Science.gov

Sample records for 13c magnetic resonance

  1. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cardiac metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seeholzer, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques for following the metabolic fate of compounds specifically labeled with /sup 13/C. The goals of the present study are: (1) to develop reliable quantitative procedures for measuring the /sup 13/C enrichment of specific carbon sites in compounds enriched by the metabolism of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates in rat heart, and (2) to use these quantitative measurements of fractional /sup 13/C enrichment within the context of a mathematical flux model describing the carbon flow through the TCA cycle and ancillary pathways, as a means for obtaining unknown flux parameters. Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with various combinations of glucose, acetate, pyruvate, and propionate to achieve steady state flux conditions, followed by perfusion with the same substrates labeled with /sup 13/C in specific carbon sites. The hearts were frozen at different times after addition of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates and neutralized perchloric acid extracts were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The fractional /sup 13/C enrichment (F.E.) of individual carbon sites in different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for saturation and nuclear Overhauser effects. These F.E. measurements by /sup 13/C NMR were validated by the analysis of /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H scalar coupling patterns observed in /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the extracted metabolites. The results obtained from perfusion of hearts glucose plus either (2-/sup 13/C) acetate or (3-/sup 13/C) pyruvate are similar to those obtained by previous investigators using /sup 14/C-labeled substrates.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Hyperpolarized 13C Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Jeremy W.

    Hyperpolarized 13C substrates offer the potential to non-invasively image metabolism and enzymatic activity. However, hyperpolarization introduces a number of difficulties, and imaging is hampered by non-equilibrium magnetization and the need for spectral encoding. There is therefore a need for fast and RF efficient spectral imaging techniques. This work presents a number of new methods that can be used to improve polarization, increase RF efficiency and improve modeling accuracy in hyperpolarized 13C experiments. In particular, a novel encoding and reconstruction algorithm is presented that can generate spatially and spectrally resolved images with a single RF excitation and echo time. This reconstruction framework increases data acquisition efficiency, enabling accelerated acquisition speed, preserved polarization, and/or improved temporal or spatial resolution. Overall, the methods enumerated in this dissertation have the potential to improve modeling accuracy and to mitigate the conventional tradeoffs between SNR, spatial resolution, and temporal resolution that govern image quality in hyperpolarized 13C experiments.

  3. Spectral editing for in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yun; Shen, Jun

    2012-01-01

    In vivo detection of carboxylic/amide carbons is a promising technique for studying cerebral metabolism and neurotransmission due to the very low RF power required for proton decoupling. In the carboxylic/amide region, however, there is severe spectral overlap between acetate C1 and glutamate C5, complicating studies that use acetate as an astroglia-specific substrate. There are no known in vivo MRS techniques that can spectrally resolve acetate C1 and glutamate C5 singlets. In this study, we propose to spectrally separate acetate C1 and glutamate C5 by a two-step J-editing technique after introducing homonuclear 13C- 13C scalar coupling between carboxylic/amide carbons and aliphatic carbons. By infusing [1,2- 13C 2]acetate instead of [1- 13C]acetate the acetate doublet can be spectrally edited because of the large separation between acetate C2 and glutamate C4 in the aliphatic region. This technique can be applied to studying acetate transport and metabolism in brain in the carboxylic/amide region without spectral interference.

  4. The 13C nuclear magnetic resonance in graphite intercalation compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Resing, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of graphite intercalation compounds were calculated. For acceptor types, the shifts come mainly from the paramagnetic (Ramsey) intra-atomic terms. They are related to the gross features of the two-dimensional band structures. The calculated anisotropy is about -140 ppm and is independent of the finer details such as charge transfer. For donor types, the carbon 2p pi orbitals are spin-polarized because of mixing with metal conduction electrons, thus there is an additional dipolar contribution which may be correlated with the electronic specific heat. The general agreement with experimental data is satisfactory.

  5. Analysis of mutational lesions of acetate metabolism in Neurospora crassa by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G H; Baxter, R L

    1987-01-01

    The adaptation of Neurospora crassa mycelium to growth on acetate as the sole carbon source was examined by using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. Extracts were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance at various times after transfer of the mycelium from medium containing sucrose to medium containing [2-13C]acetate as the sole carbon source. The label was initially seen to enter the alanine, glutamate, and glutamine pools, and after 6 h 13C-enriched trehalose was evident, indicating that gluconeogenesis was occurring. Analysis of the isotopomer ratios in the alanine and glutamate-glutamine pools indicated that substantial glyoxylate cycle activity became evident between 2 and 4 h after transfer. Immediately after transfer of the mycelium to acetate medium, the alanine pool increased to about four times its previous level, only a small fraction of which was enriched with 13C. The quantity of 13C-enriched alanine remained almost constant between 2 and 7.5 h after the transfer, whereas the overall alanine pool decreased to its original level. The selective catabolism of the unenriched alanine leads us to suggest that the alanine pool is partitioned into two compartments during adaptation. Two acetate-nonutilizing mutants were also studied by this technique. An acu-3 strain, deficient for isocitrate lyase (EC 4.1.3.1) activity, showed metabolic changes consistent with this lesion. An acp strain, previously thought to be deficient in an inducible acetate permease, took up [2-13C]acetate but showed no evidence of glyoxylate cycle activity despite synthesizing the necessary enzymes; the lesion was therefore reinterpreted. PMID:2947898

  6. Adult-onset hypothyroidism and the cerebral metabolism of (1,2-13C2) acetate as detected by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chapa, F; Künnecke, B; Calvo, R; Escobar del Rey, F; Morreale de Escobar, G; Cerdán, S

    1995-01-01

    The effects of adult-onset hypothyroidism on the metabolic compartmentation of the cerebral tricarboxylic acid cycle and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt have been investigated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Rats thyroidectomized as adults and age-matched controls were infused in the right jugular vein with unlabeled or (1,2-13C2) acetate solutions for 60 min. At the end of the infusion, the brains were frozen in situ and perchloric acid extracts were prepared and analyzed by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and reverse-phase HPLC. Thyroidectomized animals showed a decrease in the incorporation of 13C from (1,2-13C2) acetate in cerebral metabolites and an increase in the concentrations of unlabeled glutamate and GABA. Computer-assisted interpretation of the 13C multiplets observed for the carbons of glutamate, glutamine, and GABA indicated that adult-onset hypothyroidism produced 1) a decrease in the contribution of infused (1,2-13C2) acetate to the glial tricarboxylic acid cycle; 2) an increase in the contribution of unlabeled acetyl-CoA to the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle; and 3) impairments in the exchange of glutamate, glutamine, and GABA between the neuronal and glial compartments. Despite the fact that the adult brain has often been considered metabolically unresponsive to thyroid hormone status, present results show metabolic alterations in the neuronal and glial compartments that are reversible with substitution therapy. PMID:7828544

  7. Proton-Enhanced 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Lipids and Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Urbina, Julio; Waugh, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    A recently developed nuclear double resonance technique which permits sensitive detection, together with high resolution, of rare spins in solids or other dipolar-coupled nuclear systems [Pines, Gibby, and Waugh (1973) J. Chem. Phys. 59, 569] has been applied to the study of natural abundance 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance in lipid mesophases and of selectively labeled carbon sites in bacterial membranes. Detailed microscopic information on the molecular organization and phase transitions of the lipid phases and their interaction with ions and other molecules can be obtained from the study of the chemical shift anisotropies and dynamical aspects of the 13C NMR spectra of unsonicated lipid dispersions (liposomes). Experiments are reported which demonstrated the feasibility of quantitatively observing the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance of specifically labeled sites in unperturbed Escherichia coli membrane vesicles for the study of the physical state of the lipids with the aim of relating it to the known lipid-dependent functional properties of the membranes. PMID:4531036

  8. CARBON-13 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE. 13C CHEMICAL SHIFTS AND 13C-199HG COUPLING CONSTANTS FOR SOME ORGANOMERCURY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The (13)C shieldings and (13)C-(199)Hg coupling constants of fourteen phenyl- and seven alkyl- and alkenyl-mercury compounds have been obtained. Substituent effects on the (13)C shieldings are similar to those in nonmercurated phenyl compounds, with a similar relationship between...

  9. Novel Imaging Contrast Methods for Hyperpolarized 13 C Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen Durant

    Magnetic resonance imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled small molecules has emerged as an extremely powerful tool for the in vivo monitoring of perfusion and metabolism. This work presents methods for improved imaging, parameter mapping, and image contrast generation for in vivo hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Angiography using hyperpolarized urea was greatly improved with a highly T2-weighted acquisition in combination with 15N labeling of the urea amide groups. This is due to the fact that the T2 of [13C]urea is strongly limited by the scalar coupling to the neighboring quadrupolar 14N. The long in vivo T2 values of [13C, 15N2]urea were utilized for sub-millimeter projection angiography using a contrast agent that could be safely injected in concentrations of 10-100 mM while still tolerated in patients with renal insufficiency. This study also presented the first method for in vivo T2 mapping of hyperpolarized 13C compounds. The in vivo T2 of urea was short in the blood and long within the kidneys. This persistent signal component was isolated to the renal filtrate, thus enabling for the first time direct detection of an imaging contrast agent undergoing glomerular filtration. While highly T2-weighted acquisitions select for molecules with short rotational correlation times, high diffusion weighting selects for those with the long translational correlation times. A specialized spin-echo EPI sequence was developed in order to generate highly diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized 13C images on a clinical MRI system operating within clinical peak- RF and gradient amplitude constraints. Low power adiabatic spin echo pulses were developed in order to generate a sufficiently large refocused bandwidth while maintaining low nominal power. This diffusion weighted acquisition gave enhanced tumor contrast-to-noise ratio when imaging [1-13C]lactate after infusion of [1-13C]pyruvate. Finally, the first in-man hyperpolarized 13C MRI clinical trial is discussed.

  10. In Vivo Natural-Abundance 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Living Ectomycorrhizal Fungi 1

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Francis; Canet, Daniel; Marchal, Jean-Pierre; Brondeau, Jean

    1984-01-01

    Natural-abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to study intact mycelia of the ectomycorrhizal fungi Cenococcum graniforme (Ascomycetes) and Hebeloma crustuliniforme (Basidiomycetes). A number of sharp resonances are observed in living fungi. These signals primarily arise from fatty acyl chains and carbohydrate nuclei. The spectra are interpreted in terms of relative concentrations of the major fatty acids present in the fungal triglycerides. The small line width of fatty acids (mainly oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acids) resonances and spin-lattice relaxation time are indicative of fast rotational reorientations and are consequently thought to arise from fatty acyl chains in fat droplets. We were able to locate the site of lipids accumulation within mycelia using light microscopy and histological staining. Many lipid droplets were observed in mycelia of both species. These results suggest that fatty acids droplets could be involved in carbon storage and metabolism from ectomycorrhizal fungi. PMID:16663561

  11. Detection of inflammatory cell function using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy of hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine

    PubMed Central

    Najac, Chloé; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Kohanbash, Gary; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Okada, Hideho; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are highly prevalent inflammatory cells that play a key role in tumor development and are considered therapeutic targets. MDSCs promote tumor growth by blocking T-cell-mediated anti-tumoral immune response through depletion of arginine that is essential for T-cell proliferation. To deplete arginine, MDSCs express high levels of arginase, which catalyzes the breakdown of arginine into urea and ornithine. Here, we developed a new hyperpolarized 13C probe, [6-13C]-arginine, to image arginase activity. We show that [6-13C]-arginine can be hyperpolarized, and hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production from [6-13C]-arginine is linearly correlated with arginase concentration in vitro. Furthermore we show that we can detect a statistically significant increase in hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production in MDSCs when compared to control bone marrow cells. This increase was associated with an increase in intracellular arginase concentration detected using a spectrophotometric assay. Hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine could therefore serve to image tumoral MDSC function and more broadly M2-like macrophages. PMID:27507680

  12. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique. PMID:16332107

  13. A Polymer-Based Magnetic Resonance Tracer for Visualization of Solid Tumors by 13C Spectroscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Iida, Mitsuru; Miura, Iwao; Inubushi, Toshiro; Morikawa, Shigehiro

    2014-01-01

    Morphological imaging precedes lesion-specific visualization in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) because of the superior ability of this technique to depict tissue morphology with excellent spatial and temporal resolutions. To achieve lesion-specific visualization of tumors by MRI, we investigated the availability of a novel polymer-based tracer. Although the 13C nucleus is a candidate for a detection nucleus because of its low background signal in the body, the low magnetic resonance sensitivity of the nucleus needs to be resolved before developing a 13C-based tracer. In order to overcome this problem, we enriched polyethylene glycol (PEG), a biocompatible polymer, with 13C atoms. 13C-PEG40,000 (13C-PEG with an average molecular weight of 40 kDa) emitted a single 13C signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio due to its ability to maintain signal sharpness, as was confirmed by in vivo investigation, and displayed a chemical shift sufficiently distinct from that of endogenous fat. 13C-PEG40,000 intravenously injected into mice showed long retention in circulation, leading to its effective accumulation in tumors reflecting the well-known phenomenon that macromolecules accumulate in tumors because of leaky tumor capillaries. These properties of 13C-PEG40,000 allowed visualization of tumors in mice by 13C spectroscopic imaging. These findings suggest that a technique based on 13C-PEG is a promising strategy for tumor detection. PMID:25007334

  14. Characterisation of black carbon-rich samples by 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Etelvino H.; Hayes, Michael H. B.; Deazevedo, Eduardo R.; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2006-09-01

    There are difficulties in quantifying and characterising the organic matter (OM) in soils that contain significant amounts of partially oxidised char or charcoal materials. The anthropogenic black carbon (BC), such as that found in the Terra Preta de Índio soils of the Amazon region, is a good example of the OM that is difficult to analyse in such soils. 13C direct polarisation/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at high MAS frequency, 1H-13C cross polarisation (CP)/MAS with total suppression of spinning sidebands (TOSS), and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filter nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been applied successfully for quantifying the different components of OM. However, because pyrogenic materials present strong local magnetic susceptibility heterogeneities, the use of CSA-filter and TOSS make the pulse sequences very sensitive to imperfections in the π pulses. In this study, the DP/MAS pulse sequence was replaced by a CP with a radio frequency ramp—variable amplitude CP (VACP)—VACP/MAS pulse sequence, and composite π pulses were used in the CSA-filter and TOSS pulse sequences. In that way, the component functionalities in a humic acid from a BC soil were successfully determined. The spectrometer time needed was greatly decreased by employing this VACP/MAS technique. This development provides an accurate method for characterising BC-rich samples from different origins.

  15. Characterisation of black carbon-rich samples by (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Etelvino H; Hayes, Michael H B; Deazevedo, Eduardo R; Bonagamba, Tito J

    2006-09-01

    There are difficulties in quantifying and characterising the organic matter (OM) in soils that contain significant amounts of partially oxidised char or charcoal materials. The anthropogenic black carbon (BC), such as that found in the Terra Preta de Indio soils of the Amazon region, is a good example of the OM that is difficult to analyse in such soils. (13)C direct polarisation/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at high MAS frequency, (1)H-(13)C cross polarisation (CP)/MAS with total suppression of spinning sidebands (TOSS), and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filter nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been applied successfully for quantifying the different components of OM. However, because pyrogenic materials present strong local magnetic susceptibility heterogeneities, the use of CSA-filter and TOSS make the pulse sequences very sensitive to imperfections in the pi pulses. In this study, the DP/MAS pulse sequence was replaced by a CP with a radio frequency ramp--variable amplitude CP (VACP)--VACP/MAS pulse sequence, and composite pi pulses were used in the CSA-filter and TOSS pulse sequences. In that way, the component functionalities in a humic acid from a BC soil were successfully determined. The spectrometer time needed was greatly decreased by employing this VACP/MAS technique. This development provides an accurate method for characterising BC-rich samples from different origins. PMID:16688435

  16. Simulation of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for isodon terpenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guochen; Tong, Jianbo; Liu, Shuling

    2008-11-01

    A quantitative structure spectroscopy relationship (QSSR) model of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of 7000 carbon atoms in 350 isodon terpenoid compounds has been developed using atomic electronegativity distance vector (AEDV) and atomic hybridization state index (AHSI). The prediction correlation coefficient ( R) value of the QSSR model based on multiple linear regression analysis was 0.9542. The stability and prediction capacity of the QSSR model have been tested using the leave-one-out cross-validation and test sets methodology. The correlation coefficients R obtained were 0.9540 and 0.9556, respectively, which showed that the predictive potential of the proposed models has good modeling stability and prediction ability.

  17. High-resolution (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy pattern recognition of fish oil capsules.

    PubMed

    Aursand, Marit; Standal, Inger B; Axelson, David E

    2007-01-10

    13C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy, in conjunction with multivariate analysis of commercial fish oil-related health food products, have been used to provide discrimination concerning the nature, composition, refinement, and/or adulteration or authentication of the products. Supervised (probabilistic neural networks, PNN) and unsupervised (principal component analysis, PCA; Kohonen neural networks; generative topographic mapping, GTM) pattern recognition techniques were used to visualize and classify samples. Simple PCA score plots demonstrated excellent, but not totally unambiguous, class distinctions, whereas Kohonen and GTM visualization provided better results. Quantitative class predictions with accuracies >95% were achieved with PNN analysis. Trout, salmon, and cod oils were completely and correctly classified. Samples reported to be salmon oils and cod liver oils did not cluster with true salmon and cod liver oil samples, indicating mislabeling or adulteration. PMID:17199311

  18. [Characterization of biochar by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-yu; Jin, Jie; Yan, Yu; Han, Lan-fang; Kang, Ming-jie; Wang, Zi-ying; Zhao, Ye; Sun, Ke

    2014-12-01

    The wood (willow branch) and grass (rice straw) materials were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300, 450 and 600 °C) to obtain the biochars used in the present study. The biochars were characterized using elementary analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and solid state 13C cross-polarization and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR) to illuminate the structure and composition of the biochars which were derived from the different thermal temperatures and biomass. The results showed that the H/C, O/C and (O+N)/C ratios of the biochars decreased with the increase in the pyrolysis temperatures. The surface polarity and ash content of the grass-derived biochars were higher than those of the wood-derived biochars. The minerals of the wood-derived biochars were mainly covered by the organic matter; in contrast, parts of the mineral surfaces of the grass-derived biochars were not covered by organic matter? The 13C NMR of the low temperature-derived biochars revealed a large contribution of aromatic carbon, aliphatic carbon, carboxyl and carbonyl carbon, while the high temperature-derived biochars contained a large amount of aromatic carbon. Moreover, the wood-derived biochars produced at low heat treatment temperatures contained more lignin residues than grass-derived ones, probably due to the existence of high lignin content in the feedstock soures of wood-derived biochars. The results of the study would be useful for environmental application of biochars. PMID:25881450

  19. Position-Specific Isotope Analysis of Xanthines: A (13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Method to Determine the (13)C Intramolecular Composition at Natural Abundance.

    PubMed

    Diomande, Didier G; Martineau, Estelle; Gilbert, Alexis; Nun, Pierrick; Murata, Ariaki; Yamada, Keita; Watanabe, Naoharu; Tea, Illa; Robins, Richard J; Yoshida, Naohiro; Remaud, Gérald S

    2015-07-01

    The natural xanthines caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline are of major commercial importance as flavor constituents in coffee, cocoa, tea, and a number of other beverages. However, their exploitation for authenticity, a requirement in these commodities that have a large origin-based price-range, by the standard method of isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry (irm-MS) is limited. We have now developed a methodology that overcomes this deficit that exploits the power of isotopic quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry combined with chemical modification of the xanthines to enable the determination of positional intramolecular (13)C/(12)C ratios (δ(13)Ci) with high precision. However, only caffeine is amenable to analysis: theobromine and theophylline present substantial difficulties due to their poor solubility. However, their N-methylation to caffeine makes spectral acquisition feasible. The method is confirmed as robust, with good repeatability of the δ(13)Ci values in caffeine appropriate for isotope fractionation measurements at natural abundance. It is shown that there is negligible isotope fractionation during the chemical N-methylation procedure. Thus, the method preserves the original positional δ(13)Ci values. The method has been applied to measure the position-specific variation of the (13)C/(12)C distribution in caffeine. Not only is a clear difference between caffeine isolated from different sources observed, but theobromine from cocoa is found to show a (13)C pattern distinct from that of caffeine. PMID:26067163

  20. 13C Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and µ-Raman Spectroscopic Characterization of Sicilian Amber.

    PubMed

    Barone, Germana; Capitani, Donatella; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Proietti, Noemi; Raneri, Simona; Longobardo, Ugo; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2016-08-01

    (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and µ-Raman spectroscopy were applied to characterize Sicilian amber samples. The main goal of this work was to supply a complete study of simetite, highlighting discriminating criteria useful to distinguish Sicilian amber from fossil resins from other regions and laying the foundations for building a spectroscopic database of Sicilian amber. With this aim, a private collection of unrefined simetite samples and fossil resins from the Baltic region and Dominican Republic was analyzed. Overall, the obtained spectra permitted simetite to be distinguished from the other resins. In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectroscopic data, allowing the clustering of simetite samples with respect to the Baltic and Dominican samples and to group the simetite samples in two sets, depending on their maturity. Finally, the analysis of loadings allowed for a better understanding of the spectral features that mainly influenced the discriminating characteristics of the investigated ambers. PMID:27340217

  1. Solid-State 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Cellulose in the Cell Walls of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, R. H.; Davies, L. M.; Harris, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance was used to characterize the molecular ordering of cellulose in a cell-wall preparation containing mostly primary walls obtained from the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. Proton and 13C spin relaxation time constants showed that the cellulose was in a crystalline rather than a paracrystalline state or amorphous state. Cellulose chains were distributed between the interiors (40%) and surfaces (60%) of crystallites, which is consistent with crystallite cross-sectional dimensions of about 3 nm. Digital resolution enhancement revealed signals indicative of triclinic and monoclinic crystalline forms of cellulose mixed in similar proportions. Of the five nuclear spin relaxation processes used, proton rotating-frame relaxation provided the clearest distinction between cellulose and other cell-wall components for purposes of editing solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. PMID:12226303

  2. A general chemical shift decomposition method for hyperpolarized (13) C metabolite magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Xiong; Merritt, Matthew E; Sherry, Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized carbon-13 allows sequential steps of metabolism to be detected in vivo. Potential applications in cancer, brain, muscular, myocardial, and hepatic metabolism suggest that clinical applications could be readily developed. A primary concern in imaging hyperpolarized nuclei is the irreversible decay of the enhanced magnetization back to thermal equilibrium. Multiple methods for rapid imaging of hyperpolarized substrates and their products have been proposed with a multi-point Dixon method distinguishing itself as a robust protocol for imaging [1-(13) C]pyruvate. We describe here a generalized chemical shift decomposition method that incorporates a single-shot spiral imaging sequence plus a spectroscopic sequence to retain as much spin polarization as possible while allowing detection of metabolites that have a wide range of chemical shift values. The new method is demonstrated for hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate, [1-(13) C]acetoacetate, and [2-(13) C]dihydroxyacetone. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27060361

  3. Hyperpolarized (13)C Magnetic Resonance and Its Use in Metabolic Assessment of Cultured Cells and Perfused Organs.

    PubMed

    Lumata, Lloyd; Yang, Chendong; Ragavan, Mukundan; Carpenter, Nicholas; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Merritt, Matthew E

    2015-01-01

    Diseased tissue is often characterized by abnormalities in intermediary metabolism. Observing these alterations in situ may lead to an improved understanding of pathological processes and novel ways to monitor these processes noninvasively in human patients. Although (13)C is a stable isotope safe for use in animal models of disease as well as human subjects, its utility as a metabolic tracer has largely been limited to ex vivo analyses employing analytical techniques like mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Neither of these techniques is suitable for noninvasive metabolic monitoring, and the low abundance and poor gyromagnetic ratio of conventional (13)C make it a poor nucleus for imaging. However, the recent advent of hyperpolarization methods, particularly dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), makes it possible to enhance the spin polarization state of (13)C by many orders of magnitude, resulting in a temporary amplification of the signal sufficient for monitoring kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in living tissue through magnetic resonance spectroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging. Here, we review DNP techniques to monitor metabolism in cultured cells, perfused hearts, and perfused livers, focusing on our experiences with hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. We present detailed approaches to optimize the DNP procedure, streamline biological sample preparation, and maximize detection of specific metabolic activities. We also discuss practical aspects in the choice of metabolic substrates for hyperpolarization studies and outline some of the current technical and conceptual challenges in the field, including efforts to use hyperpolarization to quantify metabolic rates in vivo. PMID:26358902

  4. Ethanol reassimilation and ethanol tolerance in Pitchia stipitis CBS 6054 as studied by [sup 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Skoog, K.; Hahn-Haegerdal, B. ); Degn, H.; Jacobsen, H.S.; Jacobsen, J.P. )

    1992-08-01

    Ethanol reassimilation in Pichia stipitis CBS 6054 was studied by using continuous cultures, and the oxidation of [1-[sup 13]C] ethanol was monitored by in vivo and in vitro [sup 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Acetate was formed when ethanol was reassimilated. The ATP/ADP ratio and the carbon dioxide production decreased, whereas the malate dehydrogenase activity increased, in ethanol-reassimilating cells. The results are discussed in terms of the low ethanol tolerance in P. stipitis compared with that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  5. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known C ox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ??0.036 Cox units (??0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ?? 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  6. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockaday, W. C.; Masiello, C. A.; Randerson, J. T.; Smernik, R. J.; Baldock, J. A.; Chadwick, O. A.; Harden, J. W.

    2009-06-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known Cox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ±0.036 Cox units (±0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ± 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  7. Chemical structural studies of natural lignin by dipolar dephasing solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Two natural lignins, one from a gymnosperm wood the other from angiosperm wood, were examined by conventional solid-state and dipolar dephasing 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. The results obtained from both techniques show that the structure of natural lignins is consistent with models of softwood and hardwood lignin. The dipolar dephasing NMR data provide a measure of the degree of substitution on aromatic rings which is consistent with the models. ?? 1987.

  8. (1)H and (13)C magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the chicken eggshell.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2012-12-19

    The chicken eggshell, a product of biomineralization, contains inorganic and organic substances whose content changes during the incubation process. Bloch-decay (BD) (1)H, (13)C, and cross-polarization (CP) (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of chicken eggshells were acquired under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Variable contact time (13)C CP MAS NMR experiments revealed the signals of carbonyl groups from organic and inorganic compounds. In the (13)C BD NMR spectra, a single peak at 168.1 ppm was detected, whereas in the (1)H BD spectra, the signals from water and the bicarbonate ion were assigned. A simultaneous decrease of the water signal in the (1)H MAS NMR spectra and an increase of the carbonate ion signal in the (13)C CP MAS NMR spectra of eggshells collected during the incubation period indicate the substitution of calcium ions by hydrogen ions in the calcium carbonate crystalline phase during the incubation of an egg. PMID:23157303

  9. 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Acetate Incorporation into Malate During Ca2+-Uptake by Isolated Leaf Tissues 1

    PubMed Central

    Borchert, Rolf; Everett, Grover W.

    1987-01-01

    13C Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of leaflets of Gleditsia triacanthos and Albizia julibrisin was used to determine the fate of acetate taken up during the absorption of calcium from 13C-labeled Ca-acetate solution. Small amounts of acetate accumulated temporarily in the leaf tissues, but the bulk of acetate was incorporated into malate. The initial rate of malate synthesis was very low, but increased rapidly during acetate treatment and reached its maximum after 8 hours; the enzymes involved in malate synthesis thus appear to be substrate induced. Use of acetate-2-13C yielded malate labeled in C-3, indicating that vacuolar malate accumulating during Ca-uptake might be synthesized via malate synthase from acetate and glyoxalate. However, a source of glyoxalate condensing with acetate during malate synthesis could not be identified. Glycolate produced in photorespiration is an unlikely source, because glycolate-2-13C was absorbed and metabolized by the leaf tissues into products of the glycolate pathway, but was not a major precursor in malate synthesis. Malate synthesis via the glyoxalate cycle is also unlikely, because no evidence for the recycling of a 13C-labeled 4-carbon organic acid was found. Malate synthesis in the leaflets of Gleditsia and Albizia thus appears to involve the inducible condensation of acetate with a 2-carbon compound of unidentified nature and origin. PMID:16665548

  10. Conditions to obtain precise and true measurements of the intramolecular 13C distribution in organic molecules by isotopic 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bayle, Kevin; Gilbert, Alexis; Julien, Maxime; Yamada, Keita; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Akoka, Serge; Yoshida, Naohiro; Remaud, Gérald S

    2014-10-10

    Intramolecular (13)C composition gives access to new information on the (bio) synthetic history of a given molecule. Isotopic (13)C NMR spectrometry provides a general tool for measuring the position-specific (13)C content. As an emerging technique, some aspects of its performance are not yet fully delineated. This paper reports on (i) the conditions required to obtain satisfactory trueness and precision for the determination of the internal (13)C distribution, and (ii) an approach to determining the "absolute" position-specific (13)C content. In relation to (i), a precision of <1% can be obtained whatever the molecule on any spectrometer, once quantitative conditions are met, in particular appropriate proton decoupling efficiency. This performance is a prerequisite to the measurement of isotope fractionation either on the transformed or residual compound when a chemical reaction or process is being studied. The study of the trueness has revealed that the response of the spectrometer depends on the (13)C frequency range of the studied molecule, i.e. the chemical shift range. The "absolute value" and, therefore, the trueness of the (13)C NMR measurements has been assessed on acetic acid and by comparison to the results obtained on the fragments from COOH and CH3 by isotopic mass spectrometry coupled to a pyrolysis device (GC-Py-irm-MS), this technique being the reference method for acetic acid. Of the two NMR spectrometers used in this work, one gave values that corresponded to those obtained by GC-Py-irm-MS (thus, the "true" value) while the other showed a bias, which was dependent to the range covered by the resonance frequencies of the molecule. Therefore, the former can be used directly for studying isotope affiliations, while the latter can only be used directly for comparative data, for example in authenticity studies, but can also be used to obtain the true values by applying appropriate correction factors. The present study assesses several key protocol

  11. HYPERPOLARIZED 13C MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ITS USE IN METABOLIC ASSESSMENT OF CULTURED CELLS AND PERFUSED ORGANS

    PubMed Central

    Lumata, Lloyd; Yang, Chendong; Ragavan, Mukundan; Carpenter, Nicholas; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Merritt, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Diseased tissue is often characterized by abnormalities in intermediary metabolism. Observing these alterations in situ may lead to an improved understanding of pathological processes and novel ways to monitor these processes non-invasively in human patients. Although 13C is a stable isotope safe for use in animal models of disease as well as human subjects, its utility as a metabolic tracer has largely been limited to ex vivo analyses employing analytical techniques like mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Neither of these techniques is suitable for non-invasive metabolic monitoring, and the low abundance and poor gyromagnetic ratio of conventional 13C make it a poor nucleus for imaging. However, the recent advent of hyperpolarization methods, particularly dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), make it possible to enhance the spin polarization state of 13C by many orders of magnitude, resulting in a temporary amplification of the signal sufficient for monitoring kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in living tissue through magnetic resonance spectroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging. Here we review DNP techniques to monitor metabolism in cultured cells, perfused hearts, and perfused livers, focusing on our experiences with hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. We present detailed approaches to optimize the DNP procedure, streamline biological sample preparation, and maximize detection of specific metabolic activities. We also discuss practical aspects in the choice of metabolic substrates for hyperpolarization studies, and outline some of the current technical and conceptual challenges in the field, including efforts to use hyperpolarization to quantify metabolic rates in vivo. PMID:26358902

  12. 13C Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of kerogen from Cretaceous black shales thermally altered by basaltic intrusions and laboratory simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennis, L.W.; Maciel, G.E.; Hatcher, P.G.; Simoneit, B.R.T.

    1982-01-01

    Cretaceous black shales from DSDP Leg 41, Site 368 in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean were thermally altered during the Miocene by an intrusive basalt. The sediments overlying and underlying the intrusive body were subjected to high temperatures (up to ~ 500??C) and, as a result, their kerogen was significantly altered. The extent of this alteration has been determined by examination by means of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, using cross polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS). Results indicate that the kerogen becomes progressively more aromatic in the vicinity of the intrusive body. Laboratory heating experiments, simulating the thermal effects of the basaltic intrusion, produced similar results on unaltered shale from the drill core. The 13C CP/MAS results appear to provide a good measure of thermal alteration. ?? 1982.

  13. Hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride thin films studied by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, W. J.; Malyarenko, D. I.; Kraft, O.; Hoatson, G. L.; Reilly, A. C.; Holloway, B. C.

    2002-10-01

    The chemical bonding of hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films was examined using solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. The films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests reveal a recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. This combination of low modulus and high strength means the material can be regarded as hard and elastic; the material gives when pressed on and recovers its shape when the load is released. The 13C NMR results conclusively demonstrate that hard and elastic a-CNx has an sp2 carbon bonded structure and that sp3 hybridized carbons are absent. Our results stand in contrast with earlier work that proposed that the interesting mechanical properties of hard and elastic a-CNx were due, in part, to sp3 bonded carbon.

  14. Catabolism of Glucose and Lactose in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Studied by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Irene; Gaspar, Paula; Sánchez, Borja; Gueimonde, Miguel; Neves, Ana Rute

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are widely used as probiotics in several commercial products; however, to date there is little knowledge about their carbohydrate metabolic pathways. In this work, we studied the metabolism of glucose and lactose in the widely used probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 by in vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The metabolism of [1-13C]glucose was characterized in cells grown in glucose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, the metabolism of lactose specifically labeled with 13C on carbon 1 of the glucose or the galactose moiety was determined in suspensions of cells grown in lactose. These experiments allowed the quantification of some intermediate and end products of the metabolic pathways, as well as determination of the consumption rate of carbon sources. Additionally, the labeling patterns in metabolites derived from the metabolism of glucose specifically labeled with 13C on carbon 1, 2, or 3 in cells grown in glucose or lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the glucose moiety ([1-13Cglucose]lactose), lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the galactose moiety ([1-13Cgalactose]lactose), and [1-13C]glucose in lactose-grown cells were determined in cell extracts by 13C NMR. The NMR analysis showed that the recovery of carbon was fully compatible with the fructose 6-phosphate, or bifid, shunt. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase, acetate kinase, fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase, and pyruvate formate lyase differed significantly between glucose and lactose cultures. The transcriptional analysis of several putative glucose and lactose transporters showed a significant induction of Balat_0475 in the presence of lactose, suggesting a role for this protein as a lactose permease. This report provides the first in vivo experimental evidence of the metabolic flux distribution in the catabolic pathway of glucose and lactose in bifidobacteria and shows that the bifid shunt is the only pathway

  15. Reduced glutamate neurotransmission in patients with Alzheimer's disease -- an in vivo (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Alexander P; Shic, Frederick; Enriquez, Cathleen; Ross, Brian D

    2003-02-01

    Cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is not fully explained. PET indicates reduced cerebral metabolic rate for glucose. Since glutamate neurotransmission (GNT) consumes more than 80% of the ATP generated from metabolism, a pilot study was carried out to determine the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) based on the hypothesis that reduced GNT could contribute to cognitive impairment in AD. Three AD patients with cognitive impairment (mini-mental state exam: 24 vs 30, P<0.05) and significant reduction in both N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/Creatine (Cr) ( P<0.009) and NAA/myo-inositol (mI) ratio ( P<0.01), and three age-matched controls each received 0.014-0.016 g/kg/min 99%1-13C glucose IV. Quantitative (1)H and proton-decoupled (13)C MR brain spectra were acquired from combined posterior-parietal white matter and posterior-cingulate gray matter every 5 min for 140 min.(13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measures of glucose oxidation and neuronal TCA rate, including prolonged time to (13)C enrichment of glutamate (Glu2) ( P<0.004) and bicarbonate (HCO(3)) ( P<0.03) as well as reduced relative enrichment of Glu(2)/Glu(4) between 60 and 100 min ( P<0.04), were significantly different in AD patients vs. controls. (13)C measures of GNT, glutamine (Gln)(2)/Glu(2) ( P<0.02) and rates of glutamate enrichment (Glu(2)/glucose: 0.34 vs 0.86, P=ns and Glu(4)/glucose 0.26 vs 0.83, P=ns), were also reduced.(13)C MRS measures of neuronal TCA cycle, glucose oxidation and GNT were significantly correlated with measures of neuronal integrity: NAA/Cr, [NAA] and mI/NAA as determined by (1)H MRS ( R(2)=0.73-0.95; P<0.05-0.01), suggesting that impairment of GNT may be a contributing factor in the cognitive impairment characteristic of AD. PMID:12695884

  16. Chemistry and biochemistry of 13C hyperpolarized magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Keshari, Kayvan R; Wilson, David M

    2014-03-01

    The study of transient chemical phenomena by conventional NMR has proved elusive, particularly for non-(1)H nuclei. For (13)C, hyperpolarization using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique has emerged as a powerful means to improve SNR. The recent development of rapid dissolution DNP methods has facilitated previously impossible in vitro and in vivo study of small molecules. This review presents the basics of the DNP technique, identification of appropriate DNP substrates, and approaches to increase hyperpolarized signal lifetimes. Also addressed are the biochemical events to which DNP-NMR has been applied, with descriptions of several probes that have met with in vivo success. PMID:24363044

  17. Chemistry and biochemistry of 13C hyperpolarized magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Keshari, Kayvan R.; Wilson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of transient chemical phenomena by conventional NMR has proved elusive, particularly for non-1H nuclei. For 13C, hyperpolarization using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique has emerged as a powerful means to improve SNR. The recent development of rapid dissolution DNP methods has facilitated previously impossible in vitro and in vivo study of small molecules. This review presents the basics of the DNP technique, identification of appropriate DNP substrates, and approaches to increase hyperpolarized signal lifetimes. Also addressed are the biochemical events to which DNP-NMR has been applied, with descriptions of several probes that have met with in vivo success. PMID:24363044

  18. Structural characterization of ion-vapor deposited hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings by solid state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jiao; Kato, Takahisa; Watanabe, Sadayuki; Hayashi, Hideo; Kawaguchi, Masahiro

    2014-01-07

    In the present study, unique structural heterogeneity was observed in ion-vapor deposited a-C:H coatings by performing {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CPMAS experiments on solid state nuclear magnetic resonance devices. Two distinct types of sp{sup 2} C clusters were discovered: one of them denoted as sp{sup 2} C′ in content of 3–12 at. % was non-protonated specifically localized in hydrogen-absent regions, while the other dominant one denoted as sp{sup 2} C″ was hydrogenated or at least proximate to proton spins. On basis of the notably analogous variation of sp{sup 2} C′ content and Raman parameters as function of substrate bias voltage in the whole range of 0.5 kV–3.5 kV, a model of nano-clustering configuration was proposed that the sp{sup 2} C′ clusters were embedded between sp{sup 2} C″ clusters and amorphous sp{sup 3} C matrix as trapped interfaces or boundaries where the sp{sup 2} carbon bonds were highly distorted. Continuous increase of bias voltage would promote the nano-clustering and re-ordering of dominant sp{sup 2} C″ clusters, thus results in a marked decrease of interspace and a change of the content of sp{sup 2} C′ clusters. Further investigation on the {sup 13}C magnetization recovery showed typical stretched-exponential approximation due to the prominent presence of paramagnetic centers, and the stretched power α varied within 0.6–0.9 from distinct types of sp{sup 2} C clusters. Differently, the magnetization recovery of {sup 1}H showed better bi-exponential approximation with long and short T{sub 1}(H) fluctuated within 40–60 ms and 0.1–0.3 ms approximately in content of 80% ± 5% and 20% ± 5%, respectively, varying with various bias voltages. Meanwhile, the interrupted {sup 13}C saturation recovery with an interval of short T{sub 1}(H) showed that most of quick-relaxing protons were localized in sp{sup 2} C″ clusters. Such a short T{sub 1}(H) was only possibly resulted from a relaxation mechanism

  19. Quantitative solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometric analyses of wood xylen: effect of increasing carbohydrate content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    Isolated lignin with a low carbohydrate content was spiked with increasing amounts of alpha-cellulose, and then analysed by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using cross-polarization with magic angle spinning (CPMAS) and dipolar dephasing methods in order to assess the quantitative reliability of CPMAS measurement of carbohydrate content and to determine how increasingly intense resonances for carbohydrate carbons affect calculations of the degree of lignin's aromatic ring substitution and methoxyl carbon content. Comparisons were made of the carbohydrate content calculated by NMR with carbohydrate concentrations obtained by phenol-sulfuric acid assay and by the calculation from the known amounts of cellulose added. The NMR methods used in this study yield overestimates for carbohydrate carbons due to resonance area overlap from the aliphatic side chain carbons of lignin. When corrections are made for these overlapping resonance areas, the NMR results agree very well with results obtained by other methods. Neither the calculated methoxyl carbon content nor the degree of aromatic ring substitution in lignin, both calculated from dipolar dephasing spectra, change with cellulose content. Likewise, lignin methoxyl content does not correlate with cellulose abundance when measured by integration of CPMAS spectra. ?? 1992.

  20. Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of coalified gymnosperm xylem tissue from Australian brown coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Lerch, H. E., III; Bates, A.L.; Verheyen, T.V.

    1989-01-01

    We report here on the use of solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to contrast the average chemical composition of modern degraded gymnosperm woods with fossil gymnosperm woods from Australian brown coals (Miocene). We first established the quantitative nature of the NMR techniques for these samples so that the conventional solid-state 13C NMR spectra and the dipolar dephasing NMR spectra could be used with a high degree of reliability to depict average chemical compositions. The NMR results provide some valuable insights about the early coalification of xylem tissue from gymnosperms. Though the cellulosic components of wood are degraded to varying degrees during peatification and ensuing coalification, it is unlikely that they play a major role in the formation of aromatic structures in coalified woods. The NMR data show that gynmosperm lignin, the primary aromatic contribution to the coal, is altered in part by demethylation of guaiacyl-units to catechol-like structures. The dipolar dephasing NMR data indicate that the lignin also becomes more cross-linked or condensed. ?? 1989.

  1. In Situ Determination of Fructose Isomer Concentrations in Wine Using (13)C Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Cinzia; Aupic, Clara; Lewis, Andrew R; Pinto, B Mario

    2015-09-30

    A practical method for simultaneously quantifying fructose and ethanol contents in wines using (13)C quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) spectroscopy is reported. Less than 0.6 mL of wine is needed, and the method leaves an unmodified sample available for subsequent testing or additional analyses. The relative ratios of the five known fructose isomers in ethanolic solutions at different pH and their variations with the temperature are also reported. The data are correlated with the sweetness of wines. The technique was applied to commercially available wines, and the results are compared to other methods. Sugar levels above 0.6 g/L can also be measured. A simple adaptation of the method permits measurement of different carbohydrates using integration of single peaks for each compound, in combination with an external reference (13)C qNMR spectrum of a sample with a known concentration. The method can be applied at all stages of wine production, including grape must, during fermentation, and before and after bottling. PMID:26350157

  2. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance study of five- and six-coordinated carbon in nonclassical organometallic compounds: Dimeric trialkyl-, tricyclopropyl-, and triarylaluminums and some nido and closo carboranes*

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Liang, Gao; Henold, Kenneth L.; Haigh, Gary B.

    1977-01-01

    A 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of dimeric trimethyl-, triethyl-, tricyclopropyl-, and triarylaluminums is reported. The five-coordinated bridging carbons are found consistently more shielded than the terminal carbons, in accordance with the increased p-character of the former. The nature of bridging two-electron three-centered Al—C—Al bonds is discussed. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance shifts of several nido and closo carboranes containing five and six coordinated carbons and their 13C-1H spin-spin coupling constants were also obtained. The relationship between the carbon chemical shifts and coordination number of the carbon atom is discussed. There is approximately a 20- to 40-ppm shielding of the 13C chemical shifts of five- and six-coordinated carbons, compared with those of four valent carbons, with a simultaneous general increase of JC-H coupling constants. PMID:16592469

  3. Site-specific 13C content by quantitative isotopic 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry: a pilot inter-laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Chaintreau, Alain; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst; Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita; Yoshida, Naohiro; Pagelot, Alain; Moskau, Detlef; Moreno, Aitor; Schleucher, Jürgen; Reniero, Fabiano; Holland, Margaret; Guillou, Claude; Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S

    2013-07-25

    Isotopic (13)C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular (13)C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the (13)C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic (13)C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular (13)C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic (13)C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ (13)Ci profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ (13)Ci in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results. PMID:23845488

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis of [1-13C]Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and [1-13C]Acrylate Metabolism by a DMSP Lyase-Producing Marine Isolate of the α-Subclass of Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ansede, John H.; Pellechia, Perry J.; Yoch, Duane C.

    2001-01-01

    The prominence of the α-subclass of Proteobacteria in the marine bacterioplankton community and their role in dimethylsulfide (DMS) production has prompted a detailed examination of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) metabolism in a representative isolate of this phylotype, strain LFR. [1-13C]DMSP was synthesized, and its metabolism and that of its cleavage product, [1-13C]acrylate, were studied using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. [1-13C]DMSP additions resulted in the intracellular accumulation and then disappearance of both [1-13C]DMSP and [1-13C]β-hydroxypropionate ([1-13C]β-HP), a degradation product. Acrylate, the immediate product of DMSP cleavage, apparently did not accumulate to high enough levels to be detected, suggesting that it was rapidly β-hydroxylated upon formation. When [1-13C]acrylate was added to cell suspensions of strain LFR it was metabolized to [1-13C]β-HP extracellularly, where it first accumulated and was then taken up in the cytosol where it subsequently disappeared, indicating that it was directly decarboxylated. These results were interpreted to mean that DMSP was taken up and metabolized by an intracellular DMSP lyase and acrylase, while added acrylate was β-hydroxylated on (or near) the cell surface to β-HP, which accumulated briefly and was then taken up by cells. Growth on acrylate (versus that on glucose) stimulated the rate of acrylate metabolism eightfold, indicating that it acted as an inducer of acrylase activity. DMSP, acrylate, and β-HP all induced DMSP lyase activity. A putative model is presented that best fits the experimental data regarding the pathway of DMSP and acrylate metabolism in the α-proteobacterium, strain LFR. PMID:11425733

  5. Alteration of interaction between astrocytes and neurons in different stages of diabetes: a nuclear magnetic resonance study using [1-(13)C]glucose and [2-(13)C]acetate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Zhao, Liang-Cai; Zheng, Yong-Quan; Dong, Min-Jian; Su, Yongchao; Chen, Wei-Jian; Hu, Zi-Long; Yang, Yun-Jun; Gao, Hong-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that the brain is a site of diabetic end-organ damage. This study investigates cerebral metabolism and the interactions between astrocytes and neurons at different stages of diabetes to identify the potential pathogenesis of diabetic encephalopathy. [1-(13)C]glucose or [2-(13)C]acetate is infused into 1- and 15-week diabetic rats, the brain extracts of which are analyzed by using (1)H and (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The (13)C-labeling pattern and enrichment of cerebral metabolites are also investigated. The increased (13)C incorporation in the glutamine, glutamate, and γ-aminobutyric acid carbons from [2-(13)C]acetate suggests that the astrocytic mitochondrial metabolism is enhanced in 1-week diabetic rats. By contrast, the decreased labeling from [1-(13)C]glucose reflected that the neuronal mitochondrial metabolism is impaired. As diabetes developed to 15 weeks, glutamine and glutamate concentrations significantly decreased. The increased labeling of glutamine C4 but unchanged labeling of glutamate C4 from [2-(13)C]acetate suggests decreased astrocyte supply to the neurons. In addition, the enhanced pyruvate recycling pathway manifested by the increased lactate C2 enrichment in 1-week diabetic rats is weakened in 15-week diabetic rats. Our study demonstrates the overall metabolism disturbances, changes in specific metabolic pathways, and interaction between astrocytes and neurons during the onset and development of diabetes. These results contribute to the mechanistic understanding of diabetes pathogenesis and evolution. PMID:25048983

  6. Evidence of 13C non-covalent isotope effects obtained by quantitative 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at natural abundance during normal phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Botosoa, Eliot P; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Rojas, Jose Manuel Moreno; Guillou, Claude; Remaud, Gérald S

    2009-10-16

    Quantitative isotopic (13)C NMR at natural abundance has been used to determine the site-by-site (13)C/(12)C ratios in vanillin and a number of related compounds eluted from silica gel chromatography columns under similar conditions. Head-to-tail isotope fractionation is observed in all compounds at the majority of carbon positions. Furthermore, the site-specific isotope deviations show signatures characteristic of the position and functionality of the substituents present. The observed effects are more complex than would be obtained by simply summing the individual effects. Such detail is hidden when only the global (13)C content is measured by mass spectrometry. In particular, carbon positions within the aromatic ring are found to show site-specific isotope fractionation between the solute and the stationary phase. These interactions, defined as non-covalent isotope effects, can be normal or inverse and vary with the substitution pattern present. PMID:19748628

  7. Evaluation of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Pyruvate by Magnetic Resonance to Detect Ionizing Radiation Effects in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Sandulache, Vlad C.; Chen, Yunyun; Lee, Jaehyuk; Rubinstein, Ashley; Ramirez, Marc S.; Skinner, Heath D.; Walker, Christopher M.; Williams, Michelle D.; Tailor, Ramesh; Court, Laurence E.; Bankson, James A.; Lai, Stephen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) cytotoxicity is primarily mediated through reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since tumor cells neutralize ROS by utilizing reducing equivalents, we hypothesized that measurements of reducing potential using real-time hyperpolarized (HP) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can serve as a surrogate marker of IR induced ROS. This hypothesis was tested in a pre-clinical model of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), an aggressive head and neck malignancy. Human ATC cell lines were utilized to test IR effects on ROS and reducing potential in vitro and [1-13C] pyruvate HP-MRS/MRSI imaging of ATC orthotopic xenografts was used to study in vivo effects of IR. IR increased ATC intra-cellular ROS levels resulting in a corresponding decrease in reducing equivalent levels. Exogenous manipulation of cellular ROS and reducing equivalent levels altered ATC radiosensitivity in a predictable manner. Irradiation of ATC xenografts resulted in an acute drop in reducing potential measured using HP-MRS, reflecting the shunting of reducing equivalents towards ROS neutralization. Residual tumor tissue post irradiation demonstrated heterogeneous viability. We have adapted HP-MRS/MRSI to non-invasively measure IR mediated changes in tumor reducing potential in real time. Continued development of this technology could facilitate the development of an adaptive clinical algorithm based on real-time adjustments in IR dose and dose mapping. PMID:24475215

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Shift Reagents: Abnormal 13C Shifts Produced by Complexation of Lanthanide Chelates with Saturated Amines and n-Butyl Isocyanide

    PubMed Central

    Marzin, Claude; Leibfritz, Dieter; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Roberts, John D.

    1973-01-01

    Lanthanide-induced shfits of 13C nuclear magnetic resonances are reported for several amines and n-butyl isocyanide. Contact contributions to such shifts, especially of β carbons, are clearly important for the chelates of Eu+3 and Pr+3. The importance of contact terms is shown to change in a rather predictable manner with the structure of the amine. PMID:16592062

  9. Chemical structures of swine-manure chars produced under different carbonization conditions investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two types of swine manure chars, hydrothermally-produced hydrochar and slow-pyrolysis pyrochar, and their raw swine manure solid were characterized using advanced 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Compared with the parent raw swine manure, both hydrochars and pyrochar di...

