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Sample records for 13c metabolic flux

  1. 13C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, W

    2001-07-01

    Metabolic flux analysis using 13C-labeled substrates has become an important tool in metabolic engineering. It allows the detailed quantification of all intracellular fluxes in the central metabolism of a microorganism. The method has strongly evolved in recent years by the introduction of new experimental procedures, measurement techniques, and mathematical data evaluation methods. Many of these improvements require advanced skills in the application of nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry techniques on the one hand and computational and statistical experience on the other hand. This minireview summarizes these recent developments and sketches the major practical problems. An outlook to possible future developments concludes the text.

  2. Metabolic flux analysis using 13C peptide label measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) has become the experimental method of choice to investigate cellular metabolism. MFA has established flux maps of central metabolism for dozens of microbes, cell cultures, and plant seeds. Steady-state MFA utilizes isotopic labeling measurements of amino acids obtai...

  3. (13)C metabolic flux analysis of recombinant expression hosts.

    PubMed

    Young, Jamey D

    2014-12-01

    Identifying host cell metabolic phenotypes that promote high recombinant protein titer is a major goal of the biotech industry. (13)C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) provides a rigorous approach to quantify these metabolic phenotypes by applying isotope tracers to map the flow of carbon through intracellular metabolic pathways. Recent advances in tracer theory and measurements are enabling more information to be extracted from (13)C labeling experiments. Sustained development of publicly available software tools and standardization of experimental workflows is simultaneously encouraging increased adoption of (13)C MFA within the biotech research community. A number of recent (13)C MFA studies have identified increased citric acid cycle and pentose phosphate pathway fluxes as consistent markers of high recombinant protein expression, both in mammalian and microbial hosts. Further work is needed to determine whether redirecting flux into these pathways can effectively enhance protein titers while maintaining acceptable glycan profiles.

  4. 13C-based metabolic flux analysis: fundamentals and practice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Isotope-based metabolic flux analysis is one of the emerging technologies applied to system level metabolic phenotype characterization in metabolic engineering. Among the developed approaches, (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis has been established as a standard tool and has been widely applied to quantitative pathway characterization of diverse biological systems. To implement (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in practice, comprehending the underlying mathematical and computational modeling fundamentals is of importance along with carefully conducted experiments and analytical measurements. Such knowledge is also crucial when designing (13)C-labeling experiments and properly acquiring key data sets essential for in vivo flux analysis implementation. In this regard, the modeling fundamentals of (13)C-labeling systems and analytical data processing are the main topics we will deal with in this chapter. Along with this, the relevant numerical optimization techniques are addressed to help implementation of the entire computational procedures aiming at (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in vivo.

  5. A scientific workflow framework for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Dalman, Tolga; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2016-08-20

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) with (13)C labeling data is a high-precision technique to quantify intracellular reaction rates (fluxes). One of the major challenges of (13)C MFA is the interactivity of the computational workflow according to which the fluxes are determined from the input data (metabolic network model, labeling data, and physiological rates). Here, the workflow assembly is inevitably determined by the scientist who has to consider interacting biological, experimental, and computational aspects. Decision-making is context dependent and requires expertise, rendering an automated evaluation process hardly possible. Here, we present a scientific workflow framework (SWF) for creating, executing, and controlling on demand (13)C MFA workflows. (13)C MFA-specific tools and libraries, such as the high-performance simulation toolbox 13CFLUX2, are wrapped as web services and thereby integrated into a service-oriented architecture. Besides workflow steering, the SWF features transparent provenance collection and enables full flexibility for ad hoc scripting solutions. To handle compute-intensive tasks, cloud computing is supported. We demonstrate how the challenges posed by (13)C MFA workflows can be solved with our approach on the basis of two proof-of-concept use cases.

  6. 13C metabolic flux analysis in complex systems.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Nicola

    2011-02-01

    Experimental determination of in vivo metabolic rates by methods of (13)C metabolic flux analysis is a pivotal approach to unravel structure and regulation of metabolic networks, in particular with microorganisms grown in minimal media. However, the study of real-life and eukaryotic systems calls for the quantification of fluxes also in cellular compartments, rich media, cell-wide metabolic networks, dynamic systems or single cells. These scenarios drastically increase the complexity of the task, which is only partly dealt by existing approaches that rely on rigorous simulations of label propagation through metabolic networks and require multiple labeling experiments or a priori information on pathway inactivity to simplify the problem. Albeit qualitative and largely driven by human interpretation, statistical analysis of measured (13)C-patterns remains the exclusive alternative to comprehensively handle such complex systems. In the future, this practice will be complemented by novel modeling frameworks to assay particular fluxes within a network by stable isotopic tracer for targeted validation of well-defined hypotheses.

  7. 13C metabolic flux analysis at a genome-scale.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Saratram; Maranas, Costas D

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic models used in 13C metabolic flux analysis generally include a limited number of reactions primarily from central metabolism. They typically omit degradation pathways, complete cofactor balances, and atom transition contributions for reactions outside central metabolism. This study addresses the impact on prediction fidelity of scaling-up mapping models to a genome-scale. The core mapping model employed in this study accounts for (75 reactions and 65 metabolites) primarily from central metabolism. The genome-scale metabolic mapping model (GSMM) (697 reaction and 595 metabolites) is constructed using as a basis the iAF1260 model upon eliminating reactions guaranteed not to carry flux based on growth and fermentation data for a minimal glucose growth medium. Labeling data for 17 amino acid fragments obtained from cells fed with glucose labeled at the second carbon was used to obtain fluxes and ranges. Metabolic fluxes and confidence intervals are estimated, for both core and genome-scale mapping models, by minimizing the sum of square of differences between predicted and experimentally measured labeling patterns using the EMU decomposition algorithm. Overall, we find that both topology and estimated values of the metabolic fluxes remain largely consistent between core and GSM model. Stepping up to a genome-scale mapping model leads to wider flux inference ranges for 20 key reactions present in the core model. The glycolysis flux range doubles due to the possibility of active gluconeogenesis, the TCA flux range expanded by 80% due to the availability of a bypass through arginine consistent with labeling data, and the transhydrogenase reaction flux was essentially unresolved due to the presence of as many as five routes for the inter-conversion of NADPH to NADH afforded by the genome-scale model. By globally accounting for ATP demands in the GSMM model the unused ATP decreased drastically with the lower bound matching the maintenance ATP requirement. A non

  8. Parallel labeling experiments validate Clostridium acetobutylicum metabolic network model for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Au, Jennifer; Choi, Jungik; Jones, Shawn W; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we provide new insights into the metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 obtained using a systematic approach for quantifying fluxes based on parallel labeling experiments and (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). Here, cells were grown in parallel cultures with [1-(13)C]glucose and [U-(13)C]glucose as tracers and (13)C-MFA was used to quantify intracellular metabolic fluxes. Several metabolic network models were compared: an initial model based on current knowledge, and extended network models that included additional reactions that improved the fits of experimental data. While the initial network model did not produce a statistically acceptable fit of (13)C-labeling data, an extended network model with five additional reactions was able to fit all data with 292 redundant measurements. The model was subsequently trimmed to produce a minimal network model of C. acetobutylicum for (13)C-MFA, which could still reproduce all of the experimental data. The flux results provided valuable new insights into the metabolism of C. acetobutylicum. First, we found that TCA cycle was effectively incomplete, as there was no measurable flux between α-ketoglutarate and succinyl-CoA, succinate and fumarate, and malate and oxaloacetate. Second, an active pathway was identified from pyruvate to fumarate via aspartate. Third, we found that isoleucine was produced exclusively through the citramalate synthase pathway in C. acetobutylicum and that CAC3174 was likely responsible for citramalate synthase activity. These model predictions were confirmed in several follow-up tracer experiments. The validated metabolic network model established in this study can be used in future investigations for unbiased (13)C-flux measurements in C. acetobutylicum.

  9. Elucidating the role of copper in CHO cell energy metabolism using (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Nargund, Shilpa; Qiu, Jinshu; Goudar, Chetan T

    2015-01-01

    (13)C-metabolic flux analysis was used to understand copper deficiency-related restructuring of energy metabolism, which leads to excessive lactate production in recombinant protein-producing CHO cells. Stationary-phase labeling experiments with U-(13)C glucose were conducted on CHO cells grown under high and limiting copper in 3 L fed-batch bioreactors. The resultant labeling patterns of soluble metabolites were measured by GC-MS and used to estimate metabolic fluxes in the central carbon metabolism pathways using OpenFlux. Fluxes were evaluated 300 times from stoichiometrically feasible random guess values and their confidence intervals calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. Results from metabolic flux analysis exhibited significant carbon redistribution throughout the metabolic network in cells under Cu deficiency. Specifically, glycolytic fluxes increased (25%-79% relative to glucose uptake) whereas fluxes through the TCA and pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) were lower (15%-23% and 74%, respectively) compared with the Cu-containing condition. Furthermore, under Cu deficiency, 33% of the flux entering TCA via the pyruvate node was redirected to lactate and malate production. Based on these results, we hypothesize that Cu deficiency disrupts the electron transport chain causing ATP deficiency, redox imbalance, and oxidative stress, which in turn drive copper-deficient CHO cells to produce energy via aerobic glycolysis, which is associated with excessive lactate production, rather than the more efficient route of oxidative phosphorylation.

  10. Integrated 13C-metabolic flux analysis of 14 parallel labeling experiments in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Crown, Scott B; Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2015-03-01

    The use of parallel labeling experiments for (13)C metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) has emerged in recent years as the new gold standard in fluxomics. The methodology has been termed COMPLETE-MFA, short for complementary parallel labeling experiments technique for metabolic flux analysis. In this contribution, we have tested the limits of COMPLETE-MFA by demonstrating integrated analysis of 14 parallel labeling experiments with Escherichia coli. An effort on such a massive scale has never been attempted before. In addition to several widely used isotopic tracers such as [1,2-(13)C]glucose and mixtures of [1-(13)C]glucose and [U-(13)C]glucose, four novel tracers were applied in this study: [2,3-(13)C]glucose, [4,5,6-(13)C]glucose, [2,3,4,5,6-(13)C]glucose and a mixture of [1-(13)C]glucose and [4,5,6-(13)C]glucose. This allowed us for the first time to compare the performance of a large number of isotopic tracers. Overall, there was no single best tracer for the entire E. coli metabolic network model. Tracers that produced well-resolved fluxes in the upper part of metabolism (glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways) showed poor performance for fluxes in the lower part of metabolism (TCA cycle and anaplerotic reactions), and vice versa. The best tracer for upper metabolism was 80% [1-(13)C]glucose+20% [U-(13)C]glucose, while [4,5,6-(13)C]glucose and [5-(13)C]glucose both produced optimal flux resolution in the lower part of metabolism. COMPLETE-MFA improved both flux precision and flux observability, i.e. more independent fluxes were resolved with smaller confidence intervals, especially exchange fluxes. Overall, this study demonstrates that COMPLETE-MFA is a powerful approach for improving flux measurements and that this methodology should be considered in future studies that require very high flux resolution.

  11. Parallel labeling experiments for pathway elucidation and (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic pathway models provide the foundation for quantitative studies of cellular physiology through the measurement of intracellular metabolic fluxes. For model organisms metabolic models are well established, with many manually curated genome-scale model reconstructions, gene knockout studies and stable-isotope tracing studies. However, for non-model organisms a similar level of knowledge is often lacking. Compartmentation of cellular metabolism in eukaryotic systems also presents significant challenges for quantitative (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). Recently, innovative (13)C-MFA approaches have been developed based on parallel labeling experiments, the use of multiple isotopic tracers and integrated data analysis, that allow more rigorous validation of pathway models and improved quantification of metabolic fluxes. Applications of these approaches open new research directions in metabolic engineering, biotechnology and medicine.

  12. A Peptide-Based Method for 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis in Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Amit; Nilmeier, Jerome; Weaver, Daniel; Adams, Paul D.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Petzold, Christopher J.; Martín, Héctor García

    2014-01-01

    The study of intracellular metabolic fluxes and inter-species metabolite exchange for microbial communities is of crucial importance to understand and predict their behaviour. The most authoritative method of measuring intracellular fluxes, 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C MFA), uses the labeling pattern obtained from metabolites (typically amino acids) during 13C labeling experiments to derive intracellular fluxes. However, these metabolite labeling patterns cannot easily be obtained for each of the members of the community. Here we propose a new type of 13C MFA that infers fluxes based on peptide labeling, instead of amino acid labeling. The advantage of this method resides in the fact that the peptide sequence can be used to identify the microbial species it originates from and, simultaneously, the peptide labeling can be used to infer intracellular metabolic fluxes. Peptide identity and labeling patterns can be obtained in a high-throughput manner from modern proteomics techniques. We show that, using this method, it is theoretically possible to recover intracellular metabolic fluxes in the same way as through the standard amino acid based 13C MFA, and quantify the amount of information lost as a consequence of using peptides instead of amino acids. We show that by using a relatively small number of peptides we can counter this information loss. We computationally tested this method with a well-characterized simple microbial community consisting of two species. PMID:25188426

  13. OpenMebius: an open source software for isotopically nonstationary 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Kajihata, Shuichi; Furusawa, Chikara; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of metabolic flux by (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) provides valuable information regarding cell physiology. Bioinformatics tools have been developed to estimate metabolic flux distributions from the results of tracer isotopic labeling experiments using a (13)C-labeled carbon source. Metabolic flux is determined by nonlinear fitting of a metabolic model to the isotopic labeling enrichment of intracellular metabolites measured by mass spectrometry. Whereas (13)C-MFA is conventionally performed under isotopically constant conditions, isotopically nonstationary (13)C metabolic flux analysis (INST-(13)C-MFA) has recently been developed for flux analysis of cells with photosynthetic activity and cells at a quasi-steady metabolic state (e.g., primary cells or microorganisms under stationary phase). Here, the development of a novel open source software for INST-(13)C-MFA on the Windows platform is reported. OpenMebius (Open source software for Metabolic flux analysis) provides the function of autogenerating metabolic models for simulating isotopic labeling enrichment from a user-defined configuration worksheet. Analysis using simulated data demonstrated the applicability of OpenMebius for INST-(13)C-MFA. Confidence intervals determined by INST-(13)C-MFA were less than those determined by conventional methods, indicating the potential of INST-(13)C-MFA for precise metabolic flux analysis. OpenMebius is the open source software for the general application of INST-(13)C-MFA.

  14. SUMOFLUX: A Generalized Method for Targeted 13C Metabolic Flux Ratio Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kogadeeva, Maria; Zamboni, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic fluxes are a cornerstone of cellular physiology that emerge from a complex interplay of enzymes, carriers, and nutrients. The experimental assessment of in vivo intracellular fluxes using stable isotopic tracers is essential if we are to understand metabolic function and regulation. Flux estimation based on 13C or 2H labeling relies on complex simulation and iterative fitting; processes that necessitate a level of expertise that ordinarily preclude the non-expert user. To overcome this, we have developed SUMOFLUX, a methodology that is broadly applicable to the targeted analysis of 13C-metabolic fluxes. By combining surrogate modeling and machine learning, we trained a predictor to specialize in estimating flux ratios from measurable 13C-data. SUMOFLUX targets specific flux features individually, which makes it fast, user-friendly, applicable to experimental design and robust in terms of experimental noise and exchange flux magnitude. Collectively, we predict that SUMOFLUX's properties realistically pave the way to high-throughput flux analyses.

  15. SUMOFLUX: A Generalized Method for Targeted 13C Metabolic Flux Ratio Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kogadeeva, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic fluxes are a cornerstone of cellular physiology that emerge from a complex interplay of enzymes, carriers, and nutrients. The experimental assessment of in vivo intracellular fluxes using stable isotopic tracers is essential if we are to understand metabolic function and regulation. Flux estimation based on 13C or 2H labeling relies on complex simulation and iterative fitting; processes that necessitate a level of expertise that ordinarily preclude the non-expert user. To overcome this, we have developed SUMOFLUX, a methodology that is broadly applicable to the targeted analysis of 13C-metabolic fluxes. By combining surrogate modeling and machine learning, we trained a predictor to specialize in estimating flux ratios from measurable 13C-data. SUMOFLUX targets specific flux features individually, which makes it fast, user-friendly, applicable to experimental design and robust in terms of experimental noise and exchange flux magnitude. Collectively, we predict that SUMOFLUX's properties realistically pave the way to high-throughput flux analyses. PMID:27626798

  16. Hybrid optimization for 13C metabolic flux analysis using systems parametrized by compactification

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tae Hoon; Frick, Oliver; Heinzle, Elmar

    2008-01-01

    Background The importance and power of isotope-based metabolic flux analysis and its contribution to understanding the metabolic network is increasingly recognized. Its application is, however, still limited partly due to computational inefficiency. 13C metabolic flux analysis aims to compute in vivo metabolic fluxes in terms of metabolite balancing extended by carbon isotopomer balances and involves a nonlinear least-squares problem. To solve the problem more efficiently, improved numerical optimization techniques are necessary. Results For flux computation, we developed a gradient-based hybrid optimization algorithm. Here, independent flux variables were compactified into [0, 1)-ranged variables using a single transformation rule. The compactified parameters could be discriminated between non-identifiable and identifiable variables after model linearization. The developed hybrid algorithm was applied to the central metabolism of Bacillus subtilis with only succinate and glutamate as carbon sources. This creates difficulties caused by symmetry of succinate leading to limited introduction of 13C labeling information into the system. The algorithm was found to be superior to its parent algorithms and to global optimization methods both in accuracy and speed. The hybrid optimization with tolerance adjustment quickly converged to the minimum with close to zero deviation and exactly re-estimated flux variables. In the metabolic network studied, some fluxes were found to be either non-identifiable or nonlinearly correlated. The non-identifiable fluxes could correctly be predicted a priori using the model identification method applied, whereas the nonlinear flux correlation was revealed only by identification runs using different starting values a posteriori. Conclusion This fast, robust and accurate optimization method is useful for high-throughput metabolic flux analysis, a posteriori identification of possible parameter correlations, and also for Monte Carlo

  17. Multi-objective experimental design for (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouvin, Jeroen; Cajot, Simon; D'Huys, Pieter-Jan; Ampofo-Asiama, Jerry; Anné, Jozef; Van Impe, Jan; Geeraerd, Annemie; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2015-10-01

    (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis is an excellent technique to resolve fluxes in the central carbon metabolism but costs can be significant when using specialized tracers. This work presents a framework for cost-effective design of (13)C-tracer experiments, illustrated on two different networks. Linear and non-linear optimal input mixtures are computed for networks for Streptomyces lividans and a carcinoma cell line. If only glucose tracers are considered as labeled substrate for a carcinoma cell line or S. lividans, the best parameter estimation accuracy is obtained by mixtures containing high amounts of 1,2-(13)C2 glucose combined with uniformly labeled glucose. Experimental designs are evaluated based on a linear (D-criterion) and non-linear approach (S-criterion). Both approaches generate almost the same input mixture, however, the linear approach is favored due to its low computational effort. The high amount of 1,2-(13)C2 glucose in the optimal designs coincides with a high experimental cost, which is further enhanced when labeling is introduced in glutamine and aspartate tracers. Multi-objective optimization gives the possibility to assess experimental quality and cost at the same time and can reveal excellent compromise experiments. For example, the combination of 100% 1,2-(13)C2 glucose with 100% position one labeled glutamine and the combination of 100% 1,2-(13)C2 glucose with 100% uniformly labeled glutamine perform equally well for the carcinoma cell line, but the first mixture offers a decrease in cost of $ 120 per ml-scale cell culture experiment. We demonstrated the validity of a multi-objective linear approach to perform optimal experimental designs for the non-linear problem of (13)C-metabolic flux analysis. Tools and a workflow are provided to perform multi-objective design. The effortless calculation of the D-criterion can be exploited to perform high-throughput screening of possible (13)C-tracers, while the illustrated benefit of multi

  18. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis of co-cultures: A novel approach.

    PubMed

    Gebreselassie, Nikodimos A; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we present a novel approach for performing (13)C metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) of co-culture systems. We demonstrate for the first time that it is possible to determine metabolic flux distributions in multiple species simultaneously without the need for physical separation of cells or proteins, or overexpression of species-specific products. Instead, metabolic fluxes for each species in a co-culture are estimated directly from isotopic labeling of total biomass obtained using conventional mass spectrometry approaches such as GC-MS. In addition to determining metabolic fluxes, this approach estimates the relative population size of each species in a mixed culture and inter-species metabolite exchange. As such, it enables detailed studies of microbial communities including species dynamics and interactions between community members. The methodology is experimentally validated here using a co-culture of two E. coli knockout strains. Taken together, this work greatly extends the scope of (13)C-MFA to a large number of multi-cellular systems that are of significant importance in biotechnology and medicine.

  19. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis in S-adenosyl-L-methionine production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kenshi; Kajihata, Shuichi; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) is a major biological methyl group donor, and is used as a nutritional supplement and prescription drug. Yeast is used for the industrial production of SAM owing to its high intracellular SAM concentrations. To determine the regulation mechanisms responsible for such high SAM production, (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was conducted to compare the flux distributions in the central metabolism between Kyokai no. 6 (high SAM-producing) and S288C (control) strains. (13)C-MFA showed that the levels of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux in SAM-overproducing strain were considerably increased compared to those in the S228C strain. Analysis of ATP balance also showed that a larger amount of excess ATP was produced in the Kyokai 6 strain because of increased oxidative phosphorylation. These results suggest that high SAM production in Kyokai 6 strains could be attributed to enhanced ATP regeneration with high TCA cycle fluxes and respiration activity. Thus, maintaining high respiration efficiency during cultivation is important for improving SAM production.

  20. (13) C-metabolic flux analysis of human adenovirus infection: Implications for viral vector production.

    PubMed

    Carinhas, Nuno; Koshkin, Alexey; Pais, Daniel A M; Alves, Paula M; Teixeira, Ana P

    2017-01-01

    Adenoviruses are human pathogens increasingly used as gene therapy and vaccination vectors. However, their impact on cell metabolism is poorly characterized. We performed carbon labeling experiments with [1,2-(13) C]glucose or [U-(13) C]glutamine to evaluate metabolic alterations in the amniocyte-derived, E1-transformed 1G3 cell line during production of a human adenovirus type 5 vector (AdV5). Nonstationary (13) C-metabolic flux analysis revealed increased fluxes of glycolysis (17%) and markedly PPP (over fourfold) and cytosolic AcCoA formation (nearly twofold) following infection of growing cells. Interestingly, infection of growth-arrested cells increased overall carbon flow even more, including glutamine anaplerosis and TCA cycle activity (both over 1.5-fold), but was unable to stimulate the PPP and was associated with a steep drop in AdV5 replication (almost 80%). Our results underscore the importance of nucleic and fatty acid biosynthesis for adenovirus replication. Overall, we portray a metabolic blueprint of human adenovirus infection, highlighting similarities with other viruses and cancer, and suggest strategies to improve AdV5 production. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 195-207. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. 13C MRS and LC–MS Flux Analysis of Tumor Intermediary Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shestov, Alexander A.; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Nath, Kavindra; Guo, Lili; Nelson, David S.; Roman, Jeffrey C.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Wasik, Mariusz A.; Blair, Ian A.; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first validated metabolic network model for analysis of flux through key pathways of tumor intermediary metabolism, including glycolysis, the oxidative and non-oxidative arms of the pentose pyrophosphate shunt, the TCA cycle as well as its anaplerotic pathways, pyruvate–malate shuttling, glutaminolysis, and fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidation. The model that is called Bonded Cumomer Analysis for application to 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS) data and Fragmented Cumomer Analysis for mass spectrometric data is a refined and efficient form of isotopomer analysis that can readily be expanded to incorporate glycogen, phospholipid, and other pathways thereby encompassing all the key pathways of tumor intermediary metabolism. Validation was achieved by demonstrating agreement of experimental measurements of the metabolic rates of oxygen consumption, glucose consumption, lactate production, and glutamate pool size with independent measurements of these parameters in cultured human DB-1 melanoma cells. These cumomer models have been applied to studies of DB-1 melanoma and DLCL2 human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells in culture and as xenografts in nude mice at 9.4 T. The latter studies demonstrate the potential translation of these methods to in situ studies of human tumor metabolism by MRS with stable 13C isotopically labeled substrates on instruments operating at high magnetic fields (≥7 T). The melanoma studies indicate that this tumor line obtains 51% of its ATP by mitochondrial metabolism and 49% by glycolytic metabolism under both euglycemic (5 mM glucose) and hyperglycemic conditions (26 mM glucose). While a high level of glutamine uptake is detected corresponding to ~50% of TCA cycle flux under hyperglycemic conditions, and ~100% of TCA cycle flux under euglycemic conditions, glutaminolysis flux and its contributions to ATP synthesis were very small. Studies of human lymphoma cells demonstrated that inhibition of

  2. Optimal tracers for parallel labeling experiments and (13)C metabolic flux analysis: A new precision and synergy scoring system.

    PubMed

    Crown, Scott B; Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-11-01

    (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) is a widely used approach in metabolic engineering for quantifying intracellular metabolic fluxes. The precision of fluxes determined by (13)C-MFA depends largely on the choice of isotopic tracers and the specific set of labeling measurements. A recent advance in the field is the use of parallel labeling experiments for improved flux precision and accuracy. However, as of today, no systemic methods exist for identifying optimal tracers for parallel labeling experiments. In this contribution, we have addressed this problem by introducing a new scoring system and evaluating thousands of different isotopic tracer schemes. Based on this extensive analysis we have identified optimal tracers for (13)C-MFA. The best single tracers were doubly (13)C-labeled glucose tracers, including [1,6-(13)C]glucose, [5,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose, which consistently produced the highest flux precision independent of the metabolic flux map (here, 100 random flux maps were evaluated). Moreover, we demonstrate that pure glucose tracers perform better overall than mixtures of glucose tracers. For parallel labeling experiments the optimal isotopic tracers were [1,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose. Combined analysis of [1,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose labeling data improved the flux precision score by nearly 20-fold compared to widely use tracer mixture 80% [1-(13)C]glucose +20% [U-(13)C]glucose.

  3. Metabolic Flux Elucidation for Large-Scale Models Using 13C Labeled Isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Suthers, Patrick F.; Burgard, Anthony P.; Dasika, Madhukar S.; Nowroozi, Farnaz; Van Dien, Stephen; Keasling, Jay D.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2007-01-01

    A key consideration in metabolic engineering is the determination of fluxes of the metabolites within the cell. This determination provides an unambiguous description of metabolism before and/or after engineering interventions. Here, we present a computational framework that combines a constraint-based modeling framework with isotopic label tracing on a large-scale. When cells are fed a growth substrate with certain carbon positions labeled with 13C, the distribution of this label in the intracellular metabolites can be calculated based on the known biochemistry of the participating pathways. Most labeling studies focus on skeletal representations of central metabolism and ignore many flux routes that could contribute to the observed isotopic labeling patterns. In contrast, our approach investigates the importance of carrying out isotopic labeling studies using a more comprehensive reaction network consisting of 350 fluxes and 184 metabolites in Escherichia coli including global metabolite balances on cofactors such as ATP, NADH, and NADPH. The proposed procedure is demonstrated on an E. coli strain engineered to produce amorphadiene, a precursor to the anti-malarial drug artemisinin. The cells were grown in continuous culture on glucose containing 20% [U-13C]glucose; the measurements are made using GC-MS performed on 13 amino acids extracted from the cells. We identify flux distributions for which the calculated labeling patterns agree well with the measurements alluding to the accuracy of the network reconstruction. Furthermore, we explore the robustness of the flux calculations to variability in the experimental MS measurements, as well as highlight the key experimental measurements necessary for flux determination. Finally, we discuss the effect of reducing the model, as well as shed light onto the customization of the developed computational framework to other systems. PMID:17632026

  4. Metabolic network reconstruction, growth characterization and 13C-metabolic flux analysis of the extremophile Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Swarup, Aditi; Lu, Jing; DeWoody, Kathleen C; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2014-07-01

    Thermus thermophilus is an extremely thermophilic bacterium with significant biotechnological potential. In this work, we have characterized aerobic growth characteristics of T. thermophilus HB8 at temperatures between 50 and 85°C, constructed a metabolic network model of its central carbon metabolism and validated the model using (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). First, cells were grown in batch cultures in custom constructed mini-bioreactors at different temperatures to determine optimal growth conditions. The optimal temperature for T. thermophilus grown on defined medium with glucose was 81°C. The maximum growth rate was 0.25h(-1). Between 50 and 81°C the growth rate increased by 7-fold and the temperature dependence was described well by an Arrhenius model with an activation energy of 47kJ/mol. Next, we performed a (13)C-labeling experiment with [1,2-(13)C] glucose as the tracer and calculated intracellular metabolic fluxes using (13)C-MFA. The results provided support for the constructed network model and highlighted several interesting characteristics of T. thermophilus metabolism. We found that T. thermophilus largely uses glycolysis and TCA cycle to produce biosynthetic precursors, ATP and reducing equivalents needed for cells growth. Consistent with its proposed metabolic network model, we did not detect any oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux or Entner-Doudoroff pathway activity. The biomass precursors erythrose-4-phosphate and ribose-5-phosphate were produced via the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and largely via transketolase, with little contribution from transaldolase. The high biomass yield on glucose that was measured experimentally was also confirmed independently by (13)C-MFA. The results presented here provide a solid foundation for future studies of T. thermophilus and its metabolic engineering applications.

  5. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis of lipid accumulation in the oleaginous fungus Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Zhang, Huaiyuan; Wang, Liping; Chen, Haiqin; Chen, Yong Q; Chen, Wei; Song, Yuanda

    2015-12-01

    The oleaginous fungus Mucor circinelloides is of industrial interest because it can produce high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acid γ-linolenic acid. M. circinelloides CBS 277.49 is able to accumulate less than 15% of cell dry weight as lipids, while M. circinelloides WJ11 can accumulate lipid up to 36%. In order to better understand the mechanisms behind the differential lipid accumulation in these two strains, tracer experiments with (13)C-glucose were performed with the growth of M. circinelloides and subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometric detection of (13)C-patterns in proteinogenic amino acids was carried out to identify the metabolic network topology and estimate intracellular fluxes. Our results showed that the high oleaginous strain WJ11 had higher flux of pentose phosphate pathway and malic enzyme, lower flux in tricarboxylic acid cycle, higher flux in glyoxylate cycle and ATP: citrate lyase, together, it might provide more NADPH and substrate acetyl-CoA for fatty acid synthesis.

  6. Application of (13)C flux analysis to identify high-productivity CHO metabolic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Neil; Smith, Kevin D; McAtee-Pereira, Allison G; Dorai, Haimanti; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Lang, Steven E; Young, Jamey D

    2017-01-23

    Industrial bioprocesses place high demands on the energy metabolism of host cells to meet biosynthetic requirements for maximal protein expression. Identifying metabolic phenotypes that promote high expression is therefore a major goal of the biotech industry. We conducted a series of (13)C flux analysis studies to examine the metabolic response to IgG expression during early stationary phase of CHO cell cultures grown in 3L fed-batch bioreactors. We examined eight clones expressing four different IgGs and compared with three non-expressing host-cell controls. Some clones were genetically manipulated to be apoptosis-resistant by expressing Bcl-2Δ, which correlated with increased IgG production and elevated glucose metabolism. The metabolic phenotypes of the non-expressing, IgG-expressing, and Bcl-2Δ/IgG-expressing clones were fully segregated by hierarchical clustering analysis. Lactate consumption and citric acid cycle fluxes were most strongly associated with specific IgG productivity. These studies indicate that enhanced oxidative metabolism is a characteristic of high-producing CHO cell lines.

  7. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis for mevalonate-producing strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wada, Keisuke; Toya, Yoshihiro; Banno, Satomi; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    Mevalonate (MVA) is used to produce various useful products such as drugs, cosmetics and food additives. An MVA-producing strain of Escherichia coli (engineered) was constructed by introducing mvaES genes from Enterococcus faecalis. The engineered strain produced 1.84 mmol/gDCW/h yielding 22% (C-mol/C-mol) of MVA from glucose in the aerobic exponential growth phase. The mass balance analysis revealed that the MVA yield of the engineered strain was close to the upper limit at the biomass yield. Since MVA is synthesized from acetyl-CoA using NADPH as a cofactor, the production of MVA affects central metabolism in terms of carbon utilization and NADPH requirements. The reason for this highly efficient MVA production was investigated based on (13)C-metabolic flux analysis. The estimated flux distributions revealed that the fluxes of acetate formation and the TCA cycle in the engineered strain were lower than those in the control strain. Although the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway is considered as the NADPH generating pathway in E. coli, no difference of the flux was observed between the control and engineered strains. The production/consumption balance of NADPH suggested that additional requirement of NADPH for MVA synthesis was obtained from the transhydrogenase reaction in the engineered strain. Comparison between the measured flux distribution and the ideal values for MVA production proposes a strategy for further engineering to improve the MVA production in E. coli.

  8. Photobioreactor design for isotopic non-stationary 13C-metabolic flux analysis (INST 13C-MFA) under photoautotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Martzolff, Arnaud; Cahoreau, Edern; Cogne, Guillaume; Peyriga, Lindsay; Portais, Jean-Charles; Dechandol, Emmanuel; Le Grand, Fabienne; Massou, Stéphane; Gonçalves, Olivier; Pruvost, Jérémy; Legrand, Jack

    2012-12-01

    Adaptive metabolic behavior of photoautotrophic microorganisms toward genetic and environmental perturbations can be interpreted in a quantitative depiction of carbon flow through a biochemical reaction network using isotopic non-stationary (13) C-metabolic flux analysis (INST (13) C-MFA). To evaluate (13) C-metabolic flux maps for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an original experimental framework was designed allowing rapid, reliable collection of high-quality isotopomer data against time. It involved (i) a short-time (13) C labeling injection device based on mixing control in a torus-shaped photobioreactor with plug-flow hydrodynamics allowing a sudden step-change in the (13) C proportion in the substrate feed and (ii) a rapid sampling procedure using an automatic fast filtration method coupled to a manual rapid liquid nitrogen quenching step. (13) C-substrate labeling enrichment was controlled through the total dissolved inorganic carbon concentration in the pulsed solution. First results were obtained from steady-state continuous culture measurements allowing the characterization of the kinetics of label incorporation into light-limited growing cells cultivated in a photobioreactor operating at the maximal biomass productivity for an incident photon flux density of 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1). (13)C label incorporation was measured for 21 intracellular metabolites using IC-MS/MS in 58 samples collected across a labeling experiment duration of 7 min. The fastest labeling rate was observed for 2/3-phosphoglycerate with an apparent isotopic stationary state reached after 300 s. The labeling rate was consistent with the optimized mixing time of about 4.9 s inside the reactor and the shortest reliable sampling period assessed at 5 s.

  9. Metabolite channeling and compartmentation in the human cell line AGE1.HN determined by 13C labeling experiments and 13C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Jens; Sandig, Volker; Heinzle, Elmar

    2011-12-01

    This study focused on analyzing active pathways and the metabolic flux distribution in human neuronal AGE1.HN cells that is a desirable basis for a rational design and optimization of producing cell lines and production processes for biopharmaceuticals. (13)C-labeling experiments and (13)C metabolic flux analysis were conducted using glucose, glutamine, alanine and lactate tracers in parallel experiments. Connections between cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolite pools were verified, e.g., flux from TCA cycle metabolite (13)C to glycolytic metabolites. It was also found that lactate and alanine are produced from the same pyruvate pool and that consumed alanine is mainly directly metabolized and secreted as lactate. Activity of the pentose phosphate pathway was low being around 2.3% of the glucose uptake flux. This might be compensated in AGE1.HN by high mitochondrial malic enzyme flux producing NADPH. Mitochondrial pyruvate transport was almost zero. Instead pyruvate carbons were channeled via oxaloacetate into the TCA cycle which was mainly fed via α-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate during the investigated phase. The data indicate that further optimization of this cell line should focus on the improved substrate usage which can be accomplished by an improved connectivity between glycolytic and mitochondrial pyruvate pools or by better control of the substrate uptake.

  10. Integration of a constraint-based metabolic model of Brassica napus developing seeds with (13)C-metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Hay, Jordan O; Shi, Hai; Heinzel, Nicolas; Hebbelmann, Inga; Rolletschek, Hardy; Schwender, Jorg

    2014-01-01

    The use of large-scale or genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for modeling and simulation of plant metabolism and integration of those models with large-scale omics and experimental flux data is becoming increasingly important in plant metabolic research. Here we report an updated version of bna572, a bottom-up reconstruction of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.; Brassicaceae) developing seeds with emphasis on representation of biomass-component biosynthesis. New features include additional seed-relevant pathways for isoprenoid, sterol, phenylpropanoid, flavonoid, and choline biosynthesis. Being now based on standardized data formats and procedures for model reconstruction, bna572+ is available as a COBRA-compliant Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) model and conforms to the Minimum Information Requested in the Annotation of Biochemical Models (MIRIAM) standards for annotation of external data resources. Bna572+ contains 966 genes, 671 reactions, and 666 metabolites distributed among 11 subcellular compartments. It is referenced to the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, with gene-protein-reaction (GPR) associations resolving subcellular localization. Detailed mass and charge balancing and confidence scoring were applied to all reactions. Using B. napus seed specific transcriptome data, expression was verified for 78% of bna572+ genes and 97% of reactions. Alongside bna572+ we also present a revised carbon centric model for (13)C-Metabolic Flux Analysis ((13)C-MFA) with all its reactions being referenced to bna572+ based on linear projections. By integration of flux ratio constraints obtained from (13)C-MFA and by elimination of infinite flux bounds around thermodynamically infeasible loops based on COBRA loopless methods, we demonstrate improvements in predictive power of Flux Variability Analysis (FVA). Using this combined approach we characterize the difference in metabolic flux of developing seeds of two B. napus genotypes contrasting in starch and oil content.

  11. Integration of a constraint-based metabolic model of Brassica napus developing seeds with 13C-metabolic flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Jordan O.; Shi, Hai; Heinzel, Nicolas; Hebbelmann, Inga; Rolletschek, Hardy; Schwender, Jorg

    2014-01-01

    The use of large-scale or genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for modeling and simulation of plant metabolism and integration of those models with large-scale omics and experimental flux data is becoming increasingly important in plant metabolic research. Here we report an updated version of bna572, a bottom-up reconstruction of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.; Brassicaceae) developing seeds with emphasis on representation of biomass-component biosynthesis. New features include additional seed-relevant pathways for isoprenoid, sterol, phenylpropanoid, flavonoid, and choline biosynthesis. Being now based on standardized data formats and procedures for model reconstruction, bna572+ is available as a COBRA-compliant Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) model and conforms to the Minimum Information Requested in the Annotation of Biochemical Models (MIRIAM) standards for annotation of external data resources. Bna572+ contains 966 genes, 671 reactions, and 666 metabolites distributed among 11 subcellular compartments. It is referenced to the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, with gene-protein-reaction (GPR) associations resolving subcellular localization. Detailed mass and charge balancing and confidence scoring were applied to all reactions. Using B. napus seed specific transcriptome data, expression was verified for 78% of bna572+ genes and 97% of reactions. Alongside bna572+ we also present a revised carbon centric model for 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C-MFA) with all its reactions being referenced to bna572+ based on linear projections. By integration of flux ratio constraints obtained from 13C-MFA and by elimination of infinite flux bounds around thermodynamically infeasible loops based on COBRA loopless methods, we demonstrate improvements in predictive power of Flux Variability Analysis (FVA). Using this combined approach we characterize the difference in metabolic flux of developing seeds of two B. napus genotypes contrasting in starch and oil content. PMID

  12. Integration of a constraint-based metabolic model of Brassica napus developing seeds with 13C-metabolic flux analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Hay, Jordan O.; Shi, Hai; Heinzel, Nicolas; ...

    2014-12-19

    The use of large-scale or genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for modeling and simulation of plant metabolism and integration of those models with large-scale omics and experimental flux data is becoming increasingly important in plant metabolic research. Here we report an updated version of bna572, a bottom-up reconstruction of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.; Brassicaceae) developing seeds with emphasis on representation of biomass-component biosynthesis. New features include additional seed-relevant pathways for isoprenoid, sterol, phenylpropanoid, flavonoid, and choline biosynthesis. Being now based on standardized data formats and procedures for model reconstruction, bna572+ is available as a COBRA-compliant Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) modelmore » and conforms to the Minimum Information Requested in the Annotation of Biochemical Models (MIRIAM) standards for annotation of external data resources. Bna572+ contains 966 genes, 671 reactions, and 666 metabolites distributed among 11 subcellular compartments. It is referenced to the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, with gene-protein-reaction (GPR) associations resolving subcellular localization. Detailed mass and charge balancing and confidence scoring were applied to all reactions. Using B. napus seed specific transcriptome data, expression was verified for 78% of bna572+ genes and 97% of reactions. Alongside bna572+ we also present a revised carbon centric model for 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C-MFA) with all its reactions being referenced to bna572+ based on linear projections. By integration of flux ratio constraints obtained from 13C-MFA and by elimination of infinite flux bounds around thermodynamically infeasible loops based on COBRA loopless methods, we demonstrate improvements in predictive power of Flux Variability Analysis (FVA). In conclusion, using this combined approach we characterize the difference in metabolic flux of developing seeds of two B. napus genotypes contrasting in starch

  13. Metabolic flux distribution analysis by 13C-tracer experiments using the Markov chain-Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Wongsa, S; Kadirkamanathan, V; Billings, S A; Wright, P C

    2005-12-01

    Metabolic flux analysis using 13C-tracer experiments is an important tool in metabolic engineering since intracellular fluxes are non-measurable quantities in vivo. Current metabolic flux analysis approaches are fully based on stoichiometric constraints and carbon atom balances, where the over-determined system is iteratively solved by a parameter estimation approach. However, the unavoidable measurement noises involved in the fractional enrichment data obtained by 13C-enrichment experiment and the possible existence of unknown pathways prevent a simple parameter estimation method for intracellular flux quantification. The MCMC (Markov chain-Monte Carlo) method, which obtains intracellular flux distributions through delicately constructed Markov chains, is shown to be an effective approach for deep understanding of the intracellular metabolic network. Its application is illustrated through the simulation of an example metabolic network.

  14. Central metabolic responses to the overproduction of fatty acids in Escherichia coli based on 13C-metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Lian; Xiao, Yi; Gebreselassie, Nikodimos; Zhang, Fuzhong; Antoniewiez, Maciek R; Tang, Yinjie J; Peng, Lifeng

    2014-03-01

    We engineered a fatty acid overproducing Escherichia coli strain through overexpressing tesA (“pull”) and fadR (“push”) and knocking out fadE (“block”). This “pull-push-block” strategy yielded 0.17 g of fatty acids (C12–C18) per gram of glucose (equivalent to 48% of the maximum theoretical yield) in batch cultures during the exponential growth phase under aerobic conditions. Metabolic fluxes were determined for the engineered E. coli and its control strain using tracer ([1,2-13C]glucose) experiments and 13C-metabolic flux analysis. Cofactor (NADPH) and energy (ATP) balances were also investigated for both strains based on estimated fluxes. Compared to the control strain, fatty acid overproduction led to significant metabolic responses in the central metabolism: (1) Acetic acid secretion flux decreased 10-fold; (2) Pentose phosphate pathway and Entner–Doudoroff pathway fluxes increased 1.5- and 2.0-fold, respectively; (3) Biomass synthesis flux was reduced 1.9-fold; (4) Anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylation flux decreased 1.7-fold; (5) Transhydrogenation flux converting NADH to NADPH increased by 1.7-fold. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the engineered strain increased the transcription levels of pntA (encoding the membrane-bound transhydrogenase) by 2.1-fold and udhA (encoding the soluble transhydrogenase) by 1.4-fold, which is in agreement with the increased transhydrogenation flux. Cofactor and energy balances analyses showed that the fatty acid overproducing E. coli consumed significantly higher cellular maintenance energy than the control strain. We discussed the strategies to future strain development and process improvements for fatty acid production in E. coli.

  15. Investigate the Metabolic Reprogramming of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Enhanced Resistance to Mixed Fermentation Inhibitors via 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weihua; Chen, Yingying; Wei, Na; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-01-01

    The fermentation inhibitors from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials, e.g., acetic acid and furfural, are notorious due to their negative effects on the cell growth and chemical production. However, the metabolic reprogramming of the cells under these stress conditions, especially metabolic response for resistance to mixed inhibitors, has not been systematically investigated and remains mysterious. Therefore, in this study, 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA), a powerful tool to elucidate the intracellular carbon flux distributions, has been applied to two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different tolerances to the inhibitors under acetic acid, furfural, and mixed (i.e., acetic acid and furfural) stress conditions to unravel the key metabolic responses. By analyzing the intracellular carbon fluxes as well as the energy and cofactor utilization under different conditions, we uncovered varied metabolic responses to different inhibitors. Under acetate stress, ATP and NADH production was slightly impaired, while NADPH tended towards overproduction. Under furfural stress, ATP and cofactors (including both NADH and NADPH) tended to be overproduced. However, under dual-stress condition, production of ATP and cofactors was severely impaired due to synergistic stress caused by the simultaneous addition of two fermentation inhibitors. Such phenomenon indicated the pivotal role of the energy and cofactor utilization in resisting the mixed inhibitors of acetic acid and furfural. Based on the discoveries, valuable insights are provided to improve the tolerance of S. cerevisiae strain and further enhance lignocellulosic fermentation. PMID:27532329

  16. IsoDesign: a software for optimizing the design of 13C-metabolic flux analysis experiments.

    PubMed

    Millard, Pierre; Sokol, Serguei; Letisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    The growing demand for (13) C-metabolic flux analysis ((13) C-MFA) in the field of metabolic engineering and systems biology is driving the need to rationalize expensive and time-consuming (13) C-labeling experiments. Experimental design is a key step in improving both the number of fluxes that can be calculated from a set of isotopic data and the precision of flux values. We present IsoDesign, a software that enables these parameters to be maximized by optimizing the isotopic composition of the label input. It can be applied to (13) C-MFA investigations using a broad panel of analytical tools (MS, MS/MS, (1) H NMR, (13) C NMR, etc.) individually or in combination. It includes a visualization module to intuitively select the optimal label input depending on the biological question to be addressed. Applications of IsoDesign are described, with an example of the entire (13) C-MFA workflow from the experimental design to the flux map including important practical considerations. IsoDesign makes the experimental design of (13) C-MFA experiments more accessible to a wider biological community. IsoDesign is distributed under an open source license at http://metasys.insa-toulouse.fr/software/isodes/

  17. (13)C metabolic flux analysis of the extremely thermophilic, fast growing, xylose-utilizing Geobacillus strain LC300.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Lauren T; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-01-01

    Thermophiles are increasingly used as versatile hosts in the biotechnology industry. One of the key advantages of thermophiles is the potential to achieve high rates of feedstock conversion at elevated temperatures. The recently isolated Geobacillus strain LC300 grows extremely fast on xylose, with a doubling time of less than 30 min. In the accompanying paper, the genome of Geobacillus LC300 was sequenced and annotated. In this work, we have experimentally validated the metabolic network model using parallel (13)C-labeling experiments and applied (13)C-metabolic flux analysis to quantify precise metabolic fluxes. Specifically, the complete set of singly labeled xylose tracers, [1-(13)C], [2-(13)C], [3-(13)C], [4-(13)C], and [5-(13)C]xylose, was used for the first time. Isotopic labeling of biomass amino acids was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Isotopic labeling of carbon dioxide in the off-gas was also measured by an on-line mass spectrometer. The (13)C-labeling data was then rigorously integrated for flux elucidation using the COMPLETE-MFA approach. The results provided important new insights into the metabolism of Geobacillus LC300, its efficient xylose utilization pathways, and the balance between carbon, redox and energy fluxes. The pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis and TCA cycle were found to be highly active in Geobacillus LC300. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway was also active and contributed significantly to NADPH production. No transhydrogenase activity was detected. Results from this work provide a solid foundation for future studies of this strain and its metabolic engineering and biotechnological applications.

  18. (13)C Metabolic Flux Analysis for Systematic Metabolic Engineering of S. cerevisiae for Overproduction of Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amit; Ando, David; Gin, Jennifer; Runguphan, Weerawat; Denby, Charles; Wang, George; Baidoo, Edward E K; Shymansky, Chris; Keasling, Jay D; García Martín, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Efficient redirection of microbial metabolism into the abundant production of desired bioproducts remains non-trivial. Here, we used flux-based modeling approaches to improve yields of fatty acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We combined (13)C labeling data with comprehensive genome-scale models to shed light onto microbial metabolism and improve metabolic engineering efforts. We concentrated on studying the balance of acetyl-CoA, a precursor metabolite for the biosynthesis of fatty acids. A genome-wide acetyl-CoA balance study showed ATP citrate lyase from Yarrowia lipolytica as a robust source of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA and malate synthase as a desirable target for downregulation in terms of acetyl-CoA consumption. These genetic modifications were applied to S. cerevisiae WRY2, a strain that is capable of producing 460 mg/L of free fatty acids. With the addition of ATP citrate lyase and downregulation of malate synthase, the engineered strain produced 26% more free fatty acids. Further increases in free fatty acid production of 33% were obtained by knocking out the cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which flux analysis had shown was competing for carbon flux upstream with the carbon flux through the acetyl-CoA production pathway in the cytoplasm. In total, the genetic interventions applied in this work increased fatty acid production by ~70%.

  19. 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis for Systematic Metabolic Engineering of S. cerevisiae for Overproduction of Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Amit; Ando, David; Gin, Jennifer; Runguphan, Weerawat; Denby, Charles; Wang, George; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Shymansky, Chris; Keasling, Jay D.; García Martín, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Efficient redirection of microbial metabolism into the abundant production of desired bioproducts remains non-trivial. Here, we used flux-based modeling approaches to improve yields of fatty acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We combined 13C labeling data with comprehensive genome-scale models to shed light onto microbial metabolism and improve metabolic engineering efforts. We concentrated on studying the balance of acetyl-CoA, a precursor metabolite for the biosynthesis of fatty acids. A genome-wide acetyl-CoA balance study showed ATP citrate lyase from Yarrowia lipolytica as a robust source of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA and malate synthase as a desirable target for downregulation in terms of acetyl-CoA consumption. These genetic modifications were applied to S. cerevisiae WRY2, a strain that is capable of producing 460 mg/L of free fatty acids. With the addition of ATP citrate lyase and downregulation of malate synthase, the engineered strain produced 26% more free fatty acids. Further increases in free fatty acid production of 33% were obtained by knocking out the cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which flux analysis had shown was competing for carbon flux upstream with the carbon flux through the acetyl-CoA production pathway in the cytoplasm. In total, the genetic interventions applied in this work increased fatty acid production by ~70%. PMID:27761435

  20. 13C labeling analysis of sugars by high resolution-mass spectrometry for metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Acket, Sébastien; Degournay, Anthony; Merlier, Franck; Thomasset, Brigitte

    2017-02-14

    Metabolic flux analysis is particularly complex in plant cells because of highly compartmented metabolism. Analysis of free sugars is interesting because it provides data to define fluxes around hexose, pentose, and triose phosphate pools in different compartment. In this work, we present a method to analyze the isotopomer distribution of free sugars labeled with carbon 13 using a liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry, without derivatized procedure, adapted for Metabolic flux analysis. Our results showed a good sensitivity, reproducibility and better accuracy to determine isotopic enrichments of free sugars compared to our previous methods [5, 6].

  1. 13 C-metabolic flux analysis in heterologous cellulase production by Bacillus subtilis genome-reduced strain.

    PubMed

    Toya, Yoshihiro; Hirasawa, Takashi; Morimoto, Takuya; Masuda, Kenta; Kageyama, Yasushi; Ozaki, Katsuya; Ogasawara, Naotake; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-06-10

    The great potential of Bacillus subtilis to produce biomaterials would be further enhanced by the development of strains with deletions of non-essential genomic regions. Here, using stationary (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA), we investigated the metabolism during cellulase production by the genome-reduced B. subtilis strain MGB874. We transformed MGB874 and wild-type strains with the heterologous cellulase gene, and cultured these on a synthetic medium containing glucose as carbon source. The addition of glutamate and the genome reduction enhanced cellulase production, which led us to use (13)C-MFA to assess the effects of glutamate addition and gene deletions on metabolism. We found that there was a significant increase in the flux in the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, whereas the fluxes of reactions from acetyl-CoA to α-ketoglutarate were repressed in the presence of glutamate. We hypothesize that the increase in the PP pathway flux was caused by the decrease of citrate synthase flux through the accumulation of glycolytic intermediates. Excess NADPH produced by the PP pathway may affect the increase in cellulase production. Furthermore, the fluxes on glycolysis and the acetate formation of the cellulase-producing wild-type strain were significantly larger than that of the cellulase-producing MGB874 strain when the strains were cultured with glucose and glutamate.

  2. Cutting the Gordian Knot: Identifiability of anaplerotic reactions in Corynebacterium glutamicum by means of (13) C-metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Kappelmann, Jannick; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Noack, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is the major workhorse for the microbial production of several amino and organic acids. As long as these derive from tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, the activity of anaplerotic reactions is pivotal for a high biosynthetic yield. To determine single anaplerotic activities (13) C-Metabolic Flux Analysis ((13) C-MFA) has been extensively used for C. glutamicum, however with different network topologies, inconsistent or poorly determined anaplerotic reaction rates. Therefore, in this study we set out to investigate whether a focused isotopomer model of the anaplerotic node can at all admit a unique solution for all fluxes. By analyzing different scenarios of active anaplerotic reactions, we show in full generality that for C. glutamicum only certain anaplerotic deletion mutants allow to uniquely determine the anaplerotic fluxes from (13) C-isotopomer data. We stress that the result of this analysis for different assumptions on active enzymes is directly transferable to other compartment-free organisms. Our results demonstrate that there exist biologically relevant metabolic network topologies for which the flux distribution cannot be inferred by classical (13) C-MFA.

  3. Genome-based metabolic mapping and 13C flux analysis reveal systematic properties of an oleaginous microalga Chlorella protothecoides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-02-01

    Integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and (13)C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass and corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary (13)C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. The result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Taken together, the metabolic network modeling assisted by experimental metabolomics and (13)C

  4. Genome-Based Metabolic Mapping and 13C Flux Analysis Reveal Systematic Properties of an Oleaginous Microalga Chlorella protothecoides

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; ...

    2014-12-15

    We report that integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and 13C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass andmore » corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. We found that the result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Lastly, taken together, the metabolic network modeling assisted

  5. Comprehensive analysis of glucose and xylose metabolism in Escherichia coli under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jacqueline E; Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2017-01-01

    Glucose and xylose are the two most abundant sugars derived from the breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass. While aerobic glucose metabolism is relatively well understood in E. coli, until now there have been only a handful of studies focused on anaerobic glucose metabolism and no (13)C-flux studies on xylose metabolism. In the absence of experimentally validated flux maps, constraint-based approaches such as MOMA and RELATCH cannot be used to guide new metabolic engineering designs. In this work, we have addressed this critical gap in current understanding by performing comprehensive characterizations of glucose and xylose metabolism under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, using recent state-of-the-art techniques in (13)C metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). Specifically, we quantified precise metabolic fluxes for each condition by performing parallel labeling experiments and analyzing the data through integrated (13)C-MFA using the optimal tracers [1,2-(13)C]glucose, [1,6-(13)C]glucose, [1,2-(13)C]xylose and [5-(13)C]xylose. We also quantified changes in biomass composition and confirmed turnover of macromolecules by applying [U-(13)C]glucose and [U-(13)C]xylose tracers. We demonstrated that under anaerobic growth conditions there is significant turnover of lipids and that a significant portion of CO2 originates from biomass turnover. Using knockout strains, we also demonstrated that β-oxidation is critical for anaerobic growth on xylose. Quantitative analysis of co-factor balances (NADH/FADH2, NADPH, and ATP) for different growth conditions provided new insights regarding the interplay of energy and redox metabolism and the impact on E. coli cell physiology.

  6. Evidence for transketolase-like TKTL1 flux in CHO cells based on parallel labeling experiments and (13)C-metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Woo Suk; Crown, Scott B; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-09-01

    The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is a fundamental component of cellular metabolism. It provides precursors for the biosynthesis of nucleotides and contributes to the production of reducing power in the form of NADPH. It has been hypothesized that mammalian cells may contain a hidden reaction in PPP catalyzed by transketolase-like protein 1 (TKTL1) that is closely related to the classical transketolase enzyme; however, until now there has been no direct experimental evidence for this reaction. In this work, we have applied state-of-the-art techniques in (13)C metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) based on parallel labeling experiments and integrated flux fitting to estimate the TKTL1 flux in CHO cells. We identified a set of three parallel labeling experiments with [1-(13)C]glucose+[4,5,6-(13)C]glucose, [2-(13)C]glucose+[4,5,6-(13)C]glucose, and [3-(13)C]glucose+[4,5,6-(13)C]glucose and developed a new method to measure (13)C-labeling of fructose 6-phosphate by GC-MS that allows intuitive interpretation of mass isotopomer distributions to determine key fluxes in the model, including glycolysis, oxidative PPP, non-oxidative PPP, and the TKTL1 flux. Using these tracers we detected a significant TKTL1 flux in CHO cells at the stationary phase. The flux results suggest that the main function of oxidative PPP in CHO cells at the stationary phase is to fuel the TKTL1 reaction. Overall, this study demonstrates for the first time that carbon atoms can be lost in the PPP, by means other than the oxidative PPP, and that this loss of carbon atoms is consistent with the hypothesized TKTL1 reaction in mammalian cells.

  7. (13)C Metabolic Flux Analysis of acetate conversion to lipids by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nian; Qiao, Kangjian; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-11-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are an inexpensive and renewable carbon source that can be generated from gas fermentation and anaerobic digestion of fermentable wastes. The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is a promising biocatalyst that can utilize VFAs and convert them into triacylglycerides (TAGs). However, currently there is limited knowledge on the metabolism of Y. lipolytica when cultured on VFAs. To develop a better understanding, we used acetate as the sole carbon source to culture two strains, a control strain and a previously engineered strain for lipid overaccumulation. For both strains, metabolism during the growth phase and lipid production phase were investigated by metabolic flux analysis using two parallel sodium acetate tracers. The resolved flux distributions demonstrate that the glyoxylate shunt pathway is constantly active and the flux through gluconeogenesis varies depending on strain and phase. In particular, by regulating the activities of malate transport and pyruvate kinase, the cells divert only a portion of the glyoxylate shunt flux required to satisfy the needs for anaplerotic reactions and NADPH production through gluconeogenesis and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Excess flux flows back to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle for energy production. As with the case of glucose as the substrate, the primary source for lipogenic NADPH is derived from the oxidative PPP.

  8. 13C metabolic flux analysis in Clostridium acetobutylicum during growth on L-arabinose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Margaret; Sund, Christian; Liu, Sanchao; Germane, Katherine; Servinsky, Matthew; Gerlach, Elliot

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum's metabolic pathways have been studied for decades due to its metabolic diversity and industrial value, yet many details of its metabolism are continuing to emerge. To elucidate the role of xylulose-5-P/fructose-6-P phosphoketolase (XFP), and the recently discovered Pentose Phosphate Pathway (PKP) in C. acetobutylicum, experimental and computational metabolic isotope analysis was performed under growth on glucose, xylose, and arabinose. Results indicate that PKP utilization increased with increasing xylose concentration and this trend was further pronounced during growth on arabinose. This was confirmed by mutation of the gene encoding XFP, which almost completely abolished flux through the PKP during growth on arabinose and resulted in decreased acetate:butyrate ratios. We discuss these experimental and computational results here, and the implications for our understanding of sugar metabolism in C. acetobutylicum.

  9. Isotopically nonstationary 13C flux analysis of changes in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf metabolism due to high light acclimation

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Fangfang; Jazmin, Lara J.; Young, Jamey D.; ...

    2014-11-03

    Improving plant productivity is an important aim for metabolic engineering. There are few comprehensive methods that quantitatively describe leaf metabolism, although such information would be valuable for increasing photosynthetic capacity, enhancing biomass production, and rerouting carbon flux toward desirable end products. Isotopically nonstationary metabolic flux analysis (INST-MFA) has been previously applied to map carbon fluxes in photoautotrophic bacteria, which involves model-based regression of transient 13C-labeling patterns of intracellular metabolites. However, experimental and computational difficulties have hindered its application to terrestrial plant systems. Here, we performed in vivo isotopic labeling of Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes with 13CO2 and estimated fluxes throughout leafmore » photosynthetic metabolism by INST-MFA. Plants grown at 200 µmol m$-$2s$-$1 light were compared with plants acclimated for 9 d at an irradiance of 500 µmol∙m$-$2∙s$-$1. Approximately 1,400 independent mass isotopomer measurements obtained from analysis of 37 metabolite fragment ions were regressed to estimate 136 total fluxes (54 free fluxes) under each condition. The results provide a comprehensive description of changes in carbon partitioning and overall photosynthetic flux after long-term developmental acclimation of leaves to high light. Despite a doubling in the carboxylation rate, the photorespiratory flux increased from 17 to 28% of net CO2 assimilation with high-light acclimation (Vc/Vo: 3.5:1 vs. 2.3:1, respectively). In conclusion, this study highlights the potential of 13C INST-MFA to describe emergent flux phenotypes that respond to environmental conditions or plant physiology and cannot be obtained by other complementary approaches.« less

  10. Effective Estimation of Dynamic Metabolic Fluxes Using 13C Labeling and Piecewise Affine Approximation: From Theory to Practical Applicability

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Robin; Wahl, S. Aljoscha

    2015-01-01

    The design of microbial production processes relies on rational choices for metabolic engineering of the production host and the process conditions. These require a systematic and quantitative understanding of cellular regulation. Therefore, a novel method for dynamic flux identification using quantitative metabolomics and 13C labeling to identify piecewise-affine (PWA) flux functions has been described recently. Obtaining flux estimates nevertheless still required frequent manual reinitalization to obtain a good reproduction of the experimental data and, moreover, did not optimize on all observables simultaneously (metabolites and isotopomer concentrations). In our contribution we focus on measures to achieve faster and robust dynamic flux estimation which leads to a high dimensional parameter estimation problem. Specifically, we address the following challenges within the PWA problem formulation: (1) Fast selection of sufficient domains for the PWA flux functions, (2) Control of over-fitting in the concentration space using shape-prescriptive modeling and (3) robust and efficient implementation of the parameter estimation using the hybrid implicit filtering algorithm. With the improvements we significantly speed up the convergence by efficiently exploiting that the optimization problem is partly linear. This allows application to larger-scale metabolic networks and demonstrates that the proposed approach is not purely theoretical, but also applicable in practice. PMID:26690237

  11. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in the Fe(III)-reducing organism Geobacter metallireducens via 13C isotopiclabeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Martin, Hector Garcia; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-08-13

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The model indicated that over 90 percent of the acetate wascompletely oxidized to CO2 via a complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cyclewhile reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxykinase were present under these conditions, but enzymes in theglyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme were absent. Gluconeogenesis and thepentose phosphate pathway were mainly employed for biosynthesis andaccounted for less than 3 percent of total carbon consumption. The modelalso indicated surprisingly high reversibility in the reaction betweenoxoglutarate and succinate. This step operates close to the thermodynamicequilibrium possibly because succinate is synthesized via a transferasereaction, and its product, acetyl-CoA, inhibits the conversion ofoxoglutarate to succinate. These findings enable a better understandingof the relationship between genome annotation and extant metabolicpathways in G. metallireducens.

