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Sample records for 13c isotope discrimination

  1. Isotopic discrimination of stable isotopes of nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) in a host-specific holocephalan tapeworm.

    PubMed

    Navarro, J; Albo-Puigserver, M; Coll, M; Saez, R; Forero, M G; Kutcha, R

    2014-09-01

    During the past decade, parasites have been considered important components of their ecosystems since they can modify food-web structures and functioning. One constraint to the inclusion of parasites in food-web models is the scarcity of available information on their feeding habits and host-parasite relationships. The stable isotope approach is suggested as a useful methodology to determine the trophic position and feeding habits of parasites. However, the isotopic approach is limited by the lack of information on the isotopic discrimination (ID) values of parasites, which is pivotal to avoiding the biased interpretation of isotopic results. In the present study we aimed to provide the first ID values of δ(15)N and δ(13)C between the gyrocotylidean tapeworm Gyrocotyle urna and its definitive host, the holocephalan Chimaera monstrosa. We also test the effect of host body size (body length and body mass) and sex of the host on the ID values. Finally, we illustrate how the trophic relationships of the fish host C. monstrosa and the tapeworm G. urna could vary relative to ID values. Similar to other studies with parasites, the ID values of the parasite-host system were negative for both isotopic values of N (Δδ(15)N = - 3.33 ± 0.63‰) and C (Δδ(13)C = - 1.32 ± 0.65‰), independent of the sex and size of the host. By comparing the specific ID obtained here with ID from other studies, we illustrate the importance of using specific ID in parasite-host systems to avoid potential errors in the interpretation of the results when surrogate values from similar systems or organisms are used.

  2. The effects of sex, tissue type, and dietary components on stable isotope discrimination factors (Δ13C and Δ15N) in mammalian omnivores.

    PubMed

    Kurle, Carolyn M; Koch, Paul L; Tershy, Bernie R; Croll, Donald A

    2014-01-01

    We tested the effects of sex, tissue, and diet on stable isotope discrimination factors (Δ(13)C and Δ(15)N) for six tissues from rats fed four diets with varied C and N sources, but comparable protein quality and quantity. The Δ(13)C and Δ(15)N values ranged from 1.7-4.1‰ and 0.4-4.3‰, respectively. Females had higher Δ(15)N values than males because males grew larger, whereas Δ(13)C values did not differ between sexes. Differences in Δ(13)C values among tissue types increased with increasing variability in dietary carbon sources. The Δ(15)N values increased with increasing dietary δ(15)N values for all tissues except liver and serum, which have fast stable isotope turnover times, and differences in Δ(15)N values among tissue types decreased with increasing dietary animal protein. Our results demonstrate that variability in dietary sources can affect Δ(13)C values, protein source affects Δ(15)N values even when protein quality and quantity are controlled, and the isotope turnover rate of a tissue can influence the degree to which diet affects Δ(15)N values.

  3. Effect of age and ration on diet-tissue isotopic13C, Δ15N) discrimination in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis).

    PubMed

    Hobson, Keith A; Quirk, Travis W

    2014-01-01

    An important prerequisite for the effective use of stable isotopes in animal ecology is the accurate assessment of isotopic discrimination factors linking animals to their diets for a multitude of tissue types. Surprisingly, these values are poorly known in general and especially for mammalian carnivores and omnivores in particular. Also largely unknown are the factors that influence diet-tissue isotopic discrimination such as nutritional quality and age. We raised adult and juvenile striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) in captivity on a constant omnivore diet (Mazuri Omnivore A 5635). Adults (n=6) and juveniles (n=3) were kept for 7 months and young (n=7) to the age of 50 days. We then examined individuals for stable carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotope values of hair, nails, lipid, liver, muscle, bone collagen and the plasma, and cellular fractions of blood. Discrimination values differed among age groups and were significantly higher for young compared with their mothers, likely due to the effects of weaning. Δ(15)N isotopic discrimination factors ranged from 3.14 (nails) to 5.6‰ (plasma) in adults and 4.3 (nails) to 5.8‰ (liver) for young. For Δ(13)C, values ranged from-3.3 (fat) to 3.0‰ (collagen) in adults and from-3.3 (fat) to 2.0‰ (collagen) in young. Our data provide an important tool for predicting diets and source of feeding for medium-sized mammalian omnivorous adults integrated over short (e.g. liver, plasma) through long (e.g. collagen) periods and underline the potential effects of age on isotopic values in omnivore diets.

  4. Enhanced forensic discrimination of pollutants by position-specific isotope analysis using isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Julien, Maxime; Nun, Pierrick; Höhener, Patrick; Parinet, Julien; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S

    2016-01-15

    In forensic environmental investigations the main issue concerns the inference of the original source of the pollutant for determining the liable party. Isotope measurements in geochemistry, combined with complimentary techniques for contaminant identification, have contributed significantly to source determination at polluted sites. In this work we have determined the intramolecular (13)C profiles of several molecules well-known as pollutants. By giving additional analytical parameters, position-specific isotope analysis performed by isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (irm-(13)C NMR) spectrometry gives new information to help in answering the major question: what is the origin of the detected contaminant? We have shown that isotope profiling of the core of a molecule reveals both the raw materials and the process used in its manufacture. It also can reveal processes occurring between the contamination site 'source' and the sampling site. Thus, irm-(13)C NMR is shown to be a very good complement to compound-specific isotope analysis currently performed by mass spectrometry for assessing polluted sites involving substantial spills of pollutant.

  5. Isotopic discrimination during litter decomposition and delta13C and delta15N soil profiles in a young artificial stand and in an old floodplain forest.

    PubMed

    Gioacchini, Paola; Masia, Andrea; Canaccini, Francesca; Boldreghini, Pietro; Tonon, Giustino

    2006-06-01

    In the present study, rates of litter decomposition and microbial biomass nitrogen were monitored over an 8-month period in a young broadleaf plantation (18 y) and in an old floodplain forest. Moreover, delta13C and delta15N temporal variations within soil profiles were evaluated at both sites. Rates of litter decomposition were higher in spring and autumn than in summer, in both forests. At the end of the observation period the percentage of original litter remaining was not statistically different between the young and the old forest and accounted for 60-70% of the original amount. Microbial biomass nitrogen in the remaining litter and the percentage of litter mass lost during decomposition were positively correlated. The difference in litter quality affected the decomposition rate and also the changes in carbon isotopic composition during the decomposition process. In contrast, 15N isotopic signatures showed a similar trend in the litter of the two forests irrespective of the litter quality. Although delta13Csoil and delta15Nsoil showed considerable temporal variation they increased with depth in the soils of both sites but their seasonal changes did not reflect those of the decomposing litter. Within the same soil horizon, both delta13C and delta15N showed similar seasonal trends in the soils of the two forests, suggesting the involvement of environmental factors acting at regional level, such as soil temperature and rainfall variations, in regulating seasonal delta13C and delta15N soil variations.

  6. Study of Urban environmental quality through Isotopes δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Sosa, E.; Mastachi-Loza, C.; Becerril-Piña, R.; Ramos-Salinas, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    Usually, trees with similar pH values on their bark develop epiphytes of similar species, the acidity to be a factor for growth. The aim of the study was evaluate the air quality through isotope δ13C in order to define the levels of environmental quality in the city of Queretaro, Mexico. In this work were collected at least 4 epiphytes positioned in trees of the species Prosopis Laevigata at 25 sites of Queretaro City. The samples were analyzed for trace elements with an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP). The collecting took place during dry period, in May and early rain June 2011 period, and on four sectors to identify the spatial distribution of pollution, using isotopic analysis of concentration of δ 13C. According with the results there are significant differences among the species in each of the sampled areas. The 5 February Avenue presented greater diversity and richness of δ13C, followed by those who were surveyed in the proximity of the UAQ and finally in the middle-east area. An average value of δ13C-17.92%, followed by those surveyed in the vicinity of the UAQ that correspond to sector I and II with an concentration of δ13C-17.55% and δ13C-17.22%, and finally the samples collected in trees scattered in the East-Sector II and IV with a value of δ13C-17.02% and δ13C-15.62%, respectively. Also were observed differences between the dry and wet period. It is likely that these results of δ 13C in moist period reflect the drag of the isotopes due to rain events that could mark a trend in the dilution of this element, however there is a trend in terms of abundance and composition of finding more impact in those species sampled in dry period, in May and early June 2011.

  7. On the use of phloem sap δ13C to estimate canopy carbon discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascher, Katherine; Máguas, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2010-05-01

    Although the carbon stable isotope composition (d13C) of bulk leaf material is a good integrative parameter of photosynthetic discrimination and can be used as a reliable ecological index of plant functioning; it is not a good tracer of short-term changes in photosynthetic discrimination. In contrast, d13C of phloem sap is potentially useful as an indicator of short-term changes in canopy photosynthetic discrimination. However, recent research indicates that d13C signatures may be substantially altered by metabolic processes downstream of initial leaf-level carbon fixation (e.g. post-photosynthetic fractionation). Accordingly, before phloem sap d13C can be used as a proxy for canopy level carbon discrimination an understanding of factors influencing the degree and magnitude of post-photosynthetic fractionation and how these vary between species is of paramount importance. In this study, we measured the d13C signature along the basipetal transport pathway in two co-occurring tree species in the field - an understory invasive exotic legume, Acacia longifolia, and a native pine, Pinus pinaster. We measured d13C of bulk leaf and leaf water soluble organic matter (WSOM), phloem sap sampled at two points along the plant axis and leaf and root dark respiration. In general, species differences in photosynthetic discrimination resulted in more enriched d13C values in the water-conserving P. pinaster relative to the water-spending A. longifolia. Post-photosynthetic fractionation led to differences in d13C of carbon pools along the plant axis with progressively more depleted d13C from the canopy to the trunk (~6.5 per mil depletion in A. longifolia and ~0.8per mil depletion in P. pinaster). Leaf and root respiration, d13C, were consistently enriched relative to putative substrates. We hypothesize that the pronounced enrichment of leaf respired CO2 relative to leaf WSOM may have left behind relatively depleted carbon to be loaded into the phloem resulting in d13C depletion

  8. Process Model for Studying Regional 13C Stable Isotope Exchange between Vegetation and Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. M.; Chen, B.; Huang, L.; Tans, P.; Worthy, D.; Ishizawa, M.; Chan, D.

    2007-12-01

    The variation of the stable isotope 13CO2 in the air in exchange with land ecosystems results from fractionation processes in both plants and soil during photosynthesis and respiration. Its diurnal and seasonal variations therefore contain information on the carbon cycle. We developed a model (BEPS-iso) to simulate its exchange between vegetation and the atmosphere. To be useful for regional carbon cycle studies, the model has the following characteristics: (i) it considers the turbulent mixing in the vertical profile from the soil surface to the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL); (ii) it scales individual leaf photosynthetic discrimination to the whole canopy through the separation of sunlit and shaded leaf groups; (iii) through simulating leaf-level photosynthetic processes, it has the capacity to mechanistically examine isotope discrimination resulting from meteorological forcings, such as radiation, precipitation and humidity; and (iv) through complete modeling of radiation, energy and water fluxes, it also simulates soil moisture and temperature needed for estimating ecosystem respiration and the 13C signal from the soil. After validation using flask data acquired at 20 m level on a tower near Fraserdale, Ontario, Canada, during intensive campaigns (1998-2000), the model has been used for several purposes: (i) to investigate the diurnal and seasonal variations in the disequilibrium in 13C fractionation between ecosystem respiration and photosynthesis, which is an important step in using 13C measurements to separate these carbon cycle components; (ii) to quantify the 13C rectification in the PBL, which differs significantly from CO2 rectification because of the diurnal and seasonal disequilibriums; and (iii) to model the 13C spatial and temporal variations over the global land surface for the purpose of CO2 inversion using 13C as an additional constraint.

  9. Temperature-mediated changes in microbial carbon use efficiency and 13C discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmeier, C. A.; Ballantyne, F., IV; Min, K.; Billings, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding how carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from soils feeds back to climate warming depends in part on our ability to quantify the efficiency with which microorganisms convert soil organic carbon (C) into either biomass or CO2. Quantifying ecosystem-level respiratory CO2 losses often also requires assumptions about stable C isotope fractionations associated with the microbial transformation of soil organic substrates. However, the diversity of organic substrates' δ13C and the challenges of measuring microbial C use efficiency (CUE) in soils fundamentally limit our ability to project soil, and thus ecosystem, C budgets in a warming climate. Here, we quantify the effect of temperature on C fluxes during metabolic transformations of cellobiose, a common microbial substrate, by a cosmopolitan soil microorganism growing at a constant rate. Specific respiration rate increased by 250 % between 13 and 26.5 °C, decreasing CUE from 77 to 56 %. Specific respiration rate was positively correlated with an increase in respiratory 13C discrimination from 4.4 to 6.7 ‰ across the same temperature range. This first demonstration of a direct link between temperature, microbial CUE and associated isotope fluxes provides a critical step towards understanding δ13C of respired CO2 at multiple scales, and towards a framework for predicting future soil C fluxes.

  10. Temperature-mediated changes in microbial carbon use efficiency and 13C discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Ballantyne, Ford, IV; Min, Kyungjin; Billings, Sharon A.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding how carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from ecosystems feeds back to climate warming depends in part on our ability to quantify the efficiency with which microorganisms convert organic carbon (C) into either biomass or CO2. Quantifying ecosystem-level respiratory CO2 losses often also requires assumptions about stable C isotope fractionations associated with the microbial transformation of organic substrates. However, the diversity of organic substrates' δ13C and the challenges of measuring microbial C use efficiency (CUE) in their natural environment fundamentally limit our ability to project ecosystem C budgets in a warming climate. Here, we quantify the effect of temperature on C fluxes during metabolic transformations of cellobiose, a common microbial substrate, by a cosmopolitan microorganism growing at a constant rate. Biomass C specific respiration rate increased by 250 % between 13 and 26.5 °C, decreasing CUE from 77 to 56 %. Biomass C specific respiration rate was positively correlated with an increase in respiratory 13C discrimination from 4.4 to 6.7 ‰ across the same temperature range. This first demonstration of a direct link between temperature, microbial CUE, and associated isotope fluxes provides a critical step towards understanding δ13C of respired CO2 at multiple scales, and towards a framework for predicting future ecosystem C fluxes.

  11. delta15N and delta13C diet-tissue discrimination factors for large sharks under semi-controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Nigel E; Brush, Jaclyn; McCarthy, Ian D; Fisk, Aaron T

    2010-04-01

    Stable isotopes (delta(15)N and delta(13)C) are being widely applied in ecological research but there has been a call for ecologists to determine species- and tissue-specific diet discrimination factors ((13)C and (15)N) for their study animals. For large sharks stable isotopes may provide an important tool to elucidate aspects of their ecological roles in marine systems, but laboratory based controlled feeding experiments are impractical. By utilizing commercial aquaria, we estimated (15)N and (13)C of muscle, liver, vertebral cartilage and a number of organs of three large sand tiger (Carcharias taurus) and one large lemon shark (Negaprion brevirostris) under a controlled feeding regime. For all sharks mean+/-SD for (15)N and (13)C in lipid extracted muscle using lipid extracted prey data were 2.29 per thousand+/-0.22 and 0.90 per thousand+/-0.33, respectively. The use of non-lipid extracted muscle and prey resulted in very similar (15)N and (13)C values but mixing of lipid and non-lipid extracted data produced variable estimates. Values of (15)N and (13)C in lipid extracted liver and prey were 1.50 per thousand+/-0.54 and 0.22 per thousand+/-1.18, respectively. Non-lipid extracted diet discrimination factors in liver were highly influenced by lipid content and studies that examine stable isotopes in shark liver, and likely any high lipid tissue, should strive to remove lipid effects through standardising C:N ratios, prior to isotope analysis. Mean vertebral cartilage (15)N and (13)C values were 1.45 per thousand+/-0.61 and 3.75 per thousand+/-0.44, respectively. Organ (15)N and (13)C values were more variable among individual sharks but heart tissue was consistently enriched by approximately 1-2.5 per thousand. Minimal variability in muscle and liver delta(15)N and delta(13)C sampled at different intervals along the length of individual sharks and between liver lobes suggests that stable isotope values are consistent within tissues of individual animals. To our

  12. Influence of 13C isotopic labeling location of 13C DNP of acetate using TEMPO free radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Lumata, Lloyd

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) via the dissolution method enhances the liquid-state magnetic resonance (NMR or MRI) signals of insensitive nuclear spins by at least 10,000-fold. The basis for all these signal enhancements at room temperature is the polarization transfer from the electrons to nuclear spins at cryogenic temperature and high magnetic field. In this work, we have studied the influence of the location of 13C isotopic labeling on the DNP of sodium acetate at 3.35 T and 1.4 K using a wide ESR linewidth free radical 4-oxo-TEMPO. The carbonyl [1-13C]acetate spins produced a polarization level that is almost twice that of the methyl [2-13C]acetate spins. On the other hand, the polarization of the methyl 13C spins doubled to reach the level of [1-13C]acetate when the methyl group was deuterated. Meanwhile, the solid-state nuclear relaxation of these samples are the same and do not correlate with the polarization levels. These behavior implies that the nuclear relaxation for these samples is dominated by the contribution from the free radicals and the polarization levels can be explained by a thermodynamic picture of DNP.

  13. sup 13 C and sup 18 O isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates: II. In vitro simulation of kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Biological carbonates are built largely from CO{sub 2}, which diffuses across the skeletogenic membrane and reacts to form HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Kinetic discrimination against the heavy isotopes {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C during CO{sub 2} hydration and hydroxylation apparently causes most of the isotopic disequilibrium observed in biological carbonates. These kinetic isotope effects are expressed when the extracytosolic calcifying solution is thin and alkaline, and HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} precipitates fairly rapidly as CaCO{sub 3}. In vitro simulation of the calcifying environment produced heavy isotope depletions qualitatively similar to, but somewhat more extreme than, those seen in biological carbonates. Isotopic equilibration during biological calcification occurs through CO{sub 2} exchange across the calcifying membrane and by admixture ambient waters (containing HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) into the calcifying fluids. Both mechanisms tend to produce linear correlations between skeletal {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O.

  14. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve

    PubMed Central

    van Gils, Jan A.; Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Vall

    2015-01-01

    The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal diets require controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite several pleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notably in consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we present such a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of a medium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris canutus canutus), consuming a chemosymbiotic lucinid bivalve (Loripes lucinalis). Because this bivalve forms a symbiosis with chemoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria living inside its gill, the bivalve is isotopically distinct from ‘normal’ bivalves whose food has a photosynthetic basis. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis that isotope discrimination and incorporation dynamics are different when consuming such chemosynthesis-based prey. The experiment showed that neither the isotopic discrimination factor, nor isotopic turnover time, differed between birds consuming the chemosymbiotic lucinid and a control group consuming a photosynthesis-based bivalve. This was true for 13C as well as for 15N. However, in both groups the 15N discrimination factor was much higher than expected, which probably had to do with the birds losing body mass over the course of the experiment. PMID:26458005

  15. Multi-year estimates of plant and ecosystem 13C discrimination at AmeriFlux sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, X.; Lai, C.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Bush, S.; Randerson, J. T.; Law, B. E.; Schauer, A. J.; Ehleringer, J.

    2011-12-01

    We estimated plant and ecosystem 13C discrimination continuously at 8 AmeriFlux sites (Howland Forest, Harvard Forest, Wind River Forest, Rannells Prairie, Freeman Ranch, Chestnut Ridge, Metolius, and Marys River fir) over 8 years (2002-2009). We used an observation-based approach from weekly measurements of eddy covariance CO2 fluxes and their 13C/12C ratios to estimate photosynthetic 13C discrimination (△A) and respiration (δ13CR) on seasonal and interannual time scales. The coordinated, systematic flask sampling across the AmeriFlux subnetwork were used for cross-site synthesis of monthly flux estimates [Dang et al. Combining tower mixing ratio and community model data to estimate regional-scale net ecosystem carbon exchange by boundary layer inversion over 4 flux towers in the U.S.A., Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, in press]. Here, we evaluated environmental factors that also influenced temporal variability in △A and δ13CR from daily to interannual time scales, comparing atmospheric 13C/12C measurements, leaf and needle organic matter, and tree ring cellulose. Across these major biomes that dominate the continent, we show differential ecophysiological responses to environmental stresses, among which water availability appeared to be a dominant factor. Our decadal measurement period provided robust estimates of atmospheric 13C discrimination by terrestrial ecosystems, but also suggest regions where enhanced monitoring efforts are required (e.g., 13C/12C emission from fire and urban metabolism; increased temporal resolution of 13C measurements in stress-sensitive ecosystems) to make atmospheric 13C/12C measurements an effective constraint for continental-scale assessments of the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  16. Organic vs. conventional grassland management: do (15)N and (13)C isotopic signatures of hay and soil samples differ?

    PubMed

    Klaus, Valentin H; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ(15)N and δ(13)C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ(15)N (δ(15)N plant - δ(15)N soil) to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ(13)C in hay and δ(15)N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ(13)C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ(15)N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ(13)C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be efficiently

  17. Organic vs. Conventional Grassland Management: Do 15N and 13C Isotopic Signatures of Hay and Soil Samples Differ?

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Valentin H.; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ15N and δ13C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ15N (δ15N plant - δ15N soil) to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ13C in hay and δ15N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ13C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ15N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ13C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be efficiently used in practice

  18. Isotopic 13C NMR spectrometry to assess counterfeiting of active pharmaceutical ingredients: site-specific 13C content of aspirin and paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Virginie; Mboula, Vanessa Maroga; Jouitteau, Catherine; Akoka, Serge; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S

    2009-10-15

    Isotope profiling is a well-established technique to obtain information about the chemical history of a given compound. However, the current methodology using IRMS can only determine the global (13)C content, leading to the loss of much valuable data. The development of quantitative isotopic (13)C NMR spectrometry at natural abundance enables the measurement of the (13)C content of each carbon within a molecule, thus giving simultaneous access to a number of isotopic parameters. When it is applied to active pharmaceutical ingredients, each manufactured batch can be characterized better than by IRMS. Here, quantitative isotopic (13)C NMR is shown to be a very promising and effective tool for assessing the counterfeiting of medicines, as exemplified by an analysis of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and paracetamol (acetaminophen) samples collected from pharmacies in different countries. It is proposed as an essential complement to (2)H NMR and IRMS.

  19. sup 13 C and sup 18 O isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates: I. Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Biological carbonates frequently precipitate out of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C equilibrium with ambient waters. Two patterns of isotopic disequilibrium are particularly common. Kinetic disequilibria, so designated because they apparently result from kinetic isotope effects during CO{sub 2} hydration and hydroxylation, involve simultaneous depletions of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C as large as 4{per thousand} and 10 to 15{per thousand}, respectively. Rapid skeletogenesis favors strong kinetic effects, and approximately linear correlations between skeletal {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C are common in carbonates showing mainly the kinetic pattern. Metabolic effects involve additional positive or negative modulation of skeletal {delta}{sup 13}C, reflecting changes in the {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic carbon, caused mainly by photosynthesis and respiration. Kinetic isotope disequilibria tend to be fairly consistent in rapidly growing parts of photosynthetic corals, and time dependent isotopic variations therefore reflect changes in environmental conditions. {delta}{sup 18}O variations from Galapagos corals yields meaningful clues regarding seawater temperature, while {delta}{sup 13}C variations reflect changes in photosynthesis, modulated by cloudiness.

  20. Isotopic variability of cave bears (δ15N, δ13C) across Europe during MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajcarz, Magdalena; Pacher, Martina; Krajcarz, Maciej T.; Laughlan, Lana; Rabeder, Gernot; Sabol, Martin; Wojtal, Piotr; Bocherens, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Collagen, the organic fraction of bone, records the isotopic parameters of consumed food for carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). This relationship of isotopic signature between diet and tissue is an important tool for the study of dietary preferences of modern and fossil animal species. Since the first information on the isotopic signature of cave bear was reported, numerous data from Europe have become available. The goal of this work is to track the geographical variation of cave bear collagen isotopic values in Europe during Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (about 60,000-25,000 yr BP). In this study the results of new δ13C and δ15N isotopic analyses of cave bear collagen from four Central-Eastern European sites are presented, as well as a review of all published isotopic data for cave bears of the same period. The main conclusion is a lack of geographical East-West pattern in the variations of δ13C and δ15N values of cave bear collagen. Moreover, no relationship was found between cave bear taxonomy and isotopic composition. The cave bears from Central-Eastern Europe exhibit δ13C and δ15N values near the average of the range of Central, Western and Southern European cave bears. Despite the fact that most cave bear sites follow an altitudinal gradient, separate groups of sites exhibit shift in absolute values of δ13C, what disturbs an altitude-related isotopic pattern. The most distinct groups are: high Alpine sites situated over 1500 m a.s.l. - in terms of δ13C; and two Romanian sites Peştera cu Oase and Urşilor - in case of δ15N. Although the cave bear isotopic signature is driven by altitude, the altitudinal adjustment of isotopic data is not enough to explain the isotopic dissimilarity of these cave bears. The unusually high δ15N signature of mentioned Romanian sites is an isolated case in Europe. Cave bears from relatively closely situated Central-Eastern European sites and other Romanian sites are more similar to Western European than to Romanian

  1. Understanding carbon isotope behaviour during combustion processes: a pre-requisite to using d13C in the field of air pollution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrel, P.; Widory, D.

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of stable isotopes in the field of air pollution research, especially their success in clearly discriminating the different sources of pollution in urban environments, and in tracing their respective impacts for a given sampling location. Among them, carbon isotopes have been used to track the origin of both gases (i.e. CO2; Widory &Javoy, 2003) and particulate matter (i.e. PM2 .5 and PM10; Widory et al., 2004). But understanding the carbon isotope behaviour that leads to this discrimination during combustion processes is a pre-requisite to using them as tracers of pollution sources in the atmosphere. d13C in fuels has been extensively used as an indicator of the processes leading to the generation of their parent crude-oil. Here, we isotopically characterise fuels and combustibles sold in Paris (France), and characterise the isotopic relations existing with their combustion by-products, i.e. gases (CO2) and particles (bulk carbon). Results show that d13C in fuels is clearly related to their physical state, with natural gas being strongly depleted in 13C while coal yields the highest d13C, and liquid fuels display intermediate values. This relation is also valid for exhaust gases, though d13C values of combustion particles form a homogeneous range within which no clear distinction is observed. Combustion processes are accompanied by carbon-isotope fractionation resulting from the combustion being incomplete. Carbon-isotope fractionation is strictly negative ( 1.3‰) during the formation of combustion gases, but generally positive in particle formation even if values close to zero are observed. This study helps understanding the processes leading to the d13C discrimination observed in pollution sources' exhausts, and definitely validates the use of carbon isotopes as tracers of atmospheric pollution.

  2. Isotopic ((13)C) fractionation during plant residue decomposition and its implications for soil organic matter studies.

    PubMed

    Schweizer; Fear; Cadisch

    1999-07-01

    Carbon isotopic fractionations in plant materials and those occurring during decomposition have direct implications in studies of short-and longer-term soil organic matter dynamics. Thus the products of decomposition, the evolved CO(2) and the newly formed soil organic matter, may vary in their (13)C signature from that of the original plant material. To evaluate the importance of such fractionation processes, the variations in (13)C signatures between and within plant parts of a tropical grass (Brachiaria humidicola) and tropical legume (Desmodium ovalifolium) were measured and the changes in (13)C content (signatures) during decomposition were monitored over a period of four months. As expected the grass materials were less depleted in (13)C (-11.4 to -11.9 per thousand) than those of the legume (-27.3 to -25.8 per thousand). Root materials of the legume were less (1.5 per thousand) depleted in (13)C compared with the leaves. Plant lignin-C was strongly depleted in (13)C compared with the bulk material by up to 2.5 per thousand in the legume and up to 4.7 per thousand in the grass. Plant materials were subsequently incubated in a sand/nutrient-solution/microbial inoculum mixture. The respiration product CO(2) was trapped in NaOH and precipitated as CaCO(3), suitable for analysis using an automated C/N analyser coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Significant depletion in (13)C of the evolved CO(2) was observed during the initial stages of decomposition probably as a result of microbial fractionation as it was not associated with the (13)C signatures of the measured more decomposable fractions (non-acid detergent fibre and cellulose). While the cumulative CO(2)-(13)C signatures of legume materials became slightly enriched with ongoing decomposition, the CO(2)-C of the grass materials remained depleted in (13)C. Associated isotopic fractionation correction factors for source identification of CO(2-)C varied with time and suggested errors of 2-19% in the

  3. Natural isotope correction of MS/MS measurements for metabolomics and (13)C fluxomics.

    PubMed

    Niedenführ, Sebastian; ten Pierick, Angela; van Dam, Patricia T N; Suarez-Mendez, Camilo A; Nöh, Katharina; Wahl, S Aljoscha

    2016-05-01

    Fluxomics and metabolomics are crucial tools for metabolic engineering and biomedical analysis to determine the in vivo cellular state. Especially, the application of (13)C isotopes allows comprehensive insights into the functional operation of cellular metabolism. Compared to single MS, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides more detailed and accurate measurements of the metabolite enrichment patterns (tandem mass isotopomers), increasing the accuracy of metabolite concentration measurements and metabolic flux estimation. MS-type data from isotope labeling experiments is biased by naturally occurring stable isotopes (C, H, N, O, etc.). In particular, GC-MS(/MS) requires derivatization for the usually non-volatile intracellular metabolites introducing additional natural isotopes leading to measurements that do not directly represent the carbon labeling distribution. To make full use of LC- and GC-MS/MS mass isotopomer measurements, the influence of natural isotopes has to be eliminated (corrected). Our correction approach is analyzed for the two most common applications; (13)C fluxomics and isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) based metabolomics. Natural isotopes can have an impact on the calculated flux distribution which strongly depends on the substrate labeling and the actual flux distribution. Second, we show that in IDMS based metabolomics natural isotopes lead to underestimated concentrations that can and should be corrected with a nonlinear calibration. Our simulations indicate that the correction for natural abundance in isotope based fluxomics and quantitative metabolomics is essential for correct data interpretation.

  4. Isotopic (13C) response of ponderosa pine ecosystem respiration to atmospheric stress events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, D. R.; McDowell, N. G.; Anthoni, P. M.; Law, B. E.; Bond, B. J.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2001-12-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of ecosystem respiration (\\delta13CR) reflects several biological and physical factors influencing ecosystem physiology. Recent experiments in several Oregon coniferous forests have shown a link between annual precipitation, short-term atmospheric moisture deficit, air temperature, and \\delta13CR. This link appears to be driven by changes in photosynthetic discrimination associated with changes in soil or atmospheric moisture deficit (or both), and suggests there can be substantial variation in \\delta13CRon a time scale of days. Our objective was to investigate the response of ecosystem respiration to the passage of synoptic-scale air masses and accompanying weather changes, to see if such short-term changes occur. We examined the carbon isotopic content of ecosystem respiration every night for 13 consecutive nights (summer 2001), at the Metolius AmeriFlux site, a 50-250 year old ponderosa pine forest in central Oregon, USA. Additionally, the 13C contents of the soil and branch components of the ecosystem respiration flux were measured with soil chambers and branch bags. Mean daytime atmospheric moisture deficit during this period ranged from minimal to very dry (0.36 to 3.3 kPa), and minimum nocturnal air temperature varied from 0.2 to 16.4 C. A single near-freezing event was followed by enriched \\delta13CR for several days afterwards, moderating the expected humidity response. \\delta13CR changed only marginally (-25.1 to -25.9 \\permil), but the soil and branch fluxes showed larger night-to-night variation (-23.8 to -25.3 and -23.5 to -26.4 \\permil, respectively). Based on preliminary analyses, both the soil flux and branch flux were more enriched in 13C than the whole-ecosystem flux, indicating an inconsistency in terms of mass conservation. Possible reasons for this contradiction will be discussed. These data will be further evaluated relative to meteorological and eddy flux data collected during the same time period.

  5. Site-specific 13C content by quantitative isotopic 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry: a pilot inter-laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Chaintreau, Alain; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst; Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita; Yoshida, Naohiro; Pagelot, Alain; Moskau, Detlef; Moreno, Aitor; Schleucher, Jürgen; Reniero, Fabiano; Holland, Margaret; Guillou, Claude; Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S

    2013-07-25

    Isotopic (13)C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular (13)C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the (13)C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic (13)C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular (13)C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic (13)C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ (13)Ci profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ (13)Ci in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results.

  6. (13) C dynamic nuclear polarization using isotopically enriched 4-oxo-TEMPO free radicals.

    PubMed

    Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    2016-12-01

    The nitroxide-based free radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) is a widely used polarizing agent in NMR signal amplification via dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). In this study, we have thoroughly investigated the effects of (15) N and/or (2) H isotopic labeling of 4-oxo-TEMPO free radical on (13) C DNP of 3 M [1-(13) C] sodium acetate samples in 1 : 1 v/v glycerol : water at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. Four variants of this free radical were used for (13) C DNP: 4-oxo-TEMPO, 4-oxo-TEMPO-(15) N, 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16 and 4-oxo-TEMPO-(15) N,d16 . Our results indicate that, despite the striking differences seen in the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectral features, the (13) C DNP efficiency of these (15) N and/or (2) H-enriched 4-oxo-TEMPO free radicals are relatively the same compared with (13) C DNP performance of the regular 4-oxo-TEMPO. Furthermore, when fully deuterated glassing solvents were used, the (13) C DNP signals of these samples all doubled in the same manner, and the (13) C polarization buildup was faster by a factor of 2 for all samples. The data here suggest that the hyperfine coupling contributions of these isotopically enriched 4-oxo-TEMPO free radicals have negligible effects on the (13) C DNP efficiency at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. These results are discussed in light of the spin temperature model of DNP. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. CARBON ISOTOPE DISCRIMINATION AND GROWTH RESPONSE TO STAND DENSITY REDUCTIONS IN OLD PINUS PONDEROSA TREES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon isotope ratios ( 13C) of tree rings are commonly used for paleoclimatic reconstruction and for inferring canopy water-use efficiency (WUE). However, the responsiveness of carbon isotope discrimination ( ) to site disturbance and resource availability has only rarely been ...

  8. Deuterium isotope effects in 13C NMR spectra of trans-azobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikić-Topić, Draz̆en; Novak, Predrag; Smrec̆ki, Vilko; Meić, Zlatko

    1997-06-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts have been determined in a series of deuteriated trans-azobenzene isotopomers. The longest effect observed is the one over ten bonds ( 10Δ) in 4- 2H-isotopomer at C-4' atom amounting to 3.3 ppb. The magnitude and the extent of isotope effects in trans-azobenzene are related to those observed in isoelectronic and conformationally similar trans-stilbene. The sign alternation pattern of the long-range isotope effects in trans-azobenzene parallels that in isoelectronic trans-stilbene, cis-stilbene and trans-N-benzylideneaniline.

  9. 13C/12C isotope ratio MS analysis of testosterone, in chemicals and pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, X; González, J C; Pichini, S; Pascual, J A; Segura, J

    2001-02-01

    The 13C/12C ratio can be used to detect testosterone misuse in sport because (semi)-synthetic testosterone is supposed to have a 13C abundance different from that of endogenous natural human testosterone. In this study, gas chromatography/combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) analysis for the measurement of the delta 13C/1000 value of testosterone from esterified forms of 13 pharmaceutical preparations, six reagent grade chemicals and three bulk materials (raw materials used in pharmaceutical proarations) obtained world-wide was investigated after applying a strong acidic solvolytic procedure. Mean delta 13C/1000 values of non esterified (free) testosterone from chemicals and bulk materials of several testosterone esters were in the range: -25.91/-32.82/1000 while the value obtained for a (semi)-synthetic, reagent grade, free testosterone was -27.36/1000. The delta 13C/1000 results obtained for testosterone from the pharmaceuticals investigated containing testosterone esters were quite homogeneous (mean and S.D. of delta 13C/1000 values of free testosterone: 27.43 +/- 0.76/1000), being the range between -26.18 and -30.04/1000. Values described above were clearly different from those reported by several authors for endogenous natural human testosterone and its main metabolites excreted into the urine in non-consumers of testosterone (delta 13C/1000 range: from -21.3 to -24.4/1000), while they were similar to those of urinary testosterone and metabolites from individuals treated with testosterone esters and testosterone precursors. This finding justifies the fact that administration of these pharmaceutical formulations led to a statistical decrease of carbon isotope ratio of urinary testosterone and its main metabolites in treated subjects.

  10. OpenMebius: an open source software for isotopically nonstationary 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Kajihata, Shuichi; Furusawa, Chikara; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of metabolic flux by (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) provides valuable information regarding cell physiology. Bioinformatics tools have been developed to estimate metabolic flux distributions from the results of tracer isotopic labeling experiments using a (13)C-labeled carbon source. Metabolic flux is determined by nonlinear fitting of a metabolic model to the isotopic labeling enrichment of intracellular metabolites measured by mass spectrometry. Whereas (13)C-MFA is conventionally performed under isotopically constant conditions, isotopically nonstationary (13)C metabolic flux analysis (INST-(13)C-MFA) has recently been developed for flux analysis of cells with photosynthetic activity and cells at a quasi-steady metabolic state (e.g., primary cells or microorganisms under stationary phase). Here, the development of a novel open source software for INST-(13)C-MFA on the Windows platform is reported. OpenMebius (Open source software for Metabolic flux analysis) provides the function of autogenerating metabolic models for simulating isotopic labeling enrichment from a user-defined configuration worksheet. Analysis using simulated data demonstrated the applicability of OpenMebius for INST-(13)C-MFA. Confidence intervals determined by INST-(13)C-MFA were less than those determined by conventional methods, indicating the potential of INST-(13)C-MFA for precise metabolic flux analysis. OpenMebius is the open source software for the general application of INST-(13)C-MFA.

  11. Photobioreactor design for isotopic non-stationary 13C-metabolic flux analysis (INST 13C-MFA) under photoautotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Martzolff, Arnaud; Cahoreau, Edern; Cogne, Guillaume; Peyriga, Lindsay; Portais, Jean-Charles; Dechandol, Emmanuel; Le Grand, Fabienne; Massou, Stéphane; Gonçalves, Olivier; Pruvost, Jérémy; Legrand, Jack

    2012-12-01

    Adaptive metabolic behavior of photoautotrophic microorganisms toward genetic and environmental perturbations can be interpreted in a quantitative depiction of carbon flow through a biochemical reaction network using isotopic non-stationary (13) C-metabolic flux analysis (INST (13) C-MFA). To evaluate (13) C-metabolic flux maps for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an original experimental framework was designed allowing rapid, reliable collection of high-quality isotopomer data against time. It involved (i) a short-time (13) C labeling injection device based on mixing control in a torus-shaped photobioreactor with plug-flow hydrodynamics allowing a sudden step-change in the (13) C proportion in the substrate feed and (ii) a rapid sampling procedure using an automatic fast filtration method coupled to a manual rapid liquid nitrogen quenching step. (13) C-substrate labeling enrichment was controlled through the total dissolved inorganic carbon concentration in the pulsed solution. First results were obtained from steady-state continuous culture measurements allowing the characterization of the kinetics of label incorporation into light-limited growing cells cultivated in a photobioreactor operating at the maximal biomass productivity for an incident photon flux density of 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1). (13)C label incorporation was measured for 21 intracellular metabolites using IC-MS/MS in 58 samples collected across a labeling experiment duration of 7 min. The fastest labeling rate was observed for 2/3-phosphoglycerate with an apparent isotopic stationary state reached after 300 s. The labeling rate was consistent with the optimized mixing time of about 4.9 s inside the reactor and the shortest reliable sampling period assessed at 5 s.

  12. Paleoclimate record from Zidita Cave (Romania) using guano-derived δ13C isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forray, Ferenc L.; Giurgiu, Alexandra; Onac, Bogdan P.; Tămaş, Tudor

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we measured the carbon isotopic composition of a core taken from a bat guano deposit in Zidita Cave (Metaliferi Mountains, Romania). The cave develops in Late Jurassic limestones, has a total length of 547 m, and its entrance was fortified during the XIV - XVIII centuries. The cave is a fossil maze with a filling represented by limestone blocks, clay sediments, and scarce calcite speleothems. The guano accumulation, 1.5 m thick, is located in a small room towards the end of the cave, under a Rhinolophus euryale roost site.The core was recovered with a Russian peat corer. 14C dating performed on the guano indicates a continuous deposition since ca. 500 years BP, but however, the upper first meter of the core has a modern age and high radiocarbon activity acquired from atmospheric radiocarbon bomb pulse. The core was sampled at 2 cm ± 2 mm intervals for δ13C analyses (76 samples) and at 5 cm for pollen. The investigations were carried out using a Picarro G2121-i δ13C analyzer (Combustion Module coupled with a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy technique) at the Stable Isotope Laboratory of the Department of Geology, Babes-Bolyai University (Cluj-Napoca, Romania). The result shows that guano δ13C range from -24.07 to -27.61 o‰The carbon isotopic profile indicates two major wet periods and 2 to 3 shorter periods characterized by drier climate.

  13. Quantitative analysis of deuterium using the isotopic effect on quaternary (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Tamim A; Yepuri, Nageshwar Rao; Holden, Peter J; James, Michael

    2016-07-13

    Quantitative analysis of specifically deuterated compounds can be achieved by a number of conventional methods, such as mass spectroscopy, or by quantifying the residual (1)H NMR signals compared to signals from internal standards. However, site specific quantification using these methods becomes challenging when dealing with non-specifically or randomly deuterated compounds that are produced by metal catalyzed hydrothermal reactions in D2O, one of the most convenient deuteration methods. In this study, deuterium-induced NMR isotope shifts of quaternary (13)C resonances neighboring deuterated sites have been utilized to quantify the degree of isotope labeling of molecular sites in non-specifically deuterated molecules. By probing (13)C NMR signals while decoupling both proton and deuterium nuclei, it is possible to resolve (13)C resonances of the different isotopologues based on the isotopic shifts and the degree of deuteration of the carbon atoms. We demonstrate that in different isotopologues, the same quaternary carbon, neighboring partially deuterated carbon atoms, are affected to an equal extent by relaxation. Decoupling both nuclei ((1)H, (2)H) resolves closely separated quaternary (13)C signals of the different isotopologues, and allows their accurate integration and quantification under short relaxation delays (D1 = 1 s) and hence fast accumulative spectral acquisition. We have performed a number of approaches to quantify the deuterium content at different specific sites to demonstrate a convenient and generic analysis method for use in randomly deuterated molecules, or in cases of specifically deuterated molecules where back-exchange processes may take place during work up.

  14. On the status of IAEA delta-13C stable isotope reference materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assonov, Sergey; Groening, Manfred; Fajgelj, Ales

    2016-04-01

    For practical reasons all isotope measurements are performed on relative scales realized through the use of international, scale-defining primary standards. In fact these standards were materials (artefacts, similar to prototypes of meter and kg) selected based on their properties. The VPDB delta-13C scale is realised via two highest-level reference materials NBS19 and LSVEC, the first defining the scale and the second aimed to normalise lab-to-lab calibrations. These two reference materials (RMs) have been maintained and distributed by IAEA and NIST. The priority task is to maintain these primary RMs at the required uncertainty level, thus ensuring the long-term scale consistency. The second task is to introduce replacements when needed (currently for exhausted NBS19, work in progress). The next is to produce a family of lower level RMs (secondary, tertiary) addressing needs of various applications (with different delta values, in different physical-chemical forms) and their needs for the uncertainty; these RMs should be traceable to the highest level RMs. Presently three is a need for a range of RMs addressing existing and newly emerging analytical techniques (e.g. optical isotopic analysers) in form of calibrated CO2 gases with different delta-13C values. All that implies creating a family of delta-13C stable isotope reference materials. Presently IAEA works on replacement for NBS19 and planning new RMs. Besides, we found that LSVEC (introduced as second anchor for the VPDB scale in 2006) demonstrate a considerable scatter of its delta-13C value which implies a potential bias of the property value and increased value uncertainty which may conflict with uncertainty requirements for atmospheric monitoring. That is not compatible with the status of LSVEC, and therefore it should be replaced as soon as possible. The presentation will give an overview of the current status, the strategic plan of developments and the near future steps.

  15. 13C-18O isotope signatures and ‘clumped isotope’ thermometry in foraminifera and coccoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Eagle, Robert A.; Thiagarajan, Nivedita; Gagnon, Alexander C.; Bauch, Henning; Halloran, Paul R.; Eiler, John M.

    2010-10-01

    Accurate constraints on past ocean temperatures and compositions are critical for documenting climate change and resolving its causes. Most proxies for temperature are not thermodynamically based, appear to be subject to biological processes, require regional calibrations, and/or are influenced by fluid composition. As a result, their interpretation becomes uncertain when they are applied in settings not necessarily resembling those in which they were empirically calibrated. Independent proxies for past temperature could provide an important means of testing and/or expanding on existing reconstructions. Here we report measurements of abundances of stable isotopologues of calcitic and aragonitic benthic and planktic foraminifera and coccoliths, relate those abundances to independently estimated growth temperatures, and discuss the possible scope of equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects. The proportions of 13C- 18O bonds in these samples exhibits a temperature dependence that is generally similar to that previously been reported for inorganic calcite and other biologically precipitated carbonate-containing minerals (apatite from fish, reptile, and mammal teeth; calcitic brachiopods and molluscs; aragonitic coral and mollusks). Most species that exhibit non-equilibrium 18O/ 16O (δ 18O) and 13C/ 12C (δ 13C) ratios are characterized by 13C- 18O bond abundances that are similar to inorganic calcite and are generally indistinguishable from apparent equilibrium, with possible exceptions among benthic foraminiferal samples from the Arctic Ocean where temperatures are near-freezing. Observed isotope ratios in biogenic carbonates can be explained if carbonate minerals generally preserve a state of ordering that reflects the extent of isotopic equilibration of the dissolved inorganic carbon species.

  16. Mechanisms linking metabolism of Helicobacter pylori to (18)O and (13)C-isotopes of human breath CO2.

    PubMed

    Som, Suman; De, Anulekha; Banik, Gourab Dutta; Maity, Abhijit; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Pal, Mithun; Daschakraborty, Sunil B; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Jana, Subhra; Pradhan, Manik

    2015-06-03

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilize glucose during metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms linking to oxygen-18 ((18)O) and carbon-13 ((13)C)-isotopic fractionations of breath CO2 during glucose metabolism are poorly understood. Using the excretion dynamics of (18)O/(16)O and (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios of breath CO2, we found that individuals with Helicobacter pylori infections exhibited significantly higher isotopic enrichments of (18)O in breath CO2 during the 2h-glucose metabolism regardless of the isotopic nature of the substrate, while no significant enrichments of (18)O in breath CO2 were manifested in individuals without the infections. In contrast, the (13)C-isotopic enrichments of breath CO2 were significantly higher in individuals with Helicobacter pylori compared to individuals without infections in response to (13)C-enriched glucose uptake, whereas a distinguishable change of breath (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios was also evident when Helicobacter pylori utilize natural glucose. Moreover, monitoring the (18)O and (13)C-isotopic exchange in breath CO2 successfully diagnosed the eradications of Helicobacter pylori infections following a standard therapy. Our findings suggest that breath (12)C(18)O(16)O and (13)C(16)O(16)O can be used as potential molecular biomarkers to distinctively track the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori and also for eradication purposes and thus may open new perspectives into the pathogen's physiology along with isotope-specific non-invasive diagnosis of the infection.

  17. Measurement of position-specific 13C isotopic composition of propane at the nanomole level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita; Suda, Konomi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a novel method for analyzing intramolecular carbon isotopic distribution of propane as a potential new tracer of its origin. The method is based on on-line pyrolysis of propane followed by analysis of carbon isotope ratios of the pyrolytic products methane, ethylene and ethane. Using propane samples spiked with 13C at the terminal methyl carbon, we characterize the origin of the pyrolytic fragments. We show that the exchange between C-atoms during the pyrolytic process is negligible, and thus that relative intramolecular isotope composition can be calculated. Preliminary data from 3 samples show that site-preference (SP) values, defined as the difference of δ13C values between terminal and sub-terminal C-atom positions of propane, range from -1.8‰ to -12.9‰. In addition, SP value obtained using our method for a thermogenic natural gas sample is consistent with that expected from theoretical models of thermal cracking, suggesting that the isotope fractionation associated with propane pyrolysis is negligible. The method will provide novel insights into the characterization of the origin of propane and will help better understand the biogeochemistry of natural gas deposits.

  18. Aspects regarding at 13C isotope separation column control using Petri nets system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, M. L.; Ciortea, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is intended to show that Petri nets can be also applicable in the chemical industry. It used linear programming, modeling underlying Petri nets, especially discrete event systems for isotopic separation, the purpose of considering and control events in real-time through graphical representations. In this paper it is simulate the control of 13C Isotope Separation column using Petri nets. The major problem with 13C comes from the difficulty of obtaining it and raising its natural fraction. Carbon isotopes can be obtained using many methods, one of them being the cryogenic distillation of carbon monoxide. Some few aspects regarding operating conditions and the construction of such cryogenic plants are known today, and even less information are available as far as the separation process modeling and control are concerned. In fact, the efficient control of the carbon monoxide distillation process represents a necessity for large-scale 13C production. Referring to a classic distillation process, some models for carbon isotope separation have been proposed, some based on mass, component and energy balance equations, some on the nonlinear wave theory or the Cohen equations. For modeling the system it was used Petri nets because in this case it is deal with discrete event systems. In use of the non-timed and with auxiliary times Petri model, the transport stream was divided into sections and these sections will be analyzed successively. Because of the complexity of the system and the large amount of calculations required it was not possible to analyze the system as a unitary whole. A first attempt to model the system as a unitary whole led to the blocking of the model during simulation, because of the large processing times.

  19. Application of nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(13)C) to quantify food chain length and trophic structure.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Matthew J; McDonald, Robbie A; van Veen, F J Frank; Kelly, Simon D; Rees, Gareth; Bearhop, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ(15)N) and carbon (δ(13)C) are used to quantify trophic structure, though relatively few studies have tested accuracy of isotopic structural measures. For laboratory-raised and wild-collected plant-invertebrate food chains spanning four trophic levels we estimated nitrogen range (NR) using δ(15)N, and carbon range (CR) using δ(13)C, which are used to quantify food chain length and breadth of trophic resources respectively. Across a range of known food chain lengths we examined how NR and CR changed within and between food chains. Our isotopic estimates of structure are robust because they were calculated using resampling procedures that propagate variance in sample means through to quantified uncertainty in final estimates. To identify origins of uncertainty in estimates of NR and CR, we additionally examined variation in discrimination (which is change in δ(15)N or δ(13)C from source to consumer) between trophic levels and among food chains. δ(15)N discrimination showed significant enrichment, while variation in enrichment was species and system specific, ranged broadly (1.4‰ to 3.3‰), and importantly, propagated variation to subsequent estimates of NR. However, NR proved robust to such variation and distinguished food chain length well, though some overlap between longer food chains infers a need for awareness of such limitations. δ(13)C discrimination was inconsistent; generally no change or small significant enrichment was observed. Consequently, estimates of CR changed little with increasing food chain length, showing the potential utility of δ(13)C as a tracer of energy pathways. This study serves as a robust test of isotopic quantification of food chain structure, and given global estimates of aquatic food chains approximate four trophic levels while many food chains include invertebrates, our use of four trophic level plant-invertebrate food chains makes our findings relevant for a majority of

  20. Carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C) of pine honey and detection of HFCS adulteration.

    PubMed

    Çinar, Serap B; Ekşi, Aziz; Coşkun, İlknur

    2014-08-15

    Carbon isotope ratio ((13)C/(12)C=δ(13)C) of 100 pine honey samples collected from 9 different localities by Mugla region (Turkey) in years 2006, 2007 and 2008 were investigated. The δ(13)Cprotein value of honey samples ranged between -23.7 and -26.6‰, while the δ(13)Choney value varied between -22.7 and -27‰. For 90% of the samples, the difference in the C isotope ratio of protein and honey fraction (δ(13)Cpro-δ(13)Chon) was -1.0‰ and/or higher. Therefore, it can be said that the generally anticipated minimum value of C isotope difference (-1.0‰) for honey is also valid for pine honey. On the other hand, C4 sugar value (%), which was calculated from the δ(13)Cpro-δ(13)Chon difference, was found to be linearly correlated with the amount of adulterant (HFCS) in pine honey. These results indicate that C4 sugar value is a powerful criteria for detecting HFCS adulteration in pine honey. The δ(13)Choney and δ(13)Cprotein-δ(13)Choney values of the samples did not show any significant differences in terms of both year and locality (P>0.05), while the δ(13)Cprotein values showed significant differences due to year (P<0.05) but not due to locality (P>0.05).

  1. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with (2)H, (13)C and (15)N in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D

    2015-06-01

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80% can be achieved for (15)N and (13)C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For (2)H,(15)N and (2)H,(13)C,(15)N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73%, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins.

  2. Variation in δ13C and δ15N diet–vibrissae trophic discrimination factors in a wild population of California sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newsome, Seth D.; Bentall, Gena B.; Tinker, M. Tim; Oftedal, Olav T.; Ralls, Katherine; Estes, James A.; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to quantify dietary inputs using stable isotope data depends on accurate estimates of isotopic differences between a consumer (c) and its diet (d), commonly referred to as trophic discrimination factors (TDFs) and denoted by Δc-d. At present, TDFs are available for only a few mammals and are usually derived in captive settings. The magnitude of TDFs and the degree to which they vary in wild populations is unknown. We determined δ13C and δ15N TDFs for vibrissae (i.e., whiskers), a tissue that is rapidly becoming an informative isotopic substrate for ecologists, of a wild population of sea otters for which individual diet has been quantified through extensive observational study. This is one of the very few studies that report TDFs for free-living wild animals feeding on natural diets. Trophic discrimination factors of 2.2‰ ± 0.7‰ for δ13C and 3.5‰ ± 0.6‰ for δ15N (mean ± SD) were similar to those reported for captive carnivores, and variation in individual δ13C TDFs was negatively but significantly related to sea urchin consumption. This pattern may relate to the lipid-rich diet consumed by most sea otters in this population and suggests that it may not be appropriate to lipid-extract prey samples when using the isotopic composition of keratinaceous tissues to examine diet in consumers that frequently consume lipid-rich foods, such as many marine mammals and seabirds. We suggest that inherent variation in TDFs should be included in isotopically based estimates of trophic level, food chain length, and mixing models used to quantify dietary inputs in wild populations; this practice will further define the capabilities and limitations of isotopic approaches in ecological studies.

  3. Variation in delta13C and delta15N diet-vibrissae trophic discrimination factors in a wild population of California sea otters.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Seth D; Bentall, Gena B; Tinker, M Tim; Oftedal, Olav T; Ralls, Katherine; Estes, James A; Fogel, Marilyn L

    2010-09-01

    The ability to quantify dietary inputs using stable isotope data depends on accurate estimates of isotopic differences between a consumer (c) and its diet (d), commonly referred to as trophic discrimination factors (TDFs) and denoted by delta(c-d). At present, TDFs are available for only a few mammals and are usually derived in captive settings. The magnitude of TDFs and the degree to which they vary in wild populations is unknown. We determined delta13C and delta15N TDFs for vibrissae (i.e., whiskers), a tissue that is rapidly becoming an informative isotopic substrate for ecologists, of a wild population of sea otters for which individual diet has been quantified through extensive observational study. This is one of the very few studies that report TDFs for free-living wild animals feeding on natural diets. Trophic discrimination factors of 2.2 per thousand +/- 0.7 per thousand for delta13C and 3.5 per thousand +/- 0.6 per thousand for delta15N (mean +/- SD) were similar to those reported for captive carnivores, and variation in individual delta13C TDFs was negatively but significantly related to sea urchin consumption. This pattern may relate to the lipid-rich diet consumed by most sea otters in this population and suggests that it may not be appropriate to lipid-extract prey samples when using the isotopic composition of keratinaceous tissues to examine diet in consumers that frequently consume lipid-rich foods, such as many marine mammals and seabirds. We suggest that inherent variation in TDFs should be included in isotopically based estimates of trophic level, food chain length, and mixing models used to quantify dietary inputs in wild populations; this practice will further define the capabilities and limitations of isotopic approaches in ecological studies.

  4. Deuterium isotope effect on 13C chemical shifts of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rozwadowski, Z

    2006-09-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shift of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases, derivatives of amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-methionine) and various ortho-hydroxyaldehydes in CDCl3 have been measured. The results have shown that the tetrabutylammonium salts of the Schiff bases amino acids, being derivatives of 2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde and 3,5-dibromosalicylaldehyde, exist in the NH-form, while in the derivatives of salicylaldehyde and 5-bromosalicylaldehyde a proton transfer takes place. The interactions between COO- and NH groups stabilize the proton-transferred form through a bifurcated intramolecular hydrogen bond.

  5. Quinone-based stable isotope probing for assessment of 13C substrate-utilizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunihiro, Tadao; Katayama, Arata; Demachi, Toyoko; Veuger, Bart; Boschker, Henricus T. S.; van Oevelen, Dick

    2015-04-01

    13C abundance in the quinone. In this study, we verified carbon stable isotope of quinone compared with bulk carbon stable isotope of bacterial culture. Results indicated a good correlation between carbon stable isotope of quinone compared with bulk carbon stable isotope. However, our measurement conditions for detection of quinone isotope-ions incurred underestimation of 13C abundance in the quinone. The quinone-SIP technique needs further optimization for measurement conditions of LC-MS/MS.

  6. Effects of roasting conditions on the changes of stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13 C) in sesame oil and usefulness of δ13 c to differentiate blended sesame oil from corn oil.

    PubMed

    Seol, Nam Gyu; Jang, Eun Yeong; Kim, Mi-Ja; Lee, Jaehwan

    2012-12-01

    Differentiating blended sesame oils from authentic sesame oil (SO) is a critical step in protecting consumer rights. Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ(13) C), color, fluorescence intensity, and fatty acid profiles were analyzed in SO prepared from sesame seeds with different roasting conditions and in corn oil blended with SO. Sesame seeds were roasted at 175, 200, 225, or 250 °C for 15 or 30 min at each temperature. SO was mixed with corn oil at varying ratios. Roasting conditions ranging from175 to 250 °C at the 30 min time point did not result in significant changes in δ(13) C (P > 0.05). Values of δ(13) C in corn oil and SO from sesame seeds roasted at 250 °C for 15 min were -17.55 and -32.13 ‰, respectively. Fatty acid ratios, including (O + L)/(P × Ln) and (L × L)/O, where O, L, P, and Ln were oleic, linoleic, palmitic, and linolenic acids, respectively, showed good discriminating abilities among the SO blended with corn oil. Therefore, using different combinations of stable carbon isotope ratios and some fatty acid ratios can allow successful differentiation of authentic SO from SO blended with corn oil.

  7. Thz Spectroscopy of 13C Isotopic Species of a "weed": Acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2011-06-01

    Our studies of the isotopic species of 13C and D isotopologues of methyl formate (HCOOCH_3), have allowed the detection of more than 600 lines in Orion. This confirms that many observed U-lines are coming from isotopic species of one of the most abundant molecules in space. Since its first detection in 1976 in SgrB2 and in Orion A, acetaldehyde (CH_3CHO) was detected in many other numerous objects. If its deuterated species (CD_3CHO and CH_3CDO) have been previously studied in the millimeterwave range, the data concerning the 13C species are limited to few lines measured in 1957 up to 40 GHz. In this context we decided to study the 13C species of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde molecule displays a large amplitude motion: the hindered rotation of the methyl group with respect to the rest of the molecule. The analysis is performed with the Rho Axis Method. Recent versions of the codes include high orders term in order to reproduce the observed frequencies for large quantum numbers values as J-values as high as 70a,b,. Measurements and analysis of the rotational spectra of 13C isotopic species are in progress in Lille with a solid-state submillimetre-wave spectrometer (50-950 GHz), the first results will be presented. This work is supported by the contract ANR-08-BLAN-0054 and by the Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (PCMI-CNRS). Carvajal, M.; Margulès, L.; Tercero, B.; et al.A&A 500, (2009) 1109 Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.; Demaison J.; et al.,ApJ 714, (2010) 1120. Ikeda, M.; Ohishi, M.; Nummelin, A.; et al., ApJ, 560, (2001) 792 Kleiner, I.; Lopez, J.-C.; Blanco, S.; et al.J. Mol. Spectrosc. 197, (1999) 275 Elkeurti M.; Coudert, L. H.; Medvedev, I. R.; et al.J. Mol. Spectrosc. 263, (2010) 145 Kilb, R.W.; Lin, C.C.; and Wilson, E.B.J. Chem. Phys. 26, (1957) 1695 Kleiner, I. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 260, (2010) 1 Ilyushin, V.V.; Kryvda, A; and Alekseev, E;J. Mol. Spectrosc. 255, (2009) 32

  8. Correlation between the synthetic origin of methamphetamine samples and their 15N and 13C stable isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Billault, Isabelle; Courant, Frédérique; Pasquereau, Léo; Derrien, Solène; Robins, Richard J; Naulet, Norbert

    2007-06-12

    The active ingredient of ecstasy, N-methyl-3,4-methyldioxyphenylisopropylamine (MDMA) can be manufactured by a number of easy routes from simple precursors. We have synthesised 45 samples of MDMA following the five most common routes using N-precursors from 12 different origins and three different precursors for the aromatic moiety. The 13C and 15N contents of both the precursors and the MDMA samples derived therefrom were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to an elemental analyser (EA-IRMS). We show that within-pathway correlation between the 15N content of the precursor and that of the derived MDMA can be strong but that no general pattern of correlation can be defined. Rather, it is evident that the delta15N values of MDMA are strongly influenced by a combination of the delta15N values of the source of nitrogen used, the route by which the MDMA is synthesised, and the experimental conditions employed. Multivariate analysis (PCA) based on the delta15N values of the synthetic MDMA and of the delta15N and delta13C values of the N-precursors leads to good discrimination between the majority of the reaction conditions tested.

  9. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes.

  10. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes. PMID:27678172

  11. Ca and Mg isotope constraints on the origin of Earth's deepest δ13 C excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Jon M.; Higgins, John A.; Maloof, Adam C.; Schoene, Blair

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the extreme carbon isotope excursions found in carbonate rocks of the Ediacaran Period (635-541 Ma), where δ13 C of marine carbonates (δ13 Ccarb) reach their minimum (- 12 ‰) for Earth history, is one of the most vexing problems in Precambrian geology. Known colloquially as the 'Shuram' excursion, the event has been interpreted by many as a product of a profoundly different Ediacaran carbon cycle. More recently, diagenetic processes have been invoked, with the very negative δ13 C values of Ediacaran carbonates explained via meteoric alteration, late-stage burial diagenesis or growth of authigenic carbonates in the sediment column, thus challenging models which rely upon a dramatically changing redox state of the Ediacaran oceans. Here we present 257 δ 44 / 40 Ca and 131 δ26 Mg measurements, along with [Mg], [Mn] and [Sr] data, from carbonates of the Ediacaran-aged Wonoka Formation (Fm.) of South Australia to bring new isotope systems to bear on understanding the 'Shuram' excursion. Data from four measured sections spanning the basin reveal stratigraphically coherent trends, with variability of ∼1.5‰ in δ26 Mg and ∼1.2‰ in δ 44 / 40 Ca. This Ca isotope variability dwarfs the 0.2-0.3 ‰ change seen coeval with the Permian-Triassic mass extinction, the largest recorded in the rock record, and is on par with putative changes in the δ 44 / 40 Ca value of seawater seen over the Phanerozoic Eon. Changes in both isotopic systems are too large to explain with changes in the isotopic composition of Ca and Mg in global seawater given modern budgets and residence times, and thus must be products of alternative processes. Relationships between δ 44 / 40 Ca and [Sr] and δ26 Mg and [Mg] are consistent with mineralogical control (e.g., aragonite vs. calcite, limestone vs. dolostone) on calcium and magnesium isotope variability. The most pristine samples in the Wonoka dataset, preserving Sr concentrations (in the 1000s of ppm range) and δ 44 / 40

  12. Metabolic Flux Elucidation for Large-Scale Models Using 13C Labeled Isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Suthers, Patrick F.; Burgard, Anthony P.; Dasika, Madhukar S.; Nowroozi, Farnaz; Van Dien, Stephen; Keasling, Jay D.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2007-01-01

    A key consideration in metabolic engineering is the determination of fluxes of the metabolites within the cell. This determination provides an unambiguous description of metabolism before and/or after engineering interventions. Here, we present a computational framework that combines a constraint-based modeling framework with isotopic label tracing on a large-scale. When cells are fed a growth substrate with certain carbon positions labeled with 13C, the distribution of this label in the intracellular metabolites can be calculated based on the known biochemistry of the participating pathways. Most labeling studies focus on skeletal representations of central metabolism and ignore many flux routes that could contribute to the observed isotopic labeling patterns. In contrast, our approach investigates the importance of carrying out isotopic labeling studies using a more comprehensive reaction network consisting of 350 fluxes and 184 metabolites in Escherichia coli including global metabolite balances on cofactors such as ATP, NADH, and NADPH. The proposed procedure is demonstrated on an E. coli strain engineered to produce amorphadiene, a precursor to the anti-malarial drug artemisinin. The cells were grown in continuous culture on glucose containing 20% [U-13C]glucose; the measurements are made using GC-MS performed on 13 amino acids extracted from the cells. We identify flux distributions for which the calculated labeling patterns agree well with the measurements alluding to the accuracy of the network reconstruction. Furthermore, we explore the robustness of the flux calculations to variability in the experimental MS measurements, as well as highlight the key experimental measurements necessary for flux determination. Finally, we discuss the effect of reducing the model, as well as shed light onto the customization of the developed computational framework to other systems. PMID:17632026

  13. 13C discriminations of Pinus sylvestris vs. Pinus ponderosa at a dry site in Brandenburg (eastern Germany): 100-year growth comparison.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ralf; Insinna, Patrick A; Götz, Bernhard; Junge, Sebastian; Boettger, Tatjana

    2007-06-01

    The carbon isotope composition (delta(13)C, per thousand) and discrimination (Delta, per thousand) of old grown North American Pinus ponderosa Dougl. Ex P. et C. Laws. and European Pinus sylvestris L. were determined using trees grown under almost identical growing conditions in a mixed stand in Bralitz, Northeast Germany. Single-tree delta(13)C analyses of tree-ring cellulose of both species were carried out at a yearly resolution for the period 1901-2001 and the results compared with growth (basal area increment). Annual mean delta(13)C values for P. ponderosa ranged from-21.6 per thousand to-25.2 per thousand and for P. sylvestris from-21.4 per thousand to-24.4 per thousand. Accordingly, (13)C discrimination (Delta) showed higher values for P. ponderosa throughout the investigation period. Five characteristic periods of Delta were identified for both the tree species, reflecting positive and negative influences of environmental factors. Good growing conditions such as after-thinning events had a positive effect on Delta, reflecting higher values, while poor conditions like aridity and air pollution had a negative influence, reflecting lower values. The dynamics of Delta were likewise reflected in the growth (basal area increment, BAI). Higher (13)C discrimination values of P. ponderosa led to higher BAIs of P. ponderosa in comparison with P. sylvestris. Correlation function analyses confirmed that P. sylvestris was more dependent on precipitation than P. ponderosa, which showed a closer relationship with temperature. The results confirm that under predominantly dry growing conditions, P. ponderosa showed better growth performance than P. sylvestris, indicating better common intrinsic water-use efficiency and, therefore, higher rates of net photosynthesis at a given transpiration. In view of the prospect of climate change, the results are very significant for assessing both trees' physiological properties and, hence, their potential for coping with future growing

  14. Mechanisms linking metabolism of Helicobacter pylori to 18O and 13C-isotopes of human breath CO2

    PubMed Central

    Som, Suman; De, Anulekha; Banik, Gourab Dutta; Maity, Abhijit; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Pal, Mithun; Daschakraborty, Sunil B.; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Jana, Subhra; Pradhan, Manik

    2015-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilize glucose during metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms linking to oxygen-18 (18O) and carbon-13 (13C)-isotopic fractionations of breath CO2 during glucose metabolism are poorly understood. Using the excretion dynamics of 18O/16O and 13C/12C-isotope ratios of breath CO2, we found that individuals with Helicobacter pylori infections exhibited significantly higher isotopic enrichments of 18O in breath CO2 during the 2h-glucose metabolism regardless of the isotopic nature of the substrate, while no significant enrichments of 18O in breath CO2 were manifested in individuals without the infections. In contrast, the 13C-isotopic enrichments of breath CO2 were significantly higher in individuals with Helicobacter pylori compared to individuals without infections in response to 13C-enriched glucose uptake, whereas a distinguishable change of breath 13C/12C-isotope ratios was also evident when Helicobacter pylori utilize natural glucose. Moreover, monitoring the 18O and 13C-isotopic exchange in breath CO2 successfully diagnosed the eradications of Helicobacter pylori infections following a standard therapy. Our findings suggest that breath 12C18O16O and 13C16O16O can be used as potential molecular biomarkers to distinctively track the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori and also for eradication purposes and thus may open new perspectives into the pathogen’s physiology along with isotope-specific non-invasive diagnosis of the infection. PMID:26039789

  15. Analogy between mission critical detection in distributed systems and 13C isotope separation column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, Maria L.; Secara, Mihai

    2015-02-01

    Carbon represents the fourth most abundant chemical element in the world, having two stable and one radioactive isotope. The 13 Carbon isotopes, with a natural abundance of 1.1%, plays an important role in numerous applications, such as the study of human metabolism changes, molecular structure studies, non-invasive respiratory tests, Alzheimer tests, air pollution and global warming effects on plants [2]. Distributed systems are increasingly being applied in critical real-time applications and their complexity forces programmers to use design methods which guarantee correctness and increase the maintainability of the products. Objectoriented methodologies are widely used to cope with complexity in any kind of system, but most of them lack a formal foundation to allow the analysis and verification of designs, which is one of the main requirements for dealing with concurrent and reactive systems. This research is intended to make an analogy between two tips of industrial processes, one 13C Isotope Separation Column and other one distributed systems. We try to highlight detection of "mission critical "situations for this two processes and show with one is more critical and needs deeply supervisyon [1], [3].