  10. Investigations of enzymatic alterations of 2,4-dichlorophenol using {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance in combination with site-specific {sup 13}C-labeling: Understanding the environmental fate of this pollutant

    SciTech Connect

    Nanny, M.A.; Bortiatynski, J.M.; Tien, M.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1996-11-01

    The biodegradation of {sup 13}C-labeled 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP labeled at the C-2 and C-6 positions), in the presence and absence of natural organic matter (NOM), by the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, was examined using {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Using this method permitted the chemistry occurring at or near the labeled site to be followed. The formation of alkyl ethers and alkene ethers was observed. No aromatic by-products were detected, indicating that aromatic compounds are quickly degraded. Examining the reaction with time shows the exponential removal of 2,4-DCP and the consequential formation of labeled by-products, whose concentration reaches a maximum just before all 2,4-DCP is consumed. After this, the by-products degrade exponentially. The presence of NOM causes 2,4-DCP to be removed from the aqueous phase more quickly than in its absence and also causes the by-products to reach their maximum concentration much earlier. Degradation of the by-products occurs at a much greater rate in the presence of NOM. One hypothesis for this behavior is that the NOM interacts with 2,4-DCP and its by-products, allowing them to be incorporated into the fungal biomass. {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fungal biomass after NaOH extraction show the presence of alkanes and a small amount of 2,4-DCP.

  11. Characterization and quantitation of urinary metabolites of [1,2,3-13C]acrylamide in rats and mice using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sumner, S C; MacNeela, J P; Fennell, T R

    1992-01-01

    Acrylamide, widely used for the production of polymers and as a grouting agent, causes neurotoxic effects in humans and neurotoxic, genotoxic, reproductive, and carcinogenic effects in laboratory animals. In this study, 13C NMR spectroscopy was used to detect metabolites of acrylamide directly in the urine of rats and mice following administration of [1,2,3-13C]acrylamide (50 mg/kg po). Two-dimensional NMR experiments were used to correlate carbon signals for each metabolite in the urine samples and to determine the number of hydrogens attached to each carbon. Metabolite structures were identified from the NMR data together with calculated values of shift for biochemically feasible metabolites and by comparison with standards. The metabolites assigned in rat and mouse urine are N-acetyl-S-(3-amino-3-oxopropyl)cysteine, N-acetyl-S-(3-amino-2-hydroxy-3-oxopropyl)cysteine, N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxy-ethyl)cysteine, glycidamide, and 2,3-dihydroxypropionamide. These metabolites arise from direct conjugation of acrylamide with glutathione or from oxidation to the epoxide, glycidamide, and further metabolism. Acrylamide was also detected in the urine. Quantitation was carried out by integrating the metabolite carbon signals with respect to that of dioxane added at a known concentration. The major metabolite for both the rat (70% of total metabolites excreted) and the mouse (40%) was formed from direct conjugation of acrylamide with glutathione. The remaining metabolites for the rat (30%) and mouse (60%) are derived from glycidamide. The species differences in extent of metabolism through glycidamide may have important consequences for the toxic and carcinogenic effects of acrylamide. PMID:1581543

  12. Increasing Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Flux as a Treatment for Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: A Combined 13C Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance and Echocardiography Study

    PubMed Central

    Le Page, Lydia M.; Rider, Oliver J.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Ball, Vicky; Clarke, Kieran; Johansson, Edvin; Carr, Carolyn A.; Heather, Lisa C.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Although diabetic cardiomyopathy is widely recognised, there are no specific treatments available. Altered myocardial substrate selection has emerged as a candidate mechanism behind the development of cardiac dysfunction in diabetes. As pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity appears central to the balance of substrate utilisation, we aimed to investigate the relationship between PDH flux and myocardial function in a rodent model of type-II diabetes and to explore whether or not increasing PDH flux, with dichloroacetate, would restore the balance of substrate utilisation and improve cardiac function. All animals underwent in vivo hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopy and echocardiography to assess cardiac PDH flux and function respectively. Diabetic animals showed significantly higher blood glucose (10.8±0.7mM vs 8.4±0.5mM), lower PDH flux (0.005±0.001s−1 vs 0.017±0.002s−1) and significantly impaired diastolic function (E/E’ 12.2±0.8 vs 20±2) in keeping with early diabetic cardiomyopathy. Twenty-eight days treatment with dichloroacetate restored PDH flux to normal levels (0.018±0.002s−1), reversed diastolic dysfunction (E/E’ 14±1) and normalized blood glucose (7.5±0.7mM). Treatment of diabetes with dichloroacetate therefore restored the balance of myocardial substrate selection, reversed diastolic dysfunction and normalised blood glucose levels. This suggests that PDH modulation could be a novel therapy for the treatment and/or prevention of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25795215

  13. Use of 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance To Assess Fossil Fuel Biodegradation: Fate of [1-13C]Acenaphthene in Creosote Polycyclic Aromatic Compound Mixtures Degraded by Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Selifonov, Sergey A.; Chapman, Peter J.; Akkerman, Simon B.; Gurst, Jerome E.; Bortiatynski, Jacqueline M.; Nanny, Mark A.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    1998-01-01

    [1-13C]acenaphthene, a tracer compound with a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-active nucleus at the C-1 position, has been employed in conjunction with a standard broad-band-decoupled 13C-NMR spectroscopy technique to study the biodegradation of acenaphthene by various bacterial cultures degrading aromatic hydrocarbons of creosote. Site-specific labeling at the benzylic position of acenaphthene allows 13C-NMR detection of chemical changes due to initial oxidations catalyzed by bacterial enzymes of aromatic hydrocarbon catabolism. Biodegradation of [1-13C]acenaphthene in the presence of naphthalene or creosote polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) was examined with an undefined mixed bacterial culture (established by enrichment on creosote PACs) and with isolates of individual naphthalene- and phenanthrene-degrading strains from this culture. From 13C-NMR spectra of extractable materials obtained in time course biodegradation experiments under optimized conditions, a number of signals were assigned to accumulated products such as 1-acenaphthenol, 1-acenaphthenone, acenaphthene-1,2-diol and naphthalene 1,8-dicarboxylic acid, formed by benzylic oxidation of acenaphthene and subsequent reactions. Limited degradation of acenaphthene could be attributed to its oxidation by naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase or related dioxygenases, indicative of certain limitations of the undefined mixed culture with respect to acenaphthene catabolism. Coinoculation of the mixed culture with cells of acenaphthene-grown strain Pseudomonas sp. strain A2279 mitigated the accumulation of partial transformation products and resulted in more complete degradation of acenaphthene. This study demonstrates the value of the stable isotope labeling approach and its ability to reveal incomplete mineralization even when as little as 2 to 3% of the substrate is incompletely oxidized, yielding products of partial transformation. The approach outlined may prove useful in assessing bioremediation performance

  14. 1H, 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance coordination shifts in Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with phenylpyridines.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Tousek, Jaromír; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2009-08-01

    1H, 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance studies of gold(III), palladium(II) and platinum(II) chloride complexes with phenylpyridines (PPY: 4-phenylpyridine, 4ppy; 3-phenylpyridine, 3ppy; and 2-phenylpyridine, 2ppy) having the general formulae [Au(PPY)Cl3], trans-/cis-[Pd(PPY)2Cl2] and trans-/cis-[Pt(PPY)2Cl2] were performed and the respective chemical shifts (delta1H, delta13C and delta15N) reported. 1H, 13C and 15N coordination shifts (i.e. differences between chemical shifts of the same atom in the complex and ligand molecules: Delta(coord)(1H) = delta(complex)(1H)-delta(ligand)(1H), Delta(coord)(13C) = delta(complex)(13C)-delta(ligand)(13C), Delta(coord)(15N) = delta(complex)(15N)-delta(ligand)(15N)) were discussed in relation to the type of the central atom (Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(II)), geometry (trans-/cis-) and the position of a phenyl group in the pyridine ring system. PMID:19472306

  15. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of glucose and citrate end products in an ldhL-ldhD double-knockout strain of Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed Central

    Ferain, T; Schanck, A N; Delcour, J

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the metabolic consequences of knocking out the two ldh genes in Lactobacillus plantarum using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. Unlike its wild-type isogenic progenitor, which produced lactate as the major metabolite under all conditions tested, ldh null strain TF103 mainly produced acetoin. A variety of secondary end products were also found, including organic acids (acetate, succinate, pyruvate, and lactate), ethanol, 2,3-butanediol, and mannitol. PMID:8955418

  16. Detection of tannins in modern and fossil barks and in plant residues by high-resolution solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.A.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Bark samples isolated from brown coal deposits in Victoria, Australia, and buried wood from Rhizophora mangle have been studies by high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Dipolar dephasing 13C NMR appears to be a useful method of detecting the presence of tannins in geochemical samples including barks, buried woods, peats and leaf litter. It is shown that tannins are selectively preserved in bark during coalification to the brown coal stage. ?? 1988.

  17. Carbonic Anhydrase Activity Monitored In Vivo by Hyperpolarized 13C-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Demonstrates Its Importance for pH Regulation in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Ferdia A; Sladen, Helen; Kettunen, Mikko I; Serrao, Eva M; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Wright, Alan; Gill, Andrew B; McGuire, Sarah; Booth, Thomas C; Boren, Joan; McIntyre, Alan; Miller, Jodi L; Lee, Shen-Han; Honess, Davina; Day, Sam E; Hu, De-En; Howat, William J; Harris, Adrian L; Brindle, Kevin M

    2015-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase buffers tissue pH by catalyzing the rapid interconversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) and bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)). We assessed the functional activity of CAIX in two colorectal tumor models, expressing different levels of the enzyme, by measuring the rate of exchange of hyperpolarized (13)C label between bicarbonate (H(13)CO3(-)) and carbon dioxide ((13)CO2), following injection of hyperpolarized H(13)CO3(-), using (13)C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((13)C-MRS) magnetization transfer measurements. (31)P-MRS measurements of the chemical shift of the pH probe, 3-aminopropylphosphonate, and (13)C-MRS measurements of the H(13)CO3(-)/(13)CO2 peak intensity ratio showed that CAIX overexpression lowered extracellular pH in these tumors. However, the (13)C measurements overestimated pH due to incomplete equilibration of the hyperpolarized (13)C label between the H(13)CO3(-) and (13)CO2 pools. Paradoxically, tumors overexpressing CAIX showed lower enzyme activity using magnetization transfer measurements, which can be explained by the more acidic extracellular pH in these tumors and the decreased activity of the enzyme at low pH. This explanation was confirmed by administration of bicarbonate in the drinking water, which elevated tumor extracellular pH and restored enzyme activity to control levels. These results suggest that CAIX expression is increased in hypoxia to compensate for the decrease in its activity produced by a low extracellular pH and supports the hypothesis that a major function of CAIX is to lower the extracellular pH. PMID:26249175

  18. Germination of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ascospores without trehalose mobilization as revealed by in vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Donnini, C; Puglisi, P P; Vecli, A; Marmiroli, N

    1988-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae ascospores germinate in the presence of acetate without any detectable trehalose degradation, as revealed by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by a standard colorimetric assay. The results presented here substantiate the hypothesis that in S. cerevisiae trehalose supplies energy during dormancy of the spores and not during the germination process. PMID:3042762

  19. Solid-state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of simultaneously metabolized acetate and phenol in a soil Pseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Heiman, A.S.; Copper, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was made of the concentration-dependent primary and secondary substrate relationships in the simultaneous metabolism of the ubiquitous pollutant phenol and the naturally occurring substrate acetate by a Pseudomonas sp. soil isolate capable of utilizing either substance as a sole source of carbon and energy. In addition to conventional analytical techniques, solid-state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to follow the cellular distribution of (1-/sup 13/C)acetate in the presence of unlabeled phenol. These results suggest that, when phenol is present as the primary substrate, acetate is preferentially shuttled into fatty acyl chain synthesis, whereas phenol carbon is funnelled into the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Thus, simultaneous use of a xenobiotic compound and a natural substrate apparently does occur, and the relative concentrations of the two substrates do influence the rate and manner in which the compounds are utilized. These results also demonstrate the unique advantage of using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques combined with /sup 13/C labeling of specific sites in substrates when doing microbial degradation studies. In this work, the entire cellular biomass was examined directly without extensive extraction, fractionation, or isolation of subcellular units; thus, there is no uncertainty about chemical alteration of substrate metabolites as a result of these often harsh treatments.

  20. Enhanced forensic discrimination of pollutants by position-specific isotope analysis using isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Julien, Maxime; Nun, Pierrick; Höhener, Patrick; Parinet, Julien; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S

    2016-01-15

    In forensic environmental investigations the main issue concerns the inference of the original source of the pollutant for determining the liable party. Isotope measurements in geochemistry, combined with complimentary techniques for contaminant identification, have contributed significantly to source determination at polluted sites. In this work we have determined the intramolecular (13)C profiles of several molecules well-known as pollutants. By giving additional analytical parameters, position-specific isotope analysis performed by isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (irm-(13)C NMR) spectrometry gives new information to help in answering the major question: what is the origin of the detected contaminant? We have shown that isotope profiling of the core of a molecule reveals both the raw materials and the process used in its manufacture. It also can reveal processes occurring between the contamination site 'source' and the sampling site. Thus, irm-(13)C NMR is shown to be a very good complement to compound-specific isotope analysis currently performed by mass spectrometry for assessing polluted sites involving substantial spills of pollutant. PMID:26592622

  1. Non-invasive differentiation of benign renal tumors from clear cell renal cell carcinomas using clinically translatable hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Renuka; Van Criekinge, Mark; DeLos Santos, Justin; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Wilson, David M.; Peehl, Donna; Kurhanewicz, John; Wang, Zhen J.

    2016-01-01

    Localized renal tumors are increasingly detected incidentally at imaging. Conventional imaging cannot reliably differentiate the 20% of these tumors that are benign from malignant renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), leading to unnecessary surgical resection and resulting morbidity associated with surgery. Here, we investigated hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate metabolism in live patient-derived renal tumor tissue slices using a novel magnetic resonance (MR) -compatible bioreactor platform. We demonstrated for the first time that clear cell RCCs (ccRCCs), which account for 70–80% of all RCCs, have increased lactate production as well as rapid lactate efflux compared to benign renal tumors. This difference is attributed to increased lactate dehydrogenase A and monocarboxylate transporter 4 expression in ccRCCs. This distinctive metabolic phenotype can be used to differentiate RCCs from benign renal tumors using clinically translatable hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate MR. PMID:27227168

  2. High-resolution {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of phase transition of Rb,Cs-intercalated single-walled nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhrara, M.; Saih, Y.; Waagberg, T.; Goze-Bac, C.; Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-09-01

    We present 13 C high-resolution magic-angle-turning (MAT) and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance data of Cs and Rb intercalated single walled carbon nanotubes. We find two distinct phases at different intercalation levels. A simple charge transfer is applicable at low intercalation level. The new phase at high intercalation level is accompanied by a hybridization of alkali (s) orbitals with the carbon (sp2) orbitals of the single walled nanotubes, which indicate bundle surface sites is the most probable alkali site.

  3. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-06-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive (13)C/(15)N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of (13)C/(15)N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% (13)C-glycerol and 0.5% (15)N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of (13)C/(15)N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state. PMID:25795666

  4. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly 13C/15N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive 13C/15N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of 13C/15N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% 13C-glycerol and 0.5% 15N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of 13C/15N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state. PMID:25795666

  5. Phase transition in triglycine sulfate crystals by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance in the rotating frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Jeong, Se-Young

    2013-09-01

    The ferroelectric phase transition in triglycine sulfate ((NH2CH2COOH)3·H2SO4, TGS)) crystals, occurring at TC of 322 K, was studied using 1H and 13C CP/MAS NMR. From the spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame, T1ρ, of 1H and 13C, we found that the slopes of the T1ρ versus temperature curve changed near TC. In addition, the change of intensities for the protons and carbons NMR signals in the ferroelectric and the paraelectric phases led to the noticeable changes in the environments of proton and carbon in the carboxyl groups. The carboxyl ordering was the dominant factor driving the phase transition. Our study of the 1H and 13C spectra showed that the ferroelectric phase transition of TGS is of the order-disorder type due to ordering of the carboxyl groups.

  6. Direct proof by 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance of semi-purified extract and isolation of ent-Catechin from leaves of Eucalyptus cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Sayonara Mendes; Abe, Simone Yae; Bueno, Fernanda Giacomini; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Nakashima, Tomoe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Eucalyptus cinerea F. Muell. ex Benth. is native to Australia and acclimatized to Southern Brazil. Its aromatic leaves are used for ornamental purposes and have great potential for essential oil production, although reports of its use in folk medicine are few. Objective: This study evaluated the composition of E. cinerea leaves using the solid state 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and isolation of the compound from the semipurified extract (SE). Materials and Methods: The SE of E. cinerea leaves was evaluated in the solid state by 13C-NMR spectrum, and the SE was chromatographed on a Sephadex LH-20 column, followed by high-speed counter-current chromatography to isolate the compound. The SE was analyzed by 13C-NMR and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight spectra. Results: Flavan-3-ol units were present, suggesting the presence of proanthocyanidins as well as a gallic acid unit. The uncommon ent-catechin was isolated. Conclusion: The presence of ent-catechin is reported for the first time in this genus and species. PMID:25210302

  7. Analysis of Changes in Biochemical Composition Under Free-Air CO2 enrichment by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Leaf Litter, Roots, and Soils From Oak Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockaday, W. C.; Masiello, C. A.; Baldock, J. A.; Iversen, C. M.; Norby, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    Changes in plant biochemistry as a result of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [CO2] influence the cycling of the terrestrial carbon pool and thereby constitute a climate feedback. We have investigated molecular-level changes in the chemical composition of the organic carbon pool of a deciduous forest in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, after 9 years of free-air CO2 enrichment. We employ a novel approach based upon solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis and application of a molecular mixing model. This method generates quantitative estimates of total lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lignin. 13C NMR spectra were acquired for acid-insoluble soil organic matter from depths of 0 - 5 cm and 5 - 15 cm in two ambient and two elevated [CO2] treatments. In the upper 5 cm, elevated [CO2] soils show a 7% increase in lignin, while lipids and proteins decrease by approximately 10%. Below 5 cm, soil lipid content decreased by 15% relative to ambient [CO2] soils. Changes in the composition of the SOM pool may be attributed to changes in plant biochemistry under elevated [CO2]. Therefore we have performed 13C NMR analysis of major aboveground and belowground biomass inputs: senesced leaves and fine roots (<1 mm diameter). Significant [CO2] effects on root chemistry are observed. Based upon these data, we are able to make a preliminary assessment of the contributions of leaf C and root C to changes in the molecular composition of the SOM pool.

  8. Single-carbon catabolism in acetogens: analysis of carbon flow in Acetobacterium woodii and Butyribacterium methylotrophicum by fermentation and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance measurement.

    PubMed Central

    Kerby, R; Niemczura, W; Zeikus, J G

    1983-01-01

    The catabolism of methanol, formate, or carbon monoxide to acetate or butyrate or both was examined in two acetogenic bacteria. Butyribacterium methylotrophicum simultaneously transformed methanol and formate mainly to butyrate with concomitant H2 and CO2 production and consumption. In contrast, methanol plus CO was primarily converted to acetate, and only slight amounts of CO2 were produced. In vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of [13C]methanol transformation by B. methylotrophicum indicated that methanol was predominantly incorporated into the methyl of acetate. 13CO2 was produced and then consumed, and butyrate was formed from the condensation of two acetate precursors. The analysis of the position of acetate labeled by a given 13C single-carbon substrate when B. methylotrophicum or Acetobacterium woodii was grown in the presence of a second one-carbon substrate indicated two trends: when methanol was consumed, CO, CO2, or formate predominantly labeled the acetate carboxyl; when CO was consumed, CO2 and formate were principally funneled into the acetate methyl group, and CO remained a better carboxyl precursor. These data suggest a model of acetate synthesis via the combined operation of two readily reversible single-carbon pathways which are linked by CO2. PMID:6411684

  9. Single-carbon catabolism in acetogens: analysis of carbon flow in Acetobacterium woodii and Butyribacterium methylotrophicum by fermentation and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance measurement.

    PubMed

    Kerby, R; Niemczura, W; Zeikus, J G

    1983-09-01

    The catabolism of methanol, formate, or carbon monoxide to acetate or butyrate or both was examined in two acetogenic bacteria. Butyribacterium methylotrophicum simultaneously transformed methanol and formate mainly to butyrate with concomitant H2 and CO2 production and consumption. In contrast, methanol plus CO was primarily converted to acetate, and only slight amounts of CO2 were produced. In vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of [13C]methanol transformation by B. methylotrophicum indicated that methanol was predominantly incorporated into the methyl of acetate. 13CO2 was produced and then consumed, and butyrate was formed from the condensation of two acetate precursors. The analysis of the position of acetate labeled by a given 13C single-carbon substrate when B. methylotrophicum or Acetobacterium woodii was grown in the presence of a second one-carbon substrate indicated two trends: when methanol was consumed, CO, CO2, or formate predominantly labeled the acetate carboxyl; when CO was consumed, CO2 and formate were principally funneled into the acetate methyl group, and CO remained a better carboxyl precursor. These data suggest a model of acetate synthesis via the combined operation of two readily reversible single-carbon pathways which are linked by CO2. PMID:6411684

  10. Topographical analysis of regulatory and metal ion binding sites on glutamine synthetase from Escherichia coli: 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence energy transfer study

    PubMed Central

    Villafranca, J. J.; Rhee, S. G.; Chock, P. B.

    1978-01-01

    The paramagnetic effect of Mn(II) on 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance signals from the [2-13C]ATP adenylylated glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming); EC 6.3.1.2] from Escherichia coli was measured. This effect permitted the determination of distances from the 2-C position and the phosphorus of covalently bound AMP to the two Mn(II) binding sites, n1 and n2. Binding of Mn(II) to the n1 site converts an inactive apo-enzyme to its active form, while the metal ion bound at n2 occupies the metal-nucleotide substrate site. The distances from Mn(II) at the n1 and n2 sites to phosphorus are ∼10 and ∼7 Å and to the 2-C position of the adenine ring are ∼12 and ∼11 Å, respectively. The fluorescence energy transfer method was used to determine distances between Co(II) at n1 and n2 and the adenylyl site. For this experiment the enzyme was adenylylated with ε-ATP. The distances between ε-adenine and Co(II) at n1 and n2 are ∼13 and ∼11 Å, respectively. Quantitation of the paramagnetic effect due to Co(II) on the 31P nuclear magnetic resonance signal yielded values of 8 and 6 Å for the distances between the phosphorus of the covalently bound AMP and the n1 and n2 sites, respectively. The results reveal that the covalent modification site is very close to the catalytic center of the enzyme. In this study both nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence energy transfer techniques have been used to determine distances between the same set of sites on an enzyme surface. PMID:26053

  11. Conformation of gramicidin A channel in phospholipid vesicles: a 13C and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, S; Wallace, B A; Blout, E R; Morrow, J S; Veatch, W

    1979-01-01

    We have determined the conformation of the channel-forming polypeptide antibiotic gramicidin A in phosphatidylcholine vesicles by using 13C and 19F NMR spectroscopy. The models previously proposed for the conformation of the dimer channel differ in the surface localization of the NH2 and COOH termini. We have incorporated specific 13C and 19F nuclei at both the NH2, and COOH termini of gramicidin and have used 13C and 19F chemical shifts and spin lattice relaxation time measurements to determine the accessibility of these labels to three paramagnetic NMR probes--two in aqueous solution and one attached to the phosphatidylcholine fatty acid chain9 all of our results indicate that the COOH terminus of gramicidin in the channel is located near the surface of the membrane and the NH2 terminus is buried deep within the lipid bilayer. These findings strongly favor an NH2-terminal to NH2-terminal helical dimer as the major conformation for the gramicidin channel in phosphatidylcholine vesicles. PMID:92025

  12. Estimates of Oil and Gas Potential of Source Rock by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbottom, T. L.; Hockaday, W. C.; Boling, K. S.; Dworkin, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Kerogen is defined as the insoluble fraction of organic matter preserved in sediments. Due to its structural complexity, kerogen is poorly understood, yet it holds vast economic importance as petroleum source rock, and represents the largest organic carbon pool on earth. Kerogen originates from a mixture of organic biomolecules and tends to be dominated by the polymeric components of cell walls and cellular membranes, which undergo interactions with sedimentary minerals at elevated temperature and pressure upon burial. Due to the importance of burial diagenesis to petroleum formation, much of our knowledge of chemical properties of kerogens is related to diagenetic and catagenetic effects. The more common geochemical evaluations of the oil and gas potentials of source rock are based upon proximate analyses such as hydrogen and oxygen indices and thermal stability indices, such as those provided by Fisher assay and Rock Eval®. However, proximate analyses provide limited information regarding the chemical structure of kerogens, and therefore provide little insight to the processes of kerogen formation. NMR spectra of kerogen have been previously shown to be useful in estimating oil and gas potential, and the proposed study seeks to refine nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool in kerogen characterization, specifically for the purpose of oil and gas potential calculations.

  13. 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Electron Paramagnetic Spectroscopic Comparison of Hydrophobic Acid, Transphilic Acid, and Reverse Osmosis May 2012 Isolates of Organic Matter from the Suwannee River

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Ugwumsinachi G.; Cook, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is found in most natural waters at concentrations low enough to make DOM isolation methodologies critical to full analytical characterization and preservation. During the last few decades, two major protocols have been developed for the extraction of DOM isolates from natural waters. These methods utilize XAD resins and reverse osmosis (RO). In this work, the hydrophobic acid (May 2012 HPOA) and transphilic acid (May 2012 TPIA) isolates from XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins, respectively, were compared with the RO (May 2012 RO) natural organic matter isolate of the Suwannee River water using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. 13C NMR analysis showed that the May 2012 RO isolate could be viewed as a hybrid of the more hydrophobic May 2012 HPOA isolate and more hydrophilic May 2012 TPIA isolate. The May 2012 HPOA isolate is shown to be higher in alkyl and aromatic moieties, while the May 2012 TPIA isolate is higher in O-alkyl moieties. EPR analysis revealed that the May 2012 TPIA and, in particular, May 2012 HPOA isolates had higher radical concentrations than the May 2012 RO isolate. It is postulated that some of the radical concentrations came from the use of base during the isolation procedures, especially in the XAD method. PMID:25565761

  14. The Contribution of Blood Lactate to Brain Energy Metabolism in Humans Measured by Dynamic 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    BOUMEZBEUR, Fawzi; PETERSEN, Kitt F.; CLINE, Gary W.; MASON, Graeme F.; BEHAR, Kevin L; SHULMAN, Gerald I.; ROTHMAN, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether plasma lactate can be a significant fuel for human brain energy metabolism infusions of [3-13C]lactate and 1H-13C polarization transfer spectroscopy were used to detect the entry and utilization of lactate. During the 2-hour infusion study, 13C incorporation in the amino acid pools of glutamate and glutamine were measured with a 5 minutes time-resolution. With a plasma concentration ([Lac]P) being in the 0.8–2.8 mmol/L range, the tissue lactate concentration ([Lac]B) was assessed as well as the fractional contribution of lactate to brain energy metabolism (CMRlac). From the measured relationship between unidirectional lactate influx (Vin) and plasma and brain lactate concentrations lactate transport constants were calculated using a reversible Michaelis-Menten model. The results show (i) that in the physiological range plasma lactate unidirectional transport (Vin) and concentration in tissue increases close to linearly with the lactate concentration in plasma, (ii) the maximum potential contribution of plasma lactate to brain metabolism is 10% under basal plasma lactate conditions of ~ 1.0 mmol/L and as much as 60% at supra-physiological plasma lactate concentrations when the transporters are saturated, (iii) the half-saturation constant KT is 5.1±2.7 mmol/L and VMAX is 0.40±0.13 μmol/g/min (68% confidence interval), (iv) the majority of plasma lactate is metabolized in neurons similar to glucose. PMID:20962220

  15. Fragment-based {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals: An alternative to planewave methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Joshua D.; Beran, Gregory J. O.; Monaco, Stephen; Schatschneider, Bohdan

    2015-09-14

    We assess the quality of fragment-based ab initio isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shift predictions for a collection of 25 molecular crystals with eight different density functionals. We explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, combined cluster/fragment, and the planewave gauge-including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) models relative to experiment. When electrostatic embedding is employed to capture many-body polarization effects, the simple and computationally inexpensive two-body fragment model predicts both isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shifts and the chemical shielding tensors as well as both cluster models and the GIPAW approach. Unlike the GIPAW approach, hybrid density functionals can be used readily in a fragment model, and all four hybrid functionals tested here (PBE0, B3LYP, B3PW91, and B97-2) predict chemical shifts in noticeably better agreement with experiment than the four generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals considered (PBE, OPBE, BLYP, and BP86). A set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided based on these benchmark calculations. Statistical cross-validation procedures are used to demonstrate the robustness of these fits.

  16. Detection of poly(ethylene glycol) residues from nonionic surfactants in surface water by1h and13c nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Brown, P.A.; Noyes, T.I.

    1991-01-01

    ??? Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) residues were detected in organic solute isolates from surface water by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), 13C NMR spectrometry, and colorimetric assay. PEG residues were separated from natural organic solutes in Clear Creek, CO, by a combination of methylation and chromatographic procedures. The isolated PEG residues, characterized by NMR spectrometry, were found to consist of neutral and acidic residues that also contained poly(propylene glycol) moieties. The 1H NMR and the colorimetric assays for poly(ethylene glycol) residues were done on samples collected in the lower Mississippi River and tributaries between St. Louis, MO, and New Orleans, LA, in July-August and November-December 1987. Aqueous concentrations for poly(ethylene glycol) residues based on colorimetric assay ranged from undetectable to ???28 ??g/L. Concentrations based on 1H NMR spectrometry ranged from undetectable to 145 ??g/L.

  17. Detection of poly(ethylene glycol) residues from nonionic surfactants in surface water by sup 1 H and sup 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R.L.; Brown, P.A.; Noyes, T.I. )

    1991-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) residues were detected in organic solute isolates from surface water by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry, and colorimetric assay. PEG residues were separated from natural organic solutes in Clear Creek, CO, by a combination of methylation and chromatographic procedures. The isolated PEG residues, characterized by NMR spectrometry, were found to consist of neutral and acidic residues that also contained poly(propylene glycol) moieties. The {sup 1}H NMR and the colorimetric assays for poly(ethylene glycol) residues were done on samples collected in the lower Mississippi River and tributaries between S. Louis, MO, and New Orleans, LA, in July-August and November-December 1987. Aqueous concentrations for poly(ethylene glycol) residues based on colorimetric assay ranged from undetectable to {approximately}28 {mu}g/L. Concentrations based on {sup 1}H NMR spectrometry ranged from undetectable to 145 {mu}g/L.

  18. Validation of the In Vivo Assessment of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Activity Using Hyperpolarized 13C-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Michael S.; Heather, Lisa C.; Carter, Emma E.; Cochlin, Lowri E.; Nagel, Simon; Sibson, Nicola R.; Radda, George K.; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Many diseases of the heart are characterised by changes in substrate utilisation, which is in part regulated by the activity of the enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). Consequently, there is much interest in the in vivo evaluation of PDH activity in a range of physiological and pathological states to obtain information regarding the metabolic mechanisms of cardiac diseases. Hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate, detected using MRS, is a novel technique for evaluating PDH flux non-invasively. PDH flux has been assumed to directly reflect in vivo PDH activity, although to date this assumption remains unproven. Methods Control animals and animals undergoing interventions known to modulate PDH activity, namely high fat feeding and dichloroacetate infusion, were used to investigate the relationship between in vivo hyperpolarized MRS measurements of PDH flux and ex vivo measurements of PDH enzyme activity (PDHa). Further, the plasma concentrations of pyruvate and other important metabolites were evaluated following pyruvate infusion to assess the metabolic consequences of the pyruvate infusion during hyperpolarized MRS experiments. Results Hyperpolarized MRS measurements of PDH flux significantly correlated with ex vivo measurements of PDHa, confirming that PDH activity directly influences the in vivo flux of hyperpolarized pyruvate through cardiac PDH. The maximum plasma concentration of pyruvate reached during hyperpolarized MRS experiments was ~250 μM, equivalent to physiological pyruvate concentrations reached during exercise or with dietary interventions. Concentrations of other metabolites, including lactate, glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), did not vary during the 60 s following pyruvate infusion. Hence, during the 60 s data acquisition period, metabolism was minimally affected by pyruvate infusion. PMID:20799252

  19. Comparative Analysis of the Chemical Composition of Mixed and Pure Cultures of Green Algae and Their Decomposed Residues by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zelibor, J. L.; Romankiw, L.; Hatcher, P. G.; Colwell, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    It is known that macromolecular organic matter in aquatic environments, i.e., humic substances, is highly aliphatic. These aliphatic macromolecules, predominantly paraffinic in structure, are prevalent in marine and lacustrine sediments and are believed to originate from algae or bacteria. A comparative study of mixed and pure cultures of green algae and their decomposed residues was performed by using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as the primary analytical method. Results obtained in this study confirm the presence of components that are chemically refractory and that are defined as alghumin and hydrolyzed alghumin. These were detected in heterogeneous, homogeneous, and axenic biomasses composed of several genera of Chlorophyta. Although the chemical composition of algal biomass varied with culture conditions, the chemical structure of the alghumin and hydrolyzed alghumin, demonstrated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy appeared to be constant for members of the Chlorophyta examined in this study. The alghumin was dominated by carbohydrate-carbon, with minor amounts of amide or carboxyl carbon and paraffinic carbon, the latter surviving strong hydrolysis by 6 N HCI (hydrolyzed alghumin). Bacterial decomposition of heterogeneous algal biomass labeled with 13C was conducted under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions to determine chemical structure and stability of the refractory material. The refractory fraction ranged from 33% in aerobic to 44% in anaerobic cultures. The refractory fraction recovered from either aerobic or anaerobic degradation comprised 40% alghumin, which represented an enrichment by 10% relative to the proportion of alghumin derived from whole cells of algae. The paraffinic component in the hydrolyzed alghumin of whole algal cells was found to be 1.8% and increased to 5.1 and 6.9% after aerobic and anaerobic bacterial degradation, respectively. It is concluded that members of the Chlorophyta contain a

  20. Metabolic pathway for propionate utilization by phosphorus-accumulating organisms in activated sludge: 13C labeling and in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Paulo C; Serafim, Luísa S; Santos, Margarida M; Reis, Maria A M; Santos, Helena

    2003-01-01

    In vivo 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to study propionate metabolism by activated sludge in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems. The fate of label supplied in [3-13C]propionate was monitored in living cells subjected to anaerobic/aerobic cycles. During the anaerobic phase, propionate was converted to polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) with the following monomer composition: hydroxyvalerate, 74.2%; hydroxymethylvalerate, 16.9%; hydroxymethylbutyrate, 8.6%; and hydroxybutyrate, 0.3%. The isotopic enrichment in the different carbon atoms of hydroxyvalerate (HV) produced during the first anaerobic stage was determined: HV5, 59%; HV4, 5.0%; HV3, 1.1%; HV2, 3.5%; and HV1, 2.8%. A large proportion of the supplied label ended up on carbon C-5 of HV, directly derived from the pool of propionyl-coenzyme A (CoA), which is primarily labeled on C-3; useful information on the nature of operating metabolic pathways was provided by the extent of labeling on C-1, C-2, and C-4. The labeling pattern on C-1 and C-2 was explained by the conversion of propionyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA via succinyl-CoA and the left branch of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which involves scrambling of label between the inner carbons of succinate. This constitutes solid evidence for the operation of succinate dehydrogenase under anaerobic conditions. The labeling in HV4 is explained by backflux from succinate to propionyl-CoA. The involvement of glycogen in the metabolism of propionate was also demonstrated; moreover, it was shown that the acetyl moiety to the synthesis of PHA was derived preferentially from glycogen. According to the proposed metabolic scheme, the decarboxylation of pyruvate is coupled to the production of hydrogen, and the missing reducing equivalents should be derived from a source other than glycogen metabolism. PMID:12514001

  1. Carbon flux analysis by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to determine the effect of CO2 on anaerobic succinate production by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Radoš, Dušica; Turner, David L; Fonseca, Luís L; Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Blombach, Bastian; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2014-05-01

    Wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum produces a mixture of lactic, succinic, and acetic acids from glucose under oxygen deprivation. We investigated the effect of CO2 on the production of organic acids in a two-stage process: cells were grown aerobically in glucose, and subsequently, organic acid production by nongrowing cells was studied under anaerobic conditions. The presence of CO2 caused up to a 3-fold increase in the succinate yield (1 mol per mol of glucose) and about 2-fold increase in acetate, both at the expense of l-lactate production; moreover, dihydroxyacetone formation was abolished. The redistribution of carbon fluxes in response to CO2 was estimated by using (13)C-labeled glucose and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of the labeling patterns in end products. The flux analysis showed that 97% of succinate was produced via the reductive part of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, with the low activity of the oxidative branch being sufficient to provide the reducing equivalents needed for the redox balance. The flux via the pentose phosphate pathway was low (~5%) regardless of the presence or absence of CO2. Moreover, there was significant channeling of carbon to storage compounds (glycogen and trehalose) and concomitant catabolism of these reserves. The intracellular and extracellular pools of lactate and succinate were measured by in vivo NMR, and the stoichiometry (H(+):organic acid) of the respective exporters was calculated. This study shows that it is feasible to take advantage of natural cellular regulation mechanisms to obtain high yields of succinate with C. glutamicum without genetic manipulation. PMID:24610842

  2. Carbon Flux Analysis by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance To Determine the Effect of CO2 on Anaerobic Succinate Production by Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Radoš, Dušica; Turner, David L.; Fonseca, Luís L.; Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Blombach, Bastian; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.; Neves, Ana Rute

    2014-01-01

    Wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum produces a mixture of lactic, succinic, and acetic acids from glucose under oxygen deprivation. We investigated the effect of CO2 on the production of organic acids in a two-stage process: cells were grown aerobically in glucose, and subsequently, organic acid production by nongrowing cells was studied under anaerobic conditions. The presence of CO2 caused up to a 3-fold increase in the succinate yield (1 mol per mol of glucose) and about 2-fold increase in acetate, both at the expense of l-lactate production; moreover, dihydroxyacetone formation was abolished. The redistribution of carbon fluxes in response to CO2 was estimated by using 13C-labeled glucose and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of the labeling patterns in end products. The flux analysis showed that 97% of succinate was produced via the reductive part of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, with the low activity of the oxidative branch being sufficient to provide the reducing equivalents needed for the redox balance. The flux via the pentose phosphate pathway was low (∼5%) regardless of the presence or absence of CO2. Moreover, there was significant channeling of carbon to storage compounds (glycogen and trehalose) and concomitant catabolism of these reserves. The intracellular and extracellular pools of lactate and succinate were measured by in vivo NMR, and the stoichiometry (H+:organic acid) of the respective exporters was calculated. This study shows that it is feasible to take advantage of natural cellular regulation mechanisms to obtain high yields of succinate with C. glutamicum without genetic manipulation. PMID:24610842

  3. Ascorbic acid prolongs the viability and stability of isolated perfused lungs: A mechanistic study using 31P and hyperpolarized 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Shaghaghi, Hoora; Kadlecek, Stephen; Siddiqui, Sarmad; Pourfathi, Mehrdad; Hamedani, Hooman; Clapp, Justin; Profka, Harrilla; Rizi, Rahim

    2015-12-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has recently shown promise as a means of more accurately gauging the health of lung grafts and improving graft performance post-transplant. However, reperfusion of ischemic lung promotes the depletion of high-energy compounds and a progressive loss of normal mitochondrial function, and it remains unclear how and to what extent the EVLP approach contributes to this metabolic decline. Although ascorbate has been used to mitigate the effects of ischemia-reperfusion injury, the nature of its effects during EVLP are also not clear. To address these uncertainties, this study monitored the energy status of lungs during EVLP and after the administration of ascorbate using (31)P and hyperpolarized (13)C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance). Our experiments demonstrated that the oxidative phosphorylation capacity and pyruvate dehydrogenase flux of lungs decline during ex vivo perfusion. The addition of ascorbate to the perfusate prolonged lung viability by 80% and increased the hyperpolarized (13)C bicarbonate signal by a factor of 2.7. The effect of ascorbate is apparently due not to its antioxidant quality but rather to its ability to energize cellular respiration given that it increased the lung's energy charge significantly, whereas other antioxidants (glutathione and α-lipoic acid) did not alter energy metabolism. During ascorbate administration, inhibition of mitochondrial complex I with rotenone depressed energy charge and shifted the metabolic state of the lung toward glycolysis; reenergizing the electron transport chain with TMPD (N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine) recovered metabolic activity. This indicates that ascorbate slows the decline of the ex vivo perfused lung's mitochondrial activity through an independent interaction with the electron transport chain complexes. PMID:26165188

  4. High altitude may alter oxygen availability and renal metabolism in diabetics as measured by hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Laustsen, Christoffer; Lycke, Sara; Palm, Fredrik; Østergaard, Jakob A; Bibby, Bo M; Nørregaard, Rikke; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Pedersen, Michael; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan H

    2014-07-01

    The kidneys account for about 10% of the whole body oxygen consumption, whereas only 0.5% of the total body mass. It is known that intrarenal hypoxia is present in several diseases associated with development of kidney disease, including diabetes, and when renal blood flow is unaffected. The importance of deranged oxygen metabolism is further supported by deterioration of kidney function in patients with diabetes living at high altitude. Thus, we argue that reduced oxygen availability alters renal energy metabolism. Here, we introduce a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to monitor metabolic changes associated with diabetes and oxygen availability. Streptozotocin diabetic and control rats were given reduced, normal, or increased inspired oxygen in order to alter tissue oxygenation. The effects on kidney oxygen metabolism were studied using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate MRI. Reduced inspired oxygen did not alter renal metabolism in the control group. Reduced oxygen availability in the diabetic kidney altered energy metabolism by increasing lactate and alanine formation by 23% and 34%, respectively, whereas the bicarbonate flux was unchanged. Thus, the increased prevalence and severity of nephropathy in patients with diabetes at high altitudes may originate from the increased sensitivity toward inspired oxygen. This increased lactate production shifts the metabolic routs toward hypoxic pathways. PMID:24352155

  5. /sup 18/O isotope effect in /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Part 9. Hydrolysis of benzyl phosphate by phosphatase enzymes and in acidic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Parente, J.E.; Risley, J.M.; Van Etten, R.L.

    1984-12-26

    The /sup 18/O isotope-induced shifts in /sup 13/C and /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to establish the position of bond cleavage in the phosphatase-catalyzed and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis reactions of benzyl phosphate. The application of the /sup 18/O-isotope effect in NMR spectroscopy affords a continuous, nondestructive assay method for following the kinetics and position of bond cleavage in the hydrolytic process. The technique provides advantages over most discontinuous methods in which the reaction components must be isolated and converted to volatile derivatives prior to analysis. In the present study, (..cap alpha..-/sup 13/C,ester-/sup 18/O)benzyl phosphate and (ester-/sup 18/O)benzyl phosphate were synthesized for use in enzymatic and nonenzymatic studies. Hydrolysis reactions catalyzed by the alkaline phosphatase from E. coli and by the acid phosphatases isolated from human prostate and human liver were all accompanied by cleavage of the substrate phosphorus-oxygen bond consistent with previously postulated mechanisms involving covalent phosphoenzyme intermediates. An extensive study of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of benzyl phosphate at 75/sup 0/C revealed that the site of bond cleavage is dependent on pH. At pH less than or equal to 1.3, the hydrolysis proceeds with C-O bond cleavage; at 1.3 < pH < 2.0, there is a mixture of C-O and P-O bond scission, the latter progressively predominating as the pH is raised; at pH greater than or equal to 2.0, the hydrolysis proceeds with exclusive P-O bond scission. (S)-(+)-(..cap alpha..-/sup 2/H)Benzyl phosphate was also synthesized. Hydrolysis of this chiral benzyl derivative demonstrated that the acid-catalyzed C-O bond scission of benzyl phosphate proceeds by an A-1 (S/sub N/1) mechanism with 70% racemization and 30% inversion at carbon. 37 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Chemical structures of coal lithotypes before and after CO2 adsorption as investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cao, X.; Mastalerz, Maria; Chappell, M.A.; Miller, L.F.; Li, Y.; Mao, J.

    2011-01-01

    Four lithotypes (vitrain, bright clarain, clarain, and fusain) of a high volatile bituminous Springfield Coal from the Illinois Basin were characterized using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR techniques included quantitative direct polarization/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS), cross polarization/total sideband suppression (CP/TOSS), dipolar dephasing, CHn selection, and recoupled C-H long-range dipolar dephasing techniques. The lithotypes that experienced high-pressure CO2 adsorption isotherm analysis were also analyzed to determine possible changes in coal structure as a result of CO2 saturation at high pressure and subsequent evacuation. The main carbon functionalities present in original vitrain, bright clarain, clarain and fusain were aromatic carbons (65.9%-86.1%), nonpolar alkyl groups (9.0%-28.9%), and aromatic C-O carbons (4.1%-9.5%). Among these lithotypes, aromaticity increased in the order of clarain, bright clarain, vitrain, and fusain, whereas the fraction of alkyl carbons decreased in the same order. Fusain was distinct from other three lithotypes in respect to its highest aromatic composition (86.1%) and remarkably small fraction of alkyl carbons (11.0%). The aromatic cluster size in fusain was larger than that in bright clarain. The lithotypes studied responded differently to high pressure CO2 saturation. After exposure to high pressure CO2, vitrain and fusain showed a decrease in aromaticity but an increase in the fraction of alkyl carbons, whereas bright clarain and clarain displayed an increase in aromaticity but a decrease in the fraction of alkyl carbons. Aromatic fused-rings were larger for bright clarain but smaller for fusain in the post-CO2 adsorption samples compared to the original lithotypes. These observations suggested chemical CO2-coal interactions at high pressure and the selectivity of lithotypes in response to CO2 adsorption. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of interaction of ligands with Streptococcus faecium dihydrofolate reductase labeled with (. gamma. -/sup 13/C)tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.E.; Groff, J.P.; Cocco, L.; Blakley, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase from Streptococcus faecium has been labeled with (..gamma..-/sup 13/C)tryptophan. We have determined changes occurring in the chemical shifts and line widths of the four resonances of the /sup 13/C NMR spectrum of the labeled enzyme, due to its interaction with various ligands. These include the coenzyme, NPDPH and related nucleotides, folate and its polyglutamate derivatives, and many inhibitors including methotrexate and trimethoprim. In addition, paramagnetic relaxation effects produced by a bound spin-labeled analogue of 2'-phosphoadenosine-5'-diphosphoribose on the tryptophan C/sup ..gamma../ carbons have been measured. Distances calculated from the relaxation data have been compared with corresponding distances in the crystallographic model of the NADPH-methotrexate ternary complex of Lactobacillus casei reductase. The paramagnetic relaxation data indicate that the two downfield resonances (1 and 2) correspond to tryptophans (W/sub A/ and W/sub B/) that are more remote from the catalytic site, and from the crystallographic model these are seen to be Trp-115 and Trp-160. The upfield resonances (3 and 4) that show broadening due to chemical exchange correspond to closer residues (W/sub C/ and W/sub D/), and these are identified with Trp-6 and Trp-22. However, the relaxation data do not permit specific assignments within the nearer and farther pairs. Although resonance 3, which is split due to chemical exchange, was formerly assigned to Trp-6, data obtained for the enzyme in the presence of various ligands are better interpreted if resonance 3 is assigned to Trp-22, which is located on a loop that joins elements of secondary structure and forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity.

  8. A low calorie morning meal prevents the decline of hepatic glycogen stores: a pilot in vivo (13)C magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Bawden, S J; Stephenson, M C; Ciampi, E; Hunter, K; Marciani, L; Spiller, R C; Aithal, G P; Morris, P G; Macdonald, I A; Gowland, P A

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have reported a meal-induced rise in hepatic glycogen stores from baseline levels following a fast and it is generally assumed that glycogen levels rise steadily following meals throughout the day. However, measurements are normally taken in conditions that are not typical of the Western breakfast, which is relatively carbohydrate rich with a lower calorific content than most experimental test meals. As such, little is known about the normal metabolic response to a realistic, low calorie morning meal. Therefore, the aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effects of a low dose oral glucose intake on hepatic glycogen levels following an overnight fast in healthy subjects. Glycogen levels were monitored in vivo using (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy at baseline and hourly for 4 hours following either a 50 g glucose drink (773 kJ) or a control drink (0 kJ) given over two different visits. During the control visit hepatic glycogen levels decreased throughout the experiment with statistically significant decreases from baseline at 190 minutes (P < 0.05) and 250 minutes (P < 0.05). By contrast, the low dose glucose intake maintained glycogen concentrations with no significant decrease from baseline over 4 hours. A comparison between visits revealed that mean glycogen concentrations were significantly greater during the glucose visit (control visit, AUC = 218 ± 39 mol L(-1) min(-1); glucose visit, AUC = 305 ± 49 mol L(-1) min(-1); P < 0.05). Liver volume decreased significantly from baseline at 180 minutes (P < 0.05) post consumption in both groups, with no significant difference found between visits. Gastric content volumes were significantly higher for the glucose visit immediately following consumption (P < 0.001) and at 60 minutes (P = 0.007) indicating slower gastric emptying for the glucose compared with the control. In conclusion, following an overnight fast, a low dose oral glucose challenge prevents a reduction in hepatic glycogen

  9. In Vivo13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Human Brain on a Clinical 3 Tesla Scanner Using [2-13C]Glucose Infusion and Low Power Stochastic Decoupling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shizhe; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Shumin; Yang, Jehoon; Araneta, Maria Ferraris; Farris, Amanda; Johnson, Christopher; Fox, Stephen; Innis, Robert; Shen, Jun

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the detection of [2-13C]glucose metabolism in the carboxylic/amide region in the human brain, and demonstrates that the cerebral metabolism of [2-13C]glucose can be studied in human subjects in the presence of severe hardware constraints of widely available 3 T clinical scanners and with low power stochastic decoupling. In the carboxylic/amide region of human brain, the primary products of 13C label incorporation from [2-13C]glucose into glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, γ-aminobutyric acid, and N-acetylaspartate were detected. Unlike the commonly used alkanyl region where lipid signals spread over a broad frequency range, the carboxylic carbon signal of lipids was found to be confined to a narrow range centered at 172.5 ppm and present no spectral interference in the absence of lipid suppression. Comparison using phantoms shows that stochastic decoupling is far superior than the commonly used WALTZ sequence at very low decoupling power at 3 T. It was found that glutamine C1 and C5 can be decoupled using stochastic decoupling at 2.2 W although glutamine protons span a frequency range of ∼700 Hz. Detailed specific absorption rate analysis was also performed using finite difference time domain numerical simulation. PMID:19526500

  10. {sup 13}C, {sup 1}H, {sup 6}Li magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and Fourier transform infrared study of intercalation electrodes based in ultrasoft carbons obtained below 3100 K

    SciTech Connect

    Alcantara, R.; Madrigal, F.J.F.; Lavela, P.; Tirado, J.L.; Mateos, J.M.J.; Stoyanova, R.; Zhecheva, E.

    1999-01-01

    The past decade has seen an important development of materials for high-performance energy storage systems. Particularly, the field of electrode materials for advanced lithium batteries has attracted the interest of numerous researchers. Petroleum coke samples of different origins and heat treated at different temperatures below 3100 K have been studied by spectroscopic and electrochemical procedures. According to {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (IR), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data, aromatic compounds and surface OH groups are present in green coke samples. The preparation of CMB (combustible) sample from 1673 K leads to a low-temperature graphitization process, as shown by the occurrence of multiphase products containing both turbostatic and graphitized solid. This process is accompanied by the loss of aromatic compounds and surface hydroxyls. The optimization of the lithium intercalation electrodes based in the green coke materials was carried out by thermal treatment at 1023 K under dynamic vacuum conditions. Such pretreatment of the electrode material leads to marked enhancement of reversible capacities without the higher temperatures usually required for other soft carbon materials. Finally, the results of {sup 6}Li MAS NMR and EPR have been correlated with the experimental determination of lithium diffusion coefficients and surface properties. On the basis of these results, spin resonance spectroscopies are found to be a powerful tool to discern between the different petroleum coke samples to select the active electrode material with best performance.

