dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Kecker, K.H.; Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Thorngate, J.H.

    1975-07-22

    This patent relates to an improved fast-neutron solid-state dosimeter that does not require separation of materials before it can be read out, that utilizes materials that do not melt or otherwise degrade at about 300$sup 0$C readout temperature, that provides a more efficient dosimeter, and that can be reused. The dosimeters are fabricated by intimately mixing a TL material, such as CaSO$sub 4$:Dy, with a powdered polyphenyl, such as p-sexiphenyl, and hot- pressing the mixture to form pellets, followed by out-gassing in a vacuum furnace at 150$sup 0$C prior to first use dosimeters. (auth)

  20. Programmable solid state atom sources for nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Stark, Thomas; Del Corro, Pablo G.; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian A.; Lally, Richard W.; Bishop, David J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques.In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A document containing further information about device characterization

  1. Solid State Marx Modulators for Emerging Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, M.A.; /SLAC

    2012-09-14

    Emerging linear accelerator applications increasingly push the boundaries of RF system performance and economics. The power modulator is an integral part of RF systems whose characteristics play a key role in the determining parameters such as efficiency, footprint, cost, stability, and availability. Particularly within the past decade, solid-state switch based modulators have become the standard in high-performance, high power modulators. One topology, the Marx modulator, has characteristics which make it particularly attractive for several emerging applications. This paper is an overview of the Marx topology, some recent developments, and a case study of how this architecture can be applied to a few proposed linear accelerators.

  2. The 60 GHz solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclymonds, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new amplifier architecture was developed during this contract that is superior to any other solid state approach. The amplifier produced 6 watts with 4 percent efficiency over a 2 GHz band at 61.5 GHz. The unit was 7 x 9 x 3 inches in size, 5.5 pounds in weight, and the conduction cooling through the baseplate is suitable for use in space. The amplifier used high efficiency GaAs IMPATT diodes which were mounted in 1-diode circuits, called modules. Eighteen modules were used in the design, and power combining was accomplished with a proprietary passive component called a combiner plate.

  3. Nanoengineering for solid-state lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, E. Fred; Koleske, Daniel David; Wetzel, Christian; Lee, Stephen Roger; Missert, Nancy A.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes results from a 3-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project performed in collaboration with researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Our collaborative effort was supported by Sandia's National Institute for Nanoengineering and focused on the study and application of nanoscience and nanoengineering concepts to improve the efficiency of semiconductor light-emitting diodes for solid-state lighting applications. The project explored LED efficiency advances with two primary thrusts: (1) the study of nanoscale InGaN materials properties, particularly nanoscale crystalline defects, and their impact on internal quantum efficiency, and (2) nanoscale engineering of dielectric and metal materials and integration with LED heterostructures for enhanced light extraction efficiency.

  4. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Peramunage, Dharmasena

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li.sub.4 Ti.sub.5 O.sub.12 anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn.sub.2 O.sub.4, LiCoO.sub.2, LiNiO.sub.2 and LiV.sub.2 O.sub.5 and their derivatives.

  5. Compact solid-state laser source for 1S-2S spectroscopy in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Haensch, T. W.

    2006-02-15

    We demonstrate a compact solid-state laser source for high-resolution two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen. The source emits up to 20 mW at 243 nm and consists of a 972 nm diode laser, a tapered amplifier, and two doubling stages. The diode laser is actively stabilized to a high-finesse cavity. We compare the new source to the stable 486 nm dye laser used in previous experiments and record 1S-2S spectra using both systems. With the solid-state laser system, we demonstrate a resolution of the hydrogen spectrometer of 6x10{sup 11}, which is promising for a number of high-precision measurements in hydrogenlike systems.

  6. Deformation-induced localized solid-state amorphization in nanocrystalline nickel

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuang; Zhao, Lei; Jiang, Qing; Lian, Jianshe

    2012-01-01

    Although amorphous structures have been widely obtained in various multi-component metallic alloys, amorphization in pure metals has seldom been observed and remains a long-standing scientific curiosity and technological interest. Here we present experimental evidence of localized solid-state amorphization in bulk nanocrystalline nickel introduced by quasi-static compression at room temperature. High-resolution electron microscope observations illustrate that nano-scale amorphous structures present at the regions where severe deformation occurred, e.g. along crack paths or surrounding nano-voids. These findings have indicated that nanocrystalline structures are highly desirable for promoting solid-state amorphization, which may provide new insights for understanding the nature of the crystalline-to-amorphous transformation and suggested a potential method to produce elemental metallic glasses that have hardly been available hitherto through rapid solidification. PMID:22768383

  7. Synthesis Of 2h- And 13c-Substituted Dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  8. Synthesis of 2H- and 13C-substituted dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  9. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a new approach to study humic material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike; Lange, Sascha; van Rossum, Barth; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Compared to solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectra suffer from broad resonance lines and low resolution. This could be overcome by the use of 2-dimenstional solid-state NMR pulse sequences. Until recently, this approach has been unfeasible as a routine tool in soil chemistry, mainly because of the low NMR sensitivity of the respective samples. A possibility to circumvent those sensitivity problems represents high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy (Barnes et al., 2008), allowing considerable signal enhancements (Akbey et al., 2010). This is achieved by a microwave-driven transfer of polarization from a paramagnetic center to nuclear spins. Application of DNP to MAS spectra of biological systems (frozen solutions) showed enhancements of the factor 40 to 50 (Hall et al., 1997). Enhancements of this magnitude, thus may enable the use of at least some of the 2D solid-state NMR techniques that are presently already applied for pure proteins but are difficult to apply to soil peptides in their complex matrix. After adjusting the required acquisition parameters to the system "soil organic matter", lower but still promising enhancement factors were achieved. Additional optimization was performed and allowed the acquisition of 2D 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra of humified 13C and 15N enriched plant residues. Within the present contribution, the first solid-state DNP NMR spectra of humic material are presented. Those data demonstrate the great potential of this approach which certainly opens new doors for a better understanding of biochemical processes in soils, sediments and water. Akbey, Ü., Franks, W.T., Linden, A., Lange, S., Griffin, R.G., van Rossum, B.-J., Oschkinat, H., 2010. Dynamic nuclear polarization of deuterated proteins. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 7803-7806. Barnes, A.B., De Paëpe, G., van der Wel, P.C.A., Hu, K.N., Joo, C.G., Bajaj, V.S., Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L., Sirigiri, J.R., Herzfeld, J