  16. Evolution of E. coli on [U-13C]Glucose Reveals a Negligible Isotopic Influence on Metabolism and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Troy E.; Long, Christopher P.; Gonzalez, Jacqueline E.; Feist, Adam M.; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2016-01-01

    13C-Metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) traditionally assumes that kinetic isotope effects from isotopically labeled compounds do not appreciably alter cellular growth or metabolism, despite indications that some biochemical reactions can be non-negligibly impacted. Here, populations of Escherichia coli were adaptively evolved for ~1000 generations on uniformly labeled 13C-glucose, a commonly used isotope for 13C-MFA. Phenotypic characterization of these evolved strains revealed ~40% increases in growth rate, with no significant difference in fitness when grown on either labeled (13C) or unlabeled (12C) glucose. The evolved strains displayed decreased biomass yields, increased glucose and oxygen uptake, and increased acetate production, mimicking what is observed after adaptive evolution on unlabeled glucose. Furthermore, full genome re-sequencing revealed that the key genetic changes underlying these phenotypic alterations were essentially the same as those acquired during adaptive evolution on unlabeled glucose. Additionally, glucose competition experiments demonstrated that the wild-type exhibits no isotopic preference for unlabeled glucose, and the evolved strains have no preference for labeled glucose. Overall, the results of this study indicate that there are no significant differences between 12C and 13C-glucose as a carbon source for E. coli growth. PMID:26964043

  17. Experimentally Derived δ13C and δ15N Discrimination Factors for Gray Wolves and the Impact of Prior Information in Bayesian Mixing Models

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Melanie E.; Callahan, Peggy; Koprowski, John L.; Polfus, Jean L.; Krausman, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of diet has become a common tool in conservation research. However, the multiple sources of uncertainty inherent in this analysis framework involve consequences that have not been thoroughly addressed. Uncertainty arises from the choice of trophic discrimination factors, and for Bayesian stable isotope mixing models (SIMMs), the specification of prior information; the combined effect of these aspects has not been explicitly tested. We used a captive feeding study of gray wolves (Canis lupus) to determine the first experimentally-derived trophic discrimination factors of C and N for this large carnivore of broad conservation interest. Using the estimated diet in our controlled system and data from a published study on wild wolves and their prey in Montana, USA, we then investigated the simultaneous effect of discrimination factors and prior information on diet reconstruction with Bayesian SIMMs. Discrimination factors for gray wolves and their prey were 1.97‰ for δ13C and 3.04‰ for δ15N. Specifying wolf discrimination factors, as opposed to the commonly used red fox (Vulpes vulpes) factors, made little practical difference to estimates of wolf diet, but prior information had a strong effect on bias, precision, and accuracy of posterior estimates. Without specifying prior information in our Bayesian SIMM, it was not possible to produce SIMM posteriors statistically similar to the estimated diet in our controlled study or the diet of wild wolves. Our study demonstrates the critical effect of prior information on estimates of animal diets using Bayesian SIMMs, and suggests species-specific trophic discrimination factors are of secondary importance. When using stable isotope analysis to inform conservation decisions researchers should understand the limits of their data. It may be difficult to obtain useful information from SIMMs if informative priors are omitted and species-specific discrimination factors are unavailable. PMID:25803664

  18. Capillary Absorption Spectrometer for 13C Isotopic Composition of Pico to Subpico Molar Sample Quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Kelly, J.; Sams, R.; Newburn, M.; Kreuzer, H.; Alexander, M.

    2011-12-01

    Quick incorporation of IR spectroscopy based isotope measurements into cutting edge research in biogeochemical cycling attests to the advantages of a spectroscopy versus mass spectrometry method for making some 13C measurements. The simple principles of optical spectroscopy allow field portability and provide a more robust general platform for isotope measurements. We present results with a new capillary absorption spectrometer (CAS) with the capability of reducing the sample size required for high precision isotopic measurements to the picomolar level and potentially the sub-picomolar level. This work was motivated by the minute sample size requirements for laser ablation isotopic studies of carbon cycling in microbial communities but has potential to be a valuable tool in other areas of biological and geological research. The CAS instrument utilizes a capillary waveguide as a sample chamber for interrogating CO2 via near IR laser absorption spectroscopy. The capillary's small volume (~ 0.5 mL) combined with propagation and interaction of the laser mode with the entire sample reduces sample size requirements to a fraction of that accessible with commercially available IR absorption including those with multi-pass or ring-down cavity systems. Using a continuous quantum cascade laser system to probe nearly adjacent rovibrational transitions of different isotopologues of CO2 near 2307 cm-1 permits sample measurement at low analyte pressures (as low as 2 Torr) for further sensitivity improvement. A novel method to reduce cw-fringing noise in the hollow waveguide is presented, which allows weak absorbance features to be studied at the few ppm level after averaging 1,000 scans in 10 seconds. Detection limits down to the 20 picomoles have been observed, a concentration of approximately 400 ppm at 2 Torr in the waveguide with precision and accuracy at or better than 1 %. Improvements in detection and signal averaging electronics and laser power and mode quality are

  19. Physiological and isotopic (delta(13)C and delta(18)O) responses of three tropical tree species to water and nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Cernusak, Lucas A; Winter, Klaus; Turner, Benjamin L

    2009-10-01

    Water-use efficiency and stable isotope composition were studied in three tropical tree species. Seedlings of Tectona grandis, Swietenia macrophylla and Platymiscium pinnatum were grown at either high or low water supply, and with or without added fertilizer. These three species previously exhibited low, intermediate and high whole-plant water-use efficiency (TE) when grown at high water supply in unfertilized soil. Responses of TE to water and nutrient availability varied among species. The TE was calculated as experiment-long dry matter production divided by cumulative water use. Species-specific offsets were observed in relationships between TE and whole-plant (13)C discrimination (Delta(13)C(p)). These offsets could be attributed to a breakdown in the relationship between Delta(13)C(p) and the ratio of intercellular to ambient CO(2) partial pressures (c(i)/c(a)) in P. pinnatum, and to variation among species in the leaf-to-air vapour pressure difference (v). Thus, a plot of v.TE against c(i)/c(a) showed a general relationship among species. Relationships between delta(18)O of stem dry matter and stomatal conductance ranged from strongly negative for S. macrophylla to no relationship for T. grandis. Results suggest inter-specific variation among tropical tree species in relationships between stable isotope ratios (delta(13)C and delta(18)O) and the gas exchange processes thought to affect them.

  20. The Late Devonian Frasnian-Famennian (F/F) biotic crisis: Insights from δ13C carb, δ13C org and 87Sr / 86Sr isotopic systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daizhao; Qing, Hairuo; Li, Renwei

    2005-06-01

    A severe biotic crisis occurred during the Late Devonian Frasnian-Famennian (F/F) transition (± 367 Myr). Here we present δ13C carb, δ13C org and 87Sr / 86Sr isotopic systematics, from identical samples of two sections across F/F boundary in South China, which directly demonstrate large and frequent climatic fluctuations (˜200 kyr) from warming to cooling during the F/F transition. These climate fluctuations are interpreted to have been induced initially by increased volcanic outgassing, and subsequent enhanced chemical weathering linked to the rapid expansion of vascular plants on land, which would have increased riverine delivery to oceans and primary bioproductivity, and subsequent burial of organic matter, thereby resulting in climate cooling. Such large and frequent climatic fluctuations, together with volcanic-induced increases in nutrient (e.g., biolimiting Fe), toxin (sulfide) and anoxic water supply, and subsequent enhanced riverine fluxes and microbial bloom, were likely responsible for the stepwise faunal demise of F/F biotic crisis.

  1. Measurement of 13C/12C of chloroacetic acids by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, Charles S; Muir, Derek C G; Mabury, Scott A

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a novel analytical methodology using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) to measure the 13C/12C ratios of chloroacetic acids (CAAs). CAAs are a major class of environmental pollutants that are widely distributed throughout the world, often at relatively high concentrations, and are of concern due to their toxic effects, particularly on plants. The 13C/12C of CAA reagents was measured by IRMS subsequent to offline combustion. Aqueous solutions of these CAAs were derivatized to the corresponding methyl chloroacetates (MCAAs) with acidic methanol with a known isotopic composition, extracted into pentane, and analyzed by GC/C/IRMS. Measured 13C/12C ratios of derivatized MCAAs were in agreement with calculated values within 1 per thousand for monochloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid and within 2 per thousand for dichloroacetic acid, suggesting that methylation and other analytical methodology steps do not isotopically fractionate derivatized MCAAs. 13C/12C ratios of reagent CAAs from different sources had varying isotopic signatures suggesting differences in source carbon and/or production methods. Our results underscore the potential of stable isotopes to serve as tracers of environmental sources of CAAs.

  2. Dissecting the mechanisms of a class of chemical glycosylation using primary 13C kinetic isotope effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min; Garrett, Graham E.; Birlirakis, Nicolas; Bohé, Luis; Pratt, Derek A.; Crich, David

    2012-08-01

    Although arguably the most important reaction in glycoscience, chemical glycosylations are among the least well understood of organic chemical reactions, resulting in an unnecessarily high degree of empiricism and a brake on rational development in this critical area. To address this problem, primary 13C kinetic isotope effects have now been determined for the formation of β- and α-manno- and glucopyranosides using a natural abundance NMR method. In contrast to the common current assumption, for three of the four cases studied the experimental and computed values are indicative of associative displacement of the intermediate covalent glycosyl trifluoromethanesulfonates. For the formation of the α-mannopyranosides, the experimentally determined KIE differs significantly from that computed for an associative displacement, which is strongly suggestive of a dissociative mechanism that approaches the intermediacy of a glycosyl oxocarbenium ion. The application of analogous experiments to other glycosylation systems should shed further light on their mechanisms and thus assist in the design of better reactions conditions with improved stereoselectivity.

  3. Dissecting the Mechanisms of a Class of Chemical Glycosylation Using Primary 13C Kinetic Isotope Effects

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min; Garrett, Graham E.; Birlirakis, Nicolas; Bohé, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Although arguably the most important reaction in glycoscience, chemical glycosylations are among the least well understood of organic chemical reactions resulting in an unnecessarily high degree of empiricism and a brake on rational development in this critical area. To address this problem primary 13C kinetic isotope effects now have been determined for the formation of β- and α-manno- and glucopyranosides by a natural abundance NMR method. In contrast to the common current assumption, for three of the four cases studied the experimental values concur with those computed for associative displacement of the intermediate covalent glycosyl trifluoromethanesulfonates. For the formation of the α-mannopyranosides the experimentally determined KIE differs significantly from that computed for an associative displacement, which is strongly suggestive of a dissociative mechanism that approaches the intermediacy of a glycosyl oxocarbenium ion. The application of comparable experiments to other glycosylation systems should shed further light on their glycosylation mechanisms and thus assist in the design of better reactions conditions with improved stereoselectivity. PMID:22824899

  4. Synthesis of isotopically labeled R- or S-[.sup.13C, .sup.2H] glycerols

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2008-01-22

    The present invention is directed to asymmetric chiral labeled glycerols including at least one chiral atom, from one to two .sup.13C atoms and from zero to four deuterium atoms bonded directly to a carbon atom, e.g., (2S) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol and (2R) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol, and to the use of such chiral glycerols in the preparation of labeled amino acids.

  5. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the determination of 13C-valine isotopic ratios in complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Breuillé, Denis; Obled, Christiane; Papet, Isabelle; Schierbeek, Henk; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Fay, Laurent-Bernard

    2008-10-01

    On-line gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is commonly used to measure isotopic ratios at natural abundance as well as for tracer studies in nutritional and medical research. However, high-precision (13)C isotopic enrichment can also be measured by liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). Indeed, LC-IRMS can be used, as shown by the new method reported here, to obtain a baseline separation and to measure (13)C isotopic enrichment of underivatised amino acids (Asp, Thr-Ser, Glu, Pro, Gly, Ala, Cys and Val). In case of Val, at natural abundance, the SD(delta(13)C) reported with this method was found to be below 1 per thousand . Another key feature of the new LC-IRMS method reported in this paper is the comparison of the LC-IRMS approach with the conventional GC-C-IRMS determination. To perform this comparative study, isotopic enrichments were measured from underivatised Val and its N(O, S)-ethoxycarbonyl ethyl ester derivative. Between 0.0 and 1.0 molar percent excess (MPE) (delta(13)C= -12.3 to 150.8 per thousand), the calculated root-mean-square (rms) of SD was 0.38 and 0.46 per thousand and the calculated rms of accuracy was 0.023 and 0.005 MPE, respectively, for GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS. Both systems measured accurately low isotopic enrichments (0.002 atom percent excess (APE)) with an SD (APE) of 0.0004. To correlate the relative (delta(13)C) and absolute (atom%, APE and MPE) isotopic enrichment of Val measured by the GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS devices, mathematical equations showing the slope and intercept of the curves were established and validated with experimental data between 0.0 to 2.3 MPE. Finally, both GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS instruments were also used to assess isotopic enrichment of protein-bound (13)C-Val in tibial epiphysis in a tracer study performed in rats. Isotopic enrichments measured by LC-IRMS and GC-C-IRMS were not statistically different (p>0.05). The results of this work indicate that

  6. 13C Tracers for Glucose Degrading Pathway Discrimination in Gluconobacter oxydans 621H

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Steffen; Richhardt, Janine; Bringer, Stephanie; Bott, Michael; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Oldiges, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans 621H is used as an industrial production organism due to its exceptional ability to incompletely oxidize a great variety of carbohydrates in the periplasm. With glucose as the carbon source, up to 90% of the initial concentration is oxidized periplasmatically to gluconate and ketogluconates. Growth on glucose is biphasic and intracellular sugar catabolism proceeds via the Entner–Doudoroff pathway (EDP) and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Here we studied the in vivo contributions of the two pathways to glucose catabolism on a microtiter scale. In our approach we applied specifically 13C labeled glucose, whereby a labeling pattern in alanine was generated intracellularly. This method revealed a dynamic growth phase-dependent pathway activity with increased activity of EDP in the first and PPP in the second growth phase, respectively. Evidence for a growth phase-independent decarboxylation-carboxylation cycle around the pyruvate node was obtained from 13C fragmentation patterns of alanine. For the first time, down-scaled microtiter plate cultivation together with 13C-labeled substrate was applied for G. oxydans to elucidate pathway operation, exhibiting reasonable labeling costs and allowing for sufficient replicate experiments. PMID:26404385

  7. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Laser analysis of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 in exhaled air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, E. V.

    2002-11-01

    Tunable diode lasers (TDLs) are applied to the diagnostics of gastroenterological diseases using respiratory tests and preparations enriched with the stable 13C isotope. This method of the analysis of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 in exhaled air is based on the selective measurement of the resonance absorption at the vibrational — rotational structure of 12CO2 and 13CO2. The CO2 transmission spectra in the region of 4.35 μm were measured with a PbEuSe double-heterostructure TDL. The accuracy of carbon isotope ratio measurements in CO2 of exhaled air performed with the TDL was ~0.5%. The data of clinical tests of the developed laser-based analyser are presented.

  8. Isotopically-selective two-photon ionization of 12C- and 13C-benzene and hexadeuterobenzene in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Cruz, A.; Ortiz, M.; Cabrera, J. A.; Campos, J.

    1994-04-01

    In this work the 610 band spectra for 12C6H6, 12C6D6, 13C12C5H6 and 13C12C5D6 isotopically-substituted benzenes are reported. Spectra of deuterated species are given for the first time. These molecular spectra can be employed to test the technical performances of REMPI-TOFMS systems. The experimental method was laser-induced two-photon ionization of molecules cooled in a He supersonic beam followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A splitting of the 610 band appears when a 13C atom is present in the benzene-ring, favoring the isotope selectivity. In the present experiment a complete mass discrimination has been accomplished by using appropriate electronic circuits. A proportional counter has been used to obtain the corresponding spectra of the molecules at 300 K. The device is very useful to tune the laser wavelength to resonance in this kind of mass spectrometry experiment.

  9. 2H/(1)H and (13)C/(12)C isotope ratios of trans-anethole using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bilke, Steffi; Mosandl, Armin

    2002-07-03

    Authenticity assessment of trans-anethole is deduced from (2)H/(1)H and (13)C/(12)C isotope ratios, determined by gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS). For that purpose, self-prepared anise and fennel oils, and synthetic and "natural" samples of trans-anethole, as well as commercially available anise and fennel oils have been investigated. Authenticity ranges of (2)H/(1)H and (13)C/(12)C isotope ratios of trans-anethole were defined. Scope and limitations of the applied online GC-IRMS techniques are discussed.

  10. Evaluating North Sea carbon sources using radiogenic (224Ra and 228Ra) and stable carbon isotope (DI13C) tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, William; Thomas, Helmuth; Hagens, Mathilde; Brenner, Heiko; Paetsch, Johannes; Clargo, Nikki

    2015-04-01

    In the North Sea, much uncertainty still exists regarding the role of boundary fluxes (e.g. benthic input from sediments or lateral inputs from the coastline) in the overall biogeochemical cycling of the system. The stable carbon isotope signature of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC) is a common tool for following transformations of carbon in the water column and identifying carbon sources and sinks. Here, analyses of the first basin-wide observations of δ13C-DIC reveal that a balance between biological production and respiration, as well as a freshwater input near the European continental coast, predominantly control surface distributions in the North Sea. A strong relationship between the biological component of DIC (DICbio) and δ13C-DIC is then used to quantify the metabolic DIC flux associated with changes in the carbon isotopic signature. Correlations are also found between δ13C-DIC and naturally-occurring Radium isotopes (224Ra and 228Ra), which have well-identified sources from the seafloor and coastal boundaries. The relationship between δ13C-DIC and the longer-lived 228Ra isotope (half-life = 5.8 years) is used to derive a metabolic DIC flux from the European continental coastline. 228Ra is also shown to be a highly effective tracer of North Sea total alkalinity (TA) compared to the more conventional use of salinity as a tracer. Coastal alkalinity inputs are calculated using relationships with 228Ra, and ratios of DIC and TA suggest denitrification as the main metabolic pathway for the formation of these coastal inputs. Finally, coastal TA inputs are translated into inputs of protons to quantify their impact on the buffering capacity of the Southern North Sea.

  11. Correction for the 17O interference in δ(13C) measurements when analyzing CO2 with stable isotope mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Assonov, Sergey S.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of δ(13C) determined on CO2 with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) must be corrected for the amount of 17O in the CO2. For data consistency, this must be done using identical methods by different laboratories. This report aims at unifying data treatment for CO2 IRMS by proposing (i) a unified set of numerical values, and (ii) a unified correction algorithm, based on a simple, linear approximation formula. Because the oxygen of natural CO2 is derived mostly from the global water pool, it is recommended that a value of 0.528 be employed for the factor λ, which relates differences in 17O and 18O abundances. With the currently accepted N(13C)/N(12C) of 0.011 180(28) in VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) reevaluation of data yields a value of 0.000 393(1) for the oxygen isotope ratio N(17O)/N(16O) of the evolved CO2. The ratio of these quantities, a ratio of isotope ratios, is essential for the 17O abundance correction: [N(17O)/N(16O)]/[N(13C)/N(12C)] = 0.035 16(8). The equation [δ(13C) ≈ 45δVPDB-CO2 + 2 17R/13R (45δVPDB-CO2 – λ46δVPDB-CO2)] closely approximates δ(13C) values with less than 0.010 ‰ deviation for normal oxygen-bearing materials and no more than 0.026 ‰ in extreme cases. Other materials containing oxygen of non-mass-dependent isotope composition require a more specific data treatment. A similar linear approximation is also suggested for δ(18O). The linear approximations are easy to implement in a data spreadsheet, and also help in generating a simplified uncertainty budget.

  12. Variations in growth, survival and carbon isotope composition (delta(13)C) among Pinus pinaster populations of different geographic origins.

    PubMed

    Correia, Isabel; Almeida, Maria Helena; Aguiar, Alexandre; Alía, Ricardo; David, Teresa Soares; Pereira, João Santos

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate differences in growth and adaptability of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), we studied growth, polycyclism, needle tissue carbon isotope composition (delta(13)C) as an estimate of water-use efficiency (WUE) and survival of seven populations at 10 years of age growing in a performance trial at a provenance test site in Escaroupim, Portugal. Six populations were from relatively high rainfall sites in Portugal and southwestern France (Atlantic group), and one population was from a more arid Mediterranean site in Spain. There were significant differences between some populations in total height, diameter at breast height, delta(13)C of bulk needle tissue, polycyclism and survival. A population from central Portugal (Leiria, on the Atlantic coast) was the tallest and had the lowest delta(13)C. Overall, the variation in delta(13)C was better explained by the mean minimum temperatures of the coldest month than by annual precipitation at the place of origin. Analyses of the relationships between delta(13)C and growth or survival revealed a distinct pattern for the Mediterranean population, with low delta(13)C (and WUE) associated with the lowest growth potential and reduced survival. There were significant negative correlations between delta(13)C and height or survival in the Atlantic group. Variation in polycyclism was correlated with annual precipitation at the place of origin. Some Atlantic populations maintained a high growth potential while experiencing moderate water stress. A detailed knowledge of the relationships between growth, survival and delta(13)C in contrasting environments will enhance our ability to select populations for forestry or conservation.

  13. Tracing the diet of the monitor lizard Varanus mabitang by stable isotope analyses (δ15N, δ13C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, Ulrich; Altenbach, Alexander; Gaulke, Maren; Glaw, Frank

    2002-09-01

    In this study, we used analyses of stable isotopes of nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) to determine the trophic ecology of the monitor lizard Varanus mabitang. Stable isotopes from claws, gut contents, and soft tissues were measured from the type specimen. Samples from Varanus olivaceus, Varanus prasinus, Varanus salvator, the herbivorous agamid lizard Hydrosaurus pustulatus, and some plant matter were included for comparison. Our data show a rapid decrease in δ13C (about10‰) from food plants towards gut contents and soft tissues of herbivorous species. For the varanids, we found a significant linear correlation of decreasing δ13C and increasing δ15N from herbivorous towards carnivorous species. In terms of trophic isotope ecology, the type specimen of V. mabitang is a strict herbivore. Thus it differs significantly in its isotopic composition from the morphologically next closest related species V. olivaceus. The most highly carnivorous species is V. salvator, while δ15N values for V. prasinus and V. olivaceus are intermediate. Claws provide very valuable samples for such measurements, because they can be sampled from living animals without harm. Additionally, their range of variability is relatively small in comparison with measurements from soft tissues.

  14. Easy Extraction Method To Evaluate δ13C Vanillin by Liquid Chromatography-Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry in Chocolate Bars and Chocolate Snack Foods.

    PubMed

    Bononi, Monica; Quaglia, Giancarlo; Tateo, Fernando

    2015-05-20

    An easy extraction method that permits the use of a liquid chromatography-isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS) system to evaluate δ(13)C of vanillin in chocolate products and industrial flavorings is presented. The method applies the determination of stable isotopes of carbon to discriminate between natural vanillin from vanilla beans and vanillin from other sources (mixtures from beans, synthesis, or biotechnology). A series of 13 chocolate bars and chocolate snack foods available on the Italian market and 8 vanilla flavorings derived from industrial quality control processes were analyzed. Only 30% of products considered in this work that declared "vanilla" on the label showed data that permitted the declaration "vanilla" according to European Union (EU) Regulation 1334/2008. All samples not citing "vanilla" or "natural flavoring" on the label gave the correct declaration. The extraction method is presented with data useful for statistical evaluation.

  15. Methane concentration and isotopic composition (δ13C-CH4) in the Nerja Cave system (South Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadillo, Iñaki; Etiope, Giuseppe; Benavente, José; Ojeda, Lucia; Liñán, Cristina; Carrasco, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    Air in underground caves often has methane (CH4) concentrations below the atmospheric level, due to methanotrophic or other unkown CH4 consuming processes. Caves are thus considered a potential sink for atmospheric methane. If globally important, this underground CH4 oxidation should be taken into account in the atmospheric methane budget, in addition to the known soil methanotrophy and tropospheric/stratospheric sinks. A large set of data is however necessary to understand how and how much methane from external atmospheric air is consumed in the caves. While methane concentration data are available for several caves worldwide, its isotopic composition and variations in space and time are poorly documented. We measured methane concentration and stable C isotope composition (δ13C) in the Nerja cave (Southern Spain) air during two surveys in March and April 2015. CH4 concentration decreases progressively from the more external cave rooms, with atmospheric levels of 1.9 ppmv, to the more internal and isolated rooms down to 0.5 ppmv. δ13C increases correspondingly from -47 ‰ to -41 ‰ (VPDB). CH4 is systematically 13C-enriched (δ13C > -45) in areas of the cave where the concentration is below 1.4 ppmv. This combination of concentration decrease and 13C-enrichment towards the more internal and isolated zones of the cave confirms the importance of CH4 oxidation, likely driven by methanotrophic bacteria. Further data, including stable H isotope composition of sub-atmospheric CH4 concentrations, CO2 and microbial analyses, shall be acquired over time to assess the actual role of methanotrophic bacteria and seasonal controls in the CH4 consumption process.

  16. Continuous flow stable isotope methods for study of δ13C fractionation during halomethane production and degradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalin, Robert M.; Hamilton, John T.G.; Harper, David B.; Miller, Laurence G.; Lamb, Clare; Kennedy, James T.; Downey, Angela; McCauley, Sean; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2001-01-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/MS/IRMS) methods for δ13C measurement of the halomethanes CH3Cl, CH3Br, CH3I and methanethiol (CH3SH) during studies of their biological production, biological degradation, and abiotic reactions are presented. Optimisation of gas chromatographic parameters allowed the identification and quantification of CO2, O2, CH3Cl, CH3Br, CH3I and CH3SH from a single sample, and also the concurrent measurement of δ13C for each of the halomethanes and methanethiol. Precision of δ13C measurements for halomethane standards decreased (±0.3, ±0.5 and ±1.3‰) with increasing mass (CH3Cl, CH3Br, CH3I, respectively). Given that carbon isotope effects during biological production, biological degradation and some chemical (abiotic) reactions can be as much as 100‰, stable isotope analysis offers a precise method to study the global sources and sinks of these halogenated compounds that are of considerable importance to our understanding of stratospheric ozone destruction. 

  17. A capillary absorption spectrometer for stable carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C) analysis in very small samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. F.; Sams, R. L.; Blake, T. A.; Newburn, M.; Moran, J.; Alexander, M. L.; Kreuzer, H.

    2012-02-01

    A capillary absorption spectrometer (CAS) suitable for IR laser isotope analysis of small CO2 samples is presented. The system employs a continuous-wave (cw) quantum cascade laser to study nearly adjacent rovibrational transitions of different isotopologues of CO2 near 2307 cm-1 (4.34 μm). This initial CAS system can achieve relative isotopic precision of about 10 ppm 13C, or ˜1‰ (per mil in delta notation relative to Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite) with 20-100 picomoles of entrained sample within the hollow waveguide for CO2 concentrations ˜400-750 ppm. Isotopic analyses of such gas fills in a 1-mm ID hollow waveguide of 0.8 m overall physical path length can be carried out down to ˜2 Torr. Overall 13C/12C ratios can be calibrated to ˜2‰ accuracy with diluted CO2 standards. A novel, low-cost method to reduce cw-fringing noise resulting from multipath distortions in the hollow waveguide is presented, which allows weak absorbance features to be studied at the few ppm level (peak-to-rms) after 1000 scans are co-added in ˜10 s. The CAS is meant to work directly with converted CO2 samples from a laser ablation-catalytic combustion micro-sampler to provide 13C/12C ratios of small biological isolates currently operating with spatial resolutions ˜50 μm.

  18. Mangrove isotopic (δ15N and δ13C) fractionation across a nitrogen vs. phosphorus limitation gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mckee, Karen L.; Feller, Ilka C.; Popp, Marianne; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Mangrove islands in Belize are characterized by a unique switching from nitrogen (N) to phosphorus (P) limitation to tree growth from shoreline to interior. Fertilization has previously shown that Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove) fringe trees (5–6 m tall) growing along the shoreline are N limited; dwarf trees (!1.5 m tall) in the forestinterior are P limited; and transition trees (2–4 m tall) are co-limited by both N and P.  Growth patterns paralleled a landward decrease in soil flushing by tides and an increase in bioavailable N, but P availability remained consistently low across the gradient. Stable isotopic composition was measured in R. mangle leaves to aid in explaining this nutrient switching pattern and growth variation. Along control transects, leaf !15N decreased from "0.10‰ (fringe) to #5.38‰ (dwarf). The !15N of N-fertilized trees also varied spatially, but the values were consistently more negative (by $3‰) compared to control trees. Spatial variation in !15N values disappeared when the trees were fertilized with P, and values averaged "0.12‰, similar to that in control fringe trees. Neither variation in source inputs nor microbial fractionation could fully account for the observed patterns in !15N. The results instead suggest that the lower !15N values in transition and dwarf control trees were due to plant fractionation as a consequence of slower growth and lower N demand. P fertilization increased N demand and decreased fractionation. Although leaf !13C was unaffected by fertilization, values increased from fringe (#28.6‰) to transition (#27.9‰) to dwarf (#26.4‰) zones, indicating spatial variation in environmental stresses affecting stomatal conductance or carboxylation. The results thus suggest an interaction of external supply, internal demand, and plant ability to acquire nutrients under different hydro-edaphic conditions that vary across this tree-height gradient. The findings not only aid in understanding

  19. The aspartate metabolism pathway is differentiable in human hepatocellular carcinoma: transcriptomics and (13) C-isotope based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Darpolor, Moses M; Basu, Sankha S; Worth, Andrew; Nelson, David S; Clarke-Katzenberg, Regina H; Glickson, Jerry D; Kaplan, David E; Blair, Ian A

    2014-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the primary form of human adult liver malignancy, is a highly aggressive tumor with average survival rates that are currently less than a year following diagnosis. Although bioinformatic analyses have indicated differentially expressed genes and cancer related mutations in HCC, integrated genetic and metabolic pathway analyses remain to be investigated. Herein, gene (i.e. messenger RNA, mRNA) enrichment analysis was performed to delineate significant alterations of metabolic pathways in HCC. The objective of this study was to investigate the pathway of aspartate metabolism in HCC of humans. Coupled with transcriptomic (i.e. mRNA) and NMR based metabolomics of human tissue extracts, we utilized liquid chromatography mass spectrometry based metabolomics analysis of stable [U-(13) C6 ]glucose metabolism or [U-(13) C5 ,(15) N2 ]glutamine metabolism of HCC cell culture. Our results indicated that aspartate metabolism is a significant and differentiable metabolic pathway of HCC compared with non-tumor liver (p value < 0.0001). In addition, branched-chain amino acid metabolism (p value < 0.0001) and tricarboxylic acid metabolism (p value < 0.0001) are significant and differentiable. Statistical analysis of measurable NMR metabolites indicated that at least two of the group means were significantly different for the metabolites alanine (p value = 0.0013), succinate (p value = 0.0001), lactate (p value = 0.0114), glycerophosphoethanolamine (p value = 0.015), and inorganic phosphate (p value = 0.0001). However, (13) C isotopic enrichment analysis of these metabolites revealed less than 50% isotopic enrichment with either stable [U-(13) C6 ]glucose metabolism or [U-(13) C5 ,(15) N2 ]glutamine. This may indicate the differential account of total metabolite pool versus de novo metabolites from a (13) C labeled substrate. The ultimate translation of these findings will be to determine putative enzyme activity via

  20. A twenty year record of the 13C isotopic composition of methane from Cape Meares, Oregon (1978-1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teama, D.; Rice, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas, second only to carbon dioxide in its radiative forcing since the industrial revolution. Over this time, the concentration of methane has increased by ~150% , primarily as a result of anthropogenic practices such as fossil fuel production, rice cultivation, biomass burning and waste management. In 1980s and through the 1990s, direct measurements of atmospheric methane from several global monitoring networks showed that the growth rate slowed from its previous ~1% per year climb. The year 2000 was the first year to record a negative annual growth. However, interannual variations are large and there remains considerable uncertainty regarding future trends in the global burden of methane due, in part, to poorly quantified trends of sources and sinks. One tool to better understand trends in sources and sinks of methane is through the use of stable isotopes. By comparing trends in the13C/12C and D/H content of atmospheric methane in time series to the isotopic signatures of sources, we can potentially disentangle trends in methane sources and sinks. Here we report preliminary measurements of 13C/12C ratios in atmospheric methane from a rare historic archive of whole air collected at Cape Meares, Oregon (45.5 °N, 124 °W) during the period 1978-1998 as part of the global monitoring program at the Oregon Graduate Institute. This unique dataset is the only direct time series of methane isotopic composition in the northern hemisphere prior to the late 1980s and early 1990s. The measurements reveal an increasing trend in the δ13C of methane consistent with more recent time series and firn air results (0.2-0.4‰ year-1). The increase in δ 13C over this time reflects an increase in fossil (~ -40‰) and pyrogenic (~ -25‰) sources of methane, which are enriched relative to biogenic sources (~ -60‰), and the relaxation of δ13C associated with isotopic disequilibrium. We discuss the long term trend in δ13C, its shorter term

  1. [Distribution of carbon isotopes ((13)C/(12)C) in cells and temporal organization of cellular processes].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies on fractionation of carbon isotopes in biological systems are reviewed. It follows that direct experimental proofs have been obtained that 1) basic fractionation of carbon isotopes in the cell is related to isotope effect in pyruvate decarboxylation; 2) fractionation of carbon isotopes in the above reaction in vivo proceeds with exhausting substrate pool. The latter provides natural relationship between metabolites isotope distribution and sequence of their synthesis in the cell cycle, or with the temporal organization of cellular metabolism. The non-steady and periodic pattern of pyruvate decarboxylation due to the exhausting substrate pool well agrees with the existing notions on reciprocal oscillations in the cell glycolytic chain. Experimental data are presented corroborating indirectly the existence of oscillations in bacterial cells. Earlier proposed model of the mechanism of carbon isotope fractionation based on the above principles can be used for analysing changes in isotopic characteristics of the organisms and interpreting their relations with metabolic processes.

  2. The suitability of the dual isotope approach (δ13C and δ18O) in tree ring studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegwolf, Rolf; Saurer, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The use of stable isotopes, complementary to tree ring width data in tree ring research has proven to be a powerful tool in studying the impact of environmental parameters on tree physiology and growth. These three proxies are thus instrumental for climate reconstruction and improve the understanding of underlying causes of growth changes. In various cases, however, their use suggests non-plausible interpretations. Often the use of one isotope alone does not allow the detection of such "erroneous isotope responses". A careful analysis of these deviating results shows that either the validity of the carbon isotope discrimination concept is no longer true (Farquhar et al. 1982) or the assumptions for the leaf water enrichment model (Cernusak et al., 2003) are violated and thus both fractionation models are not applicable. In this presentation we discuss such cases when the known fractionation concepts fail and do not allow a correct interpretation of the isotope data. With the help of the dual isotope approach (Scheidegger et al.; 2000) it is demonstrated, how to detect and uncover the causes for such anomalous isotope data. The fractionation concepts and their combinations before the background of CO2 and H2O gas exchange are briefly explained and the specific use of the dual isotope approach for tree ring data analyses and interpretations are demonstrated. References: Cernusak, L. A., Arthur, D. J., Pate, J. S. and Farquhar, G. D.: Water relations link carbon and oxygen isotope discrimination to phloem sap sugar concentration in Eucalyptus globules, Plant Physiol., 131, 1544-1554, 2003. Farquhar, G. D., O'Leary, M. H. and Berry, J. A.: On the relationship between carbon isotope discrimination and the intercellular carbon dioxide concentration in leaves, Aust. J. Plant Physiol., 9, 121-137, 1982. Scheidegger, Y., Saurer, M., Bahn, M. and Siegwolf, R.: Linking stable oxygen and carbon isotopes with stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity: A conceptual model

  3. Comparing isotope signatures of prey fish: does gut removal affect δ13C or δ15N?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, Steven R.; Fincel, Mark J.; VanDeHey, Justin A.; Wuestewald, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis is a quick and inexpensive method to monitor the effects of food web changes on aquatic communities. Traditionally, whole specimens have been used when determining isotope composition of prey fish or age-0 recreational fishes. However, gut contents of prey fish could potentially alter isotope composition of the specimen, especially when recent foraging has taken place or when the gut contains non-assimilated material that would normally pass through fishes undigested. To assess the impacts of gut content on prey fish isotope signatures, we examined the differences in isotopic variation of five prey fish species using whole fish, whole fish with the gut contents removed, and dorsal muscle only. We found significant differences in both δ15N and δ13C between the three tissue treatments. In most cases, muscle tissue was enriched compared to whole specimens or gut-removed specimens. Moreover, differences in mean δ15N within a species were up to 2‰ among treatments. This would result in a change of over half a trophic position (TP) based on a 3.4‰ increase per trophic level. However, there were no apparent relationships between tissue isotope values in fish with increased gut fullness (more prey tissue present). We suggest that muscle tissue should be used as the standard tissue for determining isotope composition of prey fish or age-0 recreational fishes, especially when determining enrichment for mixing models, calculating TP, or constructing aquatic food webs.

  4. Stimulated Raman scattering-active isotopically pure 12C and 13C diamond crystals: A milestone in the development of diamond photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminskii, A. A.; Ral'chenko, V. G.; Yoneda, H.; Bol'shakov, A. P.; Inyushkin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    Isotopically pure 12C and 13C diamonds are synthesized by chemical vapor deposition and impulsive stimulated Raman scattering in these crystals is investigated. The thermal conductivity of 12C isotopically pure damond and natC diamond with natural isotopic composition is measured. Phonon-nondegenerate Stokes lasing based on the χ(3) nonlinearity in the 12C, 13C, and natC diamond "triad" is attained, which opens a new stage in the development of diamond photonics.

  5. Isotope dilution/mass spectrometry of serum cholesterol with (3,4-/sup 13/C)cholesterol: proposed definitive method

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, O.; Wright, L.A.; Breckenridge, W.C.

    1987-08-01

    We describe a new gas-chromatographic/mass-spectrometric (GC/MS) isotope-dilution method for determination of serum cholesterol. The method has been fully optimized and documented to provide the high accuracy and precision expected for a Definitive Method. In the presence of (3,4-/sup 13/C)cholesterol, cholesteryl esters in serum are hydrolyzed under optimum conditions and the entire cholesterol pool is extracted and derivatized to silyl ethers. The cholesterol derivatives are resolved from other sterols by gas-liquid chromatography on a fused silica column, and selected ions characteristic of cholesterol and the (3,4-/sup 13/C)cholesterol are monitored with a GC/MS quandrupole system. We estimated the cholesterol content of samples by bracketing each sample with standards of comparable cholesterol concentration that also contained the (3,4-/sup 13/C)cholesterol. The procedure was highly reproducible (CV less than 0.5%), better accuracy and precision being obtained with (3,4-/sup 13/C)cholesterol than with heptadeuterated cholesterol. Mean values per gram of dry serum for one serum pool assayed by this method and that of the National Bureau of Standards differed by 0.5%. We conclude that the method satisfies the criteria for a Definitive Method.

  6. Determination of 13C/12C Isotope Ratio in Alcohols of Different Origin by 1н Nuclei NMR-Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhimak, S. S.; Basov, A. A.; Buzko, V. Yu.; Kopytov, G. F.; Kashaev, D. V.; Shashkov, D. I.; Shlapakov, M. S.; Baryshev, M. G.

    2017-02-01

    A new express method of indirect assessment of 13C/12C isotope ratio on 1H nuclei is developed to verify the authenticity of ethanol origin in alcohol-water-based fluids and assess the facts of various alcoholic beverages falsification. It is established that in water-based alcohol-containing systems, side satellites for the signals of ethanol methyl and methylene protons in the NMR spectra on 1H nuclei, correspond to the protons associated with 13C nuclei. There is a direct correlation between the intensities of the signals of ethanol methyl and methylene protons' 1H- NMR and their side satellites, therefore, the data obtained can be used to assess 13C/12C isotope ratio in water-based alcohol-containing systems. The analysis of integrated intensities of main and satellite signals of methyl and methylene protons of ethanol obtained by NMR on 1H nuclei makes it possible to differentiate between ethanol of synthetic and natural origin. Furthermore, the method proposed made it possible to differentiate between wheat and corn ethanol.

  7. Correction algorithm for online continuous flow δ13C and δ18O carbonate and cellulose stable isotope analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. N.; Selmer, K. J.; Breeden, B. T.; Lopatka, A. S.; Plummer, R. E.

    2016-09-01

    We describe an algorithm to correct for scale compression, runtime drift, and amplitude effects in carbonate and cellulose oxygen and carbon isotopic analyses made on two online continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS) systems using gas chromatographic (GC) separation. We validate the algorithm by correcting measurements of samples of known isotopic composition which are not used to estimate the corrections. For carbonate δ13C (δ18O) data, median precision of validation estimates for two reference materials and two calibrated working standards is 0.05‰ (0.07‰); median bias is 0.04‰ (0.02‰) over a range of 49.2‰ (24.3‰). For α-cellulose δ13C (δ18O) data, median precision of validation estimates for one reference material and five working standards is 0.11‰ (0.27‰); median bias is 0.13‰ (-0.10‰) over a range of 16.1‰ (19.1‰). These results are within the 5th-95th percentile range of subsequent routine runtime validation exercises in which one working standard is used to calibrate the other. Analysis of the relative importance of correction steps suggests that drift and scale-compression corrections are most reliable and valuable. If validation precisions are not already small, routine cross-validated precision estimates are improved by up to 50% (80%). The results suggest that correction for systematic error may enable these particular CF-IRMS systems to produce δ13C and δ18O carbonate and cellulose isotopic analyses with higher validated precision, accuracy, and throughput than is typically reported for these systems. The correction scheme may be used in support of replication-intensive research projects in paleoclimatology and other data-intensive applications within the geosciences.

  8. Optimization of 13C dynamic nuclear polarization: isotopic labeling of free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kiswandi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a physics technique that amplifies the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals by transferring the high polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. Thus, the choice of free radical is crucial in DNP as it can directly affect the NMR signal enhancement levels, typically on the order of several thousand-fold in the liquid-state. In this study, we have investigated the efficiency of four variants of the well-known 4-oxo-TEMPO radical (normal 4-oxo-TEMPO plus its 15N-enriched and/or perdeuterated variants) for use in DNP of an important metabolic tracer [1-13C]acetate. Though the variants have significant differences in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, we have found that changing the composition of the TEMPO radical through deuteration or 15N doping yields no significant difference in 13C DNP efficiency at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. On the other hand, deuteration of the solvent causes a significant increase of 13C polarization that is consistent over all the 4-oxo-TEMPO variants. These findings are consistent with the thermal mixing model of DNP. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  9. Stable isotope analysis (δ (13)C and δ (15)N) of soil nematodes from four feeding groups.

    PubMed

    Melody, Carol; Griffiths, Bryan; Dyckmans, Jens; Schmidt, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Soil nematode feeding groups are a long-established trophic categorisation largely based on morphology and are used in ecological indices to monitor and analyse the biological state of soils. Stable isotope ratio analysis ((13)C/(12)C and (15)N/(14)N, expressed as δ (13)C and δ (15)N) has provided verification of, and novel insights into, the feeding ecology of soil animals such as earthworms and mites. However, isotopic studies of soil nematodes have been limited to date as conventional stable isotope ratio analysis needs impractically large numbers of nematodes (up to 1,000) to achieve required minimum sample weights (typically >100 µg C and N). Here, micro-sample near-conventional elemental analysis-isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (μEA-IRMS) of C and N using microgram samples (typically 20 µg dry weight), was employed to compare the trophic position of selected soil nematode taxa from four feeding groups: predators (Anatonchus and Mononchus), bacterial feeders (Plectus and Rhabditis), omnivores (Aporcelaimidae and Qudsianematidae) and plant feeder (Rotylenchus). Free-living nematodes were collected from conventionally and organically managed arable soils. As few as 15 nematodes, for omnivores and predators, were sufficient to reach the 20 µg dry weight target. There was no significant difference in δ (15)N (p = 0.290) or δ (13)C (p = 0.706) between conventional and organic agronomic treatments but, within treatments, there was a significant difference in N and C stable isotope ratios between the plant feeder, Rotylenchus (δ (15)N = 1.08 to 3.22 mUr‰, δ (13)C = -29.58 to -27.87 mUr) and all other groups. There was an average difference of 9.62 mUr in δ (15)N between the plant feeder and the predator group (δ (15)N = 9.89 to 12.79 mUr, δ (13)C = -27.04 to -25.51 mUr). Isotopic niche widths were calculated as Bayesian derived standard ellipse areas and were smallest for the plant feeder (1.37 mUr(2)) and the predators (1.73 mUr(2)), but largest for

  10. Stable isotope analysis (δ13C and δ15N) of soil nematodes from four feeding groups

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Bryan; Dyckmans, Jens; Schmidt, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Soil nematode feeding groups are a long-established trophic categorisation largely based on morphology and are used in ecological indices to monitor and analyse the biological state of soils. Stable isotope ratio analysis (13C/12C and 15N/14N, expressed as δ13C and δ15N) has provided verification of, and novel insights into, the feeding ecology of soil animals such as earthworms and mites. However, isotopic studies of soil nematodes have been limited to date as conventional stable isotope ratio analysis needs impractically large numbers of nematodes (up to 1,000) to achieve required minimum sample weights (typically >100 µg C and N). Here, micro-sample near-conventional elemental analysis–isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (μEA–IRMS) of C and N using microgram samples (typically 20 µg dry weight), was employed to compare the trophic position of selected soil nematode taxa from four feeding groups: predators (Anatonchus and Mononchus), bacterial feeders (Plectus and Rhabditis), omnivores (Aporcelaimidae and Qudsianematidae) and plant feeder (Rotylenchus). Free-living nematodes were collected from conventionally and organically managed arable soils. As few as 15 nematodes, for omnivores and predators, were sufficient to reach the 20 µg dry weight target. There was no significant difference in δ15N (p = 0.290) or δ13C (p = 0.706) between conventional and organic agronomic treatments but, within treatments, there was a significant difference in N and C stable isotope ratios between the plant feeder, Rotylenchus (δ15N = 1.08 to 3.22 mUr‰, δ13C = –29.58 to –27.87 mUr) and all other groups. There was an average difference of 9.62 mUr in δ15N between the plant feeder and the predator group (δ15N = 9.89 to 12.79 mUr, δ13C = –27.04 to –25.51 mUr). Isotopic niche widths were calculated as Bayesian derived standard ellipse areas and were smallest for the plant feeder (1.37 mUr2) and the predators (1.73 mUr2), but largest for omnivores (3.83 mUr2

  11. Modeling δ 13C and δ D of Stratospheric Methane: Implications for Kinetic Isotope Effects and the Isotopic Composition of Tropospheric Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M. C.; Boering, K. A.; Boering, K. A.; Rice, A. L.; Tyler, S. C.; Connell, P.; Atlas, E.

    2001-12-01

    New measurements of δ D and δ 13C in stratospheric CH4 from 78 whole air samples collected aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft during the STRAT, POLARIS, and SOLVE field campaigns are compared with model results from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2-D model. Although uncertainties in stratospheric transport are not small, the effect of these uncertainties on the isotopic compositions is likely small compared to the current range of experimental values for the kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for the 13C and D isotopomers of CH4 and their associated experimental uncertainties. Thus, by comparing the new δ 13C and δ D observations from the stratosphere with various model scenarios that vary the KIEs for OH, Cl, and O(1D), the uncertainty in the laboratory KIEs may be reduced. Furthermore, latitudinal and seasonal trends in the observations are compared with modeled variability. In addition, model results predict the influence of the KIEs of stratospheric sinks on the δ 13C and δ D of CH4 in the free troposphere, which is of importance in inverse models that use isotopic compositions to derive the magnitude and distribution of methane sources to the atmosphere.

  12. Design and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber for uniform or differential, metabolic and structural, plant tissue isotope labeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tracing heavy stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as 13C with 15N, 18O o...

  13. Growth decline and divergent tree ring isotopic composition (δ(13) C and δ(18) O) contradict predictions of CO2 stimulation in high altitudinal forests.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Guerrero, Armando; Silva, Lucas C R; Barrera-Reyes, Miguel; Kishchuk, Barbara; Velázquez-Martínez, Alejandro; Martínez-Trinidad, Tomás; Plascencia-Escalante, Francisca Ofelia; Horwath, William R

    2013-06-01

    Human-induced changes in atmospheric composition are expected to affect primary productivity across terrestrial biomes. Recent changes in productivity have been observed in many forest ecosystems, but low-latitude upper tree line forests remain to be investigated. Here, we use dendrochronological methods and isotopic analysis to examine changes in productivity, and their physiological basis, in Abies religiosa (Ar) and Pinus hartwegii (Ph) trees growing in high-elevation forests of central Mexico. Six sites were selected across a longitudinal transect (Transverse Volcanic Axis), from the Pacific Ocean toward the Gulf of Mexico, where mature dominant trees were sampled at altitudes ranging from 3200 to 4000 m asl. A total of 60 Ar and 84 Ph trees were analyzed to describe changes in growth (annual-resolution) and isotopic composition (decadal-resolution) since the early 1900s. Our results show an initial widespread increase in basal area increment (BAI) during the first half of the past century. However, BAI has decreased significantly since the 1950s with accentuated decline after the 1980s in both species and across sites. We found a consistent reduction in atmosphere to wood (13) C discrimination, resulting from increasing water use efficiency (20-60%), coinciding with rising atmospheric CO2 . Changes in (13) C discrimination were not followed, however, by shifts in tree ring δ(18) O, indicating site- and species-specific differences in water source or uptake strategy. Our results indicate that CO2 stimulation has not been enough to counteract warming-induced drought stress, but other stressors, such as progressive nutrient limitation, could also have contributed to growth decline. Future studies should explore the distinct role of resource limitation (water vs. nutrients) in modulating the response of high-elevation ecosystems to atmospheric change.

  14. The {sup 13}C-pocket structure in AGB models: constraints from zirconium isotope abundances in single mainstream SiC grains

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Nan; Davis, Andrew M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara; Savina, Michael R.

    2014-06-20

    We present postprocess asymptotic giant branch (AGB) nucleosynthesis models with different {sup 13}C-pocket internal structures to better explain zirconium isotope measurements in mainstream presolar SiC grains by Nicolussi et al. and Barzyk et al. We show that higher-than-solar {sup 92}Zr/{sup 94}Zr ratios can be predicted by adopting a {sup 13}C-pocket with a flat {sup 13}C profile, instead of the previous decreasing-with-depth {sup 13}C profile. The improved agreement between grain data for zirconium isotopes and AGB models provides additional support for a recent proposal of a flat {sup 13}C profile based on barium isotopes in mainstream SiC grains by Liu et al.

  15. Carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C and (14)C activity) of plant samples in the vicinity of the Slovene nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Martina; Vreča, Polona; Krajcar Bronić, Ines

    2012-08-01

    δ(13)C values of various plants (apples, wheat, and maize) collected in the vicinity of the Krško Nuclear Power Plant (Slovenia) during 2008 and 2009 were determined. By measuring dried samples and their carbonized counterparts we showed that no significant isotopic fractionation occurs during the carbonization phase of the sample preparation process in the laboratory. The measured δ(13)C values of the plants were used for δ(13)C correction of their measured (14)C activities.

  16. [Carbon isotope (13C/12C) effect of photorespiration in photosynthetic organisms. Evidence for existence, probable mechanism].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A

    2002-01-01

    Experimental evidence in favor of the new phenomenon predicted for photosynthesizing organisms, the fractionation of carbon isotopes in photorespiration is presented. A possible mechanism of this process is discussed. The fractionation of carbon in isotopes photorespiration occurs in the oxygenase phase of the functioning of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco), the key enzyme of photosynthesis, which is capable to act as carboxylase and oxygenase. Which function of the enzyme is active depends on CO2/O2 concentration ratio, which periodically changes in a cell. The key reaction in the mechanism of carbon isotope fractionation in photorespiration is glycine decarboxylation, which results in the splitting and removal from the cell of CO2 enriched with 12C and the accumulation of 13C photorespiratory carbon flow. The coupling of photorespiration and CO2 photoassimilation gives rise to two isotopically different carbon flows, which fill up separate carbohydrate pools, which are the sources of carbon in the following syntheses in the dark phase of photosynthesis. This enables one to identify, from the carbon isotope ratio of metabolites, their involvement in the photorespiratory and assimilatory carbon flows, to investigate the pathways of carbon metabolism, and to estimate more thoroughly the biosynthetic role of photorespiration.

  17. Combination of the (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio and light stable isotopic values (δ(13)C, δ(15)N and δD) for identifying the geographical origin of winter wheat in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyan; Wei, Yimin; Lu, Hai; Wei, Shuai; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Yingquan; Guo, Boli

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to investigate whether isotopic signatures can be used to develop reliable fingerprints for discriminating the geographical origin of Chinese winter wheat, and to evaluate the discrimination effects of δ(13)C, δ(15)N and δD, alone or with (87)Sr/(86)Sr. In this study, the values of δ(13)C, δ(15)N and δD, and the (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios of wheat and provenance soils from three regions were determined. Significant differences were found in all parameters of wheat and (87)Sr/(86)Sr in soil extract (reflecting the bioavailable fraction of soil) among different regions. A significantly positive correlation was observed between the (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios of wheat and soil extracts. An overall correct classification rate of 77.8% was obtained for discriminating wheat from three regions based on light stable isotopes (δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and δD). The correct classification rate of 98.1% could be obtained with the combination of the (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio and the light stable isotopic values.

  18. Characterising ontogenetic niche shifts in Nile crocodile using stable isotope13C, δ15N) analyses of scute keratin.

    PubMed

    Radloff, Frans G T; Hobson, Keith A; Leslie, Alison J

    2012-09-01

    Nile crocodiles undergo a three to five order of magnitude increase in body size during their lifespan. This shift coincides with a change in resource and habitat use which influences the strength, type and symmetry of interactions with other species. Identifying size-specific crocodile groups displaying similar traits is important for conservation planning. Here, we illustrate how stable carbon (δ(13) C) and nitrogen (δ(15) N) isotope analysis of scute keratin, together with breakpoint modelling analysis can be used to characterise ontogenetic niche shifts. Using a sample set of 238 crocodiles from the Okavango Delta, Botswana (35-463 cm total length), we found prominent size-related changes in the scute keratin δ(13) C and δ(15) N profiles close to 40 and 119 cm snout-vent length. The first shift corroborated the findings of a traditional stomach-content study conducted on the same population at the same time, and the second conformed to known crocodile ecology. This approach can be used as a first approximation to identify size-specific groups within crocodile populations, and these can then be investigated further using isotopic or other methods.

  19. Modelling aspects regarding the control in 13C isotope separation column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, M. L.

    2016-08-01

    Carbon represents the fourth most abundant chemical element in the world, having two stable and one radioactive isotope. The 13Carbon isotopes, with a natural abundance of 1.1%, plays an important role in numerous applications, such as the study of human metabolism changes, molecular structure studies, non-invasive respiratory tests, Alzheimer tests, air pollution and global warming effects on plants [9] A manufacturing control system manages the internal logistics in a production system and determines the routings of product instances, the assignment of workers and components, the starting of the processes on not-yet-finished product instances. Manufacturing control does not control the manufacturing processes themselves, but has to cope with the consequences of the processing results (e.g. the routing of products to a repair station). In this research it was fulfilled some UML (Unified Modelling Language) diagrams for modelling the C13 Isotope Separation column, implement in STARUML program. Being a critical process and needing a good control and supervising, the critical parameters in the column, temperature and pressure was control using some PLC (Programmable logic controller) and it was made some graphic analyze for this to observe some critical situation than can affect the separation process. The main parameters that need to be control are: -The liquid nitrogen (N2) level in the condenser. -The electrical power supplied to the boiler. -The vacuum pressure.

  20. Measurement of insulin sensitivity indices using 13C-glucose and gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Clapperton, Allan T; Coward, W Andrew; Bluck, Leslie J C

    2002-01-01

    Important aspects of glucose metabolism can be quantified by using the minimal model of glucose kinetics to interpret the results of intravenous glucose tolerance tests. The power of this methodology can be greatly increased by the addition of stable isotopically labelled tracer to the glucose bolus dose. This allows the separation of glucose disposal from endogenous glucose production and also increases the precision of the estimates of the physiological parameters measured. Until now the tracer of choice has been deuteriated glucose and the analytical technique has been gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The consequence of this choice is that nearly 2 g of labelled material are needed and this makes the test expensive. We have investigated the use of (13)C-labelled glucose as the tracer in combination with gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) as the analytical technique. This methodology offers superior analytical precision when compared with the conventional method and so the amount of tracer used, and hence the cost, can be reduced considerably. Healthy non-obese male volunteers were recruited for a standard intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) protocol but 6,6-(2)H-glucose and 1-(13)C-glucose were administered simultaneously. Tracer/tracee ratios were derived from isotope ratio measurements of plasma glucose using both GC/MS and GC/C/IRMS. The results of these determinations indicated that the two tracers behaved identically under the test protocol. The combination of these results with plasma glucose and insulin concentration data allowed determination of the minimal model parameters S*g and S*i. The parameter relating to insulin-assisted glucose disposal, S*i, was found to be the same in the two techniques, but this was not the case for the non-insulin-dependent parameter S*g.

  1. Positional Enrichment by Proton Analysis (PEPA): A One-Dimensional (1) H-NMR Approach for (13) C Stable Isotope Tracer Studies in Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Vinaixa, Maria; Rodríguez, Miguel A; Aivio, Suvi; Capellades, Jordi; Gómez, Josep; Canyellas, Nicolau; Stracker, Travis H; Yanes, Oscar

    2017-03-20

    A novel metabolomics approach for NMR-based stable isotope tracer studies called PEPA is presented, and its performance validated using human cancer cells. PEPA detects the position of carbon label in isotopically enriched metabolites and quantifies fractional enrichment by indirect determination of (13) C-satellite peaks using 1D-(1) H-NMR spectra. In comparison with (13) C-NMR, TOCSY and HSQC, PEPA improves sensitivity, accelerates the elucidation of (13) C positions in labeled metabolites and the quantification of the percentage of stable isotope enrichment. Altogether, PEPA provides a novel framework for extending the high-throughput of (1) H-NMR metabolic profiling to stable isotope tracing in metabolomics, facilitating and complementing the information derived from 2D-NMR experiments and expanding the range of isotopically enriched metabolites detected in cellular extracts.

  2. Carbon (δ13C) and Nitrogen (δ15N) Stable Isotope Signatures in Bat Fur Indicate Swarming Sites Have Catchment Areas for Bats from Different Summering Areas

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Jordi L.; Broders, Hugh G.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory patterns of bats are not well understood and traditional methods to study this, like capture-mark-recapture, may not provide enough detail unless there are many records. Stable isotope profiles of many animal species have been used to make inferences about migration. Each year Myotis lucifugus and M. septentrionalis migrate from summering roosts to swarming caves and mines in the fall, but the pattern of movement between them is not well understood. In this study, fur δ13C and δ15N values of 305 M. lucifugus and 200 M. septentrionalis were analyzed to make inferences about migration patterns between summering areas and swarming sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. We expected that there would be greater variability in δ13C and δ15N among individuals at swarming sites because it was believed that these sites are used by individuals originating from many summering areas. There was extensive overlap in the standard ellipse area, corrected for small sample sizes (SEAc), of bats at swarming sites and much less overlap in SEAc among groups sampled at summering areas. Meaningful inference could not be made on M. septentrionalis because their low variation in SEAc may have been the result of sampling only 3 summering areas. However, for M. lucifugus, swarming sites had larger SEAc than summering areas and predictive discriminant analysis assigned swarming bats to multiple summering areas, supporting the contention that swarming bats are mixed aggregations of bats from several summering areas. Together, these data support the contention that swarming sites have catchment areas for bats from multiple summering areas and it is likely that the catchment areas for swarming sites overlap. These data suggest that δ13C and δ15N profiling of bat fur offer some potential to make inferences about regional migration in bats. PMID:25923696

  3. Carbon (δ13C) and Nitrogen (δ15N) Stable Isotope Signatures in Bat Fur Indicate Swarming Sites Have Catchment Areas for Bats from Different Summering Areas.

    PubMed

    Segers, Jordi L; Broders, Hugh G

    2015-01-01

    Migratory patterns of bats are not well understood and traditional methods to study this, like capture-mark-recapture, may not provide enough detail unless there are many records. Stable isotope profiles of many animal species have been used to make inferences about migration. Each year Myotis lucifugus and M. septentrionalis migrate from summering roosts to swarming caves and mines in the fall, but the pattern of movement between them is not well understood. In this study, fur δ13C and δ15N values of 305 M. lucifugus and 200 M. septentrionalis were analyzed to make inferences about migration patterns between summering areas and swarming sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. We expected that there would be greater variability in δ13C and δ15N among individuals at swarming sites because it was believed that these sites are used by individuals originating from many summering areas. There was extensive overlap in the standard ellipse area, corrected for small sample sizes (SEAc), of bats at swarming sites and much less overlap in SEAc among groups sampled at summering areas. Meaningful inference could not be made on M. septentrionalis because their low variation in SEAc may have been the result of sampling only 3 summering areas. However, for M. lucifugus, swarming sites had larger SEAc than summering areas and predictive discriminant analysis assigned swarming bats to multiple summering areas, supporting the contention that swarming bats are mixed aggregations of bats from several summering areas. Together, these data support the contention that swarming sites have catchment areas for bats from multiple summering areas and it is likely that the catchment areas for swarming sites overlap. These data suggest that δ13C and δ15N profiling of bat fur offer some potential to make inferences about regional migration in bats.

  4. Intrapopulation variation in gray wolf isotope (delta(15)N and delta(13)C) profiles: implications for the ecology of individuals.

    PubMed

    Urton, Erin J M; Hobson, Keith A

    2005-09-01

    Trophic relationships among organisms in terrestrial boreal ecosystems define ecological communities and are important in determining dynamics of energy flow and ecosystem function. We examined trophic relationships between the gray wolf (Canis lupus) and 18 mammalian species from the boreal forest of central Saskatchewan, Canada, using delta(13)C and delta(15)N stable isotope values measured in guard hair samples. Variance in isotope values for wolves and other carnivores was investigated as a proxy for variation in diet among individuals. Isosource, an isotopic source partitioning model, quantified the relative range in proportions of five most-likely prey items in the diets of wolves. The distribution of feasible contributions from each source was dominated by elk (Cervus elaphus; mean: 48%, range:11-75%), followed by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; mean: 21%, range: 0-54%), moose (Alces alces; mean:14%, range: 0-41%), beaver (Castor canadensis; mean: 8%, range:0-25%) and snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus; mean: 8%, range: 0-24%). Despite social foraging, our results indicate highly variable diets among individuals and we discuss this in terms of individual versus group ecology of boreal wolves.

  5. Complementary constraints from carbon (13C) and nitrogen (15N) isotopes on the glacial ocean's soft-tissue biological pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Somes, C. J.

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional, process-based model of the ocean's carbon and nitrogen cycles, including 13C and 15N isotopes, is used to explore effects of idealized changes in the soft-tissue biological pump. Results are presented from one preindustrial control run (piCtrl) and six simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with increasing values of the spatially constant maximum phytoplankton growth rate μmax, which accelerates biological nutrient utilization mimicking iron fertilization. The default LGM simulation, without increasing μmax and with a shallower and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and increased sea ice cover, leads to 280 Pg more respired organic carbon (Corg) storage in the deep ocean with respect to piCtrl. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the colder glacial thermocline increase, which reduces water column denitrification and, with delay, nitrogen fixation, thus increasing the ocean's fixed nitrogen inventory and decreasing δ15NNO3 almost everywhere. This simulation already fits sediment reconstructions of carbon and nitrogen isotopes relatively well, but it overestimates deep ocean δ13CDIC and underestimates δ15NNO3 at high latitudes. Increasing μmax enhances Corg and lowers deep ocean δ13CDIC, improving the agreement with sediment data. In the model's Antarctic and North Pacific Oceans modest increases in μmax result in higher δ15NNO3 due to enhanced local nutrient utilization, improving the agreement with reconstructions there. Models with moderately increased μmax fit both isotope data best, whereas large increases in nutrient utilization are inconsistent with nitrogen isotopes although they still fit the carbon isotopes reasonably well. The best fitting models reproduce major features of the glacial δ13CDIC, δ15N, and oxygen reconstructions while simulating increased Corg by 510-670 Pg compared with the preindustrial ocean. These results are consistent with the idea that the soft-tissue pump was more efficient

  6. Apportioning carbon sources of authigenic carbonate of extremely 13C-depleted foraminifera from the western North Pacific sediments: Implication from the coupled 13C and 14C isotopic mass balance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, M.; Ohkushi, K.; Ahagon, N.; Kimoto, K.; Inagaki, F.; Shibata, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Recently, Uchida et al. (G-cubed, 2004) and Ohkushi et al. (G-cubed, 2005) interprete /delta 13C variations of planktonic and benthic foraminifera found in Last Glacial sediments in off Shimokita Peninsula and Tokachi as evidence for periodic releases of methane, arising from the dissociation of methane hydrate, and its subsequent oxidation in bottom- and/or surface-water environments. According to recent observations of anomalous bottom-simulating reflections, northwest Pacific marginal sediments around Japan main islands bear large abundances of methane hydrate. In this study, analyzed piston cores (42° 21.42' N, 144° 13.36' E) at a water depth 1066-m was retrieved from the off Tokachi continental slope in the Oyashio current region, where recently is found to bear immense amounts of methane hydrate. The piston core covered past 22 ka with high-resolution. Here we showed that carbon isotope signals indicated that planktonic and benthic foraminifera in several glacial sediment layers in the core were highly depleted in13 C; both the planktonic and benthic foraminiferal /delta 13C values ranged from about -10/permil to -2/permil. Most foraminiferal tests in these horizons were brown as a result of postdepositional alteration. Foraminiferal oxygen isotopes fluctuated abnormally in the glacial sediment layers, showing small (about 0.5/permil) positive shifts relative to normal glacial values. We attributed the positive shifts to authigenic carbonate formation in the foraminiferal tests. In order to decipher the relation between foraminifera carbon isotopic signal and methane release from the seafloor, we have apportioned carbon sources (methane from methane hydrate or not) of foraminiferal carbon isotopic anomalies using dual mass balance isotopic model (14C/ 12C and 13C/ 12C). It has been suggested that sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) dominates carbon oxidation and attendant authigenic carbonate precipitation to foraminifera. To this assumption

  7. Ontogeny and habitat change in Mesozoic cephalopods revealed by stable isotopes ( δ18O, δ13C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukeneder, Alexander; Harzhauser, Mathias; Müllegger, Stefan; Piller, Werner E.