  11. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the biosynthesis by Microbacterium ammoniaphilum of L-glutamate selectively enriched with carbon-13

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.E.; Han, C.H.; Kollman, V.H.; London, R.E.; Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1982-02-10

    /sup 13/C NMR of isotopically enriched metabolites has been used to study the metabolism of Microbacterium ammoniaphilum, a bacterium which excretes large quantities of L-glutamic acid into the medium. Biosynthesis from 90% (1-/sup 13/C) glucose results in relatively high specificity of the label, with (2,4-/sup 13/C/sub 2/) glutamate as the major product. The predominant biosynthetic pathway for synthesis of glutamate from glucose was determined to be the Embden Meyerhof glycolytic pathway followed by P-enolpyruvate carboxylase and the first third of the Krebs cycle. Different metabolic pathways are associated with different correlations in the enrichment of the carbons, reflected in the spectrum as different /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C scalar multiplet intensities. Hence, intensity and /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C multiplet analysis allows quantitation of the pathways involved. Although blockage of the Krebs cycle at the ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase step is the basis for the accumulation of glutamate, significant Krebs cycle activity was found in glucose grown cells, and extensive Krebs cycle activity in cells metabolizing (1-/sup 13/C) acetate. In addition to the observation of the expected metabolites, the disaccharide ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-trehalose and ..cap alpha..,..beta..-glucosylamine were identified from the /sup 13/C NMR spectra.

  12. 13C and 199Hg nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of alkenemercurinium ions: Effect of methyl substituents on 199Hg chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Garcia-Luna, Armando

    1980-01-01

    The long-lived ethylene, cyclohexene, and norbornenemercurinium ions prepared in superacidic, low-nucleophilic media have been studied by 13C and 199Hg NMR spectroscopy. The norbornenemercurinium ion shows temperature-dependent 13C and 199Hg NMR spectra, consistent with equilibration via rapid hydride and Wagner-Meerwin shifts. The 199Hg NMR shifts of a series of alkylmercury bromides were also obtained in order to elucidate the effect of methyl substituents on 199Hg NMR chemical shifts. PMID:16592870

  13. Magnetic susceptibility effects on 13C MAS NMR spectra of carbon materials and graphite.

    PubMed

    Freita, J C; Emmerich, F G; Cernicchiaro, G R; Sampaio, L C; Bonagamba, T J

    2001-01-01

    13C high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study carbon materials prepared through the thermal decomposition of four different organic precursors (rice hulls, endocarp of babassu coconut, peat, and PVC). For heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) above about 600 C, all materials presented 13C NMR spectra composed of a unique resonance line associated with carbon atoms in aromatic planes. With increasing HTT a continuous broadening of this resonance and a diamagnetic shift in its central frequency were verified for all samples. The evolution of the magnitude and anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of the heat-treated carbon samples with HTT explains well these findings. It is shown that these results are better understood when a comparison is made with the features of the 13C NMR spectrum of polycrystalline graphite, for which the magnetic susceptibility effect is also present and is much more pronounced. PMID:11529420

  14. Monitoring tumor response of prostate cancer to radiation therapy by multi-parametric 1H and hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Vickie Yi

    Radiation therapy is one of the most common curative therapies for patients with localized prostate cancer, but despite excellent success rates, a significant number of patients suffer post- treatment cancer recurrence. The accurate characterization of early tumor response remains a major challenge for the clinical management of these patients. Multi-parametric MRI/1H MR spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) has been shown to increase the diagnostic performance in evaluating the effectiveness of radiation therapy. 1H MRSI can detect altered metabolic profiles in cancerous tissue. In this project, the concentrations of prostate metabolites from snap-frozen biopsies of recurrent cancer after failed radiation therapy were correlated with histopathological findings to identify quantitative biomarkers that predict for residual aggressive versus indolent cancer. The total choline to creatine ratio was significantly higher in recurrent aggressive versus indolent cancer, suggesting that use of a higher threshold tCho/Cr ratio in future in vivo 1H MRSI studies could improve the selection and therapeutic planning for patients after failed radiation therapy. Varying radiation doses may cause a diverse effect on prostate cancer micro-environment and metabolism, which could hold the key to improving treatment protocols for individual patients. The recent development and clinical translation of hyperpolarized 13C MRI have provided the ability to monitor both changes in the tumor micro-environment and its metabolism using a multi-probe approach, [1-13C]pyruvate and 13C urea, combined with 1H Multi-parametric MRI. In this thesis, hyperpolarized 13C MRI, 1H dynamic contrast enhancement, and diffusion weighted imaging were used to identify early radiation dose response in a transgenic prostate cancer model. Hyperpolarized pyruvate to lactate metabolism significantly decreased in a dose dependent fashion by 1 day after radiation therapy, prior to any changes observed using 1H DCE and diffusion

  15. Rotary resonance recoupling of 13C- 1H dipolar interactions in magic angle spinning 13C NMR of dynamic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchin, Simon J.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Aliev, Abil E.; Apperley, David C.

    2000-06-01

    Rotary resonance recoupling of heteronuclear 13C- 1H dipolar interactions in magic angle spinning solid state 13C NMR spectra (recorded under conditions of 1H decoupling at frequency ν1 and magic angle spinning at frequency νr) has been studied for three examples of molecular solids (adamantane, ferrocene and hexamethylbenzene) in which substantial molecular motion is known to occur. It is shown that when rotary resonance conditions are satisfied (i.e. ν1/νr= n, for n=1 or 2), the recoupling can lead to motionally averaged Pake-like powder patterns from which information on 13C- 1H internuclear distances and/or molecular motion can be derived.

  16. Development of qualitative and quantitative analysis methods in pharmaceutical application with new selective signal excitation methods for 13 C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using 1 H T1rho relaxation time.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Mamiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Most pharmaceutical drug substances and excipients in formulations exist in a crystalline or amorphous form, and an understanding of their state during manufacture and storage is critically important, particularly in formulated products. Carbon 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is useful for studying the chemical and physical state of pharmaceutical solids in a formulated product. We developed two new selective signal excitation methods in (13) C solid-state NMR to extract the spectrum of a target component from such a mixture. These methods were based on equalization of the proton relaxation time in a single domain via rapid intraproton spin diffusion and the difference in proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame ((1) H T1rho) of individual components in the mixture. Introduction of simple pulse sequences to one-dimensional experiments reduced data acquisition time and increased flexibility. We then demonstrated these methods in a commercially available drug and in a mixture of two saccharides, in which the (13) C signals of the target components were selectively excited, and showed them to be applicable to the quantitative analysis of individual components in solid mixtures, such as formulated products, polymorphic mixtures, or mixtures of crystalline and amorphous phases. PMID:23147444

  17. Conformational dynamics of phenylene rings in poly(p-phenylene vinylene) as revealed by 13C magic-angle-spinning exchange nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deAzevedo, E. R.; Franco, R. W. A.; Marletta, A.; Faria, R. M.; Bonagamba, T. J.

    2003-08-01

    Poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) has shown a great potential for electro-optical applications due to its electroluminescent and semiconducting properties. Such properties are directly related with the polymer chain conformation and dynamics. Then, it is important to understand in detail the local chain motions. In this work, three 13C solid-state magic-angle-spinning (MAS) exchange NMR techniques were used to study conformational dynamics of phenylene rings in PPV. The standard 2D MAS exchange experiment was used to identify exchange processes between equivalent and nonequivalent sites. Centerband-only detection of exchange (CODEX) experiments were applied to determine the amplitude of the phenylene ring flips and small-angle oscillations. Additionally, a new version of the CODEX technique, which allows for the selective observation of segments executing exchange between non-equivalent sites, is demonstrated and applied to determine the flipping fractions and the activation energies of the phenylene ring rotations. It was found that, at -15 °C, (26±3)% of the rings undergo 180° flips in the millisecond time scale, with average imprecision of (30±5)° and activation energies of (23±3) kJ/mol. Other (31±10)% of the rings perform only small-angle oscillations with an average amplitude of (9±2)°. These results corroborate previous experimental data and agree with recent ab initio calculations of potential energies barriers in phenylenevinylene oligomers.

  18. Detection of kestoses and kestose-related oligosaccharides in extracts of Festuca arundinacea, Dactylis glomerate L. , and Asparagus officinalis L. root cultures and invertase by sup 13 C and sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, K.L.; Feather, M.S.; Gracz, H.; Wong, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Previous studies show that {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to detect and identify mixtures of 1-kestose and neokestose after conversion to the acetate derivatives. In this study, unequivocal assignments are made for the anomeric carbon and proton signals for the above two trisaccharide acetates as well as for 6-kestose hendecaacetate and for nystose tetradecaacetate (a 1-kestose-derived tetrasaccharide). A number of oligosaccharide fractions were isolated from several plant species, converted to the acetates, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra obtained. Using the above reference data, the following information was obtained. The trisaccharide fraction from Dactylis gomerata L. stem tissue and Asparagus officinalis L. roots contain both 1-kestose and neokestose, and the tetrasaccharide fractions contain three components, one of which is nystose. Penta- and hexasaccharide acetates were also isolated from A. officinalis L. roots and were found to contain, respectively, four and at least five components. All components of both of the above species appear to contain a kestose residue and to be produced by the sequential addition of fructofuranosyl units to these. The trisaccharide fraction from Festuca arundinacea is complex, and contains at least five different components, two of which appear to be 1-kestose and neokestose.

  19. Assignment of 1H and 13C hyperfine-shifted resonances for tuna ferricytochrome c.

    PubMed Central

    Sukits, S F; Satterlee, J D

    1996-01-01

    Tuna ferricytochrome c has been used to demonstrate the potential for completely assigning 1H and 13C strongly hyperfine-shifted resonances in metalloprotein paramagnetic centers. This was done by implementation of standard two-dimensional NMR experiments adapted to take advantage of the enhanced relaxation rates of strongly hyperfine-shifted nuclei. The results show that complete proton assignments of the heme and axial ligands can be achieved, and that assignments of several strongly shifted protons from amino acids located close to the heme can also be made. Virtually all proton-bearing heme 13C resonances have been located, and additional 13C resonances from heme vicinity amino acids are also identified. These results represent an improvement over previous proton resonance assignment efforts that were predicated on the knowledge of specific assignments in the diamagnetic protein and relied on magnetization transfer experiments in heterogeneous solutions composed of mixtures of diamagnetic ferrocytochrome c and paramagnetic ferricytochrome c. Even with that more complicated procedure, complete heme proton assignments for ferricytochrome c have never been demonstrated by a single laboratory. The results presented here were achieved using a more generally applicable strategy with a solution of the uniformly oxidized protein, thereby eliminating the requirement of fast electron self-exchange, which is a condition that is frequently not met. PMID:8913622

  20. Study and validity of 13C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and 2H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey.

    PubMed

    Cotte, J F; Casabianca, H; Lhéritier, J; Perrucchietti, C; Sanglar, C; Waton, H; Grenier-Loustalot, M F

    2007-01-16

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The delta(13)C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H)(I) ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C(4) syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per thousand (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with the natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C(4) syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying. PMID:17386484

  1. Astroglial Contribution to Brain Energy Metabolism in Humans Revealed by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Elucidation of the Dominant Pathway for Neurotransmitter Glutamate Repletion and Measurement of Astrocytic Oxidative Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lebon, Vincent; Petersen, Kitt F.; Cline, Gary W.; Shen, Jun; Mason, Graeme F.; Dufour, Sylvie; Behar, Kevin L.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Rothman, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a crucial role for glial metabolism in maintaining proper synaptic function and in the etiology of neurological disease. However, the study of glial metabolism in humans has been hampered by the lack of noninvasive methods. To specifically measure the contribution of astroglia to brain energy metabolism in humans, we used a novel noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic approach. We measured carbon 13 incorporation into brain glutamate and glutamine in eight volunteers during an intravenous infusion of [2-13C] acetate, which has been shown in animal models to be metabolized specifically in astroglia. Mathematical modeling of the three established pathways for neurotransmitter glutamate repletion indicates that the glutamate/glutamine neurotransmitter cycle between astroglia and neurons (0.32 ± 0.07 μmol · gm−1 · min−1) is the major pathway for neuronal glutamate repletion and that the astroglial TCA cycle flux (0.14 ± 0.06 μmol · gm−1 · min−1) accounts for ~14% of brain oxygen consumption. Up to 30% of the glutamine transferred to the neurons by the cycle may derive from replacement of oxidized glutamate by anaplerosis. The further application of this approach could potentially enlighten the role of astroglia in supporting brain glutamatergic activity and in neurological and psychiatric disease. PMID:11880482

  2. Relayed 13C magnetization transfer: Detection of malate dehydrogenase reaction in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jehoon; Shen, Jun

    2007-02-01

    Malate dehydrogenase catalyzes rapid interconversion between dilute metabolites oxaloacetate and malate. Both oxaloacetate and malate are below the detection threshold of in vivo MRS. Oxaloacetate is also in rapid exchange with aspartate catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase, the latter metabolite is observable in vivo using 13C MRS. We hypothesized that the rapid turnover of oxaloacetate can effectively relay perturbation of magnetization between malate and aspartate. Here, we report indirect observation of the malate dehydrogenase reaction by saturating malate C2 resonance at 71.2 ppm and detecting a reduced aspartate C2 signal at 53.2 ppm due to relayed magnetization transfer via oxaloacetate C2 at 201.3 ppm. Using this strategy the rate of the cerebral malate dehydrogenase reaction was determined to be 9 ± 2 μmol/g wet weight/min (means ± SD, n = 5) at 11.7 Tesla in anesthetized adult rats infused with [1,6- 13C 2]glucose.

  3. Study of lignification by noninvasive techniques in growing maize internodes. An investigation by Fourier transform infrared cross-polarization-magic angle spinning 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and immunocytochemical transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Joseleau, J P; Ruel, K

    1997-07-01

    Noninvasive techniques were used for the study in situ of lignification in the maturing cell walls of the maize (Zea mays L.) stem. Within the longitudinal axis of a developing internode all of the stages of lignification can be found. The synthesis of the three types of lignins, p-hydroxyphenylpropane (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S), was investigated in situ by cross-polarization-magic angle spinning 13C-solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and immunocytochemical electron microscopy. The first lignin appearing in the parenchyma is of the G-type preceeding the incorporation of S nuclei in the later stages. However, in vascular bundles, typical absorption bands of S nuclei are visible in the Fourier transform infrared spectra at the earliest stage of lignification. Immunocytochemical determination of the three types of lignin in transmission electron microscopy was possible thanks to the use of antisera prepared against synthetic H, G, and the mixed GS dehydrogenative polymers (K. Ruel, O. Faix, J.P. Joseleau [1994] J Trace Microprobe Tech 12: 247-265). The specificity of the immunological probes demonstrated that there are differences in the relative temporal synthesis of the H, G, and GS lignins in the different tissues undergoing lignification. Considering the intermonomeric linkages predominating in the antigens used for the preparation of the immunological probes, the relative intensities of the labeling obtained provided, for the first time to our knowledge, information about the macromolecular nature of lignins (condensed versus noncondensed) in relation to their ultrastructural localization and development stage. PMID:9232887

  4. Multiple Locations of Peptides in the Hydrocarbon Core of Gel-Phase Membranes Revealed by Peptide 13C to Lipid 2H Rotational-Echo Double-Resonance Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Membrane locations of peptides and proteins are often critical to their functions. Solid-state rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance is applied to probe the locations of two peptides via peptide 13CO to lipid 2H distance measurements. The peptides are KALP, an α-helical membrane-spanning peptide, and HFP, the β-sheet N-terminal fusion peptide of the HIV gp41 fusion protein that plays an important role in HIV–host cell membrane fusion. Both peptides are shown to have at least two distinct locations within the hydrocarbon core of gel-phase membranes. The multiple locations are attributed to snorkeling of lysine side chains for KALP and to the distribution of antiparallel β-sheet registries for HFP. The relative population of each location is also quantitated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clear experimental support of multiple peptide locations within the membrane hydrocarbon core. These data are for gel-phase membranes, but the approach should work for liquid-ordered membranes containing cholesterol and may be applicable to liquid-disordered membranes with appropriate additional analysis to take into account protein and lipid motion. This paper also describes the methodological development of 13CO–2H REDOR using the lyophilized I4 peptide that is α-helical and 13CO-labeled at A9 and 2Hα-labeled at A8. The I4 spins are well-approximated as an ensemble of isolated 13CO–2H spin pairs each separated by 5.0 Å with a 37 Hz dipolar coupling. A pulse sequence with rectangular 100 kHz 2H π pulses results in rapid and extensive buildup of REDOR (ΔS/S0) with a dephasing time (τ). The buildup is well-fit by a simple exponential function with a rate of 24 Hz and an extent close to 1. These parameter values reflect nonradiative transitions between the 2H spin states during the dephasing period. Each spin pair spends approximately two-thirds of its time in the 13CO–2H (m = ±1) states and approximately one-third of

  5. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of URNdesign, a computationally redesigned RRM protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Neil; Dantas, Gautam; Varani, Gabriele

    2005-10-01

    Protein design represents one of the great challenges of computational structural biology. The ability to successfully design new proteins would allow us to generate new reagents and enzymes, while at the same time providing us with an understanding of the principles of protein stability. Here we report 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of a redesigned U1A protein, URNdesign. U1A has been studied extensively by our group and hence was chosen as a design target. For the assignments we sued 2D and 3D heteronuclearNMR experiments with uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled URNdesign. The assignments for the backbone NH, CO,Ca and Cb nuclei are 94%complete. Sidechain 1Hand13C, aromatic andQ/NNH2 resonances are essentially complete with guanidinium and K NH3 residues unassigned. BMRB deposit with accession number 6493

  6. alpha-L-iduronate ring conformations in heparin and heparin derivatives. 13-C Nuclear-magnetic-resonance analysis and titration data for variously desulphated and periodate-oxidized heparins.

    PubMed Central

    Fransson, L A; Huckerby, T N; Nieduszynski, I A

    1978-01-01

    A heparin derivative that had been O/N-desulphated and re-N-acetylated was investigated by 13C n.m.r. spectroscopy and potentiometric titration. Three forms of uronic acid were observed, tentatively identified as beta-D-glucuronate, and two different forms of alpha-L-iduronate. A comparison of the n.m.r. spectra of heparin, an oligosaccharide (beta-D-glucuronate-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucose)n, and heparin that had been subjected to selective oxidation of beta-D-glucuronate, enabled the position of the anomeric carbon of the latter residue to be assigned [delta 102.9 (p.p.m.)]. Periodate oxidation of O/N-desulphated heparin destroyed in addition, approx. 40% of the alpha-L-iduronate content. The remainder of the alpha-L-iduronate residues displayed only one anomeric resonance, at delta 99.7 (p.p.m.). In another preparation, after sequential desulphation of heparin (N-desulphation, re-N-acetylation and O-desulphation) the anomeric resonance of the alpha-L-iduronate residue shifted downfield [from delta99.7 (p.p.m.) to delta 102.3]indicating a change in ring conformation. These data support the interpretation that the unsulphated alpha-L-iduronate residues may adopt two conformations. It was shown that the proportions of alpha-L-iduronate conformers are determined by the sequence of desulphation operations. Also minor components of heparin were assigned. PMID:216348

  7. HCCCH Experiment for Through-Bond Correlation of Thymine Resonances in 13C-Labeled DNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklenář, Vladimír.; Masse, James E.; Feigon, Juli

    1999-04-01

    Application of heteronuclear magnetic resonance pulse methods to13C,15N-labeled nucleic acids is important for the accurate structure determination of larger RNA and DNA oligonucleotides and protein-nucleic acid complexes. These methods have been applied primarily to RNA, due to the availability of labeled samples. The two major differences between DNA and RNA are at the C2‧ of the ribose and deoxyribose and the additional methyl group on thymine versus uracil. We have enzymatically synthesized a13C,15N-labeled 32 base DNA oligonucleotide that folds to form an intramolecular triplex. We present two- and three-dimensional versions of a new HCCCH-TOCSY experiment that provides intraresidue correlation between the thymine H6 and methyl resonances via the intervening carbons (H6-C6-C5-Cme-Hme).

  8. Exploring the conformational energy landscape of glassy disaccharides by cross polarization magic angle spinning 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and numerical simulations. II. Enhanced molecular flexibility in amorphous trehalose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, Ronan; Bordat, Patrice; Cesaro, Attilio; Descamps, Marc

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses chemical shift surfaces to simulate experimental C13 cross polarization magic angle spinning spectra for amorphous solid state disaccharides, paying particular attention to the glycosidic linkage atoms in trehalose, sucrose, and lactose. The combination of molecular mechanics with density functional theory/gauge invariant atomic orbital ab initio methods provides reliable structural information on the conformational distribution in the glass. The results are interpreted in terms of an enhanced flexibility that trehalose possesses in the amorphous solid state, at least on the time scale of C13 nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. Implications of these findings for the fragility of trehalose glass and bioprotectant action are discussed.

  9. Characterization of the International Humic Substances Society standard and reference fulvic and humic acids by solution state carbon-13 (13C) and hydrogen-1 (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Folan, Daniel W.; MacCarthy, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Standard and reference samples of the International Humic Substances Society have been characterized by solution state carbon-13 and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Samples included the Suwannee River, soil, and peat standard fulvic and humic acids, the Leonardite standard humic acid, the Nordic aquatic reference fulvic and humic acids, and the Summit Hill soil reference humic acid. Aqueous-solution carbon-13 NMR analyses included the measurement of spin-lattice relaxation times, measurement of nuclear Overhauser enhancement factors, measurement of quantitative carbon distributions, recording of attached proton test spectra, and recording of spectra under nonquantitative conditions. Distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer carbon-13 NMR spectra also were recorded on the Suwannee River fulvic acid in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide. Hydrogen-1 NMR spectra were recorded on sodium salts of the samples in deuterium oxide. The carbon aromaticities of the samples ranged from 0.24 for the Suwannee River fulvic acid to 0.58 for the Leonardite humic acid.

  10. Determination of glucan phosphorylation using heteronuclear 1H, 13C double and 1H, 13C, 31P triple-resonance NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Peter; Nitschke, Felix; Steup, Martin; Mallow, Keven; Specker, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of starch and glycogen are important for their physicochemical properties and also their physiological functions. It is therefore desirable to reliably determine the phosphorylation sites. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR-spectroscopy is in principle a straightforward analytical approach even for complex carbohydrate molecules. With heterogeneous samples from natural sources, however, the task becomes more difficult because a full assignment of the resonances of the carbohydrates is impossible to obtain. Here, we show that the combination of heteronuclear (1) H,(13) C and (1) H,(13) C,(31) P techniques and information derived from spectra of a set of reference compounds can lead to an unambiguous determination of the phosphorylation sites even in heterogeneous samples. PMID:23913630

  11. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H-13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H-13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H-13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H-13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr-Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr-Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C-13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils.

  12. 1H and 13C resonance designation of antimycin A1 by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.; Adams, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    Complete 1H and 13C resonance assignments of antimycin A1 were accomplished by two-dimensional NMR techniques, viz. 1H homonuclear COSY correlation, heteronuclear 13C-1H chemical shift correlation and long-range heteronuclear 13C-1H COLOC correlation. Antimycin A1 was found to consist of two isomeric components in a 2:1 ratio based on NMR spectroscopic evidence. The structure of the major component was newly assigned as the 8-isopentanoic acid ester. The spectra of the minor component were consistent with the known structure of antimycin A1.

  13. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for 13C NMR relaxation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of 15N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to 13C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and 13C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly 13C -labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  14. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for (13)C NMR relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of (15)N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to (13)C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and (13)C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly (13)C-labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions. PMID:27003380

  15. 13C and 31P chemical shielding tensors of a single crystal of dipotassium α- D-glucose-1-phosphate dihydrate. An application of a 13C-{ 1H, 31P} triple-resonance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, C. A.; Naito, A.; Sastry, D. L.; Takegoshi, K.

    The 13C NMR spectra of a single crystal of dipotassium α- D-glucose-l-phosphate dehydrate for different orientations in the external magnetic field, were recorded by using 1H and 31P double nuclear decoupling. To overcome difficulties encountered because of the high 13C RF power required to achieve the Hartmann-Hahn condition, a new cross-polarization method (K. Takegoshi and C. A. McDowell, J. Magn. Reson.67, 356 (1986)) was used. The directions of the most shielded principal value of the 13C chemical shielding tensors for the C2-C6 carbon nuclei in the glucose group were along the CO bond, and that for the CI carbon nucleus made an angle of 42† with the C1-O5 bond direction in the O1-C1-O5 plane. The 31P chemical shielding tensors are axially symmetric and the direction of the least shielded principal value is almost parallel to the P-O1(R) bond, which is the longest among the four PO bonds in the phosphate moiety.

  16. Alpha Resonances in {sup 13}C Excited by the {sup 9}Be ({sup 6}Li,d) Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Souza, M. A.; Miyake, H.; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Ukita, G. M.

    2010-05-21

    The {sup 9}Be({sup 6}Li,d){sup 13}C reaction was used to investigate alpha resonant states in {sup 13}C up to 13 MeV of excitation. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the Sao Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion detection technique. The resolution of 50 keV allowed for the separation of the resonant contributions to the known 7/2{sup -} at 10.753 MeV and (5/2{sup -}) at 10.818 MeV {sup 13}C states. The alpha resonance seen at the (3alpha+n) threshold was not previously reported. The experimental angular distributions are presented in comparison with DWBA predictions.

  17. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H–13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H–13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H–13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H–13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr–Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr–Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C–13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils. PMID:22743540

  18. High-field 13C NMR spectroscopy of tissue in Vivo. A double-resonance surface-coil probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reo, Nicholas V.; Ewy, Coleen S.; Siegfried, Barry A.; Ackerman, Joseph J. H.

    A double-resonance surface-coil NMR probe is described for performance of high-field (8.5 T) proton decoupled carbon-13 experiments with tissue in vivo. The probe may be accommodated in standard, 89 mm i.d. clear bore, commercial spectrometers and is suitable for studies utilizing small laboratory animals such as mice, hamsters, and rats. A coaxial coil design is employed (10 mm diameter 13C coil, 20 mm diameter 1H coil) which provides ca. 40 dB attenuation between the 13C observe and 1H decouple channels. The inherent efficiency of the surface-coil configuration provides a sensitivity comparable to a commercial probe of the same nominal dimension (10 mm Helmholtz coil) and assures adequate decoupling in conductive samples with ca. 3-5 W power. In the absence of 13C isotopic enrichment, NMR spectra of rat leg, liver, and brain in vivo provide signalto-noise sufficient for 10 min time resolution. Administration of 100 mg of 90% 13C-labeled glucose into a peripheral vein of a ca. 300 g rat resulted in a liver glucose resonance which could be monitored with good signal-to-noise and 3 min time resolution.

  19. Secondary structure and (1)H, (13)C, (15)N resonance assignments of the endosomal sorting protein sorting nexin 3.

    PubMed

    Overduin, Michael; Rajesh, Sandya; Gruenberg, Jean; Lenoir, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Sorting nexin 3 (SNX3) belongs to a sub-family of sorting nexins that primarily contain a single Phox homology domain capable of binding phosphoinositides and membranes. We report the complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the full-length human SNX3 protein and identification of its secondary structure elements, revealing a canonical fold and unstructured termini. PMID:25893673

  20. Earth's magnetic field enabled scalar coupling relaxation of 13C nuclei bound to fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N in amide groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavazza, Enrico; Kubala, Eugen; Gringeri, Concetta V.; Düwel, Stephan; Durst, Markus; Schulte, Rolf F.; Menzel, Marion I.

    2013-02-01

    Scalar coupling relaxation, which is usually only associated with closely resonant nuclei (e.g., 79Br-13C), can be a very effective relaxation mechanism. While working on hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, fast liquid-state polarization decay during transfer to the MRI scanner was observed. This behavior could hypothetically be explained by substantial T1 shortening due to a scalar coupling contribution (type II) to the relaxation caused by the fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N adjacent to the 13C nucleus in the amide group. This contribution is only effective in low magnetic fields (i.e., less than 800 μT) and prevents the use of molecules bearing the 13C-amide group as hyperpolarized MRS/MRI probes. In the present work, this hypothesis is explored both theoretically and experimentally. The results show that high hyperpolarization levels can be retained using either a 15N-labeled amide or by applying a magnetic field during transfer of the sample from the polarizer to the MRI scanner.

  1. 13C/15N‐Enriched l‐Dopa as a Triple‐Resonance NMR Probe to Monitor Neurotransmitter Dopamine in the Brain and Liver Extracts of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Tetsuro; Kimura, Yu; Imai, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Sando, Shinsuke; Toshimitsu, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In an attempt to monitor μm‐level trace constituents, we applied here 1H‐{13C‐15N} triple‐resonance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to 13C/15N‐enriched l‐Dopa as the inevitable precursor of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the brain. The perfect selectivity (to render endogenous components silent) and μm‐level sensitivity (700 MHz spectrometer equipped with a cryogenic probe) of triple‐resonance allowed the unambiguous and quantitative metabolic and pharmacokinetic analyses of administered l‐Dopa/dopamine in the brain and liver of mice. The level of dopamine generated in the brain (within the range 7–76 μm, which covers the typical stimulated level of ∼30 μm) could be clearly monitored ex vivo, but was slightly short of the detection limit of a 7 T MR machine for small animals. This work suggests that μm‐level trace constituents are potential targets of ex vivo monitoring as long as they contain N atom(s) and their appropriate 13C/15N‐enrichment is synthetically accessible. PMID:27308224

  2. Magnetic isotope effects in the photolysis of dibenzyl ketone on porous silica. /sup 13/C and /sup 17/O enrichments

    SciTech Connect

    Turro, N.J.; Cheng, C.C.; Wan, P.; Chung, C.; Mahler, W.

    1985-04-25

    The photolysis of dibenzyl ketone (DBK) on porous silica has been investigated. Both /sup 13/C and /sup 17/O isotopic enrichment in the ketone remaining after partial photolysis is demonstrated. The efficiency of /sup 13/C enrichment was found to be relatively insensitive to the average pore diameter of the silica host, to the percent coverage by DBK, and to the application of an external magnetic field. A significant dependence of /sup 13/C enrichment with temperature, with a maximum in the enrichment-temperature profile, was observed. The results are interpreted in terms of the competition between pathways available to the triplet C/sub 6/H/sub 5/CH/sub 2/COCH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/ radical pair produced by photolysis of DBK.

  3. Structure of /sup 13/C studied by pion scattering near the (3,3) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom-Morris, S.J.

    1981-09-01

    Good resolution (..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup +/') and (..pi../sup -/,..pi../sup -/') data were obtained for many states in /sup 13/C using the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Differential cross sections were measured for angles between 20/sup 0/ and 105/sup 0/ at an incident pion energy of 162 MeV for the elastic scattering as well as for states at excitation energies of 3.09, 3.68, 3.85, 7.55, 8.86, 9.5, 11.82, 16.05, 17.92, 21.37, and 21.6 MeV. Excitation functions were measured at momentum transfers of q = 1.1 h fm /sup -1/ and q = 1.4 h fm/sup -1/, for energies between 100 and 300 MeV. A sigma(..pi../sup -/)/sigma(..pi../sup +/) ratio of 9:1 was observed for the first time, indicating a pure neutron particle-hole excitation of a high spin state (J/sup ..pi../ = 9/2/sup +/). Strikingly different energy dependences were found for ..delta..S = 0 and ..delta..S = 1 transitions. Data for all states were compared with the microscopic model calculations of Lee and Kurath. Very good agreement was found between experiment and theory for the strongly excited states and the 9/2/sup +/ state at 9.5 MeV, in sharp contrast to the disagreement for weak transitions. The excitation function data and comparisons with the microscopic model calculations were used to identify the states at 16.05, 17.92, 21.37, and 21.6 MeV as either 7/2/sup +/ or 9/2/sup +/ states. The elastic scattering data were analyzed with an optical modeland the results were found to be consistent with neutron and proton distributions having equal rms radii. The optical potentials generated were used in a collective model analysis of the 3/2/sup -/ (3.68 MeV) and 5/2/sup -/ (7.55 MeV) states. The reduced transition probabilities (B(E2)) derived from the proton parts of the transition strength are in agreement with those determined from electromagnetic measurements.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, E. R.

    2009-06-01

    Author's preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Basic theory; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Measurement of nuclear properties and general physical applications; 5. Nuclear magnetic resonance in liquids and gases; 6. Nuclear magnetic resonance in non-metallic solids; 7. Nuclear magnetic resonance in metals; 8. Quadrupole effects; Appendices 1-6; Glossary of symbols; Bibliography and author index; Subject index.

  6. Using magnetic coupling to implement 1H, 19F, 13C experiments in routine high resolution NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Paul; Finnigan, Jim; Marsden, Brian; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2015-12-01

    We report in this paper the design of 1H, 19F, 13C circuitry using magnetic coupling which can do on demand experiments where one of the three nuclei is observed and the other two are decoupled. The implementation of this circuitry in routine NMR probes is compared with capacitive coupling methods where it was found that by using magnetic coupling the performance of the routine NMR probe was not impacted by the addition of this circuitry. It is surmised that using this type of circuitry would be highly desirable for those chemists doing routine 19F NMR.

  7. Sequential backbone assignment of uniformly 13C-labeled RNAs by a two-dimensional P(CC)H-TOCSY triple resonance NMR experiment.

    PubMed

    Wijmenga, S S; Heus, H A; Leeuw, H A; Hoppe, H; van der Graaf, M; Hilbers, C W

    1995-01-01

    A new 1H-13C-31P triple resonance experiment is described which allows unambiguous sequential backbone assignment in 13C-labeled oligonucleotides via through-bond coherence transfer from 31P via 13C to 1H. The approach employs INEPT to transfer coherence from 31P to 13C and homonuclear TOCSY to transfer the 13C coherence through the ribose ring, followed by 13C to 1H J-cross-polarisation. The efficiencies of the various possible transfer pathways are discussed. The most efficient route involves transfer of 31Pi coherence via C4'i and C4'i-1, because of the relatively large JPC4' couplings involved. Via the homonuclear and heteronuclear mixing periods, the C4'i and C4'i-1 coherences are subsequently transferred to, amongst others, H1'i and H1'i-1, respectively, leading to a 2D 1H-31P spectrum which allows a sequential assignment in the 31P-1H1' region of the spectrum, i.e. in the region where the proton resonances overlap least. The experiment is demonstrated on a 13C-labeled RNA hairpin with the sequence 5'(GGGC-CAAA-GCCU)3'. PMID:7533569

  8. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  9. Towards a vibrational analysis of spheroidene. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of 13C-labelled spheroidenes in petroleum ether and in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Kok, P; Köhler, J; Groenen, E J; Gebhard, R; van der Hoef, I; Lugtenburg, J; Hoff, A F; Farhoosh, R; Frank, H A

    1994-04-28

    We report resonance Raman spectra of the carotenoid spheroidene and its 14'-13C and 15'-13C substituted analogues in petroleum ether and bound to the reaction centre of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. The spectra in petroleum ether correspond to planar all-trans spheroidene while those of the reaction centres are consistent with a nonplanar 15,15'-cis spheroidene. The effect of 13C labelling is largest in the carbon-carbon double-bond stretching region. The 15'-13C substitution of the reaction centre bound spheroidene, however, hardly changes the C=C band as compared to that for the natural abundance spheroidene apart from a new weak band at 1508 cm(-1). This observation has been interpreted as a decoupling of the C15=C15' stretch from the other double-bond stretches in combination with a small intrinsic Raman intensity of this local mode for 15,15'-cis spheroidene. PMID:8167135

  10. Measurement of sub threshold resonance contributions to fusion reactions: the case of the 13C(α, n)16O astrophysical neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Avila, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Santiago, D.; Spartà, R.

    2015-01-01

    The 13C(α, n)16O reaction is the neutron source for the main component of the s-process. It is is active inside the helium-burning shell of asymptotic giant branch stars, at temperatures ≲ 108 K. In this temperature region, corresponding to an energy interval of 140 - 230 keV, the 13C(α, n)16O cross section is dominated by the -3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in 17O. Direct measurements could not establish its contribution owing to the Coulomb barrier between interacting nuclei, strongly reducing the cross section at astrophysical energies. Similarly, indirect measurements and extrapolations yielded inconsistent results, calling for further investigations. The Trojan Horse Method was applied to the 13C(6Li, n16O)d quasi-free reaction to access the low as well as the negative energy region of the 13C(α, n)16O reaction. By using the generalized R-matrix approach, the asymptotic normalization coefficient (C˜17O(1/2+)α13C)2 of the 6.356 MeV level was deduced. For the first time, the Trojan Horse Method and the asymptotic normalization coefficient were used in synergy. Our indirect approach lead to (C˜17O(1/2+)α13C)2 = 7.7-1.5+1.6 fm-1, slightly larger than the values in the literature, determining a 13C(α, n)16O reaction rate slightly larger than the one in the literature at temperatures lower than 108 K, with enhanced accuracy.

  11. Sequence-specific 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of the 23.7-kDa homodimeric toxin CcdB from Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Respondek, Michal; Buts, Lieven; De Jonge, Natalie; Haesaerts, Sarah; Loris, Remy; Van Melderen, Laurence; Wyns, Lode; Zangger, Klaus

    2009-06-01

    CcdB is the toxic component of a bacterial toxin-antitoxin system. It inhibits DNA gyrase (a type II topoisomerase), and its toxicity can be neutralized by binding of its antitoxin CcdA. Here we report the sequential backbone and sidechain (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of CcdB(Vfi) from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. The BMRB accession number is 16135. PMID:19636967

  12. Observation of 1H-13C and 1H-1H proximities in a paramagnetic solid by NMR at high magnetic field under ultra-fast MAS.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenhui; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Zhou, Lei; Shen, Ming; Pourpoint, Frédérique; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The assignment of NMR signals in paramagnetic solids is often challenging since: (i) the large paramagnetic shifts often mask the diamagnetic shifts specific to the local chemical environment, and (ii) the hyperfine interactions with unpaired electrons broaden the NMR spectra and decrease the coherence lifetime, thus reducing the efficiency of usual homo- and hetero-nuclear NMR correlation experiments. Here we show that the assignment of (1)H and (13)C signals in isotopically unmodified paramagnetic compounds with moderate hyperfine interactions can be facilitated by the use of two two-dimensional (2D) experiments: (i) (1)H-(13)C correlations with (1)H detection and (ii) (1)H-(1)H double-quantum↔single-quantum correlations. These methods are experimentally demonstrated on isotopically unmodified copper (II) complex of l-alanine at high magnetic field (18.8 T) and ultra-fast Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) frequency of 62.5 kHz. Compared to (13)C detection, we show that (1)H detection leads to a 3-fold enhancement in sensitivity for (1)H-(13)C 2D correlation experiments. By combining (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(1)H 2D correlation experiments with the analysis of (13)C longitudinal relaxation times, we have been able to assign the (1)H and (13)C signals of each l-alanine ligand. PMID:25557861

  13. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system.

  14. Quantification of brain glycogen concentration and turnover through localized 13C NMR of both the C1 and C6 resonances.

    PubMed

    van Heeswijk, Ruud B; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Xin, Lijing; Gruetter, Rolf

    2010-04-01

    We have recently shown that at isotopic steady state (13)C NMR can provide a direct measurement of glycogen concentration changes, but that the turnover of glycogen was not accessible with this protocol. The aim of the present study was to design, implement and apply a novel dual-tracer infusion protocol to simultaneously measure glycogen concentration and turnover. After reaching isotopic steady state for glycogen C1 using [1-(13)C] glucose administration, [1,6-(13)C(2)] glucose was infused such that isotopic steady state was maintained at the C1 position, but the C6 position reflected (13)C label incorporation. To overcome the large chemical shift displacement error between the C1 and C6 resonances of glycogen, we implemented 2D gradient based localization using the Fourier series window approach, in conjunction with time-domain analysis of the resulting FIDs using jMRUI. The glycogen concentration of 5.1 +/- 1.6 mM measured from the C1 position was in excellent agreement with concomitant biochemical determinations. Glycogen turnover measured from the rate of label incorporation into the C6 position of glycogen in the alpha-chloralose anesthetized rat was 0.7 micromol/g/h. PMID:20186693

  15. HCN, a triple-resonance NMR technique for selective observation of histidine and tryptophan side chains in 13C/15N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, J L; Ash, E L; Günther, U L; Luo, X; Bullock, P A; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from 1H to 13C to 15N and reverse through direct spin couplings 1JCH and 1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay tau 3 were employed for determination of optimal tau 3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the 1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the 13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 12 1H and 13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 12 15N chemical shifts were determined. The 13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping 1H and 15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mM sample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited alpha-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited alpha-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole 1H and/or 15N nuclei. PMID:8995843

  16. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Annual, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The inaugural volume of Magnetic Resonance Annual includes reviews of MRI of the posterior fossa, cerebral neoplasms, and the cardiovascular and genitourinary systems. A chapter on contrast materials outlines the mechanisms of paramagnetic contrast enhancement and highlights several promising contrast agents.

  19. Single spin magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  20. Single spin magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution. PMID:27378060

  1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  2. Reaction rate of the 13C(α,n)16O neutron source using the ANC of the -3 keV resonance measured with the THM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Avila, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Santiago, D.; Spartà, R.

    2016-01-01

    The s-process is responsible of the synthesis of most of the nuclei in the mass range 90 ≤ A ≤ 208. It consists in a series of neutron capture reactions on seed nuclei followed by β-decays, since the neutron accretion rate is slower than the β-decay rate. Such small neutron flux is supplied by the 13C(α,n)16O reaction. It is active inside the helium-burning shell of asymptotic giant branch stars, at temperatures < 108 K, corresponding to an energy interval of 140-230 keV. In this region, the astrophysical S (E)-factor is dominated by the -3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in 17O. In this work, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the 13C(6Li,n16O)d quasi-free reaction to extract the 6.356 MeV level resonance parameters, in particular the asymptotic normalization coefficient . A preliminary analysis of a partial data set has lead to , slightly larger than the values in the literature. However, the deduced 13C(α, n)16O reaction rate is in agreement with most results in the literature at ˜ 108 K, with enhanced accuracy thanks to our innovative approach merging together ANC and THM.

  3. A combination strategy for extraction and isolation of multi-component natural products by systematic two-phase solvent extraction-(13)C nuclear magnetic resonance pattern recognition and following conical counter-current chromatography separation: Podophyllotoxins and flavonoids from Dysosma versipellis (Hance) as examples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Wu, Youqian; Wu, Shihua

    2016-01-29

    Despite of substantial developments of extraction and separation techniques, isolation of natural products from natural resources is still a challenging task. In this work, an efficient strategy for extraction and isolation of multi-component natural products has been successfully developed by combination of systematic two-phase liquid-liquid extraction-(13)C NMR pattern recognition and following conical counter-current chromatography separation. A small-scale crude sample was first distributed into 9 systematic hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (HEMWat) two-phase solvent systems for determination of the optimum extraction solvents and partition coefficients of the prominent components. Then, the optimized solvent systems were used in succession to enrich the hydrophilic and lipophilic components from the large-scale crude sample. At last, the enriched components samples were further purified by a new conical counter-current chromatography (CCC). Due to the use of (13)C NMR pattern recognition, the kinds and structures of major components in the solvent extracts could be predicted. Therefore, the method could collect simultaneously the partition coefficients and the structural information of components in the selected two-phase solvents. As an example, a cytotoxic extract of podophyllotoxins and flavonoids from Dysosma versipellis (Hance) was selected. After the systematic HEMWat system solvent extraction and (13)C NMR pattern recognition analyses, the crude extract of D. versipellis was first degreased by the upper phase of HEMWat system (9:1:9:1, v/v), and then distributed in the two phases of the system of HEMWat (2:8:2:8, v/v) to obtain the hydrophilic lower phase extract and lipophilic upper phase extract, respectively. These extracts were further separated by conical CCC with the HEMWat systems (1:9:1:9 and 4:6:4:6, v/v). As results, total 17 cytotoxic compounds were isolated and identified. In general, whole results suggested that the strategy was very

  4. Synthesis and multinuclear ( sup 13 C, sup 77 Se, sup 125 Te, sup 199 Hg) magnetic resonance spectra of adamantane-like anions of mercury(II), ((. mu. -ER) sub 6 (HgX) sub 4 ) sup 2 minus (E = S, Se, Te; X = Cl, Br, I)

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, P.A.W.; Manivannan, V. )

    1990-08-08

    Multinuclear magnetic resonance has been used to characterize the new adamantane-like anions (({mu}-ER){sub 6}(HgX){sub 4}){sup 2{minus}} (ER = SPr{sup n}, SPh, SePh, TePh; X = Cl, Br, I), which are formed in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and (or) DMF from Hg(ER){sub 2}, HgX{sub 2} and (R{sub 4}N)X in the correct stoichiometric ratio. The products (Et{sub 4}N){sub 2}(({mu}-EPh){sub 6}(HgCl){sub 4}) (E = Se, Te) have been isolated analytically pure. At ambient probe temperature, only the complexities (({mu}-TePh){sub 6}(HgX){sub 4}){sup 2{minus}} are stable to dissociation of the ({mu}-ER){sub 6}Hg{sub 4} core. However, at 213 K, only the core of (({mu}-SPh){sub 6}(HgCl){sub 4}){sup 2{minus}} is measurably dissociated. Overall, the stability of the complexes to dissociation varies with E in the order Te > Se > S. At reduced temperature inversion at Te is slow on the NMR time scale in (({mu}-TePh){sub 6}(HgX){sub 4}){sup 2{minus}}, and these complexes are shown to exist as on predominant configurational isomer or an equilibrium mixture of, probably, two such isomers. Similar behavior is found for (({mu}-SePh){sub 6}(HgX){sub 4}){sup 2{minus}} (X = Cl, Br), which are the first examples of SeR-bridged adamantanoid clusters to exhibit inversion at Se that is slow on the NMR time scale. Metal ({sup 113}Cd, {sup 199}Hg) NMR data for (({mu}-SPr{sup n}){sub 6}(MI){sub 4}){sup 2{minus}}/(({mu}-SPr{sup n}){sub 6}(M{prime}I){sub 4}){sup 2{minus}} (M = Hg, M{prime} = Cd, Zn; M = Zn, M{prime} = Cd) mixtures at 213 K show that an approximately statistical metal redistribution occurs to give (({mu}-SPr{sup n}){sub 6}(MI){sub 4{minus}n}(M{prime}I){sub n}){sup 2{minus}}. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  5. [Magnetic resonance, an introduction].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Rueda, D J; Fernández Herrerías, G

    2000-09-01

    What would you explain to a patient if he/she had to undergo a magnetic resonance imagery session? Do you know if a person wearing a pacemaker can undergo an MRI? These and many other questions are answered in the following article since magnetic resonance imagery is a very useful diagnostic medium; however, it is one which not everyone has been able to get to know and use. The authors shed light on this diagnostic technique for nurses starting with its physical foundations; since knowing these aids professionals to correctly plan our treatments and improves the attention provided to patients who undergo this test. The authors also list the specific components in this device, the possible biological effects, the detractions and some basic recommendations. PMID:11111673

  6. Sequence-specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the plakin repeat domain of human envoplakin.

    PubMed

    Jeeves, Mark; Fogl, Claudia; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Chidgey, Martyn; Overduin, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The plakin repeat domain is a distinctive hallmark of the plakin superfamily of proteins, which are found within all epithelial tissues. Plakin repeat domains mediate the interactions of these proteins with the cell cytoskeleton and are critical for the maintenance of tissue integrity. Despite their biological importance, no solution state resonance assignments are available for any homologue. Here we report the essentially complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone chemical shift assignments of the singular 22 kDa plakin repeat domain of human envoplakin, providing the means to investigate its interactions with ligands including intermediate filaments. PMID:26590577

  7. Pion elastic scattering from polarized sup 13 C in the energy region of the (3,3) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, N.

    1990-01-01

    In this work we measured the angular distributions of the analyzing power and the differential cross section at one energy below and one energy above the (3,3) resonance. A search for the predicted large asymmetries at momentum transfers near the second minimum of the differential cross sections was also performed at several energies across the resonance. Most of the data have been analyzed. One, for T{sub {pi}} = 162 MeV, is currently in progress.

  8. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed. PMID:25456314

  9. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for the protein coded by gene locus BB0938 of Bordetella bronchiseptica

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Paolo; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Xiao, Rong; Ho, Chi K.; Ma, LiChung; Acton, Thomas; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    The product of gene locus BB0938 from Bordetella bronchiseptica (Swiss-Prot ID: Q7WNU7-BORBR; NESG target ID: BoR11; Wunderlich et al., 2004; Pfam ID: PF03476) is a 128-residue protein of unknown function. This broadly conserved protein family is found in eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 98% of backbone and 94% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a b topology with a seven-residue helical insert, ??????????. BMRB deposit with accession number 6693. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  10. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for Escherichia coli ytfP, a member of the broadly conserved UPF0131 protein domain family

    SciTech Connect

    Aramini, James M.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Huang, Yuanpeng; Rajan, Paranji K.; Xiao, Rong; Shastry, Ritu; Acton, Thomas; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    Protein ytfP from Escherichia coli (Swiss-Prot ID: YTFP-ECOLI; NESG target ID: ER111; Wunderlich et al., 2004) is a 113-residue member of the UPF0131 protein family (Pfam ID: PF03674) of unknown function. This domain family is found in organisms from all three kingdoms, archaea, eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 97% of backbone and 91% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a mixed a/b topology,????????. BMRB deposit with Accession No. 6448. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This presentation will describe the operational principles, design basics, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James

    2012-06-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation is concluding the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, and design basics of the NMRG including an overview of the NSD designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program. General performance results from phases 3 and 4 will also be presented.

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, design, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  15. Magnetic resonance of slotted circular cylinder resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Junjie; Liu, Shiyang; Lin, Zhifang; Chui, S. T.

    2008-07-01

    By a rigorous full-wave approach, a systemic study is made on the magnetic resonance of slotted circular cylinder resonators (SCCRs) made of a perfect conductor for the lossless case. This is a two-dimensional analog of the split-ring resonator and may serve as an alternative type of essential constituent of electromagnetic metamaterials. It is found that the resonance frequency can be modulated by changing the geometrical parameters and the dielectrics filling in the cavity and the slot. An approximate empirical expression is presented for magnetic resonance frequency of SCCRs from the viewpoint of an L-C circuit system. Finally, it is demonstrated that the SCCR structure can be miniaturized to less than 1/150 resonant wavelength in size with the dielectrics available currently.

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael

    2011-05-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation is currently in phase 4 of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. The micro-NMRG technology is pushing the boundaries of size, weight, power, and performance allowing new small platform applications of navigation grade Inertial Navigation System (INS) technology. Information on the historical development of the technology, basics of operation, task performance goals, application opportunities, and a phase 2 sample of earth rate measurement data will be presented. Funding Provided by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

  17. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Duodenoscope.