  12. Overcoming the metabolic burden of protein secretion in Schizosaccharomyces pombe--a quantitative approach using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tobias; Lange, Sabrina; Wilhelm, Nadine; Bureik, Matthias; Yang, Tae-Hoon; Heinzle, Elmar; Schneider, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Protein secretion in yeast is generally associated with a burden to cellular metabolism. To investigate this metabolic burden in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we constructed a set of strains secreting the model protein maltase in different amounts. We quantified the influence of protein secretion on the metabolism applying (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in chemostat cultures. Analysis of the macromolecular biomass composition revealed an increase in cellular lipid content at elevated levels of protein secretion and we observed altered metabolic fluxes in the pentose phosphate pathway, the TCA cycle, and around the pyruvate node including mitochondrial NADPH supply. Supplementing acetate to glucose or glycerol minimal media was found to improve protein secretion, accompanied by an increased cellular lipid content and carbon flux through the TCA cycle as well as increased mitochondrial NADPH production. Thus, systematic metabolic analyses can assist in identifying factors limiting protein secretion and in deriving strategies to overcome these limitations.

  13. Comparative 13C metabolic flux analysis of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient, L-valine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Tobias; Blombach, Bastian; Lang, Siegmund; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Oldiges, Marco; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    L-Valine can be formed successfully using C. glutamicum strains missing an active pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC). Wild-type C. glutamicum and four PDHC-deficient strains were compared by (13)C metabolic flux analysis, especially focusing on the split ratio between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Compared to the wild type, showing a carbon flux of 69% ± 14% through the PPP, a strong increase in the PPP flux was observed in PDHC-deficient strains with a maximum of 113% ± 22%. The shift in the split ratio can be explained by an increased demand of NADPH for l-valine formation. In accordance, the introduction of the Escherichia coli transhydrogenase PntAB, catalyzing the reversible conversion of NADH to NADPH, into an L-valine-producing C. glutamicum strain caused the PPP flux to decrease to 57% ± 6%, which is below the wild-type split ratio. Hence, transhydrogenase activity offers an alternative perspective for sufficient NADPH supply, which is relevant for most amino acid production systems. Moreover, as demonstrated for L-valine, this bypass leads to a significant increase of product yield due to a concurrent reduction in carbon dioxide formation via the PPP.

  14. 13C metabolic flux analysis shows that resistin impairs the metabolic response to insulin in L6E9 myotubes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that the adipokine resistin links obesity and insulin resistance, although how resistin acts on muscle metabolism is controversial. We aimed to quantitatively analyse the effects of resistin on the glucose metabolic flux profile and on insulin response in L6E9 myotubes at the metabolic level using a tracer-based metabolomic approach and our in-house developed software, Isodyn. Results Resistin significantly increased glucose uptake and glycolysis, altering pyruvate utilisation by the cell. In the presence of resistin, insulin only slightly increased glucose uptake and glycolysis, and did not alter the flux profile around pyruvate induced by resistin. Resistin prevented the increase in gene expression in pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1 and the sharp decrease in gene expression in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-1 induced by insulin. Conclusions These data suggest that resistin impairs the metabolic activation of insulin. This impairment cannot be explained by the activity of a single enzyme, but instead due to reorganisation of the whole metabolic flux distribution. PMID:25217974

  15. Measuring and modeling C flux rates through the central metabolic pathways in microbial communities using position-specific 13C-labeled tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, P.; van Groenigen, K.; Hagerty, S.; Salpas, E.; Fairbanks, D. E.; Hungate, B. A.; KOCH, G. W.; Schwartz, E.

    2012-12-01

    The production of energy and metabolic precursors occurs in well-known processes such as glycolysis and Krebs cycle. We use position-specific 13C-labeled metabolic tracers, combined with models of microbial metabolic organization, to analyze the response of microbial community energy production, biosynthesis, and C use efficiency (CUE) in soils, decomposing litter, and aquatic communities. The method consists of adding position-specific 13C -labeled metabolic tracers to parallel soil incubations, in this case 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose. The measurement of CO2 released from the labeled tracers is used to calculate the C flux rates through the various metabolic pathways. A simplified metabolic model consisting of 23 reactions is solved using results of the metabolic tracer experiments and assumptions of microbial precursor demand. This new method enables direct estimation of fundamental aspects of microbial energy production, CUE, and soil organic matter formation in relatively undisturbed microbial communities. We will present results showing the range of metabolic patterns observed in these communities and discuss results from testing metabolic models.

  16. Computational analysis of storage synthesis in developing Brassica napus L. (oilseed rape) embryos: Flux variability analysis in relation to 13C-metabolic flux analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, J.; Schwender, J.

    2011-08-01

    Plant oils are an important renewable resource, and seed oil content is a key agronomical trait that is in part controlled by the metabolic processes within developing seeds. A large-scale model of cellular metabolism in developing embryos of Brassica napus (bna572) was used to predict biomass formation and to analyze metabolic steady states by flux variability analysis under different physiological conditions. Predicted flux patterns are highly correlated with results from prior 13C metabolic flux analysis of B. napus developing embryos. Minor differences from the experimental results arose because bna572 always selected only one sugar and one nitrogen source from the available alternatives, and failed to predict the use of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Flux variability, indicative of alternative optimal solutions, revealed alternative pathways that can provide pyruvate and NADPH to plastidic fatty acid synthesis. The nutritional values of different medium substrates were compared based on the overall carbon conversion efficiency (CCE) for the biosynthesis of biomass. Although bna572 has a functional nitrogen assimilation pathway via glutamate synthase, the simulations predict an unexpected role of glycine decarboxylase operating in the direction of NH4+ assimilation. Analysis of the light-dependent improvement of carbon economy predicted two metabolic phases. At very low light levels small reductions in CO2 efflux can be attributed to enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase) and glycine decarboxylase. At higher light levels relevant to the 13C flux studies, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity is predicted to account fully for the light-dependent changes in carbon balance.

  17. Synergy between 13C-metabolic flux analysis and flux balance analysis for understanding metabolic adaption to anaerobiosis in e. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-based Flux Balance Analysis (FBA, constraints based flux analysis) and steady state isotopic-labeling-based Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA) are complimentary approaches to predicting and measuring the operation and regulation of metabolic networks. Here a genome-derived model of E. coli metabol...

  18. Simultaneous investigation of cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, Krebs cycle metabolism and pH, using hyperpolarized [1,2-(13)C2]pyruvate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Albert P; Hurd, Ralph E; Schroeder, Marie A; Lau, Angus Z; Gu, Yi-ping; Lam, Wilfred W; Barry, Jennifer; Tropp, James; Cunningham, Charles H

    2012-02-01

    (13)C MR spectroscopy studies performed on hearts ex vivo and in vivo following perfusion of prepolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate have shown that changes in pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) flux may be monitored non-invasively. However, to allow investigation of Krebs cycle metabolism, the (13)C label must be placed on the C2 position of pyruvate. Thus, the utilization of either C1 or C2 labeled prepolarized pyruvate as a tracer can only afford a partial view of cardiac pyruvate metabolism in health and disease. If the prepolarized pyruvate molecules were labeled at both C1 and C2 positions, then it would be possible to observe the downstream metabolites that were the results of both PDH flux ((13)CO(2) and H(13)CO(3)(-)) and Krebs cycle flux ([5-(13)C]glutamate) with a single dose of the agent. Cardiac pH could also be monitored in the same experiment, but adequate SNR of the (13)CO(2) resonance may be difficult to obtain in vivo. Using an interleaved selective RF pulse acquisition scheme to improve (13)CO(2) detection, the feasibility of using dual-labeled hyperpolarized [1,2-(13)C(2)]pyruvate as a substrate for dynamic cardiac metabolic MRS studies to allow simultaneous investigation of PDH flux, Krebs cycle flux and pH, was demonstrated in vivo.

  19. Impacts of high β-galactosidase expression on central metabolism of recombinant Pichia pastoris GS115 using glucose as sole carbon source via (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yongsheng; Huang, Mingzhi; Lu, Junjie; Qian, Jiangchao; Lin, Weilu; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2014-10-10

    The yeast Pichia pastoris GS115 is a widely used microbial cell factory for the production of heterologous protein. In order to reveal the impacts of high heterologous protein expression on the central metabolism of Pichia pastoris GS115 using glucose as sole carbon source, we engineered a high β-galactosidase expression strain P. pastoris G1HL and a low expression control strain P. pastoris GHL through controlling the initiation strength of constitutive promoter pGAP. The carbon flux distributions in these two strains were quantified via (13)C metabolic flux analysis. Compared to the control strain, G1HL showed a lower growth rate, a higher flux through glycolysis pathway, a higher flux through pentose phosphate pathway, and a lower flux through by-products secretion pathway. The metabolic flux redistribution in G1HL was thought to compensate the increased redox cofactors and energy demands caused by the high protein expression. Although the fluxes through Krebs cycle in two engineered strains were almost the same, they were significantly lower than those in wild strain. The enhanced expression of β-galactosidase by glutamate supplementation demonstrated the potential of P. pastoris GS115 to catabolize more carbon through the Krebs cycle for even higher protein expression. In conclusion, our work indicates that P. pastoris GS115 can readjusts the central metabolism for higher heterologous protein expression and provides strategies for strain development or process optimization for enhancing production of heterologous protein.

  20. Non-stationary 13C metabolic flux analysis of Chinese hamster ovary cells in batch culture using extracellular labeling highlights metabolic reversibility and compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mapping the intracellular fluxes for established mammalian cell lines becomes increasingly important for scientific and economic reasons. However, this is being hampered by the high complexity of metabolic networks, particularly concerning compartmentation. Results Intracellular fluxes of the CHO-K1 cell line central carbon metabolism were successfully determined for a complex network using non-stationary 13C metabolic flux analysis. Mass isotopomers of extracellular metabolites were determined using [U-13C6] glucose as labeled substrate. Metabolic compartmentation and extracellular transport reversibility proved essential to successfully reproduce the dynamics of the labeling patterns. Alanine and pyruvate reversibility changed dynamically even if their net production fluxes remained constant. Cataplerotic fluxes of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and mitochondrial malic enzyme and pyruvate carboxylase were successfully determined. Glycolytic pyruvate channeling to lactate was modeled by including a separate pyruvate pool. In the exponential growth phase, alanine, glycine and glutamate were excreted, and glutamine, aspartate, asparagine and serine were taken up; however, all these amino acids except asparagine were exchanged reversibly with the media. High fluxes were determined in the pentose phosphate pathway and the TCA cycle. The latter was fueled mainly by glucose but also by amino acid catabolism. Conclusions The CHO-K1 central metabolism in controlled batch culture proves to be robust. It has the main purpose to ensure fast growth on a mixture of substrates and also to mitigate oxidative stress. It achieves this by using compartmentation to control NADPH and NADH availability and by simultaneous synthesis and catabolism of amino acids. PMID:24773761

  1. Exo-MFA - A 13C metabolic flux analysis framework to dissect tumor microenvironment-secreted exosome contributions towards cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Achreja, Abhinav; Zhao, Hongyun; Yang, Lifeng; Yun, Tae Hyun; Marini, Juan; Nagrath, Deepak

    2017-01-11

    Dissecting the pleiotropic roles of tumor micro-environment (TME) on cancer progression has been brought to the foreground of research on cancer pathology. Extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, transport proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, to mediate intercellular communication between TME components and have emerged as candidates for anti-cancer therapy. We previously reported that cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) derived exosomes (CDEs) contain metabolites in their cargo that are utilized by cancer cells for central carbon metabolism and promote cancer growth. However, the metabolic fluxes involved in donor cells towards packaging of metabolites in extracellular vesicles and exosome-mediated metabolite flux upregulation in recipient cells are still not known. Here, we have developed a novel empirical and computational technique, exosome-mediated metabolic flux analysis (Exo-MFA) to quantify flow of cargo from source cells to recipient cells via vesicular transport. Our algorithm, which is based on (13)C metabolic flux analysis, successfully predicts packaging fluxes to metabolite cargo in CAFs, dynamic changes in rate of exosome internalization by cancer cells, and flux of cargo release over time. We find that cancer cells internalize exosomes rapidly leading to depletion of extracellular exosomes within 24h. However, metabolite cargo significantly alters intracellular metabolism over the course of 24h by regulating glycolysis pathway fluxes via lactate supply. Furthermore, it can supply up to 35% of the TCA cycle fluxes by providing TCA intermediates and glutamine. Our algorithm will help gain insight into (i) metabolic interactions in multicellular systems (ii) biogenesis of extracellular vesicles and their differential packaging of cargo under changing environments, and (iii) regulation of cancer cell metabolism by its microenvironment.

  2. Genome-Based Metabolic Mapping and 13C Flux Analysis Reveal Systematic Properties of an Oleaginous Microalga Chlorella protothecoides1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    Integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and 13C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass and corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. The result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Taken together, the metabolic network modeling assisted by experimental metabolomics and 13C labeling

  3. 13C-Tracer and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses Reveal Metabolic Flux Distribution in the Oleaginous Microalga Chlorella protothecoides1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Liu, Lixia; Wu, Chao; Yang, Chen; Wu, Qingyu

    2010-01-01

    The green alga Chlorella protothecoides has received considerable attention because it accumulates neutral triacylglycerols, commonly regarded as an ideal feedstock for biodiesel production. In order to gain a better understanding of its metabolism, tracer experiments with [U-13C]/[1-13C]glucose were performed with heterotrophic growth of C. protothecoides for identifying the metabolic network topology and estimating intracellular fluxes. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis tracked the labeling patterns of protein-bound amino acids, revealing a metabolic network consisting of the glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with inactive glyoxylate shunt. Evidence of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and malic enzyme activity was also obtained. It was demonstrated that the relative activity of the pentose phosphate pathway to glycolysis under nitrogen-limited environment increased, reflecting excess NADPH requirements for lipid biosynthesis. Although the growth rate and cellular oil content were significantly altered in response to nitrogen limitation, global flux distribution of C. protothecoides remained stable, exhibiting the rigidity of central carbon metabolism. In conclusion, quantitative knowledge on the metabolic flux distribution of oleaginous alga obtained in this study may be of value in designing strategies for metabolic engineering of desirable bioproducts. PMID:20720172

  4. (13)C metabolic flux analysis in neurons utilizing a model that accounts for hexose phosphate recycling within the pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Gebril, Hoda M; Avula, Bharathi; Wang, Yan-Hong; Khan, Ikhlas A; Jekabsons, Mika B

    2016-02-01

    Glycolysis, mitochondrial substrate oxidation, and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) are critical for neuronal bioenergetics and oxidation-reduction homeostasis, but quantitating their fluxes remains challenging, especially when processes such as hexose phosphate (i.e., glucose/fructose-6-phosphate) recycling in the PPP are considered. A hexose phosphate recycling model was developed which exploited the rates of glucose consumption, lactate production, and mitochondrial respiration to infer fluxes through the major glucose consuming pathways of adherent cerebellar granule neurons by replicating [(13)C]lactate labeling from metabolism of [1,2-(13)C2]glucose. Flux calculations were predicated on a steady-state system with reactions having known stoichiometries and carbon atom transitions. Non-oxidative PPP activity and consequent hexose phosphate recycling, as well as pyruvate production by cytoplasmic malic enzyme, were optimized by the model and found to account for 28 ± 2% and 7.7 ± 0.2% of hexose phosphate and pyruvate labeling, respectively. From the resulting fluxes, 52 ± 6% of glucose was metabolized by glycolysis, compared to 19 ± 2% by the combined oxidative/non-oxidative pentose cycle that allows for hexose phosphate recycling, and 29 ± 8% by the combined oxidative PPP/de novo nucleotide synthesis reactions. By extension, 62 ± 6% of glucose was converted to pyruvate, the metabolism of which resulted in 16 ± 1% of glucose oxidized by mitochondria and 46 ± 6% exported as lactate. The results indicate a surprisingly high proportion of glucose utilized by the pentose cycle and the reactions synthesizing nucleotides, and exported as lactate. While the in vitro conditions to which the neurons were exposed (high glucose, no lactate or other exogenous substrates) limit extrapolating these results to the in vivo state, the approach provides a means of assessing a number of metabolic fluxes within the context of hexose phosphate recycling in the PPP from a

  5. Metabolomic and (13)C-metabolic flux analysis of a xylose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing xylose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Wasylenko, Thomas M; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2015-03-01

    Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in the engineering of xylose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for production of lignocellulosic biofuels. However, the ethanol productivities achieved on xylose are still significantly lower than those observed on glucose for reasons that are not well understood. We have undertaken an analysis of central carbon metabolite pool sizes and metabolic fluxes on glucose and on xylose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in a strain capable of rapid xylose assimilation via xylose isomerase in order to investigate factors that may limit the rate of xylose fermentation. We find that during xylose utilization the flux through the non-oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway (PPP) is high but the flux through the oxidative PPP is low, highlighting an advantage of the strain employed in this study. Furthermore, xylose fails to elicit the full carbon catabolite repression response that is characteristic of glucose fermentation in S. cerevisiae. We present indirect evidence that the incomplete activation of the fermentation program on xylose results in a bottleneck in lower glycolysis, leading to inefficient re-oxidation of NADH produced in glycolysis.

  6. Metabolic flux analysis of Arthrobacter sp. CGMCC 3584 for cAMP production based on 13C tracer experiments and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huanqing; Chen, Yong; Yao, Shiwei; Liu, Lixia; Yang, Chen; Li, Bingbing; Liu, Dong; Xie, Jingjing; Chen, Xiaochun; Wu, Jinglan; Ying, Hanjie

    2013-12-01

    Arthrobacter sp. CGMCC 3584 are able to produce cAMP from glucose by the purine synthesis pathway via de novo or salvage biosynthesis. In order to gain an improved understanding of its metabolism, (13)C-labeling experiment and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis were employed to determine the metabolic network structure and estimate the intracellular fluxes. GC-MS analysis helps to reflect the activity of the intracellular pathways and reactions. The metabolic network mainly contains glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the inactive glyoxylate shunt. Hypoxanthine as a precursor of cAMP and sodium fluoride as an inhibitor of glycolysis were found to increase the cAMP production, as well as the flux through the PP pathway. The effects of adding hypoxanthine and sodium fluoride are discussed based on the enzyme assays and metabolic flux analysis. In conclusion, our results provide quantitative insights into how cells manipulate the metabolic network under different culture conditions and this may be of value in metabolic regulation for desirable production.

  7. 13C-metabolic flux ratio and novel carbon path analyses confirmed that Trichoderma reesei uses primarily the respirative pathway also on the preferred carbon source glucose

    PubMed Central

    Jouhten, Paula; Pitkänen, Esa; Pakula, Tiina; Saloheimo, Markku; Penttilä, Merja; Maaheimo, Hannu

    2009-01-01

    Background The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is an important host organism for industrial enzyme production. It is adapted to nutrient poor environments where it is capable of producing large amounts of hydrolytic enzymes. In its natural environment T. reesei is expected to benefit from high energy yield from utilization of respirative metabolic pathway. However, T. reesei lacks metabolic pathway reconstructions and the utilization of the respirative pathway has not been investigated on the level of in vivo fluxes. Results The biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei supported by genome-level evidence were reconstructed with computational carbon path analysis. The pathway reconstructions were a prerequisite for analysis of in vivo fluxes. The distribution of in vivo fluxes in both wild type strain and cre1, a key regulator of carbon catabolite repression, deletion strain were quantitatively studied by performing 13C-labeling on both repressive carbon source glucose and non-repressive carbon source sorbitol. In addition, the 13C-labeling on sorbitol was performed both in the presence and absence of sophorose that induces the expression of cellulase genes. Carbon path analyses and the 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids indicated high similarity between biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, however, mitochondrial rather than cytosolic biosynthesis of Asp was observed under all studied conditions. The relative anaplerotic flux to the TCA cycle was low and thus characteristic to respiratory metabolism in both strains and independent of the carbon source. Only minor differences were observed in the flux distributions of the wild type and cre1 deletion strain. Furthermore, the induction of the hydrolytic gene expression did not show altered flux distributions and did not affect the relative amino acid requirements or relative anabolic and respirative activities

  8. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Lipid Biosynthesis in the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Using 13C-Labled Glucose and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaiyuan; Wu, Chao; Wu, Qingyu; Dai, Junbiao; Song, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has considerable potential for producing single cell oil, which can be converted to biodiesel, a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels. However, extensive fundamental and engineering efforts must be carried out before commercialized production become cost-effective. Therefore, in this study, metabolic flux analysis of Y. lipolytica was performed using 13C-labeled glucose as a sole carbon source in nitrogen sufficient and insufficient media. The nitrogen limited medium inhibited cell growth while promoting lipid accumulation (from 8.7% of their biomass to 14.3%). Metabolic flux analysis showed that flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was not significantly regulated by nitrogen concentration, suggesting that NADPH generation is not the limiting factor for lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica. Furthermore, metabolic flux through malic enzyme was undetectable, confirming its non-regulatory role in lipid accumulation in this yeast. Nitrogen limitation significantly increased flux through ATP:citrate lyase (ACL), implying that ACL plays a key role in providing acetyl-CoA for lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica.

  9. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Lipid Biosynthesis in the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Using 13C-Labled Glucose and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huaiyuan; Wu, Chao; Wu, Qingyu; Dai, Junbiao; Song, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has considerable potential for producing single cell oil, which can be converted to biodiesel, a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels. However, extensive fundamental and engineering efforts must be carried out before commercialized production become cost-effective. Therefore, in this study, metabolic flux analysis of Y. lipolytica was performed using 13C-labeled glucose as a sole carbon source in nitrogen sufficient and insufficient media. The nitrogen limited medium inhibited cell growth while promoting lipid accumulation (from 8.7% of their biomass to 14.3%). Metabolic flux analysis showed that flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was not significantly regulated by nitrogen concentration, suggesting that NADPH generation is not the limiting factor for lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica. Furthermore, metabolic flux through malic enzyme was undetectable, confirming its non-regulatory role in lipid accumulation in this yeast. Nitrogen limitation significantly increased flux through ATP:citrate lyase (ACL), implying that ACL plays a key role in providing acetyl-CoA for lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica. PMID:27454589

  10. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cardiac metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seeholzer, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques for following the metabolic fate of compounds specifically labeled with /sup 13/C. The goals of the present study are: (1) to develop reliable quantitative procedures for measuring the /sup 13/C enrichment of specific carbon sites in compounds enriched by the metabolism of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates in rat heart, and (2) to use these quantitative measurements of fractional /sup 13/C enrichment within the context of a mathematical flux model describing the carbon flow through the TCA cycle and ancillary pathways, as a means for obtaining unknown flux parameters. Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with various combinations of glucose, acetate, pyruvate, and propionate to achieve steady state flux conditions, followed by perfusion with the same substrates labeled with /sup 13/C in specific carbon sites. The hearts were frozen at different times after addition of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates and neutralized perchloric acid extracts were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The fractional /sup 13/C enrichment (F.E.) of individual carbon sites in different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for saturation and nuclear Overhauser effects. These F.E. measurements by /sup 13/C NMR were validated by the analysis of /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H scalar coupling patterns observed in /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the extracted metabolites. The results obtained from perfusion of hearts glucose plus either (2-/sup 13/C) acetate or (3-/sup 13/C) pyruvate are similar to those obtained by previous investigators using /sup 14/C-labeled substrates.

  11. Isotopically nonstationary 13C flux analysis of changes in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf metabolism due to high light acclimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving plant productivity is an important aim for metabolic engineering. There are few comprehensive methods that quantitatively describe the primary metabolism of leaves, though such information would be valuable for improving photosynthetic capacity, increasing biomass production, and rerouting...

  12. GC-MS/MS survey of collision-induced dissociation of tert-butyldimethylsilyl-derivatized amino acids and its application to (13)C-metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli central metabolism.

    PubMed

    Okahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawana, Shuichi; Iida, Junko; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    Stable isotope labeling experiments using mass spectrometry have been employed to investigate carbon flow levels (metabolic flux) in mammalian, plant, and microbial cells. To achieve a more precise (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA), novel fragmentations of tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS)-amino acids were investigated by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The product ion scan analyses of 15 TBDMS-amino acids revealed 24 novel fragment ions. The amino acid-derived carbons included in the five fragment ions were identified by the analyses of (13)C-labeled authentic standards. The identification of the fragment ion at m/z 170 indicated that the isotopic abundance of S-methyl carbon in methionine could be determined from the cleavage of C5 in the precursor of [M-159](+) (m/z 218). It was also confirmed that the precision of (13)C-MFA in Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism could be improved by introducing (13)C-labeling data derived from novel fragmentations. Graphical Abstract Novel collision-induced dissociation fragmentations of tert-butyldimethylsilyl amino acids were investigated and identified by GC-MS/MS.

  13. Mass spectrometry-based microassay of 2H and 13C plasma glucose labeling to quantify liver metabolic fluxes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hasenour, Clinton M.; Wall, Martha L.; Ridley, D. Emerson; Hughey, Curtis C.; James, Freyja D.; Wasserman, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models designed to examine hepatic metabolism are critical to diabetes and obesity research. Thus, a microscale method to quantitatively assess hepatic glucose and intermediary metabolism in conscious, unrestrained mice was developed. [13C3]propionate, [2H2]water, and [6,6-2H2]glucose isotopes were delivered intravenously in short- (9 h) and long-term-fasted (19 h) C57BL/6J mice. GC-MS and mass isotopomer distribution (MID) analysis were performed on three 40-μl arterial plasma glucose samples obtained during the euglycemic isotopic steady state. Model-based regression of hepatic glucose and citric acid cycle (CAC)-related fluxes was performed using a comprehensive isotopomer model to track carbon and hydrogen atom transitions through the network and thereby simulate the MIDs of measured fragment ions. Glucose-6-phosphate production from glycogen diminished, and endogenous glucose production was exclusively gluconeogenic with prolonged fasting. Gluconeogenic flux from phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) remained stable, whereas that from glycerol modestly increased from short- to long-term fasting. CAC flux [i.e., citrate synthase (VCS)] was reduced with long-term fasting. Interestingly, anaplerosis and cataplerosis increased with fast duration; accordingly, pyruvate carboxylation and the conversion of oxaloacetate to PEP were severalfold higher than VCS in long-term fasted mice. This method utilizes state-of-the-art in vivo methodology and comprehensive isotopomer modeling to quantify hepatic glucose and intermediary fluxes during physiological stress in mice. The small plasma requirements permit serial sampling without stress and the affirmation of steady-state glucose kinetics. Furthermore, the approach can accommodate a broad range of modeling assumptions, isotope tracers, and measurement inputs without the need to introduce ad hoc mathematical approximations. PMID:25991647

  14. Physiological characterization of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the Aspergillus nidulans phosphoketolase pathway: validation of activity through 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Papini, Marta; Nookaew, Intawat; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Several bacterial species and filamentous fungi utilize the phosphoketolase pathway (PHK) for glucose dissimilation as an alternative to the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. In Aspergillus nidulans, the utilization of this metabolic pathway leads to increased carbon flow towards acetate and acetyl CoA. In the first step of the PHK, the pentose phosphate pathway intermediate xylulose-5-phosphate is converted into acetylphosphate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate through the action of xylulose-5-phosphate phosphoketolase, and successively acetylphosphate is converted into acetate by the action of acetate kinase. In the present work, we describe a metabolic engineering strategy used to express the fungal genes of the phosphoketolase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the effects of the expression of this recombinant route in yeast. The phenotype of the engineered yeast strain MP003 was studied during batch and chemostat cultivations, showing a reduced biomass yield and an increased acetate yield during batch cultures. To establish whether the observed effects in the recombinant strain MP003 were due directly or indirectly to the expression of the phosphoketolase pathway, we resolved the intracellular flux distribution based on (13)C labeling during chemostat cultivations. From flux analysis it is possible to conclude that yeast is able to use the recombinant pathway. Our work indicates that the utilization of the phosphoketolase pathway does not interfere with glucose assimilation through the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway and that the expression of this route can contribute to increase the acetyl CoA supply, therefore holding potential for future metabolic engineering strategies having acetyl CoA as precursor for the biosynthesis of industrially relevant compounds.

  15. Flux response of glycolysis and storage metabolism during rapid feast/famine conditions in Penicillium chrysogenum using dynamic (13)C labeling.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Lodewijk; Buijs, Nicolaas A A; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M; Abate, Alessandro; Wahl, S Aljoscha

    2014-03-01

    The scale-up of fermentation processes frequently leads to a reduced productivity compared to small-scale screening experiments. Large-scale mixing limitations that lead to gradients in substrate and oxygen availability could influence the microorganism performance. Here, the impact of substrate gradients on a penicillin G producing Penicillium chrysogenum cultivation was analyzed using an intermittent glucose feeding regime. The intermittent feeding led to fluctuations in the extracellular glucose concentration between 400 μM down to 6.5 μM at the end of the cycle. The intracellular metabolite concentrations responded strongly and showed up to 100-fold changes. The intracellular flux changes were estimated on the basis of dynamic (13) C mass isotopomer measurements during three cycles of feast and famine using a novel hybrid modeling approach. The flux estimations indicated a high turnover of internal and external storage metabolites in P. chrysogenum under feast/famine conditions. The synthesis and degradation of storage requires cellular energy (ATP and UTP) in competition with other cellular functions including product formation. Especially, 38% of the incoming glucose was recycled once in storage metabolism. This result indicated that storage turnover is increased under dynamic cultivation conditions and contributes to the observed decrease in productivity compared to reference steady-state conditions.

  16. CeCaFDB: a curated database for the documentation, visualization and comparative analysis of central carbon metabolic flux distributions explored by 13C-fluxomics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Shen, Tie; Rui, Bin; Zhou, Wenwei; Zhou, Xiangfei; Shang, Chuanyu; Xin, Chenwei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Gang; Jiang, Jiansi; Li, Chao; Li, Ruiyuan; Han, Mengshu; You, Shanping; Yu, Guojun; Yi, Yin; Wen, Han; Liu, Zhijie; Xie, Xiaoyao

    2015-01-01

    The Central Carbon Metabolic Flux Database (CeCaFDB, available at http://www.cecafdb.org) is a manually curated, multipurpose and open-access database for the documentation, visualization and comparative analysis of the quantitative flux results of central carbon metabolism among microbes and animal cells. It encompasses records for more than 500 flux distributions among 36 organisms and includes information regarding the genotype, culture medium, growth conditions and other specific information gathered from hundreds of journal articles. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the CeCaFDB supports a common text search function among the data and interactive visualization of the curated flux distributions with compartmentation information based on the Cytoscape Web API, which facilitates data interpretation. The CeCaFDB offers four modules to calculate a similarity score or to perform an alignment between the flux distributions. One of the modules was built using an inter programming algorithm for flux distribution alignment that was specifically designed for this study. Based on these modules, the CeCaFDB also supports an extensive flux distribution comparison function among the curated data. The CeCaFDB is strenuously designed to address the broad demands of biochemists, metabolic engineers, systems biologists and members of the -omics community.

  17. Metabolic flux analysis of recombinant Pichia pastoris growing on different glycerol/methanol mixtures by iterative fitting of NMR-derived (13)C-labelling data from proteinogenic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Jordà, Joel; de Jesus, Sérgio S; Peltier, Solenne; Ferrer, Pau; Albiol, Joan

    2014-01-25

    The yeast Pichia pastoris has emerged as one of the most promising yeast cell factories for the production of heterologous proteins. The readily available genetic tools and the ease of high-cell density cultivations using methanol or glycerol/methanol mixtures are among the key factors for this development. Previous studies have shown that the use of mixed feeds of glycerol and methanol seem to alleviate the metabolic burden derived from protein production, allowing for higher specific and volumetric process productivities. However, initial studies of glycerol/methanol co-metabolism in P. pastoris by classical metabolic flux analyses using (13)C-derived Metabolic Flux Ratio (METAFoR) constraints were hampered by the reduced labelling information obtained when using C3:C1 substrate mixtures in relation to the conventional C6 substrate, that is, glucose. In this study, carbon flux distributions through the central metabolic pathways in glycerol/methanol co-assimilation conditions have been further characterised using biosynthetically directed fractional (13)C labelling. In particular, metabolic flux distributions were obtained under 3 different glycerol/methanol ratios and growth rates by iterative fitting of NMR-derived (13)C-labelling data from proteinogenic amino acids using the software tool (13)CFlux2. Specifically, cells were grown aerobically in chemostat cultures fed with 80:20, 60:40 and 40:60 (w:w) glycerol/methanol mixtures at two dilutions rates (0.05 hour(-1) and 0.16 hour(-1)), allowing to obtain additional data (biomass composition and extracellular fluxes) to complement pre-existing datasets. The performed (13)C-MFA reveals a significant redistribution of carbon fluxes in the central carbon metabolism as a result of the shift in the dilution rate, while the ratio of carbon sources has a lower impact on carbon flux distribution in cells growing at the same dilution rate. At low growth rate, the percentage of methanol directly dissimilated to CO2 ranges

  18. Gas Chromatography-Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry-Based Determination of Isotopologue and Tandem Mass Isotopomer Fractions of Primary Metabolites for (13)C-Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mairinger, Teresa; Steiger, Matthias; Nocon, Justyna; Mattanovich, Diethard; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    For the first time an analytical work flow based on accurate mass gas chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-QTOFMS) with chemical ionization for analysis providing a comprehensive picture of (13)C distribution along the primary metabolism is elaborated. The method provides a powerful new toolbox for (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis, which is an emerging strategy in metabolic engineering. In this field, stable isotope tracer experiments based on, for example, (13)C are central for providing characteristic patterns of labeled metabolites, which in turn give insights into the regulation of metabolic pathway kinetics. The new method enables the analysis of isotopologue fractions of 42 free intracellular metabolites within biotechnological samples, while tandem mass isotopomer information is also accessible for a large number of analytes. Hence, the method outperforms previous approaches in terms of metabolite coverage, while also providing rich isotopomer information for a significant number of key metabolites. Moreover, the established work flow includes novel evaluation routines correcting for isotope interference of naturally distributed elements, which is crucial following derivatization of metabolites. Method validation in terms of trueness, precision, and limits of detection was performed, showing excellent analytical figures of merit with an overall maximum bias of 5.8%, very high precision for isotopologue and tandem mass isotopomer fractions representing >10% of total abundance, and absolute limits of detection in the femtomole range. The suitability of the developed method is demonstrated on a flux experiment of Pichia pastoris employing two different tracers, i.e., 1,6(13)C2-glucose and uniformly labeled (13)C-glucose.

  19. In vivo investigation of cardiac metabolism in the rat using MRS of hyperpolarized [1-13C] and [2-13C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Josan, Sonal; Park, Jae Mo; Hurd, Ralph; Yen, Yi-Fen; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Spielman, Daniel; Mayer, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    Hyperpolarized (13)C MRS allows the in vivo assessment of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) flux, which converts pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). [1-(13)C]pyruvate has been used to measure changes in cardiac PDC flux, with demonstrated increase in (13)C-bicarbonate production after dichloroacetate (DCA) administration. With [1-(13)C]pyruvate, the (13)C label is released as (13 CO2 /(13)C-bicarbonate, and, hence, does not allow us to follow the fate of acetyl-CoA. Pyruvate labeled in the C2 position has been used to track the (13)C label into the TCA (tricarboxylic acid) cycle and measure [5-(13)C]glutamate as well as study changes in [1-(13)C]acetylcarnitine with DCA and dobutamine. This work investigates changes in the metabolic fate of acetyl-CoA in response to metabolic interventions of DCA-induced increased PDC flux in the fed and fasted state, and increased cardiac workload with dobutamine in vivo in rat heart at two different pyruvate doses. DCA led to a modest increase in the (13)C labeling of [5-(13)C]glutamate, and a considerable increase in [1-(13)C]acetylcarnitine and [1,3-(13)C]acetoacetate peaks. Dobutamine resulted in an increased labeling of [2-(13)C]lactate, [2-(13)C]alanine and [5-(13)C]glutamate. The change in glutamate with dobutamine was observed using a high pyruvate dose but not with a low dose. The relative changes in the different metabolic products provide information about the relationship between PDC-mediated oxidation of pyruvate and its subsequent incorporation into the TCA cycle compared with other metabolic pathways. Using a high dose of pyruvate may provide an improved ability to observe changes in glutamate.

  20. Hyperpolarized 13C Metabolic MRI of the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Justin Y.C.; Chen, Albert P.; Geraghty, Benjamin J.; Perks, William J.; Roifman, Idan; Wright, Graham A.; Connelly, Kim A.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Altered cardiac energetics is known to play an important role in the progression toward heart failure. A noninvasive method for imaging metabolic markers that could be used in longitudinal studies would be useful for understanding therapeutic approaches that target metabolism. Objective: To demonstrate the first hyperpolarized 13C metabolic magnetic resonance imaging of the human heart. Methods and Results: Four healthy subjects underwent conventional proton cardiac magnetic resonance imaging followed by 13C imaging and spectroscopic acquisition immediately after intravenous administration of a 0.1 mmol/kg dose of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. All subjects tolerated the procedure well with no adverse effects reported ≤1 month post procedure. The [1-13C]pyruvate signal appeared within the chambers but not within the muscle. Imaging of the downstream metabolites showed 13C-bicarbonate signal mainly confined to the left ventricular myocardium, whereas the [1-13C]lactate signal appeared both within the chambers and in the myocardium. The mean 13C image signal:noise ratio was 115 for [1-13C]pyruvate, 56 for 13C-bicarbonate, and 53 for [1-13C]lactate. Conclusions: These results represent the first 13C images of the human heart. The appearance of 13C-bicarbonate signal after administration of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate was readily detected in this healthy cohort (n=4). This shows that assessment of pyruvate metabolism in vivo in humans is feasible using current technology. Clinical Trial Registration: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02648009. PMID:27635086

  1. Multi-year estimates of plant and ecosystem 13C discrimination at AmeriFlux sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, X.; Lai, C.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Bush, S.; Randerson, J. T.; Law, B. E.; Schauer, A. J.; Ehleringer, J.

    2011-12-01

    We estimated plant and ecosystem 13C discrimination continuously at 8 AmeriFlux sites (Howland Forest, Harvard Forest, Wind River Forest, Rannells Prairie, Freeman Ranch, Chestnut Ridge, Metolius, and Marys River fir) over 8 years (2002-2009). We used an observation-based approach from weekly measurements of eddy covariance CO2 fluxes and their 13C/12C ratios to estimate photosynthetic 13C discrimination (△A) and respiration (δ13CR) on seasonal and interannual time scales. The coordinated, systematic flask sampling across the AmeriFlux subnetwork were used for cross-site synthesis of monthly flux estimates [Dang et al. Combining tower mixing ratio and community model data to estimate regional-scale net ecosystem carbon exchange by boundary layer inversion over 4 flux towers in the U.S.A., Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, in press]. Here, we evaluated environmental factors that also influenced temporal variability in △A and δ13CR from daily to interannual time scales, comparing atmospheric 13C/12C measurements, leaf and needle organic matter, and tree ring cellulose. Across these major biomes that dominate the continent, we show differential ecophysiological responses to environmental stresses, among which water availability appeared to be a dominant factor. Our decadal measurement period provided robust estimates of atmospheric 13C discrimination by terrestrial ecosystems, but also suggest regions where enhanced monitoring efforts are required (e.g., 13C/12C emission from fire and urban metabolism; increased temporal resolution of 13C measurements in stress-sensitive ecosystems) to make atmospheric 13C/12C measurements an effective constraint for continental-scale assessments of the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  2. Metabolism of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate through alternate pathways in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Karlos X.; Wang, Jian‐Xiong; Fidelino, Leila; Merritt, Matthew E.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    The source of hyperpolarized (HP) [13C]bicarbonate in the liver during metabolism of HP [1‐13C]pyruvate is uncertain and likely changes with physiology. Multiple processes including decarboxylation through pyruvate dehydrogenase or pyruvate carboxylase followed by subsequent decarboxylation via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (gluconeogenesis) could play a role. Here we tested which metabolic fate of pyruvate contributed to the appearance of HP [13C]bicarbonate during metabolism of HP [1‐13C]pyruvate by the liver in rats after 21 h of fasting compared to rats with free access to food. The 13C NMR of HP [13C]bicarbonate was observed in the liver of fed rats, but not in fasted rats where pyruvate carboxylation and gluconeogenesis was active. To further explore the relative fluxes through pyruvate carboxylase versus pyruvate dehydrogenase in the liver under typical conditions of hyperpolarization studies, separate parallel experiments were performed with rats given non‐hyperpolarized [2,3‐13C]pyruvate. 13C NMR analysis of glutamate isolated from the liver of rats revealed that flux from injected pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase was dominant under fed conditions whereas flux through pyruvate carboxylase dominated under fasted conditions. The NMR signal of HP [13C]bicarbonate does not parallel pyruvate carboxylase activity followed by subsequent decarboxylation reaction leading to glucose production. In the liver of healthy well‐fed rats, the appearance of HP [13C]bicarbonate exclusively reflects decarboxylation of HP [1‐13C]pyruvate via pyruvate dehydrogenase. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26836042

  3. Metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate through alternate pathways in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Jin, Eunsook S; Moreno, Karlos X; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Fidelino, Leila; Merritt, Matthew E; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-04-01

    The source of hyperpolarized (HP) [(13)C]bicarbonate in the liver during metabolism of HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate is uncertain and likely changes with physiology. Multiple processes including decarboxylation through pyruvate dehydrogenase or pyruvate carboxylase followed by subsequent decarboxylation via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (gluconeogenesis) could play a role. Here we tested which metabolic fate of pyruvate contributed to the appearance of HP [(13)C]bicarbonate during metabolism of HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate by the liver in rats after 21 h of fasting compared to rats with free access to food. The (13)C NMR of HP [(13)C]bicarbonate was observed in the liver of fed rats, but not in fasted rats where pyruvate carboxylation and gluconeogenesis was active. To further explore the relative fluxes through pyruvate carboxylase versus pyruvate dehydrogenase in the liver under typical conditions of hyperpolarization studies, separate parallel experiments were performed with rats given non-hyperpolarized [2,3-(13)C]pyruvate. (13)C NMR analysis of glutamate isolated from the liver of rats revealed that flux from injected pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase was dominant under fed conditions whereas flux through pyruvate carboxylase dominated under fasted conditions. The NMR signal of HP [(13)C]bicarbonate does not parallel pyruvate carboxylase activity followed by subsequent decarboxylation reaction leading to glucose production. In the liver of healthy well-fed rats, the appearance of HP [(13)C]bicarbonate exclusively reflects decarboxylation of HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate via pyruvate dehydrogenase.

  4. Refined Analysis of Brain Energy Metabolism Using In Vivo Dynamic Enrichment of 13C Multiplets

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani M., Masoumeh; Duarte, João M. N.; Kunz, Nicolas; Gruetter, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with the infusion of 13C-labeled precursors is a unique approach to study in vivo brain energy metabolism. Incorporating the maximum information available from in vivo localized 13C spectra is of importance to get broader knowledge on cerebral metabolic pathways. Metabolic rates can be quantitatively determined from the rate of 13C incorporation into amino acid neurotransmitters such as glutamate and glutamine using suitable mathematical models. The time course of multiplets arising from 13C-13C coupling between adjacent carbon atoms was expected to provide additional information for metabolic modeling leading to potential improvements in the estimation of metabolic parameters. The aim of the present study was to extend two-compartment neuronal/glial modeling to include dynamics of 13C isotopomers available from fine structure multiplets in 13C spectra of glutamate and glutamine measured in vivo in rats brain at 14.1 T, termed bonded cumomer approach. Incorporating the labeling time courses of 13C multiplets of glutamate and glutamine resulted in elevated precision of the estimated fluxes in rat brain as well as reduced correlations between them. PMID:26969691

  5. Simultaneous steady-state and dynamic 13C NMR can differentiate alternative routes of pyruvate metabolism in living cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chendong; Harrison, Crystal; Jin, Eunsook S; Chuang, David T; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R; Merritt, Matthew E; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2014-02-28

    Metabolic reprogramming facilitates cancer cell growth, so quantitative metabolic flux measurements could produce useful biomarkers. However, current methods to analyze flux in vivo provide either a steady-state overview of relative activities (infusion of (13)C and analysis of extracted metabolites) or a dynamic view of a few reactions (hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy). Moreover, although hyperpolarization has successfully quantified pyruvate-lactate exchanges, its ability to assess mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism is unproven in cancer. Here, we combined (13)C hyperpolarization and isotopomer analysis to quantify multiple fates of pyruvate simultaneously. Two cancer cell lines with divergent pyruvate metabolism were incubated with thermally polarized [3-(13)C]pyruvate for several hours, then briefly exposed to hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate during acquisition of NMR spectra using selective excitation to maximize detection of H[(13)C]O3(-) and [1-(13)C]lactate. Metabolites were then extracted and subjected to isotopomer analysis to determine relative rates of pathways involving [3-(13)C]pyruvate. Quantitation of hyperpolarized H[(13)C]O3(-) provided a single definitive metabolic rate, which was then used to convert relative rates derived from isotopomer analysis into quantitative fluxes. This revealed that H[(13)C]O3(-) appearance reflects activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase rather than pyruvate carboxylation followed by subsequent decarboxylation reactions. Glucose substantially altered [1-(13)C]pyruvate metabolism, enhancing exchanges with [1-(13)C]lactate and suppressing H[(13)C]O3(-) formation. Furthermore, inhibiting Akt, an oncogenic kinase that stimulates glycolysis, reversed these effects, indicating that metabolism of pyruvate by both LDH and pyruvate dehydrogenase is subject to the acute effects of oncogenic signaling on glycolysis. The data suggest that combining (13)C isotopomer analyses and dynamic hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy may enable

  6. Real-time assessment of Krebs cycle metabolism using hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Marie A; Atherton, Helen J; Ball, Daniel R; Cole, Mark A; Heather, Lisa C; Griffin, Julian L; Clarke, Kieran; Radda, George K; Tyler, Damian J

    2009-08-01

    The Krebs cycle plays a fundamental role in cardiac energy production and is often implicated in the energetic imbalance characteristic of heart disease. In this study, we measured Krebs cycle flux in real time in perfused rat hearts using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). [2-(13)C]Pyruvate was hyperpolarized and infused into isolated perfused hearts in both healthy and postischemic metabolic states. We followed the enzymatic conversion of pyruvate to lactate, acetylcarnitine, citrate, and glutamate with 1 s temporal resolution. The appearance of (13)C-labeled glutamate was delayed compared with that of other metabolites, indicating that Krebs cycle flux can be measured directly. The production of (13)C-labeled citrate and glutamate was decreased postischemia, as opposed to lactate, which was significantly elevated. These results showed that the control and fluxes of the Krebs cycle in heart disease can be studied using hyperpolarized [2-(13)C]pyruvate.

  7. Computational Platform for Flux Analysis Using 13C-Label Tracing- Phase I SBIR Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dien, Stephen J.

    2005-04-12

    Isotopic label tracing is a powerful experimental technique that can be combined with metabolic models to quantify metabolic fluxes in an organism under a particular set of growth conditions. In this work we constructed a genome-scale metabolic model of Methylobacterium extorquens, a facultative methylotroph with potential application in the production of useful chemicals from methanol. A series of labeling experiments were performed using 13C-methanol, and the resulting distribution of labeled carbon in the proteinogenic amino acids was determined by mass spectrometry. Algorithms were developed to analyze this data in context of the metabolic model, yielding flux distributions for wild-type and several engineered strains of M. extorquens. These fluxes were compared to those predicted by model simulation alone, and also integrated with microarray data to give an improved understanding of the metabolic physiology of this organism.

  8. 13C Tracer Studies of Metabolism in Mouse Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Yan, Jun; Fan, Teresa W-M.

    2015-01-01

    Mice are widely used for human tumor xenograft studies of cancer development and drug efficacy and toxicity. Stable isotope tracing coupled with metabolomic analysis is an emerging approach for assaying metabolic network activity. In mouse models there are several routes of tracer introduction, which have particular advantages and disadvantages that depend on the model and the questions addressed. This protocol describes the bolus i.v. route via repeated tail vein injections of solutions of stable isotope enriched tracers including 13C6-glucose and 13C5,15N2-glutamine. Repeated injections give higher enrichments and over longer labeling periods than a single bolus. Multiple injections of glutamine are necessary to achieve adequate enrichment in engrafted tumors. PMID:26693168

  9. Profiling human gut bacterial metabolism and its kinetics using [U-13C]glucose and NMR.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Albert A; Maathuis, Annet; de Waard, Pieter; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Dijkema, Cor; de Vos, Willem M; Venema, Koen

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces a stable-isotope metabolic approach employing [U-(13)C]glucose that, as a novelty, allows selective profiling of the human intestinal microbial metabolic products of carbohydrate food components, as well as the measurement of the kinetics of their formation pathways, in a single experiment. A well-established, validated in vitro model of human intestinal fermentation was inoculated with standardized gastrointestinal microbiota from volunteers. After culture stabilization, [U-(13)C]glucose was added as an isotopically labeled metabolic precursor. System lumen and dialysate samples were taken at regular intervals. Metabolite concentrations and isotopic labeling were determined by NMR, GC, and enzymatic methods. The main microbial metabolites were lactate, acetate, butyrate, formate, ethanol, and glycerol. They together accounted for a (13)C recovery rate as high as 91.2%. Using an NMR chemical shift prediction approach, several minor products that showed (13)C incorporation were identified as organic acids, amino acids, and various alcohols. Using computer modeling of the (12)C contents and (13)C labeling kinetics, the metabolic fluxes in the gut microbial pathways for synthesis of lactate, formate, acetate, and butyrate were determined separately for glucose and unlabeled background substrates. This novel approach enables the study of the modulation of human intestinal function by single nutrients, providing a new rational basis for achieving control of the short-chain fatty acids profile by manipulating substrate and microbiota composition in a purposeful manner.

  10. Hyperpolarized 13C allows a direct measure of flux through a single enzyme-catalyzed step by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Matthew E.; Harrison, Crystal; Storey, Charles; Jeffrey, F. Mark; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.

    2007-01-01

    13C NMR is a powerful tool for monitoring metabolic fluxes in vivo. The recent availability of automated dynamic nuclear polarization equipment for hyperpolarizing 13C nuclei now offers the potential to measure metabolic fluxes through select enzyme-catalyzed steps with substantially improved sensitivity. Here, we investigated the metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-13C1]pyruvate in a widely used model for physiology and pharmacology, the perfused rat heart. Dissolved 13CO2, the immediate product of the first step of the reaction catalyzed by pyruvate dehydrogenase, was observed with a temporal resolution of ≈1 s along with H13CO3−, the hydrated form of 13CO2 generated catalytically by carbonic anhydrase. In hearts presented with the medium-chain fatty acid octanoate in addition to hyperpolarized [1-13C1]pyruvate, production of 13CO2 and H13CO3− was suppressed by ≈90%, whereas the signal from [1-13C1]lactate was enhanced. In separate experiments, it was shown that O2 consumption and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux were unchanged in the presence of added octanoate. Thus, the rate of appearance of 13CO2 and H13CO3− from [1-13C1]pyruvate does not reflect production of CO2 in the TCA cycle but rather reflects flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase exclusively. PMID:18056642

  11. An in Vivo 13C NMR Analysis of the Anaerobic Yeast Metabolism of 1-13C-Glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Brent J.; Matsche, Zenziwe; Egeland, Ryan D.; Reed, Ryan A.; Morioka, Scott S.; Taber, Richard L.

    1999-11-01

    A biochemistry laboratory experiment that studies the dynamics of the anaerobic yeast metabolism of 1-13C-D-glucose via NMR is described. Fleischmann's Active Dry yeast, under anaerobic conditions, produces primarily 2-13C-ethanol and some 1-13C-glycerol as end products. An experiment is described in which the yeast is subjected to osmotic shock from an increasing sodium chloride concentration. Under these conditions, the yeast increases the ratio of glycerol to ethanol. The experiment can be accomplished in a single laboratory period.

  12. Probing metabolic processes of intact soil microbial communities using position-specific 13C-labeled glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbanks, D. E.; Hungate, B. A.; KOCH, G. W.; Schwartz, E.; Dijkstra, P.

    2012-12-01

    Soils represent one of the largest carbon pools in the terrestrial biosphere and fluxes into or out of this pool may feedback to current climate change. Understanding the mechanisms behind microbial processes regulating C cycling, microbial turnover, and soil organic matter stabilization is hindered by our lack of understanding of the details of microbial physiology in soils. Position-specific 13C labeled metabolic tracers are proposed as a new way to probe microbial community energy production, biosynthesis, C use efficiency (the proportion of substrate incorporated into microbial biomass), and enables the determination of C fluxes through the various C metabolic pathways. We determined the 13CO2 production from microbial communities within a one hour time frame by adding six isotopomers (1-13C, 2-13C, 3-13C, 4-13C, 5-13C, 6-13C) of glucose in parallel incubations using a young volcanic soil (Pinyon-juniper wood, near Sunset Crater, Flagstaff, Arizona). We compared the measured rates of position-specific 13CO2 production with modeled results based on glucose (1-13C and U-13C) and pyruvate (1-13C and 2,3-13C) incubations. These labeling and modeling techniques may improve our ability to analyze the biochemistry and ecophysiology of intact soil microbial communities.

  13. Microbial metabolism in soil at low temperatures: Mechanisms unraveled by position-specific 13C labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bore, Ezekiel

    2016-04-01

    Microbial transformation of organic substances in soil is the most important process of the C cycle. Most of the current studies base their information about transformation of organic substances on incubation studies under laboratory conditions and thus, we have a profound knowledge on SOM transformations at ambient temperatures. However, metabolic pathway activities at low temperature are not well understood, despite the fact that the processes are relevant for many soils globally and seasonally. To analyze microbial metabolism at low soil temperatures, isotopomeres of position-specifically 13C labeled glucose were incubated at three temperature; 5, -5 -20 oC. Soils were sampled after 1, 3 and 10 days and additionally after 30 days for samples at -20 °C. The 13C from individual molecule position was quantifed in respired CO2, bulk soil, extractable organic C and extractable microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) and cell membranes of microbial communities classified by 13C phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. 13CO2 released showed a dominance of the flux from C-1 position at 5 °C. Consequently, at 5 °C, pentose phosphate pathway activity is a dominant metabolic pathway of glucose metabolization. In contrast to -5 °C and -20 oC, metabolic behaviors completely switched towards a preferential respiration of the glucose C-4 position. With decreasing temperature, microorganism strongly shifted towards metabolization of glucose via glycolysis which indicates a switch to cellular maintenance. High recoveries of 13C in extractable microbial biomass at -5 °C indicates optimal growth condition for the microorganisms. PLFA analysis showed high incorporation of 13C into Gram negative bacteria at 5 °C but decreased with temperature. Gram positive bacteria out-competed Gram negatives with decreasing temperature. This study revealed a remarkable microbial activity at temperatures below 0 °C, differing significantly from that at ambient

  14. Methods for metabolic evaluation of prostate cancer cells using proton and 13C HR-MAS spectroscopy and [3-13C] pyruvate as a metabolic substrate

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Yakir S.; Albers, Mark J.; Butler, Thomas N.; Spielman, Daniel; Peehl, Donna M.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer has been shown to undergo unique metabolic changes associated with neoplastic transformation, with associated changes in citrate, alanine, and lactate concentrations. 13C HR-MAS spectroscopy provides an opportunity to simultaneously investigate the metabolic pathways implicated in these changes by using 13C labeled substrates as metabolic probes. In this work, a method to reproducibly interrogate metabolism in prostate cancer cells in primary culture was developed using HR-MAS spectroscopy. Optimization of cell culture protocols, labeling parameters, harvesting, storage, and transfer was performed. Using [3-13C] pyruvate as a metabolic probe, 1H and 13C HR-MAS spectroscopy were used to quantify the net amount and fractional enrichment of several labeled metabolites that evolved in multiple cell samples from each of five different prostate cancers. Average enrichment across all cancers was 32.4±5.4% for [3-13C] alanine, 24.5±5.4% for [4-13C] glutamate, 9.1±2.5% for [3-13C] glutamate, 25.2±5.7% for [3-13C] aspartate, and 4.2±1.0% for [3-13C] lactate. Cell samples from the same parent population demonstrated reproducible fractional enrichments of alanine, glutamate, and aspartate to within 12%, 10%, and 10%, respectively. Furthermore, the cells produced a significant amount of [4-13C] glutamate, which supports the bioenergetic theory for prostate cancer. These methods will allow further characterization of metabolic properties of prostate cancer cells in the future. PMID:19780158

  15. HepatoDyn: A Dynamic Model of Hepatocyte Metabolism That Integrates 13C Isotopomer Data

    PubMed Central

    Foguet, Carles; Selivanov, Vitaly A.; Fanchon, Eric; Guinovart, Joan J.; de Atauri, Pedro; Cascante, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs many essential metabolic functions, which can be studied using computational models of hepatocytes. Here we present HepatoDyn, a highly detailed dynamic model of hepatocyte metabolism. HepatoDyn includes a large metabolic network, highly detailed kinetic laws, and is capable of dynamically simulating the redox and energy metabolism of hepatocytes. Furthermore, the model was coupled to the module for isotopic label propagation of the software package IsoDyn, allowing HepatoDyn to integrate data derived from 13C based experiments. As an example of dynamical simulations applied to hepatocytes, we studied the effects of high fructose concentrations on hepatocyte metabolism by integrating data from experiments in which rat hepatocytes were incubated with 20 mM glucose supplemented with either 3 mM or 20 mM fructose. These experiments showed that glycogen accumulation was significantly lower in hepatocytes incubated with medium supplemented with 20 mM fructose than in hepatocytes incubated with medium supplemented with 3 mM fructose. Through the integration of extracellular fluxes and 13C enrichment measurements, HepatoDyn predicted that this phenomenon can be attributed to a depletion of cytosolic ATP and phosphate induced by high fructose concentrations in the medium. PMID:27124774

  16. Energy contribution of octanoate to intact rat brain metabolism measured by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Douglas; Haller, Ronald G; Walton, Marlei E

    2003-07-02

    Glucose is the dominant oxidative fuel for brain, but studies have indicated that fatty acids are used by brain as well. We postulated that fatty acid oxidation in brain could contribute significantly to overall energy usage and account for non-glucose-derived energy production. [2,4,6,8-13C4]octanoate oxidation in intact rats was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We found that oxidation of 13C-octanoate in brain is avid and contributes approximately 20% to total brain oxidative energy production. Labeling patterns of glutamate and glutamine were distinct, and analysis of these metabolites indicated compartmentalized oxidation of octanoate in brain. Examination of liver and blood spectra revealed that label from 13C-octanoate was incorporated into glucose and ketones, which enabled calculation of its overall energy contribution to brain metabolism: glucose (predominantly unlabeled) and 13C-labeled octanoate can account for the entire oxidative metabolism of brain. Additionally, flux through anaplerotic pathways relative to tricarboxylic acid cycle flux (Y) was calculated to be 0.08 +/- 0.039 in brain, indicating that anaplerotic flux is significant and should be considered when assessing brain metabolism. Y was associated with the glutamine synthesis compartment, consistent with the view that anaplerotic flux occurs primarily in astrocytes.

  17. Propionate metabolism in the rat heart by 13C n.m.r. spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, A D; Malloy, C R; Roby, R E; Rajagopal, A; Jeffrey, F M

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution 13C n.m.r. spectroscopy has been used to examine propionate metabolism in the perfused rat heart. A number of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates are observable by 13C n.m.r. in hearts perfused with mixtures of pyruvate and propionate. When the enriched 13C-labelled nucleus originates with pyruvate, the resonances of the intermediates appear as multiplets due to formation of multiply-enriched 13C-labelled isotopomers, whereas when the 13C-labelled nucleus originates with propionate, these same intermediates appear as singlets in the 13C spectrum since entry of propionate into the TCA cycle occurs via succinyl-CoA. An analysis of the isotopomer populations in hearts perfused with [3-13C]pyruvate plus unlabelled propionate indicates that about 27% of the total pyruvate pool available to the heart is derived directly from unlabelled propionate. This was substantiated by perfusing a heart for 2 h with [3-13C]propionate as the only available exogenous substrate. Under these conditions, all of the propionate consumed by the heart, as measured by conventional chemical analysis, ultimately entered the oxidative pathway as [2-13C] or [3-13C]pyruvate. This is consistent with entry of propionate into the TCA cycle intermediate pools as succinyl-CoA and concomitant disposal of malate to pyruvate via the malic enzyme. 13C resonances arising from enriched methylmalonate and propionylcarnitine are also detected in hearts perfused with [3-13C] or [1-13C]propionate which suggests that 13C n.m.r. may be useful as a non-invasive probe in vivo of metabolic abnormalities involving the propionate pathway, such as methylmalonic aciduria or propionic acidaemia. PMID:3178775

  18. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes.

