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Sample records for 13c metabolic imaging

  1. Multi-band frequency encoding method for metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Morze, Cornelius; Reed, Galen; Shin, Peter; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Bok, Robert; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2011-08-01

    A new method was developed for simultaneous spatial localization and spectral separation of multiple compounds based on a single echo, by designing the acquisition to place individual compounds in separate frequency encoding bands. This method was specially designed for rapid and robust metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized 13C substrates and their metabolic products, and was investigated in phantom studies and studies in normal mice and transgenic models of prostate cancer to provide rapid metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and its metabolic products [1- 13C]lactate and [1- 13C]alanine at spatial resolutions up to 3 mm in-plane. Elevated pyruvate and lactate signals in the vicinity of prostatic tissues were observed in transgenic tumor mice. The multi-band frequency encoding technique enabled rapid metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized 13C compounds with important advantages over prior approaches, including less complicated acquisition and reconstruction methods.

  2. Metabolic Imaging in the Anesthetized Rat Brain Using Hyperpolarized [1-13C] Pyruvate and [1-13C] Ethyl Pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Ralph E.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Mayer, Dirk; Chen, Albert; Wilson, David; Kohler, Susan; Bok, Robert; Vigneron, Daniel; Kurhanewicz, John; Tropp, James; Spielman, Daniel; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-01-01

    Formulation, polarization, and dissolution conditions were developed to obtain a stable hyperpolarized solution of [1-13C]-ethyl pyruvate. A maximum tolerated concentration and injection rate were determined, and 13C spectroscopic imaging was used to compare the uptake of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-ethyl pyruvate relative to hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate into anesthetized rat brain. Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-ethyl pyruvate and [1-13C]-pyruvate metabolic imaging in normal brain is demonstrated and quantified in this feasibility and range-finding study. PMID:20432284

  3. Chemical Shift Separation with Controlled Aliasing for Hyperpolarized 13C Metabolic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Peter J.; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Uecker, Martin; Reed, Galen D.; Kerr, Adam B.; Tropp, James; Ohliger, Michael A.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Pauly, John M.; Lustig, Michael; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A chemical shift separation technique for hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging with high spatial and temporal resolution was developed. Specifically, a fast 3D pulse sequence and a reconstruction method were implemented to acquire signals from multiple 13C species simultaneously with subsequent separation into individual images. Methods A stack of flyback-EPI readouts and a set of multiband excitation RF pulses were designed to spatially modulate aliasing patterns of the acquired metabolite images, which translated the chemical shift separation problem into parallel imaging reconstruction problem. An eight-channel coil array was used for data acquisition and a parallel imaging method based on nonlinear inversion was developed to separate the aliased images. Results Simultaneous acquisitions of pyruvate and lactate in a phantom study and in vivo rat experiments were performed. The results demonstrated successful separation of the metabolite distributions into individual images having high spatial resolution. Conclusion This method demonstrated the ability to provide accelerated metabolite imaging in hyperpolarized 13C MR utilizing multi-channel coils, tailored readout, and specialized RF pulses. PMID:25298086

  4. Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Metabolism: Imaging by Hyperpolarized 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Darpolor, Moses M.; Kaplan, David E.; Pedersen, Peter L.; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Most cancers exhibit high levels of aerobic glycolytic metabolism with diminished levels of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation even in the presence of normal or near-normal levels of oxygen (“Warburg effect”). However, technical challenges have limited the development of non-invasive in vivo imaging techniques for monitoring glycolytic metabolism of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and quantitatively evaluating the impact of this effect on the growth and therapy of this disease. Thus, there is a critical need to develop non-invasive techniques for longitudinal assessment of the metabolism and treatment response of patients with unresectable HCCs. Procedures This article discusses a novel method, “Hyperpolarized 13C MRS imaging”, for achieving this objective and thus improving the prognosis of HCC patients. The primary objective has been to characterize in vivo metabolic biomarkers as determinants of HCC metabolism and treatment response of unresectable HCC tumors or viable HCC cells. Results This innovative technique capitalizes on a new technology that increases the sensitivity of MRS detection of crucial metabolites in cancer cells. Conclusion It is anticipated that this innovative approach will lead to improved methods, both for the diagnosis and staging of HCCs and for the facilitation of the development of enzyme targeted therapies and other therapeutic interventions. PMID:24224182

  5. Open-Source Automated Parahydrogen Hyperpolarizer for Molecular Imaging Using (13)C Metabolic Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Aaron M; Shchepin, Roman V; Truong, Milton L; Wilkens, Ken; Pham, Wellington; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-08-16

    An open-source hyperpolarizer producing (13)C hyperpolarized contrast agents using parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) for biomedical and other applications is presented. This PHIP hyperpolarizer utilizes an Arduino microcontroller in conjunction with a readily modified graphical user interface written in the open-source processing software environment to completely control the PHIP hyperpolarization process including remotely triggering an NMR spectrometer for efficient production of payloads of hyperpolarized contrast agent and in situ quality assurance of the produced hyperpolarization. Key advantages of this hyperpolarizer include: (i) use of open-source software and hardware seamlessly allowing for replication and further improvement as well as readily customizable integration with other NMR spectrometers or MRI scanners (i.e., this is a multiplatform design), (ii) relatively low cost and robustness, and (iii) in situ detection capability and complete automation. The device performance is demonstrated by production of a dose (∼2-3 mL) of hyperpolarized (13)C-succinate with %P13C ∼ 28% and 30 mM concentration and (13)C-phospholactate at %P13C ∼ 15% and 25 mM concentration in aqueous medium. These contrast agents are used for ultrafast molecular imaging and spectroscopy at 4.7 and 0.0475 T. In particular, the conversion of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate to (13)C-lactate in vivo is used here to demonstrate the feasibility of ultrafast multislice (13)C MRI after tail vein injection of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate in mice. PMID:27478927

  6. In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of Hyperpolarized [1-13C] Pyruvate Metabolism in Rat Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Darpolor, Moses M.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Chua, Mei-Sze; Xing, Lei; Clarke-Katzenberg, Regina H.; Shi, Wenfang; Mayer, Dirk; Josan, Sonal; Hurd, Ralph E.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Senadheera, Lasitha; So, Samuel; Hofmann, Lawrence V.; Glazer, Gary M.; Spielman, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the primary form of human adult liver malignancy, is a highly aggressive tumor with average survival rates that are currently less than a year following diagnosis. Most patients with HCC are diagnosed at an advanced stage, and no efficient marker exists for predicting prognosis and/or response(s) to therapy. We previously reported a high level of [1-13C] alanine in an orthotopic HCC using single-voxel hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In the present study, we implemented a 3D-magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequence to investigate this potential hallmark of cellular metabolism in rat livers bearing HCC (N=7 buffalo rats). In addition, quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the mRNA levels of lactate dehydrogenase A, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1, and alanine transaminase. The enzymes levels were significantly higher in the tumor than the normal liver tissues within each rat, which is associated with the in vivo MRSI signal of [1-13C]alanine and [1-13C]lactate after a bolus intravenous injection of [1-13C]pyruvate. Histopathological analysis of these tumors confirms successful growth of HCC as a nodule in buffalo rats’ livers revealing malignancy and hyper-vascular architecture. More importantly, the results demonstrate that the metabolic fate of [1-13C]pyruvate conversion to [1-13C]alanine significantly supersedes that of [1-13C]pyruvate conversion to [1-13C]lactate potentially serving as a marker of HCC tumors. PMID:21674652

  7. Fast volumetric imaging of ethanol metabolism in rat liver with hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Sonal; Spielman, Daniel; Yen, Yi-Fen; Hurd, Ralph; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Mayer, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Rapid, volumetric imaging of hyperpolarized 13C compounds allows the real time measurement of metabolic activity and can be useful in distinguishing between normal and diseased tissues. This work extends a fast 2D under-sampled spiral magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequence to provide volumetric coverage, acquiring a 16×16×12 matrix with a nominal 5 mm isotropic resolution in 4.5 s. The rapid acquisition enables a high temporal resolution for dynamic imaging. This dynamic 3D MRSI method was used to investigate hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate metabolism modulated by the administration of ethanol in rat liver. A significant increase in the pyruvate to lactate conversion was observed in the liver due to the greater availability of NADH from ethanol metabolism. PMID:22331837

  8. Metabolic imaging of acute and chronic infarction in the perfused rat heart using hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Ball, Daniel R; Cruickshank, Rachel; Carr, Carolyn A; Stuckey, Daniel J; Lee, Philip; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J

    2013-11-01

    Hyperpolarised (13)C MRI can be used to generate metabolic images of the heart in vivo. However, there have been no similar studies performed in the isolated perfused heart. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a method for the creation of (13)C metabolite maps of the perfused rat heart and to demonstrate the technique in a study of acute and chronic myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rat hearts were isolated, perfused and imaged before and after occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, creating an acute infarct group. In addition, a chronic infarct group was generated from hearts which had their LAD coronary artery occluded in vivo. Four weeks later, hearts were excised, perfused and imaged to generate metabolic maps of infused pyruvate and its metabolites lactate and bicarbonate. Myocardial perfusion and energetics were assessed by first-pass perfusion imaging and (31)P MRS, respectively. In both acute and chronically infarcted hearts, perfusion was reduced to the infarct region, as revealed by reduced gadolinium influx and lower signal intensity in the hyperpolarised pyruvate images. In the acute infarct region, there were significant alterations in the lactate (increased) and bicarbonate (decreased) signal ratios. In the chronically infarcted region, there was a significant reduction in both bicarbonate and lactate signals. (31)P-derived energetics revealed a significant decrease between control and chronic infarcted hearts. Significant decreases in contractile function between control and both acute and chronic infracted hearts were also seen. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that hyperpolarised pyruvate can detect reduced perfusion in the rat heart following both acute and chronic infarction. Changes in lactate and bicarbonate ratios indicate increased anaerobic metabolism in the acute infarct, which is not observed in the chronic infarct. Thus, this study has successfully demonstrated a novel imaging approach to assess

  9. In vivo application of sub-second spiral chemical shift imaging (CSI) to hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging: Comparison with phase-encoded CSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Dirk; Yen, Yi-Fen; Levin, Yakir S.; Tropp, James; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Hurd, Ralph E.; Spielman, Daniel M.

    2010-06-01

    A fast spiral chemical shift imaging (CSI) has been developed to address the challenge of the limited acquisition window in hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging. The sequence exploits the sparsity of the spectra and prior knowledge of resonance frequencies to reduce the measurement time by undersampling the data in the spectral domain. As a consequence, multiple reconstructions are necessary for any given data set as only frequency components within a selected bandwidth are reconstructed "in-focus" while components outside that band are severely blurred ("spectral tomosynthesis"). A variable-flip-angle scheme was used for optimal use of the longitudinal magnetization. The sequence was applied to sub-second metabolic imaging of the rat in vivo after injection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]-pyruvate on a clinical 3T MR scanner. The comparison with conventional CSI based on phase encoding showed similar signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution in metabolic maps for the substrate and its metabolic products lactate, alanine, and bicarbonate, despite a 50-fold reduction in scan time for the spiral CSI acquisition. The presented results demonstrate that dramatic reductions in scan time are feasible in hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging without a penalty in SNR or spatial resolution.

  10. Multi-channel metabolic imaging, with SENSE reconstruction, of hyperpolarized [1- 13C] pyruvate in a live rat at 3.0 tesla on a clinical MR scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tropp, James; Lupo, Janine M.; Chen, Albert; Calderon, Paul; McCune, Don; Grafendorfer, Thomas; Ozturk-Isik, Esin; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Yen, Yi-Fen; Robb, Fraser; Bok, Robert; Schulte, Rolf; Xu, Duan; Hurd, Ralph; Vigneron, Daniel; Nelson, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    We report metabolic images of 13C, following injection of a bolus of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate in a live rat. The data were acquired on a clinical scanner, using custom coils for volume transmission and array reception. Proton blocking of all carbon resonators enabled proton anatomic imaging with the system body coil, to allow for registration of anatomic and metabolic images, for which good correlation was achieved, with some anatomic features (kidney and heart) clearly visible in a carbon image, without reference to the corresponding proton image. Parallel imaging with sensitivity encoding was used to increase the spatial resolution in the SI direction of the rat. The signal to noise ratio in was in some instances unexpectedly high in the parallel images; variability of the polarization among different trials, plus partial volume effects, are noted as a possible cause of this.

  11. Imaging the time-integrated cerebral metabolic activity with subcellular resolution through nanometer-scale detection of biosynthetic products deriving from (13)C-glucose.

    PubMed

    Takado, Yuhei; Knott, Graham; Humbel, Bruno M; Masoodi, Mojgan; Escrig, Stéphane; Meibom, Anders; Comment, Arnaud

    2015-11-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the brain but also an important source of building blocks for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Little is known about the use of glucose for biosynthesis in tissues at the cellular level. We demonstrate that local cerebral metabolic activity can be mapped in mouse brain tissue by quantitatively imaging the biosynthetic products deriving from [U-(13)C]glucose metabolism using a combination of in situ electron microscopy and secondary ion mass-spectroscopy (NanoSIMS). Images of the (13)C-label incorporated into cerebral ultrastructure with ca. 100 nm resolution allowed us to determine the timescale on which the metabolic products of glucose are incorporated into different cells, their sub-compartments and organelles. These were mapped in astrocytes and neurons in the different layers of the motor cortex. We see evidence for high metabolic activity in neurons via the nucleus (13)C enrichment. We observe that in all the major cell compartments, such as e.g. nucleus and Golgi apparatus, neurons incorporate substantially higher concentrations of (13)C-label than astrocytes. PMID:26409162

  12. (13)C-labeled biochemical probes for the study of cancer metabolism with dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Keshari, Kayvan R

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, advances in metabolic imaging have become dependable tools for the diagnosis and treatment assessment in cancer. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has recently emerged as a promising technology in hyperpolarized (HP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and has reached clinical relevance with the successful visualization of [1-(13)C] pyruvate as a molecular imaging probe in human prostate cancer. This review focuses on introducing representative compounds relevant to metabolism that are characteristic of cancer tissue: aerobic glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism, glutamine addiction and glutamine/glutamate metabolism, and the redox state and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate metabolism. In addition, a brief introduction of probes that can be used to trace necrosis, pH changes, and other pathways relevant to cancer is presented to demonstrate the potential that HP MRI has to revolutionize the use of molecular imaging for diagnosis and assessment of treatments in cancer.

  13. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cardiac metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seeholzer, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques for following the metabolic fate of compounds specifically labeled with /sup 13/C. The goals of the present study are: (1) to develop reliable quantitative procedures for measuring the /sup 13/C enrichment of specific carbon sites in compounds enriched by the metabolism of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates in rat heart, and (2) to use these quantitative measurements of fractional /sup 13/C enrichment within the context of a mathematical flux model describing the carbon flow through the TCA cycle and ancillary pathways, as a means for obtaining unknown flux parameters. Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with various combinations of glucose, acetate, pyruvate, and propionate to achieve steady state flux conditions, followed by perfusion with the same substrates labeled with /sup 13/C in specific carbon sites. The hearts were frozen at different times after addition of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates and neutralized perchloric acid extracts were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The fractional /sup 13/C enrichment (F.E.) of individual carbon sites in different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for saturation and nuclear Overhauser effects. These F.E. measurements by /sup 13/C NMR were validated by the analysis of /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H scalar coupling patterns observed in /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the extracted metabolites. The results obtained from perfusion of hearts glucose plus either (2-/sup 13/C) acetate or (3-/sup 13/C) pyruvate are similar to those obtained by previous investigators using /sup 14/C-labeled substrates.

  14. 13C-based metabolic flux analysis: fundamentals and practice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Isotope-based metabolic flux analysis is one of the emerging technologies applied to system level metabolic phenotype characterization in metabolic engineering. Among the developed approaches, (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis has been established as a standard tool and has been widely applied to quantitative pathway characterization of diverse biological systems. To implement (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in practice, comprehending the underlying mathematical and computational modeling fundamentals is of importance along with carefully conducted experiments and analytical measurements. Such knowledge is also crucial when designing (13)C-labeling experiments and properly acquiring key data sets essential for in vivo flux analysis implementation. In this regard, the modeling fundamentals of (13)C-labeling systems and analytical data processing are the main topics we will deal with in this chapter. Along with this, the relevant numerical optimization techniques are addressed to help implementation of the entire computational procedures aiming at (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in vivo.

  15. A method for simultaneous echo planar imaging of hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate and 13C lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen D.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Lustig, Michael; Kerr, Adam B.; Pauly, John M.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2012-04-01

    A rapid echo planar imaging sequence for dynamic imaging of [1-13C] lactate and [1-13C] pyruvate simultaneously was developed. Frequency-based separation of these metabolites was achieved by spatial shifting in the phase-encoded direction with the appropriate choice of echo spacing. Suppression of the pyruvate-hydrate and alanine resonances is achieved through an optimized spectral-spatial RF waveform. Signal sampling efficiency as a function of pyruvate and lactate excitation angle was simulated using two site exchange models. Dynamic imaging is demonstrated in a transgenic mouse model, and phantom validations of the RF pulse frequency selectivity were performed.

  16. A scientific workflow framework for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Dalman, Tolga; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2016-08-20

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) with (13)C labeling data is a high-precision technique to quantify intracellular reaction rates (fluxes). One of the major challenges of (13)C MFA is the interactivity of the computational workflow according to which the fluxes are determined from the input data (metabolic network model, labeling data, and physiological rates). Here, the workflow assembly is inevitably determined by the scientist who has to consider interacting biological, experimental, and computational aspects. Decision-making is context dependent and requires expertise, rendering an automated evaluation process hardly possible. Here, we present a scientific workflow framework (SWF) for creating, executing, and controlling on demand (13)C MFA workflows. (13)C MFA-specific tools and libraries, such as the high-performance simulation toolbox 13CFLUX2, are wrapped as web services and thereby integrated into a service-oriented architecture. Besides workflow steering, the SWF features transparent provenance collection and enables full flexibility for ad hoc scripting solutions. To handle compute-intensive tasks, cloud computing is supported. We demonstrate how the challenges posed by (13)C MFA workflows can be solved with our approach on the basis of two proof-of-concept use cases.

  17. A scientific workflow framework for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Dalman, Tolga; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2016-08-20

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) with (13)C labeling data is a high-precision technique to quantify intracellular reaction rates (fluxes). One of the major challenges of (13)C MFA is the interactivity of the computational workflow according to which the fluxes are determined from the input data (metabolic network model, labeling data, and physiological rates). Here, the workflow assembly is inevitably determined by the scientist who has to consider interacting biological, experimental, and computational aspects. Decision-making is context dependent and requires expertise, rendering an automated evaluation process hardly possible. Here, we present a scientific workflow framework (SWF) for creating, executing, and controlling on demand (13)C MFA workflows. (13)C MFA-specific tools and libraries, such as the high-performance simulation toolbox 13CFLUX2, are wrapped as web services and thereby integrated into a service-oriented architecture. Besides workflow steering, the SWF features transparent provenance collection and enables full flexibility for ad hoc scripting solutions. To handle compute-intensive tasks, cloud computing is supported. We demonstrate how the challenges posed by (13)C MFA workflows can be solved with our approach on the basis of two proof-of-concept use cases. PMID:26721184

  18. Compartmentation of glycogen metabolism revealed from 13C isotopologue distributions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Stable isotope tracers are used to assess metabolic flux profiles in living cells. The existing methods of measurement average out the isotopic isomer distribution in metabolites throughout the cell, whereas the knowledge of compartmental organization of analyzed pathways is crucial for the evaluation of true fluxes. That is why we accepted a challenge to create a software tool that allows deciphering the compartmentation of metabolites based on the analysis of average isotopic isomer distribution. Results The software Isodyn, which simulates the dynamics of isotopic isomer distribution in central metabolic pathways, was supplemented by algorithms facilitating the transition between various analyzed metabolic schemes, and by the tools for model discrimination. It simulated 13C isotope distributions in glucose, lactate, glutamate and glycogen, measured by mass spectrometry after incubation of hepatocytes in the presence of only labeled glucose or glucose and lactate together (with label either in glucose or lactate). The simulations assumed either a single intracellular hexose phosphate pool, or also channeling of hexose phosphates resulting in a different isotopic composition of glycogen. Model discrimination test was applied to check the consistency of both models with experimental data. Metabolic flux profiles, evaluated with the accepted model that assumes channeling, revealed the range of changes in metabolic fluxes in liver cells. Conclusions The analysis of compartmentation of metabolic networks based on the measured 13C distribution was included in Isodyn as a routine procedure. The advantage of this implementation is that, being a part of evaluation of metabolic fluxes, it does not require additional experiments to study metabolic compartmentation. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the distribution of measured 13C-labeled glucose metabolites is inconsistent with the idea of perfect mixing of hexose phosphates in cytosol. In contrast

  19. In vivo hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopic imaging with 1H decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Albert P.; Tropp, James; Hurd, Ralph E.; Van Criekinge, Mark; Carvajal, Lucas G.; Xu, Duan; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2009-03-01

    Application of 13C MRS in vivo on whole body MR system has been limited due to the low static field (and consequent low signal to noise ratio—SNR) of these scanners; thus there have been few reports of 1H decoupled 13C MRS in vivo using a clinical MR platform. The recent development of techniques to retain highly polarized spins in solution following DNP in a solid matrix has provided a mechanism to use endogenous pre-polarized 13C labeled substrates to study real time cellular metabolism in vivo with high SNR. In a recent in vivo hyperpolarized metabolic imaging study using 13C pyruvate, it has been demonstrated that the line shape (signal decay) of the resonances observed are greatly affected by JCH coupling in addition to inhomogeneous broadening. This study demonstrates the feasibility of improving hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging in vivo by incorporating 1H decoupling on a clinical whole body 3 T MR scanner. No reduction of T1 of a pre-polarized 13C substrate ([1- 13C] lactate) in solution was observed when 1H decoupling was applied with WALTZ16 sequence. Narrower linewidth for the [1- 13C] lactate resonance was observed in hyperpolarized 13C MRSI data in vivo with 1H decoupling.

  20. Proline Metabolism in the Wild-Type and in a Salt-Tolerant Mutant of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia Studied by 13C-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Roosens, Nancy H.; Willem, Rudolph; Li, Yan; Verbruggen, Ingrid; Biesemans, Monique; Jacobs, Michel

    1999-01-01

    To obtain insight into the link between proline (Pro) accumulation and the increase in osmotolerance in higher plants, we investigated the biochemical basis for the NaCl tolerance of a Nicotiana plumbaginifolia mutant (RNa) that accumulates Pro. Pro biosynthesis and catabolism were investigated in both wild-type and mutant lines. 13C-Nuclear magnetic resonance with [5-13C]glutamate (Glu) as the Pro precursor was used to provide insight into the mechanism of Pro accumulation via the Glu pathway. After 24 h under 200 mm NaCl stress in the presence of [5-13C]Glu, a significant enrichment in [5-13C]Pro was observed compared with non-stress conditions in both the wild type (P2) and the mutant (RNa). Moreover, under the same conditions, [5-13C]Pro was clearly synthesized in higher amounts in RNa than in P2. On the other hand, measurements of enzyme activities indicate that neither the biosynthesis via the ornithine pathway, nor the catabolism via the Pro oxidation pathway were affected in the RNa mutant. Finally, the regulatory effect exerted by Pro on its biosynthesis was evaluated. In P2 plantlets, exogenous Pro markedly reduced the conversion of [5-13C]Glu into [5-13C]Pro, whereas Pro feedback inhibition was not detected in the RNa plantlets. It is proposed that the origin of tolerance in the RNa mutant is due to a mutation leading to a substantial reduction of the feedback inhibition normally exerted in a wild-type (P2) plant by Pro at the level of the Δ-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase enzyme. PMID:10594115

  1. Transport and imaging of brute-force (13)C hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Smith, Bryce A; Mattingly, Mark; Goloshevsky, Artem G; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate transport of hyperpolarized frozen 1-(13)C pyruvic acid from its site of production to a nearby facility, where a time series of (13)C images was acquired from the aqueous dissolution product. Transportability is tied to the hyperpolarization (HP) method we employ, which omits radical electron species used in other approaches that would otherwise relax away the HP before reaching the imaging center. In particular, we attained (13)C HP by 'brute-force', i.e., using only low temperature and high-field (e.g., T<∼2K and B∼14T) to pre-polarize protons to a large Boltzmann value (∼0.4% (1)H polarization). After polarizing the neat, frozen sample, ejection quickly (<1s) passed it through a low field (B<100G) to establish the (1)H pre-polarization spin temperature on (13)C via the process known as low-field thermal mixing (yielding ∼0.1% (13)C polarization). By avoiding polarization agents (a.k.a. relaxation agents) that are needed to hyperpolarize by the competing method of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP), the (13)C relaxation time was sufficient to transport the sample for ∼10min before finally dissolving in warm water and obtaining a (13)C image of the hyperpolarized, dilute, aqueous product (∼0.01% (13)C polarization, a >100-fold gain over thermal signals in the 1T scanner). An annealing step, prior to polarizing the sample, was also key for increasing T1∼30-fold during transport. In that time, HP was maintained using only modest cryogenics and field (T∼60K and B=1.3T), for T1((13)C) near 5min. Much greater time and distance (with much smaller losses) may be covered using more-complete annealing and only slight improvements on transport conditions (e.g., yielding T1∼5h at 30K, 2T), whereas even intercity transfer is possible (T1>20h) at reasonable conditions of 6K and 2T. Finally, it is possible to increase the overall enhancement near d-DNP levels (i.e., 10(2)-fold more) by polarizing below 100mK, where nanoparticle

  2. Transport and imaging of brute-force 13C hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Smith, Bryce A.; Mattingly, Mark; Goloshevsky, Artem G.; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate transport of hyperpolarized frozen 1-13C pyruvic acid from its site of production to a nearby facility, where a time series of 13C images was acquired from the aqueous dissolution product. Transportability is tied to the hyperpolarization (HP) method we employ, which omits radical electron species used in other approaches that would otherwise relax away the HP before reaching the imaging center. In particular, we attained 13C HP by 'brute-force', i.e., using only low temperature and high-field (e.g., T < ∼2 K and B ∼ 14 T) to pre-polarize protons to a large Boltzmann value (∼0.4% 1H polarization). After polarizing the neat, frozen sample, ejection quickly (<1 s) passed it through a low field (B < 100 G) to establish the 1H pre-polarization spin temperature on 13C via the process known as low-field thermal mixing (yielding ∼0.1% 13C polarization). By avoiding polarization agents (a.k.a. relaxation agents) that are needed to hyperpolarize by the competing method of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP), the 13C relaxation time was sufficient to transport the sample for ∼10 min before finally dissolving in warm water and obtaining a 13C image of the hyperpolarized, dilute, aqueous product (∼0.01% 13C polarization, a >100-fold gain over thermal signals in the 1 T scanner). An annealing step, prior to polarizing the sample, was also key for increasing T1 ∼ 30-fold during transport. In that time, HP was maintained using only modest cryogenics and field (T ∼ 60 K and B = 1.3 T), for T1(13C) near 5 min. Much greater time and distance (with much smaller losses) may be covered using more-complete annealing and only slight improvements on transport conditions (e.g., yielding T1 ∼ 5 h at 30 K, 2 T), whereas even intercity transfer is possible (T1 > 20 h) at reasonable conditions of 6 K and 2 T. Finally, it is possible to increase the overall enhancement near d-DNP levels (i.e., 102-fold more) by polarizing below 100 mK, where

  3. Optimized [1-13C]glucose infusion protocol for 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 Tesla of human brain glucose metabolism under euglycemic and hypoglycemic conditions

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Kim C.C.; van der Graaf, Marinette; Tack, Cees J.J.; Klomp, Dennis W.J.; Heerschap, Arend; de Galan, Bastiaan E.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of insulin-induced hypoglycemia on cerebral glucose metabolism is largely unknown. 13C MRS is a unique tool to study cerebral glucose metabolism, but the concurrent requirement for [1-13C]glucose administration limits its use under hypoglycemic conditions. To facilitate 13C MRS data analysis we designed separate [1-13C]glucose infusion protocols for hyperinsulinemic euglycemic and hypoglycemic clamps in such a way that plasma isotopic enrichment of glucose was stable and comparable under both glycemic conditions. 13C MR spectra were acquired with optimized 13C MRS measurement techniques to obtain high quality 13C MR spectra with these protocols. PMID:19913052

  4. 13C metabolic flux analysis at a genome-scale.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Saratram; Maranas, Costas D

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic models used in 13C metabolic flux analysis generally include a limited number of reactions primarily from central metabolism. They typically omit degradation pathways, complete cofactor balances, and atom transition contributions for reactions outside central metabolism. This study addresses the impact on prediction fidelity of scaling-up mapping models to a genome-scale. The core mapping model employed in this study accounts for (75 reactions and 65 metabolites) primarily from central metabolism. The genome-scale metabolic mapping model (GSMM) (697 reaction and 595 metabolites) is constructed using as a basis the iAF1260 model upon eliminating reactions guaranteed not to carry flux based on growth and fermentation data for a minimal glucose growth medium. Labeling data for 17 amino acid fragments obtained from cells fed with glucose labeled at the second carbon was used to obtain fluxes and ranges. Metabolic fluxes and confidence intervals are estimated, for both core and genome-scale mapping models, by minimizing the sum of square of differences between predicted and experimentally measured labeling patterns using the EMU decomposition algorithm. Overall, we find that both topology and estimated values of the metabolic fluxes remain largely consistent between core and GSM model. Stepping up to a genome-scale mapping model leads to wider flux inference ranges for 20 key reactions present in the core model. The glycolysis flux range doubles due to the possibility of active gluconeogenesis, the TCA flux range expanded by 80% due to the availability of a bypass through arginine consistent with labeling data, and the transhydrogenase reaction flux was essentially unresolved due to the presence of as many as five routes for the inter-conversion of NADPH to NADH afforded by the genome-scale model. By globally accounting for ATP demands in the GSMM model the unused ATP decreased drastically with the lower bound matching the maintenance ATP requirement. A non

  5. Kinetic modeling of hyperpolarized 13C 1-pyruvate metabolism in normal rats and TRAMP mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierhut, Matthew L.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Chen, Albert P.; Bok, Robert; Albers, Mark J.; Zhang, Vickie; Tropp, Jim; Park, Ilwoo; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Kurhanewicz, John; Hurd, Ralph E.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2010-01-01

    PurposeTo investigate metabolic exchange between 13C 1-pyruvate, 13C 1-lactate, and 13C 1-alanine in pre-clinical model systems using kinetic modeling of dynamic hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopic data and to examine the relationship between fitted parameters and dose-response. Materials and methodsDynamic 13C spectroscopy data were acquired in normal rats, wild type mice, and mice with transgenic prostate tumors (TRAMP) either within a single slice or using a one-dimensional echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (1D-EPSI) encoding technique. Rate constants were estimated by fitting a set of exponential equations to the dynamic data. Variations in fitted parameters were used to determine model robustness in 15 mm slices centered on normal rat kidneys. Parameter values were used to investigate differences in metabolism between and within TRAMP and wild type mice. ResultsThe kinetic model was shown here to be robust when fitting data from a rat given similar doses. In normal rats, Michaelis-Menten kinetics were able to describe the dose-response of the fitted exchange rate constants with a 13.65% and 16.75% scaled fitting error (SFE) for kpyr→lac and kpyr→ala, respectively. In TRAMP mice, kpyr→lac increased an average of 94% after up to 23 days of disease progression, whether the mice were untreated or treated with casodex. Parameters estimated from dynamic 13C 1D-EPSI data were able to differentiate anatomical structures within both wild type and TRAMP mice. ConclusionsThe metabolic parameters estimated using this approach may be useful for in vivo monitoring of tumor progression and treatment efficacy, as well as to distinguish between various tissues based on metabolic activity.

  6. Novel Imaging Contrast Methods for Hyperpolarized 13 C Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen Durant

    Magnetic resonance imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled small molecules has emerged as an extremely powerful tool for the in vivo monitoring of perfusion and metabolism. This work presents methods for improved imaging, parameter mapping, and image contrast generation for in vivo hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Angiography using hyperpolarized urea was greatly improved with a highly T2-weighted acquisition in combination with 15N labeling of the urea amide groups. This is due to the fact that the T2 of [13C]urea is strongly limited by the scalar coupling to the neighboring quadrupolar 14N. The long in vivo T2 values of [13C, 15N2]urea were utilized for sub-millimeter projection angiography using a contrast agent that could be safely injected in concentrations of 10-100 mM while still tolerated in patients with renal insufficiency. This study also presented the first method for in vivo T2 mapping of hyperpolarized 13C compounds. The in vivo T2 of urea was short in the blood and long within the kidneys. This persistent signal component was isolated to the renal filtrate, thus enabling for the first time direct detection of an imaging contrast agent undergoing glomerular filtration. While highly T2-weighted acquisitions select for molecules with short rotational correlation times, high diffusion weighting selects for those with the long translational correlation times. A specialized spin-echo EPI sequence was developed in order to generate highly diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized 13C images on a clinical MRI system operating within clinical peak- RF and gradient amplitude constraints. Low power adiabatic spin echo pulses were developed in order to generate a sufficiently large refocused bandwidth while maintaining low nominal power. This diffusion weighted acquisition gave enhanced tumor contrast-to-noise ratio when imaging [1-13C]lactate after infusion of [1-13C]pyruvate. Finally, the first in-man hyperpolarized 13C MRI clinical trial is discussed.

  7. Evaluation of 13C isotopic tracers for metabolic flux analysis in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, Christian M.; Walther, Jason L.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is the most comprehensive means of characterizing cellular metabolic states. Uniquely labeled isotopic tracers enable more focused analyses to probe specific reactions within the network. As a result, the choice of tracer largely determines the precision with which one can estimate metabolic fluxes, especially in complex mammalian systems that require multiple substrates. Here we have experimentally determined metabolic fluxes in a tumor cell line, successfully recapitulating the hallmarks of cancer cell metabolism. Using these data, we computationally evaluated specifically labeled 13C glucose and glutamine tracers for their ability to precisely and accurately estimate fluxes in central carbon metabolism. These methods enabled us to to identify the optimal tracer for analyzing individual fluxes, specific pathways, and central carbon metabolism as a whole. [1,2-13C2]glucose provided the most precise estimates for glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the overall network. Tracers such as [2-13C]glucose and [3-13C]glucose also outperformed the more commonly used [1-13C]glucose. [U-13C5]glutamine emerged as the preferred isotopic tracer for analysis of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. These results provide valuable, quantitative information on the performance of 13C-labeled substrates and can aid in the design of more informative MFA experiments in mammalian cell culture. PMID:19622376

  8. Effects of fasting on serial measurements of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate metabolism in tumors.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Eva M; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Gallagher, Ferdia A; Kettunen, Mikko I; Kennedy, Brett W C; Vowler, Sarah L; Burling, Keith A; Brindle, Kevin M

    2016-08-01

    Imaging of the metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate has shown considerable promise in preclinical studies in oncology, particularly for the assessment of early treatment response. The repeatability of measurements of (13) C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate was determined in a murine lymphoma model in fasted and non-fasted animals. The fasted state showed lower intra-individual variability, although the [1-(13) C]lactate/[1-(13) C]pyruvate signal ratio was significantly greater in fasted than in non-fasted mice, which may be explained by the higher tumor lactate concentrations in fasted animals. These results indicate that the fasted state may be preferable for the measurement of (13) C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate, as it reduces the variability and therefore should make it easier to detect the effects of therapy. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27309986

  9. Effects of fasting on serial measurements of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate metabolism in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Eva M.; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Gallagher, Ferdia A.; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Kennedy, Brett W. C.; Vowler, Sarah L.; Burling, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the metabolism of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate has shown considerable promise in preclinical studies in oncology, particularly for the assessment of early treatment response. The repeatability of measurements of 13C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate was determined in a murine lymphoma model in fasted and non‐fasted animals. The fasted state showed lower intra‐individual variability, although the [1‐13C]lactate/[1‐13C]pyruvate signal ratio was significantly greater in fasted than in non‐fasted mice, which may be explained by the higher tumor lactate concentrations in fasted animals. These results indicate that the fasted state may be preferable for the measurement of 13C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate, as it reduces the variability and therefore should make it easier to detect the effects of therapy. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27309986

  10. Design of a sup 13 C (1H) RF probe for monitoring the in vivo metabolism of (1- sup 13 C)glucose in primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, B.E.; Sacks, W.; Bigler, R.E.; Hennessy, M.J.; Sacks, S.; Fleischer, A.; Zanzonico, P.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of an RF probe suitable for obtaining proton-decoupled {sup 13}C spectra from a subhuman primate brain is described. Two orthogonal saddle coils, one tuned to the resonant frequency of {sup 13}C and the other to the resonant frequency of 1H, were used to monitor the in vivo metabolism of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose in rhesus monkey brain at 2.1 T. Difference spectra showed the appearance of {sup 13}C-enriched glutamate and glutamine 30 to 40 min after a bolus injection of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose.

  11. Refined Analysis of Brain Energy Metabolism Using In Vivo Dynamic Enrichment of 13C Multiplets

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani M., Masoumeh; Duarte, João M. N.; Kunz, Nicolas; Gruetter, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with the infusion of 13C-labeled precursors is a unique approach to study in vivo brain energy metabolism. Incorporating the maximum information available from in vivo localized 13C spectra is of importance to get broader knowledge on cerebral metabolic pathways. Metabolic rates can be quantitatively determined from the rate of 13C incorporation into amino acid neurotransmitters such as glutamate and glutamine using suitable mathematical models. The time course of multiplets arising from 13C-13C coupling between adjacent carbon atoms was expected to provide additional information for metabolic modeling leading to potential improvements in the estimation of metabolic parameters. The aim of the present study was to extend two-compartment neuronal/glial modeling to include dynamics of 13C isotopomers available from fine structure multiplets in 13C spectra of glutamate and glutamine measured in vivo in rats brain at 14.1 T, termed bonded cumomer approach. Incorporating the labeling time courses of 13C multiplets of glutamate and glutamine resulted in elevated precision of the estimated fluxes in rat brain as well as reduced correlations between them. PMID:26969691

  12. Metabolic networks in motion: 13C-based flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    Many properties of complex networks cannot be understood from monitoring the components--not even when comprehensively monitoring all protein or metabolite concentrations--unless such information is connected and integrated through mathematical models. The reason is that static component concentrations, albeit extremely informative, do not contain functional information per se. The functional behavior of a network emerges only through the nonlinear gene, protein, and metabolite interactions across multiple metabolic and regulatory layers. I argue here that intracellular reaction rates are the functional end points of these interactions in metabolic networks, hence are highly relevant for systems biology. Methods for experimental determination of metabolic fluxes differ fundamentally from component concentration measurements; that is, intracellular reaction rates cannot be detected directly, but must be estimated through computer model-based interpretation of stable isotope patterns in products of metabolism.

  13. Hyperpolarized (13)C Magnetic Resonance and Its Use in Metabolic Assessment of Cultured Cells and Perfused Organs.

    PubMed

    Lumata, Lloyd; Yang, Chendong; Ragavan, Mukundan; Carpenter, Nicholas; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Merritt, Matthew E

    2015-01-01

    Diseased tissue is often characterized by abnormalities in intermediary metabolism. Observing these alterations in situ may lead to an improved understanding of pathological processes and novel ways to monitor these processes noninvasively in human patients. Although (13)C is a stable isotope safe for use in animal models of disease as well as human subjects, its utility as a metabolic tracer has largely been limited to ex vivo analyses employing analytical techniques like mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Neither of these techniques is suitable for noninvasive metabolic monitoring, and the low abundance and poor gyromagnetic ratio of conventional (13)C make it a poor nucleus for imaging. However, the recent advent of hyperpolarization methods, particularly dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), makes it possible to enhance the spin polarization state of (13)C by many orders of magnitude, resulting in a temporary amplification of the signal sufficient for monitoring kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in living tissue through magnetic resonance spectroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging. Here, we review DNP techniques to monitor metabolism in cultured cells, perfused hearts, and perfused livers, focusing on our experiences with hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. We present detailed approaches to optimize the DNP procedure, streamline biological sample preparation, and maximize detection of specific metabolic activities. We also discuss practical aspects in the choice of metabolic substrates for hyperpolarization studies and outline some of the current technical and conceptual challenges in the field, including efforts to use hyperpolarization to quantify metabolic rates in vivo.

  14. Insights into the metabolic response to traumatic brain injury as revealed by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bartnik-Olson, Brenda L.; Harris, Neil G.; Shijo, Katsunori; Sutton, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The present review highlights critical issues related to cerebral metabolism following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the use of 13C labeled substrates and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study these changes. First we address some pathophysiologic factors contributing to metabolic dysfunction following TBI. We then examine how 13C NMR spectroscopy strategies have been used to investigate energy metabolism, neurotransmission, the intracellular redox state, and neuroglial compartmentation following injury. 13C NMR spectroscopy studies of brain extracts from animal models of TBI have revealed enhanced glycolytic production of lactate, evidence of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activation, and alterations in neuronal and astrocyte oxidative metabolism that are dependent on injury severity. Differential incorporation of label into glutamate and glutamine from 13C labeled glucose or acetate also suggest TBI-induced adaptations to the glutamate-glutamine cycle. PMID:24109452

  15. A Large Metabolic Carbon Ccontribution to the δ13C Record in Marine Aragonitic Bivalve Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, D. P.; Lorrain, A.; Dehairs, F.

    2006-12-01

    The stable carbon isotopic signature archived in bivalve shells was originally thought to record the δ13C of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC). However, more recent studies have shown that the incorporation of isotopically light metabolic carbon (M) significantly affects the δ13C signal recorded in biogenic carbonates. To assess the M contribution to Mercenaria mercenaria shells collected in North Carolina, USA, we sampled seawater δ13C-DIC, tissue, hemolymph and shell δ13C. We found up to a 4‰ decrease through ontogeny in shell δ13C in a 23 year old individual. There was no correlation between shell height or age and tissue δ13C. Thus, the ontogenic decrease observed in the shell δ13C could not be attributed to changes in food sources as the animal ages leading to more negative metabolic CO2, since this would require a negative relationship between tissue δ13C and shell height. Hemolymph δ13C, on the other hand, did exhibit a negative relationship with height, but the δ13C values were more positive than expected, indicating that hemolymph may not be a good proxy of extrapallial fluid δ13C. Nevertheless, the hemolymph data indicate that respired CO2 does influence the δ13C of internal fluids and that the amount of respired CO2 is related to the age of the bivalve. The percent metabolic C incorporated into the shell (%M) was significantly higher (up to 37%) than has been found in other bivalve shells, which usually contain less than 10 %M. Attempts to use shell biometrics to predict %M could not explain more than ~60% of the observed variability. Moreover, there were large differences in the %M between different sites. Thus, the metabolic effect on shell δ13C cannot easily be accounted for to allow reliable δ13C-DIC reconstructions. However, there does seem to be a common effect of size, as all sites had indistinguishable slopes between the %M and shell height (+0.19% per mm of shell height).

  16. Hyperpolarized (13)C MR imaging detects no lactate production in mutant IDH1 gliomas: Implications for diagnosis and response monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chaumeil, Myriam M; Radoul, Marina; Najac, Chloé; Eriksson, Pia; Viswanath, Pavithra; Blough, Michael D; Chesnelong, Charles; Luchman, H Artee; Cairncross, J Gregory; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic imaging of brain tumors using (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate is a promising neuroimaging strategy which, after a decade of preclinical success in glioblastoma (GBM) models, is now entering clinical trials in multiple centers. Typically, the presence of GBM has been associated with elevated hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate produced from [1-(13)C] pyruvate, and response to therapy has been associated with a drop in hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate. However, to date, lower grade gliomas had not been investigated using this approach. The most prevalent mutation in lower grade gliomas is the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation, which, in addition to initiating tumor development, also induces metabolic reprogramming. In particular, mutant IDH1 gliomas are associated with low levels of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) and monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4), three proteins involved in pyruvate metabolism to lactate. We therefore investigated the potential of (13)C MRS of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate for detection of mutant IDH1 gliomas and for monitoring of their therapeutic response. We studied patient-derived mutant IDH1 glioma cells that underexpress LDHA, MCT1 and MCT4, and wild-type IDH1 GBM cells that express high levels of these proteins. Mutant IDH1 cells and tumors produced significantly less hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate compared to GBM, consistent with their metabolic reprogramming. Furthermore, hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate production was not affected by chemotherapeutic treatment with temozolomide (TMZ) in mutant IDH1 tumors, in contrast to previous reports in GBM. Our results demonstrate the unusual metabolic imaging profile of mutant IDH1 gliomas, which, when combined with other clinically available imaging methods, could be used to detect the presence of the IDH1 mutation in vivo. PMID:27437179

  17. Metabolism of [13C5]hydroxyproline in vitro and in vivo: implications for primary hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Juquan; Johnson, Lynnette C.; Knight, John; Callahan, Michael F.; Riedel, Travis J.; Holmes, Ross P.

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyproline (Hyp) metabolism is a key source of glyoxylate production in the body and may be a major contributor to excessive oxalate production in the primary hyperoxalurias where glyoxylate metabolism is impaired. Important gaps in our knowledge include identification of the tissues with the capacity to degrade Hyp and the development of model systems to study this metabolism and how to suppress it. The expression of mRNA for enzymes in the pathway was examined in 15 different human tissues. Expression of the complete pathway was identified in liver, kidney, pancreas, and small intestine. HepG2 cells also expressed these mRNAs and enzymes and were shown to metabolize Hyp in the culture medium to glycolate, glycine, and oxalate. [18O]- and [13C5]Hyp were synthesized and evaluated for their use with in vitro and in vivo models. [18O]Hyp was not suitable because of an apparent tautomerism of [18O]glyoxylate between enol and hydrated forms, which resulted in a loss of isotope. [13C5]Hyp, however, was metabolized to [13C2]glycolate, [13C2]glycine, and [13C2]oxalate in vitro in HepG2 cells and in vivo in mice infused with [13C5]Hyp. These model systems should be valuable tools for exploring various aspects of Hyp metabolism and will be useful in determining whether blocking Hyp catabolism is an effective therapy in the treatment of primary hyperoxaluria. PMID:22207577

  18. Hyperpolarized [1,3-13C2 ]ethyl acetoacetate is a novel diagnostic metabolic marker of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pernille R; Serra, Sonia Colombo; Miragoli, Luigi; Karlsson, Magnus; Cabella, Claudia; Poggi, Luisa; Venturi, Luca; Tedoldi, Fabio; Lerche, Mathilde H

    2015-02-15

    An increased prevalence of liver diseases such as hepatitis C and nonalcoholic fatty liver results in an augmented incidence of the most common form of liver cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC is most often found in the cirrhotic liver and it can therefore be challenging to rely on anatomical information alone when diagnosing HCC. Valuable information on specific cellular metabolism can be obtained with high sensitivity thanks to an emerging magnetic resonance (MR) technique that uses 13C labeled hyperpolarized molecules. Our interest was to explore potential new high contrast metabolic markers of HCC using hyperpolarized 13C-MR. This work led to the identification of a class of substrates, low molecular weight ethyl-esters, which showed high specificity for carboxyl esterases and proved in many cases to possess good properties for signal enhancement. In particular, hyperpolarized [1,3-13C2 ]ethyl acetoacetate (EAA) was shown to provide a metabolic fingerprint of HCC. Using this substrate a liver cancer implanted in rats was diagnosed as a consequence of an ∼4 times higher metabolic substrate-to-product ratio than in the surrounding healthy tissue, (p=0.009). Unregulated cellular uptake as well as cosubstrate independent enzymatic conversion of EAA, made this substrate highly useful as a hyperpolarized 13C-MR marker. This could be appreciated by the signal-to-noise (SNR) obtained from EAA, which was comparable to the SNR reported in a literature liver cancer study with state-of-the-art hyperpolarized substrate, [1-13C]pyruvate. Also, the contrast-to-noise (CNR) in the EAA based metabolic ratio images was significantly improved compared with the CNR in equivalent images reported using [1-13C]pyruvate.