  10. In vivo dynamic turnover of cerebral 13C isotopomers from [U- 13C]glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su; Shen, Jun

    2006-10-01

    An INEPT-based 13C MRS method and a cost-effective and widely available 11.7 Tesla 89-mm bore vertical magnet were used to detect dynamic 13C isotopomer turnover from intravenously infused [U- 13C]glucose in a 211 μL voxel located in the adult rat brain. The INEPT-based 1H → 13C polarization transfer method is mostly adiabatic and therefore minimizes signal loss due to B 1 inhomogeneity of the surface coils used. High quality and reproducible data were acquired as a result of combined use of outer volume suppression, ISIS, and the single-shot three-dimensional localization scheme built in the INEPT pulse sequence. Isotopomer patterns of both glutamate C4 at 34.00 ppm and glutamine C4 at 31.38 ppm are dominated first by a doublet originated from labeling at C4 and C5 but not at C3 (with 1JC4C5 = 51 Hz) and then by a quartet originated from labeling at C3, C4, and C5 (with 1JC3C4 = 35 Hz). A lag in the transition of glutamine C4 pattern from doublet-dominance to quartet dominance as compared to glutamate C4 was observed, which provides an independent verification of the precursor-product relationship between neuronal glutamate and glial glutamine and a significant intercompartmental cerebral glutamate-glutamine cycle between neurons and glial cells.

  11. Calculation of total meal d13C from individual food d13C.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variations in the isotopic signature of carbon in biological samples can be used to distinguish dietary patterns and monitor shifts in metabolism. But for these variations to have meaning, the isotopic signature of the diet must be known. We sought to determine if knowledge of the 13C isotopic abund...

  12. Nanocrystal-enabled solid state bonding.

    SciTech Connect

    San Diego State University, San Diego, CA; Puskar, Joseph David; Tikare, Veena; Garcia Cardona, Cristina; Reece, Mark; Brewer, Luke N.; Holm, Elizabeth Ann

    2010-10-01

    In this project, we performed a preliminary set of sintering experiments to examine nanocrystal-enabled diffusion bonding (NEDB) in Ag-on-Ag and Cu-on-Cu using Ag nanoparticles. The experimental test matrix included the effects of material system, temperature, pressure, and particle size. The nanoparticle compacts were bonded between plates using a customized hot press, tested in shear, and examined post mortem using microscopy techniques. NEDB was found to be a feasible mechanism for low-temperature, low-pressure, solid-state bonding of like materials, creating bonded interfaces that were able to support substantial loads. The maximum supported shear strength varied substantially within sample cohorts due to variation in bonded area; however, systematic variation with fabrication conditions was also observed. Mesoscale sintering simulations were performed in order to understand whether sintering models can aid in understanding the NEDB process. A pressure-assisted sintering model was incorporated into the SPPARKS kinetic Monte Carlo sintering code. Results reproduce most of the qualitative behavior observed in experiments, indicating that simulation can augment experiments during the development of the NEDB process. Because NEDB offers a promising route to low-temperature, low-pressure, solid-state bonding, we recommend further research and development with a goal of devising new NEDB bonding processes to support Sandia's customers.

  13. Solid-state power conversion handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Tarter, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    This new handbook is the first to be devoted to the field of solid-state power conversion. The material in this book is to be used in engineering practice and is oriented toward application rather than theory. The purpose of the book is to assemble in a single volume all the pertinent and comprehensive information necessary to meet the growing demands placed upon solid-state power conversion equipment. These demands include increased efficiency, improved reliability, higher packaging density, improved performance, and meeting safety and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements. The material presented includes a thorough analysis of fundamental electrical and magnetic aspects of power conversion plus thermal, protection, and reliability considerations. Attention is focused on semi-conductor and magnetic components and on analysis of various topologies. The handbook is organized into four sections. (1) Chapters 1-3 present the relations of various waveforms, transient components with emphasis on power semiconductors and magnetic components. (2) Chapters 4-12 deal with single-level conversion of rectifier circuits, filters, inverters and converters, feedback and stability analysis, and modulators and pulse-forming networks. (3) Chapters 13-16 discuss ancillary topics related to safety, EMC, thermal management, and reliability. (4) Chapters 17-19 cover design and operation of power supplies and systems from a detailed building block standpoint.

  14. A Model of Solid State Gas Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woestman, J. T.; Brailsford, A. D.; Shane, M.; Logothetis, E. M.

    1997-03-01

    Solid state gas sensors are widely used to measure the concentrations of gases such as CO, CH_4, C_3H_6, H_2, C_3H8 and O2 The applications of these sensors range from air-to-fuel ratio control in combustion processes including those in automotive engines and industrial furnaces to leakage detection of inflammable and toxic gases in domestic and industrial environments. As the need increases to accurately measure smaller and smaller concentrations, problems such as poor selectivity, stability and response time limit the use of these sensors. In an effort to overcome some of these limitations, a theoretical model of the transient behavior of solid state gas sensors has been developed. In this presentation, a model for the transient response of an electrochemical gas sensor to gas mixtures containing O2 and one reducing species, such as CO, is discussed. This model accounts for the transport of the reactive species to the sampling electrode, the catalyzed oxidation/reduction reaction of these species and the generation of the resulting electrical signal. The model will be shown to reproduce the results of published steady state models and to agree with experimental steady state and transient data.

  15. High Resolution PDF Measurements on Ag Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Tulio C. R.; Martin, Chris; Kycia, Stefan; Zanchet, Daniela

    2009-01-29

    The quantitative analysis of structural defects in Ag nanoparticles was addressed in this work. We performed atomic scale structural characterization by a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Pair Distribution Function analysis (PDF) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The XRD measurements were performed using an innovative instrumentation setup to provide high resolution PDF patterns.