    PubMed

    Syms, Richard R A; Young, Ian R; Wadsworth, Christopher A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Rea, Marc

    2013-12-01

    A side-viewing duodenoscope capable of both optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The instrument is constructed from MR-compatible materials and combines a coherent fiber bundle for optical imaging, an irrigation channel and a side-opening biopsy channel for the passage of catheter tools with a tip saddle coil for radio-frequency signal reception. The receiver coil is magnetically coupled to an internal pickup coil to provide intrinsic safety. Impedance matching is achieved using a mechanically variable mutual inductance, and active decoupling by PIN-diode switching. (1)H MRI of phantoms and ex vivo porcine liver specimens was carried out at 1.5 T. An MRI field-of-view appropriate for use during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was obtained, with limited artefacts, and a signal-to-noise ratio advantage over a surface array coil was demonstrated. PMID:23807423

  19. Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Litwiller, Daniel V.; Mariappan, Yogesh K.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Often compared to the practice of manual palpation, magnetic resonance elastography is an emerging technology for quantitatively assessing the mechanical properties of tissue as a basis for characterizing disease. The potential of MRE as a diagnostic tool is rooted in the fact that normal and diseased tissues often differ significantly in terms of their intrinsic mechanical properties. MRE uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with the application of mechanical shear waves to probe tissue mechanics. This process can be broken down into three essential steps: inducing shear waves in the tissue,imaging the propagating shear waves with MRI, andanalyzing the wave data to generate quantitative images of tissue stiffness MRE has emerged as a safe, reliable and noninvasive method for staging hepatic liver fibrosis, and is now used in some locations as an alternative to biopsy. MRE is also being used in the ongoing investigations of numerous other organs and tissues, including, for example, the spleen, kidney, pancreas, brain, heart, breast, skeletal muscle, prostate, vasculature, lung, spinal cord, eye, bone, and cartilage. In the article that follows, some fundamental techniques and applications of MRE are summarized. PMID:26361467

  20. (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of translationally-controlled tumor protein from photosynthetic microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xingzhe; Xiao, Yan; Cui, Qiu; Feng, Yingang

    2015-10-01

    Translationally-controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a eukaryote-conserved protein with crucial roles in cellular growth. It has also been proposed that plant TCTP has functions specific to plant, while no structure of TCTP from photosynthetic organism has been reported. Nannochloropsis is a photosynthetic microalga with high yield of lipid and high-value polyunsaturated fatty acid, which is promising for biodiesel production. Study of growth-related proteins may provide new clue for improving the yield of lipid. TCTP from Nannochloropsis oceanica shares low sequence identity with structure-known TCTPs. Here we reported the NMR resonance assignments of TCTP from N. oceanica for further structural and functional studies. PMID:25680850

  1. Measurement of the 13C(α,n)16O reaction with the Trojan horse method: Focus on the sub threshold resonance at -3 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Avila, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Santiago, D.; Spartà, R.

    2014-05-01

    The 13C(α,n)16O reaction is the neutron source of the main component of the s-process. The astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the -3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in 17O. Its contribution is still controversial as extrapolations, e.g., through R-matrix calculations, and indirect techniques, such as the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC), yield inconsistent results. Therefore, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the 13C(6Li,n16O)d reaction to measure its contribution. For the first time, the ANC for the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced through the THM, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy. Though a larger ANC for the 6.356 MeV level is measured, our experimental S(E) factor agrees with the most recent extrapolation in the literature in the 140-230 keV energy interval, the accuracy being greatly enhanced thanks to this innovative approach, merging together two well establish indirect techniques, namely, the THM and the ANC.

  2. 13C MR imaging of methionine-rich gliomas at 4.7T: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sasao, Akira; Hirai, Toshinori; Iriguchi, Norio; Nakamura, Hideo; Kudo, Mareina; Sasao, Ako; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    We explored the feasibility of using carbon-13 ((13)C) magnetic resonance imaging ((13)C-MRI) to depict (13)C-labeled methionine-enriched gliomas at 4.7 tesla. We transplanted 2 types of glioma cells separately to 2 subcutaneous tissue sites on the backs of mice weighing 15 to 20 g. After confirming tumor growth, we used (13)C-MRI and (1)H-MRI to scan 4 mice that had been administered (13)C-labeled methionine and 2 control mice. (13)C-MRI of all 4 transplanted mice administered with (13)C-labeled methionine revealed 2 areas of hyperintensity that corresponded to the tumor sites on (1)H-MR images, but no such areas were visualized in transplanted controls. Our data suggest that (13)C-MRI can show the accumulation of (13)C-labeled tracer by gliomas. PMID:21720117

  3. 1H, 13C, and 15N backbone and side chain resonance assignments of thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus cyclophilin-A

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, Michael; Zhang, Fengli; Isern, Nancy G.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2014-04-01

    Cyclophilins catalyze the reversible peptidyl-prolyl isomerization of their substrates and are present across all kingdoms of life from humans to bacteria. Although numerous biological roles have now been discovered for cyclophilins, their function was initially ascribed to their chaperone-like activity in protein folding where they catalyze the often rate-limiting step of proline isomerization. This chaperone-like activity may be especially important under extreme conditions where cyclophilins are often over expressed, such as in tumors for human cyclophilins {Lee, 2010 #1167}, but also in organisms that thrive under extreme conditions, such as theromophilic bacteria. Moreover, the reversible nature of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerization reaction catalyzed by cyclophilins has allowed these enzymes to serve as model systems for probing the role of conformational changes during catalytic turnover {Eisenmesser, 2002 #20;Eisenmesser, 2005 #203}. Thus, we present here the resonance assignments of a thermophilic cyclophilin from Geobacillus kaustophilus derived from deep-sea sediment {Takami, 2004 #1384}. This thermophilic cyclophilin may now be studied at a variety of temperatures to provide insight into the comparative structure, dynamics, and catalytic mechanism of cyclophilins.

  4. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment of the cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin 1 from the pathogen Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Monica; Sturlese, Mattia; Manta, Bruno; Löhr, Frank; Mammi, Stefano; Comini, Marcelo; Bellanda, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosomatids are parasites responsible for several tropical and subtropical diseases, such as Chaga's disease, sleeping sickness and Leishmaniasis. In contrast to the mammalian host, the thiol-redox metabolism of these pathogens depends on trypanothione [bis-glutathionylspermidine, T(SH)2] instead of glutathione (GSH) providing a set of lineage-specific proteins as drug target candidates. Glutaredoxins (Grx) are ubiquitous small thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases that belong to the thioredoxin-fold family. They play a central role in redox homeostasis and iron sulfur-cluster biogenesis. Each species, including trypanosomes, possesses its own set of isoforms distributed in different subcellular compartments. The genome of trypanosomatids encodes for two class I (dithiolic) Grxs named 2-C-Grx1 and 2-C-Grx2. Both proteins were shown to efficiently reduce different disulfides at the expenses of T(SH)2 using a mechanism that involves the two cysteines in the active site. Moreover, the cytosolic Trypanosoma brucei 2-C-Grx1 but not the mitochondrial 2-C-Grx2 was able to coordinate an iron-sulfur cluster with T(SH)2 or GSH as ligand. As a first step to unravel the structural basis for the specificity observed in the trypanosomal glutaredoxins, we present here the NMR resonance assignment of 2-C-Grx1 from the parasite T. brucei brucei. PMID:26386962

  5. Secondary structure and side-chain sup 1 H and sup 13 C resonance assignments of calmodulin in solution by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Spera, S.; Barbato, G.; Kay, L.E.; Bax, A. ); Krinks, M. )

    1991-09-24

    Heteronuclear 2D and 3D NMR experiments were carried out on recombinant Drosophila calmodulin (CaM), a protein of 148 residues and with molecular mass of 16.7 kDa, that is uniformly labeled with {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C to a level of > 95%. Nearly complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C side-chain assignments for all amino acid residues are obtained by using the 3D HCCH-COSY and HCCH-TOCSY experiments that rely on large heteronuclear one-bond scalar couplings to transfer magnetization and establish through-bond connectivities. The secondary structure of this protein in solution has been elucidated by a qualitative interpretation of nuclear Overhauser effects, hydrogen exchange data, and {sup 3}J{sub HNH{alpha}} coupling constants. A clear correlation between the {sup 13}C{alpha} chemical shift and secondary structure is found. The secondary structure in the two globular domains of Drosophila CaM in solution is essentially identical with that of the X-ray crystal structure of mammalian CaM which consists of two pairs of a helix-loop-helix motif in each globular domain. The existence of a short antiparallel {beta}-sheet between the two loops in each domain has been confirmed. The eight {alpha}-helix segments identified from the NMR data are located at Glu-6 to Phe-19, thr-29 to Ser-38, Glu-45 to Glu-54, Phe-65 to Lys-77, Glu-82 to Asp-93, Ala-102 to Asn-111, Asp-118 to Glu-127, and Tyr-138 to Thr-146. Although the crystal structure has a long central helix from Phe-65 to Phe-92 that connects the two globular domains, NMR data indicate that residues Asp-78 to Ser-81 of this central helix adopt a nonhelical conformation with considerable flexibility.

  6. Accessible magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, L; Arakawa, M; Hale, J; Rothschild, P; Carlson, J; Hake, K; Kramer, D; Lu, W; Van Heteren, J

    1989-10-01

    The cost of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is driven by magnetic field strength. Misperceptions as to the impact of field strength on performance have led to systems that are more expensive than they need to be. Careful analysis of all the factors that affect diagnostic quality lead to the conclusion that field strength per se is not a strong determinant of system performance. Freed from the constraints imposed by high-field operation, it is possible to exploit a varied set of opportunities afforded by low-field operation. In addition to lower costs and easier siting, we can take advantage of shortened T1 times, higher contrast, reduced sensitivity to motion, and reduced radiofrequency power deposition. These conceptual advantages can be made to coalesce onto practical imaging systems. We describe a low-cost MRI system that utilizes a permanent magnet of open design. Careful optimization of receiving antennas and acquisition sequences permit performance levels consistent with those needed for an effective diagnostic unit. Ancillary advantages include easy access to the patient, reduced claustrophobia, quiet and comfortable operation, and absence of a missile effect. The system can be sited in 350 sq ft and consumes a modest amount of electricity. MRI equipment of this kind can widen the population base than can access this powerful and beneficial diagnostic modality. PMID:2640910

  7. Measuring changes in substrate utilization in the myocardium in response to fasting using hyperpolarized [1-13C]butyrate and [1-13C]pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaansen, Jessica A. M.; Merritt, Matthew E.; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is often associated with a shift in substrate preference for ATP production. Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has the unique ability to detect real-time metabolic changes in vivo due to its high sensitivity and specificity. Here a protocol using HP [1-13C]pyruvate and [1-13C]butyrate is used to measure carbohydrate versus fatty acid metabolism in vivo. Metabolic changes in fed and fasted Sprague Dawley rats (n = 36) were studied at 9.4 T after tail vein injections. Pyruvate and butyrate competed for acetyl-CoA production, as evidenced by significant changes in [13C]bicarbonate (−48%), [1-13C]acetylcarnitine (+113%), and [5-13C]glutamate (−63%), following fasting. Butyrate uptake was unaffected by fasting, as indicated by [1-13C]butyrylcarnitine. Mitochondrial pseudoketogenesis facilitated the labeling of the ketone bodies [1-13C]acetoacetate and [1-13C]β-hydroxybutyryate, without evidence of true ketogenesis. HP [1-13C]acetoacetate was increased in fasting (250%) but decreased during pyruvate co-injection (−82%). Combining HP 13C technology and co-administration of separate imaging agents enables noninvasive and simultaneous monitoring of both fatty acid and carbohydrate oxidation. This protocol illustrates a novel method for assessing metabolic flux through different enzymatic pathways simultaneously and enables mechanistic studies of the changing myocardial energetics often associated with disease. PMID:27150735

  8. Measuring changes in substrate utilization in the myocardium in response to fasting using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]butyrate and [1-(13)C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Merritt, Matthew E; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is often associated with a shift in substrate preference for ATP production. Hyperpolarized (HP) (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has the unique ability to detect real-time metabolic changes in vivo due to its high sensitivity and specificity. Here a protocol using HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate and [1-(13)C]butyrate is used to measure carbohydrate versus fatty acid metabolism in vivo. Metabolic changes in fed and fasted Sprague Dawley rats (n = 36) were studied at 9.4 T after tail vein injections. Pyruvate and butyrate competed for acetyl-CoA production, as evidenced by significant changes in [(13)C]bicarbonate (-48%), [1-(13)C]acetylcarnitine (+113%), and [5-(13)C]glutamate (-63%), following fasting. Butyrate uptake was unaffected by fasting, as indicated by [1-(13)C]butyrylcarnitine. Mitochondrial pseudoketogenesis facilitated the labeling of the ketone bodies [1-(13)C]acetoacetate and [1-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyryate, without evidence of true ketogenesis. HP [1-(13)C]acetoacetate was increased in fasting (250%) but decreased during pyruvate co-injection (-82%). Combining HP (13)C technology and co-administration of separate imaging agents enables noninvasive and simultaneous monitoring of both fatty acid and carbohydrate oxidation. This protocol illustrates a novel method for assessing metabolic flux through different enzymatic pathways simultaneously and enables mechanistic studies of the changing myocardial energetics often associated with disease. PMID:27150735

  9. Cryptate 13C and 23Na nuclear magnetic relaxation as a probe of counterion dynamics in aqueous polyacrylate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Maarel, J. R. C.; Van Duijn, D.; De Bleijser, J.; Leyte, J. C.

    1987-03-01

    In a series of fully alkali neutralized polyacrylate solutions the counterions are included by a macrobicyclic ligand (cryptand) to form a well-defined coordination shell. Vapor pressure experiments show the polyacrylate-cryptate system to behave osmotically as an ordinary polyelectrolyte solution. Cryptate 13C and 23Na relaxation show that the influence of polyions on the counter-ion reorientational mobility is moderate. The main 23Na relaxation mechanism is found to be the fluctuating electric field gradient caused by the surrounding ligand.

  10. Virtual magnetic resonance colonography

    PubMed Central

    Debatin, J; Lauenstein, T

    2003-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening has vast potential. Beyond considerations for cost and diagnostic accuracy, the effectiveness of any colorectal screening strategy will be dependent on the degree of patient acceptance. Magnetic resonance (MR) colonography has been shown to be accurate regarding the detection of clinically relevant colonic polyps exceeding 10 mm in size, with reported sensitivity and specificity values exceeding 95%. To further increase patient acceptance, strategies for fecal tagging have recently been developed. By modulating the signal of fecal material to be identical to the signal characteristics of the enema applied to distend the colon, fecal tagging in conjunction with MR colonography obviates the need for bowel cleansing. The review will describe the techniques underlying MR colonography and describe early clinical experience with fecal tagging techniques. PMID:12746264

  11. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  12. In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Studies of Glycine and Glutathione Metabolism in a Rat Mammary Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Thelwall, Peter E.; Simpson, Nicholas E.; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Clark, M. Daniel; Pourdeyhimi, Roxana; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Blackband, Stephen J.; Gamcsik, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolism of glycine into glutathione was monitored noninvasively in vivo in intact R3230Ac rat tumors by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Metabolism was tracked by following the isotope label from intravenously infused [2-13C]-glycine into the glycinyl residue of glutathione. Signals from [2-13C]-glycine and γ-glutamylcysteinyl-[2-13C]-glycine (13C-glutathione) were detected by nonlocalized 13C spectroscopy as these resonances are distinct from background signals. In addition, using spectroscopic imaging methods, heterogeneity in the in vivo tumor distribution of glutathione was observed. In vivo spectroscopy also detected isotope incorporation from [2-13C]-glycine into both the 2- and 3-carbons of serine. Analyses of tumor tissue extracts show single and multiple label incorporation from [2-13C]-glycine into serine from metabolism through the serine hydroxymethyltransferase and glycine cleavage system pathways. Mass spectrometric analysis of extracts also shows that isotope-labeled serine is further metabolized via the transsulfuration pathway as the 13C-isotope labels appear in both the glycinyl- and the cysteinyl-residue of glutathione. Our studies demonstrate the use of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy for monitoring tumor metabolic processes central to oxidative stress defense. PMID:21751272

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Mirijanian, James; Pavell, James

    2015-05-01

    The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) is being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC). Cold and hot atom interferometer based gyroscopes have suffered from Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) challenges and limits in bandwidth, scale factor stability, dead time, high rotation rate, vibration, and acceleration. NMRG utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as a reference for determining rotation, providing continuous measurement, high bandwidth, stable scale factor, high rotation rate measurement, and low sensitivity to vibration and acceleration in a low SWaP package. The sensitivity to vibration has been partially tested and demonstrates no measured sensitivity within error bars. Real time closed loop implementation of the sensor significantly decreases environmental and systematic sensitivities and supports a compact and low power digital signal processing and control system. Therefore, the NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost SWaP package. The poster will describe the history, operation, and design of the NMRG. General performance results will also be presented along with recent vibration test results.

  14. 13C and 1H NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) studies of solid polyolefines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudby, M. E. A.; Harris, R. K.; Metcalfe, K.; Packer, K. J.; Smith, P. W. R.

    1983-01-01

    The basis of H-1 and C-13 high-resolution NMR investigations of solid polymers is outlined. The C-13 NMR spectra of solid syndiotactic and isotactic polypropene are discussed and their interpretation in terms of conformation and chain-packing effects are reviewed. The effects of decreasing temperature on the C-13 high-resolution spectrum of an annealed sample of isotactic polypropene is described and interpreted in terms of the crystal structure. The question of the proportion of the sample giving rise to C-13 signals is addressed and some results reported. The main cause for observing only part of the total sample is shown to be the H-1 rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation behavior. The H-1 spin-lattice relaxation and spectral characteristics of a number of polyolefin samples are summarized and the role of spin-diffusion discussed.

  15. Superconducting Magnets for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenan, Peter

    2000-03-01

    MRI is now a well established diagnostic technique in medicine. The richness of information provided by magnetic resonance gives rise to a variety of techniques which in turn leads to a variety of magnet designs. Magnet designers must consider suitable superconduting materials for the magnet, but need also to consider the overall fomat of the magnet to maximise patient comfort, access for clinicians and convenience of use - in some examples magnets are destined for use within the operating theatre and special considerations are required for this. Magnet types include; (1) low-field general purpose imagers, (2) extremity imaging, (3) open magnets with exellent all-round access often employing iron or permanent magnetic materials, (4) high-field magnets, and (5) very high-field (7 Tesla and more) magnets for spectroscopy and functional imaging research. Examples of these magnet varieties will be shown and some of the design challenges discussed.

  16. Backbone 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of the 39 kDa staphylococcal hemoglobin receptor IsdH.

    PubMed

    Spirig, Thomas; Clubb, Robert T

    2012-10-01

    During infections Stahpylococcus aureus preferentially uses heme as an iron source, which it captures from human hemoglobin using the Iron regulated surface determinant (Isd) system. On the cell surface two related staphylococcal surface receptors called IsdH and IsdB bind to hemoglobin and extract its heme. Both receptors contain multiple NEAr iron Transporter (NEAT) domains that either bind to hemoglobin, or to heme. All previous structural studies have investigated individual NEAT domains and have not explored how the domains might interact with one another to synergistically extract heme from hemoglobin. Here, we report the near complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of a bi-domain unit from IsdH that contains the N2 and N3 NEAT domains, which bind to hemoglobin and heme, respectively (IsdH(N2N3), residues 326-660, 39 kDa). The assigned backbone resonances lay the foundation for future NMR studies that will explore the molecular basis of IsdH function. PMID:22101872

  17. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  18. Deciphering the impact of diagenesis overprint on negative δ13C excursions using rock magnetism: Case study of Ediacaran carbonates, Yangjiaping section, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macouin, Mélina; Ader, Magali; Moreau, Marie-Gabrielle; Poitou, Charles; Yang, Zhenyu; Sun, Zhimming

    2012-10-01

    Rock magnetism is used here to investigate the genesis of one of the puzzling negative carbon isotopic excursions of the Neoproterozoic in the Yangtze platform (South China). A detailed characterization of the magnetic mineralogy, which includes low-temperature and high-field magnetometry and classical magnetic measurement (ARM, IRM, susceptibility), was therefore performed along upper Doushantuo and lower Dengying Formations outcropping in the Yangjiaping section. The derived magnetic parameters show variations that can be interpreted as variations in magnetic grains size and in oxide contents. They show that the magnetic content is significantly reduced in samples presenting negative δ13Ccalcite values. We interpret this as a result of magnetite dissolution and secondary carbonate precipitation during early diagenesis bacterial sulfate reduction. Combined with C and O isotopic data, paleomagnetic techniques thus show that the upper Doushantuo-lower Dengying negative excursion of the Yangjiaping section is largely due to diagenesis, although the preservation of a genuine δ13C excursion of lower magnitude from +7‰ down to 0‰, instead of down to -9‰ as usually considered, cannot be ruled out. A corrected δ13Ccarbonate chemostratigraphic curve is therefore proposed. The unambiguous identification of a strong diagenetic component for this excursion casts doubts on the primary nature of other potentially time equivalent negative excursions of the Yangtze platform and thus to its correlation to negative excursions in other cratons (i.e. Shuram excursion). More generally, this study illustrates the potential of magnetic mineralogy characterization, a low cost, time efficient and non-destructive technique, as screening tool for diagenetic overprints of δ13C and δ18O.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks. PMID:27432660

  2. Detecting a new source for photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization in the LOV2 domain of phototropin by magnetic-field dependent (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kothe, Gerd; Lukaschek, Michail; Link, Gerhard; Kacprzak, Sylwia; Illarionov, Boris; Fischer, Markus; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Bacher, Adelbert; Weber, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Phototropin is a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) containing blue-light receptor, which regulates, governed by its two LOV domains, the phototropic response of higher plants. Upon photoexcitation, the FMN cofactor triplet state, (3)F, reacts with a nearby cysteine to form a covalent adduct. Cysteine-to-alanine mutants of LOV domains instead generate a flavin radical upon illumination. Here, we explore the formation of photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) in LOV2-C450A of Avena sativa phototropin and demonstrate that photo-CIDNP observed in solution (13)C NMR spectra can reliably be interpreted in terms of solid-state mechanisms including a novel triplet mechanism. To minimize cross-polarization, which transfers light-induced magnetization to adjacent (13)C nuclei, our experiments were performed on proteins reconstituted with specifically (13)C-labeled flavins. Two potential sources for photo-CIDNP can be identified: The photogenerated triplet state, (3)F, and the triplet radical pair (3)(F(-•)W(+•)), formed by electron abstraction of (3)F from tryptophan W491. To separate the two contributions, photo-CIDNP studies were performed at four different magnetic fields ranging from 4.7 to 11.8 T. Analysis revealed that, at fields <9 T, both (3)(F(-•)W(+•)) and (3)F contribute to photo-CIDNP, whereas at high magnetic fields, the calculated enhancement factors of (3)F agree favorably with their experimental counterparts. Thus, we have for the first time detected that a triplet state is the major source for photo-CIDNP in a photoactive protein. Since triplet states are frequently encountered upon photoexcitation of flavoproteins, the novel triplet mechanism opens up new means of studying electronic structures of the active cofactors in these proteins at atomic resolution. PMID:25207844

  3. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference. PMID:26878709

  4. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Bolo, N.R.

    1991-11-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate the potential for and limitations of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for quantitation of glucose flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (shunt). Interest in the shunt is motivated by the possibility that its activity may be greatly increased in cancer and in the pathological states of cardiac and cerebral ischemia. The ability to dynamically monitor flux through the pentose shunt can give new knowledge about metabolism in pathological states. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor shunt activity by determination of the ratios of ({sup 13}C-4) to ({sup 13}C-5)-glutamate, ({sup 13}C-3) to ({sup 13}C-2)-alanine or ({sup 13}C-3) to ({sup 13}C-2)-lactate produced when ({sup 13}C-2)-glucose is infused. These methods provide measures of the effect of oxidative stresses on shunt activity in systems ranging from cell free enzyme-substrate preparations to cell suspensions and whole animals. In anaerobic cell free preparations, the fraction of glucose flux through the shunt was monitored with a time resolution of 3 minutes. This work predicts the potential for in vivo human studies of pentose phosphate pathway activity based on the mathematical simulation of the {sup 13}C fractional enrichments of C4 and C5-glutamate as a function of shunt activity and on the signal-to- noise ratio acquired in {sup 13}C NMR human studies from the current literature.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Bolo, N.R.

    1991-11-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate the potential for and limitations of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for quantitation of glucose flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (shunt). Interest in the shunt is motivated by the possibility that its activity may be greatly increased in cancer and in the pathological states of cardiac and cerebral ischemia. The ability to dynamically monitor flux through the pentose shunt can give new knowledge about metabolism in pathological states. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor shunt activity by determination of the ratios of [{sup 13}C-4] to [{sup 13}C-5]-glutamate, [{sup 13}C-3] to [{sup 13}C-2]-alanine or [{sup 13}C-3] to [{sup 13}C-2]-lactate produced when [{sup 13}C-2]-glucose is infused. These methods provide measures of the effect of oxidative stresses on shunt activity in systems ranging from cell free enzyme-substrate preparations to cell suspensions and whole animals. In anaerobic cell free preparations, the fraction of glucose flux through the shunt was monitored with a time resolution of 3 minutes. This work predicts the potential for in vivo human studies of pentose phosphate pathway activity based on the mathematical simulation of the {sup 13}C fractional enrichments of C4 and C5-glutamate as a function of shunt activity and on the signal-to- noise ratio acquired in {sup 13}C NMR human studies from the current literature.

  7. Optical hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in nanodiamond ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical nuclear polarization holds the key for orders of magnitude enhancements of nuclear magnetic resonance signals which, in turn, would enable a wide range of novel applications in biomedical sciences. However, current implementations of DNP require cryogenic temperatures and long times for achieving high polarization. Here we propose and analyze in detail protocols that can achieve rapid hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in randomly oriented ensembles of nanodiamonds at room temperature. Our protocols exploit a combination of optical polarization of electron spins in nitrogen-vacancy centers and the transfer of this polarization to 13C nuclei by means of microwave control to overcome the severe challenges that are posed by the random orientation of the nanodiamonds and their nitrogen-vacancy centers. Specifically, these random orientations result in exceedingly large energy variations of the electron spin levels that render the polarization and coherent control of the nitrogen-vacancy center electron spins as well as the control of their coherent interaction with the surrounding 13C nuclear spins highly inefficient. We address these challenges by a combination of an off-resonant microwave double resonance scheme in conjunction with a realization of the integrated solid effect which, together with adiabatic rotations of external magnetic fields or rotations of nanodiamonds, leads to a protocol that achieves high levels of hyperpolarization of the entire nuclear-spin bath in a randomly oriented ensemble of nanodiamonds even at room temperature. This hyperpolarization together with the long nuclear-spin polarization lifetimes in nanodiamonds and the relatively high density of 13C nuclei has the potential to result in a major signal enhancement in 13C nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and suggests functionalized and hyperpolarized nanodiamonds as a unique probe for molecular imaging both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Starch Biosynthesis and Intermediary Metabolism in Maize Kernels. Quantitative Analysis of Metabolite Flux by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance1

    PubMed Central

    Glawischnig, Erich; Gierl, Alfons; Tomas, Adriana; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    The seeds of cereals represent an important sink for metabolites during the accumulation of storage products, and seeds are an essential component of human and animal nutrition. Understanding the metabolic interconversions (networks) underpinning storage product formation could provide the foundation for effective metabolic engineering of these primary nutritional sources. In this paper, we describe the use of retrobiosynthetic nuclear magnetic resonance analysis to establish the metabolic history of the glucose (Glc) units of starch in maize (Zea mays) kernels. Maize kernel cultures were grown with [U-13C6]Glc, [U-13C12]sucrose, or [1,2-13C2]acetate as supplements. After 19 d, starch was hydrolyzed, and the isotopomer composition of the resulting Glc was determined by quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. [1,2-13C2]Acetate was not incorporated into starch. [U-13C6]Glc or [U-13C12]sucrose gave similar labeling patterns of polysaccharide Glc units, which were dominated by [1,2,3-13C3]- and [4,5,6-13C3]-isotopomers, whereas the [U-13C6]-, [3,4,5,6-13C4]-, [1,2-13C2]-, [5,6-13C2], [3-13C1], and [4-13C1]-isotopomers were present at lower levels. These isotopomer compositions indicate that there is extensive recycling of Glc before its incorporation into starch, via the enzymes of glycolytic, glucogenic, and pentose phosphate pathways. The relatively high abundance of the [5,6-13C2]-isotopomer can be explained by the joint operation of glycolysis/glucogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway. PMID:12481054

  9. Near-complete 1H, 13C, 15N resonance assignments of dimethylsulfoxide-denatured TGFBIp FAS1-4 A546T.

    PubMed

    Kulminskaya, Natalia V; Yoshimura, Yuichi; Runager, Kasper; Sørensen, Charlotte S; Bjerring, Morten; Andreasen, Maria; Otzen, Daniel E; Enghild, Jan J; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Mulder, Frans A A

    2016-04-01

    The transforming growth factor beta induced protein (TGFBIp) is a major protein component of the human cornea. Mutations occurring in TGFBIp may cause corneal dystrophies, which ultimately lead to loss of vision. The majority of the disease-causing mutations are located in the C-terminal domain of TGFBIp, referred as the fourth fascilin-1 (FAS1-4) domain. In the present study the FAS1-4 Ala546Thr, a mutation that causes lattice corneal dystrophy, was investigated in dimethylsulfoxide using liquid-state NMR spectroscopy, to enable H/D exchange strategies for identification of the core formed in mature fibrils. Isotope-labeled fibrillated FAS1-4 A546T was dissolved in a ternary mixture 95/4/1 v/v/v% dimethylsulfoxide/water/trifluoroacetic acid, to obtain and assign a reference 2D (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum for the H/D exchange analysis. Here, we report the near-complete assignments of backbone and aliphatic side chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonances for unfolded FAS1-4 A546T at 25 °C. PMID:26275916

  10. Sequence-specific (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C resonance assignments of the autophagy-related protein LC3C.

    PubMed

    Krichel, Carsten; Weiergräber, Oliver H; Pavlidou, Marina; Mohrlüder, Jeannine; Schwarten, Melanie; Willbold, Dieter; Neudecker, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy is a versatile catabolic pathway for lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic material. While the phenomenological and molecular characteristics of autophagic non-selective (bulk) decomposition have been investigated for decades, the focus of interest is increasingly shifting towards the selective mechanisms of autophagy. Both, selective as well as bulk autophagy critically depend on ubiquitin-like modifiers belonging to the Atg8 (autophagy-related 8) protein family. During evolution, Atg8 has diversified into eight different human genes. While all human homologues participate in the formation of autophagosomal membrane compartments, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3C (LC3C) additionally plays a unique role in selective autophagic clearance of intracellular pathogens (xenophagy), which relies on specific protein-protein recognition events mediated by conserved motifs. The sequence-specific (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C resonance assignments presented here form the stepping stone to investigate the high-resolution structure and dynamics of LC3C and to delineate LC3C's complex network of molecular interactions with the autophagic machinery by NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26280529

  11. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to evaluate the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  12. High-field dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization of [1-(13)C]pyruvic acid.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Can, Emine; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H; Schwitter, Juerg; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-05-14

    [1-(13)C]pyruvate is the most widely used hyperpolarized metabolic magnetic resonance imaging agent. Using a custom-built 7.0 T polarizer operating at 1.0 K and trityl radical-doped [1-(13)C]pyruvic acid, unextrapolated solution-state (13)C polarization greater than 60% was measured after dissolution and rapid transfer to a spectrometer magnet, demonstrating the signal enhancement attainable using optimized hardware. Slower rates of polarization under these conditions can be largely overcome with higher radical concentrations. PMID:27093499

  13. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  14. Basics of magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Beginning with the behavior of a compass needle in a magnetic field, this text uses analogies from everyday experience to explain the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and how it is used for imaging. Using a minimum of scientific abbreviations and symbols, the basics of tissue visualization and characterization are presented. A description of the various types of magnets and scanners is followed by the practical advantages and limitations of MRI relative to x-ray CT scanning.

  15. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  16. Influence of 13C isotopic labeling location of 13C DNP of acetate using TEMPO free radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Lumata, Lloyd

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) via the dissolution method enhances the liquid-state magnetic resonance (NMR or MRI) signals of insensitive nuclear spins by at least 10,000-fold. The basis for all these signal enhancements at room temperature is the polarization transfer from the electrons to nuclear spins at cryogenic temperature and high magnetic field. In this work, we have studied the influence of the location of 13C isotopic labeling on the DNP of sodium acetate at 3.35 T and 1.4 K using a wide ESR linewidth free radical 4-oxo-TEMPO. The carbonyl [1-13C]acetate spins produced a polarization level that is almost twice that of the methyl [2-13C]acetate spins. On the other hand, the polarization of the methyl 13C spins doubled to reach the level of [1-13C]acetate when the methyl group was deuterated. Meanwhile, the solid-state nuclear relaxation of these samples are the same and do not correlate with the polarization levels. These behavior implies that the nuclear relaxation for these samples is dominated by the contribution from the free radicals and the polarization levels can be explained by a thermodynamic picture of DNP.

  17. Performance evaluation of quantitative adiabatic (13)C NMR pulse sequences for site-specific isotopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Thibaudeau, Christophe; Remaud, Gérald; Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge

    2010-07-01

    (2)H/(1)H and (13)C/(12)C site-specific isotope ratios determined by NMR spectroscopy may be used to discriminate pharmaceutically active ingredients based on the synthetic process used in production. Extending the Site-specific Natural Isotope Fractionation NMR (SNIF-NMR) method to (13)C is highly beneficial for complex organic molecules when measurements of (2)H/(1)H ratios lead to poorly defined molecular fingerprints. The current NMR methodology to determine (13)C/(12)C site-specific isotope ratios suffers from poor sensitivity and long experimental times. In this work, several NMR pulse sequences based on polarization transfer were evaluated and optimized to measure precise quantitative (13)C NMR spectra within a short time. Adiabatic 180 degrees (1)H and (13)C pulses were incorporated into distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT) and refocused insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer (INEPT) to minimize the influence of 180 degrees pulse imperfections and of off-resonance effects on the precision of the measured (13)C peak areas. The adiabatic DEPT sequence was applied to draw up a precise site-specific (13)C isotope profile of ibuprofen. A modified heteronuclear cross-polarization (HCP) experiment featuring (1)H and (13)C spin-locks with adiabatic 180 degrees pulses is also introduced. This sequence enables efficient magnetization transfer across a wide (13)C frequency range although not enough for an application in quantitative (13)C isotopic analysis. PMID:20527737

  18. Qualitative Metabolome Analysis of Human Cerebrospinal Fluid by 13C-/12C-Isotope Dansylation Labeling Combined with Liquid Chromatography Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kevin; Bamforth, Fiona; Li, Liang

    2011-02-01

    Metabolome analysis of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is challenging because of low abundance of metabolites present in a small volume of sample. We describe and apply a sensitive isotope labeling LC-MS technique for qualitative analysis of the CSF metabolome. After a CSF sample is divided into two aliquots, they are labeled by 13C-dansyl and 12C-dansyl chloride, respectively. The differentially labeled aliquots are then mixed and subjected to LC-MS using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). Dansylation offers significant improvement in the performance of chromatography separation and detection sensitivity. Moreover, peaks detected in the mass spectra can be readily analyzed for ion pair recognition and database search based on accurate mass and/or retention time information. It is shown that about 14,000 features can be detected in a 25-min LC-FTICR MS run of a dansyl-labeled CSF sample, from which about 500 metabolites can be profiled. Results from four CSF samples are compared to gauge the detectability of metabolites by this method. About 261 metabolites are commonly detected in replicate runs of four samples. In total, 1132 unique metabolite ion pairs are detected and 347 pairs (31%) matched with at least one metabolite in the Human Metabolome Database. We also report a dansylation library of 220 standard compounds and, using this library, about 85 metabolites can be positively identified. Among them, 21 metabolites have never been reported to be associated with CSF. These results illustrate that the dansylation LC-FTICR MS method can be used to analyze the CSF metabolome in a more comprehensive manner.

  19. High-field small animal magnetic resonance oncology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High-field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRS as well as diffusion-weighted, blood oxygen level dependent contrast imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies.

  20. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  1. 13C NMR spectroscopy applications to brain energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Valette, Julien; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2013-01-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the method of choice for studying brain metabolism. Indeed, the most convincing data obtained to decipher metabolic exchanges between neurons and astrocytes have been obtained using this technique, thus illustrating its power. It may be difficult for non-specialists, however, to grasp thefull implication of data presented in articles written by spectroscopists. The aim of the review is, therefore, to provide a fundamental understanding of this topic to facilitate the non-specialists in their reading of this literature. In the first part of this review, we present the metabolic fate of 13C-labeled substrates in the brain in a detailed way, including an overview of some general neurochemical principles. We also address and compare the various spectroscopic strategies that can be used to study brain metabolism. Then, we provide an overview of the 13C NMR experiments performed to analyze both intracellular and intercellular metabolic fluxes. More particularly, the role of lactate as a potential energy substrate for neurons is discussed in the light of 13C NMR data. Finally, new perspectives and applications offered by 13C hyperpolarization are described. PMID:24367329

  2. Magnetic resonance apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Jasper A.; Cooper, Richard K.

    1982-01-01

    Means for producing a region of homogeneous magnetic field remote from the source of the field, wherein two equal field sources are arranged axially so their fields oppose, producing a region near the plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the sources where the radial component of the field goes through a maximum. Near the maximum, the field is homogeneous over prescribed regions.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    NMR is remarkable in the number of innovations that have appeared and become established within the past five years. This thoroughly up-to-date account of the field explains fundamentals and applications of the NMR phenomenon from the viewpoint of a physical chemist. Beginning with descriptions of basic concepts involved in continuous wave operation, the book goes on to cover spectral analysis, relaxation phenomena, the effects of pulses, the Fourier transform model, double resonance and the effects of chemical exchange and quadrupolar interactions. The book also includes the new techniques for work on solids and for complicated pulse sequences, plus abundant figures and illustrative spectra.

  4. Magnetic resonance apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, J.A.; Cooper, R.K.

    1980-10-10

    The patent consists of means for producing a region of homogeneous magnetic field remote from the source of the field, wherein two equal field sources are arranged axially so their fields oppose, producing a region near the plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the sources where the radial correspondent of the field goes through a maximum. Near the maximum, the field is homogeneous over prescribed regions.

  5. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  6. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection.

    PubMed

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-06-12

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized (13)C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized (13)C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  7. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  8. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of the LAM-RRM1 N-terminal module of La protein from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Chasapis, Christos T; Argyriou, Aikaterini I; Apostolidi, Maria; Konstantinidou, Parthena; Bentrop, Detlef; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-10-01

    The N-terminal half of La protein consists of two concatenated motifs: La motif (LAM) and the N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM1) both of which are responsible for poly(U) RNA binding. Here, we present the backbone and side-chain assignments of the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonances of the 191-residue LAM-RRM1 region of the La protein from the lower eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum and its secondary structure prediction. PMID:25687647

  9. Pediatric Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging modality with excellent contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Since ionizing radiation is an important concern in the pediatric population, MRI serves as a useful alternative to computed tomography (CT) and also provides additional clues to diagnosis, not discernible on other investigations. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), urography, angiography, enterography, dynamic multiphasic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging provide wealth of information. The main limitations include, long scan time, need for sedation/anesthesia, cost and lack of widespread availability. With the emergence of newer sequences and variety of contrast agents, MRI has become a robust modality and may serve as a one-stop shop for both anatomical and functional information. PMID:26916887

  10. Measurement of the 13C(α, n)16O reaction at astrophysical energies using the Trojan Horse Method. Focus on the -3 keV sub-threshold resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Avila, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Santiago, D.; Spartà, R.

    2014-03-01

    Most of the nuclei in the mass range 90 ≲ A ≲ 208 are produced through the so-called s-process, namely through a series of neutron capture reactions on seed nuclei followed by β-decays. The 13C(α, n)16O reaction is the neutron source for the main component of the s-process. It is active inside the helium-burning shell of asymptotic giant branch stars, at temperatures ≲ 108 K, corresponding to an energy interval of 140 - 230 keV. In this region, the astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the -3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in 17O. Direct measurements could not soundly establish its contribution owing to the cross section suppression at astrophysical energies determined by the Coulomb barrier between interacting nuclei. Indirect measurements and extrapolations yielded inconsistent results, calling for further investigations. The Trojan Horse Method turns out to be very suited for the study of the 13C(α, n)16O reaction as it allows us to access the low as well as the negative energy re- gion, in particular in the case of resonance reactions. We have applied the Trojan HorseMethod to the 13C(6Li, n16O)d quasi-free reaction. By using the modified R-matrix approach, the asymptotic normalization coefficient {( {tilde C{α 13{{C}}}17{{O(1/}{{{2}}{ + }}{{)}}}} )^2} of the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced as well as the n-partial width, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy for the 13C(α, n)16O astrophysical factor. A preliminary analysis of a partial data set has lead to {( {tilde C{α 13{{C}}}17{{O(1/}{{{2}}{ + }}{{)}}}} )^2} = 6.7 - 0.6 + 0.9 {{f}}{{{m}} - 1}, slightly larger than the values in the literature, determining a 13C(α, n)16O reaction rate in agreement with the most results in the literature at ˜ 108 K, with enhanced accuracy thanks to this innovative approach.

  11. (1)H-(13)C-(29)Si triple resonance and REDOR solid-state NMR-A tool to study interactions between biosilica and organic molecules in diatom cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wisser, Dorothea; Brückner, Stephan I; Wisser, Florian M; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Getzschmann, Jürgen; Kaskel, Stefan; Brunner, Eike

    2015-01-01

    Triple resonance solid-state NMR experiments using the spin combination (1)H-(13)C-(29)Si are still rarely found in the literature. This is due to the low natural abundance of the two heteronuclei. Such experiments are, however, increasingly important to study hybrid materials such as biosilica and others. A suitable model substance, ideally labeled with both (13)C and (29)Si, is thus very useful to optimize the experiments before applying them to studies of more complex samples such as biosilica. Tetraphenoxysilane could be synthesized in an easy, two-step synthesis including double isotope labelling. Using tetraphenoxysilane, we established a (1)H-(13)C-(29)Si double CP-based HETCOR experiment and applied it to diatom biosilica from the diatom species Thalassiosira pseudonana. Furthermore, we carried out (1)H-(13)C{(29)Si} CP-REDOR experiments in order to estimate the distance between the organic matrix and the biosilica. Our experiments on diatom biosilica strongly indicate a close contact between polyamine-containing parts of the organic matrix and the silica. This corroborates the assumption that the organic matrix is essential for the control of the cell wall formation. PMID:25638422

  12. Refined Analysis of Brain Energy Metabolism Using In Vivo Dynamic Enrichment of 13C Multiplets

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani M., Masoumeh; Duarte, João M. N.; Kunz, Nicolas; Gruetter, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with the infusion of 13C-labeled precursors is a unique approach to study in vivo brain energy metabolism. Incorporating the maximum information available from in vivo localized 13C spectra is of importance to get broader knowledge on cerebral metabolic pathways. Metabolic rates can be quantitatively determined from the rate of 13C incorporation into amino acid neurotransmitters such as glutamate and glutamine using suitable mathematical models. The time course of multiplets arising from 13C-13C coupling between adjacent carbon atoms was expected to provide additional information for metabolic modeling leading to potential improvements in the estimation of metabolic parameters. The aim of the present study was to extend two-compartment neuronal/glial modeling to include dynamics of 13C isotopomers available from fine structure multiplets in 13C spectra of glutamate and glutamine measured in vivo in rats brain at 14.1 T, termed bonded cumomer approach. Incorporating the labeling time courses of 13C multiplets of glutamate and glutamine resulted in elevated precision of the estimated fluxes in rat brain as well as reduced correlations between them. PMID:26969691

  13. 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of light organ-associated fatty acid-binding protein of Taiwanese fireflies.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kai-Li; Lee, Yi-Zong; Chen, Yun-Ru; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2016-04-01

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are a family of proteins that modulate the transfer of various fatty acids in the cytosol and constitute a significant portion in many energy-consuming cells. The ligand binding properties and specific functions of a particular type of FABP seem to be diverse and depend on the respective binding cavity as well as the cell type from which this protein is derived. Previously, a novel FABP (lcFABP; lc: Luciola cerata) was identified in the light organ of Taiwanese fireflies. The lcFABP was proved to possess fatty acids binding capabilities, especially for fatty acids of length C14-C18. However, the structural details are unknown, and the structure-function relationship has remained to be further investigated. In this study, we finished the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of (15)N/(13)C-enriched lcFABP by solution NMR spectroscopy. In addition, the secondary structure distribution was revealed based on the backbone N, H, Cα, Hα, C and side chain Cβ assignments. These results can provide the basis for further structural exploration of lcFABP. PMID:26373428

  14. Wide-range nuclear magnetic resonance detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.; Jirberg, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Compact and easy to use solid state nuclear magnetic resonance detector is designed for measuring field strength to 20 teslas in cryogenically cooled magnets. Extremely low noise and high sensitivity make detector applicable to nearly all types of analytical nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and can be used in high temperature and radiation environments.

  15. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:26751800

  16. Introduction to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, Stanley L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to try to give a short overview of what the status is on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's a subject where one really has to spend some time to look at the physics in detail to develop a proper working understanding. I feel it's not appropriate to present to you density matrices, Hamiltonians of all sorts, and differential equations representing the motion of spins. I'm really going to present some history and status, and show a few very simple concepts involved in NMR. It is a form of radio frequency spectroscopy and there are a great number of nuclei that can be studied very usefully with the technique. NMR requires a magnet, a r.f. transmitter/receiver system, and a data acquisition system.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of acquired cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, C L; Higgins, C B; Caputo, G R

    1996-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, advances in magnetic resonance imaging techniques have increased the accuracy and applicability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. These advances have improved the utility of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating cardiac morphology, blood flow, and myocardial contractility, all significant diagnostic features in the evaluation of the patient with acquired heart disease. Utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been limited, primarily due to clinical reliance upon nuclear scintigraphy and echocardiography. Recent developments in fast and ultrafast imaging should continue to enhance the significance of magnetic resonance imaging in this field. Widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the cardiovascular system will ultimately depend upon its maturation into a comprehensive, noninvasive imaging technique for the varying manifestations of acquired heart disease, including cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and acquired valvular disease. Images PMID:8792545

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.

    1988-01-01

    MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE SPINE thoroughly demonstrates the advantages of this new radiologic modality in diagnosing spinal disorders. The book begins with an introductory chapter on the basic physics and technical considerations of magnetic resonance in general and magnetic resonance imaging of the spine in particular. The second chapter covers normal spinal anatomy, and features color photos of multi-planar sections of spinal anatomy.

  19. Practical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Alpendurada, F; Wong, J; Pennell, D J

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in magnetic resonance imaging have focused attention on evaluation of patients with cardiac disease. These improvements have been substantiated by a large and expanding body of clinical evidence, making cardiovascular magnetic resonance the imaging modality of choice in a wide variety of cardiovascular disorders. A brief review on the current applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance is provided, with reference to some of the most relevant studies, statements and reviews published in this field.

  20. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yungsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe-based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  1. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  2. Apparatus for investigating resonance with application to magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Sytil; Jones, Dyan L.; Gross, Josh; Zollman, Dean

    2015-11-01

    Resonance is typically studied in the context of either a pendulum or a mass on a spring. We have developed an apparatus that enables beginning students to investigate resonant behavior of changing magnetic fields, in addition to the properties of the magnetic field due to a wire and the superposition of magnetic fields. In this resonant system, a compass oscillates at a frequency determined by the compass's physical properties and an external magnetic field. While the analysis is mathematically similar to that of the pendulum, this apparatus has an advantage that the magnetic field is easily controlled, while it is difficult to control the strength of gravity. This apparatus has been incorporated into a teaching module on magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Yogesh K; Glaser, Kevin J; Ehman, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is a rapidly developing technology for quantitatively assessing the mechanical properties of tissue. The technology can be considered to be an imaging-based counterpart to palpation, commonly used by physicians to diagnose and characterize diseases. The success of palpation as a diagnostic method is based on the fact that the mechanical properties of tissues are often dramatically affected by the presence of disease processes such as cancer, inflammation, and fibrosis. MRE obtains information about the stiffness of tissue by assessing the propagation of mechanical waves through the tissue with a special magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique. The technique essentially involves three steps: generating shear waves in the tissue,acquiring MR images depicting the propagation of the induced shear waves andprocessing the images of the shear waves to generate quantitative maps of tissue stiffness, called elastograms. MRE is already being used clinically for the assessment of patients with chronic liver diseases and is emerging as a safe, reliable and noninvasive alternative to liver biopsy for staging hepatic fibrosis. MRE is also being investigated for application to pathologies of other organs including the brain, breast, blood vessels, heart, kidneys, lungs and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this review article is to introduce this technology to clinical anatomists and to summarize some of the current clinical applications that are being pursued. PMID:20544947

  4. Separation of extra- and intracellular metabolites using hyperpolarized 13C diffusion weighted MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelsch, Bertram L.; Sriram, Renuka; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Leon Swisher, Christine; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Wang, Zhen J.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-09-01

    This work demonstrates the separation of extra- and intracellular components of glycolytic metabolites with diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using b-values of up to 15,000 s mm-2, a multi-exponential signal response was measured for hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate and lactate. By fitting the fast and slow asymptotes of these curves, their extra- and intracellular weighted diffusion coefficients were determined in cells perfused in a MR compatible bioreactor. In addition to measuring intracellular weighted diffusion, extra- and intracellular weighted hyperpolarized 13C metabolites pools are assessed in real-time, including their modulation with inhibition of monocarboxylate transporters. These studies demonstrate the ability to simultaneously assess membrane transport in addition to enzymatic activity with the use of diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C MR. This technique could be an indispensible tool to evaluate the impact of microenvironment on the presence, aggressiveness and metastatic potential of a variety of cancers.

  5. Separation of extra- and intracellular metabolites using hyperpolarized (13)C diffusion weighted MR.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Bertram L; Sriram, Renuka; Keshari, Kayvan R; Leon Swisher, Christine; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Vigneron, Daniel B; Wang, Zhen J; Larson, Peder E Z; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-09-01

    This work demonstrates the separation of extra- and intracellular components of glycolytic metabolites with diffusion weighted hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using b-values of up to 15,000smm(-2), a multi-exponential signal response was measured for hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate and lactate. By fitting the fast and slow asymptotes of these curves, their extra- and intracellular weighted diffusion coefficients were determined in cells perfused in a MR compatible bioreactor. In addition to measuring intracellular weighted diffusion, extra- and intracellular weighted hyperpolarized (13)C metabolites pools are assessed in real-time, including their modulation with inhibition of monocarboxylate transporters. These studies demonstrate the ability to simultaneously assess membrane transport in addition to enzymatic activity with the use of diffusion weighted hyperpolarized (13)C MR. This technique could be an indispensible tool to evaluate the impact of microenvironment on the presence, aggressiveness and metastatic potential of a variety of cancers. PMID:27434780

  6. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  7. Combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations to Characterize Carvedilol Polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Carlos A; San Gil, Rosane A S; Borré, Leandro B; Pires, José Ricardo; Vaiss, Viviane S; Resende, Jackson A L C; Leitão, Alexandre A; De Alencastro, Ricardo B; Leal, Katia Z

    2016-09-01

    The experiments of carvedilol form II, form III, and hydrate by (13)C and (15)N cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP MAS) are reported. The GIPAW (gauge-including projector-augmented wave) method from DFT (density functional theory) calculations was used to simulate (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts. A very good agreement was found for the comparison between the global results of experimental and calculated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts for carvedilol polymorphs. This work aims a comprehensive understanding of carvedilol crystalline forms employing solution and solid-state NMR as well as DFT calculations. PMID:26372719

  8. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge. PMID:18266413

  9. Torque-mixing magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Losby, J E; Fani Sani, F; Grandmont, D T; Diao, Z; Belov, M; Burgess, J A J; Compton, S R; Hiebert, W K; Vick, D; Mohammad, K; Salimi, E; Bridges, G E; Thomson, D J; Freeman, M R

    2015-11-13

    A universal, torque-mixing method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy is presented. In analogy to resonance detection by magnetic induction, the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment can be measured in sensitive broadband spectroscopy, here using a resonant mechanical torque sensor. Unlike induction, the torque amplitude allows equilibrium magnetic properties to be monitored simultaneously with the spin dynamics. Comprehensive electron spin resonance spectra of a single-crystal, mesoscopic yttrium iron garnet disk at room temperature reveal assisted switching between magnetization states and mode-dependent spin resonance interactions with nanoscale surface imperfections. The rich detail allows analysis of even complex three-dimensional spin textures. The flexibility of microelectromechanical and optomechanical devices combined with broad generality and capabilities of torque-mixing magnetic resonance spectroscopy offers great opportunities for development of integrated devices. PMID:26564851

  10. Measurement of the -3 keV resonance in the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction and its influence on the synthesis of s-process nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Avila, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Santiago, D.; Sparta, R.; and others

    2012-11-20

    The {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O reaction is the neutron source for the main component of the s-process, responsible of the production of most nuclei in the mass range 90 < A < 204. It is active inside the helium-burning shell in asymptotic giant branch stars, at temperatures < 10{sup 8} K, corresponding to an energy interval where the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O is effective of 140 - 230 keV. In this region, the astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the -3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in {sup 17}O, giving rise to a steep increase of the S-factor. Notwithstanding that it plays a crucial role in astrophysics, no direct measurements exist. Therefore, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the {sup 13}C({sup 6}Li,n{sup 16}O)d quasi-free reaction to achieve an experimental estimate of such contribution. For the first time, the ANC for the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced through the THM as well as the n-partial width, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy in the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O study. Though a larger ANC for the 6.356 MeV level is measured, our experimental S(E) factor agrees with the most recent extrapolation in the literature in the 140 - 230 keV energy interval, the accuracy being greatly enhanced thanks to this innovative approach.