    2010-07-01

    Stable isotope ( δ18O and δ13C) ratios were measured in successive aragonitic shell sequences of ammonoids (class Cephalopoda) to determine whether their depth distributions changed within ontogeny and whether stable isotope values differ in various morphological groups (e.g. Leiostraca vs. Trachyostraca). We concentrate mainly on δ18O for temperature results and added δ13C data to obtain information on the ontogenetic history, for which full spiral measurements were undertaken for the first time. To obtain valid stable isotope data from ammonoid shells, we measured ontogenetic sequences (full shell) within different genera. Data sets from the Jurassic ( Cadoceras) and Cretaceous ( Hypacanthoplites, Nowakites) were chosen due to the pure primary aragonitic shell preservation. The study was designed to extract better information on the habitat and life cycle of fossil cephalopods (e.g. ammonoids) in comparison with recent cephalopods (e.g. Nautilus, Spirula, Sepia) possessing equivalent or comparable hard parts. The data from three genera suggest different modes of life in at least two morphological groups. We detected and established two main groups with different ontogenetic strategies based on the δ18O data. The wcw-type (warm-cool-warm type) of Cadoceras resembles strategies in Nautilus and Sepia, which migrate from shallow into deeper environments and back in ontogeny ( wc-type, warm-cool-type), and the cw-type (cool-warm type) of Hypacanthoplites resembling the first two migration phases of Spirula ( cwc-type), which migrates from deeper into shallower and back again into deeper habitats. The main (three) phases revealed by both δ18O and δ13C data sets most probably reflect diet changes in juvenile to mid-aged individuals, followed by a habitat change for spawning adults. In Cadoceras the temperatures range from 21.2 °C for juveniles down to 12.1 °C for mid-aged individuals and back up 16.9 °C in adults. The cw- type strategy of Hypacanthoplites

  8. The stable isotopic composition of a phosphorite deposit: δ13C, δ34S, and δ18O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.Z.; Kolodny, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The stable isotopes of carbon and sulfur in a major marine sedimentary phosphate deposit from the northwestern United States (the Phosphoria Formation of Permian age) characterize the chemical properties of the depositional environment. The δ34S and δ13C analyses suggest deposition under conditions of variable redox from a solution the acidity of which was controlled by reaction with carbonate rocks and exchange with seawater. The δ18O concentration of apetite indicates phosphatization in a shallow sea, during three glacial and intervening interglacial stages. These data tend to corroborate the interpretation of field studies by others, that the apatite formed on a continental shelf in an area of intense oceanic upwelling during several episodes of sea level change. 

  9. Congener-specific concentrations and carbon stable isotope ratios (delta13C) of two technical toxaphene products (Toxaphene and Melipax).

    PubMed

    Vetter, Walter; Gleixner, Gerd; Armbruster, Wolfgang; Ruppe, Steffen; Stern, Gary A; Braekevelt, Eric

    2005-01-01

    In this study we compared the contribution of individual congeners and the ratios of stable carbon isotopes of two technical toxaphene products. The former US-American product Toxaphene was from 1978 and the East-German product Melipax from 1979. Both technical products showed the known complexity in GC/ECD measurements. Contributions of 24 peaks to each of the technical products were determined by gas chromatography in combination high resolution electron capture negative ion mass spectrometry (GC/ECNI-HRMS). The percentages of the compounds studied in the technical mixtures ranged from approximately 0.05% to approximately 2.5% but showed some individual differences. 2,2,5,5,8,9,9,10,10-nonachlorobornane (B9-1025 or P-62) was identified as a major congener in both mixtures. 2-Endo,3-exo,5-endo,6-exo,8,8,10,10-octachlorobornane (B8-1413 or P26) and 2-endo,3-exo,5-endo,6-exo,8,8,9,10,10-nonachlorobornane (B9-1679 or P-50) were found at similar concentration in both technical products. Identical amounts of Melipax or Toxaphene were combusted to CO2 in an element analyzer and their delta13C values were determined relative to the international standard Vienna PeeDee belemnite (VPDB). The mean delta13C values of both products varied by 2.8% (determined at two different locations) which is roughly one order of magnitude more than the precision obtained in repetitive analyses of the individual products. Thus, both investigated products could be unequivocally distinguished by stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). IRMS analyses may thus be a suitable tool for tracing back toxaphene residues in environmental and food samples to the one or both of the products.

  10. Isotopically nonstationary 13C flux analysis of changes in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf metabolism due to high light acclimation

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Fangfang; Jazmin, Lara J.; Young, Jamey D.; ...

    2014-11-03

    Improving plant productivity is an important aim for metabolic engineering. There are few comprehensive methods that quantitatively describe leaf metabolism, although such information would be valuable for increasing photosynthetic capacity, enhancing biomass production, and rerouting carbon flux toward desirable end products. Isotopically nonstationary metabolic flux analysis (INST-MFA) has been previously applied to map carbon fluxes in photoautotrophic bacteria, which involves model-based regression of transient 13C-labeling patterns of intracellular metabolites. However, experimental and computational difficulties have hindered its application to terrestrial plant systems. Here, we performed in vivo isotopic labeling of Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes with 13CO2 and estimated fluxes throughout leafmore » photosynthetic metabolism by INST-MFA. Plants grown at 200 µmol m$-$2s$-$1 light were compared with plants acclimated for 9 d at an irradiance of 500 µmol∙m$-$2∙s$-$1. Approximately 1,400 independent mass isotopomer measurements obtained from analysis of 37 metabolite fragment ions were regressed to estimate 136 total fluxes (54 free fluxes) under each condition. The results provide a comprehensive description of changes in carbon partitioning and overall photosynthetic flux after long-term developmental acclimation of leaves to high light. Despite a doubling in the carboxylation rate, the photorespiratory flux increased from 17 to 28% of net CO2 assimilation with high-light acclimation (Vc/Vo: 3.5:1 vs. 2.3:1, respectively). In conclusion, this study highlights the potential of 13C INST-MFA to describe emergent flux phenotypes that respond to environmental conditions or plant physiology and cannot be obtained by other complementary approaches.« less

  11. delta 13C analyses of vegetable oil fatty acid components, determined by gas chromatography--combustion--isotope ratio mass spectrometry, after saponification or regiospecific hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Woodbury, S E; Evershed, R P; Rossell, J B

    1998-05-01

    The delta 13C values of the major fatty acids of several different commercially important vegetable oils were measured by gas chromatography--combustion--isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The delta 13C values obtained were found to fall into two distinct groups, representing the C3 and C4 plants classes from which the oils were derived. The delta 13C values of the oils were measured by continuous flow elemental isotope ratio mass spectrometry and were found to be similar to their fatty acids, with slight differences between individual fatty acids. Investigations were then made into the influence on the delta 13C values of fatty acids of the position occupied on the glycerol backbone. Pancreatic lipase was employed to selectively hydrolyse fatty acids from the 1- and 3-positions with the progress of the reaction being followed by high-temperature gas chromatography in order to determine the optimum incubation time. The 2-monoacylglycerols were then isolated by thin-layer chromatography and fatty acid methyl esters prepared. The delta 13C values obtained indicate that fatty acids from any position on the glycerol backbone are isotopically identical. Thus, whilst quantification of fatty acid composition at the 2-position and measurement of delta 13C values of oils and their major fatty acids are useful criteria in edible oil purity assessment, measurement of delta 13C values of fatty acids from the 2-position does not assist with oil purity assignments.

  12. The Titan 14N/ 15N and 12C/ 13C isotopic ratios in HCN from Cassini/CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, Sandrine; Bézard, Bruno; Nixon, Conor A.

    2007-11-01

    We report the detection of H 13CN and HC 15N in mid-infrared spectra recorded by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard Cassini, along with the determination of the 12C/ 13C and 14N/ 15N isotopic ratios. We analyzed two sets of limb spectra recorded near 13-15° S (Tb flyby) and 83° N (T4 flyby) at 0.5 cm -1 resolution. The spectral range 1210-1310 cm -1 was used to retrieve the temperature profile in the range 145-490 km at 13° S and 165-300 km at 83° N. These two temperature profiles were then incorporated in the atmospheric model to retrieve the abundance profile of H 12C 14N, H 13CN and HC 15N from their bands at 713, 706 and 711 cm -1, respectively. The HCN abundance profile was retrieved in the range 90-460 km at 15° S and 165-305 km at 83° N. There is no evidence for vertical variations of the isotopic ratios. Constraining the isotopic abundance profiles to be proportional to the HCN one, we find C12/C13=89-18+22 at 15° S, and 68-12+16 at 83° N, two values that are statistically consistent. A combination of these results yields a 12C/ 13C value equal to 75±12. This global result, as well as the 15° S one, envelop the value in Titan's methane ( 82.3±1) [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779-784] measured at 10° S and is slightly lower than the terrestrial inorganic standard value (89). The 14N/ 15N isotopic ratio is found equal to 56-13+16 at 15° S and 56-9+10 at 83° N. Combining the two values yields 14N/ 15N = 56 ± 8, which corresponds to an enrichment in 15N of about 4.9 compared with the terrestrial ratio. These results agree with the values obtained from previous ground-based millimeter observations [Hidayat, T., Marten, A., Bézard, B., Gautier, D., Owen, T., Matthews, H.E., Paubert, G., 1997. Icarus 126, 170-182; Marten, A., Hidayat, T., Biraud, Y., Moreno, R., 2002. Icarus 158, 532-544]. The 15N/ 14N ratio found in HCN is ˜3 times higher than in N 2 [Niemann, H.B., and 17 colleagues, 2005. Nature 438, 779

  13. C4 plant isotopic composition (delta13C) evidence for urban CO2 pollution in the city of Cotonou, Benin (West Africa).

    PubMed

    Kèlomé, Nelly C; Lévêque, Jean; Andreux, Francis; Milloux, Marie-Jeanne; Oyédé, Lucien-Marc

    2006-08-01

    The carbon isotopic composition (delta13C) of plants can reveal the isotopic carbon content of the atmosphere in which they develop. The delta13C values of air and plants depend on the amount of atmospheric fossil fuel CO2, which is chiefly emitted in urban areas. A new indicator of CO2 pollution is tested using the delta13C variation in a C4 grass: Eleusine indica. A range of about 4 per thousand delta units was observed at different sites in Cotonou, the largest city in the Republic of Benin. The highest delta13C values, from -12 per thousand to -14 per thousand, were found in low traffic zones; low delta13C values, from -14 per thousand to -16 per thousand, were found in high traffic zones. The amount of fossil fuel carbon assimilated by plants represented about 20% of the total plant carbon content. An overall decrease in plant delta13C values was observed over a four-year monitoring period. This decrease was correlated with increasing vehicle traffic. The delta13C dataset and the corresponding geographical database were used to map and define zones of high and low 13C-depleted CO2 emissions in urban and sub-urban areas. The spatial distribution follows dominant wind directions, with the lowest emission zones found in the southwest of Cotonou. High CO2 emissions occurred in the north, the east and the center, providing evidence of intense anthropogenic activity related to industry and transportation.

  14. The signatures of stable isotopes δ 15N and δ 13C in anadromous and non-anadromous Coilia nasus living in the Yangtze River, and the adjacent sea waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Tang, Wenqiao; Dong, Wenxia

    2015-12-01

    Stable isotopes are increasingly used to investigate seasonal migrations of aquatic organisms. This study employed stable isotopes ( δ 13C and δ 15N) for Coilia nasus from the lower Yangtze River and the adjacent East China Sea to distinguish different ecotypic groups, ascertain trophic nutrition positions, and reflect environmental influences on C. nasus. δ 13C signatures of C. nasus sampled from Zhoushan (ZS), Chongming (CM), and Jingjiang (JJ) waters were significantly higher than those from the Poyang Lake (PYL) ( P < 0.05). By contrast, δ 15N signatures of C. nasus in ZS, CM, and JJ groups were significantly lower than those in PYL group ( P < 0.05). Basing on δ 13C and δ 15N signatures, we could distinguish anadromous (ZS, CM, and JJ) and non-anadromous (PYL) groups. The trophic level (TL) of anadromous C. nasus ranged from 2.90 to 3.04, whereas that of non-anadromous C. nasus was 4.38. C. nasus occupied the middle and top nutrition positions in the marine and Poyang Lake food webs, respectively. C. nasus in Poyang Lake were significantly more enriched in δ 15N but depleted in δ 13C, suggesting that anthropogenic nutrient inputs and terrigenous organic carbon are important to the Poyang Lake food web. This study is the first to apply δ 15N and δ 13C to population assignment studies of C. nasus in the Yangtze River and its affiliated waters. Analysis of stable isotopes ( δ 15N and δ 13C) is shown to be a useful tool for discriminating anadromous and non-anadromous C. nasus.

  15. Basal area growth, carbon isotope discrimination, and intrinsic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many hectares of intensively managed Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Mirb. Franco) stands in western North America are fertilized with nitrogen to increase growth rates. Understanding the mechanisms of response facilitates prioritization of stands for treatment. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the short-term basal area growth response to a single application of 224 kg N ha-1 as urea was associated with reduced stable carbon isotope discrimination (∆13C) and increased intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) in a 20-yr-old plantation of Douglas-fir in the Oregon Coast Range, USA. Increment cores were measured to estimate earlywood, latewood, and total basal area increment over a time series from 1997 to 2015. Stable carbon isotope discrimination and iWUE were estimated using earlywood and latewood stable carbon isotope concentrations in tree-ring holocellulose starting seven years before fertilization in early 2009 and ending seven years after treatment. A highly significant interaction effect between fertilization treatment and year was found for total basal area growth and earlywood basal area increment. Fertilized trees showed significant total basal area growth and earlywood basal area increment in the first (2009) and second (2010) growing seasons after fertilization in 2009. A marginally significant fertilization effect was found for latewood basal area increment only in the first growing season after treatment. A significant i

  16. Combining position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis: first steps towards soil fluxomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics is one of the most important challenges in soil science. Transformation of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) is a key step in biogeochemical cycles because 1) all high molecular substances pass this stage during their decomposition and 2) only LMWOS will be taken up by microorganisms. Previous studies on LMWOS were focused on determining net fluxes through the LMWOS pool, but they rarely identified transformations. As LMWOS are the preferred C and energy source for microorganisms, the transformations of LMWOS are dominated by biochemical pathways of the soil microorganisms. Thus, understanding fluxes and transformations in soils requires a detailed knowledge on the biochemical pathways and its controlling factors. Tracing C fate in soil by isotopes became on of the most applied and promising biogeochemistry tools. Up to now, studies on LMWOS were nearly exclusively based on uniformly labeled organic substances i.e. all C atoms in the molecules were labeled with 13C or 14C. However, this classical approach did not allow the differentiation between use of intact initial substances in any process, or whether they were transformed to metabolites. The novel tool of position-specific labeling enables to trace molecule atoms separately and thus to determine the cleavage of molecules - a prerequisite for metabolic tracing. Position-specific labeling of LMWOS and quantification of 13CO2 and 13C in bulk soil enabled following the basic metabolic pathways of soil microorganisms. However, only the combination of position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis of microbial biomarkers and metabolites allowed 1) tracing specific anabolic pathways in diverse microbial communities in soils and 2) identification of specific pathways of individual functional microbial groups. So, these are the prerequisites for soil fluxomics. Our studies combining position-specific labeled glucose with amino

  17. Trophic discrimination factors of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in hair of corn fed wild boar.

    PubMed

    Holá, Michaela; Ježek, Miloš; Kušta, Tomáš; Košatová, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope measurements are increasingly being used to gain insights into the nutritional ecology of many wildlife species and their role in ecosystem structure and function. Such studies require estimations of trophic discrimination factors (i.e. differences in the isotopic ratio between the consumer and its diet). Although trophic discrimination factors are tissue- and species-specific, researchers often rely on generalized, and fixed trophic discrimination factors that have not been experimentally derived. In this experimental study, captive wild boar (Sus scrofa) were fed a controlled diet of corn (Zea mays), a popular and increasingly dominant food source for wild boar in the Czech Republic and elsewhere in Europe, and trophic discrimination factors for stable carbon (Δ13C) and nitrogen (Δ15N) isotopes were determined from hair samples. The mean Δ13C and Δ15N in wild boar hair were -2.3‰ and +3.5‰, respectively. Also, in order to facilitate future derivations of isotopic measurements along wild boar hair, we calculated the average hair growth rate to be 1.1 mm d(-1). Our results serve as a baseline for interpreting isotopic patterns of free-ranging wild boar in current European agricultural landscapes. However, future research is needed in order to provide a broader understanding of the processes underlying the variation in trophic discrimination factors of carbon and nitrogen across of variety of diet types.

  18. Trophic Discrimination Factors of Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes in Hair of Corn Fed Wild Boar

    PubMed Central

    Holá, Michaela; Ježek, Miloš; Kušta, Tomáš; Košatová, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope measurements are increasingly being used to gain insights into the nutritional ecology of many wildlife species and their role in ecosystem structure and function. Such studies require estimations of trophic discrimination factors (i.e. differences in the isotopic ratio between the consumer and its diet). Although trophic discrimination factors are tissue- and species- specific, researchers often rely on generalized, and fixed trophic discrimination factors that have not been experimentally derived. In this experimental study, captive wild boar (Sus scrofa) were fed a controlled diet of corn (Zea mays), a popular and increasingly dominant food source for wild boar in the Czech Republic and elsewhere in Europe, and trophic discrimination factors for stable carbon (Δ13C) and nitrogen (Δ15N) isotopes were determined from hair samples. The mean Δ13C and Δ15N in wild boar hair were –2.3 ‰ and +3.5 ‰, respectively. Also, in order to facilitate future derivations of isotopic measurements along wild boar hair, we calculated the average hair growth rate to be 1.1 mm d-1. Our results serve as a baseline for interpreting isotopic patterns of free-ranging wild boar in current European agricultural landscapes. However, future research is needed in order to provide a broader understanding of the processes underlying the variation in trophic discrimination factors of carbon and nitrogen across of variety of diet types. PMID:25915400

  19. Carbon Isotope Discrimination in Leaves of C3 Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Gleixner, G.

    2009-04-01

    Carbon isotope composition is regarded as a powerful tool in understanding carbon cycling, both as a tracer and as a process recorder. However, accurate predictions of, for example, partitioning the net carbon flux into its components or obtaining climate information from tree rings, requires a good understanding of plant metabolism and related isotopic fractionations. Mechanistic models have concentrated largely on photosynthetic pathways and their isotopic composition. This cannot be said for respiratory processes. The mechanistic models of leaf isotope discrimination hence do not describe dawn, dusk and night very realistically or not at all. A new steady-state approach of the carbon isotope distribution in glucose potentially addresses the time of twilight and night (Tcherkez et al. 2004). Here, a new model of 13C discrimination in leaves of C3 plants is presented. The model is based on the steady-state approach of Tcherkez et al. (2004) but with much reduced complexity while retaining its general characteristics. In addition, the model introduces some new concepts such as a day-length dependent starch synthesis, night-length dependent starch degradation, energy-driven biosynthesis rates, and continuous leaf discrimination calculation for the whole diel cycle. It is therefore well adapted for biosphere-atmosphere exchange studies. The model predicts enriched sucrose and starch pools in the leaf compared to assimilated CO2. Biosynthesis on the other hand acts as the sink of the remaining, depleted carbon. The model calculates slightly different absolute starch compositions from the Tcherkez et al. (2004) model but this depends on chosen fractionation factors. The greatest difference between the two models is during dawn, dusk and night. For example, while Tcherkez et al. has changing phloem sucrose isotope composition during night, the model here predicts constant sucrose export composition. Observations seem to support rather constant phloem isotope composition

  20. Investigation of amino acid δ 13C signatures in bone collagen to reconstruct human palaeodiets using liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Kyungcheol; Smith, Colin I.; Fuller, Benjamin T.; Richards, Michael P.

    2010-11-01

    This research presents the individual amino acid δ 13C values in bone collagen of humans ( n = 9) and animals ( n = 27) from two prehistoric shell midden sites in Korea. We obtained complete baseline separation of 16 of the 18 amino acids found in bone collagen by using liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). The isotopic results reveal that the humans and animals in the two sites had similar patterns in essential amino acids (EAAs) and non-essential amino acids (NEAAs). The EAA and NEAA δ 13C values in humans are intermediate between those in marine and terrestrial animals. However, the threonine δ 13C values in humans and animals measured in this study are more highly enriched than those of other amino acids. At both sites, all amino acids in marine animals are 13C-enriched relative to those of the terrestrial animals. The isotopic evidence suggests that the Tongsamdong human had EAAs and NEAAs from marine food resources, while the Nukdo humans mainly had EAAs from terrestrial food resources but obtained NEAAs from both terrestrial and marine resources. The δ 13C isotopic differences in amino acids between marine and terrestrial animals were the largest for glycine (NEAA) and histidine (EAA) and the smallest for tyrosine (NEAA) and phenylalanine (EAA). In addition, threonine among the EAAs also had a large difference (˜8‰) in δ 13C values between marine and terrestrial animals, and has the potential to be used as an isotopic marker in palaeodietary studies. Threonine δ 13C values were used in conjunction with the established Δ 13C Glycine-phenylalanine values and produced three distinct dietary groups (terrestrial, omnivorous, and marine). In addition, threonine δ 13C values and Δ 13C Serine-phenylalanine values were discovered to separate between two dietary groups (terrestrial vs. marine), and these δ 13C values may provide a potential new indicator for investigating the distinction between marine and terrestrial protein

  1. 13C-isotopic fingerprint of Pinus pinaster Ait. and Pinus sylvestris L. wood related to the quality of standing tree mass in forests from NW Spain.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Irene; González-Prieto, Serafin J; Cabaneiro, Ana

    2005-01-01

    Pine forest plantations of Pinus pinaster Ait. and P. sylvestris L. located in Galicia, NW Spain, were selected to study the 13C/12C-isotopic fingerprint in wood core samples in order to find possible relationships between the delta(13)C at natural abundance levels and the quality of the standing tree mass. For each pine species, 24 forests growing on acidic soils were studied: half developed over granite and half over schists. Two dominant trees from each plot, corresponding to all possible combinations of forest stands with high or low site index and with adults or young trees, were drilled at the basal part of trunks using a Pressler drill to obtain tree ring samples. The C-isotopic compositions of the litter and the soil organic matter from different soil depths were also determined and statistically significant correlations between these values and the 13C content of the wood were observed. Despite internal variations due to the influence of site index, tree age and parent material, the isotopic fingerprint of P. pinaster wood (mean value delta13C=-26.2+/-0.8 per thousand) significantly differed (P<0.001) from that of P. sylvestris (mean value delta13C=-24.6+/-0.7 per thousand). Relationships between the quality of the stand and the C-isotopic composition of the wood were observed, high quality stands having trees more 13C-depleted than low quality ones. A high correlation between wood delta13C and site index values for P. pinaster stands (r=-0.667, P<0.001) was found, this correlation being even clearer when only P. pinaster growing over schists (r=-0.833, P<0.001) are considered. Again, the correlation between the site index and the wood delta13C of young P. pinaster trees is higher when plots over granite or schists are separately considered. A similar fact occurs for adult P. sylvestris trees from schists stands, high quality specimens being 13C-depleted compared with low quality ones. On the other hand, 13C natural abundance of wood from P. sylvestris

  2. A conifer-friendly high-throughput α-cellulose extraction method for δ13C and δ18O stable isotope ratio analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, W.; Noormets, A.; domec, J.; King, J. S.; Sun, G.; McNulty, S.

    2012-12-01

    Wood stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ18O) offer insight to water source and plant water use efficiency (WUE), which in turn provide a glimpse to potential plant responses to changing climate, particularly rainfall patterns. The synthetic pathways of cell wall deposition in wood rings differ in their discrimination ratios between the light and heavy isotopes, and α-cellulose is broadly seen as the best indicator of plant water status due to its local and temporal fixation and to its high abundance within the wood. To use the effects of recent severe droughts on the WUE of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) throughout Southeastern USA as a harbinger of future changes, an effort has been undertaken to sample the entire range of the species and to sample the isotopic composition in a consistent manner. To be able to accommodate the large number of samples required by this analysis, we have developed a new high-throughput method for α-cellulose extraction, which is the rate-limiting step in such an endeavor. Although an entire family of methods has been developed and perform well, their throughput in a typical research lab setting is limited to 16-75 samples per week with intensive labor input. The resin exclusion step in conifersis is particularly time-consuming. We have combined the recent advances of α-cellulose extraction in plant ecology and wood science, including a high-throughput extraction device developed in the Potsdam Dendro Lab and a simple chemical-based resin exclusion method. By transferring the entire extraction process to a multiport-based system allows throughputs of up to several hundred samples in two weeks, while minimizing labor requirements to 2-3 days per batch of samples.

  3. Benthic macroinvertebrates and the use of stable isotopes13C and δ15N) in the impact assessment of peatland use on boreal stream ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Mika L.; Daza Secco, Emmanuela; Nykänen, Hannu; Meissner, Kristian

    2013-04-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) can provide insights into carbon flow dynamics and trophic positions of consumers in food webs. SIA is used in this study, where we assess the possible changes in the basal resources of Finnish boreal stream ecosystems and differences in the impact of two forms of peatland use, forestry and peat mining. About 30% of the total land area of Finland is classified as peatland, of which about 55% has been drained for forestry and about 0.6% is in peat production. Unlike forestry, peat production is regionally less scattered and can thus have measurable local impacts although the total area of peat production is small. Three watersheds were used as study areas. Within each watershed, one stream drains a subcatchment affected only by peat mining, whereas the other stream flows through a subcatchment affected by forestry. The two subcatchment streams merge to form a single stream flowing into a lake. Studied watersheds were subject to no other forms of land use. In addition to the impacted sites, we used two pristine natural mire and two natural forest catchments as controls. We analysed the stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) from benthic macroinvertebrates, stream bank soil, stream sediment, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in stream water. Samples for stable isotope analyses were collected in the summer of 2011 and samples for invertebrate community analyses in the autumn of 2011. Upon sampling we measured several physical parameters at each sampling site. In addition, stream water samples collected in summer and autumn 2012 were analysed for CH4 and CO2 gas concentrations and autumn gas samples also for their δ13C values. Our initial SIA results of invertebrates suggest some degree of discrimination between different sources of OM and possible effects on feeding habits, presumably due to the quality of the basal resources. We will explore this result further by examining not only taxonomical structure, but also the

  4. Real-time in situ δ13C Methane Measurements with a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer at Four Corners to Discriminate Biogenic and Thermogenic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arata, C.; Dubey, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    We characterized the performance of a new cavity ring-down δ13C isotopic CH4 spectrometer (Picarro G2123-i) in the laboratory. Our Allan variance plots show that the instrument can integrate 1-second measurements over 5 minutes to yield a precision better than ± 1 per mil. We subsequently deployed it at a field site at Four Corners (FC), New Mexico, where we had observed large sustained CH4 enhancements (2-8 ppm peaks for hours) at night. Potential sources of this large CH4 signal at FC include (1) fugitive emissions from coal mining and gas processing that are thermogenic and isotopically heavy and (2) Emissions from agriculture, ruminants, fires, and landfills that are biogenic and isotopically light. We analyze our measurements of δ13C of CH4 during spring and summer of 2012 to distinguish these two types of sources. We find CH4 plumes that are both isotopically heavy and light at our site. Keeling plots show two distinct limiting δ13C source compositions of -40 per mil and -60 per mil that we attribute to thermogenic and biogenic sources respectively. We use our results to quantify the contributions of these two sources and combine them with meteorological data to identify their sources in the Four Corners regions.

  5. Food partitioning of leaf-eating mangrove crabs ( Sesarminae): Experimental and stable isotope ( 13C and 15N) evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Ditte K.; Kristensen, Erik; Mangion, Perrine

    2010-05-01

    The feasibility of mangrove leaves as a full diet for sesarmid crabs has been questioned for decades. Since these leaves are nitrogen-poor, sesarmids probably obtain nitrogen from other sources to sustain growth. The aim of this study was to assess the food partitioning of the sesarmid species Neoepisesarma versicolor with emphasis on nitrogen allocation. The preference for animal tissue when crabs were pre-fed diets of different nitrogen content was determined in the laboratory. Furthermore, the possible in situ diet composition of N. versicolor was established from carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signature ( δ13C and δ15N) of freshly caught individuals and their potential food sources, using a concentration-dependent mixing model. N. versicolor showed significantly higher feeding preferences for fish meat when pre-fed leaf material without than with access to meat, indicating that this crab species can meet its nitrogen demand by ingesting animal tissue. The stable isotope mixing model based on in situ materials suggests that the diet of N. versicolor consists of ˜60% leaves in terms of biomass, leaving ˜40% for other sources such as animal tissue and benthic microorganisms. The biomass contribution from animal tissues, in form of e.g. other crustaceans and fish carcasses, was found to account for ˜15%. Despite the relative low biomass fraction, animal food sources may contribute with up to half of the nitrogen in the diet of N. versicolor. The quantity of ingested sediment most likely exceeds that of animal tissues. However, due to the low concentration of assimilable microalgae and other microorganism, we propose that sediment associated sources are less important as a nitrogen source for N. versicolor than hitherto presumed.

  6. Stable isotopes to discriminate lambs fed herbage or concentrate both obtained from C(3) plants.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Rojas, Jose M; Vasta, Valentina; Lanza, Alfio; Luciano, Giuseppe; Ladroue, Virginie; Guillou, Claude; Priolo, Alessandro

    2008-12-01

    This study was aimed at determining whether isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) enables us to discriminate between lambs fed herbage or concentrate, both obtained from C(3) plants, and those fed a concentrate obtained from C(4) plants. Thirty-four Comisana male lambs (age 45 days) were assigned to three feeding treatments. Fourteen lambs were fed vetch (Vicia sativa) ad libitum. Another fourteen lambs received a barley-based concentrate. The remaining six lambs were fed a maize-based concentrate. After 60 days of experimental treatment the animals were slaughtered and the wool, perirenal fat and muscle longissimus dorsi were sampled. The delta(13)C and delta(15)N values of the muscle, wool and feed were measured by continuous flow elemental analysis (CF-EA)-IRMS. The delta(13)C of the fat was determined likewise. The isotopic composition of the tissues reflected that of the three diets. For the lambs which were fed herbage the muscle delta(13)C values were higher (P < 0.0005) and delta(15)N values were lower (P < 0.0005) than those of the lambs receiving concentrates. The delta(15)N and delta(13)C values in the muscle and delta(13)C values in the adipose tissue allowed perfect discrimination between the lambs fed the three different diets. The regression between the delta(13)C values measured in muscle and in wool of lambs was linear (R(2) = 0.99; P < 0.0005). This result shows that delta(13)C measured in the wool can predict muscle delta(13)C distribution, suggesting that wool is a valuable matrix for meat authentication.

  7. Detection of adulteration in honey samples added various sugar syrups with 13C/12C isotope ratio analysis method.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Murat

    2013-06-01

    Honey can be adulterated in various ways. One of the adulteration methods is the addition of different sugar syrups during or after honey production. Starch-based sugar syrups, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), glucose syrup (GS) and saccharose syrups (SS), which are produced from beet or canes, can be used for adulterating honey. In this study, adulterated honey samples were prepared with the addition of HFCS, GS and SS (beet sugar) at a ratio of 0%, 10%, 20%, 40% and 50% by weight. (13)C/(12)C analysis was conducted on these adulterated honey samples using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer in combination with an elemental analyser (EA-IRMS). As a result, adulteration using C(4) sugar syrups (HFCS and GS) could be detected to a certain extent while adulteration of honey using C(3) sugar syrups (beet sugar) could not be detected. Adulteration by using SS (beet sugar) still has a serious detection problem, especially in countries in which beet is used in manufacturing sugar. For this reason, practice and analysis methods are needed to meet this deficit and to detect the adulterations precisely in the studies that will be conducted.

  8. Isotopic discrimination of zinc in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Weiss, D J; Mason, T F D; Zhao, F J; Kirk, G J D; Coles, B J; Horstwood, M S A

    2005-03-01

    * The extent of isotopic discrimination of transition metals in biological processes is poorly understood but potentially has important applications in plant and biogeochemical studies. * Using multicollector inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry, we measured isotopic fractionation of zinc (Zn) during uptake from nutrient solutions by rice (Oryza sativa), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants. * For all three species, the roots showed a similar extent of heavy Zn enrichment relative to the nutrient solution, probably reflecting preferential adsorption on external root surfaces. By contrast, a plant-species specific enrichment of the light Zn isotope occurred in the shoots, indicative of a biological, membrane-transport controlled uptake into plant cells. The extent of the fractionation in the shoots further depended on the Zn speciation in the nutrient solution. * The observed isotopic depletion in heavy Zn from root to shoot (-0.13 to -0.26 per atomic mass unit) is equivalent to roughly a quarter of the total reported terrestrial variability of Zn isotopic compositions (c. 0.84 per atomic mass unit). Plant uptake therefore represents an important source of isotopic variation in biogeochemical cycling of Zn.

  9. Assessing waterbird habitat use in coastal evaporative systems using stable isotopes13C, δ 15N and δD) as environmental tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Francisco; Abdennadher, Aida; Sanpera, Carola; Jover, Lluís; Wassenaar, Leonard I.; Hobson, Keith A.

    2011-04-01

    Isotopic patterns of biota across salinity gradients in man-made evaporative systems could assist in determining the use of these habitats by animals. Here we report δ 13C, δ 15N and δD measurements of a euryhaline fish, the Mediterranean toothcarp ( Aphanius fasciatus), inhabiting a range of salinities in the Thyna saltworks near Sfax (Tunisia). The contribution of these salinity niches to egg formation of two typically piscivorous bird species breeding in the area and feeding within saltworks, Little Tern ( Sternula albifrons) and Little Egret ( Egretta garzetta), was inferred trough a triple-isotope13C, δ 15N and δD) Bayesian mixing model. Isotopic trends for fish δ 15N and δD across the salinity gradient followed the equations: δ 15N = e (1.1 + 47.68/Salinity) and δD = -175.74 + Salinity + Salinity 2; whereas fish δ 13C increased as salinity rose (δ 13C = -10.83 + 0.02·Salinity), after a sudden drop in fish isotopic values for salinities >60 (Practical Salinity Scale) (average fish δ 13C for salinities <60 = -5.92‰). Both bird species fed largely on low hypersalinity ponds (salinity = 43; average contribution = 37% and 22% for Little Egrets and Little Terns, respectively), although the use of intermediate hypersalinities (salinities 63 and 70) by Little Terns also occurred (16% and 21%, respectively). Isotopic patterns across salinity gradients allow the use of isotopic measurements to inform studies of habitat occupancy within evaporative systems and provide further insights into how wildlife communities interact with them.

  10. Water use efficiency and shoot biomass production under water limitation is negatively correlated to the discrimination against (13)C in the C3 grasses Dactylis glomerata, Festuca arundinacea and Phalaris arundinacea.

    PubMed

    Mårtensson, Linda-Maria; Carlsson, Georg; Prade, Thomas; Kørup, Kirsten; Lærke, Poul Erik; Jensen, Erik Steen

    2017-04-01

    Climate change impacts rainfall patterns which may lead to drought stress in rain-fed agricultural systems. Crops with higher drought tolerance are required on marginal land with low precipitation or on soils with low water retention used for biomass production. It is essential to obtain plant breeding tools, which can identify genotypes with improved drought tolerance and water use efficiency (WUE). In C3 plant species, the variation in discrimination against (13)C (Δ(13)C) during photosynthesis has been shown to be a potential indicator for WUE, where discrimination against (13)C and WUE were negatively correlated. The aim of this study was to determine the variation in the discrimination against (13)C between species and cultivars of three perennial C3 grasses (Dactylis glomerata (cocksfoot), Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue) and Phalaris arundinacea (reed canary grass)) and test the relationships between discrimination against (13)C, season-long water use WUEB, shoot and root biomass production in plants grown under well-watered and water-limited conditions. The grasses were grown in the greenhouse and exposed to two irrigation regimes, which corresponded to 25% and 60% water holding capacity, respectively. We found negative relationships between discrimination against (13)C and WUEB and between discrimination against (13)C and shoot biomass production, under both the well-watered and water-limited growth conditions (p < 0.001). Discrimination against (13)C decreased in response to water limitation (p < 0.001). We found interspecific differences in the discrimination against (13)C, WUEB, and shoot biomass production, where the cocksfoot cultivars showed lowest and the reed canary grass cultivars highest values of discrimination against (13)C. Cocksfoot cultivars also showed highest WUEB, shoot biomass production and potential tolerance to water limitation. We conclude that discrimination against (13)C appears to be a useful indicator, when selecting C3

  11. Optimization of automated gas sample collection and isotope ratio mass spectrometric analysis of delta(13)C of CO(2) in air.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, Matthias J; Werner, Roland A; Eugster, Werner; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Wehrle, Günther; Mohn, Joachim; Buchmann, Nina

    2008-12-01

    The application of (13)C/(12)C in ecosystem-scale tracer models for CO(2) in air requires accurate measurements of the mixing ratios and stable isotope ratios of CO(2). To increase measurement reliability and data intercomparability, as well as to shorten analysis times, we have improved an existing field sampling setup with portable air sampling units and developed a laboratory setup for the analysis of the delta(13)C of CO(2) in air by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The changes consist of (a) optimization of sample and standard gas flow paths, (b) additional software configuration, and (c) automation of liquid nitrogen refilling for the cryogenic trap. We achieved a precision better than 0.1 per thousand and an accuracy of 0.11 +/- 0.04 per thousand for the measurement of delta(13)C of CO(2) in air and unattended operation of measurement sequences up to 12 h.

  12. Geometries and tautomerism of OHN hydrogen bonds in aprotic solution probed by H/D isotope effects on (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, Peter M; Guo, Jing; Koeppe, Benjamin; Golubev, Nikolai S; Denisov, Gleb S; Smirnov, Sergei N; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-10-14

    The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of 17 OHN hydrogen-bonded complexes formed by CH(3)(13)COOH(D) with 14 substituted pyridines, 2 amines, and N-methylimidazole have been measured in the temperature region between 110 and 150 K using CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl mixture as solvent. The slow proton and hydrogen bond exchange regime was reached, and the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group were measured. In combination with the analysis of the corresponding (1)H chemical shifts, it was possible to distinguish between OHN hydrogen bonds exhibiting a single proton position and those exhibiting a fast proton tautomerism between molecular and zwitterionic forms. Using H-bond correlations, we relate the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group with the OHN hydrogen bond geometries.

  13. 13C/12C and 15N/14N Isotope Analysis to Characterize Natural Degradation of Atrazine: Evidence from Parent and Daughter Compound Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Martin; Meyer, Armin

    2013-04-01

    The mobile and still herbicidal metabolites desethylatrazine (DEA) and desisopropylatrazine (DIA) are frequently detected together with its parent compound atrazine (Atz) in the aquatic environment. Interpretation of their transformation state is often difficult with current methods, which are mainly measuring concentrations. Alternatively, compound specific isotope analyses (CSIA) has become a novel tool to detect degradation processes of contaminants in groundwater. The aim of our study was to investigate on the lab scale 13C/12C and 15N/14N isotope trends in parent and daughter compounds associated with different degradation scenarios of atrazine likely to occur in the environment. Thus atrazine was dealkylated with (i) permanganate and (ii) the bacterium Rhodococcus sp. NI86/21. In both transformations, 13C/12C ratios of atrazine increased strongly (epsilon carbon/permanganate = -4.6 ± 0.6 ‰ and epsilon carbon/Rhodoccoccus = -3.8 ± 0.2 ‰) whereas nitrogen isotope fractionation was small. 13C/12C ratios of DEA showed the following trends. (i) When DEA was formed as only product (Atz + permanganate) 13C/12C remained constant, close to the initial value of Atz. (ii) When DEA was formed together with deisopropylatrazine (biodegradation of Atz) 13C/12C increased, but only within 2‰. (iii) When DEA and DIA was further biodegraded, 13C/12C increased for both metabolites up to 9‰. Thus strong enrichment of 13C/12C in the metabolites in comparison to Atz can give strong testimony for further breakdown of the metabolite.

  14. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level 2H-, 13C- and 15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Albertino, Andrea; Sauer, Peter E; Qi, Haiping; Molinie, Roland; Mesnard, François

    2009-11-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the delta values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown delta values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for delta13C and delta15N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: delta2H(nicotine) -162 to -45 per thousand, delta13C(nicotine) -30.05 to +7.72 per thousand, delta15N(nicotine) -6.03 to +33.62 per thousand; delta15N(acetanilide) +1.18 to +40.57 per thousand; delta13C(urea) -34.13 to +11.71 per thousand, delta15N(urea) +0.26 to +40.61 per thousand (recommended delta values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as

  15. Stable isotopes (δD and δ(13)C) are geographic indicators of natal origins of monarch butterflies in eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Keith A; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Taylor, Orley R

    1999-08-01

    Wing membranes of laboratory and field-reared monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) were analyzed for their stable-hydrogen (δD) and carbon (δ(13)C) isotope ratios to determine whether this technique could be used to identify their natal origins. We hypothesized that the hydrogen isotopic composition of monarch butterfly wing keratin would reflect the hydrogen isotope patterns of rainfall in areas of natal origin where wings were formed. Monarchs were reared in the laboratory on milkweed plants (Asclepias sp.) grown with water of known deuterium content, and, with the assistance of volunteers, on native milkweeds throughout eastern North America. The results show that the stable hydrogen isotopic composition of monarch butterflies is highly correlated with the isotopic composition of the milkweed host plants, which in turn corresponds closely with the long-term geographic patterns of deuterium in rainfall. Stable-carbon isotope values in milkweed host plants were similarly correlated with those values in monarch butterflies and showed a general pattern of enrichment along a southwest to northeast gradient bisecting the Great Lakes. These findings indicate that natal origins of migratory and wintering monarchs in Mexico can be inferred from the combined δD and δ(13)C isotopic signatures in their wings. This relationship establishes that analysis of hydrogen and carbon isotopes can be used to answer questions concerning the biology of migratory monarch butterflies and provides a new approach to tracking similar migratory movements of other organisms.

  16. Abundance Anomaly of the 13C Isotopic Species of c-C3H2 in the Low-mass Star Formation Region L1527

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kento; Sakai, Nami; Tokudome, Tomoya; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Takano, Shuro; Lefloch, Bertrand; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Bachiller, Rafael; Caux, Emmanuel; Vastel, Charlotte; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-07-01

    The rotational spectral lines of c-C3H2 and two kinds of the 13C isotopic species, c-{}13{{CCCH}}2 ({C}2v symmetry) and c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2 (Cs symmetry), have been observed in the 1-3 mm band toward the low-mass star-forming region L1527. We have detected 7, 3, and 6 lines of c-C3H2, c-{}13{{CCCH}}2, and c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2, respectively, with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and 34, 6, and 13 lines, respectively, with the IRAM 30 m telescope, where seven, two, and two transitions, respectively, are observed with both telescopes. With these data, we have evaluated the column densities of the normal and 13C isotopic species. The [c-C3H2]/[c-{}13{{CCCH}}2] ratio is determined to be 310 ± 80, while the [c-C3H2]/[c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2] ratio is determined to be 61 ± 11. The [c-C3H2]/[c-{}13{{CCCH}}2] and [c-C3H2]/[c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2] ratios expected from the elemental 12C/13C ratio are 60-70 and 30-35, respectively, where the latter takes into account the statistical factor of 2 for the two equivalent carbon atoms in c-C3H2. Hence, this observation further confirms the dilution of the 13C species in carbon-chain molecules and their related molecules, which are thought to originate from the dilution of 13C+ in the gas-phase C+ due to the isotope exchange reaction: {}13{{{C}}}++{CO}\\to {}13{CO}+{{{C}}}+. Moreover, the abundances of the two 13C isotopic species are different from each other. The ratio of c-{}13{{CCCH}}2 species relative to c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2 is determined to be 0.20 ± 0.05. If 13C were randomly substituted for the three carbon atoms, the [c-{}13{{CCCH}}2]/[c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2] ratio would be 0.5. Hence, the observed ratio indicates that c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2 exists more favorably. Possible origins of the different abundances are discussed. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope and the NRO 45 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain). NRO is a branch of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

  17. The 13C-excess: a new dual-element stable isotopic approach for detrending the effects of evaporation on lake carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, T. W.; Oze, C.

    2012-12-01

    Stable isotope-based proxy methods enhance our ability to interpret paleohydrology, paleoelevation, climate change, and biogeochemical cycles. In ancient carbonate lakes, these methods often require that the unmodified isotopic composition of meteoric water, or local carbon reservoirs, or both, are recorded by authigenic minerals. Surprisingly, these critical assumptions have not been tested across wide-ranging environmental contexts. Here, we show that globally distributed Quaternary lake carbonate oxygen isotope compositions are not strongly, nor significantly, correlated with local meteoric-derived water compositions due to the modification of in-flow waters following entry into the lake environment. These modifications are largely caused by surface water evaporation, and can result in dubious reconstructions of ancient hydrological conditions and water source effects such as the strength of prevailing air-mass trajectory, >3km errors in paleoelevation estimates, unrealistic shifts in lake water temperature, and misleading interpretations of local carbon cycle conditions if not accounted for. However, our analysis suggests that positive shifts in surface water δ18O are accompanied by similar magnitude shifts in δ13C-DIC during lake residence. This positive co-variation in δ18O and δ13C may be used to detrend lake carbonate compositions for the effects of surface water evaporation using a parameter we define here as the '13C-excess'. This approach uses the isotopic covariant trend between in-flow waters and lake waters, rather than lacustrine covariation alone, to better constrain ancient meteoric-derived water compositions. To demonstrate the potential strength of the 13C-excess approach over single element methods, we compare the paleoelevation estimates derived from lake carbonate compositions using both approaches. When Tibetan lakes are excluded from the dataset, 13C-excess values are significantly correlated with mean up-slope hypsometric altitude with

  18. Coral skeletal carbon isotopes13C and Δ14C) record the delivery of terrestrial carbon to the coastal waters of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, R.P.; Grottoli, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Tropical small mountainous rivers deliver a poorly quantified, but potentially significant, amount of carbon to the world's oceans. However, few historical records of land-ocean carbon transfer exist for any region on Earth. Corals have the potential to provide such records, because they draw on dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for calcification. In temperate systems, the stable- (δ13C) and radiocarbon (Δ14C) isotopes of coastal DIC are influenced by the δ13C and Δ14C of the DIC transported from adjacent rivers. A similar pattern should exist in tropical coastal DIC and hence coral skeletons. Here, δ13C and Δ14C measurements were made in a 56-year-old Montastraea faveolata coral growing ~1 km from the mouth of the Rio Fajardo in eastern Puerto Rico. Additionally, the δ13C and Δ14C values of the DIC of the Rio Fajardo and its adjacent coastal waters were measured during two wet and dry seasons. Three major findings were observed: (1) synchronous depletions of both δ13C and Δ14C in the coral skeleton are annually coherent with the timing of peak river discharge, (2) riverine DIC was always more depleted in δ13C and Δ14C than seawater DIC, and (3) the correlation of δ13C and Δ14C was the same in both coral skeleton and the DIC of the river and coastal waters. These results indicate that coral skeletal δ13C and Δ14C are recording the delivery of riverine DIC to the coastal ocean. Thus, coral records could be used to develop proxies of historical land-ocean carbon flux for many tropical regions. Such information could be invaluable for understanding the role of tropical land-ocean carbon flux in the context of land-use change and global climate change.

  19. Coral skeletal carbon isotopes13C and Δ14C) record the delivery of terrestrial carbon to the coastal waters of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, R.P.; Grottoli, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Tropical small mountainous rivers deliver a poorly quantified, but potentially significant, amount of carbon to the world's oceans. However, few historical records of land-ocean carbon transfer exist for any region on Earth. Corals have the potential to provide such records, because they draw on dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for calcification. In temperate systems, the stable- (??13C) and radiocarbon (??14C) isotopes of coastal DIC are influenced by the ??13C and ??14C of the DIC transported from adjacent rivers. A similar pattern should exist in tropical coastal DIC and hence coral skeletons. Here, ??13C and ??14C measurements were made in a 56-year-old Montastraea faveolata coral growing ~1 km from the mouth of the Rio Fajardo in eastern Puerto Rico. Additionally, the ??13C and ??14C values of the DIC of the Rio Fajardo and its adjacent coastal waters were measured during two wet and dry seasons. Three major findings were observed: (1) synchronous depletions of both ??13C and ??14C in the coral skeleton are annually coherent with the timing of peak river discharge, (2) riverine DIC was always more depleted in ??13C and ??14C than seawater DIC, and (3) the correlation of ??13C and ??14C was the same in both coral skeleton and the DIC of the river and coastal waters. These results indicate that coral skeletal ??13C and ??14C are recording the delivery of riverine DIC to the coastal ocean. Thus, coral records could be used to develop proxies of historical land-ocean carbon flux for many tropical regions. Such information could be invaluable for understanding the role of tropical land-ocean carbon flux in the context of land-use change and global climate change. ?? 2011 United States Geological Survey.

  20. Positional Enrichment by Proton Analysis (PEPA): A One‐Dimensional 1H‐NMR Approach for 13C Stable Isotope Tracer Studies in Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Aivio, Suvi; Capellades, Jordi; Gómez, Josep; Canyellas, Nicolau; Stracker, Travis H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A novel metabolomics approach for NMR‐based stable isotope tracer studies called PEPA is presented, and its performance validated using human cancer cells. PEPA detects the position of carbon label in isotopically enriched metabolites and quantifies fractional enrichment by indirect determination of 13C‐satellite peaks using 1D‐1H‐NMR spectra. In comparison with 13C‐NMR, TOCSY and HSQC, PEPA improves sensitivity, accelerates the elucidation of 13C positions in labeled metabolites and the quantification of the percentage of stable isotope enrichment. Altogether, PEPA provides a novel framework for extending the high‐throughput of 1H‐NMR metabolic profiling to stable isotope tracing in metabolomics, facilitating and complementing the information derived from 2D‐NMR experiments and expanding the range of isotopically enriched metabolites detected in cellular extracts. PMID:28220994

  1. The 13C-excess: a new dual element stable isotopic approach for de-trending the effects of evaporation on lake carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, T. W.; Oze, C.

    2013-12-01

    Stable isotope based proxy methods enhance our ability to interpret paleohydrology, paleoelevation, climate change, and biogeochemical cycles. In ancient carbonate lakes, these methods often require that the unmodified isotopic composition of meteoric water or local carbon reservoirs, or both, are recorded by authigenic minerals. Surprisingly, these critical assumptions have not been tested across wide-ranging environmental contexts. A review of globally distributed Quaternary records reveals that lake carbonate oxygen isotope compositions are not strongly, nor significantly, correlated with local meteoric-derived water compositions due to the modification of in-flow waters following entry into the lake environment. These modifications are largely caused by surface water evaporation, and can result in dubious reconstructions of ancient environmental conditions if not accounted for. However, our analysis suggests that positive shifts in surface water δ18O are accompanied by similar magnitude shifts in δ13C-DIC during lake residence. This positive co-variation in δ18O and δ13C may be used to de-trend lake carbonate compositions for the effects of surface water evaporation using a parameter we define as the ';13C-excess'. This approach uses the isotopic covariant trend between in-flow waters and lake waters, rather than lacustrine covariation alone, to better constrain ancient meteoric-derived water compositions. In Quaternary lake systems, 13C-excess values are significantly correlated with modern mean up-slope hypsometric altitude with an error of ×500m. Application of the 13C-excess approach to Cenozoic lake carbonate records from the western U.S. Cordillera both challenges and reinforces previous paleoelevational interpretations based on δ18O alone, while application of the 13C-excess approach to Middle Miocene laminated lacustrine carbonates from California and New Zealand provides important insights into the paleohydrologies of these two highly debated

  2. Spatial and temporal variations in stable carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotopic composition of symbiotic scleractinian corals.

    PubMed

    Nahon, Sarah; Richoux, Nicole B; Kolasinski, Joanna; Desmalades, Martin; Ferrier Pages, Christine; Lecellier, Gael; Planes, Serge; Berteaux Lecellier, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Tropical scleractinian corals are considered autotrophic as they rely mainly on photosynthesis-derived nutrients transferred from their photosymbionts. Corals are also able to capture and ingest suspended particulate organic matter, so heterotrophy can be an important supplementary trophic pathway to optimize coral fitness. The aim of this in situ study was to elucidate the trophic status of 10 coral species under contrasted environmental conditions in a French Polynesian lagoon. Carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotopic compositions of coral host tissues and photosymbionts were determined at 3 different fringing reefs during wet and dry seasons. Our results highlighted spatial variability in stable isotopic compositions of both coral host tissues and photosymbionts. Samples from the site with higher level of suspended particulate matter were (13)C-depleted and (15)N-enriched relative to corals and photosymbionts from less turbid sites. However, differences in both δ(13)C and δ(15)N between coral host tissues and their photosymbionts (Δ(host-photosymbionts 13)C and Δ(host-photosymbionts 15)N) were small (0.27 ± 0.76‰ and 1.40 ± 0.90‰, respectively) and similar at all sites, thus indicating no general increases in the heterotrophic pathway. Depleted δ(13)C and enriched δ(15)N values of coral host tissues measured at the most turbid site were explained by changes in isotopic composition of the inorganic nutrients taken up by photosymbionts and also by changes in rate of isotopic fractionation with environmental conditions. Our results also highlighted a lack of significant temporal variations in δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of coral host and photosymbiont tissues and in Δ(host-photosymbionts 13)C and Δ(host-photosymbionts 15)N values. This temporal stability indicated that corals remained principally autotrophic even during the wet season when photosymbiont densities were lower and the concentrations of phytoplankton were higher. Increased coral

  3. Investigating the influence of sulphur dioxide (SO 2) on the stable isotope ratios (δ 13C and δ 18O) of tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, K. T.; Loader, N. J.; Switsur, V. R.; Treydte, K. S.; Waterhouse, J. S.

    2010-04-01

    This study reports the influence of a 20th century pollution signal recorded in the δ 13C and δ 18O of absolutely dated tree rings from Quercus robur and Pinus sylvestris from southern England. We identify a correspondence between the inter-relationship and climate sensitivity of stable isotope series that appears to be linked to recent trends in local SO 2 emissions. This effect is most clearly exhibited in the broadleaved trees studied but is also observed in the δ 13C values of the (less polluted) pine site at Windsor. The SO 2 induced stomatal closure leads to a maximum increase of 2.5‰ in the isotope values (δ 13C). The combined physiological response to high pollution levels is less in δ 18O than δ 13C. The SO 2 signal also seems to be present as a period of reduced growth in the two ring-width chronologies. Direct, quantitative correction for the SO 2 effect represents a significant challenge owing to the nature of the records and likely local plant response to environmental pollution. Whilst it appears that this signal is both limited to the late industrial period and demonstrates a recovery in line with improvements in air quality, the role of atmospheric pollution during the calibration period should not be underestimated and adequate consideration needs to be taken when calibrating biological environmental proxies in order to avoid development of biased reconstructions.

  4. Use of isotope ratio mass spectrometry to detect doping with oral testosterone undecanoate: inter-individual variability of 13C/12C ratio.

    PubMed

    Baume, Norbert; Saudan, Christophe; Desmarchelier, Aurélien; Strahm, Emmanuel; Sottas, Pierre-Edouard; Bagutti, Carlo; Cauderay, Michel; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; Mangin, Patrice; Saugy, Martial

    2006-05-01

    The metabolic effect of multiple oral testosterone undecanoate (TU) doses over 4 weeks was assessed in seven voluntary men. The protocol was designed to detect accumulation of the substance by choosing the appropriate spot urines collections time and to study the urinary clearance of the substance after weeks of treatment. Urines were analysed by a new GC/C/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) method to establish the delta(13)C-values of testosterone metabolites (androsterone and etiocholanolone) together with an endogenous reference compound (16(5alpha)-androsten-3alpha-ol). The significant differences in inter-individual metabolism following TU intake was illustrated by large variations in delta(13)C-values of both T metabolites (maximum Deltadelta(13)C-values = 5.5 per thousand), as well as by very stable longitudinal T/E profiles and carbon isotopic ratios in the first hours following administration. According to T/E ratios and delta(13)C-values, the washout period after 80 mg TU intake was less than 48 h for all subjects and no accumulation phenomenon was observed upon chronic oral administration.

  5. Design and Operation of a Continuous 13C and 15N Labeling Chamber for Uniform or Differential, Metabolic and Structural, Plant Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Jennifer L; Reuss, Dan; Pinney, Colin; Boyack, Ty; Haddix, Michelle L; Stewart, Catherine E; Cotrufo, M. Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Tracing rare stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as 13C with 15N, 18O or 2H has the potential to reveal even more information about complex stoichiometric relationships during biogeochemical transformations. Isotope labeled plant material has been used in various studies of litter decomposition and soil organic matter formation1-4. From these and other studies, however, it has become apparent that structural components of plant material behave differently than metabolic components (i.e. leachable low molecular weight compounds) in terms of microbial utilization and long-term carbon storage5-7. The ability to study structural and metabolic components separately provides a powerful new tool for advancing the forefront of ecosystem biogeochemical studies. Here we describe a method for producing 13C and 15N labeled plant material that is either uniformly labeled throughout the plant or differentially labeled in structural and metabolic plant components. Here, we present the construction and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber that can be modified to meet various research needs. Uniformly labeled plant material is produced by continuous labeling from seedling to harvest, while differential labeling is achieved by removing the growing plants from the chamber weeks prior to harvest. Representative results from growing Andropogon gerardii Kaw demonstrate the system's ability to efficiently label plant material at the targeted levels. Through this method we have produced plant material with a 4.4 atom%13C and 6.7 atom%15N uniform plant label, or material that is differentially labeled by up to 1.29 atom%13C and 0.56 atom%15N in its metabolic and structural components (hot water extractable and hot water residual components

  6. Design and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber for uniform or differential, metabolic and structural, plant isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Soong, Jennifer L; Reuss, Dan; Pinney, Colin; Boyack, Ty; Haddix, Michelle L; Stewart, Catherine E; Cotrufo, M Francesca

    2014-01-16

    Tracing rare stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as (13)C with (15)N, (18)O or (2)H has the potential to reveal even more information about complex stoichiometric relationships during biogeochemical transformations. Isotope labeled plant material has been used in various studies of litter decomposition and soil organic matter formation(1-4). From these and other studies, however, it has become apparent that structural components of plant material behave differently than metabolic components (i.e. leachable low molecular weight compounds) in terms of microbial utilization and long-term carbon storage(5-7). The ability to study structural and metabolic components separately provides a powerful new tool for advancing the forefront of ecosystem biogeochemical studies. Here we describe a method for producing (13)C and (15)N labeled plant material that is either uniformly labeled throughout the plant or differentially labeled in structural and metabolic plant components. Here, we present the construction and operation of a continuous (13)C and (15)N labeling chamber that can be modified to meet various research needs. Uniformly labeled plant material is produced by continuous labeling from seedling to harvest, while differential labeling is achieved by removing the growing plants from the chamber weeks prior to harvest. Representative results from growing Andropogon gerardii Kaw demonstrate the system's ability to efficiently label plant material at the targeted levels. Through this method we have produced plant material with a 4.4 atom%(13)C and 6.7 atom%(15)N uniform plant label, or material that is differentially labeled by up to 1.29 atom%(13)C and 0.56 atom%(15)N in its metabolic and structural components (hot water extractable and hot water

  7. Carbon isotope compositions (δ(13) C) of leaf, wood and holocellulose differ among genotypes of poplar and between previous land uses in a short-rotation biomass plantation.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, M S; Fichot, R; Broeckx, L S; Vanholme, B; Boerjan, W; Ceulemans, R

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of water use to produce biomass is a key trait in designing sustainable bioenergy-devoted systems. We characterized variations in the carbon isotope composition (δ(13) C) of leaves, current year wood and holocellulose (as proxies for water use efficiency, WUE) among six poplar genotypes in a short-rotation plantation. Values of δ(13) Cwood and δ(13) Cholocellulose were tightly and positively correlated, but the offset varied significantly among genotypes (0.79-1.01‰). Leaf phenology was strongly correlated with δ(13) C, and genotypes with a longer growing season showed a higher WUE. In contrast, traits related to growth and carbon uptake were poorly linked to δ(13) C. Trees growing on former pasture with higher N-availability displayed higher δ(13) C as compared with trees growing on former cropland. The positive relationships between δ(13) Cleaf and leaf N suggested that spatial variations in WUE over the plantation were mainly driven by an N-related effect on photosynthetic capacities. The very coherent genotype ranking obtained with δ(13) C in the different tree compartments has some practical outreach. Because WUE remains largely uncoupled from growth in poplar plantations, there is potential to identify genotypes with satisfactory growth and higher WUE.

  8. The stable isotopic composition of Daphnia ephippia reflects changes in δ13C and δ18O values of food and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilder, J.; Tellenbach, C.; Möst, M.; Spaak, P.; van Hardenbroek, M.; Wooller, M. J.; Heiri, O.

    2015-06-01

    The stable isotopic composition of fossil resting eggs (ephippia) of Daphnia spp. is being used to reconstruct past environmental conditions in lake ecosystems. However, the underlying assumption that the stable isotopic composition of the ephippia reflects the stable isotopic composition of the parent Daphnia, of their diet and of the environmental water have yet to be confirmed in a controlled experimental setting. We performed experiments with Daphnia pulicaria cultures, which included a control treatment conducted at 12 °C in filtered lake water and with a diet of fresh algae and three treatments in which we manipulated the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C value) of the algae, stable oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O value) of the water and the water temperature, respectively. The stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N value) of the algae was similar for all treatments. At 12 °C, differences in algal δ13C values and in δ18O values of water were reflected in those of Daphnia. The differences between ephippia and Daphnia stable isotope ratios were similar in the different treatments (δ13C: +0.2 ± 0.4 ‰ (standard deviation); δ15N: -1.6 ± 0.4 ‰; δ18O: -0.9 ± 0.4 ‰), indicating that changes in dietary δ13C values and in δ18O values of water are passed on to these fossilizing structures. A higher water temperature (20 °C) resulted in lower δ13C values in Daphnia and ephippia than in the other treatments with the same food source and in a minor change in the difference between δ13C values of ephippia and Daphnia (to -1.3 ± 0.3 ‰). This may have been due to microbial processes or increased algal respiration rates in the experimental containers, which may not affect Daphnia in natural environments. There was no significant difference in the offset between δ18O and δ15N values of ephippia and Daphnia between the 12 and 20 °C treatments, but the δ18O values of Daphnia and ephippia were on average 1.2 ‰ lower at 20 °C than at

  9. Hydrogen bond geometries and proton tautomerism of homoconjugated anions of carboxylic acids studied via H/D isotope effects on 13C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Tolstoy, Peter M; Koeppe, Benjamin; Golubev, Nikolai S; Denisov, Gleb S; Smirnov, Sergei N; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2012-11-26

    Ten formally symmetric anionic OHO hydrogen bonded complexes, modeling Asp/Glu amino acid side chain interactions in nonaqueous environment (CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl solution, 200-110 K) have been studied by (1)H, (2)H, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, i.e. intermolecularly H-bonded homoconjugated anions of acetic, chloroacetic, dichloroacetic, trifluoroacetic, trimethylacetic, and isobutyric acids, and intramolecularly H-bonded hydrogen succinate, hydrogen rac-dimethylsuccinate, hydrogen maleate, and hydrogen phthalate. In particular, primary H/D isotope effects on the hydrogen bond proton signals as well as secondary H/D isotope effects on the (13)C signals of the carboxylic groups are reported and analyzed. We demonstrate that in most of the studied systems there is a degenerate proton tautomerism between O-H···O(-) and O(-)···H-O structures which is fast in the NMR time scale. The stronger is the proton donating ability of the acid, the shorter and more symmetric are the H-bonds in each tautomer of the homoconjugate. For the maleate and phthalate anions exhibiting intramolecular hydrogen bonds, evidence for symmetric single well potentials is obtained. We propose a correlation between H/D isotope effects on carboxylic carbon chemical shifts and the proton transfer coordinate, q(1) = ½(r(OH) - r(HO)), which allows us to estimate the desired OHO hydrogen bond geometries from the observed (13)C NMR parameters, taking into account the degenerate proton tautomerism.

  10. Methylamphetamine synthesis: does an alteration in synthesis conditions affect the δ(13) C, δ(15) N and δ(2) H stable isotope ratio values of the product?

    PubMed

    Salouros, Helen; Collins, Michael; Cawley, Adam; Longworth, Mitchell

    2012-05-01

    Conventional chemical profiling of methylamphetamine has long been employed by national forensic laboratories to determine the synthetic route and where possible the precursor chemicals used in its manufacture. This laboratory has been studying the use of stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) analysis as a complementary technique to conventional chemical profiling of fully synthetic illicit drugs such as methylamphetamine. As part of these investigations the stable carbon (δ(13) C), nitrogen (δ(15) N), and hydrogen (δ(2) H) isotope values in the precursor chemicals of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine and the resulting methylamphetamine end-products have been measured to determine the synthetic origins of methylamphetamine. In this study, results are presented for δ(13) C, δ(15) N, and δ(2) H values in methylamphetamine synthesized from ephedrine and pseudoephedrine by two synthetic routes with varying experimental parameters. It was demonstrated that varying parameters, such as stoichiometry, reaction temperature, reaction time, and reaction pressure, had no effect on the δ(13) C, δ(15) N, and δ(2) H isotope values of the final methylamphetamine product, within measurement uncertainty. Therefore the value of the IRMS technique in identifying the synthetic origin of precursors, such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, is not compromised by the potential variation in synthetic method that is expected from one batch to the next, especially in clandestine laboratories where manufacture can occur without stringent quality control of reactions.

  11. Amino acid delta13C analysis of hair proteins and bone collagen using liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry: paleodietary implications from intra-individual comparisons.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Maanasa; McCullagh, James S O; Lynnerup, Niels; Hedges, Robert E M

    2010-03-15

    We report a novel method for the chromatographic separation and measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios (delta(13)C) of individual amino acids in hair proteins and bone collagen using the LC-IsoLink system, which interfaces liquid chromatography (LC) with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). This paper provides baseline separation of 15 and 13 of the 18 amino acids in bone collagen and hair proteins, respectively. We also describe an approach to analysing small hair samples for compound-specific analysis of segmental hair sections. The LC/IRMS method is applied in a historical context by the delta(13)C analysis of hair proteins and bone collagen recovered from six individuals from Uummannaq in Greenland. The analysis of hair and bone amino acids from the same individual, compared for the first time in this study, is of importance in palaeodietary reconstruction. If hair proteins can be used as a proxy for bone collagen at the amino acid level, this validates compound-specific isotope studies using hair as a model for palaeodietary reconstruction. Our results suggest that a small offset observed in the bulk delta(13)C values of the hair and bone samples may be attributed to two factors: (i) amino acid compositional differences between hair and bone proteins, and (ii) differential turnover rates of the tissues and the amino acid pools contributing to their synthesis. This application proposes that hair may be a useful complementary or alternative source of compound-specific paleodietary information.

  12. Sensitive, Efficient Quantitation of 13C-Enriched Nucleic Acids via Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Applications in Stable Isotope Probing.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Roland; Szeitz, András; Klassen, Tara L; Mohn, William W

    2014-12-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids is a powerful tool for studying the functional traits of microbial populations within complex communities, but SIP involves a number of technical challenges. Many of the difficulties in DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments can be effectively overcome with an efficient, sensitive method for quantitating the isotopic enrichment of nucleic acids. Here, we present a sensitive method for quantitating (13)C enrichment of nucleic acids, requiring a few nanograms of sample, and we demonstrate its utility in typical DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments. All five nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) were separated and detected by using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We detected all isotopic species in samples with as low as 1.5 atom% (13)C above natural abundance, using 1-ng loadings. Quantitation was used to characterize the isotopic enrichment kinetics of cellulose- and lignin-based microcosm experiments and to optimize the recovery of enriched nucleic acids. Application of our method will minimize the quantity of expensive isotopically labeled substrates required and reduce the risk of failed experiments due to insufficient recovery of labeled nucleic acids for sequencing library preparation.