  16. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  17. Solid state amorphization of nanocrystalline nickel by cryogenic laser shock peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chang; Liu, Yang; Sang, Xiahan; Ren, Zhencheng; Zhao, Jingyi; Hou, Xiaoning; Dong, Yalin

    2015-10-01

    In this study, complete solid state amorphization in nanocrystalline nickel has been achieved through cryogenic laser shock peening (CLSP). High resolution transmission electron microscopy has revealed the complete amorphous structure of the sample after CLSP processing. A molecular dynamic model has been used to investigate material behavior during the shock loading and the effects of nanoscale grain boundaries on the amorphization process. It has been found that the initial nanoscale grain boundaries increase the initial Gibbs free energy before plastic deformation and also serve as dislocation emission sources during plastic deformation to contribute to defect density increase, leading to the amorphization of pure nanocrystalline nickel.

  18. Solid state amorphization of nanocrystalline nickel by cryogenic laser shock peening

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chang Ren, Zhencheng; Zhao, Jingyi; Hou, Xiaoning; Dong, Yalin; Liu, Yang; Sang, Xiahan

    2015-10-07

    In this study, complete solid state amorphization in nanocrystalline nickel has been achieved through cryogenic laser shock peening (CLSP). High resolution transmission electron microscopy has revealed the complete amorphous structure of the sample after CLSP processing. A molecular dynamic model has been used to investigate material behavior during the shock loading and the effects of nanoscale grain boundaries on the amorphization process. It has been found that the initial nanoscale grain boundaries increase the initial Gibbs free energy before plastic deformation and also serve as dislocation emission sources during plastic deformation to contribute to defect density increase, leading to the amorphization of pure nanocrystalline nickel.

  19. Zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Wei; Tycko, Robert

    2012-09-01

    We present the theoretical description and experimental demonstration of a zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling (ZQ-SDR) technique for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of 13C-labeled molecules, including proteins, under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The ZQ-SDR technique combines zero-quantum recoupling pulse sequence blocks with randomly varying chemical shift precession periods to create randomly amplitude- and phase-modulated effective homonuclear magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. To a good approximation, couplings between different 13C spin pairs become uncorrelated under ZQ-SDR, leading to spin dynamics (averaged over many repetitions of the ZQ-SDR sequence) that are fully described by an orientation-dependent N × N polarization transfer rate matrix for an N-spin system, with rates that are inversely proportional to the sixth power of internuclear distances. Suppression of polarization transfers due to non-commutivity of pairwise couplings (i.e., dipolar truncation) does not occur under ZQ-SDR, as we show both analytically and numerically. Experimental demonstrations are reported for uniformly 13C-labeled L-valine powder (at 14.1 T and 28.00 kHz MAS), uniformly 13C-labeled protein GB1 in microcrystalline form (at 17.6 T and 40.00 kHz MAS), and partially labeled 13C-labeled protein GB1 (at 14.1 T and 40.00 kHz MAS). The experimental results verify that spin dynamics under ZQ-SDR are described accurately by rate matrices and suggest the utility of ZQ-SDR in structural studies of 13C-labeled solids.

  20. Solid state imagers and their applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cannes, France, November 26, 27, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Declerck, Gilbert J. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Topics treated include the use of semiconductor imagers in high energy particle physics, an X-ray image sensor based on an optical TDI-CCD imager, and an electron-sensitive CCD readout array for a circular-scan streak tube. Papers are presented on the pan-imager, high resolution linear arrays, the reduction of reflection losses in solid-state image sensors, a high resolution CCD imager module with swing operation, large area CCD image sensors for scientific applications, and new readout techniques for frame transfer CCDs. Consideration is given to advanced optoelectronical sensors for autonomous rendezvous/docking and proximity operations in space, the testing and characterization of CCDs for the Rosat star sensors, an advanced radial camera for the Hubble Space Telescope, and scanning or staring infrared imagers.

  1. Solid-state curved focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael (Inventor); Jones, Todd (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to curved focal plane arrays. More specifically, the present invention relates to a system and method for making solid-state curved focal plane arrays from standard and high-purity devices that may be matched to a given optical system. There are two ways to make a curved focal plane arrays starting with the fully fabricated device. One way, is to thin the device and conform it to a curvature. A second way, is to back-illuminate a thick device without making a thinned membrane. The thick device is a special class of devices; for example devices fabricated with high purity silicon. One surface of the device (the non VLSI fabricated surface, also referred to as the back surface) can be polished to form a curved surface.

  2. Solid-state lighting technology perspective.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Coltrin, Michael Elliott

    2006-08-01

    Solid-State Lighting (SSL) uses inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to convert electricity into light for illumination. SSL has the potential for enormous energy savings and accompanying environmental benefits if its promise of 50% (or greater) energy efficiencies can be achieved. This report provides a broad summary of the technologies that underlie SSL. The applications for SSL and potential impact on U.S. and world-wide energy consumption, and impact on the human visual experience are discussed. The properties of visible light and different technical metrics to characterize its properties are summarized. The many factors contributing to the capital and operating costs for SSL and traditional lighting sources (incandescent, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge lamps) are discussed, with extrapolations for future SSL goals. The technologies underlying LEDs and OLEDs are also described, including current and possible alternative future technologies and some of the present limitations.

  3. Solid-state ring laser gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, S.

    The ring laser gyroscope is a rotation sensor used in most kinds of inertial navigation units. It usually consists in a ring cavity filled with a mixture of helium and neon, together with high-voltage pumping electrodes. The use of a gaseous gain medium, while resulting naturally in a stable bidirectional regime enabling rotation sensing, is however the main industrially limiting factor for the ring laser gyroscopes in terms of cost, reliability and lifetime. We study in this book the possibility of substituting for the gaseous gain medium a solid-state medium (diode-pumped Nd-YAG). For this, a theoretical and experimental overview of the lasing regimes of the solid-state ring laser is reported. We show that the bidirectional emission can be obtained thanks to a feedback loop acting on the states of polarization and inducing differential losses proportional to the difference of intensity between the counterpropagating modes. This leads to the achievement of a solid-state ring laser gyroscope, whose frequency response is modified by mode coupling effects. Several configurations, either mechanically or optically based, are then successively studied, with a view to improving the quality of this frequency response. In particular, vibration of the gain crystal along the longitudinal axis appears to be a very promising technique for reaching high inertial performances with a solid-state ring laser gyroscope. Gyrolaser à état solide. Le gyrolaser est un capteur de rotation utilisé dans la plupart des centrales de navigation inertielle. Dans sa forme usuelle, il est constitué d'une cavité laser en anneau remplie d'un mélange d'hélium et de néon pompé par des électrodes à haute tension. L'utilisation d'un milieu amplificateur gazeux, si elle permet de garantir naturellement le fonctionnement bidirectionnel stable nécessaire à la mesure des rotations, constitue en revanche la principale limitation industrielle des gyrolasers actuels en termes de coût, fiabilit

  4. Enhanced electrodes for solid state gas sensors

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.