  11. High Field Small Animal Magnetic Resonance Oncology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging, and hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy as well as diffusion-weighted, Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies. PMID:24374985

  12. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and secondary structure analysis of CmPI-II, a serine protease inhibitor isolated from marine snail Cenchritis muricatus.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Alonso-del-Rivero Antigua, Maday; Pires, José Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    A protease inhibitor (CmPI-II) (UNIPROT: IPK2_CENMR) from the marine mollusc Cenchritis muricatus, has been isolated and characterized. It is the first member of a new group (group 3) of non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors. CmPI-II is a tight-binding inhibitor of serine proteases: trypsin, human neutrophil elastase (HNE), subtilisin A and pancreatic elastase. This specificity is exceptional in the members of Kazal-type inhibitor family. Several models of three-dimensional structure of CmPI-II have been constructed by homology with other inhibitors of the family but its structure has not yet been solved experimentally. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of CmPI-II as basis for NMR structure determination and interaction studies. Secondary structure analyses deduced from the NMR chemical shift data have identified three β-strands β1: residues 14-19, β2: 23-35 and β3: 43-45 and one helix α1: 28-37 arranged in the sequential order β1-β2-α1-β3. These secondary structure elements suggest that CmPI-II adopts the typical scaffold of a Kazal-type inhibitor. PMID:26547437

  13. Analysis of mercerization process based on the intensity change of deconvoluted resonances of (13)C CP/MAS NMR: Cellulose mercerized under cooling and non-cooling conditions.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kento; Nakano, Takato

    2015-08-01

    The area intensity change of C1, C4, and C6 in spectrum obtained by (13)C CP/MAS NMR and the mutual relationship between their changes were examined for cellulose samples treated with various concentrations of aqueous NaOH solutions under non-cooling and cooling conditions. The area intensity of C1-up and C6-down changed cooperatively with that of C4-down which corresponds to the crystallinity of samples: "-up" and "-down" are the up- and down- field component in a splitting peak of NMR spectrum, respectively. The intensity change of C1-up starts to decrease with decreasing in that of C4-down after that of C6-down is almost complete. These changes were more clearly observed for samples treated under cooling condition. It can be suggested that their characteristic change relates closely to the change in conformation of cellulose chains by induced decrystallization and the subsequent crystallization of cellulose II, and presumed that their changes at microscopic level relate to the macroscopic morphological changes such as contraction along the length of cellulose chains and recovery along the length. PMID:26042706

  14. Dephosphorylation and biodistribution of 1-13C-phospholactate in vivo†

    PubMed Central

    Shchepin, Roman V.; Pham, Wellington; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a new approach for the delivery of a metabolic contrast agent for in vivo molecular imaging. The use of a phosphate-protecting group that facilitates parahydrogen-induced polarization of 1-13C-phospholactate potentially enables the in vivo administration of a hydrogenated hyperpolarized adduct. When injected, nonhyperpolarized 1-13C-phospholactate is retained in the vasculature during its metabolic conversion to 1-13C-lactate by blood phosphatases as demonstrated here using a mucin 1 mouse model of breast cancer and ex vivo high-resolution 13C NMR. This multisecond process is a suitable mechanism for the delivery of relatively short-lived 13C and potentially 15N hyperpolarized contrast agents using –OH phosphorylated small molecules, which is demonstrated here for the first time as an example of 1-13C-phospholactate. Through this approach, DL-1-13C-lactate is taken up by tissues and organs including the liver, kidneys, brain, heart, and tumors according to a timescale amenable to hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24995802

  15. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance -- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Three Axis Vector Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James

    2012-06-01

    The Northrop Grumman Corporation is leveraging the technology developed for the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) to build a combined Electron Paramagnetic Resonance -- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (EPR-NMR) magnetometer. The EPR-NMR approach provides a high bandwidth and high sensitivity simultaneous measurement of all three vector components of the magnetic field averaged over the small volume of the sensor's one vapor cell. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, and design basics of the EPR-NMR magnetometer including an overview of the NSD designs developed and demonstrated to date. General performance results will also be presented.

  16. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has become an indispensible tool for studying cognition in both the healthy and dysfunctional brain. FMRI monitors changes in the oxygenation of brain tissue resulting from altered metabolism consequent to a task-based evoked neural response or from spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity in the absence of conscious mentation (the “resting state”). Task-based studies have revealed neural correlates of a large number of important cognitive processes, while fMRI studies performed in the resting state have demonstrated brain-wide networks that result from brain regions with synchronized, apparently spontaneous activity. In this article, we review the methods used to acquire and analyze fMRI signals. PMID:26248581

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  18. Magnetic resonance elastography of abdomen.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur; Ehman, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    Many diseases cause substantial changes in the mechanical properties of tissue, and this provides motivation for developing methods to noninvasively assess the stiffness of tissue using imaging technology. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a versatile MRI-based technique, based on direct visualization of propagating shear waves in the tissues. The most established clinical application of MRE in the abdomen is in chronic liver disease. MRE is currently regarded as the most accurate noninvasive technique for detection and staging of liver fibrosis. Increasing experience and ongoing research is leading to exploration of applications in other abdominal organs. In this review article, the current use of MRE in liver disease and the potential future applications of this technology in other parts of the abdomen are surveyed. PMID:25488346

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Elastography of Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause substantial changes in the mechanical properties of tissue and this provides motivation for developing methods to non-invasively assess the stiffness of tissue using imaging technology. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a versatile MRI-based technique, based on direct visualization of propagating shear waves in the tissues. The most established clinical application of MRE in the abdomen is in chronic liver disease. MRE is currently regarded as the most accurate non-invasive technique for detection and staging of liver fibrosis. Increasing experience and ongoing research is leading to exploration of applications in other abdominal organs. In this review article, the current use of MRE in liver disease and the potential future applications of this technology in other parts of the abdomen are surveyed. PMID:25488346

  1. Magnetic resonance sees lesions of multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ziporyn, T.

    1985-02-15

    The value of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and quantitation of the progression of multiple sclerosis is discussed. Magnetic resonance imaging generates images that reflect differential density and velocity of hydrogen nuclei between cerebral gray and white matter, as well as between white matter and pathological lesions of the disease.

  2. Enhancement of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Slobozhanyuk, Alexey P; Poddubny, Alexander N; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; Kozachenko, Alexander V; Dubrovina, Irina A; Melchakova, Irina V; Kivshar, Yuri S; Belov, Pavel A

    2016-03-01

    It is revealed that the unique properties of ultrathin metasurface resonators can improve magnetic resonance imaging dramatically. A metasurface formed when an array of metallic wires is placed inside a scanner under the studied object and a substantial enhancement of the radio-frequency magnetic field is achieved by means of subwavelength manipulation with the metasurface, also allowing improved image resolution. PMID:26754827

  3. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence.

  5. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  6. Hyperpolarized functional magnetic resonance of murine skeletal muscle enabled by multiple tracer-paradigm synchronizations.

    PubMed

    Leftin, Avigdor; Roussel, Tangi; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Measuring metabolism's time- and space-dependent responses upon stimulation lies at the core of functional magnetic resonance imaging. While focusing on water's sole resonance, further insight could arise from monitoring the temporal responses arising from the metabolites themselves, in what is known as functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Performing these measurements in real time, however, is severely challenged by the short functional timescales and low concentrations of natural metabolites. Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization is an emerging technique that can potentially alleviate this, as it provides a massive sensitivity enhancement allowing one to probe low-concentration tracers and products in a single-scan. Still, conventional implementations of this hyperpolarization approach are not immediately amenable to the repeated acquisitions needed in real-time functional settings. This work proposes a strategy for functional magnetic resonance of hyperpolarized metabolites that bypasses this limitation, and enables the observation of real-time metabolic changes through the synchronization of stimuli-triggered, multiple-bolus injections of the metabolic tracer 13C1-pyruvate. This new approach is demonstrated with paradigms tailored to reveal in vivo thresholds of murine hind-limb skeletal muscle activation, involving the conversion of 13C1-pyruvate to 13C1-lactate and 13C1-alanine. These functional hind-limb studies revealed that graded skeletal muscle stimulation causes commensurate increases in glycolytic metabolism in a frequency- and amplitude-dependent fashion, that can be monitored on the seconds/minutes timescale using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization. Spectroscopic imaging further allowed the in vivo visualization of uptake, transformation and distribution of the tracer and products, in fast-twitch glycolytic and in slow-twitch oxidative muscle fiber groups. While these studies open vistas in time and sensitivity for metabolic

  7. Hyperpolarized Functional Magnetic Resonance of Murine Skeletal Muscle Enabled by Multiple Tracer-Paradigm Synchronizations

    PubMed Central

    Leftin, Avigdor; Roussel, Tangi; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Measuring metabolism's time- and space-dependent responses upon stimulation lies at the core of functional magnetic resonance imaging. While focusing on water's sole resonance, further insight could arise from monitoring the temporal responses arising from the metabolites themselves, in what is known as functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Performing these measurements in real time, however, is severely challenged by the short functional timescales and low concentrations of natural metabolites. Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization is an emerging technique that can potentially alleviate this, as it provides a massive sensitivity enhancement allowing one to probe low-concentration tracers and products in a single-scan. Still, conventional implementations of this hyperpolarization approach are not immediately amenable to the repeated acquisitions needed in real-time functional settings. This work proposes a strategy for functional magnetic resonance of hyperpolarized metabolites that bypasses this limitation, and enables the observation of real-time metabolic changes through the synchronization of stimuli-triggered, multiple-bolus injections of the metabolic tracer 13C1-pyruvate. This new approach is demonstrated with paradigms tailored to reveal in vivo thresholds of murine hind-limb skeletal muscle activation, involving the conversion of 13C1-pyruvate to 13C1-lactate and 13C1-alanine. These functional hind-limb studies revealed that graded skeletal muscle stimulation causes commensurate increases in glycolytic metabolism in a frequency- and amplitude-dependent fashion, that can be monitored on the seconds/minutes timescale using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization. Spectroscopic imaging further allowed the in vivo visualization of uptake, transformation and distribution of the tracer and products, in fast-twitch glycolytic and in slow-twitch oxidative muscle fiber groups. While these studies open vistas in time and sensitivity for metabolic

  8. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of a highly-soluble murine interleukin-3 analogue with wild-type bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shenggen; Murphy, James M; Low, Andrew; Norton, Raymond S

    2010-04-01

    Interleukin-3 (IL-3) is a cytokine that acts as a critical mediator of inflammation and immune responses to infections. IL-3, like interleukin-5 (IL-5) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), exerts its effects on target cells via receptors composed of cytokine-specific alpha-subunits and a common beta-subunit (betac-subunit, shared with IL-5 and GM-CSF). In contrast to humans, mice also possess an additional beta-receptor, beta(IL-3), that can specifically bind IL-3. Except for a study carried out on an analogue of human IL-3 that contains 14 mutations, structure-related studies of IL-3 have been very limited, largely because of its poor solution behaviour. Here we report (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments of murine IL-3 comprising residues 33-156 (SWISS-PROT accession number: P01586), in which the only mutation is an alanine substitution of Cys105. The mIL-3 construct used in the present study was engineered by eliminating residues 27-32 of the N-terminus (the first 26 residues of the primary sequence of mIL-3 are cleaved in vivo during secretion), the C-terminal 10 residues (157-166), and a disulfide bond between Cys105 and Cys166 that is poorly conserved in orthologue sequences. The new construct vastly improves the solubility of murine IL-3 while maintaining its wild-type biological activity. PMID:20174897

  9. Investigating brain metabolism at high fields using localized 13C NMR spectroscopy without 1H decoupling.

    PubMed

    Deelchand, Dinesh Kumar; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2006-02-01

    Most in vivo 13C NMR spectroscopy studies in the brain have been performed using 1H decoupling during acquisition. Decoupling imposes significant constraints on the experimental setup (particularly for human studies at high magnetic field) in order to stay within safety limits for power deposition. We show here that incorporation of the 13C label from 13C-labeled glucose into brain amino acids can be monitored accurately using localized 13C NMR spectroscopy without the application of 1H decoupling. Using LCModel quantification with prior knowledge of one-bond and multiple-bond J(CH) coupling constants, the uncertainty on metabolites concentrations was only 35% to 91% higher (depending on the carbon resonance of interest) in undecoupled spectra compared to decoupled spectra in the rat brain at 9.4 Tesla. Although less sensitive, 13C NMR without decoupling dramatically reduces experimental constraints on coil setup and pulse sequence design required to keep power deposition within safety guidelines. This opens the prospect of safely measuring 13C NMR spectra in humans at varied brain locations (not only the occipital lobe) and at very high magnetic fields above 4 Tesla. PMID:16345037

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of glioblastoma using aptamer conjugated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongjune; Yang, Jaemoon; Hwang, Myeonghwan; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2012-10-01

    Here we introduce a new class of smart imaging probes hybridizing polysorbate 80 coated-magnetic nanoparticles with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-targetable aptamer for specific magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of angiogenesis from glioblastoma.

  11. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments for intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein complexed with palmitate (15.4 kDA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hodsdon, M.E.; Toner, J.J.; Cistola, D.P.

    1994-12-01

    Intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein (I-FABP) belongs to a family of soluble, cytoplasmic proteins that are thought to function in the intracellular transport and trafficking of polar lipids. Individual members of this protein family have distinct specificities and affinities for fatty acids, cholesterol, bile salts, and retinoids. We are comparing several retinol- and fatty-acid-binding proteins from intestine in order to define the factors that control molecular recognition in this family of proteins. We have established sequential resonance assignments for uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-enriched I-FABP complexed with perdeuterated palmitate at pH7.2 and 37{degrees}C. The assignment strategy was similar to that introduced for calmodulin. We employed seven three-dimensional NMR experiments to establish scalar couplings between backbone and sidechain atoms. Backbone atoms were correlated using triple-resonance HNCO, HNCA, TOCSY-HMQC, HCACO, and HCA(CO)N experiments. Sidechain atoms were correlated using CC-TOCSY, HCCH-TOCSY, and TOCSY-HMQC. The correlations of peaks between three-dimensional spectra were established in a computer-assisted manner using NMR COMPASS (Molecular Simulations, Inc.) Using this approach, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments have been established for 120 of the 131 residues of I-FABP. For 18 residues, amide {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances were unobservable, apparently because of the rapid exchange of amide protons with bulk water at pH 7.2. The missing amide protons correspond to distinct amino acid patterns in the protein sequence, which will be discussed. During the assignment process, several sources of ambiguity in spin correlations were observed. To overcome this ambiguity, the additional inter-residue correlations often observed in the HNCA experiment were used as cross-checks for the sequential backbone assignments.

  12. Metabolic pathways for ketone body production. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of rat liver in vivo using /sup 13/C-multilabeled fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl-Wostl, C.; Seelig, J.

    1986-11-04

    The hormonal regulation of ketogenesis in the liver of living rat has been studied noninvasively with /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance. The spatial selection for the liver was better than 90%, with extrahepatic adipose tissue contribution only a very small amount of signal. The metabolic activities of the liver were investigated by infusion of /sup 13/C-labeled butyrate in the jugular vein of the anesthetized rat. The rate of butyrate infusion was chosen to be close to the maximum oxidative capacity of the rat liver, and the /sup 13/C signal intensities were enhanced by using doubly labeled (1,3-/sup 13/C)butyrate as a substrate. Different /sup 13/C NMR spectra and hence different metabolites were observed depending on the hormonal state of the animal. The /sup 13/C NMR studies demonstrate that even when rate of acetyl-CoA production are high, the disposal of this compound is not identical in fasted and diabetic animals. This supports previous suggestions that the redox state of the mitochondrion represents the most important factor in regulation. For a given metabolic state of the animal, different signal intensities were obtained depending on whether butyrate was labeled at C-1, C-3, or C-1,3. From the ratios of incorporation of /sup 13/C label into the carbons of 3-hydroxybutyrate, it could be estimated that a large fraction of butyrate evaded ..beta..-oxidation to acetyl-CoA but was converted directly to acetoacetyl-CoA. /sup 13/C-labeled glucose could be detected in vivo in the liver of diabetic rats.

  13. Elastic magnetic electron scattering from sup 13 C at Q sup 2 =1 GeV sup 2 / c sup 2

    SciTech Connect

    Miskimen, R.A.; Baghaei, H.; Bosted, P.E.; Dow, K.A.; Frodyma, M.; Frois, B.; Hicks, R.S.; Hotta, A.; Huffman, R.L.; Lee, K.S.; Martino, J.; Peterson, G.A.; Platchkov, S.; Rock, S.E.; Rokni, S.H.; Turchinetz, W.; Zumbro, J.D. )

    1991-10-01

    Electron scattering from {sup 13}C was measured at a momentum transfer of 5.08 fm{sup {minus}1}. No electron events were observed in the vicinity of the elastic peak, giving an upper limit for the elastic cross section of 1.2{times}10{sup {minus}39} cm{sup 2}/sr with a confidence level of 90%. At this momentum transfer, the square of the elastic {ital M}1 form factor apparently continues to fall exponentially with {ital q}. Comparison of the data with shell-model calculations indicates that admixtures of 2{h bar}{omega} configurations in the {sup 13}C ground state cannot entirely explain the high-{ital q} enhancement of the {ital M}1 form factor relative to 1{ital p}-shell calculations.

  14. Effect of ionic interaction between a hyperpolarized magnetic resonance chemical probe and a gadolinium contrast agent for the hyperpolarized lifetime after dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakusagi, Yoichi; Inoue, Kaori; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In hyperpolarization of 13C-enriched magnetic resonance chemical probes in the solid-state, a trace amount of gadolinium (Gd) contrast agent can be used to maximize polarization of the 13C nuclear spins. Here, we report systematic measurement of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and enhancement level of 13C-enriched chemical probes in the presence of various Gd contrast agents in the liquid-state after dissolution. Using two different 13C probes having opposite electric charges at neutral pH, we clearly show the T1 of hyperpolarized 13C was barely affected by the use of a Gd complex that displays repulsive interaction with the 13C probe in solution, whilst T1 was drastically shortened when there was ionic attraction between probe and complex.

  15. Effect of ionic interaction between a hyperpolarized magnetic resonance chemical probe and a gadolinium contrast agent for the hyperpolarized lifetime after dissolution.

    PubMed

    Takakusagi, Yoichi; Inoue, Kaori; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In hyperpolarization of (13)C-enriched magnetic resonance chemical probes in the solid-state, a trace amount of gadolinium (Gd) contrast agent can be used to maximize polarization of the (13)C nuclear spins. Here, we report systematic measurement of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and enhancement level of (13)C-enriched chemical probes in the presence of various Gd contrast agents in the liquid-state after dissolution. Using two different (13)C probes having opposite electric charges at neutral pH, we clearly show the T1 of hyperpolarized (13)C was barely affected by the use of a Gd complex that displays repulsive interaction with the (13)C probe in solution, whilst T1 was drastically shortened when there was ionic attraction between probe and complex. PMID:27490303

  16. Cardiac perfusion imaging using hyperpolarized 13c urea using flow sensitizing gradients

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jack J.; Robson, Matthew D.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of imaging the first passage of a bolus of hyperpolarized 13C urea through the rodent heart using flow‐sensitizing gradients to reduce signal from the blood pool. Methods A flow‐sensitizing bipolar gradient was optimized to reduce the bright signal within the cardiac chambers, enabling improved contrast of the agent within the tissue capillary bed. The gradient was incorporated into a dynamic golden angle spiral 13C imaging sequence. Healthy rats were scanned during rest (n = 3) and under adenosine stress‐induced hyperemia (n = 3). Results A two‐fold increase in myocardial perfusion relative to rest was detected during adenosine stress‐induced hyperemia, consistent with a myocardial perfusion reserve of two in rodents. Conclusion The new pulse sequence was used to obtain dynamic images of the first passage of hyperpolarized 13C urea in the rodent heart, without contamination from bright signal within the neighboring cardiac lumen. This probe of myocardial perfusion is expected to enable new hyperpolarized 13C studies in which the cardiac metabolism/perfusion mismatch can be identified. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Magn Reson Med 75:1474–1483, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance. PMID:25991580

  17. Hyperpolarized 13C urea relaxation mechanism reveals renal changes in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Stokholm Nørlinger, Thomas; Christoffer Hansen, David; Qi, Haiyun; Mose Nielsen, Per; Bonde Bertelsen, Lotte; Henrik Ardenkjaer‐Larsen, Jan; Stødkilde Jørgensen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to assess a novel 13C radial fast spin echo golden ratio single shot method for interrogating early renal changes in the diabetic kidney, using hyperpolarized (HP) [13C,15N2]urea as a T2 relaxation based contrast bio‐probe. Methods A novel HP 13C MR contrast experiment was conducted in a group of streptozotocin type‐1 diabetic rat model and age matched controls. Results A significantly different relaxation time (P = 0.004) was found in the diabetic kidney (0.49 ± 0.03 s) compared with the controls (0.64 ± 0.02 s) and secondly, a strong correlation between the blood oxygen saturation level and the relaxation times were observed in the healthy controls. Conclusion HP [13C,15N2]urea apparent T2 mapping may be a useful for interrogating local renal pO2 status and renal tissue alterations. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. Magn Reson Med 75:515–518, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID:26584247

  18. The use of dynamic nuclear polarization 13C-pyruvate MRS in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam Espe; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Clemmensen, Andreas Ettrup; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an immense development of new targeted anti-cancer drugs. For practicing precision medicine, a sensitive method imaging for non-invasive, assessment of early treatment response and for assisting in developing new drugs is warranted. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a potent technique for non-invasive in vivo investigation of tissue chemistry and cellular metabolism. Hyperpolarization by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is capable of creating solutions of molecules with polarized nuclear spins in a range of biological molecules and has enabled the real-time investigation of in vivo metabolism. The development of this new method has been demonstrated to enhance the nuclear polarization more than 10,000-fold, thereby significantly increasing the sensitivity of the MRS with a spatial resolution to the millimeters and a temporal resolution at the subsecond range. Furthermore, the method enables measuring kinetics of conversion of substrates into cell metabolites and can be integrated with anatomical proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many nuclei and substrates have been hyperpolarized using the DNP method. Currently, the most widely used compound is 13C-pyruvate due to favoring technicalities. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate results in appearance of 13C-lactate, 13C-alanine and 13C-bicarbonate resonance peaks depending on the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. In cancer, the lactate level is increased due to increased glycolysis. The use of DNP enhanced 13C-pyruvate has in preclinical studies shown to be a sensitive method for detecting cancer and for assessment of early treatment response in a variety of cancers. Recently, a first-in-man 31-patient study was conducted with the primary objective to assess the safety of hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate in healthy subjects and prostate cancer patients. The study showed an elevated 13C-lactate/13C-pyruvate ratio in regions of biopsy

  19. Measuring N-acetyl aspartate synthesis in vivo using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Su; Yang, Jehoon; Shen, Jun

    2008-01-01

    N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) is an important marker of neuronal function and viability that can be measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In this paper, we proposed a method to measure NAA synthesis using proton MRS with infusion of uniformly 13C-labeled glucose, and demonstrated its feasibility in an in vivo study of the rat brain. The rate of 13C-label incorporation into the acetyl group of NAA was measured using a localized, long echo-time proton MRS method. Signals from the 13C satellites of the main NAA methyl protons at 2.02 ppm were continuously monitored for 10 hours. Quantification of the data based on a linear kinetic model showed that NAA synthesis rate in isoflurane-anesthetized rats was 0.19 ± 0.02 µmol/g/h (mean ± standard deviation, n = 12). PMID:18486230

  20. Tunable Magnetic Resonance via Interlayer Exchange Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Wilson, Jeffrey; Simons, Rainee; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John

    Magnetic resonance is a critical property of magnetic materials for the applications in microwave devices and novel spintronics devices. The resonance frequency is commonly controlled with an external magnetic field generated by an energy-inefficient and bulky electromagnet. The search for tuning the resonance frequency without electromagnets has attracted tremendous attention. The voltage control of resonance frequency has been demonstrated in multiferroic heterostructures through magnetoelastic effect. However, the frequency tunable range is limited. We propose a paradigm to tune the magnetic resonance frequency by recognizing the huge interlayer exchange field and the existence of the high-frequency modes in coupled oscillators. We demonstrate the optical mode in exchange coupled magnetic layers which occurred at much higher frequencies than coherent ferromagnetic resonance. We further demonstrated a large resonance frequency tunable range from 11GHz to 21 GHz in a spin valve device by in-situ manipulating of the exchange interaction. The technique developed here is far more efficient than the conventional methods of using electromagnets and multiferroics. This new scheme will have an immediate impact on applications based on magnetic resonance.

  1. Directly detected (55)Mn MRI: application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized (13)C MRI development.

    PubMed

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-12-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 ((55)Mn) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized (13)C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the (55)Mn and (13)C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective "(13)C" MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, (55)Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical (13)C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large (13)C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d=8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7 M) was scanned rapidly by (55)Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for (13)C, using a balanced steady state free precession acquisition. The requisite penetration of radiofrequency magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for (55)Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image signal-to-noise ratio of ~60 at 0.5 cm(3) spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP (13)C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  2. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Summary Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature. PMID:25745524

  3. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is investigated. Single element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 tesla (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 tesla in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in transmit magnetic field, as well as, RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus SAR) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements. PMID:23508243

  4. Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance: A Novel Technique for the In Vivo Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Marie A.; Clarke, Kieran; Neubauer, Stefan; Tyler, Damian J.

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging plays a central role in cardiovascular disease for determining diagnosis, prognosis, and optimizing patient management. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that monitoring hyperpolarized 13C-labelled tracers with magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI and MRS) offers a new way to investigate the normal and diseased heart, and that the technology may be useful in patients with heart disease. In this review, we show how hyperpolarized 13C-labelled tracers are generated and have been applied experimentally, and outline the methodological advances currently underway to enable translation of hyperpolarized 13C MRI and MRS into the clinic. Using hyperpolarized 13C-labelled metabolites and metabolic MRI and MRS could help assessment of many human cardiovascular diseases, including coronary artery disease, heart failure and metabolic cardiomyopathies. We discuss the clinical areas in which the technology may, in the future, aid in the diagnosis and management of patients with cardiovascular diseases, including dynamic investigations of in vivo metabolism, coronary angiography and quantitative perfusion imaging. It is possible that, in the future, hyperpolarized magnetic resonance will play a major role in clinical cardiology. PMID:21969318

  5. Measurement of the {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction with the Trojan horse method: Focus on the sub threshold resonance at −3 keV

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Guardo, G. L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Spartà, R.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Avila, M.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Santiago, D.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Lamia, L.

    2014-05-02

    The {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O reaction is the neutron source of the main component of the s-process. The astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the −3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in {sup 17}O. Its contribution is still controversial as extrapolations, e.g., through R-matrix calculations, and indirect techniques, such as the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC), yield inconsistent results. Therefore, we have applied the Trojan Horse Method (THM) to the {sup 13}C({sup 6}Li,n{sup 16}O)d reaction to measure its contribution. For the first time, the ANC for the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced through the THM, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy. Though a larger ANC for the 6.356 MeV level is measured, our experimental S(E) factor agrees with the most recent extrapolation in the literature in the 140-230 keV energy interval, the accuracy being greatly enhanced thanks to this innovative approach, merging together two well establish indirect techniques, namely, the THM and the ANC.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis and molecular properties of berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Ju; Lee, Ken S.; Hurley, Sharon J.

    An extensive theoretical study of berberine has been performed at the ab initio HF/6-31G**, HF/6-311G**, and B3LYP/6-311G** levels with and without solvent effects. The optimized structures are compared with X-ray data. We found that the optimized structures with solvent effects are in slightly better agreement with X-ray data than those without solvent effects. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of berberine were calculated by using the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) (with and without solvent effects), CSGT, and IGAIM methods. The calculated chemical shifts were compared with the two-dimensional NMR experimental data. Overall, the calculated chemical shifts show very good agreement with the experimental results. The harmonic vibrational frequencies for berberine were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G** level.

  7. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy.

    PubMed

    Markovich, Dmitry; Baryshnikova, Kseniia; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    All-dielectric "magnetic light" nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here an approach for enhancing of magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of the magnetic moment, tailoring the latter in the dynamical range of 100% and delivering enhancement up to 36% relative to performances of standalone spherical particles. The proposed approach provides pathways for designs of all-dielectric metamaterials and metasurfaces with strong magnetic responses. PMID:26941126

  8. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovich, Dmitry; Baryshnikova, Kseniia; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    All-dielectric “magnetic light” nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here an approach for enhancing of magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of the magnetic moment, tailoring the latter in the dynamical range of 100% and delivering enhancement up to 36% relative to performances of standalone spherical particles. The proposed approach provides pathways for designs of all-dielectric metamaterials and metasurfaces with strong magnetic responses.

  9. Directly detected 55Mn MRI: Application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized 13C MRI development

    PubMed Central

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D.; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 (55Mn) MRI using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized 13C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the 55Mn and 13C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective “13C” MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, 55Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical 13C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large 13C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d= 8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7M) was scanned rapidly by 55Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for 13C, using a balanced SSFP acquisition. The requisite penetration of RF magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for 55Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image SNR of ~60 at 0.5cm3 spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP 13C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  10. Backbone 1H, 15N, and 13C resonance assignments and secondary structure of a novel protein OGL-20P(T)-358 from hyperthermophile Thermococcus thioreducens sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Randall; Hughes, Ronny; Curto, Ernest; Ng, Joseph; Twigg, Pamela

    2007-12-31

    OGL-20P(T)-358 is a novel 66 amino acid residue protein from the hyperthermophile Thermococcus thioreducens sp. nov., strain OGL-20PT, which was collected from the wall of the hydrothermal black smoker in the Rainbow Vent along the mid-Atlantic ridge. This protein, which has no detectable sequence homology with proteins or domains of known function, has a calculated pI of 4.76 and a molecular mass of 8.2 kDa. We report here the backbone 1H, 15N, and 13C resonance assignments of OGL-20PT-358. Assignments are 97.5% (316/324) complete. Chemical shift index was used to determine the secondary structure of the protein, which appears to consist of primarily alpha-helical regions. This work is the foundation for future studies to determine the three-dimensional solution structure of the protein. PMID:18182861

  11. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  12. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans.

  13. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR.

  14. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive ... possibility that you’re pregnant tell your doctor as well. On the day of your exam, it’s ...

  15. International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Upcoming Workshops & Deadlines Past Workshops Endorsed Meetings & Education International Outreach Event Planning Guides Education MR Safety Resources ... Center E-Library Virtual Meetings Connect With Us International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2300 Clayton ...

  16. Coronary Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Birgit; Nagel, Eike; Schoenhagen, Paul; Barkhausen, Jörg; Gerber, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography and magnetic resonance are relatively new imaging modalities that can exceed the ability of established imaging modalities to detect present pathology or predict patient outcomes. Coronary calcium scoring may be useful in asymptomatic patients at intermediate risk. Computed tomographic coronary angiography is a first-line indication to evaluate congenitally abnormal coronary arteries and, along with stress magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging, is useful in symptomatic patients with nondiagnostic conventional stress tests. Cardiac magnetic resonance is indicated for visualizing cardiac structure and function, and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance is a first-line indication for assessing myocardial viability. Imaging plaque and molecular mechanisms related to plaque rupture holds great promise for the presymptomatic detection of patients at risk for coronary events but is not yet suitable for routine clinical use. PMID:19269527

  17. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  18. High resolution (13)C MRI with hyperpolarized urea: in vivo T(2) mapping and (15)N labeling effects.

    PubMed

    Reed, Galen D; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Koelsch, Bertram L; Van Criekinge, Mark; Smith, Kenneth J; Hong Shang; Larson, Peder E Z; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-02-01

    (13)C steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging and effective spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping were performed using hyperpolarized [(13)C] urea and [(13) C,(15)N2] urea injected intravenously in rats. (15)N labeling gave large T2 increases both in solution and in vivo due to the elimination of a strong scalar relaxation pathway. The T2 increase was pronounced in the kidney, with [(13) C,(15) N2] urea giving T2 values of 6.3±1.3 s in the cortex and medulla, and 11±2 s in the renal pelvis. The measured T2 in the aorta was 1.3±0.3 s. [(13)C] urea showed shortened T2 values in the kidney of 0.23±0.03 s compared to 0.28±0.03 s measured in the aorta. The enhanced T2 of [(13)C,(15)N2] urea was utilized to generate large signal enhancement by SSFP acquisitions with flip angles approaching the fully refocused regime. Projection images at 0.94 mm in-plane resolution were acquired with both urea isotopes, with [(13)C,(15) N2] urea giving a greater than four-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio over [(13)C] urea. PMID:24235273

  19. Torque-mixing Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losby, Joseph; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Grandmont, Dylan; Diao, Zhu; Belov, Miro; Burgess, Jacob; Compton, Shawn; Hiebert, Wayne; Vick, Doug; Mohammad, Kaveh; Salimi, Elham; Bridges, Gregory; Thomson, Douglas; Freeman, Mark

    A universal, mechanical torque method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy is presented. In analogy to resonance detection by induction, a signal proportional to the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment can be measured as a pure mechanical torque in broadband, frequency-swept spectroscopy. Comprehensive electron spin resonance of a single-crystal, mesoscopic yttrium iron garnet disk at room temperature are presented to demonstrate the method. The rich detail allows analysis of even complex 3D spin textures.

  20. Production and NMR signal optimization of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Amino acids are targeted nutrients for consumption by cancers to sustain their rapid growth and proliferation. 13C-enriched amino acids are important metabolic tracers for cancer diagnostics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Despite this diagnostic potential, 13C NMR of amino acids however is hampered by the inherently low NMR sensitivity of the 13C nuclei. In this work, we have employed a physics technique known as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance the NMR signals of 13C-enriched amino acids. DNP works by transferring the high polarization of electrons to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Using a fast dissolution method in which the frozen polarized samples are dissolved rapidly with superheated water, injectable solutions of 13C-amino acids with highly enhanced NMR signals (by at least 5,000-fold) were produced at room temperature. Factors that affect the NMR signal enhancement levels such as the choice of free radical polarizing agents and sample preparation will be discussed along with the thermal mixing physics model of DNP. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  1. An overview of methods using 13C for improved compound identification in metabolomics and natural products

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Stupp, Gregory S.; Ajredini, Ramadan; Lee-McMullen, Brittany; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    Compound identification is a major bottleneck in metabolomics studies. In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations, resonance overlap often hinders unambiguous database matching or de novo compound identification. In liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), discriminating between biological signals and background artifacts and reliable determination of molecular formulae are not always straightforward. We have designed and implemented several NMR and LC-MS approaches that utilize 13C, either enriched or at natural abundance, in metabolomics applications. For LC-MS applications, we describe a technique called isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA), which utilizes samples that are isotopically labeled with 5% (test) and 95% (control) 13C. This labeling strategy leads to characteristic isotopic patterns that allow the differentiation of biological signals from artifacts and yield the exact number of carbons, significantly reducing possible molecular formulae. The relative abundance between the test and control samples for every IROA feature can be determined simply by integrating the peaks that arise from the 5 and 95% channels. For NMR applications, we describe two 13C-based approaches. For samples at natural abundance, we have developed a workflow to obtain 13C–13C and 13C–1H statistical correlations using 1D 13C and 1H NMR spectra. For samples that can be isotopically labeled, we describe another NMR approach to obtain direct 13C–13C spectroscopic correlations. These methods both provide extensive information about the carbon framework of compounds in the mixture for either database matching or de novo compound identification. We also discuss strategies in which 13C NMR can be used to identify unknown compounds from IROA experiments. By combining technologies with the same samples, we can identify important biomarkers and corresponding metabolites of interest. PMID:26379677

  2. A procedure to validate and correct the 13C chemical shift calibration of RNA datasets.

    PubMed

    Aeschbacher, Thomas; Schubert, Mario; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-02-01

    Chemical shifts reflect the structural environment of a certain nucleus and can be used to extract structural and dynamic information. Proper calibration is indispensable to extract such information from chemical shifts. Whereas a variety of procedures exist to verify the chemical shift calibration for proteins, no such procedure is available for RNAs to date. We present here a procedure to analyze and correct the calibration of (13)C NMR data of RNAs. Our procedure uses five (13)C chemical shifts as a reference, each of them found in a narrow shift range in most datasets deposited in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank. In 49 datasets we could evaluate the (13)C calibration and detect errors or inconsistencies in RNA (13)C chemical shifts based on these chemical shift reference values. More than half of the datasets (27 out of those 49) were found to be improperly referenced or contained inconsistencies. This large inconsistency rate possibly explains that no clear structure-(13)C chemical shift relationship has emerged for RNA so far. We were able to recalibrate or correct 17 datasets resulting in 39 usable (13)C datasets. 6 new datasets from our lab were used to verify our method increasing the database to 45 usable datasets. We can now search for structure-chemical shift relationships with this improved list of (13)C chemical shift data. This is demonstrated by a clear relationship between ribose (13)C shifts and the sugar pucker, which can be used to predict a C2'- or C3'-endo conformation of the ribose with high accuracy. The improved quality of the chemical shift data allows statistical analysis with the potential to facilitate assignment procedures, and the extraction of restraints for structure calculations of RNA. PMID:22252483

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... uses radio waves, a magnetic field and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the spine and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  5. Characterization of a Mixture of CO2 Adsorption Products in Hyperbranched Aminosilica Adsorbents by (13)C Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Mehta, Anil K; Conradi, Mark S; Jones, Christopher W; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-11-17

    Hyperbranched amine polymers (HAS) grown from the mesoporous silica SBA-15 (hereafter "SBA-15-HAS") exhibit large capacities for CO2 adsorption. We have used static in situ and magic-angle spinning (MAS) ex situ (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the adsorption of CO2 by SBA-15-HAS. (13)C NMR distinguishes the signal of gas-phase (13)CO2 from that of the chemisorbed species. HAS polymers possess primary, secondary, and tertiary amines, leading to multiple chemisorption reaction outcomes, including carbamate (RnNCOO(-)), carbamic acid (RnNCOOH), and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) moieties. Carbamates and bicarbonate fall within a small (13)C chemical shift range (162-166 ppm), and a mixture was observed including carbamic acid and carbamate, the former disappearing upon evacuation of the sample. By examining the (13)C-(14)N dipolar coupling through low-field (B0 = 3 T) (13)C{(1)H} cross-polarization MAS NMR, carbamate is confirmed through splitting of the (13)C resonance. A third species that is either bicarbonate or a second carbamate is evident from bimodal T2 decay times of the ∼163 ppm peak, indicating the presence of two species comprising that single resonance. The mixture of products suggests that (1) the presence of amines and water leads to bicarbonate being present and/or (2) the multiple types of amine sites in HAS permit formation of chemically distinct carbamates. PMID:26477882

  6. Trapped Ion Magnetic Resonance: Concepts and Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizarro, Pedro Jose

    A novel spectroscopy of trapped ions is proposed which will bring single-ion detection sensitivity to the observation of magnetic resonance spectra and resolve the apparent incompatibility in existing techniques between high information content and high sensitivity. Methods for studying both electron spin resonance (ESR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are designed. They assume established techniques for trapping ions in high magnetic field and observing electrically the trapping frequencies with high resolution (<1 Hz) and sensitivity (single -ion). A magnetic bottle field gradient couples the spin and spatial motions together and leads to the small spin -dependent force on the ion exploited by Dehmelt to observe directly the perturbation of the ground-state electron's axial frequency by its spin magnetic moment. A series of fundamental innovations is described to extend magnetic resonance to molecular ions ( cong 100 amu) and nuclear magnetic moments. It is demonstrated how time-domain trapping frequency observations before and after magnetic resonance can be used to make cooling of the particle to its ground state unnecessary. Adiabatic cycling of the magnetic bottle off between detection periods is shown to be practical and to allow high-resolution magnetic resonance to be encoded pointwise as the presence or absence of trapping frequency shifts. Methods of inducing spin -dependent work on the ion orbits with magnetic field gradients and Larmor frequency irradiation are proposed which greatly amplify the attainable shifts in trapping frequency. The first proposal presented builds on Dehmelt's experiment to reveal ESR spectra. A more powerful technique for ESR is then designed where axially synchronized spin transitions perform spin-dependent work in the presence of a magnetic bottle, which also converts axial amplitude changes into cyclotron frequency shifts. The most general approach presented is a continuous Stern-Gerlach effect in which a magnetic field

  7. Carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Goff, H M; Morgan, L O

    1978-07-01

    Carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra have been recorded for porphyrins, zinc porphyrins, and iron(III) porphyrin complexes in aqueous media. Spectra of porphyrin-c and hemin-c confirm the structure with thioether linkages at positions alpha to the porphyrin ring. The pattern of NMR isotropic shifts has implications regarding electron transfer in cytochrome-c. Free-base porphyrin-c and meso-substituted porphyrins have been examined for pyrrole nitrogen-hydrogen tautomerism and possible aggregation in aqueous solution. Zinc porphyrin 13C NMR spectra were recorded in order to provide diamagnetic references for paramagnetic iron(III) derivatives. Low-spin iron(III) porphyrin-biscyano complexes in aqueous solution exhibit NMR isotropic shift patterns similar to those previously observed for related compounds in non-aqueous media. The first 13C NMR spectra are reported for mu-oxo-bridged iron(III) porphyrin dimers. A partially resolved spectrum of a high-spin iron(III) porphyrin has also been obtained. Patterns of 13C and proton isotropic shifts are compared, and unpaired spin delocalization mechanisms for 13C resonances are discussed in a qualitative manner. PMID:687673

  8. Designing dielectric resonators on substrates: combining magnetic and electric resonances.

    PubMed

    van de Groep, J; Polman, A

    2013-11-01

    High-performance integrated optics, solar cells, and sensors require nanoscale optical components at the surface of the device, in order to manipulate, redirect and concentrate light. High-index dielectric resonators provide the possibility to do this efficiently with low absorption losses. The resonances supported by dielectric resonators are both magnetic and electric in nature. Combined scattering from these two can be used for directional scattering. Most applications require strong coupling between the particles and the substrate in order to enhance the absorption in the substrate. However, the coupling with the substrate strongly influences the resonant behavior of the particles. Here, we systematically study the influence of particle geometry and dielectric environment on the resonant behavior of dielectric resonators in the visible to near-IR spectral range. We show the key role of retardation in the excitation of the magnetic dipole (MD) mode, as well as the limit where no MD mode is supported. Furthermore, we study the influence of particle diameter, shape and substrate index on the spectral position, width and overlap of the electric dipole (ED) and MD modes. Also, we show that the ED and MD mode can selectively be enhanced or suppressed using multi-layer substrates. And, by comparing dipole excitation and plane wave excitation, we study the influence of driving field on the scattering properties. Finally, we show that the directional radiation profiles of the ED and MD modes in resonators on a substrate are similar to those of point-dipoles close to a substrate. Altogether, this work is a guideline how to tune magnetic and electric resonances for specific applications. PMID:24216852

  9. Investigation of laser polarized xenon magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-based investigations of a new biomedical diagnostic technology: nuclear magnetic resonance of laser polarized noble gas are addressed. The specific research tasks discussed are: (1) Development of a large-scale noble gas polarization system; (2) biomedical investigations using laser polarized noble gas in conventional (high magnetic field) NMR systems; and (3) the development and application of a low magnetic field system for laser polarized noble gas NMR.

  10. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the full-length 40 kDa S. acidocaldarius Y-family DNA polymerase, dinB homolog.

    PubMed

    Moro, Sean L; Cocco, Melanie J

    2015-10-01

    The dinB homolog (Dbh) is a member of the Y-family of translesion DNA polymerases, which are specialized to accurately replicate DNA across from a wide variety of lesions in living cells. Lesioned bases block the progression of high-fidelity polymerases and cause detrimental replication fork stalling; Y-family polymerases can bypass these lesions. The active site of the translesion synthesis polymerase is more open than that of a replicative polymerase; consequently Dbh polymerizes with low fidelity. Bypass polymerases also have low processivity. Short extension past the lesion allows the high-fidelity polymerase to switch back onto the site of replication. Dbh and the other Y-family polymerases have been used as structural models to investigate the mechanisms of DNA polymerization and lesion bypass. Many high-resolution crystal structures of Y-family polymerases have been reported. NMR dynamics studies can complement these structures by providing a measure of protein motions. Here we report the (15)N, (1)H, and (13)C backbone resonance assignments at two temperatures (35 and 50 °C) for Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Dbh polymerase. Backbone resonance assignments have been obtained for 86 % of the residues. The polymerase active site is assigned as well as the majority of residues in each of the four domains. PMID:26154586

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging provides anatomical definition of normal and abnormal tissues with a contrast and detection sensitivity superior to those of x-ray computed tomography in the human head and pelvis and parts of the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. Recent improvements in technology should lead to advances in diagnostic imaging of the breast and regions of the abdomen. Selected-region nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of protons, carbon-13, and phosphorus-31 has developed into a basic science tool for in vivo studies on man and a unique tool for clinical diagnoses of metabolic disorders. At present, nuclear magnetic resonance is considered safe if access to the magnet environment is controlled. Technological advances employing field strengths over 2 teslas will require biophysical studies of heating and static field effects.

  12. Zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Wei; Tycko, Robert

    2012-09-01

    We present the theoretical description and experimental demonstration of a zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling (ZQ-SDR) technique for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of 13C-labeled molecules, including proteins, under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The ZQ-SDR technique combines zero-quantum recoupling pulse sequence blocks with randomly varying chemical shift precession periods to create randomly amplitude- and phase-modulated effective homonuclear magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. To a good approximation, couplings between different 13C spin pairs become uncorrelated under ZQ-SDR, leading to spin dynamics (averaged over many repetitions of the ZQ-SDR sequence) that are fully described by an orientation-dependent N × N polarization transfer rate matrix for an N-spin system, with rates that are inversely proportional to the sixth power of internuclear distances. Suppression of polarization transfers due to non-commutivity of pairwise couplings (i.e., dipolar truncation) does not occur under ZQ-SDR, as we show both analytically and numerically. Experimental demonstrations are reported for uniformly 13C-labeled L-valine powder (at 14.1 T and 28.00 kHz MAS), uniformly 13C-labeled protein GB1 in microcrystalline form (at 17.6 T and 40.00 kHz MAS), and partially labeled 13C-labeled protein GB1 (at 14.1 T and 40.00 kHz MAS). The experimental results verify that spin dynamics under ZQ-SDR are described accurately by rate matrices and suggest the utility of ZQ-SDR in structural studies of 13C-labeled solids.

  13. Low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wago, Koichi

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a technique whose goal is to combine the three-dimensional, chemically specific imaging capability of magnetic resonance imaging with the atomic-scale spatial resolution of scanning force microscopy. MRFM relies on the detection of small oscillatory magnetic forces between spins in the sample and a magnetic tip, using a micromechanical cantilever. The force resolution is a key issue for successfully operating MRFM experiments. Operating at low temperature improves the force resolution because of the reduced thermal energy and increased mechanical Q of the cantilever. The spin polarization is also enhanced at low temperature, leading to the improved magnetic resonance sensitivity for ensemble spin samples. A low-temperature magnetic resonance force detection apparatus was built and used to demonstrate a force resolution of 8×10sp{-17}\\ N/sqrt{Hz} at 6 K with a commercial single-crystal silicon cantilever. Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were detected in micron-size samples. Force-detection technique was also applied to a wide range of magnetic resonance measurements, including inversion recovery, nutation, and spin echoes. Force-detected EPR spectra of phosphorus-doped silicon revealed hyperfine splitting, illustrating the possibility of using the MRFM technique for spectroscopic purposes. An improved low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscope was also built, incorporating a magnetic tip mounted directly on the cantilever. This allows a much wider variety of samples to be investigated and greatly improves the convenience of the technique. Using the improved microscope, three-dimensional EPR imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed a broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of sphingomyelin bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruzik, K.S.; Sobon, B.; Salamonczyk, G.M. )

    1990-04-24

    Bilayers of D-erythro-(N-stearoylsphingosyl)-1-phosphocholine (C{sub l8}-SPM), previously characterized by differential scanning calorimetry in various phases, were studied by means of wide-line {sup 31}P, {sup 2}H, high-resolution {sup 13}C CP-MAS, and {sup 1}H MAS NMR. The fully relaxed gel phase of C{sub 18}-SPM at temperatures below 306 K displayed {sup 31}P NMR spectra characteristic of the rigid phase with frozen rotation of the phosphocholine head group. Three other gel phases existing in the temperature range 306-318 K displayed spectra with incompletely averaged axially symmetric powder line shapes and were difficult to differentiate on the basis of their {sup 31}P NMR spectra. The gel-to-gel transition at 306 K was found to be fully reversible. The main phase transition at 318 K resulted in the formation of the liquid-crystalline phase for which spectra with axially symmetric line shapes of uniform width were obtained, regardless of the nature of the starting gel phase. {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR spectra revealed significant differences in the molecular dynamics of sphingomyelin in various phases. All carbon atoms of the polar head group in the liquid-crystalline phase gave rise to a separate resonance lines. Numerous carbon atom signals were doubled in the stable phase, demonstrating the existence of two slowly interconverting conformers.

  15. Cyclotron resonance in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.M. )

    1993-08-01

    Relativistic test particles interacting with a small monochromatic electromagnetic wave are studied in the presence of an inhomogeneous background magnetic field. A resonance-averaged Hamiltonian is derived which retains the effects of passage through resonance. Two distinct regimes are found. In the strongly inhomogeneous case, the resonant phase angle at successive resonances is random, and multiple resonant interactions lead to a random walk in phase space. In the other, adiabatic limit, the phase angle is determined by the phase portrait of the Hamiltonian and leads to a systematic change in the appropriate canonical action (and therefore in the energy and pitch angle), so that the cumulative effect increases directly with the number of resonances.

  16. Use of dipolar 1H-15N and 1H-13C couplings in the structure determination of magnetically oriented macromolecules in solution.

    PubMed

    Tjandra, N; Omichinski, J G; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M; Bax, A

    1997-09-01

    Anisotropy of the molecular magnetic susceptibility gives rise to a small degree of alignment. The resulting residual dipolar couplings, which can now be measured with the advent of higher magnetic fields in NMR, contain information on the orientation of the internuclear vectors relative to the molecular magnetic susceptibility tensor, thereby providing information on long range order that is not accessible by any of the solution NMR parameters currently used in structure determination. Thus, the dipolar couplings constitute unique and powerful restraints in determining the structures of magnetically oriented macromolecules in solution. The method is demonstrated on a complex of the DNA-binding domain of the transcription factor GATA-1 with a 16 base pair oligodeoxyribonucleotide. PMID:9303001

  17. Design of a sup 13 C (1H) RF probe for monitoring the in vivo metabolism of (1- sup 13 C)glucose in primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, B.E.; Sacks, W.; Bigler, R.E.; Hennessy, M.J.; Sacks, S.; Fleischer, A.; Zanzonico, P.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of an RF probe suitable for obtaining proton-decoupled {sup 13}C spectra from a subhuman primate brain is described. Two orthogonal saddle coils, one tuned to the resonant frequency of {sup 13}C and the other to the resonant frequency of 1H, were used to monitor the in vivo metabolism of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose in rhesus monkey brain at 2.1 T. Difference spectra showed the appearance of {sup 13}C-enriched glutamate and glutamine 30 to 40 min after a bolus injection of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose.