  13. Sensitive, Efficient Quantitation of 13C-Enriched Nucleic Acids via Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Applications in Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Roland; Szeitz, András; Klassen, Tara L.

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids is a powerful tool for studying the functional traits of microbial populations within complex communities, but SIP involves a number of technical challenges. Many of the difficulties in DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments can be effectively overcome with an efficient, sensitive method for quantitating the isotopic enrichment of nucleic acids. Here, we present a sensitive method for quantitating 13C enrichment of nucleic acids, requiring a few nanograms of sample, and we demonstrate its utility in typical DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments. All five nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) were separated and detected by using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. We detected all isotopic species in samples with as low as 1.5 atom% 13C above natural abundance, using 1-ng loadings. Quantitation was used to characterize the isotopic enrichment kinetics of cellulose- and lignin-based microcosm experiments and to optimize the recovery of enriched nucleic acids. Application of our method will minimize the quantity of expensive isotopically labeled substrates required and reduce the risk of failed experiments due to insufficient recovery of labeled nucleic acids for sequencing library preparation. PMID:25217022

  14. Stable Oxygen (δ 18O) and Carbon (δ 13C) Isotopes in the Skeleton of Bleached and Recovering Corals From Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, L. J.; Grottoli, A. G.

    2004-12-01

    Coral skeletal stable oxygen isotopes (δ 18O) reflect changes in seawater temperature and salinity, while stable carbon isotopes13C) reflect a combination of both metabolic (photosynthesis and feeding) and kinetic fractionation. Together, the two isotopic signatures may be used as a proxy for past bleaching events. During bleaching, increased seawater temperatures often contribute to a decline in zooxanthellae and/or chlorophyll concentrations, resulting in a decrease in photosynthesis. We experimentally investigated the effect of bleaching and subsequent recovery on the δ 13C and δ 18O values of coral skeleton. Fragments from two coral species (Montipora capitata and Porites compressa) from Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii were bleached in outdoor tanks by raising the seawater temperature to 30° C. Additional fragments from the same parent colonies were maintained at ambient seawater temperatures (27° C) in separate tanks as controls. After one month in the tanks, a subset of the fragments was frozen and all remaining fragments were placed back on the reef to recover. All coral fragments were analyzed for their skeletal δ 13C and δ 18O compositions at five time intervals: before, immediately after, 1.5, 4, and 8 months after bleaching. In addition, rates of photosynthesis, calcification, and heterotrophy were also measured. Immediately after bleaching, δ 18O decreased in bleached M. capitata relative to controls, reflecting their exposure to increased seawater temperatures. During recovery, δ 18O values in the treatment M. capitata were not different from the controls. In P. compressa, δ 18O did not significantly differ in bleached and control corals at any time during the experiment. Immediately after bleaching, δ 13C decreased in the bleached fragments of both species relative to controls reflecting decreased photosynthetic rates. However, during recovery δ 13C in both species was greater in bleached than control fragments despite photosynthesis remaining

  15. The feasibility of using delta15N and delta13C values for discriminating between conventionally and organically fertilized pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Flores, Pilar; Fenoll, José; Hellín, Pilar

    2007-07-11

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to determine the feasibility of using leaf and fruit delta15N and delta13C values to discriminate between conventionally and organically fertilized peppers, when conventional management involves the application of organic amendment for soil preparation. All of the treatments involved adding horse manure to the soil before applying different rates of synthetic N fertilizers: 0 (T1 and T2), 150 (T3), and 300 kg ha(-1) (T4). The difference between T1 and T2 was that no synthetic fertilizer had been applied to plot T1 during the 5 years prior to the experiment. Significant differences were found in the delta15N values of leaves and fruit from the plants grown under organic or mixed fertilization. The results indicate the possibility of using 15N natural abundance as an indicator of fertilization management. On the other hand, delta13C values did not contribute any additional information for discriminating between the organically and the synthetically and organically fertilized peppers.

  16. Regional patterns of δ13C and δ15N stable isotopes of size-fractionated zooplankton in the western tropical North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Li, Chaolun; Guilini, Katja; Wang, Xiaocheng; Wang, Yanqing

    2017-02-01

    Zooplankton play a prominent role in the biogeochemical cycles of marine ecosystems. Little is known about the trophodynamics of zooplankton in response to geographic patterns in isotopic baselines and physical processes in the western tropical North Pacific. In this study, stable isotope ratios of five size fractions of zooplankton (100 to >2000 μm) from different current regions in the western tropical North Pacific Ocean were analyzed. Both δ13C and δ15N isotopic values increased with zooplankton size class. The largest zooplankton group (>2000 μm), with a diverse composition, showed relatively higher stable isotope signatures, covering a wider range. Regional variations in the zooplankton stable isotope signatures were similar across all size classes, with generally higher values in the North Equatorial Counter Current (NECC) and the North Equatorial Current (NEC) and lower values in the Subtropical Counter Current (STCC). These regional patterns of zooplankton isotope signatures were consistent with the variation of oceanographic features (temperature, salinity, nutrients, chlorophyll a) and were also related to the isotopic baselines of particulate organic matter (POM) in the different current regions. Moreover, the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria Trichodesmium spp. may be the main contributor to low δ15N values in the STCC. The results of this study demonstrate the influence of physical processes on the stable isotopic signatures of zooplankton. This baseline information is crucial for future food web studies in the western tropical North Pacific Ocean.

  17. Effects of preservation methods of muscle tissue from upper-trophic level reef fishes on stable isotope values (δ (13)C and δ (15)N).

    PubMed

    Stallings, Christopher D; Nelson, James A; Rozar, Katherine L; Adams, Charles S; Wall, Kara R; Switzer, Theodore S; Winner, Brent L; Hollander, David J

    2015-01-01

    Research that uses stable isotope analysis often involves a delay between sample collection in the field and laboratory processing, therefore requiring preservation to prevent or reduce tissue degradation and associated isotopic compositions. Although there is a growing literature describing the effects of various preservation techniques, the results are often contextual, unpredictable and vary among taxa, suggesting the need to treat each species individually. We conducted a controlled experiment to test the effects of four preservation methods of muscle tissue from four species of upper trophic-level reef fish collected from the eastern Gulf of Mexico (Red Grouper Epinephelus morio, Gag Mycteroperca microlepis, Scamp Mycteroperca phenax, and Red Snapper Lutjanus campechanus). We used a paired design to measure the effects on isotopic values for carbon and nitrogen after storage using ice, 95% ethanol, and sodium chloride (table salt), against that in a liquid nitrogen control. Mean offsets for both δ (13)C and δ (15)N values from controls were lowest for samples preserved on ice, intermediate for those preserved with salt, and highest with ethanol. Within species, both salt and ethanol significantly enriched the δ (15)N values in nearly all comparisons. Ethanol also had strong effects on the δ (13)C values in all three groupers. Conversely, for samples preserved on ice, we did not detect a significant offset in either isotopic ratio for any of the focal species. Previous studies have addressed preservation-induced offsets in isotope values using a mass balance correction that accounts for changes in the isotope value to that in the C/N ratio. We tested the application of standard mass balance corrections for isotope values that were significantly affected by the preservation methods and found generally poor agreement between corrected and control values. The poor performance by the correction may have been due to preferential loss of lighter isotopes and

  18. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level2H-,13C- and15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimmelmann, A.; Albertino, A.; Sauer, P.E.; Qi, H.; Molinie, R.; Mesnard, F.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the S values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown S values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for ??13C and ??13N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: ??2Hnicotine -162 to -45%o, ??13Cnicotine -30.05 to +7.72%, ?? 15Nnicotine -6.03 to +33.62%; ??15N acetanilide +1-18 to +40.57%; ??13Curea -34.13 to +11.71%, ??15Nurea +0.26 to +40.61% (recommended ?? values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as the first organic nitrogen stable isotope reference materials for GC-IRMS that are available with different ??13N

  19. Measurements of the D/H and 13C/12C Isotope Ratios in Stratospheric CH4 from the POLARIS, STRAT, and SOLVE Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A. L.; Tyler, S. C.; McCarthy, M. C.; Boering, K. A.; Boering, K. A.; Atlas, E.

    2001-12-01

    We report δ D and δ 13C measurements of stratospheric CH4 from 78 air samples collected aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft during the SOLVE (2000), POLARIS (1997), and STRAT (1996) campaigns. These measurements are the first to be reported using continuous flow gas chromatography isotope mass spectrometry, which provides for high precision of measurement on 63 ml of air. The δ D-CH4 data comprise the only high precision data set of this kind to date. Precision of measurement is +/-1.5‰ for δ D (vs. V-SMOW) and +/-0.07‰ for δ 13C (vs. V-PDB) on samples with as little as 700 ppb CH4. The samples cover latitudes ranging from 1° S to 89° N and altitudes ranging from 11 to 21 km. Values of δ D range from -89.8‰ for CH4 near the tropical tropopause to +26.4‰ for CH4 in the polar vortex. Similarly, values of δ 13C range from -47.3‰ to -34.0‰ . The isotopic enrichment in CH4 with decreasing mixing ratio is a result of kinetic isotope effects in CH4 loss processes, i.e. chemical reaction with OH, Cl, and O(1D), as the air mass ages. Our measurement data have been compared to calculated values using the LLNL 2-D chemical-radiative-transport model of the atmosphere. We discuss the observed trends in δ D and δ 13C of CH4 and their implications for stratospheric chemistry.

  20. Similarities and differences in 13C and 15N stable isotope ratios in two non-lethal tissue types from shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus (Rafinesque, 1820)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeVries, R. J.; Schramm, Harold L.

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that δ13C and δ15N signatures of pectoral spines would provide measures of δ13C and δ15N similar to those obtained from fin clips for adult shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus. Thirty-two shovelnose sturgeon (fork length [FL] = 500–724 mm) were sampled from the lower Mississippi River, USA on 23 February 2013. Isotopic relationships between the two tissue types were analyzed using mixed model analysis of covariance. Tissue types differed significantly for both δ13C (P < 0.01; spine: mean = −23.83, SD = 0.62; fin clip: mean = −25.74, SD = 0.97) and δ15N (P = 0.01; spine: mean = 17.01, SD = 0.51; fin clip: mean = 17.19, SD = 0.62). Neither FL nor the FL × tissue type interaction had significant (P > 0.05) effects on δ13C. Fin clip δ13C values were highly variable and weakly correlated (r = 0.16, P = 0.40) with those from pectoral spines. We found a significant FL-tissue type interaction for δ15N, reflecting increasing δ15N with FL for spines and decreasing δ15N with FL for fin clips. These results indicate that spines are not a substitute for fin clip tissue for measuring δ13C and δ15N for shovelnose sturgeon in the lower Mississippi River, but the two tissues have different turnover rates they may provide complementary information for assessing trophic position at different time scales.

  1. Provenancing Archaeological Wool Textiles from Medieval Northern Europe by Light Stable Isotope Analysis (δ13C, δ15N, δ2H)

    PubMed Central

    von Holstein, Isabella C. C.; Walton Rogers, Penelope; Craig, Oliver E.; Penkman, Kirsty E. H.; Newton, Jason; Collins, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the origin of archaeological wool textiles preserved by anoxic waterlogging from seven medieval archaeological deposits in north-western Europe (c. 700–1600 AD), using geospatial patterning in carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N) and non-exchangeable hydrogen (δ2H) composition of modern and ancient sheep proteins. δ13C, δ15N and δ2H values from archaeological wool keratin (n = 83) and bone collagen (n = 59) from four sites were interpreted with reference to the composition of modern sheep wool from the same regions. The isotopic composition of wool and bone collagen samples clustered strongly by settlement; inter-regional relationships were largely parallel in modern and ancient samples, though landscape change was also significant. Degradation in archaeological wool samples, examined by elemental and amino acid composition, was greater in samples from Iceland (Reykholt) than in samples from north-east England (York, Newcastle) or northern Germany (Hessens). A nominal assignment approach was used to classify textiles into local/non-local at each site, based on maximal estimates of isotopic variability in modern sheep wool. Light element stable isotope analysis provided new insights into the origins of wool textiles, and demonstrates that isotopic provenancing of keratin preserved in anoxic waterlogged contexts is feasible. We also demonstrate the utility of δ2H analysis to understand the location of origin of archaeological protein samples. PMID:27764106

  2. A gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry system for high-precision delta13C measurements of atmospheric methane extracted from ice core samples.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Melanie; Schmitt, Jochen; Richter, Klaus-Uwe; Bock, Michael; Richter, Ulrike C; Levin, Ingeborg; Fischer, Hubertus

    2008-10-01

    Past atmospheric composition can be reconstructed by the analysis of air enclosures in polar ice cores which archive ancient air in decadal to centennial resolution. Due to the different carbon isotopic signatures of different methane sources high-precision measurements of delta13CH4 in ice cores provide clues about the global methane cycle in the past. We developed a highly automated (continuous-flow) gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) technique for ice core samples of approximately 200 g. The methane is melt-extracted using a purge-and-trap method, then separated from the main air constituents, combusted and measured as CO2 by a conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometer. One CO2 working standard, one CH4 and two air reference gases are used to identify potential sources of isotope fractionation within the entire sample preparation process and to enhance the stability, reproducibility and accuracy of the measurement. After correction for gravitational fractionation, pre-industrial air samples from Greenland ice (1831 +/- 40 years) show a delta13C(VPDB) of -49.54 +/- 0.13 per thousand and Antarctic samples (1530 +/- 25 years) show a delta13C(VPDB) of -48.00 +/- 0.12 per thousand in good agreement with published data.

  3. Provenancing Archaeological Wool Textiles from Medieval Northern Europe by Light Stable Isotope Analysis (δ13C, δ15N, δ2H).

    PubMed

    von Holstein, Isabella C C; Walton Rogers, Penelope; Craig, Oliver E; Penkman, Kirsty E H; Newton, Jason; Collins, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the origin of archaeological wool textiles preserved by anoxic waterlogging from seven medieval archaeological deposits in north-western Europe (c. 700-1600 AD), using geospatial patterning in carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N) and non-exchangeable hydrogen (δ2H) composition of modern and ancient sheep proteins. δ13C, δ15N and δ2H values from archaeological wool keratin (n = 83) and bone collagen (n = 59) from four sites were interpreted with reference to the composition of modern sheep wool from the same regions. The isotopic composition of wool and bone collagen samples clustered strongly by settlement; inter-regional relationships were largely parallel in modern and ancient samples, though landscape change was also significant. Degradation in archaeological wool samples, examined by elemental and amino acid composition, was greater in samples from Iceland (Reykholt) than in samples from north-east England (York, Newcastle) or northern Germany (Hessens). A nominal assignment approach was used to classify textiles into local/non-local at each site, based on maximal estimates of isotopic variability in modern sheep wool. Light element stable isotope analysis provided new insights into the origins of wool textiles, and demonstrates that isotopic provenancing of keratin preserved in anoxic waterlogged contexts is feasible. We also demonstrate the utility of δ2H analysis to understand the location of origin of archaeological protein samples.

  4. [Carbon stable isotope composition (delta 13C) of lichen thalli in the forests in the vicinity of the Chernobyl atomic power station].

    PubMed

    Biazrov, L G; Gongal'skiĭ, K B; Pel'gunova, L A; Tiunov, A V

    2010-01-01

    The stable isotope abundance of carbon in the lichens Cladina mitis, Cladonia crispata Hypogymnia physodes, Parmelia sulcata has been investigated in a study relating these values with known levels of 106Ru, 134Cs, 137Cs and 144Ce defined activity in their thalli in the pine forests of region within a 30-km radius of the Chernobyl atomic power station and beyond it (37 km). All 63 samples of the lichens were obtained from 7 different sites. Small effects on delta 13C values in the lichens Cladina mitis, Hypogymnia physodes were found to be associated with distance from CNPP, activity level of radionuclides in them thalli whereas at Cladonia crispata is observed weighting of carbon with increase in values of 134Cs and 137Cs activity in thalli. Values of delta 13C the investigated lichen species more depends on habitat conditions rather than from levels of thalli radioactivity. In our study we didn't reveal the isotope specificity of any one species as it was not possible to establish a correlation between values of delta 13C and a particular species.

  5. High-resolution direct infusion-based mass spectrometry in combination with whole 13C metabolome isotope labeling allows unambiguous assignment of chemical sum formulas.

    PubMed

    Giavalisco, Patrick; Hummel, Jan; Lisec, Jan; Inostroza, Alvaro Cuadros; Catchpole, Gareth; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2008-12-15

    A new strategy for direct infusion-based metabolite analysis employing a combination of high-resolution mass spectrometry and (13)C-isotope labeling of entire metabolomes is described. Differentially isotope labeled metabolite extracts from otherwise identically grown reference plants were prepared and infused into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The derived accurate mass lists from each extract were searched, using an in-house-developed database search tool, against a number of comprehensive metabolite databases. Comparison of the retrieved chemical formulas from both, the (12)C and (13)C samples, leads to two major advantages compared to nonisotope-based metabolite fingerprinting: first, removal of background contaminations from the result list, due to the (12)C/(13)C peak pairing principle and therefore positive identification of compounds of true biological origin; second, elimination of ambiguity in chemical formula assignment due to the same principle, leading to the clear association of one measured mass to only one chemical formula. Applying this combination of strategies to metabolite extracts of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana therefore resulted in the reproducible identification of more than 1000 unambiguous chemical sum formulas of biological origin of which more than 80% have not been associated to Arabidopsis before.

  6. (13)C/(12)C isotope ratios of organic acids, glucose and fructose determined by HPLC-co-IRMS for lemon juices authenticity.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Francois; Auberger, Pauline; Gaillard, Laetita; Loublanches, Caroline; Viateau, Maryse; Sabathié, Nathalie; Salagoïty, Marie-Hélène; Médina, Bernard

    2014-03-01

    High performance liquid chromatography linked to isotope ratio mass spectrometry via an interface allowing the chemical oxidation of organic matter (HPLC-co-IRMS) was used to simultaneously determine carbon 13 isotope ratio (δ(13)C) of organic acids, glucose and fructose in lime and lemon juices. Because of the significant difference between organic acids and sugars concentrations, the experimental protocol was optimised by applying a "current jump" to the IRMS device. The filament current is increased of 300μA during elution in order to enhance IRMS sensitivity. Then, analysis were performed on 35 lemon and lime fruits from various geographical origins and squeezed in the laboratory. An overall average δ(13)C values of -25.40±1.62‰, -23.83±1.82‰ and -25.67±1.72‰ is found for organic acids mixture mainly made up of citric acid, glucose and fructose, respectively. These authentic samples allowed the definition of a confidence domain to which have been confronted 30 commercial juices (24 "pure juices" and 6 coming from concentrate). Among these 30 samples, 10 present δ(13)C values outside the defined range revealing an added "C4" type organic acids or sugars, addition not specified on the label that is not in agreement with EU regulation.

  7. The δ13C evolution of cave drip water along discreet flow paths in a central Texas cave: Quantifying kinetic isotope fractionation factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickler, P. J.; Carlson, P. E.; Banner, J.; Breecker, D.; Stern, L. A.; Baseman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Gaps remain in our understanding of in-cave processes that influence cave water chemistry during speleothem formation. Quantifying environmental controls on the isotopic and chemical evolution of karst groundwater would improve the accuracy of speleothem-based paleoclimate reconstructions. In this study, drip water chemical evolution along flow paths was sampled monthly at two locations in Inner Space Cavern, Texas, over a period of 8 months. In each of the two locations, cave water drips off a stalactite, flows along a flowstone and subsequently drips off a lower stalactite, allowing cave water to be sampled at two points, 1-2 meters apart, along each flow path. The chemical and isotopic evolution of drip water along its flow path shows seasonality, where 1) summer months (high cave-air pCO2) have small variations in δ13C values along the flow paths, high and relatively invariant DIC and Ca values,; and 2) winter months (low cave-air pCO2) generally have large increases in DIC δ13C values along the flow paths, lower DIC and Ca values. The magnitude of the increase in DIC δ13C values along the flow paths, <~1‰ to ~4‰, is controlled by the extent of DIC loss to CO2 degassing and calcite precipitation which is controlled by the pCO2 gradient between drip water and cave air. If the DIC loss is less than 15%, then the evolution of the δ13C value of the DIC reservoir can be modelled using a Rayleigh distillation model and equilibrium fractionation factors between (CO2(g)-HCO3-(aq)) and (CaCO3-HCO3-(aq)). As the loss of the DIC reservoir increases above 15% the DIC δ13C values become progressively higher such that the ɛ (CO2(g)-HCO3-(aq)) values needed to model the observed results change from equilibrium values of ~8‰ to non-equilibrium values up to ~25‰. The variance in magnitude of carbon isotope fractionation during CO2 degassing cannot be attributed to changes in temperature, and thus we infer significant kinetic isotope effects at higher rates of DIC

  8. Discrimination of carbon and nitrogen isotopes from milk to serum and vibrissae in Alaska Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stegall, V.K.; Farley, Sean D.; Rea, Lorrie D.; Pitcher, K.W.; Rye, R.O.; Kester, C.L.; Stricker, C.A.; Bern, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of diet-tissue stable isotope discrimination is required to properly interpret stable isotope values and to identify possible diet shifts, such as might be expected from nursing through weaning. This study compared ??13C and ??15N of paired serum and vibrissal roots with those of ingested milk (n = 52) from free-ranging Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus (Schreber, 1776)) pups (1-11 months) and juveniles (14-27 months) to estimate diet-tissue discrimination. Mean 15N enrichment from ingested milk to serum was 2.1??? ?? 0.6%??? and ??15N at the root of the vibrissae (representing current growth) were not significantly different from serum values. Milk was enriched for mean 13C by 5.0??? ?? 1.0%??? and 7.3??? ?? 1.2??? relative to serum and vibrissal roots, respectively, which was due to the presence of 13C-depleted lipids in milk. This was confirmed by lipid extraction from a subset of milk and serum samples, resulting in a 5.8??? ?? 1.0??? change only in milk. This study established that vibrissal roots and serum are reflective of a milk diet with approximately 2.0??? 15N enrichment, and vibrissal roots reflect serum and lipid-extracted milk values with approximately 2.0??? 13C enrichment. These discrimination factors are important to establish for stable isotope studies assessing diet shifts. ?? 2008 NRC.

  9. Experimental assessment of the purity of α-cellulose produced by variations of the Brendel method: Implications for stable isotope13C, δ18O) dendroclimatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookman, Tom; Whittaker, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Stable isotope dendroclimatology using α-cellulose has unique potential to deliver multimillennial-scale, sub-annually resolved, terrestrial climate records. However, lengthy processing and analytical methods often preclude such reconstructions. Variants of the Brendel extraction method have reduced these limitations, providing fast, easy methods of isolating α-cellulose in some species. Here, we investigate application of Standard Brendel (SBrendel) variants to resinous soft-woods by treating samples of kauri (Agathis australis), ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and huon pine (Lagarastrobus franklinii), varying reaction vessel, temperature, boiling time and reagent volume. Numerous samples were visibly `under-processed' and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) investigation showed absorption peaks at 1520 cm-1 and ˜1600 cm-1 in those fibers suggesting residual lignin and retained resin respectively. Replicate analyses of all samples processed at high temperature yielded consistent δ13C and δ18O despite color and spectral variations. Spectra and isotopic data revealed that α-cellulose δ13C can be altered during processing, most likely due to chemical contamination from insufficient acetone removal, but is not systematically affected by methodological variation. Reagent amount, temperature and extraction time all influence δ18O, however, and our results demonstrate that different species may require different processing methods. FTIR prior to isotopic analysis is a fast and cost effective way to determine α-cellulose extract purity. Furthermore, a systematic isotopic test such as we present here can also determine sensitivity of isotopic values to methodological variables. Without these tests, isotopic variability introduced by the method could obscure or `create' climatic signals within a data set.

  10. UV-laser microdissection system - A novel approach for the preparation of high-resolution stable isotope records (δ13C/δ18O) from tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollaen, Karina; Helle, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Intra-annual stable isotope13C and δ18O) studies of tree rings at various incremental resolutions have been attempting to extract valuable seasonal climatic and environmental information or assessing plant ecophysiological processes. For preparing high-resolution isotope samples normally wood segments or cores are mechanically divided in radial direction or cut in tangential direction. After mechanical dissection, wood samples are ground to a fine powder and either cellulose is extracted or bulk wood samples are analyzed. Here, we present a novel approach for the preparation of high-resolution stable isotope records from tree rings using an UV-laser microdissection system. Firstly, tree-ring cellulose is directly extracted from wholewood cross-sections largely leaving the wood anatomical structure intact and saving time as compared to the classical procedure. Secondly, micro-samples from cellulose cross-sections are dissected with an UV-Laser dissection microscope. Tissues of interest from cellulose cross-sections are identified and marked precisely with a screen-pen and dissected via an UV-laser beam. Dissected cellulose segments were automatically collected in capsules and are prepared for stable isotope13C and δ18O) analysis. The new techniques facilitate inter- and intra-annual isotope analysis on tree-ring and open various possibilities for comparisons with wood anatomy in plant eco-physiological studies. We describe the design and the handling of this novel methodology and discuss advantages and constraints given by the example of intra-annual oxygen isotope analysis on tropical trees.

  11. 13C-isotope analyses reveal that chemolithoautotrophic Gamma- and Epsilonproteobacteria feed a microbial food web in a pelagic redoxcline of the central Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Glaubitz, Sabine; Lueders, Tillmann; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Jost, Günter; Jürgens, Klaus; Labrenz, Matthias

    2009-02-01

    Marine pelagic redoxclines are zones of high dark CO(2) fixation rates, which can correspond up to 30% of the surface primary production. However, despite this significant contribution to the pelagic carbon cycle, the identity of most chemolithoautotrophic organisms is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to directly link the dark CO(2) fixation capacity of a pelagic redoxcline in the central Baltic Sea (Landsort Deep) with the identity of the main chemolithoautotrophs involved. Our approach was based on the analysis of natural carbon isotope signatures in fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and on measurements of CO(2) incorporation in (13)C-bicarbonate pulse experiments. The incorporation of (13)C into chemolithoautotrophic cells was investigated by rRNA-based stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) and FAME analysis after incubation for 24 and 72 h under in situ conditions. Our results demonstrated that fatty acids indicative of Proteobacteria were significantly enriched in (13)C slightly below the chemocline. RNA-SIP analyses revealed that two different Gammaproteobacteria and three closely related Epsilonproteobacteria of the Sulfurimonas cluster were active dark CO(2)-fixing microorganisms, with a time-dependent community shift between these groups. Labelling of Archaea was not detectable, but after 72 h of incubation the (13)C-label had been transferred to a potentially bacterivorous ciliate related to Euplotes sp. Thus, RNA-SIP provided direct evidence for the contribution of chemolithoautotrophic production to the microbial food web in this marine pelagic redoxcline, emphasizing the importance of dark CO(2)-fixing Proteobacteria within this habitat.

  12. Synthesizing the Use of Carbon Isotope (14C and 13C) Approaches to Understand Rates and Pathways for Permafrost C Mobilization and Mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estop-Aragones, C.; Olefeldt, D.; Schuur, E.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the permafrost carbon (C) feedback it is important to synthesize our current knowledge, and knowledge gaps, of how permafrost thaw can cause in situ mineralization or downstream mobilization of aged soil organic carbon (SOC) and the rate of this release. This potential loss of old SOC may occur via gaseous flux of CO2 and CH4 exchanged between soil and the atmosphere and via waterborne flux as DOC, POC (and their subsequent decomposition and release to the atmosphere). Carbon isotope (14C and 13C) approaches have been used to estimate both rates and pathways for permafrost C mobilization and mineralization. Radiocarbon (14C) has been used to estimate the contribution of aged C to overall respiration or waterborne C export. We aim to contrast results from radiocarbon studies, in order to assess differences between ecosystems (contrasting wet and dry ecosystems), thaw histories (active layer deepening or thermokarst landforms), greenhouse gas considered (CO2 and CH4) and seasons. We propose to also contrast methodologies used for assessing the contribution of aged C to overall C balance, and include studies using 13C data. Biological fractionation of 13C during both uptake and decomposition has been taken advantage of both in order to aid the interpretation of 14C data and on its own to assess sources and mineralization pathways. For example, 13C data has been used to differentiate between CH4 production pathways, and the relative contribution of anaerobic CO2 production to overall respiration. Overall, carbon isotope research is proving highly valuable for our understanding of permafrost C dynamics following thaw, and there is a current need to synthesize the available literature.

  13. Determination of methanogenic pathways through carbon isotope13C) analysis for the two-stage anaerobic digestion of high-solids substrates.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Tito; Klang, Johanna; Niedermayr, Andrea; Berzio, Stephan; Immenhauser, Adrian; Klocke, Michael; Wichern, Marc; Lübken, Manfred

    2015-04-07

    This study used carbon isotope (δ(13)C)-based calculations to quantify the specific methanogenic pathways in a two-stage experimental biogas plant composed of three thermophilic leach bed reactors (51-56 °C) followed by a mesophilic (36.5 °C) anaerobic filter. Despite the continuous dominance of the acetoclastic Methanosaeta in the anaerobic filter, the methane (CH4) fraction derived from carbon dioxide reduction (CO2), fmc, varied significantly over the investigation period of 200 days. At organic loading rates (OLRs) below 6.0 gCOD L(-1) d(-1), the average fmc value was 33%, whereas at higher OLRs, with a maximum level of 17.0 gCOD L(-1) d(-1), the fmc values reached 47%. The experiments allowed for a clear differentiation of the isotope fractionation related to the formation and consumption of acetate in both stages of the plant. Our data indicate constant carbon isotope fractionation for acetate formation at different OLRs within the thermophilic leach bed reactors as well as a negligible contribution of homoacetogenesis. These results present the first quantification of methanogenic pathway (fmc values) dynamics for a continually operated mesophilic bioreactor and highlight the enormous potential of δ(13)C analysis for a more comprehensive understanding of the anaerobic degradation processes in CH4-producing biogas plants.

  14. A mantle origin for Paleoarchean peridotitic diamonds from the Panda kimberlite, Slave Craton: Evidence from 13C-, 15N- and 33,34S-stable isotope systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartigny, Pierre; Farquhar, James; Thomassot, Emilie; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Wing, Bozwell; Masterson, Andy; McKeegan, Kevin; Stachel, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    In order to address diamond formation and origin in the lithospheric mantle underlying the Central Slave Craton, we report N- and C-stable isotopic compositions and N-contents and aggregation states for 85 diamonds of known paragenesis (73 peridotitic, 8 eclogitic and 4 from lower mantle) from the Panda kimberlite (Ekati Mine, Lac de Gras Area, Canada). For 12 peridotitic and two eclogitic sulfide inclusion-bearing diamonds from this sample set, we also report multiple-sulfur isotope ratios. The 73 peridotitic diamonds have a mean δ13C-value of - 5.2‰ and range from - 6.9 to - 3.0‰, with one extreme value at - 14.1‰. The associated δ15N-values range from - 17.0 to + 8.5‰ with a mean value of - 4.0‰. N-contents range from 0 to 1280 ppm. The 8 eclogitic diamonds have δ13C-values ranging from - 11.2 to - 4.4‰ with one extreme value at - 19.4‰. Their δ15N ranges from - 2.1 to + 7.9‰ and N-contents fall between 0 and 3452 ppm. Four diamonds with an inferred lower mantle origin are all Type II (i.e. nitrogen-free) and have a narrow range of δ13C values, between - 4.5 and - 3.5‰. The δ34S of the 14 analyzed peridotitic and eclogitic sulfide inclusions ranges from - 3.5 to +5.7‰. None of them provide evidence for anomalous δ33S-values; observed variations in δ33S are from +0.19 to - 0.33‰, i.e. within the 2 sigma uncertainties of mantle sulfur ( δ33S = 0‰). At Panda, the N contents and the δ13C of sulfide-bearing peridotitic diamonds show narrower ranges than silicate-bearing peridotitic diamonds. This evidence supports the earlier suggestion established from eclogitic diamonds from the Kaapvaal that sulfide-(±silicate) bearing diamonds sample a more restricted portion of sublithospheric mantle than silicate-(no sulfide) bearing diamonds. Our findings at Panda suggest that sulfide-bearing diamonds should be considered as a specific diamond population on a global-scale. Based on our study of δ34S, Δ 33S, δ15N and δ13C, we find no

  15. Pyrolysis compound specific isotopic analysis (δ13C and δD Py-CSIA) of soil organic matter size fractions under four vegetation covers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; González-Vila, Francisco J.; Almendros, Gonzalo; De la Rosa, José M.; González-Pérez, José A.

    2015-04-01

    A chemical characterization of soil organic matter (SOM) under different ground cover from a Mediterranean climate (Doñana National Park, Andalusia, Spain) is approached using bulk δ15N, δ13C, δ18O and δD isotopic analysis (C/TC-IRMS) and δ13C and δD pyrolysis compound specific isotopic analysis (Py-CSIA: Py-GC-C/TC-IRMS). Soil samples were collected in sandy soils, Arenosols (WRB 2006) from the Doñana National Park (SW Spain) under different vegetation cover: cork oak (Quercus suber, QS), eagle fern (Pteridium aquilinum, PA), pine (Pinus pinea, PP) and rockrose (Halimium halimifolium, HH). Two size fractions; coarse (C: 1-2 mm) and fine (F: <0.05 mm) were studied from each soil. A complete conventional analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS) of these samples have been studied in detail (Jiménez-Morillo et al., 2015). Bulk isotopic analysis of stable light elements (δ15N, δ13C, δ18O and δD) revealed particular isotopic signatures showing differences related with the main vegetation cover and the different soil size fraction. All samples had a carbon isotopic signature between -26 and -29 ‰, which indicated that the organic matter in the two fractions of each soil sample derived from C3-type plants. The bulk δD isotopic signature in whole soil sample indicate a lower deuterium fractionation occurs in SOM under arboreal than under no-arboreal vegetation, this can be caused by the occurrence of a higher water evaporation rate under bush vegetation and/or to differences due to leaf morphology as previously described (Leaney et al., 1985). A δ15N vs. δ18O chart may provide some clues about N origin in the soil and particularly about the original source of nitrates (Kendall et al., 1996). In in all sample and size fractions our values are in the chart area corresponding to NO3 in precipitation, with lighter δ18O (c. 20 ‰) values compatible with fertilizers may be from adjacent crops. In addition we were able to assign δ13C and δD values for a number of

  16. Paleobiological Implications of the Isotopic Signatures ( 13C, 15N) of Fossil Mammal Collagen in Scladina Cave (Sclayn, Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocherens, Hervé; Billiou, Daniel; Patou-Mathis, Marylène; Bonjean, Dominique; Otte, Marcel; Mariotti, André

    1997-11-01

    An isotopic investigation of upper Pleistocene mammal bones and teeth from Scladina cave (Sclayn, Belgium) demonstrated the very good quality of collagen preservation. A preliminary screening of the samples used the amount of nitrogen in whole bone and dentine in order to estimate the preserved amount of collagen before starting the extraction process. The isotopic abundances of fossil specimens from still-extant species are consistent with their trophic position. Moreover, the 15N isotopic abundance is higher in dentine than in bone in bears and hyenas, a phenomenon already observed in modern specimens. These results demonstrate that the isotopic compositions of samples from Scladina cave can be interpreted in ecological terms. Mammoths exhibit a high 15N isotopic abundance relative to other herbivores, as was the case in Siberian and Alaskan samples. These results suggest distinctive dietary adaptations in herbivores living in the mammoth steppe. Cave bears are clearly isotopically different from coeval brown bears, suggesting an ecological separation between species, with a pure vegetarian diet for cave bear and an omnivorous diet for brown bear.

  17. Stable Carbon Isotope Discrimination Is under Genetic Control in the C4 Species Maize with Several Genomic Regions Influencing Trait Expression1[W

    PubMed Central

    Gresset, Sebastian; Westermeier, Peter; Rademacher, Svenja; Ouzunova, Milena; Presterl, Thomas; Westhoff, Peter; Schön, Chris-Carolin

    2014-01-01

    In plants with C4 photosynthesis, physiological mechanisms underlying variation in stable carbon isotope discrimination13C) are largely unknown, and genetic components influencing Δ13C have not been described. We analyzed a maize (Zea mays) introgression library derived from two elite parents to investigate whether Δ13C is under genetic control in this C4 species. High-density genotyping with the Illumina MaizeSNP50 Bead Chip was used for a detailed structural characterization of 89 introgression lines. Phenotypic analyses were conducted in the field and in the greenhouse for kernel Δ13C as well as plant developmental and photosynthesis-related traits. Highly heritable significant genetic variation for Δ13C was detected under field and greenhouse conditions. For several introgression library lines, Δ13C values consistently differed from the recurrent parent within and across the two phenotyping platforms. Δ13C was significantly associated with 22 out of 164 analyzed genomic regions, indicating a complex genetic architecture of Δ13C. The five genomic regions with the largest effects were located on chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 7, and 9 and explained 55% of the phenotypic variation for Δ13C. Plant development stage had no effect on Δ13C expression, as phenotypic as well as genotypic correlations between Δ13C, flowering time, and plant height were not significant. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating Δ13C to be under polygenic control in the C4 species maize. PMID:24280436

  18. Evaluation of on-line pyrolysis coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the determination of position-specific (13)C isotope composition of short chain n-alkanes (C6-C12).

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-06-01

    We measured (13)C intramolecular isotopic composition of commercially available short-chain hydrocarbons (n-C6-n-C12) using (13)C-NMR. Results show that the main variation is between the terminal and the sub-terminal C-atom positions. Site-preference (difference in δ(13)C values between terminal and sub-terminal C-atom positions) among all the samples varies between -12.2‰ and +8.4‰. Comparison of these results with those obtained using on-line pyrolysis coupled with GC-C-IRMS show that the thermal cracking of hydrocarbons occurs with a good isotopic fidelity between terminal and sub-terminal C-atom positions of the starting material and the related pyrolysis products (methane and ethylene). On-line pyrolysis coupled with GC-C-IRMS can thus be used for tracing hydrocarbons biogeochemical processes.

  19. Isotopic discrimination between food and blood and feathers of captive penguins: implications for dietary studies in the wild.

    PubMed

    Cherel, Yves; Hobson, Keith A; Hassani, Sami

    2005-01-01

    Using measurements of naturally occurring stable isotopes to reconstruct diets or source of feeding requires quantifying isotopic discrimination factors or the relationships between isotope ratios in food and in consumer tissues. Diet-tissue discrimination factors of carbon ((13)C/(12)C, or delta (13)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N, or delta (15)N) isotopes in whole blood and feathers, representing noninvasive sampling techniques, were examined using three species of captive penguins (king Aptenodytes patagonicus, gentoo Pygoscelis papua, and rockhopper Eudyptes chrysocome penguins) fed known diets. King and rockhopper penguins raised on a constant diet of herring and capelin, respectively, had tissues enriched in (15)N compared to fish, with discrimination factors being higher in feathers than in blood. These data, together with previous works, allowed us to calculate average discrimination factors for (15)N between whole lipid-free prey and blood and feathers of piscivorous birds; they amount to +2.7 per thousand and +4.2 per thousand, respectively. Both fish species were segregated by their delta (13)C and delta (15)N values, and importantly, lipid-free fish muscle tissue was consistently depleted in (13)C and enriched in (15)N compared to whole lipid-free fish. This finding has important implications because previous studies usually base dietary reconstructions on muscle of prey rather than on whole prey items consumed by the predator. We tested the effect of these differences using mass balance calculations to the quantification of food sources of gentoo penguins that had a mixed diet. Modeling indicated correct estimates when using the isotopic signature of whole fish (muscle) and the discrimination factors between whole fish (muscle) and penguin blood. Conversely, the use of isotopic signatures of muscle together with discrimination factors between whole fish and blood (or the reverse) leads to spurious estimates in food proportions. Consequently, great care

  20. Biosynthesis, molecular structure, and domain architecture of potato suberin: a (13)C NMR study using isotopically labeled precursors.

    PubMed

    Yan, B; Stark, R E

    2000-08-01

    Although suberin in potato wound periderm is known to be a polyester containing long-chain fatty acids and phenolics embedded within the cell wall, many aspects of its molecular structure and polymer-polymer connectivities remain elusive. The present work combines biosynthetic incorporation of site-specifically (13)C-enriched acetates and phenylalanines with one- and two-dimensional solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopic methods to monitor the developing suberin polymer. Exogenous acetate is found to be incorporated preferentially at the carboxyl end of the aliphatic carbon chains, suggesting addition during the later elongation steps of fatty acid synthesis. Carboxyl-labeled phenylalanine precursors provide evidence for the concurrent development of phenolic esters and of monolignols typical of lignin. Experiments with ring-labeled phenylalanine precursors demonstrate a predominance of sinapyl and guaiacyl structures among suberin's phenolic moieties. Finally, the analysis of spin-exchange (solid-state NOESY) NMR experiments in ring-labeled suberin indicates distances of no more than 0.5 nm between pairs of phenolic and oxymethine carbons, which are attributed to the aromatic-aliphatic polyester and the cell wall polysaccharide matrix, respectively. These results offer direct and detailed molecular information regarding the insoluble intermediates of suberin biosynthesis, indicate probable covalent linkages between moieties of its polyester and polysaccharide domains, and yield a clearer overall picture of this agriculturally important protective material.

  1. δD and δ13C analyses of atmospheric volatile organic compounds by thermal desorption gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    von Eckstaedt, Christiane Vitzthum; Grice, Kliti; Ioppolo-Armanios, Marisa; Chidlow, Geoff; Jones, Mark

    2011-09-16

    This paper describes the establishment of a robust method to determine compound specific δD and δ(13)C values of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a standard mixture ranging between C(6) and C(10) and was applied to various complex emission samples, e.g. from biomass combustion and car exhaust. A thermal desorption (TD) unit was linked to a gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-irMS) to enable compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of gaseous samples. TenaxTA was used as an adsorbent material in stainless steel TD tubes. We determined instrument settings to achieve a minimal water background level for reliable δD analysis and investigated the impact of storage time on δD and δ(13)C values of collected VOCs (176 days and 40 days of storage, respectively). Most of the standard compounds investigated showed standard deviations (SD)<6‰ (δD) when stored for 148 days at 4 °C. However, benzene revealed occasionally D depleted values (21‰ SD) for unknown reasons. δ(13)C analysis demonstrated that storage of 40 days had no effect on VOCs investigated. We also showed that breakthrough (benzene and toluene, 37% and 7%, respectively) had only a negligible effect (0.7‰ and 0.4‰, respectively) on δ(13)C values of VOCs on the sample tube. We established that the sample portion collected at the split flow effluent of the TD unit can be used as a replicate sample for isotope analysis saving valuable sampling time and resources. We also applied TD-GC-irMS to different emission samples (biomass combustion, petrol and diesel car engines exhaust) and for the first time δD values of atmospheric VOCs in the above range are reported. Significant differences in δD of up to 130‰ were observed between VOCs in emissions from petrol car engine exhaust and biomass combustion (Karri tree). However, diesel car emissions showed a high content of highly complex unresolved mixtures thus a baseline separation of VOCs was not achieved for stable hydrogen

  2. Identifying the African Wintering Grounds of Hybrid Flycatchers Using a Multi–Isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) Assignment Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Wilgenburg, Steven L.; Hobson, Keith A.; Folmer, Eelke; Font, Laura; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Migratory routes and wintering grounds can have important fitness consequences, which can lead to divergent selection on populations or taxa differing in their migratory itinerary. Collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (F. hypoleuca) flycatchers breeding in Europe and wintering in different sub-Saharan regions have distinct migratory routes on the eastern and western sides of the Sahara desert, respectively. In an earlier paper, we showed that hybrids of the two species did not incur reduced winter survival, which would be expected if their migration strategy had been a mix of the parent species' strategies potentially resulting in an intermediate route crossing the Sahara desert to different wintering grounds. Previously, we compared isotope ratios and found no significant difference in stable-nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) in winter-grown feathers between the parental species and hybrids, but stable-carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in hybrids significantly clustered only with those of pied flycatchers. We followed up on these findings and additionally analyzed the same feathers for stable-hydrogen isotope ratios (δ2H) and conducted spatially explicit multi-isotope assignment analyses. The assignment results overlapped with presumed wintering ranges of the two species, highlighting the efficacy of the method. In contrast to earlier findings, hybrids clustered with both parental species, though most strongly with pied flycatcher. PMID:24847717

  3. sup 18 O/ sup 16 O and sup 13 C/ sup 12 C in lower Paleozoic articulate brachiopods: Implications for the isotopic composition of seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Wadleigh, M.A. ); Veizer, J. Ruhr Univ., Bochum )

    1992-01-01

    Three hundred and eleven articulate brachiopods, with extensive geographic coverage, spanning the Cambrian to Silurian stratigraphic interval, were analyzed for oxygen and carbon isotopic composition. Cambrian samples have {delta}{sup 18}O {le} {minus}7{per thousand}, Ordovician samples {le} {minus}2.4{per thousand}, and Silurian samples {le} {minus}1.9{per thousand}, confirming the previously established trend towards lighter isotopic compositions with increasing age throughout the Lower Paleozoic. Forty-nine best preserved' Ordovician and Silurian samples were identified based on scanning electron microscopy and trace element analysis. They were found to bracket the isotopic compositions of over 85% of specimens from these stratigraphic intervals supporting widespread preservation of the isotopic signal. Some latest Ordovician and Lower Ludlovian samples associated with shale sequences are apparently enriched' in {sup 18}O. These are interpreted as an environmental phenomenon, perhaps related to water temperature and glaciation. A number of Silurian samples of varying genera and stratigraphic levels are highly enriched in {sup 13}C, up to +6{per thousand}. Some are shale related, but some are associated with carbonate-bearing basins. These are also thought to represent near-original' compositions, but a single environmental cause is unknown. The present data show that luminescence is not a decisive criterion for evaluating the degree of brachiopod preservation. Whole-shell values were isotopically similar to their nonluminescent portions for both oxygen and carbon.

  4. The C-13/C-12 kinetic isotope effect for soil oxidation of methane at ambient atmospheric concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Stagg L.; Quay, Paul D.; Lansdown, John M.

    1989-01-01

    During a survey of the Alaskan North Slope to estimate the isotopic composition and fluxes of methane (CH4) from the tundra, two sites were encountered that showed net methane consumption within flux chambers. Methane concentrations decreased from ambient (1.78 ppmv) by up to 50 percent, and the delta C-13 increased by up to 10 percent in the two chamber deployments showing CH4 consumption. CH4 consumption rates were measured to be 1.2 and 0.6 mg CH4/sq m per day; the corresponding carbon kinetic isotope effects (k13/k12) were 0.974 and 0.984, respectively.

  5. Paleocene to Early Eocene paleoceanography of the Middle East: The δ13C and δ18O isotopes from foraminiferal calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charisi, Stella D.; Schmitz, Birger

    1998-02-01

    Paleocene to early Eocene benthic foraminiferal δ13C and δ18O records from southern Tethyan sections at Ben Gurion, Israel (paleodepth 500-700 m), and Gebel Aweina, Egypt (paleodepth 150-200 m), show generally similar trends but 1-3‰ more negative values than coeval deep-sea isotopic records. In both Tethyan sections a negative δ13C excursion of 2.5-3‰ marks the benthic extinction event in the latest Paleocene. For at least 1 m.y. after this event, δ13C values were 1.5-2‰ more negative on the shelf than at upper bathyal depths, reflecting a deepening of the oxygen minimum zone, possibly related to an increase or spatial shift in upwelling. Benthic δ18O records indicate a 2-4°C temperature gradient between the shelf and upper bathyal depths. Temperature-salinity reconstructions suggest that upwelling was a dominant mechanism for surface water formation in this part of the southern Tethys during the late Paleocene.

  6. Spatially tracking 13C labeled substrate (bicarbonate) accumulation in microbial communities using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Doll, Charles G.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2014-08-25

    This is a manuscript we would like to submit for publication in Environmental Microbiology Reports. This manuscript contains a description of a laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry methodology developed at PNNL and applied to a microbial system at a PNNL project location – Hot Lake, Washington. I will submit a word document containing the entire manuscript with this Erica input request form.

  7. Biogeochemical Indicators in High- and Low-Arctic Marine and Terrestrial Avian Community Changes: Comparative Isotopic (13C, 15N, and 34S) Studies in Alaska and Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Causey, D.; Bargmann, N. A.; Burnham, K. K.; Burnham, J. L.; Padula, V. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Welker, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the complex dynamics of environmental change in northern latitudes is of paramount importance today, given documented rapid shifts in sea ice, plant phenology, temperatures, deglaciation, and habitat fidelity. This knowledge is particularly critical for Arctic avian communities, which are integral components by which biological teleconnections are maintained between the mid and northern latitudes. Furthermore, Arctic birds are fundamental to Native subsistence lifestyles and a focus for conservation activities. Avian communities of marine and terrestrial Arctic environments represent a broad spectrum of trophic levels, from herbivores (eg., geese Chen spp.), planktivores (eg., auklets Aethia spp.), and insectivores (eg., passerines: Wheatears Oenanthe spp., Longspurs Calcarius spp.), to predators of marine invertebrates (eg., eiders Somateria spp.), nearshore and offshore fish (eg., cormorants Phalacrocorax spp, puffins Fratercula spp.), even other bird species (eg., gulls Larus spp., falcons Peregrinus spp.). This diversity of trophic interconnections is an integral factor in the dynamics of Arctic ecosystem ecology, and they are key indicators for the strength and trajectories of change. We are especially interested in their feeding ecology, using stable isotope-diet relations to examine historical diets and to predict future feeding ecology by this range of species. Since 2009, we have been studying the foodweb ecology using stable isotopes13C, δ15N, δ34S) of contemporaneous coastal and marine bird communities in High Arctic (Northwest Greenland) and Low Arctic (western Aleutian Islands, AK). We are quantifying the isotopic values of blood, organ tissues, and feathers, and have carried out comparisons between native and lipid-extracted samples. Although geographically distant, these communities comprise similar taxonomic and ecological congeners, including several species common to both (eg., Common Eider, Black-legged Kittiwake, Northern

  8. Isotopic Discrimination of Some Solutes in Liquid Ammonia

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Taube, H.; Viste, A.

    1966-01-01

    The nitrogen isotopic discrimination of some salts and metals, studies in liquid ammonia solution at -50�C, decreases in magnitude in the order Pb{sup ++}, Ca{sup ++}, Li{sup +}, AG{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Li, K{sup +}, Na, K. The isotopic discrimination appears to provide qualitative information about the strength of the cation-solvent interaction in liquid ammonia.

  9. Influence of diet on growth, condition and reproductive capacity in Newfoundland and Labrador cod ( Gadus morhua): Insights from stable carbon isotopes ( δ13C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Graham D.; Rideout, Rick M.; Fudge, Susan B.; Rose, George A.

    2007-11-01

    Cod populations in Newfoundland and Labrador waters have shown differing growth, condition and recruitment since near-universal declines in these properties during the cold period of the late 1980s and early 1990s. To assess the influence of variable prey communities on these parameters, we compared cod energetics and diet in populations off Labrador and the northeast and south coasts of Newfoundland. Many properties were highest in the southern group(s) and lowest in the northern group(s), including growth, somatic condition, liver index and age-at-maturity. Most differences could be explained by variations in diet, as measured by stomach contents and stable carbon isotopes ( δ13C). The diet of Labrador cod consisted almost entirely of northern shrimp ( Pandalus borealis), and these cod displayed the most benthic δ13C signatures. Northeast cod had a more varied diet that included capelin and other fish, but still had mostly benthic δ13C signatures, suggesting the importance of benthic prey like shrimp in this population. South coast cod exhibited the most varied diet, including capelin ( Mallotus villosus), zooplankton, crabs and other fish, and had the most pelagic δ13C signatures. Among and within populations, the benefits of a more pelagic diet in medium-sized (30-69 cm) cod included higher somatic condition, higher liver index (lipid stores) and greater spawning potential (decreased incidence of atresia). It is hypothesized that major rebuilding of Newfoundland and Labrador cod stocks will require a return to a system that supports mostly pelagic feeding (i.e. capelin) in cod.

  10. Strong anion exchange liquid chromatographic separation of protein amino acids for natural 13C-abundance determination by isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abaye, Daniel A; Morrison, Douglas J; Preston, Tom

    2011-02-15

    Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and the analysis of their (13)C abundances is greatly simplified by the use of liquid chromatography (LC) systems coupled with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) compared with gas chromatography (GC)-based methods. To date, various cation exchange chromatography columns have been employed for amino acid separation. Here, we report strong anion exchange chromatography (SAX) coupled to IRMS with a Liquiface interface for amino acid δ(13)C determination. Mixtures of underivatised amino acids (0.1-0.5 mM) and hydrolysates of representative proteins (prawns and bovine serum albumin) were resolved by LC/IRMS using a SAX column and inorganic eluents. Background inorganic carbon content was minimised through careful preparation of alkaline reagents and use of a pre-injector on-line carbonate removal device. SAX chromatography completely resolved 11 of the 16 expected protein amino acids following acid hydrolysis in underivatised form. Basic and neutral amino acids were resolved with 35 mM NaOH in isocratic mode. Elution of the aromatic and acidic amino acids required a higher hydroxide concentration (180 mM) and a counterion (NO 3-, 5-25 mM). The total run time was 70 min. The average δ(13)C precision of baseline-resolved peaks was 0.75‰ (range 0.04 to 1.06‰). SAX is a viable alternative to cation chromatography, especially where analysis of basic amino acids is important. The technology shows promise for (13)C amino acid analysis in ecology, archaeology, forensic science, nutrition and protein metabolism.

  11. Pan-Arctic concentrations of mercury and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in marine zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Pomerleau, Corinne; Stern, Gary A; Pućko, Monika; Foster, Karen L; Macdonald, Robie W; Fortier, Louis

    2016-05-01

    Zooplankton play a central role in marine food webs, dictating the quantity and quality of energy available to upper trophic levels. They act as "keystone" species in transfer of mercury (Hg) up through the marine food chain. Here, we present the first Pan-Arctic overview of total and monomethylmercury concentrations (THg and MMHg) and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in selected zooplankton species by assembling data collected between 1998 and 2012 from six arctic regions (Laptev Sea, Chukchi Sea, southeastern Beaufort Sea, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Hudson Bay and northern Baffin Bay). MMHg concentrations in Calanus spp., Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp. were found to increase with higher δ(15)N and lower δ(13)C. The southern Beaufort Sea exhibited both the highest THg and MMHg concentrations. Biomagnification of MMHg between Calanus spp. and two of its known predators, Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp., was greatest in the southern Beaufort Sea. Our results show large geographical variations in Hg concentrations and isotopic signatures for individual species related to regional ecosystem features, such as varying water masses and freshwater inputs, and highlight the increased exposure to Hg in the marine food chain of the southern Beaufort Sea.

  12. CH4 sources estimated from atmospheric observations of CH4 and its 13C/12C isotopic ratios: 1. Inverse modeling of source processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaloff Fletcher, Sara E.; Tans, Pieter P.; Bruhwiler, Lori M.; Miller, John B.; Heimann, Martin

    2004-12-01

    A time-dependent inverse modeling approach that estimates the global magnitude of atmospheric methane sources from the observed spatiotemporal distribution of atmospheric CH4, 13C/12C isotopic ratios, and a priori estimates of the source strengths is presented. Relative to the a priori source estimates, the inverse model calls for increased CH4 flux from sources with strong spatial footprints in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere and decreases in sources in the Northern Hemisphere. The CH4 and 13C/12C isotopic ratio observations suggest an unusually high CH4 flux from swamps (˜200 ± 44 Tg CH4/yr) and biomass burning (88 ± 18 Tg CH4/yr) with relatively low estimates of emissions from bogs (˜20 ± 14 Tg CH4/yr), and landfills (35 ± 14 Tg CH4/yr). The model results support the hypothesis that the 1998 CH4 growth rate anomaly was caused in part by a large increase in CH4 production from wetlands, and indicate that wetland sources were about 40 Tg CH4/yr higher in 1998 than 1999.

  13. Trophic ecology of the supralittoral rocky shore (Roscoff, France): A dual stable isotope13C, δ 15N) and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurand, Sandrine; Riera, Pascal

    2006-07-01

    The present study investigates the trophic transfers on the upper littoral rocky shore (i.e. the supralittoral zone together with the upper midlittoral and adlittoral) of northern Brittany. The population mainly consists of four invertebrate species: the littorinids Littorina saxatilis and Melarhaphe neritoides, the isopod Ligia oceanica and the insect Petrobius maritimus. The utilisation of food sources available to these grazers was examined in a laboratory microcosm feeding experiment and a field study using stable isotopes13C, δ 15N). The results indicated that although Ligia oceanica preferentially occurs in the supralittoral zone, its trophic subsidies originate mostly from the adlittoral and lower intertidal zones. The stable isotope data also suggested that adlittoral terrestrial organic material may be the major food source of Petrobius maritimus. δ 15N of Littorina saxatilis indicated a highly variable diet consisting of supralittoral lichens, midlittoral macroalgae and other food sources (e.g. microalgae). Both feeding experiments and stable isotope data show that only Melarhaphe neritoides has a clearly identifiable diet based on a mixture of lichens, mostly Verrucaria maura and Caloplaca marina, as estimated by an isotopic mixing model. Hence, the food web of this intertidal zone appears largely based on trophic subsidies from other habitats (i.e. upper and lower intertidal zones).

  14. Chemical weathering and the role of sulfuric and nitric acids in carbonate weathering: Isotopes (13C, 15N, 34S, and 18O) and chemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cai; Ji, Hongbing

    2016-05-01

    Multiple isotopes (13C-DIC, 34S and 18O-SO42-, 15N and 18O-NO3-) and water chemistry were used to evaluate weathering rates and associated CO2 consumption by carbonic acid and strong acids (H2SO4 and HNO3) in a typical karst watershed (Wujiang River, Southwest China). The dual sulfate isotopes indicate that sulfate is mainly derived from sulfide oxidation in coal stratum and sulfide-containing minerals, and dual nitrate isotopes indicate that nitrate is mainly derived from soil N and nitrification. The correlation between isotopic compositions and water chemistry suggests that sulfuric and nitric acids, in addition to carbonic acid, are involved in carbonate weathering. The silicate and carbonate weathering rates are 7.2 t km-2 yr-1 and 76 t km-2 yr-1, respectively. In comparison with carbonate weathering rates (43 t km-2 yr-1) by carbonic acid alone, the subsequent increase in rates indicates significant enhancement of weathering when combined with sulfuric and nitric acids. Therefore, the role of sulfuric and nitric acids in the rock weathering should be considered in the global carbon cycle.

  15. Calcium isotope constraints on the marine carbon cycle and CaCO3 deposition during the late Silurian (Ludfordian) positive δ13C excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkaš, Juraj; Frýda, Jiří; Holmden, Chris

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates calcium isotope variations (δ 44 / 40 Ca) in late Silurian marine carbonates deposited in the Prague Basin (Czech Republic), which records one of the largest positive carbon isotope excursion (CIE) of the entire Phanerozoic, the mid-Ludfordian CIE, which is associated with major climatic changes (abrupt cooling) and global sea-level fluctuations. Our results show that during the onset of the CIE, when δ13 C increases rapidly from ∼0‰ to ∼8.5‰, δ 44 / 40Ca remains constant at about 0.3 ± 0.1 ‰ (relative to NIST 915a), while 87Sr/86Sr in well-preserved carbonates are consistent with a typical Ludfordian seawater composition (ranging from ∼0.70865 to ∼0.70875). Such decoupling between δ13 C and δ 44 / 40Ca trends during the onset of the CIE is consistent with the expected order-of-magnitude difference in the residence times of Ca (∼106yr) and C (∼105yr) in the open ocean, suggesting that the mid-Ludfordian CIE was caused by processes where the biogeochemical pathways of C and Ca in seawater were mechanistically decoupled. These processes may include: (i) near shore methanogenesis and photosynthesis, (ii) changes in oceanic circulation and stratification, and/or (iii) increased production and burial of organic C in the global ocean. The latter, however, is unlikely due to the lack of geological evidence for enhanced organic C burial, and also because of unrealistic parameterization of the ocean C cycle needed to generate the observed CIE over the relatively short time interval. In contrast, higher up in the section where δ13 C shifts back to pre-excursion baseline values, there is a correlated shift to higher δ 44 / 40Ca values. Such coupling of the records of Ca and C isotope changes in this part of the study section is inconsistent with the abovementioned differences in oceanic Ca and C residence times, indicating that the record of δ 44 / 40Ca changes does not faithfully reflect the evolution of the oceanic Ca

  16. Carbon Isotope Discrimination in Forest and Pasture Ecosystems of the Amazon Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehleringer, J. R.; Ometto, J.; Ometto, J.; Flanagan, L. B.; Martinelli, L. A.; Moreira, M. Z.; Higuchi, N.

    2001-12-01

    Our objective was to measure the stable carbon isotope composition of leaf tissue and CO2 released by respiration (\\deltaR), and to use this information as an estimate of changes in ecosystem isotopic discrimination that occur in response to seasonal and interannual changes in environmental conditions, and land-use change (forest-pasture conversion). We made measurements in primary forest and pastures in the Amazon Basin of Brazil. At the Santarem forest site \\deltaR values showed a seasonal cycle varying from less than -29\\permil to approximately -26\\permil. The observed seasonal change in \\deltaR was correlated with variation in the average monthly precipitation. In contrast there was no significant seasonal variation in \\deltaR at the Manaus forest site (average δ _{R} approximately -28‰ ), consistent with a narrower range of variation in monthly precipitation than occurred in Santarem. Despite substantial (9‰ ) vertical variation in leaf δ ^{13}C, the average δ _{R} values observed for both forest sites were similar to the δ ^{13}C values of the most exposed, sun foliage of the dominant tree species. This suggested that the major portion of recently respired carbon dioxide in these forests was metabolized carbohydrate fixed by the sun leaves at the top of the forest canopy. There was no significant seasonal variation observed in the δ ^{13}C values of leaf organic matter for the forest sites. We sampled in pastures dominated by the C_{4} grass, Brachiaria spp., which is planted after forest vegetation has been cleared. The carbon isotope ratio of respired CO_{2} in pastures was enriched in ^{13}C by approximately 10‰ compared to forest ecosystems. A significant temporal change occurred in δ _{R} after the Manaus pasture was burned. Burning removed much of the encroaching C_{3} shrub vegetation and so allowed an increased dominance of the C_{4} pasture grass, which resulted in higher δ _{R}$ values.

  17. Monitoring the bio-stimulation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by measurements of soil electrical properties, and CO2 content and its 13C/12C isotopic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, C.; Gourry, J.; Ignatiadis, I.; Colombano, S.; Dictor, M.; Guimbaud, C.; Chartier, M.; Dumestre, A.; Dehez, S.; Naudet, V.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbon contaminated soils represent an environmental issue as it impacts on ecosystems and aquifers. Where significant subsurface heterogeneity exists, conventional intrusive investigations and groundwater sampling can be insufficient to obtain a robust monitoring of hydrocarbon contaminants, as the information they provide is restricted to vertical profiles at discrete locations, with no information between sampling points. In order to obtain wider information in space volume on subsurface modifications, complementary methods can be used like geophysics. Among geophysical methods, geoelectrical techniques such as electrical resistivity (ER) and induced polarization (IP) seem the more promising, especially to study the effects of biodegradation processes. Laboratory and field geoelectrical experiments to characterize soils contaminated by oil products have shown that mature hydrocarbon-contaminated soils are characterized by enhanced electrical conductivity although hydrocarbons are electrically resistive. This high bulk conductivity is due to bacterial impacts on geological media, resulting in changes in the chemical and physical properties and thus, to the geophysical properties of the ground. Moreover, microbial activity induced CO2 production and isotopic deviation of carbon. Indeed, produced CO2 will reflect the pollutant isotopic signature. Thus, the ratio δ13C(CO2) will come closer to δ13C(hydrocarbon). BIOPHY, project supported by the French National Research Agency (ANR), proposes to use electrical methods and gas analyses to develop an operational and non-destructive method for monitoring in situ biodegradation of hydrocarbons in order to optimize soil treatment. Demonstration field is located in the South of Paris (France), where liquid fuels (gasoline and diesel) leaked from some tanks in 1997. In order to stimulate biodegradation, a trench has been dug to supply oxygen to the water table and thus stimulate aerobic metabolic bioprocesses. ER and

  18. Helium isotopes in ocelandic geothermal systems: I. [sup 3]He, gas chemistry, and [sup 13]C relations

    SciTech Connect

    Poreda, R.J.; Craig, H.; Welhan, J.A. ); Arnorsson, S. )

    1992-12-01

    Gas samples from seventeen high-temperature and twenty-two low-temperature geothermal systems have been analyzed for chemistry and [sup 3]He/[sup 4]He ratios. Within the Neo-Volcanic Zone the [sup 3]He/[sup 4]He ratios show a consistent regional pattern: 14-19 times the atmospheric ratio (R[sub A]) in the southwest, 8-11 R[sub A] in the north, and 17-26 R[sub A] in central Iceland. Outside of the rift zones a mantle helium component also dominates with the highest [sup 3]He/[sup 4]He ratios found in waters circulating through 9-My-old crust in Northwest Iceland (up to 29 R[sub A]). The minimum Icelandic [sup 3]He/[sup 4]He ratio (excluding a methane seep east of the rift) is 8.5 R[sub A] at Kverkfjoll, in central Iceland at the southern end of the narrow Northern Rift Zone; throughout the NRZ the ratios vary only from 8.5 to 10.7 R[sub A]. The Kverkfjoll ratio is precisely the mean MORB ratio: (8 [+-] 1)R[sub A] R[sub A]. Thus, the mantle helium emerging at Iceland is a simple mixture of two components: MORB He (8 R[sub A]) and deep-mantle plume He with R/R[sub A] > 29. High-temperature systems have CO[sub 2]/[sup 3]He ratios of 10[sup 9] to 10[sup 10] that encompass the range found in MORB (1-3 [times] 10[sup 9]). However, the CO[sub 2]/[sup 3]He values have been subjected to postmagmatic effects that alter and obscure the original magmatic CO[sub 2]/[sup 3]He ratios. [delta]([sup 13]C) in the fluid-phase CO[sub 2] is well defined at -3.8[per thousand] in the high-CO[sub 2] fluids (up to 1 mol/kg fluid), very similar to MORB values. CH[sub 4]/[sup 3]He ratios vary widely, from 3 [times] 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 8]. Most high-temperature systems from southwestern and northern Iceland have CH[sub 4]/[sup 3]He ratios less than 10[sup 6], while those from central Iceland have consistently higher ratios of the order of 10[sup 7]. Local conditions and possible proximity to an organic source of methane can have a strong effect on this ratio.

  19. Spatial variation in the stable isotopes of 13C and 15N and trophic position of Leporinus friderici (Characiformes, Anostomidae) in Corumbá Reservoir, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Alexandre L; Benedito, Evanilde; Sakuragui, Cássia M

    2007-03-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon (delta13C) and nitrogen (delta15N) were used to describe sources of energy and trophic position for adult Leporinus friderici in the area of the Corumbá Reservoir, Brazil. Samples were collected from April 1999 to March 2000. Spatial variations were not identified in the isotopic composition. The maximum and minimum contribution of C4 plants calculated integrating the variation of plants and fish were 47.7% and 2.4%, respectively. Among C3 plants, periphyton presented closer isotopic values to those observed for fishes, corresponding to an important carbon source. The proportion of ingested plant item is larger in rivers upstream from the reservoir (42.7%), which justifies the smaller trophic level among there. However, in the reservoir, the ingestion of fish was 81.4%, while ingested plants contributed with 18.6%. Downstream from the dam, participation of plant item was even smaller (14.4%). Although the trophic position calculated with diet data was proportional to the one calculated with delta15N values, the former elevated the trophic level of L. friderici in the food web, because estimated trophic positions were based on fish items belonging to the 2nd (a) and to the 3rd (b) trophic levels.