  19. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes. PMID:27678172

  20. Evolution of E. coli on [U-13C]Glucose Reveals a Negligible Isotopic Influence on Metabolism and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Troy E.; Long, Christopher P.; Gonzalez, Jacqueline E.; Feist, Adam M.; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2016-01-01

    13C-Metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) traditionally assumes that kinetic isotope effects from isotopically labeled compounds do not appreciably alter cellular growth or metabolism, despite indications that some biochemical reactions can be non-negligibly impacted. Here, populations of Escherichia coli were adaptively evolved for ~1000 generations on uniformly labeled 13C-glucose, a commonly used isotope for 13C-MFA. Phenotypic characterization of these evolved strains revealed ~40% increases in growth rate, with no significant difference in fitness when grown on either labeled (13C) or unlabeled (12C) glucose. The evolved strains displayed decreased biomass yields, increased glucose and oxygen uptake, and increased acetate production, mimicking what is observed after adaptive evolution on unlabeled glucose. Furthermore, full genome re-sequencing revealed that the key genetic changes underlying these phenotypic alterations were essentially the same as those acquired during adaptive evolution on unlabeled glucose. Additionally, glucose competition experiments demonstrated that the wild-type exhibits no isotopic preference for unlabeled glucose, and the evolved strains have no preference for labeled glucose. Overall, the results of this study indicate that there are no significant differences between 12C and 13C-glucose as a carbon source for E. coli growth. PMID:26964043

  1. Bonded Cumomer Analysis of Human Melanoma Metabolism Monitored by 13C NMR Spectroscopy of Perfused Tumor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Shestov, Alexander A.; Mancuso, Anthony; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Guo, Lili; Nelson, David S.; Roman, Jeffrey C.; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Leeper, Dennis B.; Blair, Ian A.; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2016-01-01

    A network model for the determination of tumor metabolic fluxes from 13C NMR kinetic isotopomer data has been developed and validated with perfused human DB-1 melanoma cells carrying the BRAF V600E mutation, which promotes oxidative metabolism. The model generated in the bonded cumomer formalism describes key pathways of tumor intermediary metabolism and yields dynamic curves for positional isotopic enrichment and spin-spin multiplets. Cells attached to microcarrier beads were perfused with 26 mm [1,6-13C2]glucose under normoxic conditions at 37 °C and monitored by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Excellent agreement between model-predicted and experimentally measured values of the rates of oxygen and glucose consumption, lactate production, and glutamate pool size validated the model. ATP production by glycolytic and oxidative metabolism were compared under hyperglycemic normoxic conditions; 51% of the energy came from oxidative phosphorylation and 49% came from glycolysis. Even though the rate of glutamine uptake was ∼50% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux, the rate of ATP production from glutamine was essentially zero (no glutaminolysis). De novo fatty acid production was ∼6% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux was 3.6% of glycolysis, and three non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway exchange fluxes were calculated. Mass spectrometry was then used to compare fluxes through various pathways under hyperglycemic (26 mm) and euglycemic (5 mm) conditions. Under euglycemic conditions glutamine uptake doubled, but ATP production from glutamine did not significantly change. A new parameter measuring the Warburg effect (the ratio of lactate production flux to pyruvate influx through the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier) was calculated to be 21, close to upper limit of oxidative metabolism. PMID:26703469

  2. Robust hyperpolarized (13)C metabolic imaging with selective non-excitation of pyruvate (SNEP).

    PubMed

    Chen, Way Cherng; Teo, Xing Qi; Lee, Man Ying; Radda, George K; Lee, Philip

    2015-08-01

    In vivo metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate provides localized biochemical information and is particularly useful in detecting early disease changes, as well as monitoring disease progression and treatment response. However, a major limitation of hyperpolarized magnetization is its unrecoverable decay, due not only to T1 relaxation but also to radio-frequency (RF) excitation. RF excitation schemes used in metabolic imaging must therefore be able to utilize available hyperpolarized magnetization efficiently and robustly for the optimal detection of substrate and metabolite activities. In this work, a novel RF excitation scheme called selective non-excitation of pyruvate (SNEP) is presented. This excitation scheme involves the use of a spectral selective RF pulse to specifically exclude the excitation of [1-(13)C]pyruvate, while uniformly exciting the key metabolites of interest (namely [1-(13)C]lactate and [1-(13)C]alanine) and [1-(13)C]pyruvate-hydrate. By eliminating the loss of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate magnetization due to RF excitation, the signal from downstream metabolite pools is increased together with enhanced dynamic range. Simulation results, together with phantom measurements and in vivo experiments, demonstrated the improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the extension of the lifetime of the [1-(13)C]lactate and [1-(13)C]alanine pools when compared with conventional non-spectral selective (NS) excitation. SNEP has also been shown to perform comparably well with multi-band (MB) excitation, yet SNEP possesses distinct advantages, including ease of implementation, less stringent demands on gradient performance, increased robustness to frequency drifts and B0 inhomogeneity as well as easier quantification involving the use of [1-(13)C]pyruvate-hydrate as a proxy for the actual [1-(13)C] pyruvate signal. SNEP is therefore a promising alternative for robust hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate metabolic imaging with high

  3. Simultaneous imaging of 13C metabolism and 1H structure: technical considerations and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeremy W; Fain, Sean B; Niles, David J; Ludwig, Kai D; Johnson, Kevin M; Peterson, Eric T

    2015-05-01

    Real-time imaging of (13)C metabolism in vivo has been enabled by recent advances in hyperpolarization. As a result of the inherently low natural abundance of endogenous (13)C nuclei, hyperpolarized (13)C images lack structural information that could be used to aid in motion detection and anatomical registration. Motion before or during the (13)C acquisition can therefore result in artifacts and misregistration that may obscure measures of metabolism. In this work, we demonstrate a method to simultaneously image both (1)H and (13)C nuclei using a dual-nucleus spectral-spatial radiofrequency excitation and a fully coincident readout for rapid multinuclear spectroscopic imaging. With the appropriate multinuclear hardware, and the means to simultaneously excite and receive on both channels, this technique is straightforward to implement requiring little to no increase in scan time. Phantom and in vivo experiments were performed with both Cartesian and spiral trajectories to validate and illustrate the utility of simultaneous acquisitions. Motion compensation of dynamic metabolic measurements acquired during free breathing was demonstrated using motion tracking derived from (1)H data. Simultaneous multinuclear imaging provides structural (1)H and metabolic (13)C images that are correlated both spatially and temporally, and are therefore amenable to joint (1)H and (13)C analysis and correction of structure-function images.

  4. Determination of fructose metabolic pathways in normal and fructose-intolerant children: A sup 13 C NMR study using (U- sup 13 C)fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Gopher, A.; Lapidot, A. ); Vaisman, N. ); Mandel, H. )

    1990-07-01

    An inborn deficiency in the ability of aldolase B to split fructose 1-phosphate is found in humans with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). A stable isotope procedure to elucidate the mechanism of conversion of fructose to glucose in normal children and in HFI children has been developed. A constant infusion of D-(U-{sup 13}C)fructose was given nasogastrically to control and to HFI children. Hepatic fructose conversion to glucose was estimated by examination of {sup 13}C NMR spectra of plasma glucose. Significantly lower values ({approx}3-fold) for fructose conversion to glucose were obtained for the HFI patients as compared to the controls. A quantitative determination of the metabolic pathways of fructose conversion to glucose was derived from {sup 13}C NMR measurement of plasma ({sup 13}C)glucose isotopomer populations. The finding of isotopomer populations of three adjacent {sup 13}C atoms at glucose C-4 ({sup 13}C{sub 3}-{sup 13}C{sub 4}-{sup 13}C{sub 5}) suggests that there is a direct pathway from fructose, by-passing fructose-1-phosphate aldolase, to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The metabolism of fructose by fructose-1-phosphate aldolase activity accounts for only {approx}50% of the total amount of hepatic fructose conversion to glucose. In view of the marked decline by 67% in synthesis of glucose from fructose in HFI subjects found in this study, the extent of ({sup 13}C)glucose formation from a trace amount of (U-{sup 13}C)fructose infused into the patient can be used as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic test for inherent faulty fructose metabolism.

  5. 13C-labelled microdialysis studies of cerebral metabolism in TBI patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Keri L.H.; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Gallagher, Clare N.; Grice, Peter; Howe, Duncan J.; Mason, Andrew; Timofeev, Ivan; Helmy, Adel; Murphy, Michael P.; Menon, David K.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Sutherland, Garnette R.; Pickard, John D.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Human brain chemistry is incompletely understood and better methodologies are needed. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes metabolic perturbations, one result of which includes increased brain lactate levels. Attention has largely focussed on glycolysis, whereby glucose is converted to pyruvate and lactate, and is proposed to act as an energy source by feeding into neurons’ tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, generating ATP. Also reportedly upregulated by TBI is the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) that does not generate ATP but produces various molecules that are putatively neuroprotective, antioxidant and reparative, in addition to lactate among the end products. We have developed a novel combination of 13C-labelled cerebral microdialysis both to deliver 13C-labelled substrates into brains of TBI patients and recover the 13C-labelled metabolites, with high-resolution 13C NMR analysis of the microdialysates. This methodology has enabled us to achieve the first direct demonstration in humans that the brain can utilise lactate via the TCA cycle. We are currently using this methodology to make the first direct comparison of glycolysis and the PPP in human brain. In this article, we consider the application of 13C-labelled cerebral microdialysis for studying brain energy metabolism in patients. We set this methodology within the context of metabolic pathways in the brain, and 13C research modalities addressing them. PMID:24361470

  6. (13)C-labelled microdialysis studies of cerebral metabolism in TBI patients.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Keri L H; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Gallagher, Clare N; Grice, Peter; Howe, Duncan J; Mason, Andrew; Timofeev, Ivan; Helmy, Adel; Murphy, Michael P; Menon, David K; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Carpenter, T Adrian; Sutherland, Garnette R; Pickard, John D; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2014-06-16

    Human brain chemistry is incompletely understood and better methodologies are needed. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes metabolic perturbations, one result of which includes increased brain lactate levels. Attention has largely focussed on glycolysis, whereby glucose is converted to pyruvate and lactate, and is proposed to act as an energy source by feeding into neurons' tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, generating ATP. Also reportedly upregulated by TBI is the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) that does not generate ATP but produces various molecules that are putatively neuroprotective, antioxidant and reparative, in addition to lactate among the end products. We have developed a novel combination of (13)C-labelled cerebral microdialysis both to deliver (13)C-labelled substrates into brains of TBI patients and recover the (13)C-labelled metabolites, with high-resolution (13)C NMR analysis of the microdialysates. This methodology has enabled us to achieve the first direct demonstration in humans that the brain can utilise lactate via the TCA cycle. We are currently using this methodology to make the first direct comparison of glycolysis and the PPP in human brain. In this article, we consider the application of (13)C-labelled cerebral microdialysis for studying brain energy metabolism in patients. We set this methodology within the context of metabolic pathways in the brain, and (13)C research modalities addressing them.

  7. Constraining Methane Flux Estimates Using Atmospheric Observations of Methane and 1^3C in Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaloff Fletcher, S. E.; Tans, P. P.; Miller, J. B.; Bruhwiler, L. M.

    2002-12-01

    Understanding the budget of methane is crucial to predicting climate change and managing earth's carbon reservoirs. Methane is responsible for approximately 15% of the anthropogenic greenhouse forcing and has a large impact on the oxidative capacity of Earth's atmosphere due to its reaction with hydroxyl radical. At present, many of the sources and sinks of methane are poorly understood due in part to the large spatial and temporal variability of the methane flux. Model simulations of methane mixing ratios using most process-based source estimates typically over-predict the latitudinal gradient of atmospheric methane relative to the observations; however, the specific source processes responsible for this discrepancy have not been identified definitively. The aim of this work is to use the isotopic signatures of the sources to attribute these discrepancies to a source process or group of source processes and create global and regional budget estimates that are in agreement with both the atmospheric observations of methane and 1^3C in methane. To this end, observations of isotopic ratios of 1^3C in methane and isotopic signatures of methane source processes are used in conjunction with an inverse model of the methane budget. Inverse modeling is a top-down approach which uses observations of trace gases in the atmosphere, an estimate of the spatial pattern of trace gas fluxes, and a model of atmospheric transport to estimate the sources and sinks. The atmospheric transport was represented by the TM3 three-dimensional transport model. The GLOBALVIEW 2001 methane observations were used along with flask measurements of 1^3C in methane at six of the CMDL-NOAA stations by INSTAAR. Initial results imply interesting differences from previous methane budget estimates. For example, the 1^3C isotope observations in methane call for an increase in southern hemisphere sources with a bacterial isotopic signature such as wetlands, rice paddies, termites, and ruminant animals. The

  8. Biosynthesis of highly enriched 13C-lycopene for human metabolic studies using repeated batch tomato cell culturing with 13C-glucose.

    PubMed

    Moran, Nancy Engelmann; Rogers, Randy B; Lu, Chi-Hua; Conlon, Lauren E; Lila, Mary Ann; Clinton, Steven K; Erdman, John W

    2013-08-15

    While putative disease-preventing lycopene metabolites are found in both tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) products and in their consumers, mammalian lycopene metabolism is poorly understood. Advances in tomato cell culturing techniques offer an economical tool for generation of highly-enriched (13)C-lycopene for human bioavailability and metabolism studies. To enhance the (13)C-enrichment and yields of labelled lycopene from the hp-1 tomato cell line, cultures were first grown in (13)C-glucose media for three serial batches and produced increasing proportions of uniformly labelled lycopene (14.3±1.2%, 39.6±0.5%, and 48.9±1.5%) with consistent yields (from 5.8 to 9 mg/L). An optimised 9-day-long (13)C-loading and 18-day-long labelling strategy developed based on glucose utilisation and lycopene yields, yielded (13)C-lycopene with 93% (13)C isotopic purity, and 55% of isotopomers were uniformly labelled. Furthermore, an optimised acetone and hexane extraction led to a fourfold increase in lycopene recovery from cultures compared to a standard extraction.

  9. Metabolic pathways for ketone body production. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of rat liver in vivo using /sup 13/C-multilabeled fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl-Wostl, C.; Seelig, J.

    1986-11-04

    The hormonal regulation of ketogenesis in the liver of living rat has been studied noninvasively with /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance. The spatial selection for the liver was better than 90%, with extrahepatic adipose tissue contribution only a very small amount of signal. The metabolic activities of the liver were investigated by infusion of /sup 13/C-labeled butyrate in the jugular vein of the anesthetized rat. The rate of butyrate infusion was chosen to be close to the maximum oxidative capacity of the rat liver, and the /sup 13/C signal intensities were enhanced by using doubly labeled (1,3-/sup 13/C)butyrate as a substrate. Different /sup 13/C NMR spectra and hence different metabolites were observed depending on the hormonal state of the animal. The /sup 13/C NMR studies demonstrate that even when rate of acetyl-CoA production are high, the disposal of this compound is not identical in fasted and diabetic animals. This supports previous suggestions that the redox state of the mitochondrion represents the most important factor in regulation. For a given metabolic state of the animal, different signal intensities were obtained depending on whether butyrate was labeled at C-1, C-3, or C-1,3. From the ratios of incorporation of /sup 13/C label into the carbons of 3-hydroxybutyrate, it could be estimated that a large fraction of butyrate evaded ..beta..-oxidation to acetyl-CoA but was converted directly to acetoacetyl-CoA. /sup 13/C-labeled glucose could be detected in vivo in the liver of diabetic rats.

  10. Kinetic modeling of hyperpolarized 13C 1-pyruvate metabolism in normal rats and TRAMP mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierhut, Matthew L.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Chen, Albert P.; Bok, Robert; Albers, Mark J.; Zhang, Vickie; Tropp, Jim; Park, Ilwoo; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Kurhanewicz, John; Hurd, Ralph E.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2010-01-01

    PurposeTo investigate metabolic exchange between 13C 1-pyruvate, 13C 1-lactate, and 13C 1-alanine in pre-clinical model systems using kinetic modeling of dynamic hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopic data and to examine the relationship between fitted parameters and dose-response. Materials and methodsDynamic 13C spectroscopy data were acquired in normal rats, wild type mice, and mice with transgenic prostate tumors (TRAMP) either within a single slice or using a one-dimensional echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (1D-EPSI) encoding technique. Rate constants were estimated by fitting a set of exponential equations to the dynamic data. Variations in fitted parameters were used to determine model robustness in 15 mm slices centered on normal rat kidneys. Parameter values were used to investigate differences in metabolism between and within TRAMP and wild type mice. ResultsThe kinetic model was shown here to be robust when fitting data from a rat given similar doses. In normal rats, Michaelis-Menten kinetics were able to describe the dose-response of the fitted exchange rate constants with a 13.65% and 16.75% scaled fitting error (SFE) for kpyr→lac and kpyr→ala, respectively. In TRAMP mice, kpyr→lac increased an average of 94% after up to 23 days of disease progression, whether the mice were untreated or treated with casodex. Parameters estimated from dynamic 13C 1D-EPSI data were able to differentiate anatomical structures within both wild type and TRAMP mice. ConclusionsThe metabolic parameters estimated using this approach may be useful for in vivo monitoring of tumor progression and treatment efficacy, as well as to distinguish between various tissues based on metabolic activity.

  11. Metabolic network analysis of Bacillus clausii on minimal and semirich medium using (13)C-labeled glucose.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Torben; Christensen, Bjarke; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-04-01

    Using (13)C-labeled glucose fed to the facultative alkalophilic Bacillus clausii producing the alkaline serine protease Savinase, the intracellular fluxes were quantified in continuous cultivation and in batch cultivation on a minimal medium. The flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was found to increase with increasing specific growth rate but at a much lower level than previously reported for Bacillus subtilis. Two futile cycles in the pyruvate metabolism were included in the metabolic network. A substantial flux in the futile cycle involving malic enzyme was estimated, whereas only a very small or zero flux through PEP carboxykinase was estimated, indicating that the latter enzyme was not active during growth on glucose. The uptake of the amino acids in a semirich medium containing 15 of the 20 amino acids normally present in proteins was estimated using fully labeled glucose in batch cultivations. It was found that leucine, isoleucine, and phenylalanine were taken up from the medium and not synthesized de novo from glucose. In contrast, serine and threonine were completely synthesized from other metabolites and not taken up from the medium. Valine, proline, and lysine were partly taken up from the medium and partly synthesized from glucose. The metabolic network analysis was extended to include analysis of growth on the semirich medium containing amino acids, and the metabolic flux distribution on this medium was estimated and compared with growth on minimal medium.

  12. Monitoring electron donor metabolism under variable electron acceptor conditions using 13C-labeled lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Three sets of flow-through columns constructed with aquifer sediment from Hanford (WA) were used to study reduction of Cr(VI) to poorly soluble Cr(III) under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing/fermentative, and iron-reducing conditions with lactate as the electron donor. In order to understand the relationship between electron donors and biomarkers, and to determine the differences in carbon isotope fractionation resulting from different microbial metabolic processes, we monitored the variation in carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in total organic carbon (TOC), and in lactate, acetate and propionate. The greatest enrichment in 13C in columns was observed under denitrifying conditions. The δ13C of DIC increased by ~1750 to ~2000‰ fifteen days after supplementation of natural abundance lactate with a 13C-labeled lactate tracer (for an influent δ13C of ~2250‰ for the lactate) indicating almost complete oxidation of the electron donor. The denitrifying columns were among the most active columns and had the highest cell counts and the denitrification rate was highly correlated with Cr(VI) reduction rate. δ13C values of DIC ranged from ~540 to ~1170‰ for iron-reducing conditions. The lower enrichment in iron columns was related to the lower biological activity observed with lower yields of RNA and cell numbers in the column effluents. The carbon isotope shift in the sulfate-reducing ~198 to ~1960‰ for sulfate-reducing conditions reflecting the lower levels of the lactate in these columns. Additionally, in two of the sulfate columns, almost complete fermentation of the lactate occurred, producing acetate and propionate with the labeled carbon signature, but relatively smaller amounts of inorganic carbon. For all electron-accepting conditions, TOC yielded similar δ13C values as lactate stock solutions. Differences in C use efficiency, metabolic rate or metabolic pathway contributed to the differing TOC δ13C to DIC δ13C ratios between treatments

  13. Metabolism of [U-13C]glucose in Human Brain Tumors In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Elizabeth A.; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Bachoo, Robert M.; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Raisanen, Jack; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Jindal, Ashish; Jeffrey, F. Mark; Choi, Changho; Madden, Christopher; Mathews, Dana; Pascual, Juan M.; Mickey, Bruce E.; Malloy, Craig R.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) and brain metastases demonstrate avid uptake of 18fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) by positron emission tomography (PET) and display perturbations of intracellular metabolite pools by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). These observations suggest that metabolic reprogramming contributes to brain tumor growth in vivo. The Warburg effect, excess metabolism of glucose to lactate in the presence of oxygen, is a hallmark of cancer cells in culture. FDG-positive tumors are assumed to metabolize glucose in a similar manner, with high rates of lactate formation compared to mitochondrial glucose oxidation, but few studies have specifically examined the metabolic fates of glucose in vivo. In particular, the capacity of human brain malignancies to oxidize glucose in the tricarboxylic acid cycle is unknown. Here we studied the metabolism of human brain tumors in situ. [U-13C]glucose was infused during surgical resection, and tumor samples were subsequently subjected to 13C NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of tumor metabolites revealed lactate production, as expected. We also determined that pyruvate dehydrogenase, turnover of the TCA cycle, anaplerosis and de novo glutamine and glycine synthesis contributed significantly to the ultimate disposition of glucose carbon. Surprisingly, less than 50% of the acetyl-CoA pool was derived from blood-borne glucose, suggesting that additional substrates contribute to tumor bioenergetics. This study illustrates a convenient approach that capitalizes on the high information content of 13C NMR spectroscopy and enables the analysis of intermediary metabolism in diverse malignancies growing in their native microenvironment. PMID:22419606

  14. Metabolic phenotyping of the diseased rat heart using 13C-substrates and ex vivo perfusion in the working mode.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Geneviève; Khairallah, Maya; Bouchard, Bertrand; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare energy substrate fluxes through metabolic pathways leading to mitochondrial citrate synthesis and release in normal and diseased rat hearts using 13C-substrates and mass isotopomer analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). This study was prompted by our previous finding of a modulated citrate release by perfused rat hearts and by the possibility that a dysregulated myocardial citrate release represents a specific chronic alteration of energy metabolism in cardiac patients. The 15-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) was chosen as our animal model of disease and the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat as its matched control. Ex vivo work-performing hearts were perfused with a semi-recirculating buffer containing physiological concentrations of unlabeled (glucose) and 13C-labeled ([U-13C3](lactate + pyruvate) and/or [1-(13)C]oleate) substrates. In parallel to the continuous monitoring of indices of the heart's functional and physiological status, the following metabolic parameters were documented: (i) citrate release rates and citric acid cycle intermediate tissue levels, (ii) the contribution of fatty acids as well as pyruvate decarboxylation and carboxylation to citrate synthesis, and (iii) lactate and pyruvate uptake and efflux rates. Working hearts from both rat species showed a similar percent contribution of carbohydrates for citrate synthesis through decarboxylation (70%) and carboxylation (10%). SHR hearts showed the following metabolic alterations: a higher citrate release rate, which was associated with a parallel increase in its tissue level, a lower contribution of oleate beta-oxidation to citrate synthesis, and an accelerated efflux rate of unlabeled lactate from glycolysis. These metabolic changes were not explained by differences in myocardial oxygen consumption, cardiac performance or efficiency, nor correlated with indices of tissue necrosis or ischemia. This study demonstrates how the

  15. Probing pyruvate metabolism in normal and mutant fibroblast cell lines using 13C-labeled mass isotopomer analysis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Riazi, Roya; Khairallah, Maya; Cameron, Jessie M; Pencharz, Paul B; Des Rosiers, Christine; Robinson, Brian H

    2009-12-01

    Fibroblast cell lines are frequently used to diagnose genetic mitochondrial defects in children. The effect of enzyme deficiency on overall flux rate through metabolic pathways is, however, not generally considered. We have transposed an experimental paradigm that was developed for isolated perfused organs using (13)C-labeled substrates and (13)C-isotopomer analysis to probe pyruvate mitochondrial metabolism in cultured human fibroblast cell lines with normal or genetically mutant pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC) or carboxylation (PC) activity. Cells were incubated with 1mM [U-(13)C]pyruvate, and the (13)C-molar percent enrichment (MPE) of intracellular pyruvate, citrate, malate (as a surrogate of oxaloacetate) and aspartate was assessed by mass spectrometry. We estimated various flux ratios relevant to metabolic pathways involved in energy production, namely pyruvate formation, PDC, PC, and citrate recycling in the citric acid cycle (CAC). In all cell lines, exogenous pyruvate was predominately decarboxylated (PC/PDC ratios 0.01-0.3). PC-deficient cell lines displayed an expected negligible contribution of PC flux to oxaloacetate formation for citrate synthesis (PC/CS), which was associated with a greater contribution of PDC to acetyl-CoA formation (PDC/CS), and greater recycling of (13)C-labeled citrate into the CAC. In PDH-deficient cell lines, metabolic flux alterations were most apparent in cells with more than 50% reduction in enzyme activity. This led to an unexpected lower PC/CS flux ratio, while the PDC/CS flux ratio was unchanged. These data illustrate the usefulness of this approach in identifying unexpected metabolic consequences of genetic defects related to pyruvate metabolism.

  16. Hyperpolarized 13C dehydroascorbate as an endogenous redox sensor for in vivo metabolic imaging.

    PubMed

    Keshari, Kayvan R; Kurhanewicz, John; Bok, Robert; Larson, Peder E Z; Vigneron, Daniel B; Wilson, David M

    2011-11-15

    Reduction and oxidation (redox) chemistry is involved in both normal and abnormal cellular function, in processes as diverse as circadian rhythms and neurotransmission. Intracellular redox is maintained by coupled reactions involving NADPH, glutathione (GSH), and vitamin C, as well as their corresponding oxidized counterparts. In addition to functioning as enzyme cofactors, these reducing agents have a critical role in dealing with reactive oxygen species (ROS), the toxic products of oxidative metabolism seen as culprits in aging, neurodegenerative disease, and ischemia/ reperfusion injury. Despite this strong relationship between redox and human disease, methods to interrogate a redox pair in vivo are limited. Here we report the development of [1-(13)C] dehydroascorbate [DHA], the oxidized form of Vitamin C, as an endogenous redox sensor for in vivo imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy. In murine models, hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] DHA was rapidly converted to [1-(13)C] vitamin C within the liver, kidneys, and brain, as well as within tumor in a transgenic prostate cancer mouse. This result is consistent with what has been previously described for the DHA/Vitamin C redox pair, and points to a role for hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] DHA in characterizing the concentrations of key intracellular reducing agents, including GSH. More broadly, these findings suggest a prognostic role for this new redox sensor in determining vulnerability of both normal and abnormal tissues to ROS.

  17. Interaction between rhizosphere microorganisms and plant roots: 13C fluxes in the rhizosphere after pulse labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevdokimov, I. V.; Ruser, R.; Buegger, F.; Marx, M.; Munch, J. C.

    2007-07-01

    The input dynamics of labeled C into pools of soil organic matter and CO2 fluxes from soil were studied in a pot experiment with the pulse labeling of oats and corn under a 13CO2 atmosphere, and the contribution of the root and microbial respiration to the emission of CO2 from the soil was determined from the fluxes of labeled C in the microbial biomass and the evolved carbon dioxide. A considerable amount of 13C (up to 96% of the total amount of the label found in the rhizosphere soil) was incorporated into the biomass of the rhizosphere microorganisms. The diurnal fluctuations of the labeled C pools in the microbial biomass, dissolved organic carbon, and CO2 released in the rhizosphere of oats and corn were related to the day/night changes, i.e., to the on and off periods of the photosynthetic activity of the plants. The average contribution of the corn root respiration (70% of the total CO2 emission from the soil surface) was higher than that of the oats roots (44%), which was related to the lower incorporation of rhizodeposit carbon into the microbial biomass in the soil under the corn plants than in the soil under the oats plants.

  18. Increased tricarboxylic acid cycle flux in rat brain during forepaw stimulation detected with 1H[13C]NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Hyder, F; Chase, J R; Behar, K L; Mason, G F; Siddeek, M; Rothman, D L; Shulman, R G

    1996-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy was used to test recent proposals that the additional energy required for brain activation is provided through nonoxidative glycolysis. Using localized NMR spectroscopic methods, the rate of C4-glutamate isotopic turnover from infused [1-(13)C]glucose was measured in the somatosensory cortex of rat brain both at rest and during forepaw stimulation. Analysis of the glutamate turnover data using a mathematical model of cerebral glucose metabolism showed that the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux [(V(TCA)] increased from 0.49 +/- 0.03 at rest to 1.48 +/- 0.82 micromol/g/min during stimulation (P < 0.01). The minimum fraction of C4-glutamate derived from C1-glucose was approximately 75%, and this fraction was found in both the resting and stimulated rats. Hence, the percentage increase in oxidative cerebral metabolic rate of glucose use (CMRglc) equals the percentage increases in V(TCA) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2). Comparison with previous work for the same rat model, which measured total CMRglc [Ueki, M., Linn, F. & Hossman, K. A. (1988) J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab. 8, 486-4941, indicates that oxidative CMRglc supplies the majority of energy during sustained brain activation. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8755523

  19. Determining the in vivo regulation of cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase based on label flux from hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Marie A; Atherton, Helen J; Heather, Lisa C; Griffin, Julian L; Clarke, Kieran; Radda, George K; Tyler, Damian J

    2011-10-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a key regulator of cardiac substrate selection and is regulated by both pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)-mediated phosphorylation and feedback inhibition. The extent to which chronic upregulation of PDK protein levels, acutely increased PDK activity and acute feedback inhibition limit PDH flux remains unclear because existing in vitro assessment methods inherently disrupt the regulation of the enzyme complex. We have demonstrated previously that hyperpolarised (13)C-labelled metabolic tracers coupled with MRS can monitor flux through PDH in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine the relative contributions of acute and chronic changes in PDK and PDH activities to in vivo myocardial PDH flux. We examined both fed and fasted rats with either hyperpolarised [1-(13)C]pyruvate alone or hyperpolarised [1-(13)C]pyruvate co-infused with malate [to modulate mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH/NAD(+)) and acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA)/CoA ratios, which alter both PDH activity and flux]. To confirm the metabolic fate of infused malate, we performed in vitro (1)H NMR spectroscopy on cardiac tissue extracts. We observed that, in fed rats, where PDH activity was high, the presence of malate increased PDH flux by 27%, whereas, in the fasted state, malate infusion had no effect on PDH flux. These observations suggest that pyruvate oxidation is limited by feedback inhibition from acetyl-CoA only when PDH activity is high. Therefore, in the case of PDH, and potentially other enzymes, hyperpolarised (13)C MRI can be used to assess noninvasively enzymatic regulation.

  20. Tracing metabolic pathways of lipid biosynthesis in ectomycorrhizal fungi from position-specific 13C-labelling in glucose.

    PubMed

    Scandellari, Francesca; Hobbie, Erik A; Ouimette, Andrew P; Stucker, Valerie K

    2009-12-01

    Six position-specific (13)C-labelled isotopomers of glucose were supplied to the ectomycorrhizal fungi Suillus pungens and Tricholoma flavovirens. From the resulting distribution of (13)C among fungal PLFAs, the overall order and contribution of each glucose atom to fatty acid (13)C enrichment was: C6 (approximately 31%) > C5 (approximately 25%) > C1 (approximately 18%) > C2 (approximately 18%) > C3 (approximately 8%) > C4 (approximately 1%). These data were used to parameterize a metabolic model of the relative fluxes from glucose degradation to lipid synthesis. Our data revealed that a higher amount of carbon is directed to glycolysis than to the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (60% and 40% respectively) and that a significant part flows through these pathways more than once (73%) due to the reversibility of some glycolysis reactions. Surprisingly, 95% of carbon cycled through glyoxylate prior to incorporation into lipids, possibly to consume the excess of acetyl-CoA produced during fatty acid turnover. Our approach provides a rigorous framework for analysing lipid biosynthesis in fungi. In addition, this approach could ultimately improve the interpretation of isotopic patterns at natural abundance in field studies.

  1. Hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate mouse brain metabolism with absorptive-mode EPSI at 1 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloushev, Vesselin Z.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Correa, Fabian; Granlund, Kristin L.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2017-02-01

    The expected signal in echo-planar spectroscopic imaging experiments was explicitly modeled jointly in spatial and spectral dimensions. Using this as a basis, absorptive-mode type detection can be achieved by appropriate choice of spectral delays and post-processing techniques. We discuss the effects of gradient imperfections and demonstrate the implementation of this sequence at low field (1.05 T), with application to hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate imaging of the mouse brain. The sequence achieves sufficient signal-to-noise to monitor the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate to lactate in the mouse brain. Hyperpolarized pyruvate imaging of mouse brain metabolism using an absorptive-mode EPSI sequence can be applied to more sophisticated murine disease and treatment models. The simple modifications presented in this work, which permit absorptive-mode detection, are directly translatable to human clinical imaging and generate improved absorptive-mode spectra without the need for refocusing pulses.

  2. Hyperpolarized [1,4-13C]-Diethylsuccinate: A Potential DNP Substrate for In Vivo Metabolic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Billingsley, Kelvin L.; Josan, Sonal; Park, Jae Mo; Tee, Sui Seng; Spielman-Sun, Eleanor; Hurd, Ralph; Mayer, Dirk; Spielman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) performs an essential role in the regulation of energy and metabolism, and deficiencies in this pathway are commonly correlated with various diseases. However, the development of non-invasive techniques for the assessment of the cycle in vivo has remained challenging. In this work, the applicability of a novel imaging agent, [1,4-13C]-diethylsuccinate, for hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging of the TCA cycle was explored. In vivo spectroscopic studies were conducted in conjunction with in vitro analyses to determine the metabolic fate of the imaging agent. Contrary to previous reports (Zacharias, N. M. et. al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 934-943), [13C]-labeled diethylsuccinate was primarily metabolized to succinate-derived products not originating from TCA cycle metabolism. These results illustrate potential issues of utilizing dialkyl ester analogs of TCA cycle intermediates as molecular probes for hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging. PMID:24421249

  3. 15N and 13C NMR Determination of Allantoin Metabolism in Developing Soybean Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Coker, George T.; Schaefer, Jacob

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of allantoin by immature cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max L. cv Elf) grown in culture was investigated using solid state 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance. All of the nitrogens of allantoin were incorporated into protein in a manner similar to that of each other and to the amide nitrogen of glutamine. The C-2 of allantoin was not incorporated into cellular material; presumably it was lost as CO2. About 50% of the C-5 of allantoin was incorporated into cellular material as a methylene carbon; the other 50% was presumably also lost as CO2. The 13C-15N bonds of [5-13C;1-15N] and [2-13C;1,3-15N]allantoin were broken prior to the incorporation of the nitrogens into protein. These data are consistent with allantoin's degradation to two molecules of urea and one two-carbon fragment. Cotyledons grown on allantoin as a source of nitrogen accumulated 21% of the nitrogen of cotyledons grown on glutamine. Only 50% of the nitrogen of the degraded allantoin was incorporated into the cotyledon as organic nitrogen; the other 50% was recovered as NH4+ in the media in which the cotyledons had been grown. The latter results suggests that the lower accumulation of nitrogen by cotyledons grown on allantoin was in part due to failure to assimilate NH4+ produced from allantoin. The seed coats had a higher activity of glutamine synthetase and a higher rate of allantoin degradation than cotyledons indicating that seed coats play an important role in the assimilation and degradation of allantoin. PMID:16663995

  4. Real-time cardiac metabolism assessed with hyperpolarized [1-13C]acetate in a large-animal model

    PubMed Central

    Flori, Alessandra; Liserani, Matteo; Frijia, Francesca; Giovannetti, Giulio; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Casieri, Valentina; Positano, Vincenzo; Aquaro, Giovanni Donato; Recchia, Fabio A.; Santarelli, Maria Filomena; Landini, Luigi; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Menichetti, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Dissolution-Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (dissolution-DNP) for Magnetic Resonance (MR) Spectroscopic Imaging has recently emerged as a novel technique for non invasive studies of the metabolic fate of biomolecules in vivo. Since acetate is the most abundant extra- and intra-cellular short-chain fatty acid, we focused on [1-13C]acetate as a promising candidate for a chemical probe to study myocardial metabolism of beating heart. Dissolution-DNP procedure of Na[1-13C]acetate for in vivo cardiac applications with 3T MR scanner was optimized in pigs during bolus injection of doses up to 3 mmoles. The Na[1-13C]acetate formulation was characterized by a liquid-state polarization of 14.2% and T1Eff in vivo of 17.6 ± 1.7 s. In vivo Na[1-13C]acetate kinetic displayed a bimodal shape: [1-13C]acetyl carnitine (AcC) was detected in a slice covering the cardiac volume, and the signal of 13C-acetate and 13C-AcC was modeled using the total Area Under the Curve (AUC) for kinetic analysis. A good correlation was found between the ratio AUC(AcC)/AUC(acetate) and the apparent kinetic constant of metabolic conversion kAcC/r1 from [1-13C]acetate to [1-13C]AcC. Our study proved the feasibility and limitations of administration of large doses of hyperpolarized [1-13C]acetate with dissolution DNP to study by MR spectroscopy the myocardial conversion of [1-13C]acetate in [1-13C]acetyl-carnitine generated by acetyltransferase in healthy pigs. PMID:25201079

  5. Energy metabolism in the rat cortex under thiopental anaesthesia measured In Vivo by (13) C MRS.

    PubMed

    Sonnay, Sarah; Duarte, João M N; Just, Nathalie; Gruetter, Rolf

    2017-03-19

    Barbiturates, commonly used as general anaesthetics, depress neuronal activity and thus cerebral metabolism. Moreover, they are likely to disrupt the metabolic support of astrocytes to neurons, as well as the uptake of nutrients from circulation. By employing (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in vivo at high magnetic field, we characterized neuronal and astrocytic pathways of energy metabolism in the rat cortex under thiopental anaesthesia. The neuronal tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle rate was 0.46 ± 0.02 µmol/g/min, and the rate of the glutamate-glutamine cycle was 0.09 ± 0.02 µmol/g/min. In astrocytes, the TCA cycle rate was 0.16 ± 0.02 µmol/g/min, accounting for a quarter of whole brain glucose oxidation, pyruvate carboxylase rate was 0.02 ± 0.01 µmol/g/min, and glutamine synthetase was 0.12 ± 0.01 µmol/g/min. Relative to previous experiments under light α-chloralose anaesthesia, thiopental reduced oxidative metabolism in neurons and even more so in astrocytes. Interestingly, total oxidative metabolism in the cortex under thiopental anaesthesia surpassed the rate of pyruvate production by glycolysis, indicating substantial utilisation of substrates other than glucose, likely plasma lactate. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Methods and advances in metabolic flux analysis: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is one of the pillars of metabolic engineering. Over the past three decades, it has been widely used to quantify intracellular metabolic fluxes in both native (wild type) and engineered biological systems. Through MFA, changes in metabolic pathway fluxes are quantified that result from genetic and/or environmental interventions. This information, in turn, provides insights into the regulation of metabolic pathways and may suggest new targets for further metabolic engineering of the strains. In this mini-review, we discuss and classify the various methods of MFA that have been developed, which include stoichiometric MFA, (13)C metabolic flux analysis, isotopic non-stationary (13)C metabolic flux analysis, dynamic metabolic flux analysis, and (13)C dynamic metabolic flux analysis. For each method, we discuss key advantages and limitations and conclude by highlighting important recent advances in flux analysis approaches.

  7. Ursodeoxycholic acid treatment of hepatic steatosis: a (13)C NMR metabolic study.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Patrícia M; Jones, John G; Rolo, Anabela P; Palmeira, Carlos M M; Carvalho, Rui A

    2011-11-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is commonly used for the treatment of hepatobiliary disorders. In this study, we tested whether a 4-week treatment with this bile acid (12-15 mg/kg/day) could improve hepatic fatty acid oxidation in obese Zucker rats - a model for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and steatosis. After 24 h of fasting, livers were perfused with physiological concentrations of [U-(13) C]nonesterified fatty acids and [3-(13) C]lactate/[3-(13) C]pyruvate. Steatosis was associated with abundant intracellular glucose, lactate, alanine and methionine, and low concentrations of choline and betaine. Steatotic livers also showed the highest output of glucose and lactate. Glucose and glycolytic products were mostly unlabeled, indicating active glycogenolysis and glycolysis after 24 h of fasting. UDCA treatment resulted in a general amelioration of liver metabolic abnormalities with a decrease in intracellular glucose and lactate, as well as their output. Hepatic betaine and methionine were also normalized after UDCA treatment, suggesting the amelioration of anti-oxidative defenses. Choline levels were not affected by the bile acid, which may indicate a deficient synthesis of very-low-density lipoproteins. The percentage contribution of [U-(13) C]nonesterified fatty acids to acetyl-coenzyme A entering the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was significantly lower in livers from Zucker obese rats relative to control rats: 23.1 ± 4.9% versus 44.1 ± 2.7% (p < 0.01). UDCA treatment did not alter significantly fatty acid oxidation in control rats, but improved significantly oxidation in Zucker obese rats to 46.0 ± 6.1% (p > 0.05), comparable with control group values. The TCA cycle activity subsequent to fatty acid oxidation was reduced in steatotic livers and improved when UDCA was administered (0.24 ± 0.04 versus 0.37 ± 0.05, p = 0.05). We further suggest that the mechanism of action of UDCA is either related to the activity of the

  8. Mechanisms linking metabolism of Helicobacter pylori to (18)O and (13)C-isotopes of human breath CO2.

    PubMed

    Som, Suman; De, Anulekha; Banik, Gourab Dutta; Maity, Abhijit; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Pal, Mithun; Daschakraborty, Sunil B; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Jana, Subhra; Pradhan, Manik

    2015-06-03

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilize glucose during metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms linking to oxygen-18 ((18)O) and carbon-13 ((13)C)-isotopic fractionations of breath CO2 during glucose metabolism are poorly understood. Using the excretion dynamics of (18)O/(16)O and (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios of breath CO2, we found that individuals with Helicobacter pylori infections exhibited significantly higher isotopic enrichments of (18)O in breath CO2 during the 2h-glucose metabolism regardless of the isotopic nature of the substrate, while no significant enrichments of (18)O in breath CO2 were manifested in individuals without the infections. In contrast, the (13)C-isotopic enrichments of breath CO2 were significantly higher in individuals with Helicobacter pylori compared to individuals without infections in response to (13)C-enriched glucose uptake, whereas a distinguishable change of breath (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios was also evident when Helicobacter pylori utilize natural glucose. Moreover, monitoring the (18)O and (13)C-isotopic exchange in breath CO2 successfully diagnosed the eradications of Helicobacter pylori infections following a standard therapy. Our findings suggest that breath (12)C(18)O(16)O and (13)C(16)O(16)O can be used as potential molecular biomarkers to distinctively track the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori and also for eradication purposes and thus may open new perspectives into the pathogen's physiology along with isotope-specific non-invasive diagnosis of the infection.

  9. Effect of glyphosate on plant cell metabolism. 31P and 13C NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Gout, E; Bligny, R; Genix, P; Tissut, M; Douce, R

    1992-01-01

    The effect of glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl glycine; the active ingredient of Roundup herbicide) on plant cells metabolism was analysed by 31P and 13C NMR using suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L) cells. Cells were compressed in the NMR tube and perfused with an original arrangement enabling a tight control of the circulating nutrient medium. Addition of 1 mM glyphosate to the nutrient medium triggered the accumulation of shikimate (20-30 mumol g-1 cell wet weight within 50 h) and shikimate 3-phosphate (1-1.5 mumol g-1 cell wet weight within 50 h). From in vivo spectra it was demonstrated that these two compounds were accumulated in the cytoplasm where their concentrations reached potentially lethal levels. On the other hand, glyphosate present in the cytoplasmic compartment was extensively metabolized to yield aminomethylphosphonic acid which also accumulated in the cytoplasm. Finally, the results presented in this paper indicate that although the cell growth was stopped by glyphosate the cell respiration rates and the level of energy metabolism intermediates remained unchanged.

  10. Effects of fasting on serial measurements of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate metabolism in tumors.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Eva M; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Gallagher, Ferdia A; Kettunen, Mikko I; Kennedy, Brett W C; Vowler, Sarah L; Burling, Keith A; Brindle, Kevin M

    2016-08-01

    Imaging of the metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate has shown considerable promise in preclinical studies in oncology, particularly for the assessment of early treatment response. The repeatability of measurements of (13) C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate was determined in a murine lymphoma model in fasted and non-fasted animals. The fasted state showed lower intra-individual variability, although the [1-(13) C]lactate/[1-(13) C]pyruvate signal ratio was significantly greater in fasted than in non-fasted mice, which may be explained by the higher tumor lactate concentrations in fasted animals. These results indicate that the fasted state may be preferable for the measurement of (13) C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate, as it reduces the variability and therefore should make it easier to detect the effects of therapy. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effects of fasting on serial measurements of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate metabolism in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Eva M.; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Gallagher, Ferdia A.; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Kennedy, Brett W. C.; Vowler, Sarah L.; Burling, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the metabolism of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate has shown considerable promise in preclinical studies in oncology, particularly for the assessment of early treatment response. The repeatability of measurements of 13C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate was determined in a murine lymphoma model in fasted and non‐fasted animals. The fasted state showed lower intra‐individual variability, although the [1‐13C]lactate/[1‐13C]pyruvate signal ratio was significantly greater in fasted than in non‐fasted mice, which may be explained by the higher tumor lactate concentrations in fasted animals. These results indicate that the fasted state may be preferable for the measurement of 13C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate, as it reduces the variability and therefore should make it easier to detect the effects of therapy. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27309986

  12. Faster flux of neurotransmitter glutamate during seizure - Evidence from 13C-enrichment of extracellular glutamate in kainate rat model.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Keiko

    2017-01-01

    The objective is to examine how the flux of neurotransmitter glutamate from neurons to the extracellular fluid, as measured by the rate of 13C enrichment of extracellular glutamate (GLUECF), changes in response to seizures in the kainate-induced rat model of temporal-lobe epilepsy. Following unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainate, GLUECF was collected by microdialysis from the CA1/CA3 region of awake rats, in combination with EEG recording of chronic-phase recurrent seizures and intravenous infusion of [2,5-13C]glucose. The 13C enrichment of GLUECF C5 at ~ 10 picomol level was measured by gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry. The rate of 13C enrichment, expressed as the increase of the fractional enrichment/min, was 0.0029 ± 0.0001/min in frequently seizing rats (n = 4); this was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than in the control (0.00167 ± 0.0001/min; n = 6) or in rats with infrequent seizures (0.00172 ± 0.0001/min; n = 6). This result strongly suggests that the flux of the excitatory neurotransmitter from neurons to the extracellular fluid is significantly increased by frequent seizures. The extracellular [12C + 13C]glutamate concentration increased progressively in frequently seizing rats. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the observed seizure-induced high flux of glutamate overstimulated glutamate receptors, which triggered a chain reaction of excitation in the CA3 recurrent glutamatergic networks. The rate of 13C enrichment of extracellular glutamine (GLNECF) at C5 was 0.00299 ± 0.00027/min in frequently seizing rats, which was higher (p < 0.05) than in controls (0.00227 ± 0.00008/min). For the first time in vivo, this study examined the effects of epileptic seizures on fluxes of the neurotransmitter glutamate and its precursor glutamine in the extracellular fluid of the hippocampus. The advantages, limitations and the potential for improvement of this approach for pre-clinical and clinical studies of temporal-lobe epilepsy

  13. Characterization of Acetate and Pyruvate Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Zea mays by 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Dennis J.; Lee, Rino Y.; Adams, Douglas O.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been applied to the direct observation of acetate and pyruvate metabolism in suspension cultures of Zea mays (var Black Mexican Sweet). Growth of the corn cells in the presence of 2 millimolar [2-13C]acetate resulted in a rapid uptake of the substrate from the medium and initial labeling (0-4 hours) of primarily the intracellular glutamate and malate pools. Further metabolism of these intermediates resulted in labeling of glutamine, aspartate, and alanine. With [1-13C]acetate as the substrate very little incorporation into intermediary metabolites was observed in the 13C NMR spectra due to loss of the label as 13CO2. Uptake of [3-13C]pyruvate by the cells was considerably slower than with [2-13C]acetate; however, the labelling patterns were similar with the exception of increased [3-13C] alanine generation with pyruvate as the substrate. Growth of the cells for up to 96 hours with 2 millimolar [3-13C]pyruvate ultimately resulted in labeling of valine, leucine, isoleucine, threonine, and the polyamine putrescine. PMID:16665721

  14. Reduced mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity has a strong effect on photorespiratory metabolism as revealed by 13C labelling

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Pernilla; Keech, Olivier; Stenlund, Hans; Gardeström, Per; Moritz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) catalyses the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate (OAA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Its activity is important for redox control of the mitochondrial matrix, through which it may participate in regulation of TCA cycle turnover. In Arabidopsis, there are two isoforms of mMDH. Here, we investigated to which extent the lack of the major isoform, mMDH1 accounting for about 60% of the activity, affected leaf metabolism. In air, rosettes of mmdh1 plants were only slightly smaller than wild type plants although the fresh weight was decreased by about 50%. In low CO2 the difference was much bigger, with mutant plants accumulating only 14% of fresh weight as compared to wild type. To investigate the metabolic background to the differences in growth, we developed a 13CO2 labelling method, using a custom-built chamber that enabled simultaneous treatment of sets of plants under controlled conditions. The metabolic profiles were analysed by gas- and liquid- chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate the metabolic adjustments between wild type and mmdh1. The genotypes responded similarly to high CO2 treatment both with respect to metabolite pools and 13C incorporation during a 2-h treatment. However, under low CO2 several metabolites differed between the two genotypes and, interestingly most of these were closely associated with photorespiration. We found that while the glycine/serine ratio increased, a concomitant altered glutamine/glutamate/α-ketoglutarate relation occurred. Taken together, our results indicate that adequate mMDH activity is essential to shuttle reductants out from the mitochondria to support the photorespiratory flux, and strengthen the idea that photorespiration is tightly intertwined with peripheral metabolic reactions. PMID:26889011

  15. Acetate stimulates flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle in rabbit renal proximal tubules synthesizing glutamine from alanine: a 13C NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Dugelay, S; Chauvin, M F; Megnin-Chanet, F; Martin, G; Laréal, M C; Lhoste, J M; Baverel, G

    1999-01-01

    Although glutamine synthesis has a major role in the control of acid-base balance and ammonia detoxification in the kidney of herbivorous species, very little is known about the regulation of this process. We therefore studied the influence of acetate, which is readily metabolized by the kidney and whose metabolism is accompanied by the production of bicarbonate, on glutamine synthesis from variously labelled [(13)C]alanine and [(14)C]alanine molecules in isolated rabbit renal proximal tubules. With alanine as sole exogenous substrate, glutamine and, to a smaller extent, glutamate and CO(2), were the only significant products of the metabolism of this amino acid, which was removed at high rates. Absolute fluxes through the enzymes involved in alanine conversion into glutamine were assessed by using a novel model describing the corresponding reactions in conjunction with the (13)C NMR, and to a smaller extent, the radioactive and enzymic data. The presence of acetate (5 mM) led to a large stimulation of fluxes through citrate synthase and alpha-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. These effects were accompanied by increases in the removal of alanine, in the accumulation of glutamate and in flux through the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase. Acetate did not alter fluxes through glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase; as a result, acetate did not change the accumulation of ammonia, which was negligible under both experimental conditions. We conclude that acetate, which seems to be an important energy-provider to the rabbit renal proximal tubule, simultaneously traps as glutamate the extra nitrogen removed as alanine, thus preventing the release of additional ammonia by the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. PMID:10477267

  16. The aspartate metabolism pathway is differentiable in human hepatocellular carcinoma: transcriptomics and (13) C-isotope based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Darpolor, Moses M; Basu, Sankha S; Worth, Andrew; Nelson, David S; Clarke-Katzenberg, Regina H; Glickson, Jerry D; Kaplan, David E; Blair, Ian A

    2014-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the primary form of human adult liver malignancy, is a highly aggressive tumor with average survival rates that are currently less than a year following diagnosis. Although bioinformatic analyses have indicated differentially expressed genes and cancer related mutations in HCC, integrated genetic and metabolic pathway analyses remain to be investigated. Herein, gene (i.e. messenger RNA, mRNA) enrichment analysis was performed to delineate significant alterations of metabolic pathways in HCC. The objective of this study was to investigate the pathway of aspartate metabolism in HCC of humans. Coupled with transcriptomic (i.e. mRNA) and NMR based metabolomics of human tissue extracts, we utilized liquid chromatography mass spectrometry based metabolomics analysis of stable [U-(13) C6 ]glucose metabolism or [U-(13) C5 ,(15) N2 ]glutamine metabolism of HCC cell culture. Our results indicated that aspartate metabolism is a significant and differentiable metabolic pathway of HCC compared with non-tumor liver (p value < 0.0001). In addition, branched-chain amino acid metabolism (p value < 0.0001) and tricarboxylic acid metabolism (p value < 0.0001) are significant and differentiable. Statistical analysis of measurable NMR metabolites indicated that at least two of the group means were significantly different for the metabolites alanine (p value = 0.0013), succinate (p value = 0.0001), lactate (p value = 0.0114), glycerophosphoethanolamine (p value = 0.015), and inorganic phosphate (p value = 0.0001). However, (13) C isotopic enrichment analysis of these metabolites revealed less than 50% isotopic enrichment with either stable [U-(13) C6 ]glucose metabolism or [U-(13) C5 ,(15) N2 ]glutamine. This may indicate the differential account of total metabolite pool versus de novo metabolites from a (13) C labeled substrate. The ultimate translation of these findings will be to determine putative enzyme activity via

  17. Hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate: a metabolic imaging biomarker of IDH1 mutational status in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Woods, Sarah M.; Cai, Larry; Eriksson, Pia; Robinson, Aaron E.; Lupo, Janine M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Pieper, Russell O.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene are among the most prevalent in low-grade glioma and secondary glioblastoma, represent an early pathogenic event, and are associated with epigenetically-driven modulations of metabolism. Of particular interest is the recently uncovered relationship between the IDH1 mutation and decreased activity of the branched-chain amino acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1) enzyme. Non-invasive imaging methods that can assess BCAT1 activity could therefore improve detection of mutant IDH1 tumors and aid in developing and monitoring new targeted therapies. BCAT1 catalyzes the transamination of branched-chain amino acids while converting α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to glutamate. Our goal was to use 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy to probe the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C] α-KG to hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate as a readout of BCAT1 activity. We investigated two isogenic glioblastoma lines that differed only in their IDH1 status, and performed experiments in live cells and in vivo in rat orthotopic tumors. Following injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C] α-KG, hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate production was detected both in cells and in vivo, and the level of hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate was significantly lower in mutant IDH1 cells and tumors compared to their IDH1-wild-type counterparts. Importantly however, in our cells the observed drop in hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate was likely mediated not only by a drop in BCAT1 activity, but also by reductions in aspartate transaminase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities, suggesting additional metabolic reprogramming at least in our model. Hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate could thus inform on multiple mutant IDH1-associated metabolic events that mediate reduced glutamate production. PMID:24876103

  18. Reproducibility study for free-breathing measurements of pyruvate metabolism using hyperpolarized (13) C in the heart.

    PubMed

    Lau, Angus Z; Chen, Albert P; Barry, Jennifer; Graham, John J; Dominguez-Viqueira, William; Ghugre, Nilesh R; Wright, Graham A; Cunningham, Charles H

    2013-04-01

    Spatially resolved images of hyperpolarized (13) C substrates and their downstream products provide insight into real-time metabolic processes occurring in vivo. Recently, hyperpolarized (13) C pyruvate has been used to characterize in vivo cardiac metabolism in the rat and pig, but accurate and reproducible measurements remain challenging due to the limited period available for imaging as well as physiological motion. In this article, time-resolved cardiac- and respiratory-gated images of [1-(13) C] pyruvate, [1-(13) C] lactate, and (13) C bicarbonate in the heart are acquired without the need for a breathhold. The robustness of these free-breathing measurements is demonstrated using the time-resolved data to produce a normalized metric of pyruvate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activity in the heart. The values obtained are reproducible in a controlled metabolic state. In a 60-min ischemia/reperfusion model, significant differences in hyperpolarized bicarbonate and lactate, normalized using the left ventricular pyruvate signal, were detected between scans performed at baseline and 45 min after reperfusion. The sequence is anticipated to improve quantitative measurements of cardiac metabolism, leading to feasible validation studies using fewer subjects, and potentially improved diagnosis, serial monitoring, and treatment of cardiac disease in patients.

  19. In vivo and in vitro liver cancer metabolism observed with hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabella, C.; Karlsson, M.; Canapè, C.; Catanzaro, G.; Colombo Serra, S.; Miragoli, L.; Poggi, L.; Uggeri, F.; Venturi, L.; Jensen, P. R.; Lerche, M. H.; Tedoldi, F.

    2013-07-01

    Glutamine metabolism is, with its many links to oncogene expression, considered a crucial step in cancer metabolism and it is thereby a key target for alteration in cancer development. In particular, strong correlations have been reported between oncogene expression and expression and activity of the enzyme glutaminase. This mitochondrial enzyme, which is responsible for the deamidation of glutamine to form glutamate, is overexpressed in many tumour tissues. In animal models, glutaminase expression is correlated with tumour growth rate and it is readily possible to limit tumour growth by suppression of glutaminase activity. In principle, hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy can provide insight to glutamine metabolism and should hence be a valuable tool to study changes in glutaminase activity as tumours progress. However, no such successful in vivo studies have been reported, even though several good biological models have been tested. This may, at least partly, be due to problems in preparing glutamine for hyperpolarization. This paper reports a new and improved preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, which provides a highly sensitive 13C MR marker. With this preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, glutaminase activity in vivo in a rat liver tumour was investigated. Moreover, this marker was also used to measure response to drug treatment in vitro in cancer cells. These examples of [5-13C]glutamine used in tumour models warrant the new preparation to allow metabolic studies with this conditionally essential amino acid.

  20. Estimating Relative Changes of Metabolic Fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Kim, Dongsung; Liu, Xiaojing; Myers, Christopher R.; Locasale, Jason W.

    2014-01-01

    Fluxes are the central trait of metabolism and Kinetic Flux Profiling (KFP) is an effective method of measuring them. To generalize its applicability, we present an extension of the method that estimates the relative changes of fluxes using only relative quantitation of 13C-labeled metabolites. Such features are directly tailored to the more common experiment that performs only relative quantitation and compares fluxes between two conditions. We call our extension rKFP. Moreover, we examine the effects of common missing data and common modeling assumptions on (r)KFP, and provide practical suggestions. We also investigate the selection of measuring times for (r)KFP and provide a simple recipe. We then apply rKFP to 13C-labeled glucose time series data collected from cells under normal and glucose-deprived conditions, estimating the relative flux changes of glycolysis and its branching pathways. We identify an adaptive response in which de novo serine biosynthesis is compromised to maintain the glycolytic flux backbone. Together, these results greatly expand the capabilities of KFP and are suitable for broad biological applications. PMID:25412287

  1. Mechanisms linking metabolism of Helicobacter pylori to 18O and 13C-isotopes of human breath CO2

    PubMed Central

    Som, Suman; De, Anulekha; Banik, Gourab Dutta; Maity, Abhijit; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Pal, Mithun; Daschakraborty, Sunil B.; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Jana, Subhra; Pradhan, Manik

    2015-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilize glucose during metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms linking to oxygen-18 (18O) and carbon-13 (13C)-isotopic fractionations of breath CO2 during glucose metabolism are poorly understood. Using the excretion dynamics of 18O/16O and 13C/12C-isotope ratios of breath CO2, we found that individuals with Helicobacter pylori infections exhibited significantly higher isotopic enrichments of 18O in breath CO2 during the 2h-glucose metabolism regardless of the isotopic nature of the substrate, while no significant enrichments of 18O in breath CO2 were manifested in individuals without the infections. In contrast, the 13C-isotopic enrichments of breath CO2 were significantly higher in individuals with Helicobacter pylori compared to individuals without infections in response to 13C-enriched glucose uptake, whereas a distinguishable change of breath 13C/12C-isotope ratios was also evident when Helicobacter pylori utilize natural glucose. Moreover, monitoring the 18O and 13C-isotopic exchange in breath CO2 successfully diagnosed the eradications of Helicobacter pylori infections following a standard therapy. Our findings suggest that breath 12C18O16O and 13C16O16O can be used as potential molecular biomarkers to distinctively track the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori and also for eradication purposes and thus may open new perspectives into the pathogen’s physiology along with isotope-specific non-invasive diagnosis of the infection. PMID:26039789

  2. Alterations in Cytosolic and Mitochondrial [U-13C]Glucose Metabolism in a Chronic Epilepsy Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Temporal lobe epilepsy is a common form of adult epilepsy and shows high resistance to treatment. Increasing evidence has suggested that metabolic dysfunction contributes to the development of seizures, with previous studies indicating impairments in brain glucose metabolism. Here we aim to elucidate which pathways involved in glucose metabolism are impaired, by tracing the hippocampal metabolism of injected [U-13C]glucose (i.p.) during the chronic stage of the pilocarpine-status epilepticus mouse model of epilepsy. The enrichment of 13C in the intermediates of glycolysis and the TCA cycle were quantified in hippocampal extracts using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectroscopy, along with the measurement of the activities of enzymes in each pathway. We show that there is reduced incorporation of 13C in the intermediates of glycolysis, with the percentage enrichment of all downstream intermediates being highly correlated with those of glucose 6-phosphate. Furthermore, the activities of all enzymes in this pathway including hexokinase and phosphofructokinase were unaltered, suggesting that glucose uptake is reduced in this model without further impairments in glycolysis itself. The key findings were 33% and 55% losses in the activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, respectively, along with reduced 13C enrichment in TCA cycle intermediates. This lower 13C enrichment is best explained in part by the reduced enrichment in glycolytic intermediates, whereas the reduction of key TCA cycle enzyme activity indicates that TCA cycling is also impaired in the hippocampal formation. Together, these data suggest that multitarget approaches may be necessary to restore metabolism in the epileptic brain. PMID:28303258

  3. Alterations in Cytosolic and Mitochondrial [U-(13)C]Glucose Metabolism in a Chronic Epilepsy Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Tanya S; Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Hodson, Mark P; Borges, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is a common form of adult epilepsy and shows high resistance to treatment. Increasing evidence has suggested that metabolic dysfunction contributes to the development of seizures, with previous studies indicating impairments in brain glucose metabolism. Here we aim to elucidate which pathways involved in glucose metabolism are impaired, by tracing the hippocampal metabolism of injected [U-(13)C]glucose (i.p.) during the chronic stage of the pilocarpine-status epilepticus mouse model of epilepsy. The enrichment of (13)C in the intermediates of glycolysis and the TCA cycle were quantified in hippocampal extracts using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy, along with the measurement of the activities of enzymes in each pathway. We show that there is reduced incorporation of (13)C in the intermediates of glycolysis, with the percentage enrichment of all downstream intermediates being highly correlated with those of glucose 6-phosphate. Furthermore, the activities of all enzymes in this pathway including hexokinase and phosphofructokinase were unaltered, suggesting that glucose uptake is reduced in this model without further impairments in glycolysis itself. The key findings were 33% and 55% losses in the activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, respectively, along with reduced (13)C enrichment in TCA cycle intermediates. This lower (13)C enrichment is best explained in part by the reduced enrichment in glycolytic intermediates, whereas the reduction of key TCA cycle enzyme activity indicates that TCA cycling is also impaired in the hippocampal formation. Together, these data suggest that multitarget approaches may be necessary to restore metabolism in the epileptic brain.