  18. Magnetic material arrangement in oriented termites: a magnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, O. C.; Wajnberg, E.; de Oliveira, J. F.; Esquivel, D. M. S.

    2004-06-01

    Temperature dependence of the magnetic resonance is used to study the magnetic material in oriented Neocapritermes opacus (N.o.) termite, the only prey of the migratory ant Pachycondyla marginata (P.m.). A broad line in the g=2 region, associated to isolated nanoparticles shows that at least 97% of the magnetic material is in the termite's body (abdomen + thorax). From the temperature dependence of the resonant field and from the spectral linewidths, we estimate the existence of magnetic nanoparticles 18.5 ± 0.3 nm in diameter and an effective magnetic anisotropy constant, Keff between 2.1 and 3.2 × 10 4 erg/cm 3. A sudden change in the double integrated spectra at about 100 K for N.o. with the long body axis oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field can be attributed to the Verwey transition, and suggests an organized film-like particle system.

  19. The cluster and single-particle states in 13C (α,α)13C reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynbayev, N. A.; Nurmukhanbetova, A. K.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Rogachev, G. V.; Golovkov, M. S.; Koloberdin, M.; Ivanov, I.; Nauruzbayev, D. K.; Berdibek, Sh S.; Rakhymzhanov, A. M.; Tribble, R. E.

    2016-06-01

    The excitation functions of elastic scattering of 13C on alpha particle have been measured using the thick-target inverse kinematic method at the heavy ion DC-60 cyclotron. The helium gas was used as a target and also as a degrader to stop the beam. New data (including 180°degree) of the resonances close to the threshold in 17O have been obtained.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrollahi, H.; Khorramdin, A.; Isapour, Gh.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants.

  1. Magnetic plasmonic Fano resonance at optical frequency.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanjun; Hu, Zhijian; Li, Ziwei; Zhu, Xing; Fang, Zheyu

    2015-05-13

    Plasmonic Fano resonances are typically understood and investigated assuming electrical mode hybridization. Here we demonstrate that a purely magnetic plasmon Fano resonance can be realized at optical frequency with Au split ring hexamer nanostructure excited by an azimuthally polarized incident light. Collective magnetic plasmon modes induced by the circular electric field within the hexamer and each of the split ring can be controlled and effectively hybridized by designing the size and orientation of each ring unit. With simulated results reproducing the experiment, our suggested configuration with narrow line-shape magnetic Fano resonance has significant potential applications in low-loss sensing and may serves as suitable elementary building blocks for optical metamaterials. PMID:25594885

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the body

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Hricak, H.

    1987-01-01

    This text provides reference to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body. Beginning with explanatory chapters on the physics, instrumentation, and interpretation of MRI, it proceeds to the normal anatomy of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Other chapters cover magnetic resonance imaging of blood flow, the larynx, the lymph nodes, and the spine, as well as MRI in obstetrics. The text features detailed coverage of magnetic resonance imaging of numerous disorders and disease states, including neck disease, thoracic disease; breast disease; congenital and acquired heart disease; vascular disease; diseases of the liver, pancreas, and spleen; diseases of the kidney, adrenals, and retroperitoneum; diseases of the male and female pelvis; and musculoskeletal diseases. Chapters on the biological and environmental hazards of MRI, the current clinical status of MRI in comparison to other imaging modalities, and economic considerations are also included.

  3. The Diversity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Corey W.; Alekseyev, Viktor Y.; Allwardt, Jeffrey R.; Bankovich, Alexander J.; Cade-Menun, Barbara J.; Davis, Ronald W.; Du, Lin-Shu; Garcia, K. Christopher; Herschlag, Daniel; Khosla, Chaitan; Kraut, Daniel A.; Li, Qing; Null, Brian; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Sigala, Paul A.; Stebbins, Jonathan F.; Varani, Luca

    The discovery of the physical phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in 1946 gave rise to the spectroscopic technique that has become a remarkably versatile research tool. One could oversimplify NMR spectros-copy by categorizing it into the two broad applications of structure elucidation of molecules (associated with chemistry and biology) and imaging (associated with medicine). But, this certainly does not do NMR spectroscopy justice in demonstrating its general acceptance and utilization across the sciences. This manuscript is not an effort to present an exhaustive, or even partial review of NMR spectroscopy applications, but rather to provide a glimpse at the wide-ranging uses of NMR spectroscopy found within the confines of a single magnetic resonance research facility, the Stanford Magnetic Resonance Laboratory. Included here are summaries of projects involving protein structure determination, mapping of intermolecular interactions, exploring fundamental biological mechanisms, following compound cycling in the environmental, analysis of synthetic solid compounds, and microimaging of a model organism.

  4. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. Accelerating Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Analysis of Soil Organic Matter with Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, A. E.; Smith, A. N.; Long, J. R.; Reddy, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    13C magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR) has become an essential tool for discerning the chemical composition of soil organic matter (SOM). However, the technique is limited due to the inherent insensitivity of NMR resulting in long acquisition times, especially for low carbon (C) soil. The pursuits of higher magnetic fields or concentrating C with hydrofluoric acid are limited solutions for signal improvement. Recent advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) have addressed the insensitivity of NMR. DNP utilizes the greater polarization of an unpaired electron in a given magnetic field and transfers that polarization to an NMR active nucleus of interest via microwave irradiation. Signal enhancements of up to a few orders of magnitude have been achieved for various DNP experiments. In this novel study, we conduct DNP 13C cross-polarization (CP) MAS ssNMR experiments of SOM varying in soil C content and chemical composition. DNP signal enhancements reduce the experiment run time allowing samples with low C to be analyzed in hours rather than days. We compare 13C CP MAS ssNMR of SOM with multiple magnetic field strengths, hydrofluoric acid treatment, and novel DNP approaches. We also explore DNP surface enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (SENP) to determine the surface chemistry of SOM. The presented results and future DNP MAS ssNMR advances will lead to further understanding of the nature and processes of SOM.

  6. Magnetic resonance of magnetic fluid and magnetoliposome preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, Paulo C.; Santos, Judes G.; Skeff Neto, K.; Pelegrini, Fernando; De Cuyper, Marcel

    2005-05-01

    In this study, magnetic resonance was used to investigate lauric acid-coated magnetite-based magnetic fluid particles and particles which are surrounded by a double layer of phospholipid molecules (magnetoliposomes). The data reveal the presence of monomers and dimers in both samples. Whereas evidence for a thermally induced disruption of dimers is found in the magnetic fluid, apparently, the bilayer phospholipid envelop prevents the dissociation in the magnetoliposome samples.

  7. Synthesis of D-[U-{sup 13}C]Glucal, D-[U-{sup 13}C] Galactal, and L-[U-{sup 13}C]Fucose for NMR structure studies of oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.; Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III

    1996-12-31

    The role of carbohydrates is well recognized in a variety of important biological phenomena such as cell surface recognition. Recent advances in carbohydrate chemistry, including the development of solid phase synthesis methods, have helped to provide significant quantities of material by offering general protocols for synthesis of well-defined, pure material. However, the study of the solution structure of oligosaccharides by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been hampered by the lack of enriched {sup 13}C material. In an effort to help alleviate this situation, we have been interested in the construction of the title compounds from a single economical carbon source, D-[U-{sup 13}C]glucose. Details of the syntheses will be provided.

  8. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Fridjonsson, E O; Creber, S A; Vrouwenvelder, J S; Johns, M L

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system. PMID:25700116

  9. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridjonsson, E. O.; Creber, S. A.; Vrouwenvelder, J. S.; Johns, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  10. Compartmentalized Cerebral Metabolism of [1,6-13C]Glucose Determined by in vivo 13C NMR Spectroscopy at 14.1 T

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, João M. N.; Lanz, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral metabolism is compartmentalized between neurons and glia. Although glial glycolysis is thought to largely sustain the energetic requirements of neurotransmission while oxidative metabolism takes place mainly in neurons, this hypothesis is matter of debate. The compartmentalization of cerebral metabolic fluxes can be determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy upon infusion of 13C-enriched compounds, especially glucose. Rats under light α-chloralose anesthesia were infused with [1,6-13C]glucose and 13C enrichment in the brain metabolites was measured by 13C NMR spectroscopy with high sensitivity and spectral resolution at 14.1 T. This allowed determining 13C enrichment curves of amino acid carbons with high reproducibility and to reliably estimate cerebral metabolic fluxes (mean error of 8%). We further found that TCA cycle intermediates are not required for flux determination in mathematical models of brain metabolism. Neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle rate (VTCA) and neurotransmission rate (VNT) were 0.45 ± 0.01 and 0.11 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min, respectively. Glial VTCA was found to be 38 ± 3% of total cerebral oxidative metabolism, accounting for more than half of neuronal oxidative metabolism. Furthermore, glial anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation rate (VPC) was 0.069 ± 0.004 μmol/g/min, i.e., 25 ± 1% of the glial TCA cycle rate. These results support a role of glial cells as active partners of neurons during synaptic transmission beyond glycolytic metabolism. PMID:21713114

  11. Direct Monitoring of γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase Activity In Vivo Using a Hyperpolarized (13) C-Labeled Molecular Probe.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Tatsuya; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Nonaka, Hiroshi; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Can, Emine; Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Takado, Yuhei; Comment, Arnaud; Sando, Shinsuke

    2016-08-26

    The γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) enzyme plays a central role in glutathione homeostasis. Direct detection of GGT activity could provide critical information for the diagnosis of several pathologies. We propose a new molecular probe, γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly, for monitoring GGT activity in vivo by hyperpolarized (HP) (13) C magnetic resonance (MR). The properties of γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly are suitable for in vivo HP (13) C metabolic analysis since the chemical shift between γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly and its metabolic product, [1-(13) C]Gly, is large (4.3 ppm) and the T1 of both compounds is relatively long (30 s and 45 s, respectively, in H2 O at 9.4 T). We also demonstrate that γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly is highly sensitive to in vivo modulation of GGT activity induced by the inhibitor acivicin. PMID:27483206

  12. Noninvasive biomarkers for acute hepatotoxicity induced by 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol: hyperpolarized 13C dynamic MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang-Won; Oh, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Choon; Yoon, Woong; Jeong, Yong-Yeon; Kim, Yun-Hyeon; Kim, Jae-Kyu; Park, Jin-Gyoon; Kang, Heoung-Keun; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cellular metabolite change for acute hepatotoxicity induced by 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol (1,3-DCP) in rats and its correlations with the enzyme levels. In order to induce acute hepatotoxicity, a single subcutaneous injection of 1,3-DCP (80 mg/kg) was given to six male Sprague-Dawley rats. Hyperpolarized (13)C dynamic magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on rat liver following injection of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate. The levels of serum aspartate am inotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the 1,3-DCP treated rats were significantly increased as compared with those in normal rats. In the dynamic (13)C MR spectra, the ratios of [1-(13)C] lactate to the total carbon and [1-(13)C] alanine to the total carbon in the 1,3-DCP treated rats were significantly increased, and there were positive correlations between cellular metabolic changes and enzyme levels. The levels of [1-(13)C] lactate and [1-(13)C] alanine are potentially considered as important biomarkers for the 1,3-DCP-induced acute hepatotoxicity. PMID:26523652

  13. Nanomagnetic planar magnetic resonance microscopy "lens".

    PubMed

    Barbic, Mladen; Scherer, Axel

    2005-04-01

    The achievement of three-dimensional atomic resolution magnetic resonance microscopy remains one of the main challenges in the visualization of biological molecules. The prospects for single spin microscopy have come tantalizingly close due to the recent developments in sensitive instrumentation. Despite the single spin detection capability in systems of spatially well-isolated spins, the challenge that remains is the creation of conditions in space where only a single spin is resonant and detected in the presence of other spins in its natural dense spin environment. We present a nanomagnetic planar design where a localized Angstrom-scale point in three-dimensional space is created above the nanostructure with a nonzero minimum of the magnetic field magnitude. The design thereby represents a magnetic resonance microscopy "lens" where potentially only a single spin located in the "focus" spot of the structure is resonant. Despite the presence of other spins in the Angstrom-scale vicinity of the resonant spin, the high gradient magnetic field of the "lens" renders those spins inactive in the detection process. PMID:15826129

  14. Magnetic resonance neurography of the brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Vaishali; Upadhyaya, Divya Narain; Kumar, Adarsh; Pandey, Ashok Kumar; Gujral, Ratni; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is being increasingly recognised all over the world as the imaging modality of choice for brachial plexus and peripheral nerve lesions. Recent refinements in MRI protocols have helped in imaging nerve tissue with greater clarity thereby helping in the identification, localisation and classification of nerve lesions with greater confidence than was possible till now. This article on Magnetic Resonance Neurography (MRN) is based on the authors’ experience of imaging the brachial plexus and peripheral nerves using these protocols over the last several years. PMID:26424974

  15. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrichs, E. E.; Jaeger, H. M.; Karczmar, Greg S.; Knight, James B.; Kuperman, Vadim Yu.; Nagel, Sidney R.

    1995-03-01

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here.

  16. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrichs, E.E.; Jaeger, H.M.; Knight, J.B.; Nagel, S.R.; Karczmar, G.S.; Kuperman, V.Yu.

    1995-03-17

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Artifacts in Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Marina-Portia; Nguyen, Dustin; Friedlander, Lauren; Mango, Victoria; Wynn, Ralph; Ha, Richard

    2016-01-01

    As breast magnetic resonance imaging has evolved to become a routine part of clinical practice, so too has the need for radiologists to be aware of its potential pitfalls and limitations. Unique challenges arise in the identification and remedy of artifacts in breast magnetic resonance imaging, and it is important that radiologists and technicians work together to optimize protocols and monitor examinations such that these may be minimized or avoided entirely. This article presents patient-related and technical artifacts that may give rise to reduced image quality and ways to recognize and reduce them. PMID:26343534

  18. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Nomura, Hikaru; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-01

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip-sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip-sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium.

  19. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Nomura, Hikaru; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-27

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip-sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip-sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium. PMID:25736463

  20. The Fate of Oral Glucosamine Traced by 13C Labeling in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, George R.; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Noyszewski, Elizabeth A.; Hall, Jeffery O.; Sharma, Akella V.; Callaway, D. Allen; Reddy, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Objective: It has remained ambiguous as to whether oral dosing of glucosamine (GlcN) would make its way to the joint and affect changes in the cartilage, particularly the integrity of cartilage and chondrocyte function. The objective of this study was to trace the fate of orally dosed GlcN and determine definitively if GlcN was incorporated into cartilage proteoglycans. Design: Two dogs were treated with 13C-GlcN-HCl by oral dosing (500 mg/dog/d for 2 weeks and 250 mg/dog/d for 3 weeks). Cartilage was harvested from the tibial plateau and femoral condyles along with tissue specimens from the liver, spleen, heart, kidney, skin, skeletal muscle, lung, and costal cartilage. Percentages of 13C and 13C-GlcN present in each tissue sample were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Results: In the case of dog 1 (2-week treatment), there was an increase of 2.3% of 13C present in the articular cartilage compared to the control and an increase of 1.6% of 13C in dog 2 compared to control. As to be expected, the highest percentage of 13C in the other tissues tested was found in the liver, and the remaining tissues had percentages of 13C less than that of articular cartilage. Conclusion: The results are definitive and for the first time provide conclusive evidence that orally given GlcN can make its way through the digestive tract and be used by chondrocytes in joint cartilage, thereby potentially having an effect on the available GlcN for proteoglycan biosynthesis. PMID:26069586

  1. Magnetic elliptical polarization of Schumann resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Sentman, D.D.

    1987-08-01

    Measurements of orthogonal, horizontal components of the magnetic field in the ELF range obtained during September 1985 show that the Schumann resonance eigenfrequencies determined separately for the north-south and east-west magnetic components differ by as much as 0.5 Hz, suggesting that the underlying magnetic signal is not linearly polarized at such times. The high degree of magnetic ellipticity found suggests that the side multiplets of the Schumann resonances corresponding to azimuthally inhomogeneous normal modes are strongly excited in the highly asymmetric earth-ionosphere cavity. The dominant sense of polarization over the measurement passband is found to be right-handed during local daylight hours, and to be left-handed during local nighttime hours. 16 references.

  2. Magnetic elliptical polarization of Schumann resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of orthogonal, horizontal components of the magnetic field in the ELF range obtained during September 1985 show that the Schumann resonance eigenfrequencies determined separately for the north-south and east-west magnetic components differ by as much as 0.5 Hz, suggesting that the underlying magnetic signal is not linearly polarized at such times. The high degree of magnetic ellipticity found suggests that the side multiplets of the Schumann resonances corresponding to azimuthally inhomogeneous normal modes are strongly excited in the highly asymmetric earth-ionosphere cavity. The dominant sense of polarization over the measurement passband is found to be right-handed during local daylight hours, and to be left-handed during local nighttime hours.

  3. Development of Magnetic Resonance-based Functional Imaging: The Past, the Present, and the Future.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The term "theranostics" is a compound word combining "therapeutics" and "diagnostics". Discovery of the X-ray made an extraordinary contribution to the field of medical science. Development of computer science after World War II has been absolutely imperative for the development of medical imaging technology to date. The invention of X-ray computed tomography (CT) has revolutionized medical image diagnostic systems. Several functional imaging modalities emerged not only in the radiological field but also in magnetic resonance and ultrasonic fields. The fusion of three digital imaging techniques, MR Redox imaging, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oxygen mapping, and hyperpolarized (13)C MRI techniques in the magnetic resonance field, contribute to the newly-termed theranostics. Future development of a suitable contrast agent for each imaging modality will be a key for the success of theranositics. PMID:27477720

  4. Spin connection resonance in magnetic motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Myron W.; Eckardt, H.

    2007-11-01

    A mechanism is proposed for rotation of magnetic assemblies by a torque consisting of the magnetic dipole moment of the assembly and a magnetic field generated from space-time in Einstein-Cartan-Evans (ECE) field theory. It is shown that when the magnetic assembly is stationary, the space-time is described by a Helmholtz wave equation in the tetrad as eigenfunction. This is a balance condition in which the Cartan torsion of the space-time is zero, but in which the tetrad and spin connection are non-zero. This balance may be broken by a driving current density produced by the magnetic assembly. The Helmholtz equation becomes an undamped oscillator equation. At resonance the torque on the magnetic assembly may be amplified sufficiently to cause the whole assembly to rotate, as observed experimentally in a repeatable and reproducible manner.

  5. 13C NMR spectral characterization of epimeric rotenone and some related tetrahydrobenzopyranofurobenzopyranones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.; Abidi, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    The 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectra of epimers of rotenone and four 12a-hydroxy-analogues were examined to determine the stereochemical effect of the B/C ring fusion involving the 6a- and 12a-carbon centers. Chemical shift differences between the epimeric carbon resonances of cis- and trans-6a,12a-compounds were notably larger than those of diastereoisomers derived from the same B/C ring junction stereochemistry. Results of the spectral analysis have been useful for the quantification of mixtures of epimers and for the measurement of rates of epimerization and oxygenation.

  6. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Markovich, Dmitry; Baryshnikova, Kseniia; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    All-dielectric “magnetic light” nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here an approach for enhancing of magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of the magnetic moment, tailoring the latter in the dynamical range of 100% and delivering enhancement up to 36% relative to performances of standalone spherical particles. The proposed approach provides pathways for designs of all-dielectric metamaterials and metasurfaces with strong magnetic responses. PMID:26941126

  7. Structural Studies of Glutamine-Binding Protein of Escherichia Coli Using Multinuclear and Multidimensional Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjandra Leksana, Nico

    1993-01-01

    Multinuclear and multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy along with molecular biology techniques were utilized in studying the structure of glutamine -binding protein (GlnBP). Uniform and specific labeling of the GlnBP with ^{15}N and ^{13}C provided filtering of the otherwise overlapping ^ 1H resonances and markers along the GlnBP primary sequence. These facts are important in creating a possibility of sequentially assigning the ^ 1H backbone resonances, which is the first step in elucidating a protein structure. In parallel with this effort, specific distance measurement were done using ^ 1H-^ 1H nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) measurement and solid-state rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) spectroscopy. These distances can be used as constraints in building all possible structures of GlnBP. The consequences of the structural features observed are noted and discussed in this thesis.

  8. Multi-Spectroscopic Analysis of Seed Quality and 13C-Stable-Iotopologue Monitoring in Initial Growth Metabolism of Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Takanori; Ohishi, Risa; Shino, Amiu; Akashi, Kinya; Kikuchi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we applied nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, to Jatropha curcas to fulfill two objectives: (1) to qualitatively examine the seeds stored at different conditions, and (2) to monitor the metabolism of J. curcas during its initial growth stage under stable-isotope-labeling condition (until 15 days after seeding). NIR spectra could non-invasively distinguish differences in storage conditions. NMR metabolic analysis of water-soluble metabolites identified sucrose and raffinose family oligosaccharides as positive markers and gluconic acid as a negative marker of seed germination. Isotopic labeling patteren of metabolites in germinated seedlings cultured in agar-plate containg 13C-glucose and 15N-nitrate was analyzed by zero-quantum-filtered-total correlation spectroscopy (ZQF-TOCSY) and 13C-detected 1H-13C heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy (HETCOR). 13C-detected HETOCR with 13C-optimized cryogenic probe provided high-resolution 13C-NMR spectra of each metabolite in molecular crowd. The 13C-13C/12C bondmer estimated from 1H-13C HETCOR spectra indicated that glutamine and arginine were the major organic compounds for nitrogen and carbon transfer from roots to leaves. PMID:25401292

  9. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  10. Sports Health Magnetic Resonance Imaging Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Gary A.; Stadnick, Michael E.; Awh, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians. PMID:23015984

  11. An improved nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Manatt, S. L.

    1967-01-01

    Cylindrical sample container provides a high degree of nuclear stabilization to a nuclear magnetic resonance /nmr/ spectrometer. It is placed coaxially about the nmr insert and contains reference sample that gives a signal suitable for locking the field and frequency of an nmr spectrometer with a simple audio modulation system.

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  13. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  14. Use of Magnetic Resonance in Pancreaticobiliary Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Bates, David D B; LeBedis, Christina A; Soto, Jorge A; Gupta, Avneesh

    2016-05-01

    This article presents the magnetic resonance protocols, imaging features, diagnostic criteria, and complications of commonly encountered emergencies in pancreaticobiliary imaging. Pancreatic trauma, bile leak, acute cholecystitis, biliary obstruction, and pancreatitis are discussed. Various classifications and complications that can arise with these conditions, as well as artifacts that may mimic pathology, are also included. PMID:27150328

  15. Magnetic resonance investigation of magnetic-labeled baker's yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy Morais, J. P. M.; Azevedo, R. B.; Silva, L. P.; Lacava, Z. G. M.; Báo, S. N.; Silva, O.; Pelegrini, F.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Safarik, I.; Safarikova, M.; Morais, P. C.

    2004-05-01

    In this study, the interaction of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (5 and 10 nm core-size) with Saccharomyces cerevisae was investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs revealed magnetite nanoparticles attached externally to the cell wall. The MR data support the strong interaction among the nanoparticles supported by the cells. A remarkable shift in the resonance field was used as signature of particle attachment to the cell wall.

  16. Noninvasive in vivo magnetic resonance measures of glutathione synthesis in human and rat liver as an oxidative stress biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Skamarauskas, John T; Oakley, Fiona; Smith, Fiona E; Bawn, Carlo; Dunn, Michael; Vidler, Daniel S; Clemence, Matthew; Blain, Peter G; Taylor, Roy; Gamcsik, Michael P; Thelwall, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays a central role in the progression of liver disease and in damage to liver by toxic xenobiotics. We have developed methods for noninvasive assessment of hepatic OS defenses by measuring flux through the glutathione (GSH) synthesis pathway. 13C-labeled GSH is endogenously produced and detected by in vivo magnetic resonance after administration of [2-13C]-glycine. We report on a successful first-ever human demonstration of this approach as well as preclinical studies demonstrating perturbed GSH metabolism in models of acute and chronic OS. Human studies employed oral administration of [2-13C]-glycine and 13C spectroscopy on a 3T clinical magnetic resonance (MR) imaging scanner and demonstrated detection and quantification of endogenously produced 13C-GSH after labeled glycine ingestion. Plasma analysis demonstrated that glycine 13C fractional enrichment achieved steady state during the 6-hour ingestion period. Mean rate of synthesis of hepatic 13C-labeled GSH was 0.32 ± 0.18 mmole/kg/hour. Preclinical models of acute OS and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) comprised CCl4-treated and high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet-fed Sprague-Dawley rats, respectively, using intravenous administration of [2-13C]-glycine and observation of 13C-label metabolism on a 7T preclinical MR system. Preclinical studies demonstrated a 54% elevation of GSH content and a 31% increase in flux through the GSH synthesis pathway at 12 hours after acute insult caused by CCl4 administration, as well as a 23% decrease in GSH content and evidence of early steatohepatitis in the model of NASH. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate in vivo 13C-labeling and detection of GSH as a biomarker of tissue OS defenses, detecting chronic and acute OS insults. The methods are applicable to clinical research studies of hepatic OS in disease states over time as well as monitoring effects of therapeutic interventions. PMID:24242936

  17. Natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of histone and DNA dynamics in nucleosome cores.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, P R; Smith, R M; Rill, R L

    1986-05-01

    Natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (67.9 MHz) were obtained for native nucleosome cores: cores dissociated in 2 M NaCl and 2 M NaCl, 6 M urea; and cores degraded with DNase I plus proteinase K. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectra of native and dissociated cores and core length DNA were also obtained at 60.7 MHz. The 31P resonance and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of DNA were only slightly affected by packaging in nucleosome cores, in agreement with other reports, but 13C resonances of DNA were essentially unobservable. The loss of DNA spectral intensity suggests that rapid internal motions of DNA sugar carbons in protein-free DNA previously demonstrated by 13C NMR methods are partly restricted in nucleosomes. The 13C spectrum of native cores contains many narrow intense resonances assigned to lysine side chain and alpha-carbons, glycine alpha-carbons, alanine alpha- and beta- carbons, and arginine side chain carbons. Several weaker resonances were also assigned. The narrow line widths, short T1 values, and non-minimal nuclear Overhauser enhancements of these resonances, including alpha- and beta-carbons, show that some terminal chain segments of histones in nucleosomes are as mobile as small random coil polypeptides. The mobile segments include about 9% of all histone residues and 25% of all lysines, but only 10% of all arginines. The compositions of these segments indicate that mobile regions are located in amino- or carboxyl-terminal sequences of two or more histones. In addition, high mobility was observed for side chain carbons of 45-50% of all lysines (delta and epsilon carbons) and about 25% of all arginines (zeta carbon) in histones (including those in mobile segments), suggesting that basic residues in terminal histone sequences are not strongly involved in nucleosome structure and may instead help stabilize higher order chromatin structure. PMID:3700380

  18. High-resolution low-field molecular magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized liquids.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Aaron M; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Barskiy, Danila A; Koptyug, Igor V; Shchepin, Roman V; Waddell, Kevin W; He, Ping; Groome, Kirsten A; Best, Quinn A; Shi, Fan; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-09-16

    We demonstrate the feasibility of microscale molecular imaging using hyperpolarized proton and carbon-13 MRI contrast media and low-field (47.5 mT) preclinical scale (38 mm i.d.) 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hyperpolarized proton images with 94 × 94 μm(2) spatial resolution and hyperpolarized carbon-13 images with 250 × 250 μm(2) in-plane spatial resolution were recorded in 4-8 s (largely limited by the electronics response), surpassing the in-plane spatial resolution (i.e., pixel size) achievable with micro-positron emission tomography (PET). These hyperpolarized proton and (13)C images were recorded using large imaging matrices of up to 256 × 256 pixels and relatively large fields of view of up to 6.4 × 6.4 cm(2). (13)C images were recorded using hyperpolarized 1-(13)C-succinate-d2 (30 mM in water, %P(13C) = 25.8 ± 5.1% (when produced) and %P(13C) = 14.2 ± 0.7% (when imaged), T1 = 74 ± 3 s), and proton images were recorded using (1)H hyperpolarized pyridine (100 mM in methanol-d4, %P(H) = 0.1 ± 0.02% (when imaged), T1 = 11 ± 0.1 s). Both contrast agents were hyperpolarized using parahydrogen (>90% para-fraction) in an automated 5.75 mT parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) hyperpolarizer. A magnetized path was demonstrated for successful transportation of a (13)C hyperpolarized contrast agent (1-(13)C-succinate-d2, sensitive to fast depolarization when at the Earth's magnetic field) from the PHIP polarizer to the 47.5 mT low-field MRI. While future polarizing and low-field MRI hardware and imaging sequence developments can further improve the low-field detection sensitivity, the current results demonstrate that microscale molecular imaging in vivo is already feasible at low (<50 mT) fields and potentially at low (~1 mM) metabolite concentrations. PMID:25162371

  19. High-Resolution Low-Field Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Hyperpolarized Liquids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of microscale molecular imaging using hyperpolarized proton and carbon-13 MRI contrast media and low-field (47.5 mT) preclinical scale (38 mm i.d.) 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hyperpolarized proton images with 94 × 94 μm2 spatial resolution and hyperpolarized carbon-13 images with 250 × 250 μm2 in-plane spatial resolution were recorded in 4–8 s (largely limited by the electronics response), surpassing the in-plane spatial resolution (i.e., pixel size) achievable with micro-positron emission tomography (PET). These hyperpolarized proton and 13C images were recorded using large imaging matrices of up to 256 × 256 pixels and relatively large fields of view of up to 6.4 × 6.4 cm2. 13C images were recorded using hyperpolarized 1-13C-succinate-d2 (30 mM in water, %P13C = 25.8 ± 5.1% (when produced) and %P13C = 14.2 ± 0.7% (when imaged), T1 = 74 ± 3 s), and proton images were recorded using 1H hyperpolarized pyridine (100 mM in methanol-d4, %PH = 0.1 ± 0.02% (when imaged), T1 = 11 ± 0.1 s). Both contrast agents were hyperpolarized using parahydrogen (>90% para-fraction) in an automated 5.75 mT parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) hyperpolarizer. A magnetized path was demonstrated for successful transportation of a 13C hyperpolarized contrast agent (1-13C-succinate-d2, sensitive to fast depolarization when at the Earth’s magnetic field) from the PHIP polarizer to the 47.5 mT low-field MRI. While future polarizing and low-field MRI hardware and imaging sequence developments can further improve the low-field detection sensitivity, the current results demonstrate that microscale molecular imaging in vivo is already feasible at low (<50 mT) fields and potentially at low (∼1 mM) metabolite concentrations. PMID:25162371

  20. In vivo dynamic turnover of cerebral 13C isotopomers from [U- 13C]glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su; Shen, Jun

    2006-10-01

    An INEPT-based 13C MRS method and a cost-effective and widely available 11.7 Tesla 89-mm bore vertical magnet were used to detect dynamic 13C isotopomer turnover from intravenously infused [U- 13C]glucose in a 211 μL voxel located in the adult rat brain. The INEPT-based 1H → 13C polarization transfer method is mostly adiabatic and therefore minimizes signal loss due to B 1 inhomogeneity of the surface coils used. High quality and reproducible data were acquired as a result of combined use of outer volume suppression, ISIS, and the single-shot three-dimensional localization scheme built in the INEPT pulse sequence. Isotopomer patterns of both glutamate C4 at 34.00 ppm and glutamine C4 at 31.38 ppm are dominated first by a doublet originated from labeling at C4 and C5 but not at C3 (with 1JC4C5 = 51 Hz) and then by a quartet originated from labeling at C3, C4, and C5 (with 1JC3C4 = 35 Hz). A lag in the transition of glutamine C4 pattern from doublet-dominance to quartet dominance as compared to glutamate C4 was observed, which provides an independent verification of the precursor-product relationship between neuronal glutamate and glial glutamine and a significant intercompartmental cerebral glutamate-glutamine cycle between neurons and glial cells.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance properties of lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, D.; Weeks, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of Na-23, Al-27, and P-31 in fines samples 10084,60 and 14163,168 and in crystalline rock samples 12021,55 and 14321,166, have been recorded over a range of frequencies up to 20 MHz. A shift in the field at which maximum absorption occurs for all of the spectra relative to the field at which maximum absorption occurs for terrestrial analogues is attributed to a sample-dependent magnetic field at the Na, Al, and P sites opposing the laboratory field. The magnitude of these fields internal to the samples is sample dependent and varies from 5 to 10 G. These fields do not correlate with the iron content of the samples. However, the presence of single-domain particles of iron distributed throughout the plagioclase fraction that contains the principal fraction of Na and Al is inferred from electron magnetic resonance spectra shapes.

  2. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The Community College Division is pleased to report progress of NASA funded research at West Virginia State College. During this reporting period, the project research group has continued with activities to develop instrumentation capability designed to monitor resonant cavity frequencies in the atmospheric region between the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. In addition, the project's principal investigator, Dr. Craig Spaniol, and NASA technical officer, Dr. John Sutton, have written and published technical papers intended to expand the scientific and technical framework needed for project research. This research continues to provide an excellent example of government and education working together to provide significant research in the college environment. This cooperative effort has provided many students with technical project work which compliments their education.

  3. Solution and Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Characterization of Efavirenz.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Eduardo Gomes Rodrigues de; Carvalho, Erika Martins de; San Gil, Rosane Aguiar da Silva; Santos, Tereza Cristina Dos; Borré, Leandro Bandeira; Santos-Filho, Osvaldo Andrade; Ellena, Javier

    2016-09-01

    Samples of efavirenz (EFZ) were evaluated to investigate the influence of the micronization process on EFZ stability. A combination of X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, FTIR, observations of isotropic chemical shifts of (1)H in distinct solvents, their temperature dependence and spin-lattice relaxation time constants (T1), solution (1D and 2D) (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and solid-state (13)C NMR (CPMAS NMR) provides valuable structural information and structural elucidation of micronized EFZ and heptane-recrystallized polymorphs (EFZ/HEPT). This study revealed that the micronization process did not affect the EFZ crystalline structure. It was observed that the structure of EFZ/HEPT is in the same form as that obtained from ethyl acetate/hexane, as shown in the literature. A comparison of the solid-state NMR spectra revealed discrepancies regarding the assignments of some carbons published in the literature that have been resolved. PMID:26886313

  4. Volume coil based on hybridized resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouvaud, C.; Abdeddaim, R.; Larrat, B.; de Rosny, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present an electromagnetic device based on hybridization of four half-wavelength dipoles which increases the uniformity and the strength of the radio-frequency (RF) field of a Magnetic Resonant Imaging (MRI) apparatus. Numerical results show that this Hybridized Coil (HC) excited with a classical loop coil takes advantage of the magnetic hybrid modes. The distribution of the RF magnetic field is experimentally confirmed on a 7-T MRI with a gelatin phantom. Finally, the HC is validated in vivo by imaging the head of an anesthetized rat. We measure an overall increase of the signal to noise ratio with up to 2.4 fold increase in regions of interest far from the active loop coil.

  5. Hyperpolarized (13)C MR imaging detects no lactate production in mutant IDH1 gliomas: Implications for diagnosis and response monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chaumeil, Myriam M; Radoul, Marina; Najac, Chloé; Eriksson, Pia; Viswanath, Pavithra; Blough, Michael D; Chesnelong, Charles; Luchman, H Artee; Cairncross, J Gregory; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic imaging of brain tumors using (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate is a promising neuroimaging strategy which, after a decade of preclinical success in glioblastoma (GBM) models, is now entering clinical trials in multiple centers. Typically, the presence of GBM has been associated with elevated hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate produced from [1-(13)C] pyruvate, and response to therapy has been associated with a drop in hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate. However, to date, lower grade gliomas had not been investigated using this approach. The most prevalent mutation in lower grade gliomas is the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation, which, in addition to initiating tumor development, also induces metabolic reprogramming. In particular, mutant IDH1 gliomas are associated with low levels of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) and monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4), three proteins involved in pyruvate metabolism to lactate. We therefore investigated the potential of (13)C MRS of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate for detection of mutant IDH1 gliomas and for monitoring of their therapeutic response. We studied patient-derived mutant IDH1 glioma cells that underexpress LDHA, MCT1 and MCT4, and wild-type IDH1 GBM cells that express high levels of these proteins. Mutant IDH1 cells and tumors produced significantly less hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate compared to GBM, consistent with their metabolic reprogramming. Furthermore, hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate production was not affected by chemotherapeutic treatment with temozolomide (TMZ) in mutant IDH1 tumors, in contrast to previous reports in GBM. Our results demonstrate the unusual metabolic imaging profile of mutant IDH1 gliomas, which, when combined with other clinically available imaging methods, could be used to detect the presence of the IDH1 mutation in vivo. PMID:27437179

  6. State-of-the-Art Direct 13C and Indirect 1H-[13C] NMR Spectroscopy In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Robin A.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy in combination with 13C-labeled substrate infusion is a powerful technique to measure a large number of metabolic fluxes non-invasively in vivo. It has been used to quantify glycogen synthesis rates, establish quantitative relationships between energy metabolism and neurotransmission and evaluate the importance of different substrates. All measurements can, in principle, be performed through direct 13C NMR detection or via indirect 1H-[13C] NMR detection of the protons attached to 13C nuclei. The choice for detection scheme and pulse sequence depends on the magnetic field strength, whereas substrate selection depends on the metabolic pathways that are studied. 13C NMR spectroscopy remains a challenging technique that requires several non-standard hardware modifications, infusion of 13C-labeled substrates and sophisticated processing and metabolic modeling. Here the various aspects of direct 13C and indirect 1H-[13C] NMR are reviewed with the aim of providing a practical guide. PMID:21919099

  7. Magnetic resonance of calcified tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrli, Felix W.

    2013-04-01

    MRI of the human body is largely made possible by the favorable relaxation properties of protons of water and triacyl glycerides prevalent in soft tissues. Hard tissues - key among them bone - are generally less amenable to measurement with in vivo MR imaging techniques, not so much as a result of the lower proton density but rather due to the extremely short life-times of the proton signal in water bound to solid-like entities, typically collagen, or being trapped in micro-pores. Either mechanism can enhance T2 relaxation by up to three orders of magnitude relative to their soft-tissue counterparts. Detection of these protons requires solid-state techniques that have emerged in recent years and that promise to add a new dimension to the study of hard tissues. Alternative approaches to probe calcified tissues exploit their characteristic magnetic properties. Bone, teeth and extra-osseous calcium-containing biomaterials are unique in that they are more diamagnetic than all other tissues and thus yield information indirectly by virtue of the induced magnetic fields present in their vicinity. Progress has also been made in methods allowing very high-resolution structural imaging of trabecular and cortical bone relying on detection of the surrounding soft-tissues. This brief review, much of it drawn from work conducted in the author's laboratory, seeks to highlight opportunities with focus on early-stage developments for image-based assessment of structure, function, physiology and mechanics of calcified tissues in humans via liquid and solid-state approaches, including proton, deuteron and phosphorus NMR and MRI.

  8. 1H, 13C, 15N backbone and side chain NMR resonance assignments for the N-terminal RNA recognition motif of the HvGR-RBP1 protein involved in the regulation of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) senescence

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Katelyn E.; Tripet, Brian P.; Parrott, David; Fischer, Andreas M.; Copié, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Leaf senescence is an important process in the developmental life of all plant species. Senescence efficiency influences important agricultural traits such as grain protein content and plant growth, which are often limited by nitrogen use. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating this highly orchestrated process. To enhance our understanding of leaf senescence and its regulation, we have undertaken the structural and functional characterization of previously unknown proteins that are involved in the control of senescence in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Previous microarray analysis highlighted several barley genes whose transcripts are differentially expressed during senescence, including a specific gene which is greater than 40 fold up-regulated in the flag leaves of early- as compared to late-senescing near-isogenic barley lines at 14 and 21 days past flowering (anthesis). From inspection of its amino acid sequence, this gene is predicted to encode a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein herein referred to as HvGR-RBP1. HvGR-RBP1 has been expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli, and preliminary NMR data analysis has revealed that its glycine-rich C-terminal region [residues: 93–162] is structurally disordered whereas its N-terminal region [residues: 1–92] forms a well-folded domain. Herein, we report the complete 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments of backbone and sidechain atoms, and the secondary structural topology of the N-terminal RNA Recognition Motif (RRM) domain of HvGR-RBP1, as a first step to unraveling its structural and functional role in the regulation of barley leaf senescence. PMID:23417794

  9. Profiling planktonic biomass using element-specific, multicomponent nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Kobayashi, Toshiya; Hatanaka, Minoru; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Planktonic metabolism plays crucial roles in Earth's elemental cycles. Chemical speciation as well as elemental stoichiometry is important for advancing our understanding of planktonic roles in biogeochemical cycles. In this study, a multicomponent solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach is proposed for chemical speciation of cellular components, using several advanced NMR techniques. Measurements by ssNMR were performed on (13)C and (15)N-labeled Euglena gracilis, a flagellated protist. 3D dipolar-assisted rotational resonance, double-cross-polarization (1)H-(13)C correlation spectroscopy, and (1)H-(13)C solid-state heteronuclear single quantum correlation spectroscopy successively allowed characterization of cellular components. These techniques were then applied to E. gracilis cultured in high and low ammonium media to demonstrate the power of this method for profiling and comparing cellular components. Cellular NMR spectra indicated that ammonium induced both paramylon degradation and amination. Arginine was stored as a nitrogen reserve and ammonium replaced by arginine catabolism via the arginine dihydrolase pathway. (15)N and (31)P cellular ssNMR indicated arginine and polyphosphate accumulation in E. gracilis, respectively. This chemical speciation technique will contribute to environmental research by providing detailed information on environmental chemical properties. PMID:25973714

  10. Quantitative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of mobile residues in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.L.; Oldfield, E.

    1988-07-12

    The authors have used quantitative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the dynamic structure of the backbone of bacteriorhodopsin in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium R/sub 1/ and JW-3. NMR experiments were performed using an internal sucrose quantitation standard on purple membranes in which one of the following /sup 13/C'-labeled amino acids had been biosynthetically incorporated: glycine, isoleucine, lysine, phenylalanine, and valine. The results suggest that the C-terminus of the polypeptide chain backbone, and possibly one of the connecting loops, undergoes rapid, large angle fluctuations. The results are compared with previous NMR and fluorescence spectroscopic data obtained on bacteriorhodopsin.

  11. Determination of alkylbenzenesulfonate surfactants in groundwater using macroreticular resins and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Willoughby, T.; Barber, L.B., Jr.; Thorn, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    Alkylbenzenesulfonate surfactants were determined in groundwater at concentrations as low as 0.3 mg/L. The method uses XAD-8 resin for concentration, followed by elution with methanol, separation of anionic and nonionic surfactants by anion exchange, quantitation by titration, and identification by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Laboratory standards and field samples containing straight-chain and branched-chain alkylbenzenesulfonates, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and alkylbenzene ethoxylates were studied. The XAD-8 extraction of surfactants from groundwater was completed in the field, which simplified sample preservation and reduced the cost of transporting samples.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging with an optical atomicmagnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shoujun; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Rochester, Simon M.; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2006-05-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive andversatile methodology that has been applied in many disciplines1,2. Thedetection sensitivity of conventional Faraday detection of MRI depends onthe strength of the static magnetic field and the sample "fillingfactor." Under circumstances where only low magnetic fields can be used,and for samples with low spin density or filling factor, the conventionaldetection sensitivity is compromised. Alternative detection methods withhigh sensitivity in low magnetic fields are thus required. Here we showthe first use of a laser-based atomic magnetometer for MRI detection inlow fields. Our technique also employs remote detection which physicallyseparates the encoding and detection steps3-5, to improve the fillingfactor of the sample. Potentially inexpensive and using a compactapparatus, our technique provides a novel alternative for MRI detectionwith substantially enhanced sensitivity and time resolution whileavoiding the need for cryogenics.

  13. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10-3 Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  14. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B; Mewis, Ryan E; Highton, Louise A R; Kenny, Stephen M; Green, Gary G R; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all ¹H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10⁻³ Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application. PMID:24336292

  15. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10−3 Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application. PMID:24336292

  16. Foundations of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan; Newbould, Rexford; Liu, Chunlei; Thijs, Vincent; Ropele, Stefan; Clayton, David B.; Krueger, Gunnar; Moseley, Michael E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: During the past decade, major breakthroughs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality were made by means of quantum leaps in scanner hardware and pulse sequences. Some advanced MRI techniques have truly revolutionized the detection of disease states and MRI can now—within a few minutes—acquire important quantitative information noninvasively from an individual in any plane or volume at comparatively high resolution. This article provides an overview of the most common advanced MRI methods including diffusion MRI, perfusion MRI, functional MRI, and the strengths and weaknesses of MRI at high magnetic field strengths. PMID:15897944

  17. Strategy for Enhancement of (13)C-Photo-CIDNP NMR Spectra by Exploiting Fractional (13)C-Labeling of Tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Joshi, Monika; Illarionov, Boris; Kacprzak, Sylwia; Lukaschek, Michail; Kothe, Gerd; Budisa, Nediljko; Fischer, Markus; Bacher, Adelbert; Weber, Stefan

    2015-10-29

    The photo-CIDNP effect has proven to be useful to strongly enhance NMR signals of photochemically active proteins simply by irradiation with light. The evolving characteristic patterns of enhanced absorptive and emissive NMR lines can be exploited to elucidate the photochemistry and photophysics of light-driven protein reactions. In particular, by the assignment of (13)C NMR resonances, redox-active amino acids may be identified and thereby electron-transfer pathways unraveled, in favorable cases, even with (13)C at natural abundance. If signal enhancement is weak, uniform (13)C isotope labeling is traditionally applied to increase the signal strength of protein (13)C NMR. However, this typically leads to cross relaxation, which transfers light-induced nuclear-spin polarization to adjacent (13)C nuclei, thereby preventing an unambiguous analysis of the photo-CIDNP effect. In this contribution, two isotope labeling strategies are presented; one leads to specific but ubiquitous (13)C labeling in tryptophan, and the other is based on fractional isotope labeling affording sets of isotopologs with low probability of next-neighbor isotope accumulation within individual tryptophan molecules. Consequently, cross relaxation is largely avoided while the signal enhancement by (13)C enrichment is preserved. This results in significantly simplified polarization patterns that are easier to analyze with respect to the generation of light-generated nuclear-spin polarization. PMID:26244593

  18. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26460094

  19. Magnetic resonances in nano-scale metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhao; Liddle, Alex; Martin, Michael

    2006-03-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and optically measured several different kinds of nano-scale metamaterials. We make use e-beam nano-lithography technology at LBNL's Center for X-Ray Optics for fabricating these structures on extremely thin SiN substrates so that they are close to free-standing. Optical properties were measured as a function of incidence angle and polarization. We directly observe a strong magnetic resonance consistent with a negative magnetic permeability in our samples at mid- and near-IR optical frequencies. We will discuss the results in comparison with detailed simulations, and will discuss the electric dipole or quadrupole resonances observed in the samples. Finally, we will report on our progress towards constructing a fully negative index of refraction meta-material.

  20. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolinsky, J.S.; Narayana, P.A.; Fenstermacher, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Regional in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides quantitative data on selected chemical constituents of brain. We imaged 16 volunteers with clinically definite multiple sclerosis on a 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance scanner to define plaque-containing volumes of interest, and obtained localized water-suppressed proton spectra using a stimulated echo sequence. Twenty-five of 40 plaque-containing regions provided spectra of adequate quality. Of these, 8 spectra from 6 subjects were consistent with the presence of cholesterol or fatty acids; the remainder were similar to those obtained from white matter of normal volunteers. This early experience with regional proton spectroscopy suggests that individual plaques are distinct. These differences likely reflect dynamic stages of the evolution of the demyelinative process not previously accessible to in vivo investigation.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Ischemic Tissue Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jerry S; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhe Sun, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) are versatile diagnostic techniques capable of characterizing the complex stroke pathophysiology, and hold great promise for guiding stroke treatment. Particularly, tissue viability and salvageability are closely associated with its metabolic status. Upon ischemia, ischemic tissue metabolism is disrupted including altered metabolism of glucose and oxygen, elevated lactate production/accumulation, tissue acidification and eventually, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion and energy failure. Whereas metabolism impairment during ischemic stroke is complex, it may be monitored non-invasively with magnetic resonance (MR)-based techniques. Our current article provides a concise overview of stroke pathology, conventional and emerging imaging and spectroscopy techniques, and data analysis tools for characterizing ischemic tissue damage. PMID:22216079

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography: physical principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Kiruluta, Andrew J M; González, R Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is the visualization of hemodynamic flow using imaging techniques that discriminate flowing spins in blood from those in stationary tissue. There are two classes of MRA methods based on whether the magnetic resonance imaging signal in flowing blood is derived from the amplitude of the moving spins, the time-of-flight methods, or is based on the phase accumulated by these flowing spins, as in phase contrast methods. Each method has particular advantages and limitations as an angiographic imaging technique, as evidenced in their application space. Here we discuss the physics of MRA for both classes of imaging techniques, including contrast-enhanced approaches and the recent rapid expansion of the techniques to fast acquisition and processing techniques using parallel imaging coils as well as their application in high-field MR systems such as 3T and 7T. PMID:27432663

  3. Combined Confocal and Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Majors, Paul D.; Minard, Kevin R.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Daly, Don S.; Holtom, Gary R.; Thrall, Brian D.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2002-05-12

    Confocal and magnetic resonance microscopy are both used to study live cells in a minimally invasive way. Both techniques provide complementary information. Therefore, by examining cells simultaneously with both methodologies, more detailed information is obtained than is possible with each of the microscopes individually. In this paper two configurations of a combined confocal and magnetic resonance microscope described. In both cases the sample compartment is part of a temperature regulated perfusion system. The first configuration is capable of studying large single cells or three-dimensional cell agglomerates, whereas with the second configuration monolayers of mammalian cells can be investigated . Combined images are shown of Xenopus laevis frog oocytes, model JB6 tumor spheroids, and a single layer of Chinese hamster ovary cells. Finally, potential applications of the combined microscope are discussed.

  4. [Indications for magnetic resonance imaging in pneumology].

    PubMed

    Arrivé, L

    1997-04-19

    Tissue mobilization caused by respiration and heart beat and lower spacial resolution than with computed tomography has limited use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pneumology. Nevertheless, because of the high-quality of spontaneous contrast and the non irradiation nature of the examination, there are selected indications. For bronchogenic cancer, MRI is reserved for selected cases to evaluate tumor extension. For tumors of the mediastinum, MRI is particularly useful for evaluating extension of neurogenic tumors. MRI also gives a better visualization of processes involving the diaphragm than computed tomography. The development of magnetic resonance angiography is a major progress for exploration of pulmonary embolism as repeated acquisitions can be obtained without injection of a contrast medium. Several studies have shown that MRI visualizes well solitary lung nodules, clearly distinguishing fat content from vascularized nodules. For the pulmonary parenchyma, further advances are necessary before MRI can become a routine exploration technique. PMID:9180867

  5. Antiferromagnetic resonance excitation by terahertz magnetic field resonantly enhanced with split ring resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Y.; Hirori, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kageyama, H.; Tanaka, K.

    2014-07-14

    Excitation of antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) in a HoFeO{sub 3} crystal combined with a split ring resonator (SRR) is studied using terahertz (THz) electromagnetic pulses. The magnetic field in the vicinity of the SRR is induced by the incident THz electric field component and excites spin oscillations that correspond to the AFMR, which are directly probed by the Faraday rotation of the polarization of a near-infrared probe pulse. The good agreement of the temperature-dependent magnetization dynamics with the calculation using the two-lattice Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation confirms that the AFMR is excited by the THz magnetic field, which is enhanced at the SRR resonance frequency by a factor of 20 compared to the incident magnetic field.