  20. Elemental formula annotation of polar and lipophilic metabolites using (13) C, (15) N and (34) S isotope labelling, in combination with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Giavalisco, Patrick; Li, Yan; Matthes, Annemarie; Eckhardt, Aenne; Hubberten, Hans-Michael; Hesse, Holger; Segu, Shruthi; Hummel, Jan; Köhl, Karin; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2011-10-01

    The unbiased and comprehensive analysis of metabolites in any organism presents a major challenge if proper peak annotation and unambiguous assignment of the biological origin of the peaks are required. Here we provide a comprehensive multi-isotope labelling-based strategy using fully labelled (13) C, (15) N and (34) S plant tissues, in combination with a fractionated metabolite extraction protocol. The extraction procedure allows for the simultaneous extraction of polar, semi-polar and hydrophobic metabolites, as well as for the extraction of proteins and starch. After labelling and extraction, the metabolites and lipids were analysed using a high-resolution mass spectrometer providing accurate MS and all-ion fragmentation data, providing an unambiguous readout for every detectable isotope-labelled peak. The isotope labelling assisted peak annotation process employed can be applied in either an automated database-dependent or a database-independent analysis of the plant polar metabolome and lipidome. As a proof of concept, the developed methods and technologies were applied and validated using Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and root extracts. Along with a large repository of assigned elemental compositions, which is provided, we show, using selected examples, the accuracy and reliability of the developed workflow.

  1. Submillimeter Observations of Titan: Global Measures of Stratospheric Temperature, CO, HCN, HC3N, and the Isotopic Ratios 12C/13C and 14N/15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurwell, Mark A.

    2004-11-01

    Interferometric observations of the atmosphere of Titan were performed with the Submillimeter Array on two nights in 2004 February to investigate the global average vertical distributions of several molecular species above the tropopause. Rotational transitions of CO, isomers of HCN, and HC3N were simultaneously recorded. The abundance of CO is determined to be 51+/-4 parts per million (ppm), constant with altitude. The vertical profile of HCN is dependent on the assumed temperature but generally increases from 30 parts per billion at the condensation altitude (~83 km) to 5 ppm at ~300 km. Furthermore, the central core of the HCN emission is strong and can be reproduced only if the upper stratospheric temperature increases with altitude. The isotopic ratios are determined to be 12C/13C=132+/-25 and 14N/15N=94+/-13 assuming the Coustenis & Bézard temperature profile. If the Lellouch temperature profile is assumed, the ratios decrease to 12C/13C=108+/-20 and 14N/15N=72+/-9. The vertical profile of HC3N is consistent with that derived by Marten et al.

  2. Spatial distribution of PAH concentrations and stable isotope signatures (δ13C, δ15N) in mosses from three European areas--characterization by multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Foan, L; Leblond, S; Thöni, L; Raynaud, C; Santamaría, J M; Sebilo, M; Simon, V

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations and N, C stable isotope signatures were determined in mosses Hypnum cupressiforme Hedw. from 61 sites of 3 European regions: Île-de-France (France); Navarra (Spain); the Swiss Plateau and Basel area (Switzerland). Total PAH concentrations of 100-700 ng g(-1), as well as δ(13)C values of -32 to -29‰ and δ(15)N values of -11 to -3‰ were measured. Pearson correlation tests revealed opposite trends between high molecular weight PAH (4-6 aromatic rings) content and δ(13)C values. Partial Least Square regressions explained the very significant correlations (r > 0.91, p < 0.001) between high molecular weight PAH concentrations by local urban land use (<10 km) and environmental factors such as elevation and pluviometry. Finally, specific correlations between heavy metal and PAH concentrations were attributed to industrial emissions in Switzerland and road traffic emissions in Spain.

  3. Quantitative twoplex glycan analysis using (12)C6 and (13)C6 stable isotope 2-aminobenzoic acid labelling and capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Váradi, Csaba; Mittermayr, Stefan; Millán-Martín, Silvia; Bones, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) offers excellent efficiency and orthogonality to liquid chromatographic (LC) separations for oligosaccharide structural analysis. Combination of CE with high resolution mass spectrometry (MS) for glycan analysis remains a challenging task due to the MS incompatibility of background electrolyte buffers and additives commonly used in offline CE separations. Here, a novel method is presented for the analysis of 2-aminobenzoic acid (2-AA) labelled glycans by capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry (CE-MS). To ensure maximum resolution and excellent precision without the requirement for excessive analysis times, CE separation conditions including the concentration and pH of the background electrolyte, the effect of applied pressure on the capillary inlet and the capillary length were evaluated. Using readily available (12/13)C6 stable isotopologues of 2-AA, the developed method can be applied for quantitative glycan profiling in a twoplex manner based on the generation of extracted ion electropherograms (EIE) for (12)C6 'light' and (13)C6 'heavy' 2-AA labelled glycan isotope clusters. The twoplex quantitative CE-MS glycan analysis platform is ideally suited for comparability assessment of biopharmaceuticals, such as monoclonal antibodies, for differential glycomic analysis of clinical material for potential biomarker discovery or for quantitative microheterogeneity analysis of different glycosylation sites within a glycoprotein. Additionally, due to the low injection volume requirements of CE, subsequent LC-MS analysis of the same sample can be performed facilitating the use of orthogonal separation techniques for structural elucidation or verification of quantitative performance.

  4. Identification of biomass utilizing bacteria in a carbon-depleted glacier forefield soil by the use of 13C DNA stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Zumsteg, Anita; Schmutz, Stefan; Frey, Beat

    2013-06-01

    As Alpine glaciers are retreating rapidly, bare soils with low organic C and N contents are becoming exposed. Carbon availability is a key factor regulating microbial diversity and ecosystem functioning in these soils. The aim of this study was to investigate how bacterial activity, community structure and composition are influenced by organic carbon availability. Bare soils were supplied with (13)C-labelled fungal (Penicillium sp.) and green algal (Chlorella sp.) biomass and the CO2 evolution and its δ(13)C signature were monitored up to 60 days. These organisms have previously been isolated near the glacier terminus. DNA stable isotope probing followed by T-RFLP profiling and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes was employed to identify consumers able to assimilate carbon from these biomass amendments. Higher respiration and higher bacterial activity indicated a more efficient utilization of algal cells than fungal cells. Flavobacterium sp. predominantly incorporated fungal-derived C, whereas the algal-derived C was mainly incorporated by Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria. This study emphasizes the important role of both fungal and algal biomass in increasing the carbon pool in recently deglaciated bare soils, as only 20% of the added C was respired as CO2, and the rest, we presume, remained in the soil.

  5. Using (13)C isotopes to explore denitrification-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation in a paddy-peatland.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yao; Wang, Zhongqiang; He, Chunguang; Zhang, Xinyu; Sheng, Lianxi; Ren, Xiaodong

    2017-01-18

    Peatlands are organic-matter-rich but nitrogen-limited natural systems, the carbon/nitrogen (C/N) status of which are subject to increasing exposure from long-term nitrate (NO3(-)) fertilizer inputs and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposits. To manage and protect these unique environments, an improved understanding of denitrification-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (DAMO) in peatlands is needed. In this study, we used stable isotope measurements and incubation with NO3(-) additions to facilitate an investigation and comparison of the potential DAMO rates in a paddy-peatland that has been influenced by N fertilizer over 40 years and an undisturbed peatland in northeast China. Monitoring of (13)CO2 production confimed DAMO did occur in both the paddy-peatland and the undisturbed peatland, the rates of which increased with NO3(-) additions, but decreased logarithmically with time. When NO3(-) was added, there were no significant differences between the CH4 oxidation in the paddy-peatland and peatland samples after 36 hours of incubation (97.08 vs. 143.69 nmol g(-1) dry peat) and the potential DAMO rate after incubation for 1 hour (92.53 vs. 69.99 nmol g(-1 )h(-1)). These results indicate that the occurrence of DAMO in peatlands might be controlled by the amount of NO3(-) applied and the depth to which it penetrates into the anoxic layer.

  6. Using 13C isotopes to explore denitrification-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation in a paddy-peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yao; Wang, Zhongqiang; He, Chunguang; Zhang, Xinyu; Sheng, Lianxi; Ren, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Peatlands are organic-matter-rich but nitrogen-limited natural systems, the carbon/nitrogen (C/N) status of which are subject to increasing exposure from long-term nitrate (NO3‑) fertilizer inputs and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposits. To manage and protect these unique environments, an improved understanding of denitrification-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (DAMO) in peatlands is needed. In this study, we used stable isotope measurements and incubation with NO3‑ additions to facilitate an investigation and comparison of the potential DAMO rates in a paddy-peatland that has been influenced by N fertilizer over 40 years and an undisturbed peatland in northeast China. Monitoring of 13CO2 production confimed DAMO did occur in both the paddy-peatland and the undisturbed peatland, the rates of which increased with NO3‑ additions, but decreased logarithmically with time. When NO3‑ was added, there were no significant differences between the CH4 oxidation in the paddy-peatland and peatland samples after 36 hours of incubation (97.08 vs. 143.69 nmol g‑1 dry peat) and the potential DAMO rate after incubation for 1 hour (92.53 vs. 69.99 nmol g‑1 h‑1). These results indicate that the occurrence of DAMO in peatlands might be controlled by the amount of NO3‑ applied and the depth to which it penetrates into the anoxic layer.

  7. Using 13C isotopes to explore denitrification-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation in a paddy-peatland

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yao; Wang, Zhongqiang; He, Chunguang; Zhang, Xinyu; Sheng, Lianxi; Ren, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Peatlands are organic-matter-rich but nitrogen-limited natural systems, the carbon/nitrogen (C/N) status of which are subject to increasing exposure from long-term nitrate (NO3−) fertilizer inputs and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposits. To manage and protect these unique environments, an improved understanding of denitrification-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (DAMO) in peatlands is needed. In this study, we used stable isotope measurements and incubation with NO3− additions to facilitate an investigation and comparison of the potential DAMO rates in a paddy-peatland that has been influenced by N fertilizer over 40 years and an undisturbed peatland in northeast China. Monitoring of 13CO2 production confimed DAMO did occur in both the paddy-peatland and the undisturbed peatland, the rates of which increased with NO3− additions, but decreased logarithmically with time. When NO3− was added, there were no significant differences between the CH4 oxidation in the paddy-peatland and peatland samples after 36 hours of incubation (97.08 vs. 143.69 nmol g−1 dry peat) and the potential DAMO rate after incubation for 1 hour (92.53 vs. 69.99 nmol g−1 h−1). These results indicate that the occurrence of DAMO in peatlands might be controlled by the amount of NO3− applied and the depth to which it penetrates into the anoxic layer. PMID:28098207

  8. Assessment of trace elements, POPs, (210)Po and stable isotopes ((15)N and (13)C) in a rare filter-feeding shark: The megamouth.

    PubMed

    Moura, Jailson Fulgencio de; Merico, Agostino; Montone, Rosalinda Carmela; Silva, Josilene; Seixas, Tércia Guedes; Godoy, José Marcus de Oliveira; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana Dillenburg; Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann; Di Beneditto, Ana Paula Madeira; Reis, Estéfane Cardinot; Tavares, Davi Castro; Lemos, Leila Soledade; Siciliano, Salvatore

    2015-06-15

    With less than 60 records being reported worldwide, the megamouth (Megachasma pelagios) is today one of the least known shark species inhabiting our oceans. Therefore, information concerning the biology and ecology of this enigmatic organism is very scarce and limited to feeding behaviour and preferred habitat. The present work reports new data on the concentrations of trace elements, organic mercury, POPs and (210)Po in hepatic and muscular tissues of a specimen found stranded in the southeastern coast of Brazil. Additionally, we provide new evidence based on stable isotope analysis (δ(15)N and δ(13)C) confirming the preference for the pelagic habitat and the zooplanktivorous feeding behaviour of the megamouth. These results are consistent with the low concentrations of organic pollutant compounds and other elements measured in our samples.

  9. Variability in Isotope Discrimination Factors in Coral Reef Fishes: Implications for Diet and Food Web Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Alex S. J.; Waite, Anya M.; Humphries, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Interpretation of stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen (δ13C and δ15N) is generally based on the assumption that with each trophic level there is a constant enrichment in the heavier isotope, leading to diet-tissue discrimination factors of 3.4‰ for 15N (ΔN) and ∼0.5‰ for 13C (ΔC). Diet-tissue discrimination factors determined from paired tissue and gut samples taken from 152 individuals from 26 fish species at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia demonstrate a large amount of variability around constant values. While caution is necessary in using gut contents to represent diet due to the potential for high temporal variability, there were significant effects of trophic position and season that may also lead to variability in ΔN under natural conditions. Nitrogen enrichment increased significantly at higher trophic levels (higher tissue δ15N), with significantly higher ΔN in carnivorous species. Changes in diet led to significant changes in ΔN, but not tissue δ15N, between seasons for several species: Acanthurus triostegus, Chromis viridis, Parupeneus signatus and Pomacentrus moluccensis. These results confirm that the use of meta-analysis averages for ΔN is likely to be inappropriate for accurately determining diets and trophic relationships using tissue stable isotope ratios. Where feasible, discrimination factors should be directly quantified for each species and trophic link in question, acknowledging the potential for significant variation away from meta-analysis averages and, perhaps, controlled laboratory diets and conditions. PMID:21060681

  10. A triple-isotope approach for discriminating the geographic origin of Asian sesame oils.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyeonjin; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Oh, Jae-Ho; Kwon, Kisung; Kim, Byung Hee

    2015-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the geographic location and climatic characteristics of the sesame-producing sites on the carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen stable isotope ratios of Korean sesame oil. In addition, the study aimed to differentiate Korean sesame oil from Chinese and Indian sesame oils using isotopic data in combination with canonical discriminant analysis. The isotopic data were obtained from 84 roasted oil samples that were prepared from 51 Korean, 19 Chinese, and 14 Indian sesame seeds harvested during 2010-2011 and distributed in Korea during the same period. The δ(13)C, δD, and δ(18)O values of Korean sesame oil were negatively correlated with latitude, distance from the sea, and precipitation (May-September), respectively. By applying two canonical discriminant functions, 89.3% of the sesame oil samples were correctly classified by their geographic origin, indicating that the triple-isotope approach is a useful tool for the traceability of the oils.

  11. Multi-Isotopic (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) Tracing of Molt Origin for Red-Winged Blackbirds Associated with Agro-Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Scott J.; Hobson, Keith A.; Van Wilgenburg, Steven L.; Fischer, Justin W.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed stable-hydrogen (δ2H), carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) isotope ratios in feathers to better understand the molt origin and food habits of Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) near sunflower production in the Upper Midwest and rice production in the Mid-South of the United States. Outer primary feathers were used from 661 after-second-year (ASY) male blackbirds collected in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota (spring collection), and Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Texas (winter collection). The best-fit model indicated that the combination of feather δ2H, δ13C and δ15N best predicted the state of sample collections and thus supported the use of this approach for tracing molt origins in Red-winged Blackbirds. When considering only birds collected in spring, 56% of birds were classified to their collection state on the basis of δ2H and δ13C alone. We then developed feather isoscapes for δ13C based upon these data and for δ2H based upon continental patterns of δ2H in precipitation. We used 81 birds collected at the ten independent sites for model validation. The spatially-explicit assignment of these 81 birds to the δ2H isoscape resulted in relatively high rates (~77%) of accurate assignment to collection states. We also modeled the spatial extent of C3 (e.g. rice, sunflower) and C4 (corn, millet, sorghum) agricultural crops grown throughout the Upper Midwest and Mid-South United States to predict the relative use of C3- versus C4-based foodwebs among sampled blackbirds. Estimates of C3 inputs to diet ranged from 50% in Arkansas to 27% in Minnesota. As a novel contribution to blackbird conservation and management, we demonstrate how such feather isoscapes can be used to predict the molt origin and interstate movements of migratory blackbirds for subsequent investigations of breeding biology (e.g. sex-specific philopatry), agricultural depredation, feeding ecology, physiology of migration and sensitivity to

  12. Multi-Isotopic (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) Tracing of Molt Origin for Red-Winged Blackbirds Associated with Agro-Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Werner, Scott J; Hobson, Keith A; Van Wilgenburg, Steven L; Fischer, Justin W

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed stable-hydrogen (δ2H), carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) isotope ratios in feathers to better understand the molt origin and food habits of Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) near sunflower production in the Upper Midwest and rice production in the Mid-South of the United States. Outer primary feathers were used from 661 after-second-year (ASY) male blackbirds collected in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota (spring collection), and Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Texas (winter collection). The best-fit model indicated that the combination of feather δ2H, δ13C and δ15N best predicted the state of sample collections and thus supported the use of this approach for tracing molt origins in Red-winged Blackbirds. When considering only birds collected in spring, 56% of birds were classified to their collection state on the basis of δ2H and δ13C alone. We then developed feather isoscapes for δ13C based upon these data and for δ2H based upon continental patterns of δ2H in precipitation. We used 81 birds collected at the ten independent sites for model validation. The spatially-explicit assignment of these 81 birds to the δ2H isoscape resulted in relatively high rates (~77%) of accurate assignment to collection states. We also modeled the spatial extent of C3 (e.g. rice, sunflower) and C4 (corn, millet, sorghum) agricultural crops grown throughout the Upper Midwest and Mid-South United States to predict the relative use of C3- versus C4-based foodwebs among sampled blackbirds. Estimates of C3 inputs to diet ranged from 50% in Arkansas to 27% in Minnesota. As a novel contribution to blackbird conservation and management, we demonstrate how such feather isoscapes can be used to predict the molt origin and interstate movements of migratory blackbirds for subsequent investigations of breeding biology (e.g. sex-specific philopatry), agricultural depredation, feeding ecology, physiology of migration and sensitivity to

  13. Stable Isotope13C, δ15N, δ34S) Analysis and Satellite Telemetry Depict the Complexity of Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) Diets in Southwest Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, A.; Watts, D. E.; Cohn, B. R.; Spencer, P.; Mangipane, B.; Welker, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Throughout Alaska, gray wolves (Canis lupus) are a top predator of large ungulates. While they primarily rely on ungulates such as moose (Alces alces) and caribou (Rangifer tarandus) as food, they are opportunistic and use alternative resources. The variation and supplemental protein sources in wolf diet has not been studied extensively on live animals currently using the landscape. With large seasonal influxes of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus sp.) into Alaska, terrestrial carnivore use of marine species is of particular interest. Using stable isotope13C, δ15N, δ34S) analysis of wolf guard hair and blood, this study aims to determine the proportion of marine derived nutrients (MDN) in the diet of wolf packs within and surrounding Lake Clark National Park and Preserve and Alaska Peninsula and Becharof National Wildlife Refuges in Southwest Alaska. Satellite telemetry from the animals sampled facilitates quantification of landscape use patterns in correspondence with isotopic traits. Wolf pack territories within and surrounding the Lake Clark region appear to vary in spatial extent and in availability of MDN, such as salmon. Initial analysis shows that two packs with smaller home ranges, centrally located around areas with greater salmon availability, have enriched δ15N values compared to packs that have larger home ranges not centralized around salmon spawning waters. This pattern of isotopic enrichment is found in red blood cells, blood serum and hair, representing diets over different time scales. The enrichment in both blood and hair indicates a sustained use of MDN over the previous six to nine months. In the Lake Clark region, simple mixing model estimates suggest that up to 30% of wolf pack diets may be from marine sources. In contrast, packs with larger home ranges and less access to salmon have stable isotope values representative of a terrestrial diet.

  14. Observations of atmospheric methane and its stable isotope ratio (δ13C) over the Arctic seas from ship cruises in the summer and autumn of 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorokhod, Andrey; Belikov, Igor; Pankratova, Natalia; Novigatsky, Alexander; Thompson, Rona

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) is the second most important long-lived greenhouse gas. The Arctic has significant sources of CH4, such as from wetlands and possibly also from methane hydrates, which may act as a positive feedback on the climate system. Despite significant efforts in establishing a network of ground-based CH4 observations in the Arctic zone, there is still a lack of measurements over the Arctic Ocean and sub-polar seas. From 21 July to 9 October 2015, concentrations of CH4 and CO2, as well as of the 13C:12C isotopic ratio in CH4, i.e., δ13C, were measured in the marine boundary layer from aboard the Research Vessel "Akademik Mstislav Keldysh" by the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology. Measurements were made using a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy instrument from Picarro™ (model G2132-i). The cruises covered a vast area including the North Atlantic up to 70°N, the Baltic, North, Norwegian, Greenland, Barents, White, Kara and Laptev Seas. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first measurements of their type made in these regions. Concentrations of CH4 typically had low variations (in the range of a few ppb) in the open sea but relatively large variations (of the order of 100 ppb) were recorded near and during stops in ports. High variability of atmospheric CH4 was also registered near the delta of the Lena River in the Laptev Sea, which has been suggested to be a large CH4 reservoir and where bubbles rising through the water column have been observed. The obtained set of δ13CCH4 is characterized by significant range of the measured values varying from open Atlantic to polluted regions near large sea ports. The Keeling plot analyses were implemented to study possible CH4 sources according to its isotopic signature. Footprint analyses are presented for the shipboard observations, as well as comparisons to simulated CH4 concentrations and δ13C using the Lagrangian transport model, FLEXPART. This work has been carried-out with the financial support of

  15. Multiple isotope analyses of the pike tapeworm Triaenophorus nodulosus reveal peculiarities in consumer-diet discrimination patterns.

    PubMed

    Behrmann-Godel, J; Yohannes, E

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies of dietary isotope discrimination have led to the general expectation that a consumer will exhibit enriched stable isotope levels relative to its diet. Parasite-host systems are specific consumer-diet pairs in which the consumer (parasite) feeds exclusively on one dietary source: host tissue. However, the small numbers of studies previously carried out on isotopic discrimination in parasite-host (ΔXP-HT) systems have yielded controversial results, showing some parasites to be isotopically depleted relative to their food source, while others are enriched or in equilibrium with their hosts. Although the mechanism for these deviations from expectations remains to be understood, possible influences of specific feeding niche or selection for only a few nutritional components by the parasite are discussed. ΔXP-HT for multiple isotopes13C, δ15N, δ34S) were measured in the pike tapeworm Triaenophorus nodulosus and two of its life-cycle fish hosts, perch Perca fluviatilis and pike Esox lucius, within which T. nodulosus occupies different feeding locations. Variability in the value of ΔXP-HT calculated for the parasite and its different hosts indicates an influence of feeding location on isotopic discrimination. In perch liver ΔXP-HT was relatively more negative for all three stable isotopes. In pike gut ΔXP-HT was more positive for δ13C, as expected in conventional consumer-diet systems. For parasites feeding on pike gut, however, the δ15N and δ34S isotope values were comparable with those of the host. We discuss potential causes of these deviations from expectations, including the effect of specific parasite feeding niches, and conclude that ΔXP-HT should be critically evaluated for trophic interactions between parasite and host before general patterns are assumed.

  16. Isotopic incorporation rates and discrimination factors in mantis shrimp crustaceans.

    PubMed

    deVries, Maya S; Del Rio, Carlos Martínez; Tunstall, Tate S; Dawson, Todd E

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has provided insights into the trophic ecology of a wide diversity of animals. Knowledge about isotopic incorporation rates and isotopic discrimination between the consumer and its diet for different tissue types is essential for interpreting stable isotope data, but these parameters remain understudied in many animal taxa and particularly in aquatic invertebrates. We performed a 292-day diet shift experiment on 92 individuals of the predatory mantis shrimp, Neogonodactylus bredini, to quantify carbon and nitrogen incorporation rates and isotope discrimination factors in muscle and hemolymph tissues. Average isotopic discrimination factors between mantis shrimp muscle and the new diet were 3.0 ± 0.6 ‰ and 0.9 ± 0.3 ‰ for carbon and nitrogen, respectively, which is contrary to what is seen in many other animals (e.g. C and N discrimination is generally 0-1 ‰ and 3-4 ‰, respectively). Surprisingly, the average residence time of nitrogen in hemolymph (28.9 ± 8.3 days) was over 8 times longer than that of carbon (3.4 ± 1.4 days). In muscle, the average residence times of carbon and nitrogen were of the same magnitude (89.3 ± 44.4 and 72.8 ± 18.8 days, respectively). We compared the mantis shrimps' incorporation rates, along with rates from four other invertebrate taxa from the literature, to those predicted by an allometric equation relating carbon incorporation rate to body mass that was developed for teleost fishes and sharks. The rate of carbon incorporation into muscle was consistent with rates predicted by this equation. Our findings provide new insight into isotopic discrimination factors and incorporation rates in invertebrates with the former showing a different trend than what is commonly observed in other animals.

  17. Isotopic Incorporation Rates and Discrimination Factors in Mantis Shrimp Crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    deVries, Maya S.; del Rio, Carlos Martínez; Tunstall, Tate S.; Dawson, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has provided insights into the trophic ecology of a wide diversity of animals. Knowledge about isotopic incorporation rates and isotopic discrimination between the consumer and its diet for different tissue types is essential for interpreting stable isotope data, but these parameters remain understudied in many animal taxa and particularly in aquatic invertebrates. We performed a 292-day diet shift experiment on 92 individuals of the predatory mantis shrimp, Neogonodactylus bredini, to quantify carbon and nitrogen incorporation rates and isotope discrimination factors in muscle and hemolymph tissues. Average isotopic discrimination factors between mantis shrimp muscle and the new diet were 3.0 ± 0.6 ‰ and 0.9 ± 0.3 ‰ for carbon and nitrogen, respectively, which is contrary to what is seen in many other animals (e.g. C and N discrimination is generally 0–1 ‰ and 3–4 ‰, respectively). Surprisingly, the average residence time of nitrogen in hemolymph (28.9 ± 8.3 days) was over 8 times longer than that of carbon (3.4 ± 1.4 days). In muscle, the average residence times of carbon and nitrogen were of the same magnitude (89.3 ± 44.4 and 72.8 ± 18.8 days, respectively). We compared the mantis shrimps’ incorporation rates, along with rates from four other invertebrate taxa from the literature, to those predicted by an allometric equation relating carbon incorporation rate to body mass that was developed for teleost fishes and sharks. The rate of carbon incorporation into muscle was consistent with rates predicted by this equation. Our findings provide new insight into isotopic discrimination factors and incorporation rates in invertebrates with the former showing a different trend than what is commonly observed in other animals. PMID:25835953

  18. Determination of 13C isotopic enrichment of glutathione and glycine by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry after formation of the N- or N,S-ethoxycarbonyl methyl ester derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tea, Illa; Ferchaud-Roucher, Véronique; Küster, Alice; Darmaun, Dominique; Robins, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    The depletion of glutathione (GSH) reported in very-low-birth-weight infants is implicated in several pathologies, especially if deficiency occurs during foetal development. The cause of this depletion is suggested to be modification of GSH turnover. To probe the role of GSH, a reliable non-invasive method adapted to very-low-birth-weight infants is required. In this paper, we report the preparation of the N,S-ethoxycarbonyl methyl ester derivatives of GSH and glycine and their application to the measurement of (13)C/(12)C ratios at natural abundance in erythrocyte samples by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). The technique allowed the determination of (13)C/(12)C ratios at natural abundance with a precision <3% and within-day and between-day variabilities both <4%. The method is able to determine accurately low (13)C-enrichments in GSH (0.00241 to 0.00753 Atom Percent Excess) in erythrocyte extracts following incubation with (13)C-glycine at low specific enrichment (approx. 1.5 atom %). Excellent agreement was obtained between the calculated GSH fractional synthesis rate (FSR) in human adult blood (approx. 300% day(-1)) using the low-enrichment (13)C-glycine/GC/C/IRMS protocol and that using highly enriched (13)C-glycine (99 atom %)/GC/MS with the same derivative. The GC/C/IRMS method was shown to be suitable to measure the in vitro GSH FSR (200-660% day(-1)) in human venous and arterial blood from the umbilical cord. This approach provides a good tool for studying the turnover of GSH in vitro in infants, allowing both the use of minimal amounts of tracer and negligible perturbation of endogenous precursor pools.

  19. Establishing spatial trends in water chemistry and stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) in the Elwha River prior to dam removal and salmon recolonization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, J.J.; Coe, H.J.; Morley, S.A.; Kloehn, K.K.

    2011-01-01

    Two high-head dams on the Elwha River in Washington State (USA) have changed the migratory patterns of resident and anadromous fish, limiting Pacific salmon to the lower 7.9 km of a river that historically supported large Pacific salmon runs. To document the effects of the dams prior to their removal, we measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of primary producers, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish, and water chemistry above, between and below the dams. We found that δ15N was significantly higher in fish, stoneflies, black flies, periphyton and macroalgae where salmon still have access. Fish and chloroperlid stoneflies were enriched in δ13C, but the values were more variable than in δ15N. For some taxa, there were also differences between the two river sections that lack salmon, suggesting that factors other than marine-derived nutrients are structuring longitudinal isotopic profiles. Consistent with trophic theory, macroalgae had the lowest δ15N, followed by periphyton, macroinvertebrates and fish, with a range of 6.9, 6.2 and 7.7‰ below, between, and above the dams, respectively. Water chemistry analyses confirmed earlier reports that the river is oligotrophic. Phosphorous levels in the Elwha were lower than those found in other regional rivers, with significant differences among regulated, unregulated and reference sections. The removal of these dams, among the largest of such projects ever attempted, is expected to facilitate the return of salmon and their marine-derived nutrients (MDN) throughout the watershed, possibly altering the food web structure, nutrient levels and stable isotope values that we documented.

  20. Diet analysis of Alaska Arctic snow crabs (Chionoecetes opilio) using stomach contents and δ13C and δ15N stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divine, Lauren M.; Bluhm, Bodil A.; Mueter, Franz J.; Iken, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    We used stomach content and stable δ13C and δ15N isotope analyses to investigate male and female snow crab diets over a range of body sizes (30-130 mm carapace width) in five regions of the Pacific Arctic (southern and northern Chukchi Sea, western, central, and Canadian Beaufort Sea). Snow crab stomach contents from the southern Chukchi Sea were also compared to available prey biomass and abundance. Snow crabs consumed four main prey taxa: polychaetes, decapod crustaceans (crabs, amphipods), echinoderms (mainly ophiuroids), and mollusks (bivalves, gastropods). Both approaches revealed regional differences. Crab diets in the two Chukchi regions were similar to those in the western Beaufort (highest bivalve, amphipod, and crustacean consumption). The Canadian Beaufort region was most unique in prey composition and in stable isotope values. We also observed a trend of decreasing carbon stable isotopes in crabs from the Chukchi to those in the Canadian Beaufort, likely reflecting the increasing use of terrestrial carbon sources towards the eastern regions of the Beaufort Sea from Mackenzie River influx. Cannibalism on snow crabs was higher in the Chukchi regions relative to the Beaufort regions. We suggest that cannibalism may have an impact on recruitment in the Chukchi Sea via reduction of cohort strength after settlement to the benthos, as known from the Canadian Atlantic. Prey composition varied with crab size only in some size classes in the southern Chukchi and central Beaufort, while stable isotope results showed no size-dependent differences. Slightly although significantly higher mean carbon isotope values for males in the southern Chukchi may not be reflective of a gender-specific pattern but rather be driven by low sample size. Finally, the lack of prey selection relative to availability in crabs in the southern Chukchi suggests that crabs consume individual prey taxa in relative proportions to prey field abundances. The present study is the first to

  1. Carbon isotope13C) excursions suggest times of major methane release during the last 14 kyr in Fram Strait, the deep-water gateway to the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolaro, C.; Rasmussen, T. L.; Panieri, G.; Mienert, J.; Bünz, S.; Sztybor, K.

    2015-04-01

    We present results from a sediment core collected from a pockmark field on the Vestnesa Ridge (~ 80° N) in the eastern Fram Strait. This is the only deep-water gateway to the Arctic, and one of the northernmost marine gas hydrate provinces in the world. Eight 14C AMS dates reveal a detailed chronology for the last 14 ka BP. The δ 13C record measured on the benthonic foraminiferal species Cassidulina neoteretis shows two distinct intervals with negative values termed carbon isotope excursion (CIE I and CIE II, respectively). The values were as low as -4.37‰ in CIE I, correlating with the Bølling-Allerød interstadials, and as low as -3.41‰ in CIE II, correlating with the early Holocene. In the Bølling-Allerød interstadials, the planktonic foraminifera also show negative values, probably indicating secondary methane-derived authigenic precipitation affecting the foraminiferal shells. After a cleaning procedure designed to remove authigenic carbonate coatings on benthonic foraminiferal tests from this event, the 13C values are still negative (as low as -2.75‰). The CIE I and CIE II occurred during periods of ocean warming, sea-level rise and increased concentrations of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere. CIEs with similar timing have been reported from other areas in the North Atlantic, suggesting a regional event. The trigger mechanisms for such regional events remain to be determined. We speculate that sea-level rise and seabed loading due to high sediment supply in combination with increased seismic activity as a result of rapid deglaciation may have triggered the escape of significant amounts of methane to the seafloor and the water column above.

  2. Study and validity of 13C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and 2H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey.

    PubMed

    Cotte, J F; Casabianca, H; Lhéritier, J; Perrucchietti, C; Sanglar, C; Waton, H; Grenier-Loustalot, M F

    2007-01-16

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The delta(13)C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H)(I) ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C(4) syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per thousand (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with the natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C(4) syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying.

  3. Carbon isotope composition of latex does not reflect temporal variations of photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination in rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Kanpanon, Nicha; Kasemsap, Poonpipope; Thaler, Philippe; Kositsup, Boonthida; Gay, Frédéric; Lacote, Régis; Epron, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Latex, the cytoplasm of laticiferous cells localized in the inner bark of rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.), is collected by tapping the bark. Following tapping, latex flows out of the trunk and is regenerated, whereas in untapped trees, there is no natural exudation. It is still unknown whether the carbohydrates used for latex regeneration in tapped trees is coming from recent photosynthates or from stored carbohydrates, and in the former case, it is expected that latex carbon isotope composition of tapped trees will vary seasonally, whereas latex isotope composition of untapped trees will be more stable. Temporal variations of carbon isotope composition of trunk latex (δ(13)C-L), leaf soluble compounds (δ(13)C-S) and bulk leaf material (δ(13)C-B) collected from tapped and untapped 20-year-old trees were compared. A marked difference in δ(13)C-L was observed between tapped and untapped trees whatever the season. Trunk latex from tapped trees was more depleted (1.6‰ on average) with more variable δ(13)C values than those of untapped trees. δ(13)C-L was higher and more stable across seasons than δ(13)C-S and δ(13)C-B, with a maximum seasonal difference of 0.7‰ for tapped trees and 0.3‰ for untapped trees. δ(13)C-B was lower in tapped than in untapped trees, increasing from August (middle of the rainy season) to April (end of the dry season). Differences in δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-B between tapped and untapped trees indicated that tapping affects the metabolism of both laticiferous cells and leaves. The lack of correlation between δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-S suggests that recent photosynthates are mixed in the large pool of stored carbohydrates that are involved in latex regeneration after tapping.

  4. Measurements of CH4 Mixing Ratio and D/H and 13C/12C Isotope Ratios in Atmospheric Samples from Continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, S. C.; Ajie, H. O.; Gotoh, A. A.; Rice, A. L.

    2002-12-01

    We report δD and δ13C measurements of atmospheric CH4 from air samples collected bi-weekly from fixed surface sites in the United States. Our fixed surface sites are located at the mid-continental site Niwot Ridge, CO (41°N, 105°W) and a Pacific coastal northern hemispheric site receiving strong westerlies, Montaña de Oro, CA (35°N, 121°W). Data from multiyear bi-weekly sampling provide information relating seasonal cycling of CH4 sources and sinks in background air, provide a record of long term trends in CH4 mixing and isotope ratio related to atmospheric CH4 loading, and may reveal information on regional sources of CH4. Measurements of δD-CH4 average -93+/-3‰ (versus V-SMOW) at Niwot Ridge from 1999 through 2001 and -97+/-4‰ at Montaña de Oro from 2000 through 2001. Annual seasonal cycles observed at both sites are 6-7‰ , exhibiting strong anti-correlation with CH4 mixing ratio seasonality that appears to be largely sink-driven (i.e. through reaction with OH). More extensive time series in δ13C-CH4 average -47.2+/-0.1‰ (versus V-PDB) at Niwot Ridge from 1995 through 2001 and -47.3+/-0.2‰ at Montaña de Oro from 1996 through 2001. In contrast to δD-CH4, seasonality in δ13C-CH4 has a relatively poor anti-correlation with seasonality in CH4 mixing ratio, indicating significant source-driven influence. We discuss the implications of these measurements on the atmospheric CH4 budget and detail the precision and accuracy of our data with respect international reference standards. It is our intention to have these data archived and available for modeling and advanced calculations by other atmospheric researchers in the near future.

  5. Application of a methane carbon isotope analyzer for the investigation of δ13C of methane emission measured by the automatic chamber method in an Arctic Tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastepanov, Mikhail; Christensen, Torben

    2014-05-01

    Methane emissions have been monitored by an automatic chamber method in Zackenberg valley, NE Greenland, since 2006 as a part of Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring (GEM) program. During most of the seasons the measurements were carried out from the time of snow melt (June-July) until freezing of the active layer (October-November). Several years of data, obtained by the same method, instrumentation and at exactly the same site, provided a unique opportunity for the analysis of interannual methane flux patterns and factors affecting their temporal variability. The start of the growing season emissions was found to be closely related to a date of snow melt at the site. Despite a large between year variability of this date (sometimes more than a month), methane emission started within a few days after, and was increasing for the next about 30 days. After this peak of emission, it slowly decreased and stayed more or less constant or slightly decreasing during the rest of the growing season (Mastepanov et al., Biogeosciences, 2013). During the soil freezing, a second peak of methane emission was found (Mastepanov et al., Nature, 2008); its amplitude varied a lot between the years, from almost undetectable to comparable with total growing season emissions. Analysis of the multiyear emission patterns (Mastepanov et al., Biogeosciences, 2013) led to hypotheses of different sources for the spring, summer and autumn methane emissions, and multiyear cycles of accumulation and release of these components to the atmosphere. For the further investigation of this it was decided to complement the monitoring system with a methane carbon isotope analyzer (Los Gatos Research, USA). The instrument was installed during 2013 field season and was successfully operating until the end of the measurement campaign (27 October). Detecting both 12C-CH4 and 13C-CH4 concentrations in real time (0.5 Hz) during automatic chamber closure (15 min), the instrument was providing data for determination of

  6. Coupling a high-temperature catalytic oxidation total organic carbon analyzer to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer to measure natural-abundance delta13C-dissolved organic carbon in marine and freshwater samples.

    PubMed

    Panetta, Robert J; Ibrahim, Mina; Gélinas, Yves

    2008-07-01

    The stable isotope composition of dissolved organic carbon (delta(13)C-DOC) provides powerful information toward understanding carbon sources and cycling, but analytical limitations have precluded its routine measurement in natural samples. Recent interfacing of wet oxidation-based dissolved organic carbon analyzers and isotope ratio mass spectrometers has simplified the measurement of delta(13)C-DOC in freshwaters, but the analysis of salty estuarine/marine samples still proves difficult. Here we describe the coupling of the more widespread high-temperature catalytic oxidation-based total organic carbon analyzer to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (HTC-IRMS) through cryogenic trapping of analyte gases exiting the HTC analyzer for routine analysis of delta(13)C-DOC in aquatic and marine samples. Targeted elimination of major sources of background CO2 originating from the HTC analyzer allows for the routine measurement of samples over the natural range of DOC concentrations (from 40 microM to over 2000 microM), and salinities (<0.1-36 g/kg). Because consensus reference natural samples for delta(13)C-DOC do not exist, method validation was carried out with water-soluble stable isotope standards as well as previously measured natural samples (IAEA sucrose, Suwannee River Fulvic Acids, Deep Sargasso Sea consensus reference material, and St. Lawrence River water) and result in excellent delta(13)C-DOC accuracy (+/-0.2 per thousand) and precision (+/-0.3 per thousand).

  7. A stable isotope ( δ13C, δ15N) model for the North Water food web: implications for evaluating trophodynamics and the flow of energy and contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Keith A.; Fisk, Aaron; Karnovsky, Nina; Holst, Meike; Gagnon, Jean-Marc; Fortier, Martin

    fundamentally in transferring energy and carbon flux to higher trophic-level seabirds and marine mammals. We measured PCB 153 among selected organisms to investigate the behavior of bioaccumulating contaminants within the food web. Our isotopic model confirmed the trophic magnification of PCB 153 in this high-Arctic food web due to a strong correlation between contaminant concentration and organism δ15N values, demonstrating the utility of combining isotopic and contaminant approaches to food-web studies. Stable-carbon isotope analysis confirmed an enrichment in 13C between POM and ice algae (-22.3 vs. -17.7‰). Benthic organisms were generally enriched in 13C compared to pelagic species. We discuss individual species isotopic data and the general utility of our stable isotope model for defining carbon flux and contaminant flow through the North Water food web.

  8. Stable carbon isotope discrimination in rice field soil during acetate turnover by syntrophic acetate oxidation or acetoclastic methanogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Ralf; Klose, Melanie

    2011-03-01

    Rice fields are an important source for the greenhouse gas methane. In Italian rice field soil CH 4 is produced either by hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis, or by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and syntrophic acetate oxidation when temperatures are below and above about 40-45 °C, respectively. In order to see whether these acetate consumption pathways differently discriminate the stable carbon isotopes of acetate, we measured the δ 13C of total acetate and acetate-methyl as well as the δ 13C of CO 2 and CH 4 in rice field soil that had been pre-incubated at 45 °C and then shifted to different temperatures between 25 and 50 °C. Acetate transiently accumulated to about 6 mM, which is about one-third of the amount of CH 4 produced, irrespective of the incubation temperature and the CH 4 production pathway involved. However, the patterns of δ 13C of the CH 4 and CO 2 produced were different at low (25, 30, 35 °C) versus high (40, 45, 50 °C) temperatures. These patterns were consistent with CH 4 being exclusively formed by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at high temperatures, and by a combination of acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at low temperatures. The patterns of δ 13C of total acetate and acetate-methyl were also different at high versus low temperatures, indicating the involvement of different pathways of production and consumption of acetate at the two temperature regimes. Isotope fractionation during consumption of the methyl group of acetate was more pronounced at low ( α = 1.010-1.025) than at high ( α = 1.0-1.01) temperatures indicating that acetoclastic methanogenesis exhibits a stronger isotope effect than syntrophic acetate oxidation. Small amounts of propionate also transiently accumulated and were analyzed for δ 13C. The δ 13C values slightly increased (by about 10‰) during production and consumption of propionate, but were not affected by incubation temperature. Collectively, our results showed distinct

  9. Isotopic Discrimination in the Double-Crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus).

    PubMed

    Craig, Elizabeth C; Dorr, Brian S; Hanson-Dorr, Katie C; Sparks, Jed P; Curtis, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    The diet-tissue discrimination factor is the amount by which a consumer's tissue varies isotopically from its diet, and is therefore a key element in models that use stable isotopes to estimate diet composition. In this study we measured discrimination factors in blood (whole blood, red blood cells and plasma), liver, muscle and feathers of Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) for stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. Cormorants exhibited discrimination factors that differed significantly among tissue types (for carbon and nitrogen), and differed substantially (in the context of the isotopic variation among relevant prey species) from those observed in congeneric species. The Double-crested Cormorant has undergone rapid population expansion throughout much of its historic range over the past three decades, leading to both real and perceived conflicts with fisheries throughout North America, and this study provides an essential link for the use of stable isotope analysis in researching foraging ecology, diet, and resource use of this widespread and controversial species.

  10. Isotopic Discrimination in the Double-Crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Elizabeth C.; Sparks, Jed P.; Curtis, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The diet-tissue discrimination factor is the amount by which a consumer’s tissue varies isotopically from its diet, and is therefore a key element in models that use stable isotopes to estimate diet composition. In this study we measured discrimination factors in blood (whole blood, red blood cells and plasma), liver, muscle and feathers of Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) for stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. Cormorants exhibited discrimination factors that differed significantly among tissue types (for carbon and nitrogen), and differed substantially (in the context of the isotopic variation among relevant prey species) from those observed in congeneric species. The Double-crested Cormorant has undergone rapid population expansion throughout much of its historic range over the past three decades, leading to both real and perceived conflicts with fisheries throughout North America, and this study provides an essential link for the use of stable isotope analysis in researching foraging ecology, diet, and resource use of this widespread and controversial species. PMID:26473353

  11. /sup 18/O isotope effect in /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Part 9. Hydrolysis of benzyl phosphate by phosphatase enzymes and in acidic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Parente, J.E.; Risley, J.M.; Van Etten, R.L.

    1984-12-26

    The /sup 18/O isotope-induced shifts in /sup 13/C and /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to establish the position of bond cleavage in the phosphatase-catalyzed and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis reactions of benzyl phosphate. The application of the /sup 18/O-isotope effect in NMR spectroscopy affords a continuous, nondestructive assay method for following the kinetics and position of bond cleavage in the hydrolytic process. The technique provides advantages over most discontinuous methods in which the reaction components must be isolated and converted to volatile derivatives prior to analysis. In the present study, (..cap alpha..-/sup 13/C,ester-/sup 18/O)benzyl phosphate and (ester-/sup 18/O)benzyl phosphate were synthesized for use in enzymatic and nonenzymatic studies. Hydrolysis reactions catalyzed by the alkaline phosphatase from E. coli and by the acid phosphatases isolated from human prostate and human liver were all accompanied by cleavage of the substrate phosphorus-oxygen bond consistent with previously postulated mechanisms involving covalent phosphoenzyme intermediates. An extensive study of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of benzyl phosphate at 75/sup 0/C revealed that the site of bond cleavage is dependent on pH. At pH less than or equal to 1.3, the hydrolysis proceeds with C-O bond cleavage; at 1.3 < pH < 2.0, there is a mixture of C-O and P-O bond scission, the latter progressively predominating as the pH is raised; at pH greater than or equal to 2.0, the hydrolysis proceeds with exclusive P-O bond scission. (S)-(+)-(..cap alpha..-/sup 2/H)Benzyl phosphate was also synthesized. Hydrolysis of this chiral benzyl derivative demonstrated that the acid-catalyzed C-O bond scission of benzyl phosphate proceeds by an A-1 (S/sub N/1) mechanism with 70% racemization and 30% inversion at carbon. 37 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Can tree-ring isotopes (δ18O and δ13C) improve our understanding of hydroclimate variability in the Columbia River Basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csank, A. Z.; Wise, E.; McAfee, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The trajectory of incoming storms from the Pacific Ocean has a strong impact on hydroclimate in the Pacific Northwest. Shifts between zonal and meridional flow are a key influence on drought and pluvial regimes in both the PNW and the western United States as a whole. Circulation-dependent variability in the isotopic composition of precipitation can be recorded and potentially reconstructed using δ18O records derived from tree-rings. Here we present isotopic records of δ18O and δ13C from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) for the period 1950-2013 from six sites located in the lee of the Cascades in eastern Washington. Because of the orientation of the Cascades, zonal flow will result in an intensified rain shadow whereas meridional flow allows moisture to penetrate at a lower elevation leading to a lower rainout effect. This means zonal flow results in drier conditions in eastern Washington and the converse for meridional flow. We hypothesized that more depleted precipitation δ18O values will occur with periods of more zonal flow across the PNW and will be recorded by trees at our sites. Results show a strong relationship between our δ18O chronologies and winter precipitation (R = -0.50; p<0.001). δ13C chronologies from the same trees showed a relationship to prior fall/winter (pOct-pDec) precipitation (R = -0.46; p<0.005) suggesting a possible link to antecedent moisture conditions. With a focus on years with clear zonal and meridional flow regimes, we regressed the tree-ring δ18O anomaly against the instrumental record of total precipitation and compared the residual series to records of storm track for the period 1978-2008, and we found a detectable signal where the most depleted δ18O was generally associated with zonal flow and the most enriched δ18O with meridional flow. However, there are still some years where the relationship is unclear. Further work is aimed at understanding these anomalous years and extending our record beyond the instrumental

  13. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope turnover rates and diet-tissue discrimination in Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Alves-Stanley, Christy D; Worthy, Graham A J

    2009-08-01

    The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is a herbivorous marine mammal that occupies freshwater, estuarine and marine habitats. Despite being considered endangered, relatively little is known about its feeding ecology. The present study expands on previous work on manatee feeding ecology by providing critical baseline parameters for accurate isotopic data interpretation. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were examined over a period of more than 1 year in the epidermis of rescued Florida manatees that were transitioning from a diet of aquatic forage to terrestrial forage (lettuce). The mean half-life for (13)C turnover was 53 and 59 days for skin from manatees rescued from coastal and riverine regions, respectively. The mean half-life for (15)N turnover was 27 and 58 days, respectively. Because of these slow turnover rates, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis in manatee epidermis is useful in summarizing average dietary intake over a long period of time rather than assessing recent diet. In addition to turnover rate, a diet-tissue discrimination value of 2.8 per thousand for (13)C was calculated for long-term captive manatees on a lettuce diet. Determining both turnover rate and diet-tissue discrimination is essential in order to accurately interpret stable isotope data.

  14. Major Sources of Organic Matter in a Complex Coral Reef Lagoon: Identification from Isotopic Signatures (δ13C and δ15N).

    PubMed

    Briand, Marine J; Bonnet, Xavier; Goiran, Claire; Guillou, Gaël; Letourneur, Yves

    2015-01-01

    A wide investigation was conducted into the main organic matter (OM) sources supporting coral reef trophic networks in the lagoon of New Caledonia. Sampling included different reef locations (fringing, intermediate and barrier reef), different associated ecosystems (mangroves and seagrass beds) and rivers. In total, 30 taxa of macrophytes, plus pools of particulate and sedimentary OM (POM and SOM) were sampled. Isotopic signatures (C and N) of each OM sources was characterized and the composition of OM pools assessed. In addition, spatial and seasonal variations of reef OM sources were examined. Mangroves isotopic signatures were the most C-depleted (-30.17 ± 0.41 ‰) and seagrass signatures were the most C-enriched (-4.36 ± 0.72 ‰). Trichodesmium spp. had the most N-depleted signatures (-0.14 ± 0.03 ‰) whereas mangroves had the most N-enriched signatures (6.47 ± 0.41 ‰). The composition of POM and SOM varied along a coast-to-barrier reef gradient. River POM and marine POM contributed equally to coastal POM, whereas marine POM represented 90% of the POM on barrier reefs, compared to 10% river POM. The relative importance of river POM, marine POM and mangroves to the SOM pool decreased from fringing to barrier reefs. Conversely, the relative importance of seagrass, Trichodesmium spp. and macroalgae increased along this gradient. Overall, spatial fluctuations in POM and SOM were much greater than in primary producers. Seasonal fluctuations were low for all OM sources. Our results demonstrated that a large variety of OM sources sustain coral reefs, varying in their origin, composition and role and suggest that δ13C was a more useful fingerprint than δ15N in this endeavour. This study also suggested substantial OM exchanges and trophic connections between coral reefs and surrounding ecosystems. Finally, the importance of accounting for environmental characteristics at small temporal and spatial scales before drawing general patterns is highlighted.

  15. Dual element ((15)N/(14)N, (13)C/(12)C) isotope analysis of glyphosate and AMPA by derivatization-gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) combined with LC/IRMS.

    PubMed

    Mogusu, Emmanuel O; Wolbert, J Benjamin; Kujawinski, Dorothea M; Jochmann, Maik A; Elsner, Martin

    2015-07-01

    To assess sources and degradation of the herbicide glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine] and its metabolite AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid), concentration measurements are often inconclusive and even (13)C/(12)C analysis alone may give limited information. To advance isotope ratio analysis of an additional element, we present compound-specific (15)N/(14)N analysis of glyphosate and AMPA by a two step derivatization in combination with gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). The N-H group was derivatized with isopropyl chloroformate (iso-PCF), and remaining acidic groups were subsequently methylated with trimethylsilyldiazomethane (TMSD). Iso-PCF treatment at pH <10 gave too low (15)N/(14)N ratios indicating an incomplete derivatization; in contrast, too high (15)N/(14)N ratios at pH >10 indicated decomposition of the derivative. At pH 10, and with an excess of iso-PCF by 10-24, greatest yields and accurate (15)N/(14)N ratios were obtained (deviation from elemental analyzer-IRMS: -0.2 ± 0.9% for glyphosate; -0.4 ± 0.7% for AMPA). Limits for accurate δ(15)N analysis of glyphosate and AMPA were 150 and 250 ng injected, respectively. A combination of δ(15)N and δ(13)C analysis by liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) (1) enabled an improved distinction of commercial glyphosate products and (2) showed that glyphosate isotope values during degradation by MnO2 clearly fell outside the commercial product range. This highlights the potential of combined carbon and nitrogen isotopes analysis to trace sources and degradation of glyphosate.

  16. Combining stable isotope13C) of trace gases and aerobiological data to monitor the entry and dispersion of microorganisms in caves.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Anton, E; Cuezva, S; Jurado, V; Porca, E; Miller, A Z; Fernandez-Cortes, A; Saiz-Jimenez, C; Sanchez-Moral, S

    2014-01-01

    Altamira Cave (north of Spain) contains one of the world's most prominent Paleolithic rock art paintings, which are threatened by a massive microbial colonization of ceiling and walls. Previous studies revealed that exchange rates between the cave and the external atmosphere through the entrance door play a decisive role in the entry and transport of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) and nutrients to the interior of the cave. A spatial-distributed sampling and measurement of carrier (CO2) and trace (CH4) gases and isotopic signal of CO2 (δ(13)C) inside the cave supports the existence of a second connection (active gas exchange processes) with the external atmosphere at or near the Well Hall, the innermost and deepest area of the cave. A parallel aerobiological study also showed that, in addition to the entrance door, there is another connection with the external atmosphere, which favors the transport and increases microorganism concentrations in the Well Hall. This double approach provides a more complete knowledge on cave ventilation and revealed the existence of unknown passageways in the cave, a fact that should be taken into account in future cave management.

  17. Regional Scale Variability in Background and Source δ13C of Methane in the Atlantic, Europe and the Arctic: Cautionary Tales for Isotopic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, D.; Fisher, R. E.; France, J. L.; Lanoiselle, M.; Zazzeri, G.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling studies of methane δ13C, both of modern atmosphere and glacial palaeoclimates have used a global isotopic signature for each of the main source categories, whereas detailed studies of source fluxes, such as boreal wetlands, suggest that on the centimeter to meter scale there is very great variability. In recent years we have been reassessing the usefulness of using a generic source value from source up to regional scale through sampling campaigns in the European Arctic, the UK and onboard ships sailing the Atlantic up to the Arctic Ocean. Currently the boreal wetland source of methane dominates above 60°N. Within Finland this source varies at the wetland scale from -74 to -66‰ depending on wetland type and seasonal variability in temperature and water table. Lapland road trips and ship sampling suggest that these emissions are homogenized to -70 to -67‰ in the well-mixed regional atmosphere. An infrequent boreal forest fire emission adds a -30 to -26‰ component into the mix, and such inputs have been observed in the Mace Head (Ireland) isotopic record of 2002. The story is much more complex once the latitudes of heavily urbanized and agricultural areas of Northern Europe are reached. Isotopic signatures applied to UK and EC inventories suggest that national emissions can vary from -42 to -60‰ depending on source mix, but even this is too simplified. Fugitive emissions from gas distribution systems vary based on the source of the gas, with biogenic-dominated supplies from west Siberia at -50‰ to thermogenic gas of the Southern North Sea fields at -32‰. Coal emissions are also source-dependent and have a similar range to gas, but unlike pipeline-homogenized gas can vary from one mine to the next. Emissions from ruminants vary due to C3 and C4 plant diets, with C4 closer to -50‰ while C3 emissions are in the low -60's. A recent whole barn experiment in the UK recorded -66‰. Landfill signatures also vary. Sites engineered in the last decade

  18. Carbon isotope discrimination in forest and pasture ecosystems of the Amazon Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ometto, Jean P. H. B.; Flanagan, Lawrence B.; Martinelli, Luiz A.; Moreira, Marcelo Z.; Higuchi, Niro; Ehleringer, James R.

    2002-12-01

    Our objective was to measure the stable carbon isotope composition of leaf tissue and CO2 released by respiration (δr), and to use this information as an estimate of changes in ecosystem isotopic discrimination that occur in response to seasonal and interannual changes in environmental conditions, and land-use change (forest-pasture conversion). We made measurements in primary forest and pastures in the Amazon Basin of Brazil. At the Santarém forest site, δr values showed a seasonal cycle varying from less than -29‰ to approximately -26‰. The observed seasonal change in δr was correlated with variation in the observed monthly precipitation. In contrast, there was no significant seasonal variation in δr at the Manaus forest site (average δr approximately -28‰), consistent with a narrower range of variation in monthly precipitation than occurred in Santarém. Despite substantial (9‰) vertical variation in leaf δ13C, the average δr values observed for all forest sites were similar to the δ13C values of the most exposed sun foliage of the dominant tree species. This suggested that the major portion of recently respired carbon dioxide in these forests was metabolized carbohydrate fixed by the sun leaves at the top of the forest canopy. There was no significant seasonal variation observed in the δ13C values of leaf organic matter for the forest sites. We sampled in pastures dominated by the C4 grass, Brachiaria spp., which is planted after forest vegetation has been cleared. The carbon isotope ratio of respired CO2 in pastures was enriched in 13C by approximately 10‰ compared to forest ecosystems. A significant temporal change occurred in δr after the Manaus pasture was burned. Burning removed much of the encroaching C3 shrub vegetation and so allowed an increased dominance of the C4 pasture grass, which resulted in higher δr values.

  19. Carbon Availability Modifies Temperature Responses of Heterotrophic Microbial Respiration, Carbon Uptake Affinity, and Stable Carbon Isotope Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyungjin; Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Billings, Sharon A.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial transformations of organic carbon (OC) generate a large flux of CO2 into the atmosphere and influence the C balance of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Yet, inherent heterogeneity in natural environments precludes direct quantification of multiple microbial C fluxes that underlie CO2 production. Here we used a continuous flow bioreactor coupled with a stable C isotope analyzer to determine the effects of temperature and C availability (cellobiose concentration) on C fluxes and 13C discrimination of a microbial population growing at steady-state in a homogeneous, well-mixed environment. We estimated C uptake affinity and C use efficiency (CUE) to characterize the physiological responses of microbes to changing environmental conditions. Temperature increased biomass-C specific respiration rate and C uptake affinity at lower C availability, but did not influence those parameters at higher C availability. CUE decreased non-linearly with increasing temperature. The non-linear, negative relationship between CUE and temperature was more pronounced under lower C availability than under relatively high C availability. We observed stable isotope fractionation between C substrate and microbial biomass C (7~12‰ depletion), and between microbial biomass and respired CO2 (4~10‰ depletion). Microbial discrimination against 13C-containing cellobiose during C uptake was influenced by temperature and C availability, while discrimination during respiration was only influenced by C availability. Shifts in C uptake affinity with temperature and C availability may have modified uptake-induced 13C fractionation. By stressing the importance of C availability on temperature responses of microbial C fluxes, C uptake affinity, CUE, and isotopic fractionation, this study contributes to a fundamental understanding of C flow through microbes. This will help guide parameterization of microbial responses to varying temperature and C availability within Earth-system models. PMID

  20. Carbon Availability Modifies Temperature Responses of Heterotrophic Microbial Respiration, Carbon Uptake Affinity, and Stable Carbon Isotope Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyungjin; Lehmeier, Christoph A; Iv, Ford Ballantyne; Billings, Sharon A

    2016-01-01

    Microbial transformations of organic carbon (OC) generate a large flux of CO2 into the atmosphere and influence the C balance of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Yet, inherent heterogeneity in natural environments precludes direct quantification of multiple microbial C fluxes that underlie CO2 production. Here we used a continuous flow bioreactor coupled with a stable C isotope analyzer to determine the effects of temperature and C availability (cellobiose concentration) on C fluxes and (13)C discrimination of a microbial population growing at steady-state in a homogeneous, well-mixed environment. We estimated C uptake affinity and C use efficiency (CUE) to characterize the physiological responses of microbes to changing environmental conditions. Temperature increased biomass-C specific respiration rate and C uptake affinity at lower C availability, but did not influence those parameters at higher C availability. CUE decreased non-linearly with increasing temperature. The non-linear, negative relationship between CUE and temperature was more pronounced under lower C availability than under relatively high C availability. We observed stable isotope fractionation between C substrate and microbial biomass C (7~12‰ depletion), and between microbial biomass and respired CO2 (4~10‰ depletion). Microbial discrimination against (13)C-containing cellobiose during C uptake was influenced by temperature and C availability, while discrimination during respiration was only influenced by C availability. Shifts in C uptake affinity with temperature and C availability may have modified uptake-induced (13)C fractionation. By stressing the importance of C availability on temperature responses of microbial C fluxes, C uptake affinity, CUE, and isotopic fractionation, this study contributes to a fundamental understanding of C flow through microbes. This will help guide parameterization of microbial responses to varying temperature and C availability within Earth-system models.

  1. An analysis of ash and isotopic carbon discrimination (delta13C) methods to evaluate water use efficiency in apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple cultivars are selected for fruit quality, disease and insect resistance, not water use efficiency (WUE), however, the need for more water use efficient crops is accelerating due to climate change and increased competition for water resources. On a whole plant basis, calculation of water use e...

  2. The Effect of Parasite Infection on Stable Isotope Turnover Rates of δ15N, δ13C and δ34S in Multiple Tissues of Eurasian Perch Perca fluviatilis

    PubMed Central

    Yohannes, Elizabeth; Grimm, Claudia; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of commercially and ecologically important fish can improve understanding of life-history and trophic ecology. However, accurate interpretation of stable isotope values requires knowledge of tissue-specific isotopic turnover that will help to describe differences in the isotopic composition of tissues and diet. We performed a diet-switch experiment using captive-reared parasite-free Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) and wild caught specimens of the same species, infected with the pike tapeworm Triaenophorus nodulosus living in host liver tissue. We hypothesize that metabolic processes related to infection status play a major role in isotopic turnover and examined the influence of parasite infection on isotopic turn-over rate of carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N) and sulphur (δ34S) in liver, blood and muscle. The δ15N and δ13C turnovers were fastest in liver tissues, followed by blood and muscle. In infected fish, liver and blood δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were similar. However, in infected fish, liver and blood δ13C turnover was faster than that of δ15N. Moreover, in infected subjects, liver δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were three to five times faster than in livers of uninfected subjects (isotopic half-life of ca.3-4 days compared to 16 and 10 days, respectively). Blood δ34S turnover rate were about twice faster in non-infected individuals implying that parasite infection could retard the turnover rate of δ34S and sulphur containing amino acids. Slower turnover rate of essential amino acid could probably decrease individual immune function. These indicate potential hidden costs of chronic and persistent infections that may have accumulated adverse effects and might eventually impair life-history fitness. For the first time, we were able to shift the isotope values of parasites encapsulated in the liver by changing the dietary source of the host. We also report variability in isotopic turnover rates between tissues, elements and

  3. The Effect of Parasite Infection on Stable Isotope Turnover Rates of δ15N, δ13C and δ34S in Multiple Tissues of Eurasian Perch Perca fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Elizabeth; Grimm, Claudia; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of commercially and ecologically important fish can improve understanding of life-history and trophic ecology. However, accurate interpretation of stable isotope values requires knowledge of tissue-specific isotopic turnover that will help to describe differences in the isotopic composition of tissues and diet. We performed a diet-switch experiment using captive-reared parasite-free Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) and wild caught specimens of the same species, infected with the pike tapeworm Triaenophorus nodulosus living in host liver tissue. We hypothesize that metabolic processes related to infection status play a major role in isotopic turnover and examined the influence of parasite infection on isotopic turn-over rate of carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N) and sulphur (δ34S) in liver, blood and muscle. The δ15N and δ13C turnovers were fastest in liver tissues, followed by blood and muscle. In infected fish, liver and blood δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were similar. However, in infected fish, liver and blood δ13C turnover was faster than that of δ15N. Moreover, in infected subjects, liver δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were three to five times faster than in livers of uninfected subjects (isotopic half-life of ca.3-4 days compared to 16 and 10 days, respectively). Blood δ34S turnover rate were about twice faster in non-infected individuals implying that parasite infection could retard the turnover rate of δ34S and sulphur containing amino acids. Slower turnover rate of essential amino acid could probably decrease individual immune function. These indicate potential hidden costs of chronic and persistent infections that may have accumulated adverse effects and might eventually impair life-history fitness. For the first time, we were able to shift the isotope values of parasites encapsulated in the liver by changing the dietary source of the host. We also report variability in isotopic turnover rates between tissues, elements and

  4. An overview of methods using (13)C for improved compound identification in metabolomics and natural products.

    PubMed

    Clendinen, Chaevien S; Stupp, Gregory S; Ajredini, Ramadan; Lee-McMullen, Brittany; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S

    2015-01-01

    Compound identification is a major bottleneck in metabolomics studies. In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations, resonance overlap often hinders unambiguous database matching or de novo compound identification. In liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), discriminating between biological signals and background artifacts and reliable determination of molecular formulae are not always straightforward. We have designed and implemented several NMR and LC-MS approaches that utilize (13)C, either enriched or at natural abundance, in metabolomics applications. For LC-MS applications, we describe a technique called isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA), which utilizes samples that are isotopically labeled with 5% (test) and 95% (control) (13)C. This labeling strategy leads to characteristic isotopic patterns that allow the differentiation of biological signals from artifacts and yield the exact number of carbons, significantly reducing possible molecular formulae. The relative abundance between the test and control samples for every IROA feature can be determined simply by integrating the peaks that arise from the 5 and 95% channels. For NMR applications, we describe two (13)C-based approaches. For samples at natural abundance, we have developed a workflow to obtain (13)C-(13)C and (13)C-(1)H statistical correlations using 1D (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra. For samples that can be isotopically labeled, we describe another NMR approach to obtain direct (13)C-(13)C spectroscopic correlations. These methods both provide extensive information about the carbon framework of compounds in the mixture for either database matching or de novo compound identification. We also discuss strategies in which (13)C NMR can be used to identify unknown compounds from IROA experiments. By combining technologies with the same samples, we can identify important biomarkers and corresponding metabolites of interest.

  5. The effects of preservation methods, dyes and acidification on the isotopic values (δ15N and δ13C) of two zooplankton species from the KwaZulu-Natal Bight, South Africa.

    PubMed

    de Lecea, Ander M; Cooper, Rachel; Omarjee, Aadila; Smit, Albertus J

    2011-07-15

    Stable isotope measurements are an important tool for ecosystem trophic linkage studies. Ideally, fresh samples should be used for isotopic analysis, but in many cases organisms must be preserved and analysed later. In some cases dyes must be used to help distinguish organisms from detritus. Since preservatives and dyes are carbon-based, their addition could influence isotopic readings. This study aims to improve understanding of the effects of sample storage method, dye addition and acidification on the δ(15)N and δ(13)C values of zooplankton (Euphasia frigida and Undinula vulgaris). Zooplankton was collected and preserved by freezing, or by the addition of 5% formalin, 70% ethanol, or 5% formalin with added Phloxine B or Rose Bengal, and stored for 1 month before processing. Samples in 5% formalin and 70% ethanol were also kept and processed after 3 and 9 months to study changes over time. Formalin caused the largest enrichment for δ(13)C and a slight enrichment for δ(15)N, while ethanol produced a slight depletion for δ(13)C, and different effects on δ(15)N depending on the species. In formalin, dyes depleted the δ(13)C values, but had variable effects on δ(15)N, relative to formalin alone. Acidification had no significant effect on δ(15)N or δ(13)C for either species. Long-term storage showed that the effects of the preservatives were species-dependent. Although the effects on δ(15)N varied, a relative enrichment in (13)C of samples occurred with time. This can have important consequences for the understanding of the organic flow within a food web and for trophic studies. .

  6. Will carbon isotope discrimination be useful as a tool for analysing the functional response of barley plants to salinity under the future atmospheric CO₂ conditions?

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Usue; Mena-Petite, Amaia; Muñoz-Rueda, Alberto

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the response of barley's carbon isotope composition and other physiological parameters to the interaction of salt stress and elevated CO2 levels, and the usefulness of carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C) as indicative of the functional performance of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Barley plants were grown under ambient (350 μmol mol(-1)) and elevated (700 μmol mol(-1)) CO2 conditions and subjected to salt stress (0, 80, 160, and 240 mM NaCl) for 14 days. Elevated CO2 levels increased biomass production, water use efficiency and the photosynthetic rate, although this parameter was partly acclimated to elevated CO2 levels. Salt stress decreased this acclimation response because it enhanced the sink strength of the plant. Elevated CO2 significantly decreased the (13)C isotopic composition (δ(13)C) in all plant organs; however, the ratio of δ(13)C between the root and the leaf was increased, indicating a higher allocation of δ(13)C to the below-ground parts. Conversely, salt stress increased plant δ(13)C, showing differences between plant organs. From the strong correlations between Δ(13)C and biomass production, the photosynthetic rate or water use efficiency both at ambient and elevated CO2, we concluded that Δ(13)C is a useful parameter for evaluating leaf and whole plant responses to salinity and can provide an integrated index of processes to understand the mechanisms underlying salt tolerance of barley both under current and future environmental CO2 conditions.