  19. Multiband excitation pulses for hyperpolarized 13C dynamic chemical-shift imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kerr, Adam B.; Chen, Albert P.; Lustig, Michael S.; Zierhut, Matthew L.; Hu, Simon; Cunningham, Charles H.; Pauly, John M.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2008-09-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C offers high signal-to-noise ratios for imaging metabolic activity in vivo, but care must be taken when designing pulse sequences because the magnetization cannot be recovered once it has decayed. It has a short lifetime, on the order of minutes, and gets used up by each RF excitation. In this paper, we present a new dynamic chemical-shift imaging method that uses specialized RF pulses designed to maintain most of the hyperpolarized substrate while providing adequate SNR for the metabolic products. These are multiband, variable flip angle, spectral-spatial RF pulses that use spectral selectivity to minimally excite the injected prepolarized 13C-pyruvate substrate. The metabolic products of lactate and alanine are excited with a larger flip angle to increase SNR. This excitation was followed by an RF amplitude insensitive double spin-echo and an echo-planar flyback spectral-spatial readout gradient. In vivo results in rats and mice are presented showing improvements over constant flip angle RF pulses. The metabolic products are observable for a longer window because the low pyruvate flip angle preserves magnetization, allowing for improved observation of spatially varying metabolic reactions.

  20. In vivo single-shot 13C spectroscopic imaging of hyperpolarized metabolites by spatiotemporal encoding

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Rita; Laustsen, Christoffer; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Serrao, Eva M.; Marco-Rius, Irene; Brindle, Kevin M.; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolic imaging is a growing field that has provided a tool for analyzing metabolism, particularly in cancer. Given the short life times of the hyperpolarized signal, fast and effective spectroscopic imaging methods compatible with dynamic metabolic characterizations are necessary. Several approaches have been customized for hyperpolarized 13C MRI, including CSI with a center-out k-space encoding, EPSI, and spectrally selective pulses in combination with spiral EPI acquisitions. Recent studies have described the potential of single-shot alternatives based on spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) principles, to derive chemical-shift images within a sub-second period. By contrast to EPSI, SPEN does not require oscillating acquisition gradients to deliver chemical-shift information: its signal encodes both spatial as well as chemical shift information, at no extra cost in experimental complexity. SPEN MRI sequences with slice-selection and arbitrary excitation pulses can also be devised, endowing SPEN with the potential to deliver single-shot multi-slice chemical shift images, with a temporal resolution required for hyperpolarized dynamic metabolic imaging. The present work demonstrates this with initial in vivo results obtained from SPEN-based imaging of pyruvate and its metabolic products, after injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. Multi-slice chemical-shift images of healthy rats were obtained at 4.7 T in the region of the kidney, and 4D (2D spatial, 1D spectral, 1D temporal) data sets were obtained at 7 T from a murine lymphoma tumor model. PMID:24486720

  1. In vivo single-shot 13C spectroscopic imaging of hyperpolarized metabolites by spatiotemporal encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Rita; Laustsen, Christoffer; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Serrao, Eva M.; Marco-Rius, Irene; Brindle, Kevin M.; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-03-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolic imaging is a growing field that has provided a new tool for analyzing metabolism, particularly in cancer. Given the short life times of the hyperpolarized signal, fast and effective spectroscopic imaging methods compatible with dynamic metabolic characterizations are necessary. Several approaches have been customized for hyperpolarized 13C MRI, including CSI with a center-out k-space encoding, EPSI, and spectrally selective pulses in combination with spiral EPI acquisitions. Recent studies have described the potential of single-shot alternatives based on spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) principles, to derive chemical-shift images within a sub-second period. By contrast to EPSI, SPEN does not require oscillating acquisition gradients to deliver chemical-shift information: its signal encodes both spatial as well as chemical shift information, at no extra cost in experimental complexity. SPEN MRI sequences with slice-selection and arbitrary excitation pulses can also be devised, endowing SPEN with the potential to deliver single-shot multi-slice chemical shift images, with a temporal resolution required for hyperpolarized dynamic metabolic imaging. The present work demonstrates this with initial in vivo results obtained from SPEN-based imaging of pyruvate and its metabolic products, after injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. Multi-slice chemical-shift images of healthy rats were obtained at 4.7 T in the region of the kidney, and 4D (2D spatial, 1D spectral, 1D temporal) data sets were obtained at 7 T from a murine lymphoma tumor model.

  2. Determination of fructose metabolic pathways in normal and fructose-intolerant children: A sup 13 C NMR study using (U- sup 13 C)fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Gopher, A.; Lapidot, A. ); Vaisman, N. ); Mandel, H. )

    1990-07-01

    An inborn deficiency in the ability of aldolase B to split fructose 1-phosphate is found in humans with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). A stable isotope procedure to elucidate the mechanism of conversion of fructose to glucose in normal children and in HFI children has been developed. A constant infusion of D-(U-{sup 13}C)fructose was given nasogastrically to control and to HFI children. Hepatic fructose conversion to glucose was estimated by examination of {sup 13}C NMR spectra of plasma glucose. Significantly lower values ({approx}3-fold) for fructose conversion to glucose were obtained for the HFI patients as compared to the controls. A quantitative determination of the metabolic pathways of fructose conversion to glucose was derived from {sup 13}C NMR measurement of plasma ({sup 13}C)glucose isotopomer populations. The finding of isotopomer populations of three adjacent {sup 13}C atoms at glucose C-4 ({sup 13}C{sub 3}-{sup 13}C{sub 4}-{sup 13}C{sub 5}) suggests that there is a direct pathway from fructose, by-passing fructose-1-phosphate aldolase, to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The metabolism of fructose by fructose-1-phosphate aldolase activity accounts for only {approx}50% of the total amount of hepatic fructose conversion to glucose. In view of the marked decline by 67% in synthesis of glucose from fructose in HFI subjects found in this study, the extent of ({sup 13}C)glucose formation from a trace amount of (U-{sup 13}C)fructose infused into the patient can be used as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic test for inherent faulty fructose metabolism.

  3. Elucidation of intrinsic biosynthesis yields using 13C-based metabolism analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of 13C-based metabolism analysis for the assessment of intrinsic product yields — the actual carbon contribution from a single carbon substrate to the final product via a specific biosynthesis route — in the following four cases. First, undefined nutrients (such as yeast extract) in fermentation may contribute significantly to product synthesis, which can be quantified through an isotopic dilution method. Second, product and biomass synthesis may be dependent on the co-metabolism of multiple-carbon sources. 13C labeling experiments can track the fate of each carbon substrate in the cell metabolism and identify which substrate plays a main role in product synthesis. Third, 13C labeling can validate and quantify the contribution of the engineered pathway (versus the native pathway) to the product synthesis. Fourth, the loss of catabolic energy due to cell maintenance (energy used for functions other than production of new cell components) and low P/O ratio (Phosphate/Oxygen Ratio) significantly reduces product yields. Therefore, 13C-metabolic flux analysis is needed to assess the influence of suboptimal energy metabolism on microbial productivity, and determine how ATP/NAD(P)H are partitioned among various cellular functions. Since product yield is a major determining factor in the commercialization of a microbial cell factory, we foresee that 13C-isotopic labeling experiments, even without performing extensive flux calculations, can play a valuable role in the development and verification of microbial cell factories. PMID:24642094

  4. Elucidation of intrinsic biosynthesis yields using 13C-based metabolism analysis.

    PubMed

    Varman, Arul M; He, Lian; You, Le; Hollinshead, Whitney; Tang, Yinjie J

    2014-03-19

    This paper discusses the use of 13C-based metabolism analysis for the assessment of intrinsic product yields - the actual carbon contribution from a single carbon substrate to the final product via a specific biosynthesis route - in the following four cases. First, undefined nutrients (such as yeast extract) in fermentation may contribute significantly to product synthesis, which can be quantified through an isotopic dilution method. Second, product and biomass synthesis may be dependent on the co-metabolism of multiple-carbon sources. 13C labeling experiments can track the fate of each carbon substrate in the cell metabolism and identify which substrate plays a main role in product synthesis. Third, 13C labeling can validate and quantify the contribution of the engineered pathway (versus the native pathway) to the product synthesis. Fourth, the loss of catabolic energy due to cell maintenance (energy used for functions other than production of new cell components) and low P/O ratio (Phosphate/Oxygen Ratio) significantly reduces product yields. Therefore, 13C-metabolic flux analysis is needed to assess the influence of suboptimal energy metabolism on microbial productivity, and determine how ATP/NAD(P)H are partitioned among various cellular functions. Since product yield is a major determining factor in the commercialization of a microbial cell factory, we foresee that 13C-isotopic labeling experiments, even without performing extensive flux calculations, can play a valuable role in the development and verification of microbial cell factories.

  5. Compartmentalized Cerebral Metabolism of [1,6-13C]Glucose Determined by in vivo 13C NMR Spectroscopy at 14.1 T

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, João M. N.; Lanz, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral metabolism is compartmentalized between neurons and glia. Although glial glycolysis is thought to largely sustain the energetic requirements of neurotransmission while oxidative metabolism takes place mainly in neurons, this hypothesis is matter of debate. The compartmentalization of cerebral metabolic fluxes can be determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy upon infusion of 13C-enriched compounds, especially glucose. Rats under light α-chloralose anesthesia were infused with [1,6-13C]glucose and 13C enrichment in the brain metabolites was measured by 13C NMR spectroscopy with high sensitivity and spectral resolution at 14.1 T. This allowed determining 13C enrichment curves of amino acid carbons with high reproducibility and to reliably estimate cerebral metabolic fluxes (mean error of 8%). We further found that TCA cycle intermediates are not required for flux determination in mathematical models of brain metabolism. Neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle rate (VTCA) and neurotransmission rate (VNT) were 0.45 ± 0.01 and 0.11 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min, respectively. Glial VTCA was found to be 38 ± 3% of total cerebral oxidative metabolism, accounting for more than half of neuronal oxidative metabolism. Furthermore, glial anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation rate (VPC) was 0.069 ± 0.004 μmol/g/min, i.e., 25 ± 1% of the glial TCA cycle rate. These results support a role of glial cells as active partners of neurons during synaptic transmission beyond glycolytic metabolism. PMID:21713114

  6. A Peptide-Based Method for 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis in Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Amit; Nilmeier, Jerome; Weaver, Daniel; Adams, Paul D.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Petzold, Christopher J.; Martín, Héctor García

    2014-01-01

    The study of intracellular metabolic fluxes and inter-species metabolite exchange for microbial communities is of crucial importance to understand and predict their behaviour. The most authoritative method of measuring intracellular fluxes, 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C MFA), uses the labeling pattern obtained from metabolites (typically amino acids) during 13C labeling experiments to derive intracellular fluxes. However, these metabolite labeling patterns cannot easily be obtained for each of the members of the community. Here we propose a new type of 13C MFA that infers fluxes based on peptide labeling, instead of amino acid labeling. The advantage of this method resides in the fact that the peptide sequence can be used to identify the microbial species it originates from and, simultaneously, the peptide labeling can be used to infer intracellular metabolic fluxes. Peptide identity and labeling patterns can be obtained in a high-throughput manner from modern proteomics techniques. We show that, using this method, it is theoretically possible to recover intracellular metabolic fluxes in the same way as through the standard amino acid based 13C MFA, and quantify the amount of information lost as a consequence of using peptides instead of amino acids. We show that by using a relatively small number of peptides we can counter this information loss. We computationally tested this method with a well-characterized simple microbial community consisting of two species. PMID:25188426

  7. OpenMebius: An Open Source Software for Isotopically Nonstationary 13C-Based Metabolic Flux Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Furusawa, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of metabolic flux by 13C-based metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) provides valuable information regarding cell physiology. Bioinformatics tools have been developed to estimate metabolic flux distributions from the results of tracer isotopic labeling experiments using a 13C-labeled carbon source. Metabolic flux is determined by nonlinear fitting of a metabolic model to the isotopic labeling enrichment of intracellular metabolites measured by mass spectrometry. Whereas 13C-MFA is conventionally performed under isotopically constant conditions, isotopically nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis (INST-13C-MFA) has recently been developed for flux analysis of cells with photosynthetic activity and cells at a quasi-steady metabolic state (e.g., primary cells or microorganisms under stationary phase). Here, the development of a novel open source software for INST-13C-MFA on the Windows platform is reported. OpenMebius (Open source software for Metabolic flux analysis) provides the function of autogenerating metabolic models for simulating isotopic labeling enrichment from a user-defined configuration worksheet. Analysis using simulated data demonstrated the applicability of OpenMebius for INST-13C-MFA. Confidence intervals determined by INST-13C-MFA were less than those determined by conventional methods, indicating the potential of INST-13C-MFA for precise metabolic flux analysis. OpenMebius is the open source software for the general application of INST-13C-MFA. PMID:25006579

  8. OpenMebius: an open source software for isotopically nonstationary 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Kajihata, Shuichi; Furusawa, Chikara; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of metabolic flux by (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) provides valuable information regarding cell physiology. Bioinformatics tools have been developed to estimate metabolic flux distributions from the results of tracer isotopic labeling experiments using a (13)C-labeled carbon source. Metabolic flux is determined by nonlinear fitting of a metabolic model to the isotopic labeling enrichment of intracellular metabolites measured by mass spectrometry. Whereas (13)C-MFA is conventionally performed under isotopically constant conditions, isotopically nonstationary (13)C metabolic flux analysis (INST-(13)C-MFA) has recently been developed for flux analysis of cells with photosynthetic activity and cells at a quasi-steady metabolic state (e.g., primary cells or microorganisms under stationary phase). Here, the development of a novel open source software for INST-(13)C-MFA on the Windows platform is reported. OpenMebius (Open source software for Metabolic flux analysis) provides the function of autogenerating metabolic models for simulating isotopic labeling enrichment from a user-defined configuration worksheet. Analysis using simulated data demonstrated the applicability of OpenMebius for INST-(13)C-MFA. Confidence intervals determined by INST-(13)C-MFA were less than those determined by conventional methods, indicating the potential of INST-(13)C-MFA for precise metabolic flux analysis. OpenMebius is the open source software for the general application of INST-(13)C-MFA.

  9. HYPERPOLARIZED 13C MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ITS USE IN METABOLIC ASSESSMENT OF CULTURED CELLS AND PERFUSED ORGANS

    PubMed Central

    Lumata, Lloyd; Yang, Chendong; Ragavan, Mukundan; Carpenter, Nicholas; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Merritt, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Diseased tissue is often characterized by abnormalities in intermediary metabolism. Observing these alterations in situ may lead to an improved understanding of pathological processes and novel ways to monitor these processes non-invasively in human patients. Although 13C is a stable isotope safe for use in animal models of disease as well as human subjects, its utility as a metabolic tracer has largely been limited to ex vivo analyses employing analytical techniques like mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Neither of these techniques is suitable for non-invasive metabolic monitoring, and the low abundance and poor gyromagnetic ratio of conventional 13C make it a poor nucleus for imaging. However, the recent advent of hyperpolarization methods, particularly dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), make it possible to enhance the spin polarization state of 13C by many orders of magnitude, resulting in a temporary amplification of the signal sufficient for monitoring kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in living tissue through magnetic resonance spectroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging. Here we review DNP techniques to monitor metabolism in cultured cells, perfused hearts, and perfused livers, focusing on our experiences with hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. We present detailed approaches to optimize the DNP procedure, streamline biological sample preparation, and maximize detection of specific metabolic activities. We also discuss practical aspects in the choice of metabolic substrates for hyperpolarization studies, and outline some of the current technical and conceptual challenges in the field, including efforts to use hyperpolarization to quantify metabolic rates in vivo. PMID:26358902

  10. Real-time assessment of Krebs cycle metabolism using hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Marie A; Atherton, Helen J; Ball, Daniel R; Cole, Mark A; Heather, Lisa C; Griffin, Julian L; Clarke, Kieran; Radda, George K; Tyler, Damian J

    2009-08-01

    The Krebs cycle plays a fundamental role in cardiac energy production and is often implicated in the energetic imbalance characteristic of heart disease. In this study, we measured Krebs cycle flux in real time in perfused rat hearts using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). [2-(13)C]Pyruvate was hyperpolarized and infused into isolated perfused hearts in both healthy and postischemic metabolic states. We followed the enzymatic conversion of pyruvate to lactate, acetylcarnitine, citrate, and glutamate with 1 s temporal resolution. The appearance of (13)C-labeled glutamate was delayed compared with that of other metabolites, indicating that Krebs cycle flux can be measured directly. The production of (13)C-labeled citrate and glutamate was decreased postischemia, as opposed to lactate, which was significantly elevated. These results showed that the control and fluxes of the Krebs cycle in heart disease can be studied using hyperpolarized [2-(13)C]pyruvate.

  11. A comparison of quantitative methods for clinical imaging with hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Charlie J; McLean, Mary A; Schulte, Rolf F; Robb, Fraser J; Gill, Andrew B; McGlashan, Nicholas; Graves, Martin J; Schwaiger, Markus; Lomas, David J; Brindle, Kevin M; Gallagher, Ferdia A

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enables the metabolism of hyperpolarized (13)C-labelled molecules, such as the conversion of [1-(13)C]pyruvate to [1-(13)C]lactate, to be dynamically and non-invasively imaged in tissue. Imaging of this exchange reaction in animal models has been shown to detect early treatment response and correlate with tumour grade. The first human DNP study has recently been completed, and, for widespread clinical translation, simple and reliable methods are necessary to accurately probe the reaction in patients. However, there is currently no consensus on the most appropriate method to quantify this exchange reaction. In this study, an in vitro system was used to compare several kinetic models, as well as simple model-free methods. Experiments were performed using a clinical hyperpolarizer, a human 3 T MR system, and spectroscopic imaging sequences. The quantitative methods were compared in vivo by using subcutaneous breast tumours in rats to examine the effect of pyruvate inflow. The two-way kinetic model was the most accurate method for characterizing the exchange reaction in vitro, and the incorporation of a Heaviside step inflow profile was best able to describe the in vivo data. The lactate time-to-peak and the lactate-to-pyruvate area under the curve ratio were simple model-free approaches that accurately represented the full reaction, with the time-to-peak method performing indistinguishably from the best kinetic model. Finally, extracting data from a single pixel was a robust and reliable surrogate of the whole region of interest. This work has identified appropriate quantitative methods for future work in the analysis of human hyperpolarized (13)C data.

  12. Microbial metabolism in soil at low temperatures: Mechanisms unraveled by position-specific 13C labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bore, Ezekiel

    2016-04-01

    Microbial transformation of organic substances in soil is the most important process of the C cycle. Most of the current studies base their information about transformation of organic substances on incubation studies under laboratory conditions and thus, we have a profound knowledge on SOM transformations at ambient temperatures. However, metabolic pathway activities at low temperature are not well understood, despite the fact that the processes are relevant for many soils globally and seasonally. To analyze microbial metabolism at low soil temperatures, isotopomeres of position-specifically 13C labeled glucose were incubated at three temperature; 5, -5 -20 oC. Soils were sampled after 1, 3 and 10 days and additionally after 30 days for samples at -20 °C. The 13C from individual molecule position was quantifed in respired CO2, bulk soil, extractable organic C and extractable microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) and cell membranes of microbial communities classified by 13C phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. 13CO2 released showed a dominance of the flux from C-1 position at 5 °C. Consequently, at 5 °C, pentose phosphate pathway activity is a dominant metabolic pathway of glucose metabolization. In contrast to -5 °C and -20 oC, metabolic behaviors completely switched towards a preferential respiration of the glucose C-4 position. With decreasing temperature, microorganism strongly shifted towards metabolization of glucose via glycolysis which indicates a switch to cellular maintenance. High recoveries of 13C in extractable microbial biomass at -5 °C indicates optimal growth condition for the microorganisms. PLFA analysis showed high incorporation of 13C into Gram negative bacteria at 5 °C but decreased with temperature. Gram positive bacteria out-competed Gram negatives with decreasing temperature. This study revealed a remarkable microbial activity at temperatures below 0 °C, differing significantly from that at ambient

  13. Metabolic pathways for ketone body production. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of rat liver in vivo using /sup 13/C-multilabeled fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl-Wostl, C.; Seelig, J.

    1986-11-04

    The hormonal regulation of ketogenesis in the liver of living rat has been studied noninvasively with /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance. The spatial selection for the liver was better than 90%, with extrahepatic adipose tissue contribution only a very small amount of signal. The metabolic activities of the liver were investigated by infusion of /sup 13/C-labeled butyrate in the jugular vein of the anesthetized rat. The rate of butyrate infusion was chosen to be close to the maximum oxidative capacity of the rat liver, and the /sup 13/C signal intensities were enhanced by using doubly labeled (1,3-/sup 13/C)butyrate as a substrate. Different /sup 13/C NMR spectra and hence different metabolites were observed depending on the hormonal state of the animal. The /sup 13/C NMR studies demonstrate that even when rate of acetyl-CoA production are high, the disposal of this compound is not identical in fasted and diabetic animals. This supports previous suggestions that the redox state of the mitochondrion represents the most important factor in regulation. For a given metabolic state of the animal, different signal intensities were obtained depending on whether butyrate was labeled at C-1, C-3, or C-1,3. From the ratios of incorporation of /sup 13/C label into the carbons of 3-hydroxybutyrate, it could be estimated that a large fraction of butyrate evaded ..beta..-oxidation to acetyl-CoA but was converted directly to acetoacetyl-CoA. /sup 13/C-labeled glucose could be detected in vivo in the liver of diabetic rats.

  14. Multi-objective experimental design for (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouvin, Jeroen; Cajot, Simon; D'Huys, Pieter-Jan; Ampofo-Asiama, Jerry; Anné, Jozef; Van Impe, Jan; Geeraerd, Annemie; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2015-10-01

    (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis is an excellent technique to resolve fluxes in the central carbon metabolism but costs can be significant when using specialized tracers. This work presents a framework for cost-effective design of (13)C-tracer experiments, illustrated on two different networks. Linear and non-linear optimal input mixtures are computed for networks for Streptomyces lividans and a carcinoma cell line. If only glucose tracers are considered as labeled substrate for a carcinoma cell line or S. lividans, the best parameter estimation accuracy is obtained by mixtures containing high amounts of 1,2-(13)C2 glucose combined with uniformly labeled glucose. Experimental designs are evaluated based on a linear (D-criterion) and non-linear approach (S-criterion). Both approaches generate almost the same input mixture, however, the linear approach is favored due to its low computational effort. The high amount of 1,2-(13)C2 glucose in the optimal designs coincides with a high experimental cost, which is further enhanced when labeling is introduced in glutamine and aspartate tracers. Multi-objective optimization gives the possibility to assess experimental quality and cost at the same time and can reveal excellent compromise experiments. For example, the combination of 100% 1,2-(13)C2 glucose with 100% position one labeled glutamine and the combination of 100% 1,2-(13)C2 glucose with 100% uniformly labeled glutamine perform equally well for the carcinoma cell line, but the first mixture offers a decrease in cost of $ 120 per ml-scale cell culture experiment. We demonstrated the validity of a multi-objective linear approach to perform optimal experimental designs for the non-linear problem of (13)C-metabolic flux analysis. Tools and a workflow are provided to perform multi-objective design. The effortless calculation of the D-criterion can be exploited to perform high-throughput screening of possible (13)C-tracers, while the illustrated benefit of multi

  15. Watching tumours gasp and die with MRI: the promise of hyperpolarised 13C MR spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Brindle, K

    2012-06-01

    A better understanding of tumour biology has led to the development of "targeted therapies", in which a drug is designed to disrupt a specific biochemical pathway important for tumour cell survival or proliferation. The introduction of these drugs into the clinic has shown that patients can vary widely in their responses. Molecular imaging is likely to play an increasingly important role in predicting and detecting these responses and thus in guiding treatment in individual patients: so-called "personalised medicine". The aim of this review is to discuss how hyperpolarised (13)C MR spectroscopic imaging might be used for treatment response monitoring. This technique, which increases the sensitivity of detection of injected (13)C-labelled molecules by >10,000-fold, has allowed a new approach to metabolic imaging. The basic principles of the technique and its potential advantages over other imaging methods for detecting early evidence of treatment response will be discussed. Given that the technique is poised to translate to the clinic, I will also speculate on its likely applications. PMID:22496072

  16. Monitoring electron donor metabolism under variable electron acceptor conditions using 13C-labeled lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Three sets of flow-through columns constructed with aquifer sediment from Hanford (WA) were used to study reduction of Cr(VI) to poorly soluble Cr(III) under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing/fermentative, and iron-reducing conditions with lactate as the electron donor. In order to understand the relationship between electron donors and biomarkers, and to determine the differences in carbon isotope fractionation resulting from different microbial metabolic processes, we monitored the variation in carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in total organic carbon (TOC), and in lactate, acetate and propionate. The greatest enrichment in 13C in columns was observed under denitrifying conditions. The δ13C of DIC increased by ~1750 to ~2000‰ fifteen days after supplementation of natural abundance lactate with a 13C-labeled lactate tracer (for an influent δ13C of ~2250‰ for the lactate) indicating almost complete oxidation of the electron donor. The denitrifying columns were among the most active columns and had the highest cell counts and the denitrification rate was highly correlated with Cr(VI) reduction rate. δ13C values of DIC ranged from ~540 to ~1170‰ for iron-reducing conditions. The lower enrichment in iron columns was related to the lower biological activity observed with lower yields of RNA and cell numbers in the column effluents. The carbon isotope shift in the sulfate-reducing ~198 to ~1960‰ for sulfate-reducing conditions reflecting the lower levels of the lactate in these columns. Additionally, in two of the sulfate columns, almost complete fermentation of the lactate occurred, producing acetate and propionate with the labeled carbon signature, but relatively smaller amounts of inorganic carbon. For all electron-accepting conditions, TOC yielded similar δ13C values as lactate stock solutions. Differences in C use efficiency, metabolic rate or metabolic pathway contributed to the differing TOC δ13C to DIC δ13C ratios between treatments

  17. Simultaneous steady-state and dynamic 13C NMR can differentiate alternative routes of pyruvate metabolism in living cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chendong; Harrison, Crystal; Jin, Eunsook S; Chuang, David T; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R; Merritt, Matthew E; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2014-02-28

    Metabolic reprogramming facilitates cancer cell growth, so quantitative metabolic flux measurements could produce useful biomarkers. However, current methods to analyze flux in vivo provide either a steady-state overview of relative activities (infusion of (13)C and analysis of extracted metabolites) or a dynamic view of a few reactions (hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy). Moreover, although hyperpolarization has successfully quantified pyruvate-lactate exchanges, its ability to assess mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism is unproven in cancer. Here, we combined (13)C hyperpolarization and isotopomer analysis to quantify multiple fates of pyruvate simultaneously. Two cancer cell lines with divergent pyruvate metabolism were incubated with thermally polarized [3-(13)C]pyruvate for several hours, then briefly exposed to hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate during acquisition of NMR spectra using selective excitation to maximize detection of H[(13)C]O3(-) and [1-(13)C]lactate. Metabolites were then extracted and subjected to isotopomer analysis to determine relative rates of pathways involving [3-(13)C]pyruvate. Quantitation of hyperpolarized H[(13)C]O3(-) provided a single definitive metabolic rate, which was then used to convert relative rates derived from isotopomer analysis into quantitative fluxes. This revealed that H[(13)C]O3(-) appearance reflects activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase rather than pyruvate carboxylation followed by subsequent decarboxylation reactions. Glucose substantially altered [1-(13)C]pyruvate metabolism, enhancing exchanges with [1-(13)C]lactate and suppressing H[(13)C]O3(-) formation. Furthermore, inhibiting Akt, an oncogenic kinase that stimulates glycolysis, reversed these effects, indicating that metabolism of pyruvate by both LDH and pyruvate dehydrogenase is subject to the acute effects of oncogenic signaling on glycolysis. The data suggest that combining (13)C isotopomer analyses and dynamic hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy may enable

  18. Simultaneous Steady-state and Dynamic 13C NMR Can Differentiate Alternative Routes of Pyruvate Metabolism in Living Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chendong; Harrison, Crystal; Jin, Eunsook S.; Chuang, David T.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Merritt, Matthew E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming facilitates cancer cell growth, so quantitative metabolic flux measurements could produce useful biomarkers. However, current methods to analyze flux in vivo provide either a steady-state overview of relative activities (infusion of 13C and analysis of extracted metabolites) or a dynamic view of a few reactions (hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy). Moreover, although hyperpolarization has successfully quantified pyruvate-lactate exchanges, its ability to assess mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism is unproven in cancer. Here, we combined 13C hyperpolarization and isotopomer analysis to quantify multiple fates of pyruvate simultaneously. Two cancer cell lines with divergent pyruvate metabolism were incubated with thermally polarized [3-13C]pyruvate for several hours, then briefly exposed to hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate during acquisition of NMR spectra using selective excitation to maximize detection of H[13C]O3− and [1-13C]lactate. Metabolites were then extracted and subjected to isotopomer analysis to determine relative rates of pathways involving [3-13C]pyruvate. Quantitation of hyperpolarized H[13C]O3− provided a single definitive metabolic rate, which was then used to convert relative rates derived from isotopomer analysis into quantitative fluxes. This revealed that H[13C]O3− appearance reflects activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase rather than pyruvate carboxylation followed by subsequent decarboxylation reactions. Glucose substantially altered [1-13C]pyruvate metabolism, enhancing exchanges with [1-13C]lactate and suppressing H[13C]O3− formation. Furthermore, inhibiting Akt, an oncogenic kinase that stimulates glycolysis, reversed these effects, indicating that metabolism of pyruvate by both LDH and pyruvate dehydrogenase is subject to the acute effects of oncogenic signaling on glycolysis. The data suggest that combining 13C isotopomer analyses and dynamic hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy may enable quantitative flux measurements in

  19. Fast dynamic 3D MR spectroscopic imaging with compressed sensing and multiband excitation pulses for hyperpolarized 13C studies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Peder E Z; Hu, Simon; Lustig, Michael; Kerr, Adam B; Nelson, Sarah J; Kurhanewicz, John; Pauly, John M; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2011-03-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopic imaging can detect not only the uptake of the pre-polarized molecule but also its metabolic products in vivo, thus providing a powerful new method to study cellular metabolism. Imaging the dynamic perfusion and conversion of these metabolites provides additional tissue information but requires methods for efficient hyperpolarization usage and rapid acquisitions. In this work, we have developed a time-resolved 3D MR spectroscopic imaging method for acquiring hyperpolarized 13C data by combining compressed sensing methods for acceleration and multiband excitation pulses to efficiently use the magnetization. This method achieved a 2 sec temporal resolution with full volumetric coverage of a mouse, and metabolites were observed for up to 60 sec following injection of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]-pyruvate. The compressed sensing acquisition used random phase encode gradient blips to create a novel random undersampling pattern tailored to dynamic MR spectroscopic imaging with sampling incoherency in four (time, frequency, and two spatial) dimensions. The reconstruction was also tailored to dynamic MR spectroscopic imaging by applying a temporal wavelet sparsifying transform to exploit the inherent temporal sparsity. Customized multiband excitation pulses were designed with a lower flip angle for the [1-(13)C]-pyruvate substrate given its higher concentration than its metabolic products ([1-(13)C]-lactate and [1-(13)C]-alanine), thus using less hyperpolarization per excitation. This approach has enabled the monitoring of perfusion and uptake of the pyruvate, and the conversion dynamics to lactate and alanine throughout a volume with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:20939089

  20. 13CFLUX2—high-performance software suite for 13C-metabolic flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weitzel, Michael; Nöh, Katharina; Dalman, Tolga; Niedenführ, Sebastian; Stute, Birgit; Wiechert, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Summary: 13C-based metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) is the state-of-the-art method to quantitatively determine in vivo metabolic reaction rates in microorganisms. 13CFLUX2 contains all tools for composing flexible computational 13C-MFA workflows to design and evaluate carbon labeling experiments. A specially developed XML language, FluxML, highly efficient data structures and simulation algorithms achieve a maximum of performance and effectiveness. Support of multicore CPUs, as well as compute clusters, enables scalable investigations. 13CFLUX2 outperforms existing tools in terms of universality, flexibility and built-in features. Therewith, 13CFLUX2 paves the way for next-generation high-resolution 13C-MFA applications on the large scale. Availability and implementation: 13CFLUX2 is implemented in C++ (ISO/IEC 14882 standard) with Java and Python add-ons to run under Linux/Unix. A demo version and binaries are available at www.13cflux.net. Contact: info@13cflux.net or k.noeh@fz-juelich.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23110970

  1. Application of Good's buffers to pH imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C MRI.

    PubMed

    Flavell, Robert R; von Morze, Cornelius; Blecha, Joseph E; Korenchan, David E; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sriram, Renuka; Gordon, Jeremy W; Chen, Hsin-Yu; Subramaniam, Sukumar; Bok, Robert A; Wang, Zhen J; Vigneron, Daniel B; Larson, Peder E; Kurhanewicz, John; Wilson, David M

    2015-09-25

    N-(2-Acetamido)-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (ACES), one of Good's buffers, was applied to pH imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Rapid NMR- and MRI-based pH measurements were obtained by exploiting the sensitive pH-dependence of its (13)C chemical shift within the physiologic range.

  2. Metabolic network reconstruction, growth characterization and 13C-metabolic flux analysis of the extremophile Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Swarup, Aditi; Lu, Jing; DeWoody, Kathleen C; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2014-07-01

    Thermus thermophilus is an extremely thermophilic bacterium with significant biotechnological potential. In this work, we have characterized aerobic growth characteristics of T. thermophilus HB8 at temperatures between 50 and 85°C, constructed a metabolic network model of its central carbon metabolism and validated the model using (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). First, cells were grown in batch cultures in custom constructed mini-bioreactors at different temperatures to determine optimal growth conditions. The optimal temperature for T. thermophilus grown on defined medium with glucose was 81°C. The maximum growth rate was 0.25h(-1). Between 50 and 81°C the growth rate increased by 7-fold and the temperature dependence was described well by an Arrhenius model with an activation energy of 47kJ/mol. Next, we performed a (13)C-labeling experiment with [1,2-(13)C] glucose as the tracer and calculated intracellular metabolic fluxes using (13)C-MFA. The results provided support for the constructed network model and highlighted several interesting characteristics of T. thermophilus metabolism. We found that T. thermophilus largely uses glycolysis and TCA cycle to produce biosynthetic precursors, ATP and reducing equivalents needed for cells growth. Consistent with its proposed metabolic network model, we did not detect any oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux or Entner-Doudoroff pathway activity. The biomass precursors erythrose-4-phosphate and ribose-5-phosphate were produced via the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and largely via transketolase, with little contribution from transaldolase. The high biomass yield on glucose that was measured experimentally was also confirmed independently by (13)C-MFA. The results presented here provide a solid foundation for future studies of T. thermophilus and its metabolic engineering applications.

  3. Analysis of mutational lesions of acetate metabolism in Neurospora crassa by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G H; Baxter, R L

    1987-01-01

    The adaptation of Neurospora crassa mycelium to growth on acetate as the sole carbon source was examined by using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. Extracts were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance at various times after transfer of the mycelium from medium containing sucrose to medium containing [2-13C]acetate as the sole carbon source. The label was initially seen to enter the alanine, glutamate, and glutamine pools, and after 6 h 13C-enriched trehalose was evident, indicating that gluconeogenesis was occurring. Analysis of the isotopomer ratios in the alanine and glutamate-glutamine pools indicated that substantial glyoxylate cycle activity became evident between 2 and 4 h after transfer. Immediately after transfer of the mycelium to acetate medium, the alanine pool increased to about four times its previous level, only a small fraction of which was enriched with 13C. The quantity of 13C-enriched alanine remained almost constant between 2 and 7.5 h after the transfer, whereas the overall alanine pool decreased to its original level. The selective catabolism of the unenriched alanine leads us to suggest that the alanine pool is partitioned into two compartments during adaptation. Two acetate-nonutilizing mutants were also studied by this technique. An acu-3 strain, deficient for isocitrate lyase (EC 4.1.3.1) activity, showed metabolic changes consistent with this lesion. An acp strain, previously thought to be deficient in an inducible acetate permease, took up [2-13C]acetate but showed no evidence of glyoxylate cycle activity despite synthesizing the necessary enzymes; the lesion was therefore reinterpreted. PMID:2947898

  4. Reflections on the application of 13C-MRS to research on brain metabolism.

    PubMed

    Morris, Peter; Bachelard, Herman

    2003-01-01

    The power of (13)C-MRS lies in its unique chemical specificity, enabling detection and quantification of metabolic intermediates which would not be so readily monitored using conventional radiochemical techniques. Examples from animal studies, by examination of tissue extracts from the whole brain, brain slices and cultured cells, include observation of intermediates such as citrate and triose phosphates which have yielded novel information on neuronal/glial relationships. The use of (13)C-labelled acetate as a specific precursor for glial metabolism provided evidence in support of the view that some of the GABA produced in the brain is derived from glial glutamine. Such studies have also provided direct evidence on the contribution of anaplerotic pathways to intermediary metabolism. Analogous studies are now being performed on the human brain, where (13)C-acetate is used to quantitate the overall contribution of glial cells to intermediary metabolism, and use of (13)C-glucose enables direct calculation of rates of flux through the TCA (F(TCA)) and of the glutamate-glutamine cycle (F(CYC)), leading to the conclusion that the rate of glial recycling of glutamate accounts for some 50% of F(TCA). The rate of 0.74 micromol min(-1) g(-1) for F(TCA) is compatible with PET rates of CMRglc of 0.3-0.4 micromol min(-1) g(-1) (since each glucose molecule yields two molecules of pyruvate entering the TCA). Our brain activation studies showed a 60% increase in F(TCA), which is very similar to the increases in CBF and in CMRglc observed in PET activation studies.

  5. SUMOFLUX: A Generalized Method for Targeted 13C Metabolic Flux Ratio Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kogadeeva, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic fluxes are a cornerstone of cellular physiology that emerge from a complex interplay of enzymes, carriers, and nutrients. The experimental assessment of in vivo intracellular fluxes using stable isotopic tracers is essential if we are to understand metabolic function and regulation. Flux estimation based on 13C or 2H labeling relies on complex simulation and iterative fitting; processes that necessitate a level of expertise that ordinarily preclude the non-expert user. To overcome this, we have developed SUMOFLUX, a methodology that is broadly applicable to the targeted analysis of 13C-metabolic fluxes. By combining surrogate modeling and machine learning, we trained a predictor to specialize in estimating flux ratios from measurable 13C-data. SUMOFLUX targets specific flux features individually, which makes it fast, user-friendly, applicable to experimental design and robust in terms of experimental noise and exchange flux magnitude. Collectively, we predict that SUMOFLUX's properties realistically pave the way to high-throughput flux analyses. PMID:27626798

  6. SUMOFLUX: A Generalized Method for Targeted 13C Metabolic Flux Ratio Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kogadeeva, Maria; Zamboni, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic fluxes are a cornerstone of cellular physiology that emerge from a complex interplay of enzymes, carriers, and nutrients. The experimental assessment of in vivo intracellular fluxes using stable isotopic tracers is essential if we are to understand metabolic function and regulation. Flux estimation based on 13C or 2H labeling relies on complex simulation and iterative fitting; processes that necessitate a level of expertise that ordinarily preclude the non-expert user. To overcome this, we have developed SUMOFLUX, a methodology that is broadly applicable to the targeted analysis of 13C-metabolic fluxes. By combining surrogate modeling and machine learning, we trained a predictor to specialize in estimating flux ratios from measurable 13C-data. SUMOFLUX targets specific flux features individually, which makes it fast, user-friendly, applicable to experimental design and robust in terms of experimental noise and exchange flux magnitude. Collectively, we predict that SUMOFLUX's properties realistically pave the way to high-throughput flux analyses. PMID:27626798

  7. HepatoDyn: A Dynamic Model of Hepatocyte Metabolism That Integrates 13C Isotopomer Data

    PubMed Central

    Foguet, Carles; Selivanov, Vitaly A.; Fanchon, Eric; Guinovart, Joan J.; de Atauri, Pedro; Cascante, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs many essential metabolic functions, which can be studied using computational models of hepatocytes. Here we present HepatoDyn, a highly detailed dynamic model of hepatocyte metabolism. HepatoDyn includes a large metabolic network, highly detailed kinetic laws, and is capable of dynamically simulating the redox and energy metabolism of hepatocytes. Furthermore, the model was coupled to the module for isotopic label propagation of the software package IsoDyn, allowing HepatoDyn to integrate data derived from 13C based experiments. As an example of dynamical simulations applied to hepatocytes, we studied the effects of high fructose concentrations on hepatocyte metabolism by integrating data from experiments in which rat hepatocytes were incubated with 20 mM glucose supplemented with either 3 mM or 20 mM fructose. These experiments showed that glycogen accumulation was significantly lower in hepatocytes incubated with medium supplemented with 20 mM fructose than in hepatocytes incubated with medium supplemented with 3 mM fructose. Through the integration of extracellular fluxes and 13C enrichment measurements, HepatoDyn predicted that this phenomenon can be attributed to a depletion of cytosolic ATP and phosphate induced by high fructose concentrations in the medium. PMID:27124774

  8. (13)C MRS and LC-MS Flux Analysis of Tumor Intermediary Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shestov, Alexander A; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Nath, Kavindra; Guo, Lili; Nelson, David S; Roman, Jeffrey C; Leeper, Dennis B; Wasik, Mariusz A; Blair, Ian A; Glickson, Jerry D

    2016-01-01

    We present the first validated metabolic network model for analysis of flux through key pathways of tumor intermediary metabolism, including glycolysis, the oxidative and non-oxidative arms of the pentose pyrophosphate shunt, the TCA cycle as well as its anaplerotic pathways, pyruvate-malate shuttling, glutaminolysis, and fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidation. The model that is called Bonded Cumomer Analysis for application to (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((13)C MRS) data and Fragmented Cumomer Analysis for mass spectrometric data is a refined and efficient form of isotopomer analysis that can readily be expanded to incorporate glycogen, phospholipid, and other pathways thereby encompassing all the key pathways of tumor intermediary metabolism. Validation was achieved by demonstrating agreement of experimental measurements of the metabolic rates of oxygen consumption, glucose consumption, lactate production, and glutamate pool size with independent measurements of these parameters in cultured human DB-1 melanoma cells. These cumomer models have been applied to studies of DB-1 melanoma and DLCL2 human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells in culture and as xenografts in nude mice at 9.4 T. The latter studies demonstrate the potential translation of these methods to in situ studies of human tumor metabolism by MRS with stable (13)C isotopically labeled substrates on instruments operating at high magnetic fields (≥7 T). The melanoma studies indicate that this tumor line obtains 51% of its ATP by mitochondrial metabolism and 49% by glycolytic metabolism under both euglycemic (5 mM glucose) and hyperglycemic conditions (26 mM glucose). While a high level of glutamine uptake is detected corresponding to ~50% of TCA cycle flux under hyperglycemic conditions, and ~100% of TCA cycle flux under euglycemic conditions, glutaminolysis flux and its contributions to ATP synthesis were very small. Studies of human lymphoma cells demonstrated that inhibition of

  9. 13C MRS and LC–MS Flux Analysis of Tumor Intermediary Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shestov, Alexander A.; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Nath, Kavindra; Guo, Lili; Nelson, David S.; Roman, Jeffrey C.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Wasik, Mariusz A.; Blair, Ian A.; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first validated metabolic network model for analysis of flux through key pathways of tumor intermediary metabolism, including glycolysis, the oxidative and non-oxidative arms of the pentose pyrophosphate shunt, the TCA cycle as well as its anaplerotic pathways, pyruvate–malate shuttling, glutaminolysis, and fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidation. The model that is called Bonded Cumomer Analysis for application to 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS) data and Fragmented Cumomer Analysis for mass spectrometric data is a refined and efficient form of isotopomer analysis that can readily be expanded to incorporate glycogen, phospholipid, and other pathways thereby encompassing all the key pathways of tumor intermediary metabolism. Validation was achieved by demonstrating agreement of experimental measurements of the metabolic rates of oxygen consumption, glucose consumption, lactate production, and glutamate pool size with independent measurements of these parameters in cultured human DB-1 melanoma cells. These cumomer models have been applied to studies of DB-1 melanoma and DLCL2 human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells in culture and as xenografts in nude mice at 9.4 T. The latter studies demonstrate the potential translation of these methods to in situ studies of human tumor metabolism by MRS with stable 13C isotopically labeled substrates on instruments operating at high magnetic fields (≥7 T). The melanoma studies indicate that this tumor line obtains 51% of its ATP by mitochondrial metabolism and 49% by glycolytic metabolism under both euglycemic (5 mM glucose) and hyperglycemic conditions (26 mM glucose). While a high level of glutamine uptake is detected corresponding to ~50% of TCA cycle flux under hyperglycemic conditions, and ~100% of TCA cycle flux under euglycemic conditions, glutaminolysis flux and its contributions to ATP synthesis were very small. Studies of human lymphoma cells demonstrated that inhibition of

  10. Mapping cancer cell metabolism with13C flux analysis: Recent progress and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Duckwall, Casey Scott; Murphy, Taylor Athanasaw; Young, Jamey Dale

    2013-01-01

    The reprogramming of energy metabolism is emerging as an important molecular hallmark of cancer cells. Recent discoveries linking specific metabolic alterations to cancer development have strengthened the idea that altered metabolism is more than a side effect of malignant transformation, but may in fact be a functional driver of tumor growth and progression in some cancers. As a result, dysregulated metabolic pathways have become attractive targets for cancer therapeutics. This review highlights the application of13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) to map the flow of carbon through intracellular biochemical pathways of cancer cells. We summarize several recent applications of MFA that have identified novel biosynthetic pathways involved in cancer cell proliferation and shed light on the role of specific oncogenes in regulating these pathways. Through such studies, it has become apparent that the metabolic phenotypes of cancer cells are not as homogeneous as once thought, but instead depend strongly on the molecular alterations and environmental factors at play in each case. PMID:23961260

  11. Metabolic characterization of Lactococcus lactis deficient in lactate dehydrogenase using in vivo 13C-NMR.

    PubMed

    Neves, A R; Ramos, A; Shearman, C; Gasson, M J; Almeida, J S; Santos, H

    2000-06-01

    The metabolism of glucose by nongrowing cells of Lactococcus lactis strain FI7851, constructed from the wild-type L. lactis strain MG1363 by disruption of the lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene [Gasson, M.J., Benson, K., Swindel, S. & Griffin, H. (1996) Lait 76, 33-40] was studied in a noninvasive manner by 13C-NMR. The kinetics of the build-up and consumption of the pools of intracellular intermediates mannitol 1-phosphate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, 3-phosphoglycerate, and phosphoenolpyruvate as well as the utilization of [1-13C]glucose and formation of products (lactate, acetate, mannitol, ethanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol) were monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 30 s. The metabolism of glucose by the parental wild-type strain was also examined for comparison. A clear shift from typical homolactic fermentation (parental strain) to a mixed acid fermentation (lactate dehdydrogenase deficient; LDHd strain) was observed. Furthermore, high levels of mannitol were transiently produced and metabolized once glucose was depleted. Mannitol 1-phosphate accumulated intracellularly up to 76 mM concentration. Mannitol was formed from fructose 6-phosphate by the combined action of mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphatase. The results show that the formation of mannitol 1-phosphate by the LDHd strain during glucose catabolism is a consequence of impairment in NADH oxidation caused by a highly reduced LDH activity, the transient production of mannitol 1-phosphate serving as a regeneration pathway for NAD+ regeneration. Oxygen availability caused a drastic change in the pattern of intermediates and end-products, reinforcing the key-role of the fulfilment of the redox balance. The flux control coefficients for the step catalysed by mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase were calculated and the implications in the design of metabolic engineering strategies are discussed.

  12. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes. PMID:27678172

  13. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes.

  14. Design of spectral-spatial outer volume suppression RF pulses for tissue specific metabolic characterization with hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Albert P.; Leung, Kevin; Lam, Wilfred; Hurd, Ralph E.; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Cunningham, Charles H.

    2009-10-01

    [1- 13C] pyruvate pre-polarized via DNP has been used in animal models to probe changes in metabolic enzyme activities in vivo. To more accurately assess the metabolic state and its change from disease progression or therapy in a specific region or tissue in vivo, it may be desirable to separate the downstream 13C metabolite signals resulting from the metabolic activity within the tissue of interest and those brought into the tissue by perfusion. In this study, a spectral-spatial saturation pulse that selectively saturates the signal from the metabolic products [1- 13C] lactate and [1- 13C] alanine was designed and implemented as outer volume suppression for localized MRSI acquisition. Preliminary in vivo results showed that the suppression pulse did not prevent the pre-polarized pyruvate from being delivered throughout the animal while it saturated the metabolites within the targeted saturation region.