  6. Fundamental physics of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Villafana, T

    1988-07-01

    Although similar to computerized tomography, in that cross-sectional images are produced, the physical principles underlying magnetic resonance are entirely different. The MRI process, as commonly implemented, involves the excitation of hydrogen nuclei and the analysis of how these nuclei recover to the original equilibrium steady states that they had prior to excitation. This article discusses that process, that is, preparatory alignment, RF excitation, relaxation and signal measurement, and spatial localization. PMID:3380941

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance in Kondo lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curro, Nicholas J.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has emerged as a vital tool to explore the fundamental physics of Kondo lattice systems. Because nuclear spins experience two different hyperfine couplings to the itinerant conduction electrons and to the local f moments, the Knight shift can probe multiple types of spin correlations that are not accessible via other techniques. The Knight shift provides direct information about the onset of heavy electron coherence and the emergence of the heavy electron fluid.

  8. Neurosurgical uses for intraprocedural magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mutchnick, Ian S; Moriarty, Thomas M

    2005-10-01

    Neurosurgical procedures demand precision, and efforts to create accurate neurosurgical navigation have been central to the profession through its history. Magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided navigation offers the possibility of real-time, image-based stereotactic information for the neurosurgeon, which makes possible a number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. This article will review both current options for intraoperative MRI operative suite arrangements and the current therapeutic/diagnostic uses of intraoperative MRI. PMID:16924171

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging: Principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kean, D.; Smith, M.

    1986-01-01

    This text covers the physics underlying magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; pulse sequences; image production; equipment; aspects of clinical imaging; and the imaging of the head and neck, thorax, abdomen and pelvis, and musculoskeletal system; and MR imaging. The book provides about 150 examples of MR images that give an overview of the pathologic conditions imaged. There is a discussion of the physics of MR imaging and also on the spin echo.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Low, Keynes TA; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications.

    PubMed

    Low, Keynes T A; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  12. Spherical tensor analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Jacco D; Carravetta, Marina; Antonioli, Gian Carlo; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2005-06-22

    In a nuclear magnetic-resonance (NMR) experiment, the spin density operator may be regarded as a superposition of irreducible spherical tensor operators. Each of these spin operators evolves during the NMR experiment and may give rise to an NMR signal at a later time. The NMR signal at the end of a pulse sequence may, therefore, be regarded as a superposition of spherical components, each derived from a different spherical tensor operator. We describe an experimental method, called spherical tensor analysis (STA), which allows the complete resolution of the NMR signal into its individual spherical components. The method is demonstrated on a powder of a (13)C-labeled amino acid, exposed to a pulse sequence generating a double-quantum effective Hamiltonian. The propagation of spin order through the space of spherical tensor operators is revealed by the STA procedure, both in static and rotating solids. Possible applications of STA to the NMR of liquids, liquid crystals, and solids are discussed. PMID:16035785

  13. Magnetic resonance-detectable metabolic consequences of MEK inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, Alessia; Woods, Sarah M.; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is increasingly viewed as a hallmark of cancer. Accordingly, metabolic readouts can serve as biomarkers of response to therapy. The goal of this study was to investigate some of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)-detectable metabolic consequences of MEK inhibition. We investigated PC3 prostate cancer, MCF-7 breast cancer and A375 melanoma cells and determined that, consistent with previous studies, MRS-detectable levels of phosphocholine dropped significantly in all cell lines (to 63%, 50% and 18% of control, respectively) following MEK inhibition with U0126. This effect was mediated by a drop in the expression of choline kinase α, the enzyme that catalyzed the phosphorylation of choline. In contrast, the impact of MEK inhibition on glycolysis was cell-line dependent. A375 cells, which express mutant BRAF demonstrated a significant drop in glucose uptake (to 36% of control) and a drop in lactate production (to 42% of control) in line with PET data. In contrast, in PC3 and MCF-7 cells an increase in glucose uptake (to 198 % and 192% of control, respectively) and an increase in lactate production (to 177% and to 212% of control, respectively) was observed, in line with a previous hyperpolarized 13C MRS study. This effect is likely mediated by activation of the PI3K pathway and AMPK. Our findings demonstrate the value of translatable non-invasive MRS methods for informing on cellular metabolism as a readout for activation of potential feedback loops following MEK inhibition. PMID:24706368

  14. Fluctuating magnetic field induced resonant activation

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Shrabani; Das, Sudip; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2014-12-14

    In this paper, we have studied the properties of a Brownian particle at stationary state in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field. Time dependence of the field makes the system thermodynamically open. As a signature of that the steady state distribution function becomes function of damping strength, intensity of fluctuations and constant parts of the applied magnetic field. It also depends on the correlation time of the fluctuating magnetic field. Our another observation is that the random magnetic field can induce the resonant activation phenomenon. Here correlation time is increased under the fixed variance of the fluctuating field. But if the correlation time (τ) increases under the fixed field strength then the mean first passage time rapidly grows at low τ and it almost converges at other limit. This is sharp contrast to the usual colored noise driven open system case where the mean first passage time diverges exponentially. We have also observed that a giant enhancement of barrier crossing rate occurs particularly at large strength of constant parts of the applied magnetic field even for very weak fluctuating magnetic field. Finally, break down of the Arrhenius result and disappearance of the Kramers’ turn over phenomenon may occur in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field.

  15. High-resolution magic-angle spinning (13)C spectroscopy of brain tissue at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxia; Chen, Lei; Gao, Hongchang; Zeng, Danlin; Yue, Yong; Liu, Maili; Lei, Hao; Deng, Feng; Ye, Chaohui

    2006-03-01

    High-resolution magic-angle spinning (MAS) (1)H and (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has recently been applied to study the metabolism in intact biological tissue samples. Because of the low natural abundance and the low gyromagnetic ratio of the (13)C nuclei, signal enhancement techniques such as cross-polarization (CP) and distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT) are often employed in MAS (13)C MRS to improve the detection sensitivity. In this study, several sensitivity enhancement techniques commonly used in liquid- and solid-state NMR, including CP, DEPT and nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE), were combined with MAS to acquire high-resolution (13)C spectra on intact rat brain tissue at natural abundance, and were compared for their performances. The results showed that different signal enhancement techniques are sensitive to different classes of molecules/metabolites, depending on their molecular weights and mobility. DEPT was found to enhance the signals of low-molecular weight metabolites exclusively, while the signals of lipids, which often are associated with membranes and have relatively lower mobility, were highly sensitive to CP enhancement. PMID:16477685

  16. MRI with hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate detects advanced pancreatic preneoplasia prior to invasive disease in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Eva M; Kettunen, Mikko I; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Dzien, Piotr; Wright, Alan J; Gopinathan, Aarthi; Gallagher, Ferdia A; Lewis, David Y; Frese, Kristopher K; Almeida, Jaime; Howat, William J; Tuveson, David A; Brindle, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatic cancer (PCa) is treatable by surgery when detected at an early stage. Non-invasive imaging methods able to detect both established tumours and their precursor lesions are needed to select patients for surgery. We investigated here whether pancreatic preneoplasia could be detected prior to the development of invasive cancers in genetically engineered mouse models of PCa using metabolic imaging. Design The concentrations of alanine and lactate and the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were measured in extracts prepared from the pancreas of animals at different stages of disease progression; from pancreatitis, through tissue with predominantly low-grade and then high-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and then tumour. 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (13C-MRSI) was used to measure non-invasively changes in 13C labelling of alanine and lactate with disease progression, following injection of hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate. Results Progressive decreases in the alanine/lactate concentration ratio and ALT/LDH activity ratio with disease progression were accompanied by a corresponding decrease in the [1-13C]alanine/[1-13C]lactate signal ratio observed in 13C-MRSI images of the pancreas. Conclusions Metabolic imaging with hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate enables detection and monitoring of the progression of PCa precursor lesions. Translation of this MRI technique to the clinic has the potential to improve the management of patients at high risk of developing PCa. PMID:26347531

  17. The Feasibility of Assessing Branched-Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in Cellular Models of Prostate Cancer with Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Ketoisocaproate

    PubMed Central

    Billingsley, Kelvin L.; Park, Jae Mo; Josan, Sonal; Hurd, Ralph; Mayer, Dirk; Spielman-Sun, Eleanor; Nishimura, Dwight G.; Brooks, James D.; Spielman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have yielded powerful techniques capable of real-time analysis of metabolic pathways. These non-invasive methods have increasingly shown application in impacting disease diagnosis and have further been employed in mechanistic studies of disease onset and progression. Our goals were to investigate branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT) activity in prostate cancer with a novel molecular probe, hyperpolarized [1-13C]-2-ketoisocaproate ([1-13C]-KIC), and explore the potential of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism to serve as a biomarker. Using traditional spectrophotometric assays, BCAT enzymatic activities were determined in vitro for various sources of prostate cancer (human, transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mouse and human cell lines). These preliminary studies indicated that low levels of BCAT activity were present in all models of prostate cancer but enzymatic levels are altered significantly in prostate cancer relative to healthy tissue. The MR spectroscopic studies were conducted with two cellular models (PC-3 and DU-145) that exhibited levels of BCAA metabolism comparable to the human disease state. Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-KIC was administered to prostate cancer cell lines, and the conversion of [1-13C]-KIC to the metabolic product, [1-13C]-leucine ([1-13C]-Leu), could be monitored via hyperpolarized 13C MRS. PMID:24907854

  18. Discovering [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR Spectroscopy in the General Chemistry Laboratory through a Sequence of Guided-Inquiry Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Justice, David; Brauer, Shari; Landis, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This sequence of three guided-inquiry labs is designed for a second-semester general chemistry course and challenges students to discover basic theoretical principles associated with [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR spectroscopy. Students learn to identify and explain basic concepts of magnetic resonance and vibrational…

  19. Estimation of procyanidin/prodelphinidin and cis/trans flavanol ratios of condensed tannin fractions by 1H-13C HSQC NMR spectroscopy: Correlation with thiolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integration of cross-peak contours of H/C-2’,6’ signals from prodelphinidin (PD) and of H/C-6’ signals from procyanidin (PC) units in 1H-13C HSQC nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of condensed tannins yielded nuclei-adjusted PC/PD estimates that were highly correlated with PC/PD ratios obtain...

  20. Differences between Lignin in Unprocessed Wood, Milled Wood, Mutant Wood, and Extracted Lignin Detected by 13C Solid-State NMR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been applied to an array of intact and isolated wood samples in order to identify potential structural changes induced by tree age, milling, lignin extraction, or naturally occurring mutations. Included in this study were mature loblolly pine mil...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Collagen Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Chesnick, Ingrid E.; Mason, Jeffrey T.; Giuseppetti, Anthony A.; Eidelman, Naomi; Potter, Kimberlee

    2008-01-01

    A model mineralizing system was subjected to magnetic resonance microscopy to investigate how water proton transverse (T2) relaxation times and magnetization transfer ratios can be applied to monitor collagen mineralization. In our model system, a collagen sponge was mineralized with polymer-stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. The lower hydration and water proton T2 values of collagen sponges during the initial mineralization phase were attributed to the replacement of the water within the collagen fibrils by amorphous calcium carbonate. The significant reduction in T2 values by day 6 (p < 0.001) was attributed to the appearance of mineral crystallites, which were also detected by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. In the second phase, between days 6 and 13, magnetic resonance microscopy properties appear to plateau as amorphous calcium carbonate droplets began to coalesce within the intrafibrillar space of collagen. In the third phase, after day 15, the amorphous mineral phase crystallized, resulting in a reduction in the absolute intensity of the collagen diffraction pattern. We speculate that magnetization transfer ratio values for collagen sponges, with similar collagen contents, increased from 0.25 ± 0.02 for control strips to a maximum value of 0.31 ± 0.04 at day 15 (p = 0.03) because mineral crystals greatly reduce the mobility of the collagen fibrils. PMID:18487295

  2. Time-course metabolic changes in high-fat diet-induced obesity rats: A pilot study using hyperpolarized (13)C dynamic MRS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang-Won; Ahn, Kyu-Youn; Kim, Yun-Hyeon; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the time-course metabolic changes based on hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity rats and the correlation between metabolic and serum enzyme levels. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either HFD (60% fat) or normal diet (10% fat) for 6weeks. A HyperSense DNP was used to hyperpolarize [1-(13)C] pyruvic acid and the hyperpolarized (13)C MRS was examined every 2weeks in the course of 6weeks using a 3T GE MR750 scanner. The body weight of HFD-induced obese rats was significantly increased compared to normal rats at the 6th week after the onset of feeding (p=0.05). Simultaneously, the HFD-induced obese rats showed significantly increased levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol compared to normal rats (p≤0.05). In the dynamic (13)C MR spectra acquired at the 6th week, the obese rats showed significantly increased ratios of [1-(13)C] lactate/[1-(13)C] pyruvate and [1-(13)C] alanine/[1-(13)C] pyruvate (p=0.05). The (13)C spectral outcomes are positively correlated with the enzyme levels of ALT and LDH in the HFD-induced obesity. The [1-(13)C] lactate and [1-(13)C] alanine are potentially considered as noninvasive biomarkers for the HFD-induced obesity. PMID:27374624

  3. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    PubMed Central

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benitez, Ania; Peláez Brioso, Gerardo A.; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main MRI and MRS strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), Blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast (BOLD), and Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) have revealed Mn2+ accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions, and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable. PMID:23781199

  4. Characterization of cerebral glutamine uptake from blood in the mouse brain: implications for metabolic modeling of 13C NMR data

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, Puneet; Behar, Kevin L; Mason, Graeme F; De Feyter, Henk M; Rothman, Douglas L; Patel, Anant B

    2014-01-01

    13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of rodent and human brain using [1-13C]/[1,6-13C2]glucose as labeled substrate have consistently found a lower enrichment (∼25% to 30%) of glutamine-C4 compared with glutamate-C4 at isotopic steady state. The source of this isotope dilution has not been established experimentally but may potentially arise either from blood/brain exchange of glutamine or from metabolism of unlabeled substrates in astrocytes, where glutamine synthesis occurs. In this study, the contribution of the former was evaluated ex vivo using 1H-[13C]-NMR spectroscopy together with intravenous infusion of [U-13C5]glutamine for 3, 15, 30, and 60 minutes in mice. 13C labeling of brain glutamine was found to be saturated at plasma glutamine levels >1.0 mmol/L. Fitting a blood–astrocyte–neuron metabolic model to the 13C enrichment time courses of glutamate and glutamine yielded the value of glutamine influx, VGln(in), 0.036±0.002 μmol/g per minute for plasma glutamine of 1.8 mmol/L. For physiologic plasma glutamine level (∼0.6 mmol/L), VGln(in) would be ∼0.010 μmol/g per minute, which corresponds to ∼6% of the glutamine synthesis rate and rises to ∼11% for saturating blood glutamine concentrations. Thus, glutamine influx from blood contributes at most ∼20% to the dilution of astroglial glutamine-C4 consistently seen in metabolic studies using [1-13C]glucose. PMID:25074745

  5. An intact small animal model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion: Characterization of metabolic changes by hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Berthonneche, Corinne; Comment, Arnaud; Schwitter, Juerg

    2015-12-15

    Hyperpolarized carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((13)C MRS) enables the sensitive and noninvasive assessment of the metabolic changes occurring during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion. Ischemia-reperfusion models using hyperpolarized (13)C MRS are established in heart preparations ex vivo and in large animals in vivo, but an in vivo model in small animals would be advantageous to allow the study of reperfusion metabolism with neuroendocrine and inflammatory responses intact with the option to perform a greater number of experiments. A novel intact rat model of ischemia-reperfusion is presented that incorporates hyperpolarized (13)C MRS to characterize reperfusion metabolism. Typically, in an in vivo model, a tissue input function (TIF) is required to account for apparent changes in the metabolism of injected hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate resulting from changes in perfusion. Whereas the measurement of a TIF by metabolic imaging is particularly challenging in small animals, the ratios of downstream metabolites can be used as an alternative. The ratio of [(13)C]bicarbonate:[1-(13)C]lactate (RatioBic/Lac) measured within 1-2 min after coronary release decreased vs. baseline in ischemic rats (n = 10, 15-min occlusion, controls: n = 10; P = 0.017 for interaction, 2-way ANOVA). The decrease in oxidative pyruvate metabolism [RatioBic/Lac(Ischemia)/RatioBic/Lac(Baseline)] modestly correlated with area at risk (r = 0.66; P = 0.002). Hyperpolarized (13)C MRS was also used to examine alanine production during ischemia, which is observed in ex vivo models, but no significant change was noted; metrics incorporating [1-(13)C]alanine did not substantially improve the discrimination of ischemic-reperfused myocardium from nonischemic myocardium. This intact rat model, which mimics the human situation of reperfused myocardial infarction, could be highly valuable for the testing of new drugs to treat reperfusion injury, thereby facilitating translational research. PMID

  6. Molecular structure of crude beeswax studied by solid-state 13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2004-01-01

    13C Solid-state NMR experiments were performed to investigate the structure of beeswax in the native state (crude beeswax) for the first time. From quantitative direct polarization 13C MAS NMR spectrum, it was found that the fraction of internal-chain methylene (int-(CH2)) component compared to other components of crude beeswax was over 95%. The line shape of the int-(CH2) carbon resonance region was comprehensively analyzed in terms of NMR chemical shift. The 13C broad peak component covering from 31 to 35ppm corresponds to int-(CH2) carbons with trans conformation in crystalline domains, whereas the sharp signal at 30.3 ppm corresponds to gauche conformation in the non-crystalline domain. From peak deconvolution of the aliphatic region, it was found that over 85% of the int-(CH2) has a crystal structure and several kinds of molecular packing for int-(CH2), at least three, exist in the crystalline domain. Abbreviation: NMR nuclear magnetic resonance int-(CH2) internal-chain methylene CP cross-polarization MAS magic angle spinning PMID:15861244

  7. Preparation of 13C and 15N labelled RNAs for heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Nikonowicz, E P; Sirr, A; Legault, P; Jucker, F M; Baer, L M; Pardi, A

    1992-09-11

    A procedure is described for the efficient preparation of isotopically enriched RNAs of defined sequence. Uniformly labelled nucleotide 5'triphosphates (NTPs) were prepared from E.coli grown on 13C and/or 15N isotopically enriched media. These procedures routinely yield 180 mumoles of labelled NTPs per gram of 13C enriched glucose. The labelled NTPs were then used to synthesize RNA oligomers by in vitro transcription. Several 13C and/or 15N labelled RNAs have been synthesized for the sequence r(GGCGCUUGCGUC). Under conditions of high salt or low salt, this RNA forms either a symmetrical duplex with two U.U base pairs or a hairpin containing a CUUG loop respectively. These procedures were used to synthesize uniformly labelled RNAs and a RNA labelled only on the G and C residues. The ability to generate milligram quantities of isotopically labelled RNAs allows application of multi-dimensional heteronuclear magnetic resonance experiments that enormously simplify the resonance assignment and solution structure determination of RNAs. Examples of several such heteronuclear NMR experiments are shown. PMID:1383927

  8. Optimization of 13C dynamic nuclear polarization: isotopic labeling of free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kiswandi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a physics technique that amplifies the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals by transferring the high polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. Thus, the choice of free radical is crucial in DNP as it can directly affect the NMR signal enhancement levels, typically on the order of several thousand-fold in the liquid-state. In this study, we have investigated the efficiency of four variants of the well-known 4-oxo-TEMPO radical (normal 4-oxo-TEMPO plus its 15N-enriched and/or perdeuterated variants) for use in DNP of an important metabolic tracer [1-13C]acetate. Though the variants have significant differences in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, we have found that changing the composition of the TEMPO radical through deuteration or 15N doping yields no significant difference in 13C DNP efficiency at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. On the other hand, deuteration of the solvent causes a significant increase of 13C polarization that is consistent over all the 4-oxo-TEMPO variants. These findings are consistent with the thermal mixing model of DNP. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  9. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strózik-Kotlorz, D.

    2014-01-01

    I give a brief description of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the human brain examinations. MRS allows a noninvasive chemical analysis of the brain using a standard high field MR system. Nowadays, the dominant form of MR brain spectroscopy is proton spectroscopy. Two main techniques of MRS, which utilize the chemical shift of metabolites in the external magnetic field, are SVS (single voxel) and CSI (single slice). The major peaks in the spectrum of a normal brain include NAA, Cr, Cho and m-Ins, which are neuronal, energetic, membrane turnover and glial markers, respectively. In disease, two pathological metabolites can be found in the brain spectra: Lac, which is end product of anaerobic glycolysis and Lip, which is a marker of membrane breakdown, occurring in necrosis. The common way to analyze clinical spectra is to determine metabolite ratios, e.g. NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA. This analysis permits a safe and noninvasive examination of the brain tissue as each disease state has its own characteristic spectroscopic image. MRS is a valuable diagnostic tool in such clinical applications as detecting brain tumors and differentiating tumors from inflammatory and infectious processes. Proton MRS is also very helpful in diagnostic of ischemic lesions, Alzheimer's disease and hepatic encephalopathy. The MRS brain spectra should always be correlated with the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results and alone cannot make neurological diagnosis.

  10. Magnetic resonance at the quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertet, Patrice

    The detection and characterization of paramagnetic species by electron-spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy has numerous applications in chemistry, biology, and materials science. Most ESR spectrometers rely on the inductive detection of the small microwave signals emitted by the spins during their Larmor precession into a microwave resonator in which they are embedded. Using the tools offered by circuit Quantum Electrodynamics (QED), namely high quality factor superconducting micro-resonators and Josephson parametric amplifiers that operate at the quantum limit when cooled at 20mK, we report an increase of the sensitivity of inductively detected ESR by 4 orders of magnitude over the state-of-the-art, enabling the detection of 1700 Bismuth donor spins in silicon with a signal-to-noise ratio of 1 in a single echo. We also demonstrate that the energy relaxation time of the spins is limited by spontaneous emission of microwave photons into the measurement line via the resonator, which opens the way to on-demand spin initialization via the Purcell effect. These results constitute a first step towards circuit QED experiments with magnetically coupled individual spins.

  11. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20–25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier (Thurber et al., J. Magn. Reson. 2008) [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids. PMID:23238592

  12. 13C SPE MAS measurement of ligand concentration in compressible chromatographic beads

    PubMed Central

    Elwinger, Fredrik; Dvinskikh, Sergey V.

    2015-01-01

    A method for measuring the ligand concentration in heterogeneous materials like chromatography media is described. In this method, 13C single pulse excitation magic angle spinning NMR experiment with broadband 1H decoupling is used to determine the peak integrals for a butyl ligand in the spectrum of a dried chromatography medium. Within a carefully controlled protocol, those integrals compared with that of the internal reference compound dimethyl sulfone provide the required volume concentration with an accuracy of ca 2%. The effects of temperature, degree of hydration, and other experimental parameters are discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26053054

  13. Comparative study of ¹³C composition in ethanol and bulk dry wine using isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry and by nuclear magnetic resonance as an indicator of vine water status.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Francois; van Leeuwen, Cornelis; Gaillard, Laetitia; Grand, Mathilde; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S; Sabathié, Nathalie; Salagoïty, Marie-Hélène

    2015-12-01

    The potential of wine (13)C isotope composition (δ(13)C) is presented to assess vine water status during grape ripening. Measurements of δ(13)C have been performed on a set of 32 authentic wines and their ethanol recovered after distillation. The data, obtained by isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry coupled to an elemental analyser (irm-EA/MS), show a high correlation between δ(13)C of the bulk wine and its ethanol, indicating that the distillation step is not necessary when the wine has not been submitted to any oenological treatment. Therefore, the ethanol/wine δ(13)C correlation can be used as an indicator of possible enrichment of the grape must or the wine with exogenous organic compounds. Wine ethanol δ(13)C is correlated to predawn leaf water potential (R(2) = 0.69), indicating that this parameter can be used as an indicator of vine water status. Position-specific (13)C analysis (PSIA) of ethanol extracted from wine, performed by isotope ratio monitoring by nuclear magnetic resonance (irm-(13)C NMR), confirmed the non-homogenous repartition of (13)C on ethanol skeleton. It is the δ(13)C of the methylene group of ethanol, compared to the methyl moiety, which is the most correlated to predawn leaf water potential, indicating that a phase of photorespiration of the vine during water stress period is most probably occurring due to stomata closure. However, position-specific (13)C analysis by irm-(13)C NMR does not offer a greater precision in the assessment of vine water status compared to direct measurement of δ(13)C on bulk wine by irm-EA/MS. PMID:26438472

  14. Investigation of enzymatic C-P bond formation using multiple quantum HCP nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kaifeng; Werner, Williard J; Allen, Kylie D; Wang, Susan C

    2015-04-01

    The biochemical mechanism for the formation of the C-P-C bond sequence found in l-phosphinothricin, a natural product with antibiotic and herbicidal activity, remains unclear. To obtain further insight into the catalytic mechanism of PhpK, the P-methyltransferase responsible for the formation of the second C-P bond in l-phosphinothricin, we utilized a combination of stable isotopes and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Exploiting the newly emerged Bruker QCI probe (Bruker Corp.), we specifically designed and ran a (13) C-(31) P multiple quantum (1) H-(13) C-(31) P (HCP) experiment in (1) H-(31) P two-dimensional mode directly on a PhpK-catalyzed reaction mixture using (13) CH3 -labeled methylcobalamin as the methyl group donor. This method is particularly advantageous because minimal sample purification is needed to maximize product visualization. The observed 3:1:1:3 multiplet specifically and unequivocally illustrates direct bond formation between (13) CH3 and (31) P. Related nuclear magnetic resonance experiments based upon these principles may be designed for the study of enzymatic and/or synthetic chemical reaction mechanisms. PMID:25594737

  15. Use of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy for studying metabolic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jong-Hee; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the worldwide obesity epidemic and the sedentary lifestyle in industrialized countries, the number of people with metabolic diseases is explosively increasing. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), which is fundamentally similar to magnetic resonance imaging, can detect metabolic changes in vivo noninvasively. With its noninvasive nature, 1H, 13C and 31P MRS are being actively utilized in clinical and biomedical metabolic studies to detect lipids and important metabolites without ionizing radiation. 1H MRS can quantify lipid content in liver and muscle and can detect other metabolites, such as 2-hydroxyglutarate, in vivo. Of interest, many studies have indicated that hepatic and intramyocellular lipid content is inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity in humans. Thus, lipid content can be utilized as an in vivo biomarker for detecting early insulin resistance. Employing 13C MRS, hepatic glycogen synthesis and breakdown can be directly detected, whereas 31P MRS provides in vivo adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis rates by saturation transfer methods in addition to ATP content. These in vivo data can be very difficult to assess by other methods and offer a critical piece of metabolic information. To aid the reader in understanding these new methods, fundamentals of MRS are described in this review in addition to promising future applications of MRS and its limitations. PMID:25656949

  16. Investigation of enzymatic C–P bond formation using multiple quantum HCP nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kaifeng; Werner, Williard J.; Allen, Kylie D.; Wang, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical mechanism for the formation of the C–P–C bond sequence found in L-phosphinothricin, a natural product with antibiotic and herbicidal activity, remains unclear. To obtain further insight into the catalytic mechanism of PhpK, the P-methyltransferase responsible for the formation of the second C–P bond in L-phosphinothricin, we utilized a combination of stable isotopes and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Exploiting the newly emerged Bruker QCI probe (Bruker Corp.), we specifically designed and ran a 13C-31P multiple quantum 1H-13C-31P (HCP) experiment in 1H-31P two-dimensional mode directly on a PhpK-catalyzed reaction mixture using 13CH3-labeled methylcobalamin as the methyl group donor. This method is particularly advantageous because minimal sample purification is needed to maximize product visualization. The observed 3:1:1:3 multiplet specifically and unequivocally illustrates direct bond formation between 13CH3 and 31P. Related nuclear magnetic resonance experiments based upon these principles may be designed for the study of enzymatic and/or synthetic chemical reaction mechanisms. PMID:25594737

  17. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzaro, Nicolas; Ruchotzke, William; Belding, Amanda; Cardellino, Jeremy; Blomberg, Erick; McCullian, Brendan; Bhallamudi, Vidya; Pelekhov, Denis; Hammel, P. Chris

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) membranes are commercially-available, versatile structures that have a variety of applications. Although most commonly used as the support structure for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies, membranes are also ultrasensitive high-frequency mechanical oscillators. The sensitivity stems from the high quality factor Q 106 , which has led to applications in sensitive quantum optomechanical experiments. The high sensitivity also opens the door to ultrasensitive force detection applications. We report force detection of electron spin magnetic resonance at 300 K using a Si3N4 membrane with a force sensitivity of 4 fN/√{ Hz}, and a potential low temperature sensitivity of 25 aN/√{ Hz}. Given membranes' sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiN membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument that has superior spatial resolution to conventional NMR.

  18. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are “stiffness weighted” and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery. PMID:18777934

  19. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in central pontine myelinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, P D; Miller, D; Gledhill, R F; Rossor, M N

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in two patients in whom a clinical diagnosis of central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) had been made. MRI showed lesions in the pons in both cases about 2 years after the illness, at a time when the spastic quadriparesis and pseudobulbar palsy had recovered. The persisting abnormal signals in CPM are likely to be due to fibrillary gliosis. Persistence of lesions on MRI means that the diagnosis of CPM may be electively, after the acute illness has resolved. Images PMID:2732743

  1. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hedgire, Sandeep S; Oei, Tamara N; McDermott, Shaunagh; Cao, Kai; Patel M, Zena; Harisinghani, Mukesh G

    2012-07-01

    In India, prostate cancer has an incidence rate of 3.9 per 100,000 men and is responsible for 9% of cancer-related mortality. It is the only malignancy that is diagnosed with an apparently blind technique, i.e., transrectal sextant biopsy. With increasing numbers of high-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment being installed in India, the radiologist needs to be cognizant about endorectal MRI and multiparametric imaging for prostate cancer. In this review article, we aim to highlight the utility of multiparamteric MRI in prostate cancer. It plays a crucial role, mainly in initial staging, restaging, and post-treatment follow-up. PMID:23599562

  2. Insight into protein nuclear magnetic resonance research.

    PubMed

    Stoven, V; Lallemand, J Y; Abergel, D; Bouaziz, S; Delsuc, M A; Ekondzi, A; Guittet, E; Laplante, S; Le Goas, R; Malliavin, T

    1990-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the most powerful techniques to investigate the geometry of molecules in solution. It has been widely applied, in recent years, to the study of protein conformation. However, full reconstruction of the 3-D structure of such macro-molecules, still constitutes a real challenge for the spectroscopist. Skills as diverse as biology, spectroscopy, signal processing, or computer sciences, are required. This paper presents various aspects of the research in that domain, and our contribution to it. PMID:2126458

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of intramammary metastases.

    PubMed

    Wienbeck, Susanne; Herzog, Aimee; Kinner, Sonja; Surov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of intramammary metastases (IM). We identified 8 cases with IM, which were investigated by breast MRI (1.5T). In every case, the diagnosis of IM was proven histopathologically on breast biopsy specimens. Overall, 187 IM were identified. IM had inconsistent MRI features, which cannot be clearly classify as benign or malignant. IM should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of breast lesions to avoid possible misinterpretations. PMID:27133668

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nael, Kambiz; Kubal, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    Neuroimaging plays a critical role in the management of patients with acute stroke syndrome, with diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. A multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol in the emergency setting can address both primary goals of neuroimaging (ie, detection of infarction and exclusion of hemorrhage) and secondary goals of neuroimaging (ie, identifying the site of arterial occlusion, tissue characterization for defining infarct core and penumbra, and determining stroke cause/mechanism). MR imaging provides accurate diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and can differentiate AIS from other potential differential diagnoses. PMID:27150320

  5. Magnetic Resonance of Pelvic and Gastrointestinal Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Kaewlai, Rathachai; Dattwyler, Matthew; Abujudeh, Hani H; Singh, Ajay K

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is gaining increased acceptance in the emergency setting despite the continued dominance of computed tomography. MR has the advantages of more precise tissue characterization, superior soft tissue contrast, and a lack of ionizing radiation. Traditional barriers to emergent MR are being overcome by streamlined imaging protocols and newer rapid-acquisition sequences. As the utilization of MR imaging in the emergency department increases, a strong working knowledge of the MR appearance of the most commonly encountered abdominopelvic pathologies is essential. In this article, MR imaging protocols and findings of acute pelvic, scrotal, and gastrointestinal pathologies are discussed. PMID:27150327

  6. New magnetic resonance imaging methods in nephrology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Morrell, Glen; Rusinek, Henry; Sigmund, Eric; Chandarana, Hersh; Lerman, Lilach O.; Prasad, Pottumarthi Vara; Niles, David; Artz, Nathan; Fain, Sean; Vivier, Pierre H.; Cheung, Alfred K.; Lee, Vivian S.

    2013-01-01

    Established as a method to study anatomic changes, such as renal tumors or atherosclerotic vascular disease, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to interrogate renal function has only recently begun to come of age. In this review, we briefly introduce some of the most important MRI techniques for renal functional imaging, and then review current findings on their use for diagnosis and monitoring of major kidney diseases. Specific applications include renovascular disease, diabetic nephropathy, renal transplants, renal masses, acute kidney injury and pediatric anomalies. With this review, we hope to encourage more collaboration between nephrologists and radiologists to accelerate the development and application of modern MRI tools in nephrology clinics. PMID:24067433

  7. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  8. Review: Magnetic resonance imaging techniques in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eye’s propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. PMID:23112569

  9. Pelvic applications of diffusion magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Antonio C; Krishnaraj, Arun; Pires, Cintia E; Bittencourt, Leonardo K; Guimarães, Alexander R

    2011-02-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a powerful imaging technique in neuroimaging; its value in abdominal and pelvic imaging has only recently been appreciated as a result of improvements in magnetic resonance imaging technology. There is growing interest in the use of DWI for evaluating pathology in the pelvis. Its ability to noninvasively characterize tissues and to depict changes at a cellular level allows DWI to be an effective complement to conventional sequences of pelvic imaging, especially in oncologic patients. The addition of DWI may obviate contrast material in those with renal insufficiency or contrast material allergy. PMID:21129639

  10. Emergency Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Musculoskeletal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kumaravel, Manickam; Weathers, William M

    2016-05-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) trauma is commonly encountered in the emergency department. Computed tomography and radiography are the main forms of imaging assessment, but the use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become more common in the emergency room (ER) setting for evaluation of low-velocity/sports-related injury and high-velocity injury. The superior soft tissue contrast and detail provided by MR imaging gives clinicians a powerful tool in the management of acute MSK injury in the ER. This article provides an overview of techniques and considerations when using MR imaging in the evaluation of some of the common injuries seen in the ER setting. PMID:27150325

  11. Approach to breast magnetic resonance imaging interpretation.

    PubMed

    Palestrant, Sarah; Comstock, Christopher E; Moy, Linda

    2014-05-01

    With the increasing use of breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging comes the expectation that the breast radiologist is as fluent in its interpretation as in that of mammography and breast ultrasonography. Knowledge of who should be included for imaging and how to perform the imaging are as essential as interpreting the images. When reading the examination, the radiologist should approach the images from both a global and focused perspective, synthesizing findings into a report that includes a management plan. This article reviews a systematic and organized approach to breast MR imaging interpretation. PMID:24792657

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension. PMID:22559053

  13. Rapid estimation of nuclear magnetic resonance experiment time in low-concentration environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Masoom, Hussain; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Soong, Ronald; Simpson, Myrna J; Maas, Werner; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry; Simpson, André J

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an essential tool for studying environmental samples but is often hindered by low sensitivity, especially for the direct detection of nuclei such as(13) C. In very heterogeneous samples with NMR nuclei at low abundance, such as soils, sediments, and air particulates, it can take days to acquire a conventional(13) C spectrum. The present study describes a prescreening method that permits the rapid prediction of experimental run time in natural samples. The approach focuses the NMR chemical shift dispersion into a single spike, and, even in samples with extremely low carbon content, the spike can be observed in two to three minutes, or less. The intensity of the spike is directly proportional to the total concentration of nuclei of interest in the sample. Consequently, the spike intensity can be used as a powerful prescreening method that answers two key questions: (1) Will this sample produce a conventional NMR spectrum? (2) How much instrument time is required to record a spectrum with a specific signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio? The approach identifies samples to avoid (or pretreat) and permits additional NMR experiments to be performed on samples producing high-quality NMR data. Applications in solid- and liquid-state(13) C NMR are demonstrated, and it is shown that the technique is applicable to a range of nuclei. PMID:23065696

  14. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  15. Probing molecular geometry of solids by nuclear magnetic resonance spin exchange at the n=0 rotational-resonance condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekely, Piotr; Gardiennet, Carole; Potrzebowski, Marek J.; Sebald, Angelika; Reichert, Detlef; Luz, Zeev

    2002-05-01

    Exploration of the molecular geometry in rotating powder solids on the basis of magnetization exchange between spins with identical isotropic chemical shifts but differing chemical shielding tensor orientations is demonstrated experimentally. For this we take advantage of the potential of the ODESSA (one-dimensional exchange spectroscopy by sidebands alternation) experiment for the accurate measurement of spin exchange rate constants. We also report the observation of oscillatory behavior of the rotor-driven magnetization exchange at this so-called n=0 rotational-resonance condition which, in contrast to n=1,2,3,… rotational-resonance conditions, takes place at nearly arbitrary magic-angle spinning frequencies. The sensitivity of the longitudinal exchange decays to the relevant physical parameters of the spin system under conditions of rotor-driven and proton-driven magnetization exchange is discussed theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. Several 13C and 31P spin-exchange measurements have been performed on a series of model compounds covering a broad range of internuclear distances between carboxyl carbon atoms, and on a series of phosphorylated amino acids with different internuclear distances between phosphorus sites. The capacity of the ODESSA experiment for an unambiguous recognition of distinct internuclear distances is demonstrated. Potential applications of such measurements involve the exploration of intermolecular distances and the determination of the mutual orientation of neighboring molecular fragments in polycrystalline and noncrystalline solids.

  16. Metabolite specific proton magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, R.E.; Freeman, D.M.

    1989-06-01

    An imaging method is described that makes use of proton double quantum nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to construct images based on selected metabolites such as lactic acid. The optimization of the method is illustrated in vitro, followed by in vivo determination of lactic acid distribution in a solid tumor model. Water suppression and editing of lipid signals are such that two-dimensional spectra of lactic acid may be obtained from a radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumor in under 1 min and lactic acid images from the same tumor in under 1 hr at 2.0 T. This technique provides a fast and reproducible method at moderate magnetic field strength for mapping biologically relevant metabolites.

  17. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-05-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  18. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  19. Quantitative (13)C Solid-State NMR Spectra by Multiple-Contact Cross-polarization for Drug Delivery: From Active Principles to Excipients and Drug Carriers.

    PubMed

    Saïdi, Fadila; Taulelle, Francis; Martineau, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    In this contribution, we present an analysis of the main parameters influencing the efficiency of the (1)H → (13)C multiple-contact cross-polarization nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment in the context of solid pharmaceutical materials. Using the optimum experimental conditions, quantitative (13)C NMR spectra are then obtained for porous metal-organic frameworks (potential drug carriers) and for components present in drug formulations (active principle ingredient and excipients, amorphous or crystalline). Finally, we show that mixtures of components can also be quantified with this method and, hence, that it represents an ideal tool for quantification of pharmaceutical formulations by (13)C cross-polarization under magic-angle spinning NMR in the industry as it is robust and easy to set up, much faster than direct (13)C polarization and is efficient for samples at natural abundance. PMID:27372550

  20. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging: Current role in prostate cancer management.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshiko; Tamada, Tsutomu; Bist, Vipul; Reinhold, Caroline; Miyake, Hideaki; Tanaka, Utaru; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Sugimura, Kazuro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    Digital rectal examination, serum prostate-specific antigen screening and transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy are conventionally used as screening, diagnostic and surveillance tools for prostate cancer. However, they have limited sensitivity and specificity. In recent years, the role of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging has steadily grown, and is now part of the standard clinical management in many institutions. In multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, the morphological assessment of T2-weighted imaging is correlated with diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging perfusion and/or magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging is currently regarded as the most sensitive and specific imaging technique for the evaluation of prostate cancer, including detection, staging, localization and aggressiveness evaluation. This article presents an overview of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, and discusses the current role of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in the different fields of prostate cancer management. PMID:27184019

  1. Plasmon coupling of magnetic resonances in an asymmetric gold semishell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jian; Kong, Yan; Liu, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The generation of magnetic dipole resonances in metallic nanostructures is of great importance for constructing near-zero or even negative refractive index metamaterials. Commonly, planar two-dimensional (2D) split-ring resonators or relevant structures are basic elements of metamaterials. In this work, we introduce a three-dimensional (3D) asymmetric Au semishell composed of two nanocups with a face-to-face geometry and demonstrate two distinct magnetic resonances spontaneously in the visible–near infrared optical wavelength regime. These two magnetic resonances are from constructive and destructive hybridization of magnetic dipoles of individual nanocups in the asymmetric semishell. In contrast, complete cancellation of magnetic dipoles in the symmetric semishell leads to only a pronounced electric mode with near-zero magnetic dipole moment. These 3D asymmetric resonators provide new ways for engineering hybrid resonant modes and ultra-high near-field enhancement for the design of 3D metamaterials.

  2. Local and bulk 13C hyperpolarization in nitrogen-vacancy-centred diamonds at variable fields and orientations

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Bretschneider, Christian O.; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Kanda, Hisao; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Gershoni, David; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Polarizing nuclear spins is of fundamental importance in biology, chemistry and physics. Methods for hyperpolarizing 13C nuclei from free electrons in bulk usually demand operation at cryogenic temperatures. Room temperature approaches targeting diamonds with nitrogen-vacancy centres could alleviate this need; however, hitherto proposed strategies lack generality as they demand stringent conditions on the strength and/or alignment of the magnetic field. We report here an approach for achieving efficient electron-13C spin-alignment transfers, compatible with a broad range of magnetic field strengths and field orientations with respect to the diamond crystal. This versatility results from combining coherent microwave- and incoherent laser-induced transitions between selected energy states of the coupled electron–nuclear spin manifold. 13C-detected nuclear magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that this hyperpolarization can be transferred via first-shell or via distant 13Cs throughout the nuclear bulk ensemble. This method opens new perspectives for applications of diamond nitrogen-vacancy centres in nuclear magnetic resonance, and in quantum information processing. PMID:26404169

  3. Local and bulk (13)C hyperpolarization in nitrogen-vacancy-centred diamonds at variable fields and orientations.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A; Bretschneider, Christian O; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Kanda, Hisao; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Gershoni, David; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Polarizing nuclear spins is of fundamental importance in biology, chemistry and physics. Methods for hyperpolarizing (13)C nuclei from free electrons in bulk usually demand operation at cryogenic temperatures. Room temperature approaches targeting diamonds with nitrogen-vacancy centres could alleviate this need; however, hitherto proposed strategies lack generality as they demand stringent conditions on the strength and/or alignment of the magnetic field. We report here an approach for achieving efficient electron-(13)C spin-alignment transfers, compatible with a broad range of magnetic field strengths and field orientations with respect to the diamond crystal. This versatility results from combining coherent microwave- and incoherent laser-induced transitions between selected energy states of the coupled electron-nuclear spin manifold. (13)C-detected nuclear magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that this hyperpolarization can be transferred via first-shell or via distant (13)Cs throughout the nuclear bulk ensemble. This method opens new perspectives for applications of diamond nitrogen-vacancy centres in nuclear magnetic resonance, and in quantum information processing. PMID:26404169

  4. Fano resonance generated by magnetic scatterer in micro metal slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun-Song; Wang, Pei-Jie; Wang, Hai; Feng, Sheng-Fei

    2014-09-01

    A micro metal slit/magnetic scatterer structure is proposed to generate electromagnetic Fano resonance. The magnetic scatterer is formed by infinite long split cylinder resonator array. The analytical transmissivity formulas are deduced from Maxwell electromagnetic theory and the Fano resonance transmission is achieved by the theoretical calculations. The enhancement of environment refractive index leads to an ultrasensitive and linear red shift of resonance peak in the THz range.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers on technological advancement and diagnostic uses g magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative evaluation with computerized tomography is presented. Topics covered are imaging principles g magnetic resonance;instrumentation of magnetic resonance (MR);pathophysiology;quality and limitations g images;NMR imaging of brain and spinal cord;MR spectroscopy and its applications;neuroanatomy;Congenital malformations of brain and MR imaging;planning g MR imaging of spine and head and neck imaging.

  6. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  7. Massive subchorionic thrombosis followed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himoto, Yuki; Okumura, Ryosuke; Tsuji, Natsuki; Nagano, Tadayoshi; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Yamaoka, Toshihide; Kohno, Shigene

    2012-01-01

    Massive subchorionic thrombosis is a rare condition, defined as a large thrombus confined to the subchorionic space. It is associated with poor perinatal prognosis. However, prenatal diagnosis by ultrasonography is often difficult. We report a case of massive subchorionic thrombosis developing dermatomyositis after the delivery, followed by magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, we review other 4 cases assessed with magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging is very useful for confirmation of diagnosis and follow-up in combination with ultrasonography. PMID:22592619

  8. 13C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The many advantages of 13C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, 13C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semi-automated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE datasets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures. PMID:25932900

  9. General review of magnetic resonance elastography

    PubMed Central

    Low, Gavin; Kruse, Scott A; Lomas, David J

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an innovative imaging technique for the non-invasive quantification of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues via the direct visualization of propagating shear waves in vivo using a modified phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence. Fundamentally, MRE employs the same physical property that physicians utilize when performing manual palpation - that healthy and diseased tissues can be differentiated on the basis of widely differing mechanical stiffness. By performing “virtual palpation”, MRE is able to provide information that is beyond the capabilities of conventional morphologic imaging modalities. In an era of increasing adoption of multi-parametric imaging approaches for solving complex problems, MRE can be seamlessly incorporated into a standard MRI examination to provide a rapid, reliable and comprehensive imaging evaluation at a single patient appointment. Originally described by the Mayo Clinic in 1995, the technique represents the most accurate non-invasive method for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis and is currently performed in more than 100 centers worldwide. In this general review, the mechanical properties of soft tissues, principles of MRE, clinical applications of MRE in the liver and beyond, and limitations and future directions of this discipline -are discussed. Selected diagrams and images are provided for illustration. PMID:26834944

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Olgunturk, Rana; Cevik, Ayhan; Terlemez, Semiha; Kacar, Emre; Oner, Yusuf Ali

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to determine the efficacy and reliability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in establishing the diagnosis and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension in children. This is a retrospective comparison of 25 children with pulmonary hypertension and a control group comprising 19 healthy children. The diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension was made when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was ≥25 mmHg by catheter angiography. The children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly lower body mass indices than did the healthy children (P=0.048). In addition, the children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main pulmonary artery diameters and ascending aortic diameters (both P=0.001) but statistically similar ratios of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aortic diameter. If the main pulmonary artery diameter was ≥25 mm, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 72% sensitivity and 84% specificity. In the event that the ratio of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aorta diameter was ≥1, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 60% sensitivity and 53% specificity. When compared with children who had New York Heart Association functional class II pulmonary hypertension, the children with functional class III pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main (P=0.046), right (P=0.036), and left (P=0.003) pulmonary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is useful in the diagnosis of children with pulmonary hypertension. Pediatric pulmonary hypertension can be diagnosed with high sensitivity and specificity when the main pulmonary artery diameter measures ≥25 mm. PMID:26175631

  11. General review of magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Low, Gavin; Kruse, Scott A; Lomas, David J

    2016-01-28

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an innovative imaging technique for the non-invasive quantification of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues via the direct visualization of propagating shear waves in vivo using a modified phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence. Fundamentally, MRE employs the same physical property that physicians utilize when performing manual palpation - that healthy and diseased tissues can be differentiated on the basis of widely differing mechanical stiffness. By performing "virtual palpation", MRE is able to provide information that is beyond the capabilities of conventional morphologic imaging modalities. In an era of increasing adoption of multi-parametric imaging approaches for solving complex problems, MRE can be seamlessly incorporated into a standard MRI examination to provide a rapid, reliable and comprehensive imaging evaluation at a single patient appointment. Originally described by the Mayo Clinic in 1995, the technique represents the most accurate non-invasive method for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis and is currently performed in more than 100 centers worldwide. In this general review, the mechanical properties of soft tissues, principles of MRE, clinical applications of MRE in the liver and beyond, and limitations and future directions of this discipline -are discussed. Selected diagrams and images are provided for illustration. PMID:26834944

  12. PLANTAR THROMBOPHLEBITIS: MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Frederico Celestino; Carneiro, Renato Duarte; Longo, Carlos Henrique; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Rosemberg, Laércio Alberto; de Gusmão Funari, Marcelo Buarque

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in plantar thrombophlebitis. Methods: Retrospective review of twenty patients with pain in the plantar region of the foot, in which the MRI findings indicated plantar thrombophlebitis. Results: A total of fourteen men and six women, mean age 46.7 years were evaluated. Eight of these patients also underwent Doppler ultrasonography, which confirmed the thrombophlebitis. The magnetic resonance images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists with experience in musculoskeletal radiology (more than 10 years each), showing perivascular edema in all twenty patients (100%) and muscle edema in nineteen of the twenty patients (95%). All twenty patients had intraluminal intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted (100%) and venous ectasia was present in seventeen of the twenty cases (85%). Collateral veins were visualized in one of the twenty patients (5%). All fourteen cases (100%), in which intravenous contrast was administered, showed perivenular tissues enhancement and intraluminal filling defect. Venous ectasia, loss of compressibility and no flow on Doppler ultrasound were also observed in all eight cases examined by the method. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive in the evaluation of plant thrombophlebitis in patients with plantar foot pain. PMID:27047898

  13. Magnetic resonance elastography hardware design: a survey.

    PubMed

    Tse, Z T H; Janssen, H; Hamed, A; Ristic, M; Young, I; Lamperth, M

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an emerging technique capable of measuring the shear modulus of tissue. A suspected tumour can be identified by comparing its properties with those of tissues surrounding it; this can be achieved even in deep-lying areas as long as mechanical excitation is possible. This would allow non-invasive methods for cancer-related diagnosis in areas not accessible with conventional palpation. An actuating mechanism is required to generate the necessary tissue displacements directly on the patient in the scanner and three different approaches, in terms of actuator action and position, exist to derive stiffness measurements. However, the magnetic resonance (MR) environment places considerable constraints on the design of such devices, such as the possibility of mutual interference between electrical components, the scanner field, and radio frequency pulses, and the physical space restrictions of the scanner bore. This paper presents a review of the current solutions that have been developed for MRE devices giving particular consideration to the design criteria including the required vibration frequency and amplitude in different applications, the issue of MR compatibility, actuation principles, design complexity, and scanner synchronization issues. The future challenges in this field are also described. PMID:19499839

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, R. H.; Somers, S.; Jurriaans, E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review indications, contraindications, and risks of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to help primary care physicians refer patients appropriately for MRI, screen for contraindications to using MRI, and educate patients about MRI. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Recommendations are based on classic textbooks, the policies of our MRI group, and a literature search using MEDLINE with the MeSH headings magnetic resonance imaging, brain, musculoskeletal, and spine. The search was limited to human, English-language, and review articles. Evidence in favour of using MRI for imaging the head, spine, and joints is well established. For cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic conditions, MRI has been shown useful for certain indications, usually to complement other modalities. MAIN MESSAGE: For demonstrating soft tissue conditions, MRI is better than computed tomography (CT), but CT shows bone and acute bleeding better. Therefore, patients with trauma or suspected intracranial bleeding should have CT. Tumours, congenital abnormalities, vascular structures, and the cervical or thoracic spine show better on MRI. Either modality can be used for lower back pain. Cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic abnormalities should be imaged with ultrasound or CT before MRI. Contraindications for MRI are mainly metallic implants or shrapnel, severe claustrophobia, or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: With the increasing availability of MRI scanners in Canada, better understanding of the indications, contraindications, and risks will be helpful for family physicians and their patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:10509224

  15. Magnetic resonance-guided thermal surgery.

    PubMed

    Cline, H E; Schenck, J F; Watkins, R D; Hynynen, K; Jolesz, F A

    1993-07-01

    A demonstration of MR guided thermal surgery involved experiments with imaging of focused ultrasound in an MRI system, measurements of the thermal transients and a thermal analysis of the resulting images. Both the heat distribution and the creation of focused ultrasound lesions in gel phantoms, in vitro bovine muscle and in vivo rabbit muscle were monitored with magnetic resonance imaging. Thermal surgical procedures were modeled by an elongated gaussian heat source where heat flow is controlled by tissue thermal properties and tissue perfusion. Temperature profiles were measured with thermocouples or calculated from magnetic resonance imaging in agreement with the model. A 2-s T1-weighted gradient-refocused acquisition provided thermal profiles needed to localize the heat distribution produced by a 4-s focused ultrasound pulse. Thermal analysis of the images give an effective thermal diffusion coefficient of 0.0015 cm2/s in gel and 0.0033 cm2/s in muscle. The lesions were detected using a T2-weighted spin-echo or fast spin-echo pulse sequence in agreement with muscle tissue sections. Potential thermal surgery applications are in the prostate, liver, kidney, bladder, breast, eye and brain. PMID:8371680

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pektas, Ayhan; Olgunturk, Rana; Cevik, Ayhan; Terlemez, Semiha; Kacar, Emre; Oner, Yusuf Ali

    2015-06-01

    The present study aims to determine the efficacy and reliability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in establishing the diagnosis and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension in children. This is a retrospective comparison of 25 children with pulmonary hypertension and a control group comprising 19 healthy children. The diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension was made when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was ≥25 mmHg by catheter angiography. The children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly lower body mass indices than did the healthy children (P=0.048). In addition, the children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main pulmonary artery diameters and ascending aortic diameters (both P=0.001) but statistically similar ratios of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aortic diameter. If the main pulmonary artery diameter was ≥25 mm, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 72% sensitivity and 84% specificity. In the event that the ratio of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aorta diameter was ≥1, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 60% sensitivity and 53% specificity. When compared with children who had New York Heart Association functional class II pulmonary hypertension, the children with functional class III pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main (P=0.046), right (P=0.036), and left (P=0.003) pulmonary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is useful in the diagnosis of children with pulmonary hypertension. Pediatric pulmonary hypertension can be diagnosed with high sensitivity and specificity when the main pulmonary artery diameter measures ≥25 mm. PMID:26175631

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal injury.