  7. (13)C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Clendinen, Chaevien S; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S

    2015-06-02

    The many advantages of (13)C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, (13)C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semiautomated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE data sets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures.

  8. Assessing methane oxidation under landfill covers and its contribution to the above atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels: The added value of the isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D CH{sub 4}) approach

    SciTech Connect

    Widory, D.; Proust, E.; Bellenfant, G.; Bour, O.

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of the isotope and mass balance approaches to evaluate the level of methane oxidation within a landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The level of methane oxidation is not homogenous under the landfill cover and is strongly correlated to the methane flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope tracking of the contribution of the methane oxidation to the CO{sub 2} concentrations in the ambient air. - Abstract: We are presenting here a multi-isotope approach ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O of CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D of CH{sub 4}) to assess (i) the level(s) of methane oxidation during waste biodegradation and its migration through a landfill cover in Sonzay (France), and (ii) its contribution to the atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels above the surface. The isotope approach is compared to the more conventional mass balance approach. Results from the two techniques are comparable and show that the CH{sub 4} oxidation under the landfill cover is heterogenous, with low oxidation percentages in samples showing high biogas fluxes, which was expected in clay covers presenting fissures, through which CH{sub 4} is rapidly transported. At shallow depth, more immobile biogas pockets show a higher level of CH{sub 4} oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria. {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} samples taken at different heights (from below the cover up to 8 m above the ground level) were also used to identify and assess the relative contributions of its main sources both under the landfill cover and in the surrounding atmosphere.

  9. Discrimination of ginseng cultivation regions using light stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kiwook; Song, Joo-Hyun; Heo, Sang-Cheol; Lee, Jin-Hee; Jung, In-Woo; Min, Ji-Sook

    2015-10-01

    Korean ginseng is considered to be a precious health food in Asia. Today, thieves frequently compromise ginseng farms by pervasive theft. Thus, studies regarding the characteristics of ginseng according to growth region are required in order to deter ginseng thieves and prevent theft. In this study, 6 regions were selected on the basis of Korea regional criteria (si, gun, gu), and two ginseng-farms were randomly selected from each of the 6 regions. Then 4-6 samples of ginseng were acquired from each ginseng farm. The stable isotopic compositions of H, O, C, and N of the collected ginseng samples were analyzed. As a result, differences in the hydrogen isotope ratios could be used to distinguish regional differences, and differences in the nitrogen isotope ratios yielded characteristic information regarding the farms from which the samples were obtained. Thus, stable isotope values could be used to differentiate samples according to regional differences. Therefore, stable isotope analysis serves as a powerful tool to discriminate the regional origin of Korean ginseng samples from across Korea.

  10. Incorporation of 13C labelled root-shoot residues in soil in the presence of Lumbricus terrestris: An isotopic and molecular approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Alix; Alexis, Marie; Nguyen Tu, Thanh Tu; Anquetil, Christelle; Vaury, Véronique; Derenne, Sylvie; Quenea, Katell

    2016-04-01

    Litter from plant biomass deposited on soil surface can either be mineralized; releasing CO2 to the atmosphere, or transferred into the soil as organic compounds. Both pathways depend on biotic factors such as litter characteristics and the of soil organism activity. During the last decades, many studies have focused on the origin of organic matter, with a particular attention to the fate of root and shoot litter. It is generally admitted that roots decompose at a slower rate than shoots, resulting in a higher carbon sequestration in soil for compounds originating from roots. Earthworms play a central role in litter decomposition and carbon cycling, ingesting both organic and mineral compounds which are mixed, complexed and dejected in the form of casts at the soil surface or along earthworm burrows. The simultaneous impact of earthworms and root-shoot on soil carbon cycling is still poorly understood. This study aimed at (1) defining the rate of incorporation of root and shoot litter with or without earthworms and (2) characterizing the molecular composition of soil organic matter upon litter decomposition, after one year of experimentation. A mesocosm experiment was set up to follow the incorporation of 13C labelled Ryegrass root and shoot litter in the soil, in the presence of anecic earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris). Soil samples were collected at 0-20 and 40-60 cm, as well as surface casts, at the beginning and after 1, 2, 4, 8, 24 and 54 weeks of experiment. Organic carbon content and δ13C values were determined for all the samples with Elemental Analysis - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry. Lipid-free soil and cast samples after 54 weeks of incubation were analyzed with Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Pyrolysis products were grouped into six classes: polysaccharides, lignin derived compounds, phenols, N-compounds, aliphatic compounds and sterols. Each pyrolysis product was quantified thanks to its peak area, relative to the total area of the

  11. Stable isotope ratio (13C/12C) mass spectrometry to evaluate carbon sources and sinks: changes and trends during the decomposition of vegetal debris from eucalyptus clone plantations (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, I.; Cabaneiro, A.

    2014-02-01

    Vegetal debris is known to participate in key soil processes such as the formation of soil organic matter (OM), also being a potential source of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. However, its contribution to the isotopic composition of both the soil OM and the atmospheric carbon dioxide is not clear yet. Hence, the main objective of the present research is to understand the isotopic 13C changes and trends that take place during the successive biodegradative stages of decomposing soil organic inputs. By incubating bulk plant tissues for several months under laboratory controlled conditions, the kinetics of the CO2 releases and shifts in the 13C natural abundance of the solid residues were investigated using litter samples coming from forest plantations with a different clone (Anselmo: 1st clonal generation attained by morphological selection and Odiel: 2nd clonal generation genetically obtained) of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. developed over granitic or schistic bedrocks and located in northwestern Spain. Significant isotopic variations with time were observed, probably due to the isotopically heterogeneous composition of these complex substrates in conjunction with the initial selective consumption of more easily degradable 13C-differentiated compounds during the first stages of the biodegradation, while less available or recalcitrant litter components were decomposed at later stages of biodegradation, generating products that have their own specific isotopic signatures. These results, which significantly differ depending on the type of clone, suggest that caution must be exercised when interpreting carbon isotope studies (at natural abundance levels) since perturbations associated with the quality or chemical composition of the organic debris from different terrestrial ecosystems can have an important effect on the carbon stable isotope dynamics.

  12. Conifers, Angiosperm Trees, and Lianas: Growth, Whole-Plant Water and Nitrogen Use Efficiency, and Stable Isotope Composition (δ13C and δ18O) of Seedlings Grown in a Tropical Environment1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Cernusak, Lucas A.; Winter, Klaus; Aranda, Jorge; Turner, Benjamin L.

    2008-01-01

    Seedlings of several species of gymnosperm trees, angiosperm trees, and angiosperm lianas were grown under tropical field conditions in the Republic of Panama; physiological processes controlling plant C and water fluxes were assessed across this functionally diverse range of species. Relative growth rate, r, was primarily controlled by the ratio of leaf area to plant mass, of which specific leaf area was a key component. Instantaneous photosynthesis, when expressed on a leaf-mass basis, explained 69% of variation in r (P < 0.0001, n = 94). Mean r of angiosperms was significantly higher than that of the gymnosperms; within angiosperms, mean r of lianas was higher than that of trees. Whole-plant nitrogen use efficiency was also significantly higher in angiosperm than in gymnosperm species, and was primarily controlled by the rate of photosynthesis for a given amount of leaf nitrogen. Whole-plant water use efficiency, TEc, varied significantly among species, and was primarily controlled by ci/ca, the ratio of intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressures during photosynthesis. Instantaneous measurements of ci/ca explained 51% of variation in TEc (P < 0.0001, n = 94). Whole-plant 13C discrimination also varied significantly as a function of ci/ca (R2 = 0.57, P < 0.0001, n = 94), and was, accordingly, a good predictor of TEc. The 18O enrichment of stem dry matter was primarily controlled by the predicted 18O enrichment of evaporative sites within leaves (R2 = 0.61, P < 0.0001, n = 94), with some residual variation explained by mean transpiration rate. Measurements of carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios could provide a useful means of parameterizing physiological models of tropical forest trees. PMID:18599645

  13. Galactose oxidation using (13)C in healthy and galactosemic children.

    PubMed

    Resende-Campanholi, D R; Porta, G; Ferrioli, E; Pfrimer, K; Ciampo, L A Del; Junior, J S Camelo

    2015-03-01

    Galactosemia is an inborn error of galactose metabolism that occurs mainly as the outcome of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) deficiency. The ability to assess galactose oxidation following administration of a galactose-labeled isotope (1-(13)C-galactose) allows the determination of galactose metabolism in a practical manner. We aimed to assess the level of galactose oxidation in both healthy and galactosemic Brazilian children. Twenty-one healthy children and seven children with galactosemia ranging from 1 to 7 years of age were studied. A breath test was used to quantitate (13)CO2 enrichment in exhaled air before and at 30, 60, and 120 min after the oral administration of 7 mg/kg of an aqueous solution of 1-(13)C-galactose to all children. The molar ratios of (13)CO2 and (12)CO2 were quantified by the mass/charge ratio (m/z) of stable isotopes in each air sample by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. In sick children, the cumulative percentage of (13)C from labeled galactose (CUMPCD) in the exhaled air ranged from 0.03% at 30 min to 1.67% at 120 min. In contrast, healthy subjects showed a much broader range in CUMPCD, with values from 0.4% at 30 min to 5.58% at 120 min. The study found a significant difference in galactose oxidation between children with and without galactosemia, demonstrating that the breath test is useful in discriminating children with GALT deficiencies.

  14. Compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios (delta13C values) of the halogenated natural product 2,3,3',4,4',5,5'-heptachloro-1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrrole (Q1).

    PubMed

    Vetter, Walter; Gleixner, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis using gas chromatography interfaced to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) was applied for the determination of delta13C values of the marine halogenated natural product 2,3,3',4,4',5,5'-heptachloro-1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrrole (Q1). The delta13C value of a lab-made Q1 standard (-34.20 +/- 0.27 per thousand) was depleted in 13C by more than 11 per thousand relative to the residues of Q1 in dolphin blubber from Australia and skua liver from Antarctica. This clarified that the synthesized Q1 was not the source for Q1 in the biota samples. However, two Australian marine mammals showed a large variation in the delta13C value, which, in our experience, was implausible. Since the GC/IRMS system was connected to a conventional ion trap mass spectrometer by a post-column splitter, we were able to closely inspect the peak purity of Q1 in the respective samples. While the mass spectra of Q1 did not indicate any impurity, a fronting peak of PCB 101 was identified in one sample. This interference falsified the delta13C value of the respective sample. Once this sample was excluded, we found that the delta13C values of the remaining samples, i.e. liver of Antarctic brown skua (-21.47 +/- 1.47 per thousand) and blubber of Australian melon-headed whale (-22.80 +/- 0.33 per thousand), were in the same order. The standard deviation for Q1 was larger in the skua samples than in the standard and the whale blubber sample. This was due to lower amounts of skua sample available. It remained unclear if the Q1 residues originate from the same producer and location.

  15. Stable isotopes (δ 18O and δ 13C), trace and minor element compositions of Recent scleractinians and Last Glacial bivalves at the Santa Maria di Leuca deep-water coral province, Ionian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Matthias López; Montagna, Paolo; Vendrell-Simón, Begoña; McCulloch, Malcolm; Taviani, Marco

    2010-03-01

    The aragonitic skeletons of bathyal cold-water corals have a high potential as geochemical in situ archives for paleoceanography. Oxygen isotopes and stable carbon isotopes (δ 18O and δ 13C) have been analyzed, as well as trace and minor element compositions (e.g. Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, U/Ca, B/Ca and P/Ca) in Lophelia pertusa, one of the most important frame-builders at the Santa Maria di Leuca (SML) deep-water coral hotspot in the Central Mediterranean. The Apulian Bank is swept by strong currents of the Adriatic Deep Water Outflow. The temperature of 13.9 °C is the highest temperature recorded for L. pertusa and provides an important end-member of environmental conditions for geochemical analyses on living Atlantic and Mediterranean cold-water corals. Temperature and salinity (38.77 PSU) are stable throughout the year, and thus virtually no changes should be observed in the stable oxygen isotope signal—if the coral precipitates its skeleton in equilibrium with seawater. We measured various marine properties, such as the seawater oxygen isotope composition (δ 18O sw), stable carbon isotope composition (δ 13C DIC) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations (PO 4, NO 3, NO 2, NH 3 and SiO 2). Bottom water at the coral sites shows a mean oxygen isotope composition of 1.47‰ δ 18O sw-VSMOW, and δ 13C DIC showed a mean of 1.1‰ VPDB. A section of a living L. pertusa with a thick theca calcification was probed with a Merchantek MicroMill at a high spatial sampling resolution with 10 samples per 1 mm. This reduced the signal-smoothing inherent to conventional sampling. The δ 18O ag of coral aragonite ranges between -2.0‰ and +2.8‰ VPDB and the δ 13C ag ranges between -7.77‰ and +1.47‰ VPDB. The Gaussian data distribution for both parameters, including heavy equilibrium values, suggests the completeness of the captured isotopic variability. The strict linear correlation of δ 13C and δ 18O displays a strong 'kinetic

  16. 13C Isotopic Fractionation of HC3N in Star-forming Regions: Low-mass Star-forming Region L1527 and High-mass Star-forming Region G28.28-0.36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Kotomi; Saito, Masao; Ozeki, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    We observed the J = 9-8 and 10-9 rotational lines of three 13C isotopologues of HC3N in L1527 and G28.28-0.36, with the 45 m radio telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory, in order to constrain the main formation mechanisms of HC3N in each source. The abundance ratios of the three 13C isotopologues of HC3N are found to be 0.9 (±0.2) : 1.00 : 1.29 (±0.19) (1σ), and 1.0 (±0.2) : 1.00 : 1.47 (±0.17) (1σ), for [H13CCCN : HC13CCN : HCC13CN] in L1527 and G28.28-0.36, respectively. We recognize, from a similar 13C isotopic fractionation pattern, that the abundances of H13CCCN and HC13CCN are comparable, and HCC13CN is more abundant than the others. Based on the results, we discuss the main formation pathway of HC3N. The 13C isotopic fractionation pattern derived from our observations can be explained by the neutral-neutral reaction between C2H2 and CN in both the low-mass (L1527) and high-mass (G28.28-0.36) star-forming regions.

  17. The Semiquinone at the Qi Site of the bc1 Complex Explored Using HYSCORE Spectroscopy and Specific Isotopic Labeling of Ubiquinone in Rhodobacter sphaeroides via 13C Methionine and Construction of a Methionine Auxotroph

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Specific isotopic labeling at the residue or substituent level extends the scope of different spectroscopic approaches to the atomistic level. Here we describe 13C isotopic labeling of the methyl and methoxy ring substituents of ubiquinone, achieved through construction of a methionine auxotroph in Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain BC17 supplemented with l-methionine with the side chain methyl group 13C-labeled. Two-dimensional electron spin echo envelope modulation (HYSCORE) was applied to study the 13C methyl and methoxy hyperfine couplings in the semiquinone generated in situ at the Qi site of the bc1 complex in its membrane environment. The data were used to characterize the distribution of unpaired spin density and the conformations of the methoxy substituents based on density functional theory calculations of 13C hyperfine tensors in the semiquinone of the geometry-optimized X-ray structure of the bc1 complex (Protein Data Bank entry 1PP9) with the highest available resolution. Comparison with other proteins indicates individual orientations of the methoxy groups in each particular case are always different from the methoxy conformations in the anion radical prepared in a frozen alcohol solution. The protocol used in the generation of the methionine auxotroph is more generally applicable and, because it introduces a gene deletion using a suicide plasmid, can be applied repeatedly. PMID:25184535

  18. Multi-isotope labelling of organic matter by diffusion of 2H/18O-H2O vapour and 13C-CO2 into the leaves and its distribution within the plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, M. S.; Siegwolf, R. T. W.; Leuenberger, M.; Abiven, S.

    2015-03-01

    Isotope labelling is a powerful tool to study elemental cycling within terrestrial ecosystems. Here we describe a new multi-isotope technique to label organic matter (OM). We exposed poplars (Populus deltoides × nigra) for 14 days to an atmosphere enriched in 13CO2 and depleted in 2H218O. After 1 week, the water-soluble leaf OM (δ13C = 1346 ± 162‰) and the leaf water were strongly labelled (δ18O = -63 ± 8, δ2H = -156 ± 15‰). The leaf water isotopic composition was between the atmospheric and stem water, indicating a considerable back-diffusion of vapour into the leaves (58-69%) in the opposite direction to the net transpiration flow. The atomic ratios of the labels recovered (18O/13C, 2H/13C) were 2-4 times higher in leaves than in the stems and roots. This could be an indication of the synthesis of more condensed compounds in roots and stems (e.g. lignin vs. cellulose) or might be the result of O and H exchange and fractionation processes during phloem transport and biosynthesis. We demonstrate that the three major OM elements (C, O, H) can be labelled and traced simultaneously within the plant. This approach could be of interdisciplinary interest in the fields of plant physiology, palaeoclimatic reconstruction or soil science.

  19. Calculation of total meal d13C from individual food d13C.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variations in the isotopic signature of carbon in biological samples can be used to distinguish dietary patterns and monitor shifts in metabolism. But for these variations to have meaning, the isotopic signature of the diet must be known. We sought to determine if knowledge of the 13C isotopic abund...

  20. Discrimination of geographical origin of lentils (Lens culinaris Medik.) using isotope ratio mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Longobardi, F; Casiello, G; Cortese, M; Perini, M; Camin, F; Catucci, L; Agostiano, A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the geographic origin of lentils by using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in combination with chemometrics. Lentil samples from two origins, i.e. Italy and Canada, were analysed obtaining the stable isotope ratios of δ(13)C, δ(15)N, δ(2)H, δ(18)O, and δ(34)S. A comparison between median values (U-test) highlighted statistically significant differences (p<0.05) for all isotopic parameters between the lentils produced in these two different geographic areas, except for δ(15)N. Applying principal component analysis, grouping of samples was observed on the basis of origin but with overlapping zones; consequently, two supervised discriminant techniques, i.e. partial least squares discriminant analysis and k-nearest neighbours algorithm were used. Both models showed good performances with external prediction abilities of about 93% demonstrating the suitability of the methods developed. Subsequently, isotopic determinations were also performed on the protein and starch fractions and the relevant results are reported.

  1. Linking Isotopes and Panmixia: High Within-Colony Variation in Feather δ2H, δ13C, and δ15N across the Range of the American White Pelican

    PubMed Central

    Reudink, Matthew W.; Kyle, Christopher J.; McKellar, Ann E.; Somers, Christopher M.; Reudink, Robyn L. F.; Kyser, T. Kurt; Franks, Samantha E.; Nocera, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Complete panmixia across the entire range of a species is a relatively rare phenomenon; however, this pattern may be found in species that have limited philopatry and frequent dispersal. American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhyncos) provide a unique opportunity to examine the role of long-distance dispersal in facilitating gene flow in a species recently reported as panmictic across its broad breeding range. This species is also undergoing a range expansion, with new colonies arising hundreds of kilometers outside previous range boundaries. In this study, we use a multiple stable isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) approach to examine feather isotopic structuring at 19 pelican colonies across North America, with the goal of establishing an isotopic basemap that could be used for assigning individuals at newly established breeding sites to source colonies. Within-colony isotopic variation was extremely high, exceeding 100‰ in δ2H within some colonies (with relatively high variation also observed for δ13C and δ15N). The high degree of within-site variation greatly limited the utility of assignment-based approaches (42% cross-validation success rate; range: 0–90% success). Furthermore, clustering algorithms identified four likely isotopic clusters; however, those clusters were generally unrelated to geographic location. Taken together, the high degree of within-site isotopic variation and lack of geographically-defined isotopic clusters preclude the establishment of an isotopic basemap for American white pelicans, but may indicate that a high incidence of long-distance dispersal is facilitating gene flow, leading to genetic panmixia. PMID:26974163

  2. Taphonomy of deciduous leaves and changes in the d13C signal after deposition in fresh water settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, Simon; Roth-Nebelsick, Anita; Nebelsick, James; Grein, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Carbon isotopic signals from fossil plant material are an important source of information for palaeoecology and palaeoclimatology. Usually, the 13C isotope is depleted in plant material, compared to the atmospheric 13C content, because 13C is discriminated against 12C during the process of photosynthesis. The degree of 13C discrimination depends on the photosynthetic pathway (C3, C4 and CAM) and is substantially affected by environmental factors (for example, water stress). Various plant material components, however, differ also with respect to their 13C content. It is generally assumed that the d13C signal found in fossil plants reflects that of the living plant to a sufficient degree. Obtaining information on possible alterations during the taphonomic process is, however, desirable. In this study, changes in d13C of deciduous leaves are monitored, from the living leaf still attached to the tree to leaves deposited in fresh water setting for one or more years, thus focusing on early stages of taphonomy. The considered taxa are species from Quercus (oak) and Fagus (beech). Deposited leaves from three fresh water environments in Southwestern Germany were studied: active stream in a forest, still water pond in a forest, and a waterlogged moor environment. Additionally to the isotope measurements, the degree of leaf tissue degradation and colonization with degrading organisms were observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy.

  3. Development of new method of δ(13)C measurement for trace hydrocarbons in natural gas using solid phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongping; Wang, Xibin; Li, Liwu; Zhang, Mingjie; Tao, Mingxin; Xing, Lantian; Cao, Chunhui; Xia, Yanqing

    2014-11-01

    Compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of normal-level hydrocarbons (C1-C4) in natural gas is often successfully used in natural gas origin identification and classification, but little progress so far has been made for trace level hydrocarbons (C5-C14) in natural gas. In this study, we developed a method for rapid analysis of carbon isotopic ratios for trace hydrocarbons in natural gas samples. This method can be described as a combined approach characterized by solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) technique coupled to gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). In this study, the CAR-PDMS fiber was chosen as the SPME adsorptive material after comparative experiments with other four fibers, and the parameters, including equilibration time, extraction temperature and desorption time, for efficient extraction of trace hydrocarbons were systematically optimized. The results showed the carbon isotopic fractionation was not observed as a function of equilibration time and extraction temperature. And the δ(13)C signatures determined by SPME-GC/IRMS were in good agreement with the known δ(13)C values of C5-C14 measured by GC-IRMS, and the accuracy is generally within ±0.5‰. Five natural gas samples were analyzed using this method, and the δ(13)C values for C5-C14 components were obtained with satisfied repeatability. The SPME-GC/IRMS approach fitted with CAR-PDMS fiber is well suited for the preconcentration of trace hydrocarbons and provides so far the most reliable carbon isotopic analysis for trace compounds in natural gas.

  4. NMR 13C-isotopic enrichment experiments to study carbon-partitioning into organic solutes in the red alga Grateloupia doryphora.

    PubMed

    Simon-Colin, Christelle; Kervarec, Nelly; Pichon, Roger; Deslandes, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The red alga Grateloupia doryphora Montagne (Howe) (Cryptonemiales, Halymeniaceae) was used as a model to investigate the effects of changes in seawater salinity on the intracellular low-molecular-weight organic compounds. Carbon-partitioning into major organic solutes was followed by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy on living algae incubated in NaH13CO3-enriched seawater, and by high resolution 1H and 13C NMR experiments performed on 13C-enriched algal extracts. NMR and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses both demonstrated that floridoside level was the most affected by changes in salinity: it rose under the hypersaline treatment and decreased under hyposaline one. Moreover, at low salinity, the high labeling of floridoside (45.3% 13C-enrichment for C1) together with its low concentrations both provided evidence of great increase in the de novo biosynthesis and turnover rate. Our experiments also demonstrated a high incorporation of photosynthetic carbon into amino acids, especially glutamate, under hypoosmotic conditions. On the other hand, isethionic acid and N-methyl-methionine sulfoxide were only partly labeled, which indicates they do not directly derive from carbon photoassimilation. In algae exposed to high salinity, elevated concentrations of floridoside coupled to a low labeling (9.4%) were observed. These results suggest that hyperosmotic conditions stimulated floridoside biosynthesis from endogen storage products rather than from carbon assimilation through photosynthesis.

  5. Tracing source, mixing and uptaking processes of carbon in an epikarst spring-pond system in southeastern Guizhou of China by carbon isotopes (13C-14C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; Chen, B.; Liu, Z.; Li, H. C.; Yang, R.

    2015-12-01

    δ13C and Δ14C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and aquatic plants from a karst spring and two spring-fed ponds in Laqiao, Maolan County, Guizhou Province in January, July and October of 2013 were measured to understand the roles of aquatic photosynthesis through DIC uptake in karst surface waters. The mean Δ14C and δ13C values of DIC for the spring pool, midstream and downstream ponds are -60.6±26.3‰ and -13.53±1.97‰, -62.8±62.9‰ and -11.72±2.72‰, and -54.2±56.5‰ and -9.40±2.03‰, respectively. Both Δ14C and δ13C show seasonal variations, with lower Δ14C values but heavier δ13C values in dry season and vice versa in summer rainy season. This observation indicates that (1) the main carbon source of the spring DIC is from limestone bedrock dissolution and soil CO2 with higher contribution in summer due to higher productivity; and (2) 13C and 14C have different behaviors during DIC uptake by aquatic plants and during CO2 exchange between DIC and the atmospheric CO2. Biological uptake of CO2 will not affect the Δ14C of DIC, but lead to δ13CDIC enrichment. CO2 exchange between DIC and the atmospheric CO2 should elevate both the Δ14C and δ13C of DIC. In Laqiao spring-pond system, it seems that the effect of biological uptake on the Δ14C and δ13C of DIC is much stronger than that of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere. The mean Δ14C values of POC from the spring pool, midstream and downstream ponds are -308.1 ±64.3‰, -164.4±84.4‰ and -195.1±108.5‰, respectively, indicating mixture of aquatic algae and detrital particle (clay and dust). More aquatic algae were formed in the stream ponds especially in the summer. SEM results of the POC samples support this conclusion. Furthermore, the Δ14C values of the submerged aquatic plants range from -200.0‰ to -51.3 ‰ and were similar to those of the DIC, indicating that the aquatic plants used DIC for photosynthesis. The Δ14C value of an emergent plant

  6. Latest Paleocene benthic extinction event on the southern Tethyan shelf (Egypt): Foraminiferal stable isotopic13C, δ18O) records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, B.; Speijer, R. P.; Aubry, M.-P.

    1996-04-01

    The dramatic global extinction of 35% 50% of benthic foraminifera species in the deep sea in the latest Paleocene and associated negative excursions in δ13C and δ18O may be related to spreading of warm, saline bottom water from subtropical Tethyan shallow regions over the sea floor worldwide. Our study of neritic sections in Egypt shows that in the southern shallow Tethys, a prominent long-term change in bottom-water chemistry, sedimentation, and benthic foraminifera fauna was initiated at the time when the deep-sea benthic extinction event (BEE) took place. Bottom-water δ13C values on the Tethyan shelf show a sudden 3.0‰ negative shift at this event; however, contrary to the deep sea, in which the δ13C excursion was of short duration, Tethyan δ13C values did not fully return to preboundary values, but remained depressed by ˜1.5‰ for at least 1 m.y. The δ13C values at the Egyptian shelf during the BEE are much lower than would be expected if this was a source region for global deep water. The δ18O values indicate no significant change in bottom-water salinity or temperature at the BEE. The long-lasting environmental changes that began on the Egyptian shelf at the BEE may be related to, for example, gateway reorganization along the Tethyan seaway. Paleogeographic changes possibly also triggered a change in the loci of global deep-water formation; however, these loci must be sought in another part of the Tethys.

  7. Changing gull diet in a changing world: a 150-year stable isotope13C, δ15N) record from feathers collected in the Pacific Northwest of North America.

    PubMed

    Blight, Louise K; Hobson, Keith A; Kyser, T Kurt; Arcese, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The world's oceans have undergone significant ecological changes following European colonial expansion and associated industrialization. Seabirds are useful indicators of marine food web structure and can be used to track multidecadal environmental change, potentially reflecting long-term human impacts. We used stable isotope (δ(13)C, δ(15)N) analysis of feathers from glaucous-winged gulls (Larus glaucescens) in a heavily disturbed region of the northeast Pacific to ask whether diets of this generalist forager changed in response to shifts in food availability over 150 years, and whether any detected change might explain long-term trends in gull abundance. Sampled feathers came from birds collected between 1860 and 2009 at nesting colonies in the Salish Sea, a transboundary marine system adjacent to Washington, USA and British Columbia, Canada. To determine whether temporal trends in stable isotope ratios might simply reflect changes to baseline environmental values, we also analysed muscle tissue from forage fishes collected in the same region over a multidecadal timeframe. Values of δ(13)C and δ(15)N declined since 1860 in both subadult and adult gulls (δ(13)C, ~ 2-6‰; δ(15)N, ~4-5‰), indicating that their diet has become less marine over time, and that birds now feed at a lower trophic level than previously. Conversely, forage fish δ(13)C and δ(15)N values showed no trends, supporting our conclusion that gull feather values were indicative of declines in marine food availability rather than of baseline environmental change. Gradual declines in feather isotope values are consistent with trends predicted had gulls consumed less fish over time, but were equivocal with respect to whether gulls had switched to a more garbage-based diet, or one comprising marine invertebrates. Nevertheless, our results suggest a long-term decrease in diet quality linked to declining fish abundance or other anthropogenic influences, and may help to explain regional

  8. Drivers of radial growth and carbon isotope discrimination of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.) across continental gradients in precipitation, vapour pressure deficit and irradiance.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Steven L; Meinzer, Frederick C; Lachenbruch, Barbara; Brooks, J Renée; Guyette, Richard P

    2014-03-01

    Tree-ring characteristics are commonly used to reconstruct climate variables, but divergence from the assumption of a single biophysical control may reduce the accuracy of these reconstructions. Here, we present data from bur oaks (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.) sampled within and beyond the current species bioclimatic envelope to identify the primary environmental controls on ring-width indices (RWIs) and carbon stable isotope discrimination (Δ(13) C) in tree-ring cellulose. Variation in Δ(13) C and RWI was more strongly related to leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit (VPD) at the centre and western edge of the range compared with the northern and wettest regions. Among regions, Δ(13) C of tree-ring cellulose was closely predicted by VPD and light responses of canopy-level Δ(13) C estimated using a model driven by eddy flux and meteorological measurements (R(2)  = 0.96, P = 0.003). RWI and Δ(13) C were positively correlated in the drier regions, while they were negatively correlated in the wettest region. The strength and direction of the correlations scaled with regional VPD or the ratio of precipitation to evapotranspiration. Therefore, the correlation strength between RWI and Δ(13) C may be used to infer past wetness or aridity from paleo wood by determining the degree to which carbon gain and growth have been more limited by moisture or light.

  9. Does the Shuram δ13C excursion record Ediacaran oxygenation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, J. M.; Maloof, A. C.; Schoene, B.; Higgins, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The most negative carbon isotope excursion in Earth history is found in carbonate rocks of the Ediacaran Period (635-542 Ma). Known colloquially as the the 'Shuram' excursion, workers have long noted its tantalizing, broad concordance with the rise of abundant macro-scale fossils in the rock record, variously interpreted as animals, giant protists, macro-algae and lichen, and known as the 'Ediacaran Biota.' Thus, the Shuram excursion has been interpreted by many in the context of a dramatically changing redox state of the Ediacaran oceans - e.g., a result of methane cycling in a low O2 atmosphere, the final destruction of a large pool of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and the step-wise oxidation of the Ediacaran oceans. More recently, diagenetic interpretations of the Shuram excursion - e.g. sedimentary in-growth of very δ13C depleted authigenic carbonates, meteoric alteration of Ediacaran carbonates, late-stage burial diagenesis - have challenged the various Ediacaran redox models. A rigorous geologic context is required to discriminate between these explanatory models, and determine whether the Shuram excursion can be used to evaluate terminal Neoproterozoic oxygenation. Here, we present chemo-stratigraphic data (δ13C, δ18O, δ44/42Ca and redox sensitive trace element abundances) from 12 measured sections of the Ediacaran-aged Wonoka Formation (Fm.) of South Australia that require a syn-depositional age for the extraordinary range of δ13C values (-12 to +4‰) observed in the formation. In some locations, the Wonoka Fm. is ~700 meters (m) of mixed shelf limestones and siliclastics that record the full 16 ‰ δ13C excursion in a remarkably consistent fashion across 100s of square kilometers of basin area. Fabric-altering diagenesis, where present, occurs at the sub-meter vertical scale, only results in sub-permil offsets in δ13C and cannot be used to explain the full δ13C excursion. In other places, the Wonoka Fm. is host to deep (1 km

  10. New guidelines for δ13C measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Gehre, Matthias; Groning, Manfred; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Toman, Blaza; Verkouteren, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Consistency of δ13C measurements can be improved 39−47% by anchoring the δ13C scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in 13C/12C. It is recommended thatδ13C values of both organic and inorganic materials be measured and expressed relative to VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on a scale normalized by assigning consensus values of −46.6‰ to L-SVEC lithium carbonate and +1.95‰ to NBS 19 calcium carbonate. Uncertainties of other reference material values on this scale are improved by factors up to two or more, and the values of some have been notably shifted:  the δ13C of NBS 22 oil is −30.03%.

  11. Stable carbon ((12/13)C) and nitrogen ((14/15)N) isotopes as a tool for identifying the sources of cyanide in wastes and contaminated soils--a method development.

    PubMed

    Weihmann, Jenny; Mansfeldt, Tim; Schulte, Ulrike

    2007-01-23

    The occurrence of iron-cyanide complexes in the environment is of concern, since they are potentially hazardous. In order to determine the source of iron-cyanide complexes in contaminated soils and wastes, we developed a method based on the stable isotope ratios (13)C/(12)C and (15)N/(14)N of the complexed cyanide-ion (CN(-)). The method was tested on three pure chemicals and two industrials wastes: blast-furnace sludge (BFS) and gas-purifier waste (GPW). The iron-cyanide complexes were converted into the solid cupric ferrocyanide, Cu(2)[Fe(CN)(6)].7H(2)O, followed by combustion and determination of the isotope-ratios by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Cupric ferrocyanide was obtained from the materials by (i) an alkaline extraction with 1M NaOH and (ii) a distillate digestion. The [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) of the alkaline extraction was precipitated after adding Cu(2+). The CN(-) of the distillate digestion was at first complexed with Fe(2+) under inert conditions and then precipitated after adding Cu(2+). The delta(13)C-values obtained by the two methods differed slightly up to 1-3 per thousand for standards and BFS. The difference was larger for alkaline-extracted GPW (4-7 per thousand), since non-cyanide C was co-extracted and co-precipitated. Therefore the distillate digestion technique is recommended when determining the C isotope ratios in samples rich in organic carbon. Since the delta(13)C-values of BFS are in the range of -30 to -24 per thousand and of -17 to -5 per thousand for GPW, carbon seems to be a suitable tracer for identifying the source of cyanide in both wastes. However, the delta(15)N-values overlapped for BFS and GPW, making nitrogen unsuitable as a tracer.

  12. Trophic Discrimination Factors and Incorporation Rates of Carbon- and Nitrogen-Stable Isotopes in Adult Green Frogs, Lithobates clamitans.

    PubMed

    Cloyed, Carl S; Newsome, Seth D; Eason, Perri K

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis is an increasingly useful ecological tool, but its accuracy depends on quantifying the tissue-specific trophic discrimination factors (TDFs) and isotopic incorporation rates for focal taxa. Despite the technique's ubiquity, most laboratory experiments determining TDFs and incorporation rates have focused on birds, mammals, and fish; we know little about terrestrial ectotherms, and amphibians in particular are understudied. In this study we used two controlled feeding experiments to determine carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotope TDFs for skin, whole blood, and bone collagen and incorporation rates for skin and whole blood in adult green frogs, Lithobates clamitans. The mean (±SD) TDFs for δ(13)C were 0.1‰ (±0.4‰) for skin, 0.5‰ (±0.5‰) for whole blood, and 1.6‰ (0.6‰) for bone collagen. The mean (±SD) TDFs for δ(15)N were 2.3‰ (±0.5‰) for skin, 2.3‰ (±0.4‰) for whole blood, and 3.1‰ (±0.6‰) for bone collagen. A combination of different isotopic incorporation models was best supported by our data. Carbon in skin was the only tissue in which incorporation was best explained by two compartments, which had half-lives of 89 and 8 d. The half-life of carbon in whole blood was 69 d. Half-lives for nitrogen were 75 d for skin and 71 d for whole blood. Our results help fill a taxonomic gap in our knowledge of stable isotope dynamics and provide ecologists with a method to measure anuran diets.

  13. The key factor limiting plant growth in cold and humid alpine areas also plays a dominant role in plant carbon isotope discrimination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Wang, Guoan; Li, Xiaoliang; Cai, Xiaobu; Li, Xiaolin; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Junling

    2015-01-01

    Many environmental factors affect carbon isotope discrimination in plants, yet the predominant factor influencing this process is generally assumed to be the key growth-limiting factor. However, to our knowledge this hypothesis has not been confirmed. We therefore determined the carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of plants growing in two cold and humid mountain regions where temperature is considered to be the key growth-limiting factor. Mean annual temperature (MAT) showed a significant impact on variation in carbon isotope discrimination value (Δ) irrespective of study area or plant functional type with either partial correlation or regression analysis, but the correlation between Δ and soil water content (SWC) was usually not significant. In multiple stepwise regression analysis, MAT was either the first or the only variable selected into the prediction model of Δ against MAT and SWC, indicating that the effect of temperature on carbon isotope discrimination was predominant. The results therefore provide evidence that the key growth-limiting factor is also crucial for plant carbon isotope discrimination. Changes in leaf morphology, water viscosity and carboxylation efficiency with temperature may be responsible for the observed positive correlation between Δ and temperature.

  14. Anthropogenic and solar forcing in δ13C time pattern of coralline sponges.

    PubMed

    Madonia, Paolo; Reitner, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a re-analysis of a previously published carbon isotope data-set related to coralline sponges in the Caribbean Sea. The original interpretation led to the discrimination between a pre-industrial period, with a signal controlled by solar-induced climatic variations, followed by the industrial era, characterized by a progressive δ(13)C negative shift due to the massive anthropogenic carbon emissions. Our re-analysis allowed to extract from the raw isotopic data evidence of a solar forcing still visible during the industrial era, with a particular reference to the 88-year Gleissberg periods. These signals are related to slope changes in both the δ(13)C versus time and the δ(13)C versus carbon emission curves.

  15. Synthesis, NMR spectroscopic characterization and structure of a divinyldisilazane-(triphenylphosphine)platinum(0) complex: observation of isotope-induced chemical shifts (1)Δ(12/13)C((195)Pt).

    PubMed

    Wrackmeyer, Bernd; Klimkina, Elena V; Schmalz, Thomas; Milius, Wolfgang

    2013-05-01

    Tetramethyldivinyldisilazane-(triphenylphosphine)platinum(0) was prepared, characterized in solid state by X-ray crystallography and in solution by multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H, (13)C, (15)N, (29)Si, (31)P and (195)Pt NMR). Numerous signs of spin-spin coupling constants were determined by two-dimensional heteronuclear shift correlations (HETCOR) and two-dimensional (1)H/(1)H COSY experiments. Isotope-induced chemical shifts (1)Δ(12/13)C((195)Pt) were measured from (195)Pt NMR spectra of the title compound as well as of other Pt(0), Pt(II) and Pt(IV) compounds for comparison. In contrast to other heavy nuclei such as (199)Hg or (207)Pb, the "normal" shifts of the heavy isotopomers to low frequencies are found, covering a range of >500 ppb.

  16. Quantitative trait loci for water-use efficiency in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) measured by carbon isotope discrimination under rain-fed conditions on the Canadian Prairies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Chang, Scott X; Anyia, Anthony O

    2012-06-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) yield is commonly limited by low rainfall and high temperature during the growing season on the Canadian Prairies. Empirical knowledge suggests that carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C), through its negative relationship with water-use efficiency (WUE), is a good index for selecting stable yielding crops in some rain-fed environments. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and linked markers for Δ(13)C will enhance its use efficiency in breeding programs. In the present study, two barley populations (W89001002003 × I60049 or W × I, six-row type, and Merit × H93174006 or M × H, two-row type), containing 200 and 127 recombinant inbred lines (RILs), were phenotyped for leaf Δ(13)C and agronomic traits under rain-fed environments in Alberta, Canada. A transgressive segregation pattern for leaf Δ(13)C was observed among RILs. The broad-sense heritability (H (2)) of leaf Δ(13)C was 0.8, and there was no significant interaction between genotype and environment for leaf Δ(13)C in the W × I RILs. A total of 12 QTL for leaf Δ(13)C were detected in the W × I RILs and 5 QTL in the M × H RILs. For the W × I RILs, a major QTL located on chromosome 3H near marker Bmag606 (9.3, 9.4 and 10.7 cM interval) was identified. This major QTL overlapped with several agronomic traits, with W89001002003 alleles favoring lower leaf Δ(13)C, increased plant height, and reduced leaf area index, grain yield, harvest index and days to maturity at this locus or loci. This major QTL and its associated marker, when validated, maybe useful in breeding programs aimed at improving WUE and yield stability of barley on the Canadian Prairies.

  17. The effect of transient and continuous drought on yield, photosynthesis and carbon isotope discrimination in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Monti, A; Brugnoli, E; Scartazza, A; Amaducci, M T

    2006-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope discrimination (delta13C), photosynthetic performance (A), dry matter accumulation (DW), and sucrose yield (Y(s)) of sugar beet were evaluated in a glasshouse experiment under transient (TS) and permanent (PS) water stress. A was significantly reduced under drought, to an extent depending on stress duration. The reduced A was strictly associated with a low DW and Y(s), the later being 42% lower in PS than control plants (C). Restoring water steeply increased A and the associated leaf traits (RWC, leaf water potential etc.), but the increase of Y(s) was negligible. Therefore, the negative effects of severe water stress in the early growth period, though reversible on gas-exchange and most leaf traits, can drastically reduce Y(s) of sugar beet. Furthermore, A seems not to be effective in predicting sucrose accumulation, although it was very effective in detecting the occurrence of plant water stress. The A/C(i) model was used to assess the photosynthetic adjustments to continuous or transient drought by calculating the photosynthetic parameters Vcmax and Jmax and then compared with delta13C. Mesophyll conductance (g(m)) was estimated by comparing delta13C measured on soluble sugars and gas-exchange data. This approach confirmed the expectation that g(m) was limiting A and that there was a significant drop in [CO2] from the substomatal cavities and the chloroplast stroma both in favourable and drought conditions. Therefore, the carbon concentration at the carboxylation site was overestimated by 25-35% by conventional gas-exchange measurements, and Vcmax was consistently underestimated when g(m) was not taken into account, especially under severe drought. Root delta13C was found to be strictly related to sucrose content (brix%), Y(s) and root dry weight, and this was especially clear when delta13C was measured on bulk dry matter. By contrast, leaf delta13C measured in soluble sugars (delta(s)) and bulk dry matter (delta(dm)) were found to

  18. Identifying carbon sources and trophic position of coral reef fishes using diet and stable isotope (δ15N and δ13C) analyses in two contrasted bays in Moorea, French Polynesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letourneur, Y.; Lison de Loma, T.; Richard, P.; Harmelin-Vivien, M. L.; Cresson, P.; Banaru, D.; Fontaine, M.-F.; Gref, T.; Planes, S.

    2013-12-01

    Stable isotope ratios (δ15N and δ13C) and diet of three fish species, Stegastes nigricans, Chaetodon citrinellus and Epinephelus merra, were analyzed on the fringing coral reefs of two bays that are differentially exposed to river runoff on Moorea Island, French Polynesia. S. nigricans and C. citrinellus relied mostly on turf algae and presented similar trophic levels and δ15N values, whereas E. merra fed on large invertebrates (crabs and shrimps) and had higher trophic levels and δ15N values. Discrepancies existed between stomach content and stable isotope analyses for the relative importance of food items. Bayesian mixing models indicated that sedimented organic matter was also an important additional food for S. nigricans and C. citrinellus, and fishes for E. merra. The main sources of organic matter involved in the food webs ending with these species were algal turfs and surface sediments, while water particulate organic matter was barely used. Significant spatial differences in C and N isotopic ratios for sources and fishes were found within and between bays. Lower 13C and higher 15N values were observed for various compartments of the studied trophic network at the end of each bay than at the entrance. Differences were observed between bays, with organic sources and consumers being, on average, slightly more 13C-depleted and 15N-enriched in Cook's Bay than in Opunohu Bay, linked with a higher mean annual flow of the river at Cook's Bay. Our results suggest that rivers bring continental material into these two bays, which is partly incorporated into the food webs of fringing coral reefs at least close to river mouths. Thus, continental inputs can influence the transfer of organic matter within coral reef food webs depending on the diet of organisms.

  19. Coupling aboveground and belowground activities using short term fluctuations in 13C composition of soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Parent, F.; Grossiord, C.; Plain, C.; Longdoz, B.; Granier, A.

    2011-12-01

    There is a growing amount of evidence that belowground processes in forest ecosystems are tightly coupled to aboveground activities. Soil CO2 efflux, the largest flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, is dominated by root respiration and by respiration of microorganisms that find the carbohydrates required to fulfil their energetic costs in the rhizosphere. A close coupling between aboveground photosynthetic activity and soil CO2 efflux is therefore expected. The isotopic signature of photosynthates varies with time because photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination is dynamically controlled by environmental factors. This temporal variation of δ13C of photosynthate is thought to be transferred along the tree-soil continuum and it will be retrieved in soil CO2 efflux after a time lag that reflects the velocity of carbon transport from canopy to belowground. However, isotopic signature of soil CO2 efflux is not solely affected by photosynthetic carbon discrimination, bur also by post photosynthetic fractionation, and especially by fractionation processes affecting CO2 during the transport from soil layers to surface. Tunable diode laser spectrometry is a useful tool to quantify short-term variation in δ13C of soil CO2 efflux and of CO2 in the soil atmosphere. We set up hydrophobic tubes to measure the vertical profile of soil CO2 concentration and its δ13C composition in a temperate beech forest, and we monitored simultaneously δ13C of trunk and soil CO2 efflux, δ13C of phloem exudate and δ13C of leaf sugars. We evidenced that temporal changes in δ13C of soil CO2 and soil CO2 efflux reflected changes in environmental conditions that affect photosynthetic discrimination and that soil CO2 was 4.4% enriched compared to soil CO2 efflux according to diffusion fractionation. However, this close coupling can be disrupted when advective transport of CO2 took place. We also reported evidences that temporal variations in the isotopic composition of soil CO2 efflux reflect

  20. An overview of methods using 13C for improved compound identification in metabolomics and natural products

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Stupp, Gregory S.; Ajredini, Ramadan; Lee-McMullen, Brittany; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    Compound identification is a major bottleneck in metabolomics studies. In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations, resonance overlap often hinders unambiguous database matching or de novo compound identification. In liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), discriminating between biological signals and background artifacts and reliable determination of molecular formulae are not always straightforward. We have designed and implemented several NMR and LC-MS approaches that utilize 13C, either enriched or at natural abundance, in metabolomics applications. For LC-MS applications, we describe a technique called isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA), which utilizes samples that are isotopically labeled with 5% (test) and 95% (control) 13C. This labeling strategy leads to characteristic isotopic patterns that allow the differentiation of biological signals from artifacts and yield the exact number of carbons, significantly reducing possible molecular formulae. The relative abundance between the test and control samples for every IROA feature can be determined simply by integrating the peaks that arise from the 5 and 95% channels. For NMR applications, we describe two 13C-based approaches. For samples at natural abundance, we have developed a workflow to obtain 13C–13C and 13C–1H statistical correlations using 1D 13C and 1H NMR spectra. For samples that can be isotopically labeled, we describe another NMR approach to obtain direct 13C–13C spectroscopic correlations. These methods both provide extensive information about the carbon framework of compounds in the mixture for either database matching or de novo compound identification. We also discuss strategies in which 13C NMR can be used to identify unknown compounds from IROA experiments. By combining technologies with the same samples, we can identify important biomarkers and corresponding metabolites of interest. PMID:26379677

  1. Ecological processes dominate the 13C land disequilibrium in a Rocky Mountain subalpine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, D. R.; Ballantyne, A. P.; Miller, J. B.; Burns, S. P.; Conway, T. J.; Menzer, O.; Stephens, B. B.; Vaughn, B. H.

    2014-04-01

    Fossil fuel combustion has increased atmospheric CO2 by ≈ 115 µmol mol-1 since 1750 and decreased its carbon isotope composition (δ13C) by 1.7-2‰ (the 13C Suess effect). Because carbon is stored in the terrestrial biosphere for decades and longer, the δ13C of CO2 released by terrestrial ecosystems is expected to differ from the δ13C of CO2 assimilated by land plants during photosynthesis. This isotopic difference between land-atmosphere respiration (δR) and photosynthetic assimilation (δA) fluxes gives rise to the 13C land disequilibrium (D). Contemporary understanding suggests that over annual and longer time scales, D is determined primarily by the Suess effect, and thus, D is generally positive (δR > δA). A 7 year record of biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange was used to evaluate the seasonality of δA and δR, and the 13C land disequilibrium, in a subalpine conifer forest. A novel isotopic mixing model was employed to determine the δ13C of net land-atmosphere exchange during day and night and combined with tower-based flux observations to assess δA and δR. The disequilibrium varied seasonally and when flux-weighted was opposite in sign than expected from the Suess effect (D = -0.75 ± 0.21‰ or -0.88 ± 0.10‰ depending on method). Seasonality in D appeared to be driven by photosynthetic discrimination (Δcanopy) responding to environmental factors. Possible explanations for negative D include (1) changes in Δcanopy over decades as CO2 and temperature have risen, and/or (2) post-photosynthetic fractionation processes leading to sequestration of isotopically enriched carbon in long-lived pools like wood and soil.

  2. Comparison of liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) and gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) for the determination of collagen amino acid δ13C values for palaeodietary and palaeoecological reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Philip J H; Honch, Noah V; Evershed, Richard P

    2011-10-30

    Results are presented of a comparison of the amino acid (AA) δ(13)C values obtained by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) and liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS). Although the primary focus was the compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis of bone collagen AAs, because of its growing application for palaeodietary and palaeoecological reconstruction, the results are relevant to any field where AA δ(13)C values are required. We compare LC/IRMS with the most up-to-date GC/C/IRMS method using N-acetyl methyl ester (NACME) AA derivatives. This comparison involves the analysis of standard AAs and hydrolysates of archaeological human bone collagen, which have been previously investigated as N-trifluoroacetyl isopropyl esters (TFA/IP). It was observed that, although GC/C/IRMS analyses required less sample, LC/IRMS permitted the analysis of a wider range of AAs, particularly those not amenable to GC analysis (e.g. arginine). Accordingly, reconstructed bulk δ(13)C values based on LC/IRMS-derived δ(13)C values were closer to the EA/IRMS-derived δ(13)C values than those based on GC/C/IRMS values. The analytical errors for LC/IRMS AA δ(13)C values were lower than GC/C/IRMS determinations. Inconsistencies in the δ(13)C values of the TFA/IP derivatives compared with the NACME- and LC/IRMS-derived δ(13)C values suggest inherent problems with the use of TFA/IP derivatives, resulting from: (i) inefficient sample combustion, and/or (ii) differences in the intra-molecular distribution of δ(13)C values between AAs, which are manifested by incomplete combustion. Close similarities between the NACME AA δ(13)C values and the LC/IRMS-derived δ(13)C values suggest that the TFA/IP derivatives should be abandoned for the natural abundance determinations of AA δ(13)C values.

  3. An estimation of Central Iberian Peninsula atmospheric δ13C and water δD in the Upper Cretaceous using pyrolysis compound specific isotopic analysis (Py-CSIA) of a fossil conifer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Pérez, José A.; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; De la Rosa, José M.; Almendros, Gonzalo; González-Vila, Francisco J.

    2015-04-01

    Frenelopsis is a frequently found genus of the Cretaceous floras adapted to dry, saline and in general to environmental conditions marked by severe water stress [1]. Stable isotope analysis of fossil organic materials can be used to infer palaeoenvironmental variables helpful to reconstruct plant paleohabitats [2]. In this study stable isotope analysis of organic fossil remains (FR) and humic fractions (FA, HA and humin) of Frenelopsis oligiostomata are studied in bulk (C, H, O, N IRMS) and in specific compounds released by pyrolysis (C, H, Py-CSIA). Well preserved F. oligiostomata fossils were handpicked from a limestone included in compacted marls from Upper Cretaceous (Senonian c. 72 Mya) in Guadalix de la Sierra (Madrid, Spain) [3]. The fossils were decarbonated with 6M HCl. Humic substances were extracted from finely ground fossil remains (FR) by successive treatments with 0.1M Na4P2O7 + NaOH [4]. The extract was acidified resulting into insoluble HA and soluble FA fractions. The HA and FA were purified as in [5] and [6] respectively. Bulk stable isotopic analysis (δ13C, δD, δ18O, δ15N IRMS) was done in an elemental micro-analyser coupled to a continuous flow Delta V Advantage isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Pyrolysis compound specific isotopic analysis Py-CSIA (δ13C, δD): was done by coupling a double-shot pyrolyzer to a chromatograph connected to an IRMS. Structural features of specific peaks were inferred by comparing/matching mass spectra from conventional Py-GC/MS (data not shown) with Py-GC/IRMS chromatograms obtained using the same chromatographic conditions. Bulk C isotopic signature found for FR (-20.5±0.02 ‰) was in accordance with previous studies [2, 7-9]. This heavy isotopic δ13C signature indicates a depleted stomatal conductance and paleoenvironmental growth conditions of water and salt stress. This is in line with the morphological and depositional characteristics [3] confirming that F. oligostomata was adapted to highly xeric

  4. Characterization of metabolic profile of honokiol in rat feces using liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry and (13)C stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yinfeng; Tang, Minghai; Song, Hang; Li, Rong; Wang, Chunyu; Ye, Haoyu; Qiu, Neng; Zhang, Yongkui; Chen, Lijuan; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-03-15

    As fecal excretion is one of important routes of elimination of drugs and their metabolites, it is indispensable to investigate the metabolites in feces for more comprehensive information on biotransformation in vivo. In this study, a sensitive and reliable approach based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS) was applied to characterize the metabolic profile of honokiol in rat feces after the administration of an equimolar mixture of honokiol and [(13)C6]-labeled honokiol. Totally 42 metabolites were discovered and tentatively identified in rat feces samples, 26 metabolites were first reported, including two novel classes of metabolites, methylated and dimeric metabolites of honokiol. Moreover, this study provided basic comparative data on the metabolites in rat plasma, feces and urine, which gave better understanding of the metabolic fate of honokiol in vivo.

  5. Beneficial effects of sustained activity on the use of dietary protein and carbohydrate traced with stable isotopes 15N and 13C in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Felip, O; Blasco, J; Ibarz, A; Martin-Perez, M; Fernández-Borràs, J

    2013-02-01

    To determine the effects of sustained swimming on the use and fate of dietary nutrients in gilthead sea bream, a group of fish were forced to undertake moderate and sustained swimming (1.5 BL s(-1)) for 3 weeks and compared with a control group undertaking voluntary activity. The exercise group showed a significant increase in specific growth rate (C: 1.13 ± 0.05; E: 1.32 ± 0.06 % day(-1), P < 0.05) with no significant change in food intake (C: 3.56 ± 0.20; E: 3.84 ± 0.03 % of body weight). The addition of (13)C-starch and (15)N-protein to a single meal of 1 % ration allowed analysis of the fate of both nutrients in several tissues and in their components, 6 and 24 h after force-feeding. In exercised fish improved redistribution of dietary components increased the use of carbohydrates and lipid as fuels. Gilthead sea bream have a considerable capacity for carbohydrate absorption irrespective of swimming conditions, but in trained fish (13)C rose in all liver fractions with no changes in store contents. This implies higher nutrient turnover with exercise. Higher retention of dietary protein (higher (15)N uptake into white muscle during the entire post-prandial period) was found under sustained exercise, highlighting the protein-sparing effect. The combined effects of a carbohydrate-rich, low-protein diet plus sustained swimming enhanced amino acid retention and also prevented excessive lipid deposition in gilthead sea bream.

  6. Complex Physiological Response of Norway Spruce to Atmospheric Pollution - Decreased Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Unchanged Tree Biomass Increment.

    PubMed

    Čada, Vojtěch; Šantrůčková, Hana; Šantrůček, Jiří; Kubištová, Lenka; Seedre, Meelis; Svoboda, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution critically affects forest ecosystems around the world by directly impacting the assimilation apparatus of trees and indirectly by altering soil conditions, which subsequently also leads to changes in carbon cycling. To evaluate the extent of the physiological effect of moderate level sulfate and reactive nitrogen acidic deposition, we performed a retrospective dendrochronological analysis of several physiological parameters derived from periodic measurements of carbon stable isotope composition ((13)C discrimination, intercellular CO2 concentration and intrinsic water use efficiency) and annual diameter increments (tree biomass increment, its inter-annual variability and correlation with temperature, cloud cover, precipitation and Palmer drought severity index). The analysis was performed in two mountain Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands of the Bohemian Forest (Czech Republic, central Europe), where moderate levels of pollution peaked in the 1970s and 1980s and no evident impact on tree growth or link to mortality has been reported. The significant influence of pollution on trees was expressed most sensitively by a 1.88‰ reduction of carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C). The effects of atmospheric pollution interacted with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature. As a result, we observed no change in intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci), an abrupt increase in water use efficiency (iWUE) and no change in biomass increment, which could also partly result from changes in carbon partitioning (e.g., from below- to above-ground). The biomass increment was significantly related to Δ(13)C on an individual tree level, but the relationship was lost during the pollution period. We suggest that this was caused by a shift from the dominant influence of the photosynthetic rate to stomatal conductance on Δ(13)C during the pollution period. Using biomass increment-climate correlation analyses, we did not identify any clear pollution

  7. Complex Physiological Response of Norway Spruce to Atmospheric Pollution – Decreased Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Unchanged Tree Biomass Increment

    PubMed Central

    Čada, Vojtěch; Šantrůčková, Hana; Šantrůček, Jiří; Kubištová, Lenka; Seedre, Meelis; Svoboda, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution critically affects forest ecosystems around the world by directly impacting the assimilation apparatus of trees and indirectly by altering soil conditions, which subsequently also leads to changes in carbon cycling. To evaluate the extent of the physiological effect of moderate level sulfate and reactive nitrogen acidic deposition, we performed a retrospective dendrochronological analysis of several physiological parameters derived from periodic measurements of carbon stable isotope composition (13C discrimination, intercellular CO2 concentration and intrinsic water use efficiency) and annual diameter increments (tree biomass increment, its inter-annual variability and correlation with temperature, cloud cover, precipitation and Palmer drought severity index). The analysis was performed in two mountain Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands of the Bohemian Forest (Czech Republic, central Europe), where moderate levels of pollution peaked in the 1970s and 1980s and no evident impact on tree growth or link to mortality has been reported. The significant influence of pollution on trees was expressed most sensitively by a 1.88‰ reduction of carbon isotope discrimination13C). The effects of atmospheric pollution interacted with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature. As a result, we observed no change in intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci), an abrupt increase in water use efficiency (iWUE) and no change in biomass increment, which could also partly result from changes in carbon partitioning (e.g., from below- to above-ground). The biomass increment was significantly related to Δ13C on an individual tree level, but the relationship was lost during the pollution period. We suggest that this was caused by a shift from the dominant influence of the photosynthetic rate to stomatal conductance on Δ13C during the pollution period. Using biomass increment-climate correlation analyses, we did not identify any clear pollution

  8. Determining the Local Abundance of Martian Methane and its 13-C/l2-C and D/H Isotopic Ratios for Comparison with Related Gas and Soil Analysis on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the origin of Martian methane will require numerous complementary measurements from both in situ and remote sensing investigations and laboratory work to correlate planetary surface geophysics with atmospheric dynamics and chemistry. Three instruments (Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), Gas Chromatograph (GC) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS)) with sophisticated sample handling and processing capability make up the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) analytical chemistry suite on NASA s 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission. Leveraging off the SAM sample and gas processing capability that includes methane enrichment, TLS has unprecedented sensitivity for measuring absolute methane (parts-per-trillion), water, and carbon dioxide abundances in both the Martian atmosphere and evolved from heated soil samples. In concert with a wide variety of associated trace gases (e.g. SO2, H2S, NH3, higher hydrocarbons, organics, etc.) and other isotope ratios measured by SAM, TLS will focus on determining the absolute abundances of methane, water and carbon dioxide, and their isotope ratios: 13C/12C and D/H in methane; 13C/12C and 18O/17O/16O in carbon dioxide; and 18O/17O/16O and D/H in water. Measurements near the MSL landing site will be correlated with satellite (Mars Express, Mars 2016) and ground-based observations.

  9. The forensic analysis of office paper using carbon isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Part 3: Characterizing the source materials and the effect of production and usage on the δ13C values of paper.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kylie; Benson, Sarah; Roux, Claude

    2013-12-10

    When undertaking any study of the isotope abundance values of a bulk material, consideration should be given to the source materials and how they are combined to reach the final product being measured. While it is demonstrative to measure and record the values of clean papers, such as the results published as part one of this series, the majority of forensic casework samples would have undergone some form of writing or printing process prior to examination. Understanding the effects of these processes on the δ(13)C values of paper is essential for interpretation and comparison with clean samples, for example in cases where printed documents need to be compared to paper from an unprinted suspect ream. This study was undertaken so that the source materials, the effects of the production process and the effects of printing and forensic testing could be observed with respect to 80 gsm white office papers. Samples were taken sequentially from the paper production facility at the Australian Paper Mill (Maryvale, VIC). These samples ranged from raw wood chips through the pulping, whitening and refinement steps to the final formed and packed paper. Cellulose was extracted from each sample to observe both fractionation and mixing steps and their effect on the δ(13)C values. Overall, the mixing steps were observed to have a larger effect on the isotopic values of the bulk materials than any potential fractionation. Printing of papers using toner and inkjet printing processes and forensic testing were observed to have little effect on δ(13)C. These experiments highlighted considerations for sampling and confirmed the need for a holistic understanding of sample history to inform the interpretation of results.

  10. Using isotopic ratios for discrimination of environmental anthropogenic radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robert B; Akbarzadeh, Mansour

    2014-10-01

    When air is pulled into the WIPP repository for ventilation purposes, this air is unfiltered and contains all the components of ubiquitous anthropogenic radionuclides from global nuclear fallout (including Cs and Pu isotopes). Although the NORM in aeolian sand and dust contribute to the gross alpha beta activity on effluent air filters, there remains a need to discriminate effluent TRU generated in the disposal process at WIPP from TRU being pulled into the repository with the unfiltered surface air. This is only evaluated using ratios of Cs and Pu activity found through radioassay of air filters taken from the mine effluent. By characterizing both the credible range of Cs/Pu ratios from the environment and those known to exist in the waste, a rigorous test criteria is attained. The use of HPGE to assay Cs in the intake dust plated out in the mine allowed a gross assay of total TRU radioactivity pulled into the mine over time from global fallout. Radiochemistry of samples from deposition in the mine's air intake shaft was also carried out. The use of net activity ratios at background levels is also shown to follow a Cauchy distribution in terms of their expected statistical distributions.

  11. Discriminating the source of elements in travertine and tufa deposits: new perspectives from trace elements and isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teboul, Pierre-Alexandre; Durlet, Christophe; Adam, Maïté; Lopez, Benjamin; Gaucher, Eric C.; Virgone, Aurélien; Girard, Jean-Pierre; Camoin, Gilbert F.

    2015-04-01

    Calcitic or aragonitic travertine and tufa deposits (CATT) are frequently associated to former limestone dissolution in epigean or hypogean hydrogeological reservoirs. However, a large variety of other rocks can also occur as substratum and potential source of elements building these continental carbonates. In modern and recent environments, many studies have suggested that igneous rocks (basalts, rhyolites, carbonatites, ultramafics, syenites, granites) and other sedimentary rocks (dolomites, evaporites) may constitute "exotic" sources for calcium and other elements. Unfortunately in drilled fossil CATT, a wide array of rocks forming palaeo-hydrogeological reservoirs are generally unknown. Because CATT microfacies bring only little information to this issue, a geochemical database has been established by compiling major, minor, trace elements and stable isotopes. This database includes data from published literature and a new data acquired as part of an on-going research work. The later includes analyzed Modern and Recent non-marine CATT from the Ligurian Ophiolites (Italy), the Chaine des Puys (France), the Limagne graben (France), the Paris Basin (France) and the Reunion Island (Indian Ocean). Each of these case studies is located on a relatively well-constrained hydrogeological reservoir. Among the geochemical tracers investigated in this dataset, particular emphasis is placed on (1) barium and strontium concentrations and (2) stable isotopes13C and δ18O). Barium and strontium concentrations allow the definition of three distinct geochemical fields. The first field is characterized by Ba and Sr concentrations respectively below 80 and 500 ppm, and corresponds to CATT associated with epigean karst system in limestone. The second field, in which CATT exhibits high Ba concentration (>80 ppm) but consistently low Sr content, is indicative of either ultramafic reservoirs or epigean reservoirs with a mixture of dolomite, evaporite and limestone. The third field

  12. Life history of the individuals buried in the St. Benedict Cemetery (Prague, 15th-18th centuries): insights from (14)C dating and stable isotope (δ(13)C, δ(15)N, δ(18)O) analysis.

    PubMed

    Salesse, Kevin; Dufour, Élise; Castex, Dominique; Velemínský, Petr; Santos, Frédéric; Kuchařová, Hedvika; Jun, Libor; Brůžek, Jaroslav

    2013-06-01

    Funerary practices and bioarchaeological (sex and age) data suggest that a mortality crisis linked to an epidemic episode occurred during the fifth phase of the St. Benedict cemetery in Prague (Czech Republic). To identify this mass mortality episode, we reconstructed individual life histories (dietary and mobility factors), assessed the population's biological homogeneity, and proposed a new chronology through stable isotope analysis (δ(13)C, δ(18)O and δ(15)N) and direct radiocarbon dating. Stable isotope analysis was conducted on the bone and tooth enamel (collagen and carbonate) of 19 individuals from three multiple graves (MG) and 12 individuals from individual graves (IG). The δ(15)N values of collagen and the difference between the δ(13)C values of collagen and bone carbonate could indicate that the IG individuals had a richer protein diet than the MG individuals or different food resources. The human bone and enamel carbonate and δ(18)O values suggest that the majority of individuals from MG and all individuals from IG spent most of their lives outside of the Bohemian region. Variations in δ(18)O values also indicate that all individuals experienced residential mobility during their lives. The stable isotope results, biological (age and sex) data and eight (14)C dates clearly differentiate the MG and IG groups. The present work provides evidence for the reuse of the St. Benedict cemetery to bury soldiers despite the funeral protest ban (1635 AD). The Siege of Prague (1742 AD) by French-Bavarian-Saxon armies is identified as the cause of the St. Benedict mass mortality event.

  13. Leaf and root pectin methylesterase activity and 13C/12C stable isotopic ratio measurements of methanol emissions give insight into methanol production in Lycopersicon esculentum.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Patricia Yoshino; Giebel, Brian M; Sternberg, Leonel da Silveira Lobo O'Reilly; Li, Lei; Timko, Michael P; Swart, Peter K; Riemer, Daniel D; Mak, John E; Lerdau, Manuel T

    2011-09-01

    Plant production of methanol (MeOH) is a poorly understood aspect of metabolism, and understanding MeOH production in plants is crucial for modeling MeOH emissions. Here, we have examined the source of MeOH emissions from mature and immature leaves and whether pectin methylesterase (PME) activity is a good predictor of MeOH emission. We also investigated the significance of below-ground MeOH production for mature leaf emissions. We present measurements of MeOH emission, PME activity, and MeOH concentration in mature and immature tissues of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). We also present stable carbon isotopic signatures of MeOH emission and the pectin methoxyl pool. Our results suggest that below-ground MeOH production was not the dominant contributor to daytime MeOH emissions from mature and immature leaves. Stable carbon isotopic signatures of mature and immature leaf MeOH were similar, suggesting that they were derived from the same pathway. Foliar PME activity was related to MeOH flux, but unexplained variance suggested PME activity could not predict emissions. The data show that MeOH production and emission are complex and cannot be predicted using PME activity alone. We hypothesize that substrate limitation of MeOH synthesis and MeOH catabolism may be important regulators of MeOH emission.