    2001-01-01

    A solid state gas sensor generates an electrical potential between an equilibrium electrode and a second electrode indicative of a gas to be sensed. A solid electrolyte substrate has the second electrode mounted on a first portion of the electrolyte substrate and a composite equilibrium electrode including conterminous transition metal oxide and Pt components mounted on a second portion of the electrolyte substrate. The composite equilibrium electrode and the second electrode are electrically connected to generate an electrical potential indicative of the gas that is being sensed. In a particular embodiment of the present invention, the second electrode is a reference electrode that is exposed to a reference oxygen gas mixture so that the electrical potential is indicative of the oxygen in a gas stream.

  5. Solid state synthesis of calcium borohydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, H.; Gündoğmaz, G.; Kurtuluş, F.; Çelik, G.; Gacanoğlu, Ş. S.

    2011-11-01

    Calcium borohydroxyapatite was synthesized by the solid-state reaction of colemanite (Ca 2B 6O 11·5H 2O) and diamonium hydrogenphosphate ((NH 4) 2HPO 4) at 1200 °C for 12 h. X-ray diffraction pattern showed only the formation of calcium borohydroxyapatite. The experimental analysis assigned the chemical formula as Ca 10[(PO 4) 5.80(BO 3) 0.20](OH) 2. It was indexed in the hexagonal system with the refined unit cell parameters of a = 9.557(3) Å, c = 6.926(8) Å and space group P6 3/ m. The experimental results verified that if colemanite was used as a primary reactant for both calcium and boron source, the calcium borohydroxyapatite could be obtained.

  6. Experimental aspects of solid-state voltammetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wooster, T.T.; Longmire, M.L.; Zhang, H.

    1992-05-15

    This paper describes the properties of poly(ether) polymer electrolytes as solvent media for solid-state voltammetry. Experimental requirements for microelectrode voltammetry and results for the dependency of diffusive transport of electroactive solutes on polymer solvent molecular weight, structure, and temperature (and related phase state) are described for eight poly(ether)s: linear poly(ethylene oxides) MW = 400, 1000, 2000, and 600 000 (Me{sub 2}PEG-400, Me{sub 2}PEG-1000, Me{sub 2}PEG-2000, PEO-600 000), linear poly(propylene oxide) MW = 4000 (PPO-4000), the comb polymer poly(bis[(methoxyethoxy)ethoxy]phosphazine) (MEEP), the block copolymer poly(ether)-poly(urethane urea)(PEUU), and the cross-linked poly(ether) network PEO. 28 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Radioactive isotopes in solid state physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkel-Wirth, D.

    1996-04-01

    A wide range of solid state physics techniques is using radioactive ion beams, both from on-line and off-line separators. The different techniques can be roughly subdivided into two classes: one, including the hyperfine techniques like Mößbauer spectroscopy (MS), Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) spectroscopy, β-NMR and the ion-beam technique of Emission Channeling (EC). They all crucially depend on the availability of radioactive isotopes with very specific decay properties. The second group comprises radio-tracer techniques which combine radioactive probe atoms with conventional semiconductor physics methods like Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS), Capacitance Voltage measurements (CV), Hall-effect measurements or Photoluminescence Spectroscopy (PL). They are perfectly feasible without any radioactive probe atom, however, using such isotopes enables the unambiguous chemical identification of impurities. The present paper gives an overview on the potential of nuclear techniques by describing some typical experiments.

  8. Compact high voltage solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.

    2003-09-23

    A compact, solid state, high voltage switch capable of high conduction current with a high rate of current risetime (high di/dt) that can be used to replace thyratrons in existing and new applications. The switch has multiple thyristors packaged in a single enclosure. Each thyristor has its own gate drive circuit that circuit obtains its energy from the energy that is being switched in the main circuit. The gate drives are triggered with a low voltage, low current pulse isolated by a small inexpensive transformer. The gate circuits can also be triggered with an optical signal, eliminating the trigger transformer altogether. This approach makes it easier to connect many thyristors in series to obtain the hold off voltages of greater than 80 kV.

  9. Solid state dye laser for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldag, Henry R.

    1994-06-01

    The development of solid state dye lasers could lead to a major breakthrough in the cost and compactness of a medical device. Advantages include: elimination of the flow system for the gain medium; ease with which to implement wavelength agility or the replacement of a degraded rod or sheet; and toxicity and flammability become a non-issue. Dye lasers have played a role in cardiology, dermatology, and urology. Of these cardiology is of interest to Palomar. The Palomar Model 3010 flashlamp-pumped dye laser medical device was used during phase 1 FDA clinical trials to break-up blood clots that cause heart attacks, a process known as coronary laser thrombolysis. It is the objective of this research and development effort to produce solid matrix lasers that will replace liquid dye lasers in these medical specialties.

  10. Efficient scalable solid-state neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Daniel

    2015-06-15

    We report on scalable solid-state neutron detector system that is specifically designed to yield high thermal neutron detection sensitivity. The basic detector unit in this system is made of a {sup 6}Li foil coupled to two crystalline silicon diodes. The theoretical intrinsic efficiency of a detector-unit is 23.8% and that of detector element comprising a stack of five detector-units is 60%. Based on the measured performance of this detector-unit, the performance of a detector system comprising a planar array of detector elements, scaled to encompass effective area of 0.43 m{sup 2}, is estimated to yield the minimum absolute efficiency required of radiological portal monitors used in homeland security.