  15. Metabolic Flux Elucidation for Large-Scale Models Using 13C Labeled Isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Suthers, Patrick F.; Burgard, Anthony P.; Dasika, Madhukar S.; Nowroozi, Farnaz; Van Dien, Stephen; Keasling, Jay D.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2007-01-01

    A key consideration in metabolic engineering is the determination of fluxes of the metabolites within the cell. This determination provides an unambiguous description of metabolism before and/or after engineering interventions. Here, we present a computational framework that combines a constraint-based modeling framework with isotopic label tracing on a large-scale. When cells are fed a growth substrate with certain carbon positions labeled with 13C, the distribution of this label in the intracellular metabolites can be calculated based on the known biochemistry of the participating pathways. Most labeling studies focus on skeletal representations of central metabolism and ignore many flux routes that could contribute to the observed isotopic labeling patterns. In contrast, our approach investigates the importance of carrying out isotopic labeling studies using a more comprehensive reaction network consisting of 350 fluxes and 184 metabolites in Escherichia coli including global metabolite balances on cofactors such as ATP, NADH, and NADPH. The proposed procedure is demonstrated on an E. coli strain engineered to produce amorphadiene, a precursor to the anti-malarial drug artemisinin. The cells were grown in continuous culture on glucose containing 20% [U-13C]glucose; the measurements are made using GC-MS performed on 13 amino acids extracted from the cells. We identify flux distributions for which the calculated labeling patterns agree well with the measurements alluding to the accuracy of the network reconstruction. Furthermore, we explore the robustness of the flux calculations to variability in the experimental MS measurements, as well as highlight the key experimental measurements necessary for flux determination. Finally, we discuss the effect of reducing the model, as well as shed light onto the customization of the developed computational framework to other systems. PMID:17632026

  16. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis of lipid accumulation in the oleaginous fungus Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Zhang, Huaiyuan; Wang, Liping; Chen, Haiqin; Chen, Yong Q; Chen, Wei; Song, Yuanda

    2015-12-01

    The oleaginous fungus Mucor circinelloides is of industrial interest because it can produce high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acid γ-linolenic acid. M. circinelloides CBS 277.49 is able to accumulate less than 15% of cell dry weight as lipids, while M. circinelloides WJ11 can accumulate lipid up to 36%. In order to better understand the mechanisms behind the differential lipid accumulation in these two strains, tracer experiments with (13)C-glucose were performed with the growth of M. circinelloides and subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometric detection of (13)C-patterns in proteinogenic amino acids was carried out to identify the metabolic network topology and estimate intracellular fluxes. Our results showed that the high oleaginous strain WJ11 had higher flux of pentose phosphate pathway and malic enzyme, lower flux in tricarboxylic acid cycle, higher flux in glyoxylate cycle and ATP: citrate lyase, together, it might provide more NADPH and substrate acetyl-CoA for fatty acid synthesis.

  17. Investigate the Metabolic Reprogramming of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Enhanced Resistance to Mixed Fermentation Inhibitors via 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weihua; Chen, Yingying; Wei, Na; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-01-01

    The fermentation inhibitors from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials, e.g., acetic acid and furfural, are notorious due to their negative effects on the cell growth and chemical production. However, the metabolic reprogramming of the cells under these stress conditions, especially metabolic response for resistance to mixed inhibitors, has not been systematically investigated and remains mysterious. Therefore, in this study, 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA), a powerful tool to elucidate the intracellular carbon flux distributions, has been applied to two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different tolerances to the inhibitors under acetic acid, furfural, and mixed (i.e., acetic acid and furfural) stress conditions to unravel the key metabolic responses. By analyzing the intracellular carbon fluxes as well as the energy and cofactor utilization under different conditions, we uncovered varied metabolic responses to different inhibitors. Under acetate stress, ATP and NADH production was slightly impaired, while NADPH tended towards overproduction. Under furfural stress, ATP and cofactors (including both NADH and NADPH) tended to be overproduced. However, under dual-stress condition, production of ATP and cofactors was severely impaired due to synergistic stress caused by the simultaneous addition of two fermentation inhibitors. Such phenomenon indicated the pivotal role of the energy and cofactor utilization in resisting the mixed inhibitors of acetic acid and furfural. Based on the discoveries, valuable insights are provided to improve the tolerance of S. cerevisiae strain and further enhance lignocellulosic fermentation.

  18. Investigate the Metabolic Reprogramming of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Enhanced Resistance to Mixed Fermentation Inhibitors via 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weihua; Chen, Yingying; Wei, Na; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-01-01

    The fermentation inhibitors from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials, e.g., acetic acid and furfural, are notorious due to their negative effects on the cell growth and chemical production. However, the metabolic reprogramming of the cells under these stress conditions, especially metabolic response for resistance to mixed inhibitors, has not been systematically investigated and remains mysterious. Therefore, in this study, 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA), a powerful tool to elucidate the intracellular carbon flux distributions, has been applied to two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different tolerances to the inhibitors under acetic acid, furfural, and mixed (i.e., acetic acid and furfural) stress conditions to unravel the key metabolic responses. By analyzing the intracellular carbon fluxes as well as the energy and cofactor utilization under different conditions, we uncovered varied metabolic responses to different inhibitors. Under acetate stress, ATP and NADH production was slightly impaired, while NADPH tended towards overproduction. Under furfural stress, ATP and cofactors (including both NADH and NADPH) tended to be overproduced. However, under dual-stress condition, production of ATP and cofactors was severely impaired due to synergistic stress caused by the simultaneous addition of two fermentation inhibitors. Such phenomenon indicated the pivotal role of the energy and cofactor utilization in resisting the mixed inhibitors of acetic acid and furfural. Based on the discoveries, valuable insights are provided to improve the tolerance of S. cerevisiae strain and further enhance lignocellulosic fermentation. PMID:27532329

  19. Investigate the Metabolic Reprogramming of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Enhanced Resistance to Mixed Fermentation Inhibitors via 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weihua; Chen, Yingying; Wei, Na; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-01-01

    The fermentation inhibitors from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials, e.g., acetic acid and furfural, are notorious due to their negative effects on the cell growth and chemical production. However, the metabolic reprogramming of the cells under these stress conditions, especially metabolic response for resistance to mixed inhibitors, has not been systematically investigated and remains mysterious. Therefore, in this study, 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA), a powerful tool to elucidate the intracellular carbon flux distributions, has been applied to two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different tolerances to the inhibitors under acetic acid, furfural, and mixed (i.e., acetic acid and furfural) stress conditions to unravel the key metabolic responses. By analyzing the intracellular carbon fluxes as well as the energy and cofactor utilization under different conditions, we uncovered varied metabolic responses to different inhibitors. Under acetate stress, ATP and NADH production was slightly impaired, while NADPH tended towards overproduction. Under furfural stress, ATP and cofactors (including both NADH and NADPH) tended to be overproduced. However, under dual-stress condition, production of ATP and cofactors was severely impaired due to synergistic stress caused by the simultaneous addition of two fermentation inhibitors. Such phenomenon indicated the pivotal role of the energy and cofactor utilization in resisting the mixed inhibitors of acetic acid and furfural. Based on the discoveries, valuable insights are provided to improve the tolerance of S. cerevisiae strain and further enhance lignocellulosic fermentation. PMID:27532329

  20. Integration of a constraint-based metabolic model of Brassica napus developing seeds with 13C-metabolic flux analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Hay, Jordan O.; Shi, Hai; Heinzel, Nicolas; Hebbelmann, Inga; Rolletschek, Hardy; Schwender, Jorg

    2014-12-19

    The use of large-scale or genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for modeling and simulation of plant metabolism and integration of those models with large-scale omics and experimental flux data is becoming increasingly important in plant metabolic research. Here we report an updated version of bna572, a bottom-up reconstruction of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.; Brassicaceae) developing seeds with emphasis on representation of biomass-component biosynthesis. New features include additional seed-relevant pathways for isoprenoid, sterol, phenylpropanoid, flavonoid, and choline biosynthesis. Being now based on standardized data formats and procedures for model reconstruction, bna572+ is available as a COBRA-compliant Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) modelmore » and conforms to the Minimum Information Requested in the Annotation of Biochemical Models (MIRIAM) standards for annotation of external data resources. Bna572+ contains 966 genes, 671 reactions, and 666 metabolites distributed among 11 subcellular compartments. It is referenced to the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, with gene-protein-reaction (GPR) associations resolving subcellular localization. Detailed mass and charge balancing and confidence scoring were applied to all reactions. Using B. napus seed specific transcriptome data, expression was verified for 78% of bna572+ genes and 97% of reactions. Alongside bna572+ we also present a revised carbon centric model for 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C-MFA) with all its reactions being referenced to bna572+ based on linear projections. By integration of flux ratio constraints obtained from 13C-MFA and by elimination of infinite flux bounds around thermodynamically infeasible loops based on COBRA loopless methods, we demonstrate improvements in predictive power of Flux Variability Analysis (FVA). In conclusion, using this combined approach we characterize the difference in metabolic flux of developing seeds of two B. napus genotypes contrasting in starch

  1. Integration of a constraint-based metabolic model of Brassica napus developing seeds with 13C-metabolic flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Jordan O.; Shi, Hai; Heinzel, Nicolas; Hebbelmann, Inga; Rolletschek, Hardy; Schwender, Jorg

    2014-01-01

    The use of large-scale or genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for modeling and simulation of plant metabolism and integration of those models with large-scale omics and experimental flux data is becoming increasingly important in plant metabolic research. Here we report an updated version of bna572, a bottom-up reconstruction of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.; Brassicaceae) developing seeds with emphasis on representation of biomass-component biosynthesis. New features include additional seed-relevant pathways for isoprenoid, sterol, phenylpropanoid, flavonoid, and choline biosynthesis. Being now based on standardized data formats and procedures for model reconstruction, bna572+ is available as a COBRA-compliant Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) model and conforms to the Minimum Information Requested in the Annotation of Biochemical Models (MIRIAM) standards for annotation of external data resources. Bna572+ contains 966 genes, 671 reactions, and 666 metabolites distributed among 11 subcellular compartments. It is referenced to the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, with gene-protein-reaction (GPR) associations resolving subcellular localization. Detailed mass and charge balancing and confidence scoring were applied to all reactions. Using B. napus seed specific transcriptome data, expression was verified for 78% of bna572+ genes and 97% of reactions. Alongside bna572+ we also present a revised carbon centric model for 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C-MFA) with all its reactions being referenced to bna572+ based on linear projections. By integration of flux ratio constraints obtained from 13C-MFA and by elimination of infinite flux bounds around thermodynamically infeasible loops based on COBRA loopless methods, we demonstrate improvements in predictive power of Flux Variability Analysis (FVA). Using this combined approach we characterize the difference in metabolic flux of developing seeds of two B. napus genotypes contrasting in starch and oil content. PMID

  2. Mechanisms linking metabolism of Helicobacter pylori to (18)O and (13)C-isotopes of human breath CO2.

    PubMed

    Som, Suman; De, Anulekha; Banik, Gourab Dutta; Maity, Abhijit; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Pal, Mithun; Daschakraborty, Sunil B; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Jana, Subhra; Pradhan, Manik

    2015-06-03

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilize glucose during metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms linking to oxygen-18 ((18)O) and carbon-13 ((13)C)-isotopic fractionations of breath CO2 during glucose metabolism are poorly understood. Using the excretion dynamics of (18)O/(16)O and (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios of breath CO2, we found that individuals with Helicobacter pylori infections exhibited significantly higher isotopic enrichments of (18)O in breath CO2 during the 2h-glucose metabolism regardless of the isotopic nature of the substrate, while no significant enrichments of (18)O in breath CO2 were manifested in individuals without the infections. In contrast, the (13)C-isotopic enrichments of breath CO2 were significantly higher in individuals with Helicobacter pylori compared to individuals without infections in response to (13)C-enriched glucose uptake, whereas a distinguishable change of breath (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios was also evident when Helicobacter pylori utilize natural glucose. Moreover, monitoring the (18)O and (13)C-isotopic exchange in breath CO2 successfully diagnosed the eradications of Helicobacter pylori infections following a standard therapy. Our findings suggest that breath (12)C(18)O(16)O and (13)C(16)O(16)O can be used as potential molecular biomarkers to distinctively track the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori and also for eradication purposes and thus may open new perspectives into the pathogen's physiology along with isotope-specific non-invasive diagnosis of the infection.

  3. 13C-NMR analysis of Aspergillus mutants disturbed in pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dijkema, C; Visser, J

    1987-12-10

    The metabolic consequences of two defects in pyruvate metabolism of the hyphal fungus Aspergillus nidulans have been investigated by natural abundance 13C-NMR spectroscopy. A pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (pdh) mutant, grown on acetate, accumulates alanine upon starvation which is derived from mannitol reserves. The L-alanine level increases further upon incubation with the non-permissive substrate D-glucose. L-Glutamate is absent from these spectra as it is required both for the transamination of pyruvate and as a reaction on an impaired energy metabolism in such a pdh-deficient strain. A pyruvate carboxylase (pyc) mutant, grown upon acetate, only starts to accumulate alanine after a long incubation period with D-glucose, due to the long-lasting presence of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzyme, which are both induced by growth on acetate. When this strain is grown on D-fructose and L-glutamate, alanine also accumulates within 3 h upon transfer to D-glucose.

  4. (13)C metabolic flux analysis of the extremely thermophilic, fast growing, xylose-utilizing Geobacillus strain LC300.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Lauren T; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-01-01

    Thermophiles are increasingly used as versatile hosts in the biotechnology industry. One of the key advantages of thermophiles is the potential to achieve high rates of feedstock conversion at elevated temperatures. The recently isolated Geobacillus strain LC300 grows extremely fast on xylose, with a doubling time of less than 30 min. In the accompanying paper, the genome of Geobacillus LC300 was sequenced and annotated. In this work, we have experimentally validated the metabolic network model using parallel (13)C-labeling experiments and applied (13)C-metabolic flux analysis to quantify precise metabolic fluxes. Specifically, the complete set of singly labeled xylose tracers, [1-(13)C], [2-(13)C], [3-(13)C], [4-(13)C], and [5-(13)C]xylose, was used for the first time. Isotopic labeling of biomass amino acids was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Isotopic labeling of carbon dioxide in the off-gas was also measured by an on-line mass spectrometer. The (13)C-labeling data was then rigorously integrated for flux elucidation using the COMPLETE-MFA approach. The results provided important new insights into the metabolism of Geobacillus LC300, its efficient xylose utilization pathways, and the balance between carbon, redox and energy fluxes. The pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis and TCA cycle were found to be highly active in Geobacillus LC300. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway was also active and contributed significantly to NADPH production. No transhydrogenase activity was detected. Results from this work provide a solid foundation for future studies of this strain and its metabolic engineering and biotechnological applications.

  5. High-throughput hyperpolarized 13C metabolic investigations using a multi-channel acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehyuk; Ramirez, Marc S.; Walker, Christopher M.; Chen, Yunyun; Yi, Stacey; Sandulache, Vlad C.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Bankson, James A.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of hyperpolarized (HP) compounds such as [1-13C]-pyruvate have shown tremendous potential for offering new insight into disease and response to therapy. New applications of this technology in clinical research and care will require extensive validation in cells and animal models, a process that may be limited by the high cost and modest throughput associated with dynamic nuclear polarization. Relatively wide spectral separation between [1-13C]-pyruvate and its chemical endpoints in vivo are conducive to simultaneous multi-sample measurements, even in the presence of a suboptimal global shim. Multi-channel acquisitions could conserve costs and accelerate experiments by allowing acquisition from multiple independent samples following a single dissolution. Unfortunately, many existing preclinical MRI systems are equipped with only a single channel for broadband acquisitions. In this work, we examine the feasibility of this concept using a broadband multi-channel digital receiver extension and detector arrays that allow concurrent measurement of dynamic spectroscopic data from ex vivo enzyme phantoms, in vitro anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells, and in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. Throughput and the cost of consumables were improved by up to a factor of four. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential for efficient multi-sample studies employing hyperpolarized agents.

  6. Characterization of Acetate and Pyruvate Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Zea mays by 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Dennis J.; Lee, Rino Y.; Adams, Douglas O.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been applied to the direct observation of acetate and pyruvate metabolism in suspension cultures of Zea mays (var Black Mexican Sweet). Growth of the corn cells in the presence of 2 millimolar [2-13C]acetate resulted in a rapid uptake of the substrate from the medium and initial labeling (0-4 hours) of primarily the intracellular glutamate and malate pools. Further metabolism of these intermediates resulted in labeling of glutamine, aspartate, and alanine. With [1-13C]acetate as the substrate very little incorporation into intermediary metabolites was observed in the 13C NMR spectra due to loss of the label as 13CO2. Uptake of [3-13C]pyruvate by the cells was considerably slower than with [2-13C]acetate; however, the labelling patterns were similar with the exception of increased [3-13C] alanine generation with pyruvate as the substrate. Growth of the cells for up to 96 hours with 2 millimolar [3-13C]pyruvate ultimately resulted in labeling of valine, leucine, isoleucine, threonine, and the polyamine putrescine. PMID:16665721

  7. IsoDesign: a software for optimizing the design of 13C-metabolic flux analysis experiments.

    PubMed

    Millard, Pierre; Sokol, Serguei; Letisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    The growing demand for (13) C-metabolic flux analysis ((13) C-MFA) in the field of metabolic engineering and systems biology is driving the need to rationalize expensive and time-consuming (13) C-labeling experiments. Experimental design is a key step in improving both the number of fluxes that can be calculated from a set of isotopic data and the precision of flux values. We present IsoDesign, a software that enables these parameters to be maximized by optimizing the isotopic composition of the label input. It can be applied to (13) C-MFA investigations using a broad panel of analytical tools (MS, MS/MS, (1) H NMR, (13) C NMR, etc.) individually or in combination. It includes a visualization module to intuitively select the optimal label input depending on the biological question to be addressed. Applications of IsoDesign are described, with an example of the entire (13) C-MFA workflow from the experimental design to the flux map including important practical considerations. IsoDesign makes the experimental design of (13) C-MFA experiments more accessible to a wider biological community. IsoDesign is distributed under an open source license at http://metasys.insa-toulouse.fr/software/isodes/

  8. Characterization of cerebral glutamine uptake from blood in the mouse brain: implications for metabolic modeling of 13C NMR data

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, Puneet; Behar, Kevin L; Mason, Graeme F; De Feyter, Henk M; Rothman, Douglas L; Patel, Anant B

    2014-01-01

    13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of rodent and human brain using [1-13C]/[1,6-13C2]glucose as labeled substrate have consistently found a lower enrichment (∼25% to 30%) of glutamine-C4 compared with glutamate-C4 at isotopic steady state. The source of this isotope dilution has not been established experimentally but may potentially arise either from blood/brain exchange of glutamine or from metabolism of unlabeled substrates in astrocytes, where glutamine synthesis occurs. In this study, the contribution of the former was evaluated ex vivo using 1H-[13C]-NMR spectroscopy together with intravenous infusion of [U-13C5]glutamine for 3, 15, 30, and 60 minutes in mice. 13C labeling of brain glutamine was found to be saturated at plasma glutamine levels >1.0 mmol/L. Fitting a blood–astrocyte–neuron metabolic model to the 13C enrichment time courses of glutamate and glutamine yielded the value of glutamine influx, VGln(in), 0.036±0.002 μmol/g per minute for plasma glutamine of 1.8 mmol/L. For physiologic plasma glutamine level (∼0.6 mmol/L), VGln(in) would be ∼0.010 μmol/g per minute, which corresponds to ∼6% of the glutamine synthesis rate and rises to ∼11% for saturating blood glutamine concentrations. Thus, glutamine influx from blood contributes at most ∼20% to the dilution of astroglial glutamine-C4 consistently seen in metabolic studies using [1-13C]glucose. PMID:25074745

  9. In vivo and in vitro liver cancer metabolism observed with hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabella, C.; Karlsson, M.; Canapè, C.; Catanzaro, G.; Colombo Serra, S.; Miragoli, L.; Poggi, L.; Uggeri, F.; Venturi, L.; Jensen, P. R.; Lerche, M. H.; Tedoldi, F.

    2013-07-01

    Glutamine metabolism is, with its many links to oncogene expression, considered a crucial step in cancer metabolism and it is thereby a key target for alteration in cancer development. In particular, strong correlations have been reported between oncogene expression and expression and activity of the enzyme glutaminase. This mitochondrial enzyme, which is responsible for the deamidation of glutamine to form glutamate, is overexpressed in many tumour tissues. In animal models, glutaminase expression is correlated with tumour growth rate and it is readily possible to limit tumour growth by suppression of glutaminase activity. In principle, hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy can provide insight to glutamine metabolism and should hence be a valuable tool to study changes in glutaminase activity as tumours progress. However, no such successful in vivo studies have been reported, even though several good biological models have been tested. This may, at least partly, be due to problems in preparing glutamine for hyperpolarization. This paper reports a new and improved preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, which provides a highly sensitive 13C MR marker. With this preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, glutaminase activity in vivo in a rat liver tumour was investigated. Moreover, this marker was also used to measure response to drug treatment in vitro in cancer cells. These examples of [5-13C]glutamine used in tumour models warrant the new preparation to allow metabolic studies with this conditionally essential amino acid.

  10. 13C metabolic flux analysis for larger scale cultivation using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongbo; Yang, Tae Hoon; Heinzle, Elmar

    2010-07-01

    (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)CMFA) is limited to smaller scale experiments due to very high costs of labeled substrates. We measured (13)C enrichment in proteinogenic amino acid hydrolyzates using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) from a series of parallel batch cultivations of Corynebacterium glutamicum utilizing mixtures of natural glucose and [1-(13)C] glucose, containing 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, and 10% [1-(13)C] glucose. Decreasing the [1-(13)C] glucose content, kinetic isotope effects played an increasing role but could be corrected. From the corrected (13)C enrichments in vivo fluxes in the central metabolism were determined by numerical optimization. The obtained flux distribution was very similar to those obtained from parallel labeling experiments using conventional high labeling GC-MS method and to published results. The GC-C-IRMS-based method involving low labeling degree of expensive tracer substrate, e.g. 1%, is well suited for larger laboratory and industrial pilot scale fermentations.

  11. Application of Flow Sensitive Gradients for Improved Measures of Metabolism Using Hyperpolarized 13C MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jeremy W.; Niles, David J.; Adamson, Erin B.; Johnson, Kevin M.; Fain, Sean B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop the use of bipolar gradients to suppress partial-volume and flow-related artifacts from macro-vascular, hyperpolarized spins. Methods Digital simulations were performed over a range of spatial resolutions and gradient strengths to determine the optimal bipolar gradient strength and duration to suppress flowing spins while minimizing signal loss from static tissue. In-vivo experiments were performed to determine the efficacy of this technique to suppress vascular signal in the study of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate renal metabolism. Results Digital simulations showed that in the absence of bipolar gradients, partial-volume artifacts from the vasculature were still present, causing underestimation of the apparent reaction rate of pyruvate to lactate (kP). The addition of a bipolar gradient with b = 32 s/mm2 sufficiently suppressed the vascular signal without a substantial decrease in signal from static tissue. In-vivo results corroborate digital simulations, with similar peak lactate SNR but substantially different kP in the presence of bipolar gradients. Conclusion The proposed approach suppresses signal from flowing spins while minimizing signal loss from static tissue, removing contaminating signal from the vasculature and increasing kinetic modeling accuracy without substantially sacrificing SNR or temporal resolution. PMID:25951611

  12. Metabolic evolution and (13) C flux analysis of a succinate dehydrogenase deficient strain of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Yuzbashev, Tigran V; Bondarenko, Pavel Yu; Sobolevskaya, Tatiana I; Yuzbasheva, Evgeniya Yu; Laptev, Ivan A; Kachala, Vadim V; Fedorov, Alexander S; Vybornaya, Tatiana V; Larina, Anna S; Sineoky, Sergey P

    2016-11-01

    Bio-based succinic acid production can redirect industrial chemistry processes from using limited hydrocarbons to renewable carbohydrates. A fermentation process that does not require pH-titrating agents will be advantageous to the industry. Previously, a Yarrowia lipolytica strain that was defective for succinate dehydrogenase was constructed and was found to accumulate up to 17.5 g L(-1) of succinic acid when grown on glycerol without buffering. Here, a derivative mutant was isolated that produced 40.5 g L(-1) of succinic acid in 36 h with a yield of 0.32 g g(-1) glycerol. A combination approach of induced mutagenesis and metabolic evolution allowed isolation of another derivative that could utilize glucose efficiently and accumulated 50.2 g L(-1) succinic acid in 54 h with a yield of 0.43 g g(-1) . The parent strain of these isolated mutants was used for [1,6-(13) C2 ]glucose assimilation analysis. At least 35% glucose was estimated to be utilized through the pentose phosphate pathway, while ≥84% succinic acid was formed through the oxidative branch of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2425-2432. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27182846

  13. Central metabolic responses to the overproduction of fatty acids in Escherichia coli based on 13C-metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Lian; Xiao, Yi; Gebreselassie, Nikodimos; Zhang, Fuzhong; Antoniewiez, Maciek R; Tang, Yinjie J; Peng, Lifeng

    2014-03-01

    We engineered a fatty acid overproducing Escherichia coli strain through overexpressing tesA (“pull”) and fadR (“push”) and knocking out fadE (“block”). This “pull-push-block” strategy yielded 0.17 g of fatty acids (C12–C18) per gram of glucose (equivalent to 48% of the maximum theoretical yield) in batch cultures during the exponential growth phase under aerobic conditions. Metabolic fluxes were determined for the engineered E. coli and its control strain using tracer ([1,2-13C]glucose) experiments and 13C-metabolic flux analysis. Cofactor (NADPH) and energy (ATP) balances were also investigated for both strains based on estimated fluxes. Compared to the control strain, fatty acid overproduction led to significant metabolic responses in the central metabolism: (1) Acetic acid secretion flux decreased 10-fold; (2) Pentose phosphate pathway and Entner–Doudoroff pathway fluxes increased 1.5- and 2.0-fold, respectively; (3) Biomass synthesis flux was reduced 1.9-fold; (4) Anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylation flux decreased 1.7-fold; (5) Transhydrogenation flux converting NADH to NADPH increased by 1.7-fold. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the engineered strain increased the transcription levels of pntA (encoding the membrane-bound transhydrogenase) by 2.1-fold and udhA (encoding the soluble transhydrogenase) by 1.4-fold, which is in agreement with the increased transhydrogenation flux. Cofactor and energy balances analyses showed that the fatty acid overproducing E. coli consumed significantly higher cellular maintenance energy than the control strain. We discussed the strategies to future strain development and process improvements for fatty acid production in E. coli.

  14. Mechanisms linking metabolism of Helicobacter pylori to 18O and 13C-isotopes of human breath CO2

    PubMed Central

    Som, Suman; De, Anulekha; Banik, Gourab Dutta; Maity, Abhijit; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Pal, Mithun; Daschakraborty, Sunil B.; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Jana, Subhra; Pradhan, Manik

    2015-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilize glucose during metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms linking to oxygen-18 (18O) and carbon-13 (13C)-isotopic fractionations of breath CO2 during glucose metabolism are poorly understood. Using the excretion dynamics of 18O/16O and 13C/12C-isotope ratios of breath CO2, we found that individuals with Helicobacter pylori infections exhibited significantly higher isotopic enrichments of 18O in breath CO2 during the 2h-glucose metabolism regardless of the isotopic nature of the substrate, while no significant enrichments of 18O in breath CO2 were manifested in individuals without the infections. In contrast, the 13C-isotopic enrichments of breath CO2 were significantly higher in individuals with Helicobacter pylori compared to individuals without infections in response to 13C-enriched glucose uptake, whereas a distinguishable change of breath 13C/12C-isotope ratios was also evident when Helicobacter pylori utilize natural glucose. Moreover, monitoring the 18O and 13C-isotopic exchange in breath CO2 successfully diagnosed the eradications of Helicobacter pylori infections following a standard therapy. Our findings suggest that breath 12C18O16O and 13C16O16O can be used as potential molecular biomarkers to distinctively track the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori and also for eradication purposes and thus may open new perspectives into the pathogen’s physiology along with isotope-specific non-invasive diagnosis of the infection. PMID:26039789

  15. A Polymer-Based Magnetic Resonance Tracer for Visualization of Solid Tumors by 13C Spectroscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Iida, Mitsuru; Miura, Iwao; Inubushi, Toshiro; Morikawa, Shigehiro

    2014-01-01

    Morphological imaging precedes lesion-specific visualization in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) because of the superior ability of this technique to depict tissue morphology with excellent spatial and temporal resolutions. To achieve lesion-specific visualization of tumors by MRI, we investigated the availability of a novel polymer-based tracer. Although the 13C nucleus is a candidate for a detection nucleus because of its low background signal in the body, the low magnetic resonance sensitivity of the nucleus needs to be resolved before developing a 13C-based tracer. In order to overcome this problem, we enriched polyethylene glycol (PEG), a biocompatible polymer, with 13C atoms. 13C-PEG40,000 (13C-PEG with an average molecular weight of 40 kDa) emitted a single 13C signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio due to its ability to maintain signal sharpness, as was confirmed by in vivo investigation, and displayed a chemical shift sufficiently distinct from that of endogenous fat. 13C-PEG40,000 intravenously injected into mice showed long retention in circulation, leading to its effective accumulation in tumors reflecting the well-known phenomenon that macromolecules accumulate in tumors because of leaky tumor capillaries. These properties of 13C-PEG40,000 allowed visualization of tumors in mice by 13C spectroscopic imaging. These findings suggest that a technique based on 13C-PEG is a promising strategy for tumor detection. PMID:25007334

  16. Development and testing of hyperpolarized 13C MR calibrationless parallel imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yesu; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Shin, Peter J.; von Morze, Cornelius; Lustig, Michael; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Ohliger, Michael A.; Carvajal, Lucas; Tropp, James; Pauly, John M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    A calibrationless parallel imaging technique developed previously for 1H MRI was modified and tested for hyperpolarized 13C MRI for applications requiring large FOV and high spatial resolution. The technique was demonstrated with both retrospective and prospective under-sampled data acquired in phantom and in vivo rat studies. A 2-fold acceleration was achieved using a 2D symmetric EPI readout equipped with random blips on the phase encode dimension. Reconstructed images showed excellent qualitative agreement with fully sampled data. Further acceleration can be achieved using acquisition schemes that incorporate multi-dimensional under-sampling.

  17. 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis for Systematic Metabolic Engineering of S. cerevisiae for Overproduction of Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Amit; Ando, David; Gin, Jennifer; Runguphan, Weerawat; Denby, Charles; Wang, George; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Shymansky, Chris; Keasling, Jay D.; García Martín, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Efficient redirection of microbial metabolism into the abundant production of desired bioproducts remains non-trivial. Here, we used flux-based modeling approaches to improve yields of fatty acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We combined 13C labeling data with comprehensive genome-scale models to shed light onto microbial metabolism and improve metabolic engineering efforts. We concentrated on studying the balance of acetyl-CoA, a precursor metabolite for the biosynthesis of fatty acids. A genome-wide acetyl-CoA balance study showed ATP citrate lyase from Yarrowia lipolytica as a robust source of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA and malate synthase as a desirable target for downregulation in terms of acetyl-CoA consumption. These genetic modifications were applied to S. cerevisiae WRY2, a strain that is capable of producing 460 mg/L of free fatty acids. With the addition of ATP citrate lyase and downregulation of malate synthase, the engineered strain produced 26% more free fatty acids. Further increases in free fatty acid production of 33% were obtained by knocking out the cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which flux analysis had shown was competing for carbon flux upstream with the carbon flux through the acetyl-CoA production pathway in the cytoplasm. In total, the genetic interventions applied in this work increased fatty acid production by ~70%. PMID:27761435

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Metabolic Mixtures by 2D 13C-Constant-Time TOCSY NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Kerem; Zhang, Fengli; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of organisms can be fully 13C-labeled, which has the advantage that their metabolomes can be studied by high-resolution 2D NMR 13C–13C constant-time (CT) TOCSY experiments. Individual metabolites can be identified via database searching or, in the case of novel compounds, through the reconstruction of their backbone-carbon topology. Determination of quantitative metabolite concentrations is another key task. Because significant peak overlaps in 1D NMR spectra prevents straightforward quantification through 1D peak integrals, we demonstrate here the direct use of 13C–13C CT-TOCSY spectra for metabolite quantification. This is accomplished through the quantum-mechanical treatment of the TOCSY magnetization transfer at short and long mixing times or by the use of analytical approximations, which are solely based on the knowledge of the carbon-backbone topologies. The methods are demonstrated for carbohydrate and amino-acid mixtures. PMID:23773204

  19. Glutamatergic and GABAergic energy metabolism measured in the rat brain by (13) C NMR spectroscopy at 14.1 T.

    PubMed

    Duarte, João M N; Gruetter, Rolf

    2013-09-01

    Energy metabolism supports both inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission processes. This study investigated the specific contribution of astrocytic metabolism to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis and inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission that remained to be ilucidated in vivo. Therefore, we measured (13)C incorporation into brain metabolites by dynamic (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 14.1 T in rats under α-chloralose anaesthesia during infusion of [1,6-(13)C]glucose. The enhanced sensitivity at 14.1 T allowed to quantify incorporation of (13) C into the three aliphatic carbons of GABA non-invasively. Metabolic fluxes were determined with a mathematical model of brain metabolism comprising glial, glutamatergic and GABAergic compartments. GABA synthesis rate was 0.11 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min. GABA-glutamine cycle was 0.053 ± 0.003 μmol/g/min and accounted for 22 ± 1% of total neurotransmitter cycling between neurons and glia. Cerebral glucose oxidation was 0.47 ± 0.02 μmol/g/min, of which 35 ± 1% and 7 ± 1% was diverted to the glutamatergic and GABAergic tricarboxylic acid cycles, respectively. The remaining fraction of glucose oxidation was in glia, where 12 ± 1% of the TCA cycle flux was dedicated to oxidation of GABA. 16 ± 2% of glutamine synthesis was provided to GABAergic neurons. We conclude that substantial metabolic activity occurs in GABAergic neurons and that glial metabolism supports both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in the living rat brain. PMID:23745684

  20. Cutting the Gordian Knot: Identifiability of anaplerotic reactions in Corynebacterium glutamicum by means of (13) C-metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Kappelmann, Jannick; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Noack, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is the major workhorse for the microbial production of several amino and organic acids. As long as these derive from tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, the activity of anaplerotic reactions is pivotal for a high biosynthetic yield. To determine single anaplerotic activities (13) C-Metabolic Flux Analysis ((13) C-MFA) has been extensively used for C. glutamicum, however with different network topologies, inconsistent or poorly determined anaplerotic reaction rates. Therefore, in this study we set out to investigate whether a focused isotopomer model of the anaplerotic node can at all admit a unique solution for all fluxes. By analyzing different scenarios of active anaplerotic reactions, we show in full generality that for C. glutamicum only certain anaplerotic deletion mutants allow to uniquely determine the anaplerotic fluxes from (13) C-isotopomer data. We stress that the result of this analysis for different assumptions on active enzymes is directly transferable to other compartment-free organisms. Our results demonstrate that there exist biologically relevant metabolic network topologies for which the flux distribution cannot be inferred by classical (13) C-MFA. PMID:26375179

  1. Effects of trichloroacetic acid on the nitrogen metabolism of Pinus sylvestris--a 13C/15N tracer study.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Christoph; Jung, Klaus; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2002-01-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) can be found in various environmental compartments like air, rain and plants all over the world. It is assumed that TCA is an atmospheric degradation product of volatile chloroorganic hydrocarbons. The herbicide effect of TCA in higher concentrations is well known, but not much is known about the phytotoxic effects in environmentally relevant concentrations. It can be shown in this study by using the 13C/15N stable isotope tracer technique that [13C]TCA is taken up by roots of two-year-old seedlings of Pinus sylvestris L. and transported into the needles. At the same time the effect of the substance on nitrogen metabolism can be analyzed by measuring the incorporation of 15NO3- into different nitrogen fractions of the plant. The more [13C]TCA incorporation, the higher the synthesis of 15N labelled amino acids and proteins is. These effects on the nitrogen metabolism are probably based on the activation of stress- and detoxification metabolism. It has to be assumed that there is an influence on N metabolism of Pinus sylvestris caused by the deposition of environmentally relevant TCA concentrations.

  2. Genome-based metabolic mapping and 13C flux analysis reveal systematic properties of an oleaginous microalga Chlorella protothecoides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-02-01

    Integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and (13)C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass and corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary (13)C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. The result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Taken together, the metabolic network modeling assisted by experimental metabolomics and (13)C

  3. Genome-Based Metabolic Mapping and 13C Flux Analysis Reveal Systematic Properties of an Oleaginous Microalga Chlorella protothecoides

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2014-12-15

    We report that integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and 13C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass andmore » corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. We found that the result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Lastly, taken together, the metabolic network modeling assisted

  4. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Metabolic Imaging in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Chaumeil, Myriam M; Lupo, Janine M; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2015-11-01

    This review is focused on describing the use of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy for metabolic imaging of brain tumors. We will first review the MR metabolic imaging findings generated from preclinical models, focusing primarily on in vivo studies, and will then describe the use of metabolic imaging in the clinical setting. We will address relatively well-established (1) H MRS approaches, as well as (31) P MRS, (13) C MRS and emerging hyperpolarized (13) C MRS methodologies, and will describe the use of metabolic imaging for understanding the basic biology of glioma as well as for improving the characterization and monitoring of brain tumors in the clinic.

  5. 13 C-metabolic flux analysis in heterologous cellulase production by Bacillus subtilis genome-reduced strain.

    PubMed

    Toya, Yoshihiro; Hirasawa, Takashi; Morimoto, Takuya; Masuda, Kenta; Kageyama, Yasushi; Ozaki, Katsuya; Ogasawara, Naotake; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-06-10

    The great potential of Bacillus subtilis to produce biomaterials would be further enhanced by the development of strains with deletions of non-essential genomic regions. Here, using stationary (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA), we investigated the metabolism during cellulase production by the genome-reduced B. subtilis strain MGB874. We transformed MGB874 and wild-type strains with the heterologous cellulase gene, and cultured these on a synthetic medium containing glucose as carbon source. The addition of glutamate and the genome reduction enhanced cellulase production, which led us to use (13)C-MFA to assess the effects of glutamate addition and gene deletions on metabolism. We found that there was a significant increase in the flux in the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, whereas the fluxes of reactions from acetyl-CoA to α-ketoglutarate were repressed in the presence of glutamate. We hypothesize that the increase in the PP pathway flux was caused by the decrease of citrate synthase flux through the accumulation of glycolytic intermediates. Excess NADPH produced by the PP pathway may affect the increase in cellulase production. Furthermore, the fluxes on glycolysis and the acetate formation of the cellulase-producing wild-type strain were significantly larger than that of the cellulase-producing MGB874 strain when the strains were cultured with glucose and glutamate.

  6. Carbon Metabolism of Soil microorganisms at Low Temperatures: Position-Specific 13C Labeled Glucose Reveals the Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, C.; Bore, E. K.; Halicki, S.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Dippold, M.

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic pathway activities at low temperature are not well understood, despite the fact that the processes are relevant for many soils globally and seasonally. To analyze soil metabolism at low temperature, isotopomeres of position-specifically 13C labeled glucose were applied at three temperature levels; +5, -5 -20 oC. In additon, one sterilization treatment with sodium azide at +5 oC was also performed. Soils were incubated for 1, 3 and 10 days while soil samples at -20 oC were additionally sampled after 30 days. The 13C from individual molecule position in respired CO2 was quantifed. Incorporation of 13C in bulk soil, extractable microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) and cell membranes of different microbial communities classified by 13C phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) was carried out. Our 13CO2 data showed a dominance of C-1 respiration at +5 °C for treatments with and without sodium azide, but total respiration for sodium azide inhibited treatments increased by 14%. In contrast, at -5 and -20 oC metabolic behavior showed intermingling of preferential respiration of the glucose C-4 and C-1 positions. Therefore, at +5 °C, pentose phosphate pathway activity is a dominant metabolic pathway used by microorganisms to metabolize glucose. The respiration increase due to NaN3 inhibition was attributed to endoenzymes released from dead organisms that are stabilized at the soil matrix and have access to suitable substrate and co-factors to permit their funtions. Our PLFA analysis showed that incorporation of glucose 13C was higher in Gram negative bacteria than other microbial groups as they are most competitive for LMWOS. Only a limited amount of microbial groups maintained their glucose utilizing activity at -5 and -20 °C and they strongly shifted towards a metabolization of glucose via both glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways indicating both growth and cellular maintenance. This study revealed a remarkable microbial acitivity

  7. Bonded Cumomer Analysis of Human Melanoma Metabolism Monitored by 13C NMR Spectroscopy of Perfused Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Shestov, Alexander A; Mancuso, Anthony; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Guo, Lili; Nelson, David S; Roman, Jeffrey C; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Leeper, Dennis B; Blair, Ian A; Glickson, Jerry D

    2016-03-01

    A network model for the determination of tumor metabolic fluxes from (13)C NMR kinetic isotopomer data has been developed and validated with perfused human DB-1 melanoma cells carrying the BRAF V600E mutation, which promotes oxidative metabolism. The model generated in the bonded cumomer formalism describes key pathways of tumor intermediary metabolism and yields dynamic curves for positional isotopic enrichment and spin-spin multiplets. Cells attached to microcarrier beads were perfused with 26 mm [1,6-(13)C2]glucose under normoxic conditions at 37 °C and monitored by (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Excellent agreement between model-predicted and experimentally measured values of the rates of oxygen and glucose consumption, lactate production, and glutamate pool size validated the model. ATP production by glycolytic and oxidative metabolism were compared under hyperglycemic normoxic conditions; 51% of the energy came from oxidative phosphorylation and 49% came from glycolysis. Even though the rate of glutamine uptake was ∼ 50% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux, the rate of ATP production from glutamine was essentially zero (no glutaminolysis). De novo fatty acid production was ∼ 6% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux was 3.6% of glycolysis, and three non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway exchange fluxes were calculated. Mass spectrometry was then used to compare fluxes through various pathways under hyperglycemic (26 mm) and euglycemic (5 mm) conditions. Under euglycemic conditions glutamine uptake doubled, but ATP production from glutamine did not significantly change. A new parameter measuring the Warburg effect (the ratio of lactate production flux to pyruvate influx through the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier) was calculated to be 21, close to upper limit of oxidative metabolism. PMID:26703469

  8. The Contribution of Blood Lactate to Brain Energy Metabolism in Humans Measured by Dynamic 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    BOUMEZBEUR, Fawzi; PETERSEN, Kitt F.; CLINE, Gary W.; MASON, Graeme F.; BEHAR, Kevin L; SHULMAN, Gerald I.; ROTHMAN, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether plasma lactate can be a significant fuel for human brain energy metabolism infusions of [3-13C]lactate and 1H-13C polarization transfer spectroscopy were used to detect the entry and utilization of lactate. During the 2-hour infusion study, 13C incorporation in the amino acid pools of glutamate and glutamine were measured with a 5 minutes time-resolution. With a plasma concentration ([Lac]P) being in the 0.8–2.8 mmol/L range, the tissue lactate concentration ([Lac]B) was assessed as well as the fractional contribution of lactate to brain energy metabolism (CMRlac). From the measured relationship between unidirectional lactate influx (Vin) and plasma and brain lactate concentrations lactate transport constants were calculated using a reversible Michaelis-Menten model. The results show (i) that in the physiological range plasma lactate unidirectional transport (Vin) and concentration in tissue increases close to linearly with the lactate concentration in plasma, (ii) the maximum potential contribution of plasma lactate to brain metabolism is 10% under basal plasma lactate conditions of ~ 1.0 mmol/L and as much as 60% at supra-physiological plasma lactate concentrations when the transporters are saturated, (iii) the half-saturation constant KT is 5.1±2.7 mmol/L and VMAX is 0.40±0.13 μmol/g/min (68% confidence interval), (iv) the majority of plasma lactate is metabolized in neurons similar to glucose. PMID:20962220

  9. Acute porcine renal metabolic effect of endogastric soft drink administration assessed with hyperpolarized [1‐13c]pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Esben Søvsø Szocska; Kjærgaard, Uffe; Bertelsen, Lotte Bonde; Ringgaard, Steffen; Stødkilde‐Jørgensen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to determine the quantitative reproducibility of metabolic breakdown products in the kidney following intravenous injection of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate and secondly to investigate the metabolic effect on the pyruvate metabolism of oral sucrose load using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization. By this technique, metabolic alterations in several different metabolic related diseases and their metabolic treatment responses can be accessed. Methods In four healthy pigs the lactate‐to‐pyruvate, alanine‐to‐pyruvate and bicarbonate‐to‐pyruvate ratio was measured following administration of regular cola and consecutive injections of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate four times within an hour. Results The overall lactate‐to‐pyruvate metabolic profile changed significantly over one hour following an acute sucrose load leading to a significant rise in blood glucose. Conclusion The reproducibility of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the healthy pig kidney demonstrated a repeatability of more than 94% for all metabolites and, furthermore, that the pyruvate to lactate conversion and the blood glucose level is elevated following endogastric sucrose administration. Magn Reson Med 74:558–563, 2015. © 2015 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:26014387

  10. Analysis of 13C labeling enrichment in microbial culture applying metabolic tracer experiments using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Heinzle, Elmar; Yuan, Yongbo; Kumar, Sathish; Wittmann, Christoph; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Herrmann; Wehrung, Patrick; Adam, Pierre; Albrecht, Pierre

    2008-09-15

    The applicability of gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) for the quantification of 13C enrichment of proteinogenic amino acids in metabolic tracer experiments was evaluated. Measurement of the 13C enrichment of proteinogenic amino acids from cell hydrolyzates of Corynebacterium glutamicum growing on different mixtures containing between 0.5 and 10% [1-13C]glucose shows the significance of kinetic isotope effects in metabolic flux studies at low degree of labeling. We developed a method to calculate the 13C enrichment. The approach to correct for these effects in metabolic flux studies using delta13C measurement by GC-C-IRMS uses two parallel experiments applying substrate with natural abundance and 13C-enriched tracer substrate, respectively. The fractional enrichment obtained in natural substrate is subtracted from that of the enriched one. Tracer studies with C. glutamicum resulted in a statistically identical relative fractional enrichment of 13C in proteinogenic amino acids over the whole range of applied concentrations of [1-13C]glucose. The current findings indicate a great potential of GC-C-IRMS for labeling quantification in 13C metabolic flux analysis with low labeling degree of tracer substrate directly in larger scale bioreactors.

  11. 13C metabolic flux analysis in Clostridium acetobutylicum during growth on L-arabinose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Margaret; Sund, Christian; Liu, Sanchao; Germane, Katherine; Servinsky, Matthew; Gerlach, Elliot

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum's metabolic pathways have been studied for decades due to its metabolic diversity and industrial value, yet many details of its metabolism are continuing to emerge. To elucidate the role of xylulose-5-P/fructose-6-P phosphoketolase (XFP), and the recently discovered Pentose Phosphate Pathway (PKP) in C. acetobutylicum, experimental and computational metabolic isotope analysis was performed under growth on glucose, xylose, and arabinose. Results indicate that PKP utilization increased with increasing xylose concentration and this trend was further pronounced during growth on arabinose. This was confirmed by mutation of the gene encoding XFP, which almost completely abolished flux through the PKP during growth on arabinose and resulted in decreased acetate:butyrate ratios. We discuss these experimental and computational results here, and the implications for our understanding of sugar metabolism in C. acetobutylicum.