  14. Discrimination of bullet types using analysis of lead isotopes deposited in gunshot entry wounds.

    PubMed

    Wunnapuk, Klintean; Minami, Takeshi; Durongkadech, Piya; Tohno, Setsuko; Ruangyuttikarn, Werawan; Moriwake, Yumi; Vichairat, Karnda; Sribanditmongkol, Pongruk; Tohno, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    In order to discriminate bullet types used in firearms, of which the victims died, the authors investigated lead isotope ratios in gunshot entry wounds from nine lead (unjacketed) bullets, 15 semi-jacketed bullets, and 14 full-jacketed bullets by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. It was found that the lead isotope ratio of 207/206 in gunshot entry wounds was the highest with lead bullets, and it decreased in order from full-jacketed to semi-jacketed bullets. Lead isotope ratios of 208/206 or 208/207 to 207/206 at the gunshot entry wound were able to discriminate semi-jacketed bullets from lead and full-jacketed ones, but it was difficult to discriminate between lead and full-jacketed bullets. However, a combination of element and lead isotope ratio analyses in gunshot entry wounds enabled discrimination between lead, semi-jacketed, and full-jacketed bullets.

  15. Slow isotope turnover rates and low discrimination values in the American alligator: implications for interpretation of ectotherm stable isotope data.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Adam E; Heithaus, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has become a standard ecological tool for elucidating feeding relationships of organisms and determining food web structure and connectivity. There remain important questions concerning rates at which stable isotope values are incorporated into tissues (turnover rates) and the change in isotope value between a tissue and a food source (discrimination values). These gaps in our understanding necessitate experimental studies to adequately interpret field data. Tissue turnover rates and discrimination values vary among species and have been investigated in a broad array of taxa. However, little attention has been paid to ectothermic top predators in this regard. We quantified the turnover rates and discrimination values for three tissues (scutes, red blood cells, and plasma) in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Plasma turned over faster than scutes or red blood cells, but turnover rates of all three tissues were very slow in comparison to those in endothermic species. Alligator δ(15)N discrimination values were surprisingly low in comparison to those of other top predators and varied between experimental and control alligators. The variability of δ(15)N discrimination values highlights the difficulties in using δ(15)N to assign absolute and possibly even relative trophic levels in field studies. Our results suggest that interpreting stable isotope data based on parameter estimates from other species can be problematic and that large ectothermic tetrapod tissues may be characterized by unique stable isotope dynamics relative to species occupying lower trophic levels and endothermic tetrapods.

  16. Altered Carbon Isotope Discrimination of C3 Plants Under Very High pCO2 Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, R. J.; Schubert, B.; Jahren, H.

    2009-12-01

    Various modeling and proxy-based reconstructions of atmospheric pCO2 levels for the last 120 Ma have estimated RCO2 as high as 12x for the Early Cretaceous, generally decreasing into the Cenozoic, and decreasing further into the Quaternary. Multiple ecological studies to assess the effect of elevated CO2 on plant biomass and δ13C value have been spurred on by recent increases in greenhouse gases, however these studies typically grow plants under only slightly elevated CO2 levels (i.e., the twenty foremost studies published since 1990 involved 550 to 750 ppm pCO2, which equals RCO2 = 1.4 to 1.9x). In order to recreate the highest pCO2 environments of the last 120 Ma, we grew radish (Raphanus sativus L.) in growth chambers that maintained controlled environmental conditions and pCO2 levels ranging from ~5 to 11x that of today’s atmosphere (1791 to 4200 ppm); upon harvest we measured total biomass and stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13Cplant) in both above and below ground plant tissue. Unlike the 1:1 relationship between stable isotopes of atmospheric CO2 (δ13Catm) and δ13Cplant observed at lower pCO2 levels (i.e., RCO2 = 1x to 3x; Jahren et al., 2008), the δ13Cplant of biomass grown at more elevated RCO2 was dependent upon δ13Catm according to the linear relationship: δ13Cplant = 1.9(δ13Cplant) - 12.2 ‰ (r2 = 0.71). Concomitantly, we see a highly significant (p < 0.001) positive correlation between net carbon isotope discrimination in plant tissue and pCO2 level, with a change in the average Δδ13Cplant-atm in R. sativus L. from -27.0 to -28.0 ‰ at RCO2 = 5x to 11x, respectively. We will discuss possible mechanisms for changing isotope discrimination at very high pCO2 levels that may not be operative at lower concentrations. For example, we noted a striking reduction in the variability of biomass between plants grown at the same (very high) level of pCO2. This variability (calculated as the standard deviation of the log-transformed biomass data after

  17. Observations of atmospheric methane and its stable isotope ratio (δ13C) over the Russian Arctic seas from ship cruises in the summer and autumn of 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorokhod, A. I.; Pankratova, N. V.; Belikov, I. B.; Thompson, R. L.; Novigatsky, A. N.; Golitsyn, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    The results of experimental measurements of atmospheric methane concentrations and its isotopic composition in the Russian Arctic seas in the summer and autumn of 2015 are discussed. The Keeling plot method and inverse number simulation were used for revealing the factors responsible for elevated methane concentrations over the sea surface. Its maximum concentrations (up to 2050 ppb) were measured over the Kara and Laptev seas, as well as in the port area of Arkhangel'sk. It is shown that tundra and bog ecosystems of Siberia serve as the main sources of methane in the measurement zone (except for the area adjacent to large ports). As a whole, the share of methane from microbiological sources is as high as approximately 43% of the total methane concentrations along the ship route.

  18. Effects of foliar boron application on seed composition, cell wall boron, and seed δ15N and δ13C isotopes in water-stressed soybean plants

    PubMed Central

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Hu, Yanbo; Mengistu, Alemu; Kassem, My A.; Abel, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Limited information is available on the effects of foliar boron (B) application on soybean seed composition. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of foliar B on seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars). Our hypothesis was that since B is involved in nitrogen and carbon metabolism, it may impact seed composition. A repeated greenhouse experiment was conducted where half of the soybean plants was exposed to water stress (WS) and the other half was well-watered. Foliar boron (FB) in the form of boric acid was applied twice at a rate of 1.1 kg ha−1. The first application was during flowering stage, and the second application was during seed-fill stage. Treatments were water stressed plants with no FB (WS–B); water stressed plants with FB (WS+B); watered plants without FB (W–B), and watered plants with FB (W+B). The treatment W–B was used as a control. Comparing with WS–B plants, B concentration was the highest in leaves and seed of W+B plants (84% increase in leaves and 73% in seed). Seeds of W+B plants had higher protein (11% increase), oleic acid (27% increase), sucrose (up to 40% increase), glucose, and fructose comparing with W–B. However, seed stachyose concentrations increased by 43% in WS–B plants seed compared with W–B plants. Cell wall (structural) B concentration in leaves was higher in all plants under water stress, especially in WS–B plants where the percentage of cell wall B reached up to 90%. Water stress changed seed δ15N and δ13C values in both B applied and non-B applied plants, indicating possible effects on nitrogen and carbon metabolism. This research demonstrated that FB increased B accumulation in leaves and seed, and altered seed composition of well-watered and water stressed plants, indicating a possible involvement of B in seed protein, and oleic and linolenic fatty acids. Further research is needed to explain mechanisms of B involvement in seed protein and fatty acids. PMID:23888163

  19. Automated determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in aqueous samples: RSIL lab codes 1851 and 1852

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Révész, Kinga M.; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab codes 1851 and 1852 are to determine the total carbon mass and the ratio of the stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) for total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, lab code 1851) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC, lab code 1852) in aqueous samples. The analysis procedure is automated according to a method that utilizes a total carbon analyzer as a peripheral sample preparation device for analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas by a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The carbon analyzer produces CO2 and determines the carbon mass in parts per million (ppm) of DIC and DOC in each sample separately, and the CF-IRMS determines the carbon isotope ratio of the produced CO2. This configuration provides a fully automated analysis of total carbon mass and δ13C with no operator intervention, additional sample preparation, or other manual analysis. To determine the DIC, the carbon analyzer transfers a specified sample volume to a heated (70 °C) reaction vessel with a preprogrammed volume of 10% phosphoric acid (H3PO4), which allows the carbonate and bicarbonate species in the sample to dissociate to CO2. The CO2 from the reacted sample is subsequently purged with a flow of helium gas that sweeps the CO2 through an infrared CO2 detector and quantifies the CO2. The CO2 is then carried through a high-temperature (650 °C) scrubber reactor, a series of water traps, and ultimately to the inlet of the mass spectrometer. For the analysis of total dissolved organic carbon, the carbon analyzer performs a second step on the sample in the heated reaction vessel during which a preprogrammed volume of sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) is added, and the hydroxyl radicals oxidize the organics to CO2. Samples containing 2 ppm to 30,000 ppm of carbon are analyzed. The precision of the carbon isotope analysis is within 0.3 per mill for DIC, and within 0.5 per mill for DOC.

  20. Growth in two common gardens reveals species by environment interaction in carbon isotope discrimination of Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Turner, Neil C; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Nicolle, Dean; Kuhlmann, Iris

    2010-06-01

    One-year-old sun leaves of 60 species of Eucalyptus were collected in August 2005 at an arboretum in South Australia with a mean annual rainfall of 427 mm, and 14 of the same species were sampled at an arboretum in Western Australia with a mean annual rainfall of 216 mm. We determined the genetic and phenotypic variation in carbon isotope composition (delta13C), specific leaf area (SLA) and nitrogen content per unit area of the species at each site. There were very significant (P < 0.001) differences in delta13C among the species at both sites. The mean delta13C of the 60 species at the wetter site was -27.6 per thousand (from -25.8 per thousand in Eucalyptus youngiana to -29.9 per thousand in Eucalyptus salicola) and of the 14 species at the drier site was -25.3 per thousand (from -23.7 per thousand in Eucalyptus ravida to -27.3 per thousand in Eucalyptus ewartiana). Of the 14 species common to both sites, four species had similar values of delta13C at the two sites despite the differences in rainfall, whereas in others the values of delta13C were significantly (P < 0.001) lower (more negative) at the wet than at the dry site. The SLA and nitrogen content per unit leaf area also differed significantly among the species (P < 0.001), but there was not a common relationship between delta13C and SLA or between delta13C and nitrogen content at the two sites. The strong species by environment interaction resulted from some species demonstrating phenotypic plasticity for delta13C, while others were inherently stable across environments.

  1. Defining fish community structure in Lake Winnipeg using stable isotopes (δ(13)C, δ(15)N, δ(34)S): implications for monitoring ecological responses and trophodynamics of mercury & other trace elements.

    PubMed

    Ofukany, Amy F A; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Bond, Alexander L; Hobson, Keith A

    2014-11-01

    The ecological integrity of freshwater lakes is influenced by atmospheric and riverine deposition of contaminants, shoreline development, eutrophication, and the introduction of non-native species. Changes to the trophic structure of Lake Winnipeg, Canada, and consequently, the concentrations of contaminants and trace elements measured in tissues of native fishes, are likely attributed to agricultural runoff from the 977,800 km(2) watershed and the arrival of non-native zooplankters and fishes. We measured δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and δ(34)S along with concentrations of 15 trace elements in 17 native fishes from the north and south basins of Lake Winnipeg in 2009 and 2010. After adjusting for differences in isotopic baseline values between the two basins, fishes in the south basin had consistently higher δ(13)C and δ(34)S, and lower δ(15)N. We found little evidence of biomagnification of trace elements at the community level, but walleye (Sander vitreus) and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) had higher mercury and selenium concentrations with increased trophic position, coincident with increased piscivory. There was evidence of growth dilution of cobalt, copper, manganese, molybdenum, thallium, and vanadium, and bioaccumulation of mercury, which could be explained by increases in algal (and consequently, lake and fish) productivity. We conclude that the north and south basins of Lake Winnipeg represent very different communities with different trophic structures and trace element concentrations.

  2. A stable isotope13C and δ15N) perspective on human diet on Rapa Nui (Easter Island) ca. AD 1400-1900.

    PubMed

    Commendador, Amy S; Dudgeon, John V; Finney, Bruce P; Fuller, Benjamin T; Esh, Kelley S

    2013-10-01

    Ecological and environmental evidence suggests that Rapa Nui was among the most marginally habitable islands in Eastern Polynesia, with only a fraction of the biotic diversity found on archipelagos to the west, and capable of sustaining many fewer cultigens traditionally transported by Polynesian colonizers. However, archaeological evidence for human dietary adaptations under such restrictions is limited. Little is known about the particulars of the subsistence base and dietary changes on Rapa Nui that may be associated with a hypothesized late prehistoric decline in the quality and diversity of food sources. To better understand prehistoric Rapa Nui diet we examined stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions of human teeth along with archaeological faunal material thought to comprise the Rapa Nui food web. Our results indicate that contrary to previous zooarchaeological studies diet was predominantly terrestrial throughout the entire sequence of occupation, with reliance on rats, chickens and C3 plants. While a few individuals may have had access to higher trophic level marine resources, this is evident only later in time (generally post-AD 1600). A decline in (15)N through time was observed, and may be attributed to declines in available terrestrial proteins; however, presently we cannot rule out the effect of changing soil and plant baseline δ(15)N. Our results also suggest differential access to higher trophic level marine resources among contemporaneous populations, but more research is required to clarify this observation.

  3. Simultaneous determination of stable isotopic compositions of nitrous oxide (δ15N and δ18O of N2O) and methane (δ13C of CH4) in nanomolar quantities from a single water sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, A.; Tsunogai, U.; Komatsu, D. D.; Nakagawa, F.

    2010-12-01

    The stable isotopic compositions of nitrous oxide (δ15N of N2O and δ18O of N2O, respectively) and methane (δ13C of CH4) have provided us with some interesting geochemical insights. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and automated analytical system to simultaneously determine the concentrations and stable isotopic compositions of nanomolar quantities of N2O and CH4 in the environmental water, by combining continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry and a He-sparging system to extract and purify the dissolved gases. Our system, which is composed of a sparging bottle, a chemical trap, four cold traps and a capillary gas chromatograph that use ultra-pure helium as the carrier gas, achieves complete extraction of N2O and CH4 in a water sample and separation among N2O, CH4, and the other component gases. The flow path subsequent to gas chromatograph was periodically changed to pass the gases through the combustion furnace to convert CH4 and the other hydrocarbons into CO2, or to bypass the combustion furnace for the direct introduction of eluted N2O into the mass spectrometer, for determining the stable isotopic compositions through monitoring m/z = 44, 45, and 46, on the bases of CO2+ and N2O+, respectively. The analytical system can be operated automatically with sequential software programmed on a personal computer. The analytical precisions (the standard deviation of a single measurement) were better than 0.2‰ for δ15N of N2O and 0.3‰ for δ18O of N2O, in the case of more than 6.7 nmol N2O injection and better than 1.4‰ for δ15N of N2O and 2.6‰ for δ18O of N2O, in the case of more than 0.2 nmol N2O injection, respectively. Simultaneously, the analytical precisions were better than 0.07‰ for δ13C of CH4, in the case of more than 5.5 nmol CH4 infection and better than 2.1‰ for δ13C of CH4, when more than 0.024 nmol CH4 injection. In this manner, we can simultaneously determine stable isotopic compositions of a 120 mL water sample having

  4. Biomagnification profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols and polychlorinated biphenyls in Tokyo Bay elucidated by delta13C and delta15N isotope ratios as guides to trophic web structure.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Ichiro; Miyoshi, Noriko; Mizukawa, Kaoruko; Takada, Hideshige; Ikemoto, Tokutaka; Omori, Koji; Tsuchiya, Kotaro

    2009-05-01

    Biomagnification profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the innermost part of Tokyo Bay, Japan were analyzed using stable carbon (delta(13)C) and nitrogen (delta(15)N) isotope ratios as guides to trophic web structure. delta(15)N analysis indicated that all species of mollusks tested were primary consumers, while decapods and fish were secondary consumers. Higher concentrations of PCBs occurred in decapods and fish than in mollusks. In contrast, concentrations of PAHs and alkylphenols were lower in decapods and fish than in mollusks. Unlike PCBs, whose concentrations largely increased with increasing delta(15)N (i.e. increasing trophic level), all PAHs and alkylphenols analyzed followed a reverse trend. Molecular weights of PAHs are lower than those of PCBs, therefore low membrane permeability caused by large molecular size is an unlikely factor in the "biodilution" of PAHs. Organisms at higher trophic levels may rapidly metabolize PAHs or they may assimilate less of them.

  5. An extractive removal step optimized for a high-throughput α-cellulose extraction method for δ13C and δ18O stable isotope ratio analysis in conifer tree rings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen; Noormets, Asko; King, John S; Sun, Ge; McNulty, Steve; Domec, Jean-Christophe

    2016-09-26

    Stable isotope ratios (δ(13)C and δ(18)O) of tree-ring α-cellulose are important tools in paleoclimatology, ecology, plant physiology and genetics. The Multiple Sample Isolation System for Solids (MSISS) was a major advance in the tree-ring α-cellulose extraction methods, offering greater throughput and reduced labor input compared to traditional alternatives. However, the usability of the method for resinous conifer species may be limited by the need to remove extractives from some conifer species in a separate pretreatment step. Here we test the necessity of pretreatment for α-cellulose extraction in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.), and the efficiency of a modified acetone-based ambient-temperature step for the removal of extractives (i) in loblolly pine from five geographic locations representing its natural range in the southeastern USA, and (ii) on five other common coniferous species (black spruce (Picea mariana Mill.), Fraser fir (Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa D.)) with contrasting extractive profiles. The differences of δ(13)C values between the new and traditional pretreatment methods were within the precision of the isotope ratio mass spectrometry method used (±0.2‰), and the differences between δ(18)O values were not statistically significant. Although some unanticipated results were observed in Fraser fir, the new ambient-temperature technique was deemed as effective as the more labor-consuming and toxic traditional pretreatment protocol. The proposed technique requires a separate acetone-inert multiport system similar to MSISS, and the execution of both pretreatment and main extraction steps allows for simultaneous treatment of up to several hundred microsamples from resinous softwood, while the need of additional labor input remains minimal.

  6. Development and Validation of a Rapid 13C6-Glucose Isotope Dilution UPLC-MRM Mass Spectrometry Method for Use in Determining System Accuracy and Performance of Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

    PubMed Central

    Matsunami, Risë K.; Angelides, Kimon; Engler, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is currently considerable discussion about the accuracy of blood glucose concentrations determined by personal blood glucose monitoring systems (BGMS). To date, the FDA has allowed new BGMS to demonstrate accuracy in reference to other glucose measurement systems that use the same or similar enzymatic-based methods to determine glucose concentration. These types of reference measurement procedures are only comparative in nature and are subject to the same potential sources of error in measurement and system perturbations as the device under evaluation. It would be ideal to have a completely orthogonal primary method that could serve as a true standard reference measurement procedure for establishing the accuracy of new BGMS. Methods: An isotope-dilution liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (ID-UPLC-MRM) assay was developed using 13C6-glucose as a stable isotope analogue to specifically measure glucose concentration in human plasma, and validated for use against NIST standard reference materials, and against fresh isolates of whole blood and plasma into which exogenous glucose had been spiked. Assay performance was quantified to NIST-traceable dry weight measures for both glucose and 13C6-glucose. Results: The newly developed assay method was shown to be rapid, highly specific, sensitive, accurate, and precise for measuring plasma glucose levels. The assay displayed sufficient dynamic range and linearity to measure across the range of both normal and diabetic blood glucose levels. Assay performance was measured to within the same uncertainty levels (<1%) as the NIST definitive method for glucose measurement in human serum. Conclusions: The newly developed ID UPLC-MRM assay can serve as a validated reference measurement procedure to which new BGMS can be assessed for glucose measurement performance. PMID:25986627

  7. Stable isotope ratio analysis as a tool to discriminate between rainbow trout (O. mykiss) fed diets based on plant or fish-meal proteins.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Rojas, J M; Tulli, F; Messina, M; Tibaldi, E; Guillou, C

    2008-12-01

    The use of stable isotope ratio analysis (SIRA) as a rapid analytical tool to characterize and discriminate farmed fish on the basis of the feedstuffs included in the diet formulation is discussed. Two isoproteic (44.8%) and isolipidic (19.6%) extruded diets were formulated: a fish-meal-based diet (FM diet), containing fish meal as the sole protein source; a plant-protein-based diet (PP diet), where pea protein concentrate and wheat gluten meal replaced 80% of fish meal protein. The diets were fed to eight groups of rainbow trout (initial body weight: 106.6g) for 103 days in two daily meals under controlled rearing conditions. Growth performance (final body weight: 318.5 g; specific growth rate: 1.06%) and feed-to-gain ratio (0.79) were not affected by the dietary treatment. The differences in isotopic values of the two diets were clearly reflected in the different carbon and nitrogen isotopic values in rainbow trout fillets. The delta(13)C and delta(15)N values of muscle of farmed rainbow trout showed differences between farmed fish fed a fish-protein-based diet (-20.47 +/- 0.34 and 12.38 +/- 0.57 for delta(13)C and delta(15)N, respectively) and those fed a plant-protein-based diet (-23.96 +/- 0.38 and 7.15 +/- 0.51 for delta(13)C and delta(15)N, respectively). The results suggest that SIRA provides a robust and verifiable analytical tool to discriminate between fish fed on a plant or a fish protein diet.

  8. Short-term natural δ13C and δ18O variations in pools and fluxes in a beech forest: the transfer of isotopic signal from recent photosynthates to soil respired CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, O.; Proietti, S.; Moscatello, S.; Portarena, S.; Battistelli, A.; Matteucci, G.; Brugnoli, E.

    2011-10-01

    The fate of photosynthetic products within the plant-soil continuum determines how long the reduced carbon resides within the ecosystem and when it returns back to the atmosphere in the form of respiratory CO2. We have tested the possibility of measuring natural variation in δ13C and δ18O to disentangle the potential times needed to transfer carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis down to trunk, roots and, in general, to belowground up to its further release in the form of soil respiration into the atmosphere in a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. We have measured the variation in stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in plant material and in soil respired CO2 every three hours for three consecutive days. Possible steps and different signs of post-photosynthetic fractionation during carbon translocation were also identified. A 12 h-periodicity was observed for variation in δ13C in soluble sugars in the top crown leaves and it can be explained by starch day/night dynamics in synthesis and breakdown and by stomatal limitations under elevated vapour pressure deficits. Photosynthetic products were transported down the trunk and mixed with older carbon pools, therefore causing the dampening of the δ13C signal variation. The strongest periodicity of 24 h was found in δ13C in soil respiration indicating changes in root contribution to the total CO2 efflux. Other non-biological causes like diffusion fractionation and advection induced by gas withdrawn from the measurement chamber complicate data interpretation on this step of C transfer path. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify the speed of carbohydrates' translocation from the point of assimilation to the trunk breast height because leaf-imprinted enrichment of δ18O in soluble sugars was less modified along the downward transport and was well related to environmental parameters potentially linked to stomatal conductance. The speed of carbohydrates translocation from the site of assimilation to the trunk

  9. Characterizing the feeding habits of the testate amoebae Hyalosphenia papilio and Nebela tincta along a narrow "fen-bog" gradient using digestive vacuole content and 13C and 15N isotopic analyses.

    PubMed

    Jassey, Vincent E J; Shimano, Satoshi; Dupuy, Christine; Toussaint, Marie-Laure; Gilbert, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Population dynamics and feeding habits of the testate amoebae Nebela tincta and Hyalosphenia papilio were studied along a short "fen" to "bog" gradient in a Sphagnum-dominated mire (Jura, France). Samples were collected in living "top segments" (0-3 cm) and early declining "bottom segments" (3-6 cm) of Sphagnum fallax peat. Observations of digestive vacuole content and stable isotope analyses ((13)C and (15)N) were used to establish the feeding behavior of both testate amoeba species. Owing to their vertical distribution, the feeding habit of H. papilio was described from top segments, and that of N. tincta from bottom segments. Among identified food sources, those most frequently ingested by N. tincta were spores and mycelia of fungi (55%), microalgae (25%) and cyanobacteria (8.5%). For H. papilio, the most frequently ingested prey were ciliates (55%) and microalgae (35%). Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling analysis clearly demonstrated that the two species did not have the same feeding habit along the "fen-bog" gradient, and furthermore that a significant spatial split exists in the feeding behavior of H. papilio. Additionally, isotope analyses suggested that H. papilio and N. tincta did not have the same trophic position in the microbial food web, probably resulting from their different feeding strategies.

  10. An isotopic (Δ14C, δ13C, and δ15N) investigation of particulate organic matter and zooplankton biomass in Lake Superior and across a size-gradient of aquatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zigah, P. K.; Minor, E. C.; Werne, J. P.; McCallister, S. Leigh

    2012-04-01

    Food webs in aquatic systems can be supported both by carbon from recent local primary productivity and by carbon subsidies, such as material from terrestrial ecosystems or past in situ primary productivity. The importance of these subsidies to respiration and biomass production remains a topic of debate, but they may play major roles in determining the fate of organic carbon and in sustaining upper trophic levels, including those contributing to economically important fisheries. While some studies have reported that terrigenous organic carbon supports disproportionately high zooplankton production, others have suggested that phytoplankton preferentially supports zooplankton production in aquatic ecosystems. Here we apply natural abundance radiocarbon (Δ14C) and stable isotope13C, δ15N) analyses to show that zooplankton in Lake Superior selectively incorporate recently-fixed, locally-produced (autochthonous) organic carbon even though other carbon sources are readily available. Estimates from Bayesian isotopic modeling based on Δ14C values show that the average lakewide median contributions of recent in situ algal, terrestrial, sedimentary, and bacterial organic carbon to the bulk POM in Lake Superior were 23%, 28%, 15%, and 25%, respectively. However, the isotopic modeling estimates show that recent in situ production (algae) contributed a disproportionately large amount (median, 40-89%) of the carbon in zooplankton biomass in Lake Superior. Although terrigenous organic carbon and old organic carbon from resuspended sediments were significant portions of the available basal food resources, these contributed only a small amount to zooplankton biomass (average lakewide median, 2% from sedimentary organic carbon and 9% from terrigenous organic carbon). Comparison of zooplankton food sources based on their radiocarbon composition showed that terrigenous organic carbon was relatively more important in rivers and small lakes, and the proportion of terrestrially

  11. A 200 year temperature record from tree ring δ13C at the Qaidam Basin of the Tibetan Plateau after identifying the optimum method to correct for changing atmospheric CO2 and δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenzhi; Liu, Xiaohong; Shao, Xuemei; Leavitt, Steven; Xu, Guobao; An, Wenling; Qin, Dahe

    2011-12-01

    Improved understanding of climate influences on tree ring stable carbon isotope13C) ratios for Qilian juniper (Sabina przewalskii Kom.) will improve prospects for long climate reconstructions in northwestern China's Qaidam Basin, where weather stations are widely scattered with relatively short records. Here, we developed an annual-resolution δ13C series from 1800 to 2005 for trees in this extremely arid, high-elevation area. As expected, a significant decline in δ13C (of about 3.5‰) occurred from 1850 to 2005 in response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and decreasing atmospheric δ13C. High-frequency correlation analysis based on comparison of the tree ring δ13C chronology with recorded weather parameters revealed that mean temperature during the current growing season (April-August) most strongly influenced tree ring δ13C discrimination from 1956 to 2005. To clarify the climatic implications of the long-term trend, we systematically compared four previously published approaches to remove the effects of decreasing atmospheric δ13C from the climate signals. The optimal correction, which accounted for the decline in atmospheric δ13C (δ13Ccor) and for a discrimination rate of about 0.016‰ ppmv-1 for the CO2 partial pressure, captured the strongest temperature signal (r = 0.75, P < 0.001). The historical mean April-August temperatures inferred from the correlations of tree ring δ13C with climate data revealed a persistent warming trend during the past two centuries, especially since the 1980s. Our results therefore reveal a high potential for reconstruction of growing season temperatures on a millennial scale in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau.

  12. Diurnal, seasonal and interannual variability of carbon isotope discrimination at the canopy level in response to environmental factors in a boreal forest ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baozhang; Chen, Jing M

    2007-10-01

    Accurate estimation of temporal and spatial variations in photosynthetic discrimination of 13C is critical to carbon cycle research. In this study, a combined ecosystem-boundary layer isotope model, which was satisfactorily validated against intensive campaign data, was used to explore the temporal variability of carbon discrimination in response to environmental driving factors in a boreal ecosystem in the vicinity of Fraserdale Tower, Ontario, Canada (49 degrees 52'30''N, 81 degrees 34'12''W). A 14 year (1990-1996 and 1998-2004) hourly CO2 concentration and meteorological record measured on this tower was used for this purpose. The 14 year mean yearly diurnal amplitude of canopy-level discrimination Delta(canopy) was computed to be 2.8 +/- 0.5 per thousand, and the overall diurnal cycle showed that the greatest Delta(canopy) values occurred at dawn and dusk, while the minima generally appeared in mid-afternoon. The average annual Delta(canopy) varied from 18.3 to 19.7 per thousand with the 14 year average of 19 +/- 0.4 per thousand. The overall seasonality of Delta(canopy) showed a gradually increasing trend from leaf emergence in May-September and with a slight decrease at the end of the growing season in October. Delta(canopy) was negatively correlated to vapour pressure deficit and air temperature across hourly to decadal timescales. A strong climatic control on stomatal regulation of ecosystem isotope discrimination was found in this study.

  13. Differential C Isotope Discrimination by Fungi during Decomposition of C3- and C4-Derived Sucrose

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Matthew R.; Chapela, Ignacio H.

    2000-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis is a major tool used in ecosystem studies to establish pathways and rates of C exchange between various ecosystem components. Little is known about isotopic effects of many such components, especially microbes. Here we report on the discovery of an unexpected pattern of C isotopic discrimination by basidiomycete fungi with far-reaching consequences for our understanding of isotopic processing in ecosystems where these microbes mediate material transfers across trophic levels. We measured fractionation effects on three ecologically relevant basidiomycete species under controlled laboratory conditions. Sucrose derived from C3 and C4 plants is fractionated differentially by these microbes in a taxon-specific manner. The differentiation between mycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi observed in the field by others is not explained by intrinsic discrimination patterns. Fractionation occurs during sugar uptake and is sensitive to the nonrandom distribution of stable isotopes in the sucrose molecule. The balance between respiratory physiology and fermentative physiology modulates the degree of fractionation. These discoveries disprove the assumption that fungal C processing does not significantly alter the distribution of stable C isotopes and provide the basis for a reevaluation of ecosystem models based on isotopic evidence that involve C transfer across microbial interfaces. We provide a mechanism to account for the observed differential discrimination effects. PMID:11010857

  14. Carbon Isotope Discrimination in C3 Land Plants is Independent of Atmospheric PCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The δ13C of terrestrial C3 plant tissues and soil organic matter is important for understanding the carbon cycle, inferring past climatic and ecological conditions, and predicting responses of vegetation to future climate change. Plant δ13C depends on the δ13C of atmospheric CO2 and mean annual precipitation (MAP), but an unresolved decades-long debate centers on whether terrestrial C3 plant δ13C responds to pCO2. Here, the pCO2-dependence of C3 land plant δ13C was tested using isotopic records from low- and high-pCO2 times spanning historical through Eocene data. Historical data do not resolve a clear pCO2-effect (-1.2±1.0 to 0.59±0.34‰/100 ppmv), and organic carbon records of the Pleistocene-Holocene transition implicate changes in MAP and ecosystems, rather than pCO2, as the major driver of δ13C changes. Fossil collagen and tooth enamel data constrain pCO2-effects most tightly to -0.03±0.13 and -0.03±0.24‰/100 ppmv between 200 and 700 ppmv. Combining all constraints yields a preferred value of 0.0±0.2‰/100 ppmv (2 s.e.), i.e. there is effectively no pCO2 effect. Recent models of pCO2-dependence imply unrealistic MAP for Cenozoic records.

  15. Carbon isotope discrimination in western hemlock and its relationship to mineral nutrition and growth.

    PubMed

    Walia, Ankit; Guy, Robert D; White, Barry

    2010-06-01

    Western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla [Raf.] Sarg.) is a major component of temperate rainforests in coastal British Columbia. Forest fertilization can enhance the growth of forest trees, but results are inconsistent for western hemlock. We investigated the relationship between delta13C (foliage and stemwood), growth response and tree nutritional status in this species. To establish a sampling protocol for stemwood, we first assessed spot-to-spot variation around and along the bole, which exceeded 1 per thousand. We utilized the reaction wood (high lignin content) and adjacent normal wood in two curved western hemlock stems to evaluate whether this variation was related to wood composition. There was a consistent 3.43 per thousand difference between lignin and holocellulose, but the isotopic mass balance of whole wood was conserved and, therefore, did not vary with lignin content. Therefore, extraction of cellulose or holocellulose prior to analysis can introduce (not remove) bias. In a detailed study of a third stem, circumferential and longitudinal variation in delta13C was associated with spiral grain indicating limited physiological mixing of isotopic signatures originating from the crown. Wood was subsequently pooled from four cardinal positions around each stem. Eight even-aged western hemlock stands were selected and fertilized with different combinations of nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P) and a blend of S, K, Mg, Zn and Cu. Fertilization was effective in increasing foliar N, P, K and S depending on treatment. At the end of the first growing season after fertilization, the effect of treatments on foliar delta13C was nearly significant (P = 0.054), but did not persist into a second year. Effects on tree-ring delta13C were more obvious and persisted for about 3 years, averaging approximately 0.2-0.4 per thousand over this period, depending on treatment. Combinations of N, P and blend had the greatest effect, consistent with relative increases in basal area

  16. Distinctive diet-tissue isotopic discrimination factors derived from the exclusive bamboo-eating giant panda.

    PubMed

    Han, Han; Wei, Wei; Nie, Yonggang; Zhou, Wenliang; Hu, Yibo; Wu, Qi; Wei, Fuwen

    2016-11-01

    Stable isotope analysis is very useful in animal ecology, especially in diet reconstruction and trophic studies. Differences in isotope ratios between consumers and their diet, termed discrimination factors, are essential for studies of stable isotope ecology and are species-specific and tissue-specific. Given the specialized bamboo diet and clear foraging behavior, here, we calculated discrimination factors for carbon and nitrogen isotopes from diet to tissues (tooth enamel, hair keratin and bone collagen) for the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), a species derived from meat-eating ancestors. Our results showed that carbon discrimination factor obtained from giant panda tooth enamel (ε (13) Cdiet-enamel = 10.0‰) and nitrogen discrimination factors from hair keratin (Δ(15) Ndiet-hair = 2.2‰) and bone collagen (Δ(15) Ndiet-collagen = 2.3‰) were lower, and carbon discrimination factors from hair keratin (Δ(13) Cdiet-hair = 5.0‰) and bone collagen (Δ(13) Cdiet-collagen = 6.1‰) were higher than those of other mammalian carnivores, omnivores and herbivores. Such distinctive values are likely the result of a low-nutrient and specialized bamboo diet, carnivore-like digestive system and exceptionally low metabolism in giant pandas.

  17. Anomalous 13C enrichment in modern marine organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Claypool, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Marine organic carbon is heavier isotopically (13C enriched) than most land-plant or terrestrial organic C1. Accordingly, ??13C values of organic C in modern marine sediments are routinely interpreted in terms of the relative proportions of marine and terrestrial sources of the preserved organic matter2,3. When independent geochemical techniques are used to evaluate the source of organic matter in Cretaceous or older rocks, those rocks containing mostly marine organic C are found typically to have lighter (more-negative) ??13C values than rocks containing mostly terrestrial organic C. Here we conclude that marine photosynthesis in mid-Cretaceous and earlier oceans generally resulted in a greater fractionation of C isotopes and produced organic C having lighter ??13C values. Modern marine photosynthesis may be occurring under unusual geological conditions (higher oceanic primary production rates, lower PCO2) that limit dissolved CO2 availability and minimize carbon isotope fractionation4. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  18. The evolution of 13C and 18O isotope composition of DIC in a calcite depositing film of water with isotope exchange between the DIC and a CO2 containing atmosphere, and simultaneous evaporation of the water. Implication to climate proxies from stalagmites: A theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreybrodt, Wolfgang; Romanov, Douchko

    2016-12-01

    The most widely applied climate proxies in speleothems are the isotope compositions of carbon and oxygen expressed by δ13C and δ18O values. However, mechanisms, which are not related to climate changes, overlay the climate signal. One is the temporal increase of both, δ13C and δ18O values by kinetic processes during precipitation of calcite. Isotope exchange between DIC in the water and the CO2 in the surrounding cave atmosphere can also change isotope composition. Here we present a theoretical model of the temporal isotope evolution of DIC in a thin water layer during precipitation of calcite and simultaneous isotope exchange with the cave atmosphere, and simultaneous evaporation of water. The exchange of oxygen isotopes in the DIC with those in the water is also considered. For drip times for Tdrip < 0.2τ, where τ is the precipitation time, we find for the change of the δ13C and δ18O values, respectively, after the time Tdrip ΔDIC(Tdrip) = ((λ + ɛ)Ceq/C0 - ɛ) Tdrip/τ + ((δeqatm - δ0) Tdrip/τinatm) + (δeqwater - δ0 - ɛw Tdrip/Tev) Tdrip/Twater The first term on the right hand side is the contribution from precipitation of calcite, the second stems from isotope exchange with the CO2 of the cave atmosphere, and the third results from isotope exchange between oxygen in the DIC and the oxygen in the water. λ, ε are kinetic parameters, τ is the time scale of precipitation, (δeqatm -δ0) and (δeqwater -δ0) are the differences between the corresponding initial δ-value δ0 and the value δeqatm,water if DIC were in isotope equilibrium with the atmosphere or in the case of oxygen with the water, respectively. τinatm and τwater are the time scales of approach to isotope equilibrium by the exchange reactions. Ceq is the concentration of DIC in chemical equilibrium with the CO2 in the cave atmosphere and C0 is the initial concentration, when the water drips to the stalagmite. Tev is the time needed for complete evaporation of the water layer. ε

  19. Strong Coupling of Shoot Assimilation and Soil Respiration during Drought and Recovery Periods in Beech As Indicated by Natural Abundance δ(13)C Measurements.

    PubMed

    Blessing, Carola H; Barthel, Matti; Gentsch, Lydia; Buchmann, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Drought down-regulates above- and belowground carbon fluxes, however, the resilience of trees to drought will also depend on the speed and magnitude of recovery of these above- and belowground fluxes after re-wetting. Carbon isotope composition of above- and belowground carbon fluxes at natural abundance provides a methodological approach to study the coupling between photosynthesis and soil respiration (SR) under conditions (such as drought) that influence photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination. In turn, the direct supply of root respiration with recent photoassimilates will impact on the carbon isotope composition of soil-respired CO2. We independently measured shoot and soil CO2 fluxes of beech saplings (Fagus sylvatica L.) and their respective δ(13)C continuously with laser spectroscopy at natural abundance. We quantified the speed of recovery of drought stressed trees after re-watering and traced photosynthetic carbon isotope signal in the carbon isotope composition of soil-respired CO2. Stomatal conductance responded strongly to the moderate drought (-65%), induced by reduced soil moisture content as well as increased vapor pressure deficit. Simultaneously, carbon isotope discrimination decreased by 8‰, which in turn caused a significant increase in δ(13)C of recent metabolites (1.5-2.5‰) and in δ(13)C of SR (1-1.5‰). Generally, shoot and soil CO2 fluxes and their δ(13)C were in alignment during drought and subsequent stress release, clearly demonstrating a permanent dependence of root respiration on recently fixed photoassimilates, rather than on older reserves. After re-watering, the drought signal persisted longer in δ(13)C of the water soluble fraction that integrates multiple metabolites (soluble sugars, amino acids, organic acids) than in the neutral fraction which represents most recently assimilated sugars or in the δ(13)C of SR. Nevertheless, full recovery of all aboveground physiological variables was reached within 4 days - and

  20. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  1. Influence of Reproduction on Stable-Isotope Ratios: Nitrogen and Carbon Isotope Discrimination between Mothers, Fetuses, and Milk in the Fin Whale, a Capital Breeder.

    PubMed

    Borrell, A; Gómez-Campos, E; Aguilar, A

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the influence of gestation and lactation on the tissue stable-isotope ratios of females, fetuses, and milk remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the incidence of these events on δ(13)C and δ(15)N values in fin whales sampled off northwestern Spain between 1983 and 1985. The effect of gestation on tissue stable-isotope ratios was examined in the muscle of pregnant females (n = 13) and their fetuses (n = 10) and that of lactation in the muscle of nursing females (n = 21) and their milk (n = 25). Results suggest that fetuses are enriched compared to their mothers in both (15)N (Δ(15)N = 1.5‰) and (13)C (Δ(13)C =1.1‰), while, compared to muscle, milk is enriched in (15)N (Δ(15)N = 0.3‰) but depleted in (13)C (Δ(13)C = -0.62‰). This pattern is consistent with that previously observed for other species that, like the fin whale, rely on endogenous energy during reproduction, and it substantiates a general difference in the physiological processing of nitrogen and carbon balances between income and capital breeders. These findings are relevant to the understanding of the energetic balance of mammals during gestation and lactation and are central when inferences on trophic ecology are drawn from isotopic values of reproductive females.

  2. δ13C and δ18O isotopic composition of CaCO3 measured by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry: statistical evaluation and verification by application to Devils Hole core DH-11 calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, Kinga M.; Landwehr, Jurate M.

    2002-01-01

    A new method was developed to analyze the stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of small samples (400 ± 20 µg) of calcium carbonate. This new method streamlines the classical phosphoric acid/calcium carbonate (H3PO4/CaCO3) reaction method by making use of a recently available Thermoquest-Finnigan GasBench II preparation device and a Delta Plus XL continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Conditions for which the H3PO4/CaCO3 reaction produced reproducible and accurate results with minimal error had to be determined. When the acid/carbonate reaction temperature was kept at 26 °C and the reaction time was between 24 and 54 h, the precision of the carbon and oxygen isotope ratios for pooled samples from three reference standard materials was ≤0.1 and ≤0.2 per mill or ‰, respectively, although later analysis showed that materials from one specific standard required reaction time between 34 and 54 h for δ18O to achieve this level of precision. Aliquot screening methods were shown to further minimize the total error. The accuracy and precision of the new method were analyzed and confirmed by statistical analysis. The utility of the method was verified by analyzing calcite from Devils Hole, Nevada, for which isotope-ratio values had previously been obtained by the classical method. Devils Hole core DH-11 recently had been re-cut and re-sampled, and isotope-ratio values were obtained using the new method. The results were comparable with those obtained by the classical method with correlation = +0.96 for both isotope ratios. The consistency of the isotopic results is such that an alignment offset could be identified in the re-sampled core material, and two cutting errors that occurred during re-sampling then were confirmed independently. This result indicates that the new method is a viable alternative to the classical reaction method. In particular, the new method requires less sample material permitting finer resolution and allows

  3. Linking Biogeochemistry to Microbial Diversity Using New 13C Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggs, E. M.

    2005-12-01

    The use of 13C enables us to overcome uncertainties associated with soil C processes and to assess the links between species diversity and ecosystem function. Recent advances in stable isotope techniques enable determination of process rates, for example CH4 oxidation by direct measurement of 13C-CH4 and 13C-CO2. This overcomes uncertainties associated with reliance on changes in net CH4 emission, which may have compromised some earlier studies as both methanogenesis and CH4 oxidation may occur simultaneously in soil, providing significant advances in our understanding of the process of CH4 oxidation. These stable isotope techniques can be combined with molecular techniques (analysis of gene expression, stable isotope probing (SIP)) to relate the measured process to the microbial populations responsible. Here we will give a synthesis of results from experiments in which we applied 13C-CH4 to accurately determine CH4 oxidation rates in soils, and also present results of 13C-SIP from which we can identify the key players in the microbial population that are using the applied 13C substrate. With the 13C-CH4 technique we were able to provide direct evidence of inhibition of CH4 oxidation following fertiliser application (50-300 kg N ha-1) that was less under elevated pCO2, and evidence for anaerobic CH4 oxidation occurring in soil at 75% soil water filled pore space that would not have been apparent from changes in net CH4 emissions. 13C-SIP both through plants (using 13C-CO2) and directly into soil (using 13C-methane and -organic substrates) has revealed how key players in C utilisation vary under different soil conditions, for example, under improved and unimproved grasslands.

  4. In vivo stable isotope studies in three patients affected with mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders: limited diagnostic use of 1-13C fatty acid breath test using bolus technique.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, C; Kneer, J; Martin, D; Boulloche, J; Brivet, M; Poll-The, B T; Saudubray, J M

    1997-08-01

    The in vivo oxidation of fatty acids (FA) of different chain length was investigated in three patients with documented mitochondrial FA oxidation disorders: one patient with mild multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADM), one with medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCAD), and one with carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency (CPT I). Breath tests were performed after oral administration of 1-13C butyric. 1-13C octanoic, and 1-13C palmitic acids. 13C/12C ratio in the expired oxidative end product CO2 was measured. The cumulative 13C elimination was calculated and expressed as a percentage of the administered dose. In the MADM patient the influence of carnitine therapy (or deprivation) on the utilization of 1-13C palmitic acid was also examined. In the MCAD and CPT I patients, the 1-13C butyric, 1-13C octanoic and 1-13C palmitic acids in vivo oxidation were similar to five healthy controls. In the MADM patient, the oxidation of 1-13C butyric and 1-13C octanoic acids were normal, whereas the metabolism of 1-13C palmitic acid ranged from 33% of 66% of controls. In this patient the serum carnitine level decreased from 60 to 27 mumol/l without carnitine supplementation. Clinically there was mild hypotonia. 1-13C palmitic acid oxidation compared to controls was 50%. After 2 further weeks of carnitine deprivation the serum carnitine was 10-15 mumol/l. Clinically he was very hypotonic and had a large liver. 1-13C Palmitic acid oxidation was 33%. After 6 weeks of readministration of carnitine (L-carnitine 100 mg/kg/day p.o.) the serum carnitine was 60 mumol/l and the patient was in good clinical condition. 1-13C palmitic acid oxidation was 66% compared to controls. Our study implies that this simple fatty acid breath test is not of diagnostic use for detection of enzymatic defects in FA oxidation disorders. The carnitine dependent 1-13C palmitic acid oxidation indicates that this test might be of some value in cases with primary or secondary carnitine

  5. Root distribution and potential interactions between allelopathic rice, sprangletop (Leptochloa spp.), and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli) based on 13C isotope discrimination analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed-suppressive rice cultivars hold promise for improved and more economical weed management in rice. Interactions between roots of rice and weeds are thought to be modulated by the weed-suppressive activity of some rice cultivars, but these phenomena are difficult to measure and not well understo...

  6. Root distribution and interactions between allelopathic rice and c4 grass weed species as determined by 13c isotope discrimination analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivars which carry allelopathic traits (traits that enable them to suppress weeds) could improve the economical management and sustainability of rice production. Interactions between roots of rice and weeds are thought to be modulated by the weed-suppressive activity of some rice cultivars, but ...

  7. Correlation between the Carbon Isotope Discrimination in Leaf Starch and Sugars of C3 Plants and the Ratio of Intercellular and Atmospheric Partial Pressures of Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Brugnoli, Enrico; Hubick, Kerry T.; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Wong, Suan Chin; Farquhar, Graham D.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) was analyzed in leaf starch and soluble sugars, which represent most of the recently fixed carbon. Plants of three C3 species (Populus nigra L. × P. deltoides Marsh., Gossypium hirsutum L. and Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were kept in the dark for 24 hours to decrease contents of starch and sugar in leaves. Then gas exchange measurements were made with constant conditions for 8 hours, and subsequently starch and soluble sugars were extracted for analysis of carbon isotope composition. The ratio of intercellular, pi, and atmospheric, pa, partial pressures of CO2, was calculated from gas exchange measurements, integrated over time and weighted by assimilation rate, for comparison with the carbon isotope ratios in soluble sugars and starch. Carbon isotope discrimination in soluble sugars correlated strongly (r = 0.93) with pi/pa in all species, as did Δ in leaf starch (r = 0.84). Starch was found to contain significantly more 13C than soluble sugar, and possible explanations are discussed. The strong correlation found between Δ and pi/pa suggests that carbon isotope analysis in leaf starch and soluble sugars may be used for monitoring, indirectly, the average of pi/pa weighted by CO2 assimilation rate, over a day. Because pi/pa has a negative correlation with transpiration efficiency (mol CO2/mol H2O) of isolated plants, Δ in starch and sugars may be used to predict differences in this efficiency. This new method may be useful in ecophysiological studies and in selection for improved transpiration efficiency in breeding programs for C3 species. PMID:16666476

  8. Influence of form IA RubisCO and environmental dissolved inorganic carbon on the delta13C of the clam-chemoautotroph symbiosis Solemya velum.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kathleen M; Schwedock, Julie; Schrag, Daniel P; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2004-12-01

    Many nutritive symbioses between chemoautotrophic bacteria and invertebrates, such as Solemya velum, have delta(13)C values of approximately -30 to -35%, considerably more depleted than phytoplankton. Most of the chemoautotrophic symbionts fix carbon with a form IA ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO). We hypothesized that this form of RubisCO discriminates against (13)CO(2) to a greater extent than other forms. Solemya velum symbiont RubisCO was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and characterized. Enzyme from this recombinant system fixed carbon most rapidly at pH 7.5 and 20-25 degrees C. Surprisingly, this RubisCO had an epsilon-value (proportional to the degree to which the enzyme discriminates against (13)CO(2)) of 24.4 per thousand, similar to form IB RubisCOs, and higher than form II RubisCOs. Samples of interstitial water from S. velum's habitat were collected to determine whether the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) could contribute to the negative delta(13)C values. Solemya velum habitat DIC was present at high concentrations (up to approximately 5 mM) and isotopically depleted, with delta(13)C values as low as approximately -6%. Thus environmental DIC, coupled with a high degree of isotopic fractionation by symbiont RubisCO likely contribute to the isotopically depleted delta(13)C values of S. velum biomass, highlighting the necessity of considering factors at all levels (from environmental to enzymatic) in interpreting stable isotope ratios.

  9. Stable carbon isotope discrimination and microbiology of methane formation in tropical anoxic lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, R.; Noll, M.; Claus, P.; Klose, M.; Enrich-Prast, A.

    2010-12-01

    Methane is an important end product of degradation of organic matter in anoxic lake sediments. Methane is produced by either reduction of CO2 or cleavage of acetate involving different methanogenic archaea. The contribution of the different methanogenic paths and of the diverse bacteria and archaea involved in CH4 production exhibits a large variability that is not well understood. Lakes in tropical areas, e.g. in Brazil, are wetlands with high potential impact on the global CH4 budget. However, they have hardly been studied with respect to methanogenesis. Therefore, we used samples from 16 different lake sites in the Pantanal and Amazon region of Brazil to measure production of CH4, CO2, analyze the content of 13C in the products and in intermediately formed acetate, determine the abundance of bacterial and archaeal microorganisms and their community composition and diversity by targeting the genes of bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA and of methyl coenzyme M reductase, the key enzyme of methanogenic archaea. These experiments were done in the presence and absence of methyl fluoride, an inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis. While production rates of CH4 and CO2 were correlated to the content of organic matter and the abundance of archaea in the sediment, values of 13C in acetate and CH4 were related to the 13C content of organic matter and to the path of CH4 production with its intrinsic carbon isotope fractionation. Isotope fractionation was small (average 10‰) for conversion of C-org to acetate-methyl, which was hardly further fractionated during CH4 production. However, fractionation was strong for CO2 conversion to CH4 (average 75‰), which generally accounted for >50% of total CH4 production. Canonical correspondence analysis did not reveal an effect of microbial community composition, despite the fact that it exhibited a pronounced variability among the different sediments.

  10. Stable carbon isotope discrimination and microbiology of methane formation in tropical anoxic lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, R.; Noll, M.; Claus, P.; Klose, M.; Bastos, W. R.; Enrich-Prast, A.

    2010-11-01

    Methane is an important end product of degradation of organic matter in anoxic lake sediments. Methane is mainly produced by either reduction of CO2 or cleavage of acetate involving different methanogenic archaea. The contribution of the different methanogenic paths and of the diverse bacteria and archaea involved in CH4 production exhibits a large variability that is not well understood. Lakes in tropical areas, e.g. in Brazil, are wetlands with high potential impact on the global CH4 budget. However, they have hardly been studied with respect to methanogenesis. Therefore, we used samples from 16 different lake sediments in the Pantanal and Amazon region of Brazil to measure production of CH4, CO2, analyze the content of 13C in the products and in intermediately formed acetate, determine the abundance of bacterial and archaeal microorgansisms and their community composition and diversity by targeting the genes of bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA and of methyl coenzyme M reductase, the key enzyme of methanogenic archaea. These experiments were done in the presence and absence of methyl fluoride, an inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis. While production rates of CH4 and CO2 were correlated to the content of organic matter and the abundance of archaea in the sediment, values of 13C in acetate and CH4 were related to the 13C content of organic matter and to the path of CH4 production with its intrinsic carbon isotope fractionation. Isotope fractionation was small (average 10‰) for conversion of Corg to acetate-methyl, which was hardly further fractionated during CH4 production. However, fractionation was strong for CO2 conversion to CH4 (average 75‰), which generally accounted for >50% of total CH4 production. Canonical correspondence analysis did not reveal an effect of microbial community composition, despite the fact that it exhibited a pronounced variability among the different sediments.

  11. Stable carbon isotope discrimination and microbiology of methane formation in tropical anoxic lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, R.; Noll, M.; Claus, P.; Klose, M.; Bastos, W. R.; Enrich-Prast, A.

    2011-03-01

    Methane is an important end product of degradation of organic matter in anoxic lake sediments. Methane is mainly produced by either reduction of CO2 or cleavage of acetate involving different methanogenic archaea. The contribution of the different methanogenic paths and of the diverse bacteria and archaea involved in CH4 production exhibits a large variability that is not well understood. Lakes in tropical areas, e.g. in Brazil, are wetlands with high potential impact on the global CH4 budget. However, they have hardly been studied with respect to methanogenesis. Therefore, we used samples from 16 different lake sediments in the Pantanal and Amazon region of Brazil to measure production of CH4, CO2, analyze the content of 13C in the products and in intermediately formed acetate, determine the abundance of bacterial and archaeal microorgansisms and their community composition and diversity by targeting the genes of bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA and of methyl coenzyme M reductase, the key enzyme of methanogenic archaea. These experiments were done in the presence and absence of methyl fluoride, an inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis. While production rates of CH4 and CO2 were correlated to the content of organic matter and the abundance of archaea in the sediment, values of 13C in acetate, CO2, and CH4 were related to the 13C content of organic matter and to the path of CH4 production with its intrinsic carbon isotope fractionation. Isotope fractionation was small (average 10‰) for conversion of Corg to acetate-methyl, which was hardly further fractionated during CH4 production. However, fractionation was strong for CO2 conversion to CH4 (average 75‰), which generally accounted for >50% of total CH4 production. Canonical correspondence analysis did not reveal an effect of microbial community composition, despite the fact that it exhibited a pronounced variability among the different sediments.

  12. Is it really organic?--multi-isotopic analysis as a tool to discriminate between organic and conventional plants.

    PubMed

    Laursen, K H; Mihailova, A; Kelly, S D; Epov, V N; Bérail, S; Schjoerring, J K; Donard, O F X; Larsen, E H; Pedentchouk, N; Marca-Bell, A D; Halekoh, U; Olesen, J E; Husted, S

    2013-12-01

    Novel procedures for analytical authentication of organic plant products are urgently needed. Here we present the first study encompassing stable isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, magnesium and sulphur as well as compound-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotope analysis of nitrate for discrimination of organically and conventionally grown plants. The study was based on wheat, barley, faba bean and potato produced in rigorously controlled long-term field trials comprising 144 experimental plots. Nitrogen isotope analysis revealed the use of animal manure, but was unable to discriminate between plants that were fertilised with synthetic nitrogen fertilisers or green manures from atmospheric nitrogen fixing legumes. This limitation was bypassed using oxygen isotope analysis of nitrate in potato tubers, while hydrogen isotope analysis allowed complete discrimination of organic and conventional wheat and barley grains. It is concluded, that multi-isotopic analysis has the potential to disclose fraudulent substitutions of organic with conventionally cultivated plants.

  13. Discrimination of the Cigarettes Geographical Origin by DRC-ICP-MS Measurements of Pb Isotope Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W.; Hu, S.; Jin, L.

    2014-12-01

    Trace Pb are taken up with the same isotopic ratios as is present in the source soil, and the isotopic composition of Pb could used to reflect these sources and provide powerful indicators of the geographic origin of agriculture products derived from vegetative matter. We developed a simple and high throughput method, which based on DRC-ICP-MS for determination of Pb isotope ratios for discriminating the geographic origin of cigarettes. After acid digestion procedure, the cigarette digested solutions were directly analyzed by ICP-QMS with a DRC pressurized by the non-reactive gas Ne. In the DRC, Ne molecules collision with Pb ions and improves Pb isotope ratios precision 3-fold, which may be due to the collisional dampling smoothes out the ion beam fluctuations. Under the optimum DRC rejection parameter Q (RPq = 0.45), the main matrix components (K, Na, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe etc.) originating from cigarettes were filtered out. Mass discrimination of 208Pb/206Pb ratio in Ne DRC mode increased 0.3% compared to the standard mode, the mass bias due to the in-cell Ne gas collision can be accurately corrected by NIST 981 Pb isotope standard. This method was verified by a tobacco reference material CTV-OTL-2. Results of 208Pb/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb were 2.0848 ± 0.0028 (2δ) and 0.8452 ± 0.0011 (2δ) for CTA-VTL-2, which were agreed with the literature values (208Pb/206Pb = 2.0884 ± 0.0090 and 207Pb/206Pb = 0.8442 ± 0.0032). The precision of Pb isotope ratios (208Pb/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb) for the cigarette samples are ranged from 0.01 to 0.08% (N = 5). It has sufficient precision to discriminate 91 different brand cigarettes originated from four different geographic regions (Shown in Fig).

  14. Isotope fractionation during precipitation of methamphetamine HCl and discrimination of seized forensic samples.

    PubMed

    David, Gabrielle E; Coxon, Anne; Frew, Russell D; Hayman, Alan R

    2010-07-15

    Methamphetamine is a widely abused illicit drug. Increasingly, studies have focused on stable isotope analysis by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to link samples of methamphetamine synthesized together or from the same source of precursor. For this reason, it is important to understand potential sources of isotope fractionation that could cause variability in forensic data sets. In this study, methamphetamine free base samples were synthesized from (-)-ephedrine HCl using the HI/red phosphorus synthetic route and then precipitated as HCl salts by bubbling with HCl gas. The entire sample did not precipitate when first bubbled with gas, and multiple precipitation steps were required. Fractions of precipitate were individually analyzed for delta(13)C, delta(15)N and delta(2)H by IRMS. Both delta(15)N and delta(2)H were found to become more negative, with the heavy isotopes depleted, in successive fractions of precipitate. Homogenizing the precipitate fractions together could eliminate this fractionation. However, in a clandestine situation this fractionation could lead to greater than expected delta(15)N and delta(2)H variability between illicit samples of methamphetamine HCl that have been synthesized from the same sample of ephedrine. This needs to be taken into account when interpreting forensic IRMS data. We also present an analysis of four separate seized case lots of methamphetamine HCl, taking into account the possible sources of fractionation and available intelligence information.

  15. Integration of stable isotope and trace contaminant concentration for enhanced forensic acetone discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wahl, Jon H.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2013-07-18

    We analyzed 21 neat acetone samples from 15 different suppliers to demonstrate the utility of a coupled stable isotope and trace contaminant strategy for distinguishing forensically-relevant samples. By combining these two pieces of orthogonal data we could discriminate all of the acetones that were produced by the 15 different suppliers. Using stable isotope ratios alone, we were able to distinguish 9 acetone samples, while the remaining 12 fell into four clusters with highly similar signatures. Adding trace chemical contaminant information enhanced discrimination to 13 individual acetones with three residual clusters. The acetones within each cluster shared a common manufacturer and might, therefore, not be expected to be resolved. The data presented here demonstrates the power of combining orthogonal data sets to enhance sample fingerprinting and highlights the role disparate data could play in future forensic investigations.

  16. Intra-trophic isotopic discrimination of 15N/14N for amino acids in plant flowers and leaves: Implications for isotopic ecological studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic reactions within heterotrophs cause discrimination in their stable nitrogen isotopic composition of amino acids (d15NAA) compared to their diets. Ecologists have exploited this measurable inter-trophic discrimination in the d15NAA value to estimate the trophic positions of heterotrophic an...

  17. Mechanism of photocatalytic reduction of CO2 by Re(bpy)(CO)3Cl from differences in carbon isotope discrimination

    DOE PAGES

    Schneider, Taylor W.; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Muckerman, James T.; ...

    2016-08-01

    The rhenium complex Re(bpy)(CO)3Cl (1, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) catalyzes CO2 reduction to CO in mixtures containing triethanolamine (TEOA) as a sacrificial reductant. The mechanism of this reaction under photocatalytic conditions remains to be fully characterized. Here, we report the competitive carbon kinetic isotope effects (13C KIEs) on photocatalytic CO2 reduction by 1 and analyze the results of experimental measurements by comparing with computed KIEs via density functional theory (DFT) calculations as a means of formulating a chemical mechanism and illustrating the utility of this approach. The 13C KIEs, k(12C)/k(13C), in acetonitrile (ACN) and dimethylformamide (DMF) were determined to be 1.0718more » ± 0.0036 and 1.0685 ± 0.0075, respectively. When [Ru(bpy)3]Cl2 is added to the reaction mixture in acetonitrile as a photosensitizer, the reduction of CO2 exhibited a 13C KIE = 1.0703 ± 0.0043. These values are consistent with the calculated isotope effect of CO2 binding to the one-electron reduced [ReI(bpy•–)(CO)3] species. The findings reported here provide strong evidence that the reactions in the two different solvents have the same first irreversible step and proceed with similar reactive intermediates upon reduction. Theoretically, we found that the major contribution for the large 13C isotope effects comes from a dominant zero-point energy (ZPE) term. Lastly, these results lay the groundwork for combined experimental and theoretical approaches for analysis of competitive isotope effects toward understanding CO2 reduction catalyzed by other complexes.« less

  18. Isotopic discrimination of zinc during root-uptake and cellular incorporation in higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, T. F.; Weiss, D. J.; Coles, B. J.; Horstwood, M.; Parrish, R. R.; Zhao, F. J.; Kirk, G. J.

    2003-04-01

    Introduction: Isotopic variability of terrestrial zinc offers a unique tool for studying the geochemical and biochemical cycling of zinc through natural ecosystems. However, to realise this potential, the mechanisms controlling the isotopic composition of zinc during geosphere-biosphere interactions must first be understood. The uptake of zinc by plants involves a variety of abiotic and biochemical reactions, and can provide insights into the types of processes that may fractionate zinc isotopes within living systems. We therefore present an experimental study to quantify if and how zinc isotopes are fractionated during uptake in higher plants. Methodology: Two experimental approaches were taken: (1) a hydroponic study in which rice, lettuce, and tomato cultivars were grown in one of two nutrient solutions (a HEDTA + NTA buffered system, and an EDTA buffered system), and (2) a field-based study in which rice plants were grown in experimental paddy fields under both zinc-sufficient and zinc-deficient conditions. Upon harvest, roots, shoots, nutrient solutions and soils were acid digested, and matrix components were removed from the zinc fraction using anion exchange procedures. For soils the 'bioavailble' zinc fraction was abstracted using a 1 N HCl leaching step. Zinc isotopic compositions were determined on a ThermoElemental Axiom MC-ICP-MS, using copper as an internal reference to correct for mass discrimination effects. Combined measurement errors based on repeated analyses of ultra-pure standards and plant reference materials were <0.035 ppm per atomic mass unit (pamu) (2σ) for 66Zn/64Zn measurements. Results: Under hydroponic condisions, all three plant species exhibit a similar pattern of zinc isotopic discrimination, with a small enrichment from nutrient solution to root of +0.04 to +0.09 ppm pamu, followed by an isotopic depletion from root to shoot of -0.13 to -0.26 ppm pamu. While the same trend is observed with the HEDTA + NTA and EDTA nutrient

  19. 13C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, W

    2001-07-01

    Metabolic flux analysis using 13C-labeled substrates has become an important tool in metabolic engineering. It allows the detailed quantification of all intracellular fluxes in the central metabolism of a microorganism. The method has strongly evolved in recent years by the introduction of new experimental procedures, measurement techniques, and mathematical data evaluation methods. Many of these improvements require advanced skills in the application of nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry techniques on the one hand and computational and statistical experience on the other hand. This minireview summarizes these recent developments and sketches the major practical problems. An outlook to possible future developments concludes the text.

  20. (13)C metabolic flux analysis of recombinant expression hosts.

    PubMed

    Young, Jamey D

    2014-12-01

    Identifying host cell metabolic phenotypes that promote high recombinant protein titer is a major goal of the biotech industry. (13)C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) provides a rigorous approach to quantify these metabolic phenotypes by applying isotope tracers to map the flow of carbon through intracellular metabolic pathways. Recent advances in tracer theory and measurements are enabling more information to be extracted from (13)C labeling experiments. Sustained development of publicly available software tools and standardization of experimental workflows is simultaneously encouraging increased adoption of (13)C MFA within the biotech research community. A number of recent (13)C MFA studies have identified increased citric acid cycle and pentose phosphate pathway fluxes as consistent markers of high recombinant protein expression, both in mammalian and microbial hosts. Further work is needed to determine whether redirecting flux into these pathways can effectively enhance protein titers while maintaining acceptable glycan profiles.

  1. Synthesis of Site-Specifically (13)C Labeled Linoleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Offenbacher, Adam R; Zhu, Hui; Klinman, Judith P

    2016-10-12

    Soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1) catalyzes the C-H abstraction from the reactive carbon (C-11) in linoleic acid as the first and rate-determining step in the formation of alkylhydroperoxides. While previous labeling strategies have focused on deuterium labeling to ascertain the primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects for this reaction, there is an emerging interest and need for selectively enriched (13)C isotopologues. In this report, we present synthetic strategies for site-specific (13)C labeled linoleic acid substrates. We take advantage of a Corey-Fuchs formyl to terminal (13)C-labeled alkyne conversion, using (13)CBr4 as the labeling source, to reduce the number of steps from a previous fatty acid (13)C synthetic labeling approach. The labeled linoleic acid substrates are useful as nuclear tunneling markers and for extracting active site geometries of the enzyme-substrate complex in lipoxygenase.

  2. Photosynthesis and carbon isotope discrimination in boreal forest ecosystems: A comparison of functional characteristics in plants from three mature forest types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Lawrence B.; Brooks, J. Renee; Ehleringer, James R.

    1997-12-01

    In this paper we compare measurements of photosynthesis and carbon isotope discrimination characteristics among plants from three mature boreal forest types (Black spruce, Jack pine, and aspen) in order to help explain variation in ecosystem-level gas exchange processes. Measurements were made at the southern study area (SSA) and northern study area (NSA) of the boreal forest in central Canada as part of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS). In both the NSA and the SSA there were significant differences in photosynthesis among the major tree species, with aspen having the highest CO2 assimilation rates and spruce the lowest. Within a species, photosynthetic rates in the SSA were approximately twice those measured in the NSA, and this was correlated with similar variations in stomatal conductance. Calculations of the ratio of leaf intercellular to ambient CO2 concentration (ci/ca) from leaf carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) values indicated a relatively low degree of stomatal limitation of photosynthesis, despite the low absolute values of stomatal conductance in these boreal tree species. Within each ecosystem, leaf Δ values were strongly correlated with life-form groups (trees, shrubs, forbs, and mosses), and these differences are maintained between years. Although we observed significant variation in the 13C content of tree rings at the old Jack pine site in the NSA during the past decade (indicating interannual variation in the degree of stomatal limitation), changes in summer precipitation and temperature accounted for only 44% of the isotopic variance. We scaled leaf-level processes to the ecosystem level through analyses of well-mixed canopy air. On average, all three forest types had similar ecosystem-level Δ values (average value ± standard deviation, 19.1‰±0.5‰), calculated from measurements of change in the concentration and carbon isotope ratio of atmospheric CO2 during a diurnal cycle within a forest canopy. However, there were

  3. Genetic variation for leaf morphology, leaf structure and leaf carbon isotope discrimination in European populations of black poplar (Populus nigra L.).