  11. Solid-state spectral transmissometer and radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L.; Steward, R. G.; Payne, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    An in situ instrument designed to measure the spectral attenuation coefficient of seawater and the ocean remote-sensing reflectance from 400 to 750 nm is in the test and development stage. It employs a 256 channel, charge-coupled type of linear array measuring the spectral intensities diffracted by a grating. Examples of the types of data delivered by this instrument have been simulated using a breadboard laboratory instrument and an above-water, solid-state radiometer. Algorithms developed using data from these instruments provide measures of chlorophyll a plus phaeophytin a concentrations from less than 0.1 to 77.0 mg/cu m, gelbstoff spectral absorption coefficients, and detrital spectral backscattering coefficients for waters of the west Florida shelf.

  12. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

  13. Supramolecular interactions in the solid state

    PubMed Central

    Resnati, Giuseppe; Boldyreva, Elena; Bombicz, Petra; Kawano, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades, supramolecular chemistry has been at the forefront of chemical research, with the aim of understanding chemistry beyond the covalent bond. Since the long-range periodicity in crystals is a product of the directionally specific short-range intermolecular interactions that are responsible for molecular assembly, analysis of crystalline solids provides a primary means to investigate intermolecular interactions and recognition phenomena. This article discusses some areas of contemporary research involving supramolecular interactions in the solid state. The topics covered are: (1) an overview and historical review of halogen bonding; (2) exploring non-ambient conditions to investigate intermolecular interactions in crystals; (3) the role of intermolecular interactions in morphotropy, being the link between isostructurality and polymorphism; (4) strategic realisation of kinetic coordination polymers by exploiting multi-interactive linker molecules. The discussion touches upon many of the prerequisites for controlled preparation and characterization of crystalline materials. PMID:26594375

  14. Solid state potentiometric gaseous oxide sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wachsman, Eric D. (Inventor); Azad, Abdul Majeed (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A solid state electrochemical cell (10a) for measuring the concentration of a component of a gas mixture (12) includes first semiconductor electrode (14) and second semiconductor electrode (16) formed from first and second semiconductor materials, respectively. The materials are selected so as to undergo a change in resistivity upon contacting a gas component, such as CO or NO. An electrolyte (18) is provided in contact with the first and second semiconductor electrodes. A reference cell can be included in contact with the electrolyte. Preferably, a voltage response of the first semiconductor electrode is opposite in slope direction to that of the second semiconductor electrode to produce a voltage response equal to the sum of the absolute values of the control system uses measured pollutant concentrations to direct adjustment of engine combustion conditions.

  15. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1995-12-31

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  16. Efficient scalable solid-state neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    We report on scalable solid-state neutron detector system that is specifically designed to yield high thermal neutron detection sensitivity. The basic detector unit in this system is made of a 6Li foil coupled to two crystalline silicon diodes. The theoretical intrinsic efficiency of a detector-unit is 23.8% and that of detector element comprising a stack of five detector-units is 60%. Based on the measured performance of this detector-unit, the performance of a detector system comprising a planar array of detector elements, scaled to encompass effective area of 0.43 m2, is estimated to yield the minimum absolute efficiency required of radiological portal monitors used in homeland security.

  17. Efficient scalable solid-state neutron detector.

    PubMed

    Moses, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    We report on scalable solid-state neutron detector system that is specifically designed to yield high thermal neutron detection sensitivity. The basic detector unit in this system is made of a (6)Li foil coupled to two crystalline silicon diodes. The theoretical intrinsic efficiency of a detector-unit is 23.8% and that of detector element comprising a stack of five detector-units is 60%. Based on the measured performance of this detector-unit, the performance of a detector system comprising a planar array of detector elements, scaled to encompass effective area of 0.43 m(2), is estimated to yield the minimum absolute efficiency required of radiological portal monitors used in homeland security. PMID:26133869

  18. Principles of solid-state power conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarter, R. E.

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this book is to assemble, in one place, the comprehensive tools necessary to meet the growing demands placed upon solid-state power conversion equipment. Aspects of transient analysis, circuit analysis, and waveforms are discussed, taking into account waveform relations, magnetic fields, dielectric fields, the RL circuit, the RC circuit, the RLC circuit, the RLCR circuit with a DC input, AC circuit analysis, and components scaling. Semiconductors and resistors are considered along with capacitors, transformers, inductors, conductors, rectifiers and filters, phase-control circuits, transistor inverters, thyristor inverters, switching regulators, DC-DC converters, protection and safety, electromagnetic compatibility and grounding, semiconductor and equipment cooling, reliability and quality, regulated power supplies, and uninterruptible power systems. Attention is given to magnetic materials, toroid tape core transformers, permalloy powder cores, a six-phase dual bridge, thermal conduction and resistance, heat pipes, and thermoelectric coolers.

  19. Solid state neutron dosimeter for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarkar, V.; Entine, G.; Stoppel, P.; Cirignano, L. ); Swinehart, P. )

    1992-08-01

    One of the most important contributions to the radiation exposure of astronauts engaged in space flight is the significant flux of high energy neutrons arising from both primary and secondary sources of ionizing radiation. Under NASA sponsorship, the authors are developing a solid state neutron sensor capable of being incorporated into a very compact, flight instrument to provide high quality real time measurement of this important radiation flux. The dosimeter uses a special, high neutron sensitivity, PIN diode that is insensitive t the other forms of ionizing radiation. The dosimeter will have the ability to measure and record neutron dose over a range of 50 microgray to tens of milligrays (5 millirads to several rads) over a flight of up to 30 days. the performance characteristics of the PIN diode with a detailed description of the overall dosimeter is presented. in this paper.

  20. Solid-State Spectral Light Source System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maffione, Robert; Dana, David

    2011-01-01

    A solid-state light source combines an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with advanced electronic control and stabilization over both the spectrum and overall level of the light output. The use of LEDs provides efficient operation over a wide range of wavelengths and power levels, while electronic control permits extremely stable output and dynamic control over the output. In this innovation, LEDs are used instead of incandescent bulbs. Optical feedback and digital control are used to monitor and regulate the output of each LED. Because individual LEDs generate light within narrower ranges of wavelengths than incandescent bulbs, multiple LEDs are combined to provide a broad, continuous spectrum, or to produce light within discrete wavebands that are suitable for specific radiometric sensors.