  4. HYPERPOLARIZED 13C MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ITS USE IN METABOLIC ASSESSMENT OF CULTURED CELLS AND PERFUSED ORGANS

    PubMed Central

    Lumata, Lloyd; Yang, Chendong; Ragavan, Mukundan; Carpenter, Nicholas; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Merritt, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Diseased tissue is often characterized by abnormalities in intermediary metabolism. Observing these alterations in situ may lead to an improved understanding of pathological processes and novel ways to monitor these processes non-invasively in human patients. Although 13C is a stable isotope safe for use in animal models of disease as well as human subjects, its utility as a metabolic tracer has largely been limited to ex vivo analyses employing analytical techniques like mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Neither of these techniques is suitable for non-invasive metabolic monitoring, and the low abundance and poor gyromagnetic ratio of conventional 13C make it a poor nucleus for imaging. However, the recent advent of hyperpolarization methods, particularly dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), make it possible to enhance the spin polarization state of 13C by many orders of magnitude, resulting in a temporary amplification of the signal sufficient for monitoring kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in living tissue through magnetic resonance spectroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging. Here we review DNP techniques to monitor metabolism in cultured cells, perfused hearts, and perfused livers, focusing on our experiences with hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. We present detailed approaches to optimize the DNP procedure, streamline biological sample preparation, and maximize detection of specific metabolic activities. We also discuss practical aspects in the choice of metabolic substrates for hyperpolarization studies, and outline some of the current technical and conceptual challenges in the field, including efforts to use hyperpolarization to quantify metabolic rates in vivo. PMID:26358902

  5. Flux analysis in plant metabolic networks: increasing throughput and coverage.

    PubMed

    Junker, Björn H

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative information about metabolic networks has been mainly obtained at the level of metabolite contents, transcript abundance, and enzyme activities. However, the active process of metabolism is represented by the flow of matter through the pathways. These metabolic fluxes can be predicted by Flux Balance Analysis or determined experimentally by (13)C-Metabolic Flux Analysis. These relatively complicated and time-consuming methods have recently seen significant improvements at the level of coverage and throughput. Metabolic models have developed from single cell models into whole-organism dynamic models. Advances in lab automation and data handling have significantly increased the throughput of flux measurements. This review summarizes advances to increase coverage and throughput of metabolic flux analysis in plants.

  6. Fast volumetric imaging of ethanol metabolism in rat liver with hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Sonal; Spielman, Daniel; Yen, Yi-Fen; Hurd, Ralph; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Mayer, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Rapid, volumetric imaging of hyperpolarized 13C compounds allows the real time measurement of metabolic activity and can be useful in distinguishing between normal and diseased tissues. This work extends a fast 2D under-sampled spiral magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequence to provide volumetric coverage, acquiring a 16×16×12 matrix with a nominal 5 mm isotropic resolution in 4.5 s. The rapid acquisition enables a high temporal resolution for dynamic imaging. This dynamic 3D MRSI method was used to investigate hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate metabolism modulated by the administration of ethanol in rat liver. A significant increase in the pyruvate to lactate conversion was observed in the liver due to the greater availability of NADH from ethanol metabolism. PMID:22331837

  7. Design and Operation of a Continuous 13C and 15N Labeling Chamber for Uniform or Differential, Metabolic and Structural, Plant Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Jennifer L; Reuss, Dan; Pinney, Colin; Boyack, Ty; Haddix, Michelle L; Stewart, Catherine E; Cotrufo, M. Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Tracing rare stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as 13C with 15N, 18O or 2H has the potential to reveal even more information about complex stoichiometric relationships during biogeochemical transformations. Isotope labeled plant material has been used in various studies of litter decomposition and soil organic matter formation1-4. From these and other studies, however, it has become apparent that structural components of plant material behave differently than metabolic components (i.e. leachable low molecular weight compounds) in terms of microbial utilization and long-term carbon storage5-7. The ability to study structural and metabolic components separately provides a powerful new tool for advancing the forefront of ecosystem biogeochemical studies. Here we describe a method for producing 13C and 15N labeled plant material that is either uniformly labeled throughout the plant or differentially labeled in structural and metabolic plant components. Here, we present the construction and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber that can be modified to meet various research needs. Uniformly labeled plant material is produced by continuous labeling from seedling to harvest, while differential labeling is achieved by removing the growing plants from the chamber weeks prior to harvest. Representative results from growing Andropogon gerardii Kaw demonstrate the system's ability to efficiently label plant material at the targeted levels. Through this method we have produced plant material with a 4.4 atom%13C and 6.7 atom%15N uniform plant label, or material that is differentially labeled by up to 1.29 atom%13C and 0.56 atom%15N in its metabolic and structural components (hot water extractable and hot water residual components

  8. Design and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber for uniform or differential, metabolic and structural, plant isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Soong, Jennifer L; Reuss, Dan; Pinney, Colin; Boyack, Ty; Haddix, Michelle L; Stewart, Catherine E; Cotrufo, M Francesca

    2014-01-16

    Tracing rare stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as (13)C with (15)N, (18)O or (2)H has the potential to reveal even more information about complex stoichiometric relationships during biogeochemical transformations. Isotope labeled plant material has been used in various studies of litter decomposition and soil organic matter formation(1-4). From these and other studies, however, it has become apparent that structural components of plant material behave differently than metabolic components (i.e. leachable low molecular weight compounds) in terms of microbial utilization and long-term carbon storage(5-7). The ability to study structural and metabolic components separately provides a powerful new tool for advancing the forefront of ecosystem biogeochemical studies. Here we describe a method for producing (13)C and (15)N labeled plant material that is either uniformly labeled throughout the plant or differentially labeled in structural and metabolic plant components. Here, we present the construction and operation of a continuous (13)C and (15)N labeling chamber that can be modified to meet various research needs. Uniformly labeled plant material is produced by continuous labeling from seedling to harvest, while differential labeling is achieved by removing the growing plants from the chamber weeks prior to harvest. Representative results from growing Andropogon gerardii Kaw demonstrate the system's ability to efficiently label plant material at the targeted levels. Through this method we have produced plant material with a 4.4 atom%(13)C and 6.7 atom%(15)N uniform plant label, or material that is differentially labeled by up to 1.29 atom%(13)C and 0.56 atom%(15)N in its metabolic and structural components (hot water extractable and hot water

  9. Increasing Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Flux as a Treatment for Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: A Combined 13C Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance and Echocardiography Study.

    PubMed

    Le Page, Lydia M; Rider, Oliver J; Lewis, Andrew J; Ball, Vicky; Clarke, Kieran; Johansson, Edvin; Carr, Carolyn A; Heather, Lisa C; Tyler, Damian J

    2015-08-01

    Although diabetic cardiomyopathy is widely recognized, there are no specific treatments available. Altered myocardial substrate selection has emerged as a candidate mechanism behind the development of cardiac dysfunction in diabetes. As pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity appears central to the balance of substrate use, we aimed to investigate the relationship between PDH flux and myocardial function in a rodent model of type 2 diabetes and to explore whether or not increasing PDH flux, with dichloroacetate, would restore the balance of substrate use and improve cardiac function. All animals underwent in vivo hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopy and echocardiography to assess cardiac PDH flux and function, respectively. Diabetic animals showed significantly higher blood glucose levels (10.8 ± 0.7 vs. 8.4 ± 0.5 mmol/L), lower PDH flux (0.005 ± 0.001 vs. 0.017 ± 0.002 s(-1)), and significantly impaired diastolic function (transmitral early diastolic peak velocity/early diastolic myocardial velocity ratio [E/E'] 12.2 ± 0.8 vs. 20 ± 2), which are in keeping with early diabetic cardiomyopathy. Twenty-eight days of treatment with dichloroacetate restored PDH flux to normal levels (0.018 ± 0.002 s(-1)), reversed diastolic dysfunction (E/E' 14 ± 1), and normalized blood glucose levels (7.5 ± 0.7 mmol/L). The treatment of diabetes with dichloroacetate therefore restored the balance of myocardial substrate selection, reversed diastolic dysfunction, and normalized blood glucose levels. This suggests that PDH modulation could be a novel therapy for the treatment and/or prevention of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  10. Use of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate and [2-13C]pyruvate to probe the effects of the anticancer agent dichloroacetate on mitochondrial metabolism in vivo in the normal rat.

    PubMed

    Hu, Simon; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Bok, Robert; Zhou, Jenny; Zhu, Minhua; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2012-12-01

    Development of hyperpolarized technology utilizing dynamic nuclear polarization has enabled the measurement of (13)C metabolism in vivo at very high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In vivo mitochondrial metabolism can, in principle, be monitored with pyruvate, which is catalyzed to acetyl-CoA via pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). The purpose of this work was to determine whether the compound sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) could aid the study of mitochondrial metabolism with hyperpolarized pyruvate. DCA stimulates PDH by inhibiting its inhibitor, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. In this work, hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate and [2-(13)C]pyruvate were used to probe mitochondrial metabolism in normal rats. Increased conversion to bicarbonate (+181±69%, P=.025) was measured when [1-(13)C]pyruvate was injected after DCA administration, and increased glutamate (+74±23%, P=.004), acetoacetate (+504±281%, P=.009) and acetylcarnitine (+377±157%, P=.003) were detected when [2-(13)C]pyruvate was used.

  11. Carbon Metabolism of Soil microorganisms at Low Temperatures: Position-Specific 13C Labeled Glucose Reveals the Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, C.; Bore, E. K.; Halicki, S.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Dippold, M.

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic pathway activities at low temperature are not well understood, despite the fact that the processes are relevant for many soils globally and seasonally. To analyze soil metabolism at low temperature, isotopomeres of position-specifically 13C labeled glucose were applied at three temperature levels; +5, -5 -20 oC. In additon, one sterilization treatment with sodium azide at +5 oC was also performed. Soils were incubated for 1, 3 and 10 days while soil samples at -20 oC were additionally sampled after 30 days. The 13C from individual molecule position in respired CO2 was quantifed. Incorporation of 13C in bulk soil, extractable microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) and cell membranes of different microbial communities classified by 13C phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) was carried out. Our 13CO2 data showed a dominance of C-1 respiration at +5 °C for treatments with and without sodium azide, but total respiration for sodium azide inhibited treatments increased by 14%. In contrast, at -5 and -20 oC metabolic behavior showed intermingling of preferential respiration of the glucose C-4 and C-1 positions. Therefore, at +5 °C, pentose phosphate pathway activity is a dominant metabolic pathway used by microorganisms to metabolize glucose. The respiration increase due to NaN3 inhibition was attributed to endoenzymes released from dead organisms that are stabilized at the soil matrix and have access to suitable substrate and co-factors to permit their funtions. Our PLFA analysis showed that incorporation of glucose 13C was higher in Gram negative bacteria than other microbial groups as they are most competitive for LMWOS. Only a limited amount of microbial groups maintained their glucose utilizing activity at -5 and -20 °C and they strongly shifted towards a metabolization of glucose via both glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways indicating both growth and cellular maintenance. This study revealed a remarkable microbial acitivity

  12. COMPLETE-MFA: complementary parallel labeling experiments technique for metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Leighty, Robert W; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a novel approach for measuring highly accurate and precise metabolic fluxes in living cells, termed COMPLETE-MFA, short for complementary parallel labeling experiments technique for metabolic flux analysis. The COMPLETE-MFA method is based on combined analysis of multiple isotopic labeling experiments, where the synergy of using complementary tracers greatly improves the precision of estimated fluxes. In this work, we demonstrate the COMPLETE-MFA approach using all singly labeled glucose tracers, [1-(13)C], [2-(13)C], [3-(13)C], [4-(13)C], [5-(13)C], and [6-(13)C]glucose to determine precise metabolic fluxes for wild-type Escherichia coli. Cells were grown in six parallel cultures on defined medium with glucose as the only carbon source. Mass isotopomers of biomass amino acids were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The data from all six experiments were then fitted simultaneously to a single flux model to determine accurate intracellular fluxes. We obtained a statistically acceptable fit with more than 300 redundant measurements. The estimated flux map is the most precise flux result obtained thus far for E. coli cells. To our knowledge, this is the first time that six isotopic labeling experiments have been successfully integrated for high-resolution (13)C-flux analysis.

  13. Impacts of proline on the central metabolism of an industrial erythromycin-producing strain Saccharopolyspora erythraea via (13)C labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Huang, Mingzhi; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-08-10

    Saccharopolyspora erythraea E3 is an important industrial strain for erythromycin production and knowledge on its metabolism is limited. In the present work, (13)C labeling experiments were conducted to characterize the metabolism of S. erythraea E3. We found that S. erythraea E3 was difficult to grow on minimal medium with glucose as sole carbon source and the addition of proline remarkably improved the cell growth. The activity of EMP pathway was very low and ED pathway was alternatively the main glucose utilization pathway. The addition of proline resulted in remarkable changes in the fluxes of central metabolism. The fluxes in PP pathway, in TCA cycle and in ED pathway were 90% higher, 64% and 31% lower on Glc/Pro than on Glc, respectively. The maintenance energy on Glc/Pro was 58.4% lower than that on Glc. The energy charge was lower on Glc than on Glc/Pro, indicating that the cells on Glc suffered from energy burden. This study elucidates the impacts of proline on the central metabolism of S. erythraea and deepens the understanding of its metabolism.

  14. Effects of insulin on perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic and untreated rats: /sup 13/C NMR assay of pyruvate kinase flux

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.M.

    1987-01-27

    The effects of insulin in vitro on perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic rats and their untreated littermates during gluconeogenesis from either (3-/sup 13/C)alanine + ethanol or (2-/sup 13/C)pyruvate + NH/sub 4/Cl + ethanol were studied by /sup 13/C NMR. A /sup 13/C NMR determination of the rate of pyruvate kinase flux under steady-state conditions of active gluconeogenesis was developed; this assay includes a check on the reuse of recycled pyruvate. The preparations studied provided gradations of pyruvate kinase flux within the confines of the assay's requirement of active gluconeogenesis. By this determination, the rate of pyruvate kinase flux was 0.74 +/- 0.04 of the gluconeogenic rate in liver from 24-h-fasted controls; in liver from 12-h fasted controls, relative pyruvate kinase flux increased to 1.0 +/- 0.2. In diabetic liver, this flux was undetectable by the authors NMR method. Insulin's hepatic influence in vitro was greatest in the streptozotocin model of type 1 diabetes: upon treatment of diabetic liver with 7 nM insulin in vitro, a partial reversal of many of the differences noted between diabetic and control liver was demonstrated by /sup 13/C NMR. A major effect of insulin in vitro upon diabetic liver was the induction of a large increase in the rate of pyruvate kinase flux, bringing relative and absolute fluxes up to the levels measured in 24-h-fasted controls. By way of comparison, the effects of ischemia on diabetic liver were studied by /sup 13/C NMR to test whether changes in allosteric effectors under these conditions could also increase pyruvate kinase flux. A large increase in this activity was demonstrated in ischemic diabetic liver.

  15. High-throughput hyperpolarized 13C metabolic investigations using a multi-channel acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehyuk; Ramirez, Marc S.; Walker, Christopher M.; Chen, Yunyun; Yi, Stacey; Sandulache, Vlad C.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Bankson, James A.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of hyperpolarized (HP) compounds such as [1-13C]-pyruvate have shown tremendous potential for offering new insight into disease and response to therapy. New applications of this technology in clinical research and care will require extensive validation in cells and animal models, a process that may be limited by the high cost and modest throughput associated with dynamic nuclear polarization. Relatively wide spectral separation between [1-13C]-pyruvate and its chemical endpoints in vivo are conducive to simultaneous multi-sample measurements, even in the presence of a suboptimal global shim. Multi-channel acquisitions could conserve costs and accelerate experiments by allowing acquisition from multiple independent samples following a single dissolution. Unfortunately, many existing preclinical MRI systems are equipped with only a single channel for broadband acquisitions. In this work, we examine the feasibility of this concept using a broadband multi-channel digital receiver extension and detector arrays that allow concurrent measurement of dynamic spectroscopic data from ex vivo enzyme phantoms, in vitro anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells, and in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. Throughput and the cost of consumables were improved by up to a factor of four. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential for efficient multi-sample studies employing hyperpolarized agents.

  16. Acute porcine renal metabolic effect of endogastric soft drink administration assessed with hyperpolarized [1‐13c]pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Esben Søvsø Szocska; Kjærgaard, Uffe; Bertelsen, Lotte Bonde; Ringgaard, Steffen; Stødkilde‐Jørgensen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to determine the quantitative reproducibility of metabolic breakdown products in the kidney following intravenous injection of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate and secondly to investigate the metabolic effect on the pyruvate metabolism of oral sucrose load using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization. By this technique, metabolic alterations in several different metabolic related diseases and their metabolic treatment responses can be accessed. Methods In four healthy pigs the lactate‐to‐pyruvate, alanine‐to‐pyruvate and bicarbonate‐to‐pyruvate ratio was measured following administration of regular cola and consecutive injections of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate four times within an hour. Results The overall lactate‐to‐pyruvate metabolic profile changed significantly over one hour following an acute sucrose load leading to a significant rise in blood glucose. Conclusion The reproducibility of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the healthy pig kidney demonstrated a repeatability of more than 94% for all metabolites and, furthermore, that the pyruvate to lactate conversion and the blood glucose level is elevated following endogastric sucrose administration. Magn Reson Med 74:558–563, 2015. © 2015 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:26014387

  17. Structural Control of Metabolic Flux

    PubMed Central

    Sajitz-Hermstein, Max; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have to continuously adapt to changing environmental conditions or undergo developmental transitions. To meet the accompanying change in metabolic demands, the molecular mechanisms of adaptation involve concerted interactions which ultimately induce a modification of the metabolic state, which is characterized by reaction fluxes and metabolite concentrations. These state transitions are the effect of simultaneously manipulating fluxes through several reactions. While metabolic control analysis has provided a powerful framework for elucidating the principles governing this orchestrated action to understand metabolic control, its applications are restricted by the limited availability of kinetic information. Here, we introduce structural metabolic control as a framework to examine individual reactions' potential to control metabolic functions, such as biomass production, based on structural modeling. The capability to carry out a metabolic function is determined using flux balance analysis (FBA). We examine structural metabolic control on the example of the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli by the recently introduced framework of functional centrality (FC). This framework is based on the Shapley value from cooperative game theory and FBA, and we demonstrate its superior ability to assign “share of control” to individual reactions with respect to metabolic functions and environmental conditions. A comparative analysis of various scenarios illustrates the usefulness of FC and its relations to other structural approaches pertaining to metabolic control. We propose a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate FCs for large networks, based on the enumeration of elementary flux modes. We further give detailed biological interpretation of FCs for production of lactate and ATP under various respiratory conditions. PMID:24367246

  18. Large-Scale 13C Flux Profiling Reveals Conservation of the Entner-Doudoroff Pathway as a Glycolytic Strategy among Marine Bacteria That Use Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Klingner, Arne; Bartsch, Annekathrin; Dogs, Marco; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Jahn, Dieter; Simon, Meinhard; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Becker, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Marine bacteria form one of the largest living surfaces on Earth, and their metabolic activity is of fundamental importance for global nutrient cycling. Here, we explored the largely unknown intracellular pathways in 25 microbes representing different classes of marine bacteria that use glucose: Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Flavobacteriia of the Bacteriodetes phylum. We used 13C isotope experiments to infer metabolic fluxes through their carbon core pathways. Notably, 90% of all strains studied use the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway for glucose catabolism, whereas only 10% rely on the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway. This result differed dramatically from the terrestrial model strains studied, which preferentially used the EMP pathway yielding high levels of ATP. Strains using the ED pathway exhibited a more robust resistance against the oxidative stress typically found in this environment. An important feature contributing to the preferential use of the ED pathway in the oceans could therefore be enhanced supply of NADPH through this pathway. The marine bacteria studied did not specifically rely on a distinct anaplerotic route, but the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) or pyruvate for fueling of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was evenly distributed. The marine isolates studied belong to clades that dominate the uptake of glucose, a major carbon source for bacteria in seawater. Therefore, the ED pathway may play a significant role in the cycling of mono- and polysaccharides by bacterial communities in marine ecosystems. PMID:25616803

  19. Pathway analysis using (13) C-glycerol and other carbon tracers reveals a bipartite metabolism of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Häuslein, Ina; Manske, Christian; Goebel, Werner; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source for Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular pathogen, which can cause a life-threatening pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. Genome, transcriptome and proteome studies indicate that L. pneumophila also utilizes carbon substrates other than amino acids. We show here that glycerol promotes intracellular replication of L. pneumophila in amoeba or macrophages (but not extracellular growth) dependent on glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GlpD. An L. pneumophila mutant strain lacking glpD was outcompeted by wild-type bacteria upon co-infection of amoeba, indicating an important role of glycerol during infection. Isotopologue profiling studies using (13) C-labelled substrates were performed in a novel minimal defined medium, MDM, comprising essential amino acids, proline and phenylalanine. In MDM, L. pneumophila utilized (13) C-labelled glycerol or glucose predominantly for gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway, while the amino acid serine was used for energy generation via the citrate cycle. Similar results were obtained for L. pneumophila growing intracellularly in amoeba fed with (13) C-labelled glycerol, glucose or serine. Collectively, these results reveal a bipartite metabolism of L. pneumophila, where glycerol and carbohydrates like glucose are mainly fed into anabolic processes, while serine serves as major energy supply.

  20. A Marked Gradient in δ13C Values of Clams Mercenaria mercenaria Across a Marine Embayment May Reflect Variations in Ecosystem metabolism

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although stable isotopes of organic carbon (δ13C) are typically used as indicators of terrestrial, intertidal, and offshore organic carbon sources to coastal ecosystems, there is evidence that δ13C values are also sensitive to in situ ecosystem metabolism. To investigate this phe...

  1. Regulation of flux through metabolic cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, K.

    1984-01-01

    The branchpoint of the tricarboxylic acid and glyoxylate shunt was characterized in the intact organism by a multidimensional approach. Theory and methodology were developed to determine velocities for the net flow of carbon through the major steps of acetate metabolism in E. coli. Rates were assigned based on the /sup 13/C-NMR spectrum of intracellular glutamate, measured rates of substrate incorporation into end products, the constituent composition of E. coli and a series of conservation equations which described the system at steady state. The in vivo fluxes through the branchpoint of the tricarboxylic acid and glyoxylate cycles were compared to rates calculated from the kinetic constants of the branchpoint enzymes and the intracellular concentrations of their substrates. These studies elucidated the role of isocitrate dehydrogenase phosphorylation in the Krebs cycle and led to the development of a generalized mathematical description of the sensitivity of branchpoints to regulatory control. This theoretical analysis was termed the branchpoint effect and it describes conditions which result in large changes in the flux through an enzyme even though that enzyme is not subject to direct regulatory control. The theoretical and experimental characterization of this system provided a framework to study the effects of enzyme overproduction and underproduction on metabolic processes in the cell. An in vivo method was developed to determine the extent to which an enzyme catalyzes a rate-controlling reaction. The enzyme chosen for this study was citrate synthase.

  2. Saturation-recovery metabolic-exchange rate imaging with hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate using spectral-spatial excitation.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Rolf F; Sperl, Jonathan I; Weidl, Eliane; Menzel, Marion I; Janich, Martin A; Khegai, Oleksandr; Durst, Markus; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Glaser, Steffen J; Haase, Axel; Schwaiger, Markus; Wiesinger, Florian

    2013-05-01

    Within the last decade hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate chemical-shift imaging has demonstrated impressive potential for metabolic MR imaging for a wide range of applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. In this work, a highly efficient pulse sequence is described for time-resolved, multislice chemical shift imaging of the injected substrate and obtained downstream metabolites. Using spectral-spatial excitation in combination with single-shot spiral data acquisition, the overall encoding is evenly distributed between excitation and signal reception, allowing the encoding of one full two-dimensional metabolite image per excitation. The signal-to-noise ratio can be flexibly adjusted and optimized using lower flip angles for the pyruvate substrate and larger ones for the downstream metabolites. Selectively adjusting the excitation of the down-stream metabolites to 90° leads to a so-called "saturation-recovery" scheme with the detected signal content being determined by forward conversion of the available pyruvate. In case of repetitive excitations, the polarization is preserved using smaller flip angles for pyruvate. Metabolic exchange rates are determined spatially resolved from the metabolite images using a simplified two-site exchange model. This novel contrast is an important step toward more quantitative metabolic imaging. Goal of this work was to derive, analyze, and implement this "saturation-recovery metabolic exchange rate imaging" and demonstrate its capabilities in four rats bearing subcutaneous tumors.

  3. Investigation of metabolic changes in STZ-induced diabetic rats with hyperpolarized [1-13C]acetate

    PubMed Central

    Koellisch, Ulrich; Laustsen, Christoffer; Nørlinger, Thomas S; Østergaard, Jakob Appel; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Gringeri, Concetta V; Menzel, Marion I; Schulte, Rolf F; Haase, Axel; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In the metabolism of acetate several enzymes are involved, which play an important role in free fatty acid oxidation. Fatty acid metabolism is altered in diabetes patients and therefore acetate might serve as a marker for pathological changes in the fuel selection of cells, as these changes occur in diabetes patients. Acetylcarnitine is a metabolic product of acetate, which enables its transport into the mitochondria for energy production. This study investigates whether the ratio of acetylcarnitine to acetate, measured by noninvasive hyperpolarized [1-13C]acetate magnetic resonance spectroscopy, could serve as a marker for myocardial, hepatic, and renal metabolic changes in rats with Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in vivo. We demonstrate that the conversion of acetate to acetylcarnitine could be detected and quantified in all three organs of interest. More interestingly, we found that the hyperpolarized acetylcarnitine to acetate ratio was independent of blood glucose levels and prolonged hyperglycemia following diabetes induction in a type-1 diabetes model. PMID:26272734

  4. Flux analysis and metabolomics for systematic metabolic engineering of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Toya, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    Rational engineering of metabolism is important for bio-production using microorganisms. Metabolic design based on in silico simulations and experimental validation of the metabolic state in the engineered strain helps in accomplishing systematic metabolic engineering. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is a method for the prediction of metabolic phenotype, and many applications have been developed using FBA to design metabolic networks. Elementary mode analysis (EMA) and ensemble modeling techniques are also useful tools for in silico strain design. The metabolome and flux distribution of the metabolic pathways enable us to evaluate the metabolic state and provide useful clues to improve target productivity. Here, we reviewed several computational applications for metabolic engineering by using genome-scale metabolic models of microorganisms. We also discussed the recent progress made in the field of metabolomics and (13)C-metabolic flux analysis techniques, and reviewed these applications pertaining to bio-production development. Because these in silico or experimental approaches have their respective advantages and disadvantages, the combined usage of these methods is complementary and effective for metabolic engineering.

  5. 13C-NMR spectroscopic evaluation of the citric acid cycle flux in conditions of high aspartate transaminase activity in glucose-perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Tran-Dinh, S; Hoerter, J A; Mateo, P; Gyppaz, F; Herve, M

    1998-12-01

    A new mathematical model, based on the observation of 13C-NMR spectra of two principal metabolites (glutamate and aspartate), was constructed to determine the citric acid cycle flux in the case of high aspartate transaminase activity leading to the formation of large amounts of labeled aspartate and glutamate. In this model, the labeling of glutamate and aspartate carbons by chemical and isotopic exchange with the citric acid cycle are considered to be interdependent. With [U-13C]Glc or [1,2-(13)C]acetate as a substrate, all glutamate and aspartate carbons can be labeled. The isotopic transformations of 32 glutamate isotopomers into 16 aspartate isotopomers or vice versa were studied using matrix operations; the results were compiled in two matrices. We showed how the flux constants of the citric acid cycle and the 13C-enrichment of acetyl-CoA can be deduced from 13C-NMR spectra of glutamate and/or aspartate. The citric acid cycle flux in beating Wistar rat hearts, aerobically perfused with [U-13C]glucose in the absence of insulin, was investigated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, aspartate instead of glutamate was found to be the most abundantly-labeled metabolite, indicating that aspartate transaminase (which catalyses the reversible reaction: (glutamate + oxaloacetate <--> 2-oxoglutarate + aspartate) is highly active in the absence of insulin. The amount of aspartate was about two times larger than glutamate. The quantities of glutamate (G0) or aspartate (A0) were approximately the same for all hearts and remained constant during perfusion: G0 = (0.74 +/- 0.03) micromol/g; A0 = (1.49 +/- 0.05) micromol/g. The flux constants, i.e., the fraction of glutamate and aspartate in exchange with the citric acid cycle, were about 1.45 min(-1) and 0.72 min(-1), respectively; the flux of this cycle is about (1.07 +/- 0.02) micromol min(-1) g(-1). Excellent agreement between the computed and experimental data was obtained, showing that: i) in the absence of insulin

  6. In vivo measurement of ethanol metabolism in the rat liver using magnetic resonance spectroscopy of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Spielman, Daniel M.; Mayer, Dirk; Yen, Yi-Fen; Tropp, James; Hurd, Ralph E.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2009-01-01

    [1-13C]pyruvate is readily polarizable substrate that has been the subject of numerous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies of in vivo metabolism. In this work, 13C-MRS of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate is used to interrogate a metabolic pathway involved in neither aerobic nor anaerobic metabolism. In particular, ethanol consumption leads to altered liver metabolism, which when excessive is associated with adverse medical conditions including fatty liver disease, hepatitis, cirrhosis, and cancer. Here we present a method for noninvasively monitoring this important process in vivo. Following the bolus injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate, we demonstrate a significantly increased rat liver lactate production rate with the co-administration of ethanol (P = 0.0016 unpaired t-test). The affect is attributable to increased liver nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) associated with ethanol metabolism in combination with NADH's role as a coenzyme in pyruvate to lactate conversion. Beyond studies of liver metabolism, this novel in vivo assay of changes in NADH levels makes hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate a potentially viable substrate for studying the multiple in vivo metabolic pathways that use NADH (or NAD+) as a coenzyme, thus broadening the range of applications that have been discussed in the literature to date. PMID:19526498

  7. BI-07HYPERPOLARIZED [1-13C] GLUTAMATE: A METABOLIC IMAGING BIOMARKER OF IDH1 MUTATIONAL STATUS IN GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Chaumeil, Myriam; Larson, Peder; Woods, Sarah; Cai, Larry; Eriksson, Pia; Robinson, Aaron; Lupo, Janine; Vigneron, Daniel; Nelson, Sarah; Pieper, Russell; Phillips, Joanna; Ronen, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene are among the most prevalent in low-grade glioma and secondary glioblastoma, represent an early pathogenic event and are being considered a promising therapeutic target. Consequently, non-invasive imaging methods are needed to monitor IDH1 status. Amongst these, we previously demonstrated the use of 13C MR spectroscopic imaging of hyperpolarized [1-13C] α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to non-invasively assess IDH1 status through the detection of the conversion of hyperpolarized α-ketoglutarate to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) catalyzed by mutant IDH1. Importantly, in addition to its oncogenic role, IDH1 mutation is also associated with global modulations in metabolism. Interestingly, a study recently uncovered a relationship between presence of IDH1 mutation and decreased activity of the branched chained amino acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1) enzyme, which transaminates amino acids while converting α-KG to glutamate. Given this new study, we decided to expand on our previous findings and investigated the potential of hyperpolarized α-KG as an imaging probe to monitor BCAT1-driven α-KG-to-glutamate conversion and its modulation in the presence of IDH1 mutation. We investigated two isogenic glioblastoma lines that differed only in their IDH1 status, and performed experiments in live cells and in vivo in rat orthotopic tumors. Following injection of hyperpolarized α-KG, hyperpolarized glutamate production was detected both in cells and in vivo, and the level of hyperpolarized glutamate was significantly lower in mutant IDH1 cells and tumors compared to their IDH1-wild-type counterparts. Importantly however, the observed drop in hyperpolarized glutamate was likely mediated not only by a drop in BCAT1 activity, but also by reductions in aspartate transaminase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities, suggesting additional metabolic reprogramming at least in our model. Hyperpolarized glutamate could thus inform on multiple

  8. Fire severity impacts trajectories of vegetative regrowth and δ13C in organic pools and fluxes in Siberian/Alaskan forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fessenden, J. E.; Randerson, J. T.; Schuur, E.; Zimov, S.

    2002-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of carbon dioxide and leaf organic matter were measured in boreal forests of varying age and fire severity in Siberia and Alaska. This study focused on moderate and extreme severity burn sites in neighboring Alaskan forests ranging from 2 years to 160 years and Siberian forests ranging from 1 year to 200 years. The Alaskan forests were composed primarily of black spruce (Picea Mariana) and quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) with a shift in species dominance from aspen to spruce approximately 50 years after fire disturbance. The Siberian forests were composed of Dahurian larch (Larix gmelinii). The understory species are the same in both Siberia and Alaska: dwarf birch (Betula nana), willow (Salix alaxensis), blueberry (Vaccinium ovalifolium), cranberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), and various moss and lichen species. Our aim was to determine how disturbance influenced local and regional carbon isotopic ratios in organic pools and fluxes. Samples of organic δ13C in whole leaf tissue were collected from the dominant species of each forest. δ13CO2 and [CO2] were measured on soil cuvette- and canopy-CO2 to determine the isotopic ratio of soil and ecosystem respiration, respectively. Plant functional type primarily controlled the organic δ13C composition, and changes in abundance of different plant functional types with time since fire lead to patterns of 13C-enrichment with increased forest age. Successional stage and species composition trajectory dictated the composition of heterotrophic respiration with more 13C-enriched values found in dry/cold coniferous areas. Burn severity and successional state largely determined the distribution and abundance of plant functional types which dictated the δ13C values of organic pools and fluxes in the ecosystems. These results suggest that fire severity and frequency changes the carbon isotope composition of ecosystems and biosphere-atmosphere fluxes in ways that are predictable at local and

  9. Structure and Metabolic-Flow Analysis of Molecular Complexity in a (13) C-Labeled Tree by 2D and 3D NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Ohishi, Risa; Shino, Amiu; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-05-10

    Improved signal identification for biological small molecules (BSMs) in a mixture was demonstrated by using multidimensional NMR on samples from (13) C-enriched Rhododendron japonicum (59.5 atom%) cultivated in air containing (13) C-labeled carbon dioxide for 14 weeks. The resonance assignment of 386 carbon atoms and 380 hydrogen atoms in the mixture was achieved. 42 BSMs, including eight that were unlisted in the spectral databases, were identified. Comparisons between the experimental values and the (13) C chemical shift values calculated by density functional theory supported the identifications of unlisted BSMs. Tracing the (13) C/(12) C ratio by multidimensional NMR spectra revealed faster and slower turnover ratios of BSMs involved in central metabolism and those categorized as secondary metabolites, respectively. The identification of BSMs and subsequent flow analysis provided insight into the metabolic systems of the plant.

  10. Use of Position-Specific 13C Isotopomers to Examine Central Carbon Metabolism in the Thermophile 'Thermoflexus hugenholtzii'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S.; Tamadonfar, K. O.; Dijkstra, P.; Dodsworth, J. A.; Hedlund, B. P.

    2013-12-01

    'Thermoflexus hugenholtzii' is a member of a newly discovered class of Chloroflexi. It is the dominant microorganism in certain hot springs; however, very little is known about its physiology, and it is unable to grow on defined media. In order to examine central carbon metabolism in 'T. hugenholtzii', the genome was annotated for genes encoding enzymes for central carbon metabolism, revealing complete pathways for glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Isotope experiments were conducted to test predicted activities by adding position-specific carbon-13 (13C)-labeled metabolites of glucose, pyruvate, acetate, TCA metabolites, and amino acids and measuring the production of 13CO2 during exponential growth. Use of these metabolites demonstrated broad heterotrophic activity of 'T. hugenholtzii,' despite its inability to grow on defined media. Use of glucose-U demonstrated an active glycolytic pathway and pyruvate-1 demonstrated the functioning of the pyruvate oxidation pathway after glycolysis. Use of the TCA cycle intermediates citrate and succinate demonstrated an active TCA cycle. Production of CO2 from alanine and cysteine demonstrated oxidation of amino acids. However, lack of activity on glucose-1 failed to reveal an active PPP suggesting 'T. hugenholtzii' may rely on exogenous sources of pentoses for nucleic acid biosynthesis.

  11. Real-time measurements of CH4 and CO2 flux and del13C from a proglacial wetland in southwestern Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, J. C.; White, J. R.; Pratt, L. M.; Thompson, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic permafrost environments represent a large repository of stored carbon that may be mobilized as global temperatures increase, providing a substrate for microbial CH4 production. Proglacial wetlands and lakes are important targets of study to better understand how rapidly changing landscapes affected by climate warming adapt their carbon cycling. Recent advances in portable laser spectrometry have enabled rapid in situ measurements of not only greenhouse gas fluxes, but also del13C compositions of these gases. Here we use a Picarro CH4 and CO2 isotope analyzer to continuously measure CH4 and CO2 flux in situ for comparison to static closed chamber measurements where samples are collected at discrete time intervals and returned to the laboratory for analysis. Real-time, in situ analysis also allowed simple light/dark experiments to be performed on chambers containing different vegetation. In addition, this instrument can be used to measure concentration and del13C of both dissolved CH4 and CO­­2 in lake waters when appropriate gas stripped methods are used. We present data for CH4 and CO2 flux and del13C of emitted and dissolved gases from permafrost-affected wetlands and lakes associated with proglacial landscapes in southwestern Greenland near the Russell Glacier.

  12. Flux-coupled genes and their use in metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Won Jun; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-09-01

    As large volumes of omics data have become available, systems biology is playing increasingly important roles in elucidating new biological phenomena, especially through genome-scale metabolic network modeling and simulation. Much effort has been exerted on integrating omics data with metabolic flux simulation, but further development is necessary for more accurate flux estimation. To move one step forward, we adopted the concept of flux-coupled genes (FCGs), which show that their expression transition patterns upon perturbations are correlated with their corresponding flux values, as additional constraints in metabolic flux analysis. It was found that gnd, pfkB, rpe, sdhB, sdhD, sucA, and zwf genes, mostly associated with pentose phosphate pathway and TCA cycle, were the most consistent FCGs in Escherichia coli based on its transcriptome and (13) C-flux data obtained from the chemostat cultivation at five different dilution rates. Consequently, constraints-based flux analyses with FCGs as additional constraints were conducted for the seven single-gene knockout mutants, compared with those obtained without using FCGs. This strategy of constraining the metabolic flux analysis with FCGs is expected to be useful due to the relative ease in obtaining transcriptional information in the functional genomics era.

  13. Comparison of Glutamate Turnover in Nerve Terminals and Brain Tissue During [1,6-(13)C2]Glucose Metabolism in Anesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anant B; Lai, James C K; Chowdhury, Golam I M; Rothman, Douglas L; Behar, Kevin L

    2017-01-01

    The (13)C turnover of neurotransmitter amino acids (glutamate, GABA and aspartate) were determined from extracts of forebrain nerve terminals and brain homogenate, and fronto-parietal cortex from anesthetized rats undergoing timed infusions of [1,6-(13)C2]glucose or [2-(13)C]acetate. Nerve terminal (13)C fractional labeling of glutamate and aspartate was lower than those in whole cortical tissue at all times measured (up to 120 min), suggesting either the presence of a constant dilution flux from an unlabeled substrate or an unlabeled (effectively non-communicating on the measurement timescale) glutamate pool in the nerve terminals. Half times of (13)C labeling from [1,6-(13)C2]glucose, as estimated by least squares exponential fitting to the time course data, were longer for nerve terminals (GluC4, 21.8 min; GABAC2 21.0 min) compared to cortical tissue (GluC4, 12.4 min; GABAC2, 14.5 min), except for AspC3, which was similar (26.5 vs. 27.0 min). The slower turnover of glutamate in the nerve terminals (but not GABA) compared to the cortex may reflect selective effects of anesthesia on activity-dependent glucose use, which might be more pronounced in the terminals. The (13)C labeling ratio for glutamate-C4 from [2-(13)C]acetate over that of (13)C-glucose was twice as large in nerve terminals compared to cortex, suggesting that astroglial glutamine under the (13)C glucose infusion was the likely source of much of the nerve terminal dilution. The net replenishment of most of the nerve terminal amino acid pools occurs directly via trafficking of astroglial glutamine.

  14. Metabolic flux prediction in cancer cells with altered substrate uptake.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Barber, Michael; Soons, Zita

    2015-12-01

    Proliferating cells, such as cancer cells, are known to have an unusual metabolism, characterized by an increased rate of glycolysis and amino acid metabolism. Our understanding of this phenomenon is limited but could potentially be used in order to develop new therapies. Computational modelling techniques, such as flux balance analysis (FBA), have been used to predict fluxes in various cell types, but remain of limited use to explain the unusual metabolic shifts and altered substrate uptake in human cancer cells. We implemented a new flux prediction method based on elementary modes (EMs) and structural flux (StruF) analysis and tested them against experimentally measured flux data obtained from (13)C-labelling in a cancer cell line. We assessed the quality of predictions using different objective functions along with different techniques in normalizing a metabolic network with more than one substrate input. Results show a good correlation between predicted and experimental values and indicate that the choice of cellular objective critically affects the quality of predictions. In particular, lactate gives an excellent correlation and correctly predicts the high flux through glycolysis, matching the observed characteristics of cancer cells. In contrast with FBA, which requires a priori definition of all uptake rates, often hard to measure, atomic StruFs (aStruFs) are able to predict uptake rates of multiple substrates.

  15. C13C4.5/Spinster, an evolutionarily conserved protein that regulates fertility in C. elegans through a lysosome-mediated lipid metabolism process.

    PubMed

    Han, Mei; Chang, Hao; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Tao; Zhao, Yanhua; Zhang, Yongdeng; Liu, Pingsheng; Xu, Tao; Xu, Pingyong

    2013-05-01

    Lipid droplets, which are conserved across almost all species, are cytoplasmic organelles used to store neutral lipids. Identification of lipid droplet regulators will be conducive to resolving obesity and other fat-associated diseases. In this paper, we selected 11 candidates that might be associated with lipid metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using a BODIPY 493/503-based flow cytometry screen, 6 negative and 3 positive regulators of fat content were identified. We selected one negative regulator of lipid content, C13C4.5, for future study. C13C4.5 was mainly expressed in the worm intestine. We found that this gene was important for maintaining the metabolism of lipid droplets. Biochemical results revealed that 50% of triacylglycerol (TAG) was lost in C13C4.5 knockout worms. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) signals in C13C4.5 mutants showed only 49.6% of the fat content in the proximal intestinal region and 86.3% in the distal intestinal region compared with wild type animals. The mean values of lipid droplet size and intensity in C13C4.5 knockout animals were found to be significantly decreased compared with those in wild type worms. The LMP-1-labeled membrane structures in worm intestines were also enlarged in C13C4.5 mutant animals. Finally, fertility defects were found in C13C4.5(ok2087) mutants. Taken together, these results indicate that C13C4.5 may regulate the fertility of C. elegans by changing the size and fat content of lipid droplets by interfering with lysosomal morphology and function.

  16. A method for (13)C-labeling of metabolic carbohydrates within French bean leaves (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) for decomposition studies in soils.

    PubMed

    Girardin, Cyril; Rasse, Daniel P; Biron, Philippe; Ghashghaie, Jaleh; Chenu, Claire

    2009-06-01

    The molecular composition of plant residues is suspected to largely govern the fate of their constitutive carbon (C) in soils. Labile compounds, such as metabolic carbohydrates, are affected differently from recalcitrant and structural compounds by soil-C stabilisation mechanisms. Producing (13)C-enriched plant residues with specifically labeled fractions would help us to investigate the fate in soils of the constitutive C of these compounds. The objective of the present research was to test (13)C pulse chase labeling as a method for specifically enriching the metabolic carbohydrate components of plant residues, i.e. soluble sugars and starch. Bean plants were exposed to a (13)CO(2)-enriched atmosphere for 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 21 h. The major soluble sugars were then determined on water-soluble extracts, and starch on HCl-hydrolysable extracts. The results show a quick differential labeling between water-soluble and water-insoluble compounds. For both groups, (13)C-labeling increased linearly with time. The difference in delta(13)C signature between water-soluble and insoluble fractions was 7 per thousand after 0.5 h and 70 per thousand after 21 h. However, this clear isotopic contrast masked a substantial labeling variability within each fraction. By contrast, metabolic carbohydrates on the one hand (i.e. soluble sugars + starch) and other fractions (essentially cell wall components) on the other hand displayed quite homogeneous signatures within fractions, and a significant difference in labeling between fractions: delta(13)C = 414 +/- 3.7 per thousand and 56 +/- 5.5 per thousand, respectively. Thus, the technique generates labeled plant residues displaying contrasting (13)C-isotopic signatures between metabolic carbohydrates and other compounds, with homogenous signatures within each group. Metabolic carbohydrates being labile compounds, our findings suggest that the technique is particularly appropriate for investigating the effect of compound lability on the long

  17. Design and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber for uniform or differential, metabolic and structural, plant tissue isotope labeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tracing heavy stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as 13C with 15N, 18O o...

  18. Rapid adaptation of rat brain and liver metabolism to a ketogenic diet: an integrated study using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Maggie; Beauvieux, Marie-Christine; Naulin, Jérôme; El Hamrani, Dounia; Gallis, Jean-Louis; Cunnane, Stephen C; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2015-07-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective alternative treatment for refractory epilepsy in children, but the mechanisms by which it reduces seizures are poorly understood. To investigate how the KD modifies brain metabolism, we infused control (CT) and 7-day KD rats with either [1-(13)C]glucose (Glc) or [2,4-(13)C2]β-hydroxybutyrate (β-HB). Specific enrichments of amino acids (AAs) measured by (1)H- and (13)C-NMR in total brain perchloric acid extracts were similar between CT and KD rats after [1-(13)C]Glc infusion whereas they were higher in KD rats after [2,4-(13)C2]β-HB infusion. This suggests better metabolic efficiency of ketone body utilization on the KD. The relative rapid metabolic adaptation to the KD included (1) 11%-higher brain γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)/glutamate (Glu) ratio versus CT, (2) liver accumulation of the ketogenic branched-chain AAs (BCAAs) leucine (Leu) and isoleucine (ILeu), which were never detected in CT, and (3) higher brain Leu and ILeu contents. Since Glu and GABA are excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, respectively, higher brain GABA/Glu ratio could contribute to the mechanism by which the KD reduces seizures in epilepsy. Increased BCAA on the KD may also contribute to better seizure control.

  19. Rapid adaptation of rat brain and liver metabolism to a ketogenic diet: an integrated study using 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Maggie; Beauvieux, Marie-Christine; Naulin, Jérôme; El Hamrani, Dounia; Gallis, Jean-Louis; Cunnane, Stephen C; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2015-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective alternative treatment for refractory epilepsy in children, but the mechanisms by which it reduces seizures are poorly understood. To investigate how the KD modifies brain metabolism, we infused control (CT) and 7-day KD rats with either [1-13C]glucose (Glc) or [2,4-13C2]β-hydroxybutyrate (β-HB). Specific enrichments of amino acids (AAs) measured by 1H- and 13C-NMR in total brain perchloric acid extracts were similar between CT and KD rats after [1-13C]Glc infusion whereas they were higher in KD rats after [2,4-13C2]β-HB infusion. This suggests better metabolic efficiency of ketone body utilization on the KD. The relative rapid metabolic adaptation to the KD included (1) 11%-higher brain γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)/glutamate (Glu) ratio versus CT, (2) liver accumulation of the ketogenic branched-chain AAs (BCAAs) leucine (Leu) and isoleucine (ILeu), which were never detected in CT, and (3) higher brain Leu and ILeu contents. Since Glu and GABA are excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, respectively, higher brain GABA/Glu ratio could contribute to the mechanism by which the KD reduces seizures in epilepsy. Increased BCAA on the KD may also contribute to better seizure control. PMID:25785828

  20. Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Torn, M.S.; Biraud, S.; Still, C.J.; Riley, W.J.; Berry, J.A.

    2010-09-22

    The {delta}{sup 13}C signature of terrestrial carbon fluxes ({delta}{sub bio}) provides an important constraint for inverse models of CO{sub 2} sources and sinks, insight into vegetation physiology, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} vegetation productivity, and ecosystem carbon residence times. From 2002-2009, we measured atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and {delta}{sup 13}C-CO{sub 2} at four heights (2 to 60 m) in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) and computed {delta}{sub bio} weekly. This region has a fine-scale mix of crops (primarily C{sub 3} winter wheat) and C{sub 4} pasture grasses. {delta}{sub bio} had a large and consistent seasonal cycle of 6-8{per_thousand}. Ensemble monthly mean {delta}{sub bio} ranged from -25.8 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} ({+-}SE) in March to -20.1 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} in July. Thus, C{sub 3} vegetation contributed about 80% of ecosystem fluxes in winter-spring and 50% in summer-fall. In contrast, prairie-soil {delta}{sub 13}C values were about -15{per_thousand}, indicating that historically the region was dominated by C{sub 4} vegetation and had more positive {delta}{sub bio} values. Based on a land-surface model, isofluxes ({delta}{sub bio} x NEE) in this region have large seasonal amplitude because {delta}{sub bio} and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) covary. Interannual variability in isoflux was driven by variability in NEE. The large seasonal amplitude in {delta}{sub bio} and isoflux imply that carbon inverse analyses require accurate estimates of land cover and temporally resolved {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes.

  1. Imaging the time-integrated cerebral metabolic activity with subcellular resolution through nanometer-scale detection of biosynthetic products deriving from (13)C-glucose.

    PubMed

    Takado, Yuhei; Knott, Graham; Humbel, Bruno M; Masoodi, Mojgan; Escrig, Stéphane; Meibom, Anders; Comment, Arnaud

    2015-11-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the brain but also an important source of building blocks for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Little is known about the use of glucose for biosynthesis in tissues at the cellular level. We demonstrate that local cerebral metabolic activity can be mapped in mouse brain tissue by quantitatively imaging the biosynthetic products deriving from [U-(13)C]glucose metabolism using a combination of in situ electron microscopy and secondary ion mass-spectroscopy (NanoSIMS). Images of the (13)C-label incorporated into cerebral ultrastructure with ca. 100 nm resolution allowed us to determine the timescale on which the metabolic products of glucose are incorporated into different cells, their sub-compartments and organelles. These were mapped in astrocytes and neurons in the different layers of the motor cortex. We see evidence for high metabolic activity in neurons via the nucleus (13)C enrichment. We observe that in all the major cell compartments, such as e.g. nucleus and Golgi apparatus, neurons incorporate substantially higher concentrations of (13)C-label than astrocytes.

  2. Rapid detection and characterization of surface CO2 leakage through the real-time measurement of δ13C signatures in CO2 flux from the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krevor, S.; Perrin, J.; Esposito, A.; Rella, C.; Benson, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    side of the pipeline with the end of the gas inlet tube approximate 9 cm above the ground at a walking speed of 1-2m/sec. This simulates the type of survey that could be easily performed if the actual or potential site of a leak was known to within an area on the order of 100 square kilometers or less, the scale of expected industrial CO2 sequestration operations. The surveys were performed both during the day and during the evening when CO2 flux due to respiration from the soil is markedly different. Keeling plots were used to characterize the spatially varying 13C composition of ground source CO2 across the site. A map constructed from this data shows that CO2 flux from sources of leakage was characterized by a δ 13C of -40‰ or less whereas locations away from the leakage spots had much higher δ 13C signatures, -25‰ or higher. The distinct isotopic signature allows for a clear discernment between leakage of petrogenic CO2 and that of natural CO2 fluxes from soil respiration. This is particularly valuable in the circumstance where the leak is slow enough that it could not be identified from CO2 concentration or flux changes above the natural background signal alone.

  3. Quantitative role of splanchnic region in leucine metabolism: L-(1-13C,15N)leucine and substrate balance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.M.; Wagner, D.A.; Tredget, E.E.; Walaszewski, J.A.; Burke, J.F.; Young, V.R. )

    1990-07-01

    The role of the splanchnic region (Sp) in whole body leucine metabolism was assessed in six chronically catheterized fasting mongrel dogs and in eight dogs during constant enteral feeding of a complete amino acid solution (0.24 g.kg-1.h-1). We used primed continuous intravenous infusions of L-(1-13C,15N)leucine and L-(1-14C)leucine and measurements of arteriovenous isotope and leucine balance across the gut, liver, and Sp. In the fasted condition, 3.5% of arterial leucine supply was oxidized in the Sp, accounting for 13% of total body leucine oxidation, with 10% by liver. With amino acid feeding (1) leucine carbon and nitrogen fluxes and oxidation were increased (P less than 0.01) at the whole body level; (2) the percent of whole body leucine oxidation occurring in the Sp and liver increased (P less than 0.01) to 41 and 27%, respectively; (3) fractional metabolic utilization of leucine delivered to the Sp was reduced (P less than 0.01) from 47 to 35%; (4) the deamination rate of leucine in the gut was increased (P less than 0.05), along with an increased reamination rate of alpha-ketoisocaproic acid in the Sp (P less than 0.05). These findings reveal that the Sp accounts for a small fraction of whole body leucine oxidation during the fasting condition, but it plays a quantitatively important role in total body leucine oxidation during amino acid feeding; the gut and liver play cooperative roles in controlling leucine supply to peripheral tissues.

  4. Quantification of Metabolic Rearrangements During Neural Stem Cells Differentiation into Astrocytes by Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sá, João V; Kleiderman, Susanne; Brito, Catarina; Sonnewald, Ursula; Leist, Marcel; Teixeira, Ana P; Alves, Paula M

    2017-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) have a crucial role to ensure neurogenesis and gliogenesis in the mammalian brain throughout life. As there is growing evidence for the significance of metabolism in regulating cell fate, knowledge on the metabolic programs in NSCs and how they evolve during differentiation into somatic cells may provide novel therapeutic approaches to address brain diseases. In this work, we applied a quantitative analysis to assess how the central carbon metabolism evolves upon differentiation of NSCs into astrocytes. Murine embryonic stem cell (mESC)-derived NSCs and astrocytes were incubated with labelled [1-(13)C]glucose and the label incorporation into intracellular metabolites was followed by GC-MS. The obtained (13)C labelling patterns, together with uptake/secretion rates determined from supernatant analysis, were integrated into an isotopic non-stationary metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) model to estimate intracellular flux maps. Significant metabolic differences between NSCs and astrocytes were identified, with a general downregulation of central carbon metabolism during astrocytic differentiation. While glucose uptake was 1.7-fold higher in NSCs (on a per cell basis), a high lactate-secreting phenotype was common to both cell types. Furthermore, NSCs consumed glutamine from the medium; the highly active reductive carboxylation of alpha-ketoglutarate indicates that this was converted to citrate and used for biosynthetic purposes. In astrocytes, pyruvate entered the TCA cycle mostly through pyruvate carboxylase (81%). This pathway supported glutamine and citrate secretion, recapitulating well described metabolic features of these cells in vivo. Overall, this fluxomics study allowed us to quantify the metabolic rewiring accompanying astrocytic lineage specification from NSCs.

  5. Carbon 13-Metabolic Flux Analysis derived constraint-based metabolic modelling of Clostridium acetobutylicum in stressed chemostat conditions.

    PubMed

    Wallenius, Janne; Maaheimo, Hannu; Eerikäinen, Tero

    2016-11-01

    The metabolism of butanol producing bacteria Clostridium acetobutylicum was studied in chemostat with glucose limited conditions, butanol stimulus, and as a reference cultivation. COnstraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) was applied using additional constraints from (13)C Metabolic Flux Analysis ((13)C-MFA) and experimental measurement results. A model consisting of 451 metabolites and 604 reactions was utilized in flux balance analysis (FBA). The stringency of the flux spaces considering different optimization objectives, i.e. growth rate maximization, ATP maintenance, and NADH/NADPH formation, for flux variance analysis (FVA) was studied in the different modelled conditions. Also a previously uncharacterized exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by C. acetobutylicum was characterized on monosaccharide level. The major monosaccharide components of the EPS were 40n-% rhamnose, 34n-% glucose, 13n-% mannose, 10n-% galactose, and 2n-% arabinose. The EPS was studied to have butanol adsorbing property, 70(butanol)mg(EPS)g(-1) at 37°C.

  6. Measuring changes in substrate utilization in the myocardium in response to fasting using hyperpolarized [1-13C]butyrate and [1-13C]pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaansen, Jessica A. M.; Merritt, Matthew E.; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is often associated with a shift in substrate preference for ATP production. Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has the unique ability to detect real-time metabolic changes in vivo due to its high sensitivity and specificity. Here a protocol using HP [1-13C]pyruvate and [1-13C]butyrate is used to measure carbohydrate versus fatty acid metabolism in vivo. Metabolic changes in fed and fasted Sprague Dawley rats (n = 36) were studied at 9.4 T after tail vein injections. Pyruvate and butyrate competed for acetyl-CoA production, as evidenced by significant changes in [13C]bicarbonate (−48%), [1-13C]acetylcarnitine (+113%), and [5-13C]glutamate (−63%), following fasting. Butyrate uptake was unaffected by fasting, as indicated by [1-13C]butyrylcarnitine. Mitochondrial pseudoketogenesis facilitated the labeling of the ketone bodies [1-13C]acetoacetate and [1-13C]β-hydroxybutyryate, without evidence of true ketogenesis. HP [1-13C]acetoacetate was increased in fasting (250%) but decreased during pyruvate co-injection (−82%). Combining HP 13C technology and co-administration of separate imaging agents enables noninvasive and simultaneous monitoring of both fatty acid and carbohydrate oxidation. This protocol illustrates a novel method for assessing metabolic flux through different enzymatic pathways simultaneously and enables mechanistic studies of the changing myocardial energetics often associated with disease. PMID:27150735

  7. Rapid detection and characterization of surface CO2 leakage through the real-time measurement of δ13C signatures in CO2 flux from the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krevor, Samuel; Benson, Sally; Rella, Chris; Perrin, Jean-Christophe; Esposito, Ariel; Crosson, Eric

    2010-05-01

    The surface monitoring of CO2 over geologic sequestration sites will be an essential tool in the monitoring and verification of sequestration projects. Surface monitoring is the only tool that currently provides the opportunity to detect and quantify leakages on the order of 1000 tons/year CO2. Near-surface detection and quantification can be made complicated, however, due to large temporal and spatial variations in natural background CO2 fluxes from biological processes. In addition, current surface monitoring technologies, such as the use of IR spectroscopy in eddy covariance towers and aerial surveys, radioactive or noble gas isotopic tracers, and flux chamber gas measurements can generally accomplish one or two of the necessary tasks of leak detection, identification, and quantification, at both large spatial scales and high spatial resolution. It would be useful, however, to combine the utility of these technologies so that a much simplified surface monitoring program can be deployed. Carbon isotopes of CO2 provide an opportunity to distinguish between natural biogenic CO2 fluxes from the ground and CO2 leaking from a sequestration reservoir that has ultimate origins in a process giving it a distinct isotopic signature such as natural gas processing. Until recently, measuring isotopic compositions of gases was a time-consuming and expensive process utilizing mass-spectrometry, not practical for deployment in a high-resolution survey of a potential leakage site at the surface. Recent developments in commercially available instruments utilizing wavelength scanned cavity ringdown spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) have made it possible to rapidly measure the isotopic composition of gases including the 13C and 12C isotopic composition of CO2 in a field setting. A portable stable carbon isotope ratio analyzer for carbon dioxide, based on wavelength scanned cavity ringdown spectroscopy, has been used to rapidly detect and

  8. Differential effects of safflower oil versus fish oil feeding on insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis, glycolysis, and pyruvate dehydrogenase flux in skeletal muscle: a 13C nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Jucker, B M; Cline, G W; Barucci, N; Shulman, G I

    1999-01-01

    To examine the effects of safflower oil versus fish oil feeding on in vivo intramuscular glucose metabolism and relative pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) versus tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux, rats were pair-fed on diets consisting of 1) 59% safflower oil, 2) 59% menhaden fish oil, or 3) 59% carbohydrate (control) in calories. Rates of glycolysis and glycogen synthesis were assessed by monitoring [1-(13)C]glucose label incorporation into [1-(13)C]glycogen, [3-(13)C]lactate, and [3-(13)C]alanine in the hindlimb of awake rats via 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy during a euglycemic (approximately 6 mmol/l) hyperinsulinemic (approximately 180 microU/ml) clamp. A steady-state isotopic analysis of lactate, alanine, and glutamate was used to determine the relative PDH versus TCA cycle flux present in muscle under these conditions. The safflower oil-fed rats were insulin resistant compared with control and fish oil-fed rats, as reflected by a markedly reduced glucose infusion rate (Ginf) during the clamp (21.4 +/- 2.3 vs. 31.6 +/- 2.8 and 31.7 +/- 1.9 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) in safflower oil versus control and fish oil groups, respectively, P < 0.006). This decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in the safflower oil group was associated with a lower rate of glycolysis (21.7 +/- 2.2 nmol x g(-1) x min(-1)) versus control (62.1 +/- 10.3 nmol x g(-1) x min(-1), P < 0.001) and versus fish oil (45.7 +/- 6.7 nmol x g(-1) x min(-1), P < 0.04), as no change in glycogen synthesis (103 +/- 15, 133 +/- 19, and 125 +/- 14 nmol x g(-1) x min(-1) in safflower oil, fish oil, and control, respectively) was detected. The intramuscular triglyceride (TG) content was increased in the safflower oil group (7.3 +/- 0.8 micromol/g) compared with the control group (5.2 +/- 0.8 micromol/g, P < 0.05) and the fish oil group (3.6 +/- 1.1 micromol/g, P < 0.01). Conversely, the percent PDH versus TCA cycle flux was decreased in the safflower oil (43 +/- 8%) versus the control

  9. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Martin, Hector Garcia; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Llora, Xavier; Meadows, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-08-19

    Shewanella spp. are a group of facultative anaerobic bacteria widely distributed in marine and fresh-water environments. In this study, we profiled the central metabolic fluxes of eight recently sequenced Shewanella species grown under the same condition in minimal med-ium with [3-13C] lactate. Although the tested Shewanella species had slightly different growth rates (0.23-0.29 h31) and produced different amounts of acetate and pyruvate during early exponential growth (pseudo-steady state), the relative intracellular metabolic flux distributions were remarkably similar. This result indicates that Shewanella species share similar regulation in regard to central carbon metabolic fluxes under steady growth conditions: the maintenance of metabolic robustness is not only evident in a single species under genetic perturbations (Fischer and Sauer, 2005; Nat Genet 37(6):636-640), but also observed through evolutionary related microbial species. This remarkable conservation of relative flux profiles through phylogenetic differences prompts us to introduce the concept of metabotype as an alternative scheme to classify microbial fluxomics. On the other hand, Shewanella spp. display flexibility in the relative flux profiles when switching their metabolism from consuming lactate to consuming pyruvate and acetate.