    PubMed

    Guet, Justine; Fabbrini, Francesco; Fichot, Régis; Sabatti, Maurizio; Bastien, Catherine; Brignolas, Franck

    2015-08-01

    To buffer against the high spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the riparian habitat, riparian tree species, such as black poplar (Populus nigra L.), may display a high level of genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity for functional traits. Using a multisite common garden experiment, we estimated the relative contribution of genetic and environmental effects on the phenotypic variation expressed for individual leaf area, leaf shape, leaf structure and leaf carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C) in natural populations of black poplar. Twenty-four to 62 genotypes were sampled in nine metapopulations covering a latitudinal range from 48 °N to 42 °N in France and in Italy and grown in two common gardens at Orléans (ORL) and at Savigliano (SAV). In the two common gardens, substantial genetic variation was expressed for leaf traits within all metapopulations, but its expression was modulated by the environment, as attested by the genotype × environment (G × E) interaction variance being comparable to or even greater than genetic effects. For LA, G × E interactions were explained by both changes in genotype ranking between common gardens and increased variation in SAV, while these interactions were mainly attributed to changes in genotype ranking for Δ(13)C. The nine P. nigra metapopulations were highly differentiated for LA, as attested by the high coefficient of genetic differentiation (QST = 0.50 at ORL and 0.51 at SAV), and the pattern of metapopulation differentiation was highly conserved between the two common gardens. In contrast, they were moderately differentiated for Δ(13)C (QST = 0.24 at ORL and 0.25 at SAV) and the metapopulation clustering changed significantly between common gardens. Our results evidenced that the nine P. nigra metapopulations present substantial genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity for leaf traits, which both represent potentially significant determinants of populations' capacities to respond, on a short-term basis and

  4. Metabolic flux analysis using 13C peptide label measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) has become the experimental method of choice to investigate cellular metabolism. MFA has established flux maps of central metabolism for dozens of microbes, cell cultures, and plant seeds. Steady-state MFA utilizes isotopic labeling measurements of amino acids obtai...

  5. Carbon isotope discrimination in leaves of the broad-leaved paperbark tree, Melaleuca quinquenervia, as a tool for quantifying past tropical and subtropical rainfall.

    PubMed

    Tibby, John; Barr, Cameron; McInerney, Francesca A; Henderson, Andrew C G; Leng, Melanie J; Greenway, Margaret; Marshall, Jonathan C; McGregor, Glenn B; Tyler, Jonathan J; McNeil, Vivienne

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative reconstructions of terrestrial climate are highly sought after but rare, particularly in Australia. Carbon isotope discrimination in plant leaves (Δleaf ) is an established indicator of past hydroclimate because the fractionation of carbon isotopes during photosynthesis is strongly influenced by water stress. Leaves of the evergreen tree Melaleuca quinquenervia have been recovered from the sediments of some perched lakes on North Stradbroke and Fraser Islands, south-east Queensland, eastern Australia. Here, we examine the potential for using M. quinquenervia ∆leaf as a tracer of past rainfall by analysing carbon isotope ratios (δ(13) C) of modern leaves. We firstly assess Δleaf variation at the leaf and stand scale and find no systematic pattern within leaves or between leaves due to their position on the tree. We then examine the relationships between climate and Δleaf for a 11-year time series of leaves collected in a litter tray. M. quinquenervia retains its leaves for 1-4 years; thus, cumulative average climate data are used. There is a significant relationship between annual mean ∆leaf and mean annual rainfall of the hydrological year for 1-4 years (i.e. 365-1460 days) prior to leaf fall (r(2)  = 0.64, P = 0.003, n = 11). This relationship is marginally improved by accounting for the effect of pCO2 on discrimination (r(2)  = 0.67, P = 0.002, n = 11). The correlation between rainfall and Δleaf , and the natural distribution of Melaleuca quinquenervia around wetlands of eastern Australia, Papua New Guinea and New Caledonia offers significant potential to infer past rainfall on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales.

  6. δ13C Degassing Dynamics of a Young Volcanic Center, Cerro Negro, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucic, G.; Stix, J.; Wing, B. A.; Muñoz, A.; Ibarra, M.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.

    2011-12-01

    inconsistent with renewed magmatic activity. However, we observe that our recent dataset preserves shifts towards heavier isotopic signatures over a space of 5 months. For example, gas collected from a major outer crater fumarole exhibits a δ13C difference of -5 (from -6.6% in September 2010 to -1.6% in January 2011). Such a shift is not characteristic of steady degassing, but it could indicate interaction between new CO2- and 13C-rich and mature CO2- and 13C-poor magmas. The potential correlation between heavier isotopic signatures and new CO2-rich magma entering the Cerro Negro system will be explored in this presentation, with a focus on confounding factors such as biogenic and hydrologic influences as well as on additional measurements that could verify its existence. For example, helium isotope analysis will help to better define the source of the magma, as the 3He/4He ratio and the carbon dioxide data together can discriminate the ultimate sources of the volcanic gases. Together, all these analyses have great potential for improving our understanding of magma dynamics associated with degassing and recharge events at subduction zones.

  7. Tunable Diode Laser Measurements of Leaf-scale Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Ecosystem Respired Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in a Semi-arid Woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N.; Chris, B.; Hanson, D.; Kern, S.; Meyer, C.; Pockman, W.; Powers, H.

    2005-12-01

    We present results and speculative interpretation of leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination and ecosystem respired carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from a semi-arid, C3/C4 woodland located in northern New Mexico, USA. Overstory leaf area index (LAI) is dominated by live juniper (Juniperus monosperma) trees with an LAI value of approximately 1.0 m2 per m2 ground area, and has a seasonally dynamic understory of mixed C3 forbs and C4 grasses and cacti, with a maximum LAI of 0.30 m2 per m2 ground area. Ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios showed values characteristic of C3 dominated photosynthesis (Keeling plot intercepts of -35 to -22 per mil). Seasonal variation was typical of that found in wetter, C3 dominated forests, as was the dependence on climate (e.g. relationships with vapor pressure deficit, soil water content, and canopy conductance). Leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination of the junipers, measured by coupling a Li-Cor 6400 photosynthesis system to the TDL, provided discrimination-Ci and discrimination-vpd relationships consistent with measured ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios. The oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration was dependent on rain water isotope composition, but was correlated with soil water content during rain-free periods. The cumulative effect of vapor pressure deficit after a rain event was tightly correlated with the oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration, suggesting the primary drivers are evaporative enrichment of soil water and perhaps nocturnal leaf enrichment. Instrument precision for carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of carbon dioxide is 0.06 to 0.18 per mil; however, overall precision is somewhat lower due to pressure and sampling effects.

  8. Simulating Photosynthetic 13C Fractionation at a Western Subalpine Forest for Seasonal and Multi-Decadal Time Periods with the Community Land Model (CLM 4.5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raczka, B. M.; Duarte, H.; Koven, C. D.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Thornton, P. E.; Lin, J. C.; Bowling, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models are an important tool to diagnose and predict land-atmosphere exchanges of carbon and energy. This is critical in order to quantify the land-carbon feedback into the climate system. Ecological observations are extremely important in order to quantify model skill and to improve techniques in which to simulate ecosystem behavior. Isotope observations of 13C are especially useful in diagnosing the ecosystem response to water stress, atmospheric humidity and CO2 fertilization. We test the representation of isotopes within CLM 4.5 against site level observations of biomass and carbon fluxes measured at Niwot Ridge, Colorado. First we 'spun-up' the model for 1800 years to approximate site level conditions during the 21st century. We accomplished this by imposing a site-level reconstruction of seasonally varying atmospheric δ13C and atmospheric CO2 from 1850-2013 and site level meteorological observations from 1998-2013. We also imposed an empirical-downscaling of simulated photosynthesis to reproduce the observed photosynthesis. We found that the simulated δ13C of biomass pools was more depleted than the observed by 1-2 o/oo. This finding suggests the magnitude of photosynthetic discrimination was overestimated in the model. The model reproduced observed seasonal trends in discrimination with higher values in the spring and fall but lower values in the summer. However, if nitrogen-limitation is imposed in the model the photosynthetic downscaling influences the fractionation in such a way to obscure this observed trend. This suggests an alternative approach should be taken in order to account for nitrogen limitation. During the last century the model simulated an abrupt drop in δ13C for biomass pools, primarily because of the concurrent drop in atmospheric δ13C, but also because of increasing discrimination driven by increases in the ratio of intercellular to atmospheric CO2. Finally, we identified photosynthetic rate, and vapor pressure

  9. Growth, carbon-isotope discrimination, and drought-associated mortality across a Pinus ponderosa elevational transect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDowell, N.G.; Allen, C.D.; Marshall, L.

    2010-01-01

    Drought- and insect-associated tree mortality at low-elevation ecotones is a widespread phenomenon but the underlying mechanisms are uncertain. Enhanced growth sensitivity to climate is widely observed among trees that die, indicating that a predisposing physiological mechanism(s) underlies tree mortality. We tested three, linked hypotheses regarding mortality using a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) elevation transect that experienced low-elevation mortality following prolonged drought. The hypotheses were: (1) mortality was associated with greater growth sensitivity to climate, (2) mortality was associated with greater sensitivity of gas exchange to climate, and (3) growth and gas exchange were correlated. Support for all three hypotheses would indicate that mortality results at least in part from gas exchange constraints. We assessed growth using basal area increment normalized by tree basal area [basal area increment (BAI)/basal area (BA)] to account for differences in tree size. Whole-crown gas exchange was indexed via estimates of the CO2 partial pressure difference between leaf and atmosphere (pa-pc) derived from tree ring carbon isotope ratios (??13C), corrected for temporal trends in atmospheric CO2 and ??13C and elevation trends in pressure. Trees that survived the drought exhibited strong correlations among and between BAI, BAI/BA, pa-pc, and climate. In contrast, trees that died exhibited greater growth sensitivity to climate than trees that survived, no sensitivity of pa-pc to climate, and a steep relationship between pa-pc and BAI/BA. The pa-pc results are consistent with predictions from a theoretical hydraulic model, suggesting trees that died had a limited buffer between mean water availability during their lifespan and water availability during drought - i.e., chronic water stress. It appears that chronic water stress predisposed low-elevation trees to mortality during drought via constrained gas exchange. Continued intensification of drought in

  10. Variation in fluxes estimated from nitrogen isotope discrimination corresponds with independent measures of nitrogen flux in Populus balsamifera L.

    PubMed

    Kalcsits, Lee A; Guy, Robert D

    2016-02-01

    Acquisition of mineral nitrogen by roots from the surrounding environment is often not completely efficient, in which a variable amount of leakage (efflux) relative to gross uptake (influx) occurs. The efflux/influx ratio (E/I) is, therefore, inversely related to the efficiency of nutrient uptake at the root level. Time-integrated estimates of E/I and other nitrogen-use traits may be obtainable from variation in stable isotope ratios or through compartmental analysis of tracer efflux (CATE) using radioactive or stable isotopes. To compare these two methods, Populus balsamifera L. genotypes were selected, a priori, for high or low nitrogen isotope discrimination. Vegetative cuttings were grown hydroponically, and E/I was calculated using an isotope mass balance model (IMB) and compared to E/I calculated using (15) N CATE. Both methods indicated that plants grown with ammonium had greater E/I than nitrate-grown plants. Genotypes with high or low E/I using CATE also had similarly high or low estimates of E/I using IMB, respectively. Genotype-specific means were linearly correlated (r = 0.77; P = 0.0065). Discrepancies in E/I between methods may reflect uncertainties in discrimination factors for the assimilatory enzymes, or temporal differences in uptake patterns. By utilizing genotypes with known variation in nitrogen isotope discrimination, a relationship between nitrogen isotope discrimination and bidirectional nitrogen fluxes at the root level was observed.

  11. Synthesis of exemestane labelled with (13)C.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Erminia; Pignatti, Alberto; Giribone, Danilo; Di Salle, Enrico

    2008-08-01

    The synthesis of exemestane Aromasin, an irreversible steroidal aromatase inhibitor, specifically labelled with (13)C is reported. The preparation of [(13)C(3)]exemestane was achieved according to an eight-step procedure starting from the commercially available testosterone.

  12. The Dependence of Plant δ13C on Atmospheric pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahren, H.; Schubert, B.

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies on multicellular plants have reported increasing carbon isotope fractionation in leaf tissue with increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2), but the magnitude of the effect is highly variable (i.e., 0.62 to 2.7 % per 100 ppm CO2). The majority of these experiments tested only small differences in CO2 levels (<100 ppm), with maximum concentrations of elevated pCO2 = 700 ppm. In order to quantify how carbon isotope fractionation in plant tissues is affected by the pCO2 concentration under which plants grow, we measured carbon isotope values in a total of 191 Arabidopsis thaliana and Raphanus sativus plants grown under controlled light, water, and temperature conditions, and varying the pCO2 concentrations across a trajectory of 17 different pCO2 levels ranging from 370 to 4200 ppm. From this large dataset, we show that the carbon isotope discrimination [Δδ13C = (δ13CCO2 - δ13Cplant) / (1000 + δ13Cplant)] is indeed a function of pCO2, however, the relationship is hyperbolic, rather than linear, as is typically assumed. Across the small changes in pCO2 previously studied the response appears linear, however, our expanded dataset clearly shows that increases in Δδ13C level off at high pCO2, which is consistent with the ultimate control over fractionation being the activity of Rubisco as the concentration of pCO2 inside the leaf approaches the pCO2 level outside the leaf. The hyperbolic relationship we have quantified using published and new data is extremely robust (R2 = 0.90, n = 26, P < 0.0001), and evident in n-alkanes as well as bulk tissue, suggesting the potential for application to fossil plant materials in order to reconstruct pCO2 across critical intervals.

  13. Species specific and environment induced variation of δ13C and δ15N in alpine plants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Körner, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope signals in plant tissues integrate plant-environment interactions over long periods. In this study, we hypothesized that humid alpine life conditions are narrowing the scope for significant deviations from common carbon, water and nitrogen relations as captured by stable isotope signals. We explored the variation in δ13C and δ15N in 32 plant species from tissue type to ecosystem scale across a suite of locations at c. Two thousand five hundred meter elevation in the Swiss Alps. Foliar δ13C and δ15N varied among species by about 3–4‰ and 7–8‰ respectively. However, there was no overall difference in means of δ13C and δ15N for species sampled in different plant communities or when bulk plant dry matter harvests of different plant communities were compared. δ13C was found to be highly species specific, so that the ranking among species was mostly maintained across 11 habitats. However, δ15N varied significantly from place to place in all species (a range of 2.7‰) except in Fabaceae (Trifolium alpinum) and Juncaceae (Luzula lutea). There was also a substantial variation among individuals of the same species collected next to each other. No difference was found in foliar δ15N of non-legumes, which were either collected next to or away from the most common legume, T. alpinum. δ15N data place Cyperaceae and Juncaceae, just like Fabaceae, in a low discrimination category, well separated from other families. Soil δ15N was higher than in plants and increased with soil depth. The results indicate a high functional diversity in alpine plants that is similar to that reported for low elevation plants. We conclude that the surprisingly high variation in δ13C and δ15N signals in the studied high elevation plants is largely species specific (genetic) and insensitive to obvious environmental cues. PMID:26097487

  14. Spatial variation in photosynthetic CO(2) carbon and oxygen isotope discrimination along leaves of the monocot triticale (Triticum × Secale) relates to mesophyll conductance and the Péclet effect.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Naomi; Cousins, Asaph; Tu, Kevin P; Barbour, Margaret M

    2011-09-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotope discrimination of CO(2) during photosynthesis (Δ(13)C(obs) and Δ(18)O(obs)) were measured along a monocot leaf, triticale (Triticum × Secale). Both Δ(13)C(obs) and Δ(18)O(obs) increased towards the leaf tip. While this was expected for Δ(18)O(obs) , because of progressive enrichment of leaf water associated with the Péclet effect, the result was surprising for Δ(13) C(obs). To explore parameters determining this pattern, we measured activities of key photosynthetic enzymes [ribulose bis-phosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and carbonic anhydrase) as well as maximum carboxylation and electron transport rates (V(cmax) and J(max)) along the leaf. Patterns in leaf internal anatomy along the leaf were also quantified. Mesophyll conductance (g(m)) is known to have a strong influence on Δ(13)C(obs) , so we used three commonly used estimation methods to quantify variation in g(m) along the leaf. Variation in Δ(13)C(obs) was correlated with g(m) and chloroplast surface area facing the intercellular air space, but unrelated to photosynthetic enzyme activity. The observed variation could cause errors at higher scales if the appropriate portion of a leaf is not chosen for leaf-level measurements and model parameterization. Our study shows that one-third of the way from the base of the leaf represents the most appropriate portion to enclose in the leaf chamber.

  15. Reconstruction of δ 13C of chemocline CO 2 (aq) in past oceans and lakes using the δ 13C of fossil isorenieratene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breugel, Yvonne; Schouten, Stefan; Paetzel, Matthias; Ossebaar, Jort; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2005-06-01

    High abundances of the diaromatic carotenoid isorenieratene derived from photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae) were found just below the chemocline in an anoxic fjord in Norway, throughout the annual cycle. The stable carbon isotope composition of this carotenoid co-varied with the δ 13C of CO 2 (aq) and is independent of the CO 2 and isorenieratene concentration. This constant isotopic fractionation ɛp of isorenieratene versus CO 2, 4 ± 1‰, was subsequently used in the reconstruction of δ 13C of CO 2 at the chemocline in ancient oceans and lakes. These reconstructions indicate that δ 13C of CO 2 at the chemocline is often influenced by isotopically light CO 2, formed by remineralization of organic matter. This process can, depending on the depth and stability of the chemocline, also effect the isotopic composition of the phytoplankton and, thus, isotopic records of sedimentary inorganic and organic carbon.

  16. Strong Coupling of Shoot Assimilation and Soil Respiration during Drought and Recovery Periods in Beech As Indicated by Natural Abundance δ13C Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Blessing, Carola H.; Barthel, Matti; Gentsch, Lydia; Buchmann, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Drought down-regulates above- and belowground carbon fluxes, however, the resilience of trees to drought will also depend on the speed and magnitude of recovery of these above- and belowground fluxes after re-wetting. Carbon isotope composition of above- and belowground carbon fluxes at natural abundance provides a methodological approach to study the coupling between photosynthesis and soil respiration (SR) under conditions (such as drought) that influence photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination. In turn, the direct supply of root respiration with recent photoassimilates will impact on the carbon isotope composition of soil-respired CO2. We independently measured shoot and soil CO2 fluxes of beech saplings (Fagus sylvatica L.) and their respective δ13C continuously with laser spectroscopy at natural abundance. We quantified the speed of recovery of drought stressed trees after re-watering and traced photosynthetic carbon isotope signal in the carbon isotope composition of soil-respired CO2. Stomatal conductance responded strongly to the moderate drought (-65%), induced by reduced soil moisture content as well as increased vapor pressure deficit. Simultaneously, carbon isotope discrimination decreased by 8‰, which in turn caused a significant increase in δ13C of recent metabolites (1.5–2.5‰) and in δ13C of SR (1–1.5‰). Generally, shoot and soil CO2 fluxes and their δ13C were in alignment during drought and subsequent stress release, clearly demonstrating a permanent dependence of root respiration on recently fixed photoassimilates, rather than on older reserves. After re-watering, the drought signal persisted longer in δ13C of the water soluble fraction that integrates multiple metabolites (soluble sugars, amino acids, organic acids) than in the neutral fraction which represents most recently assimilated sugars or in the δ13C of SR. Nevertheless, full recovery of all aboveground physiological variables was reached within 4 days – and within 7

  17. δ13C and δD Measurement using Cavity Ring-down and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry by Gas Chromatography/Combustion/Pyrolysis and Off-line Processing of Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culp, R.; Pan, H.; Saad, N.

    2015-12-01

    A comparison was made between various stable isotope measurement techniques for the purpose of quantifying each methods capability for use in hydrocarbon analyses applicable to fields such as geochemistry, agriculture, forensics and authenticity testing. Measurement techniques include: (1) Cavity Ring-down spectrometry (CRDS) using a Picarro 2120-A interfaced with a combustion module (CM) to facilitate conversion of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide and water (2) Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) using a Thermo 253 IRMS with gas chromatographic separation prior to combustion to carbon dioxide or high temperature pyrolysis to hydrogen for isotope ratio measurement. Also, off line combustion to carbon dioxide and water with further reduction to hydrogen and dual-inlet measurement by IRMS. IRMS techniques have proven track records for measurement accuracy and precision but require independent analyses of carbon and hydrogen since one needs to oxidize carbon but reduce water to hydrogen prior to measurement or pyrolyze hydrocarbons directly into hydrogen after gas chromatographic separation. Cavity ring-down spectrometry can measure carbon dioxide and water simultaneously eliminating the need for two separate measurements of carbon and hydrogen isotopes. Although the CRDS suffers from memory effects following combustion and transfer of gases early on, new technology has reduced this to acceptable levels for accurate determinations of carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios. In this study, various hydrocarbon materials were used over an extended period of time to determine the best combination of sample size, replicate analyses and combustion column composition and life. The data presented here indicates isotopic measurements by CM-CRDS, for both solid and volatile liquid samples, compare well with GC/IRMS and off-line dual inlet methods of analysis.

  18. 13C Tracer Studies of Metabolism in Mouse Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Yan, Jun; Fan, Teresa W-M.

    2015-01-01

    Mice are widely used for human tumor xenograft studies of cancer development and drug efficacy and toxicity. Stable isotope tracing coupled with metabolomic analysis is an emerging approach for assaying metabolic network activity. In mouse models there are several routes of tracer introduction, which have particular advantages and disadvantages that depend on the model and the questions addressed. This protocol describes the bolus i.v. route via repeated tail vein injections of solutions of stable isotope enriched tracers including 13C6-glucose and 13C5,15N2-glutamine. Repeated injections give higher enrichments and over longer labeling periods than a single bolus. Multiple injections of glutamine are necessary to achieve adequate enrichment in engrafted tumors. PMID:26693168

  19. Routing of Fatty Acids from Fresh Grass to Milk Restricts the Validation of Feeding Information Obtained by Measuring (13)C in Milk.

    PubMed

    Auerswald, Karl; Schäufele, Rudi; Bellof, Gerhard

    2015-12-09

    Dairy production systems vary widely in their feeding and livestock-keeping regimens. Both are well-known to affect milk quality and consumer perceptions. Stable isotope analysis has been suggested as an easy-to-apply tool to validate a claimed feeding regimen. Although it is unambiguous that feeding influences the carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) in milk, it is not clear whether a reported feeding regimen can be verified by measuring δ(13)C in milk without sampling and analyzing the feed. We obtained 671 milk samples from 40 farms distributed over Central Europe to measure δ(13)C and fatty acid composition. Feeding protocols by the farmers in combination with a model based on δ(13)C feed values from the literature were used to predict δ(13)C in feed and subsequently in milk. The model considered dietary contributions of C3 and C4 plants, contribution of concentrates, altitude, seasonal variation in (12/13)CO2, Suess's effect, and diet-milk discrimination. Predicted and measured δ(13)C in milk correlated closely (r(2) = 0.93). Analyzing milk for δ(13)C allowed validation of a reported C4 component with an error of <8% in 95% of all cases. This included the error of the method (measurement and prediction) and the error of the feeding information. However, the error was not random but varied seasonally and correlated with the seasonal variation in long-chain fatty acids. This indicated a bypass of long-chain fatty acids from fresh grass to milk.

  20. 13C-based metabolic flux analysis: fundamentals and practice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Isotope-based metabolic flux analysis is one of the emerging technologies applied to system level metabolic phenotype characterization in metabolic engineering. Among the developed approaches, (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis has been established as a standard tool and has been widely applied to quantitative pathway characterization of diverse biological systems. To implement (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in practice, comprehending the underlying mathematical and computational modeling fundamentals is of importance along with carefully conducted experiments and analytical measurements. Such knowledge is also crucial when designing (13)C-labeling experiments and properly acquiring key data sets essential for in vivo flux analysis implementation. In this regard, the modeling fundamentals of (13)C-labeling systems and analytical data processing are the main topics we will deal with in this chapter. Along with this, the relevant numerical optimization techniques are addressed to help implementation of the entire computational procedures aiming at (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in vivo.

  1. Synthesis and applications of {sup 13}C glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Stocking, E.; Khalsa, O.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-12-01

    Due in part to the use of labeled glycerol for the {sup 13}C enrichment of biomolecules, we are currently developing new synthetic routes to various isotopomers of glycerol. Judging from our experience, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment and/or have poor overall yields (12 to 15%). Furthermore, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability is limited by the level of demand. We are presently developing a short de novo synthesis of glycerol from carbon dioxide ({approximately}53% overall yield for four steps) and are examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific {sup 13}C-labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from labeled methanol and carbon dioxide. One application of {sup 13}C glycerol we have examined is enzymatic conversion of glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25 to 50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). We are also pursuing the chemical conversion of {sup 13}C-labeled DHA to DHAP. We are especially interested in {sup 13}C-labeled DHAP because we are investigating its use as a chemo-enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids.

  2. Structure of uniaxially aligned 13C labeled silk fibroin fibers with solid state 13C-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demura, Makoto; Yamazaki, Yasunobu; Asakura, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Katsuaki

    1998-01-01

    Carbon-13 isotopic labeling of B. mori silk fibroin was achieved biosynthetically with [1- 13C] glycine in order to determine the carbonyl bond orientation angle of glycine sites with the silk fibroin. Angular dependence of 13C solid state NMR spectra of uniaxially oriented silk fibroin fiber block sample due to the carbonyl 13C chemical shift anisotropy was simulated according to the chemical shift transformation with Euler angles, αF and βF, from principal axis system (PAS) to fiber axis system (FAS). The another Euler angles, αDCO and βDCO, for transformation from PAS to the molecular symmetry axis were determined from the [1- 13C] glycine sequence model compounds for the silk fibroin. By the combination of these Euler angles, the carbonyl bond orientation angle with respect to FAS of the [1- 13C] glycine sites of the silk fibroin was determined to be 90 ± 5°. This value is in agreement with the X-ray diffraction and our previous solid state NMR data of B. mori silk fibroin fiber (a typical β-pleated sheet) within experimental error.

  3. Determination of leaf carbon isotope discrimination in C4 plants under variable N and water supply.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Yu, Qiang; Sheng, Wen-Ping; Li, Sheng-Gong; Tian, Jing

    2017-03-23

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying variations in carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) in C4 plants is critical for predicting the C3/C4 ratio in C3/C4 mixed grassland. The value of Δ is determined by bundle sheath leakiness (Ф) and the ratio of intercellular to ambient CO2 concentration (C i /C a ). Leaf nitrogen concentration (N leaf ) is considered a driver of Δ in C4 plants. However, little is known about how N leaf affects Ф and C i /C a , and subsequently Δ. Here leaf carbon isotope composition, N leaf , Ф, and leaf gas exchange were measured in Cleistogenes squarrosa, a dominant C4 species in the Inner Mongolia grassland. Δ remained relatively stable under variable N and water supply. Higher N supply and lower water supply increased N leaf , stimulated photosynthesis and further decreased C i /C a . High N supply increased Ф, which responded weakly to water supply. N leaf exerted similar effects on C i /C a and on Ф in the field and pot experiments. Pooling all the data, N leaf explained 73% of the variation in C i /C a . Overall, both Ф and C i /C a determined Δ; however, the contribution of Ф was stronger. N leaf influenced Δ primarily though C i /C a , rather than Ф. Ф should be considered in estimating Δ of C4 endmember.

  4. Effects of trophic level and metamorphosis on discrimination of hydrogen isotopes in a plant-herbivore system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Jacob M.; Wolf, Nathan; Stricker, Craig A.; Collier, Timothy R.; del Rio, Martinez Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The use of stable isotopes in ecological studies requires that we know the magnitude of discrimination factors between consumer and element sources. The causes of variation in discrimination factors for carbon and nitrogen have been relatively well studied. In contrast, the discrimination factors for hydrogen have rarely been measured. We grew cabbage looper caterpillars (Trichoplusia ni) on cabbage (Brassica oleracea) plants irrigated with four treatments of deuterium-enriched water (δD = -131, -88, -48, and -2‰, respectively), allowing some of them to reach adulthood as moths. Tissue δD values of plants, caterpillars, and moths were linearly correlated with the isotopic composition of irrigation water. However, the slope of these relationships was less than 1, and hence, discrimination factors depended on the δD value of irrigation water. We hypothesize that this dependence is an artifact of growing plants in an environment with a common atmospheric δD value. Both caterpillars and moths were significantly enriched in deuterium relative to plants by ~45‰ and 23‰ respectively, but the moths had lower tissue to plant discrimination factors than did the caterpillars. If the trophic enrichment documented here is universal, δD values must be accounted for in geographic assignment studies. The isotopic value of carbon was transferred more or less faithfully across trophic levels, but δ15N values increased from plants to insects and we observed significant non-trophic 15N enrichment in the metamorphosis from larvae to adult.

  5. Testing a new Method of Estimating the δ13C of Photosynthate in Trees: Stem CO2 Equilibration}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubierna Lopez, N.; Kavanagh, K.; Marshall, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling and prediction of forest responses to climate change often deal with the difficulty of estimating gas- exchange responses to rising CO2 concentrations and temperatures. This difficulty can be overcome with stable carbon isotopes, which provide a tool to study the coupling of the carbon and water cycles. Recently, considerable research has concentrated on trying to identify processes occurring after photosynthesis that modify the isotopic composition of a given plant tissue, which has led to questions about which plant tissue will best reflect environmental variations and photosynthetic discrimination. Here, we propose a new method that uses CO2 collected from inside the stem. A simple collection apparatus consisting of a stainless steel tube is inserted into the tree. The gas from the stem diffuses and equilibrates with the headspace. Gas samples are subsequently collected by replacing the gas inside the tubing with acidified water. This technique minimizes any change in pressure inside the system or any atmospheric contamination from outside the system. We compared the measured δ13C of stem CO2 to known leaf values in four conifer species at Mica Creek Experimental Watershed, in northern Idaho, USA. In addition, δ13C of soil respiration, δ13C leaf bulk material, δ13C phloem contents, and photosynthetic gas- exchange data were collected. We collected stem CO2 samples weekly through August 2006 during a long drought period. Mean monthly temperature was 16°C, cumulative precipitation in July and August was 33 mm, and mean maximum VPD was 4.1 kPa during this month. The most depleted species was Larix occidentalis, with δ13C = -26.97 ‰ (SE = 0.30), following by the shade-tolerant Abies grandis, with δ13C = -26.33 ‰ (SE = 0.23). In comparison, Pseudotsuga menziesii, with δ13C = -24.88 ‰ (SE =0.48) and Thuja plicata with δ13C = - 23.79 ‰ (SE = 0.30) were more enriched. These δ13C values are consistent with previous measurements of leaf bulk

  6. Characterization of xanthophyll pigments, photosynthetic performance, photon energy dissipation, reactive oxygen species generation and carbon isotope discrimination during artemisinin-induced stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin, a potent antimalarial drug, is phytotoxic to many crops and weeds. The effects of artemisinin on stress markers, including fluorescence parameters, photosystem II photochemistry, photon energy dissipation, lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species generation and carbon isotope discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia (Col-0) seedlings were grown in perlite and watered with 50% Hoagland nutrient solution. Adult plants of Arabidopsis were treated with artemisinin at 0, 40, 80, 160 μM for one week. Artemisinin, in the range 40-160 μM, decreased the fresh biomass, chl a, b and leaf mineral contents. Photosynthetic efficiency, yield and electron transport rate in Arabidopsis were also reduced following exposure to 80 and 160 μM artemisinin. The ΦNPQ and NPQ were less than control. Artemisinin treatment caused an increase in root oxidizability and lipid peroxidation (MDA contents) of Arabidopsis. Calcium and nitrogen contents decreased after 80 and 160 μM artemisinin treatment compared to control. δ13C values were less negative following treatment with artemisinin as compared to the control. Artemisinin also decreased leaf protein contents in Arabidopsis. Taken together, these data suggest that artemisinin inhibits many physiological and biochemical processes in Arabidopsis.

  7. Characterization of Xanthophyll Pigments, Photosynthetic Performance, Photon Energy Dissipation, Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Carbon Isotope Discrimination during Artemisinin-Induced Stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin, a potent antimalarial drug, is phytotoxic to many crops and weeds. The effects of artemisinin on stress markers, including fluorescence parameters, photosystem II photochemistry, photon energy dissipation, lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species generation and carbon isotope discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia (Col-0) seedlings were grown in perlite and watered with 50% Hoagland nutrient solution. Adult plants of Arabidopsis were treated with artemisinin at 0, 40, 80, 160 μM for one week. Artemisinin, in the range 40–160 μM, decreased the fresh biomass, chl a, b and leaf mineral contents. Photosynthetic efficiency, yield and electron transport rate in Arabidopsis were also reduced following exposure to 80 and 160 μM artemisinin. The ΦNPQ and NPQ were less than control. Artemisinin treatment caused an increase in root oxidizability and lipid peroxidation (MDA contents) of Arabidopsis. Calcium and nitrogen contents decreased after 80 and 160 μM artemisinin treatment compared to control. δ13C values were less negative following treatment with artemisinin as compared to the control. Artemisinin also decreased leaf protein contents in Arabidopsis. Taken together, these data suggest that artemisinin inhibits many physiological and biochemical processes in Arabidopsis. PMID:25635811

  8. Stable isotopes of C and S as indicators of habitat use by fish in small oregon Coast range streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are using stable isotopes of C, N, O and S (H planned) to study the ecology of coho salmon in streams of the Oregon Coast Range. We have found isotopes of C and, surprisingly, S to be very useful in discriminating rearing habitats in our small streams. We found 13C values ...

  9. Responses of carbon isotope discrimination in C4 plant to variable N and water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Li, Shenggong

    2016-04-01

    Understanding variations and underlying mechanisms of carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) in C4 species is critical for predicting the effects of change in C3/C4 ratio of plant community on ecosystem processes and functionning. However, little is known about the effects of soil resource gradients on Δ of C4 plants. To address Δ responses to drought and nitrogen supply, the leaf carbon isotope composition, bundle sheath leakiness (BLS), and leaf gas exchange (A, gs, Ci/Ca) were measured on Cleistogenes squarrosa, a dominant C4 species in the Inner Mongolia grassland. C. squarrosa were grown in controlled-environment pots from seed under a combination of water and N supply. High N availability and drought stimulated photosynthetic rate (A) and further decreased the ratio of internal and ambient CO2 concentrations (Ci/Ca) through increasing leaf N content. BLS was higher under high N supply and was unchanged by drought. There was significant interaction between N and water supply to affect BLS and Ci/Ca. Δ was negatively related to Ci/Ca and was positively related to BLS. Tradeoff between the responses of BLS and Ci/Ca to changing environmental conditions kept leaf Δ relatively stable, which was also supported by a field N addition experiment. Our results suggested leaf Δ of C4 plant was unchanged under variable water and N environment conditions although the operating efficiency of C4 pathway and CO2 concentration in photosynthesis were changed. Our findings have implications for predicting the change of C3/C4 ratio of plant community and understanding ecosystem processes and functionning.

  10. Systematic comparison of δ13C measurements of testosterone and derivative steroids in a freeze-dried urine candidate reference material for sports drug testing by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and uncertainty evaluation using four different metrological approaches.

    PubMed

    Munton, Ellaine; Murby, John; Hibbert, D Brynn; Santamaria-Fernandez, Rebeca

    2011-06-15

    An alternative calibration procedure for use when performing carbon isotope ratio measurements by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) has been developed. This calibration procedure does not rely on the corrections in-built in the instrument software, as the carbon isotope ratios of a sample are calculated from the measured raw peak areas. The method was developed for the certification of a urine reference material for sports drug testing, as the estimation of measurement uncertainty is greatly simplified. To ensure that the method is free from bias arising from the choice of calibration material and instrument, the carbon isotope ratios of steroids in urine extracts were measured using two different instruments in different laboratories, and three different reference materials (CU/USADA steroid standards from Brenna Laboratory, Cornell University; NIST RM8539 mineral oil; methane calibrated against NIST RM8560 natural gas). The measurements were performed at LGC and the Australian National Measurement Institute (NMI). It was found that there was no significant difference in measurement results when different instruments and reference materials were used to measure the carbon isotope ratio of the major testosterone metabolites androsterone and etiocholanolone, or the endogenous reference compounds pregnanediol, 11- ketoetiocholanolone and 11β-hydroxyandrosterone. Expanded measurement uncertainties at the 95% coverage probability ranged from 0.21‰ to 1.4‰, depending on analyte, instrument and reference material. The measurement results of this comparison were used to estimate a measurement uncertainty of δ(13)C for the certification of the urine reference material being performed on a single instrument using a single reference material at NMI.

  11. Using regional-scale atmospheric δ13C of CO2 as an indicator of ecosystem health and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alden, C. B.; Miller, J. B.; White, J. W.; Yadav, V.; Michalak, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Year to year terrestrial CO2 uptake and release is highly variable and is a result of, among other factors, weather and climate variability. One of the key ecosystem parameters that links surface-atmosphere fluxes of energy, water and carbon is stomatal conductance. By measuring and analyzing atmospheric patterns of CO2 and its 13C content over North America, we can begin to identify regional scale changes in stomatal conductance, because conductance is closely related to plant isotopic discrimination. Furthermore, 13C is a useful tracer of the differential responses of C3 and C4 plants to climate and weather anomalies, because C3 and C4 plants have very different isotopic discrimination. Both aspects of the terrestrial carbon cycle are of great interest to those seeking to understand the potential effects of global climate change on cropland and forest productivity, natural CO2 sinks, continental runoff, and continental water and energy exchange with the atmosphere. Our findings may be particularly important for parameterization of process-based models, in light of recent results suggesting that stomatal conductance models driven by vapor pressure deficit (Leuning Model) better predict atmospheric δ13C than do models driven by relative humidity (Ball-Berry Model). For the first time, spatial and temporal density of δ13C of CO2 atmospheric observations may be high enough to allow for regional inversions of δ13CO2 to optimize prior estimates of plant discrimination (and disequilibrium flux -- an isoflux resulting from the combination of a finite residence time of carbon in terrestrial biosphere pools and a changing atmospheric signature due to human burning of fossil fuels with a plant-derived δ13C signature). We perform a Bayesian synthesis inversion for 1) CO2 fluxes and 2) δ13CO2 isofluxes, over the North American region: 145-25°W longitude and 10-80°N latitude. Inversion resolution, in order to avoid aggregation errors, is 1°x1° and 3-hourly, but

  12. [Responses of tissue carbon and delta 13C in epilithic mosses to the variations of anthropogenic CO2 and atmospheric nitrogen deposition in city area].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-yan; Xiao, Hua-yun; Liu, Cong-qiang; Li, You-yi; Xiao, Hong-wei

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) concentrations and isotopic signatures (delta 13C and delta15 N) in epilithic mosses collected from urban sites to rural sites along four directions at Guiyang area. Mosses C (34.47%-52.76%) decreased significantly with distance from urban to rural area and strongly correlated with tissue N (0.85%-2.97%), showing atmospheric N deposition has positive effect on C assimilation of epilithic mosses, higher atmospheric N/NHx deposition at urban area has improved the photosynthesis and C fixation of mosses near urban, which also caused greater 13C discrimination for urban mosses. Mosses delta 13C signatures (-30.69% per hundred - -26.96% per hundred) got less negative with distance from urban to rural area, which was also related to the anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the city, and these 12C-enriched CO2 sources would lead to more negative mosses delta 13C through enhancing the atmospheric CO2 concentration in urban area. Moreover, according to the characteristics of mosses C and delta 13C variations with distance, it is estimated that the influences of urban anthropogenic CO2 sources on plants was mainly within 20 km from city center. This study mainly focused on the factors regulating tissue C and delta 13C of mosses in city area and the interaction between C and N in mosses, the responses of mosses C and delta 13C to urban CO2 emission and atmospheric N deposition have been revealed, which could provide new geochemical evidences for the control of city atmospheric pollution and the protection of ecosystems around city.

  13. Three whole-wood isotopic reference materials, USGS54, USGS55, and USGS56, for δ2H, δ13C, δ15N, and δ18O measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Jordan, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative measurements of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in wood are hampered by the lack of proper reference materials (RMs). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has prepared three powdered, whole-wood RMs, USGS54 (Pinus contorta, Canadian lodgepole pine), USGS55 (Cordia cf. dodecandra, Mexican ziricote), and USGS56 (Berchemia cf. zeyheri, South African red ivorywood). The stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen in these RMs span ranges as δ2HVSMOW from –150.4 to –28.2 mUr or ‰, as δ18OVSMOW from + 17.79 to + 27.23 mUr, as δ13CVPDB from –27.13 to –24.34 mUr, and as δ15N AIR-N2 from –2.42 to + 1.8 mUr. These RMs will enable users to normalize measurements of wood samples to isotope–delta scales, and they are intended primarily for the normalization of δ2H and δ18O measurements of unknown wood samples. However, they also are suitable for normalization of stable isotope measurements of carbon and nitrogen in wood samples. In addition, these RMs are suitable for inter-laboratory calibration for the dual-water suilibration procedure for the measurements of δ2HVSMOW values of non-exchangeable hydrogen. The isotopic compositions with 1-σ uncertainties, mass fractions of each element, and fractions of exchangeable hydrogen of these materials are:USGS54 (Pinus contorta, Canadian Lodgepole pine)δ2HVSMOW = –150.4 ± 1.1 mUr (n = 29), hydrogen mass fraction = 6.00 ± 0.04 % (n = 10)Fraction of exchangeable hydrogen = 5.4 ± 0.6 % (n = 29)δ18OVSMOW = + 17.79 ± 0.15 mUr (n = 18), oxygen mass fraction = 40.4 ± 0.2 % (n = 6)δ13CVPDB = –24.43 ± 0.02 mUr (n = 18), carbon mass fraction = 48.3 ± 0.4 % (n = 12)δ15NAIR-N2 = –2.42 ± 0.32 mUr (n = 17), nitrogen mass fraction = 0.05 % (n = 4)USGS55 (Cordia cf. dodecandra, Mexican ziricote)δ2HVSMOW = –28.2 ± 1.7 mUr (n = 30), hydrogen mass fraction = 5.65 ± 0.06 % (n = 10)Fraction of exchangeable

  14. Carbon isotope discrimination during branch photosynthesis of Fagus sylvatica: a Bayesian modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Gentsch, Lydia; Hammerle, Albin; Sturm, Patrick; Ogée, Jérôme; Wingate, Lisa; Siegwolf, Rolf; Plüss, Peter; Baur, Thomas; Buchmann, Nina; Knohl, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    Field measurements of photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination ((13)Δ) of Fagus sylvatica, conducted with branch bags and laser spectrometry, revealed a high variability of (13)Δ, both on diurnal and day-to-day timescales. We tested the prediction capability of three versions of a commonly used model for (13)Δ [called here comprehensive ((13)(Δcomp)), simplified ((13) Δsimple) and revised ((13)(Δrevised)) versions]. A Bayesian approach was used to calibrate major model parameters. Constrained estimates were found for the fractionation during CO(2) fixation in (13)(Δcomp), but not in (13)(Δsimple), and partially for the mesophyll conductance for CO(2)(gi). No constrained estimates were found for fractionations during mitochondrial and photorespiration, and for a diurnally variable apparent fractionation between current assimilates and mitochondrial respiration, specific to (13)(Δrevised). A quantification of parameter estimation uncertainties and interdependencies further helped explore model structure and behaviour. We found that (13)(Δcomp) usually outperformed (13)(Δsimple) because of the explicit consideration of gi and the photorespiratory fractionation in (13)(Δcomp) that enabled a better description of the large observed diurnal variation (≈9‰) of (13)Δ. Flux-weighted daily means of (13)Δ were also better predicted with (13)(Δcomp) than with (13)(Δsimple).

  15. 13C NMR of tunnelling methyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detken, A.

    The dipolar interactions between the protons and the central 13C nucleus of a 13CH3 group are used to study rotational tunnelling and incoherent dynamics of such groups in molecular solids. Single-crystal 13C NMR spectra are derived for arbitrary values of the tunnel frequency upsilon t. Similarities to ESR and 2H NMR are pointed out. The method is applied to three different materials. In the hydroquinone/acetonitrile clathrate, the unique features in the 13C NMR spectra which arise from tunnelling with a tunnel frequency that is much larger than the dipolar coupling between the methyl protons and the 13C nucleus are demonstrated, and the effects of incoherent dynamics are studied. The broadening of the 13C resonances is related to the width of the quasi-elastic line in neutron scattering. Selective magnetization transfer experiments for studying slow incoherent dynamics are proposed. For the strongly hindered methyl groups of L-alanine, an upper limit for upsilon is derived from the 13C NMR spectrum. In aspirinTM (acetylsalicylic acid), incoherent reorientations dominate the spectra down to the lowest temperatures studied; their rate apparently increases with decreasing temperature below 25K.

  16. Measuring δ(13)C values of atmospheric acetaldehyde via sodium bisulfite adsorption and cysteamine derivatisation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Songjun; Chen, Mei; Wen, Sheng; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2012-01-01

    δ(13)C values of gaseous acetaldehyde were measured by gas chromatograph-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-C-IRMS) via sodium bisulfite (NaHSO(3)) adsorption and cysteamine derivatisation. Gaseous acetaldehyde was collected via NaHSO(3)-coated Sep-Pak(®) silica gel cartridge, then derivatised with cysteamine, and then the δ(13)C value of the acetaldehyde-cysteamine derivative was measured by GC-C-IRMS. Using two acetaldehydes with different δ(13)C values, derivatisation experiments were carried out to cover concentrations between 0.009×10(-3) and 1.96×10(-3) mg·l(-1)) of atmospheric acetaldehyde, and then δ(13)C fractionation was evaluated in the derivatisation of acetaldehyde based on stoichiometric mass balance after measuring the δ(13)C values of acetaldehyde, cysteamine and the acetaldehyde-cysteamine derivative. δ(13)C measurements in the derivertisation process showed good reproducibility (<0.5 ‰) for gaseous acetaldehyde. The differences between predicted and measured δ(13)C values were 0.04-0.31 ‰ for acetaldehyde-cysteamine derivative, indicating that the derivatisation introduces no isotope fractionation for gaseous acetaldehyde, and obtained δ(13)C values of acetaldehyde in ambient air at the two sites were distinct (-34.00 ‰ at an urban site versus-31.00 ‰ at a forest site), implying potential application of the method to study atmospheric acetaldehyde.

  17. The Nature of Carbonate and Organic δ13C Covariance Through Geological Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlert, A. M.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Significant evolutionary, climatic, and oceanographic events in Earth history are often accompanied by excursions in the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of marine carbonates and co-occurring sedimentary organic material. The observation of synchronous excursions in the δ13C values of marine carbonates and coeval organic matter is commonly thought to prove that the deposit has not been altered by diagenesis, and that the variations in the δ13C records are the result of a significant change in global carbon cycling. Furthermore, this model suggests that the covariance of carbonate and organic δ13C records is driven only by changes in the δ13C value of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the surface waters of the ocean. However, recent work suggests that there may be at least two alternate models for generating covariance between carbonate and organic δ13C values in the geologic record. One of the models invokes sea-level driven syndepositional mixing between isotopically distinct sources of carbonate and organic material to produce positive covariance between carbonate and organic δ13C values. The second model suggests that post-depositional alteration to the carbonate δ13C values during meteoric diagenesis, in concert with concurrent contributions of terrestrial organic material during subaerial exposure, can also produce co-occurring negative excursions with tightly covariant δ13C records. In contrast to earlier interpretations of covariant δ13C values, these models suggest that both syndepositional and post-depositional factors can significantly influence the relationship between carbonate and organic δ13C values in a variety of depositional environments. The implications for reconstructions of ancient global carbon cycle events will be explored within the context of these three models, and their relative importance throughout geologic time will be discussed.

  18. Unthinned slow-growing ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) trees contain muted isotopic signals in tree rings as compared to thinned trees

    EPA Science Inventory

    We analysed the oxygen isotopic values of wood (δ18Ow) of 12 ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) trees from control, moderately, and heavily thinned stands and compared them with existing wood-based estimates of carbon isotope discrimination (∆13C), basal area increment (BAI), and g...

  19. Spatial and Short-Temporal Variability of δ(13)C and δ(15)N and Water-Use Efficiency in Pine Needles of the Three Forests Along the Most Industrialized Part of Poland.

    PubMed

    Sensuła, Barbara M

    In this study, stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in the samples of pine needles collected in 2013 and 2014 from heavily urbanized area in close proximity to point-source pollution emitters, such as a heat and power plant, nitrogen plant, and steelworks in Silesia (Poland), were analyzed as bio-indicators of contemporary environmental changes. The carbon isotope discrimination has been proposed as a method for evaluating water-use efficiency. The measurement of carbon and nitrogen isotopes was carried out using the continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The isotope ratio mass spectrometer allows the precise measurement of mixtures of naturally occurring isotopes. The δ(15)N values were calibrated relative to the NO-3 and USGS34 international standards, whereas the δ(13)C values were calibrated relative to the C-3 and C-5 international standards. The strong year-to-year correlations between the δ(13)C in different sampling sites, and also the inter-annual correlation of δ(15)N values in the pine needles at each of the investigated sampling sites confirm that the measured δ(13)C and δ(15)N and also intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) trends are representative of the sampling site. Diffuse air pollution caused the variation in δ (13)C, δ(15)N, and iWUE dependent on type of emitter, the localization in the space (distance and direction) from factories and some local effect of other human activities. The complex short-term variation analysis can be helpful to distinguish isotopic fractionation, which is not an effect explainable by climatic conditions but by the anthropogenic effect. Between 2012 and 2014, an increase in iWUE is observed at leaf level.

  20. Isotopic discrimination as a tool for organic farming certification in sweet pepper.

    PubMed

    del Amor, Francisco M; Navarro, Joaquín; Aparicio, Pedro M

    2008-01-01

    Organic farming is a form of agriculture that excludes the use of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, and genetically modified organisms. These fertilizers have been traditionally overused in conventional farming to avoid lost revenue, but this often not does not take into account the potential contamination of aquifers and river due to nitrate leaching. Transition to organic farming practices could provide an instrument to reduce contamination and increase potential income. It is difficult to determine to what extent those fertilizers could have been used within a complete traceability of the production process. In this experiment, we evaluated the use of (15)N/(14)N isotopic discrimination in sweet pepper plants to test the hypothesis that synthetic fertilizers significantly reduce (15)N/(14)N compared with exclusively organic practices. Therefore, three common types of organic manures (sheep, hen, or horse) were applied at a rate of 8 kg m(-2) with or without synthetic fertilizer amendments under fully controlled environmental and irrigation conditions. Results indicate that (i) use of synthetic fertilizers significantly reduced (15/14)N(2)vsN(2)atm compared with treatments that only received water; (ii) with respect to the plant organs, old leaves and fruits were more sensitive to the synthetic fertilizer additions with reductions in (15/14)N(2)vsN(2)atm of 24.1 and 27.8%, respectively; and (iii) independently of the organic manure used, no additional fertilization (synthetic or organic) is required before 106 days after transplanting at that dosage because plant fresh weight was not reduced.

  1. Associations between growth, wood anatomy, carbon isotope discrimination and mortality in a Quercus robur forest.

    PubMed

    Levanic, Tom; Cater, Matjaz; McDowell, Nate G

    2011-03-01

    Observations of forest mortality are increasing globally, but relatively little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms driving these events. Tree rings carry physiological signatures that may be used as a tool for retrospective analyses. We capitalized on a local soil water drainage event in 1982 that resulted in increased mortality within a stand of oak trees (Quercus robur), to examine the underlying physiological patterns associated with survival and death in response to soil water limitations. Pre-dawn water potentials showed more negative values for trees in the process of dying compared with those that survived. We used tree rings formed over the 123 years prior to mortality to estimate productivity from basal area increment (BAI, mm(2)), multiple xylem hydraulic parameters via anatomical measurements and crown-level gas exchange via carbon isotope discrimination (Δ, ‰). Oaks that died had significantly higher BAI values than trees that survived until the drainage event, after which the BAI of trees that died declined dramatically. Hydraulic diameter and conductivity of vessels in trees that died were higher than in surviving trees until the last 5 years prior to mortality, at which time both groups had similar values. Trees that died had consistently lower Δ values than trees that survived. Therefore, tree mortality in this stand was associated with physiological differences prior to the onset of soil water reduction. We propose that trees that died may have been hydraulically underbuilt for dry conditions, which predisposes them to severe hydraulic constraints and subsequent mortality. Measurements of above-ground/below-ground dry mass partitioning will be critical to future tests of this hypothesis. Based on these results, it is probable that pedunculate oak trees will experience greater future mortality if climate changes cause more severe droughts than the trees have experienced previously.

  2. Determination of fructose metabolic pathways in normal and fructose-intolerant children: A sup 13 C NMR study using (U- sup 13 C)fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Gopher, A.; Lapidot, A. ); Vaisman, N. ); Mandel, H. )

    1990-07-01

    An inborn deficiency in the ability of aldolase B to split fructose 1-phosphate is found in humans with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). A stable isotope procedure to elucidate the mechanism of conversion of fructose to glucose in normal children and in HFI children has been developed. A constant infusion of D-(U-{sup 13}C)fructose was given nasogastrically to control and to HFI children. Hepatic fructose conversion to glucose was estimated by examination of {sup 13}C NMR spectra of plasma glucose. Significantly lower values ({approx}3-fold) for fructose conversion to glucose were obtained for the HFI patients as compared to the controls. A quantitative determination of the metabolic pathways of fructose conversion to glucose was derived from {sup 13}C NMR measurement of plasma ({sup 13}C)glucose isotopomer populations. The finding of isotopomer populations of three adjacent {sup 13}C atoms at glucose C-4 ({sup 13}C{sub 3}-{sup 13}C{sub 4}-{sup 13}C{sub 5}) suggests that there is a direct pathway from fructose, by-passing fructose-1-phosphate aldolase, to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The metabolism of fructose by fructose-1-phosphate aldolase activity accounts for only {approx}50% of the total amount of hepatic fructose conversion to glucose. In view of the marked decline by 67% in synthesis of glucose from fructose in HFI subjects found in this study, the extent of ({sup 13}C)glucose formation from a trace amount of (U-{sup 13}C)fructose infused into the patient can be used as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic test for inherent faulty fructose metabolism.

  3. δ(13)C and Water Use Efficiency in the Glucose of Annual Pine Tree Rings as Ecological Indicators of the Forests in the Most Industrialized Part of Poland.

    PubMed

    Sensuła, Barbara M

    In this study, stable carbon isotope ratios in the glucose samples were extracted from annual pine tree rings as bio-indicators of contemporary environmental changes in heavily urbanized areas. The sampling sites were located in close proximity to point source pollution emitters, such as a heat and power plant "Łaziska" and steelworks "Huta Katowice" in Silesia (Poland). The analysed samples covered the time span from 1975 to 2012 AD, the time period of the development of industrialization and the modernization in the industrial sector in Poland, similarly as in Eastern Europe. This modernization was connected with EU legislation and the implementation of restrictive governmental regulations on emissions. The carbon isotope discrimination has been proposed as a method for evaluating water use efficiency. The measurements of carbon isotopes were carried out using the continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer coupled to the elemental analyser. The δ(13)C values were calibrated relative to the C-3 and C-5 international standards. Diffuse air pollution caused the variation in δ(13)C and iWUE (the ratio between CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance) dependency on the type of emitter and some local effects of other human activities. In this study, the first results of water use efficiency in glucose are presented. In the period of time from 1975 to 2012, the water use efficiency values increased from 98 to 122 μmol/mol.

  4. Leaf functional response to increasing atmospheric CO(2) concentrations over the last century in two northern Amazonian tree species: a historical δ(13) C and δ(18) O approach using herbarium samples.

    PubMed

    Bonal, Damien; Ponton, Stéphane; Le Thiec, Didier; Richard, Béatrice; Ningre, Nathalie; Hérault, Bruno; Ogée, Jérôme; Gonzalez, Sophie; Pignal, Marc; Sabatier, Daniel; Guehl, Jean-Marc

    2011-08-01

    We assessed the extent of recent environmental changes on leaf morphological (stomatal density, stomatal surface, leaf mass per unit area) and physiological traits (carbon isotope composition, δ(13)C(leaf) , and discrimination, Δ(13)C(leaf) , oxygen isotope composition, δ(18)O(leaf) ) of two tropical rainforest species (Dicorynia guianensis; Humiria balsamifera) that are abundant in the Guiana shield (Northern Amazonia). Leaf samples were collected in different international herbariums to cover a 200 year time-period (1790-2004) and the whole Guiana shield. Using models describing carbon and oxygen isotope fractionations during photosynthesis, different scenarios of change in intercellular CO(2) concentrations inside the leaf (C(i)), stomatal conductance (g), and photosynthesis (A) were tested in order to understand leaf physiological response to increasing air CO(2) concentrations (C(a)). Our results confirmed that both species displayed physiological response to changing C(a) . For both species, we observed a decrease of about 1.7‰ in δ(13)C(leaf) since 1950, without significant change in Δ(13)C(leaf) and leaf morphological traits. Furthermore, there was no clear change in δ(18)O(leaf) for Humiria over this period. Our simulation approach revealed that an increase in A, rather than a decrease in g, explained the observed trends for these tropical rainforest species, allowing them to maintain a constant ratio of C(i)/C(a) .

  5. Changes in surface solar radiation in Northeastern Spain over the past six centuries recorded by tree-ring δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorado Liñán, Isabel; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Gutiérrez Merino, Emilia; Planells, Octavi; Heinrich, Ingo; Helle, Gerhard; Zorita, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopes in tree rings (δ13C) are assumed to be well established proxy indicators of past variations of temperature and hydroclimate variables. The discrimination of 13C in the organic matter (i.e. tree rings) reflects the balance between the leaf photosynthetic rate and the stomatal conductance to CO2 [Farquhar et al., 1982] which are strongly dependent on environmental variables such as temperature, humidity, and solar radiation. The control exerted by solar radiation on the physiological processes underlining carbon discrimination in tree rings suggests the large potential of this palaeoproxy in estimations of past changes of light availability. Based on that theory, some studies have successfully achieved the reconstructions of cloud cover and sunshine duration based on δ13C variations on tree-rings [i.e. Gagen et al., 2011; Loader et al., 2013]. However, the largely inter-dependence of the climate factors governing plant physiological processes hampers the unequivocal identification of the most limiting driver of isotope discrimination in a given region (e.g., surface solar radiation signals can be easily misinterpret as temperature signals). Similarly, surface solar radiation, sunshine duration and percentage of cloud cover largely covary but the short instrumental series hinder the detection of the non-linearities and thus the identification of the main driver of plant growth. We present a detailed study in northeast Spain in which the use of several station data and the effect of the volcanic eruptions on both instrumental and tree-ring data revealed surface solar radiation as the main driver of 13C discrimination in tree rings. Based on that relationship, we develop a surface solar radiation reconstruction in northeast Spain that covers the last 600 years. The relationship between past temperature and past SSR at this site is complex, with no clear linear relationship that could be used to infer the sign of a cloud cover feedback. Our

  6. Characterization of uniformly and atom-specifically 13C-labeled heparin and heparan sulfate polysaccharide precursors using 13C NMR spectroscopy and ESI mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao K. N.; Tran, Vy M.; Victor, Xylophone V.; Skalicky, Jack J.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2010-01-01

    The biological actions of heparin and heparan sulfate, two structurally related glycosaminoglycans, depend on the organization of the complex heparanome. Due to the structural complexity of the heparanome, the sequence of variably sulfonated uronic acid and glucosamine residues is usually characterized by the analysis of smaller oligosaccharide and disaccharide fragments. Even characterization of smaller heparin/heparan sulfate oligosaccharide or disaccharide fragments using simple 1D 1H NMR spectroscopy is often complicated by the extensive signal overlap. 13C NMR signals, on the other hand, overlap less and therefore, 13C NMR spectroscopy can greatly facilitate the structural elucidation of the complex heparanome and provide finer insights into the structural basis for biological functions. This is the first report of the preparation of anomeric carbon-specific 13C-labeled heparin/heparan sulfate precursors from the Escherichia coli K5 strain. Uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled precursors were also produced and characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis of enzymatically fragmented disaccharides revealed that anomeric carbon-specific labeling efforts resulted in a minor loss/scrambling of 13C in the precursor backbone, whereas uniform labeling efforts resulted in greater than 95% 13C isotope enrichment in the precursor backbone. These labeled precursors provided high-resolution NMR signals with great sensitivity and set the stage for studying the heparanome–proteome interactions. PMID:20832774

  7. Optimal tracers for parallel labeling experiments and (13)C metabolic flux analysis: A new precision and synergy scoring system.

    PubMed

    Crown, Scott B; Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-11-01

    (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) is a widely used approach in metabolic engineering for quantifying intracellular metabolic fluxes. The precision of fluxes determined by (13)C-MFA depends largely on the choice of isotopic tracers and the specific set of labeling measurements. A recent advance in the field is the use of parallel labeling experiments for improved flux precision and accuracy. However, as of today, no systemic methods exist for identifying optimal tracers for parallel labeling experiments. In this contribution, we have addressed this problem by introducing a new scoring system and evaluating thousands of different isotopic tracer schemes. Based on this extensive analysis we have identified optimal tracers for (13)C-MFA. The best single tracers were doubly (13)C-labeled glucose tracers, including [1,6-(13)C]glucose, [5,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose, which consistently produced the highest flux precision independent of the metabolic flux map (here, 100 random flux maps were evaluated). Moreover, we demonstrate that pure glucose tracers perform better overall than mixtures of glucose tracers. For parallel labeling experiments the optimal isotopic tracers were [1,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose. Combined analysis of [1,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose labeling data improved the flux precision score by nearly 20-fold compared to widely use tracer mixture 80% [1-(13)C]glucose +20% [U-(13)C]glucose.

  8. Specific 13C functional pathways as diagnostic targets in gastroenterology breath-tests: tricks for a correct interpretation.

    PubMed

    Pizzoferrato, M; Del Zompo, F; Mangiola, F; Lopetuso, L R; Petito, V; Cammarota, G; Gasbarrini, A; Scaldaferri, F

    2013-01-01

    Breath tests are non-invasive, non-radioactive, safe, simple and effective tests able to determine significant metabolic alterations due to specific diseases or lack of specific enzymes. Carbon isotope (13)C, the stable-non radioactive isotope of carbon, is the most used substrate in breath testing, in which (13)C/(12)C ratio is measured and expressed as a delta value, a differences between readings and a fixed standard. (13)C/(12)C ratio is measured with isotope ratio mass spectrometry or non-dispersive isotope-selective infrared spectrometer and generally there is a good agreement between these techniques in the isotope ratio estimation. (13)C/(12)C ratio can be expressed as static measurement (like delta over baseline in urea breath test) or as dynamic measurement as percent dose recovery, but more dosages are necessary. (13)C Breath-tests are involved in many fields of interest within gastroenterology, such as detection of Helicobacter pylori infection, study of gastric emptying, assessment of liver and exocrine pancreatic functions, determination of oro-caecal transit time, evaluation of absorption and to a lesser extend detection of bacterial overgrowth. The use of every single test in a clinical setting is vary depending on accuracy and substrate costs. This review is meant to present (13)C the meaning of (13)C/(12)C ratio and static and dynamic measure and, finally, the instruments dedicated to its use in gastroenterology. A brief presentation of (13)C breath tests in gastroenterology is also provided.

  9. Application of 13C-labeling and 13C-13C COSY NMR experiments in the structure determination of a microbial natural product.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yun; Park, Sunghyouk; Shin, Jongheon; Oh, Dong-Chan

    2014-08-01

    The elucidation of the structures of complex natural products bearing many quaternary carbons remains challenging, even in this advanced spectroscopic era. (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR spectroscopy shows direct couplings between (13)C and (13)C, which comprise the backbone of a natural product. Thus, this type of experiment is particularly useful for natural products bearing consecutive quaternary carbons. However, the low sensitivity of (13)C-based NMR experiments, due to the low natural abundance of the (13)C nucleus, is problematic when applying these techniques. Our efforts in the (13)C labeling of a microbial natural product, cyclopiazonic acid (1), by feeding (13)C-labeled glucose to the fungal culture, enabled us to acquire (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR spectra on a milligram scale that clearly show the carbon backbone of the compound. This is the first application of (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR experiments for a natural product. The results suggest that (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR spectroscopy can be routinely used for the structure determination of microbial natural products by (13)C-enrichment of a compound with (13)C-glucose.

  10. A roadmap for interpreting 13C metabolite labeling patterns from cells

    PubMed Central

    Buescher, Joerg M.; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.; Boros, Laszlo G.; Burgess, Shawn C.; Brunengraber, Henri; Clish, Clary B.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Feron, Olivier; Frezza, Christian; Ghesquiere, Bart; Gottlieb, Eyal; Hiller, Karsten; Jones, Russell G.; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Kimmelman, Alec C.; Locasale, Jason W.; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Maddocks, Oliver D. K.; Malloy, Craig; Metallo, Christian M.; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Munger, Joshua; Nöh, Katharina; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Ralser, Markus; Sauer, Uwe; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; St-Pierre, Julie; Tennant, Daniel A.; Wittmann, Christoph; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Vazquez, Alexei; Vousden, Karen; Young, Jamey D.; Zamboni, Nicola; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Measuring intracellular metabolism has increasingly led to important insights in biomedical research. 13C tracer analysis, although less information-rich than quantitative 13C flux analysis that requires computational data integration, has been established as a time-efficient method to unravel relative pathway activities, qualitative changes in pathway contributions, and nutrient contributions. Here, we review selected key issues in interpreting 13C metabolite labeling patterns, with the goal of drawing accurate conclusions from steady state and dynamic stable isotopic tracer experiments. PMID:25731751

  11. Two new organic reference materials for δ13C and δ15N measurements and a new value for the δ13C of NBS 22 oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Geilmann, Heike; Brand, Willi A.; Böhlke, John Karl

    2003-01-01

    Analytical grade L-glutamic acid is chemically stable and has a C/N mole ratio of 5, which is close to that of many of natural biological materials, such as blood and animal tissue. Two L-glutamic acid reference materials with substantially different 13C and 15N abundances have been prepared for use as organic reference materials for C and N isotopic measurements. USGS40 is analytical grade L-glutamic acid and has a δ13C value of −26.24‰ relative to VPDB and a δ15N value of −4.52‰ relative to N2 in air. USGS41 was prepared by dissolving analytical grade L-glutamic acid with L-glutamic acid enriched in 13C and 15N. USGS41 has a δ13C value of +37.76‰ and a δ15N value of +47.57‰. The δ13C and δ15N values of both materials were measured against the international reference materials NBS 19 calcium carbonate (δ13C = +1.95‰), L-SVEC lithium carbonate (δ13C = −46.48‰), IAEA-N-1 ammonium sulfate (δ15N = 0.43‰), and USGS32 potassium nitrate (δ15N = 180‰) by on-line combustion continuous-flow and off-line dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Both USGS40 and USGS41 are isotopically homogeneous; reproducibility of δ13C is better than 0.13‰, and that of δ15N is better than 0.13‰ in 100-μg amounts. These two isotopic reference materials can be used for (i) calibrating local laboratory reference materials, and (ii) quantifying drift with time, mass-dependent fractionations, and isotope-ratio-scale contraction in the isotopic analysis of various biological materials. Isotopic results presented in this paper yield a δ13C value for NBS 22 oil of −29.91‰, in contrast to the commonly accepted value of −29.78‰ for which off-line blank corrections probably have not been quantified satisfactorily.