  12. Pathway analysis using (13) C-glycerol and other carbon tracers reveals a bipartite metabolism of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Häuslein, Ina; Manske, Christian; Goebel, Werner; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source for Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular pathogen, which can cause a life-threatening pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. Genome, transcriptome and proteome studies indicate that L. pneumophila also utilizes carbon substrates other than amino acids. We show here that glycerol promotes intracellular replication of L. pneumophila in amoeba or macrophages (but not extracellular growth) dependent on glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GlpD. An L. pneumophila mutant strain lacking glpD was outcompeted by wild-type bacteria upon co-infection of amoeba, indicating an important role of glycerol during infection. Isotopologue profiling studies using (13) C-labelled substrates were performed in a novel minimal defined medium, MDM, comprising essential amino acids, proline and phenylalanine. In MDM, L. pneumophila utilized (13) C-labelled glycerol or glucose predominantly for gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway, while the amino acid serine was used for energy generation via the citrate cycle. Similar results were obtained for L. pneumophila growing intracellularly in amoeba fed with (13) C-labelled glycerol, glucose or serine. Collectively, these results reveal a bipartite metabolism of L. pneumophila, where glycerol and carbohydrates like glucose are mainly fed into anabolic processes, while serine serves as major energy supply. PMID:26691313

  13. Measuring and modeling C flux rates through the central metabolic pathways in microbial communities using position-specific 13C-labeled tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, P.; van Groenigen, K.; Hagerty, S.; Salpas, E.; Fairbanks, D. E.; Hungate, B. A.; KOCH, G. W.; Schwartz, E.

    2012-12-01

    The production of energy and metabolic precursors occurs in well-known processes such as glycolysis and Krebs cycle. We use position-specific 13C-labeled metabolic tracers, combined with models of microbial metabolic organization, to analyze the response of microbial community energy production, biosynthesis, and C use efficiency (CUE) in soils, decomposing litter, and aquatic communities. The method consists of adding position-specific 13C -labeled metabolic tracers to parallel soil incubations, in this case 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose. The measurement of CO2 released from the labeled tracers is used to calculate the C flux rates through the various metabolic pathways. A simplified metabolic model consisting of 23 reactions is solved using results of the metabolic tracer experiments and assumptions of microbial precursor demand. This new method enables direct estimation of fundamental aspects of microbial energy production, CUE, and soil organic matter formation in relatively undisturbed microbial communities. We will present results showing the range of metabolic patterns observed in these communities and discuss results from testing metabolic models.

  14. The Feasibility of Assessing Branched-Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in Cellular Models of Prostate Cancer with Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Ketoisocaproate

    PubMed Central

    Billingsley, Kelvin L.; Park, Jae Mo; Josan, Sonal; Hurd, Ralph; Mayer, Dirk; Spielman-Sun, Eleanor; Nishimura, Dwight G.; Brooks, James D.; Spielman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have yielded powerful techniques capable of real-time analysis of metabolic pathways. These non-invasive methods have increasingly shown application in impacting disease diagnosis and have further been employed in mechanistic studies of disease onset and progression. Our goals were to investigate branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT) activity in prostate cancer with a novel molecular probe, hyperpolarized [1-13C]-2-ketoisocaproate ([1-13C]-KIC), and explore the potential of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism to serve as a biomarker. Using traditional spectrophotometric assays, BCAT enzymatic activities were determined in vitro for various sources of prostate cancer (human, transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mouse and human cell lines). These preliminary studies indicated that low levels of BCAT activity were present in all models of prostate cancer but enzymatic levels are altered significantly in prostate cancer relative to healthy tissue. The MR spectroscopic studies were conducted with two cellular models (PC-3 and DU-145) that exhibited levels of BCAA metabolism comparable to the human disease state. Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-KIC was administered to prostate cancer cell lines, and the conversion of [1-13C]-KIC to the metabolic product, [1-13C]-leucine ([1-13C]-Leu), could be monitored via hyperpolarized 13C MRS. PMID:24907854

  15. A Marked Gradient in δ13C Values of Clams Mercenaria mercenaria Across a Marine Embayment May Reflect Variations in Ecosystem metabolism

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although stable isotopes of organic carbon (δ13C) are typically used as indicators of terrestrial, intertidal, and offshore organic carbon sources to coastal ecosystems, there is evidence that δ13C values are also sensitive to in situ ecosystem metabolism. To investigate this phe...

  16. Monitoring tumor response of prostate cancer to radiation therapy by multi-parametric 1H and hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Vickie Yi

    Radiation therapy is one of the most common curative therapies for patients with localized prostate cancer, but despite excellent success rates, a significant number of patients suffer post- treatment cancer recurrence. The accurate characterization of early tumor response remains a major challenge for the clinical management of these patients. Multi-parametric MRI/1H MR spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) has been shown to increase the diagnostic performance in evaluating the effectiveness of radiation therapy. 1H MRSI can detect altered metabolic profiles in cancerous tissue. In this project, the concentrations of prostate metabolites from snap-frozen biopsies of recurrent cancer after failed radiation therapy were correlated with histopathological findings to identify quantitative biomarkers that predict for residual aggressive versus indolent cancer. The total choline to creatine ratio was significantly higher in recurrent aggressive versus indolent cancer, suggesting that use of a higher threshold tCho/Cr ratio in future in vivo 1H MRSI studies could improve the selection and therapeutic planning for patients after failed radiation therapy. Varying radiation doses may cause a diverse effect on prostate cancer micro-environment and metabolism, which could hold the key to improving treatment protocols for individual patients. The recent development and clinical translation of hyperpolarized 13C MRI have provided the ability to monitor both changes in the tumor micro-environment and its metabolism using a multi-probe approach, [1-13C]pyruvate and 13C urea, combined with 1H Multi-parametric MRI. In this thesis, hyperpolarized 13C MRI, 1H dynamic contrast enhancement, and diffusion weighted imaging were used to identify early radiation dose response in a transgenic prostate cancer model. Hyperpolarized pyruvate to lactate metabolism significantly decreased in a dose dependent fashion by 1 day after radiation therapy, prior to any changes observed using 1H DCE and diffusion

  17. Isotopically nonstationary 13C flux analysis of changes in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf metabolism due to high light acclimation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fangfang; Jazmin, Lara J; Young, Jamey D; Allen, Doug K

    2014-11-25

    Improving plant productivity is an important aim for metabolic engineering. There are few comprehensive methods that quantitatively describe leaf metabolism, although such information would be valuable for increasing photosynthetic capacity, enhancing biomass production, and rerouting carbon flux toward desirable end products. Isotopically nonstationary metabolic flux analysis (INST-MFA) has been previously applied to map carbon fluxes in photoautotrophic bacteria, which involves model-based regression of transient (13)C-labeling patterns of intracellular metabolites. However, experimental and computational difficulties have hindered its application to terrestrial plant systems. We performed in vivo isotopic labeling of Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes with (13)CO2 and estimated fluxes throughout leaf photosynthetic metabolism by INST-MFA. Plants grown at 200 µmol m(-2)s(-1) light were compared with plants acclimated for 9 d at an irradiance of 500 µmol⋅m(-2)⋅s(-1). Approximately 1,400 independent mass isotopomer measurements obtained from analysis of 37 metabolite fragment ions were regressed to estimate 136 total fluxes (54 free fluxes) under each condition. The results provide a comprehensive description of changes in carbon partitioning and overall photosynthetic flux after long-term developmental acclimation of leaves to high light. Despite a doubling in the carboxylation rate, the photorespiratory flux increased from 17 to 28% of net CO2 assimilation with high-light acclimation (Vc/Vo: 3.5:1 vs. 2.3:1, respectively). This study highlights the potential of (13)C INST-MFA to describe emergent flux phenotypes that respond to environmental conditions or plant physiology and cannot be obtained by other complementary approaches. PMID:25368168

  18. Application of 13C isotope labeling using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to determining phosphate-containing metabolic incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Putluri, Vasanta; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Konde, Sai Aparna; Lydon, John P.; Sreekumar, Arun; Putluri, Nagireddy

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe an approach wherein negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has used to understand the relative flux through phosphate containing metabolic intermediates associated with central carbon metabolism after administering cells with 13C-labeled substrates. The method was applied to examine the 13C incorporation through glycolysis in T47D breast cancer cells and showed reduction of glycolytic relative flux upon treatment with 2-Deoxyglucose. PMID:24338880

  19. Metabolic network analysis of Bacillus clausii on minimal and semirich medium using (13)C-labeled glucose.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Torben; Christensen, Bjarke; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-04-01

    Using (13)C-labeled glucose fed to the facultative alkalophilic Bacillus clausii producing the alkaline serine protease Savinase, the intracellular fluxes were quantified in continuous cultivation and in batch cultivation on a minimal medium. The flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was found to increase with increasing specific growth rate but at a much lower level than previously reported for Bacillus subtilis. Two futile cycles in the pyruvate metabolism were included in the metabolic network. A substantial flux in the futile cycle involving malic enzyme was estimated, whereas only a very small or zero flux through PEP carboxykinase was estimated, indicating that the latter enzyme was not active during growth on glucose. The uptake of the amino acids in a semirich medium containing 15 of the 20 amino acids normally present in proteins was estimated using fully labeled glucose in batch cultivations. It was found that leucine, isoleucine, and phenylalanine were taken up from the medium and not synthesized de novo from glucose. In contrast, serine and threonine were completely synthesized from other metabolites and not taken up from the medium. Valine, proline, and lysine were partly taken up from the medium and partly synthesized from glucose. The metabolic network analysis was extended to include analysis of growth on the semirich medium containing amino acids, and the metabolic flux distribution on this medium was estimated and compared with growth on minimal medium. PMID:12009795

  20. Overcoming the metabolic burden of protein secretion in Schizosaccharomyces pombe--a quantitative approach using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tobias; Lange, Sabrina; Wilhelm, Nadine; Bureik, Matthias; Yang, Tae-Hoon; Heinzle, Elmar; Schneider, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Protein secretion in yeast is generally associated with a burden to cellular metabolism. To investigate this metabolic burden in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we constructed a set of strains secreting the model protein maltase in different amounts. We quantified the influence of protein secretion on the metabolism applying (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in chemostat cultures. Analysis of the macromolecular biomass composition revealed an increase in cellular lipid content at elevated levels of protein secretion and we observed altered metabolic fluxes in the pentose phosphate pathway, the TCA cycle, and around the pyruvate node including mitochondrial NADPH supply. Supplementing acetate to glucose or glycerol minimal media was found to improve protein secretion, accompanied by an increased cellular lipid content and carbon flux through the TCA cycle as well as increased mitochondrial NADPH production. Thus, systematic metabolic analyses can assist in identifying factors limiting protein secretion and in deriving strategies to overcome these limitations.

  1. Quantification of compartmented metabolic fluxes in developing soybean embryos by employing biosynthetically directed fractional (13)C labeling, two-dimensional [(13)C, (1)H] nuclear magnetic resonance, and comprehensive isotopomer balancing.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Ganesh; Fulton, D Bruce; Iyer, Vidya V; Peterson, Joan Marie; Zhou, Ruilian; Westgate, Mark E; Spalding, Martin H; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2004-10-01

    Metabolic flux quantification in plants is instrumental in the detailed understanding of metabolism but is difficult to perform on a systemic level. Toward this aim, we report the development and application of a computer-aided metabolic flux analysis tool that enables the concurrent evaluation of fluxes in several primary metabolic pathways. Labeling experiments were performed by feeding a mixture of U-(13)C Suc, naturally abundant Suc, and Gln to developing soybean (Glycine max) embryos. Two-dimensional [(13)C, (1)H] NMR spectra of seed storage protein and starch hydrolysates were acquired and yielded a labeling data set consisting of 155 (13)C isotopomer abundances. We developed a computer program to automatically calculate fluxes from this data. This program accepts a user-defined metabolic network model and incorporates recent mathematical advances toward accurate and efficient flux evaluation. Fluxes were calculated and statistical analysis was performed to obtain sds. A high flux was found through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (19.99 +/- 4.39 micromol d(-1) cotyledon(-1), or 104.2 carbon mol +/- 23.0 carbon mol per 100 carbon mol of Suc uptake). Separate transketolase and transaldolase fluxes could be distinguished in the plastid and the cytosol, and those in the plastid were found to be at least 6-fold higher. The backflux from triose to hexose phosphate was also found to be substantial in the plastid (21.72 +/- 5.00 micromol d(-1) cotyledon(-1), or 113.2 carbon mol +/-26.0 carbon mol per 100 carbon mol of Suc uptake). Forward and backward directions of anaplerotic fluxes could be distinguished. The glyoxylate shunt flux was found to be negligible. Such a generic flux analysis tool can serve as a quantitative tool for metabolic studies and phenotype comparisons and can be extended to other plant systems.

  2. Time-course metabolic changes in high-fat diet-induced obesity rats: A pilot study using hyperpolarized (13)C dynamic MRS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang-Won; Ahn, Kyu-Youn; Kim, Yun-Hyeon; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the time-course metabolic changes based on hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity rats and the correlation between metabolic and serum enzyme levels. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either HFD (60% fat) or normal diet (10% fat) for 6weeks. A HyperSense DNP was used to hyperpolarize [1-(13)C] pyruvic acid and the hyperpolarized (13)C MRS was examined every 2weeks in the course of 6weeks using a 3T GE MR750 scanner. The body weight of HFD-induced obese rats was significantly increased compared to normal rats at the 6th week after the onset of feeding (p=0.05). Simultaneously, the HFD-induced obese rats showed significantly increased levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol compared to normal rats (p≤0.05). In the dynamic (13)C MR spectra acquired at the 6th week, the obese rats showed significantly increased ratios of [1-(13)C] lactate/[1-(13)C] pyruvate and [1-(13)C] alanine/[1-(13)C] pyruvate (p=0.05). The (13)C spectral outcomes are positively correlated with the enzyme levels of ALT and LDH in the HFD-induced obesity. The [1-(13)C] lactate and [1-(13)C] alanine are potentially considered as noninvasive biomarkers for the HFD-induced obesity.

  3. In vivo measurement of ethanol metabolism in the rat liver using magnetic resonance spectroscopy of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Spielman, Daniel M.; Mayer, Dirk; Yen, Yi-Fen; Tropp, James; Hurd, Ralph E.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2009-01-01

    [1-13C]pyruvate is readily polarizable substrate that has been the subject of numerous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies of in vivo metabolism. In this work, 13C-MRS of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate is used to interrogate a metabolic pathway involved in neither aerobic nor anaerobic metabolism. In particular, ethanol consumption leads to altered liver metabolism, which when excessive is associated with adverse medical conditions including fatty liver disease, hepatitis, cirrhosis, and cancer. Here we present a method for noninvasively monitoring this important process in vivo. Following the bolus injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate, we demonstrate a significantly increased rat liver lactate production rate with the co-administration of ethanol (P = 0.0016 unpaired t-test). The affect is attributable to increased liver nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) associated with ethanol metabolism in combination with NADH's role as a coenzyme in pyruvate to lactate conversion. Beyond studies of liver metabolism, this novel in vivo assay of changes in NADH levels makes hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate a potentially viable substrate for studying the multiple in vivo metabolic pathways that use NADH (or NAD+) as a coenzyme, thus broadening the range of applications that have been discussed in the literature to date. PMID:19526498

  4. Interactions between Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism in Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii: In Vivo 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies

    PubMed Central

    Deborde, Catherine; Boyaval, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    In vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate the pathways and the regulation of pyruvate metabolism and pyruvate-lactate cometabolism noninvasively in living-cell suspensions of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii. The most important result of this work concerns the modification of fluxes of pyruvate metabolism induced by the presence of lactate. Pyruvate was temporarily converted to lactate and alanine; the flux to acetate synthesis was maintained, but the flux to propionate synthesis was increased; and the reverse flux of the first part of the Wood-Werkman cycle, up to acetate synthesis, was decreased. Pyruvate was consumed at apparent initial rates of 148 and 90 μmol · min−1 · g−1 (cell dry weight) when it was the sole substrate or cometabolized with lactate, respectively. Lactate was consumed at an apparent initial rate of 157 μmol · min−1 · g−1 when it was cometabolized with pyruvate. P. shermanii used several pathways, namely, the Wood-Werkman cycle, synthesis of acetate and CO2, succinate synthesis, gluconeogenesis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and alanine synthesis, to manage its pyruvate pool sharply. In both types of experiments, acetate synthesis and the Wood-Werkman cycle were the metabolic pathways used most. PMID:10788375

  5. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in the Fe(III)-reducing organism Geobacter metallireducens via 13C isotopiclabeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Martin, Hector Garcia; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-08-13

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The model indicated that over 90 percent of the acetate wascompletely oxidized to CO2 via a complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cyclewhile reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxykinase were present under these conditions, but enzymes in theglyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme were absent. Gluconeogenesis and thepentose phosphate pathway were mainly employed for biosynthesis andaccounted for less than 3 percent of total carbon consumption. The modelalso indicated surprisingly high reversibility in the reaction betweenoxoglutarate and succinate. This step operates close to the thermodynamicequilibrium possibly because succinate is synthesized via a transferasereaction, and its product, acetyl-CoA, inhibits the conversion ofoxoglutarate to succinate. These findings enable a better understandingof the relationship between genome annotation and extant metabolicpathways in G. metallireducens.

  6. Quantitative Metabolomics and Instationary 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis Reveals Impact of Recombinant Protein Production on Trehalose and Energy Metabolism in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Jordà, Joel; Rojas, Hugo Cueto; Carnicer, Marc; Wahl, Aljoscha; Ferrer, Pau; Albiol, Joan

    2014-05-05

    Pichia pastoris has been recognized as an effective host for recombinant protein production. In this work, we combine metabolomics and instationary 13C metabolic flux analysis (INST 13C-MFA) using GC-MS and LC-MS/MS to evaluate the potential impact of the production of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (Rol) on P. pastoris central carbon metabolism. Higher oxygen uptake and CO2 production rates and slightly reduced biomass yield suggest an increased energy demand for the producing strain. This observation is further confirmed by 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. In particular, the flux through the methanol oxidation pathway and the TCA cycle was increased in the Rol-producing strain compared to the reference strain. Next to changes in the flux distribution, significant variations in intracellular metabolite concentrations were observed. Most notably, the pools of trehalose, which is related to cellular stress response, and xylose, which is linked to methanol assimilation, were significantly increased in the recombinant strain.

  7. Quantitative Metabolomics and Instationary 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis Reveals Impact of Recombinant Protein Production on Trehalose and Energy Metabolism in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Jordà, Joel; Cueto Rojas, Hugo; Carnicer, Marc; Wahl, Aljoscha; Ferrer, Pau; Albiol, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Pichia pastoris has been recognized as an effective host for recombinant protein production. In this work, we combine metabolomics and instationary 13C metabolic flux analysis (INST 13C-MFA) using GC-MS and LC-MS/MS to evaluate the potential impact of the production of a Rhizopus oryzae lipase (Rol) on P. pastoris central carbon metabolism. Higher oxygen uptake and CO2 production rates and slightly reduced biomass yield suggest an increased energy demand for the producing strain. This observation is further confirmed by 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. In particular, the flux through the methanol oxidation pathway and the TCA cycle was increased in the Rol-producing strain compared to the reference strain. Next to changes in the flux distribution, significant variations in intracellular metabolite concentrations were observed. Most notably, the pools of trehalose, which is related to cellular stress response, and xylose, which is linked to methanol assimilation, were significantly increased in the recombinant strain. PMID:24957027

  8. Reduced mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity has a strong effect on photorespiratory metabolism as revealed by 13C labelling

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Pernilla; Keech, Olivier; Stenlund, Hans; Gardeström, Per; Moritz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) catalyses the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate (OAA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Its activity is important for redox control of the mitochondrial matrix, through which it may participate in regulation of TCA cycle turnover. In Arabidopsis, there are two isoforms of mMDH. Here, we investigated to which extent the lack of the major isoform, mMDH1 accounting for about 60% of the activity, affected leaf metabolism. In air, rosettes of mmdh1 plants were only slightly smaller than wild type plants although the fresh weight was decreased by about 50%. In low CO2 the difference was much bigger, with mutant plants accumulating only 14% of fresh weight as compared to wild type. To investigate the metabolic background to the differences in growth, we developed a 13CO2 labelling method, using a custom-built chamber that enabled simultaneous treatment of sets of plants under controlled conditions. The metabolic profiles were analysed by gas- and liquid- chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate the metabolic adjustments between wild type and mmdh1. The genotypes responded similarly to high CO2 treatment both with respect to metabolite pools and 13C incorporation during a 2-h treatment. However, under low CO2 several metabolites differed between the two genotypes and, interestingly most of these were closely associated with photorespiration. We found that while the glycine/serine ratio increased, a concomitant altered glutamine/glutamate/α-ketoglutarate relation occurred. Taken together, our results indicate that adequate mMDH activity is essential to shuttle reductants out from the mitochondria to support the photorespiratory flux, and strengthen the idea that photorespiration is tightly intertwined with peripheral metabolic reactions. PMID:26889011

  9. Use of In Vivo 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy To Elucidate l-Arabinose Metabolism in Yeasts▿

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, César; Neves, Ana Rute; Antunes, Alexandra M. M.; Noronha, João Paulo; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Santos, Helena; Spencer-Martins, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    Candida arabinofermentans PYCC 5603T and Pichia guilliermondii PYCC 3012 were shown to grow well on l-arabinose, albeit exhibiting distinct features that justify an in-depth comparative study of their respective pentose catabolism. Carbon-13 labeling experiments coupled with in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to investigate l-arabinose metabolism in these yeasts, thereby complementing recently reported physiological and enzymatic data. The label supplied in l-[2-13C]arabinose to nongrowing cells, under aerobic conditions, was found on C-1 and C-2 of arabitol and ribitol, on C-2 of xylitol, and on C-1, C-2, and C-3 of trehalose. The detection of labeled arabitol and xylitol constitutes additional evidence for the operation in yeast of the redox catabolic pathway, which is widespread among filamentous fungi. Furthermore, labeling at position C-1 of trehalose and arabitol demonstrates that glucose-6-phosphate is recycled through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). This result was interpreted as a metabolic strategy to regenerate NADPH, the cofactor essential for sustaining l-arabinose catabolism at the level of l-arabinose reductase and l-xylulose reductase. Moreover, the observed synthesis of d-arabitol and ribitol provides a route with which to supply NAD+ under oxygen-limiting conditions. In P. guilliermondii PYCC 3012, the strong accumulation of l-arabitol (intracellular concentration of up to 0.4 M) during aerobic l-arabinose metabolism indicates the existence of a bottleneck at the level of l-arabitol 4-dehydrogenase. This report provides the first experimental evidence for a link between l-arabinose metabolism in fungi and the oxidative branch of the PPP and suggests rational guidelines for the design of strategies for the production of new and efficient l-arabinose-fermenting yeasts. PMID:18245253

  10. Use of Position-Specific 13C Isotopomers to Examine Central Carbon Metabolism in the Thermophile 'Thermoflexus hugenholtzii'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S.; Tamadonfar, K. O.; Dijkstra, P.; Dodsworth, J. A.; Hedlund, B. P.

    2013-12-01

    'Thermoflexus hugenholtzii' is a member of a newly discovered class of Chloroflexi. It is the dominant microorganism in certain hot springs; however, very little is known about its physiology, and it is unable to grow on defined media. In order to examine central carbon metabolism in 'T. hugenholtzii', the genome was annotated for genes encoding enzymes for central carbon metabolism, revealing complete pathways for glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Isotope experiments were conducted to test predicted activities by adding position-specific carbon-13 (13C)-labeled metabolites of glucose, pyruvate, acetate, TCA metabolites, and amino acids and measuring the production of 13CO2 during exponential growth. Use of these metabolites demonstrated broad heterotrophic activity of 'T. hugenholtzii,' despite its inability to grow on defined media. Use of glucose-U demonstrated an active glycolytic pathway and pyruvate-1 demonstrated the functioning of the pyruvate oxidation pathway after glycolysis. Use of the TCA cycle intermediates citrate and succinate demonstrated an active TCA cycle. Production of CO2 from alanine and cysteine demonstrated oxidation of amino acids. However, lack of activity on glucose-1 failed to reveal an active PPP suggesting 'T. hugenholtzii' may rely on exogenous sources of pentoses for nucleic acid biosynthesis.

  11. Effective Estimation of Dynamic Metabolic Fluxes Using 13C Labeling and Piecewise Affine Approximation: From Theory to Practical Applicability

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Robin; Wahl, S. Aljoscha

    2015-01-01

    The design of microbial production processes relies on rational choices for metabolic engineering of the production host and the process conditions. These require a systematic and quantitative understanding of cellular regulation. Therefore, a novel method for dynamic flux identification using quantitative metabolomics and 13C labeling to identify piecewise-affine (PWA) flux functions has been described recently. Obtaining flux estimates nevertheless still required frequent manual reinitalization to obtain a good reproduction of the experimental data and, moreover, did not optimize on all observables simultaneously (metabolites and isotopomer concentrations). In our contribution we focus on measures to achieve faster and robust dynamic flux estimation which leads to a high dimensional parameter estimation problem. Specifically, we address the following challenges within the PWA problem formulation: (1) Fast selection of sufficient domains for the PWA flux functions, (2) Control of over-fitting in the concentration space using shape-prescriptive modeling and (3) robust and efficient implementation of the parameter estimation using the hybrid implicit filtering algorithm. With the improvements we significantly speed up the convergence by efficiently exploiting that the optimization problem is partly linear. This allows application to larger-scale metabolic networks and demonstrates that the proposed approach is not purely theoretical, but also applicable in practice. PMID:26690237

  12. 13C metabolic flux analysis shows that resistin impairs the metabolic response to insulin in L6E9 myotubes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that the adipokine resistin links obesity and insulin resistance, although how resistin acts on muscle metabolism is controversial. We aimed to quantitatively analyse the effects of resistin on the glucose metabolic flux profile and on insulin response in L6E9 myotubes at the metabolic level using a tracer-based metabolomic approach and our in-house developed software, Isodyn. Results Resistin significantly increased glucose uptake and glycolysis, altering pyruvate utilisation by the cell. In the presence of resistin, insulin only slightly increased glucose uptake and glycolysis, and did not alter the flux profile around pyruvate induced by resistin. Resistin prevented the increase in gene expression in pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1 and the sharp decrease in gene expression in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-1 induced by insulin. Conclusions These data suggest that resistin impairs the metabolic activation of insulin. This impairment cannot be explained by the activity of a single enzyme, but instead due to reorganisation of the whole metabolic flux distribution. PMID:25217974

  13. Delayed labelling of brain glutamate after an intra-arterial [13C]glucose bolus: evidence for aerobic metabolism of guinea pig brain glycogen store.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J L; Rae, C; Radda, G K; Matthews, P M

    1999-07-01

    Glycogen in glial cells is the largest store of glucose equivalents in the brain. Here we describe evidence that brain glycogen contributes to aerobic energy metabolism of the guinea pig brain in vivo. Five min after an intra-arterial bolus injection of d-[U-14C]glucose, 28+/-11% of the radioactivity in brain tissue was associated with the glycogen fraction, indicating that a significant proportion of labelled glucose taken up by the brain is converted to glycogen shortly after bolus infusion. Incorporation of 13C-label into lactate generated by brains made ischaemic after d-[1-13C]glucose injection confirms that these glucose equivalents can be mobilised for anaerobic glucose metabolism. Aerobic metabolism was monitored by following the time course of 13C-incorporation into glutamate in guinea pig cortex and cerebellum in vivo. After an intra-arterial bolus injection of d-[1-13C]glucose, glutamate labelling reached a maximum 40-60 min after injection, suggesting that a slowly metabolised pool of labelled glucose equivalents was present. As the concentration of 13C-labelled glucose in blood was shown to decrease below detectable levels within 5 min of bolus injection, this late phase of glutamate labelling must occur with mobilisation of a brain storage pool of labelled glucose equivalents. We interpret this as evidence that glucose equivalents in glycogen may contribute to energy metabolism in the aerobic guinea pig brain.

  14. Comparative 13C metabolic flux analysis of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient, L-valine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Tobias; Blombach, Bastian; Lang, Siegmund; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Oldiges, Marco; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    L-Valine can be formed successfully using C. glutamicum strains missing an active pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC). Wild-type C. glutamicum and four PDHC-deficient strains were compared by (13)C metabolic flux analysis, especially focusing on the split ratio between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Compared to the wild type, showing a carbon flux of 69% ± 14% through the PPP, a strong increase in the PPP flux was observed in PDHC-deficient strains with a maximum of 113% ± 22%. The shift in the split ratio can be explained by an increased demand of NADPH for l-valine formation. In accordance, the introduction of the Escherichia coli transhydrogenase PntAB, catalyzing the reversible conversion of NADH to NADPH, into an L-valine-producing C. glutamicum strain caused the PPP flux to decrease to 57% ± 6%, which is below the wild-type split ratio. Hence, transhydrogenase activity offers an alternative perspective for sufficient NADPH supply, which is relevant for most amino acid production systems. Moreover, as demonstrated for L-valine, this bypass leads to a significant increase of product yield due to a concurrent reduction in carbon dioxide formation via the PPP.

  15. Characterization of the metabolic shift between oxidative and fermentative growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by comparative 13C flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Oliver; Wittmann, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Background One of the most fascinating properties of the biotechnologically important organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae is its ability to perform simultaneous respiration and fermentation at high growth rate even under fully aerobic conditions. In the present work, this Crabtree effect called phenomenon was investigated in detail by comparative 13C metabolic flux analysis of S. cerevisiae growing under purely oxidative, respiro-fermentative and predominantly fermentative conditions. Results The metabolic shift from oxidative to fermentative growth was accompanied by complex changes of carbon flux throughout the whole central metabolism. This involved a flux redirection from the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) towards glycolysis, an increased flux through pyruvate carboxylase, the fermentative pathways and malic enzyme, a flux decrease through the TCA cycle, and a partial relocation of alanine biosynthesis from the mitochondrion to the cytosol. S. cerevisiae exhibited a by-pass of pyruvate dehydrogenase in all physiological regimes. During oxidative growth this by-pass was mainly provided via pyruvate decarboxylase, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, acetyl-CoA synthase and transport of acetyl-CoA into the mitochondrion. During fermentative growth this route, however, was saturated due to limited enzyme capacity. Under these conditions the cells exhibited high carbon flux through a chain of reactions involving pyruvate carboxylase, the oxaloacetate transporter and malic enzyme. During purely oxidative growth the PPP alone was sufficient to completely supply NADPH for anabolism. During fermentation, it provided only 60 % of the required NADPH. Conclusion We conclude that, in order to overcome the limited capacity of pyruvate dehydrogenase, S. cerevisiae possesses different metabolic by-passes to channel carbon into the mitochondrion. This involves the conversion of cytosolic pyruvate either into acetyl CoA or oxaloacetate followed by intercompartmental transport of these

  16. A method for (13)C-labeling of metabolic carbohydrates within French bean leaves (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) for decomposition studies in soils.

    PubMed

    Girardin, Cyril; Rasse, Daniel P; Biron, Philippe; Ghashghaie, Jaleh; Chenu, Claire

    2009-06-01

    The molecular composition of plant residues is suspected to largely govern the fate of their constitutive carbon (C) in soils. Labile compounds, such as metabolic carbohydrates, are affected differently from recalcitrant and structural compounds by soil-C stabilisation mechanisms. Producing (13)C-enriched plant residues with specifically labeled fractions would help us to investigate the fate in soils of the constitutive C of these compounds. The objective of the present research was to test (13)C pulse chase labeling as a method for specifically enriching the metabolic carbohydrate components of plant residues, i.e. soluble sugars and starch. Bean plants were exposed to a (13)CO(2)-enriched atmosphere for 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 21 h. The major soluble sugars were then determined on water-soluble extracts, and starch on HCl-hydrolysable extracts. The results show a quick differential labeling between water-soluble and water-insoluble compounds. For both groups, (13)C-labeling increased linearly with time. The difference in delta(13)C signature between water-soluble and insoluble fractions was 7 per thousand after 0.5 h and 70 per thousand after 21 h. However, this clear isotopic contrast masked a substantial labeling variability within each fraction. By contrast, metabolic carbohydrates on the one hand (i.e. soluble sugars + starch) and other fractions (essentially cell wall components) on the other hand displayed quite homogeneous signatures within fractions, and a significant difference in labeling between fractions: delta(13)C = 414 +/- 3.7 per thousand and 56 +/- 5.5 per thousand, respectively. Thus, the technique generates labeled plant residues displaying contrasting (13)C-isotopic signatures between metabolic carbohydrates and other compounds, with homogenous signatures within each group. Metabolic carbohydrates being labile compounds, our findings suggest that the technique is particularly appropriate for investigating the effect of compound lability on the long

  17. Simultaneous investigation of cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, Krebs cycle metabolism and pH, using hyperpolarized [1,2-(13)C2]pyruvate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Albert P; Hurd, Ralph E; Schroeder, Marie A; Lau, Angus Z; Gu, Yi-ping; Lam, Wilfred W; Barry, Jennifer; Tropp, James; Cunningham, Charles H

    2012-02-01

    (13)C MR spectroscopy studies performed on hearts ex vivo and in vivo following perfusion of prepolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate have shown that changes in pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) flux may be monitored non-invasively. However, to allow investigation of Krebs cycle metabolism, the (13)C label must be placed on the C2 position of pyruvate. Thus, the utilization of either C1 or C2 labeled prepolarized pyruvate as a tracer can only afford a partial view of cardiac pyruvate metabolism in health and disease. If the prepolarized pyruvate molecules were labeled at both C1 and C2 positions, then it would be possible to observe the downstream metabolites that were the results of both PDH flux ((13)CO(2) and H(13)CO(3)(-)) and Krebs cycle flux ([5-(13)C]glutamate) with a single dose of the agent. Cardiac pH could also be monitored in the same experiment, but adequate SNR of the (13)CO(2) resonance may be difficult to obtain in vivo. Using an interleaved selective RF pulse acquisition scheme to improve (13)CO(2) detection, the feasibility of using dual-labeled hyperpolarized [1,2-(13)C(2)]pyruvate as a substrate for dynamic cardiac metabolic MRS studies to allow simultaneous investigation of PDH flux, Krebs cycle flux and pH, was demonstrated in vivo.

  18. Rapid adaptation of rat brain and liver metabolism to a ketogenic diet: an integrated study using 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Maggie; Beauvieux, Marie-Christine; Naulin, Jérôme; El Hamrani, Dounia; Gallis, Jean-Louis; Cunnane, Stephen C; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2015-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective alternative treatment for refractory epilepsy in children, but the mechanisms by which it reduces seizures are poorly understood. To investigate how the KD modifies brain metabolism, we infused control (CT) and 7-day KD rats with either [1-13C]glucose (Glc) or [2,4-13C2]β-hydroxybutyrate (β-HB). Specific enrichments of amino acids (AAs) measured by 1H- and 13C-NMR in total brain perchloric acid extracts were similar between CT and KD rats after [1-13C]Glc infusion whereas they were higher in KD rats after [2,4-13C2]β-HB infusion. This suggests better metabolic efficiency of ketone body utilization on the KD. The relative rapid metabolic adaptation to the KD included (1) 11%-higher brain γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)/glutamate (Glu) ratio versus CT, (2) liver accumulation of the ketogenic branched-chain AAs (BCAAs) leucine (Leu) and isoleucine (ILeu), which were never detected in CT, and (3) higher brain Leu and ILeu contents. Since Glu and GABA are excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, respectively, higher brain GABA/Glu ratio could contribute to the mechanism by which the KD reduces seizures in epilepsy. Increased BCAA on the KD may also contribute to better seizure control. PMID:25785828

  19. Norlittorine and norhyoscyamine identified as products of littorine and hyoscyamine metabolism by (13)C-labeling in Datura innoxia hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Al Balkhi, Mohamad Houssam; Schiltz, Séverine; Lesur, David; Lanoue, Arnaud; Wadouachi, Anne; Boitel-Conti, Michèle

    2012-02-01

    The presence of two compounds, norlittorine and norhyoscyamine, has been reported in leaves and roots of Datura innoxia; however their metabolic origin in the tropane alkaloid pathway has remained unknown. Precise knowledge of this pathway is a necessary pre-requisite to optimize the production of hyoscyamine and scopolamine in D. innoxia hairy root cultures. The exact structure of norlittorine and norhyoscyamine was confirmed by LC-MS/MS and NMR analyses. Isotopic labeling experiments, using [1-(13)C]-phenylalanine, [1'-(13)C]-littorine and [1'-(13)C]-hyoscyamine, combined with elicitor treatments, using methyl jasmonate, coronalon and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, were used to investigate the metabolic origin of the N-demethylated tropane alkaloids. The results suggest that norlittorine and norhyoscyamine are induced under stress conditions by conversion of littorine and hyoscyamine. We propose the N-demethylation of tropane alkaloids as a mechanism to detoxify cells in overproducing conditions.

  20. Simultaneous hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate MRI and (18)F-FDG-PET in cancer (hyperPET): feasibility of a new imaging concept using a clinical PET/MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E; Henriksen, Sarah T; Johannesen, Helle H; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan; Vignaud, Alexandre; Hansen, Anders E; Børresen, Betina; Klausen, Thomas L; Wittekind, Anne-Mette N; Gillings, Nic; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Clemmensen, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of a new imaging concept - combined hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and (18)F-FDG-PET imaging. This procedure was performed in a clinical PET/MRI scanner with a canine cancer patient. We have named this concept hyper PET. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate results in an increase of (13)C-lactate, (13)C-alanine and (13)C-CO2 ((13)C-HCO3) resonance peaks relative to the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. Accordingly, with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and use of (13)C-pyruvate it is now possible to directly study the Warburg Effect through the rate of conversion of (13)C-pyruvate to (13)C-lactate. In this study, we combined it with (18)F-FDG-PET that studies uptake of glucose in the cells. A canine cancer patient with a histology verified local recurrence of a liposarcoma on the right forepaw was imaged using a combined PET/MR clinical scanner. PET was performed as a single-bed, 10 min acquisition, 107 min post injection of 310 MBq (18)F-FDG. (13)C-chemical shift imaging (CSI) was performed just after FDG-PET and 30 s post injection of 23 mL hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate. Peak heights of (13)C-pyruvate and (13)C-lactate were quantified using a general linear model. Anatomic (1)H-MRI included axial and coronal T1 vibe, coronal T2-tse and axial T1-tse with fat saturation following gadolinium injection. In the tumor we found clearly increased (13)C-lactate production, which also corresponded to high (18)F-FDG uptake on PET. This is in agreement with the fact that glycolysis and production of lactate are increased in tumor cells compared to normal cells. Yet, most interestingly, also in the muscle of the forepaw of the dog high (18)F-FDG uptake was observed. This was due to activity in these muscles prior to anesthesia, which was not accompanied by a similarly high (13)C-lactate production. Accordingly, this clearly

  1. Impacts of high β-galactosidase expression on central metabolism of recombinant Pichia pastoris GS115 using glucose as sole carbon source via (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yongsheng; Huang, Mingzhi; Lu, Junjie; Qian, Jiangchao; Lin, Weilu; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2014-10-10

    The yeast Pichia pastoris GS115 is a widely used microbial cell factory for the production of heterologous protein. In order to reveal the impacts of high heterologous protein expression on the central metabolism of Pichia pastoris GS115 using glucose as sole carbon source, we engineered a high β-galactosidase expression strain P. pastoris G1HL and a low expression control strain P. pastoris GHL through controlling the initiation strength of constitutive promoter pGAP. The carbon flux distributions in these two strains were quantified via (13)C metabolic flux analysis. Compared to the control strain, G1HL showed a lower growth rate, a higher flux through glycolysis pathway, a higher flux through pentose phosphate pathway, and a lower flux through by-products secretion pathway. The metabolic flux redistribution in G1HL was thought to compensate the increased redox cofactors and energy demands caused by the high protein expression. Although the fluxes through Krebs cycle in two engineered strains were almost the same, they were significantly lower than those in wild strain. The enhanced expression of β-galactosidase by glutamate supplementation demonstrated the potential of P. pastoris GS115 to catabolize more carbon through the Krebs cycle for even higher protein expression. In conclusion, our work indicates that P. pastoris GS115 can readjusts the central metabolism for higher heterologous protein expression and provides strategies for strain development or process optimization for enhancing production of heterologous protein.

  2. Application of multivariate image analysis in QSPR study of 13C chemical shifts of naphthalene derivatives: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Garkani-Nejad, Zahra; Poshteh-Shirani, Marziyeh

    2010-11-15

    A new implemented QSPR method, whose descriptors achieved from bidimensional images, was applied for predicting (13)C NMR chemical shifts of 25 mono substituted naphthalenes. The resulted descriptors were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and the most significant principal components (PCs) were extracted. MIA-QSPR (multivariate image analysis applied to quantitative structure-property relationship) modeling was done by means of principal component regression (PCR) and principal component-artificial neural network (PC-ANN) methods. Eigen value ranking (EV) and correlation ranking (CR) were used here to select the most relevant set of PCs as inputs for PCR and PC-ANN modeling methods. The results supported that the correlation ranking-principal component-artificial neural network (CR-PC-ANN) model could predict the (13)C NMR chemical shifts of all 10 carbon atoms in mono substituted naphthalenes with R(2) ≥ 0.922 for training set, R(2) ≥ 0.963 for validation set and R(2) ≥ 0.936 for the test set. Comparison of the results with other existing factor selection method revealed that less accurate results were obtained by the eigen value ranking procedure. PMID:21035668

  3. Long-term data on δ13C-CH4 emissions elucidate drivers of CH4 metabolism in temperate and northern wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCalley, C. K.; Shorter, J. H.; Crill, P. M.; Hodgkins, S. B.; Chanton, J.; Saleska, S. R.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Methane flux from wetlands is both a critical component of the global CH4 budget, and highly sensitive to global climate change. Gaps in our knowledge of the biological processes that underlie CH4 fluxes from natural ecosystems limit our ability to scale flux estimates as well as predict future emissions. To address these gaps, we used quantum cascade laser technology linked to automated chambers to quantify the isotopic composition of CH4 fluxes from a high latitude (68° N) wetland underlain by discontinuous permafrost (Stordalen Mire, Sweden) and a temperate wetland (43° N) undergoing shrub encroachment (Sallie's Fen, NH). Changes in plant communities and hydrology during permafrost thaw result in both large increases in CH4 emissions as well as shifts in the CH4 production pathway, from hydrogenotrophic to increasingly acetoclastic mechanisms. In contrast, shrub encroachment that replaces sedge species in the temperate wetland reduces CH4 emissions, but doesn't effect δ 13C-CH4, with predominantly acetoclastic production occurring across plant communities. Multi-year data sets identify temperature and hydrologic variability as key contributors to annual and interannual patterns in δ 13C-CH4. Fully-thawed fens at Stordalen had consistent δ13C-CH4 across years, with an annual pattern suggestive of more hydrogenotrophic production early and late in the growing season. In contrast, intermediate-thaw sites, where the water table was more dynamic, had large variations in δ13C-CH4 across years. At Sallie's Fen, patterns in δ13C-CH4 suggest an abrupt shift in CH4 transport and metabolism at the beginning of the growing season and then more stable δ13C-CH4 during the growing season. Together these results provide insights into how plant communities and variable environmental conditions interact to influence the microbial metabolisms that drive CH4 production and consumption in diverse wetland ecosystems.