    PubMed

    Tracy, P T; Wright, R M; Hanigan, W C

    1989-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 30 patients following spinal injury (SI). Spin-echo sequences and surface coils were used for all patients. Plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomography (CT), and MRI were compared for the delineation of bone, disc, and ligament injury, measurement of sagittal spinal canal diameter and subluxation, epidural hematoma, and spinal cord structure. Myelography or intrathecal contrast-enhanced CT were not performed on any of these patients. Magnetic resonance imaging accurately delineated intraspinal pathology in two of four patients with acute penetrating SI, and was normal in the other two patients. In 16 patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, MRI was superior to CT for visualizing injuries to discs, ligaments, and the spinal cord, while CT was superior to MRI in characterizing bony injury. Computed tomography and MRI provided similar measurements of subluxation in six of six patients and of sagittal spinal canal diameter in three of four patients. In ten patients with chronic SI, MRI demonstrated post-traumatic cysts, myelomalacia, spinal cord edema, and the presence or absence of spinal cord compression. In patients with acute penetrating SI and chronic SI, MRI provided comprehensive clinical information. In patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, the information obtained by MRI complemented the data given by plain radiographs and CT, allowing clinical decisions to be made without the need of invasive imaging modalities. PMID:2711244

  18. Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance examination of female reproductive tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Noyszewski, E.A.; Raman, J.; Trupin, S.R.; McFarlin, B.L.; Dawson, M.J. )

    1989-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful method of investigating the relationship between metabolism and function in living tissues. We present evidence that the phosphorus 31 spectra of myometrium and placenta are functions of physiologic state and gestational age. Specific spectroscopic abnormalities are observed in association with disorders of pregnancy and gynecologic diseases. Our results suggest that noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy examinations may sometimes be a useful addition to magnetic resonance imaging examinations, and that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biopsy specimens could become a cost-effective method of evaluating certain biochemical abnormalities.

  19. Reciprocity and gyrotropism in magnetic resonance transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tropp, James

    2006-12-15

    We give formulas for transduction in magnetic resonance - i.e., the appearance of an emf due to Larmor precession of spins - based upon the modified Lorentz reciprocity principle for gyrotropic (also called 'nonreciprocal') media, i.e., in which a susceptibility tensor is carried to its transpose by reversal of an external static field [cf., R. F. Harrington and A. T. Villeneuve IRE Trans. Microwave Theory and Technique MTT6, 308 (1958)]. Prior applications of reciprocity to magnetic resonance, despite much success, have ignored the gyrotropism which necessarily arises due to nuclear and/or unpaired electronic spins. For detection with linearly polarized fields, oscillating at the Larmor frequency, the emf is written in terms of a volume integral containing a product of two factors which we define as the antenna patterns, i.e. (H{sub 1x}{+-}iH{sub 1y}), where, e.g., for a single transceive antenna, the H's are just the spatially dependent oscillatory magnetic field strengths, per the application of some reference current at the antenna terminals, with the negative sign obtaining for transmission, and the positive for reception. Similar expressions hold for separate transmit and receive antennas; expressions are also given for circular polarization of the fields. We then exhibit a receive-only array antenna of two elements for magnetic resonance imaging of protons, which, due an intensity artifact arising from stray reactive coupling of the elements, produces, despite its own bilateral symmetry, asymmetric proton NMR images of a symmetric cylindrical phantom containing aqueous saline solution [J. Tropp and T. Schirmer, J. Magn. Reson. 151, 146 (2001)]. Modification of this two-port antenna, to function in transmit-receive mode, allows us to demonstrate highly nonreciprocal behavior: that is, to record images (of cylindrical test phantoms containing aqueous saline solution) whose appearance dramatically changes, when the roles of transmission and reception are

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance in magnets with a helicoidal magnetic structure in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankeyev, A. P.; Borich, M. A.; Smagin, V. V.

    2014-11-01

    In this review, the static and dynamic properties of a magnet with a helicoidal magnetic structure placed in an external magnetic field are discussed. The results of the investigation of its ground state and spectra, as well as the amplitudes of the spin excitations are presented. The temperature and field dependences of the basic thermodynamic characteristics (heat capacity, magnetization, and magnetic susceptibility) have been calculated in the spin-wave approximation. The results of calculating the local and integral dynamic magnetic susceptibility are given. This set of data represents a methodical basis for constructing a consistent (in the framework of unified approximations) picture of the NMR absorption in the magnet under consideration. Both local NMR characteristics (resonance frequency, line broadening, enhancement coefficient) and integral characteristics (resultant shape of the absorption line with its specific features) have been calculated. The effective Hamiltonian of the Suhl-Nakamura interaction of nuclear spins through spin waves has been constructed. The second moment and the local broadening of the line of the NMR absorption caused by this interaction have been calculated. The role of the basic local inhomogeneities in the formation of the integral line of the NMR absorption has been analyzed. The opportunities for the experimental NMR investigations in magnets with a chiral spin structure are discussed.

  1. Secondary resonance magnetic force microscopy using an external magnetic field for characterization of magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongzi; Mo, Kangxin; Ding, Xidong; Zhao, Liangbing; Lin, Guocong; Zhang, Yueli; Chen, Dihu

    2015-09-01

    A bimodal magnetic force microscopy (MFM) that uses an external magnetic field for the detection and imaging of magnetic thin films is developed. By applying the external modulation magnetic field, the vibration of a cantilever probe is excited by its magnetic tip at its higher eigenmode. Using magnetic nanoparticle samples, the capacity of the technique which allows single-pass imaging of topography and magnetic forces is demonstrated. For the detection of magnetic properties of thin film materials, its signal-to-noise ratio and sensitivity are demonstrated to be superior to conventional MFM in lift mode. The secondary resonance MFM technique provides a promising tool for the characterization of nanoscale magnetic properties of various materials, especially of magnetic thin films with weak magnetism.

  2. Biosynthesis of Camptothecin. In Silico and in Vivo Tracer Study from [1-13C]Glucose1

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Yasuyo; Kitajima, Mariko; Arita, Masanori; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Sudo, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Mami; Aimi, Norio; Saito, Kazuki

    2004-01-01

    Camptothecin derivatives are clinically used antitumor alkaloids that belong to monoterpenoid indole alkaloids. In this study, we investigated the biosynthetic pathway of camptothecin from [1-13C]glucose (Glc) by in silico and in vivo studies. The in silico study measured the incorporation of Glc into alkaloids using the Atomic Reconstruction of Metabolism software and predicted the labeling patterns of successive metabolites from [1-13C]Glc. The in vivo study followed incorporation of [1-13C]Glc into camptothecin with hairy roots of Ophiorrhiza pumila by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The 13C-labeling pattern of camptothecin isolated from the hairy roots clearly showed that the monoterpene-secologanin moiety was synthesized via the 2C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway, not via the mevalonate pathway. This conclusion was supported by differential inhibition of camptothecin accumulation by the pathway-specific inhibitors (fosmidomycin and lovastatin). The quinoline moiety from tryptophan was also labeled as predicted by the Atomic Reconstruction of Metabolism program via the shikimate pathway. These results indicate that camptothecin is formed by the combination of the 2C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway and the shikimate pathway. This study provides the innovative example for how a computer-aided comprehensive metabolic analysis will refine the experimental design to obtain more precise biological information. PMID:14657405

  3. BROADBAND EXCITATION IN NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, R.

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical methods for designing sequences of radio frequency (rf) radiation pulses for broadband excitation of spin systems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are described. The sequences excite spins uniformly over large ranges of resonant frequencies arising from static magnetic field inhomogeneity, chemical shift differences, or spin couplings, or over large ranges of rf field amplitudes. Specific sequences for creating a population inversion or transverse magnetization are derived and demonstrated experimentally in liquid and solid state NMR. One approach to broadband excitation is based on principles of coherent averaging theory. A general formalism for deriving pulse sequences is given, along with computational methods for specific cases. This approach leads to sequences that produce strictly constant transformations of a spin system. The importance of this feature in NMR applications is discussed. A second approach to broadband excitation makes use of iterative schemes, i.e. sets of operations that are applied repetitively to a given initial pulse sequences, generating a series of increasingly complex sequences with increasingly desirable properties. A general mathematical framework for analyzing iterative schemes is developed. An iterative scheme is treated as a function that acts on a space of operators corresponding to the transformations produced by all possible pulse sequences. The fixed points of the function and the stability of the fixed points are shown to determine the essential behavior of the scheme. Iterative schemes for broadband population inversion are treated in detail. Algebraic and numerical methods for performing the mathematical analysis are presented. Two additional topics are treated. The first is the construction of sequences for uniform excitation of double-quantum coherence and for uniform polarization transfer over a range of spin couplings. Double-quantum excitation sequences are demonstrated in a liquid crystal system. The

  4. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Melcher, Jennifer R.; Kiang, Nelson Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 μPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager’s permanent magnet and the room air handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  5. Material deposition and migration processes with resonant magnetic perturbation fields at TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laengner, Ruth; Schmitz, O.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; Eich, T.; Freisinger, M.; Kirschner, A.; Kreter, A.; Möller, S.; Laengner, M.; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Reimer, H.; Samm, U.; Wienhold, P.; Textor Team

    2013-07-01

    Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) are applied with the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor (DED) at TEXTOR to control the plasma edge transport and the plasma surface interaction. This leads to the formation of a three-dimensional (3D) topology of the scrape-off layer (SOL). To quantify the erosion/deposition balance and the material migration in this 3D boundary, spherical test limiters were exposed to plasmas with and without RMP fields applied. Methane doped with 13C as tracer element was injected through a gas inlet in the test limiter. The local gas source was monitored by spatially resolving spectroscopy and the resulting deposition patterns on the limiters were analysed with colourimetry and nuclear reaction analysis. These measurements were compared to simulations of the magnetic field topology simulations. The data provide evidence of a particle migration dominated by an ExB drift within stochastic zones of the 3D plasma boundary.

  6. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  7. Three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of fossils across taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietchen, D.; Aberhan, M.; Manz, B.; Hampe, O.; Mohr, B.; Neumann, C.; Volke, F.

    2007-08-01

    The visibility of life forms in the fossil record is largely determined by the extent to which they were mineralised at the time of their death. In addition to mineral structures, many fossils nonetheless contain detectable amounts of residual water or organic molecules, the analysis of which has become an integral part of current palaeontological research. The methods available for this sort of investigations, though, typically require dissolution or ionisation of the fossil sample or parts thereof, which is an issue with rare taxa and outstanding materials like pathological or type specimens. In such cases, non-destructive techniques could provide an interesting methodological alternative. While Computed Tomography has long been used to study palaeontological specimens, a number of complementary approaches have recently gained ground. These include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which had previously been employed to obtain three-dimensional images of pathological belemnites non-invasively on the basis of intrinsic contrast. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether 1H MRI can likewise provide anatomical information about non-pathological belemnites and specimens of other fossil taxa. To this end, three-dimensional MR image series were acquired from intact non-pathological invertebrate, vertebrate and plant fossils. At routine voxel resolutions in the range of several dozens to some hundreds of micrometers, these images reveal a host of anatomical details and thus highlight the potential of MR techniques to effectively complement existing methodological approaches for palaeontological investigations in a wide range of taxa. As for the origin of the MR signal, relaxation and diffusion measurements as well as 1H and 13C MR spectra acquired from a belemnite suggest intracrystalline water or hydroxyl groups, rather than organic residues.

  8. Three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of fossils across taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietchen, D.; Aberhan, M.; Manz, B.; Hampe, O.; Mohr, B.; Neumann, C.; Volke, F.

    2008-01-01

    The frequency of life forms in the fossil record is largely determined by the extent to which they were mineralised at the time of their death. In addition to mineral structures, many fossils nonetheless contain detectable amounts of residual water or organic molecules, the analysis of which has become an integral part of current palaeontological research. The methods available for this sort of investigations, though, typically require dissolution or ionisation of the fossil sample or parts thereof, which is an issue with rare taxa and outstanding materials like pathological or type specimens. In such cases, non-destructive techniques could provide a valuable methodological alternative. While Computed Tomography has long been used to study palaeontological specimens, a number of complementary approaches have recently gained ground. These include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which had previously been employed to obtain three-dimensional images of pathological belemnites non-invasively on the basis of intrinsic contrast. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether 1H MRI can likewise provide anatomical information about non-pathological belemnites and specimens of other fossil taxa. To this end, three-dimensional MR image series were acquired from intact non-pathological invertebrate, vertebrate and plant fossils. At routine voxel resolutions in the range of several dozens to some hundreds of micrometers, these images reveal a host of anatomical details and thus highlight the potential of MR techniques to effectively complement existing methodological approaches for palaeontological investigations in a wide range of taxa. As for the origin of the MR signal, relaxation and diffusion measurements as well as 1H and 13C MR spectra acquired from a belemnite suggest intracrystalline water or hydroxyl groups, rather than organic residues.

  9. Reciprocity and gyrotropism in magnetic resonance transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tropp, James

    2006-12-01

    We give formulas for transduction in magnetic resonance—i.e., the appearance of an emf due to Larmor precession of spins—based upon the modified Lorentz reciprocity principle for gyrotropic (also called “nonreciprocal”) media, i.e., in which a susceptibility tensor is carried to its transpose by reversal of an external static field [cf., R. F. Harrington and A. T. Villeneuve IRE Trans. Microwave Theory and Technique MTT6, 308 (1958)]. Prior applications of reciprocity to magnetic resonance, despite much success, have ignored the gyrotropism which necessarily arises due to nuclear and/or unpaired electronic spins. For detection with linearly polarized fields, oscillating at the Larmor frequency, the emf is written in terms of a volume integral containing a product of two factors which we define as the antenna patterns, i.e., (H1x±iH1y) , where, e.g., for a single transceive antenna, the H ’s are just the spatially dependent oscillatory magnetic field strengths, per the application of some reference current at the antenna terminals, with the negative sign obtaining for transmission, and the positive for reception. Similar expressions hold for separate transmit and receive antennas; expressions are also given for circular polarization of the fields. We then exhibit a receive-only array antenna of two elements for magnetic resonance imaging of protons, which, due an intensity artifact arising from stray reactive coupling of the elements, produces, despite its own bilateral symmetry, asymmetric proton NMR images of a symmetric cylindrical phantom containing aqueous saline solution [J. Tropp and T. Schirmer, J. Magn. Reson. 151, 146 (2001)]. Modification of this two-port antenna, to function in transmit-receive mode, allows us to demonstrate highly nonreciprocal behavior: that is, to record images (of cylindrical test phantoms containing aqueous saline solution) whose appearance dramatically changes, when the roles of transmission and reception are swapped

  10. New guidelines for δ13C measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Gehre, Matthias; Groning, Manfred; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Toman, Blaza; Verkouteren, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Consistency of δ13C measurements can be improved 39−47% by anchoring the δ13C scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in 13C/12C. It is recommended thatδ13C values of both organic and inorganic materials be measured and expressed relative to VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on a scale normalized by assigning consensus values of −46.6‰ to L-SVEC lithium carbonate and +1.95‰ to NBS 19 calcium carbonate. Uncertainties of other reference material values on this scale are improved by factors up to two or more, and the values of some have been notably shifted:  the δ13C of NBS 22 oil is −30.03%.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lens transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    Transparency of normal lens cytoplasm and loss of transparency in cataract were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Phosphorus ({sup 31}P) NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the {sup 31}P constituents and pH of calf lens cortical and nuclear homogenates and intact lenses as a function of time after lens enucleation and in opacification produced by calcium. Transparency was measured with laser spectroscopy. Despite complete loss of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) within 18 hrs of enucleation, the homogenates and lenses remained 100% transparent. Additions of calcium to ATP-depleted cortical homogenates produced opacification as well as concentration-dependent changes in inorganic phosphate, sugar phosphates, glycerol phosphorylcholine and pH. {sup 1}H relaxation measurements of lens water at 200 MHz proton Larmor frequency studied temperature-dependent phase separation of lens nuclear homogenates. Preliminary measurements of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} with non-equilibrium temperature changes showed a change in the slope of the temperature dependence of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} at the phase separation temperature. Subsequent studies with equilibrium temperature changes showed no effect of phase separation on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2}, consistent with the phase separation being a low-energy process. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) studies (measurements of the magnetic field dependence of the water proton 1/T{sub 1} relaxation rates) were performed on (1) calf lens nuclear and cortical homogenates (2) chicken lens homogenates, (3) native and heat-denatured egg white and (4) pure proteins including bovine {gamma}-II crystallin bovine serum albumin (BSA) and myoglobin. The NMRD profiles of all samples exhibited decreases in 1/T{sub 1} with increasing magnetic field.

  12. [Clinical applications of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography].

    PubMed

    Soto, J A; Castrillón, G A

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is the most important diagnostic alternative that has been developed in recent years for the evaluation of the biliary and pancreatic ducts. The advantages of this technique are: it does not use contrast media or ionizing radiation; it is noninvasive and complication free; and, the examination is relatively short (approximately 20 to 30 minutes). MRCP has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing biliary dilatation and for determining the site and cause of stenosis. Its diagnostic precision for biliary and pancreatic stones is similar to that of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). MRCP has replaced ERCP in biliary and pancreatic anatomic variants. In unsuccessful ERCP, MRCP is nearly the only diagnostic modality for the evaluation of the biliary tract. Other applications include primary sclerosing cholangitis, stenosis after liver transplantation, and the evaluation of bilioenteric anastomoses. This article reviews the clinical applications of MRCP in the evaluation of biliopancreatic diseases. PMID:18021667

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in Leber's optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Kermode, A G; Moseley, I F; Kendall, B E; Miller, D H; MacManus, D G; McDonald, W I

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen males with Leber's optic neuropathy had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, and in eight the optic nerves were imaged using STIR (Short Time Inversion Recovery) sequences. All optic nerve scans were abnormal. In seven with bilateral visual loss four showed bilateral increased optic nerve signal and three unilateral increase. The involvement was of the mid and posterior intra-orbital sections over three 5 mm slices or more with sparing of the anterior portion. One patient with unilateral visual loss had increased signal only on the affected side. Brain MRI was normal, in marked contrast to the findings in clinically isolated optic neuritis in which multiple white matter lesions are seen in the majority. Images PMID:2732742

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies. PMID:26752822

  15. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Guneyli, Serkan; Erdem, Cemile Zuhal; Erdem, Lutfi Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the causes of cancer-related deaths. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the best soft tissue resolution and plays an important role in the management of prostate cancer patients. It is the recommended imaging modality for patients with prostate cancer, and it is clinically indicated for diagnosis, staging, tumor localization, detection of tumor aggressiveness, follow-up, and MRI-guided interventions. Multiparametric MRI includes T1- and high-resolution T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. We evaluated MR images of patients with prostate cancer who underwent multiparametric endorectal MRI on a 3.0-T scanner and presented demonstrative images. PMID:27317204

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D; McDonald, W I; Tofts, P S; Johnson, G; Landon, D N

    1986-01-01

    Triethyl tin(TET)-induced cerebral oedema has been studied in cats by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the findings correlated with the histology and fine structure of the cerebrum following perfusion-fixation. MRI is a sensitive technique for detecting cerebral oedema, and the distribution and severity of the changes correlate closely with the morphological abnormalities. The relaxation times, T1 and T2 increase progressively as the oedema develops, and the proportional increase in T2 is approximately twice that in T1. Analysis of the magnetisation decay curves reveals slowly-relaxing and rapidly-relaxing components which probably correspond to oedema fluid and intracellular water respectively. The image appearances taken in conjunction with relaxation data provide a basis for determining the nature of the oedema in vivo. Images PMID:3806109

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of heterotaxis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoeckelhuber, Beate M; Eckey, Thomas; Buchholz, Michael; Kapsimalakou, Smaragda; Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild

    2008-12-20

    Failure to establish normal left-right body axis (LRA) formation during embryogenesis results in heterotaxis, a multi-malformation syndrome. We report on a 20-year-old young woman who presented to the emergency room with upper abdominal pain. On chest X-ray, dextrocardia was noted. Ultrasound was inconclusive. Barium studies demonstrated non-rotation of the intestine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen confirmed heterotaxis with abnormal arrangement of abdominal organs and vasculature. This is the first radiographic description of LRA in MRI. It provides a unique contribution to the wide morphological variety of lateralization defects in a single examination within 15 min and without the risks of ionizing radiation. In addition, a literature overview over the genetic aspects, broad morphological spectrum, and possible therapeutic consequences is given. PMID:18835766

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  20. Safety of magnetic resonance contrast media.

    PubMed

    Runge, V M

    2001-08-01

    Intravenous contrast media, specifically the gadolinium chelates, are well accepted for use in the clinical practice of magnetic resonance imaging. The gadolinium chelates are considered to be very safe and lack (in intravenous use) the nephrotoxicity found with iodinated contrast media. Minor adverse reactions, including nausea and hives, occur in a low percentage of cases. The four agents currently available in the United States cannot be differentiated on the basis of these adverse reactions. Severe anaphylactoid reactions are also known to occur with all agents, although these are uncommon. This review discusses the safety issues involved with intravenous administration of the gadolinium chelates and off-label use. The latter is common in clinical practice and permits broader application of these agents. PMID:11687717

  1. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging in cancer.

    PubMed

    Haris, Mohammad; Yadav, Santosh K; Rizwan, Arshi; Singh, Anup; Wang, Ena; Hariharan, Hari; Reddy, Ravinder; Marincola, Francesco M

    2015-01-01

    The ability to identify key biomolecules and molecular changes associated with cancer malignancy and the capacity to monitor the therapeutic outcome against these targets is critically important for cancer treatment. Recent developments in molecular imaging based on magnetic resonance (MR) techniques have provided researchers and clinicians with new tools to improve most facets of cancer care. Molecular imaging is broadly described as imaging techniques used to detect molecular signature at the cellular and gene expression levels. This article reviews both established and emerging molecular MR techniques in oncology and discusses the potential of these techniques in improving the clinical cancer care. It also discusses how molecular MR, in conjunction with other structural and functional MR imaging techniques, paves the way for developing tailored treatment strategies to enhance cancer care. PMID:26394751

  2. Fetal Cerebral Magnetic Resonance Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Jakab, András; Pogledic, Ivana; Schwartz, Ernst; Gruber, Gerlinde; Mitter, Christian; Brugger, Peter C; Langs, Georg; Schöpf, Veronika; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The recent technological advancement of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences allowed the inclusion of diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, and proton MR spectroscopy in prenatal imaging protocols. These methods provide information beyond morphology and hold the key to improving several fields of human neuroscience and clinical diagnostics. Our review introduces the fundamental works that enabled these imaging techniques, and also highlights the most recent contributions to this emerging field of prenatal diagnostics, such as the structural and functional connectomic approach. We introduce the advanced image processing approaches that are extensively used to tackle fetal or maternal movement-related image artifacts, and which are necessary for the optimal interpretation of such imaging data. PMID:26614130

  3. [Prostate biopsy under magnetic resonance imaging guidance].

    PubMed

    Kuplevatskiy, V I; CherkashiN, M A; Roshchin, D A; Berezina, N A; Vorob'ev, N A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most important problems in modern oncology. According to statistical data, PC ranks second in the cancer morbidity structure in the Russian Federation and developed countries and its prevalence has been progressively increasing over the past decade. A need for early diagnosis and maximally accurate morphological verification of the diagnosis in difficult clinical cases (inconvenient tumor location for standard transrectal biopsy; gland scarring changes concurrent with prostatitis and hemorrhage; threshold values of prostate-specific antigen with unclear changes in its doubling per unit time; suspicion of biochemical recurrence or clinical tumor progression after special treatment) leads to revised diagnostic algorithms and clinically introduced new high-tech invasive diagnostic methods. This paper gives the first analysis of literature data on Russian practice using one of the new methods to verify prostate cancer (transrectal prostate cancer under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance). The have sought the 1995-2015 data in the MEDLINE and Pubmed. PMID:27192773

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Perianal Fistula.

    PubMed

    Tolan, Damian J M

    2016-08-01

    Perianal fistulas and other inflammatory diseases of the anus and perianal soft tissues are a cause of substantial morbidity, and are a major part of the practice of any colorectal surgeon. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a key role in the assessment of patients for the extent of fistulizing Crohn disease, complications related to fistulas, and to assist in confirming the diagnosis or proposing an alternative. Technique is critical and in particular, the selection of sequences for diagnosis and characterization of abnormalities with the main choices being between standard anatomical sequences (T1 or T2), assessing for edema (FS T2 or STIR), assessing abnormal contrast enhancement (FS T1), and assessing for abnormal diffusion or a combination of these. Guidance on MRI sequence selection, classification of fistulas, the current guidance on the role of MRI in assessing patients, and advice on how to provide useful structured reports, as well as how to detect complications of perianal sepsis are included. PMID:27342895

  5. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance petrophysics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boqin; Dunn, Keh-Jim

    2005-02-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) opens a wide area for exploration in petrophysics and has significant impact to petroleum logging technology. When there are multiple fluids with different diffusion coefficients saturated in a porous medium, this information can be extracted and clearly delineated from CPMG measurements of such a system either using regular pulsing sequences or modified two window sequences. The 2D NMR plot with independent variables of T2 relaxation time and diffusion coefficient allows clear separation of oil and water signals in the rocks. This 2D concept can be extended to general studies of fluid-saturated porous media involving other combinations of two or more independent variables, such as chemical shift and T1/T2 relaxation time (reflecting pore size), proton population and diffusion contrast, etc. PMID:15833623

  6. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1993-01-01

    The West Virginia State College Community College Division NASA Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) study is described. During this contract period, the two most significant and professionally rewarding events were the presentation of the research activity at the Sir Isaac Newton Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the second Day of Discovery Conference, focusing on economic recovery in West Virginia. An active antenna concept utilizing a signal feedback principle similar to regenerative receivers used in early radio was studied. The device has potential for ELF research and other commercial applications for improved signal reception. Finally, work continues to progress on the development of a prototype monitoring station. Signal monitoring, data display, and data storage are major areas of activity. In addition, we plan to continue our dissemination of research activity through presentations at seminars and other universities.

  7. The magnetic resonance imaging-linac system.

    PubMed

    Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W; van Vulpen, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The current image-guided radiotherapy systems are suboptimal in the esophagus, pancreas, kidney, rectum, lymph node, etc. These locations in the body are not easily accessible for fiducials and cannot be visualized sufficiently on cone-beam computed tomographies, making daily patient set-up prone to geometrical uncertainties and hinder dose optimization. Additional interfraction and intrafraction uncertainties for those locations arise from motion with breathing and organ filling. To allow real-time imaging of all patient tumor locations at the actual treatment position a fully integrated 1.5-T, diagnostic quality, magnetic resonance imaging with a 6-MV linear accelerator is presented. This system must enable detailed dose painting at all body locations. PMID:24931095

  8. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Bryan, R. N.; Johnson, P.; Schonfeld, E.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    A number of physiological changes have been demonstrated in bone, muscle and blood after exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long duration space missions is an important NASA goal. The advent of tomographic nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR or MRI) gives NASA a way to greatly extend early studies of this phenomena in ways not previously possible; NMR is also noninvasive and safe. NMR provides both superb anatomical images for volume assessments of individual organs and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. The feasibility of NMR as a tool for human physiological research as it is affected by microgravity is demonstrated. The animal studies employed the rear limb suspended rat as a model of mucle atrophy that results from microgravity. And bedrest of normal male subjects was used to simulate the effects of microgravity on bone and muscle.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in medicine

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, C S

    1986-01-01

    Using the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, MR, MRI), the first images displaying pathology in humans were published in 1980.1 Since then, there has been a rapid extension in the use of the technique, with an estimated 225 machines in use in the USA at the end of 1985.2 Considerable enthusiasm has been expressed for this new imaging technique,3 although awareness of its high cost in the present economic climate has led to reservations being expressed in other quarters.2 The aim of this article is to give an outline of the present state of NMR, and indicate some possible future developments. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3(a)Fig 3 (b)Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7 (a)Fig 7 (b)Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10 PMID:3811023

  10. [Nuclear magnetic resonance in ischemic cardiopathy].

    PubMed

    Meave, Aloha

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is the "gold standard" technique to quantify the ventricular volume, the ejection fraction, and the myocardial mass. In patients suffering from ischemic cardiopathy, the ejection fraction is the most important prognostic parameter, even above from lessoned arteries index. An adequate diagnose between a non-viable and a viable myocardium is of great importance in the therapeutic approach for ischemic cardiopathy. By administrating a paramagnetic contrast media named gadolinium, fist pass and late-reinforcement techniques, are applied. With these, it is possible to evaluate the perfusion as well as necrotic areas. In order to identify sub-endocardium ischemia, drugs such as adenosine and dipiridamol, are employed as vasodilators. This technique allows the definition of reinforcement extension, being sub-endocardiac, which is an ailment which affects 50% of the myocardium depth, or even, transmural compromise. PMID:18938717

  11. Stem cell labeling for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Hoehn, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    In vivo applications of cells for the monitoring of their cell dynamics increasingly use non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. This imaging modality allows in particular to follow the migrational activity of stem cells intended for cell therapy strategies. All these approaches require the prior labeling of the cells under investigation for excellent contrast against the host tissue background in the imaging modality. The present review discusses the various routes of cell labeling and describes the potential to observe both cell localization and their cell-specific function in vivo. Possibilities for labeling strategies, pros and cons of various contrast agents are pointed out while potential ambiguities or problems of labeling strategies are emphasized. PMID:18465447

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Starnes, D.L.; Duchesneau, P.M.; Boumphrey, F.; Hardy, R.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Forty subjects were examined to determine the accuracy and clinical usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination of the spine. The NMR images were compared with plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomograms, and myelograms. The study included 15 patients with normal spinal cord anatomy and 25 patients whose pathological conditions included canal stenosis, herniated discs, metastatic tumors, primary cord tumor, trauma, Chiari malformations, syringomyelia, and developmental disorders. Saturation recovery images were best in differentiating between soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. NMR was excellent for the evaluation of the foramen magnum region and is presently the modality of choice for the diagnosis of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation. NMR was accurate in diagnosing spinal cord trauma and spinal canal block.

  13. Chronic subdural hematoma: demonstration by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sipponen, J.T.; Sepponen, R.E.; Sivula, A.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) to identify intracranial hematomas was tested in five patients with clinical and computed tomographic signs of chronic subdural hematoma. The extracerebral collections were displayed as a zone of bright intensity using the T1-weighted inversion recovery (IR 1500/400) sequence, reflecting the lesions' short T1 relaxation times. The collections also showed high intensity using the spin echo (SE) sequence, with a longer delay of 100ms and 160ms, reflecting the long T2 relaxation time. The spin echo sequence with a repetition time of 500ms and an echo delay of 160ms (SE 500/160) almost effaced other structures in the image, thus increasing the specificity of this pulse scheme for detection of chronic blood collections. Although in two of the five patients the subdural hematomas were in the isodense CT phase, all were easily visualized with MR.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Hash, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affords high-resolution visualization of the soft tissue structures (menisci, ligaments, cartilage, etc) and bone marrow of the knee. Evidence Acquisition: Pertinent clinical and research articles in the orthopaedic and radiology literature over the past 30 years using PubMed. Results: Ligament tears can be accurately assessed with MRI, but distinguishing partial tears from ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be challenging. Determining the extent of a partial tear is often extremely difficult to accurately assess. The status of the posterolateral corner structures, menisci, and cartilage can be accurately evaluated, although limitations in the evaluation of certain structures exist. Patellofemoral joint, marrow, tibiofibular joint, and synovial pathology can supplement physical examination findings and provide definitive diagnosis. Conclusions: MRI provides an accurate noninvasive assessment of knee pathology. PMID:24381701

  15. Simplifying cardiovascular magnetic resonance pulse sequence terminology.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Matthias G; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara; White, James A; Plein, Sven; Moon, James C; Almeida, Ana G; Kramer, Christopher M; Neubauer, Stefan; Pennell, Dudley J; Petersen, Steffen E; Kwong, Raymond Y; Ferrari, Victor A; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Sakuma, Hajime; Schelbert, Erik B; Larose, Éric; Eitel, Ingo; Carbone, Iacopo; Taylor, Andrew J; Young, Alistair; de Roos, Albert; Nagel, Eike

    2014-01-01

    We propose a set of simplified terms to describe applied Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) pulse sequence techniques in clinical reports, scientific articles and societal guidelines or recommendations. Rather than using various technical details in clinical reports, the description of the technical approach should be based on the purpose of the pulse sequence. In scientific papers or other technical work, this should be followed by a more detailed description of the pulse sequence and settings. The use of a unified set of widely understood terms would facilitate the communication between referring physicians and CMR readers by increasing the clarity of CMR reports and thus improve overall patient care. Applied in research articles, its use would facilitate non-expert readers' understanding of the methodology used and its clinical meaning. PMID:25551695

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: an update.

    PubMed

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging after exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Adrian

    1993-01-01

    A number of physiological changes were demonstrated in bone, muscle, and blood from exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long-duration space missions is an important NASA goal. Historically, NASA has had to rely on tape measures, x-ray, and metabolic balance studies with collection of excreta and blood specimens to obtain this information. The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the possibility of greatly extending these early studies in ways not previously possible; MRI is also non-invasive and safe; i.e., no radiation exposure. MRI provides both superb anatomical images for volume measurements of individual structures and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. This investigation will apply MRI technology to measure muscle, intervertebral disc, and bone marrow changes resulting from exposure to microgravity.

  18. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-11-11

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied.

  19. Impact of Gd3+ doping and glassing solvent deuteration on 13C DNP at 5 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lama, Bimala; Niedbalski, Peter; Goderya, Mudrekh; Long, Joanna; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique which can be used to amplify signals in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by several thousand-fold. The most commonly available DNP system typically operates at the W-band field or 3.35 T, at which it has been shown that 13C NMR signal can be enhanced by deuteration and Gd3+ doping. In this work, we have investigated the applicability of these procedures at 5 T. Our results indicate that the deuteration of the glassing matrix still yields an enhancement of 13C DNP when 4-oxo-TEMPO free radical is used. The effect is attributed to the lower heat load of the deuterons compared to protons. An addition of a trace amount of Gd3+ gives a modest enhancement of the signal when trityl OX063 is used, albeit with a less pronounced relative enhancement compared to the results obtained at 3.35 T. The results suggest that the enhancement obtained via Gd3+ doping may become saturated at higher field. These results will be discussed using a thermodynamic model of DNP. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  20. A 13C-NMR study of azacryptand complexes.

    PubMed

    Wild, Aljoscha A C; Fennell, Kevin; Morgan, Grace G; Hewage, Chandralal M; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2014-09-28

    An azacryptand has been solubilised in aqueous media containing 50% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide. (13)C-NMR has been used to determine how the azacryptand is affected by zinc binding at pH 10. Using (13)C-NMR and (13)C-enriched bicarbonate we have been able to observe the formation of 4 different carbamate derivatives of the azacryptand at pH 10. The azacryptand was shown to solubilise zinc or cadmium at alkaline pHs. Two moles of zinc are bound per mole of azacryptand and this complex binds 1 mole of carbonate. By replacing the zinc with cadmium-113 we have shown that the (13)C-NMR signal of the (13)C-enriched carbon of the bound carbonate is split into two triplets at 2.2 °C. This shows that two cadmium complexes are formed and in each of these complexes the carbonate group is bound by two magnetically equivalent metal ions. It also demonstrates that these cadmium complexes are not in fast exchange. From temperature studies we show that in the zinc complexes both complexes are in fast exchange with each other but are in slow exchange with free bicarbonate. HOESY is used to determine the position of the carbonate carbon in the complex. The solution and crystal structures of the zinc-carbonate-azacryptand complexes are compared. PMID:25091182

  1. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Energy Storage Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez Reina, Rafael

    In today's society there is high demand to have access to energy for portable devices in different forms. Capacitors with high performance in small package to achieve high charge/discharge rates, and batteries with their ability to store electricity and make energy mobile are part of this demand. The types of internal dielectric material strongly affect the characteristics of a capacitor, and its applications. In a battery, the choice of the electrolyte plays an important role in the Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) formation, and the cathode material for high output voltage. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are research techniques that exploit the magnetic properties of the electron and certain atomic nuclei to determine physical and chemical properties of the atoms or molecules in which they are contained. Both EPR and NMR spectroscopy technique can yield meaningful structural and dynamic information. Three different projects are discussed in this dissertation. First, High energy density capacitors where EPR measurements described herein provide an insight into structural and chemical differences in the dielectric material of a capacitor. Next, as the second project, Electrolyte solutions where an oxygen-17 NMR study has been employed to assess the degree of preferential solvation of Li+ ions in binary mixtures of EC (ethylene carbonate) and DMC (dimethyl carbonate) containing LiPF6 (lithium hexafluo-rophosphate) which may be ultimately related to the SEI formation mechanism. The third project was to study Bismuth fluoride as cathode material for rechargeable batteries. The objective was to study 19F and 7Li MAS NMR of some nanocomposite cathode materials as a conversion reaction occurring during lithiation and delithation of the BiF3/C nanocomposite.

  2. Could magnetic resonance provide in vivo histology?

    PubMed Central

    Dominietto, Marco; Rudin, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of a suspected tumor lesion faces two basic problems: detection and identification of the specific type of tumor. Radiological techniques are commonly used for the detection and localization of solid tumors. Prerequisite is a high intrinsic or enhanced contrast between normal and neoplastic tissue. Identification of the tumor type is still based on histological analysis. The result depends critically on the sampling sites, which given the inherent heterogeneity of tumors, constitutes a major limitation. Non-invasive in vivo imaging might overcome this limitation providing comprehensive three-dimensional morphological, physiological, and metabolic information as well as the possibility for longitudinal studies. In this context, magnetic resonance based techniques are quite attractive since offer at the same time high spatial resolution, unique soft tissue contrast, good temporal resolution to study dynamic processes and high chemical specificity. The goal of this paper is to review the role of magnetic resonance techniques in characterizing tumor tissue in vivo both at morphological and physiological levels. The first part of this review covers methods, which provide information on specific aspects of tumor phenotypes, considered as indicators of malignancy. These comprise measurements of the inflammatory status, neo-vascular physiology, acidosis, tumor oxygenation, and metabolism together with tissue morphology. Even if the spatial resolution is not sufficient to characterize the tumor phenotype at a cellular level, this multiparametric information might potentially be used for classification of tumors. The second part discusses mathematical tools, which allow characterizing tissue based on the acquired three-dimensional data set. In particular, methods addressing tumor heterogeneity will be highlighted. Finally, we address the potential and limitation of using MRI as a tool to provide in vivo tissue characterization. PMID:24454320

  3. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings in lipoid pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Bréchot, J M; Buy, J N; Laaban, J P; Rochemaure, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia was documented by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Although strongly suggesting the presence of fat on T1 weighted images, magnetic resonance does not produce images specific for this condition. Computed tomography is the best imaging modality for its diagnosis. Images PMID:1750024

  4. 21 CFR 892.1000 - Magnetic resonance diagnostic device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnetic resonance diagnostic device. 892.1000 Section 892.1000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1000 Magnetic resonance...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1000 - Magnetic resonance diagnostic device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnetic resonance diagnostic device. 892.1000 Section 892.1000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1000 Magnetic resonance...

  6. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    SciTech Connect

    Eckardt, Michael Harneit, Wolfgang; Behrends, Jan; Münter, Detlef

    2015-04-15

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a “large-scale” state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule.

  7. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.S.

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible.

  8. Magnetic resonance characterization of silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanciulli, Marco; Belli, Matteo; Vellei, Antonio; Canevali, Carmen; Rotta, Davide; Paleari, Stefano; Basini, Martina

    2012-02-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been extensively investigated in the last decades. The interest in these nanostructures stems from both fundamental and applied research motivations. The functional properties of one- and zero-dimensional silicon structures are significantly different, at least below a certain critical dimension, from those well known in the bulk. The key and peculiar functional properties of SiNWs find applications in nanoelectronics, classical and quantum information processing and storage, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, thermoelectric, battery technology, nano-biotechnology, and neuroelectronics. We report our work on the characterization by continuous wave (CW) and pulse electron spin resonance (CW, FT-EPR) and electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) measurements of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) produced by different top-down processes. SiNWs were fabricated starting from SOI wafers using standard e-beam lithography and anisotropic wet etching or by metal-assisted chemical etching. Further oxidation was used to reduce the wire cross section. Different EDMR implementations were used to address the electronic wave function of donors (P, As) and to characterize point defects at the SiNWs/SiO2 interface.

  9. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Michael; Behrends, Jan; Münter, Detlef; Harneit, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a "large-scale" state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule.

  10. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  11. A novel approach to the rapid assignment of (13)C NMR spectra of major components of vegetable oils such as avocado, mango kernel and macadamia nut oils.

    PubMed

    Retief, Liezel; McKenzie, Jean M; Koch, Klaus R

    2009-09-01

    Assignment of (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of major fatty acid components of South African produced vegetable oils was attempted using a method in which the vegetable oil was spiked with a standard triacylglycerol. This proved to be inadequate and therefore a new rapid and potentially generic graphical linear correlation method is proposed for assignment of the (13)C NMR spectra of major fatty acid components of apricot kernel, avocado pear, grapeseed, macadamia nut, mango kernel and marula vegetable oils. In this graphical correlation method, chemical shifts of fatty acids present in a known standard triacylglycerol is plotted against the corresponding chemical shifts of fatty acids present in the vegetable oils. This new approach (under carefully defined conditions and concentrations) was found especially useful for spectrally crowded regions where significant peak overlap occurs and was validated with the well-known (13)C NMR spectrum of olive oil which has been extensively reported in the literature. In this way, a full assignment of the (13)C{1H} NMR spectra of the vegetable oils, as well as tripalmitolein was readily achieved and the resonances belonging to the palmitoleic acid component of the triacylglycerols in the case of macadamia nut and avocado pear oil resonances were also assigned for the first time in the (13)C NMR spectra of these oils. PMID:19544589

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the bonding and diffusion of CO chemisorbed on Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, S.E.; Ansermet, J.; Slichter, C.P.; Sinfelt, J.H.

    1987-03-02

    The authors report use of /sup 17/O and /sup 13/C NMR to study the bonding of CO on Pd particles. By /sup 17/O-/sup 13/C double resonance, they measure the CO bond length to be 1.20 +- 0.03 A. The /sup 13/C resonance frequency is exceptionally high, 310 ppm above values typical for metal carbonyls. Evidence that the shift arises from electron-spin polarization is given from studies of the magnitude and the dependence on temperature and frequency of the /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation time. A diffusion enegy of 6 +- 2 kcal/mole, half that of CO on Pt, is deduced from motional narrowing of the /sup 13/C NMR line.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the bonding and diffusion of CO chemisorbed on Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Susan E.; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe; Slichter, Charles P.; Sinfelt, John H.

    1987-03-01

    The authors report use of 17O and 13C NMR to study the bonding of CO on Pd particles. By 17-13C double resonance, they measure the CO bond length to be 1.20+/-0.03 Å. The 13C resonance frequency is exceptionally high, 310 ppm above values typical for metal carbonyls. Evidence that the shift arises from electron-spin polarization is given from studies of the magnitude and the dependence on temperature and frequency of the 13C spin-lattice relaxation time. A diffusion enegy of 6+/-2 kcal/mole, half that of CO on Pt, is deduced from motional narrowing of the 13C NMR line.

  14. Quantification of protein secondary structure by (13)C solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Forato, Lucimara Aparecida; Bernardes Filho, Rubens; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution (13)C solid-state NMR stands out as one of the most promising techniques to solve the structure of insoluble proteins featuring biological and technological importance. The simplest nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method to quantify the secondary structure of proteins uses the areas of carbonyl and alpha carbon peaks. The quantification obtained by fitting procedures depends on the assignment of the peaks to the structure, type of line shape, number of peaks to be used, and other parameters that are set by the operator. In this paper, we demonstrate that the analysis of (13)C NMR spectra by a pattern recognition method-based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) regression, which does not depend on the operator-shows higher correlation coefficients for α-helix and β-sheet (0.96 and 0.91, respectively) than Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method. Therefore, the use of (13)C solid-state NMR spectra and SVD is a simple and reliable method for quantifying the secondary structures of insoluble proteins in solid-state. PMID:27068694

  15. Transmembrane Exchange of Hyperpolarized 13C-Urea in Human Erythrocytes: Subminute Timescale Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Guilhem; Puckeridge, Max; Liangfeng, Guo; Tan, Yee Ling; Jacob, Chacko; Garland, Marc; Kuchel, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    The rate of exchange of urea across the membranes of human erythrocytes (red blood cells) was quantified on the 1-s to 2-min timescale. 13C-urea was hyperpolarized and subjected to rapid dissolution and the previously reported (partial) resolution of 13C NMR resonances from the molecules inside and outside red blood cells in suspensions was observed. This enabled a stopped-flow type of experiment to measure the (initially) zero-trans transport of urea with sequential single-pulse 13C NMR spectra, every second for up to ∼2 min. Data were analyzed using Bayesian reasoning and a Markov chain Monte Carlo method with a set of simultaneous nonlinear differential equations that described nuclear magnetic relaxation combined with transmembrane exchange. Our results contribute to quantitative understanding of urea-exchange kinetics in the whole body; and the methodological approach is likely to be applicable to other cellular systems and tissues in vivo. PMID:24209840

  16. Dynamic nuclear polarization of carbonyl and methyl 13C spins in acetate using trityl OX063

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Lumata, Lloyd

    2015-03-01

    Hyperpolarization via dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a physics technique that amplifies the magnetic resonance signals by several thousand-fold for biomedical NMR spectroscopy and imaging (MRI). Herein we have investigated the effect of carbon-13 isotopic location on the DNP of acetate (one of the biomolecules commonly used for hyperpolarization) at 3.35 T and 1.4 K using a narrow ESR linewidth free radical trityl OX063. We have found that the carbonyl 13C spins yielded about twice the polarization produced in methyl 13C spins. Deuteration of the methyl group, beneficial in the liquid-state, did not produce an improvement in the polarization level at cryogenic conditions. Concurrently, the solid-state nuclear relaxation of these samples correlate with the polarization levels achieved. These results suggest that the location of the 13C isotopic labeling in acetate has a direct impact on the solid-state polarization achieved and is mainly governed by the nuclear relaxation leakage factor.

  17. The future of magnetic resonance-based techniques in neurology.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques have become increasingly important in neurology for defining: 1. brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerve or muscle structure; 2. pathological changes in tissue structures and properties; and 3. dynamic patterns of functional activation of the brain. New applications have been driven in part by advances in hardware, particularly improvements in magnet and gradient coil design. New imaging strategies allow novel approaches to contrast with, for example, diffusion imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, perfusion imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging. In parallel with developments in hardware and image acquisition have been new approaches to image analysis. These have allowed quantitative descriptions of the image changes to be used for a precise, non-invasive definition of pathology. With the increasing capabilities and specificity of magnetic resonance techniques it is becoming more important that the neurologist is intimately involved in both the selection of magnetic resonance studies for patients and their interpretation. There is a need for considerably improved access to magnetic resonance technology, particularly in the acute or intensive care ward and in the neurosurgical theatre. This report illustrates several key developments. The task force concludes that magnetic resonance imaging is a major clinical tool of growing significance and offers recommendations for maximizing the potential future for magnetic resonance techniques in neurology. PMID:11509077

  18. Plasma-induced magnetic responses during nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands due to resonant magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2014-12-15

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produce magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas. Self-healing (annihilation) of RMP-induced magnetic islands has been observed in helical systems, where a possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by plasma flows, which is well known in tokamaks. Thus, fundamental physics of RMP shielding is commonly investigated in both tokamaks and helical systems. In order to check this mechanism, detailed informations of magnetic island phases are necessary. In experiments, measurement of radial magnetic responses is relatively easy. In this study, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands, behavior of radial magnetic fields during the self-healing is investigated. It is confirmed that flips of radial magnetic fields are typically observed during the self-healing. Such behavior of radial magnetic responses is also observed in LHD experiments.

  19. Single voxel localization for dynamic hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Albert P.; Cunningham, Charles H.

    2015-09-01

    The PRESS technique has been widely used to achieve voxel localization for in vivo1H MRS acquisitions. However, for dynamic hyperpolarized 13C MRS experiments, the transition bands of the refocusing pulses may saturate the pre-polarized substrate spins flowing into the voxel. This limitation may be overcome by designing refocusing pulses that do not perturb the resonance of the hyperpolarized substrate, but selectively refocuses the spins of the metabolic products. In this study, a PRESS pulse sequence incorporating spectral-spatial refocusing pulses that have a stop band ('notch') at the substrate resonance is tested in vivo using hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. Higher metabolite SNR was observed in experiments using the spectral-spatial refocusing pulses as compared to conventional refocusing pulses.

  20. Single voxel localization for dynamic hyperpolarized (13)C MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Albert P; Cunningham, Charles H

    2015-09-01

    The PRESS technique has been widely used to achieve voxel localization for in vivo(1)H MRS acquisitions. However, for dynamic hyperpolarized (13)C MRS experiments, the transition bands of the refocusing pulses may saturate the pre-polarized substrate spins flowing into the voxel. This limitation may be overcome by designing refocusing pulses that do not perturb the resonance of the hyperpolarized substrate, but selectively refocuses the spins of the metabolic products. In this study, a PRESS pulse sequence incorporating spectral-spatial refocusing pulses that have a stop band ('notch') at the substrate resonance is tested in vivo using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. Higher metabolite SNR was observed in experiments using the spectral-spatial refocusing pulses as compared to conventional refocusing pulses. PMID:26232365