  10. Systems-level metabolic flux profiling identifies fatty acid synthesis as a target for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Joshua; Bennett, Bryson D; Parikh, Anuraag; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; McArdle, Jessica; Rabitz, Herschel A; Shenk, Thomas; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2010-01-01

    Viruses rely on the metabolic network of their cellular hosts to provide energy and building blocks for viral replication. We developed a flux measurement approach based on liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry to quantify changes in metabolic activity induced by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). This approach reliably elucidated fluxes in cultured mammalian cells by monitoring metabolome labeling kinetics after feeding cells 13C-labeled forms of glucose and glutamine. Infection with HCMV markedly upregulated flux through much of the central carbon metabolism, including glycolysis. Particularly notable increases occurred in flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and its efflux to the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. Pharmacological inhibition of fatty acid biosynthesis suppressed the replication of both HCMV and influenza A, another enveloped virus. These results show that fatty acid synthesis is essential for the replication of two divergent enveloped viruses and that systems-level metabolic flux profiling can identify metabolic targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:18820684

  11. Multi-channel metabolic imaging, with SENSE reconstruction, of hyperpolarized [1- 13C] pyruvate in a live rat at 3.0 tesla on a clinical MR scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tropp, James; Lupo, Janine M.; Chen, Albert; Calderon, Paul; McCune, Don; Grafendorfer, Thomas; Ozturk-Isik, Esin; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Yen, Yi-Fen; Robb, Fraser; Bok, Robert; Schulte, Rolf; Xu, Duan; Hurd, Ralph; Vigneron, Daniel; Nelson, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    We report metabolic images of 13C, following injection of a bolus of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate in a live rat. The data were acquired on a clinical scanner, using custom coils for volume transmission and array reception. Proton blocking of all carbon resonators enabled proton anatomic imaging with the system body coil, to allow for registration of anatomic and metabolic images, for which good correlation was achieved, with some anatomic features (kidney and heart) clearly visible in a carbon image, without reference to the corresponding proton image. Parallel imaging with sensitivity encoding was used to increase the spatial resolution in the SI direction of the rat. The signal to noise ratio in was in some instances unexpectedly high in the parallel images; variability of the polarization among different trials, plus partial volume effects, are noted as a possible cause of this.

  12. (13)C-labeled biochemical probes for the study of cancer metabolism with dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Keshari, Kayvan R

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, advances in metabolic imaging have become dependable tools for the diagnosis and treatment assessment in cancer. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has recently emerged as a promising technology in hyperpolarized (HP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and has reached clinical relevance with the successful visualization of [1-(13)C] pyruvate as a molecular imaging probe in human prostate cancer. This review focuses on introducing representative compounds relevant to metabolism that are characteristic of cancer tissue: aerobic glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism, glutamine addiction and glutamine/glutamate metabolism, and the redox state and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate metabolism. In addition, a brief introduction of probes that can be used to trace necrosis, pH changes, and other pathways relevant to cancer is presented to demonstrate the potential that HP MRI has to revolutionize the use of molecular imaging for diagnosis and assessment of treatments in cancer.

  13. A Method to Constrain Genome-Scale Models with 13C Labeling Data

    PubMed Central

    García Martín, Héctor; Kumar, Vinay Satish; Weaver, Daniel; Ghosh, Amit; Chubukov, Victor; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    Current limitations in quantitatively predicting biological behavior hinder our efforts to engineer biological systems to produce biofuels and other desired chemicals. Here, we present a new method for calculating metabolic fluxes, key targets in metabolic engineering, that incorporates data from 13C labeling experiments and genome-scale models. The data from 13C labeling experiments provide strong flux constraints that eliminate the need to assume an evolutionary optimization principle such as the growth rate optimization assumption used in Flux Balance Analysis (FBA). This effective constraining is achieved by making the simple but biologically relevant assumption that flux flows from core to peripheral metabolism and does not flow back. The new method is significantly more robust than FBA with respect to errors in genome-scale model reconstruction. Furthermore, it can provide a comprehensive picture of metabolite balancing and predictions for unmeasured extracellular fluxes as constrained by 13C labeling data. A comparison shows that the results of this new method are similar to those found through 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C MFA) for central carbon metabolism but, additionally, it provides flux estimates for peripheral metabolism. The extra validation gained by matching 48 relative labeling measurements is used to identify where and why several existing COnstraint Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) flux prediction algorithms fail. We demonstrate how to use this knowledge to refine these methods and improve their predictive capabilities. This method provides a reliable base upon which to improve the design of biological systems. PMID:26379153

  14. Inference and Prediction of Metabolic Network Fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Nikoloski, Zoran; Perez-Storey, Richard; Sweetlove, Lee J.

    2015-01-01

    In this Update, we cover the basic principles of the estimation and prediction of the rates of the many interconnected biochemical reactions that constitute plant metabolic networks. This includes metabolic flux analysis approaches that utilize the rates or patterns of redistribution of stable isotopes of carbon and other atoms to estimate fluxes, as well as constraints-based optimization approaches such as flux balance analysis. Some of the major insights that have been gained from analysis of fluxes in plants are discussed, including the functioning of metabolic pathways in a network context, the robustness of the metabolic phenotype, the importance of cell maintenance costs, and the mechanisms that enable energy and redox balancing at steady state. We also discuss methodologies to exploit 'omic data sets for the construction of tissue-specific metabolic network models and to constrain the range of permissible fluxes in such models. Finally, we consider the future directions and challenges faced by the field of metabolic network flux phenotyping. PMID:26392262

  15. Metabolic flux analysis of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under mixotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Alagesan, Swathi; Gaudana, Sandeep B; Sinha, Avinash; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2013-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes capable of utilizing solar energy to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide to biomass. Despite several "proof of principle" studies, low product yield is an impediment in commercialization of cyanobacteria-derived biofuels. Estimation of intracellular reaction rates by (13)C metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) would be a step toward enhancing biofuel yield via metabolic engineering. We report (13)C-MFA for Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, a unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, known for enhanced hydrogen yield under mixotrophic conditions. Rates of reactions in the central carbon metabolism under nitrogen-fixing and -non-fixing conditions were estimated by monitoring the competitive incorporation of (12)C and (13)C from unlabeled CO2 and uniformly labeled glycerol, respectively, into terminal metabolites such as amino acids. The observed labeling patterns suggest mixotrophic growth under both the conditions, with a larger fraction of unlabeled carbon in nitrate-sufficient cultures asserting a greater contribution of carbon fixation by photosynthesis and an anaplerotic pathway. Indeed, flux analysis complements the higher growth observed under nitrate-sufficient conditions. On the other hand, the flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle was greater in nitrate-deficient conditions, possibly to supply the precursors and reducing equivalents needed for nitrogen fixation. In addition, an enhanced flux through fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase possibly suggests the organism's preferred mode under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The (13)C-MFA results complement the reported predictions by flux balance analysis and provide quantitative insight into the organism's distinct metabolic features under nitrogen-fixing and -non-fixing conditions.

  16. Dynamic and High-Resolution Metabolic Imaging of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Pyruvate in the Rat Brain Using a High-Performance Gradient Insert

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Dirk; Yen, Yi-Fen; Takahashi, Atsushi; Josan, Sonal; Tropp, James; Rutt, B.K.; Hurd, Ralph E.; Spielman, Daniel M.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-01-01

    Fast chemical shift imaging techniques are advantageous in metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized compounds due to the limited duration of the signal amplification. At the same time, reducing the acquisition time in hyperpolarized imaging does not necessarily lead to the conventional penalty in signal-to-noise ratio that occurs in imaging at thermal equilibrium polarization levels. Here a high-performance gradient insert was used in combination with undersampled spiral chemical shift imaging to increase either the imaging speed or the spatial resolution of hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging on a clinical 3T MR scanner. Both a single-shot sequence with a total acquisition time of 125 ms and a 3-shot sequence with a nominal in-plane resolution of 1.5 mm were implemented. The k-space trajectories were measured and then used during image reconstruction. The technique was applied to metabolic imaging of the rat brain in vivo after the injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate. Dynamic imaging afforded the measurement of region-of-interest-specific time courses of pyruvate and its metabolic products, while imaging at high spatial resolution was used to better characterize the spatial distribution of the metabolite signals. PMID:21500253

  17. Metabolic Fate of the Carboxyl Groups of Malate and Pyruvate and their Influence on δ13C of Leaf-Respired CO2 during Light Enhanced Dark Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Marco M.; Wegener, Frederik; Barthel, Matti; Maurino, Veronica G.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Buchmann, Nina; Werner, Christiane; Werner, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    The enhanced CO2 release of illuminated leaves transferred into darkness, termed “light enhanced dark respiration (LEDR)”, is often associated with an increase in the carbon isotope ratio of the respired CO2 (δ13CLEDR). The latter has been hypothesized to result from different respiratory substrates and decarboxylation reactions in various metabolic pathways, which are poorly understood so far. To provide a better insight into the underlying metabolic processes of δ13CLEDR, we fed position-specific 13C-labeled malate and pyruvate via the xylem stream to leaves of species with high and low δ13CLEDR values (Halimium halimifolium and Oxalis triangularis, respectively). During respective label application, we determined label-derived leaf 13CO2 respiration using laser spectroscopy and the 13C allocation to metabolic fractions during light–dark transitions. Our results clearly show that both carboxyl groups (C-1 and C-4 position) of malate similarly influence respiration and metabolic fractions in both species, indicating possible isotope randomization of the carboxyl groups of malate by the fumarase reaction. While C-2 position of pyruvate was only weakly respired, the species-specific difference in natural δ13CLEDR patterns were best reflected by the 13CO2 respiration patterns of the C-1 position of pyruvate. Furthermore, 13C label from malate and pyruvate were mainly allocated to amino and organic acid fractions in both species and only little to sugar and lipid fractions. In summary, our results suggest that respiration of both carboxyl groups of malate (via fumarase) by tricarboxylic acid cycle reactions or by NAD-malic enzyme influences δ13CLEDR. The latter supplies the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction, which in turn determines natural δ13CLEDR pattern by releasing the C-1 position of pyruvate. PMID:27375626

  18. 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of hepatic glucose metabolism in normal subjects and subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Cline, G W; Rothman, D L; Magnusson, I; Katz, L D; Shulman, G I

    1994-01-01

    To determine the effect of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) on rates and pathways of hepatic glycogen synthesis, as well as flux through hepatic pyruvate dehydrogenase, we used 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to monitor the peak intensity of the C1 resonance of the glucosyl units of hepatic glycogen, in combination with acetaminophen to sample the hepatic UDP-glucose pool and phenylacetate to sample the hepatic glutamine pool, during a hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp using [1-13C]-glucose. Five subjects with poorly controlled IDDM and six age-weight-matched control subjects were clamped at a mean plasma glucose concentration of approximately 9 mM and mean plasma insulin concentrations approximately 400 pM for 5 h. Rates of hepatic glycogen synthesis were similar in both groups (approximately 0.43 +/- 0.09 mumol/ml liver min). However, flux through the indirect pathway of glycogen synthesis (3 carbon units-->-->glycogen) was increased by approximately 50% (P < 0.05), whereas the relative contribution of pyruvate oxidation to TCA cycle flux was decreased by approximately 30% (P < 0.05) in the IDDM subjects compared to the control subjects. These studies demonstrate that patients with poorly controlled insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus have augmented hepatic gluconeogenesis and relative decreased rates of hepatic pyruvate oxidation. These abnormalities are not immediately reversed by normalizing intraportal concentrations of glucose, insulin, and glucagon and may contribute to postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:7989593

  19. Metabolic flux rewiring in mammalian cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jamey D.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous cell lines (CCLs) engage in “wasteful” glucose and glutamine metabolism that leads to accumulation of inhibitory byproducts, primarily lactate and ammonium. Advances in techniques for mapping intracellular carbon fluxes and profiling global changes in enzyme expression have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular drivers underlying these metabolic alterations. However, recent studies have revealed that CCLs are not necessarily entrenched in a glycolytic or glutaminolytic phenotype, but instead can shift their metabolism toward increased oxidative metabolism as nutrients become depleted and/or growth rate slows. Progress to understand dynamic flux regulation in CCLs has enabled the development of novel strategies to force cultures into desirable metabolic phenotypes, by combining fed-batch feeding strategies with direct metabolic engineering of host cells. PMID:23726154

  20. Metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli knockouts: lessons from the Keio collection and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2014-08-01

    Cellular metabolic and regulatory systems are of fundamental interest to biologists and engineers. Incomplete understanding of these complex systems remains an obstacle to progress in biotechnology and metabolic engineering. An established method for obtaining new information on network structure, regulation and dynamics is to study the cellular system following a perturbation such as a genetic knockout. The Keio collection of all viable Escherichia coli single-gene knockouts is facilitating a systematic investigation of the regulation and metabolism of E. coli. Of all omics measurements available, the metabolic flux profile (the fluxome) provides the most direct and relevant representation of the cellular phenotype. Recent advances in (13)C-metabolic flux analysis are now permitting highly precise and accurate flux measurements for investigating cellular systems and guiding metabolic engineering efforts.

  1. Metabolic flux analysis of CHO cells at growth and non-growth phases using isotopic tracers and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Woo Suk; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2011-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the main platform for production of biotherapeutics in the biopharmaceutical industry. However, relatively little is known about the metabolism of CHO cells in cell culture. In this work, metabolism of CHO cells was studied at the growth phase and early stationary phase using isotopic tracers and mass spectrometry. CHO cells were grown in fed-batch culture over a period of six days. On days 2 and 4, [1,2-(13)C] glucose was introduced and the labeling of intracellular metabolites was measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) at 6, 12 and 24h following the introduction of tracer. Intracellular metabolic fluxes were quantified from measured extracellular rates and (13)C-labeling dynamics of intracellular metabolites using non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). The flux results revealed significant rewiring of intracellular metabolic fluxes in the transition from growth to non-growth, including changes in energy metabolism, redox metabolism, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and anaplerosis. At the exponential phase, CHO cell metabolism was characterized by a high flux of glycolysis from glucose to lactate, anaplerosis from pyruvate to oxaloacetate and from glutamate to α-ketoglutarate, and cataplerosis though malic enzyme. At the stationary phase, the flux map was characterized by a reduced flux of glycolysis, net lactate uptake, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux, and reduced rate of anaplerosis. The fluxes of pyruvate dehydrogenase and TCA cycle were similar at the exponential and stationary phase. The results presented here provide a solid foundation for future studies of CHO cell metabolism for applications such as cell line development and medium optimization for high-titer production of recombinant proteins.

  2. A kinetic model relating the leaf uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS) to water and CO2 fluxes and 13C fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibt, Ulrike; Berry, Joe; Sandoval-Soto, Lisseth; Kuhn, Uwe; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an atmospheric trace gas that holds great promise for studies of terrestrial carbon and water exchange. During photosynthesis, COS and CO2 follow the same pathway and are both taken up in enzyme reactions in leaves. We have developed a simple model of leaf COS uptake, analogous to the equations for CO2 and water fluxes. Leaf COS uptake predicted from the new equation was in good agreement with data from field and laboratory chambers, although with large uncertainties. We also obtained first estimates for the ratio of conductances of COS and water vapour. Empirically derived estimates were 2.0 ± 0.3 for laboratory data on Fagus sylvatica and 2.2 ± 0.8 for field data on Quercus agrifolia, both close to the theoretical estimate of 2.0 ± 0.2. As a consequence of the close coupling of leaf COS and CO2 uptake, the normalized uptake ratio of COS and CO2 can be used to provide estimates of Ci-Ca, the ratio of intercellular to atmospheric CO2, an important plant gas exchange parameter that cannot be measured directly. Published normalized COS to CO2 uptake ratios for leaf studies on a variety of species fall in the range of 1.5 to 4, corresponding to Ci-Ca ratios of 0.5 to 0.8. In addition, we utilize the coupling of Ci-Ca and photosynthetic 13C discrimination to derive an estimate of 2.8 ± 0.3 for the global mean normalized uptake ratio. This corresponds to a global vegetation sink of COS in the order of 900 ± 100 Gg S yr-1. Similarly, COS and 13C discrimination can be combined to obtain independent estimates of photosynthesis (GPP). The new process-oriented description provides a framework for understanding COS fluxes that should improve the usefulness of atmospheric COS data to obtain estimates of gross photosynthesis and stomatal conductance at regional to global scales.

  3. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-20

    The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  4. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind

    2007-06-01

    The availability of whole-cell-level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate the metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30 000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations has relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reactions are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  5. Solid-state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of simultaneously metabolized acetate and phenol in a soil Pseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Heiman, A.S.; Copper, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was made of the concentration-dependent primary and secondary substrate relationships in the simultaneous metabolism of the ubiquitous pollutant phenol and the naturally occurring substrate acetate by a Pseudomonas sp. soil isolate capable of utilizing either substance as a sole source of carbon and energy. In addition to conventional analytical techniques, solid-state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to follow the cellular distribution of (1-/sup 13/C)acetate in the presence of unlabeled phenol. These results suggest that, when phenol is present as the primary substrate, acetate is preferentially shuttled into fatty acyl chain synthesis, whereas phenol carbon is funnelled into the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Thus, simultaneous use of a xenobiotic compound and a natural substrate apparently does occur, and the relative concentrations of the two substrates do influence the rate and manner in which the compounds are utilized. These results also demonstrate the unique advantage of using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques combined with /sup 13/C labeling of specific sites in substrates when doing microbial degradation studies. In this work, the entire cellular biomass was examined directly without extensive extraction, fractionation, or isolation of subcellular units; thus, there is no uncertainty about chemical alteration of substrate metabolites as a result of these often harsh treatments.

  6. How Closely Do the δ13C Values of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plants Reflect the Proportion of CO2 Fixed during Day and Night?1

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Klaus; Holtum, Joseph A.M.

    2002-01-01

    The extent to which Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant δ13C values provide an index of the proportions of CO2 fixed during daytime and nighttime was assessed. Shoots of seven CAM species (Aloe vera, Hylocereus monocanthus, Kalanchoe beharensis, Kalanchoe daigremontiana, Kalanchoe pinnata, Vanilla pauciflora, and Xerosicyos danguyi) and two C3 species (teak [Tectona grandis] and Clusia sp.) were grown in a cuvette, and net CO2 exchange was monitored for up to 51 d. In species exhibiting net dark CO2 fixation, between 14% and 73.3% of the carbon gain occurred in the dark. δ13C values of tissues formed inside the cuvette ranged between −28.7‰ and −11.6‰, and correlated linearly with the percentages of carbon gained in the light and in the dark. The δ13C values for new biomass obtained solely during the dark and light were estimated as −8.7‰ and −26.9‰, respectively. For each 10% contribution of dark CO2 fixation integrated over the entire experiment, the δ13C content of the tissue was, thus, approximately 1.8‰ less negative. Extrapolation of the observations to plants previously surveyed under natural conditions suggests that the most commonly expressed version of CAM in the field, “the typical CAM plant,” involves plants that gain about 71% to 77% of their carbon by dark fixation, and that the isotopic signals of plants that obtain one-third or less of their carbon in the dark may be confused with C3 plants when identified on the basis of carbon isotope content alone. PMID:12177497

  7. How closely do the delta(13)C values of Crassulacean Acid metabolism plants reflect the proportion of CO(2) fixed during day and night?

    PubMed

    Winter, Klaus; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2002-08-01

    The extent to which Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant delta(13)C values provide an index of the proportions of CO(2) fixed during daytime and nighttime was assessed. Shoots of seven CAM species (Aloe vera, Hylocereus monocanthus, Kalanchoe beharensis, Kalanchoe daigremontiana, Kalanchoe pinnata, Vanilla pauciflora, and Xerosicyos danguyi) and two C(3) species (teak [Tectona grandis] and Clusia sp.) were grown in a cuvette, and net CO(2) exchange was monitored for up to 51 d. In species exhibiting net dark CO(2) fixation, between 14% and 73.3% of the carbon gain occurred in the dark. delta(13)C values of tissues formed inside the cuvette ranged between -28.7 per thousand and -11.6 per thousand, and correlated linearly with the percentages of carbon gained in the light and in the dark. The delta(13)C values for new biomass obtained solely during the dark and light were estimated as -8.7 per thousand and -26.9 per thousand, respectively. For each 10% contribution of dark CO(2) fixation integrated over the entire experiment, the delta(13)C content of the tissue was, thus, approximately 1.8 per thousand less negative. Extrapolation of the observations to plants previously surveyed under natural conditions suggests that the most commonly expressed version of CAM in the field, "the typical CAM plant," involves plants that gain about 71% to 77% of their carbon by dark fixation, and that the isotopic signals of plants that obtain one-third or less of their carbon in the dark may be confused with C(3) plants when identified on the basis of carbon isotope content alone.

  8. E-Flux2 and SPOT: Validated Methods for Inferring Intracellular Metabolic Flux Distributions from Transcriptomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyung; Lane, Anatoliy; Kelley, James J.; Lun, Desmond S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several methods have been developed to predict system-wide and condition-specific intracellular metabolic fluxes by integrating transcriptomic data with genome-scale metabolic models. While powerful in many settings, existing methods have several shortcomings, and it is unclear which method has the best accuracy in general because of limited validation against experimentally measured intracellular fluxes. Results We present a general optimization strategy for inferring intracellular metabolic flux distributions from transcriptomic data coupled with genome-scale metabolic reconstructions. It consists of two different template models called DC (determined carbon source model) and AC (all possible carbon sources model) and two different new methods called E-Flux2 (E-Flux method combined with minimization of l2 norm) and SPOT (Simplified Pearson cOrrelation with Transcriptomic data), which can be chosen and combined depending on the availability of knowledge on carbon source or objective function. This enables us to simulate a broad range of experimental conditions. We examined E. coli and S. cerevisiae as representative prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms respectively. The predictive accuracy of our algorithm was validated by calculating the uncentered Pearson correlation between predicted fluxes and measured fluxes. To this end, we compiled 20 experimental conditions (11 in E. coli and 9 in S. cerevisiae), of transcriptome measurements coupled with corresponding central carbon metabolism intracellular flux measurements determined by 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA), which is the largest dataset assembled to date for the purpose of validating inference methods for predicting intracellular fluxes. In both organisms, our method achieves an average correlation coefficient ranging from 0.59 to 0.87, outperforming a representative sample of competing methods. Easy-to-use implementations of E-Flux2 and SPOT are available as part of the open

  9. Dynamic metabolic flux analysis of plant cell wall synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuewen; Alonso, Ana P; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2013-07-01

    The regulation of plant cell wall synthesis pathways remains poorly understood. This has become a bottleneck in designing bioenergy crops. The goal of this study was to analyze the regulation of plant cell wall precursor metabolism using metabolic flux analysis based on dynamic labeling experiments. Arabidopsis T87 cells were cultured heterotrophically with (13)C labeled sucrose. The time course of ¹³C labeling patterns in cell wall precursors and related sugar phosphates was monitored using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry until steady state labeling was reached. A kinetic model based on mass action reaction mechanisms was developed to simulate the carbon flow in the cell wall synthesis network. The kinetic parameters of the model were determined by fitting the model to the labeling time course data, cell wall composition, and synthesis rates. A metabolic control analysis was performed to predict metabolic regulations that may improve plant biomass composition for biofuel production. Our results describe the routes and rates of carbon flow from sucrose to cell wall precursors. We found that sucrose invertase is responsible for the entry of sucrose into metabolism and UDP-glucose-4-epimerase plays a dominant role in UDP-Gal synthesis in heterotrophic Aradidopsis cells under aerobic conditions. We also predicted reactions that exert strong regulatory influence over carbon flow to cell wall synthesis and its composition.

  10. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  11. Designer labels for plant metabolism: statistical design of isotope labeling experiments for improved quantification of flux in complex plant metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Nargund, Shilpa; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-01-27

    Metabolic fluxes are powerful indicators of cell physiology and can be estimated by isotope-assisted metabolic flux analysis (MFA). The complexity of the compartmented metabolic networks of plants has constrained the application of isotope-assisted MFA to them, principally because of poor identifiability of fluxes from the measured isotope labeling patterns. However, flux identifiability can be significantly improved by a priori design of isotope labeling experiments (ILEs). This computational design involves evaluating the effect of different isotope label and isotopomer measurement combinations on flux identifiability, and thereby identifying optimal labels and measurements toward evaluating the fluxes of interest with the highest confidence. This article reports ILE designs for two major, compartmented plant metabolic pathways - the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt. Together, these pathways represent common motifs in plant metabolism including duplication of pathways in different subcellular compartments, reversible reactions and cyclic carbon flow. To compare various ILE designs, we employed statistical A- and D-optimality criteria. Our computations showed that 1,2-(13)C Glc is a powerful and robust label for the plant PPPs, given currently popular isotopomer measurement techniques (single quadrupole mass spectrometry [MS] and 2-D nuclear magnetic resonance [NMR]). Further analysis revealed that this label can estimate several PPP fluxes better than the popular label 1-(13)C Glc. Furthermore, the concurrent measurement of the isotopomers of hexose and pentose moieties synthesized exclusively in the cytosol or the plastid compartments (measurable through intracellular glucose or sucrose, starch, RNA ribose and histidine) considerably improves the identifiability of PPP fluxes in the individual compartments. Additionally, MS-derived isotopomer measurements outperform NMR-derived measurements in identifying PPP fluxes. The

  12. Characterization of metabolic profile of honokiol in rat feces using liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry and (13)C stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yinfeng; Tang, Minghai; Song, Hang; Li, Rong; Wang, Chunyu; Ye, Haoyu; Qiu, Neng; Zhang, Yongkui; Chen, Lijuan; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-03-15

    As fecal excretion is one of important routes of elimination of drugs and their metabolites, it is indispensable to investigate the metabolites in feces for more comprehensive information on biotransformation in vivo. In this study, a sensitive and reliable approach based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS) was applied to characterize the metabolic profile of honokiol in rat feces after the administration of an equimolar mixture of honokiol and [(13)C6]-labeled honokiol. Totally 42 metabolites were discovered and tentatively identified in rat feces samples, 26 metabolites were first reported, including two novel classes of metabolites, methylated and dimeric metabolites of honokiol. Moreover, this study provided basic comparative data on the metabolites in rat plasma, feces and urine, which gave better understanding of the metabolic fate of honokiol in vivo.

  13. NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) based signatures of abnormal choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma with no prominent Warburg effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bag, Swarnendu; Banerjee, Deb Ranjan; Basak, Amit; Das, Amit Kumar; Pal, Mousumi; Banerjee, Rita; Paul, Ranjan Rashmi; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2015-04-17

    At functional levels, besides genes and proteins, changes in metabolome profiles are instructive for a biological system in health and disease including malignancy. It is understood that metabolomic alterations in association with proteomic and transcriptomic aberrations are very fundamental to unravel malignant micro-ambient criticality and oral cancer is no exception. Hence deciphering intricate dimensions of oral cancer metabolism may be contributory both for integrated appreciation of its pathogenesis and to identify any critical but yet unexplored dimension of this malignancy with high mortality rate. Although several methods do exist, NMR provides higher analytical precision in identification of cancer metabolomic signature. Present study explored abnormal signatures in choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analysis of serum. It has demonstrated down-regulation of choline with concomitant up-regulation of its break-down product in the form of trimethylamine N-oxide in OSCC compared to normal counterpart. Further, no significant change in lactate profile in OSCC possibly indicated that well-known Warburg effect was not a prominent phenomenon in such malignancy. Amongst other important metabolites, malonate has shown up-regulation but D-glucose, saturated fatty acids, acetate and threonine did not show any significant change. Analyzing these metabolomic findings present study proposed trimethyl amine N-oxide and malonate as important metabolic signature for oral cancer with no prominent Warburg effect. - Highlights: • NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) study of Oral Squamous cell Carcinoma Serum. • Abnormal Choline metabolomic signatures. • Up-regulation of Trimethylamine N-oxide. • Unchanged lactate profile indicates no prominent Warburg effect. • Proposed alternative glucose metabolism path through up-regulation of malonate.

  14. INCA: a computational platform for isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Young, Jamey D

    2014-05-01

    13C flux analysis studies have become an essential component of metabolic engineering research. The scope of these studies has gradually expanded to include both isotopically steady-state and transient labeling experiments, the latter of which are uniquely applicable to photosynthetic organisms and slow-to-label mammalian cell cultures. Isotopomer network compartmental analysis (INCA) is the first publicly available software package that can perform both steady-state metabolic flux analysis and isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis. The software provides a framework for comprehensive analysis of metabolic networks using mass balances and elementary metabolite unit balances. The generation of balance equations and their computational solution is completely automated and can be performed on networks of arbitrary complexity.

  15. Early estrogen-induced metabolic changes and their inhibition by actinomycin D and cycloheximide in human breast cancer cells: sup 31 P and sup 13 C NMR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Neeman, M.; Degani, H. )

    1989-07-01

    Metabolic changes following estrogen stimulation and the inhibition of these changes in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide were monitored continuously in perfused human breast cancer T47D clone 11 cells with {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C NMR techniques. The experiments were performed by estrogen rescue of tamoxifen-treated cells. Immediately after perfusion with estrogen-containing medium, a continuous enhancement in the rates of glucose consumption, lactate production by glycolysis, and glutamate synthesis by the Krebs cycle occurred with a persistent 2-fold increase at 4 hr. Pretreatment with either actinomycin D or cycloheximide, at concentrations known to inhibit mRNA and protein synthesis, respectively, and simultaneous treatment with estrogen and each inhibitor prevented the estrogen-induced changes in glucose metabolism. This suggested that the observed estrogen stimulation required synthesis of mRNA and protein. These inhibitors also modulated several metabolic activities that were not related to estrogen stimulation. The observed changes in the in vivo kinetics of glucose metabolism may provide a means for the early detection of the response of human breast cancer cells to estrogen versus tamoxifen treatment.

  16. Metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli MG1655 under octanoic acid (C8) stress.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanfen; Yoon, Jong Moon; Jarboe, Laura; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2015-05-01

    Systems metabolic engineering has made the renewable production of industrial chemicals a feasible alternative to modern operations. One major example of a renewable process is the production of carboxylic acids, such as octanoic acid (C8), from Escherichia coli, engineered to express thioesterase enzymes. C8, however, is toxic to E. coli above a certain concentration, which limits the final titer. (13)C metabolic flux analysis of E. coli was performed for both C8 stress and control conditions using NMR2Flux with isotopomer balancing. A mixture of labeled and unlabeled glucose was used as the sole carbon source for bacterial growth for (13)C flux analysis. By comparing the metabolic flux maps of the control condition and C8 stress condition, pathways that were altered under the stress condition were identified. C8 stress was found to reduce carbon flux in several pathways: the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, the CO2 production, and the pyruvate dehydrogenase pathway. Meanwhile, a few pathways became more active: the pyruvate oxidative pathway, and the extracellular acetate production. These results were statistically significant for three biological replicates between the control condition and C8 stress. As a working hypothesis, the following causes are proposed to be the main causes for growth inhibition and flux alteration for a cell under stress: membrane disruption, low activity of electron transport chain, and the activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase regulator (PdhR).

  17. From elementary flux modes to elementary flux vectors: Metabolic pathway analysis with arbitrary linear flux constraints.

    PubMed

    Klamt, Steffen; Regensburger, Georg; Gerstl, Matthias P; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Schuster, Stefan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Zanghellini, Jürgen; Müller, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) emerged as a formal concept to describe metabolic pathways and have become an established tool for constraint-based modeling and metabolic network analysis. EFMs are characteristic (support-minimal) vectors of the flux cone that contains all feasible steady-state flux vectors of a given metabolic network. EFMs account for (homogeneous) linear constraints arising from reaction irreversibilities and the assumption of steady state; however, other (inhomogeneous) linear constraints, such as minimal and maximal reaction rates frequently used by other constraint-based techniques (such as flux balance analysis [FBA]), cannot be directly integrated. These additional constraints further restrict the space of feasible flux vectors and turn the flux cone into a general flux polyhedron in which the concept of EFMs is not directly applicable anymore. For this reason, there has been a conceptual gap between EFM-based (pathway) analysis methods and linear optimization (FBA) techniques, as they operate on different geometric objects. One approach to overcome these limitations was proposed ten years ago and is based on the concept of elementary flux vectors (EFVs). Only recently has the community started to recognize the potential of EFVs for metabolic network analysis. In fact, EFVs exactly represent the conceptual development required to generalize the idea of EFMs from flux cones to flux polyhedra. This work aims to present a concise theoretical and practical introduction to EFVs that is accessible to a broad audience. We highlight the close relationship between EFMs and EFVs and demonstrate that almost all applications of EFMs (in flux cones) are possible for EFVs (in flux polyhedra) as well. In fact, certain properties can only be studied with EFVs. Thus, we conclude that EFVs provide a powerful and unifying framework for constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks.

  18. Application of Double Spin-Echo Spiral Chemical Shift Imaging to Rapid Metabolic Mapping of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Sonal; Yen, Yi-Fen; Hurd, Ralph; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Spielman, Daniel; Mayer, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Undersampled spiral CSI (spCSI) using a free induction decay (FID) acquisition allows sub-second metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized 13C. Phase correction of the FID acquisition can be difficult, especially with contributions from aliased out-of-phase peaks. This work extends the spCSI sequence by incorporating double spin-echo radiofrequency (RF) pulses to eliminate the need for phase correction and obtain high quality spectra in magnitude mode. The sequence also provides an added benefit of attenuating signal from flowing spins, which can otherwise contaminate signal in the organ of interest. The refocusing pulses can potentially lead to a loss of hyperpolarized magnetization in dynamic imaging due to flow of spins through the fringe field of the RF coil, where the refocusing pulses fail to provide complete refocusing. Care must be taken for dynamic imaging to ensure that the spins remain within the B1-homogeneous sensitive volume of the RF coil. PMID:21316280

  19. Enhancing the [13C]bicarbonate signal in cardiac hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate MRS studies by infusion of glucose, insulin and potassium.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Mette Hauge; Laustsen, Christoffer; Butt, Sadia Asghar; Magnusson, Peter; Søgaard, Lise Vejby; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Åkeson, Per

    2013-11-01

    A change in myocardial metabolism is a known effect of several diseases. MRS with hyperpolarized (13)C-labelled pyruvate is a technique capable of detecting changes in myocardial pyruvate metabolism, and has proven to be useful for the evaluation of myocardial ischaemia in vivo. However, during fasting, the myocardial glucose oxidation is low and the fatty acid oxidation (β-oxidation) is high, which complicates the interpretation of pyruvate metabolism with the technique. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the infusion of glucose, insulin and potassium (GIK) could increase the myocardial glucose oxidation in the citric acid cycle, reflected as an increase in the [(13)C]bicarbonate signal in cardiac hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate MRS measurements in fasted rats. Two groups of rats were infused with two different doses of GIK and investigated by MRS after injection of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. No [(13)C]bicarbonate signal could be detected in the fasted state. However, a significant increase in the [(13)C]bicarbonate signal was observed by the infusion of a high dose of GIK. This study demonstrates that a high [(13)C]bicarbonate signal can be achieved by GIK infusion in fasted rats. The increased [(13)C]bicarbonate signal indicates an increased flux of pyruvate through the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex and an increase in myocardial glucose oxidation through the citric acid cycle.

  20. Analysis of metabolic flux using dynamic labelling and metabolic modelling.

    PubMed

    Fernie, A R; Morgan, J A

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic fluxes and the capacity to modulate them are a crucial component of the ability of the plant cell to react to environmental perturbations. Our ability to quantify them and to attain information concerning the regulatory mechanisms that control them is therefore essential to understand and influence metabolic networks. For all but the simplest of flux measurements labelling methods have proven to be the most informative. Both steady-state and dynamic labelling approaches have been adopted in the study of plant metabolism. Here the conceptual basis of these complementary approaches, as well as their historical application in microbial, mammalian and plant sciences, is reviewed, and an update on technical developments in label distribution analyses is provided. This is supported by illustrative cases studies involving the kinetic modelling of secondary metabolism. One issue that is particularly complex in the analysis of plant fluxes is the extensive compartmentation of the plant cell. This problem is discussed from both theoretical and experimental perspectives, and the current approaches used to address it are assessed. Finally, current limitations and future perspectives of kinetic modelling of plant metabolism are discussed.

  1. Investigation of Metabolism of Exogenous Glucose at the Early Stage and Onset of Diabetes Mellitus in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty Rats Using [1, 2, 3-13C]Glucose Breath Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kijima, Sho; Tanaka, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in glucose metabolism at the early stage and onset of diabetes in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Specifically, after the oral administration of [1, 2, 3-13C]glucose, the levels of exhaled 13CO2, which most likely originated from pyruvate decarboxylation and tricarboxylic acid, were measured. Eight OLETF rats and eight control rats (Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka [LETO]) were administered 13C-glucose. Three types of 13C-glucose breath tests were performed thrice in each period at 2-week intervals. [3-13C]glucose results in a 13C isotope at position 1 in the pyruvate molecule, which provides 13CO2. The 13C at carbons 1 and 2 of glucose is converted to 13C at carbons 2 and 1 of acetate, respectively, which produce 13CO2. Based on metabolic differences of the labeled sites, glucose metabolism was evaluated using the results of three breath tests. The increase in 13CO2 excretion in OLETF rats was delayed in all three breath tests compared to that in control rats, suggesting that OLETF rats had a lower glucose metabolism than control rats. In addition, overall glucose metabolism increased with age in both groups. The utilization of [2-13C]glucose was suppressed in OLETF rats at 6–12 weeks of age, but they showed higher [3-13C]glucose oxidation than control rats at 22–25 weeks of age. In the [1-13C]glucose breath test, no significant differences in the area under the curve until 180 minutes (AUC180) were observed between OLETF and LETO rats of any age. Glucose metabolism kinetics were different between the age groups and two groups of rats; however, these differences were not significant based on the overall AUC180 of [1-13C]glucose. We conclude that breath 13CO2 excretion is reduced in OLETF rats at the primary stage of prediabetes, indicating differences in glucose oxidation kinetics between OLETF and LETO rats. PMID:27483133

  2. Investigation of Metabolism of Exogenous Glucose at the Early Stage and Onset of Diabetes Mellitus in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty Rats Using [1, 2, 3-13C]Glucose Breath Tests.

    PubMed

    Kawagoe, Naoyuki; Kano, Osamu; Kijima, Sho; Tanaka, Hideki; Takayanagi, Masaaki; Urita, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in glucose metabolism at the early stage and onset of diabetes in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Specifically, after the oral administration of [1, 2, 3-13C]glucose, the levels of exhaled 13CO2, which most likely originated from pyruvate decarboxylation and tricarboxylic acid, were measured. Eight OLETF rats and eight control rats (Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka [LETO]) were administered 13C-glucose. Three types of 13C-glucose breath tests were performed thrice in each period at 2-week intervals. [3-13C]glucose results in a 13C isotope at position 1 in the pyruvate molecule, which provides 13CO2. The 13C at carbons 1 and 2 of glucose is converted to 13C at carbons 2 and 1 of acetate, respectively, which produce 13CO2. Based on metabolic differences of the labeled sites, glucose metabolism was evaluated using the results of three breath tests. The increase in 13CO2 excretion in OLETF rats was delayed in all three breath tests compared to that in control rats, suggesting that OLETF rats had a lower glucose metabolism than control rats. In addition, overall glucose metabolism increased with age in both groups. The utilization of [2-13C]glucose was suppressed in OLETF rats at 6-12 weeks of age, but they showed higher [3-13C]glucose oxidation than control rats at 22-25 weeks of age. In the [1-13C]glucose breath test, no significant differences in the area under the curve until 180 minutes (AUC180) were observed between OLETF and LETO rats of any age. Glucose metabolism kinetics were different between the age groups and two groups of rats; however, these differences were not significant based on the overall AUC180 of [1-13C]glucose. We conclude that breath 13CO2 excretion is reduced in OLETF rats at the primary stage of prediabetes, indicating differences in glucose oxidation kinetics between OLETF and LETO rats.

  3. Carbon and Nitrogen Provisions Alter the Metabolic Flux in Developing Soybean Embryos1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Doug K.; Young, Jamey D.

    2013-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) seeds store significant amounts of their biomass as protein, levels of which reflect the carbon and nitrogen received by the developing embryo. The relationship between carbon and nitrogen supply during filling and seed composition was examined through a series of embryo-culturing experiments. Three distinct ratios of carbon to nitrogen supply were further explored through metabolic flux analysis. Labeling experiments utilizing [U-13C5]glutamine, [U-13C4]asparagine, and [1,2-13C2]glucose were performed to assess embryo metabolism under altered feeding conditions and to create corresponding flux maps. Additionally, [U-14C12]sucrose, [U-14C6]glucose, [U-14C5]glutamine, and [U-14C4]asparagine were used to monitor differences in carbon allocation. The analyses revealed that: (1) protein concentration as a percentage of total soybean embryo biomass coincided with the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio; (2) altered nitrogen supply did not dramatically impact relative amino acid or storage protein subunit profiles; and (3) glutamine supply contributed 10% to 23% of the carbon for biomass production, including 9% to 19% of carbon to fatty acid biosynthesis and 32% to 46% of carbon to amino acids. Seed metabolism accommodated different levels of protein biosynthesis while maintaining a consistent rate of dry weight accumulation. Flux through ATP-citrate lyase, combined with malic enzyme activity, contributed significantly to acetyl-coenzyme A production. These fluxes changed with plastidic pyruvate kinase to maintain a supply of pyruvate for amino and fatty acids. The flux maps were independently validated by nitrogen balancing and highlight the robustness of primary metabolism. PMID:23314943

  4. Metabolic fluxes in an illuminated Arabidopsis rosette.

    PubMed

    Szecowka, Marek; Heise, Robert; Tohge, Takayuki; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Vosloh, Daniel; Huege, Jan; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John; Nikoloski, Zoran; Stitt, Mark; Fernie, Alisdair R; Arrivault, Stéphanie

    2013-02-01

    Photosynthesis is the basis for life, and its optimization is a key biotechnological aim given the problems of population explosion and environmental deterioration. We describe a method to resolve intracellular fluxes in intact Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes based on time-dependent labeling patterns in the metabolome. Plants photosynthesizing under limiting irradiance and ambient CO2 in a custom-built chamber were transferred into a (13)CO2-enriched environment. The isotope labeling patterns of 40 metabolites were obtained using liquid or gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Labeling kinetics revealed striking differences between metabolites. At a qualitative level, they matched expectations in terms of pathway topology and stoichiometry, but some unexpected features point to the complexity of subcellular and cellular compartmentation. To achieve quantitative insights, the data set was used for estimating fluxes in the framework of kinetic flux profiling. We benchmarked flux estimates to four classically determined flux signatures of photosynthesis and assessed the robustness of the estimates with respect to different features of the underlying metabolic model and the time-resolved data set.

  5. Glucose metabolic flux distribution of Lactobacillus amylophilus during lactic acid production using kitchen waste saccharified solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Qunhui; Zou, Hui; Liu, Yingying; Wang, Juan; Gan, Kemin; Xiang, Juan

    2013-11-01

    The (13) C isotope tracer method was used to investigate the glucose metabolic flux distribution and regulation in Lactobacillus amylophilus to improve lactic acid production using kitchen waste saccharified solution (KWSS). The results demonstrate that L. amylophilus is a homofermentative bacterium. In synthetic medium, 60.6% of the glucose entered the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) to produce lactic acid, whereas 36.4% of the glucose entered the pentose phosphate metabolic pathway (HMP). After solid-liquid separation of the KWSS, the addition of Fe(3+) during fermentation enhanced the NADPH production efficiency and increased the NADH content. The flux to the EMP was also effectively increased. Compared with the control (60.6% flux to EMP without Fe(3+) addition), the flux to the EMP with the addition of Fe(3+) (74.3%) increased by 23.8%. In the subsequent pyruvate metabolism, Fe(3+) also increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, and inhibited alcohol dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase, thereby increasing the lactic acid production to 9.03 g l(-1) , an increase of 8% compared with the control. All other organic acid by-products were lower than in the control. However, the addition of Zn(2+) showed an opposite effect, decreasing the lactic acid production. In conclusion it is feasible and effective means using GC-MS, isotope experiment and MATLAB software to integrate research the metabolic flux distribution of lactic acid bacteria, and the results provide the theoretical foundation for similar metabolic flux distribution.

  6. Simulating dynamics of δ13C of CO2 in the planetary boundary layer over a boreal forest region: covariation between surface fluxes and atmospheric mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baozhang; Chen, Jing M.; Tans, Pieter P.; Huang, Lin

    2006-11-01

    Stable isotopes of CO2 contain unique information on the biological and physical processes that exchange CO2 between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes with the atmosphere is correlated diurnally and seasonally with the planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics. The strength of this kind of covariation affects the vertical gradient of δ13C and thus the global δ13C distribution pattern. We need to understand the various processes involved in transport/diffusion of carbon isotope ratio in the PBL and between the PBL and the biosphere and the troposphere. In this study, we employ a one-dimensional vertical diffusion/transport atmospheric model (VDS), coupled to an ecosystem isotope model (BEPS-EASS) to simulate dynamics of 13CO2 in the PBL over a boreal forest region in the vicinity of the Fraserdale (FRD) tower (49°52'29.9''N, 81°34'12.3''W) in northern Ontario, Canada. The data from intensive campaigns during the growing season in 1999 at this site are used for model validation in the surface layer. The model performance, overall, is satisfactory in simulating the measured data over the whole course of the growing season. We examine the interaction of the biosphere and the atmosphere through the PBL with respect to δ13C on diurnal and seasonal scales. The simulated annual mean vertical gradient of δ13C in the PBL in the vicinity of the FRD tower was about 0.25‰ in 1999. The δ13C vertical gradient exhibited strong diurnal (29%) and seasonal (71%) variations that do not exactly mimic those of CO2. Most of the vertical gradient (96.5% +/-) resulted from covariation between ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes and the PBL dynamics, while the rest (3.5%+/-) was contributed by isotopic disequilibrium between respiration and photosynthesis. This disequilibrium effect on δ13C of CO2 dynamics in PBL, moreover, was confined to the near surface layers (less than 350 m).

  7. Investigation of the central carbon metabolism of Sorangium cellulosum: metabolic network reconstruction and quantification of pathway fluxes.

    PubMed

    Bolten, Christoph J; Heinzle, Elmar; Müller, Rolf; Wittmann, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, the metabolic network of primary metabolism of the slow-growing myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum was reconstructed from the annotated genome sequence of the type strain So ce56. During growth on glucose as the carbon source and asparagine as the nitrogen source, So ce56 showed a very low growth rate of 0.23 d-(1), equivalent to a doubling time of 3 days. Based on a complete stoichiometric and isotopomer model of the central metabolism, 13C metabolic flux analysis was carried out for growth with glucose as carbon and asparagine as nitrogen sources. Normalized to the uptake flux for glucose (100%), cells recruited glycolysis (51%) and the pentose phosphate pathway (48%) as major catabolic pathways. The Entner-Doudoroff pathway and glyoxylate shunt were not active. A high flux through the TCA cycle (118%) enabled a strong formation of ATP, but cells revealed a rather low yield for biomass. Inspection of fluxes linked to energy metabolism revealed that S. cellulosum utilized only 10% of the ATP formed for growth, whereas 90% is required for maintenance. This explains the apparent discrepancy between the relatively low biomass yield and the high flux through the energy-delivering TCA cycle. The total flux of NADPH supply (216%) was higher than the demand for anabolism (156%), indicating additional reactions for balancing of NADPH. The cells further exhibited a highly active metabolic cycle, interconverting C3 and C4 metabolites of glycolysis and the TCA cycle. The present work provides the first insight into fluxes of the primary metabolism of myxobacteria, especially for future investigation on the supply of cofactors, building blocks, and energy in myxobacteria, producing natural compounds of biotechnological interest.

  8. Metabolism strikes back: metabolic flux regulates cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, Christian M.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian cells depend on growth factor signaling to take up nutrients; however, coordination of glucose and glutamine uptake has been a mystery. In this issue of Genes & Development, Wellen and colleagues (pp. 2784–2799) show that glucose flux through the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway regulates growth factor receptor glycosylation and enables glutamine consumption. This mechanism ensures that cells do not engage in anabolic metabolism when nutrients are limiting, and highlights how substrate availability for protein modifications can modulate cell signaling. PMID:21159812

  9. Comparative metabolic flux analysis of an Ashbya gossypii wild type strain and a high riboflavin-producing mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bo-Young; Wittmann, Christoph; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the central metabolic pathway of an Ashbya gossypii wild type strain and a riboflavin over-producing mutant strain developed in a previous study in order to characterize the riboflavin over-production pathway. (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was carried out in both strains, and the resulting data were fit to a steady-state flux isotopomer model using OpenFLUX. Flux to pentose-5-phosphate (P5P) via the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) was 9% higher in the mutant strain compared to the wild type strain. The flux from purine synthesis to riboflavin in the mutant strain was 1.6%, while that of the wild type strain was only 0.1%, a 16-fold difference. In addition, the flux from the cytoplasmic pyruvate pool to the extracellular metabolites, pyruvate, lactate, and alanine, was 2-fold higher in the mutant strain compared to the wild type strain. This result demonstrates that increased guanosine triphosphate (GTP) flux through the PPP and purine synthesis pathway (PSP) increased riboflavin production in the mutant strain. The present study provides the first insight into metabolic flux through the central carbon pathway in A. gossypii and sets the foundation for development of a quantitative and functional model of the A. gossypii metabolic network.

  10. ¹³C-based metabolic flux analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a reduced Crabtree effect.

    PubMed

    Kajihata, Shuichi; Matsuda, Fumio; Yoshimi, Mika; Hayakawa, Kenshi; Furusawa, Chikara; Kanda, Akihisa; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows a Crabtree effect that produces ethanol in a high glucose concentration even under fully aerobic condition. For efficient production of cake yeast or compressed yeast for baking, ethanol by-production is not desired since glucose limited chemostat or fed-batch cultivations are performed to suppress the Crabtree effect. In this study, the (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was performed for the S288C derived S. cerevisiae strain to characterize a metabolic state under the reduced Crabtree effect. S. cerevisiae cells were cultured at a low dilution rate (0.1 h(-1)) under the glucose-limited chemostat condition. The estimated metabolic flux distribution showed that the acetyl-CoA in mitochondria was mainly produced from pyruvate by pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) reaction and that the level of the metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was much higher than that of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, which contributes to high biomass yield at low dilution rate by supplying NADPH required for cell growth.

  11. EPR oxygen imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRI of pyruvate metabolism as noninvasive biomarkers of tumor treatment response to a glycolysis inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita; Yasui, Hironobu; Morris, H Douglas; Munasinghe, Jeeva P; Lizak, Martin; Merkle, Hellmut; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Choudhuri, Rajani; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Koretsky, Alan P; Mitchell, James B; Krishna, Murali C

    2013-05-01

    The hypoxic nature of tumors results in treatment resistance and poor prognosis. To spare limited oxygen for more crucial pathways, hypoxic cancerous cells suppress mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and promote glycolysis for energy production. Thereby, inhibition of glycolysis has the potential to overcome treatment resistance of hypoxic tumors. Here, EPR imaging was used to evaluate oxygen dependent efficacy on hypoxia-sensitive drug. The small molecule 3-bromopyruvate blocks glycolysis pathway by inhibiting hypoxia inducible enzymes and enhanced cytotoxicity of 3-bromopyruvate under hypoxic conditions has been reported in vitro. However, the efficacy of 3-bromopyruvate was substantially attenuated in hypoxic tumor regions (pO2<10 mmHg) in vivo using squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII)-bearing mouse model. Metabolic MRI studies using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled pyruvate showed that monocarboxylate transporter-1 is the major transporter for pyruvate and the analog 3-bromopyruvate in SCCVII tumor. The discrepant results between in vitro and in vivo data were attributed to biphasic oxygen dependent expression of monocarboxylate transporter-1 in vivo. Expression of monocarboxylate transporter-1 was enhanced in moderately hypoxic (8-15 mmHg) tumor regions but down regulated in severely hypoxic (<5 mmHg) tumor regions. These results emphasize the importance of noninvasive imaging biomarkers to confirm the action of hypoxia-activated drugs.

  12. Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) Function in the Brain as Revealed by the Cerebral Metabolism of (1-(13)C)-Glucose.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Laura; Rial, Eduardo; Cerdan, Sebastian; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate transporter Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12 is critically involved in brain aspartate synthesis, and AGC1 deficiency results in a drastic fall of brain aspartate levels in humans and mice. It has recently been described that the uncoupling protein UCP2 transports four carbon metabolites including aspartate. Since UCP2 is expressed in several brain cell types and AGC1 is mainly neuronal, we set to test whether UCP2 could be a mitochondrial aspartate carrier in the brain glial compartment. The study of the cerebral metabolism of (1-(13)C)-glucose in vivo in wild type and UCP2-knockout mice showed no differences in C3 or C2 labeling of aspartate, suggesting that UCP2 does not function as a mitochondrial aspartate carrier in brain. However, surprisingly, a clear decrease (of about 30-35 %) in the fractional enrichment of glutamate, glutamine and GABA was observed in the brains of UCP2-KO mice which was not associated with differences in either glucose or lactate enrichments. The results suggest that the dilution in the labeling of glutamate and its downstream metabolites could originate from the uptake of an unlabeled substrate that could not leave the matrix via UCP2 becoming trapped in the matrix. Understanding the nature of the unlabeled substrate and its precursor(s) as alternative substrates to glucose is of interest in the context of neurological diseases associated with UCP2.

  13. Oxygen dependence of metabolic fluxes and energy generation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-1A

    PubMed Central

    Jouhten, Paula; Rintala, Eija; Huuskonen, Anne; Tamminen, Anu; Toivari, Mervi; Wiebe, Marilyn; Ruohonen, Laura; Penttilä, Merja; Maaheimo, Hannu

    2008-01-01

    Background The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to adjust to external oxygen availability by utilizing both respirative and fermentative metabolic modes. Adjusting the metabolic mode involves alteration of the intracellular metabolic fluxes that are determined by the cell's multilevel regulatory network. Oxygen is a major determinant of the physiology of S. cerevisiae but understanding of the oxygen dependence of intracellular flux distributions is still scarce. Results Metabolic flux distributions of S. cerevisiae CEN.PK113-1A growing in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1 with 20.9%, 2.8%, 1.0%, 0.5% or 0.0% O2 in the inlet gas were quantified by 13C-MFA. Metabolic flux ratios from fractional [U-13C]glucose labelling experiments were used to solve the underdetermined MFA system of central carbon metabolism of S. cerevisiae. While ethanol production was observed already in 2.8% oxygen, only minor differences in the flux distribution were observed, compared to fully aerobic conditions. However, in 1.0% and 0.5% oxygen the respiratory rate was severely restricted, resulting in progressively reduced fluxes through the TCA cycle and the direction of major fluxes to the fermentative pathway. A redistribution of fluxes was observed in all branching points of central carbon metabolism. Yet only when oxygen provision was reduced to 0.5%, was the biomass yield exceeded by the yields of ethanol and CO2. Respirative ATP generation provided 59% of the ATP demand in fully aerobic conditions and still a substantial 25% in 0.5% oxygenation. An extensive redistribution of fluxes was observed in anaerobic conditions compared to all the aerobic conditions. Positive correlation between the transcriptional levels of metabolic enzymes and the corresponding fluxes in the different oxygenation conditions was found only in the respirative pathway. Conclusion 13C-constrained MFA enabled quantitative determination of intracellular fluxes in conditions of

  14. A roadmap for interpreting 13C metabolite labeling patterns from cells

    PubMed Central

    Buescher, Joerg M.; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.; Boros, Laszlo G.; Burgess, Shawn C.; Brunengraber, Henri; Clish, Clary B.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Feron, Olivier; Frezza, Christian; Ghesquiere, Bart; Gottlieb, Eyal; Hiller, Karsten; Jones, Russell G.; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Kimmelman, Alec C.; Locasale, Jason W.; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Maddocks, Oliver D. K.; Malloy, Craig; Metallo, Christian M.; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Munger, Joshua; Nöh, Katharina; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Ralser, Markus; Sauer, Uwe; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; St-Pierre, Julie; Tennant, Daniel A.; Wittmann, Christoph; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Vazquez, Alexei; Vousden, Karen; Young, Jamey D.; Zamboni, Nicola; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Measuring intracellular metabolism has increasingly led to important insights in biomedical research. 13C tracer analysis, although less information-rich than quantitative 13C flux analysis that requires computational data integration, has been established as a time-efficient method to unravel relative pathway activities, qualitative changes in pathway contributions, and nutrient contributions. Here, we review selected key issues in interpreting 13C metabolite labeling patterns, with the goal of drawing accurate conclusions from steady state and dynamic stable isotopic tracer experiments. PMID:25731751

  15. The Effect of Molecular Conformation on the Accuracy of Theoretical (1)H and (13)C Chemical Shifts Calculated by Ab Initio Methods for Metabolic Mixture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Shimbo, Yudai; Komatsu, Keiko; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-14

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analyzing metabolic mixtures. The information obtained from an NMR spectrum is in the form of physical parameters, such as chemical shifts, and construction of databases for many metabolites will be useful for data interpretation. To increase the accuracy of theoretical chemical shifts for development of a database for a variety of metabolites, the effects of sets of conformations (structural ensembles) and the levels of theory on computations of theoretical chemical shifts were systematically investigated for a set of 29 small molecules in the present study. For each of the 29 compounds, 101 structures were generated by classical molecular dynamics at 298.15 K, and then theoretical chemical shifts for 164 (1)H and 123 (13)C atoms were calculated by ab initio quantum chemical methods. Six levels of theory were used by pairing Hartree-Fock, B3LYP (density functional theory), or second order Møller-Plesset perturbation with 6-31G or aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The six average fluctuations in the (1)H chemical shift were ±0.63, ± 0.59, ± 0.70, ± 0.62, ± 0.75, and ±0.66 ppm for the structural ensembles, and the six average errors were ±0.34, ± 0.27, ± 0.32, ± 0.25, ± 0.32, and ±0.25 ppm. The results showed that chemical shift fluctuations with changes in the conformation because of molecular motion were larger than the differences between computed and experimental chemical shifts for all six levels of theory. In conclusion, selection of an appropriate structural ensemble should be performed before theoretical chemical shift calculations for development of an accurate database for a variety of metabolites.

  16. Impact of carbon metabolism on 13C signatures of cyanobacteria and green non-sulfur-like bacteria inhabiting a microbial mat from an alkaline siliceous hot spring in Yellowstone National Park (USA).

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Marcel T J; Schouten, Stefan; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Ward, David M

    2007-02-01

    Alkaline siliceous hot spring microbial mats in Yellowstone National Park are composed of two dominant phototropic groups, cyanobacteria and green non-sulfur-like bacteria (GNSLB). While cyanobacteria are thought to cross-feed low-molecular-weight organic compounds to support photoheterotrophic metabolism in GNSLB, it is unclear how this could lead to the heavier stable carbon isotopic signatures in GNSLB lipids compared with cyanobacterial lipids found in previous studies. The two groups of phototrophs were separated using percoll density gradient centrifugation and subsequent lipid and stable carbon isotopic analysis revealed that we obtained fractions with a approximately 60-fold enrichment in cyanobacterial and an approximately twofold enrichment in GNSLB biomass, respectively, compared with the mat itself. This technique was used to study the diel cycling and 13C content of the glucose pools in and the uptake of 13C-bicarbonate by the cyanobacteria and GNSLB, as well as the transfer of incorporated 13C from cyanobacteria to GNSLB. The results show that cyanobacteria have the highest bicarbonate uptake rates and accumulate glucose during the afternoon in full light conditions. In contrast, GNSLB have relatively higher bicarbonate uptake rates compared with cyanobacteria in the morning at low light levels. During the night GNSLB take up carbon that is likely derived through fermentation of cyanobacterial glucose enriched in 13C. The assimilation of 13C-enriched cyanobacterial carbon may thus lead to enriched 13C-contents of GNSLB cell components.

  17. 13C MRS studies of neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling in humans.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Douglas L; De Feyter, Henk M; de Graaf, Robin A; Mason, Graeme F; Behar, Kevin L

    2011-10-01

    In the last 25 years, (13)C MRS has been established as the only noninvasive method for the measurement of glutamate neurotransmission and cell-specific neuroenergetics. Although technically and experimentally challenging, (13)C MRS has already provided important new information on the relationship between neuroenergetics and neuronal function, the energy cost of brain function, the high neuronal activity in the resting brain state and how neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling are altered in neurological and psychiatric disease. In this article, the current state of (13)C MRS as it is applied to the study of neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling in humans is reviewed. The focus is predominantly on recent findings in humans regarding metabolic pathways, applications to clinical research and the technical status of the method. Results from in vivo (13)C MRS studies in animals are discussed from the standpoint of the validation of MRS measurements of neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling, and where they have helped to identify key questions to address in human research. Controversies concerning the relationship between neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling and factors having an impact on the accurate determination of fluxes through mathematical modeling are addressed. We further touch upon different (13)C-labeled substrates used to study brain metabolism, before reviewing a number of human brain diseases investigated using (13)C MRS. Future technological developments are discussed that will help to overcome the limitations of (13)C MRS, with special attention given to recent developments in hyperpolarized (13)C MRS.

  18. Natural (13) C distribution in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) and consequences for allocation pattern.

    PubMed

    Lamade, Emmanuelle; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Darlan, Nuzul Hijri; Rodrigues, Rosario Lobato; Fresneau, Chantal; Mauve, Caroline; Lamothe-Sibold, Marlène; Sketriené, Diana; Ghashghaie, Jaleh

    2016-01-01

    Oil palm has now become one of the most important crops, palm oil representing nearly 25% of global plant oil consumption. Many studies have thus addressed oil palm ecophysiology and photosynthesis-based models of carbon allocation have been used. However, there is a lack of experimental data on carbon fixation and redistribution within palm trees, and important C-sinks have not been fully characterized yet. Here, we carried out extensive measurement of natural (13) C-abundance (δ(13) C) in oil palm tissues, including fruits at different maturation stages. We find a (13) C-enrichment in heterotrophic organs compared to mature leaves, with roots being the most (13) C-enriched. The δ(13) C in fruits decreased during maturation, reflecting the accumulation in (13) C-depleted lipids. We further used observed δ(13) C values to compute plausible carbon fluxes using a steady-state model of (13) C-distribution including metabolic isotope effects ((12) v/(13) v). The results suggest that fruits represent a major respiratory loss (≈39% of total tree respiration) and that sink organs such as fruits are fed by sucrose from leaves. That is, glucose appears to be a quantitatively important compound in palm tissues, but computations indicate that it is involved in dynamic starch metabolism rather that C-exchange between organs.