  4. Genome-Based Metabolic Mapping and 13C Flux Analysis Reveal Systematic Properties of an Oleaginous Microalga Chlorella protothecoides1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    Integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and 13C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass and corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. The result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Taken together, the metabolic network modeling assisted by experimental metabolomics and 13C labeling

  5. 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis Identifies an Unusual Route for Pyruvate Dissimilation in Mycobacteria which Requires Isocitrate Lyase and Carbon Dioxide Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Dany J. V.; Bonde, Bhushan; Hawkins, Nathaniel; Ward, Jane L.; Beale, Michael H.; Noack, Stephan; Nöh, Katharina; Kruger, Nicholas J.; Ratcliffe, R. George; McFadden, Johnjoe

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires the enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL) for growth and virulence in vivo. The demonstration that M. tuberculosis also requires ICL for survival during nutrient starvation and has a role during steady state growth in a glycerol limited chemostat indicates a function for this enzyme which extends beyond fat metabolism. As isocitrate lyase is a potential drug target elucidating the role of this enzyme is of importance; however, the role of isocitrate lyase has never been investigated at the level of in vivo fluxes. Here we show that deletion of one of the two icl genes impairs the replication of Mycobacterium bovis BCG at slow growth rate in a carbon limited chemostat. In order to further understand the role of isocitrate lyase in the central metabolism of mycobacteria the effect of growth rate on the in vivo fluxes was studied for the first time using 13C-metabolic flux analysis (MFA). Tracer experiments were performed with steady state chemostat cultures of BCG or M. tuberculosis supplied with 13C labeled glycerol or sodium bicarbonate. Through measurements of the 13C isotopomer labeling patterns in protein-derived amino acids and enzymatic activity assays we have identified the activity of a novel pathway for pyruvate dissimilation. We named this the GAS pathway because it utilizes the Glyoxylate shunt and Anapleurotic reactions for oxidation of pyruvate, and Succinyl CoA synthetase for the generation of succinyl CoA combined with a very low flux through the succinate – oxaloacetate segment of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We confirm that M. tuberculosis can fix carbon from CO2 into biomass. As the human host is abundant in CO2 this finding requires further investigation in vivo as CO2 fixation may provide a point of vulnerability that could be targeted with novel drugs. This study also provides a platform for further studies into the metabolism of M. tuberculosis using 13C-MFA. PMID:21814509

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolism. Applications of proton and 13C NMR to the study of glutamate metabolism in cultured glial cells and human brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Portais, J C; Pianet, I; Allard, M; Merle, M; Raffard, G; Kien, P; Biran, M; Labouesse, J; Caille, J M; Canioni, P

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of cells from the central nervous system both in vitro on perchloric acid extracts obtained either from cultured tumoral cells (C6 rat glioma) or rat astrocytes in primary culture, and in vivo within the human brain. Analysis of carbon 13 NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts prepared from cultured cells in the presence of NMR [1-13C] glucose as substrate allowed determination of the glutamate and glutamine enrichments in both normal and tumoral cells. Preliminary results indicated large changes in the metabolism of these amino acids (and also of aspartate and alanine) in the C6 cell as compared to its normal counterpart. Localized proton NMR spectra of the human brain in vivo were obtained at 1.5 T, in order to evaluate the content of various metabolites, including glutamate, in peritumoral edema from a selected volume of 2 x 2 x 2 cm3. N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine, creatine, choline and inositol derivative resonances were observed in 15 min spectra. N-acetyl-aspartate was found to be at a lower level in contrast to glutamate which was detected at a higher level in the injured area as compared to the contralateral unaffected side. PMID:1674432

  7. Design and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber for uniform or differential, metabolic and structural, plant isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Soong, Jennifer L; Reuss, Dan; Pinney, Colin; Boyack, Ty; Haddix, Michelle L; Stewart, Catherine E; Cotrufo, M Francesca

    2014-01-16

    Tracing rare stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as (13)C with (15)N, (18)O or (2)H has the potential to reveal even more information about complex stoichiometric relationships during biogeochemical transformations. Isotope labeled plant material has been used in various studies of litter decomposition and soil organic matter formation(1-4). From these and other studies, however, it has become apparent that structural components of plant material behave differently than metabolic components (i.e. leachable low molecular weight compounds) in terms of microbial utilization and long-term carbon storage(5-7). The ability to study structural and metabolic components separately provides a powerful new tool for advancing the forefront of ecosystem biogeochemical studies. Here we describe a method for producing (13)C and (15)N labeled plant material that is either uniformly labeled throughout the plant or differentially labeled in structural and metabolic plant components. Here, we present the construction and operation of a continuous (13)C and (15)N labeling chamber that can be modified to meet various research needs. Uniformly labeled plant material is produced by continuous labeling from seedling to harvest, while differential labeling is achieved by removing the growing plants from the chamber weeks prior to harvest. Representative results from growing Andropogon gerardii Kaw demonstrate the system's ability to efficiently label plant material at the targeted levels. Through this method we have produced plant material with a 4.4 atom%(13)C and 6.7 atom%(15)N uniform plant label, or material that is differentially labeled by up to 1.29 atom%(13)C and 0.56 atom%(15)N in its metabolic and structural components (hot water extractable and hot water

  8. Design and Operation of a Continuous 13C and 15N Labeling Chamber for Uniform or Differential, Metabolic and Structural, Plant Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Jennifer L; Reuss, Dan; Pinney, Colin; Boyack, Ty; Haddix, Michelle L; Stewart, Catherine E; Cotrufo, M. Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Tracing rare stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as 13C with 15N, 18O or 2H has the potential to reveal even more information about complex stoichiometric relationships during biogeochemical transformations. Isotope labeled plant material has been used in various studies of litter decomposition and soil organic matter formation1-4. From these and other studies, however, it has become apparent that structural components of plant material behave differently than metabolic components (i.e. leachable low molecular weight compounds) in terms of microbial utilization and long-term carbon storage5-7. The ability to study structural and metabolic components separately provides a powerful new tool for advancing the forefront of ecosystem biogeochemical studies. Here we describe a method for producing 13C and 15N labeled plant material that is either uniformly labeled throughout the plant or differentially labeled in structural and metabolic plant components. Here, we present the construction and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber that can be modified to meet various research needs. Uniformly labeled plant material is produced by continuous labeling from seedling to harvest, while differential labeling is achieved by removing the growing plants from the chamber weeks prior to harvest. Representative results from growing Andropogon gerardii Kaw demonstrate the system's ability to efficiently label plant material at the targeted levels. Through this method we have produced plant material with a 4.4 atom%13C and 6.7 atom%15N uniform plant label, or material that is differentially labeled by up to 1.29 atom%13C and 0.56 atom%15N in its metabolic and structural components (hot water extractable and hot water residual components

  9. 13C-Tracer and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses Reveal Metabolic Flux Distribution in the Oleaginous Microalga Chlorella protothecoides1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Liu, Lixia; Wu, Chao; Yang, Chen; Wu, Qingyu

    2010-01-01

    The green alga Chlorella protothecoides has received considerable attention because it accumulates neutral triacylglycerols, commonly regarded as an ideal feedstock for biodiesel production. In order to gain a better understanding of its metabolism, tracer experiments with [U-13C]/[1-13C]glucose were performed with heterotrophic growth of C. protothecoides for identifying the metabolic network topology and estimating intracellular fluxes. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis tracked the labeling patterns of protein-bound amino acids, revealing a metabolic network consisting of the glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with inactive glyoxylate shunt. Evidence of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and malic enzyme activity was also obtained. It was demonstrated that the relative activity of the pentose phosphate pathway to glycolysis under nitrogen-limited environment increased, reflecting excess NADPH requirements for lipid biosynthesis. Although the growth rate and cellular oil content were significantly altered in response to nitrogen limitation, global flux distribution of C. protothecoides remained stable, exhibiting the rigidity of central carbon metabolism. In conclusion, quantitative knowledge on the metabolic flux distribution of oleaginous alga obtained in this study may be of value in designing strategies for metabolic engineering of desirable bioproducts. PMID:20720172

  10. In vivo quantification of neuro-glial metabolism and glial glutamate concentration using 1H-[13C] MRS at 14.1T.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Bernard; Xin, Lijing; Millet, Philippe; Gruetter, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes have recently become a major center of interest in neurochemistry with the discoveries on their major role in brain energy metabolism. An interesting way to probe this glial contribution is given by in vivo (13) C NMR spectroscopy coupled with the infusion labeled glial-specific substrate, such as acetate. In this study, we infused alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats with [2-(13) C]acetate and followed the dynamics of the fractional enrichment (FE) in the positions C4 and C3 of glutamate and glutamine with high sensitivity, using (1) H-[(13) C] magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 14.1T. Applying a two-compartment mathematical model to the measured time courses yielded a glial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle rate (Vg ) of 0.27 ± 0.02 μmol/g/min and a glutamatergic neurotransmission rate (VNT ) of 0.15 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min. Glial oxidative ATP metabolism thus accounts for 38% of total oxidative metabolism measured by NMR. Pyruvate carboxylase (VPC ) was 0.09 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min, corresponding to 37% of the glial glutamine synthesis rate. The glial and neuronal transmitochondrial fluxes (Vx (g) and Vx (n) ) were of the same order of magnitude as the respective TCA cycle fluxes. In addition, we estimated a glial glutamate pool size of 0.6 ± 0.1 μmol/g. The effect of spectral data quality on the fluxes estimates was analyzed by Monte Carlo simulations. In this (13) C-acetate labeling study, we propose a refined two-compartment analysis of brain energy metabolism based on (13) C turnover curves of acetate, glutamate and glutamine measured with state of the art in vivo dynamic MRS at high magnetic field in rats, enabling a deeper understanding of the specific role of glial cells in brain oxidative metabolism. In addition, the robustness of the metabolic fluxes determination relative to MRS data quality was carefully studied. PMID:24117599

  11. Measuring changes in substrate utilization in the myocardium in response to fasting using hyperpolarized [1-13C]butyrate and [1-13C]pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaansen, Jessica A. M.; Merritt, Matthew E.; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is often associated with a shift in substrate preference for ATP production. Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has the unique ability to detect real-time metabolic changes in vivo due to its high sensitivity and specificity. Here a protocol using HP [1-13C]pyruvate and [1-13C]butyrate is used to measure carbohydrate versus fatty acid metabolism in vivo. Metabolic changes in fed and fasted Sprague Dawley rats (n = 36) were studied at 9.4 T after tail vein injections. Pyruvate and butyrate competed for acetyl-CoA production, as evidenced by significant changes in [13C]bicarbonate (−48%), [1-13C]acetylcarnitine (+113%), and [5-13C]glutamate (−63%), following fasting. Butyrate uptake was unaffected by fasting, as indicated by [1-13C]butyrylcarnitine. Mitochondrial pseudoketogenesis facilitated the labeling of the ketone bodies [1-13C]acetoacetate and [1-13C]β-hydroxybutyryate, without evidence of true ketogenesis. HP [1-13C]acetoacetate was increased in fasting (250%) but decreased during pyruvate co-injection (−82%). Combining HP 13C technology and co-administration of separate imaging agents enables noninvasive and simultaneous monitoring of both fatty acid and carbohydrate oxidation. This protocol illustrates a novel method for assessing metabolic flux through different enzymatic pathways simultaneously and enables mechanistic studies of the changing myocardial energetics often associated with disease. PMID:27150735

  12. Measuring changes in substrate utilization in the myocardium in response to fasting using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]butyrate and [1-(13)C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Merritt, Matthew E; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is often associated with a shift in substrate preference for ATP production. Hyperpolarized (HP) (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has the unique ability to detect real-time metabolic changes in vivo due to its high sensitivity and specificity. Here a protocol using HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate and [1-(13)C]butyrate is used to measure carbohydrate versus fatty acid metabolism in vivo. Metabolic changes in fed and fasted Sprague Dawley rats (n = 36) were studied at 9.4 T after tail vein injections. Pyruvate and butyrate competed for acetyl-CoA production, as evidenced by significant changes in [(13)C]bicarbonate (-48%), [1-(13)C]acetylcarnitine (+113%), and [5-(13)C]glutamate (-63%), following fasting. Butyrate uptake was unaffected by fasting, as indicated by [1-(13)C]butyrylcarnitine. Mitochondrial pseudoketogenesis facilitated the labeling of the ketone bodies [1-(13)C]acetoacetate and [1-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyryate, without evidence of true ketogenesis. HP [1-(13)C]acetoacetate was increased in fasting (250%) but decreased during pyruvate co-injection (-82%). Combining HP (13)C technology and co-administration of separate imaging agents enables noninvasive and simultaneous monitoring of both fatty acid and carbohydrate oxidation. This protocol illustrates a novel method for assessing metabolic flux through different enzymatic pathways simultaneously and enables mechanistic studies of the changing myocardial energetics often associated with disease. PMID:27150735

  13. Altered 13C glucose metabolism in the cortico–striato–thalamo–cortical loop in the MK-801 rat model of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Eyjolfsson, Elvar M; Nilsen, Linn Hege; Kondziella, Daniel; Brenner, Eiliv; Håberg, Asta; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Using a modified MK-801 (dizocilpine) N-methyl--aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor hypofunction model for schizophrenia, we analyzed glycolysis, as well as glutamatergic, GABAergic, and monoaminergic neurotransmitter synthesis and degradation. Rats received an injection of MK-801 daily for 6 days and on day 6, they also received an injection of [1-13C]glucose. Extracts of frontal cortex (FCX), parietal and temporal cortex (PTCX), thalamus, striatum, nucleus accumbens (NAc), and hippocampus were analyzed using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. A pronounced reduction in glycolysis was found only in PTCX, in which 13C labeling of glucose, lactate, and alanine was decreased. 13C enrichment in lactate, however, was reduced in all areas investigated. The largest reductions in glutamate labeling were detected in FCX and PTCX, whereas in hippocampus, striatum, and Nac, 13C labeling of glutamate was only slightly but significantly reduced. The thalamus was the only region with unaffected glutamate labeling. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) labeling was reduced in all areas, but most significantly in FCX. Glutamine and aspartate labeling was unchanged. Mitochondrial metabolites were also affected. Fumarate labeling was reduced in FCX and thalamus, whereas malate labeling was reduced in FCX, PTCX, striatum, and NAc. Dopamine turnover was decreased in FCX and thalamus, whereas that of serotonin was unchanged in all regions. In conclusion, neurotransmitter metabolism in the cortico–striato–thalamo–cortical loop is severely impaired in the MK-801 (dizocilpine) NMDA receptor hypofunction animal model for schizophrenia. PMID:21081956

  14. Metabolic Fate of the Carboxyl Groups of Malate and Pyruvate and their Influence on δ13C of Leaf-Respired CO2 during Light Enhanced Dark Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Marco M.; Wegener, Frederik; Barthel, Matti; Maurino, Veronica G.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Buchmann, Nina; Werner, Christiane; Werner, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    The enhanced CO2 release of illuminated leaves transferred into darkness, termed “light enhanced dark respiration (LEDR)”, is often associated with an increase in the carbon isotope ratio of the respired CO2 (δ13CLEDR). The latter has been hypothesized to result from different respiratory substrates and decarboxylation reactions in various metabolic pathways, which are poorly understood so far. To provide a better insight into the underlying metabolic processes of δ13CLEDR, we fed position-specific 13C-labeled malate and pyruvate via the xylem stream to leaves of species with high and low δ13CLEDR values (Halimium halimifolium and Oxalis triangularis, respectively). During respective label application, we determined label-derived leaf 13CO2 respiration using laser spectroscopy and the 13C allocation to metabolic fractions during light–dark transitions. Our results clearly show that both carboxyl groups (C-1 and C-4 position) of malate similarly influence respiration and metabolic fractions in both species, indicating possible isotope randomization of the carboxyl groups of malate by the fumarase reaction. While C-2 position of pyruvate was only weakly respired, the species-specific difference in natural δ13CLEDR patterns were best reflected by the 13CO2 respiration patterns of the C-1 position of pyruvate. Furthermore, 13C label from malate and pyruvate were mainly allocated to amino and organic acid fractions in both species and only little to sugar and lipid fractions. In summary, our results suggest that respiration of both carboxyl groups of malate (via fumarase) by tricarboxylic acid cycle reactions or by NAD-malic enzyme influences δ13CLEDR. The latter supplies the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction, which in turn determines natural δ13CLEDR pattern by releasing the C-1 position of pyruvate. PMID:27375626

  15. Metabolic Fate of the Carboxyl Groups of Malate and Pyruvate and their Influence on δ(13)C of Leaf-Respired CO2 during Light Enhanced Dark Respiration.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Marco M; Wegener, Frederik; Barthel, Matti; Maurino, Veronica G; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Buchmann, Nina; Werner, Christiane; Werner, Roland A

    2016-01-01

    The enhanced CO2 release of illuminated leaves transferred into darkness, termed "light enhanced dark respiration (LEDR)", is often associated with an increase in the carbon isotope ratio of the respired CO2 (δ(13)CLEDR). The latter has been hypothesized to result from different respiratory substrates and decarboxylation reactions in various metabolic pathways, which are poorly understood so far. To provide a better insight into the underlying metabolic processes of δ(13)CLEDR, we fed position-specific (13)C-labeled malate and pyruvate via the xylem stream to leaves of species with high and low δ(13)CLEDR values (Halimium halimifolium and Oxalis triangularis, respectively). During respective label application, we determined label-derived leaf (13)CO2 respiration using laser spectroscopy and the (13)C allocation to metabolic fractions during light-dark transitions. Our results clearly show that both carboxyl groups (C-1 and C-4 position) of malate similarly influence respiration and metabolic fractions in both species, indicating possible isotope randomization of the carboxyl groups of malate by the fumarase reaction. While C-2 position of pyruvate was only weakly respired, the species-specific difference in natural δ(13)CLEDR patterns were best reflected by the (13)CO2 respiration patterns of the C-1 position of pyruvate. Furthermore, (13)C label from malate and pyruvate were mainly allocated to amino and organic acid fractions in both species and only little to sugar and lipid fractions. In summary, our results suggest that respiration of both carboxyl groups of malate (via fumarase) by tricarboxylic acid cycle reactions or by NAD-malic enzyme influences δ(13)CLEDR. The latter supplies the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction, which in turn determines natural δ(13)CLEDR pattern by releasing the C-1 position of pyruvate. PMID:27375626

  16. In vivo13C spectroscopy in the rat brain using hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjańska, Małgorzata; Iltis, Isabelle; Shestov, Alexander A.; Deelchand, Dinesh K.; Nelson, Christopher; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2010-10-01

    The low sensitivity of 13C spectroscopy can be enhanced using dynamic nuclear polarization. Detection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and its metabolic products has been reported in kidney, liver, and muscle. In this work, the feasibility of measuring 13C signals of hyperpolarized 13C metabolic products in the rat brain in vivo following the injection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate is investigated. Injection of [2- 13C]pyruvate led to the detection of [2- 13C]lactate, but no other downstream metabolites such as TCA cycle intermediates were detected. Injection of [1- 13C]pyruvate enabled the detection of both [1- 13C]lactate and [ 13C]bicarbonate. A metabolic model was used to fit the hyperpolarized 13C time courses obtained during infusion of [1- 13C]pyruvate and to determine the values of VPDH and VLDH.

  17. Identification of metabolically active bacteria in the gut of the generalist Spodoptera littoralis via DNA stable isotope probing using 13C-glucose.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yongqi; Arias-Cordero, Erika M; Boland, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Guts of most insects are inhabited by complex communities of symbiotic nonpathogenic bacteria. Within such microbial communities it is possible to identify commensal or mutualistic bacteria species. The latter ones, have been observed to serve multiple functions to the insect, i.e. helping in insect reproduction(1), boosting the immune response(2), pheromone production(3), as well as nutrition, including the synthesis of essential amino acids(4,) among others.     Due to the importance of these associations, many efforts have been made to characterize the communities down to the individual members. However, most of these efforts were either based on cultivation methods or relied on the generation of 16S rRNA gene fragments which were sequenced for final identification. Unfortunately, these approaches only identified the bacterial species present in the gut and provided no information on the metabolic activity of the microorganisms. To characterize the metabolically active bacterial species in the gut of an insect, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) in vivo employing (13)C-glucose as a universal substrate. This is a promising culture-free technique that allows the linkage of microbial phylogenies to their particular metabolic activity. This is possible by tracking stable, isotope labeled atoms from substrates into microbial biomarkers, such as DNA and RNA(5). The incorporation of (13)C isotopes into DNA increases the density of the labeled DNA compared to the unlabeled ((12)C) one. In the end, the (13)C-labeled DNA or RNA is separated by density-gradient ultracentrifugation from the (12)C-unlabeled similar one(6). Subsequent molecular analysis of the separated nucleic acid isotopomers provides the connection between metabolic activity and identity of the species. Here, we present the protocol used to characterize the metabolically active bacteria in the gut of a generalist insect (our model system), Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae). The

  18. Identification of Metabolically Active Bacteria in the Gut of the Generalist Spodoptera littoralis via DNA Stable Isotope Probing Using 13C-Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Guts of most insects are inhabited by complex communities of symbiotic nonpathogenic bacteria. Within such microbial communities it is possible to identify commensal or mutualistic bacteria species. The latter ones, have been observed to serve multiple functions to the insect, i.e. helping in insect reproduction1, boosting the immune response2, pheromone production3, as well as nutrition, including the synthesis of essential amino acids4, among others.     Due to the importance of these associations, many efforts have been made to characterize the communities down to the individual members. However, most of these efforts were either based on cultivation methods or relied on the generation of 16S rRNA gene fragments which were sequenced for final identification. Unfortunately, these approaches only identified the bacterial species present in the gut and provided no information on the metabolic activity of the microorganisms. To characterize the metabolically active bacterial species in the gut of an insect, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) in vivo employing 13C-glucose as a universal substrate. This is a promising culture-free technique that allows the linkage of microbial phylogenies to their particular metabolic activity. This is possible by tracking stable, isotope labeled atoms from substrates into microbial biomarkers, such as DNA and RNA5. The incorporation of 13C isotopes into DNA increases the density of the labeled DNA compared to the unlabeled (12C) one. In the end, the 13C-labeled DNA or RNA is separated by density-gradient ultracentrifugation from the 12C-unlabeled similar one6. Subsequent molecular analysis of the separated nucleic acid isotopomers provides the connection between metabolic activity and identity of the species. Here, we present the protocol used to characterize the metabolically active bacteria in the gut of a generalist insect (our model system), Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae). The phylogenetic analysis of the DNA

  19. Solid-state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of simultaneously metabolized acetate and phenol in a soil Pseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Heiman, A.S.; Copper, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was made of the concentration-dependent primary and secondary substrate relationships in the simultaneous metabolism of the ubiquitous pollutant phenol and the naturally occurring substrate acetate by a Pseudomonas sp. soil isolate capable of utilizing either substance as a sole source of carbon and energy. In addition to conventional analytical techniques, solid-state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to follow the cellular distribution of (1-/sup 13/C)acetate in the presence of unlabeled phenol. These results suggest that, when phenol is present as the primary substrate, acetate is preferentially shuttled into fatty acyl chain synthesis, whereas phenol carbon is funnelled into the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Thus, simultaneous use of a xenobiotic compound and a natural substrate apparently does occur, and the relative concentrations of the two substrates do influence the rate and manner in which the compounds are utilized. These results also demonstrate the unique advantage of using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques combined with /sup 13/C labeling of specific sites in substrates when doing microbial degradation studies. In this work, the entire cellular biomass was examined directly without extensive extraction, fractionation, or isolation of subcellular units; thus, there is no uncertainty about chemical alteration of substrate metabolites as a result of these often harsh treatments.

  20. Metabolic engineering applications of in vivo sup 31 P and sup 13 C NMR studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks, J.V.

    1989-01-01

    With intent to quantify NMR measurements as much as possible, analysis techniques of the in vivo {sup 31}P NMR spectrum are developed. A systematic procedure is formulated for estimating the relative intracellular concentrations of the sugar phosphates in S. cerevisiae from the {sup 31}P NMR spectrum. In addition, in vivo correlation of inorganic phosphate chemical shift with the chemical shifts of 3-phosphoglycerate, {beta}-fructose 1,6-diphosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, and glucose 6-phosphate are determined. Also, a method was developed for elucidation of the cytoplasmic and vacuolar components of inorganic phosphate in the {sup 31}P NMR spectrum of S. cerevisiae. An in vivo correlation relating the inorganic phosphate chemical shift of the vacuole with the chemical shift of the resonance for pyrophosphate and the terminal phosphate of polyphosphate (PP{sub 1}) is established. Transient measurements provided by {sup 31}P NMR are applied to reg1 mutant and standard strains. {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C NMR measurements are used to analyze the performance of recombinant strains in which the glucose phosphorylation step had been altered.

  1. GC-MS/MS survey of collision-induced dissociation of tert-butyldimethylsilyl-derivatized amino acids and its application to (13)C-metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli central metabolism.

    PubMed

    Okahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawana, Shuichi; Iida, Junko; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    Stable isotope labeling experiments using mass spectrometry have been employed to investigate carbon flow levels (metabolic flux) in mammalian, plant, and microbial cells. To achieve a more precise (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA), novel fragmentations of tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS)-amino acids were investigated by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The product ion scan analyses of 15 TBDMS-amino acids revealed 24 novel fragment ions. The amino acid-derived carbons included in the five fragment ions were identified by the analyses of (13)C-labeled authentic standards. The identification of the fragment ion at m/z 170 indicated that the isotopic abundance of S-methyl carbon in methionine could be determined from the cleavage of C5 in the precursor of [M-159](+) (m/z 218). It was also confirmed that the precision of (13)C-MFA in Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism could be improved by introducing (13)C-labeling data derived from novel fragmentations. Graphical Abstract Novel collision-induced dissociation fragmentations of tert-butyldimethylsilyl amino acids were investigated and identified by GC-MS/MS.

  2. Computational analysis of storage synthesis in developing Brassica napus L. (oilseed rape) embryos: Flux variability analysis in relation to 13C-metabolic flux analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, J.; Schwender, J.

    2011-08-01

    Plant oils are an important renewable resource, and seed oil content is a key agronomical trait that is in part controlled by the metabolic processes within developing seeds. A large-scale model of cellular metabolism in developing embryos of Brassica napus (bna572) was used to predict biomass formation and to analyze metabolic steady states by flux variability analysis under different physiological conditions. Predicted flux patterns are highly correlated with results from prior 13C metabolic flux analysis of B. napus developing embryos. Minor differences from the experimental results arose because bna572 always selected only one sugar and one nitrogen source from the available alternatives, and failed to predict the use of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Flux variability, indicative of alternative optimal solutions, revealed alternative pathways that can provide pyruvate and NADPH to plastidic fatty acid synthesis. The nutritional values of different medium substrates were compared based on the overall carbon conversion efficiency (CCE) for the biosynthesis of biomass. Although bna572 has a functional nitrogen assimilation pathway via glutamate synthase, the simulations predict an unexpected role of glycine decarboxylase operating in the direction of NH4+ assimilation. Analysis of the light-dependent improvement of carbon economy predicted two metabolic phases. At very low light levels small reductions in CO2 efflux can be attributed to enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase) and glycine decarboxylase. At higher light levels relevant to the 13C flux studies, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity is predicted to account fully for the light-dependent changes in carbon balance.

  3. Quantifying the metabolic contribution to δ13C of shell carbonate of Arctica islandica: an experimental calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirne, E. C.; Wanamaker, A. D.

    2010-12-01

    The stable isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon of seawater (δ13CDIC) can provide a powerful means to investigate atmospheric and oceanic carbon dynamics. Records of past δ13CDIC values of seawater, especially from the extratropical oceans, are needed to better understand how recent climate change and anthropogenic activity (namely fossil fuel emissions) have impacted the global carbon cycle. However, long-term reconstructions of marine δ13CDIC are limited (both spatially and temporally) by a lack of suitable proxy archives, which have undergone a rigorous calibration process. Marine mollusks represent a potential δ13CDIC archive given that the primary source of carbon to their shell material is ambient dissolved inorganic carbon. However, interpretation of this archive is confounded by the additional contribution of respired (or metabolic) carbon to the carbon isotope ratio of shell material (δ13Cshell). Although theoretical models predict that less than 10% of δ13Cshell of marine mollusks is attributable to metabolic carbon, several studies have reported significantly larger contributions of respired carbon (CM) to shell material depending upon the species in question, and in some cases, ontogenetic age. Therefore, species-specific calibrations must be conducted to establish metabolic contribution to δ13Cshell at different stages of ontogeny. The central objective of this study was to quantify the metabolic contribution to the shell carbonate of Arctica islandica L., juveniles and adults, to determine the viability of this species as a paleo-δ13CDIC archive. Results will be presented from an 8-month experimental calibration between δ13CDIC and δ13Cshell of the species Arctica islandica. Adults (25 to 55 years old) and juveniles (<3 years old) were collected and cultured in the Gulf of Maine, both in situ and in the laboratory environment. Relatively high growth rates in juveniles (>1mm/month) allowed for the measurement of three distinct

  4. (13)C metabolic flux analysis in neurons utilizing a model that accounts for hexose phosphate recycling within the pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Gebril, Hoda M; Avula, Bharathi; Wang, Yan-Hong; Khan, Ikhlas A; Jekabsons, Mika B

    2016-02-01

    Glycolysis, mitochondrial substrate oxidation, and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) are critical for neuronal bioenergetics and oxidation-reduction homeostasis, but quantitating their fluxes remains challenging, especially when processes such as hexose phosphate (i.e., glucose/fructose-6-phosphate) recycling in the PPP are considered. A hexose phosphate recycling model was developed which exploited the rates of glucose consumption, lactate production, and mitochondrial respiration to infer fluxes through the major glucose consuming pathways of adherent cerebellar granule neurons by replicating [(13)C]lactate labeling from metabolism of [1,2-(13)C2]glucose. Flux calculations were predicated on a steady-state system with reactions having known stoichiometries and carbon atom transitions. Non-oxidative PPP activity and consequent hexose phosphate recycling, as well as pyruvate production by cytoplasmic malic enzyme, were optimized by the model and found to account for 28 ± 2% and 7.7 ± 0.2% of hexose phosphate and pyruvate labeling, respectively. From the resulting fluxes, 52 ± 6% of glucose was metabolized by glycolysis, compared to 19 ± 2% by the combined oxidative/non-oxidative pentose cycle that allows for hexose phosphate recycling, and 29 ± 8% by the combined oxidative PPP/de novo nucleotide synthesis reactions. By extension, 62 ± 6% of glucose was converted to pyruvate, the metabolism of which resulted in 16 ± 1% of glucose oxidized by mitochondria and 46 ± 6% exported as lactate. The results indicate a surprisingly high proportion of glucose utilized by the pentose cycle and the reactions synthesizing nucleotides, and exported as lactate. While the in vitro conditions to which the neurons were exposed (high glucose, no lactate or other exogenous substrates) limit extrapolating these results to the in vivo state, the approach provides a means of assessing a number of metabolic fluxes within the context of hexose phosphate recycling in the PPP from a

  5. NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) based signatures of abnormal choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma with no prominent Warburg effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bag, Swarnendu; Banerjee, Deb Ranjan; Basak, Amit; Das, Amit Kumar; Pal, Mousumi; Banerjee, Rita; Paul, Ranjan Rashmi; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2015-04-17

    At functional levels, besides genes and proteins, changes in metabolome profiles are instructive for a biological system in health and disease including malignancy. It is understood that metabolomic alterations in association with proteomic and transcriptomic aberrations are very fundamental to unravel malignant micro-ambient criticality and oral cancer is no exception. Hence deciphering intricate dimensions of oral cancer metabolism may be contributory both for integrated appreciation of its pathogenesis and to identify any critical but yet unexplored dimension of this malignancy with high mortality rate. Although several methods do exist, NMR provides higher analytical precision in identification of cancer metabolomic signature. Present study explored abnormal signatures in choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analysis of serum. It has demonstrated down-regulation of choline with concomitant up-regulation of its break-down product in the form of trimethylamine N-oxide in OSCC compared to normal counterpart. Further, no significant change in lactate profile in OSCC possibly indicated that well-known Warburg effect was not a prominent phenomenon in such malignancy. Amongst other important metabolites, malonate has shown up-regulation but D-glucose, saturated fatty acids, acetate and threonine did not show any significant change. Analyzing these metabolomic findings present study proposed trimethyl amine N-oxide and malonate as important metabolic signature for oral cancer with no prominent Warburg effect. - Highlights: • NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) study of Oral Squamous cell Carcinoma Serum. • Abnormal Choline metabolomic signatures. • Up-regulation of Trimethylamine N-oxide. • Unchanged lactate profile indicates no prominent Warburg effect. • Proposed alternative glucose metabolism path through up-regulation of malonate.

  6. Studies of nitrogen metabolism using /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy. 3. Synthesis of DL-(3-/sup 13/C,2-/sup 15/N)Lysine and its incorporation into streptothricin F/sup 1/

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, S.J.; Thiruvengadam, T.K.

    1981-11-04

    A scheme for the synthesis of DL-(3-/sup 13/C, 2-/sup 15/N)Lysine, I, is presented. Data are also reported to show that the mutase reaction occurring in the biosynthesis of I occurs with an intramolecular migration of nitrogen from C-2 to C-3. (BLM)

  7. Impacts of proline on the central metabolism of an industrial erythromycin-producing strain Saccharopolyspora erythraea via (13)C labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Huang, Mingzhi; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-08-10

    Saccharopolyspora erythraea E3 is an important industrial strain for erythromycin production and knowledge on its metabolism is limited. In the present work, (13)C labeling experiments were conducted to characterize the metabolism of S. erythraea E3. We found that S. erythraea E3 was difficult to grow on minimal medium with glucose as sole carbon source and the addition of proline remarkably improved the cell growth. The activity of EMP pathway was very low and ED pathway was alternatively the main glucose utilization pathway. The addition of proline resulted in remarkable changes in the fluxes of central metabolism. The fluxes in PP pathway, in TCA cycle and in ED pathway were 90% higher, 64% and 31% lower on Glc/Pro than on Glc, respectively. The maintenance energy on Glc/Pro was 58.4% lower than that on Glc. The energy charge was lower on Glc than on Glc/Pro, indicating that the cells on Glc suffered from energy burden. This study elucidates the impacts of proline on the central metabolism of S. erythraea and deepens the understanding of its metabolism. PMID:27215341

  8. Impacts of proline on the central metabolism of an industrial erythromycin-producing strain Saccharopolyspora erythraea via (13)C labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Huang, Mingzhi; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-08-10

    Saccharopolyspora erythraea E3 is an important industrial strain for erythromycin production and knowledge on its metabolism is limited. In the present work, (13)C labeling experiments were conducted to characterize the metabolism of S. erythraea E3. We found that S. erythraea E3 was difficult to grow on minimal medium with glucose as sole carbon source and the addition of proline remarkably improved the cell growth. The activity of EMP pathway was very low and ED pathway was alternatively the main glucose utilization pathway. The addition of proline resulted in remarkable changes in the fluxes of central metabolism. The fluxes in PP pathway, in TCA cycle and in ED pathway were 90% higher, 64% and 31% lower on Glc/Pro than on Glc, respectively. The maintenance energy on Glc/Pro was 58.4% lower than that on Glc. The energy charge was lower on Glc than on Glc/Pro, indicating that the cells on Glc suffered from energy burden. This study elucidates the impacts of proline on the central metabolism of S. erythraea and deepens the understanding of its metabolism.

  9. Detection of modifications in the glucose metabolism induced by genetic mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by 13C- and H-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Herve, M; Buffin-Meyer, B; Bouet, F; Son, T D

    2000-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy may offer a suitable technique to characterize the glucose metabolism in response to genetic mutations in cells. The effects of various genetic modifications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast were investigated using 13C- and 1H-NMR spectroscopy associated with biochemical techniques. Cells were incubated with [1-13C]glucose in order to study glucose consumption and the formation of various end-products (ethanol, trehalose, glycerol, glutamate and amino acids) as a function of time. Two types of genetic modifications were studied in S. cerevisiae. A genetic modification deleted the N-terminal part of the TFC7 protein which is the smallest subunit (tau55) of the TFIIIC transcription factor. One secondary effect of this mutation was a large deletion of mitochondrial DNA giving the rho-phenotype. The other genetic modification corresponded to the disruption of the HUF gene; the mutated cells were rho+ like the reference strain. Both mutations increase the glycolysis rate and glycerol synthesis and decrease trehalose production. The most modified cells, which contain both TFC7 deletion and HUF gene disruption, utilize glucose in the most extreme manner as in these cells the largest production of the two glycolytic products (ethanol and glycerol) and the smallest trehalose formation occur. The HUF gene disruption serves as a positive modulator of glycolysis and respiration. However, the TFC7 deletion, associated with the phenotype rho-, induces the most damage in the cellular function, dramatically altering the behaviour of the Krebs cycle. The cycle becomes blocked at the level of 2-oxoglutarate, detected by a characteristic pattern of the 13C-NMR glutamate spectra. These NMR spectra corroborate the phenotypic data, the rho-phenotype corresponding to deletions of mitochondria DNA which block all mitochondria protein synthesis and render the cells unable to derive energy from respiration. Moreover, as a consequence of the Krebs cycle blocking, alanine

  10. Early estrogen-induced metabolic changes and their inhibition by actinomycin D and cycloheximide in human breast cancer cells: sup 31 P and sup 13 C NMR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Neeman, M.; Degani, H. )

    1989-07-01

    Metabolic changes following estrogen stimulation and the inhibition of these changes in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide were monitored continuously in perfused human breast cancer T47D clone 11 cells with {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C NMR techniques. The experiments were performed by estrogen rescue of tamoxifen-treated cells. Immediately after perfusion with estrogen-containing medium, a continuous enhancement in the rates of glucose consumption, lactate production by glycolysis, and glutamate synthesis by the Krebs cycle occurred with a persistent 2-fold increase at 4 hr. Pretreatment with either actinomycin D or cycloheximide, at concentrations known to inhibit mRNA and protein synthesis, respectively, and simultaneous treatment with estrogen and each inhibitor prevented the estrogen-induced changes in glucose metabolism. This suggested that the observed estrogen stimulation required synthesis of mRNA and protein. These inhibitors also modulated several metabolic activities that were not related to estrogen stimulation. The observed changes in the in vivo kinetics of glucose metabolism may provide a means for the early detection of the response of human breast cancer cells to estrogen versus tamoxifen treatment.

  11. Metabolomic and (13)C-metabolic flux analysis of a xylose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing xylose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Wasylenko, Thomas M; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2015-03-01

    Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in the engineering of xylose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for production of lignocellulosic biofuels. However, the ethanol productivities achieved on xylose are still significantly lower than those observed on glucose for reasons that are not well understood. We have undertaken an analysis of central carbon metabolite pool sizes and metabolic fluxes on glucose and on xylose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in a strain capable of rapid xylose assimilation via xylose isomerase in order to investigate factors that may limit the rate of xylose fermentation. We find that during xylose utilization the flux through the non-oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway (PPP) is high but the flux through the oxidative PPP is low, highlighting an advantage of the strain employed in this study. Furthermore, xylose fails to elicit the full carbon catabolite repression response that is characteristic of glucose fermentation in S. cerevisiae. We present indirect evidence that the incomplete activation of the fermentation program on xylose results in a bottleneck in lower glycolysis, leading to inefficient re-oxidation of NADH produced in glycolysis. PMID:25311863

  12. Elucidating metabolic pathways for amino acid incorporation into dragline spider silk using 13C enrichment and solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Creager, Melinda S; Izdebski, Thomas; Brooks, Amanda E; Lewis, Randolph V

    2011-07-01

    Spider silk has been evolutionarily optimized for contextual mechanical performance over the last 400 Ma. Despite precisely balanced mechanical properties, which have yet to be reproduced, the underlying molecular architecture of major ampullate spider silk can be simplified being viewed as a versatile block copolymer. Four primary amino acid motifs: polyalanine, (GA)(n), GPGXX, and GGX (X = G,A,S,Q,L,Y) will be considered in this study. Although synthetic mimetics of many of these amino acid motifs have been produced in several biological systems, the source of spider silk's mechanical integrity remains elusive. Mechanical robustness may be a product not only of the amino acid structure but also of the tertiary structure of the silk. Historically, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) has been used to reveal the crystalline structure of the polyalanine motif; however, limitations in amino acid labeling techniques have obscured the structures of the GGX and GPGXX motifs thought to be responsible for the structural mobility of spider silk. We describe the use of metabolic pathways to label tyrosine for the first time as well as to improve the labeling efficiency of proline. These improved labeling techniques will allow the previously unknown tertiary structures of major ampullate silk to be probed. PMID:21334448

  13. Metabolomic and 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis of a Xylose-Consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain Expressing Xylose Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Wasylenko, Thomas M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades significant progress has been made in the engineering of xylose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for production of lignocellulosic biofuels. However, the ethanol productivities achieved on xylose are still significantly lower than those observed on glucose for reasons that are not well understood. We have undertaken an analysis of central carbon metabolite pool sizes and metabolic fluxes on glucose and on xylose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in a strain capable of rapid xylose assimilation via xylose isomerase in order to investigate factors that may limit the rate of xylose fermentation. We find that during xylose utilization the flux through the non-oxidative PPP is high but the flux through the oxidative PPP is low, highlighting an advantage of the strain employed in this study. Furthermore, xylose fails to elicit the full carbon catabolite repression response that is characteristic of glucose fermentation in S. cerevisiae. We present indirect evidence that the incomplete activation of the fermentation program on xylose results in a bottleneck in lower glycolysis, leading to inefficient re-oxidation of NADH produced in glycolysis. PMID:25311863

  14. Mathematical models for determining metabolic fluxes through the citric acid and the glyoxylate cycles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by 13C-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tran-Dinh, S; Bouet, F; Huynh, Q T; Herve, M

    1996-12-15

    We propose, first, a practical method for studying the isotopic transformation of glutamate or any other metabolite isotopomers in the citric acid and the glyoxylate cycles; second, two mathematical models, one for evaluating the flux through the citric acid cycle and the other for evaluating the flux through the latter coupled to the glyoxylate cycle in yeast. These models are based on the analysis of 13C-NMR spectra of glutamate obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, NCYC strain, fed with 100% enriched [2-13C]acetate. The population of each glutamate isotopomer, the change in intensity of each multiplet component or the enrichment of any glutamate carbon is expressed by a specific analytical equation from which the flux in the citric acid and the glyoxylate cycles can be deduced. The aerobic metabolism of 100% [2-13C]acetate in acetate-grown S. cerevisiae cells was studied as a function of time using 13C-NMR. 1H-NMR and biochemical techniques. The C1 and C6 doublet and singlet of labeled trehalose increase continuously with time indicating that there is no isotopic transformation between trehalose isotopomers even though the corresponding formation rates are different. By contrast, the glutamate C4 singlet increases then decreases with time. The C4 doublet, which is lower than the singlet for t < 60 min, increases continuously and becomes higher than the singlet for t > 90 min. A similar observation was made for the C2 resonance singlet and doublet. In addition, the glutamate C2 multiplet consists of only seven instead of nine peaks as in random labeling. These results agree well with our models and demonstrate that, in the presence of acetate, anaplerotic carbon sources involved in the synthesis of acetyl-CoA are negligible in yeast. The flux in the citric acid cycle was deduced from a plot of the C4 area versus incubation time, while the flux within the glyoxylate cycle was determined from the relative intensity of the glutamate C4 doublet and singlet. The

  15. Voxel-by-voxel correlations of perfusion, substrate, and metabolite signals in dynamic hyperpolarized (13) C imaging.

    PubMed

    Lau, Justin Y C; Chen, Albert P; Gu, Yi-Ping; Cunningham, Charles H

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a mixture of pyruvic acid and the perfusion agent HP001 was co-polarized for simultaneous assessment of perfusion and metabolism in vivo. The pre-polarized mixture was administered to rats with subcutaneous MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenografts and imaged using an interleaved sequence with designed spectral-spatial pulses and flyback echo-planar readouts. Voxel-by-voxel signal correlations from 10 animals (15 data sets) were analyzed for tumour, kidney, and muscle regions of interest. The relationship between perfusion and hyperpolarized signal was explored on a voxel-by-voxel basis in various metabolically active tissues, including tumour, healthy kidneys, and skeletal muscle. Positive pairwise correlations between lactate, pyruvate, and HP001 observed in all 10 tumours suggested that substrate delivery was the dominant factor limiting the conversion of pyruvate to lactate in the tumour model used in this study. On the other hand, in cases where conversion is the limiting factor, such as in healthy kidneys, both pyruvate and lactate can act as excellent perfusion markers. In intermediate cases between the two limits, such as in skeletal muscle, some perfusion information may be inferred from the (pyruvate + lactate) signal distribution. Co-administration of pyruvate with a dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) perfusion agent is an effective approach for distinguishing between slow metabolism and poor perfusion and a practical strategy for lactate signal normalization to account for substrate delivery, especially in cases of rapid pyruvate-to-lactate conversion and in poorly perfused regions with inadequate pyruvate signal-to-noise ratio for reliable determination of the lactate-to-pyruvate ratio. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Dynamic or inert metabolism? Turnover of N-acetyl aspartate and glutathione from D-[1-13C]glucose in the rat brain in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Choi, In-Young; Gruetter, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    The rate of 13C-label incorporation into both aspartyl (NAA C3) and acetyl (NAA C6) groups of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) was simultaneously measured in the rat brain in vivo for up to 19 h of [1-13C]glucose infusion (n = 8). Label incorporation was detected in NAA C6 approximately 1.5 h earlier than in NAA C3 because of the delayed labeling of the precursor of NAA C3, aspartate, compared to that of NAA C6, glucose. The time courses of NAA were fitted using a mathematical model assuming synthesis of NAA in one kinetic compartment with the respective precursor pools of aspartate and acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). The turnover rates of NAA C6 and C3 were 0.7 ± 0.1 and 0.6 ± 0.1 μmol/(g h) with the time constants 14 ± 2 and 13 ± 2 h, respectively, with an estimated pool size of 8 μmol/g. The results suggest that complete label turnover of NAA from glucose occurs in approximately 70 h. Several hours after starting the glucose infusion, label incorporation into glutathione (GSH) was also detected. The turnover rate of GSH was 0.06 ± 0.02 μmol/(g h) with a time constant of 13 ± 2 h. The estimated pool size of GSH was 0.8 μmol/g, comparable to the cortical glutathione concentration. We conclude that NAA and GSH are completely turned over and that the metabolism is extremely slow (< 0.05% of the glucose metabolic rate). PMID:15525331

  17. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Lipid Biosynthesis in the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Using 13C-Labled Glucose and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaiyuan; Wu, Chao; Wu, Qingyu; Dai, Junbiao; Song, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has considerable potential for producing single cell oil, which can be converted to biodiesel, a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels. However, extensive fundamental and engineering efforts must be carried out before commercialized production become cost-effective. Therefore, in this study, metabolic flux analysis of Y. lipolytica was performed using 13C-labeled glucose as a sole carbon source in nitrogen sufficient and insufficient media. The nitrogen limited medium inhibited cell growth while promoting lipid accumulation (from 8.7% of their biomass to 14.3%). Metabolic flux analysis showed that flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was not significantly regulated by nitrogen concentration, suggesting that NADPH generation is not the limiting factor for lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica. Furthermore, metabolic flux through malic enzyme was undetectable, confirming its non-regulatory role in lipid accumulation in this yeast. Nitrogen limitation significantly increased flux through ATP:citrate lyase (ACL), implying that ACL plays a key role in providing acetyl-CoA for lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica. PMID:27454589

  18. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Lipid Biosynthesis in the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica Using 13C-Labled Glucose and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huaiyuan; Wu, Chao; Wu, Qingyu; Dai, Junbiao; Song, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has considerable potential for producing single cell oil, which can be converted to biodiesel, a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels. However, extensive fundamental and engineering efforts must be carried out before commercialized production become cost-effective. Therefore, in this study, metabolic flux analysis of Y. lipolytica was performed using 13C-labeled glucose as a sole carbon source in nitrogen sufficient and insufficient media. The nitrogen limited medium inhibited cell growth while promoting lipid accumulation (from 8.7% of their biomass to 14.3%). Metabolic flux analysis showed that flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was not significantly regulated by nitrogen concentration, suggesting that NADPH generation is not the limiting factor for lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica. Furthermore, metabolic flux through malic enzyme was undetectable, confirming its non-regulatory role in lipid accumulation in this yeast. Nitrogen limitation significantly increased flux through ATP:citrate lyase (ACL), implying that ACL plays a key role in providing acetyl-CoA for lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica. PMID:27454589

  19. Investigation of Metabolism of Exogenous Glucose at the Early Stage and Onset of Diabetes Mellitus in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty Rats Using [1, 2, 3-13C]Glucose Breath Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kijima, Sho; Tanaka, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in glucose metabolism at the early stage and onset of diabetes in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Specifically, after the oral administration of [1, 2, 3-13C]glucose, the levels of exhaled 13CO2, which most likely originated from pyruvate decarboxylation and tricarboxylic acid, were measured. Eight OLETF rats and eight control rats (Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka [LETO]) were administered 13C-glucose. Three types of 13C-glucose breath tests were performed thrice in each period at 2-week intervals. [3-13C]glucose results in a 13C isotope at position 1 in the pyruvate molecule, which provides 13CO2. The 13C at carbons 1 and 2 of glucose is converted to 13C at carbons 2 and 1 of acetate, respectively, which produce 13CO2. Based on metabolic differences of the labeled sites, glucose metabolism was evaluated using the results of three breath tests. The increase in 13CO2 excretion in OLETF rats was delayed in all three breath tests compared to that in control rats, suggesting that OLETF rats had a lower glucose metabolism than control rats. In addition, overall glucose metabolism increased with age in both groups. The utilization of [2-13C]glucose was suppressed in OLETF rats at 6–12 weeks of age, but they showed higher [3-13C]glucose oxidation than control rats at 22–25 weeks of age. In the [1-13C]glucose breath test, no significant differences in the area under the curve until 180 minutes (AUC180) were observed between OLETF and LETO rats of any age. Glucose metabolism kinetics were different between the age groups and two groups of rats; however, these differences were not significant based on the overall AUC180 of [1-13C]glucose. We conclude that breath 13CO2 excretion is reduced in OLETF rats at the primary stage of prediabetes, indicating differences in glucose oxidation kinetics between OLETF and LETO rats. PMID:27483133

  20. Low Mass MS/MS Fragments of Protonated Amino Acids Used for Distinction of Their 13C- Isotopomers in Metabolic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xin; Dagan, Shai; Somogyi, Árpád; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Scaraffia, Patricia Y.

    2013-04-01

    Glu, Gln, Pro, and Ala are the main amino acids involved in ammonia detoxification in mosquitoes. In order to develop a tandem mass spectrometry method (MS2) to monitor each carbon of the above isotopically-labeled 13C-amino acids for metabolic studies, the compositions and origins of atoms in fragments of the protonated amino acid should be first elucidated. Thus, various electrospray (ESI)-based MS2 tools were employed to study the fragmentation of these unlabeled and isotopically-labeled amino acids and better understand their dissociation pathways. A broad range of fragments, including previously-undescribed low m/z fragments was revealed. The formulae of the fragments (from m/z 130 down to m/z 27) were confirmed by their accurate masses. The structures and conformations of the larger fragments of Glu were also explored by ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments. It was found that some low m/z fragments ( m/z 27-30) are common to Glu, Gln, Pro, and Ala. The origins of carbons in these small fragments are discussed and additional collision induced dissociation (CID) MS2 fragmentation pathways are proposed for them. It was also found that small fragments (≤ m/z 84) of protonated, methylated Glu, and methylated Gln are the same as those of the underivatized Glu and Gln. Taken together, the new approach of utilizing low m/z fragments can be applied to distinguish, identify, and quantify 13C-amino acids labeled at various positions, either in the backbone or side chain.

  1. Physiological characterization of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the Aspergillus nidulans phosphoketolase pathway: validation of activity through 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Papini, Marta; Nookaew, Intawat; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Several bacterial species and filamentous fungi utilize the phosphoketolase pathway (PHK) for glucose dissimilation as an alternative to the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. In Aspergillus nidulans, the utilization of this metabolic pathway leads to increased carbon flow towards acetate and acetyl CoA. In the first step of the PHK, the pentose phosphate pathway intermediate xylulose-5-phosphate is converted into acetylphosphate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate through the action of xylulose-5-phosphate phosphoketolase, and successively acetylphosphate is converted into acetate by the action of acetate kinase. In the present work, we describe a metabolic engineering strategy used to express the fungal genes of the phosphoketolase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the effects of the expression of this recombinant route in yeast. The phenotype of the engineered yeast strain MP003 was studied during batch and chemostat cultivations, showing a reduced biomass yield and an increased acetate yield during batch cultures. To establish whether the observed effects in the recombinant strain MP003 were due directly or indirectly to the expression of the phosphoketolase pathway, we resolved the intracellular flux distribution based on (13)C labeling during chemostat cultivations. From flux analysis it is possible to conclude that yeast is able to use the recombinant pathway. Our work indicates that the utilization of the phosphoketolase pathway does not interfere with glucose assimilation through the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway and that the expression of this route can contribute to increase the acetyl CoA supply, therefore holding potential for future metabolic engineering strategies having acetyl CoA as precursor for the biosynthesis of industrially relevant compounds.