  1. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  2. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, David K.; Haverty, Thomas W.; Nordin, Carl W.; Tyree, William H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  3. Solid State Technology Meets Collider Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2005-09-20

    Probing the frontiers of particle physics and delving into the mysteries of the universe and its beginnings require machines that can accelerate beams of fundamental particles to very high energies and then collide those beams together, producing a multitude of exotic subatomic particles. The proposed Next Linear Collider (NLC), being developed by Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Lawrence Livermore and Lawrence Berkeley national laboratories, and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), is such a machine. The NLC is expected to produce a variety of subatomic particles by smashing together electrons and their antimatter counterparts (positrons) at nearly the speed of light with energies in the teraelectronvolt (TeV) range. Plans are that the NLC will initially operate at 0.5 TeV and ultimately be scaled up to 1.5 TeV. (See S&TR, April 2000, pp. 12-16.) Work at the facility will complement the research to be conducted at another high-energy particle accelerator, the 14-TeV Large Hadron Collider at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (commonly known by the acronym CERN from its former name) in Geneva, which is scheduled for completion in 2007. Achieving beam energy levels in the TeV range requires modulator systems that can convert ac line power--the same type of power one gets from the wall plug--into dc pulses. Ultimately, these pulses are transformed into radiofrequency (rf) pulses that ''kick'' the particles up to the required energy levels. Livermore scientists and engineers have designed a solid-state modulator to replace oldstyle modulators based on vacuum-tube technology. These new modulators promise to be far more efficient, reliable, and serviceable than the previous components. Livermore's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program supported the basic research and development on the solid-state modulator technology, and SLAC supported the systems integration.

  4. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered. PMID:26974032

  5. Characterisation of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of methylcitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Hanna; Martyniuk, Tomasz

    2007-06-01

    Methylcitric acid (MCA) was synthesised in Reformatsky reaction (2 RS, 3 RS stereoisomers) and in the nucleophilic addition (2 RS, 3 SR stereoisomers). The stereoselectivity of these reactions was analysed. 1H and 13C NMR spectra of diastereoisomers of methylcitric acid were recorded and interpreted. The values of 1H chemical shifts and 1H- 1H coupling constants were analysed. Proton-decoupled high-resolution 13C NMR spectra of MCA diastereoisomers were measured in a series of dilute water solutions of various acidities. These data may provide a basis for unequivocal determination of the presence of MCA in the urine samples of patients' suffering from propionic acidemia, methylmalonic aciduria, or holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency. NMR spectroscopy enables determination of MCA diastereoisomers in body fluids and can be a complementary and useful diagnostic tool.

  6. In vivo 13C NMR metabolite profiling: potential for understanding and assessing conifer seed quality.

    PubMed

    Terskikh, Victor V; Feurtado, J Allan; Borchardt, Shane; Giblin, Michael; Abrams, Suzanne R; Kermode, Allison R

    2005-08-01

    High-resolution 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy was used to profile a range of primary and secondary metabolites in vivo in intact whole seeds of eight different conifer species native to North America, including six of the Pinaceae family and two of the Cupressaceae family. In vivo 13C NMR provided information on the total seed oil content and fatty acid composition of the major storage lipids in a non-destructive manner. In addition, a number of monoterpenes were identified in the 13C NMR spectra of conifer seeds containing oleoresin; these compounds showed marked variability in individual seeds of Pacific silver fir within the same seed lot. In imbibed conifer seeds, the 13C NMR spectra showed the presence of considerable amounts of dissolved sucrose presumed to play a protective role in the desiccation-tolerance of seeds. The free amino acids arginine and asparagine, generated as a result of storage protein mobilization, were detected in vivo during seed germination and early seedling growth. The potential for NMR to profile metabolites in a non-destructive manner in single conifer seeds and seed populations is discussed. It is a powerful tool to evaluate seed quality because of its ability to assess reserve accumulation during seed development or at seed maturity; it can also be used to monitor reserve mobilization, which is critical for seedling emergence. PMID:15996983

  7. The cluster and single-particle states in 13C (α,α)13C reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynbayev, N. A.; Nurmukhanbetova, A. K.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Rogachev, G. V.; Golovkov, M. S.; Koloberdin, M.; Ivanov, I.; Nauruzbayev, D. K.; Berdibek, Sh S.; Rakhymzhanov, A. M.; Tribble, R. E.

    2016-06-01

    The excitation functions of elastic scattering of 13C on alpha particle have been measured using the thick-target inverse kinematic method at the heavy ion DC-60 cyclotron. The helium gas was used as a target and also as a degrader to stop the beam. New data (including 180°degree) of the resonances close to the threshold in 17O have been obtained.

  8. Arabidopsis thalianafrom Polarization Transfer Solid-State NMR

    SciTech Connect

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water 1H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent 1H–1H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide 13C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water–pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water–cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water–polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water–pectin spin diffusion precedes water–cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins.