  19. Phototransduction Influences Metabolic Flux and Nucleotide Metabolism in Mouse Retina*

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jianhai; Rountree, Austin; Cleghorn, Whitney M.; Contreras, Laura; Lindsay, Ken J.; Sadilek, Martin; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Raftery, Dan; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Kanow, Mark; Chan, Lawrence; Tsang, Stephen H.; Sweet, Ian R.; Hurley, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Production of energy in a cell must keep pace with demand. Photoreceptors use ATP to maintain ion gradients in darkness, whereas in light they use it to support phototransduction. Matching production with consumption can be accomplished by coupling production directly to consumption. Alternatively, production can be set by a signal that anticipates demand. In this report we investigate the hypothesis that signaling through phototransduction controls production of energy in mouse retinas. We found that respiration in mouse retinas is not coupled tightly to ATP consumption. By analyzing metabolic flux in mouse retinas, we also found that phototransduction slows metabolic flux through glycolysis and through intermediates of the citric acid cycle. We also evaluated the relative contributions of regulation of the activities of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and the aspartate-glutamate carrier 1. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of the retinal metabolome showed that phototransduction also influences steady-state concentrations of 5′-GMP, ribose-5-phosphate, ketone bodies, and purines. PMID:26677218

  20. Metabolic fuels: regulating fluxes to select mix.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-15

    Animals must regulate the fluxes of multiple fuels to support changing metabolic rates that result from variation in physiological circumstances. The aim of fuel selection strategies is to exploit the advantages of individual substrates while minimizing the impact of disadvantages. All exercising mammals share a general pattern of fuel selection: at the same %V(O(2,max)) they oxidize the same ratio of lipids to carbohydrates. However, highly aerobic species rely more on intramuscular fuels because energy supply from the circulation is constrained by trans-sarcolemmal transfer. Fuel selection is performed by recruiting different muscles, different fibers within the same muscles or different pathways within the same fibers. Electromyographic analyses show that shivering humans can modulate carbohydrate oxidation either through the selective recruitment of type II fibers within the same muscles or by regulating pathway recruitment within type I fibers. The selection patterns of shivering and exercise are different: at the same %V(O(2,max)), a muscle producing only heat (shivering) or significant movement (exercise) strikes a different balance between lipid and carbohydrate oxidation. Long-distance migrants provide an excellent model to characterize how to increase maximal substrate fluxes. High lipid fluxes are achieved through the coordinated upregulation of mobilization, transport and oxidation by activating enzymes, lipid-solubilizing proteins and membrane transporters. These endurance athletes support record lipolytic rates in adipocytes, use lipoprotein shuttles to accelerate transport and show increased capacity for lipid oxidation in muscle mitochondria. Some migrant birds use dietary omega-3 fatty acids as performance-enhancing agents to boost their ability to process lipids. These dietary fatty acids become incorporated in membrane phospholipids and bind to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors to activate membrane proteins and modify gene expression.

  1. Tracing bacterial metabolism using multi-nuclear (1H, 2H, and 13C) Solid State NMR: Realizing an Idea Initiated by James Scott

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G.; Fogel, M. L.; Jin, K.; Griffen, P.; Steele, A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 6 years ago, while at the Geophysical Laboratory, James Scott became interested in the application of Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to study bacterial metabolism. As often happens, other experiments intervened and the NMR experiments were not pursued. We have revisited Jame's question and find that using a multi-nuclear approach (1H, 2H, and 13C Solid State NMR) on laboratory cell culture has some distinct advantages. Our experiments involved batch cultures of E. coli (MG1655) harvested at stationary phase. In all experiments the growth medium consisted of MOPS medium for enterobacteria, where the substrate is glucose. In one set of experiments, 10 % of the water was D2O; in another 10 % of the glucose was per-deuterated. The control experiment used both water and glucose at natural isotopic abundance. A kill control of dead E. coli immersed in pure D2O for an extended period exhibited no deuterium incorporation. In both deuterium enriched experiments, considerable incorporation of deuterium into E. coli's biomolecular constituents was detected via 2H Solid State NMR. In the case of the D2O enriched experiment, 58 % of the incorporated deuterium is observed in a sharp peak at a frequency of 0.31 ppm, consistent with D incorporation in the cell membrane lipids, the remainder is observed in a broad peak at a higher frequency (centered at 5.4 ppm, but spanning out to beyond 10 ppm) that is consistent with D incorporation into predominantly DNA and RNA. In the case of the D-glucose experiments, 61 % of the deuterium is observed in a sharp resonance peak at 0.34 ppm, also consistent with D incorporation into membrane lipids, the remainder of the D is observed at a broad resonance peak centered at 4.3 ppm, consistent with D enrichment in glycogen. Deuterium abundance in the E. coli cells grown in 10 % D2O is nearly 2X greater than that grown with 10 % D-glucose. Very subtle differences are observed in both the 1H and 13C solid

  2. Carbon conversion efficiency and central metabolic fluxes in developing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) embryos.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ana P; Goffman, Fernando D; Ohlrogge, John B; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2007-10-01

    The efficiency with which developing sunflower embryos convert substrates into seed storage reserves was determined by labeling embryos with [U-(14)C6]glucose or [U-(14)C5]glutamine and measuring their conversion to CO2, oil, protein and other biomass compounds. The average carbon conversion efficiency was 50%, which contrasts with a value of over 80% previously observed in Brassica napus embryos (Goffman et al., 2005), in which light and the RuBisCO bypass pathway allow more efficient conversion of hexose to oil. Labeling levels after incubating sunflower embryos with [U-(14)C4]malate indicated that some carbon from malate enters the plastidic compartment and contributes to oil synthesis. To test this and to map the underlying pattern of metabolic fluxes, separate experiments were carried out in which embryos were labeled to isotopic steady state using [1-(13)C1]glucose, [2-(13)C1]glucose, or [U-(13)C5]glutamine. The resultant labeling in sugars, starch, fatty acids and amino acids was analyzed by NMR and GC-MS. The fluxes through intermediary metabolism were then quantified by computer-aided modeling. The resulting flux map accounted well for the labeling data, was in good agreement with the observed carbon efficiency, and was further validated by testing for agreement with gas exchange measurements. The map shows that the influx of malate into oil is low and that flux through futile cycles (wasting ATP) is low, which contrasts with the high rates previously determined for growing root tips and heterotrophic cell cultures.

  3. Dynamic flux cartography of hairy roots primary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, M; Perrier, M; Jolicoeur, M

    2007-01-01

    A dynamic model for plant cell and hairy root primary metabolism is presented. The model includes nutrient uptake (Pi, sugars, nitrogen sources), the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways, the TCA cycle, amino acid biosynthesis, respiratory chain, biosynthesis of cell building blocks (structural hexoses, organic acids, lipids, and organic phosphated molecules). The energy shuttles (ATP, ADP) and cofactors (NAD/H, NADP/H) are also included. The model describes the kinetics of 44 biochemical reactions (fluxes) of the primary metabolism of plant cells and includes 41 biochemical species (metabolites, nutrients, biomass components). Multiple Michaelis-Menten type kinetics are used to describe biochemical reaction rates. Known regulatory phenomena on metabolic pathways are included using sigmoid switch functions. A visualization framework showing fluxes and metabolite concentrations over time is presented. The visualization of fluxes and metabolites is used to analyze simulation results from Catharanthus roseus hairy root 50 d batch cultures. The visualization of the metabolic system allows analyzing split ratios between pathways and flux time-variations. For carbon metabolism, the cells were observed to have relatively high and stable fluxes for the central carbon metabolism and low and variable fluxes for anabolic pathways. For phosphate metabolism, a very high free intracellular Pi turnover rate was observed with higher flux variations than for the carbon metabolism. Nitrogen metabolism also exhibited large flux variations. The potential uses of the model are also discussed.

  4. Mathematical modeling of isotope labeling experiments for metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Nargund, Shilpa; Sriram, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Isotope labeling experiments (ILEs) offer a powerful methodology to perform metabolic flux analysis. However, the task of interpreting data from these experiments to evaluate flux values requires significant mathematical modeling skills. Toward this, this chapter provides background information and examples to enable the reader to (1) model metabolic networks, (2) simulate ILEs, and (3) understand the optimization and statistical methods commonly used for flux evaluation. A compartmentalized model of plant glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway illustrates the reconstruction of a typical metabolic network, whereas a simpler example network illustrates the underlying metabolite and isotopomer balancing techniques. We also discuss the salient features of commonly used flux estimation software 13CFLUX2, Metran, NMR2Flux+, FiatFlux, and OpenFLUX. Furthermore, we briefly discuss methods to improve flux estimates. A graphical checklist at the end of the chapter provides a reader a quick reference to the mathematical modeling concepts and resources.

  5. In search of the mechanisms behind soil carbon metabolism of a Douglas fir forest in complex terrain using naturally abundant 13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayler, Z. E.; Sulzman, E. W.; Barnard, H. R.; Kennedy, A.; Phillips, C.; Mix, A.; Bond, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Soil is well known for being highly variable, spatially and temporally, in moisture, texture, nutrients, carbon content and organisms. The magnitude of variation in soil characteristics represented in a study is, in part, determined by the choice in site location. Choosing sites that are topographically flat reduces variability due to environmental gradients, variability that is amplified in sites of complex terrain. We measured soil respiration, an integrative measure of ecosystem biological and physical processes, and its isotopic signature (δ13CR-s) to accomplish two goals: 1. Explore how gradients in temperature and moisture within a steeply sloped watershed affect the flux and isotopic signature of soil CO2 2. Deconvolve the isotopic signature of soil respiration into autotrophic and heterotrophic sources using a multi-source mixing model constrained by samples of soil organic matter and water soluble extracts of leaf foliage. Our site is located in a steep catchment within the central Cascades of Oregon (HJ Andrews LTER) where we made respiration measurements in plots established along side a sensor transect that continuously measures soil moisture and temperature; air relative humidity and temperature; and tree transpiration. There was a distinct difference in soil metabolism between the south and north aspects in the watershed. Temperature-corrected basal respiration of the south facing slope was 1 μmol m-2s-1 greater than the north facing slope. There was also a difference in isotopic signature between the two slopes that could be as great as 2 per mil depending on the period within the growing season. The strength of the correlation between environmental variables and soil carbon flux was non-uniform across the catchment. There was, however, a strong positive correlation between soil flux with recent transpiration rates (0 to 3 days prior) as well as with transpiration rates that occurred up to 9 days previously. This pattern was especially prevalent

  6. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of 14C/13C-labeled ortho-phenylphenol formation following dermal application to human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Timchalk, C; Selim, S; Sangha, G; Bartels, M J

    1998-08-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of uniformly labeled 14C/13C-ortho-phenylphenol (OPP) were followed in six human male volunteers given a single 8 h dermal dose of 6 microg OPP/kg body weight formulated as a 0.4% (w/v) solution in isopropyl alcohol. The application site was covered with a non-occlusive dome allowing free movement of air, but preventing the loss of radioactivity due to physical contact. At 8 h post-exposure the non-occlusive dome was removed, the dose site was wiped with isopropyl alcohol containing swabs and the skin surface repeatedly stripped with tape. Blood specimens, urine, and feces were collected from each volunteer over a 5 day post-exposure period and were analyzed for radioactivity and metabolites (urine only). 2. Following dermal application, peak plasma levels of radioactivity were obtained within 4 h post-exposure and rapidly declined with virtually all of the absorbed dose rapidly excreted into the urine within 24 h post-exposure. A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to describe the time-course of OPP absorption and clearance in male human volunteers. Approximately 43% of the dermally applied dose was absorbed through the skin with an average absorption half-life of 10 h. Once absorbed the renal clearance of OPP was rapid with an average half-life of 0.8 h. The rate limiting step for renal clearance was the relatively slower rate of dermal absorption; therefore the pharmacokinetics of OPP in humans was described by a 'flip-flop' single compartment model. Overall, the pharmacokinetics were similar between individuals, and the model parameters were in excellent agreement with the experimental data. 3. Approximately 73% of the total urinary radioactivity was accounted for as free OPP, OPP-sulfate and OPP-glucuronide conjugates. The sulfate conjugate was the major metabolite (approximately 69%). Therefore, total urinary OPP equivalents (acid-labile conjugates+free OPP) can be used to estimate the systemically absorbed

  7. Metabolic flux pattern of glucose utilization by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris: prevalent role of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway and minor fluxes through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Schatschneider, Sarah; Huber, Claudia; Neuweger, Heiko; Watt, Tony Francis; Pühler, Alfred; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Christoph; Niehaus, Karsten; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg

    2014-10-01

    The well-studied plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) synthesizes the biotechnologically important polysaccharide xanthan gum, which is also regarded as a virulence factor in plant interactions. In Xcc, sugars like glucose are utilized as a source to generate energy and biomass for growth and pathogenicity. In this study, we used [1-(13)C]glucose as a tracer to analyze the fluxes in the central metabolism of the bacterium growing in a minimal medium. (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) confirmed the prevalent catabolic role of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Comparative nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based isotopologue profiling of a mutant deficient in glycolysis gave evidence for a moderate flux via glycolysis in the wild-type. In addition to reconfirming the Entner-Doudoroff pathway as a catabolic main route, this approach affirmed a numerically minor but important flux via the pentose phosphate pathway.

  8. Metabolic flux responses to genetic modification for shikimic acid production by Bacillus subtilis strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shikimic acid (SA) is a key chiral starting molecule for the synthesis of the neuramidase inhibitor GS4104 against viral influenza. Microbial production of SA has been extensively investigated in Escherichia coli, and to a less extent in Bacillus subtilis. However, metabolic flux of the high SA-producing strains has not been explored. In this study, we constructed with genetic manipulation and further determined metabolic flux with 13C-labeling test of high SA-producing B. subtilis strains. Results B. subtilis 1A474 had a mutation in SA kinase gene (aroI) and accumulated 1.5 g/L of SA. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA, aroB, aroC or aroD in B. subtilis revealed that aroD had the most significantly positive effects on SA production. Simultaneous overexpression of genes for 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase (aroA) and SA dehydrogenase (aroD) in B. subtilis BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD resulted in SA production of 3.2 g/L. 13C-Metabolic flux assay (MFA) on the two strains BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu and BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD indicated the carbon flux from glucose to SA increased to 4.6% in BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD from 1.9% in strain BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu. The carbon flux through tricarboxylic acid cycle significantly reduced, while responses of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glycolysis to high SA production were rather weak, in the strain BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD. Based on the results from MFA, two potential targets for further optimization of SA production were identified. Experiments on genetic deletion of phosphoenoylpyruvate kinase gene confirmed its positive influence on SA production, while the overexpression of the transketolase gene did not lead to increase in SA production. Conclusion Of the genes involved in shikimate pathway in B. subtilis, aroD exerted most significant influence on SA accumulation. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA and aroD doubled SA production than its parent strain. MFA revealed metabolic flux

  9. Clinical NOE 13C MRS for neuropsychiatric disorders of the frontal lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailasuta, Napapon; Robertson, Larry W.; Harris, Kent C.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Allen, Peter S.; Ross, Brian D.

    2008-12-01

    In this communication, a scheme is described whereby in vivo 13C MRS can safely be performed in the frontal lobe, a human brain region hitherto precluded on grounds of SAR, but important in being the seat of impaired cognitive function in many neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders. By combining two well known features of 13C NMR—the use of low power NOE and the focus on 13C carbon atoms which are only minimally coupled to protons, we are able to overcome the obstacle of SAR and develop means of monitoring the 13C fluxes of critically important metabolic pathways in frontal brain structures of normal volunteers and patients. Using a combination of low-power WALTZ decoupling, variants of random noise for nuclear overhauser effect enhancement it was possible to reduce power deposition to 20% of the advised maximum specific absorption rate (SAR). In model solutions 13C signal enhancement achieved with this scheme were comparable to that obtained with WALTZ-4. In human brain, the low power procedure effectively determined glutamine, glutamate and bicarbonate in the posterior parietal brain after [1- 13C] glucose infusion. The same 13C enriched metabolites were defined in frontal brain of human volunteers after administration of [1- 13C] acetate, a recognized probe of glial metabolism. Time courses of incorporation of 13C into cerebral glutamate, glutamine and bicarbonate were constructed. The results suggest efficacy for measurement of in vivo cerebral metabolic rates of the glutamate-glutamine and tricarboxylic acid cycles in 20 min MR scans in previously inaccessible brain regions in humans at 1.5T. We predict these will be clinically useful biomarkers in many human neuropsychiatric and genetic conditions.

  10. An automated growth enclosure for metabolic labeling of Arabidopsis thaliana with 13C-carbon dioxide - an in vivo labeling system for proteomics and metabolomics research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Labeling whole Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants to high enrichment with 13C for proteomics and metabolomics applications would facilitate experimental approaches not possible by conventional methods. Such a system would use the plant's native capacity for carbon fixation to ubiquitously incorporate 13C from 13CO2 gas. Because of the high cost of 13CO2 it is critical that the design conserve the labeled gas. Results A fully enclosed automated plant growth enclosure has been designed and assembled where the system simultaneously monitors humidity, temperature, pressure and 13CO2 concentration with continuous adjustment of humidity, pressure and 13CO2 levels controlled by a computer running LabView software. The enclosure is mounted on a movable cart for mobility among growth environments. Arabidopsis was grown in the enclosure for up to 8 weeks and obtained on average >95 atom% enrichment for small metabolites, such as amino acids and >91 atom% for large metabolites, including proteins and peptides. Conclusion The capability of this labeling system for isotope dilution experiments was demonstrated by evaluation of amino acid turnover using GC-MS as well as protein turnover using LC-MS/MS. Because this 'open source' Arabidopsis 13C-labeling growth environment was built using readily available materials and software, it can be adapted easily to accommodate many different experimental designs. PMID:21310072

  11. Application of Metabolic 13C Labeling in Conjunction with High-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Comparative Conformational Analysis of High Mannose-Type Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Yukiko; Yanagi, Kotaro; Kitajima, Toshihiko; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Chiba, Yasunori; Kato, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    High mannose-type oligosaccharides are enzymatically trimmed in the endoplasmic reticulum, resulting in various processing intermediates with exposed glycotopes that are recognized by a series of lectins involved in glycoprotein fate determination in cells. Although recent crystallographic data have provided the structural basis for the carbohydrate recognition of intracellular lectins, atomic information of dynamic oligosaccharide conformations is essential for a quantitative understanding of the energetics of carbohydrate–lectin interactions. Carbohydrate NMR spectroscopy is useful for characterizing such conformational dynamics, but often hampered by poor spectral resolution and lack of recombinant techniques required to produce homogeneous glycoforms. To overcome these difficulties, we have recently developed a methodology for the preparation of a homogeneous high mannose-type oligosaccharide with 13C labeling using a genetically engineered yeast strain. We herein successfully extended this method to result in the overexpression of 13C-labeled Man9GlcNAc2 (M9) with a newly engineered yeast strain with the deletion of four genes involved in N-glycan processing. This enabled high-field NMR analyses of 13C-labeled M9 in comparison with its processing product lacking the terminal mannose residue ManD2. Long-range NOE data indicated that the outer branches interact with the core in both glycoforms, and such foldback conformations are enhanced upon the removal of ManD2. The observed conformational variabilities might be significantly associated with lectins and glycan-trimming enzymes. PMID:24970159

  12. Prediction of Metabolic Flux Distribution from Gene Expression Data Based on the Flux Minimization Principle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-14

    expression data. The proposed algorithm minimizes a weighted sum of flux magnitudes, while biomass production can be bounded to fit an ample range from...approach to investigate metabolism and metabolic processes is to analyze the flow of material and energy through a metabolic network. In particular, the...maximizing a certain fitness function (typically, biomass production) and estimates the flux distribution by solving a linear programming (LP

  13. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, John; Schwender, Jörg; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Morgan, John A

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (13)CO(2) dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  14. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady J.; Schwender J.; Shachar-Hill, Y.; Morgan, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on {sup 13}CO{sub 2} dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  15. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady, J; Schwender, J; Shachar-Hill, Y; Morgan, JA

    2012-03-26

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (CO2)-C-13 dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  16. Strategies for investigating the plant metabolic network with steady-state metabolic flux analysis: lessons from an Arabidopsis cell culture and other systems.

    PubMed

    Kruger, N J; Masakapalli, S K; Ratcliffe, R G

    2012-03-01

    Steady-state (13)C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is currently the experimental method of choice for generating flux maps of the compartmented network of primary metabolism in heterotrophic and mixotrophic plant tissues. While statistically robust protocols for the application of steady-state MFA to plant tissues have been developed by several research groups, the implementation of the method is still far from routine. The effort required to produce a flux map is more than justified by the information that it contains about the metabolic phenotype of the system, but it remains the case that steady-state MFA is both analytically and computationally demanding. This article provides an overview of principles that underpin the implementation of steady-state MFA, focusing on the definition of the metabolic network responsible for redistribution of the label, experimental considerations relating to data collection, the modelling process that allows a set of metabolic fluxes to be deduced from the labelling data, and the interpretation of flux maps. The article draws on published studies of Arabidopsis cell cultures and other systems, including developing oilseeds, with the aim of providing practical guidance and strategies for handling the issues that arise when applying steady-state MFA to the complex metabolic networks encountered in plants.

  17. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Geobactermetallireducens during reduction of solubleFe(III)-NTA

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Garcia-Martin, Hector; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The tracer experiments showed that G. metallireducens containedcomplete biosynthesis pathways for essential metabolism, and this strainmight also have an unusual isoleucine biosynthesis route (usingacetyl-CoA and pyruvate as the precursors). The model indicated that over90 percent of the acetate was completely oxidized to CO2 via a completetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle while reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylaseand phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were present under theseconditions, but enzymes in the glyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme wereabsent. Gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway were mainlyemployed for biosynthesis and accounted for less than 3 percent of totalcarbon consumption. The model also indicated surprisingly highreversibility in the reaction between oxoglutarate and succinate. Thisstep operates close to the thermodynamic equilibrium possibly becausesuccinate is synthesized via a transferase reaction, and the conversionof oxoglutarate to succinate is a rate limiting step for carbonmetabolism. These findings enable a better understanding of therelationship between genome annotation and extant metabolic pathways inG. metallireducens.

  18. Comparative absorption of [13C]glucose and [13C]lactose by premature infants.

    PubMed

    Murray, R D; Boutton, T W; Klein, P D; Gilbert, M; Paule, C L; MacLean, W C

    1990-01-01

    Oxidation of orally administered [13C]glucose and [13C]lactose and fecal recovery of malabsorbed substrates were determined in two groups of premature infants. Eighteen studies were performed with six infants at Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH); 24 studies were performed with nine infants at Columbus Children's Hospital (CCH). The two groups differed in that JHH infants had shorter gestations but were older when studied. Fecal 13C loss after [13C]glucose administration did not differ between the two groups. Compared with glucose, the metabolism of lactose appeared to involve more malabsorption and colonic fermentation in JHH infants than in CCH infants and resulted in higher fecal losses of substrate carbon. Maturation appeared to involve increased proximal intestinal absorption and greater retention of absorbed carbohydrate. Simultaneous absorption of substrate from the small and large intestine may limit the usefulness of breath tests for 13C in the premature infant.

  19. Quantitative 13C traces of glucose fate in hepatitis B virus infected hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qianfen; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2017-02-21

    Quantitative characterization of 13C-labeled metabolites is an important part of the stable isotope tracing method widely used in metabolic flux analysis. Due to long relaxation time and low sensitivity of 13C nuclei, direct measurement of 13C labeled metabolites using one dimensional 13C NMR often fails to meet the demand of metabolomics studies especially with large number of samples and metabolites having low abundance. Although HSQC-based 2D NMR methods have improved sensitivity with inversion detection, they are time-consuming thus unsuitable for high-throughput absolute quantification of 13C-labeled metabolites. In this study, we developed a method for absolute quantification of 13C labeled metabolites using naturally abundant TSP as a reference with the first increment of HMQC pulse sequence, taking polarization transfer efficiencies into consideration. We validated this method using a mixture of 13C-labeled alanine, methionine, glucose and formic acid together with a mixture of alanine, lactate, glycine, uridine, cytosine, and hypoxanthine having natural 13C abundance with known concentrations. We subsequently applied this method to analyze the flux of glucose in HepG2 cells infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). The results showed that HBV infection increased the cellular uptake of glucose, stimulated glycolysis and enhanced the pentose phosphate and hexosamine pathways for biosynthesis of RNA and DNA and nucleotide sugars to facilitate HBV replication. This method saves experimental time and provides a possibility for absolute quantitative tracking of the 13C labeled metabolites for high throughput studies.

  20. Profiling sulfation/epimerization pattern of full-length heparan sulfate by NMR following cell culture 13C-glucose metabolic labeling.

    PubMed

    Pegeot, Mathieu; Sadir, Rabia; Eriksson, Inger; Kjellen, Lena; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Gans, Pierre; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2015-02-01

    Through its ability to interact with proteins, heparan sulfate (HS) fulfills a large variety of functions. Protein binding depends on the level of HS sulfation and epimerization which are cell specific and dynamically regulated. Characterization of this molecule, however, has been restricted to oligosaccharide fragments available in large amount for structural investigation or to sulfate distribution through compositional analysis. Here we developed a (1)H-(13)C 2D NMR-based approach, directly performed on HS isolated from (13)C-labeled cells. By integrating the peak volumes measured at different chemical shifts, this non-destructive analysis allows us to determine both the sulfation and the iduronic/glucuronic profiles of the polysaccharide. Applied to wild-type and N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-deficient fibroblasts as well as to epithelial cells differentiation, it also gives insights into the functional relationships existing between HS biosynthetic enzymes. This approach should be of significant interest to better understand HS changes that occur through physiologic regulations or during pathological development.

  1. Detecting the Significant Flux Backbone of Escherichia coli metabolism.

    PubMed

    Güell, Oriol; Sagués, Francesc; Serrano, M Ángeles

    2017-04-09

    The heterogeneity of computationally predicted reaction fluxes in metabolic networks within a single flux state can be exploited to detect their significant flux backbone. Here, we disclose the backbone of Escherichia coli, and compare it with the backbones of other bacteria. We find that, in general, the core of the backbones is mainly composed of reactions in energy metabolism corresponding to ancient pathways. In E. coli, the synthesis of nucleotides and the metabolism of lipids form smaller cores which rely critically on energy metabolism. Moreover, the consideration of different media leads to the identification of pathways sensitive to environmental changes. The metabolic backbone of an organism is thus useful for tracing, simultaneously, both its evolution and adaptation fingerprints. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolic flux ratio analysis and multi-objective optimization revealed a globally conserved and coordinated metabolic response of E. coli to paraquat-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tie; Rui, Bin; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Ximing; Yi, Yin; Wen, Han; Zheng, Haoran; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2013-01-27

    The ability of a microorganism to adapt to changes in the environment, such as in nutrient or oxygen availability, is essential for its competitive fitness and survival. The cellular objective and the strategy of the metabolic response to an extreme environment are therefore of tremendous interest and, thus, have been increasingly explored. However, the cellular objective of the complex regulatory structure of the metabolic changes has not yet been fully elucidated and more details regarding the quantitative behaviour of the metabolic flux redistribution are required to understand the systems-wide biological significance of this response. In this study, the intracellular metabolic flux ratios involved in the central carbon metabolism were determined by fractional (13)C-labeling and metabolic flux ratio analysis (MetaFoR) of the wild-type E. coli strain JM101 at an oxidative environment in a chemostat. We observed a significant increase in the flux through phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malic enzyme (MEZ) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT). We applied an ε-constraint based multi-objective optimization to investigate the trade-off relationships between the biomass yield and the generation of reductive power using the in silico iJR904 genome-scale model of E. coli K-12. The theoretical metabolic redistribution supports that the trans-hydrogenase pathway should not play a direct role in the defence mounted by E. coli against oxidative stress. The agreement between the measured ratio and the theoretical redistribution established the significance of NADPH synthesis as the goal of the metabolic reprogramming that occurs in response to oxidative stress. Our work presents a framework that combines metabolic flux ratio analysis and multi-objective optimization to investigate the metabolic trade-offs that occur under varied environmental conditions. Our results led to the proposal that the metabolic response of E

  3. Fluxes through plant metabolic networks: measurements, predictions, insights and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Nicholas J; Ratcliffe, R George

    2015-01-01

    Although the flows of material through metabolic networks are central to cell function, they are not easy to measure other than at the level of inputs and outputs. This is particularly true in plant cells, where the network spans multiple subcellular compartments and where the network may function either heterotrophically or photoautotrophically. For many years, kinetic modelling of pathways provided the only method for describing the operation of fragments of the network. However, more recently, it has become possible to map the fluxes in central carbon metabolism using the stable isotope labelling techniques of metabolic flux analysis (MFA), and to predict intracellular fluxes using constraints-based modelling procedures such as flux balance analysis (FBA). These approaches were originally developed for the analysis of microbial metabolism, but over the last decade, they have been adapted for the more demanding analysis of plant metabolic networks. Here, the principal features of MFA and FBA as applied to plants are outlined, followed by a discussion of the insights that have been gained into plant metabolic networks through the application of these time-consuming and non-trivial methods. The discussion focuses on how a system-wide view of plant metabolism has increased our understanding of network structure, metabolic perturbations and the provision of reducing power and energy for cell function. Current methodological challenges that limit the scope of plant MFA are discussed and particular emphasis is placed on the importance of developing methods for cell-specific MFA.

  4. Control of fluxes in metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Basler, Georg; Nikoloski, Zoran; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Barabási, Albert-László; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the control of large-scale metabolic networks is central to biology and medicine. However, existing approaches either require specifying a cellular objective or can only be used for small networks. We introduce new coupling types describing the relations between reaction activities, and develop an efficient computational framework, which does not require any cellular objective for systematic studies of large-scale metabolism. We identify the driver reactions facilitating control of 23 metabolic networks from all kingdoms of life. We find that unicellular organisms require a smaller degree of control than multicellular organisms. Driver reactions are under complex cellular regulation in Escherichia coli, indicating their preeminent role in facilitating cellular control. In human cancer cells, driver reactions play pivotal roles in malignancy and represent potential therapeutic targets. The developed framework helps us gain insights into regulatory principles of diseases and facilitates design of engineering strategies at the interface of gene regulation, signaling, and metabolism. PMID:27197218

  5. Control of fluxes in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Basler, Georg; Nikoloski, Zoran; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Barabási, Albert-László; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the control of large-scale metabolic networks is central to biology and medicine. However, existing approaches either require specifying a cellular objective or can only be used for small networks. We introduce new coupling types describing the relations between reaction activities, and develop an efficient computational framework, which does not require any cellular objective for systematic studies of large-scale metabolism. We identify the driver reactions facilitating control of 23 metabolic networks from all kingdoms of life. We find that unicellular organisms require a smaller degree of control than multicellular organisms. Driver reactions are under complex cellular regulation in Escherichia coli, indicating their preeminent role in facilitating cellular control. In human cancer cells, driver reactions play pivotal roles in malignancy and represent potential therapeutic targets. The developed framework helps us gain insights into regulatory principles of diseases and facilitates design of engineering strategies at the interface of gene regulation, signaling, and metabolism.

  6. Estimating Metabolic Fluxes Using a Maximum Network Flexibility Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Megchelenbrink, Wout; Rossell, Sergio; Huynen, Martijn A.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Genome-scale metabolic networks can be modeled in a constraint-based fashion. Reaction stoichiometry combined with flux capacity constraints determine the space of allowable reaction rates. This space is often large and a central challenge in metabolic modeling is finding the biologically most relevant flux distributions. A widely used method is flux balance analysis (FBA), which optimizes a biologically relevant objective such as growth or ATP production. Although FBA has proven to be highly useful for predicting growth and byproduct secretion, it cannot predict the intracellular fluxes under all environmental conditions. Therefore, alternative strategies have been developed to select flux distributions that are in agreement with experimental “omics” data, or by incorporating experimental flux measurements. The latter, unfortunately can only be applied to a limited set of reactions and is currently not feasible at the genome-scale. On the other hand, it has been observed that micro-organisms favor a suboptimal growth rate, possibly in exchange for a more “flexible” metabolic network. Instead of dedicating the internal network state to an optimal growth rate in one condition, a suboptimal growth rate is used, that allows for an easier switch to other nutrient sources. A small decrease in growth rate is exchanged for a relatively large gain in metabolic capability to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Results Here, we propose Maximum Metabolic Flexibility (MMF) a computational method that utilizes this observation to find the most probable intracellular flux distributions. By mapping measured flux data from central metabolism to the genome-scale models of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that i) indeed, most of the measured fluxes agree with a high adaptability of the network, ii) this result can be used to further reduce the space of feasible solutions iii) this reduced space improves the quantitative predictions

  7. Metabolic fluxes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe grown on glucose and mixtures of glycerol and acetate.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tobias; Heinzle, Elmar; Schneider, Konstantin

    2013-06-01

    Growth on glycerol has already been a topic of research for several yeast species, and recent publications deal with the regulatory mechanisms of glycerol assimilation by the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We investigated glycerol metabolism of S. pombe from a physiological point of view, characterizing growth and metabolism on a mixture of glycerol and acetate and comparing it to growth on glucose under respirative growth conditions in chemostat experiments. On glycerol/acetate mixtures, the cells grew with a maximum specific growth rate of 0.11 h(-1) where 46 % of the carbon was channeled into biomass and the key fermentation product ethanol was not detectable. (13)C-assisted metabolic flux analysis resolved substrate distributions through central carbon metabolism, proving that glycerol is used as a precursor for glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway, while acetate enters the tricarboxylic acid cycle via acetyl-CoA. Considering compartmentalization between cytosol and mitochondria in the metabolic model, we found compartmentalization of biosynthesis for the amino acids aspartate and leucine. Balancing of redox cofactors revealed an abundant production of cytosolic NADPH that must be finally regenerated via the respiratory chain shown by the simulated and measured CO2 production and oxygen consumption rates which were in good agreement.

  8. Prediction of metabolic flux distribution from gene expression data based on the flux minimization principle.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of possible flux distributions in a metabolic network provides detailed phenotypic information that links metabolism to cellular physiology. To estimate metabolic steady-state fluxes, the most common approach is to solve a set of macroscopic mass balance equations subjected to stoichiometric constraints while attempting to optimize an assumed optimal objective function. This assumption is justifiable in specific cases but may be invalid when tested across different conditions, cell populations, or other organisms. With an aim to providing a more consistent and reliable prediction of flux distributions over a wide range of conditions, in this article we propose a framework that uses the flux minimization principle to predict active metabolic pathways from mRNA expression data. The proposed algorithm minimizes a weighted sum of flux magnitudes, while biomass production can be bounded to fit an ample range from very low to very high values according to the analyzed context. We have formulated the flux weights as a function of the corresponding enzyme reaction's gene expression value, enabling the creation of context-specific fluxes based on a generic metabolic network. In case studies of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and wild-type and mutant Escherichia coli strains, our method achieved high prediction accuracy, as gauged by correlation coefficients and sums of squared error, with respect to the experimentally measured values. In contrast to other approaches, our method was able to provide quantitative predictions for both model organisms under a variety of conditions. Our approach requires no prior knowledge or assumption of a context-specific metabolic functionality and does not require trial-and-error parameter adjustments. Thus, our framework is of general applicability for modeling the transcription-dependent metabolism of bacteria and yeasts.

  9. In vivo NMR for ¹³C Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    PubMed

    Roscher, Albrecht; Troufflard, Stéphanie; Taghki, Abdelghani Idrissi

    2014-01-01

    The use of in vivo NMR within the framework of Metabolic Flux Analysis in plants is presented. In vivo NMR allows to visualize the active metabolic network, to determine metabolic and isotopic steady state and to measure metabolic fluxes which are not necessarily accessible by isotopic steady state (stationary) Metabolic Flux Analysis. The kinetic data can be used as input for dynamic (nonstationary) Metabolic Flux Analysis. Both 1D and 2D NMR methods are employed.

  10. Dynamic metabolic flux analysis--tools for probing transient states of metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2013-12-01

    Computational approaches for analyzing dynamic states of metabolic networks provide a practical framework for design, control, and optimization of biotechnological processes. In recent years, two promising modeling approaches have emerged for characterizing transients in cellular metabolism, dynamic metabolic flux analysis (DMFA), and dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA). Both approaches combine metabolic network analysis based on pseudo steady-state (PSS) assumption for intracellular metabolism with dynamic models for extracellular environment. One strategy to capture dynamics is by combining network analysis with a kinetic model. Predictive models are thus established that can be used to optimize bioprocessing conditions and identify useful genetic manipulations. Alternatively, by combining network analysis with methods for analyzing extracellular time-series data, transients in intracellular metabolic fluxes can be determined and applied for process monitoring and control.

  11. Finding elementary flux modes in metabolic networks based on flux balance analysis and flux coupling analysis: application to the analysis of Escherichia coli metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tabe-Bordbar, Shayan; Marashi, Sayed-Amir

    2013-12-01

    Elementary modes (EMs) are steady-state metabolic flux vectors with minimal set of active reactions. Each EM corresponds to a metabolic pathway. Therefore, studying EMs is helpful for analyzing the production of biotechnologically important metabolites. However, memory requirements for computing EMs may hamper their applicability as, in most genome-scale metabolic models, no EM can be computed due to running out of memory. In this study, we present a method for computing randomly sampled EMs. In this approach, a network reduction algorithm is used for EM computation, which is based on flux balance-based methods. We show that this approach can be used to recover the EMs in the medium- and genome-scale metabolic network models, while the EMs are sampled in an unbiased way. The applicability of such results is shown by computing “estimated” control-effective flux values in Escherichia coli metabolic network.

  12. Pyruvate modifies metabolic flux and nutrient sensing during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an immature swine model

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Olson, Aaron; Isern, Nancy G.; Robillard Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support for infants and children with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. Nutritional support is mandatory during ECMO, although specific actions for substrates on the heart have not been delineated. Prior work shows that enhancing pyruvate oxidation promotes successful weaning from ECMO. Accordingly, we closely examined the role of prolonged systemic pyruvate supplementation in modifying metabolic parameters during the unique conditions of ventricular unloading provided by ECMO. Twelve male mixed breed Yorkshire piglets (age 30-49 days) received systemic infusion of either normal saline (Group C) or pyruvate (Group P) during ECMO for 8 hours. Over the final hour piglets received [2-13C] pyruvate, and [13C6]-L-leucine, as an indicator for oxidation and protein synthesis. A significant increase in lactate and pyruvate concentrations occurred, along with an increase in the absolute concentration of all measured CAC intermediates. Group P showed greater anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylation although pyruvate oxidation relative to citrate synthase flux was similar to Group C. The groups demonstrated similar leucine fractional contributions to acetyl-CoA and fractional protein synthesis rates. Pyruvate also promoted an increase in the phosphorylation state of several nutrient sensitive enzymes, such as AMPK and ACC, and promoted O-GlcNAcylation through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). In conclusion, prolonged pyruvate supplementation during ECMO modified anaplerotic pyruvate flux and elicited changes in important nutrient and energy sensitive pathways, while preserving protein synthesis. Therefore, the observed results support the further study of nutritional supplementation and its downstream effects on cardiac adaptation during ventricular unloading.

  13. Calculation of total meal d13C from individual food d13C.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variations in the isotopic signature of carbon in biological samples can be used to distinguish dietary patterns and monitor shifts in metabolism. But for these variations to have meaning, the isotopic signature of the diet must be known. We sought to determine if knowledge of the 13C isotopic abund...

  14. Metabolic flux analysis in complex isotopolog space. Recycling of glucose in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Ettenhuber, Christian; Radykewicz, Tanja; Kofer, Waltraud; Koop, Hans-Ulrich; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2005-02-01

    Tobacco plants grown in vitro were supplied with a mixture of [U-13C6]glucose and unlabelled sucrose via the root system. After 20 days, leaves were harvested and extracted with water. Glucose was isolated from the extract and was analysed by 13C NMR spectroscopy. All 13C signals appeared as complex multiplets due to 13C-13C coupling. The abundance of 21 isotopologous glucose species was determined from the 13C NMR signal integrals by numerical deconvolution using a genetic algorithm. The relative fractions of specific isotopologs in the overall excess of 13C-labelled specimens establish flux contributions via glycolysis/glucogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, citric acid cycle and Calvin cycle including 13CO2 refixation. The fluxes were modelled and reconstructed in silico by a novel rule-based approach yielding the contributions of circular pathways and the degree of multiple cycling events. The data indicate that the vast majority of the proffered [U-13C6]glucose molecules had been modified by catabolism and subsequent glucogenesis from catabolic fragments, predominantly via passage through the citric acid cycle and the pentose phosphate pathway.

  15. Quantifying plant phenotypes with isotopic labeling and metabolic flux analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analyses of metabolic flux using stable isotopes in plants have traditionally been restricted to tissues with presumed homogeneous cell populations such as developing seeds, cell suspensions, or cultured roots and root tips. It is now possible to describe these and other more complex tissues such a...

  16. Reconstructed Metabolic Network Models Predict Flux-Level Metabolic Reprogramming in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Emrah; Çakır, Tunahan

    2016-01-01

    Developments in genome scale metabolic modeling techniques and omics technologies have enabled the reconstruction of context-specific metabolic models. In this study, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), one of the most common and aggressive malignant brain tumors, is investigated by mapping GBM gene expression data on the growth-implemented brain specific genome-scale metabolic network, and GBM-specific models are generated. The models are used to calculate metabolic flux distributions in the tumor cells. Metabolic phenotypes predicted by the GBM-specific metabolic models reconstructed in this work reflect the general metabolic reprogramming of GBM, reported both in in-vitro and in-vivo experiments. The computed flux profiles quantitatively predict that major sources of the acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetic acid pool used in TCA cycle are pyruvate dehydrogenase from glycolysis and anaplerotic flux from glutaminolysis, respectively. Also, our results, in accordance with recent studies, predict a contribution of oxidative phosphorylation to ATP pool via a slightly active TCA cycle in addition to the major contributor aerobic glycolysis. We verified our results by using different computational methods that incorporate transcriptome data with genome-scale models and by using different transcriptome datasets. Correct predictions of flux distributions in glycolysis, glutaminolysis, TCA cycle and lipid precursor metabolism validate the reconstructed models for further use in future to simulate more specific metabolic patterns for GBM. PMID:27147948

  17. Using flux balance analysis to guide microbial metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Curran, Kathleen A; Crook, Nathan C; Alper, Hal S

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic engineers modify biological systems through the use of modern molecular biology tools in order to obtain desired phenotypes. However, due to the extreme complexity and interconnectedness of metabolism in all organisms, it is often difficult to a priori predict which changes will yield the optimal results. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is a mathematical approach that uses a genomic-scale metabolic network models to afford in silico prediction and optimization of metabolic changes. In particular, a genome-scale approach can help select gene targets for knockout and overexpression. This approach can be used to help expedite the strain engineering process. Here, we give an introduction to the use of FBA and provide details for its implementation in a microbial metabolic engineering context.

  18. Real-time Detection of Hepatic Gluconeogenic and Glycogenolytic States Using Hyperpolarized [2-13C]Dihydroxyacetone*

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Karlos X.; Satapati, Santhosh; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Burgess, Shawn C.; Malloy, Craig R.; Merritt, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    Glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis are sensitive to nutritional state, and the net direction of flux is controlled by multiple enzymatic steps. This delicate balance in the liver is disrupted by a variety of pathological states including cancer and diabetes mellitus. Hyperpolarized carbon-13 magnetic resonance is a new metabolic imaging technique that can probe intermediary metabolism nondestructively. There are currently no methods to rapidly distinguish livers in a gluconeogenic from glycogenolytic state. Here we use the gluconeogenic precursor dihydroxyacetone (DHA) to deliver hyperpolarized carbon-13 to the perfused mouse liver. DHA enters gluconeogenesis at the level of the trioses. Perfusion conditions were designed to establish either a gluconeogenic or a glycogenolytic state. Unexpectedly, we found that [2-13C]DHA was metabolized within a few seconds to the common intermediates and end products of both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis under both conditions, including [2,5-13C]glucose, [2-13C]glycerol 3-phosphate, [2-13C]phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), [2-13C]pyruvate, [2-13C]alanine, and [2-13C]lactate. [2-13C]Phosphoenolpyruvate, a key branch point in gluconeogenesis and glycolysis, was monitored in functioning tissue for the first time. Observation of [2-13C]PEP was not anticipated as the free energy difference between PEP and pyruvate is large. Pyruvate kinase is the only regulatory step of the common glycolytic-gluconeogenic pathway that appears to exert significant control over the kinetics of any metabolites of DHA. A ratio of glycolytic to gluconeogenic products distinguished the gluconeogenic from glycogenolytic state in these functioning livers. PMID:25352600

  19. Real-time detection of hepatic gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic states using hyperpolarized [2-13C]dihydroxyacetone.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Karlos X; Satapati, Santhosh; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Burgess, Shawn C; Malloy, Craig R; Merritt, Matthew E

    2014-12-26

    Glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis are sensitive to nutritional state, and the net direction of flux is controlled by multiple enzymatic steps. This delicate balance in the liver is disrupted by a variety of pathological states including cancer and diabetes mellitus. Hyperpolarized carbon-13 magnetic resonance is a new metabolic imaging technique that can probe intermediary metabolism nondestructively. There are currently no methods to rapidly distinguish livers in a gluconeogenic from glycogenolytic state. Here we use the gluconeogenic precursor dihydroxyacetone (DHA) to deliver hyperpolarized carbon-13 to the perfused mouse liver. DHA enters gluconeogenesis at the level of the trioses. Perfusion conditions were designed to establish either a gluconeogenic or a glycogenolytic state. Unexpectedly, we found that [2-(13)C]DHA was metabolized within a few seconds to the common intermediates and end products of both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis under both conditions, including [2,5-(13)C]glucose, [2-(13)C]glycerol 3-phosphate, [2-(13)C]phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), [2-(13)C]pyruvate, [2-(13)C]alanine, and [2-(13)C]lactate. [2-(13)C]Phosphoenolpyruvate, a key branch point in gluconeogenesis and glycolysis, was monitored in functioning tissue for the first time. Observation of [2-(13)C]PEP was not anticipated as the free energy difference between PEP and pyruvate is large. Pyruvate kinase is the only regulatory step of the common glycolytic-gluconeogenic pathway that appears to exert significant control over the kinetics of any metabolites of DHA. A ratio of glycolytic to gluconeogenic products distinguished the gluconeogenic from glycogenolytic state in these functioning livers.

  20. Isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: complex yet highly informative.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) using isotopic tracers aims at the experimental determination of in vivo reaction rates (fluxes). In recent years, the well-established 13C-MFA method based on metabolic and isotopic steady state was extended to INST-MFA (isotopically non-stationary MFA), which is performed in a transient labeling state. INST-MFA offers short-time experiments with a maximal information gain, and can moreover be applied to a wider range of growth conditions or organisms. Some of these conditions are not accessible by conventional methods. This comes at the price of significant methodological complexity involving high-frequency sampling and quenching, precise analysis of many samples and an extraordinary computational effort. This review gives a brief overview of basic principles, experimental workflows, and recent progress in this field. Special emphasis is laid on the trade-off between total effort and information gain, particularly on the suitability of INST-MFA for certain types of biological questions. In order to integrate INST-MFA as a viable method into the toolbox of MFA, some major challenges must be addressed in the coming years. These are discussed in the outlook.

  1. Software applications toward quantitative metabolic flux analysis and modeling.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Thomas; Fieselmann, Astrid; Majeed, Saman; Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2014-01-01

    Metabolites and their pathways are central for adaptation and survival. Metabolic modeling elucidates in silico all the possible flux pathways (flux balance analysis, FBA) and predicts the actual fluxes under a given situation, further refinement of these models is possible by including experimental isotopologue data. In this review, we initially introduce the key theoretical concepts and different analysis steps in the modeling process before comparing flux calculation and metabolite analysis programs such as C13, BioOpt, COBRA toolbox, Metatool, efmtool, FiatFlux, ReMatch, VANTED, iMAT and YANA. Their respective strengths and limitations are discussed and compared to alternative software. While data analysis of metabolites, calculation of metabolic fluxes, pathways and their condition-specific changes are all possible, we highlight the considerations that need to be taken into account before deciding on a specific software. Current challenges in the field include the computation of large-scale networks (in elementary mode analysis), regulatory interactions and detailed kinetics, and these are discussed in the light of powerful new approaches.

  2. Metabolic Flux Analysis -application in plant metabolic modelling for advanced life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasidharan L, Swathy; Hezard, Pauline; Poughon, Laurent; Dussap, Claude-Gilles

    Plants have an important role in providing food and fresh oxygen for humans in a closed environment during long duration missions to Mars or Moon. Also, plants play an important role for recycling water. Thus, plant modelling (crop composition, yield prediction and the responses to its environment within the closed loop) gets much attention in the development of closed ecological life support systems. In order to achieve this, metabolic flux computation methods accounting for reactions stoichiometry and chemical energy conservation obtained from metabolic pathways description of different plant parts are required. The basic ideas of metabolic modelling and their application to various plant parts will be discussed. Metabolic systems consist of a set of metabolites and reactions that consume or produce them. The metabolic pathways within a metabolic network for each plant part or sub level are characterised and the metabolic fluxes, defined as the amount of converted metabolite per unit time and per unit mass of tissue (or per plant part), can be calculated. MBA (Metabolic flux analysis) which is a constraint based approach is effective at calculating flux distributions through bio-chemical networks. This methodology can be applied to several plants' growth situations. In terms of space appli-cations, it is shown how this approach could bring valuable tools for assessing and quantifying the effects of the environment of a close system on growth rate and conversion yields.

  3. FCDECOMP: decomposition of metabolic networks based on flux coupling relations.

    PubMed

    Rezvan, Abolfazl; Marashi, Sayed-Amir; Eslahchi, Changiz

    2014-10-01

    A metabolic network model provides a computational framework to study the metabolism of a cell at the system level. Due to their large sizes and complexity, rational decomposition of these networks into subsystems is a strategy to obtain better insight into the metabolic functions. Additionally, decomposing metabolic networks paves the way to use computational methods that will be otherwise very slow when run on the original genome-scale network. In the present study, we propose FCDECOMP decomposition method based on flux coupling relations (FCRs) between pairs of reaction fluxes. This approach utilizes a genetic algorithm (GA) to obtain subsystems that can be analyzed in isolation, i.e. without considering the reactions of the original network in the analysis. Therefore, we propose that our method is useful for discovering biologically meaningful modules in metabolic networks. As a case study, we show that when this method is applied to the metabolic networks of barley seeds and yeast, the modules are in good agreement with the biological compartments of these networks.

  4. Temperature-mediated changes in microbial carbon use efficiency and 13C discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmeier, C. A.; Ballantyne, F., IV; Min, K.; Billings, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding how carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from soils feeds back to climate warming depends in part on our ability to quantify the efficiency with which microorganisms convert soil organic carbon (C) into either biomass or CO2. Quantifying ecosystem-level respiratory CO2 losses often also requires assumptions about stable C isotope fractionations associated with the microbial transformation of soil organic substrates. However, the diversity of organic substrates' δ13C and the challenges of measuring microbial C use efficiency (CUE) in soils fundamentally limit our ability to project soil, and thus ecosystem, C budgets in a warming climate. Here, we quantify the effect of temperature on C fluxes during metabolic transformations of cellobiose, a common microbial substrate, by a cosmopolitan soil microorganism growing at a constant rate. Specific respiration rate increased by 250 % between 13 and 26.5 °C, decreasing CUE from 77 to 56 %. Specific respiration rate was positively correlated with an increase in respiratory 13C discrimination from 4.4 to 6.7 ‰ across the same temperature range. This first demonstration of a direct link between temperature, microbial CUE and associated isotope fluxes provides a critical step towards understanding δ13C of respired CO2 at multiple scales, and towards a framework for predicting future soil C fluxes.

  5. Temperature-mediated changes in microbial carbon use efficiency and 13C discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Ballantyne, Ford, IV; Min, Kyungjin; Billings, Sharon A.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding how carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from ecosystems feeds back to climate warming depends in part on our ability to quantify the efficiency with which microorganisms convert organic carbon (C) into either biomass or CO2. Quantifying ecosystem-level respiratory CO2 losses often also requires assumptions about stable C isotope fractionations associated with the microbial transformation of organic substrates. However, the diversity of organic substrates' δ13C and the challenges of measuring microbial C use efficiency (CUE) in their natural environment fundamentally limit our ability to project ecosystem C budgets in a warming climate. Here, we quantify the effect of temperature on C fluxes during metabolic transformations of cellobiose, a common microbial substrate, by a cosmopolitan microorganism growing at a constant rate. Biomass C specific respiration rate increased by 250 % between 13 and 26.5 °C, decreasing CUE from 77 to 56 %. Biomass C specific respiration rate was positively correlated with an increase in respiratory 13C discrimination from 4.4 to 6.7 ‰ across the same temperature range. This first demonstration of a direct link between temperature, microbial CUE, and associated isotope fluxes provides a critical step towards understanding δ13C of respired CO2 at multiple scales, and towards a framework for predicting future ecosystem C fluxes.

  6. (Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis)

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-01-01

    The funded research deals with the physiology and genetics of glycolytic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis. Two fundamental biological questions are begin addressed: First, how do the enzymes of glycolytic pathways act in concert to regulate metabolic flux Second, what is the role of gene expression in regulating high level synthesis of the glycolytic enzymes in a balance that allows proper glycolytic flux control The specific objectives of the grant are as follows: 1. To clone the structural and regulatory regions of the Z. mobilis genes encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglucose isomerase, enolase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, 2- keto-3-deoxy- 6-phosphogluconate aldolase, glucokinase and fructokinase. 2. To characterize the structure of these genes with respect to nucleotide sequence, transcriptional initiation sites promoter location, evolutionary relatedness to similar genes from other organisms, and organization of these genes on the genome. 3. To investigate the effects of genetically engineered alterations in the levels of the cloned enzymes on metabolic flux and cell growth. 4. To study transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. The first two specific objectives have now been fully completed. Significant progress has been made on the fourth objective and work on the third objective is well underway.

  7. Metabolic fluxes and beyond-systems biology understanding and engineering of microbial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Michael; Becker, Judith; Wittmann, Christoph

    2010-11-01

    The recent years have seen tremendous progress towards the understanding of microbial metabolism on a higher level of the entire functional system. Hereby, huge achievements including the sequencing of complete genomes and efficient post-genomic approaches provide the basis for a new, fascinating era of research-analysis of metabolic and regulatory properties on a global scale. Metabolic flux (fluxome) analysis displays the first systems oriented approach to unravel the physiology of microorganisms since it combines experimental data with metabolic network models and allows determining absolute fluxes through larger networks of central carbon metabolism. Hereby, fluxes are of central importance for systems level understanding because they fundamentally represent the cellular phenotype as integrated output of the cellular components, i.e. genes, transcripts, proteins, and metabolites. A currently emerging and promising area of research in systems biology and systems metabolic engineering is therefore the integration of fluxome data in multi-omics studies to unravel the multiple layers of control that superimpose the flux network and enable its optimal operation under different environmental conditions.

  8. Starch biosynthesis and intermediary metabolism in maize kernels. Quantitative analysis of metabolite flux by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Glawischnig, Erich; Gierl, Alfons; Tomas, Adriana; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2002-12-01

    The seeds of cereals represent an important sink for metabolites during the accumulation of storage products, and seeds are an essential component of human and animal nutrition. Understanding the metabolic interconversions (networks) underpinning storage product formation could provide the foundation for effective metabolic engineering of these primary nutritional sources. In this paper, we describe the use of retrobiosynthetic nuclear magnetic resonance analysis to establish the metabolic history of the glucose (Glc) units of starch in maize (Zea mays) kernels. Maize kernel cultures were grown with [U-(13)C(6)]Glc, [U-(13)C(12)]sucrose, or [1,2-(13)C(2)]acetate as supplements. After 19 d, starch was hydrolyzed, and the isotopomer composition of the resulting Glc was determined by quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. [1,2-(13)C(2)]Acetate was not incorporated into starch. [U-(13)C(6)]Glc or [U-(13)C(12)]sucrose gave similar labeling patterns of polysaccharide Glc units, which were dominated by [1,2,3-(13)C(3)]- and [4,5,6-(13)C(3)]-isotopomers, whereas the [U-(13)C(6)]-, [3,4,5,6-(13)C(4)]-, [1,2-(13)C(2)]-, [5,6-(13)C(2)], [3-(13)C(1)], and [4-(13)C(1)]-isotopomers were present at lower levels. These isotopomer compositions indicate that there is extensive recycling of Glc before its incorporation into starch, via the enzymes of glycolytic, glucogenic, and pentose phosphate pathways. The relatively high abundance of the [5,6-(13)C(2)]-isotopomer can be explained by the joint operation of glycolysis/glucogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway.

  9. Web application for genetic modification flux with database to estimate metabolic fluxes of genetic mutants.

    PubMed

    Mohd Ali, Noorlin; Tsuboi, Ryo; Matsumoto, Yuta; Koishi, Daisuke; Inoue, Kentaro; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Kurata, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Computational analysis of metabolic fluxes is essential in understanding the structure and function of a metabolic network and in rationally designing genetically modified mutants for an engineering purpose. We had presented the genetic modification flux (GMF) that predicts the flux distribution of a broad range of genetically modified mutants. To enhance the feasibility and usability of GMF, we have developed a web application with a metabolic network database to predict a flux distribution of genetically modified mutants. One hundred and twelve data sets of Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Chinese hamster ovary were registered as standard models.

  10. Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-01-01

    This work seeks to understand the role of gene expression in regulating glycolytic enzyme synthesis in a balance that allows proper glycoltic flux control. The seven genes targeted for study in this laboratory have been cloned and sequenced, and molecular details of regulation have been investigated. Clear that glycolytic enzyme synthesis is coordinated to prevent the build up of toxic metabolic intermediates. The genetic mechanisms responsible for regulating balanced expression of the EntnerDoudoroff and glycolytic genes in Z. mobilis are beginning to be understood. Several layers of genetic control, perhaps in a hierarchal arrangement act in concert to determine the relative abundance of the glycolytic enzymes. These genetic controls involve differential translational efficiency, highly conserved promoter sequences, transcription factors, differential mRNA stabilities, and nucleolytic mRNA processing. The serendipitous cloning of the glucose facilitator, glf, as a result of linkage to several other genes of interest will have a significant impact on the study of Z. mobilis metabolism. The glucose facilitator is being characterized in a genetically reconstituted system in E. coli. Molecular genetic studies indicate that the ratio of glf expression to that of glk, zmf, and edd is carefully regulated, and suggests a critical role in metabolic control. Regulation of glycolytic gene expression is now sufficiently well understood to allow use of the glycolytic genes as tools to manipulate specified enzyme levels for the purpose of analyzing metabolic flux control. The critical genes have been subcloned for stable expression in Z. mobilis and placed under control of a regulated promoter system involving the tac promoter, the lacI repressor, and gene induction in by IPTG. HPLC methods have been developed that allow quantitation of virtually all of the metabolic intermediates in the cell pool.

  11. Natural isotope correction of MS/MS measurements for metabolomics and (13)C fluxomics.

    PubMed

    Niedenführ, Sebastian; ten Pierick, Angela; van Dam, Patricia T N; Suarez-Mendez, Camilo A; Nöh, Katharina; Wahl, S Aljoscha

    2016-05-01

    Fluxomics and metabolomics are crucial tools for metabolic engineering and biomedical analysis to determine the in vivo cellular state. Especially, the application of (13)C isotopes allows comprehensive insights into the functional operation of cellular metabolism. Compared to single MS, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides more detailed and accurate measurements of the metabolite enrichment patterns (tandem mass isotopomers), increasing the accuracy of metabolite concentration measurements and metabolic flux estimation. MS-type data from isotope labeling experiments is biased by naturally occurring stable isotopes (C, H, N, O, etc.). In particular, GC-MS(/MS) requires derivatization for the usually non-volatile intracellular metabolites introducing additional natural isotopes leading to measurements that do not directly represent the carbon labeling distribution. To make full use of LC- and GC-MS/MS mass isotopomer measurements, the influence of natural isotopes has to be eliminated (corrected). Our correction approach is analyzed for the two most common applications; (13)C fluxomics and isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) based metabolomics. Natural isotopes can have an impact on the calculated flux distribution which strongly depends on the substrate labeling and the actual flux distribution. Second, we show that in IDMS based metabolomics natural isotopes lead to underestimated concentrations that can and should be corrected with a nonlinear calibration. Our simulations indicate that the correction for natural abundance in isotope based fluxomics and quantitative metabolomics is essential for correct data interpretation.

  12. Genealogy profiling through strain improvement by using metabolic network analysis: metabolic flux genealogy of several generations of lysine-producing corynebacteria.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Christoph; Heinzle, Elmar

    2002-12-01

    A comprehensive approach of metabolite balancing, (13)C tracer studies, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry, and isotopomer modeling was applied for comparative metabolic network analysis of a genealogy of five successive generations of lysine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum. The five strains examined (C. glutamicum ATCC 13032, 13287, 21253, 21526, and 21543) were previously obtained by random mutagenesis and selection. Throughout the genealogy, the lysine yield in batch cultures increased markedly from 1.2 to 24.9% relative to the glucose uptake flux. Strain optimization was accompanied by significant changes in intracellular flux distributions. The relative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) flux successively increased, clearly corresponding to the product yield. Moreover, the anaplerotic net flux increased almost twofold as a consequence of concerted regulation of C(3) carboxylation and C(4) decarboxylation fluxes to cover the increased demand for lysine formation; thus, the overall increase was a consequence of concerted regulation of C(3) carboxylation and C(4) decarboxylation fluxes. The relative flux through isocitrate dehydrogenase dropped from 82.7% in the wild type to 59.9% in the lysine-producing mutants. In contrast to the NADPH demand, which increased from 109 to 172% due to the increasing lysine yield, the overall NADPH supply remained constant between 185 and 196%, resulting in a decrease in the apparent NADPH excess through strain optimization. Extrapolated to industrial lysine producers, the NADPH supply might become a limiting factor. The relative contributions of PPP and the tricarboxylic acid cycle to NADPH generation changed markedly, indicating that C. glutamicum is able to maintain a constant supply of NADPH under completely different flux conditions. Statistical analysis by a Monte Carlo approach revealed high precision for the estimated fluxes, underlining the

  13. Subsurface Microbial Ecosystems: A Photon Flux and a Metabolic Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Alexander P.; Tejera, Frank; Libchaber, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Mud is a porous medium containing a high density of diverse microorganisms. It is out of equilibrium as the energy from a photon flux is dissipated by a cascade of biochemical reactions, mediated by the metabolisms of the constituent organisms. Despite its complexity, microbes in nature self-organize into simple reproducible patterns. We present two experiments in which the dynamics of natural mud coming to steady state are observed and modeled. In the first, the oxygen gradient produced by cyanobacteria in an imposed light gradient is measured. In the second, a thin front of oxygen-consuming microbes forms at the penetration depth of oxygen and moves with the changing oxygen gradient.

  14. Quantification of 13C pyruvate and 13C lactate in dog blood by reversed-phase liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry after derivatization with 3-nitrophenylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Uran, Steinar; Landmark, Kristin Eitrem; Hjellum, Gro; Skotland, Tore

    2007-08-15

    Injection of hyperpolarized (13)C-labelled pyruvate ((13)C pyruvate) is under evaluation as an agent for medical metabolic imaging by measuring formation of (13)C lactate using magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the (13)C nuclei. A quantitative method for analysis of these (13)C-labelled substances in dog blood was needed as part of the development of this agent and we here describe a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for that purpose. Immediately after blood collection, the blood proteins were precipitated using methanol added internal standard ([U-(13)C]pyruvate and [U-(13)C]lactate). Prior to analysis, the compounds were derivatized using 3-nitrophenylhydrazine. Following separation on a Supelco Discovery HS C18 column, (13)C pyruvate and (13)C lactate were detected using negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Calibration standards (4.5-4500 microM (13)C pyruvate and 9-9000 microM (13)C lactate) and added internal standard were used to make the calibration curves, which were fitted to a non-linear equation y=a+bx+cx(2) and weighted with a weighting factor of 1/y(2). The analytical lower limit of quantification of (13)C pyruvate and (13)C lactate was 4.5 and 9 microM, respectively. The total precision of the method was below 9.2% for (13)C pyruvate and below 5.8% for (13)C lactate. The accuracy of the method showed a relative error less than 2.4% for (13)C pyruvate and less than 6.3% for (13)C lactate. The recoveries were in the range 93-115% for (13)C pyruvate and 70-111% for (13)C lactate. Both substances were stable in protein-free supernatant when stored for up to 3 weeks in a -20 degrees C freezer, during three freeze/thaw cycles, and when stored in an autosampler for at least 30 h.