  2. Imaging metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Han, Weiping; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Chang, Young-Tae; Olivo, Malini; Velan, S Sendhil; Bhakoo, Kishore; Townsend, David; Radda, George K

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a fast growing public health burden for almost all the developed countries and many developing nations. Despite intense efforts from both biomedical and clinical scientists, many fundamental questions regarding its aetiology and development remain unclear, partly due to the lack of suitable imaging technologies to visualize lipid composition and distribution, insulin secretion, β-cell mass and functions in vivo. Such technologies would not only impact on our understanding of the complexity of metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes, but also aid in their diagnosis, drug development and assessment of treatment efficacy. In this article we discuss and propose several strategies for visualization of physiological and pathological changes that affect pancreas and adipose tissue as a result of the development of metabolic diseases. PMID:20533426

  3. Mass spectrometry-based microassay of (2)H and (13)C plasma glucose labeling to quantify liver metabolic fluxes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hasenour, Clinton M; Wall, Martha L; Ridley, D Emerson; Hughey, Curtis C; James, Freyja D; Wasserman, David H; Young, Jamey D

    2015-07-15

    Mouse models designed to examine hepatic metabolism are critical to diabetes and obesity research. Thus, a microscale method to quantitatively assess hepatic glucose and intermediary metabolism in conscious, unrestrained mice was developed. [(13)C3]propionate, [(2)H2]water, and [6,6-(2)H2]glucose isotopes were delivered intravenously in short- (9 h) and long-term-fasted (19 h) C57BL/6J mice. GC-MS and mass isotopomer distribution (MID) analysis were performed on three 40-μl arterial plasma glucose samples obtained during the euglycemic isotopic steady state. Model-based regression of hepatic glucose and citric acid cycle (CAC)-related fluxes was performed using a comprehensive isotopomer model to track carbon and hydrogen atom transitions through the network and thereby simulate the MIDs of measured fragment ions. Glucose-6-phosphate production from glycogen diminished, and endogenous glucose production was exclusively gluconeogenic with prolonged fasting. Gluconeogenic flux from phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) remained stable, whereas that from glycerol modestly increased from short- to long-term fasting. CAC flux [i.e., citrate synthase (VCS)] was reduced with long-term fasting. Interestingly, anaplerosis and cataplerosis increased with fast duration; accordingly, pyruvate carboxylation and the conversion of oxaloacetate to PEP were severalfold higher than VCS in long-term fasted mice. This method utilizes state-of-the-art in vivo methodology and comprehensive isotopomer modeling to quantify hepatic glucose and intermediary fluxes during physiological stress in mice. The small plasma requirements permit serial sampling without stress and the affirmation of steady-state glucose kinetics. Furthermore, the approach can accommodate a broad range of modeling assumptions, isotope tracers, and measurement inputs without the need to introduce ad hoc mathematical approximations.

  4. Novel Approaches to Imaging Tumor Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Sui-Seng; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2015-01-01

    The field of metabolism research has made a dramatic resurgence in recent years, fueled by a newfound appreciation of the interactions between metabolites and phenotype. Metabolic substrates and their products can be biomarkers of a wide range of pathologies, including cancer, but our understanding of their in vivo interactions and pathways has been hindered by the robustness of non-invasive imaging approaches. The last 3 decades have been flushed with the development of new techniques for the study of metabolism in vivo. These methods include nuclear based, predominantly positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), many of which have been translated to the clinic. The purpose of this review is to introduce both long standing imaging strategies as well as novel approaches to the study of perturbed metabolic pathways in the setting of carcinogenesis. This will involve descriptions of nuclear probes labeled with 11C and 18F as well 13C for study using hyperpolarized MRI. Highlighting both advantages and disadvantages of each approach, the aim of this summary is to provide the reader with a framework for interrogation of metabolic aberrations in their system of interest. PMID:26049695

  5. Metabolism of D-glucose in a wall-less mutant of Neurospora crassa examined by /sup 13/C and /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonances: effects of insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, N.J.; McKenzie, M.A.; Adebodun, F.; Jordan, F.; Lenard, J.

    1988-11-15

    /sup 13/C NMR and /sup 31/P NMR have been used to investigate the metabolism of glucose by a wall-less strain of Neurospora crassa (slime), grown in a supplemented nutritionally defined medium and harvested in the early stationary stage of growth. With D-(1-/sup 13/C)- or D-(6-/sup 13/C)glucose as substrates, the major metabolic products identified from /sup 13/C NMR spectra were (2-/sup 13/C)ethanol, (3-/sup 13/C)alanine, and C/sub 1/- and C/sub 6/-labeled trehalose. Several observations suggested the existence of a substantial hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt: (i) a 70% greater yield of ethanol from C/sub 6/- than from C/sub 1/-labeled glucose; (ii) C/sub 1/-labeled glucose yielded 19% C/sub 6/-labeled trehalose, while C/sub 6/-labeled glucose yielded only 4% C/sub 1/-labeled trehalose; (iii) a substantial transfer of /sup 13/C from C/sub 2/-labeled glucose to the C/sub 2/-position of ethanol. /sup 31/P NMR spectra showed millimolar levels of intracellular inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), phosphodiesters, and diphosphates including sugar diphosphates and polyphosphate. Addition of glucose resulted in a decrease in cytoplasmic P/sub i/ and an increase in sugar monophosphates, which continued for at least 30 min. Phosphate resonances corresponding to metabolic intermediates of both the glycolytic and HMP pathways were identified in cell extracts. Addition of insulin (100 nM) with the glucose had the following effects relative to glucose alone: (i) a 24% increase in the rate of ethanol production; (ii) a 38% increase in the rate of alanine production; (iii) a 27% increase in the rate of glucose disappearance. Insulin thus increases the rates of production of ethanol and alanine in these cells, in addition to increasing production of CO/sub 2/ and glycogen, as previously shown.

  6. Impact of carbon metabolism on 13C signatures of cyanobacteria and green non-sulfur-like bacteria inhabiting a microbial mat from an alkaline siliceous hot spring in Yellowstone National Park (USA).

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Marcel T J; Schouten, Stefan; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Ward, David M

    2007-02-01

    Alkaline siliceous hot spring microbial mats in Yellowstone National Park are composed of two dominant phototropic groups, cyanobacteria and green non-sulfur-like bacteria (GNSLB). While cyanobacteria are thought to cross-feed low-molecular-weight organic compounds to support photoheterotrophic metabolism in GNSLB, it is unclear how this could lead to the heavier stable carbon isotopic signatures in GNSLB lipids compared with cyanobacterial lipids found in previous studies. The two groups of phototrophs were separated using percoll density gradient centrifugation and subsequent lipid and stable carbon isotopic analysis revealed that we obtained fractions with a approximately 60-fold enrichment in cyanobacterial and an approximately twofold enrichment in GNSLB biomass, respectively, compared with the mat itself. This technique was used to study the diel cycling and 13C content of the glucose pools in and the uptake of 13C-bicarbonate by the cyanobacteria and GNSLB, as well as the transfer of incorporated 13C from cyanobacteria to GNSLB. The results show that cyanobacteria have the highest bicarbonate uptake rates and accumulate glucose during the afternoon in full light conditions. In contrast, GNSLB have relatively higher bicarbonate uptake rates compared with cyanobacteria in the morning at low light levels. During the night GNSLB take up carbon that is likely derived through fermentation of cyanobacterial glucose enriched in 13C. The assimilation of 13C-enriched cyanobacterial carbon may thus lead to enriched 13C-contents of GNSLB cell components.

  7. The Effect of Molecular Conformation on the Accuracy of Theoretical (1)H and (13)C Chemical Shifts Calculated by Ab Initio Methods for Metabolic Mixture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Shimbo, Yudai; Komatsu, Keiko; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-14

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analyzing metabolic mixtures. The information obtained from an NMR spectrum is in the form of physical parameters, such as chemical shifts, and construction of databases for many metabolites will be useful for data interpretation. To increase the accuracy of theoretical chemical shifts for development of a database for a variety of metabolites, the effects of sets of conformations (structural ensembles) and the levels of theory on computations of theoretical chemical shifts were systematically investigated for a set of 29 small molecules in the present study. For each of the 29 compounds, 101 structures were generated by classical molecular dynamics at 298.15 K, and then theoretical chemical shifts for 164 (1)H and 123 (13)C atoms were calculated by ab initio quantum chemical methods. Six levels of theory were used by pairing Hartree-Fock, B3LYP (density functional theory), or second order Møller-Plesset perturbation with 6-31G or aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The six average fluctuations in the (1)H chemical shift were ±0.63, ± 0.59, ± 0.70, ± 0.62, ± 0.75, and ±0.66 ppm for the structural ensembles, and the six average errors were ±0.34, ± 0.27, ± 0.32, ± 0.25, ± 0.32, and ±0.25 ppm. The results showed that chemical shift fluctuations with changes in the conformation because of molecular motion were larger than the differences between computed and experimental chemical shifts for all six levels of theory. In conclusion, selection of an appropriate structural ensemble should be performed before theoretical chemical shift calculations for development of an accurate database for a variety of metabolites.

  8. Tracing bacterial metabolism using multi-nuclear (1H, 2H, and 13C) Solid State NMR: Realizing an Idea Initiated by James Scott

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G.; Fogel, M. L.; Jin, K.; Griffen, P.; Steele, A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 6 years ago, while at the Geophysical Laboratory, James Scott became interested in the application of Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to study bacterial metabolism. As often happens, other experiments intervened and the NMR experiments were not pursued. We have revisited Jame's question and find that using a multi-nuclear approach (1H, 2H, and 13C Solid State NMR) on laboratory cell culture has some distinct advantages. Our experiments involved batch cultures of E. coli (MG1655) harvested at stationary phase. In all experiments the growth medium consisted of MOPS medium for enterobacteria, where the substrate is glucose. In one set of experiments, 10 % of the water was D2O; in another 10 % of the glucose was per-deuterated. The control experiment used both water and glucose at natural isotopic abundance. A kill control of dead E. coli immersed in pure D2O for an extended period exhibited no deuterium incorporation. In both deuterium enriched experiments, considerable incorporation of deuterium into E. coli's biomolecular constituents was detected via 2H Solid State NMR. In the case of the D2O enriched experiment, 58 % of the incorporated deuterium is observed in a sharp peak at a frequency of 0.31 ppm, consistent with D incorporation in the cell membrane lipids, the remainder is observed in a broad peak at a higher frequency (centered at 5.4 ppm, but spanning out to beyond 10 ppm) that is consistent with D incorporation into predominantly DNA and RNA. In the case of the D-glucose experiments, 61 % of the deuterium is observed in a sharp resonance peak at 0.34 ppm, also consistent with D incorporation into membrane lipids, the remainder of the D is observed at a broad resonance peak centered at 4.3 ppm, consistent with D enrichment in glycogen. Deuterium abundance in the E. coli cells grown in 10 % D2O is nearly 2X greater than that grown with 10 % D-glucose. Very subtle differences are observed in both the 1H and 13C solid

  9. Production process monitoring by serial mapping of microbial carbon flux distributions using a novel Sensor Reactor approach: II--(13)C-labeling-based metabolic flux analysis and L-lysine production.

    PubMed

    Drysch, A; El Massaoudi, M; Mack, C; Takors, R; de Graaf, A A; Sahm, H

    2003-04-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is intensively used for the industrial large-scale (fed-) batch production of amino acids, especially glutamate and lysine. However, metabolic flux analyses based on 13C-labeling experiments of this organism have hitherto been restricted to small-scale batch conditions and carbon-limited chemostat cultures, and are therefore of questionable relevance for industrial fermentations. To lever flux analysis to the industrial level, a novel Sensor Reactor approach was developed (El Massaoudi et al., Metab. Eng., submitted), in which a 300-L production reactor and a 1-L Sensor Reactor are run in parallel master/slave modus, thus enabling 13C-based metabolic flux analysis to generate a series of flux maps that document large-scale fermentation courses in detail. We describe the successful combination of this technology with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, metabolite balancing methods and a mathematical description of 13C-isotope labelings resulting in a powerful tool for quantitative pathway analysis during a batch fermentation. As a first application, 13C-based metabolic flux analysis was performed on exponentially growing, lysine-producing C. glutamicum MH20-22B during three phases of a pilot-scale batch fermentation. By studying the growth, (co-) substrate consumption and (by-) product formation, the similarity of the fermentations in production and Sensor Reactor was verified. Applying a generally applicable mathematical model, which included metabolite and carbon labeling balances for the analysis of proteinogenic amino acid 13C-isotopomer labeling data, the in vivo metabolic flux distribution was investigated during subsequent phases of exponential growth. It was shown for the first time that the in vivo reverse C(4)-decarboxylation flux at the anaplerotic node in C. glutamicum significantly decreased (70%) in parallel with threefold increased lysine formation during the investigated subsequent phases of exponential growth.

  10. Gas Chromatography-Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry-Based Determination of Isotopologue and Tandem Mass Isotopomer Fractions of Primary Metabolites for (13)C-Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mairinger, Teresa; Steiger, Matthias; Nocon, Justyna; Mattanovich, Diethard; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    For the first time an analytical work flow based on accurate mass gas chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-QTOFMS) with chemical ionization for analysis providing a comprehensive picture of (13)C distribution along the primary metabolism is elaborated. The method provides a powerful new toolbox for (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis, which is an emerging strategy in metabolic engineering. In this field, stable isotope tracer experiments based on, for example, (13)C are central for providing characteristic patterns of labeled metabolites, which in turn give insights into the regulation of metabolic pathway kinetics. The new method enables the analysis of isotopologue fractions of 42 free intracellular metabolites within biotechnological samples, while tandem mass isotopomer information is also accessible for a large number of analytes. Hence, the method outperforms previous approaches in terms of metabolite coverage, while also providing rich isotopomer information for a significant number of key metabolites. Moreover, the established work flow includes novel evaluation routines correcting for isotope interference of naturally distributed elements, which is crucial following derivatization of metabolites. Method validation in terms of trueness, precision, and limits of detection was performed, showing excellent analytical figures of merit with an overall maximum bias of 5.8%, very high precision for isotopologue and tandem mass isotopomer fractions representing >10% of total abundance, and absolute limits of detection in the femtomole range. The suitability of the developed method is demonstrated on a flux experiment of Pichia pastoris employing two different tracers, i.e., 1,6(13)C2-glucose and uniformly labeled (13)C-glucose. PMID:26513365

  11. Astroglial Contribution to Brain Energy Metabolism in Humans Revealed by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Elucidation of the Dominant Pathway for Neurotransmitter Glutamate Repletion and Measurement of Astrocytic Oxidative Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lebon, Vincent; Petersen, Kitt F.; Cline, Gary W.; Shen, Jun; Mason, Graeme F.; Dufour, Sylvie; Behar, Kevin L.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Rothman, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a crucial role for glial metabolism in maintaining proper synaptic function and in the etiology of neurological disease. However, the study of glial metabolism in humans has been hampered by the lack of noninvasive methods. To specifically measure the contribution of astroglia to brain energy metabolism in humans, we used a novel noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic approach. We measured carbon 13 incorporation into brain glutamate and glutamine in eight volunteers during an intravenous infusion of [2-13C] acetate, which has been shown in animal models to be metabolized specifically in astroglia. Mathematical modeling of the three established pathways for neurotransmitter glutamate repletion indicates that the glutamate/glutamine neurotransmitter cycle between astroglia and neurons (0.32 ± 0.07 μmol · gm−1 · min−1) is the major pathway for neuronal glutamate repletion and that the astroglial TCA cycle flux (0.14 ± 0.06 μmol · gm−1 · min−1) accounts for ~14% of brain oxygen consumption. Up to 30% of the glutamine transferred to the neurons by the cycle may derive from replacement of oxidized glutamate by anaplerosis. The further application of this approach could potentially enlighten the role of astroglia in supporting brain glutamatergic activity and in neurological and psychiatric disease. PMID:11880482

  12. Design and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber for uniform or differential, metabolic and structural, plant tissue isotope labeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tracing heavy stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as 13C with 15N, 18O o...

  13. An automated growth enclosure for metabolic labeling of Arabidopsis thaliana with 13C-carbon dioxide - an in vivo labeling system for proteomics and metabolomics research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Labeling whole Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants to high enrichment with 13C for proteomics and metabolomics applications would facilitate experimental approaches not possible by conventional methods. Such a system would use the plant's native capacity for carbon fixation to ubiquitously incorporate 13C from 13CO2 gas. Because of the high cost of 13CO2 it is critical that the design conserve the labeled gas. Results A fully enclosed automated plant growth enclosure has been designed and assembled where the system simultaneously monitors humidity, temperature, pressure and 13CO2 concentration with continuous adjustment of humidity, pressure and 13CO2 levels controlled by a computer running LabView software. The enclosure is mounted on a movable cart for mobility among growth environments. Arabidopsis was grown in the enclosure for up to 8 weeks and obtained on average >95 atom% enrichment for small metabolites, such as amino acids and >91 atom% for large metabolites, including proteins and peptides. Conclusion The capability of this labeling system for isotope dilution experiments was demonstrated by evaluation of amino acid turnover using GC-MS as well as protein turnover using LC-MS/MS. Because this 'open source' Arabidopsis 13C-labeling growth environment was built using readily available materials and software, it can be adapted easily to accommodate many different experimental designs. PMID:21310072

  14. 13C isotopic fractionation during biodegradation of agricultural wastes.

    PubMed

    Chalk, Phillip M; Inácio, Caio T; Urquiaga, Segundo; Chen, Deli

    2015-01-01

    Significant differences in δ(13)C signatures occur within and between plant tissues and their constituent biochemical entities, and also within and between heterotrophic bacteria and fungi and their metabolic products. Furthermore, (13)C isotopic fractionation occurs during the biodegradation of organic molecules as seen in the substrate, respired CO(2) and the microbial biomass, which could be related to substrate composition and/or microbial metabolism. The (13)C isotopic fractionation observed during the decomposition of a single defined C substrate appears to be due to the intra-molecular heterogeneity in (13)C in the substrate and to (13)C isotopic fractionation during microbial metabolism. Very limited data suggest that the latter may be quantitatively more important than the former. Studies with defined fungi in culture media have highlighted the complexities associated with the interpretation of the observed patterns of (13)C isotopic fractionation when a single defined C source is added to the culture medium which itself contains one or more C sources. Techniques involving (13)C enrichment or paired treatments involving an equivalent C(3)- and C(4)-derived substrate have been devised to overcome the problem of background C in the culture medium and (13)C isotopic fractionation during metabolism. Studies with complex substrates have shown an initial (13)C depletion phase in respired CO(2) followed by a (13)C enrichment phase which may or may not be followed by another (13)C depletion phase. Basic studies involving an integrated approach are required to gain a new insight into (13)C isotopic fractionation during organic residue decomposition, by simultaneous measurements of δ(13)C in all C moieties. New analytical tools to measure real-time changes in δ(13)CO(2) and the intra-molecular δ(13)C distribution within plant biochemical entities offer new opportunities for unravelling the complex interactions between substrate and microbial metabolism with

  15. Metabolic flux analysis of recombinant Pichia pastoris growing on different glycerol/methanol mixtures by iterative fitting of NMR-derived (13)C-labelling data from proteinogenic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Jordà, Joel; de Jesus, Sérgio S; Peltier, Solenne; Ferrer, Pau; Albiol, Joan

    2014-01-25

    The yeast Pichia pastoris has emerged as one of the most promising yeast cell factories for the production of heterologous proteins. The readily available genetic tools and the ease of high-cell density cultivations using methanol or glycerol/methanol mixtures are among the key factors for this development. Previous studies have shown that the use of mixed feeds of glycerol and methanol seem to alleviate the metabolic burden derived from protein production, allowing for higher specific and volumetric process productivities. However, initial studies of glycerol/methanol co-metabolism in P. pastoris by classical metabolic flux analyses using (13)C-derived Metabolic Flux Ratio (METAFoR) constraints were hampered by the reduced labelling information obtained when using C3:C1 substrate mixtures in relation to the conventional C6 substrate, that is, glucose. In this study, carbon flux distributions through the central metabolic pathways in glycerol/methanol co-assimilation conditions have been further characterised using biosynthetically directed fractional (13)C labelling. In particular, metabolic flux distributions were obtained under 3 different glycerol/methanol ratios and growth rates by iterative fitting of NMR-derived (13)C-labelling data from proteinogenic amino acids using the software tool (13)CFlux2. Specifically, cells were grown aerobically in chemostat cultures fed with 80:20, 60:40 and 40:60 (w:w) glycerol/methanol mixtures at two dilutions rates (0.05 hour(-1) and 0.16 hour(-1)), allowing to obtain additional data (biomass composition and extracellular fluxes) to complement pre-existing datasets. The performed (13)C-MFA reveals a significant redistribution of carbon fluxes in the central carbon metabolism as a result of the shift in the dilution rate, while the ratio of carbon sources has a lower impact on carbon flux distribution in cells growing at the same dilution rate. At low growth rate, the percentage of methanol directly dissimilated to CO2 ranges

  16. An Oral Load of [13C3]Glycerol and Blood NMR Analysis Detect Fatty Acid Esterification, Pentose Phosphate Pathway, and Glycerol Metabolism through the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Jin, Eunsook S; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-09-01

    Drugs and other interventions for high impact hepatic diseases often target biochemical pathways such as gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, or the metabolic response to oxidative stress. However, traditional liver function tests do not provide quantitative data about these pathways. In this study, we developed a simple method to evaluate these processes by NMR analysis of plasma metabolites. Healthy subjects ingested [U-(13)C3]glycerol, and blood was drawn at multiple times. Each subject completed three visits under differing nutritional states. High resolution (13)C NMR spectra of plasma triacylglycerols and glucose provided new insights into a number of hepatic processes including fatty acid esterification, the pentose phosphate pathway, and gluconeogenesis through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fasting stimulated pentose phosphate pathway activity and metabolism of [U-(13)C3]glycerol in the tricarboxylic acid cycle prior to gluconeogenesis or glyceroneogenesis. Fatty acid esterification was transient in the fasted state but continuous under fed conditions. We conclude that a simple NMR analysis of blood metabolites provides an important biomarker of pentose phosphate pathway activity, triacylglycerol synthesis, and flux through anaplerotic pathways in mitochondria of human liver.

  17. An Oral Load of [13C3]Glycerol and Blood NMR Analysis Detect Fatty Acid Esterification, Pentose Phosphate Pathway, and Glycerol Metabolism through the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Jin, Eunsook S; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-09-01

    Drugs and other interventions for high impact hepatic diseases often target biochemical pathways such as gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, or the metabolic response to oxidative stress. However, traditional liver function tests do not provide quantitative data about these pathways. In this study, we developed a simple method to evaluate these processes by NMR analysis of plasma metabolites. Healthy subjects ingested [U-(13)C3]glycerol, and blood was drawn at multiple times. Each subject completed three visits under differing nutritional states. High resolution (13)C NMR spectra of plasma triacylglycerols and glucose provided new insights into a number of hepatic processes including fatty acid esterification, the pentose phosphate pathway, and gluconeogenesis through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fasting stimulated pentose phosphate pathway activity and metabolism of [U-(13)C3]glycerol in the tricarboxylic acid cycle prior to gluconeogenesis or glyceroneogenesis. Fatty acid esterification was transient in the fasted state but continuous under fed conditions. We conclude that a simple NMR analysis of blood metabolites provides an important biomarker of pentose phosphate pathway activity, triacylglycerol synthesis, and flux through anaplerotic pathways in mitochondria of human liver. PMID:27432878

  18. Compartmentalised energy metabolism supporting glutamatergic neurotransmission in response to increased activity in the rat cerebral cortex: A 13C MRS study in vivo at 14.1 T.

    PubMed

    Sonnay, Sarah; Duarte, João Mn; Just, Nathalie; Gruetter, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    Many tissues exhibit metabolic compartmentation. In the brain, while there is no doubt on the importance of functional compartmentation between neurons and glial cells, there is still debate on the specific regulation of pathways of energy metabolism at different activity levels. Using (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in vivo, we determined fluxes of energy metabolism in the rat cortex under α-chloralose anaesthesia at rest and during electrical stimulation of the paws. Compared to resting metabolism, the stimulated rat cortex exhibited increased glutamate-glutamine cycle (+67 nmol/g/min, +95%, P < 0.001) and tricarboxylic (TCA) cycle rate in both neurons (+62 nmol/g/min, +12%, P < 0.001) and astrocytes (+68 nmol/g/min, +22%, P = 0.072). A minor, non-significant modification of the flux through pyruvate carboxylase was observed during stimulation (+5 nmol/g/min, +8%). Altogether, this increase in metabolism amounted to a 15% (67 nmol/g/min, P < 0.001) increase in CMRglc(ox), i.e. the oxidative fraction of the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose. In conclusion, stimulation of the glutamate-glutamine cycle under α-chloralose anaesthesia is associated to similar enhancement of neuronal and glial oxidative metabolism. PMID:26823472

  19. Videofluorometer for imaging tissue metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Rorvik, Dawn A.; Richmond, Keith N.; Barlow, Clyde H.

    1989-11-01

    A videofluorometer is described that directly acquires digital metabolic images of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence in tissue. NADH fluorescence provides an intrinsic indicator of the state of tissue mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The device combines a computer-controlled fluorescence excitation system with digital image acquisition to quantify tissue bioenergetics in both spatial and time domains. Localized ischemia following coronary artery ligation in a perfused rat heart (model for a coronary artery occlusion heart attack) is used as an example to demonstrate the capabilities of the system. This videofluorometer permits monitoring changes in physiological state of organs and tissue without interfering with tissue metabolism. The digital nature of the acquired image allows detailed analysis of physiological features and their time dependence.

  20. Feasibility of Multianimal Hyperpolarized 13C MRS

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Marc S.; Lee, Jaehyuk; Walker, Christopher M.; Chen, Yunyun; Kingsley, Charles V.; De La Cerda, Jorge; Maldonado, Kiersten L.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Bankson, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose There is great potential for real-time investigation of metabolism with MRS and hyperpolarized (HP) 13C agents. Unfortunately, HP technology has high associated costs and efficiency limitations that may constrain in vivo studies involving many animals. To improve the throughput of preclinical investigations, we evaluate the feasibility of performing HP MRS on multiple animals simultaneously. Methods Simulations helped assess the viability of a dual-coil strategy for spatially-localized multivolume MRS.A dual-mouse system was assembled and characterized based on bench- and scanner-based experiments. Enzyme phantoms mixed with HP [1-13C] pyruvate emulated real-time metabolism and offered a controlled mechanism for evaluating system performance. Finally, a normal mouse and a mouse bearing a subcutaneous xenograft of colon cancer were simultaneously scanned in vivo using an agent containing HP [1-13C] pyruvate. Results Geometric separation/rotation, active decoupling, and use of low input impedance preamplifiers permitted an encode-by-channel approach for spatially-localized MRS. A pre-calibrated shim allowed straightforward metabolite differentiation in enzyme phantom and in vivo experiments at 7 T, with performance similar to conventional acquisitions. Conclusion The initial feasibility of multi-animal HP 13C MRS was established. Throughput scales with the number of simultaneously-scanned animals, demonstrating the potential for significant improvements in study efficiency. PMID:24903532

  1. CeCaFDB: a curated database for the documentation, visualization and comparative analysis of central carbon metabolic flux distributions explored by 13C-fluxomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Shen, Tie; Rui, Bin; Zhou, Wenwei; Zhou, Xiangfei; Shang, Chuanyu; Xin, Chenwei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Gang; Jiang, Jiansi; Li, Chao; Li, Ruiyuan; Han, Mengshu; You, Shanping; Yu, Guojun; Yi, Yin; Wen, Han; Liu, Zhijie; Xie, Xiaoyao

    2015-01-01

    The Central Carbon Metabolic Flux Database (CeCaFDB, available at http://www.cecafdb.org) is a manually curated, multipurpose and open-access database for the documentation, visualization and comparative analysis of the quantitative flux results of central carbon metabolism among microbes and animal cells. It encompasses records for more than 500 flux distributions among 36 organisms and includes information regarding the genotype, culture medium, growth conditions and other specific information gathered from hundreds of journal articles. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the CeCaFDB supports a common text search function among the data and interactive visualization of the curated flux distributions with compartmentation information based on the Cytoscape Web API, which facilitates data interpretation. The CeCaFDB offers four modules to calculate a similarity score or to perform an alignment between the flux distributions. One of the modules was built using an inter programming algorithm for flux distribution alignment that was specifically designed for this study. Based on these modules, the CeCaFDB also supports an extensive flux distribution comparison function among the curated data. The CeCaFDB is strenuously designed to address the broad demands of biochemists, metabolic engineers, systems biologists and members of the -omics community. PMID:25392417

  2. The use of dynamic nuclear polarization 13C-pyruvate MRS in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam Espe; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Clemmensen, Andreas Ettrup; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an immense development of new targeted anti-cancer drugs. For practicing precision medicine, a sensitive method imaging for non-invasive, assessment of early treatment response and for assisting in developing new drugs is warranted. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a potent technique for non-invasive in vivo investigation of tissue chemistry and cellular metabolism. Hyperpolarization by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is capable of creating solutions of molecules with polarized nuclear spins in a range of biological molecules and has enabled the real-time investigation of in vivo metabolism. The development of this new method has been demonstrated to enhance the nuclear polarization more than 10,000-fold, thereby significantly increasing the sensitivity of the MRS with a spatial resolution to the millimeters and a temporal resolution at the subsecond range. Furthermore, the method enables measuring kinetics of conversion of substrates into cell metabolites and can be integrated with anatomical proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many nuclei and substrates have been hyperpolarized using the DNP method. Currently, the most widely used compound is 13C-pyruvate due to favoring technicalities. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate results in appearance of 13C-lactate, 13C-alanine and 13C-bicarbonate resonance peaks depending on the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. In cancer, the lactate level is increased due to increased glycolysis. The use of DNP enhanced 13C-pyruvate has in preclinical studies shown to be a sensitive method for detecting cancer and for assessment of early treatment response in a variety of cancers. Recently, a first-in-man 31-patient study was conducted with the primary objective to assess the safety of hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate in healthy subjects and prostate cancer patients. The study showed an elevated 13C-lactate/13C-pyruvate ratio in regions of biopsy

  3. Calculation of total meal d13C from individual food d13C.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variations in the isotopic signature of carbon in biological samples can be used to distinguish dietary patterns and monitor shifts in metabolism. But for these variations to have meaning, the isotopic signature of the diet must be known. We sought to determine if knowledge of the 13C isotopic abund...

  4. MRI with hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate detects advanced pancreatic preneoplasia prior to invasive disease in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Eva M; Kettunen, Mikko I; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Dzien, Piotr; Wright, Alan J; Gopinathan, Aarthi; Gallagher, Ferdia A; Lewis, David Y; Frese, Kristopher K; Almeida, Jaime; Howat, William J; Tuveson, David A; Brindle, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatic cancer (PCa) is treatable by surgery when detected at an early stage. Non-invasive imaging methods able to detect both established tumours and their precursor lesions are needed to select patients for surgery. We investigated here whether pancreatic preneoplasia could be detected prior to the development of invasive cancers in genetically engineered mouse models of PCa using metabolic imaging. Design The concentrations of alanine and lactate and the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were measured in extracts prepared from the pancreas of animals at different stages of disease progression; from pancreatitis, through tissue with predominantly low-grade and then high-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and then tumour. 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (13C-MRSI) was used to measure non-invasively changes in 13C labelling of alanine and lactate with disease progression, following injection of hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate. Results Progressive decreases in the alanine/lactate concentration ratio and ALT/LDH activity ratio with disease progression were accompanied by a corresponding decrease in the [1-13C]alanine/[1-13C]lactate signal ratio observed in 13C-MRSI images of the pancreas. Conclusions Metabolic imaging with hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate enables detection and monitoring of the progression of PCa precursor lesions. Translation of this MRI technique to the clinic has the potential to improve the management of patients at high risk of developing PCa. PMID:26347531

  5. sup 13 C-enriched ribonucleosides: Synthesis and application of sup 13 C- sup 1 H and sup 13 C- sup 13 C spin-coupling constants to assess furanose and N-glycoside bond conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, P.C.; Serianni, A.S. )

    1990-09-26

    Adenosine (1), cytidine (2), guanosine (3), and uridine (4) have been prepared chemically with {sup 13}C enrichment (99 atom %) at C1{prime} and C2{prime} of the ribose ring. Reliable synthetic protocols have been developed to permit access to millimole quantities of labeled ribonucleosides required for structural studies of stable isotopically labeled oligonucleotides and for in vivo metabolism studies. High-resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra of the enriched ribonucleosides have been obtained, and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C and {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H spin-coupling constants have been measured for pathways within the {beta}-D-ribofuranose ring and across the N-glycoside bond. Related couplings were determined in methyl {alpha}- and {beta}-D-riboruanosides (5,6), and in two conformationally constrained nucleosides, 2,2{prime}-anhydro-(1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl)uracil (7) and 2{prime},3{prime}-O-isopropylidene-2,5{prime}-O-cyclouridine (8). The latter data were used to construct a crude Karplus curve for the {sup 13}C-C-N-{sup 13}C coupling pathway across the N-glycoside bond in 1-4. {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H, {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H, and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C coupling data are used to evaluate current models describing the conformational dynamics of 1-4 in aqueous solution.

  6. In search of the mechanisms behind soil carbon metabolism of a Douglas fir forest in complex terrain using naturally abundant 13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayler, Z. E.; Sulzman, E. W.; Barnard, H. R.; Kennedy, A.; Phillips, C.; Mix, A.; Bond, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Soil is well known for being highly variable, spatially and temporally, in moisture, texture, nutrients, carbon content and organisms. The magnitude of variation in soil characteristics represented in a study is, in part, determined by the choice in site location. Choosing sites that are topographically flat reduces variability due to environmental gradients, variability that is amplified in sites of complex terrain. We measured soil respiration, an integrative measure of ecosystem biological and physical processes, and its isotopic signature (δ13CR-s) to accomplish two goals: 1. Explore how gradients in temperature and moisture within a steeply sloped watershed affect the flux and isotopic signature of soil CO2 2. Deconvolve the isotopic signature of soil respiration into autotrophic and heterotrophic sources using a multi-source mixing model constrained by samples of soil organic matter and water soluble extracts of leaf foliage. Our site is located in a steep catchment within the central Cascades of Oregon (HJ Andrews LTER) where we made respiration measurements in plots established along side a sensor transect that continuously measures soil moisture and temperature; air relative humidity and temperature; and tree transpiration. There was a distinct difference in soil metabolism between the south and north aspects in the watershed. Temperature-corrected basal respiration of the south facing slope was 1 μmol m-2s-1 greater than the north facing slope. There was also a difference in isotopic signature between the two slopes that could be as great as 2 per mil depending on the period within the growing season. The strength of the correlation between environmental variables and soil carbon flux was non-uniform across the catchment. There was, however, a strong positive correlation between soil flux with recent transpiration rates (0 to 3 days prior) as well as with transpiration rates that occurred up to 9 days previously. This pattern was especially prevalent

  7. Hyperpolarized (13)C-lactate to (13)C-bicarbonate ratio as a biomarker for monitoring the acute response of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Mo; Spielman, Daniel M; Josan, Sonal; Jang, Taichang; Merchant, Milton; Hurd, Ralph E; Mayer, Dirk; Recht, Lawrence D

    2016-05-01

    Hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate MRS provides a unique imaging opportunity to study the reaction kinetics and enzyme activities of in vivo metabolism because of its favorable imaging characteristics and critical position in the cellular metabolic pathway, where it can either be reduced to lactate (reflecting glycolysis) or converted to acetyl-coenzyme A and bicarbonate (reflecting oxidative phosphorylation). Cancer tissue metabolism is altered in such a way as to result in a relative preponderance of glycolysis relative to oxidative phosphorylation (i.e. Warburg effect). Although there is a strong theoretical basis for presuming that readjustment of the metabolic balance towards normal could alter tumor growth, a robust noninvasive in vivo tool with which to measure the balance between these two metabolic processes has yet to be developed. Until recently, hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate imaging studies had focused solely on [1-(13)C]lactate production because of its strong signal. However, without a concomitant measure of pyruvate entry into the mitochondria, the lactate signal provides no information on the balance between the glycolytic and oxidative metabolic pathways. Consistent measurement of (13)C-bicarbonate in cancer tissue, which does provide such information, has proven difficult, however. In this study, we report the reliable measurement of (13)C-bicarbonate production in both the healthy brain and a highly glycolytic experimental glioblastoma model using an optimized (13)C MRS imaging protocol. With the capacity to obtain signal in all tumors, we also confirm for the first time that the ratio of (13)C-lactate to (13)C-bicarbonate provides a more robust metric relative to (13)C-lactate for the assessment of the metabolic effects of anti-angiogenic therapy. Our data suggest a potential application of this ratio as an early biomarker to assess therapeutic effectiveness. Furthermore, although further study is needed, the results suggest that anti

  8. Localized in vivo13C NMR spectroscopy of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Gruetter, Rolf; Adriany, Gregor; Choi, In-Young; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Lei, Hongxia; Öz, Gülin

    2006-01-01

    Localized 13C NMR spectroscopy provides a new investigative tool for studying cerebral metabolism. The application of 13C NMR spectroscopy to living intact humans and animals presents the investigator with a number of unique challenges. This review provides in the first part a tutorial insight into the ingredients required for achieving a successful implementation of localized 13C NMR spectroscopy. The difficulties in establishing 13C NMR are the need for decoupling of the one-bond 13C–1H heteronuclear J coupling, the large chemical shift range, the low sensitivity and the need for localization of the signals. The methodological consequences of these technical problems are discussed, particularly with respect to (a) RF front-end considerations, (b) localization methods, (c) the low sensitivity, and (d) quantification methods. Lastly, some achievements of in vivo localized 13C NMR spectroscopy of the brain are reviewed, such as: (a) the measurement of brain glutamine synthesis and the feasibility of quantifying glutamatergic action in the brain; (b) the demonstration of significant anaplerotic fluxes in the brain; (c) the demonstration of a highly regulated malate-aspartate shuttle in brain energy metabolism and isotope flux; (d) quantification of neuronal and glial energy metabolism; and (e) brain glycogen metabolism in hypoglycemia in rats and humans. We conclude that the unique and novel insights provided by 13C NMR spectroscopy have opened many new research areas that are likely to improve the understanding of brain carbohydrate metabolism in health and disease. PMID:14679498

  9. SIMS ion microscopy imaging of boronophenylalanine (BPA) and 13C15N-labeled phenylalanine in human glioblastoma cells: Relevance of subcellular scale observations to BPA-mediated boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash; Lorey, Daniel R., II

    2007-02-01

    p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a clinically approved boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent currently being used in clinical trials of glioblastoma multiforme, melanoma and liver metastases. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) observations from the Cornell SIMS Laboratory provided support for using a 6 h infusion of BPA, instead of a 2 h infusion, for achieving higher levels of boron in brain tumor cells. These observations were clinically implemented in Phase II experimental trials of glioblastoma multiforme in Sweden. However, the mechanisms for higher BPA accumulation with longer infusions have remained unknown. In this work, by using 13C15N-labeled phenylalanine and T98G human glioblastoma cells, comparisons between the 10B-delivery of BPA and the accumulation of labeled phenylalanine after 2 and 6 h treatments were made with a Cameca IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution in fast frozen, freeze-fractured, freeze-dried cells. Due to the presence of the Na-K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of most mammalian cells, the cells maintain an approximately 10/1 ratio of K/Na in the intracellular milieu. Therefore, the quantitative imaging of these highly diffusible species in the identical cell in which the boron or labeled amino acid was imaged provides a rule-of-thumb criterion for validation of SIMS observations and the reliability of the cryogenic sampling. The labeled phenylalanine was detected at mass 28, as the 28(13C15N)- molecular ion. Correlative analysis with optical and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that fractured freeze-dried glioblastoma cells contained well-preserved ultrastructural details with three discernible subcellular regions: a nucleus or multiple nuclei, a mitochondria-rich perinuclear cytoplasmic region and the remaining cytoplasm. SIMS analysis revealed that the overall cellular signals of both 10B from BPA and 28CN- from labeled phenylalanine increased approximately 1.6-fold between the 2 and 6 h exposures

  10. Pulse sequence for dynamic volumetric imaging of hyperpolarized metabolic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Charles H.; Chen, Albert P.; Lustig, Michael; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Lupo, Janine; Xu, Duan; Kurhanewicz, John; Hurd, Ralph E.; Pauly, John M.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2008-07-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization and dissolution of a 13C-labeled substrate enables the dynamic imaging of cellular metabolism. Spectroscopic information is typically acquired, making the acquisition of dynamic volumetric data a challenge. To enable rapid volumetric imaging, a spectral-spatial excitation pulse was designed to excite a single line of the carbon spectrum. With only a single resonance present in the signal, an echo-planar readout trajectory could be used to resolve spatial information, giving full volume coverage of 32 × 32 × 16 voxels every 3.5 s. This high frame rate was used to measure the different lactate dynamics in different tissues in a normal rat model and a mouse model of prostate cancer.

  11. Combined Noninvasive Imaging and Modeling Approaches Reveal Metabolic Compartmentation in the Barley Endosperm[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rolletschek, Hardy; Melkus, Gerd; Grafahrend-Belau, Eva; Fuchs, Johannes; Heinzel, Nicolas; Schreiber, Falk; Jakob, Peter M.; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2011-01-01

    The starchy endosperm of cereals is a priori taken as a metabolically uniform tissue. By applying a noninvasive assay based on 13C/1H-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to barley (Hordeum vulgare) grains, we uncovered metabolic compartmentation in the endosperm. 13C-Suc feeding during grain filling showed that the primary site of Ala synthesis was the central region of the endosperm, the part of the caryopsis experiencing the highest level of hypoxia. Region-specific metabolism in the endosperm was characterized by flux balance analysis (FBA) and metabolite profiling. FBA predicts that in the central region of the endosperm, the tricarboxylic acid cycle shifts to a noncyclic mode, accompanied by elevated glycolytic flux and the accumulation of Ala. The metabolic compartmentation within the endosperm is advantageous for the grain's carbon and energy economy, with a prominent role being played by Ala aminotransferase. An investigation of caryopses with a genetically perturbed tissue pattern demonstrated that Ala accumulation is a consequence of oxygen status, rather than being either tissue specific or dependent on the supply of Suc. Hence the 13C-Ala gradient can be used as an in vivo marker for hypoxia. The combination of MRI and metabolic modeling offers opportunities for the noninvasive analysis of metabolic compartmentation in plants. PMID:21856793

  12. /sup 13/C NMR study of effects of fasting and diabetes on the metabolism of pyruvate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and of the utilization of pyruvate and ethanol in lipogenesis in perfused rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.M.

    1987-01-27

    /sup 13/C NMR has been used to study the competition of pyruvate dehydrogenase with pyruvate carboxylase for entry of pyruvate into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic and normal donor rats. The relative proportion of pyruvate entering the TCA cycle by these two routes was estimated from the /sup 13/C enrichments at the individual carbons of glutamate when (3-/sup 13/C)alanine was the only exogenous substrate present. In this way, the proportion of pyruvate entering by the pyruvate dehydrogenase route relative to the pyruvate carboxylase route was determined to be 1:1.2 +/- 0.1 in liver from fed controls, 1:7.7 +/- 2 in liver from 24-fasted controls, and 1:2.6 +/- 0.3 in diabetic liver. Pursuant to this observation that conversion of pyruvate to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) was greatest in perfused liver from fed controls, the incorporation of /sup 13/C label into fatty acids was monitored in this liver preparation. With the exception of the repeating methylene carbons, fatty acyl carbons labeled by (1-/sup 13/C)acetyl-CoA (from (2-/sup 13/C)pyruvate) gave rise to resonances distinguishable on the basis of chemical shift from those observed when label was introduced by (3-/sup 13/C)alanine plus (2-/sup 13/C)ethanol, which are converted to (2-/sup 13/C)acetyl-CoA. Thus, measurement of /sup 13/C enrichment at several specific sites in the fatty acyl chains in time-resolved spectra of perfused liver offers a novel way of monitoring the kinetics of the biosynthesis of fatty acids. In addition to obtaining the rate of lipogenesis, it was possible to distinguish the contributions of chain elongation from those of the de novo synthesis pathway and to estimate the average chain length of the /sup 13/C-labeled fatty acids produced.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance micro-imaging in the investigation of plant cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Köckenberger, W

    2001-04-01

    Micro-imaging based on nuclear magnetic resonance offers the possibility to map metabolites in plant tissues non-invasively. Major metabolites such as sucrose and amino acids can be observed with high spatial resolution. Stable isotope tracers, such as (13)C-labelled metabolites can be used to measure the in vivo conversion rates in a metabolic network. This review summarizes the different nuclear magnetic resonance micro-imaging techniques that are available to obtain spatially resolved information on metabolites in plants. A short general introduction into NMR imaging techniques is provided. Particular emphasis is given to the difficulties encountered when NMR micro-imaging is applied to plant systems.

  14. Approaches to studies on neuronal/glial relationships by 13C-MRS analysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; McLean, M; Morris, P; Bachelard, H

    1996-01-01

    The use of different 13C-labelled precursors alone or in combination ([1-13C]glucose, [2-13C]glucose, [1-13C]acetate, [2-13C]acetate and [1,2-13C2]acetate) to study neuronal/glial metabolic relationships by MRS is discussed. Glutamine and citrate resonances represent glial metabolism if a combination of [1-13C]glucose + [2-13C]acetate is used, but only for short time periods. A combination of [2-13C]glucose + [2-13C]acetate will label -COO- groups from glucose and -CH2 groups from acetate, respectively, which distinguish well in theory. However, this approach is severely limited by the long T1S of -COO- groups and low S/N. Contributions of the anaplerotic pathway can be assessed using [2-13C]glucose, but again can be limited by the long T1S of -COO- groups. Labelling of glycerol-3-phosphate (believed to be produced in glia) from [1-13C]glucose is difficult to see under normal conditions but has proved useful in, e.g., hypoxia. We believe the most promising approach is the use of [1-13C] glucose with [1,2-13C2]acetate, by analysis of the multiplets ('isotopomers') of the amino acid resonances.

  15. Imaging Tumor Metabolism Using Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, David Y.; Soloviev, Dmitry; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an extraordinarily sensitive clinical imaging modality for interrogating tumor metabolism. Radiolabelled PET substrates can be traced at sub-physiological concentrations, allowing non-invasive imaging of metabolism and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in systems ranging from advanced cancer models to cancer patients in the clinic. There are a wide range of novel and more established PET radiotracers, which can be used to investigate various aspects of tumor metabolism, including carbohydrate, amino acid and fatty acid metabolism. In this review we will briefly discuss the more established metabolic tracers and describe recent work on the development of new tracers. Some of the unanswered questions in tumor metabolism will be considered alongside new technical developments, such as combined PET/MRI machines, that could provide new imaging solutions to some of the outstanding diagnostic challenges facing modern cancer medicine. PMID:25815854

  16. A high resolution δ13C record in a modern Porites lobata coral: Insights into controls on skeletal δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Nicola; Finch, Adrian A.; EIMF

    2012-05-01

    δ13C was determined at a high spatial resolution by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) across a 1 year section of a modern Porites lobata coral skeleton from Hawaii. Skeletal δ13C is dominated by large oscillations of 5-7‰ that typically cover skeletal distances equivalent to periods of ˜14-40 days. These variations do not reflect seawater temperature and it is unlikely that they reflect variations in the δ13C of local seawater. We observe no correlation between skeletal δ13C and the pH of the calcification fluid (estimated from previous measurements of skeletal δ11B). We conclude that either the proportion of skeletal carbon derived from metabolic CO2 is not reflected by estimated ECF pH (as the [CO2] in the overlying coral tissue varies) and/or the δ13C composition of the metabolic CO2 is highly variable. We also observe no correlation between skeletal δ13C and previous δ18O SIMS measurements. Variations in skeletal δ13C and δ18O do not have a common timing, providing no evidence that skeletal δ13C and δ18O vary in response to a single factor. This suggests that skeletal δ13C is principally driven by variations in the δ13C composition of metabolic CO2 rather than by the abundance of metabolic CO2, which would also affect skeletal δ18O. The δ13C composition of metabolic CO2 reflects the processes of photosynthesis, heterotrophic feeding and respiration in the overlying coral tissue. Corals catabolise stored lipid reserves to meet energetic demands when photosynthesis conditions are sub-optimal. Variations in the amounts and types of reserves utilised could induce changes in the δ13C composition of metabolic CO2 and the resultant skeleton which are temporally offset from skeletal δ18O records.