  9. Polymorphs of Theophylline Characterized by DNP Enhanced Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We show how dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to characterize polymorphs and solvates of organic solids. We applied DNP to three polymorphs and one hydrated form of the asthma drug molecule theophylline. For some forms of theophylline, sample grinding and impregnation with the radical-containing solution, which are necessary to prepare the samples for DNP, were found to induce polymorphic transitions or desolvation between some forms. We present protocols for sample preparation for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) DNP experiments that avoid the polymorphic phase transitions in theophylline. These protocols include cryogrinding, grinding under inert atmosphere, and the appropriate choice of the impregnating liquid. By applying these procedures, we subsequently demonstrate that two-dimensional correlation experiments, such as 1H–13C and 1H–15N HETCOR or 13C–13C INADEQUATE, can be obtained at natural isotopic abundance in reasonable times, thus enabling more advanced structural characterization of polymorphs. PMID:26393368

  10. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy of GNNQQNY nanocrystals and amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bayro, Marvin J.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; Caporini, Marc A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner E.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) utilizes the inherently larger polarization of electrons to enhance the sensitivity of conventional solid-state NMR experiments at low temperature. Recent advances in instrumentation development and sample preparation have transformed this field and have opened up new opportunities for its application to biological systems. Here, we present DNP-enhanced 13C–13C and 15N–13C correlation experiments on GNNQQNY nanocrystals and amyloid fibrils acquired at 9.4 T and 100 K and demonstrate that DNP can be used to obtain assignments and site-specific structural information very efficiently. We investigate the influence of temperature on the resolution, molecular conformation, structural integrity and dynamics in these two systems. In addition, we assess the low-temperature performance of two commonly used solid-state NMR experiments, proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) and transferred echo double resonance (TEDOR), and discuss their potential as tools for measurement of structurally relevant distances at low temperature in combination with DNP. PMID:20454733

  11. CARBON-13 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE. 13C CHEMICAL SHIFTS AND 13C-199HG COUPLING CONSTANTS FOR SOME ORGANOMERCURY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The (13)C shieldings and (13)C-(199)Hg coupling constants of fourteen phenyl- and seven alkyl- and alkenyl-mercury compounds have been obtained. Substituent effects on the (13)C shieldings are similar to those in nonmercurated phenyl compounds, with a similar relationship between...

  12. Solid-state NMR analysis of the {beta}-strand orientation of the protofibrils of amyloid {beta}-protein

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Takashi; Masuda, Yuichi; Irie, Kazuhiro; Akagi, Ken-ichi; Monobe, Youko; Imazawa, Takayoshi; Takegoshi, K.

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supramolecular structure of A{beta}42 protofibrils was analyzed by solid-state NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala-21 residue in the A{beta}42 protofibrils is included in a slightly disordered {beta}-strand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The A{beta}42 protofibrils do not form intermolecular in-register parallel {beta}-sheets. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by abnormal deposition (fibrillation) of a 42-residue amyloid {beta}-protein (A{beta}42) in the brain. During the process of fibrillation, the A{beta}42 takes the form of protofibrils with strong neurotoxicity, and is thus believed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of AD. To elucidate the supramolecular structure of the A{beta}42 protofibrils, the intermolecular proximity of the Ala-21 residues in the A{beta}42 protofibrils was analyzed by {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C rotational resonance experiments in the solid state. Unlike the A{beta}42 fibrils, an intermolecular {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation was not found in the A{beta}42 protofibrils. This result suggests that the {beta}-strands of the A{beta}42 protofibrils are not in an in-register parallel orientation. A{beta}42 monomers would assemble to form protofibrils with the {beta}-strand conformation, then transform into fibrils by forming intermolecular parallel {beta}-sheets.

  13. Spectroscopy of composite solid-state spin environments for improved metrology with spin ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Gill, Nir; Pham, Linh; Belthangady, Chinmay; Lesage, David; Cappellaro, Paola; Maze, Jeronimo; Lukin, Mikhail; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald

    2012-02-01

    For precision coherent measurements with ensembles of quantum spins the relevant Figure-of-Merit (FOM) is the product of spin density and coherence lifetime, which is generally limited by the dynamics of spin coupling to the environment. Significant effort has been invested in understanding the causes of decoherence in a diverse range of spin systems in order to increase the FOM and improve measurement sensitivity. Here, we apply a coherent spectroscopic technique to characterize the dynamics of a composite solid-state spin environment consisting of Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) color centers in room temperature diamond coupled to baths of electronic spin (N) and nuclear spin (13C) impurities. For diamond samples with a wide range of NV densities and impurity spin concentrations we employ a dynamical decoupling technique to minimize coupling to the environment, and find similar values for the FOM, which is three orders of magnitude larger than previously achieved in any room-temperature solid-state spin system, and thus should enable greatly improved precision spin metrology. We also identify a suppression of electronic spin bath dynamics in the presence of a nuclear spin bath of sufficient nuclear spin concentration. This suppression could inform efforts to engineer samples with even larger FOM for solid-state spin ensemble metrology and collective quantum information processing.

  14. The Rotational Spectrum of Singly and Doubly 13C-SUBSTITUTED Dimethylether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerber, Monika; Endres, Christian P.; Lewen, Frank; Giesen, Thomas F.; Schlemmer, Stephan; Pohl, Roland; Klein, Axel

    2010-06-01

    Dimethylether (DME) is a nearly prolate asymmetric top with two internal rotors (methyl groups) which undergo periodic large amplitude motions and show a complicated torsional splitting of each rotational energy level. Due to its complex spectrum and its high abundance in hot cores such as Orion KL or Sagittarius B2 at temperatures exceeding 100 K, DME is very prominent in astronomical line surveys and contributes to spectral line confusion of such sources. The interpretation of astronomical observations therefore depends on the knowledge of accurate rest frequencies and reliable intensities. Precise predictions for the ground state of DME's main isotopologue are now available up to 2.1 THz In contrast, very little is known about 13C-substituted DME. Only a few data are available on singly 13C-substituted DME, 12CH_3O13CH_3. However, no data are available on doubly 13C-substituted DME, (13CH_3)_2O, yet. While in (13CH_3)_2O the two internal rotating methyl groups are equivalent and the splitting of rotational energy levels into four substates is comparable to the main isotopologue, singly 13C-substituted DME has two non-equivalent internal rotors resulting in torsional splitting of rotational energy levels into five substates. The purpose of our new laboratory measurements is to extend the knowledge on the astrophysically relevant species 12CH_3O13CH_3. To analyze the complicated spectrum resulting from a 13C-enriched sample of DME, containing all different 13C-substituted species as well as the main isotopologue, also precise data on doubly 13C-substituted DME are inevitable. We performed measurements in the frequency region 35-120 GHz using an all solid state spectrometer. Rotational as well as torsional parameters have been obtained for (13CH_3)_2O as well as 12CH_3O13CH_3 by fitting the assigned transitions to an effective rotational Hamiltonian introduced by Peter Groner. C. Comito et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 156, 127-167 (2005) C. P. Endres et al

  15. NOAA's Use of High-Resolution Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hund, Erik

    2007-01-01

    NOAA's use of high-resolution imagery consists of: a) Shoreline mapping and nautical chart revision; b) Coastal land cover mapping; c) Benthic habitat mapping; d) Disaster response; and e) Imagery collection and support for coastal programs.