  15. Analysis of metabolic flux phenotypes for two Arabidopsis mutants with severe impairment in seed storage lipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lonien, J.; Schwender, J.

    2009-11-01

    Major storage reserves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds are triacylglycerols (seed oils) and proteins. Seed oil content is severely reduced for the regulatory mutant wrinkled1 (wri1-1; At3g54320) and for a double mutant in two isoforms of plastidic pyruvate kinase (pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha}; At5g52920 and At3g22960). Both already biochemically well-characterized mutants were now studied by {sup 13}C metabolic flux analysis of cultured developing embryos based on comparison with their respective genetic wild-type backgrounds. For both mutations, in seeds as well as in cultured embryos, the oil fraction was strongly reduced while the fractions of proteins and free metabolites increased. Flux analysis in cultured embryos revealed changes in nutrient uptakes and fluxes into biomass as well as an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle activity for both mutations. While in both wild types plastidic pyruvate kinase (PK{sub p}) provides most of the pyruvate for plastidic fatty acid synthesis, the flux through PK{sub p} is reduced in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha} by 43% of the wild-type value. In wri1-1, PK{sub p} flux is even more reduced (by 82%), although the genes PKp{beta}{sub 1} and PKp{alpha} are still expressed. Along a common paradigm of metabolic control theory, it is hypothesized that a large reduction in PK{sub p} enzyme activity in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha} has less effect on PK{sub p} flux than multiple smaller reductions in glycolytic enzymes in wri1-1. In addition, only in the wri1-1 mutant is the large reduction in PK{sub p} flux compensated in part by an increased import of cytosolic pyruvate and by plastidic malic enzyme. No such limited compensatory bypass could be observed in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha}.

  16. Metabolite Valves: Dynamic Control of Metabolic Flux for Pathway Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Kristala

    2015-03-01

    Microbial strains have been successfully engineered to produce a wide variety of chemical compounds, several of which have been commercialized. As new products are targeted for biological synthesis, yield is frequently considered a primary driver towards determining feasibility. Theoretical yields can be calculated, establishing an upper limit on the potential conversion of starting substrates to target compounds. Such yields typically ignore loss of substrate to byproducts, with the assumption that competing reactions can be eliminated, usually by deleting the genes encoding the corresponding enzymes. However, when an enzyme encodes an essential gene, especially one involved in primary metabolism, deletion is not a viable option. Reducing gene expression in a static fashion is possible, but this solution ignores the metabolic demand needed for synthesis of the enzymes required for the desired pathway. We have developed Metabolite valves to address this challenge. The valves are designed to allow high flux through the essential enzyme during an initial period where growth is favored. Following an external perturbation, enzyme activity is then reduced, enabling a higher precursor pool to be diverted towards the pathway of interest. We have designed valves with control at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels. In both cases, key enzymes in glucose metabolism are regulated, and two different compounds are targeted for heterologous production. We have measured increased concentrations of intracellular metabolites once the valve is closed, and have demonstrated that these increased pools lead to increased product yields. These metabolite valves should prove broadly useful for dynamic control of metabolic flux, resulting in improvements in product yields.

  17. A 13C mass isotopomer study of anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation in perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Comte, B; Vincent, G; Bouchard, B; Jetté, M; Cordeau, S; Rosiers, C D

    1997-10-17

    Anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation was examined in hearts perfused with physiological concentrations of glucose, [U-13C3]lactate, and [U-13C3]pyruvate. Also, a fatty acid, [1-13C]octanoate, or ketone bodies were added at concentrations providing acetyl-CoA at a rate resulting in either low or substantial pyruvate decarboxylation. Relative contributions of pyruvate and fatty acids to citrate synthesis were determined from the 13C labeling pattern of effluent citrate by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (see companion article, Comte, B., Vincent, G., Bouchard, B., and Des Rosiers, C. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 26117-26124). Precision on flux measurements of anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation depended on the mix of substrates supplied to the heart. Anaplerotic fluxes were precisely determined under conditions where acetyl-CoA was predominantly supplied by beta-oxidation, as it occurred with 0.2 or 1 mM octanoate. Then, anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation provided 3-8% of the OAA moiety of citrate and was modulated by concentrations of lactate and pyruvate in the physiological range. Also, the contribution of pyruvate to citrate formation through carboxylation was equal to or greater than through decarboxylation. Furthermore, 13C labeling data on tissue citric acid cycle intermediates and pyruvate suggest that (i) anaplerosis occurs also at succinate and (ii) cataplerotic malate decarboxylation is low. Rather, the presence of citrate in the effluent perfusate of hearts perfused with physiological concentrations of glucose, lactate, and pyruvate and concentrations of octanoate leading to maximal oxidative rates suggests a cataplerotic citrate efflux from mitochondria to cytosol. Taken altogether, our data raise the possibility of a link between pyruvate carboxylation and mitochondrial citrate efflux. In view of the proposed feedback regulation of glycolysis by cytosolic citrate, such a link would support a role of anaplerosis and cataplerosis in metabolic signal

  18. Evaluating North Sea carbon sources using radiogenic (224Ra and 228Ra) and stable carbon isotope (DI13C) tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, William; Thomas, Helmuth; Hagens, Mathilde; Brenner, Heiko; Paetsch, Johannes; Clargo, Nikki

    2015-04-01

    In the North Sea, much uncertainty still exists regarding the role of boundary fluxes (e.g. benthic input from sediments or lateral inputs from the coastline) in the overall biogeochemical cycling of the system. The stable carbon isotope signature of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC) is a common tool for following transformations of carbon in the water column and identifying carbon sources and sinks. Here, analyses of the first basin-wide observations of δ13C-DIC reveal that a balance between biological production and respiration, as well as a freshwater input near the European continental coast, predominantly control surface distributions in the North Sea. A strong relationship between the biological component of DIC (DICbio) and δ13C-DIC is then used to quantify the metabolic DIC flux associated with changes in the carbon isotopic signature. Correlations are also found between δ13C-DIC and naturally-occurring Radium isotopes (224Ra and 228Ra), which have well-identified sources from the seafloor and coastal boundaries. The relationship between δ13C-DIC and the longer-lived 228Ra isotope (half-life = 5.8 years) is used to derive a metabolic DIC flux from the European continental coastline. 228Ra is also shown to be a highly effective tracer of North Sea total alkalinity (TA) compared to the more conventional use of salinity as a tracer. Coastal alkalinity inputs are calculated using relationships with 228Ra, and ratios of DIC and TA suggest denitrification as the main metabolic pathway for the formation of these coastal inputs. Finally, coastal TA inputs are translated into inputs of protons to quantify their impact on the buffering capacity of the Southern North Sea.

  19. Yeast dynamic metabolic flux measurement in nutrient-rich media by HPLC and accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Benjamin J; Navid, Ali; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Bench, Graham

    2010-12-01

    Metabolic flux, the flow of metabolites through networks of enzymes, represents the dynamic productive output of cells. Improved understanding of intracellular metabolic fluxes will enable targeted manipulation of metabolic pathways of medical and industrial importance to a greater degree than is currently possible. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is a constraint-based approach to modeling metabolic fluxes, but its utility is limited by a lack of experimental measurements. Incorporation of experimentally measured fluxes as system constraints will significantly improve the overall accuracy of FBA. We applied a novel, two-tiered approach in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to measure nutrient consumption rates (extracellular fluxes) and a targeted intracellular flux using a (14)C-labeled precursor with HPLC separation and flux quantitation by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The use of AMS to trace the intracellular fate of (14)C-glutamine allowed the calculation of intracellular metabolic flux through this pathway, with glutathione as the metabolic end point. Measured flux values provided global constraints for the yeast FBA model which reduced model uncertainty by more than 20%, proving the importance of additional constraints in improving the accuracy of model predictions and demonstrating the use of AMS to measure intracellular metabolic fluxes. Our results highlight the need to use intracellular fluxes to constrain the models. We show that inclusion of just one such measurement alone can reduce the average variability of model predicted fluxes by 10%.

  20. Analysis of Metabolic Pathways and Fluxes in a Newly Discovered Thermophilic and Ethanol-Tolerant Geobacillus Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Sapra, Rajat; Joyner, Dominique; Hazen, Terry C.; Myers, Samuel; Reichmuth, David; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-01-20

    A recently discovered thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius M10EXG, ferments a range of C5 (e.g., xylose) and C6 sugars (e.g., glucose) and istolerant to high ethanol concentrations (10percent, v/v). We have investigated the central metabolism of this bacterium using both in vitro enzyme assays and 13C-based flux analysis to provide insights into the physiological properties of this extremophile and explore its metabolism for bio-ethanol or other bioprocess applications. Our findings show that glucose metabolism in G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG proceeds via glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the TCA cycle; the Entner?Doudoroff pathway and transhydrogenase activity were not detected. Anaplerotic reactions (including the glyoxylate shunt, pyruvate carboxylase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) were active, but fluxes through those pathways could not be accuratelydetermined using amino acid labeling. When growth conditions were switched from aerobic to micro-aerobic conditions, fluxes (based on a normalized glucose uptake rate of 100 units (g DCW)-1 h-1) through the TCA cycle and oxidative pentose phosphate pathway were reduced from 64+-3 to 25+-2 and from 30+-2 to 19+-2, respectively. The carbon flux under micro-aerobic growth was directed formate. Under fully anerobic conditions, G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG used a mixed acid fermentation process and exhibited a maximum ethanol yield of 0.38+-0.07 mol mol-1 glucose. In silico flux balance modeling demonstrates that lactate and acetate production from G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG reduces the maximum ethanol yieldby approximately threefold, thus indicating that both pathways should be modified to maximize ethanol production.

  1. Distinct fungal and bacterial δ13C signatures can drive the increase in soil δ13C with depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Lukas; Laganièrea, Jérôme; Edwards, Kate A.; Billings, Sharon A.; Morrill, Penny L.; Van Biesen, Geert; Ziegler, Susan E.

    2015-04-01

    Soil microbial biomass is a key precursor of soil organic carbon (SOC), and the enrichment in 13C during SOC diagenesis has been purported to be driven by increasing proportions of microbially derived SOC. Yet, little is known about how the δ13C of soil microbial biomass - and by extension the δ13C of microbial inputs to SOC - vary in space, time, or with the composition of the microbial community. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) can be analyzed to measure the variation of the natural abundance δ13C values of both individual groups of microorganisms and the microbial community as a whole. Here, we show how variations of δ13CPLFA within the soil profile provides insight into C fluxes in undisturbed soils and demonstrate that distinct δ13C of fungal and bacterial biomass and their relative abundance can drive the increase of bulk δ13CSOC with depth. We studied the variation in natural abundance δ13C signatures of PLFA in podzolic soil profiles from mesic boreal forests in Atlantic Canada. Samples from the organic horizons (L,F,H) and the mineral (B; top 10 cm) horizons were analyzed for δ13C values of PLFA specific to fungi, G+ bacteria, or G- bacteria as proxies for the δ13C of the biomass of these groups, and for δ13C values of PLFA produced by a wide range of microorganisms (e.g. 16:0) as a proxy for the δ13C value of microbial biomass as a whole. Results were compared to fungi:bacteria ratios (F:B) and bulk δ13CSOC values. The δ13C values of group-specific PLFA were driven by differences among source organisms, with fungal PLFA consistently depleted (2.1 to 6.4‰) relative to and G+ and G- bacterial PLFA in the same sample. All group-specific PLFA, however, exhibited nearly constant δ13C values throughout the soil profile, apparently unaffected by the over 2.8‰ increase in δ13CSOC with depth from the L to B horizons. This indicates that bulk SOC poorly represents the substrates actually consumed by soil microorganisms in situ. Instead, our

  2. On the use of phloem sap δ13C to estimate canopy carbon discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascher, Katherine; Máguas, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2010-05-01

    Although the carbon stable isotope composition (d13C) of bulk leaf material is a good integrative parameter of photosynthetic discrimination and can be used as a reliable ecological index of plant functioning; it is not a good tracer of short-term changes in photosynthetic discrimination. In contrast, d13C of phloem sap is potentially useful as an indicator of short-term changes in canopy photosynthetic discrimination. However, recent research indicates that d13C signatures may be substantially altered by metabolic processes downstream of initial leaf-level carbon fixation (e.g. post-photosynthetic fractionation). Accordingly, before phloem sap d13C can be used as a proxy for canopy level carbon discrimination an understanding of factors influencing the degree and magnitude of post-photosynthetic fractionation and how these vary between species is of paramount importance. In this study, we measured the d13C signature along the basipetal transport pathway in two co-occurring tree species in the field - an understory invasive exotic legume, Acacia longifolia, and a native pine, Pinus pinaster. We measured d13C of bulk leaf and leaf water soluble organic matter (WSOM), phloem sap sampled at two points along the plant axis and leaf and root dark respiration. In general, species differences in photosynthetic discrimination resulted in more enriched d13C values in the water-conserving P. pinaster relative to the water-spending A. longifolia. Post-photosynthetic fractionation led to differences in d13C of carbon pools along the plant axis with progressively more depleted d13C from the canopy to the trunk (~6.5 per mil depletion in A. longifolia and ~0.8per mil depletion in P. pinaster). Leaf and root respiration, d13C, were consistently enriched relative to putative substrates. We hypothesize that the pronounced enrichment of leaf respired CO2 relative to leaf WSOM may have left behind relatively depleted carbon to be loaded into the phloem resulting in d13C depletion

  3. Flux balance analysis of myocardial mitochondrial metabolic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ruoyu; Liao, Sha; Liu, Bifeng; Liu, Manxi; Zhang, Hongming; Luo, Qingming

    2005-03-01

    A large number of biological information has been available from genome sequencing and bioinformatics. To further understand the qualities of the biological networks (such as metabolic network) in the complex biological system, representations of integrated function in silico have been widely investigated, and various modeling approaches have been designed, most of which are based on detailed kinetic information except flux balance analysis (FBA). FBA, just based on stoichimetrical information of reactions, is a suitable method for the study of metabolic pathways, and it analyzes the behaviors of the network from the viewpoint of the whole system. Herein, this modeling approach has been utilized to reconstruct the mitochondrial metabolic network to integrate and analyze its capability of producing energy. Besides, extreme pathways analysis (EPA) and shadow prices analysis have also been integrated to study the interior characters of the network. Our modeling results have indicated for the first time that the covalent regulative property of pyruvate dehydrogenase is restrained by the feedback of acetyl-CoA. Combined with the biological experiments, these simulations in silico could be pretty useful for the further understanding of functions and characters of the biological network as a complex system.

  4. Constraining 3-PG with a new δ13C submodel: a test using the δ13C of tree rings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liang; Marshall, John D; Link, Timothy E; Kavanagh, Kathleen L; DU, Enhao; Pangle, Robert E; Gag, Peter J; Ubierna, Nerea

    2014-01-01

    A semi-mechanistic forest growth model, 3-PG (Physiological Principles Predicting Growth), was extended to calculate δ(13)C in tree rings. The δ(13)C estimates were based on the model's existing description of carbon assimilation and canopy conductance. The model was tested in two ~80-year-old natural stands of Abies grandis (grand fir) in northern Idaho. We used as many independent measurements as possible to parameterize the model. Measured parameters included quantum yield, specific leaf area, soil water content and litterfall rate. Predictions were compared with measurements of transpiration by sap flux, stem biomass, tree diameter growth, leaf area index and δ(13)C. Sensitivity analysis showed that the model's predictions of δ(13)C were sensitive to key parameters controlling carbon assimilation and canopy conductance, which would have allowed it to fail had the model been parameterized or programmed incorrectly. Instead, the simulated δ(13)C of tree rings was no different from measurements (P > 0.05). The δ(13)C submodel provides a convenient means of constraining parameter space and avoiding model artefacts. This δ(13)C test may be applied to any forest growth model that includes realistic simulations of carbon assimilation and transpiration.

  5. Short-term natural δ13C and δ18O variations in pools and fluxes in a beech forest: the transfer of isotopic signal from recent photosynthates to soil respired CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, O.; Proietti, S.; Moscatello, S.; Portarena, S.; Battistelli, A.; Matteucci, G.; Brugnoli, E.

    2011-10-01

    The fate of photosynthetic products within the plant-soil continuum determines how long the reduced carbon resides within the ecosystem and when it returns back to the atmosphere in the form of respiratory CO2. We have tested the possibility of measuring natural variation in δ13C and δ18O to disentangle the potential times needed to transfer carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis down to trunk, roots and, in general, to belowground up to its further release in the form of soil respiration into the atmosphere in a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. We have measured the variation in stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in plant material and in soil respired CO2 every three hours for three consecutive days. Possible steps and different signs of post-photosynthetic fractionation during carbon translocation were also identified. A 12 h-periodicity was observed for variation in δ13C in soluble sugars in the top crown leaves and it can be explained by starch day/night dynamics in synthesis and breakdown and by stomatal limitations under elevated vapour pressure deficits. Photosynthetic products were transported down the trunk and mixed with older carbon pools, therefore causing the dampening of the δ13C signal variation. The strongest periodicity of 24 h was found in δ13C in soil respiration indicating changes in root contribution to the total CO2 efflux. Other non-biological causes like diffusion fractionation and advection induced by gas withdrawn from the measurement chamber complicate data interpretation on this step of C transfer path. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify the speed of carbohydrates' translocation from the point of assimilation to the trunk breast height because leaf-imprinted enrichment of δ18O in soluble sugars was less modified along the downward transport and was well related to environmental parameters potentially linked to stomatal conductance. The speed of carbohydrates translocation from the site of assimilation to the trunk

  6. Hierarchical organization of fluxes in Escherichia coli metabolic network: using flux coupling analysis for understanding the physiological properties of metabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Zhaleh; Marashi, Sayed-Amir

    2015-05-01

    Flux coupling analysis is a method for investigating the connections between reactions of metabolic networks. Here, we construct the hierarchical flux coupling graph for the reactions of the Escherichia coli metabolic network model to determine the level of each reaction in the graph. This graph is constructed based on flux coupling analysis of metabolic network: if zero flux through reaction a results in zero flux through reaction b (and not vice versa), then reaction a is located at the top of reaction b in the flux coupling graph. We show that in general, more important, older and essential reactions are located at the top of the graph. Strikingly, genes corresponding to these reactions are found to be the genes which are most regulated.

  7. Synthesis of exemestane labelled with (13)C.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Erminia; Pignatti, Alberto; Giribone, Danilo; Di Salle, Enrico

    2008-08-01

    The synthesis of exemestane Aromasin, an irreversible steroidal aromatase inhibitor, specifically labelled with (13)C is reported. The preparation of [(13)C(3)]exemestane was achieved according to an eight-step procedure starting from the commercially available testosterone.

  8. SSDesign: Computational metabolic pathway design based on flux variability using elementary flux modes.

    PubMed

    Toya, Yoshihiro; Shiraki, Takanori; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic pathway modification based on the stoichiometric model has been an effective approach for enhancing microbial bio-production. The network of optimal pathways for "growth-associated" and "non-growth-associated" production can be designed from the flux variability (solution space). The present study introduces a new computational method (solution space design [SSDesign]) that visually designs the gene knockout solution space. The smallest reaction sets that satisfy the mass balances of intermediates are called elementary flux nodes (EFMs). Because some of the EFMs necessarily occupy the outer boundary nodes of the flux solution space, the proposed SSDesign determines the area over which EFMs should be removed from the solution space of the parent strain, and explores the gene knockouts that will eliminate these undesirable EFMs. To evaluate the performance of SSDesign, the model was applied to growth-associated and non-growth-associated succinate production in Escherichia coli. In the growth-associated case, the deletion mutants that promoted succinate production at maximum biomass yield were predicted, and a candidate of ΔptsG ΔpykA,F ΔpflA has been experimentally confirmed as a succinate producer. Simply by changing the parameters, the gene knockout combinations yielding high growth yield were successfully predicted by SSDesign. In the non-growth-associated case, strong candidates for succinate production were the deletion mutants ΔpntAB ΔsfcA ΔpykA,F and ΔsfcA ΔmaeB ΔpykA,F Δzwf. According to the solution spaces, these strains allow high growth yield and inevitably produce succinate at zero biomass yield, since their metabolic pathways cannot sustain steady-state without discarding succinate from the cell.

  9. 13C-labeled gluconate tracing as a direct and accurate method for determining the pentose phosphate pathway split ratio in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Kleijn, Roelco J; van Winden, Wouter A; Ras, Cor; van Gulik, Walter M; Schipper, Dick; Heijnen, Joseph J

    2006-07-01

    In this study we developed a new method for accurately determining the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) split ratio, an important metabolic parameter in the primary metabolism of a cell. This method is based on simultaneous feeding of unlabeled glucose and trace amounts of [U-13C]gluconate, followed by measurement of the mass isotopomers of the intracellular metabolites surrounding the 6-phosphogluconate node. The gluconate tracer method was used with a penicillin G-producing chemostat culture of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. For comparison, a 13C-labeling-based metabolic flux analysis (MFA) was performed for glycolysis and the PPP of P. chrysogenum. For the first time mass isotopomer measurements of 13C-labeled primary metabolites are reported for P. chrysogenum and used for a 13C-based MFA. Estimation of the PPP split ratio of P. chrysogenum at a growth rate of 0.02 h(-1) yielded comparable values for the gluconate tracer method and the 13C-based MFA method, 51.8% and 51.1%, respectively. A sensitivity analysis of the estimated PPP split ratios showed that the 95% confidence interval was almost threefold smaller for the gluconate tracer method than for the 13C-based MFA method (40.0 to 63.5% and 46.0 to 56.5%, respectively). From these results we concluded that the gluconate tracer method permits accurate determination of the PPP split ratio but provides no information about the remaining cellular metabolism, while the 13C-based MFA method permits estimation of multiple fluxes but provides a less accurate estimate of the PPP split ratio.

  10. Metabolic flux analyses for serine alkaline protease production.

    PubMed

    Çalik; Çalik; Takaç; Özdamar

    2000-12-01

    The intracellular metabolic fluxes through the central carbon pathways in Bacillus licheniformis in serine alkaline protease (SAP) production were calculated to predict the potential strategies for increasing the performance of the bacilli, by using two optimization approaches, i.e. the theoretical data-based (TDA) and the theoretical data-based capacity (TDC) analyses based on respectively minimum in-vivo SAP accumulation rate and maximum SAP synthesis rate assumptions, at low-, medium-, and high-oxygen transfer conditions. At all periods of low-oxygen transfer condition, in lag and early exponential periods of medium-oxygen transfer (MOT) condition, and SAP synthesis period of high-oxygen transfer (HOT) condition, the TDA and TDC analyses revealed that SAP overproduction capacity is almost equal to the observed SAP production due to the regulation effect of the oxygen transfer. In the growth and early SAP synthesis period and in SAP synthesis period at MOT condition the calculated results of the two analyses reveal that SAP synthesis rate of the microorganism can be increased 7.2 and 16.7 folds, respectively; whereas, in the growth and early SAP synthesis period at HOT condition it can be increased 12.6 folds. The diversions in the biochemical reaction network and the influence of the oxygen transfer on the performance of the bacilli were also presented. The results encourage the application of metabolic engineering for lifting the rate limitations and for improving the genetic regulations in order to increase the SAP production.

  11. Metabolomics integrated elementary flux mode analysis in large metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Gerstl, Matthias P; Ruckerbauer, David E; Mattanovich, Diethard; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Zanghellini, Jürgen

    2015-03-10

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) are non-decomposable steady-state pathways in metabolic networks. They characterize phenotypes, quantify robustness or identify engineering targets. An EFM analysis (EFMA) is currently restricted to medium-scale models, as the number of EFMs explodes with the network's size. However, many topologically feasible EFMs are biologically irrelevant. We present thermodynamic EFMA (tEFMA), which calculates only the small(er) subset of thermodynamically feasible EFMs. We integrate network embedded thermodynamics into EFMA and show that we can use the metabolome to identify and remove thermodynamically infeasible EFMs during an EFMA without losing biologically relevant EFMs. Calculating only the thermodynamically feasible EFMs strongly reduces memory consumption and program runtime, allowing the analysis of larger networks. We apply tEFMA to study the central carbon metabolism of E. coli and find that up to 80% of its EFMs are thermodynamically infeasible. Moreover, we identify glutamate dehydrogenase as a bottleneck, when E. coli is grown on glucose and explain its inactivity as a consequence of network embedded thermodynamics. We implemented tEFMA as a Java package which is available for download at https://github.com/mpgerstl/tEFMA.

  12. δ(13)C values of some succulent plants from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Winter, Klaus

    1979-01-01

    δ(13)C values were determined in 20 succulents from Madagascar. The values were indicative of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in 10 species of the Didiereaceae, 4 species of the Euphorbiaceae, 2 species of the Crassulaceae and 1 species of the Cucurbitaceae. The Didiereaceae and Euphorbiaceae studied are major components of a high biomass xerophytic flora in the semi-arid southwest and south of Madagascar. Three species of the Euphorbiaceae with succulent stems and non-succulent leaves, which were cultivated outdoors in the Tananarive Botanic Garden, showed C3 like δ(13)C values for both leaves and stems. δ(13)C values of leaf and stem material from a similar species, collected in the south of Madagascar, indicated Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

  13. Computational Flux Balance Analysis Predicts that Stimulation of Energy Metabolism in Astrocytes and their Metabolic Interactions with Neurons Depend on Uptake of K(+) Rather than Glutamate.

    PubMed

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Giove, Federico; Maraviglia, Bruno; Mangia, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Brain activity involves essential functional and metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes. The importance of astrocytic functions to neuronal signaling is supported by many experiments reporting high rates of energy consumption and oxidative metabolism in these glial cells. In the brain, almost all energy is consumed by the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, which hydrolyzes 1 ATP to move 3 Na(+) outside and 2 K(+) inside the cells. Astrocytes are commonly thought to be primarily involved in transmitter glutamate cycling, a mechanism that however only accounts for few % of brain energy utilization. In order to examine the participation of astrocytic energy metabolism in brain ion homeostasis, here we attempted to devise a simple stoichiometric relation linking glutamatergic neurotransmission to Na(+) and K(+) ionic currents. To this end, we took into account ion pumps and voltage/ligand-gated channels using the stoichiometry derived from available energy budget for neocortical signaling and incorporated this stoichiometric relation into a computational metabolic model of neuron-astrocyte interactions. We aimed at reproducing the experimental observations about rates of metabolic pathways obtained by (13)C-NMR spectroscopy in rodent brain. When simulated data matched experiments as well as biophysical calculations, the stoichiometry for voltage/ligand-gated Na(+) and K(+) fluxes generated by neuronal activity was close to a 1:1 relationship, and specifically 63/58 Na(+)/K(+) ions per glutamate released. We found that astrocytes are stimulated by the extracellular K(+) exiting neurons in excess of the 3/2 Na(+)/K(+) ratio underlying Na(+)/K(+) ATPase-catalyzed reaction. Analysis of correlations between neuronal and astrocytic processes indicated that astrocytic K(+) uptake, but not astrocytic Na(+)-coupled glutamate uptake, is instrumental for the establishment of neuron-astrocytic metabolic partnership. Our results emphasize the importance of K(+) in stimulating the

  14. Transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer fluxes in central metabolism

    DOE PAGES

    Schwender, Jorg; Konig, Christina; Klapperstuck, Matthias; ...

    2014-11-28

    An attempt has been made to define the extent to which metabolic flux in central plant metabolism is reflected by changes in the transcriptome and metabolome, based on an analysis of in vitro cultured immature embryos of two oilseed rape (Brassica napus) accessions which contrast for seed lipid accumulation. Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) was used to constrain a flux balance metabolic model which included 671 biochemical and transport reactions within the central metabolism. This highly confident flux information was eventually used for comparative analysis of flux vs. transcript (metabolite). Metabolite profiling succeeded in identifying 79 intermediates within the central metabolism,more » some of which differed quantitatively between the two accessions and displayed a significant shift corresponding to flux. An RNA-Seq based transcriptome analysis revealed a large number of genes which were differentially transcribed in the two accessions, including some enzymes/proteins active in major metabolic pathways. With a few exceptions, differential activity in the major pathways (glycolysis, TCA cycle, amino acid, and fatty acid synthesis) was not reflected in contrasting abundances of the relevant transcripts. The conclusion was that transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer metabolic activity/fluxes in central plant metabolism. Lastly, this limitation needs to be borne in mind in evaluating transcriptome data and designing metabolic engineering experiments.« less

  15. Transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer fluxes in central metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Schwender, Jorg; Konig, Christina; Klapperstuck, Matthias; Heinzel, Nicolas; Munz, Eberhard; Hebbelmann, Inga; Hay, Jordan O.; Denolf, Peter; De Bodt, Stefanie; Redestig, Henning; Caestecker, Evelyne; Jakob, Peter M.; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2014-11-28

    An attempt has been made to define the extent to which metabolic flux in central plant metabolism is reflected by changes in the transcriptome and metabolome, based on an analysis of in vitro cultured immature embryos of two oilseed rape (Brassica napus) accessions which contrast for seed lipid accumulation. Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) was used to constrain a flux balance metabolic model which included 671 biochemical and transport reactions within the central metabolism. This highly confident flux information was eventually used for comparative analysis of flux vs. transcript (metabolite). Metabolite profiling succeeded in identifying 79 intermediates within the central metabolism, some of which differed quantitatively between the two accessions and displayed a significant shift corresponding to flux. An RNA-Seq based transcriptome analysis revealed a large number of genes which were differentially transcribed in the two accessions, including some enzymes/proteins active in major metabolic pathways. With a few exceptions, differential activity in the major pathways (glycolysis, TCA cycle, amino acid, and fatty acid synthesis) was not reflected in contrasting abundances of the relevant transcripts. The conclusion was that transcript abundance on its own cannot be used to infer metabolic activity/fluxes in central plant metabolism. Lastly, this limitation needs to be borne in mind in evaluating transcriptome data and designing metabolic engineering experiments.

  16. Application of metabolic flux analysis for the identification of metabolic bottlenecks in the biosynthesis of penicillin-G.

    PubMed

    van Gulik, W M; de Laat, W T; Vinke, J L; Heijnen, J J

    2000-06-20

    A detailed stoichiometric model was developed for growth and penicillin-G production in Penicillium chrysogenum. From an a priori metabolic flux analysis using this model it appeared that penicillin production requires significant changes in fluxes through the primary metabolic pathways. This is brought about by the biosynthesis of carbon precursors for the beta-lactan nucleus and an increased demand for NADPH, mainly for sulfate reduction. As a result, significant changes in flux partitioning occur around four principal nodes in primary metabolism. These are located at: (1) glucose-6-phosphate; (2) 3-phosphoglycerate; (3) mitochondrial pyruvate; and (4) mitochondrial isocitrate. These nodes should be regarded as potential bottlenecks for increased productivity. The flexibility of these principal nodes was investigated by experimental manipulation of the fluxes through the central metabolic pathways using a high-producing strain of P. chrysogenum. Metabolic fluxes were manipulated through growth of the cells on different substrates in carbon-limited chemostat culture. Metabolic flux analysis, based on measured input and output fluxes, was used to calculate the fluxes around the principal nodes. It was found that, for growth on glucose, ethanol, and acetate, the flux partitioning around these nodes differed significantly. However, this had hardly any effect on penicillin productivity, showing that primary carbon metabolism is not likely to contain potential bottlenecks. Further experiments were performed to manipulate the total metabolic demand for the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). NADPH demand was increased stepwise by cultivating the cells on glucose or xylose as the carbon source combined with either ammonia or nitrate as the nitrogen source, which resulted in a stepwise decrease of penicillin production. This clearly shows that, in penicillin fermentation, possible limitations in primary metabolism reside in the supply

  17. Integrated metabolic flux and omics analysis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under mixotrophic and photoheterotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsubasa; Kajihata, Shuichi; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Matsuda, Fumio; Furusawa, Chikara; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Cyanobacteria have flexible metabolic capability that enables them to adapt to various environments. To investigate their underlying metabolic regulation mechanisms, we performed an integrated analysis of metabolic flux using transcriptomic and metabolomic data of a cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, under mixotrophic and photoheterotrophic conditions. The integrated analysis indicated drastic metabolic flux changes, with much smaller changes in gene expression levels and metabolite concentrations between the conditions, suggesting that the flux change was not caused mainly by the expression levels of the corresponding genes. Under photoheterotrophic conditions, created by the addition of the photosynthesis inhibitor atrazine in mixotrophic conditions, the result of metabolic flux analysis indicated the significant repression of carbon fixation and the activation of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Moreover, we observed gluconeogenic activity of upstream of glycolysis, which enhanced the flux of the oxidative PPP to compensate for NADPH depletion due to the inhibition of the light reaction of photosynthesis. 'Omics' data suggested that these changes were probably caused by the repression of the gap1 gene, which functions as a control valve in the metabolic network. Since metabolic flux is the outcome of a complicated interplay of cellular components, integrating metabolic flux with other 'omics' layers can identify metabolic changes and narrow down these regulatory mechanisms more effectively.

  18. Catabolism of Glucose and Lactose in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Studied by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Irene; Gaspar, Paula; Sánchez, Borja; Gueimonde, Miguel; Neves, Ana Rute

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are widely used as probiotics in several commercial products; however, to date there is little knowledge about their carbohydrate metabolic pathways. In this work, we studied the metabolism of glucose and lactose in the widely used probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 by in vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The metabolism of [1-13C]glucose was characterized in cells grown in glucose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, the metabolism of lactose specifically labeled with 13C on carbon 1 of the glucose or the galactose moiety was determined in suspensions of cells grown in lactose. These experiments allowed the quantification of some intermediate and end products of the metabolic pathways, as well as determination of the consumption rate of carbon sources. Additionally, the labeling patterns in metabolites derived from the metabolism of glucose specifically labeled with 13C on carbon 1, 2, or 3 in cells grown in glucose or lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the glucose moiety ([1-13Cglucose]lactose), lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the galactose moiety ([1-13Cgalactose]lactose), and [1-13C]glucose in lactose-grown cells were determined in cell extracts by 13C NMR. The NMR analysis showed that the recovery of carbon was fully compatible with the fructose 6-phosphate, or bifid, shunt. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase, acetate kinase, fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase, and pyruvate formate lyase differed significantly between glucose and lactose cultures. The transcriptional analysis of several putative glucose and lactose transporters showed a significant induction of Balat_0475 in the presence of lactose, suggesting a role for this protein as a lactose permease. This report provides the first in vivo experimental evidence of the metabolic flux distribution in the catabolic pathway of glucose and lactose in bifidobacteria and shows that the bifid shunt is the only pathway

  19. (13)C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Clendinen, Chaevien S; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S

    2015-06-02

    The many advantages of (13)C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, (13)C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semiautomated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE data sets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures.

  20. System N transporters are critical for glutamine release and modulate metabolic fluxes of glucose and acetate in cultured cortical astrocytes: changes induced by ammonia.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Dąbrowska, Katarzyna; Hadera, Mussie Ghezu; Sonnewald, Ursula; Albrecht, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine (Gln) is synthesized in astrocytes from glutamate (Glu) and ammonia, whereupon it can be released to be transferred to neurons. This study evaluated the as yet not definitely established role of the astrocytic Gln transporters SN1 and SN2 (Slc38a3 and Slc38a5 respectively) in Gln release and metabolic fluxes of glucose and acetate, the canonical precursors of Glu. Cultured neocortical astrocytes were grown in the absence or presence of ammonia (5 mM NH4 Cl, 24 h), which deregulates astrocytic metabolism in hyperammonemic encephalopathies. HPLC analyses of cell extracts of SN1/SN2 siRNA-treated (SN1/SN2-) astrocytes revealed a ~ 3.5-fold increase in Gln content and doubling of glutathione, aspartate, alanine and glutamate contents, as compared to SN1/SN2+ astrocytes. Uptake and efflux of preloaded [(3) H]Gln was likewise significantly decreased in SN1/SN2- astrocytes. The atom percent excess (13) C values (given as M + 1) for alanine, aspartate and glutamate were decreased when the SN1/SN2- cells were incubated with [1-(13) C] glucose, while Gln consumption was not changed. No difference was seen in M + 1 values in SN1/SN2- cells incubated with [2-(13) C] acetate, which were not treated with ammonia. In SN1/SN2- astrocytes, the increase in Gln content and the decrease in radiolabeled Gln release upon exposure to ammonia were found abrogated, and glutamate labeling from [2-(13) C]acetate was decreased as compared to SN1/SN2+ astrocytes. The results underscore a profound role of SN1 and/or SN2 in Gln release from astrocytes under physiological conditions, but less so in ammonia-overexposed astrocytes, and appear to manifest dependence of astrocytic glucose metabolism to Glu/Gln on unimpaired SN1/SN2- mediated Gln release from astrocytes. The astrocytic N system transporters SN1 and SN2 show preponderance to mediate glutamine (Gln) efflux. Under hyperammonemic conditions, accumulation of Gln, a direct product of ammonia detoxification, may deregulate

  1. Comparison of Kinetic Models for Analysis of Pyruvate-to-Lactate Exchange by Hyperpolarized 13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Crystal; Yang, Chendong; Jindal, Ashish; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Hooshyar, M.A.; Merritt, Matthew; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.

    2012-01-01

    The activity of specific enzyme-catalyzed reactions may be detected in vivo by 13C NMR of hyperpolarized (HP) substrates. The signal from HP substrates and products, acquired over time, have been fit to a number of different mathematical models to determine fluxes, but these models have not been critically compared. In this study, two-pool and three-pool first-order models were constructed to measure flux through lactate dehydrogenase in isolated glioblastoma cells by NMR detection of lactate and pyruvate following addition of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. Mass spectrometry (MS) was used to independently monitor 13C enrichment in intra- and extracellular lactate. Six models were evaluated using time dependent pyruvate C2 and lactate C1 HP NMR data acquired by use of selective excitation pulses plus 13C enrichment data from intracellular and extracellular lactate measured by MS. A three-pool bi-directional model provided the most accurate description of pyruvate metabolism in these cells. With computed values for the T1 of pyruvate and lactate as well as the effect of pulsing, the initial flux through lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was well-determined by both the two-pool bidirectional and unidirectional models when only HP data was available. The three-pool model was necessary to fit the combined data from both MS and HP, but the simpler two-pool exchange model was sufficient to determine the 13C lactate concentration when the lactate appearance was measured only by HP. PMID:22451442

  2. Efficient Modeling of MS/MS Data for Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Naama; Shlomi, Tomer

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is a widely used method for quantifying intracellular metabolic fluxes. It works by feeding cells with isotopic labeled nutrients, measuring metabolite isotopic labeling, and computationally interpreting the measured labeling data to estimate flux. Tandem mass-spectrometry (MS/MS) has been shown to be useful for MFA, providing positional isotopic labeling data. Specifically, MS/MS enables the measurement of a metabolite tandem mass-isotopomer distribution, representing the abundance in which certain parent and product fragments of a metabolite have different number of labeled atoms. However, a major limitation in using MFA with MS/MS data is the lack of a computationally efficient method for simulating such isotopic labeling data. Here, we describe the tandemer approach for efficiently computing metabolite tandem mass-isotopomer distributions in a metabolic network, given an estimation of metabolic fluxes. This approach can be used by MFA to find optimal metabolic fluxes, whose induced metabolite labeling patterns match tandem mass-isotopomer distributions measured by MS/MS. The tandemer approach is applied to simulate MS/MS data in a small-scale metabolic network model of mammalian methionine metabolism and in a large-scale metabolic network model of E. coli. It is shown to significantly improve the running time by between two to three orders of magnitude compared to the state-of-the-art, cumomers approach. We expect the tandemer approach to promote broader usage of MS/MS technology in metabolic flux analysis.

  3. Modelling central metabolic fluxes by constraint-based optimization reveals metabolic reprogramming of developing Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit.

    PubMed

    Colombié, Sophie; Nazaret, Christine; Bénard, Camille; Biais, Benoît; Mengin, Virginie; Solé, Marion; Fouillen, Laëtitia; Dieuaide-Noubhani, Martine; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Gibon, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Modelling of metabolic networks is a powerful tool to analyse the behaviour of developing plant organs, including fruits. Guided by our current understanding of heterotrophic metabolism of plant cells, a medium-scale stoichiometric model, including the balance of co-factors and energy, was constructed in order to describe metabolic shifts that occur through the nine sequential stages of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit development. The measured concentrations of the main biomass components and the accumulated metabolites in the pericarp, determined at each stage, were fitted in order to calculate, by derivation, the corresponding external fluxes. They were used as constraints to solve the model by minimizing the internal fluxes. The distribution of the calculated fluxes of central metabolism were then analysed and compared with known metabolic behaviours. For instance, the partition of the main metabolic pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, etc.) was relevant throughout fruit development. We also predicted a valid import of carbon and nitrogen by the fruit, as well as a consistent CO2 release. Interestingly, the energetic balance indicates that excess ATP is dissipated just before the onset of ripening, supporting the concept of the climacteric crisis. Finally, the apparent contradiction between calculated fluxes with low values compared with measured enzyme capacities suggest a complex reprogramming of the metabolic machinery during fruit development. With a powerful set of experimental data and an accurate definition of the metabolic system, this work provides important insight into the metabolic and physiological requirements of the developing tomato fruits.

  4. Modelling central metabolic fluxes by constraint-based optimization reveals metabolic reprogramming of developing Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit

    PubMed Central

    Colombié, Sophie; Nazaret, Christine; Bénard, Camille; Biais, Benoît; Mengin, Virginie; Solé, Marion; Fouillen, Laëtitia; Dieuaide-Noubhani, Martine; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Gibon, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Modelling of metabolic networks is a powerful tool to analyse the behaviour of developing plant organs, including fruits. Guided by our current understanding of heterotrophic metabolism of plant cells, a medium-scale stoichiometric model, including the balance of co–factors and energy, was constructed in order to describe metabolic shifts that occur through the nine sequential stages of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit development. The measured concentrations of the main biomass components and the accumulated metabolites in the pericarp, determined at each stage, were fitted in order to calculate, by derivation, the corresponding external fluxes. They were used as constraints to solve the model by minimizing the internal fluxes. The distribution of the calculated fluxes of central metabolism were then analysed and compared with known metabolic behaviours. For instance, the partition of the main metabolic pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, etc.) was relevant throughout fruit development. We also predicted a valid import of carbon and nitrogen by the fruit, as well as a consistent CO2 release. Interestingly, the energetic balance indicates that excess ATP is dissipated just before the onset of ripening, supporting the concept of the climacteric crisis. Finally, the apparent contradiction between calculated fluxes with low values compared with measured enzyme capacities suggest a complex reprogramming of the metabolic machinery during fruit development. With a powerful set of experimental data and an accurate definition of the metabolic system, this work provides important insight into the metabolic and physiological requirements of the developing tomato fruits. PMID:25279440

  5. New guidelines for δ13C measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Gehre, Matthias; Groning, Manfred; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Toman, Blaza; Verkouteren, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Consistency of δ13C measurements can be improved 39−47% by anchoring the δ13C scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in 13C/12C. It is recommended thatδ13C values of both organic and inorganic materials be measured and expressed relative to VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on a scale normalized by assigning consensus values of −46.6‰ to L-SVEC lithium carbonate and +1.95‰ to NBS 19 calcium carbonate. Uncertainties of other reference material values on this scale are improved by factors up to two or more, and the values of some have been notably shifted:  the δ13C of NBS 22 oil is −30.03%.

  6. Uranyl nitrate inhibits lactate gluconeogenesis in isolated human and mouse renal proximal tubules: A {sup 13}C-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Renault, Sophie; Faiz, Hassan; Gadet, Rudy; Ferrier, Bernard; Martin, Guy; Baverel, Gabriel; Conjard-Duplany, Agnes

    2010-01-01

    As part of a study on uranium nephrotoxicity, we investigated the effect of uranyl nitrate in isolated human and mouse kidney cortex tubules metabolizing the physiological substrate lactate. In the millimolar range, uranyl nitrate reduced lactate removal and gluconeogenesis and the cellular ATP level in a dose-dependent fashion. After incubation in phosphate-free Krebs-Henseleit medium with 5 mM L-[1-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[2-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[3-{sup 13}C]lactate, substrate utilization and product formation were measured by enzymatic and NMR spectroscopic methods. In the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate, glucose production and the intracellular ATP content were significantly reduced in both human and mouse tubules. Combination of enzymatic and NMR measurements with a mathematical model of lactate metabolism revealed an inhibition of fluxes through lactate dehydrogenase and the gluconeogenic enzymes in the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate; in human and mouse tubules, fluxes were lowered by 20% and 14% (lactate dehydrogenase), 27% and 32% (pyruvate carboxylase), 35% and 36% (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase), and 39% and 45% (glucose-6-phosphatase), respectively. These results indicate that natural uranium is an inhibitor of renal lactate gluconeogenesis in both humans and mice.

  7. Assessing compartmentalized flux in lipid metabolism with isotopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolism in plants takes place across multiple cell types and subpopulations in distinct organelles. The distributions equate to spatial heterogeneity; though the limited means to experimentally asses metabolism frequently involve homogenizing tissues and mixing metabolites from different location...

  8. Dynamic metabolic flux analysis using a convex analysis approach: Application to hybridoma cell cultures in perfusion.

    PubMed

    Fernandes de Sousa, Sofia; Bastin, Georges; Jolicoeur, Mario; Vande Wouwer, Alain

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, dynamic metabolic flux analysis (DMFA) has been developed in order to evaluate the dynamic evolution of the metabolic fluxes. Most of the proposed approaches are dedicated to exactly determined or overdetermined systems. When an underdetermined system is considered, the literature suggests the use of dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA). However the main challenge of this approach is to determine an appropriate objective function, which remains valid over the whole culture. In this work, we propose an alternative dynamic metabolic flux analysis based on convex analysis, DMFCA, which allows the determination of bounded intervals for the fluxes using the available knowledge of the metabolic network and information provided by the time evolution of extracellular component concentrations. Smoothing splines and mass balance differential equations are used to estimate the time evolution of the uptake and excretion rates from this experimental data. The main advantage of the proposed procedure is that it does not require additional constraints or objective functions, and provides relatively narrow intervals for the intracellular metabolic fluxes. DMFCA is applied to experimental data from hybridoma HB58 cell perfusion cultures, in order to investigate the influence of the operating mode (batch and perfusion) on the metabolic flux distribution.

  9. Combining pathway analysis with flux balance analysis for the comprehensive study of metabolic systems.

    PubMed

    Schilling, C H; Edwards, J S; Letscher, D; Palsson, B Ø

    The elucidation of organism-scale metabolic networks necessitates the development of integrative methods to analyze and interpret the systemic properties of cellular metabolism. A shift in emphasis from single metabolic reactions to systemically defined pathways is one consequence of such an integrative analysis of metabolic systems. The constraints of systemic stoichiometry, and limited thermodynamics have led to the definition of the flux space within the context of convex analysis. The flux space of the metabolic system, containing all allowable flux distributions, is constrained to a convex polyhedral cone in a high-dimensional space. From metabolic pathway analysis, the edges of the high-dimensional flux cone are vectors that correspond to systemically defined "extreme pathways" spanning the capabilities of the system. The addition of maximum flux capacities of individual metabolic reactions serves to further constrain the flux space and has led to the development of flux balance analysis using linear optimization to calculate optimal flux distributions. Here we provide the precise theoretical connections between pathway analysis and flux balance analysis allowing for their combined application to study integrated metabolic function. Shifts in metabolic behavior are calculated using linear optimization and are then interpreted using the extreme pathways to demonstrate the concept of pathway utilization. Changes to the reaction network, such as the removal of a reaction, can lead to the generation of suboptimal phenotypes that can be directly attributed to the loss of pathway function and capabilities. Optimal growth phenotypes are calculated as a function of environmental variables, such as the availability of substrate and oxygen, leading to the definition of phenotypic phase planes. It is illustrated how optimality properties of the computed flux distributions can be interpreted in terms of the extreme pathways. Together these developments are applied to an

  10. Insights into primary metabolism in oilseeds from labeling and flux analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Labeling investigations along with metabolic flux analysis have enabled quantification of important cellular phenotypes. These descriptions have documented uses of enzymes in unique ways and characterized the contributions of pathways to oil, protein and carbohydrate compositions in seeds. The diffe...

  11. Mapping cerebral glutamate 13C turnover and oxygen consumption by in vivo NMR.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Fahmeed; Brown, Peter; Nixon, Terennce W; Behar, Kevin L

    2003-01-01

    Regional rates of 13C incorporation from glucose to glutamate were detected in anesthetized rat brain in vivo at 7T with high temporal and spatial resolution using NMR method ICED PEPSI (in vivo carbon edited detection with proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging). Time courses of regional glutamate 13C turnover were fitted by a metabolic model to obtain regional tri-carboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) in each voxel (8 microL) of rat cortex. CMRO2 maps obtained for rats under either alpha-chloralose or morphine anesthesia revealed average cortical values of 1.5 +/- 0.2 (n = 3) and 3.2 +/- 0.3 (n = 4) mumol/g/min, respectively. These values of CMRO2 are in good agreement with previous cortical measurements with coarser spatial resolution. The heterogeneity within each map, which depicted predominantly gray and white matter differences, was significantly greater under morphine (higher cortical activity) than under-alpha-chloralose (lower cortical activity) anesthesia. The regional variations in the basal awake state, which are expected to be even greater, should be considered to avoid partial-volume artifacts in functional activation studies of awake subjects.

  12. 13C NMR of tunnelling methyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detken, A.

    The dipolar interactions between the protons and the central 13C nucleus of a 13CH3 group are used to study rotational tunnelling and incoherent dynamics of such groups in molecular solids. Single-crystal 13C NMR spectra are derived for arbitrary values of the tunnel frequency upsilon t. Similarities to ESR and 2H NMR are pointed out. The method is applied to three different materials. In the hydroquinone/acetonitrile clathrate, the unique features in the 13C NMR spectra which arise from tunnelling with a tunnel frequency that is much larger than the dipolar coupling between the methyl protons and the 13C nucleus are demonstrated, and the effects of incoherent dynamics are studied. The broadening of the 13C resonances is related to the width of the quasi-elastic line in neutron scattering. Selective magnetization transfer experiments for studying slow incoherent dynamics are proposed. For the strongly hindered methyl groups of L-alanine, an upper limit for upsilon is derived from the 13C NMR spectrum. In aspirinTM (acetylsalicylic acid), incoherent reorientations dominate the spectra down to the lowest temperatures studied; their rate apparently increases with decreasing temperature below 25K.

  13. Modeling of the 2007 JET ^13C migration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, J. D.; Likonen, J.; Hakola, A.; Coad, J. P.; Widdowson, A.; Koivuranta, S.; Hole, D. E.; Rubel, M.

    2010-11-01

    Using the last run day of the 2007 JET experimental campaign, ^13CH4 was introduced repeatedly from the vessel top into a single plasma type (H-mode, Ip= 1.6 MA, Bt= 1.6 T). Similar experiments were performed in 2001 (vessel top into L-Mode) and 2004 (outer divertor into H-Mode). Divertor and wall tiles were removed and been analysed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) to determine the ^13C migration. ^13C was observed to migrate both to the inner (largest deposit), outer divertor (less) , and the floor tiles (least). This paper reports the EDGE2D/NIMBUS based modelling of the carbon migration. The emphasis is on the comparison of the 2007 results with the 2001 results where both injections were from the machine top but ELMs were present in 2007 but not present in 2001. The ELMs seemed to cause more ^13C re-erosion near the inner strike point. Also of interest is the difference in the Private Flux Region deposits where the changes in divertor geometry between 2004 and 2007 caused differences in the deposits. In 2007, the tilting of the load bearing tile caused regions of the PFR to be shadowed from the inner strike point which were not shadowed in 2004, indicating ^13C neutrals originated from the OSP.

  14. From Metabolomics to Fluxomics: A Computational Procedure to Translate Metabolite Profiles into Metabolic Fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Cortassa, Sonia; Caceres, Viviane; Bell, Lauren N.; O’Rourke, Brian; Paolocci, Nazareno; Aon, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a believed-novel procedure for translating metabolite profiles (metabolome) into the set of metabolic fluxes (fluxome) from which they originated. Methodologically, computational modeling is integrated with an analytical platform comprising linear optimization, continuation and dynamic analyses, and metabolic control. The procedure was tested with metabolite profiles obtained from ex vivo mice Langendorff-heart preparations perfused with glucose. The metabolic profiles were analyzed using a detailed kinetic model of the glucose catabolic pathways including glycolysis, pentose phosphate (PP), glycogenolysis, and polyols to translate the glucose metabolome of the heart into the fluxome. After optimization, the ability of the model to simulate the initial metabolite profile was confirmed, and metabolic fluxes as well as the structure of control and regulation of the glucose catabolic network could be calculated. We show that the step catalyzed by phosphofructokinase together with ATP demand and glycogenolysis exert the highest control on the glycolytic flux. The negative flux control exerted by phosphofructokinase on the PP and polyol pathways revealed that the extent of glycolytic flux directly affects flux redirection through these pathways, i.e., the higher the glycolytic flux the lower the PP and polyols. This believed-novel methodological approach represents a step forward that may help in designing therapeutic strategies targeted to diagnose, prevent, and treat metabolic diseases. PMID:25564863

  15. [Breeding of Actinobacillus succiniogenes mutants with improved succinate production based on metabolic flux analysis].

    PubMed

    Pan, Lijun; Li, Xingjiang; Jiang, Shaotong; Wei, Zhaojun; Chen, Xiaohui; Cai, Licheng; Wang, Hefeng; Jiang, Jijun

    2008-09-01

    It is very important to obtain high yield mutant strains on the base of metabolic flux analysis of Actinobacillus succinogenes S.JST for the industrial bioconversion of succinic acid. The metabolic pathway was analized at first and the flux of the metabolic networks was calculated by matrix. In order to decrease acetic acid flux, the strains mutated by soft X-ray of synchronous radiation were screened on the plates with high concentration of fluoroacetic acid. For decreasing the metabolic flux of ethanol the site-directed mutagenesis was carried out for the reduction of alcohol dehydrogenase(Adh) specific activity. Then the enzyme activity determination and the gene sequence analysis of the mutant strain was compared with those of the parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis of the parent strain indicated that the flux of succinic acid was 1.78(mmol/g/h) and that the flux of acetic acid and ethanol were 0.60 (mmol/g/h) and 1.04( mmol/g/h), respectively. Meanwhile the metabolic pathway analysis showed that the ethanol metabolism enhanced the lacking of H electron donor during the synthesis of succinic acid and that the succinic acid flux was weakened by the metabolism of byproducts ethanol and acetic acid. Compared with the parent strain, the acetic acid flux of anti-fluoroacetic mutant strain S.JST1 was 0.024 (mmol/g/h), decreasing by 96%. Then the enzyme determination showed that the specific activity unit of phosphotransacetylase(Pta) decreased from 602 to 74 and a mutated site was founded in the pta gene of the mutant strain S.JST1. Compared with that of the parent strain S.JST1 the ethanol flux of adh-site-directed mutant strain S.JST2 was 0.020 (mmol/g/h), decreasing by 98%. Then the enzyme determination showed that the specific activity unit of Adh decreased from 585 to 62 and the yield of end product succinic acid was 65.7 (g/L). The interdiction of Adh and Pta decreased the metabolism of byproducts and the H electron donor was well balanced, thus the succinic

  16. A metabolite-centric view on flux distributions in genome-scale metabolic models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome-scale metabolic models are important tools in systems biology. They permit the in-silico prediction of cellular phenotypes via mathematical optimisation procedures, most importantly flux balance analysis. Current studies on metabolic models mostly consider reaction fluxes in isolation. Based on a recently proposed metabolite-centric approach, we here describe a set of methods that enable the analysis and interpretation of flux distributions in an integrated metabolite-centric view. We demonstrate how this framework can be used for the refinement of genome-scale metabolic models. Results We applied the metabolite-centric view developed here to the most recent metabolic reconstruction of Escherichia coli. By compiling the balance sheets of a small number of currency metabolites, we were able to fully characterise the energy metabolism as predicted by the model and to identify a possibility for model refinement in NADPH metabolism. Selected branch points were examined in detail in order to demonstrate how a metabolite-centric view allows identifying functional roles of metabolites. Fructose 6-phosphate aldolase and the sedoheptulose bisphosphate bypass were identified as enzymatic reactions that can carry high fluxes in the model but are unlikely to exhibit significant activity in vivo. Performing a metabolite essentiality analysis, unconstrained import and export of iron ions could be identified as potentially problematic for the quality of model predictions. Conclusions The system-wide analysis of split ratios and branch points allows a much deeper insight into the metabolic network than reaction-centric analyses. Extending an earlier metabolite-centric approach, the methods introduced here establish an integrated metabolite-centric framework for the interpretation of flux distributions in genome-scale metabolic networks that can complement the classical reaction-centric framework. Analysing fluxes and their metabolic context simultaneously opens

  17. Deriving metabolic engineering strategies from genome-scale modeling with flux ratio constraints.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jiun Y; Nazem-Bokaee, Hadi; Freedman, Benjamin G; Athamneh, Ahmad I M; Senger, Ryan S

    2013-05-01

    Optimized production of bio-based fuels and chemicals from microbial cell factories is a central goal of systems metabolic engineering. To achieve this goal, a new computational method of using flux balance analysis with flux ratios (FBrAtio) was further developed in this research and applied to five case studies to evaluate and design metabolic engineering strategies. The approach was implemented using publicly available genome-scale metabolic flux models. Synthetic pathways were added to these models along with flux ratio constraints by FBrAtio to achieve increased (i) cellulose production from Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii) isobutanol production from Saccharomyces cerevisiae; (iii) acetone production from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803; (iv) H2 production from Escherichia coli MG1655; and (v) isopropanol, butanol, and ethanol (IBE) production from engineered Clostridium acetobutylicum. The FBrAtio approach was applied to each case to simulate a metabolic engineering strategy already implemented experimentally, and flux ratios were continually adjusted to find (i) the end-limit of increased production using the existing strategy, (ii) new potential strategies to increase production, and (iii) the impact of these metabolic engineering strategies on product yield and culture growth. The FBrAtio approach has the potential to design "fine-tuned" metabolic engineering strategies in silico that can be implemented directly with available genomic tools.

  18. Emission of highly 13C-depleted methane from an upland blanket mire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, Helen L.; Hornibrook, Edward R. C.

    2006-02-01

    Rates and δ13C values of CH4 flux are reported from an upland blanket mire (Blaen Fign) situated in Wales UK. The δ13C values of CH4 flux were similar from Sphagnum and vascular flora dominated areas despite flux rates being an order of magnitude greater from the latter. Methane flux was 13C-depleted relative to belowground CH4, indicating that transport occurred predominately via passive diffusion through vascular flora and that pore water diffusion and ebullition contributed little to CH4 flux. The strong influence of vascular flora abundance on CH4 flux strength suggests that any factors altering vegetation assemblages in blanket mires will likely impact CH4 emission rates. Methane flux from Blaen Fign was highly 13C-depleted compared to emissions from minerotrophic wetlands, suggesting that δ13C values may be useful for tracing CH4 flux from blanket mires and other types of ombrogenous peatlands to the global CH4 budget.

  19. Galactose oxidation using (13)C in healthy and galactosemic children.

    PubMed

    Resende-Campanholi, D R; Porta, G; Ferrioli, E; Pfrimer, K; Ciampo, L A Del; Junior, J S Camelo

    2015-03-01

    Galactosemia is an inborn error of galactose metabolism that occurs mainly as the outcome of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) deficiency. The ability to assess galactose oxidation following administration of a galactose-labeled isotope (1-(13)C-galactose) allows the determination of galactose metabolism in a practical manner. We aimed to assess the level of galactose oxidation in both healthy and galactosemic Brazilian children. Twenty-one healthy children and seven children with galactosemia ranging from 1 to 7 years of age were studied. A breath test was used to quantitate (13)CO2 enrichment in exhaled air before and at 30, 60, and 120 min after the oral administration of 7 mg/kg of an aqueous solution of 1-(13)C-galactose to all children. The molar ratios of (13)CO2 and (12)CO2 were quantified by the mass/charge ratio (m/z) of stable isotopes in each air sample by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. In sick children, the cumulative percentage of (13)C from labeled galactose (CUMPCD) in the exhaled air ranged from 0.03% at 30 min to 1.67% at 120 min. In contrast, healthy subjects showed a much broader range in CUMPCD, with values from 0.4% at 30 min to 5.58% at 120 min. The study found a significant difference in galactose oxidation between children with and without galactosemia, demonstrating that the breath test is useful in discriminating children with GALT deficiencies.

  20. Concentration-flux relations for a multicellular biological membrane with Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Auton, T.R. )

    1993-05-01

    A mathematical model is described for the simultaneous diffusion and metabolism of a chemical penetrating a multicellular biological membrane such as skin. Metabolism is assumed to follow saturable Michaelis-Menten kinetics, which leads to nonlinear relationships between the applied concentration and the metabolic and diffusive fluxes through the membrane. Approximate concentration flux relations are derived under limiting conditions, and a computational method is described for the general case. The major barrier to dermal penetration of very lipophilic molecules is thought to be the viable tissues (viable epidermis and some of the dermis) underlying the stratum corneum, and some molecules are known to be metabolized by enzymes within these tissues. It is proposed to use the model to describe penetration and metabolism os such lipophilic molecules within the viable tissues of the skin. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Genome-scale metabolic flux analysis of Streptomyces lividans growing on a complex medium.