  17. Detection of inflammatory cell function using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy of hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine

    PubMed Central

    Najac, Chloé; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Kohanbash, Gary; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Okada, Hideho; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are highly prevalent inflammatory cells that play a key role in tumor development and are considered therapeutic targets. MDSCs promote tumor growth by blocking T-cell-mediated anti-tumoral immune response through depletion of arginine that is essential for T-cell proliferation. To deplete arginine, MDSCs express high levels of arginase, which catalyzes the breakdown of arginine into urea and ornithine. Here, we developed a new hyperpolarized 13C probe, [6-13C]-arginine, to image arginase activity. We show that [6-13C]-arginine can be hyperpolarized, and hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production from [6-13C]-arginine is linearly correlated with arginase concentration in vitro. Furthermore we show that we can detect a statistically significant increase in hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production in MDSCs when compared to control bone marrow cells. This increase was associated with an increase in intracellular arginase concentration detected using a spectrophotometric assay. Hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine could therefore serve to image tumoral MDSC function and more broadly M2-like macrophages. PMID:27507680

  18. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  19. 13C-1H dipolar-driven 13C-13C recoupling without 13C rf irradiation in nuclear magnetic resonance of rotating solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegoshi, K.; Nakamura, Shinji; Terao, Takehiko

    2003-02-01

    Two recently proposed 13C-13C recoupling methods under magic angle spinning (MAS), resonant interference recoupling (RIR), and 13C-1H dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR), are examined on a common theoretical foundation using the average Hamiltonian theory. In both methods, a rf field is applied on not 13C but 1H to recouple the 13C-1H dipolar interactions, and spectral overlap necessary to conserve energy for 13C-13C polarization transfer is achieved by the 13C-1H dipolar line broadening. While DARR employs time-independent 13C-1H interactions recoupled by suitable rf irradiation to 1H spins, RIR uses time-dependent 13C-1H interactions modulated appropriately by 1H rf irradiation. There are two distinct cases where 13C-1H line broadening realizes 13C-13C spectral overlap. For a pair of a carbonyl or aromatic carbon and an aliphatic carbon, spectral overlap can be achieved between one of the spinning sidebands of the former 13C resonance and the 13C-1H dipolar powder pattern of the latter. On the other hand for a pair of spins with a small chemical shift difference, the two center bands are overlapped with each other due to 13C-1H dipolar broadening. For the former, we show that both RIR and DARR occur in the first order, while for the latter, DARR recoupling is appreciable for time-independent 13C-1H interactions. We refer to the former DARR as the first-order DARR recoupling and the latter as the second-order DARR. Experimentally, we examined the following 13C-1H recoupling methods for DARR: 1H CW irradiation fulfilling a rotary-resonance condition or a modulatory-resonance condition, and 1H π pulses applied synchronously to MAS. For RIR, the FSLG-m2m¯m sequence is applied to 1H. Several one-dimensional DARR and RIR experiments were done for N-acetyl[1,2-13C, 15N] DL-valine, and [2,3-13C] L-alanine. It was found that the polarization transfer rate for RIR is larger than that for DARR except for fast spinning, while the rate for DARR is less sensitive to

  20. Optical metabolic imaging of live tissue cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2013-02-01

    The fluorescence properties, both intensity and fluorescence lifetime, of NADH and FAD, two coenzymes of metabolism, are sensitive, high resolution measures of cellular metabolism. However, often in vivo measurements of tissue are not feasible. In this study, we investigate the stability over time of two-photon auto-fluorescence imaging of NADH and FAD in live-cultured tissues. Our results demonstrate that cultured tissues remain viable for at least several days post excision. Furthermore, the optical redox ratio, NADH fluorescence lifetime, and FAD fluorescence lifetime do not significantly change in the cultured tissues over time. With these findings, we demonstrate the potential of sustained tissue culture techniques for optical metabolic imaging.

  1. Fast Dynamic 3D MRSI with Compressed Sensing and Multiband Excitation Pulses for Hyperpolarized 13C Studies

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Lustig, Michael; Kerr, Adam B.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Kurhanewicz, John; Pauly, John M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C MRSI can detect not only the uptake of the pre-polarized molecule but also its metabolic products in vivo, thus providing a powerful new method to study cellular metabolism. Imaging the dynamic perfusion and conversion of these metabolites provides additional tissue information but requires methods for efficient hyperpolarization usage and rapid acquisitions. In this work, we have developed a time-resolved 3D MRSI method for acquiring hyperpolarized 13C data by combining compressed sensing methods for acceleration and multiband excitation pulses to efficiently use the magnetization. This method achieved a 2 sec temporal resolution with full volumetric coverage of a mouse, and metabolites were observed for up to 60 sec following injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate. The compressed sensing acquisition used random phase encode gradient blips to create a novel random undersampling pattern tailored to dynamic MRSI with sampling incoherency in four (time, frequency and two spatial) dimensions. The reconstruction was also tailored to dynamic MRSI by applying a temporal wavelet sparsifying transform in order to exploit the inherent temporal sparsity. Customized multiband excitation pulses were designed with a lower flip angle for the [1-13C]-pyruvate substrate given its higher concentration than its metabolic products ([1-13C]-lactate and [1-13C]-alanine), thus using less hyperpolarization per excitation. This approach has enabled the monitoring of perfusion and uptake of the pyruvate, and the conversion dynamics to lactate and alanine throughout a volume with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:20939089

  2. New guidelines for δ13C measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Gehre, Matthias; Groning, Manfred; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Toman, Blaza; Verkouteren, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Consistency of δ13C measurements can be improved 39−47% by anchoring the δ13C scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in 13C/12C. It is recommended thatδ13C values of both organic and inorganic materials be measured and expressed relative to VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on a scale normalized by assigning consensus values of −46.6‰ to L-SVEC lithium carbonate and +1.95‰ to NBS 19 calcium carbonate. Uncertainties of other reference material values on this scale are improved by factors up to two or more, and the values of some have been notably shifted:  the δ13C of NBS 22 oil is −30.03%.

  3. Spectral editing for in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yun; Shen, Jun

    2012-01-01

    In vivo detection of carboxylic/amide carbons is a promising technique for studying cerebral metabolism and neurotransmission due to the very low RF power required for proton decoupling. In the carboxylic/amide region, however, there is severe spectral overlap between acetate C1 and glutamate C5, complicating studies that use acetate as an astroglia-specific substrate. There are no known in vivo MRS techniques that can spectrally resolve acetate C1 and glutamate C5 singlets. In this study, we propose to spectrally separate acetate C1 and glutamate C5 by a two-step J-editing technique after introducing homonuclear 13C- 13C scalar coupling between carboxylic/amide carbons and aliphatic carbons. By infusing [1,2- 13C 2]acetate instead of [1- 13C]acetate the acetate doublet can be spectrally edited because of the large separation between acetate C2 and glutamate C4 in the aliphatic region. This technique can be applied to studying acetate transport and metabolism in brain in the carboxylic/amide region without spectral interference.

  4. Optical metabolic imaging for monitoring tracheal health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Gil, Daniel A.; Choma, Michael A.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-04-01

    The health of the tracheal mucosa and submucosa is a vital yet poorly understood component of critical care medicine, and a minimally-invasive method is needed to monitor tracheal health in patients. Of particular interest are the ciliated cells of the tracheal epithelium that move mucus away from the lungs and prevent respiratory infection. Optical metabolic imaging (OMI) allows cellular-level measurement of metabolism, and is a compelling method for assessing tracheal health because ciliary motor proteins require ATP to function. In this pilot study, we apply multiphoton imaging of the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H and FAD to the mucosa and submucosa of ex vivo mouse trachea. We demonstrate the feasibility and potential diagnostic utility of these measurements for assessing tracheal health and pathophysiology at the single-cell level.

  5. Signal-to-noise ratio of a mouse brain (13) C CryoProbe™ system in comparison with room temperature coils: spectroscopic phantom and in vivo results.

    PubMed

    Sack, M; Wetterling, F; Sartorius, A; Ende, G; Weber-Fahr, W

    2014-06-01

    MRI and MRS in small rodents demand very high sensitivity. Cryogenic transmit/receive radiofrequency probes (CryoProbes) designed for (1) H MRI of mouse brain provide an attractive option for increasing the performance of small-animal MR systems. As the Larmor frequency of (13) C nuclei is four times lower than that for (1) H nuclei, an even larger sensitivity improvement is expected for (13) C applications. The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of a prototype (13) C CryoProbe™ for mouse brain MRS. To investigate the possible gain of the (13) C CryoProbe™, we acquired localized single-voxel (13) C spectra and chemical shift images of a dimethyl sulfoxide phantom with the CryoProbe™, as well as with two room temperature resonators. The cryogenically cooled resonator achieved approximately four-fold higher signal-to-noise ratio in phantom tests when compared with the best-performing room temperature coil. In addition, we present localized (13) C spectra of mouse brain obtained with the CryoProbe™, as well as with one of the room temperature coils, demonstrating the performance in vivo. In summary, the cryogenic cooling technique significantly enhances the (13) C signal sensitivity at 9.4 T and enables the investigation of metabolism within mouse brain.

  6. Novel biological insights through metabolomics and 13C-flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Nicola; Sauer, Uwe

    2009-10-01

    Metabolomics and (13)C-flux analysis have become instrumental for analyzing cellular metabolism and its regulation. Driven primarily by technical advances in mass spectrometry-based analytics, they provide unmatched readouts on metabolic state and activity. Functional genomics leverages metabolomics for the discovery of novel enzymes and unexpected secondary activities of annotated enzymes. (13)C-flux analyses are frequently used for empirical elucidation of pathways in poorly characterized species and for network-wide analysis of mechanisms that realize energy and redox balancing. Integration of metabolomics, (13)C-flux analysis and other data enable the condition-dependent characterization of regulatory circuits that ultimately govern the metabolic phenotype.

  7. Experimental design principles for isotopically instationary 13C labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Nöh, Katharina; Wiechert, Wolfgang

    2006-06-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is a well-established tool in Metabolic Engineering that found numerous applications in recent years. However, one strong limitation of the current method is the requirement of an-at least approximate-isotopic stationary state at sampling time. This requirement leads to a principle lower limit for the duration of a 13C labeling experiment. A new methodological development is based on repeated sampling during the instationary transient of the 13C labeling dynamics. The statistical and computational treatment of such instationary experiments is a completely new terrain. The computational effort is very high because large differential equations have to be solved and, moreover, the intracellular pool sizes play a significant role. For this reason, the present contribution works out principles and strategies for the experimental design of instationary experiments based on a simple example network. Hereby, the potential of isotopically instationary experiments is investigated in detail. Various statistical results on instationary flux identifiability are presented and possible pitfalls of experimental design are discussed. Finally, a framework for almost optimal experimental design of isotopically instationary experiments is proposed which provides a practical guideline for the analysis of large-scale networks.

  8. Translating metabolic exchange with imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Liang; Xu, Yuquan; Straight, Paul; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic exchange between an organism and the environment, including interactions with neighboring organisms, is important for processes of organismal development. Here we develop and use thin-layer agar natural product MALDI-TOF imaging mass spectrometry of intact bacterial colonies grown on top of the MALDI target plate to study an interaction between two species of bacteria and provide direct evidence that a Bacillus subtilis silences the defensive arsenal of Streptomyces coelicolor. PMID:19915536

  9. Measuring doubly 13C-substituted ethane by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clog, M.; Ling, C.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is present in non-negligible amounts in most natural gas reservoirs and is used to produce ethylene for petrochemical industries. It is one of the by-products of lipid metabolism and is the arguably simplest molecule that can manifest multiple 13C substitutions. There are several plausible controls on the relative abundances of 13C2H6 in natural gases: thermodynamically controlled homogeneous isotope exchange reactions analogous to those behind carbonate clumped isotope thermometry; inheritance from larger biomolecules that under thermal degradation to produce natural gas; mixing of natural gases that differ markedly in bulk isotopic composition; or combinations of these and/or other, less expected fractionations. There is little basis for predicting which of these will dominate in natural samples. Here, we focus on an analytical techniques that will provide the avenue for exploring these phenomena. The method is based on high-resolution gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometry, using the Thermo 253-Ultra (a new prototype mass spectrometer). This instrument achieves the mass resolution (M/Δ M) up to 27,000, permitting separation of the isobaric interferences of potential contaminants and isotopologues of an analtye or its fragments which share a cardinal mass. We present techniques to analyze several isotopologues of molecular and fragment ions of C2H6. The critical isobaric separations for our purposes include: discrimination of 13C2H6 from 13C12CDH5 at mass 32 and separation of the 13CH3 fragment from 12CH4 at mass 16, both requiring at least a mass resolution of 20000 to make an adequate measurement. Other obvious interferences are either cleanly separated (e.g., O2, O) or accounted for by peak-stripping (CH3OH on mass 32 and NH2 on mass 16). We focus on a set of measurements which constrain: the doubly-substituted isotopologue, 13C2H6, and the 13CH3/12CH3 ratio of the methyl fragment, which constrains the bulk δ 13C. Similar methods can be

  10. Optical hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in nanodiamond ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical nuclear polarization holds the key for orders of magnitude enhancements of nuclear magnetic resonance signals which, in turn, would enable a wide range of novel applications in biomedical sciences. However, current implementations of DNP require cryogenic temperatures and long times for achieving high polarization. Here we propose and analyze in detail protocols that can achieve rapid hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in randomly oriented ensembles of nanodiamonds at room temperature. Our protocols exploit a combination of optical polarization of electron spins in nitrogen-vacancy centers and the transfer of this polarization to 13C nuclei by means of microwave control to overcome the severe challenges that are posed by the random orientation of the nanodiamonds and their nitrogen-vacancy centers. Specifically, these random orientations result in exceedingly large energy variations of the electron spin levels that render the polarization and coherent control of the nitrogen-vacancy center electron spins as well as the control of their coherent interaction with the surrounding 13C nuclear spins highly inefficient. We address these challenges by a combination of an off-resonant microwave double resonance scheme in conjunction with a realization of the integrated solid effect which, together with adiabatic rotations of external magnetic fields or rotations of nanodiamonds, leads to a protocol that achieves high levels of hyperpolarization of the entire nuclear-spin bath in a randomly oriented ensemble of nanodiamonds even at room temperature. This hyperpolarization together with the long nuclear-spin polarization lifetimes in nanodiamonds and the relatively high density of 13C nuclei has the potential to result in a major signal enhancement in 13C nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and suggests functionalized and hyperpolarized nanodiamonds as a unique probe for molecular imaging both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Determination of de novo synthesized amino acids in cellular proteins revisited by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Willker, W; Leibfritz, D

    1997-04-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the absolute amounts to de novo synthesized amino acids in both the perchloric acid extracts and the hydrolyzed protein fractions of F98 glioma cells incubated for 2 h with 5 mmol/l [U-13C]glucose. 13C NMR spectra of the hydrolyzed protein fraction revealed a marked incorporation of 13C-labelled alanine, aspartate and glutamate into the proteins of F98 cells within the incubation period. Additionally, small amounts of 13C-labelled glycine, proline and serine could unambiguously be identified in the protein fraction. Astonishingly, approximately equal amounts of 13C-labelled glutamate and aspartate were incorporated into the cellular proteins, although the cytosolic steady-state concentration of aspartate was below 13C NMR detectability. Hypertonic stress decreased the incorporation of 13C-labelled amino acids into the total protein, albeit their cytosolic concentrations were increased, which reflects an inhibition of protein synthesis under these conditions. On the other hand, hypotonic stress increased the amount of 13C-labelled proline incorporated into the cellular proteins even though the cytosolic concentration of 13C-labelled proline was largely decreased. Apparently, hypoosmotic conditions stimulate the synthesis of proteins or peptides with a high proline content. The results show that already after 2 h of incubation with [U-13C]glucose there is a pronounced flux of 13C label into the cellular proteins, which is usually disregarded if cytosolic fluids are examined only. This means that calculations of metabolic fluxes based on 13C NMR spectroscopic data obtained from perchloric acid extracts of cells or tissues and also from in vivo measurements consider only the labelled 'NMR visible' cytosolic metabolites, which may have to be corrected for fast label flowing off into other compartments.

  12. Mapping cerebral glutamate 13C turnover and oxygen consumption by in vivo NMR.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Fahmeed; Brown, Peter; Nixon, Terennce W; Behar, Kevin L

    2003-01-01

    Regional rates of 13C incorporation from glucose to glutamate were detected in anesthetized rat brain in vivo at 7T with high temporal and spatial resolution using NMR method ICED PEPSI (in vivo carbon edited detection with proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging). Time courses of regional glutamate 13C turnover were fitted by a metabolic model to obtain regional tri-carboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) in each voxel (8 microL) of rat cortex. CMRO2 maps obtained for rats under either alpha-chloralose or morphine anesthesia revealed average cortical values of 1.5 +/- 0.2 (n = 3) and 3.2 +/- 0.3 (n = 4) mumol/g/min, respectively. These values of CMRO2 are in good agreement with previous cortical measurements with coarser spatial resolution. The heterogeneity within each map, which depicted predominantly gray and white matter differences, was significantly greater under morphine (higher cortical activity) than under-alpha-chloralose (lower cortical activity) anesthesia. The regional variations in the basal awake state, which are expected to be even greater, should be considered to avoid partial-volume artifacts in functional activation studies of awake subjects. PMID:14562702

  13. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c] And [2h3, 13c]Methyl Aryl Sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-03-30

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2,.sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to the labeled compounds of [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide and [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide.

  14. Multiparametric human hepatocellular carcinoma characterization and therapy response evaluation by hyperpolarized (13) C MRSI.

    PubMed

    Düwel, Stephan; Durst, Markus; Gringeri, Concetta V; Kosanke, Yvonne; Gross, Claudia; Janich, Martin A; Haase, Axel; Glaser, Steffen J; Schwaiger, Markus; Schulte, Rolf F; Braren, Rickmer; Menzel, Marion I

    2016-07-01

    Individual tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring based on current medical imaging methods remain challenging. This work investigates hyperpolarized (13) C compounds in an orthotopic rat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model system before and after transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). HCC ranks amongst the top six most common cancer types in humans and accounts for one-third of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early therapy response monitoring could aid in the development of personalized therapy approaches and novel therapeutic concepts. Measurements with selectively (13) C-labeled and hyperpolarized urea, pyruvate and fumarate were performed in tumor-bearing rats before and after TAE. Two-dimensional, slice-selective MRSI was used to obtain spatially resolved maps of tumor perfusion, cell energy metabolic conversion rates and necrosis, which were additionally correlated with immunohistochemistry. All three injected compounds, taken together with their respective metabolites, exhibited similar signal distributions. TAE induced a decrease in blood flow into the tumor and thus a decrease in tumor to muscle and tumor to liver ratios of urea, pyruvate and its metabolites, alanine and lactate, whereas conversion rates remained stable or increased on TAE in tumor, muscle and liver tissue. Conversion from fumarate to malate successfully indicated individual levels of necrosis, and global malate signals after TAE suggested the washout of fumarase or malate itself on necrosis. This study presents a combination of three (13) C compounds as novel candidate biomarkers for a comprehensive characterization of genetically and molecularly diverse HCC using hyperpolarized MRSI, enabling the simultaneous detection of differences in tumor perfusion, metabolism and necrosis. If, as in this study, bolus dynamics are not required and qualitative perfusion information is sufficient, the desired information could be extracted from hyperpolarized fumarate and

  15. Analysis of Cancer Metabolism by Imaging Hyperpolarized Nuclei: Prospects for Translation to Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B; Brindle, Kevin; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Comment, Arnaud; Cunningham, Charles H; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Green, Gary G; Leach, Martin O; Rajan, Sunder S; Rizi, Rahim R; Ross, Brian D; Warren, Warren S; Malloy, Craig R

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in cancer biology is to monitor and understand cancer metabolism in vivo with the goal of improved diagnosis and perhaps therapy. Because of the complexity of biochemical pathways, tracer methods are required for detecting specific enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Stable isotopes such as 13C or 15N with detection by nuclear magnetic resonance provide the necessary information about tissue biochemistry, but the crucial metabolites are present in low concentration and therefore are beyond the detection threshold of traditional magnetic resonance methods. A solution is to improve sensitivity by a factor of 10,000 or more by temporarily redistributing the populations of nuclear spins in a magnetic field, a process termed hyperpolarization. Although this effect is short-lived, hyperpolarized molecules can be generated in an aqueous solution and infused in vivo where metabolism generates products that can be imaged. This discovery lifts the primary constraint on magnetic resonance imaging for monitoring metabolism—poor sensitivity—while preserving the advantage of biochemical information. The purpose of this report was to briefly summarize the known abnormalities in cancer metabolism, the value and limitations of current imaging methods for metabolism, and the principles of hyperpolarization. Recent preclinical applications are described. Hyperpolarization technology is still in its infancy, and current polarizer equipment and methods are suboptimal. Nevertheless, there are no fundamental barriers to rapid translation of this exciting technology to clinical research and perhaps clinical care. PMID:21403835

  16. Natural (13) C distribution in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) and consequences for allocation pattern.

    PubMed

    Lamade, Emmanuelle; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Darlan, Nuzul Hijri; Rodrigues, Rosario Lobato; Fresneau, Chantal; Mauve, Caroline; Lamothe-Sibold, Marlène; Sketriené, Diana; Ghashghaie, Jaleh

    2016-01-01

    Oil palm has now become one of the most important crops, palm oil representing nearly 25% of global plant oil consumption. Many studies have thus addressed oil palm ecophysiology and photosynthesis-based models of carbon allocation have been used. However, there is a lack of experimental data on carbon fixation and redistribution within palm trees, and important C-sinks have not been fully characterized yet. Here, we carried out extensive measurement of natural (13) C-abundance (δ(13) C) in oil palm tissues, including fruits at different maturation stages. We find a (13) C-enrichment in heterotrophic organs compared to mature leaves, with roots being the most (13) C-enriched. The δ(13) C in fruits decreased during maturation, reflecting the accumulation in (13) C-depleted lipids. We further used observed δ(13) C values to compute plausible carbon fluxes using a steady-state model of (13) C-distribution including metabolic isotope effects ((12) v/(13) v). The results suggest that fruits represent a major respiratory loss (≈39% of total tree respiration) and that sink organs such as fruits are fed by sucrose from leaves. That is, glucose appears to be a quantitatively important compound in palm tissues, but computations indicate that it is involved in dynamic starch metabolism rather that C-exchange between organs. PMID:26228944

  17. Natural (13) C distribution in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) and consequences for allocation pattern.

    PubMed

    Lamade, Emmanuelle; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Darlan, Nuzul Hijri; Rodrigues, Rosario Lobato; Fresneau, Chantal; Mauve, Caroline; Lamothe-Sibold, Marlène; Sketriené, Diana; Ghashghaie, Jaleh

    2016-01-01

    Oil palm has now become one of the most important crops, palm oil representing nearly 25% of global plant oil consumption. Many studies have thus addressed oil palm ecophysiology and photosynthesis-based models of carbon allocation have been used. However, there is a lack of experimental data on carbon fixation and redistribution within palm trees, and important C-sinks have not been fully characterized yet. Here, we carried out extensive measurement of natural (13) C-abundance (δ(13) C) in oil palm tissues, including fruits at different maturation stages. We find a (13) C-enrichment in heterotrophic organs compared to mature leaves, with roots being the most (13) C-enriched. The δ(13) C in fruits decreased during maturation, reflecting the accumulation in (13) C-depleted lipids. We further used observed δ(13) C values to compute plausible carbon fluxes using a steady-state model of (13) C-distribution including metabolic isotope effects ((12) v/(13) v). The results suggest that fruits represent a major respiratory loss (≈39% of total tree respiration) and that sink organs such as fruits are fed by sucrose from leaves. That is, glucose appears to be a quantitatively important compound in palm tissues, but computations indicate that it is involved in dynamic starch metabolism rather that C-exchange between organs.

  18. {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin couplings in [2`-{sup 13}C]2`-deoxyribonucleosides: Correlations with molecular structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, T.; Stripe, W.A.; Carmichael, I.; Serianni, A.S.; Wu, J.

    1997-02-19

    2`-Deoxyribonucleosides (2`-deoxyadenosine (1), 2`-depoxycytidine (2), thymidine (3)) singly enriched with {sup 13}C at C2` have been prepared and used to obtain one-, two-, and three-bond {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin-coupling constants involving C2`. Spin couplings in 1-3 involving C1` and C2`are also compared to corresponding values in ribonucleosides in order to assess the effects of nucleoside structure and conformation on J values within the furanose ring. {sup 1}J{sub C2`,H2`R} and {sup 1}J{sub C2`,H2`S} in 1-3 and {sup 1}J{sub C2`,H2`} in ribonucleosides depend on C-H bond orientation: {sup 1}J{sub C1`,H1`} in 1-3 and in ribonucleosides exhibits a similar dependence. The latter couplings appear to be essentially unaffected by N-glycoside torsion. {sup 1}J{sub CC} values depend on the number and distribution of electronegative substituents on the C-C fragment. A modified projection curve is proposed to aid in the interpretation of {sup 2}J{sub C2`,H1`} values; the presence of N substitution at C1` caused a shift to more negative couplings relative to the O-substituted analog. In contrast, {sup 2}J{sub C1`,H2`} is essentially unaffected by the same change in the electronegative substituent at C1`. {sup 2}J{sub CC} values within the furanose ring are determined buy two coupling pathways; in one case (i.e., {sup 2}J{sub C1`,C3`}), the observed coupling is shown to be the algebraic sum of the two couplings arising from each pathway. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Investigation of Carbohydrate Metabolism and Transport in Castor Bean Seedlings by Cyclic JCross Polarization Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, M.; Köckenberger, W.; Kimmich, R.; Chandrakumar, N.; Bowtell, R.

    1998-05-01

    NMR experiments using13C-labeled compounds offer the possibility of noninvasive monitoring of carbohydrate transport and metabolism in living plants, but are usually hampered by the low sensitivity of the13C nucleus. The problem of low sensitivity can be overcome by using the cyclicJcross polarization (CYCLCROP) technique, which allows the indirect detection of13C nuclei coupled to1H nuclei with the high NMR sensitivity of protons. We report here on methods for imaging and spectroscopy based on the CYCLCROP technique, and their use in the firstin vivoNMR study of carbohydrate transport and metabolism in castor bean seedlings (Ricinus communis L.). Comprehensive acquisition strategies for the various NMR methods are given, including the procedure for setting up the experiments. In addition, a full analysis of the effect of relaxation on the signals generated from smallJ-coupled spin systems by the CYCLCROP sequence is given, and the high sensitivity of the sequence is demonstrated. In thein vivostudy of six-day-old castor bean seedlings, we were able to measure the uptake of labeled hexoses, supplied in solution to the cotyledons, and their conversion to sucrose, as well as the transport of this sucrose in the vascular bundles. Images of the actual distribution of labeled sucrose in the hypocotyl of the seedling have also been obtained. The resulting data show some evidence for a preferential incorporation of labeled fructose in the process of sucrose synthesis, which decreases with the time of incubation.

  20. Radiocopper for the imaging of copper metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hueting, Rebekka

    2014-04-01

    The redox-active transition metal copper is an essential trace element for growth and development and serves as a structural or catalytic cofactor for many enzymes in a range of physiological processes. Mammalian copper homeostasis is tightly regulated, and an imbalance in copper metabolism is implicated in various pathological disorders. Radioactive copper isotopes, in particular (64) Cu (t1/2  = 12.7 h) and (67) Cu (t1/2  = 62.01 h), have made important contributions to the understanding of copper metabolism in health and disease. This review gives a brief account of how radiolabelled copper(II) salts and bioreductive copper complexes have been used to trace copper uptake, transport and efflux in vitro and in vivo. Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged as a noninvasive tool to image copper metabolism in living subjects and (64) Cu-PET is investigated for the study of copper-related neurological disorders, genetic diseases and cancer.

  1. A 13C-NMR study of exopolysaccharide synthesis in Rhizobium meliloti Su47 strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernier, P.; Portais, J.-C.; Besson, I.; Courtois, J.; Courtois, B.; Barbotin, J.-N.

    1998-02-01

    Metabolic pathways implied in the synthesis of succinoglycan produced by the Su47 strain of R. meliloti were evaluated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy after incubation with [1{-}13C] or [2{-}13C] glucose. The biosynthesis of this polymer by R. meliloti from glucose occurred by a direct polymerisation of the introduced glucose and by the pentose phosphate pathway. Les voies métaboliques impliquées dans la synthèse du succinoglycane produit par la souche Su47 de R. meliloti ont été évaluées par la spectroscopie de RMN du carbone 13 après incubation des cellules avec du [1{-}13C] ou [2{-}13C] glucose. La biosynthèse de ce polymère à partir du glucose se produit par polymérisation directe du glucose et par la voie des pentoses phosphate.

  2. Overexpression of a homogeneous oligosaccharide with 13C labeling by genetically engineered yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Sayoko; Chiba, Yasunori; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Kato, Koichi

    2011-08-01

    This report describes a novel method for overexpression of (13)C-labeled oligosaccharides using genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, in which a homogeneous high-mannose-type oligosaccharide accumulates because of deletions of genes encoding three enzymes involved in the processing pathway of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides in the Golgi complex. Using uniformly (13)C-labeled glucose as the sole carbon source in the culture medium of these engineered yeast cells, high yields of the isotopically labeled Man(8)GlcNAc(2) oligosaccharide could be successfully harvested from glycoprotein extracts of the cells. Furthermore, (13)C labeling at selected positions of the sugar residues in the oligosaccharide could be achieved using a site-specific (13)C-enriched glucose as the metabolic precursor, facilitating NMR spectral assignments. The (13)C-labeling method presented provides the technical basis for NMR analyses of structures, dynamics, and interactions of larger, branched oligosaccharides.

  3. Kinetic isotope effects significantly influence intracellular metabolite 13C labeling patterns and flux determination

    PubMed Central

    Wasylenko, Thomas M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous mathematical modeling of carbon-labeling experiments allows estimation of fluxes through the pathways of central carbon metabolism, yielding powerful information for basic scientific studies as well as for a wide range of applications. However, the mathematical models that have been developed for flux determination from 13C labeling data have commonly neglected the influence of kinetic isotope effects on the distribution of 13C label in intracellular metabolites, as these effects have often been assumed to be inconsequential. We have used measurements of the 13C isotope effects on the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme from the literature to model isotopic fractionation at the pyruvate node and quantify the modeling errors expected to result from the assumption that isotope effects are negligible. We show that under some conditions kinetic isotope effects have a significant impact on the 13C labeling patterns of intracellular metabolites, and the errors associated with neglecting isotope effects in 13C-metabolic flux analysis models can be comparable in size to measurement errors associated with GC–MS. Thus, kinetic isotope effects must be considered in any rigorous assessment of errors in 13C labeling data, goodness-of-fit between model and data, confidence intervals of estimated metabolic fluxes, and statistical significance of differences between estimated metabolic flux distributions. PMID:23828762

  4. A Method to Constrain Genome-Scale Models with 13C Labeling Data

    PubMed Central

    García Martín, Héctor; Kumar, Vinay Satish; Weaver, Daniel; Ghosh, Amit; Chubukov, Victor; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    Current limitations in quantitatively predicting biological behavior hinder our efforts to engineer biological systems to produce biofuels and other desired chemicals. Here, we present a new method for calculating metabolic fluxes, key targets in metabolic engineering, that incorporates data from 13C labeling experiments and genome-scale models. The data from 13C labeling experiments provide strong flux constraints that eliminate the need to assume an evolutionary optimization principle such as the growth rate optimization assumption used in Flux Balance Analysis (FBA). This effective constraining is achieved by making the simple but biologically relevant assumption that flux flows from core to peripheral metabolism and does not flow back. The new method is significantly more robust than FBA with respect to errors in genome-scale model reconstruction. Furthermore, it can provide a comprehensive picture of metabolite balancing and predictions for unmeasured extracellular fluxes as constrained by 13C labeling data. A comparison shows that the results of this new method are similar to those found through 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C MFA) for central carbon metabolism but, additionally, it provides flux estimates for peripheral metabolism. The extra validation gained by matching 48 relative labeling measurements is used to identify where and why several existing COnstraint Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) flux prediction algorithms fail. We demonstrate how to use this knowledge to refine these methods and improve their predictive capabilities. This method provides a reliable base upon which to improve the design of biological systems. PMID:26379153

  5. Clinical NOE 13C MRS for neuropsychiatric disorders of the frontal lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailasuta, Napapon; Robertson, Larry W.; Harris, Kent C.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Allen, Peter S.; Ross, Brian D.

    2008-12-01

    In this communication, a scheme is described whereby in vivo 13C MRS can safely be performed in the frontal lobe, a human brain region hitherto precluded on grounds of SAR, but important in being the seat of impaired cognitive function in many neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders. By combining two well known features of 13C NMR—the use of low power NOE and the focus on 13C carbon atoms which are only minimally coupled to protons, we are able to overcome the obstacle of SAR and develop means of monitoring the 13C fluxes of critically important metabolic pathways in frontal brain structures of normal volunteers and patients. Using a combination of low-power WALTZ decoupling, variants of random noise for nuclear overhauser effect enhancement it was possible to reduce power deposition to 20% of the advised maximum specific absorption rate (SAR). In model solutions 13C signal enhancement achieved with this scheme were comparable to that obtained with WALTZ-4. In human brain, the low power procedure effectively determined glutamine, glutamate and bicarbonate in the posterior parietal brain after [1- 13C] glucose infusion. The same 13C enriched metabolites were defined in frontal brain of human volunteers after administration of [1- 13C] acetate, a recognized probe of glial metabolism. Time courses of incorporation of 13C into cerebral glutamate, glutamine and bicarbonate were constructed. The results suggest efficacy for measurement of in vivo cerebral metabolic rates of the glutamate-glutamine and tricarboxylic acid cycles in 20 min MR scans in previously inaccessible brain regions in humans at 1.5T. We predict these will be clinically useful biomarkers in many human neuropsychiatric and genetic conditions.

  6. A roadmap for interpreting 13C metabolite labeling patterns from cells

    PubMed Central

    Buescher, Joerg M.; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.; Boros, Laszlo G.; Burgess, Shawn C.; Brunengraber, Henri; Clish, Clary B.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Feron, Olivier; Frezza, Christian; Ghesquiere, Bart; Gottlieb, Eyal; Hiller, Karsten; Jones, Russell G.; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Kimmelman, Alec C.; Locasale, Jason W.; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Maddocks, Oliver D. K.; Malloy, Craig; Metallo, Christian M.; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Munger, Joshua; Nöh, Katharina; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Ralser, Markus; Sauer, Uwe; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; St-Pierre, Julie; Tennant, Daniel A.; Wittmann, Christoph; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Vazquez, Alexei; Vousden, Karen; Young, Jamey D.; Zamboni, Nicola; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Measuring intracellular metabolism has increasingly led to important insights in biomedical research. 13C tracer analysis, although less information-rich than quantitative 13C flux analysis that requires computational data integration, has been established as a time-efficient method to unravel relative pathway activities, qualitative changes in pathway contributions, and nutrient contributions. Here, we review selected key issues in interpreting 13C metabolite labeling patterns, with the goal of drawing accurate conclusions from steady state and dynamic stable isotopic tracer experiments. PMID:25731751

  7. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  8. Uniformly 13C-labeled algal protein used to determine amino acid essentiality in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Berthold, H K; Hachey, D L; Reeds, P J; Thomas, O P; Hoeksema, S; Klein, P D

    1991-01-01

    The edible alga Spirulina platensis was uniformly labeled with 13C by growth in an atmosphere of pure 13CO2. The labeled biomass was then incorporated into the diet of a laying hen for 27 days. The isotopic enrichment of individual amino acids in egg white and yolk proteins, as well as in various tissues of the hen at the end of the feeding period, was analyzed by negative chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The amino acids of successive eggs showed one of two exclusive enrichment patterns: complete preservation of the intact carbon skeleton or extensive degradation and resynthesis. The same observation was made in tissue proteins. These patterns were cleanly divided according to known nutritional amino acid essentiality/nonessentiality but revealed differences in labeling among the nonessential amino acids: most notable was that proline accretion was derived entirely from the diet. Feeding uniformly 13C-labeled algal protein and recovering and analyzing de novo-synthesized protein provides a useful method to examine amino acid metabolism and determine conditional amino acid essentially in vivo. Images PMID:11607211

  9. Synthesis Of 2h- And 13c-Substituted Dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  10. Synthesis of 2H- and 13C-substituted dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  11. In vivo dynamic turnover of cerebral 13C isotopomers from [U- 13C]glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su; Shen, Jun

    2006-10-01

    An INEPT-based 13C MRS method and a cost-effective and widely available 11.7 Tesla 89-mm bore vertical magnet were used to detect dynamic 13C isotopomer turnover from intravenously infused [U- 13C]glucose in a 211 μL voxel located in the adult rat brain. The INEPT-based 1H → 13C polarization transfer method is mostly adiabatic and therefore minimizes signal loss due to B 1 inhomogeneity of the surface coils used. High quality and reproducible data were acquired as a result of combined use of outer volume suppression, ISIS, and the single-shot three-dimensional localization scheme built in the INEPT pulse sequence. Isotopomer patterns of both glutamate C4 at 34.00 ppm and glutamine C4 at 31.38 ppm are dominated first by a doublet originated from labeling at C4 and C5 but not at C3 (with 1JC4C5 = 51 Hz) and then by a quartet originated from labeling at C3, C4, and C5 (with 1JC3C4 = 35 Hz). A lag in the transition of glutamine C4 pattern from doublet-dominance to quartet dominance as compared to glutamate C4 was observed, which provides an independent verification of the precursor-product relationship between neuronal glutamate and glial glutamine and a significant intercompartmental cerebral glutamate-glutamine cycle between neurons and glial cells.

  12. Dipolar-coupling-mediated total correlation spectroscopy in solid-state 13C NMR: Selection of individual 13C- 13C dipolar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spano, Justin; Wi, Sungsool

    2010-06-01

    Herein is described a useful approach in solid-state NMR, for selecting homonuclear 13C- 13C spin pairs in a multiple- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupled spin system. This method builds upon the zero-quantum (ZQ) dipolar recoupling method introduced by Levitt and coworkers (Marin-Montesinos et al., 2006 [30]) by extending the originally introduced one-dimensional (1D) experiment into a two-dimensional (2D) method with selective irradiation scheme, while moving the 13C- 13C mixing scheme from the transverse to the longitudinal mode, together with a dramatic improvement in the proton decoupling efficiency. Selective spin-pair recoupling experiments incorporating Gaussian and cosine-modulated Gaussian pulses for inverting specific spins were performed, demonstrating the ability to detect informative, simplified/individualized, long-range 13C- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupling interactions more accurately by removing less informative, stronger, short-range 13C- 13C interactions from 2D correlation spectra. The capability of this new approach was demonstrated experimentally on uniformly 13C-labeled Glutamine and a tripeptide sample, GAL.

  13. High-resolution proton NMR studies of intracellular metabolites in yeast using 13C decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Shulman, Robert G.

    The resolution and specificity of 1H NMR in studies of yeast cellular metabolism were increased by feeding a 13C-labeled substrate and observing 1H difference spectra in the presence and absence of 13C decoupling fields. [2- 13C]Acetate was utilized as a respiratory substrate in an aerobic suspension of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The broad cellular background proton resonances are removed by the technique, leaving only signals from the protons of the substrate, or its metabolites, that are coupled to 13C. Spectra of the yeast suspension after acetate feeding show the disappearance of label from the acetate pool and the subsequent appearance of 13C in glutamate C 3 and C 4 and in aspartate C 3. These results are in accord with the known fluxes of metabolites. Selective single-frequency 13C decoupling was used to provide assignments for the difference signals. The limitations on single-frequency decoupling coming from finite decoupling fields are investigated. The technique shows a potential for application in a wide variety of systems where the resolution of the 13C spectrum may be combined with the sensitivity for proton detection to observe metabolites that have been previously unobservable.

  14. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    PubMed Central

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benitez, Ania; Peláez Brioso, Gerardo A.; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main MRI and MRS strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), Blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast (BOLD), and Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) have revealed Mn2+ accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions, and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable. PMID:23781199

  15. Critical appraisal of 13C breath tests for microsomal liver function: aminopyrine revisited.

    PubMed

    Pijls, Kirsten E; de Vries, Hanne; Nikkessen, Suzan; Bast, Aalt; Wodzig, Will K W H; Koek, Ger H

    2014-04-01

    As liver diseases are a major health problem and especially the incidence of metabolic liver diseases like non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rising, the demand for non-invasive tests is growing to replace liver biopsy. Non-invasive tests such as carbon-labelled breath tests can provide a valuable contribution to the evaluation of metabolic liver function. This review aims to critically appraise the value of the (13) C-labelled microsomal breath tests for the evaluation of metabolic liver function, and to discuss the role of cytochrome P450 enzymes in the metabolism of the different probe drugs, especially of aminopyrine. Although a number of different probe drugs have been used in breath tests, the perfect drug to assess the functional metabolic capacity of the liver has not been found. Data suggest that both the (13) C(2) -aminopyrine and the (13) C-methacetin breath test can play a role in assessing the capacity of the microsomal liver function and may be useful in the follow-up of patients with chronic liver diseases. Furthermore, CYP2C19 seems to be an important enzyme in the N-demethylation of aminopyrine, and polymorphisms in this gene may influence breath test values, which should be kept in mind when performing the (13) C(2) -aminopyrine breath test in clinical practice.

  16. Stable Carbon Isotopes (δ 13C) in Coral Skeletons: Experimental Approach and Applications for Paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottoli, A. G.

    2004-12-01

    Scleractinian corals obtain fixed carbon via photosynthesis by their endosymbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) and via hetertrophy (injestion of zooplankton, δ 13C ≈ -17 to -22‰ ). Carbon dioxide (CO2) used for photosynthesis is obtained from seawater (δ 13C ≈ 0%) or from respired CO2 within the coral host. The δ 13C of the carbon used in the formation of the underlying coral skeleton is fractionated as a result of both of these metabolic processes. Here I have pooled evidence from several field and tank experiments on the effect of photosynthesis and heterotrophy of coral skeletal δ 13C. In the experiments, decreases in light levels due to shading or depth resulted in a significant decrease in skeletal δ 13C in all species studied (Pavona gigantea, Pavona clavus, Porites compressa). Decreases in photosynthesis in bleached corals also resulted in a decrease in skeletal δ 13C compared to non-bleached corals growing under the same conditions and at the same location. Skeletal δ 13C also decreased at higher than normal light levels most likely due to photoinhibition. Thus, decreases in photosynthesis due to reduced light levels, due to bleaching-induced decreases in chlorophyll a concentrations, or due to photodamage-induced decreases in functional cholorphyll a, results in significant δ 13C decreases. Comprehensive interpretation of all of the data showed that changes in photosynthesis itself can drive the changes in δ 13C. In field experiments, the addition of natural concentrations of zooplankton to the diet resulted in decreases in skeletal δ 13C. Such a decrease was more pronounced with depth and in P. gigantea compared to P. clavus. In situ feeding experiments have since confirmed these findings. However under tank conditions with unaturally high feeding rates, enhanced nitrogen supply in the diet can disrupt the coral-algal symbiosis, stimlate zooxanthellae growth and photosynthesis, and cause an incrase in skeletal δ 13C. It is proposed that under

  17. sup 13 C and sup 18 O isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates: I. Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Biological carbonates frequently precipitate out of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C equilibrium with ambient waters. Two patterns of isotopic disequilibrium are particularly common. Kinetic disequilibria, so designated because they apparently result from kinetic isotope effects during CO{sub 2} hydration and hydroxylation, involve simultaneous depletions of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C as large as 4{per thousand} and 10 to 15{per thousand}, respectively. Rapid skeletogenesis favors strong kinetic effects, and approximately linear correlations between skeletal {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C are common in carbonates showing mainly the kinetic pattern. Metabolic effects involve additional positive or negative modulation of skeletal {delta}{sup 13}C, reflecting changes in the {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic carbon, caused mainly by photosynthesis and respiration. Kinetic isotope disequilibria tend to be fairly consistent in rapidly growing parts of photosynthetic corals, and time dependent isotopic variations therefore reflect changes in environmental conditions. {delta}{sup 18}O variations from Galapagos corals yields meaningful clues regarding seawater temperature, while {delta}{sup 13}C variations reflect changes in photosynthesis, modulated by cloudiness.

  18. (13)C-Breath testing in animals: theory, applications, and future directions.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D; Welch, Kenneth C

    2016-04-01

    The carbon isotope values in the exhaled breath of an animal mirror the carbon isotope values of the metabolic fuels being oxidized. The measurement of stable carbon isotopes in carbon dioxide is called (13)C-breath testing and offers a minimally invasive method to study substrate oxidation in vivo. (13)C-breath testing has been broadly used to study human exercise, nutrition, and pathologies since the 1970s. Owing to reduced use of radioactive isotopes and the increased convenience and affordability of (13)C-analyzers, the past decade has witnessed a sharp increase in the use of breath testing throughout comparative physiology--especially to answer questions about how and when animals oxidize particular nutrients. Here, we review the practical aspects of (13)C-breath testing and identify the strengths and weaknesses of different methodological approaches including the use of natural abundance versus artificially-enriched (13)C tracers. We critically compare the information that can be obtained using different experimental protocols such as diet-switching versus fuel-switching. We also discuss several factors that should be considered when designing breath testing experiments including extrinsic versus intrinsic (13)C-labelling and different approaches to model nutrient oxidation. We use case studies to highlight the myriad applications of (13)C-breath testing in basic and clinical human studies as well as comparative studies of fuel use, energetics, and carbon turnover in multiple vertebrate and invertebrate groups. Lastly, we call for increased and rigorous use of (13)C-breath testing to explore a variety of new research areas and potentially answer long standing questions related to thermobiology, locomotion, and nutrition. PMID:26660654

  19. Multi-year estimates of plant and ecosystem 13C discrimination at AmeriFlux sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, X.; Lai, C.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Bush, S.; Randerson, J. T.; Law, B. E.; Schauer, A. J.; Ehleringer, J.

    2011-12-01

    We estimated plant and ecosystem 13C discrimination continuously at 8 AmeriFlux sites (Howland Forest, Harvard Forest, Wind River Forest, Rannells Prairie, Freeman Ranch, Chestnut Ridge, Metolius, and Marys River fir) over 8 years (2002-2009). We used an observation-based approach from weekly measurements of eddy covariance CO2 fluxes and their 13C/12C ratios to estimate photosynthetic 13C discrimination (△A) and respiration (δ13CR) on seasonal and interannual time scales. The coordinated, systematic flask sampling across the AmeriFlux subnetwork were used for cross-site synthesis of monthly flux estimates [Dang et al. Combining tower mixing ratio and community model data to estimate regional-scale net ecosystem carbon exchange by boundary layer inversion over 4 flux towers in the U.S.A., Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, in press]. Here, we evaluated environmental factors that also influenced temporal variability in △A and δ13CR from daily to interannual time scales, comparing atmospheric 13C/12C measurements, leaf and needle organic matter, and tree ring cellulose. Across these major biomes that dominate the continent, we show differential ecophysiological responses to environmental stresses, among which water availability appeared to be a dominant factor. Our decadal measurement period provided robust estimates of atmospheric 13C discrimination by terrestrial ecosystems, but also suggest regions where enhanced monitoring efforts are required (e.g., 13C/12C emission from fire and urban metabolism; increased temporal resolution of 13C measurements in stress-sensitive ecosystems) to make atmospheric 13C/12C measurements an effective constraint for continental-scale assessments of the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  20. (13)C-Breath testing in animals: theory, applications, and future directions.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D; Welch, Kenneth C

    2016-04-01

    The carbon isotope values in the exhaled breath of an animal mirror the carbon isotope values of the metabolic fuels being oxidized. The measurement of stable carbon isotopes in carbon dioxide is called (13)C-breath testing and offers a minimally invasive method to study substrate oxidation in vivo. (13)C-breath testing has been broadly used to study human exercise, nutrition, and pathologies since the 1970s. Owing to reduced use of radioactive isotopes and the increased convenience and affordability of (13)C-analyzers, the past decade has witnessed a sharp increase in the use of breath testing throughout comparative physiology--especially to answer questions about how and when animals oxidize particular nutrients. Here, we review the practical aspects of (13)C-breath testing and identify the strengths and weaknesses of different methodological approaches including the use of natural abundance versus artificially-enriched (13)C tracers. We critically compare the information that can be obtained using different experimental protocols such as diet-switching versus fuel-switching. We also discuss several factors that should be considered when designing breath testing experiments including extrinsic versus intrinsic (13)C-labelling and different approaches to model nutrient oxidation. We use case studies to highlight the myriad applications of (13)C-breath testing in basic and clinical human studies as well as comparative studies of fuel use, energetics, and carbon turnover in multiple vertebrate and invertebrate groups. Lastly, we call for increased and rigorous use of (13)C-breath testing to explore a variety of new research areas and potentially answer long standing questions related to thermobiology, locomotion, and nutrition.