  16. High-Resolution Plots of Trigonometric Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stick, Marvin E.; Stick, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    Provides computer programs (for Apple microcomputers) for drawing (in high resolution graphics) a three-leaved rose, concentric circles, circumscribed and inscribed astroids. Sample output and discussions of the mathematics involved in the programs are included. (JN)

  17. Lithium Polymer Electrolytes and Solid State NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkeley, Emily R.

    2004-01-01

    Research is being done at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) developing new kinds of batteries that do not depend on a solution. Currently, batteries use liquid electrolytes containing lithium. Problems with the liquid electrolyte are (1) solvents used can leak out of the battery, so larger, more restrictive, packages have to be made, inhibiting the diversity of application and decreasing the power density; (2) the liquid is incompatible with the lithium metal anode, so alternative, less efficient, anodes are required. The Materials Department at GRC has been working to synthesize polymer electrolytes that can replace the liquid electrolytes. The advantages are that polymer electrolytes do not have the potential to leak so they can be used for a variety of tasks, small or large, including in the space rover or in space suits. The polymers generated by Dr. Mary Ann Meador's group are in the form of rod -coil structures. The rod aspect gives the polymer structural integrity, while the coil makes it flexible. Lithium ions are used in these polymers because of their high mobility. The coils have repeating units of oxygen which stabilize the positive lithium by donating electron density. This aids in the movement of the lithium within the polymer, which contributes to higher conductivity. In addition to conductivity testing, these polymers are characterized using DSC, TGA, FTIR, and solid state NMR. Solid state NMR is used in classifying materials that are not soluble in solvents, such as polymers. The NMR spins the sample at a magic angle (54.7') allowing the significant peaks to emerge. Although solid state NMR is a helpful technique in determining bonding, the process of preparing the sample and tuning it properly are intricate jobs that require patience; especially since each run takes about six hours. The NMR allows for the advancement of polymer synthesis by showing if the expected results were achieved. Using the NMR, in addition to looking at polymers, allows for

  18. Solid-state Raman image amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmes, Lonnie Kirkland

    Amplification of low-light-level optical images is important for extending the range of lidar systems that image and detect objects in the atmosphere and underwater. The use of range-gating to produce images of particular range bins is also important in minimizing the image degradation due to light that is scattered backward from aerosols, smoke, or water along the imaging path. For practical lidar systems that must be operated within sight of unprotected observers, eye safety is of the utmost importance. This dissertation describes a new type of eye-safe, range-gated lidar sensing element based on Solid-state Raman Image Amplification (SSRIA) in a solid- state optical crystal. SSRIA can amplify low-level images in the eye-safe infrared at 1.556 μm with gains up to 106 with the addition of only quantum- limited noise. The high gains from SSRIA can compensate for low quantum efficiency detectors and can reduce the need for detector cooling. The range-gate of SSRIA is controlled by the pulsewidth of the pump laser and can be as short as 30-100 cm, using pump pulses of 2-6.7 nsec FWHM. A rate equation theoretical model is derived to help in the design of short pulsed Raman lasers. A theoretical model for the quantum noise properties of SSRIA is presented. SSRIA results in higher SNR images throughout a broad range of incident light levels, in contrast to the increasing noise factor with reduced gain in image intensified CCD's. A theoretical framework for the optical resolution of SSRIA is presented and it is shown that SSRIA can produce higher resolution than ICCD's. SSRIA is also superior in rejecting unwanted sunlight background, further increasing image SNR. Lastly, SSRIA can be combined with optical pre-filtering to perform optical image processing functions such as high-pass filtering and automatic target detection/recognition. The application of this technology to underwater imaging, called Marine Raman Image Amplification (MARIA) is also discussed. MARIA

  19. Magic-angle spinning solid-state multinuclear NMR on low-field instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Morten K.; Bakharev, Oleg; Jensen, Ole; Jakobsen, Hans J.; Skibsted, Jørgen; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile and cost-effective NMR spectroscopy exploiting low-field permanent magnets is a field of tremendous development with obvious applications for arrayed large scale analysis, field work, and industrial screening. So far such demonstrations have concentrated on relaxation measurements and lately high-resolution liquid-state NMR applications. With high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy being increasingly important in a broad variety of applications, we here introduce low-field magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state multinuclear NMR based on a commercial ACT 0.45 T 62 mm bore Halbach magnet along with a homebuilt FPGA digital NMR console, amplifiers, and a modified standard 45 mm wide MAS probe for 7 mm rotors. To illustrate the performance of the instrument and address cases where the low magnetic field may offer complementarity to high-field NMR experiments, we demonstrate applications for 23Na MAS NMR with enhanced second-order quadrupolar coupling effects and 31P MAS NMR where reduced influence from chemical shift anisotropy at low field may facilitate determination of heteronuclear dipole-dipole couplings.

  20. Probing Quadrupolar Nuclei by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Christian; Pruski, Marek

    2011-06-08

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of quadrupolar nuclei has recently undergone remarkable development of capabilities for obtaining structural and dynamic information at the molecular level. This review summarizes the key achievements attained during the last couple of decades in solid-state NMR of both integer spin and half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei. We provide a concise description of the first- and second-order quadrupolar interactions, and their effect on the static and magic angle spinning (MAS) spectra. Methods are explained for efficient excitation of single- and multiple-quantum coherences, and acquisition of spectra under low- and high-resolution conditions. Most of all, we present a coherent, comparative description of the high-resolution methods for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei, including double rotation (DOR), dynamic angle spinning (DAS), multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS), and satellite transition magic angle spinning (STMAS). Also highlighted are methods for processing and analysis of the spectra. Finally, we review methods for probing the heteronuclear and homonuclear correlations between the quadrupolar nuclei and their quadrupolar or spin-1/2 neighbors.