    PubMed

    D'Huys, Pieter-Jan; Lule, Ivan; Vercammen, Dominique; Anné, Jozef; Van Impe, Jan F; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2012-09-15

    Constraint-based metabolic modeling comprises various excellent tools to assess experimentally observed phenotypic behavior of micro-organisms in terms of intracellular metabolic fluxes. In combination with genome-scale metabolic networks, micro-organisms can be investigated in much more detail and under more complex environmental conditions. Although complex media are ubiquitously applied in industrial fermentations and are often a prerequisite for high protein secretion yields, such multi-component conditions are seldom investigated using genome-scale flux analysis. In this paper, a systematic and integrative approach is presented to determine metabolic fluxes in Streptomyces lividans TK24 grown on a nutritious and complex medium. Genome-scale flux balance analysis and randomized sampling of the solution space are combined to extract maximum information from exometabolome profiles. It is shown that biomass maximization cannot predict the observed metabolite production pattern as such. Although this cellular objective commonly applies to batch fermentation data, both input and output constraints are required to reproduce the measured biomass production rate. Rich media hence not necessarily lead to maximum biomass growth. To eventually identify a unique intracellular flux vector, a hierarchical optimization of cellular objectives is adopted. Out of various tested secondary objectives, maximization of the ATP yield per flux unit returns the closest agreement with the maximum frequency in flux histograms. This unique flux estimation is hence considered as a reasonable approximation for the biological fluxes. Flux maps for different growth phases show no active oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway, but NADPH generation in the TCA cycle and NADPH transdehydrogenase activity are most important in fulfilling the NADPH balance. Amino acids contribute to biomass growth by augmenting the pool of available amino acids and by boosting the TCA cycle, particularly

  2. Metabolic flux and nodes control analysis of brewer's yeasts under different fermentation temperature during beer brewing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhimin; Zhao, Haifeng; Zhao, Mouming; Lei, Hongjie; Li, Huiping

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work was to further investigate the glycolysis performance of lager and ale brewer's yeasts under different fermentation temperature using a combined analysis of metabolic flux, glycolytic enzyme activities, and flux control. The results indicated that the fluxes through glycolytic pathway decreased with the change of the fermentation temperature from 15 °C to 10 °C, which resulted in the prolonged fermentation times. The maximum activities (V (max)) of hexokinase (HK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), and pyruvate kinase (PK) at key nodes of glycolytic pathway decreased with decreasing fermentation temperature, which was estimated to have different control extent (22-84 %) on the glycolytic fluxes in exponential or flocculent phase. Moreover, the decrease of V (max) of PFK or PK displayed the crucial role in down-regulation of flux in flocculent phase. In addition, the metabolic state of ale strain was more sensitive to the variation of temperature than that of lager strain. The results of the metabolic flux and nodes control analysis in brewer's yeasts under different fermentation temperature may provide an alternative approach to regulate glycolytic flux by changing V (max) and improve the production efficiency and beer quality.

  3. Application of 13C-labeling and 13C-13C COSY NMR experiments in the structure determination of a microbial natural product.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yun; Park, Sunghyouk; Shin, Jongheon; Oh, Dong-Chan

    2014-08-01

    The elucidation of the structures of complex natural products bearing many quaternary carbons remains challenging, even in this advanced spectroscopic era. (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR spectroscopy shows direct couplings between (13)C and (13)C, which comprise the backbone of a natural product. Thus, this type of experiment is particularly useful for natural products bearing consecutive quaternary carbons. However, the low sensitivity of (13)C-based NMR experiments, due to the low natural abundance of the (13)C nucleus, is problematic when applying these techniques. Our efforts in the (13)C labeling of a microbial natural product, cyclopiazonic acid (1), by feeding (13)C-labeled glucose to the fungal culture, enabled us to acquire (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR spectra on a milligram scale that clearly show the carbon backbone of the compound. This is the first application of (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR experiments for a natural product. The results suggest that (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR spectroscopy can be routinely used for the structure determination of microbial natural products by (13)C-enrichment of a compound with (13)C-glucose.

  4. A 13C NMR spectrometric method for the determination of intramolecular δ13C values in fructose from plant sucrose samples.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Alexis; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Remaud, Gérald S

    2011-07-01

    Recent developments in (13) C NMR spectrometry have allowed the determination of intramolecular (13) C/(12) C ratios with high precision. However, the analysis of carbohydrates requires their derivatization to constrain the anomeric carbon. Fructose has proved to be particularly problematic because of a byproduct occurring during derivatization and the complexity of the NMR spectrum of the derivative. Here, we describe a method to determine the intramolecular (13) C/(12) C ratios in fructose by (13) C NMR analysis of the acetyl-isopropylidene derivative. We have applied this method to measure the intramolecular (13) C/(12) C distribution in the fructosyl moiety of sucrose and have compared this with that in the glucosyl moiety. Three prominent features stand out. First, in sucrose from both C(3) and C(4) plants, the C-1 and C-2 positions of the glucosyl and fructosyl moieties are markedly different. Second, these positions in C(3) and C(4) plants show a similar profile. Third, the glucosyl and fructosyl moieties of sucrose from Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) metabolism have a different profile. These contrasting values can be interpreted as a result of the isotopic selectivity of enzymes that break or make covalent bonds in glucose metabolism, whereas the distinctive (13) C pattern in CAM sucrose probably indicates a substantial contribution of gluconeogenesis to glucose synthesis.

  5. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c] And [2h3, 13c]Methyl Aryl Sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-03-30

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2,.sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to the labeled compounds of [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide and [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide.

  6. Analysis and Engineering of Metabolic Pathway Fluxes in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Christoph

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum was discovered as a natural overproducer of glutamate about 50 years ago. Linked to the steadily increasing economical importance of this microorganism for production of glutamate and other amino acids, the quest for efficient production strains has been an intense area of research during the past few decades. Efficient production strains were created by applying classical mutagenesis and selection and especially metabolic engineering strategies with the advent of recombinant DNA technology. Hereby experimental and computational approaches have provided fascinating insights into the metabolism of this microorganism and directed strain engineering. Today, C. glutamicum is applied to the industrial production of more than 2 million tons of amino acids per year. The huge achievements in recent years, including the sequencing of the complete genome and efficient post genomic approaches, now provide the basis for a new, fascinating era of research - analysis of metabolic and regulatory properties of C. glutamicum on a global scale towards novel and superior bioprocesses.

  7. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: the case of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Heise, Robert; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014). Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labeling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from non-stationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements.

  8. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: the case of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Robert; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014). Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labeling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from non-stationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements. PMID:26082786

  9. [Effects of culture conditions on coenzyme Q10 production by Rhizobium radiobacter by metabolic flux analysis].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zu-fang; Du, Guo-cheng; Chen, Jian

    2005-04-01

    Metabolic pathway network of CoQ10 synthesis by R. radiobacter WSH2601 were instructed. The metabolic flux and its changes were determined under the conditions of changing DO concentration and addition of 1% CSL in the medium. The results illustrated that the Ru5P flux (r7) increased by 26.6 when increasing the DO concentration, r7 increased by 17.2 when addition of 1% CSL. The ratio of EMP and HMP flux as well as TCA flux decreased at these two conditions. DPP flux had a little change at these two conditions. Therefore, the CoQ10 accumulation is greatly determined by two key enzymes activities of condensation reaction between p-hydroxybenzoate acid (PHB) and decaprenyl diphosphate (DPP). The nodes of G6P, pyruvate and PEP are principal nodes in primary metabolism of CoQ10 fermentation. The flexibility of principal nodes was evaluated that the G6P node is elastic, while pyruvate node is weakly flexibility, at the condition of changing culture conditions. The increase of DCW is associated with the improvement of HMP pathway flux.

  10. Detection of metabolic fluxes of O and H atoms into intracellular water in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Helen W; Quaroni, Luca; Podlesak, David W; Zlateva, Theodora; Bollinger, Nikki; McAllister, Aaron; Lott, Michael J; Hegg, Eric L

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic processes result in the release and exchange of H and O atoms from organic material as well as some inorganic salts and gases. These fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water result in an isotopic gradient that can be measured experimentally. Using isotope ratio mass spectroscopy, we revealed that slightly over 50% of the H and O atoms in the intracellular water of exponentially-growing cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts were isotopically distinct from growth medium water. We then employed infrared spectromicroscopy to detect in real time the flux of H atoms in these same cells. Importantly, both of these techniques indicate that the H and O fluxes are dependent on metabolic processes; cells that are in lag phase or are quiescent exhibit a much smaller flux. In addition, water extracted from the muscle tissue of rats contained a population of H and O atoms that were isotopically distinct from body water, consistent with the results obtained using the cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts. Together these data demonstrate that metabolic processes produce fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water, and that these fluxes can be detected and measured in both cultured mammalian cells and in mammalian tissue.

  11. Detection of Metabolic Fluxes of O and H Atoms into Intracellular Water in Mammalian Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Quaroni, Luca; Podlesak, David W.; Zlateva, Theodora; Bollinger, Nikki; McAllister, Aaron; Lott, Michael J.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2012-01-07

    Metabolic processes result in the release and exchange of H and O atoms from organic material as well as some inorganic salts and gases. These fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water result in an isotopic gradient that can be measured experimentally. Using isotope ratio mass spectroscopy, we revealed that slightly over 50% of the H and O atoms in the intracellular water of exponentially-growing cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts were isotopically distinct from growth medium water. We then employed infrared spectromicroscopy to detect in real time the flux of H atoms in these same cells. Importantly, both of these techniques indicate that the H and O fluxes are dependent on metabolic processes; cells that are in lag phase or are quiescent exhibit a much smaller flux. In addition, water extracted from the muscle tissue of rats contained a population of H and O atoms that were isotopically distinct from body, consistent with the results obtained using the cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts. Together these data demonstrate that metabolic processes produce fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water, and that these fluxes can be detected and measured in both cultured mammalian cells and in mammalian tissue.

  12. Mapping high-growth phenotypes in the flux space of microbial metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Güell, Oriol; Massucci, Francesco Alessandro; Font-Clos, Francesc; Sagués, Francesc; Serrano, M. Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and empirical observations on cell metabolism cannot be understood as a whole without their integration into a consistent systematic framework. However, the characterization of metabolic flux phenotypes is typically reduced to the study of a single optimal state, such as maximum biomass yield that is by far the most common assumption. Here, we confront optimal growth solutions to the whole set of feasible flux phenotypes (FFPs), which provides a benchmark to assess the likelihood of optimal and high-growth states and their agreement with experimental results. In addition, FFP maps are able to uncover metabolic behaviours, such as aerobic fermentation accompanying exponential growth on sugars at nutrient excess conditions, that are unreachable using standard models based on optimality principles. The information content of the full FFP space provides us with a map to explore and evaluate metabolic behaviour and capabilities, and so it opens new avenues for biotechnological and biomedical applications. PMID:26289659

  13. Hands-on metabolism analysis of complex biochemical networks using elementary flux modes.

    PubMed

    Schäuble, Sascha; Schuster, Stefan; Kaleta, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to discuss the basic principles and reasoning behind elementary flux mode analysis (EFM analysis)--an important tool for the analysis of metabolic networks. We begin with a short introduction into metabolic pathway analysis and subsequently outline in detail fundamentals of EFM analysis by way of a small example network. We discuss issues arising in the reconstruction of metabolic networks required for EFM analysis and how they can be circumvented. Subsequently, we analyze a more elaborate example network representing photosynthate metabolism. Finally, we give an overview of applications of EFM analysis in biotechnology and other fields and discuss issues arising when applying methods from metabolic pathway analysis to genome-scale metabolic networks.

  14. The role of metabolism in modulating CO2 fluxes in boreal lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, Matthew J.; Giorgio, Paul A.

    2016-10-01

    Lake CO2 emissions are increasingly recognized as an important component of the global CO2 cycle, yet the origin of these emissions is not clear, as specific contributions from metabolism and in-lake cycling, versus external inputs, are not well defined. To assess the coupling of lake metabolism with CO2 concentrations and fluxes, we estimated steady state ratios of gross primary production to respiration (GPP:R) and rates of net ecosystem production (NEP = GPP-R) from surface water O2 dynamics (concentration and stable isotopes) in 187 boreal lakes spanning long environmental gradients. Our findings suggest that internal metabolism plays a dominant role in regulating CO2 fluxes in most lakes, but this pattern only emerges when examined at a resolution that accounts for the vastly differing relationships between lake metabolism and CO2 fluxes. Fluxes of CO2 exceeded those from NEP in over half the lakes, but unexpectedly, these effects were most common and typically largest in a subset ( 30% of total) of net autotrophic lakes that nevertheless emitted CO2. Equally surprising, we found no environmental characteristics that distinguished this category from the more common net heterotrophic, CO2 outgassing lakes. Excess CO2 fluxes relative to NEP were best predicted by catchment structure and hydrologic properties, and we infer from a combination of methods that both catchment inputs and internal anaerobic processes may have contributed this excess CO2. Together, our findings show that the link between lake metabolism and CO2 fluxes is often strong but can vary widely across the boreal biome, having important implications for catchment-wide C budgets.

  15. Accurate determinations of one-bond 13C-13C couplings in 13C-labeled carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azurmendi, Hugo F.; Freedberg, Darón I.

    2013-03-01

    Carbon plays a central role in the molecular architecture of carbohydrates, yet the availability of accurate methods for 1DCC determination has not been sufficiently explored, despite the importance that such data could play in structural studies of oligo- and polysaccharides. Existing methods require fitting intensity ratios of cross- to diagonal-peaks as a function of the constant-time (CT) in CT-COSY experiments, while other methods utilize measurement of peak separation. The former strategies suffer from complications due to peak overlap, primarily in regions close to the diagonal, while the latter strategies are negatively impacted by the common occurrence of strong coupling in sugars, which requires a reliable assessment of their influence in the context of RDC determination. We detail a 13C-13C CT-COSY method that combines a variation in the CT processed with diagonal filtering to yield 1JCC and RDCs. The strategy, which relies solely on cross-peak intensity modulation, is inspired in the cross-peak nulling method used for JHH determinations, but adapted and extended to applications where, like in sugars, large one-bond 13C-13C couplings coexist with relatively small long-range couplings. Because diagonal peaks are not utilized, overlap problems are greatly alleviated. Thus, one-bond couplings can be determined from different cross-peaks as either active or passive coupling. This results in increased accuracy when more than one determination is available, and in more opportunities to measure a specific coupling in the presence of severe overlap. In addition, we evaluate the influence of strong couplings on the determination of RDCs by computer simulations. We show that individual scalar couplings are notably affected by the presence of strong couplings but, at least for the simple cases studied, the obtained RDC values for use in structural calculations were not, because the errors introduced by strong couplings for the isotropic and oriented phases are very

  16. Accurate determinations of one-bond 13C-13C couplings in 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Azurmendi, Hugo F; Freedberg, Darón I

    2013-03-01

    Carbon plays a central role in the molecular architecture of carbohydrates, yet the availability of accurate methods for (1)D(CC) determination has not been sufficiently explored, despite the importance that such data could play in structural studies of oligo- and polysaccharides. Existing methods require fitting intensity ratios of cross- to diagonal-peaks as a function of the constant-time (CT) in CT-COSY experiments, while other methods utilize measurement of peak separation. The former strategies suffer from complications due to peak overlap, primarily in regions close to the diagonal, while the latter strategies are negatively impacted by the common occurrence of strong coupling in sugars, which requires a reliable assessment of their influence in the context of RDC determination. We detail a (13)C-(13)C CT-COSY method that combines a variation in the CT processed with diagonal filtering to yield (1)J(CC) and RDCs. The strategy, which relies solely on cross-peak intensity modulation, is inspired in the cross-peak nulling method used for J(HH) determinations, but adapted and extended to applications where, like in sugars, large one-bond (13)C-(13)C couplings coexist with relatively small long-range couplings. Because diagonal peaks are not utilized, overlap problems are greatly alleviated. Thus, one-bond couplings can be determined from different cross-peaks as either active or passive coupling. This results in increased accuracy when more than one determination is available, and in more opportunities to measure a specific coupling in the presence of severe overlap. In addition, we evaluate the influence of strong couplings on the determination of RDCs by computer simulations. We show that individual scalar couplings are notably affected by the presence of strong couplings but, at least for the simple cases studied, the obtained RDC values for use in structural calculations were not, because the errors introduced by strong couplings for the isotropic and

  17. Using bioconductor package BiGGR for metabolic flux estimation based on gene expression changes in brain.

    PubMed

    Gavai, Anand K; Supandi, Farahaniza; Hettling, Hannes; Murrell, Paul; Leunissen, Jack A M; van Beek, Johannes H G M

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the distribution of metabolic fluxes in biochemical networks is of major interest in systems biology. Several databases provide metabolic reconstructions for different organisms. Software to analyze flux distributions exists, among others for the proprietary MATLAB environment. Given the large user community for the R computing environment, a simple implementation of flux analysis in R appears desirable and will facilitate easy interaction with computational tools to handle gene expression data. We extended the R software package BiGGR, an implementation of metabolic flux analysis in R. BiGGR makes use of public metabolic reconstruction databases, and contains the BiGG database and the reconstruction of human metabolism Recon2 as Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) objects. Models can be assembled by querying the databases for pathways, genes or reactions of interest. Fluxes can then be estimated by maximization or minimization of an objective function using linear inverse modeling algorithms. Furthermore, BiGGR provides functionality to quantify the uncertainty in flux estimates by sampling the constrained multidimensional flux space. As a result, ensembles of possible flux configurations are constructed that agree with measured data within precision limits. BiGGR also features automatic visualization of selected parts of metabolic networks using hypergraphs, with hyperedge widths proportional to estimated flux values. BiGGR supports import and export of models encoded in SBML and is therefore interoperable with different modeling and analysis tools. As an application example, we calculated the flux distribution in healthy human brain using a model of central carbon metabolism. We introduce a new algorithm termed Least-squares with equalities and inequalities Flux Balance Analysis (Lsei-FBA) to predict flux changes from gene expression changes, for instance during disease. Our estimates of brain metabolic flux pattern with Lsei-FBA for Alzheimer

  18. Isotopomer studies of gluconeogenesis and the Krebs cycle with 13C-labeled lactate.

    PubMed

    Katz, J; Wals, P; Lee, W N

    1993-12-05

    Fasted rats were intragastrically infused with either [2,3-13C]lactate or [1,2,3-13C]lactate. The infusate also contained 14C-labeled lactate and [3-3H]glucose. Glucose, alanine, glutamate, and glutamine were isolated from liver and blood. There was near complete equilibration of lactate and alanine, and the relative specific activities and relative enrichments were the same in blood and liver. Glucose was cleaved enzymatically to lactate. The compounds were examined by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. From the mass isotopomer spectra of the lactate, glutamate, and glutamine and their cleavage fragments the positional isotopomer composition of these compounds was obtained. The enrichment and isotopomer pattern in the lactate from cleaved glucose represents that in phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). When [1,2,3-13C]lactate was infused the mass isotopomer spectrum of glutamates consisted only of compounds containing either one, two, or three 13C carbons per molecule (m1, m2, and m3). There was little 13C in C-4 and C-5 of glutamate. The rate of pyruvate decarboxylation is low, and 3-4% of the acetyl-CoA flux in the Krebs cycle is contributed by lactate carbon. The major isotopomers in lactate, alanine, and PEP were m3 and m2 with 13C in C-2 and C-3. The predominant isotopomer in PEP from [2,3-13C]lactate was m2 with 13C in C-2 and C-3. There was much more of m1 isotopomer with 13C in C-3 and C-2 than the m1 isotopomer with 13C in C-1. There was very little m3, the isotopomer with 13C in all three carbons. Most of the 13C in C-3 and C-4 of glucose and C-1 of glutamate was introduced via 13CO2 fixation. From the isotopomer distribution and the rate of glucose turnover we deduced, applying the analysis described in the "Appendix," the absolute rates of gluconeogenic pathways, recycling of PEP and the Cori cycle, and flux in the Krebs cycle. The flux from oxaloacetate (OAA)-->PEP was seven times that of OAA-->citrate, and about half of PEP was recycled to pyruvate via

  19. A 13C-NMR study of exopolysaccharide synthesis in Rhizobium meliloti Su47 strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernier, P.; Portais, J.-C.; Besson, I.; Courtois, J.; Courtois, B.; Barbotin, J.-N.

    1998-02-01

    Metabolic pathways implied in the synthesis of succinoglycan produced by the Su47 strain of R. meliloti were evaluated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy after incubation with [1{-}13C] or [2{-}13C] glucose. The biosynthesis of this polymer by R. meliloti from glucose occurred by a direct polymerisation of the introduced glucose and by the pentose phosphate pathway. Les voies métaboliques impliquées dans la synthèse du succinoglycane produit par la souche Su47 de R. meliloti ont été évaluées par la spectroscopie de RMN du carbone 13 après incubation des cellules avec du [1{-}13C] ou [2{-}13C] glucose. La biosynthèse de ce polymère à partir du glucose se produit par polymérisation directe du glucose et par la voie des pentoses phosphate.

  20. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Mitochondrial Uncoupling in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yaguang; Shi, Hai; Lee, Kyongbum

    2009-01-01

    Background Increasing energy expenditure at the cellular level offers an attractive option to limit adiposity and improve whole body energy balance. In vivo and in vitro observations have correlated mitochondrial uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) expression with reduced white adipose tissue triglyceride (TG) content. The metabolic basis for this correlation remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings This study tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial uncoupling requires the cell to compensate for the decreased oxidation phosphorylation efficiency by up-regulating lactate production, thus redirecting carbon flux away from TG synthesis. Metabolic flux analysis was used to characterize the effects of non-lethal, long-term mitochondrial uncoupling (up to 18 days) on the pathways of intermediary metabolism in differentiating 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Uncoupling was induced by forced expression of UCP1 and chemical (FCCP) treatment. Chemical uncoupling significantly decreased TG content by ca. 35%. A reduction in the ATP level suggested diminished oxidative phosphorylation efficiency in the uncoupled adipocytes. Flux analysis estimated significant up-regulation of glycolysis and down-regulation of fatty acid synthesis, with chemical uncoupling exerting quantitatively larger effects. Conclusions/Significance The results of this study support our hypothesis regarding uncoupling-induced redirection of carbon flux into glycolysis and lactate production, and suggest mitochondrial proton translocation as a potential target for controlling adipocyte lipid metabolism. PMID:19746157

  1. Metabolic-flux profiling of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipitis.

    PubMed

    Fiaux, Jocelyne; Cakar, Z Petek; Sonderegger, Marco; Wüthrich, Kurt; Szyperski, Thomas; Sauer, Uwe

    2003-02-01

    The so far largely uncharacterized central carbon metabolism of the yeast Pichia stipitis was explored in batch and glucose-limited chemostat cultures using metabolic-flux ratio analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance. The concomitantly characterized network of active metabolic pathways was compared to those identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which led to the following conclusions. (i) There is a remarkably low use of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate (PP) pathway for glucose catabolism in S. cerevisiae when compared to P. stipitis batch cultures. (ii) Metabolism of P. stipitis batch cultures is fully respirative, which contrasts with the predominantly respiro-fermentative metabolic state of S. cerevisiae. (iii) Glucose catabolism in chemostat cultures of both yeasts is primarily oxidative. (iv) In both yeasts there is significant in vivo malic enzyme activity during growth on glucose. (v) The amino acid biosynthesis pathways are identical in both yeasts. The present investigation thus demonstrates the power of metabolic-flux ratio analysis for comparative profiling of central carbon metabolism in lower eukaryotes. Although not used for glucose catabolism in batch culture, we demonstrate that the PP pathway in S. cerevisiae has a generally high catabolic capacity by overexpressing the Escherichia coli transhydrogenase UdhA in phosphoglucose isomerase-deficient S. cerevisiae.

  2. Tracer‐Based Metabolic NMR‐Based Flux Analysis in a Leukaemia Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Carrigan, John B.; Reed, Michelle A. C.; Ludwig, Christian; Khanim, Farhat L.; Bunce, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have a profound impact on acute myeloid leukaemia cells and can be used to specifically target these cells with novel therapies. We have previously shown how the combination of two redeployed drugs, the contraceptive steroid medroxyprogesterone and the lipid‐regulating drug bezafibrate exert anti‐leukaemic effects by producing ROS. Here we report a 13C‐tracer‐based NMR metabolic study to understand how these drugs work in K562 leukaemia cells. Our study shows that [1,2‐13C]glucose is incorporated into ribose sugars, indicating activity in oxidative and non‐oxidative pentose phosphate pathways alongside lactate production. There is little label incorporation into the tricarboxylic acid cycle from glucose, but much greater incorporation arises from the use of [3‐13C]glutamine. The combined medroxyprogesterone and bezafibrate treatment decreases label incorporation from both glucose and glutamine into α‐ketoglutarate and increased that for succinate, which is consistent with ROS‐mediated conversion of α‐ketoglutarate to succinate. Most interestingly, this combined treatment drastically reduced the production of several pyrimidine synthesis intermediates. PMID:27347458

  3. The Protein Cost of Metabolic Fluxes: Prediction from Enzymatic Rate Laws and Cost Minimization.

    PubMed

    Noor, Elad; Flamholz, Avi; Bar-Even, Arren; Davidi, Dan; Milo, Ron; Liebermeister, Wolfram

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial growth depends crucially on metabolic fluxes, which are limited by the cell's capacity to maintain metabolic enzymes. The necessary enzyme amount per unit flux is a major determinant of metabolic strategies both in evolution and bioengineering. It depends on enzyme parameters (such as kcat and KM constants), but also on metabolite concentrations. Moreover, similar amounts of different enzymes might incur different costs for the cell, depending on enzyme-specific properties such as protein size and half-life. Here, we developed enzyme cost minimization (ECM), a scalable method for computing enzyme amounts that support a given metabolic flux at a minimal protein cost. The complex interplay of enzyme and metabolite concentrations, e.g. through thermodynamic driving forces and enzyme saturation, would make it hard to solve this optimization problem directly. By treating enzyme cost as a function of metabolite levels, we formulated ECM as a numerically tractable, convex optimization problem. Its tiered approach allows for building models at different levels of detail, depending on the amount of available data. Validating our method with measured metabolite and protein levels in E. coli central metabolism, we found typical prediction fold errors of 4.1 and 2.6, respectively, for the two kinds of data. This result from the cost-optimized metabolic state is significantly better than randomly sampled metabolite profiles, supporting the hypothesis that enzyme cost is important for the fitness of E. coli. ECM can be used to predict enzyme levels and protein cost in natural and engineered pathways, and could be a valuable computational tool to assist metabolic engineering projects. Furthermore, it establishes a direct connection between protein cost and thermodynamics, and provides a physically plausible and computationally tractable way to include enzyme kinetics into constraint-based metabolic models, where kinetics have usually been ignored or oversimplified.

  4. The Protein Cost of Metabolic Fluxes: Prediction from Enzymatic Rate Laws and Cost Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Elad; Flamholz, Avi; Bar-Even, Arren; Davidi, Dan; Milo, Ron; Liebermeister, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial growth depends crucially on metabolic fluxes, which are limited by the cell’s capacity to maintain metabolic enzymes. The necessary enzyme amount per unit flux is a major determinant of metabolic strategies both in evolution and bioengineering. It depends on enzyme parameters (such as kcat and KM constants), but also on metabolite concentrations. Moreover, similar amounts of different enzymes might incur different costs for the cell, depending on enzyme-specific properties such as protein size and half-life. Here, we developed enzyme cost minimization (ECM), a scalable method for computing enzyme amounts that support a given metabolic flux at a minimal protein cost. The complex interplay of enzyme and metabolite concentrations, e.g. through thermodynamic driving forces and enzyme saturation, would make it hard to solve this optimization problem directly. By treating enzyme cost as a function of metabolite levels, we formulated ECM as a numerically tractable, convex optimization problem. Its tiered approach allows for building models at different levels of detail, depending on the amount of available data. Validating our method with measured metabolite and protein levels in E. coli central metabolism, we found typical prediction fold errors of 4.1 and 2.6, respectively, for the two kinds of data. This result from the cost-optimized metabolic state is significantly better than randomly sampled metabolite profiles, supporting the hypothesis that enzyme cost is important for the fitness of E. coli. ECM can be used to predict enzyme levels and protein cost in natural and engineered pathways, and could be a valuable computational tool to assist metabolic engineering projects. Furthermore, it establishes a direct connection between protein cost and thermodynamics, and provides a physically plausible and computationally tractable way to include enzyme kinetics into constraint-based metabolic models, where kinetics have usually been ignored or oversimplified

  5. Reconstructing metabolic flux vectors from extreme pathways: defining the alpha-spectrum.

    PubMed

    Wiback, Sharon J; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2003-10-07

    The move towards genome-scale analysis of cellular functions has necessitated the development of analytical (in silico) methods to understand such large and complex biochemical reaction networks. One such method is extreme pathway analysis that uses stoichiometry and thermodynamic irreversibly to define mathematically unique, systemic metabolic pathways. These extreme pathways form the edges of a high-dimensional convex cone in the flux space that contains all the attainable steady state solutions, or flux distributions, for the metabolic network. By definition, any steady state flux distribution can be described as a nonnegative linear combination of the extreme pathways. To date, much effort has been focused on calculating, defining, and understanding these extreme pathways. However, little work has been performed to determine how these extreme pathways contribute to a given steady state flux distribution. This study represents an initial effort aimed at defining how physiological steady state solutions can be reconstructed from a network's extreme pathways. In general, there is not a unique set of nonnegative weightings on the extreme pathways that produce a given steady state flux distribution but rather a range of possible values. This range can be determined using linear optimization to maximize and minimize the weightings of a particular extreme pathway in the reconstruction, resulting in what we have termed the alpha-spectrum. The alpha-spectrum defines which extreme pathways can and cannot be included in the reconstruction of a given steady state flux distribution and to what extent they individually contribute to the reconstruction. It is shown that accounting for transcriptional regulatory constraints can considerably shrink the alpha-spectrum. The alpha-spectrum is computed and interpreted for two cases; first, optimal states of a skeleton representation of core metabolism that include transcriptional regulation, and second for human red blood cell

  6. Understanding the control of acyl flux through the lipid metabolic network of plant oil biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bates, Philip D

    2016-09-01

    Plant oil biosynthesis involves a complex metabolic network with multiple subcellular compartments, parallel pathways, cycles, and pathways that have a dual function to produce essential membrane lipids and triacylglycerol. Modern molecular biology techniques provide tools to alter plant oil compositions through bioengineering, however with few exceptions the final composition of triacylglycerol cannot be predicted. One reason for limited success in oilseed bioengineering is the inadequate understanding of how to control the flux of fatty acids through various fatty acid modification, and triacylglycerol assembly pathways of the lipid metabolic network. This review focuses on the mechanisms of acyl flux through the lipid metabolic network, and highlights where uncertainty resides in our understanding of seed oil biosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner.

  7. Metabolic flux analysis gives an insight on verapamil induced changes in central metabolism of HL-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Strigun, Alexander; Noor, Fozia; Pironti, Alejandro; Niklas, Jens; Yang, Tae Hoon; Heinzle, Elmar

    2011-09-20

    Verapamil has been shown to inhibit glucose transport in several cell types. However, the consequences of this inhibition on central metabolism are not well known. In this study we focused on verapamil induced changes in metabolic fluxes in a murine atrial cell line (HL-1 cells). These cells were adapted to serum free conditions and incubated with 4 μM verapamil and [U-¹³C₅] glutamine. Specific extracellular metabolite uptake/production rates together with mass isotopomer fractions in alanine and glutamate were implemented into a metabolic network model to calculate metabolic flux distributions in the central metabolism. Verapamil decreased specific glucose consumption rate and glycolytic activity by 60%. Although the HL-1 cells show Warburg effect with high lactate production, verapamil treated cells completely stopped lactate production after 24 h while maintaining growth comparable to the untreated cells. Calculated fluxes in TCA cycle reactions as well as NADH/FADH₂ production rates were similar in both treated and untreated cells. This was confirmed by measurement of cell respiration. Reduction of lactate production seems to be the consequence of decreased glucose uptake due to verapamil. In case of tumors, this may have two fold effects; firstly depriving cancer cells of substrate for anaerobic glycolysis on which their growth is dependent; secondly changing pH of the tumor environment, as lactate secretion keeps the pH acidic and facilitates tumor growth. The results shown in this study may partly explain recent observations in which verapamil has been proposed to be a potential anticancer agent. Moreover, in biotechnological production using cell lines, verapamil may be used to reduce glucose uptake and lactate secretion thereby increasing protein production without introduction of genetic modifications and application of more complicated fed-batch processes.

  8. Combining position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis: first steps towards soil fluxomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics is one of the most important challenges in soil science. Transformation of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) is a key step in biogeochemical cycles because 1) all high molecular substances pass this stage during their decomposition and 2) only LMWOS will be taken up by microorganisms. Previous studies on LMWOS were focused on determining net fluxes through the LMWOS pool, but they rarely identified transformations. As LMWOS are the preferred C and energy source for microorganisms, the transformations of LMWOS are dominated by biochemical pathways of the soil microorganisms. Thus, understanding fluxes and transformations in soils requires a detailed knowledge on the biochemical pathways and its controlling factors. Tracing C fate in soil by isotopes became on of the most applied and promising biogeochemistry tools. Up to now, studies on LMWOS were nearly exclusively based on uniformly labeled organic substances i.e. all C atoms in the molecules were labeled with 13C or 14C. However, this classical approach did not allow the differentiation between use of intact initial substances in any process, or whether they were transformed to metabolites. The novel tool of position-specific labeling enables to trace molecule atoms separately and thus to determine the cleavage of molecules - a prerequisite for metabolic tracing. Position-specific labeling of LMWOS and quantification of 13CO2 and 13C in bulk soil enabled following the basic metabolic pathways of soil microorganisms. However, only the combination of position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis of microbial biomarkers and metabolites allowed 1) tracing specific anabolic pathways in diverse microbial communities in soils and 2) identification of specific pathways of individual functional microbial groups. So, these are the prerequisites for soil fluxomics. Our studies combining position-specific labeled glucose with amino

  9. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  10. Experimental flux measurements on a network scale

    SciTech Connect

    Schwender, J.

    2011-10-11

    Metabolic flux is a fundamental property of living organisms. In recent years, methods for measuring metabolic flux in plants on a network scale have evolved further. One major challenge in studying flux in plants is the complexity of the plant's metabolism. In particular, in the presence of parallel pathways in multiple cellular compartments, the core of plant central metabolism constitutes a complex network. Hence, a common problem with the reliability of the contemporary results of {sup 13}C-Metabolic Flux Analysis in plants is the substantial reduction in complexity that must be included in the simulated networks; this omission partly is due to limitations in computational simulations. Here, I discuss recent emerging strategies that will better address these shortcomings.

  11. Production of hyperpolarized 13CO2 from [1-13C]pyruvate in perfused liver does reflect total anaplerosis but is not a reliable biomarker of glucose production

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Karlos X.; Moore, Christopher L.; Burgess, Shawn C.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    In liver, 13CO2 can be generated from [1-13C] pyruvate via pyruvate dehydrogenase or anaplerotic entry of pyruvate into the TCA cycle followed by decarboxylation at phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the malic enzyme, isocitrate dehydrogenase, or α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of these pathways in production of hyperpolarized (HP) 13CO2 after administration of hyper-polarized pyruvate in livers supplied with a fatty acid plus substrates for gluconeogenesis. Isolated mouse livers were perfused with a mixture of thermally-polarized 13C-enriched pyruvate, lactate and octanoate in various combinations prior to exposure to HP pyruvate. Under all perfusion conditions, HP malate, aspartate and fumarate were detected within ~ 3 s showing that HP [1-13C]pyruvate is rapidly converted to [1-13C]oxaloacetate which can subsequently produce HP 13CO2 via decarboxylation at PEPCK. Measurements using HP [2-13C]pyruvate allowed the exclusion of reactions related to TCA cycle turnover as sources of HP 13CO2. Direct measures of O2 consumption, ketone production, and glucose production by the intact liver combined with 13C isotopomer analyses of tissue extracts yielded a comprehensive profile of metabolic flux in perfused liver. Together, these data show that, even though the majority of HP 13CO2 derived from HP [1-13C]pyruvate in livers exposed to fatty acids reflects decarboxylation of [4-13C]oxaloacetate (PEPCK) or [4-13C]malate (malic enzyme), the intensity of the HP 13CO2 signal is not proportional to glucose production because the amount of pyruvate returned to the TCA cycle via PEPCK and pyruvate kinase is variable, depending upon available substrates. PMID:26543443

  12. Development of Computational Tools for Metabolic Model Curation, Flux Elucidation and Strain Design

    SciTech Connect

    Maranas, Costas D

    2012-05-21

    An overarching goal of the Department of Energy mission is the efficient deployment and engineering of microbial and plant systems to enable biomass conversion in pursuit of high energy density liquid biofuels. This has spurred the pace at which new organisms are sequenced and annotated. This torrent of genomic information has opened the door to understanding metabolism in not just skeletal pathways and a handful of microorganisms but for truly genome-scale reconstructions derived for hundreds of microbes and plants. Understanding and redirecting metabolism is crucial because metabolic fluxes are unique descriptors of cellular physiology that directly assess the current cellular state and quantify the effect of genetic engineering interventions. At the same time, however, trying to keep pace with the rate of genomic data generation has ushered in a number of modeling and computational challenges related to (i) the automated assembly, testing and correction of genome-scale metabolic models, (ii) metabolic flux elucidation using labeled isotopes, and (iii) comprehensive identification of engineering interventions leading to the desired metabolism redirection.

  13. Environmental controls over methanol production, emission, and δ13C values from Lycopersicon esculentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P.; Giebel, B. M.; Mak, J. E.; Riemer, D. D.; Swart, P. K.; Lerdau, M.

    2009-12-01

    Phytogenic methanol is the dominant source of methanol to the atmosphere, where it is the second most abundant organic compound. Beyond methanol’s role in atmospheric chemistry, it is an indicator of plant function and is linked to plant wound response. Methanol emissions are considered to be a by-product of cell wall expansion and, more specifically, the demethylation of pectin by pectin methylesterase (PME) in cell walls. Production of methanol was investigated in mature and immature tomato Lycopersicon esculentum via measurement of methanol flux, foliar PME activity, and methanol extraction from leaf, root, and stem tissues. δ13C values for mature and immature methanol emissions were also measured using a GC-IRMS system. Environmental control over methanol production and emission was studied by changing temperature and light while holding stomatal conductance constant. As seen previously, mature leaf methanol emissions were significantly less than immature emissions. Surprisingly, preliminary results suggest mature leaf methanol production to be similar to immature leaves, indicating an enhanced metabolic sink for methanol in mature leaves. These data enhance our understanding of methanol production, a term which is not well constrained in current methanol flux models.

  14. On dynamically generating relevant elementary flux modes in a metabolic network using optimization.

    PubMed

    Oddsdóttir, Hildur Æsa; Hagrot, Erika; Chotteau, Véronique; Forsgren, Anders

    2015-10-01

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) are pathways through a metabolic reaction network that connect external substrates to products. Using EFMs, a metabolic network can be transformed into its macroscopic counterpart, in which the internal metabolites have been eliminated and only external metabolites remain. In EFMs-based metabolic flux analysis (MFA) experimentally determined external fluxes are used to estimate the flux of each EFM. It is in general prohibitive to enumerate all EFMs for complex networks, since the number of EFMs increases rapidly with network complexity. In this work we present an optimization-based method that dynamically generates a subset of EFMs and solves the EFMs-based MFA problem simultaneously. The obtained subset contains EFMs that contribute to the optimal solution of the EFMs-based MFA problem. The usefulness of our method was examined in a case-study using data from a Chinese hamster ovary cell culture and two networks of varied complexity. It was demonstrated that the EFMs-based MFA problem could be solved at a low computational cost, even for the more complex network. Additionally, only a fraction of the total number of EFMs was needed to compute the optimal solution.

  15. Flux of the L-serine metabolism in rat liver. The predominant contribution of serine dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Xue, H H; Fujie, M; Sakaguchi, T; Oda, T; Ogawa, H; Kneer, N M; Lardy, H A; Ichiyama, A

    1999-06-04

    L-Serine metabolism in rat liver was investigated, focusing on the relative contributions of the three pathways, one initiated by L-serine dehydratase (SDH), another by serine:pyruvate/alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (SPT/AGT), and the other involving serine hydroxymethyltransferase and the mitochondrial glycine cleavage enzyme system (GCS). Because serine hydroxymethyltransferase is responsible for the interconversion between serine and glycine, SDH, SPT/AGT, and GCS were considered to be the metabolic exits of the serine-glycine pool. In vitro, flux through SDH was predominant in both 24-h starved and glucagon-treated rats. Flux through SPT/AGT was enhanced by glucagon administration, but even after the induction, its contribution under quasi-physiological conditions (1 mM L-serine and 0.25 mM pyruvate) was about (1)/(10) of that through SDH. Flux through GCS accounted for only several percent of the amount of L-serine metabolized. Relative contributions of SDH and SPT/AGT to gluconeogenesis from L-serine were evaluated in vivo based on the principle that 3H at the 3 position of L-serine is mostly removed in the SDH pathway, whereas it is largely retained in the SPT/AGT pathway. The results showed that SPT/AGT contributed only 10-20% even after the enhancement of its activity by glucagon. These results suggested that SDH is the major metabolic exit of L-serine in rat liver.

  16. Tissue-specific metabolic reprogramming drives nutrient flux in diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Sas, Kelli M.; Kayampilly, Pradeep; Byun, Jaeman; Nair, Viji; Hinder, Lucy M.; Zhang, Hongyu; Lin, Chengmao; Qi, Nathan R.; Michailidis, George; Groop, Per-Henrik; Nelson, Robert G.; Darshi, Manjula; Sharma, Kumar; Schelling, Jeffrey R.; Sedor, John R.; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Weinberg, Joel M.; Soleimanpour, Scott A.; Abcouwer, Steven F.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Burant, Charles F.; Feldman, Eva L.; Kretzler, Matthias; Brosius, Frank C.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with altered cellular metabolism, but how altered metabolism contributes to the development of diabetic complications is unknown. We used the BKS db/db diabetic mouse model to investigate changes in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in kidney cortex, peripheral nerve, and retina. A systems approach using transcriptomics, metabolomics, and metabolic flux analysis identified tissue-specific differences, with increased glucose and fatty acid metabolism in the kidney, a moderate increase in the retina, and a decrease in the nerve. In the kidney, increased metabolism was associated with enhanced protein acetylation and mitochondrial dysfunction. To confirm these findings in human disease, we analyzed diabetic kidney transcriptomic data and urinary metabolites from a cohort of Southwestern American Indians. The urinary findings were replicated in 2 independent patient cohorts, the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy and the Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes studies. Increased concentrations of TCA cycle metabolites in urine, but not in plasma, predicted progression of diabetic kidney disease, and there was an enrichment of pathways involved in glycolysis and fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. Our findings highlight tissue-specific changes in metabolism in complication-prone tissues in diabetes and suggest that urinary TCA cycle intermediates are potential prognostic biomarkers of diabetic kidney disease progression. PMID:27699244

  17. Two-stage flux balance analysis of metabolic networks for drug target identification

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Efficient identification of drug targets is one of major challenges for drug discovery and drug development. Traditional approaches to drug target identification include literature search-based target prioritization and in vitro binding assays which are both time-consuming and labor intensive. Computational integration of different knowledge sources is a more effective alternative. Wealth of omics data generated from genomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques changes the way researchers view drug targets and provides unprecedent opportunities for drug target identification. Results In this paper, we develop a method based on flux balance analysis (FBA) of metabolic networks to identify potential drug targets. This method consists of two linear programming (LP) models, which first finds the steady optimal fluxes of reactions and the mass flows of metabolites in the pathologic state and then determines the fluxes and mass flows in the medication state with the minimal side effect caused by the medication. Drug targets are identified by comparing the fluxes of reactions in both states and examining the change of reaction fluxes. We give an illustrative example to show that the drug target identification problem can be solved effectively by our method, then apply it to a hyperuricemia-related purine metabolic pathway. Known drug targets for hyperuricemia are correctly identified by our two-stage FBA method, and the side effects of these targets are also taken into account. A number of other promising drug targets are found to be both effective and safe. Conclusions Our method is an efficient procedure for drug target identification through flux balance analysis of large-scale metabolic networks. It can generate testable predictions, provide insights into drug action mechanisms and guide experimental design of drug discovery. PMID:21689470

  18. Metabolic network rewiring of propionate flux compensates vitamin B12 deficiency in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; Olin-Sandoval, Viridiana; Hoy, Michael J; Li, Chi-Hua; Louisse, Timo; Yao, Victoria; Mori, Akihiro; Holdorf, Amy D; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Ralser, Markus; Walhout, Albertha Jm

    2016-07-06

    Metabolic network rewiring is the rerouting of metabolism through the use of alternate enzymes to adjust pathway flux and accomplish specific anabolic or catabolic objectives. Here, we report the first characterization of two parallel pathways for the breakdown of the short chain fatty acid propionate in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using genetic interaction mapping, gene co-expression analysis, pathway intermediate quantification and carbon tracing, we uncover a vitamin B12-independent propionate breakdown shunt that is transcriptionally activated on vitamin B12 deficient diets, or under genetic conditions mimicking the human diseases propionic- and methylmalonic acidemia, in which the canonical B12-dependent propionate breakdown pathway is blocked. Our study presents the first example of transcriptional vitamin-directed metabolic network rewiring to promote survival under vitamin deficiency. The ability to reroute propionate breakdown according to B12 availability may provide C. elegans with metabolic plasticity and thus a selective advantage on different diets in the wild.

  19. Tools for the analysis of metabolic flux through the sphingolipid pathway.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Montañés, Fernando; Schneiter, Roger

    2016-11-01

    Discerning the complex regulation of the enzymatic steps necessary for sphingolipid biosynthesis is facilitated by the utilization of tracers that allow a time-resolved analysis of the pathway dynamics without affecting the metabolic flux. Different strategies have been used and new tools are continuously being developed to probe the various enzymatic conversions that occur within this complex pathway. Here, we provide a short overview of the divergent fungal and mammalian sphingolipid biosynthetic routes, and of the tracers and methods that are frequently employed to follow the flux of intermediates throughout these pathways.

  20. Metabolic flux analysis using ¹³C peptide label measurements.

    PubMed

    Mandy, Dominic E; Goldford, Joshua E; Yang, Hong; Allen, Doug K; Libourel, Igor G L

    2014-02-01

    ¹³C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) has become the experimental method of choice to investigate the cellular metabolism of microbes, cell cultures and plant seeds. Conventional steady-state MFA utilizes isotopic labeling measurements of amino acids obtained from protein hydrolysates. To retain spatial information in conventional steady-state MFA, tissues or subcellular fractions must be dissected or biochemically purified. In contrast, peptides retain their identity in complex protein extracts, and may therefore be associated with a specific time of expression, tissue type and subcellular compartment. To enable 'single-sample' spatially and temporally resolved steady-state flux analysis, we investigated the suitability of peptide mass distributions (PMDs) as an alternative to amino acid label measurements. PMDs are the discrete convolution of the mass distributions of the constituent amino acids of a peptide. We investigated the requirements for the unique deconvolution of PMDs into amino acid mass distributions (AAMDs), the influence of peptide sequence length on parameter sensitivity, and how AAMD and flux estimates that are determined through deconvolution compare to estimates from a conventional GC-MS measurement-based approach. Deconvolution of PMDs of the storage protein β-conglycinin of soybean (Glycine max) resulted in good AAMD and flux estimates if fluxes were directly fitted to PMDs. Unconstrained deconvolution resulted in inferior AAMD and flux estimates. PMD measurements do not include amino acid backbone fragments, which increase the information content in GC-MS-derived analyses. Nonetheless, the resulting flux maps were of comparable quality due to the precision of Orbitrap quantification and the larger number of peptide measurements.

  1. In situ metabolic flux analysis to quantify the liver metabolic response to experimental burn injury.

    PubMed

    Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Sharma, Nripen S; Uygun, Basak; Bieganski, Robert; Saeidi, Nima; Nahmias, Yaakov; Uygun, Korkut; Yarmush, Martin L; Berthiaume, Francois

    2011-04-01

    Trauma such as burns induces a hypermetabolic response associated with altered central carbon and nitrogen metabolism. The liver plays a key role in these metabolic changes; however, studies to date have evaluated the metabolic state of liver using ex vivo perfusions or isotope labeling techniques targeted to specific pathways. Herein, we developed a unique mass balance approach to characterize the metabolic state of the liver in situ, and used it to quantify the metabolic changes to experimental burn injury in rats. Rats received a sham (control uninjured), 20% or 40% total body surface area (TBSA) scald burn, and were allowed to develop a hypermetabolic response. One day prior to evaluation, all animals were fasted to deplete glycogen stores. Four days post-burn, blood flow rates in major vessels of the liver were measured, and blood samples harvested. We combined measurements of metabolite concentrations and flow rates in the major vessels entering and leaving the liver with a steady-state mass balance model to generate a quantitative picture of the metabolic state of liver. The main findings were: (1) Sham-burned animals exhibited a gluconeogenic pattern, consistent with the fasted state; (2) the 20% TBSA burn inhibited gluconeogenesis and exhibited glycolytic-like features with very few other significant changes; (3) the 40% TBSA burn, by contrast, further enhanced gluconeogenesis and also increased amino acid extraction, urea cycle reactions, and several reactions involved in oxidative phosphorylation. These results suggest that increasing the severity of injury does not lead to a simple dose-dependent metabolic response, but rather leads to qualitatively different responses.

  2. Towards hyperpolarized 13C-succinate imaging of brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Pratip; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Perman, William H.; Harris, Kent C.; Lin, Alexander P.; Norton, Valerie A.; Tan, Chou T.; Ross, Brian D.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2007-05-01

    We describe a novel 13C enriched precursor molecule, sodium 1- 13C acetylenedicarboxylate, which after hydrogenation by PASADENA (Parahydrogen and Synthesis Allows Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment) under controlled experimental conditions, becomes hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate. Fast in vivo 3D FIESTA MR imaging demonstrated that, following carotid arterial injection, the hyperpolarized 13C-succinate appeared in the head and cerebral circulation of normal and tumor-bearing rats. At this time, no in vivo hyperpolarized signal has been localized to normal brain or brain tumor. On the other hand, ex vivo samples of brain harvested from rats bearing a 9L brain tumor, 1 h or more following in vivo carotid injection of hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate, contained significant concentrations of the injected substrate, 13C sodium succinate, together with 13C maleate and succinate metabolites 1- 13C-glutamate, 5- 13C-glutamate, 1- 13C-glutamine and 5- 13C-glutamine. The 13C substrates and products were below the limits of NMR detection in ex vivo samples of normal brain consistent with an intact blood-brain barrier. These ex vivo results indicate that hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate may become a useful tool for rapid in vivo identification of brain tumors, providing novel biomarkers in 13C MR spectral-spatial images.

  3. Biokinetics of (13)C in the human body after oral administration of (13)C-labeled glucose as an index for the biokinetics of (14)C.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Tako, Yasuhiro; Matsushita, Kensaku; Takeda, Hiroshi; Endo, Masahiro; Nakamura, Yuji; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2016-09-01

    The retention of (13)C in the human body after oral administration of (13)C-labeled glucose was studied in three healthy volunteer subjects to estimate the 50 year cumulative body burden for (13)C as an index of the committed dose of the radioisotope (14)C. After administration of (13)C-labeled glucose, the volunteers ingested controlled diets with a fixed number of calories for 112 d. Samples of breath and urine were collected up to 112 d after administration. Samples of feces were collected up to 14 d after administration. Hair samples were obtained at 119 d after administration and analyzed as a representative index of the rate of excretion of organic (13)C via pathways such as skin cell exfoliation and mucus secretion. All samples were analyzed for (13)C/(12)C atomic ratio to determine the rate of excretion via each pathway. We then constructed a metabolic model with a total of four pathways (breath, urine, feces, and other) comprising seven compartments. We determined the values of the biokinetic parameters in the model by using the obtained excretion data. From 74% to 94% of the (13)C administered was excreted in breath, whereas  <2% was excreted in urine and feces. In the other pathway, the excretion rate constant in the compartment with the longest residence time stretched to hundreds of days but the rate constant for each subject was not statistically significant (P value  >  0.1). In addition, the dataset for one of the three subjects was markedly different from those of the other two. When we estimated the 50 year cumulative body burden for (13)C by using our model and we included non-statistically significant parameters, a considerable cumulative body burden was found in the compartments excreting to the other pathway. Although our results on the cumulative body burden of (13)C from orally administered carbon as glucose were inconclusive, we found that the compartments excreting to the other pathway had a markedly long residence time and

  4. Redirecting metabolic flux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through regulation of cofactors in UMP production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Qingguo; Chen, Xiaochun; Wu, Jinglan; Guo, Ting; Zhu, Chenjie; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-04-01

    Although it is generally known that cofactors play a major role in the production of different fermentation products, their role has not been thoroughly and systematically studied. To understand the impact of cofactors on physiological functions, a systematic approach was applied, which involved redox state analysis, energy charge analysis, and metabolite analysis. Using uridine 5'-monophosphate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model, we demonstrated that regulation of intracellular the ratio of NADPH to NADP(+) not only redistributed the carbon flux between the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways, but also regulated the redox state of NAD(H), resulting in a significant change of ATP, and a significantly altered spectrum of metabolic products.

  5. Pyruvate modifies metabolic flux and nutrient sensing during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an immature swine model

    PubMed Central

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Olson, Aaron K.; Isern, Nancy; Robillard-Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support for infants and children with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. Nutritional support is mandatory during ECMO although specific actions for substrates on the heart have not been delineated. Prior work shows that enhancing pyruvate oxidation promotes successful weaning from ECMO. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that prolonged systemic pyruvate supplementation activates pyruvate oxidation in an immature swine model in vivo. Twelve male mixed-breed Yorkshire piglets (age 30–49 days) received systemic infusion of either normal saline (group C) or pyruvate (group P) during the final 6 h of 8 h of ECMO. Over the final hour, piglets received [2-13C] pyruvate, as a reference substrate for oxidation, and [13C6]-l-leucine, as an indicator for amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis. A significant increase in lactate and pyruvate concentrations occurred, along with an increase in the absolute concentration of the citric acid cycle intermediates. An increase in anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylation in group P occurred compared with no change in pyruvate oxidation. Additionally, pyruvate promoted an increase in the phosphorylation state of several nutrient-sensitive enzymes, like AMP-activated protein kinase and acetyl CoA carboxylase, suggesting activation for fatty acid oxidation. Pyruvate also promoted O-GlcNAcylation through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. In conclusion, although prolonged pyruvate supplementation did not alter pyruvate oxidation, it did elicit changes in nutrient- and energy-sensitive pathways. Therefore, the observed results support the further study of pyruvate and its downstream effect on cardiac function. PMID:25910802

  6. Deposition of 13C tracer in the JET MkII-HD divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jet-Efda Contributors Likonen, J.; Hakola, A.; Strachan, J.; Coad, J. P.; Widdowson, A.; Koivuranta, S.; Hole, D. E.; Mizohata, K.; Rubel, M.; Jachmich, S.; Stamp, M.

    2011-08-01

    Migration of 13C has been investigated at JET by puffing 13CH4 into the outer midplane at the end of the 2007 campaign. The 13C deposition profile was measured with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) techniques. 13C was mainly found on Tile 1 and near the outer strike point (OSP) on Tile 7. The 13C transport was modelled with the EDGE2D/NIMBUS code. Previous work indicates that migration pathways are: (1) through the main chamber scrape-off layer (SOL), (2) migration through the private flux region (PFR) aided by E × B drifts and (3) neutral migration originating near the strike points. The main contribution of this paper is to further describe the neutral migration.

  7. In vivo dynamic turnover of cerebral 13C isotopomers from [U- 13C]glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su; Shen, Jun

    2006-10-01

    An INEPT-based 13C MRS method and a cost-effective and widely available 11.7 Tesla 89-mm bore vertical magnet were used to detect dynamic 13C isotopomer turnover from intravenously infused [U- 13C]glucose in a 211 μL voxel located in the adult rat brain. The INEPT-based 1H → 13C polarization transfer method is mostly adiabatic and therefore minimizes signal loss due to B 1 inhomogeneity of the surface coils used. High quality and reproducible data were acquired as a result of combined use of outer volume suppression, ISIS, and the single-shot three-dimensional localization scheme built in the INEPT pulse sequence. Isotopomer patterns of both glutamate C4 at 34.00 ppm and glutamine C4 at 31.38 ppm are dominated first by a doublet originated from labeling at C4 and C5 but not at C3 (with 1JC4C5 = 51 Hz) and then by a quartet originated from labeling at C3, C4, and C5 (with 1JC3C4 = 35 Hz). A lag in the transition of glutamine C4 pattern from doublet-dominance to quartet dominance as compared to glutamate C4 was observed, which provides an independent verification of the precursor-product relationship between neuronal glutamate and glial glutamine and a significant intercompartmental cerebral glutamate-glutamine cycle between neurons and glial cells.

  8. Synthesis of 2H- and 13C-substituted dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  9. Synthesis Of 2h- And 13c-Substituted Dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  10. Dynamic flux balance analysis of the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the shift from fully respirative or respirofermentative metabolic states to anaerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Jouhten, Paula; Wiebe, Marilyn; Penttilä, Merja

    2012-09-01

    Dynamic flux balance analysis was utilized to simulate the metabolic behaviour of initially fully respirative and respirofermentative steady-state cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during sudden oxygen depletion. The hybrid model for the dynamic flux balance analysis included a stoichiometric genome-scale metabolic model as a static part and dynamic equations for the uptake of glucose and the cessation of respirative metabolism. The yeast consensus genome-scale metabolic model [Herrgård MJ et al. (2008) Nat Biotechnol 26, 1155-1160; Dobson PD et al. (2010) BMC Syst Biol 4, 145] was refined with respect to oxygen-dependent energy metabolism and further modified to reflect S. cerevisiae anabolism in the absence of oxygen. Dynamic flux balance analysis captured well the essential features of the dynamic metabolic behaviour of S. cerevisiae during adaptation to anaerobiosis. Modelling and simulation enabled the identification of short time-scale flux distribution dynamics under the transition to anaerobic metabolism, during which the specific growth rate was reduced, as well as longer time-scale process dynamics when the specific growth rate recovered. Expression of the metabolic genes was set into the context of the identified dynamics. Metabolic gene expression responses associated with the specific growth rate and with the cessation of respirative metabolism were distinguished.

  11. Water availability and branch length determine delta(13)C in foliage of Pinus pinaster.

    PubMed

    Warren, Charles R.; Adams, Mark A.

    2000-05-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition (delta(13)C) of foliage integrates signals resulting from environmental and hydraulic constraints on water movement and photosynthesis. We used branch length as a simple predictor of hydraulic constraints to water fluxes and determined the response of delta(13)C to varying water availability. Foliage up to 6 years old was taken from Pinus pinaster Ait. trees growing at four sites differing in precipitation (P; 414-984 mm year(-1)) and potential evaporation (ET; 1091-1750 mm year(-1)). Branch length was the principal determinant of temporal trends in delta(13)C. The strong relationship between delta(13)C and branch length was a function of hydraulic conductance, which was negatively correlated with branch length (r(2) = 0.84). Variation in P and ET among sites was reflected in delta(13)C, which was negatively correlated with P/ET (r(2) = 0.66). However, this analysis was confounded by differences in branch length. If the effects of branch length on delta(13)C were first removed, then the 'residual' delta(13)C was more closely related to P/ET (r(2) = 0.99), highlighting the importance of accounting for variation in hydraulic constraints to water flux between sites and years. For plant species that exhibit considerable phenotypic plasticity in response to changes in environment (e.g., variation in leaf area, branch length and number, or stem form), the environmental effects on delta(13)C in foliage can only be reliably assessed if deconvoluted from hydraulic constraints.

  12. Metabolic flux analysis during the exponential growth phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in wine fermentations.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Manuel; Martínez-Moreno, Rubén; Albiol, Joan; Morales, Pilar; Vázquez-Lima, Felícitas; Barreiro-Vázquez, Antonio; Ferrer, Pau; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of the increase in global average temperature, grapes with the adequate phenolic and aromatic maturity tend to be overripe by the time of harvest, resulting in increased sugar concentrations and imbalanced C/N ratios in fermenting musts. This fact sets obvious additional hurdles in the challenge of obtaining wines with reduced alcohols levels, a new trend in consumer demands. It would therefore be interesting to understand Saccharomyces cerevisiae physiology during the fermentation of must with these altered characteristics. The present study aims to determine the distribution of metabolic fluxes during the yeast exponential growth phase, when both carbon and nitrogen sources are in excess, using continuous cultures. Two different sugar concentrations were studied under two different winemaking temperature conditions. Although consumption and production rates for key metabolites were severely affected by the different experimental conditions studied, the general distribution of fluxes in central carbon metabolism was basically conserved in all cases. It was also observed that temperature and sugar concentration exerted a higher effect on the pentose phosphate pathway and glycerol formation than on glycolysis and ethanol production. Additionally, nitrogen uptake, both quantitatively and qualitatively, was strongly influenced by environmental conditions. This work provides the most complete stoichiometric model used for Metabolic Flux Analysis of S. cerevisiae in wine fermentations employed so far, including the synthesis and release of relevant aroma compounds and could be used in the design of optimal nitrogen supplementation of wine fermentations.

  13. Metabolic Flux Analysis during the Exponential Growth Phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Wine Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Quirós, Manuel; Martínez-Moreno, Rubén; Albiol, Joan; Morales, Pilar; Vázquez-Lima, Felícitas; Barreiro-Vázquez, Antonio; Ferrer, Pau; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of the increase in global average temperature, grapes with the adequate phenolic and aromatic maturity tend to be overripe by the time of harvest, resulting in increased sugar concentrations and imbalanced C/N ratios in fermenting musts. This fact sets obvious additional hurdles in the challenge of obtaining wines with reduced alcohols levels, a new trend in consumer demands. It would therefore be interesting to understand Saccharomyces cerevisiae physiology during the fermentation of must with these altered characteristics. The present study aims to determine the distribution of metabolic fluxes during the yeast exponential growth phase, when both carbon and nitrogen sources are in excess, using continuous cultures. Two different sugar concentrations were studied under two different winemaking temperature conditions. Although consumption and production rates for key metabolites were severely affected by the different experimental conditions studied, the general distribution of fluxes in central carbon metabolism was basically conserved in all cases. It was also observed that temperature and sugar concentration exerted a higher effect on the pentose phosphate pathway and glycerol formation than on glycolysis and ethanol production. Additionally, nitrogen uptake, both quantitatively and qualitatively, was strongly influenced by environmental conditions. This work provides the most complete stoichiometric model used for Metabolic Flux Analysis of S. cerevisiae in wine fermentations employed so far, including the synthesis and release of relevant aroma compounds and could be used in the design of optimal nitrogen supplementation of wine fermentations. PMID:23967264

  14. [Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-07-01

    The funded research deals with the physiology and genetics of glycolytic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis. Two fundamental biological questions are begin addressed: First, how do the enzymes of glycolytic pathways act in concert to regulate metabolic flux? Second, what is the role of gene expression in regulating high level synthesis of the glycolytic enzymes in a balance that allows proper glycolytic flux control? The specific objectives of the grant are as follows: 1. To clone the structural and regulatory regions of the Z. mobilis genes encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglucose isomerase, enolase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, 2- keto-3-deoxy- 6-phosphogluconate aldolase, glucokinase and fructokinase. 2. To characterize the structure of these genes with respect to nucleotide sequence, transcriptional initiation sites promoter location, evolutionary relatedness to similar genes from other organisms, and organization of these genes on the genome. 3. To investigate the effects of genetically engineered alterations in the levels of the cloned enzymes on metabolic flux and cell growth. 4. To study transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. The first two specific objectives have now been fully completed. Significant progress has been made on the fourth objective and work on the third objective is well underway.

  15. Counting and correcting thermodynamically infeasible flux cycles in genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Daniele; Capuani, Fabrizio; Mori, Matteo; De Martino,