  1. Evaluation of a [13C]-Dextromethorphan Breath Test to Assess CYP2D6 Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, J. Steven; Pearce, Robin E.; Gaedigk, Andrea; Modak, Anil; Rosen, David I.

    2016-01-01

    A [13C]-dextromethorphan ([13C]-DM) breath test was evaluated to assess its feasibility as a rapid, phenotyping assay for CYP2D6 activity. [13C]-DM (0.5 mg/kg) was administered orally with water or potassium bicarbonate-sodium bicarbonate to 30 adult Caucasian volunteers (n = 1 each): CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (2 null alleles; PM-0) and extensive metabolizers with 1 (EM-1) or 2 functional alleles (EM-2). CYP2D6 phenotype was determined by 13CO2 enrichment measured by infrared spectrometry (delta-over-baseline [DOB] value) in expired breath samples collected before and up to 240 minutes after [13C]-DM ingestion and by 4-hour urinary metabolite ratio. The PM-0 group was readily distinguishable from either EM group by both the breath test and urinary metabolite ratio. Using a single point determination of phenotype at 40 minutes and defining PMs as subjects with a DOB ≤ 0.5, the sensitivity of the method was 100%; specificity was 95% with 95% accuracy and resulted in the misclassification of 1 EM-1 individual as a PM. Modification of the initial protocol (timing of potassium bicarbonate-sodium bicarbonate administration relative to dose) yielded comparable results, but there was a tendency toward increased DOB values. Although further development is required, these studies suggest that the [13C]-DM breath test offers promise as a rapid, minimally invasive phenotyping assay for CYP2D6 activity. PMID:18728242

  2. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c]M [2h2m 13c], And [2h3,, 13c] Methyl Aryl Sulfones And Sulfoxides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2004-07-20

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfones and [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfoxides, wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfone or sulfoxide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing methyl aryl sulfones and methyl aryl sulfoxides.

  3. 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements with hyperpolarized [1‐13C] pyruvate can be used to detect the expression of transgenic pyruvate decarboxylase activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dzien, Piotr; Tee, Sui‐Seng; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Lyons, Scott K.; Larkin, Timothy J.; Timm, Kerstin N.; Hu, De‐En; Wright, Alan; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Serrao, Eva M.; Marco‐Rius, Irene; Mannion, Elizabeth; D'Santos, Paula; Kennedy, Brett W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization can increase the sensitivity of the 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiment by at least four orders of magnitude and offers a novel approach to the development of MRI gene reporters based on enzymes that metabolize 13C‐labeled tracers. We describe here a gene reporter based on the enzyme pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1), which catalyzes the decarboxylation of pyruvate to produce acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. Methods Pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis (zmPDC) and a mutant that lacked enzyme activity were expressed using an inducible promoter in human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells. Enzyme activity was measured in the cells and in xenografts derived from the cells using 13C MRS measurements of the conversion of hyperpolarized [1‐13C] pyruvate to H13 CO3–. Results Induction of zmPDC expression in the cells and in the xenografts derived from them resulted in an approximately two‐fold increase in the H13 CO3–/[1‐13C] pyruvate signal ratio following intravenous injection of hyperpolarized [1‐13C] pyruvate. Conclusion We have demonstrated the feasibility of using zmPDC as an in vivo reporter gene for use with hyperpolarized 13C MRS. Magn Reson Med 76:391–401, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26388418

  4. SU-E-QI-11: Measurement of Renal Pyruvate-To-Lactate Exchange with Hyperpolarized 13C MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, E; Johnson, K; Fain, S; Gordon, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Previous work [1] modeling the metabolic flux between hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate and [1-13C]lactate in magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) experiments failed to account for vascular signal artifacts. Here, we investigate a method to minimize the vascular signal and its impact on the fidelity of metabolic modeling. Methods: MRSI was simulated for renal metabolism in MATLAB both with and without bipolar gradients. The resulting data were fit to a two-site exchange model [1], and the effects of vascular partial volume artifacts on kinetic modeling were assessed. Bipolar gradients were then incorporated into a gradient echo sequence to validate the simulations experimentally. The degree of diffusion weighting (b = 32 s/mm{sup 2}) was determined empirically from 1H imaging of murine renal vascular signal. The method was then tested in vivo using MRSI with bipolar gradients following injection of hyperpolarized [1-{sup 13}C]pyruvate (∼80 mM at 20% polarization). Results: In simulations, vascular signal contaminated the renal metabolic signal at resolutions as high as 2 × 2 mm{sup 2} due to partial volume effects. The apparent exchange rate from pyruvate to lactate (k{sub p}) was underestimated in the presence of these artifacts due to contaminating pyruvate signal. Incorporation of bipolar gradients suppressed vascular signal and improved the accuracy of kp estimation. Experimentally, the in vivo results supported the ability of bipolar gradients to suppress vascular signal. The in vivo exchange rate increased, as predicted in simulations, from k{sub p} = 0.012 s-{sup 1} to k{sub p} = 0.020-{sup 1} after vascular signal suppression. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the limited accuracy of the two-site exchange model in the presence of vascular partial volume artifacts. The addition of bipolar gradients suppressed vascular signal and improved model accuracy in simulations. Bipolar gradients largely affected kp estimation in vivo. Currently

  5. Directly detected 55Mn MRI: Application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized 13C MRI development

    PubMed Central

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D.; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 (55Mn) MRI using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized 13C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the 55Mn and 13C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective “13C” MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, 55Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical 13C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large 13C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d= 8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7M) was scanned rapidly by 55Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for 13C, using a balanced SSFP acquisition. The requisite penetration of RF magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for 55Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image SNR of ~60 at 0.5cm3 spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP 13C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  6. Direct measurement of brain glucose concentrations in humans by sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gruetter, R.; Novotny, E.J.; Boulware, S.D.; Rothman, D.L.; Mason, G.F.; Shulman, G.I.; Shulan, R.G.; Tamborlane, W.V. )

    1992-02-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in the normal human brain. It is generally assumed that glucose transport into the brain is not rate-limiting for metabolism. Since brain glucose concentrations cannot be determined directly by radiotracer techniques, the authors used {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy after infusing enriched D-(1-{sup 13}C)glucose to measure brain glucose concentrations at euglycemia and at hyperglycemia in six healthy children. Brain glucose concentrations averaged 1.0 {plus minus} 0.1 {mu}mol/ml at euglycemia and 1.8-2.7 {mu}mol/ml at hyperglycemia. Michaelis-Menten parameters of transport were calculated from the relationship between plasma and brain glucose concentrations. The brain glucose concentrations and transport constants are consistent with transport not being rate-limiting for resting brain metabolism at plasma levels >3 mM.

  7. Metabolic imaging of patients with cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M. )

    1991-09-01

    The cardiomyopathies comprise a diverse group of illnesses that can be characterized functionally by several techniques. However, the delineation of derangements of regional perfusion and metabolism have been accomplished only relatively recently with positron emission tomography (PET). Regional myocardial accumulation and clearance of 11C-palmitate, the primary myocardial substrate under most conditions, demonstrate marked spatial heterogeneity when studied under fasting conditions or with glucose loading. PET with 11C-palmitate permits the noninvasive differentiation of patients with nonischemic from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, since patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy demonstrate large zones of intensely depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate, probably reflecting prior infarction. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy demonstrate relatively unique patterns of myocardial abnormalities of perfusion and metabolism. The availability of new tracers and techniques for the evaluation of myocardial metabolism (11C-acetate), perfusion (H2(15)O), and autonomic tone (11-C-hydroxyephedrine) should facilitate further understanding of the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathies.

  8. Conditions for (13)C NMR detection of 2-hydroxyglutarate in tissue extracts from isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutated gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pichumani, Kumar; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Ratnakar, James; Mickey, Bruce; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Maher, Elizabeth A; Bachoo, Robert M; Malloy, Craig R; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2015-07-15

    (13)C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy of extracts from patient tumor samples provides rich information about metabolism. However, in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutant gliomas, (13)C labeling is obscured in oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutaric acid (2 HG) by glutamate and glutamine, prompting development of a simple method to resolve the metabolites. J-coupled multiplets in 2 HG were similar to glutamate and glutamine and could be clearly resolved at pH 6. A cryogenically cooled (13)C probe, but not J-resolved heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectroscopy, significantly improved detection of 2 HG. These methods enable the monitoring of (13)C-(13)C spin-spin couplings in 2 HG expressing IDH-mutant gliomas.

  9. Imaging of Tumor Metabolism Using Positron Emission Tomography (PET).

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Wedel, Florian; Brenner, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging employing PET/CT enables in vivo visualization, characterization, and measurement of biologic processes in tumors at a molecular and cellular level. Using specific metabolic tracers, information about the integrated function of multiple transporters and enzymes involved in tumor metabolic pathways can be depicted, and the tracers can be directly applied as biomarkers of tumor biology. In this review, we discuss the role of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as an in vivo glycolytic marker which reflects alterations of glucose metabolism in cancer cells. This functional molecular imaging technique offers a complementary approach to anatomic imaging such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and has found widespread application as a diagnostic modality in oncology to monitor tumor biology, optimize the therapeutic management, and guide patient care. Moreover, emerging methods for PET imaging of further biologic processes relevant to cancer are reviewed, with a focus on tumor hypoxia and aberrant tumor perfusion. Hypoxic tumors are associated with poor disease control and increased resistance to cytotoxic and radiation treatment. In vivo imaging of hypoxia, perfusion, and mismatch of metabolism and perfusion has the potential to identify specific features of tumor microenvironment associated with poor treatment outcome and, thus, contribute to personalized treatment approaches. PMID:27557539

  10. Application of Metabolic PET imaging in radiation oncology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Aizhi; Marcus, David M.; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides functional or metabolic assessment of normal tissue or disease conditions and is playing an increasing role in cancer radiotherapy planning. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging (FDG-PET) is widely used in the clinic for tumor imaging due to increased glucose metabolism in most type of tumors; its role in radiotherapy management of various cancers is reviewed. In addition, other metabolic PET imaging agents at various stages of preclinical and clinical development are reviewed. These agents include radiolabeled amino acids such as methionine for detecting increased protein synthesis, radiolabeled choline for detecting increased membrane lipid synthesis, and radiolabeled acetate for detecting increased cytoplasmic lipid synthesis. The amino acid analogs choline and acetate are often more specific to tumor cells than FDG, so they may play an important role in differentiating cancers from benign conditions and in the diagnosis of cancers with either low FDG uptake or high background FDG uptake. PET imaging with FDG and other metabolic PET imaging agents is playing an increasing role in complementary radiotherapy planning. PMID:22339451

  11. Neuroprotective effects of caffeine in MPTP model of Parkinson's disease: A (13)C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Bagga, Puneet; Chugani, Anup N; Patel, Anant B

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons with an accompanying neuroinflammation leading to loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia. Caffeine, a well-known A2A receptor antagonist is reported to slow down the neuroinflammation caused by activated microglia and reduce the extracellular glutamate in the brain. In this study, we have evaluated the neuroprotective effect of caffeine in the MPTP model of PD by monitoring the region specific cerebral energy metabolism. Adult C57BL6 mice were treated with caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min prior to MPTP (25 mg/kg, i.p.) administration for 8 days. The paw grip strength of mice was assessed in order to evaluate the motor function after various treatments. For metabolic studies, mice were infused with [1,6-(13)C2]glucose, and (13)C labeling of amino acids was monitored using ex vivo(1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy. The paw grip strength was found to be reduced following the MPTP treatment. The caffeine pretreatment showed significant protection against the reduction of paw grip strength in MPTP treated mice. The levels of GABA and myo-inositol were found to be elevated in the striatum of MPTP treated mice. The (13)C labeling of GluC4, GABAC2 and GlnC4 from [1,6-(13)C2]glucose was decreased in the cerebral cortex, striatum, olfactory bulb, thalamus and cerebellum suggesting impaired glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal activity and neurotransmission of the MPTP treated mice. Most interestingly, the pretreatment of caffeine maintained the (13)C labeling of amino acids to the control values in cortical, olfactory bulb and cerebellum regions while it partially retained in striatal and thalamic regions in MPTP treated mice. The pretreatment of caffeine provides a partial neuro-protection against severe striatal degeneration in the MPTP model of PD.

  12. Imaging tumor metabolism using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Park, Ilwoo; Nelson, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a powerful tool for noninvasively investigating normal and abnormal metabolism. When used in combination with imaging strategies, multinuclear MRS methods provide detailed biochemical information that can be directly correlated with anatomical features. Hyperpolarized C MRS is a new technology that reflects real-time metabolic conversion and is likely to be extremely valuable in managing patients with cancer. This article reviews the use of in vivo P, H, and C MRS for assessing cancer metabolism in order to provide information for diagnosis, planning treatment, assessing response to therapy, and predicting survival for patients with cancer.

  13. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  14. Natural-abundance sup 13 C NMR study of glycogen repletion in human liver and muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Jue, T.; Rothman, D.L.; Tavitian, B.A.; Shulman, R.G. )

    1989-03-01

    Optimizing the surface-coil design and spectral-acquisition parameters has led to the observation of the {sup 13}C NMR natural abundance glycogen signal in man at 2.1 T. Both the human muscle and hepatic glycogen signals can be detected definitively with a time resolution of {approx}13 min. A {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C concentric surface coil was used. The {sup 1}H outer coil was 11 cm in diameter; the {sup 13}C inner coil was 8 cm in diameter. The coils were tuned to 89.3 MHz and 22.4 MHz, respectively. The {sup 1}H coil was used for optimizing field homogeneity (shimming) the magnet and for single-frequency decoupling of the C{sub 1} glycogen signal. Total power deposition from both the transmitter pulse and the continuous wave decoupling did not exceed the Food and Drug Administration guideline of 8 W/kg of tissue. Experiments were done for which healthy subjects returned to the magnets at different times for {sup 13}C NMR measurement. The spectral difference between experiments was within the noise in the C{sub 1} glycogen region. Because of the spectral reproducibility and the signal sensitivity, hepatic glycogen repletion can be followed. Four hours postprandial, hepatic glycogen increases by 3.8 times from the basal fasted state. The hepatic glycogen data correspond directly to previous biopsy results and support the use of {sup 13}C NMR as a noninvasive probe of human metabolism.

  15. Production and NMR signal optimization of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Amino acids are targeted nutrients for consumption by cancers to sustain their rapid growth and proliferation. 13C-enriched amino acids are important metabolic tracers for cancer diagnostics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Despite this diagnostic potential, 13C NMR of amino acids however is hampered by the inherently low NMR sensitivity of the 13C nuclei. In this work, we have employed a physics technique known as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance the NMR signals of 13C-enriched amino acids. DNP works by transferring the high polarization of electrons to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Using a fast dissolution method in which the frozen polarized samples are dissolved rapidly with superheated water, injectable solutions of 13C-amino acids with highly enhanced NMR signals (by at least 5,000-fold) were produced at room temperature. Factors that affect the NMR signal enhancement levels such as the choice of free radical polarizing agents and sample preparation will be discussed along with the thermal mixing physics model of DNP. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  16. Direct Monitoring of γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase Activity In Vivo Using a Hyperpolarized (13) C-Labeled Molecular Probe.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Tatsuya; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Nonaka, Hiroshi; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Can, Emine; Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Takado, Yuhei; Comment, Arnaud; Sando, Shinsuke

    2016-08-26

    The γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) enzyme plays a central role in glutathione homeostasis. Direct detection of GGT activity could provide critical information for the diagnosis of several pathologies. We propose a new molecular probe, γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly, for monitoring GGT activity in vivo by hyperpolarized (HP) (13) C magnetic resonance (MR). The properties of γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly are suitable for in vivo HP (13) C metabolic analysis since the chemical shift between γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly and its metabolic product, [1-(13) C]Gly, is large (4.3 ppm) and the T1 of both compounds is relatively long (30 s and 45 s, respectively, in H2 O at 9.4 T). We also demonstrate that γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly is highly sensitive to in vivo modulation of GGT activity induced by the inhibitor acivicin. PMID:27483206

  17. Specific 13C functional pathways as diagnostic targets in gastroenterology breath-tests: tricks for a correct interpretation.

    PubMed

    Pizzoferrato, M; Del Zompo, F; Mangiola, F; Lopetuso, L R; Petito, V; Cammarota, G; Gasbarrini, A; Scaldaferri, F

    2013-01-01

    Breath tests are non-invasive, non-radioactive, safe, simple and effective tests able to determine significant metabolic alterations due to specific diseases or lack of specific enzymes. Carbon isotope (13)C, the stable-non radioactive isotope of carbon, is the most used substrate in breath testing, in which (13)C/(12)C ratio is measured and expressed as a delta value, a differences between readings and a fixed standard. (13)C/(12)C ratio is measured with isotope ratio mass spectrometry or non-dispersive isotope-selective infrared spectrometer and generally there is a good agreement between these techniques in the isotope ratio estimation. (13)C/(12)C ratio can be expressed as static measurement (like delta over baseline in urea breath test) or as dynamic measurement as percent dose recovery, but more dosages are necessary. (13)C Breath-tests are involved in many fields of interest within gastroenterology, such as detection of Helicobacter pylori infection, study of gastric emptying, assessment of liver and exocrine pancreatic functions, determination of oro-caecal transit time, evaluation of absorption and to a lesser extend detection of bacterial overgrowth. The use of every single test in a clinical setting is vary depending on accuracy and substrate costs. This review is meant to present (13)C the meaning of (13)C/(12)C ratio and static and dynamic measure and, finally, the instruments dedicated to its use in gastroenterology. A brief presentation of (13)C breath tests in gastroenterology is also provided. PMID:24443068

  18. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra.

  19. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra. PMID:24771296

  20. On the use of phloem sap δ13C to estimate canopy carbon discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascher, Katherine; Máguas, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2010-05-01

    Although the carbon stable isotope composition (d13C) of bulk leaf material is a good integrative parameter of photosynthetic discrimination and can be used as a reliable ecological index of plant functioning; it is not a good tracer of short-term changes in photosynthetic discrimination. In contrast, d13C of phloem sap is potentially useful as an indicator of short-term changes in canopy photosynthetic discrimination. However, recent research indicates that d13C signatures may be substantially altered by metabolic processes downstream of initial leaf-level carbon fixation (e.g. post-photosynthetic fractionation). Accordingly, before phloem sap d13C can be used as a proxy for canopy level carbon discrimination an understanding of factors influencing the degree and magnitude of post-photosynthetic fractionation and how these vary between species is of paramount importance. In this study, we measured the d13C signature along the basipetal transport pathway in two co-occurring tree species in the field - an understory invasive exotic legume, Acacia longifolia, and a native pine, Pinus pinaster. We measured d13C of bulk leaf and leaf water soluble organic matter (WSOM), phloem sap sampled at two points along the plant axis and leaf and root dark respiration. In general, species differences in photosynthetic discrimination resulted in more enriched d13C values in the water-conserving P. pinaster relative to the water-spending A. longifolia. Post-photosynthetic fractionation led to differences in d13C of carbon pools along the plant axis with progressively more depleted d13C from the canopy to the trunk (~6.5 per mil depletion in A. longifolia and ~0.8per mil depletion in P. pinaster). Leaf and root respiration, d13C, were consistently enriched relative to putative substrates. We hypothesize that the pronounced enrichment of leaf respired CO2 relative to leaf WSOM may have left behind relatively depleted carbon to be loaded into the phloem resulting in d13C depletion

  1. High Resolution 13C MRI With Hyperpolarized Urea: In Vivo T2 Mapping and 15N Labeling Effects

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Galen D.; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Koelsch, Bertram L.; Van Criekinge, Mark; Smith, Kenneth J.; Shang, Hong; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    13C steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging and effective spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping were performed using hyperpolarized [13C] urea and [13C, 15N2] urea injected intravenously in rats. 15N labeling gave large T2 increases both in solution and in vivo due to the elimination of a strong scalar relaxation pathway. The T2 increase was pronounced in the kidney, with [13C, 15N2] urea giving T2 values of 6.3±1.3 s in the cortex and medulla, and 11±2 s in the renal pelvis. The measured T2 in the aorta was 1.3±0.3 s. [13C] urea showed shortened T2 values in the kidney of 0.23±0.03 s compared to 0.28±0.03 s measured in the aorta. The enhanced T2 of [13C, 15N2] urea was utilized to generate large signal enhancement by SSFP acquisitions with flip angles approaching the fully refocused regime. Projection images at 0.94 mm in-plane resolution were acquired with both urea isotopes, with [13C, 15N2] urea giving a greater than four-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio [13C] over urea. PMID:24235273

  2. Gamma images in benign and metabolic bone diseases: volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Volume 1 of ''Gamma images in benign and metabolic bone diseases'' comprises chapters devoted to: general remarks and considerations, radiopharmaceuticals, Paget disease, osteomyelitis, trauma, benign bone tumors, chronic renal dialysis, acute renal failure, osteomalacia and rickets, and osteoporosis. Although published in 1981, the most recent references in the book were 1978 and most are 1977 or earlier. One of the strongest aspects of the volume are tables which categorize diseases, pathophysiology of disease, and image abnormalities. (JMT)

  3. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC. PMID:26755872

  4. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC. PMID:26755872

  5. Molecular Imaging of Metabolic Reprograming in Mutant IDH Cells

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Pavithra; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70–90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an “oncometabolite,” inhibits key α-KG-dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprograming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprograming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review, we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprograming of mutant IDH cells, and how this reprograming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells, and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo. PMID:27014635

  6. Application of 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance To Elucidate the Unexpected Biosynthesis of Erythritol by Leuconostoc oenos

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-Da-Cunha, Maria; Firme, Paula; Romão, M. Vitória San; Santos, Helena

    1992-01-01

    Natural-abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) revealed the production of erythritol and glycerol by nongrowing cells of Leuconostoc oenos metabolizing glucose. The ratio of erythritol to glycerol was strongly influenced by the aeration conditions of the medium. The elucidation of the metabolic pathway responsible for erythritol production was achieved by 13C-NMR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy using specifically 13C-labelled d-glucose. The 1H-NMR spectrum of the cell supernatant resulting from the metabolism of [2-13C]glucose showed that only 75% of the glucose supplied was metabolized heterofermentatively and that the remaining 25% was channelled to the production of erythritol. The synthesis of this polyol resulted from the reduction of the C-4 moiety of the intermediate fructose 6-phosphate. Oxygen has an inhibitory effect on the production of erythritol by L. oenos. Preaeration of a suspension of nongrowing cells of L. oenos resulted in 30% less erythritol and in 70% more glycerol formed during the anaerobic metabolism of glucose. The anaerobic production of erythritol from glucose was also found in growing cultures of L. oenos, although to a smaller extent. PMID:16348738

  7. Study of Urban environmental quality through Isotopes δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Sosa, E.; Mastachi-Loza, C.; Becerril-Piña, R.; Ramos-Salinas, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    Usually, trees with similar pH values on their bark develop epiphytes of similar species, the acidity to be a factor for growth. The aim of the study was evaluate the air quality through isotope δ13C in order to define the levels of environmental quality in the city of Queretaro, Mexico. In this work were collected at least 4 epiphytes positioned in trees of the species Prosopis Laevigata at 25 sites of Queretaro City. The samples were analyzed for trace elements with an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP). The collecting took place during dry period, in May and early rain June 2011 period, and on four sectors to identify the spatial distribution of pollution, using isotopic analysis of concentration of δ 13C. According with the results there are significant differences among the species in each of the sampled areas. The 5 February Avenue presented greater diversity and richness of δ13C, followed by those who were surveyed in the proximity of the UAQ and finally in the middle-east area. An average value of δ13C-17.92%, followed by those surveyed in the vicinity of the UAQ that correspond to sector I and II with an concentration of δ13C-17.55% and δ13C-17.22%, and finally the samples collected in trees scattered in the East-Sector II and IV with a value of δ13C-17.02% and δ13C-15.62%, respectively. Also were observed differences between the dry and wet period. It is likely that these results of δ 13C in moist period reflect the drag of the isotopes due to rain events that could mark a trend in the dilution of this element, however there is a trend in terms of abundance and composition of finding more impact in those species sampled in dry period, in May and early June 2011.

  8. Metabolic PET Imaging in Cancer Detection and Therapy Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Aizhi; Lee, Daniel; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides a functional or metabolic assessment of normal tissue or disease conditions. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging (FDG-PET) is widely used clinically for tumor imaging due to increased glucose metabolism in most types of tumors, and has been shown to improve the diagnosis and subsequent treatment of cancers. In this chapter, we review its use in cancer diagnosis, staging, restaging, and assessment of response to treatment. In addition, other metabolic PET imaging agents in research or clinical trial stages are discussed, including amino acid analogs based on increased protein synthesis, and choline, which is based on increased membrane lipid synthesis. Amino acid analogs and choline are more specific to tumor cells than FDG, so they play an important role in differentiating cancers from benign conditions and in the diagnosis of cancers with low FDG uptake or high background FDG uptake. For decades, researchers have shown that tumors have altered metabolic profiles and display elevated uptake of glucose, amino acids, and lipids, which can be used for cancer diagnosis and monitoring of the therapeutic response with excellent signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:21362516

  9. Metabolic Imaging Biomarkers of Postradiotherapy Xerostomia

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Blake; Schwartz, David L.; Dong Lei

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Xerostomia is a major complication of head and neck radiotherapy (RT). Available xerostomia measures remain flawed. [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET-CT) is routinely used for staging and response assessment of head and neck cancer. We investigated quantitative measurement of parotid gland FDG uptake as a potential biomarker for post-RT xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight locally advanced head and neck cancer patients receiving definitive RT underwent baseline and post-RT FDG-PET-CT on a prospective imaging trial. A separate validation cohort of 14 patients underwent identical imaging while prospectively enrolled in a second trial collecting sialometry and patient-reported outcomes. Radiation dose and pre- and post-RT standard uptake values (SUVs) for all voxels contained within parotid gland ROI were deformably registered. Results: Average whole-gland or voxel-by-voxel models incorporating parotid D{sub Met} (defined as the pretreatment parotid SUV weighted by dose) accurately predicted posttreatment changes in parotid FDG uptake (e.g., fractional parotid SUV). Fractional loss of parotid FDG uptake closely paralleled early parotid toxicity defined by posttreatment salivary output (p < 0.01) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia scores (p < 0.01). Conclusions: In this pilot series, loss of parotid FDG uptake was strongly associated with acute clinical post-RT parotid toxicity. D{sub Met} may potentially be used to guide function-sparing treatment planning. Prospective validation of FDG-PET-CT as a convenient, quantifiable imaging biomarker of parotid function is warranted and ongoing.

  10. Geochemical Approach to Archaeal Ecology: δ13C of GDGTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtin, S.; Warren, C.; Pearson, A.; Pagani, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade and a half, glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) have increasingly been used to reconstruct environmental temperatures; proxies like TEX86 that correlate the relative abundance of these archaeal cell membrane lipids to sea surface temperature are omnipresent in paleoclimatology literature. While it has become common to make claims about past temperatures using GDGTs, our present understanding of the organisms that synthesize the compounds is still quite limited. The generally accepted theory states that microorganisms like the Thaumarchaeota modify the structure of membrane lipids to increase intermolecular interactions, strengthening the membrane at higher temperatures. Yet to date, culture experiments have been largely restricted to a single species, Nitrosopumilus maritimes, and recent studies on oceanic archaeal rRNA have revealed that these biomarkers are produced in diverse, heterogeneous, and site-specific communities. This brings up questions as to whether different subclasses of GDGTs, and all subsequent proxies, represent adaptation within a single organismal group or a shift in community composition. To investigate whether GDGTs with different chain structures, from the simple isoprenoidal GDGT-0 to Crenarchaeol with its many cyclopentane groups, are sourced from archaea with similar or disparate metabolic pathways—and if that information is inherited in GDGTs trapped in marine sediments—this study examines the stable carbon isotope values (δ13C) of GDGTs extracted from the uppermost meters of sediment in the Orca Basin, Gulf of Mexico, using spooling-wire microcombustion isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (SWiM-IRMS), tackling a fundamental assumption of the TEX86 proxy that influences the way we perceive the veracity of existing temperature records.

  11. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  12. Extraordinary 13C enrichment of diether lipids at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field indicates a carbon-limited ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Alexander S.; Hayes, John M.; Summons, Roger E.

    2009-01-01

    Active and inactive carbonate chimneys from the Lost City Hydrothermal Field contain up to 0.6% organic carbon with diverse lipid assemblages. The δ 13C values of total organic carbon range from -21.5‰ vs. VPDB at an extinct carbonate chimney to -2.8‰ at a 70 °C, actively venting carbonate chimney. Samples collected at locations with total organic carbon with δ 13C > -15‰ also contained high abundances of isoprenoidal and nonisoprenoidal diether lipids. Samples with TOC more depleted in 13C lacked or contained lower amounts of these diethers. Isoprenoidal diethers, including sn-2 hydroxyarchaeol, sn-3 hydroxyarchaeol, and putative dihydroxyarchaeol, are likely to derive from methanogenic archaea. These compounds have δ 13C values ranging from -2.9 to +6.7‰ vs. VPDB. Nonisoprenoidal diethers and monoethers are presumably derived from bacteria, and have structures similar to those produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria in culture and at cold seeps. In samples that also contained abundant hydroxyarchaeols, these diethers have δ 13C values between -11.8 and +3.6‰. In samples without abundant hydroxyarchaeols, the nonisoprenoidal diethers were typically more depleted in 13C, with δ 13C as low as -28.7‰ in chimneys and -45‰ in fissures. The diethers at Lost City are probably derived from hydrogen-consuming methanogens and bacteria. High hydrogen concentrations favor methanogenesis over methanotrophy and allow the concurrent growth of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. The unusual enrichment of 13C in lipids can be attributed to nearly complete consumption of bioavailable carbon in vent fluids. Under carbon-limited conditions, the isotope effects that usually lead to 13C-depletion in organic material cannot be expressed. Consequently, metabolic products such as lipids and methane have δ 13C values typical of abiotic carbon.

  13. Structure of B sub 13 C sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bylander, D.M.; Kleinman, L. )

    1991-01-15

    By comparing calculated lattice constants with x-ray data as well as by comparison of calculated free energies, we find that the correct structure of B{sub 13}C{sub 2} is B{sub 12}(CBC) rather than B{sub 11}C(BBC), as had been suggested. We also show that B{sub 12}C{sub 3} is stable against 13B{sub 12}C{sub 3}{r arrow}12B{sub 13}C{sub 2}+15C as is B{sub 13}C{sub 2} against 3B{sub 13}C{sub 2}{r arrow}2B{sub 12}C{sub 3}+15B.

  14. Anomalous 13C enrichment in modern marine organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Claypool, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Marine organic carbon is heavier isotopically (13C enriched) than most land-plant or terrestrial organic C1. Accordingly, ??13C values of organic C in modern marine sediments are routinely interpreted in terms of the relative proportions of marine and terrestrial sources of the preserved organic matter2,3. When independent geochemical techniques are used to evaluate the source of organic matter in Cretaceous or older rocks, those rocks containing mostly marine organic C are found typically to have lighter (more-negative) ??13C values than rocks containing mostly terrestrial organic C. Here we conclude that marine photosynthesis in mid-Cretaceous and earlier oceans generally resulted in a greater fractionation of C isotopes and produced organic C having lighter ??13C values. Modern marine photosynthesis may be occurring under unusual geological conditions (higher oceanic primary production rates, lower PCO2) that limit dissolved CO2 availability and minimize carbon isotope fractionation4. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. Dihydroflavanonols from Cedrus deodara, A (13)C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, P K; Agarwal, S K; Rastogi, R P; Osterdahal, B G

    1981-09-01

    High resolution (13)C NMR study of taxifolin, cedeodarin, cedrin and their methyl ethers allowed unambiguous placement of the Me in 5,7-dihydroxyflavanonol nucleus, besides providing other valuable information on the substitution pattern in the molecule.

  16. Pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis: insights from molecular and metabolic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, Olga; Barkhof, Frederik; Bodini, Benedetta; De Stefano, Nicola; Golay, Xavier; Nicolay, Klaas; Pelletier, Daniel; Pouwels, Petra J W; Smith, Seth A; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Stankoff, Bruno; Yousry, Tarek; Miller, David H

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis induce the changes that underpin relapse-associated and progressive disability. Disease mechanisms can be investigated in preclinical models and patients with multiple sclerosis by molecular and metabolic imaging techniques. Many insights have been gained from such imaging studies: persisting inflammation in the absence of a damaged blood-brain barrier, activated microglia within and beyond lesions, increased mitochondrial activity after acute lesions, raised sodium concentrations in the brain, increased glutamate in acute lesions and normal-appearing white matter, different degrees of demyelination in different patients and lesions, early neuronal damage in grey matter, and early astrocytic proliferation and activation in lesions and white matter. Clinical translation of molecular and metabolic imaging and extension of these techniques will enable the assessment of novel drugs targeted at these disease mechanisms, and have the potential to improve health outcomes through the stratification of patients for treatments.

  17. Pulsed polarization transfer for 13C NMR in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Ad; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Maciel, Gary E.

    A new pulsed polarization transfer experiment method is described for the polarization of 13C spins in a solid by magnetization transfer from protons. The method is directly analogous to the INEPT sequence for liquids introduced by Freeman and Morris. As polarization is transferred in PPT between individual 1H 13C pairs, rather than between spin reservoirs, different opportunities exist for structurally selective experiments. Results on p-diethoxybenzene and coronene are presented.

  18. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the biosynthesis by Microbacterium ammoniaphilum of L-glutamate selectively enriched with carbon-13

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.E.; Han, C.H.; Kollman, V.H.; London, R.E.; Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1982-02-10

    /sup 13/C NMR of isotopically enriched metabolites has been used to study the metabolism of Microbacterium ammoniaphilum, a bacterium which excretes large quantities of L-glutamic acid into the medium. Biosynthesis from 90% (1-/sup 13/C) glucose results in relatively high specificity of the label, with (2,4-/sup 13/C/sub 2/) glutamate as the major product. The predominant biosynthetic pathway for synthesis of glutamate from glucose was determined to be the Embden Meyerhof glycolytic pathway followed by P-enolpyruvate carboxylase and the first third of the Krebs cycle. Different metabolic pathways are associated with different correlations in the enrichment of the carbons, reflected in the spectrum as different /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C scalar multiplet intensities. Hence, intensity and /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C multiplet analysis allows quantitation of the pathways involved. Although blockage of the Krebs cycle at the ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase step is the basis for the accumulation of glutamate, significant Krebs cycle activity was found in glucose grown cells, and extensive Krebs cycle activity in cells metabolizing (1-/sup 13/C) acetate. In addition to the observation of the expected metabolites, the disaccharide ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-trehalose and ..cap alpha..,..beta..-glucosylamine were identified from the /sup 13/C NMR spectra.

  19. Abundance anomaly of the 13C species of CCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, N.; Saruwatari, O.; Sakai, T.; Takano, S.; Yamamoto, S.

    2010-03-01

    Aims: We have observed the N = 1-0 lines of CCH and its 13C isotopic species toward a cold dark cloud, TMC-1 and a star-forming region, L1527, to investigate the 13C abundances and formation pathways of CCH. Methods: The observations have been carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Results: We have successfully detected the lines of 13CCH and C13CH toward the both sources and found a significant intensity difference between the two 13C isotopic species. The [C13CH] /[13CCH] abundance ratios are 1.6 ± 0.4 (3σ) and 1.6 ± 0.1 (3σ) for TMC-1 and L1527, respectively. The abundance difference between C13CH and 13CCH means that the two carbon atoms of CCH are not equivalent in the formation pathway. On the other hand, the [CCH]/[C13CH] and [CCH]/[13CCH] ratios are evaluated to be larger than 170 and 250 toward TMC-1, and to be larger than 80 and 135 toward L1527, respectively. Therefore, both of the 13C species are significantly diluted in comparison with the interstellar 12C/13C ratio of 60. The dilution is discussed in terms of a behavior of 13C in molecular clouds.

  20. Longitudinal optical imaging of tumor metabolism and hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, Melissa C.; Fontanella, Andrew; Lan, Lan; Izatt, Joseph A.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    An important feature of tumor hypoxia is its temporal instability, or ``cycling hypoxia.'' The primary consequence of cycling hypoxia is increased tumor aggressiveness and treatment resistance beyond that of chronic hypoxia. Longitudinal imaging of tumor metabolic demand, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and blood flow would provide valuable insight into the mechanisms and distribution of cycling hypoxia in tumors. Fluorescence imaging of metabolic demand via the optical redox ratio (fluorescence intensity of FAD/NADH), absorption microscopy of hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and Doppler optical coherence tomography of vessel morphology and blood flow are combined to noninvasively monitor changes in oxygen supply and demand in the mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber tumor model (human squamous cell carcinoma) every 6 h for 36 h. Biomarkers for metabolic demand, blood oxygenation, and blood flow are all found to significantly change with time (p<0.05). These variations in oxygen supply and demand are superimposed on a significant (p<0.05) decline in metabolic demand with distance from the nearest vessel in tumors (this gradient was not observed in normal tissues). Significant (p<0.05), but weak (r<=0.5) correlations are found between the hemoglobin oxygen saturation, blood flow, and redox ratio. These results indicate that cycling hypoxia depends on both oxygen supply and demand, and that noninvasive optical imaging could be a valuable tool to study therapeutic strategies to mitigate cycling hypoxia, thus increasing the effectiveness of radiation and chemotherapy.

  1. Computational Platform for Flux Analysis Using 13C-Label Tracing- Phase I SBIR Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dien, Stephen J.

    2005-04-12

    Isotopic label tracing is a powerful experimental technique that can be combined with metabolic models to quantify metabolic fluxes in an organism under a particular set of growth conditions. In this work we constructed a genome-scale metabolic model of Methylobacterium extorquens, a facultative methylotroph with potential application in the production of useful chemicals from methanol. A series of labeling experiments were performed using 13C-methanol, and the resulting distribution of labeled carbon in the proteinogenic amino acids was determined by mass spectrometry. Algorithms were developed to analyze this data in context of the metabolic model, yielding flux distributions for wild-type and several engineered strains of M. extorquens. These fluxes were compared to those predicted by model simulation alone, and also integrated with microarray data to give an improved understanding of the metabolic physiology of this organism.

  2. Noninvasive measurements of glycogen in perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer NMR and comparison to (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Corin O; Cao, Jin; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Damon, Bruce M; Cherrington, Alan D; Gore, John C

    2015-06-01

    Liver glycogen represents an important physiological form of energy storage. It plays a key role in the regulation of blood glucose concentrations, and dysregulations in hepatic glycogen metabolism are linked to many diseases including diabetes and insulin resistance. In this work, we develop, optimize, and validate a noninvasive protocol to measure glycogen levels in isolated perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy. Model glycogen solutions were used to determine optimal saturation pulse parameters which were then applied to intact perfused mouse livers of varying glycogen content. Glycogen measurements from serially acquired CEST Z-spectra of livers were compared with measurements from interleaved natural abundance (13)C NMR spectra. Experimental data revealed that CEST-based glycogen measurements were highly correlated with (13)C NMR glycogen spectra. Monte Carlo simulations were then used to investigate the inherent (i.e., signal-to-noise-based) errors in the quantification of glycogen with each technique. This revealed that CEST was intrinsically more precise than (13)C NMR, although in practice may be prone to other errors induced by variations in experimental conditions. We also observed that the CEST signal from glycogen in liver was significantly less than that observed from identical amounts in solution. Our results demonstrate that CEST provides an accurate, precise, and readily accessible method to noninvasively measure liver glycogen levels and their changes. Furthermore, this technique can be used to map glycogen distributions via conventional proton magnetic resonance imaging, a capability universally available on clinical and preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners vs (13)C detection, which is limited to a small fraction of clinical-scale MRI scanners. PMID:25946616

  3. Noninvasive measurements of glycogen in perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer NMR and comparison to (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Corin O; Cao, Jin; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Damon, Bruce M; Cherrington, Alan D; Gore, John C

    2015-06-01

    Liver glycogen represents an important physiological form of energy storage. It plays a key role in the regulation of blood glucose concentrations, and dysregulations in hepatic glycogen metabolism are linked to many diseases including diabetes and insulin resistance. In this work, we develop, optimize, and validate a noninvasive protocol to measure glycogen levels in isolated perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy. Model glycogen solutions were used to determine optimal saturation pulse parameters which were then applied to intact perfused mouse livers of varying glycogen content. Glycogen measurements from serially acquired CEST Z-spectra of livers were compared with measurements from interleaved natural abundance (13)C NMR spectra. Experimental data revealed that CEST-based glycogen measurements were highly correlated with (13)C NMR glycogen spectra. Monte Carlo simulations were then used to investigate the inherent (i.e., signal-to-noise-based) errors in the quantification of glycogen with each technique. This revealed that CEST was intrinsically more precise than (13)C NMR, although in practice may be prone to other errors induced by variations in experimental conditions. We also observed that the CEST signal from glycogen in liver was significantly less than that observed from identical amounts in solution. Our results demonstrate that CEST provides an accurate, precise, and readily accessible method to noninvasively measure liver glycogen levels and their changes. Furthermore, this technique can be used to map glycogen distributions via conventional proton magnetic resonance imaging, a capability universally available on clinical and preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners vs (13)C detection, which is limited to a small fraction of clinical-scale MRI scanners.

  4. Patient-adaptive lesion metabolism analysis by dynamic PET images.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic PET imaging provides important spatial-temporal information for metabolism analysis of organs and tissues, and generates a great reference for clinical diagnosis and pharmacokinetic analysis. Due to poor statistical properties of the measurement data in low count dynamic PET acquisition and disturbances from surrounding tissues, identifying small lesions inside the human body is still a challenging issue. The uncertainties in estimating the arterial input function will also limit the accuracy and reliability of the metabolism analysis of lesions. Furthermore, the sizes of the patients and the motions during PET acquisition will yield mismatch against general purpose reconstruction system matrix, this will also affect the quantitative accuracy of metabolism analyses of lesions. In this paper, we present a dynamic PET metabolism analysis framework by defining a patient adaptive system matrix to improve the lesion metabolism analysis. Both patient size information and potential small lesions are incorporated by simulations of phantoms of different sizes and individual point source responses. The new framework improves the quantitative accuracy of lesion metabolism analysis, and makes the lesion identification more precisely. The requirement of accurate input functions is also reduced. Experiments are conducted on Monte Carlo simulated data set for quantitative analysis and validation, and on real patient scans for assessment of clinical potential. PMID:23286175

  5. Generating Super Stimulated-Echoes in MRI and their Application to Hyperpolarized C-13 Diffusion Metabolic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kerr, Adam B.; Reed, Galen D.; Hurd, Ralph E.; Kurhanewicz, John; Pauly, John M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2011-01-01

    Stimulated-echoes in MR can be used to provide high sensitivity to motion and flow, creating diffusion and perfusion weighting as well as T1 contrast, but conventional approaches inherently suffer from a 50% signal loss. The super stimulated-echo, which uses a specialized radiofrequency (RF) pulse train, has been proposed in order to improve the signal while preserving motion and T1 sensitivity. This paper presents a novel and straightforward method for designing the super stimulated-echo pulse train using inversion pulse design techniques. This method can also create adiabatic designs with an improved response to RF transmit field variations. The scheme was validated in phantom experiments and shown in vivo to improve SNR. We have applied a super stimulated-echo to metabolic MRI with hyperpolarized 13C-labeled molecules. For spectroscopic imaging of hyperpolarized agents, several repetition times are required but only a single stimulated-echo encoding is feasible, which can lead to unwanted motion blurring. To address this, a super stimulated-echo preparation scheme was used in which the diffusion weighting is terminated prior to the acquisition, and we observed a SNR increases of 60% in phantoms and 49% in vivo over a conventional stimulated-echo. Experiments following injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate in murine transgenic cancer models have shown improved delineation for tumors since signals from metabolites within tumor tissues are retained while those from the vasculature are suppressed by the diffusion preparation scheme. PMID:22027366

  6. 13C and 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Glycogen Futile Cycling in Strains of the Genus Fibrobacter

    PubMed Central

    Matheron, Christelle; Delort, Anne-Marie; Gaudet, Geneviève; Forano, Evelyne; Liptaj, Tibor

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the carbon metabolism of three strains of Fibrobacter succinogenes and one strain of Fibrobacter intestinalis. The four strains produced the same amounts of the metabolites succinate, acetate, and formate in approximately the same ratio (3.7/1/0.3). The four strains similarly stored glycogen during all growth phases, and the glycogen-to-protein ratio was close to 0.6 during the exponential growth phase. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of [1-13C]glucose utilization by resting cells of the four strains revealed a reversal of glycolysis at the triose phosphate level and the same metabolic pathways. Glycogen futile cycling was demonstrated by 13C NMR by following the simultaneous metabolism of labeled [13C]glycogen and exogenous unlabeled glucose. The isotopic dilutions of the CH2 of succinate and the CH3 of acetate when the resting cells were metabolizing [1-13C]glucose and unlabeled glycogen were precisely quantified by using 13C-filtered spin-echo difference 1H NMR spectroscopy. The measured isotopic dilutions were not the same for succinate and acetate; in the case of succinate, the dilutions reflected only the contribution of glycogen futile cycling, while in the case of acetate, another mechanism was also involved. Results obtained in complementary experiments are consistent with reversal of the succinate synthesis pathway. Our results indicated that for all of the strains, from 12 to 16% of the glucose entering the metabolic pathway originated from prestored glycogen. Although genetically diverse, the four Fibrobacter strains studied had very similar carbon metabolism characteristics. PMID:12033219

  7. Noninvasive biomarkers for acute hepatotoxicity induced by 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol: hyperpolarized 13C dynamic MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang-Won; Oh, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Choon; Yoon, Woong; Jeong, Yong-Yeon; Kim, Yun-Hyeon; Kim, Jae-Kyu; Park, Jin-Gyoon; Kang, Heoung-Keun; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cellular metabolite change for acute hepatotoxicity induced by 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol (1,3-DCP) in rats and its correlations with the enzyme levels. In order to induce acute hepatotoxicity, a single subcutaneous injection of 1,3-DCP (80 mg/kg) was given to six male Sprague-Dawley rats. Hyperpolarized (13)C dynamic magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on rat liver following injection of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate. The levels of serum aspartate am inotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the 1,3-DCP treated rats were significantly increased as compared with those in normal rats. In the dynamic (13)C MR spectra, the ratios of [1-(13)C] lactate to the total carbon and [1-(13)C] alanine to the total carbon in the 1,3-DCP treated rats were significantly increased, and there were positive correlations between cellular metabolic changes and enzyme levels. The levels of [1-(13)C] lactate and [1-(13)C] alanine are potentially considered as important biomarkers for the 1,3-DCP-induced acute hepatotoxicity.

  8. Assessment of liver function in dogs using the 13C-galactose breath test.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Wyse, C A; Goodfellow, M R; Yam, P S; Preston, T; Papasouliotis, K; Hall, E J

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of the 13C-galactose breath test (13C-GBT) in assessing canine liver function by applying it to a group of healthy dogs, and to a group with clinicopathological evidence of liver dysfunction. Breath samples were collected 30 min before ingestion of 13C-galactose, and then at regular intervals thereafter for 6 h. The proportion of 13CO2/12CO2 in the breath samples was measured by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. There was no significant difference in recovery of 13CO2 in the diseased group, compared to the healthy controls, but there was considerable inter-subject variation in both groups, possibly due to differences in the rate of gastric emptying, which could preclude detection of alterations in hepatic metabolism of galactose. The results of this study do not support the application of the 13C-GBT for assessment of canine liver function. PMID:19546016

  9. Constraining riverine δ13C-DIC using Late Cretaceous and Early Paleogene freshwater bivalve mollusks (Unionoidea) form Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, D. P.; Goodwin, D. H.; Davidson, M.; Hartman, J.

    2014-12-01

    Interpretation of carbon isotope variation in freshwater unionoid mollusk shells (δ13CSHELL) is not straightforward because of the variable contributions of metabolic (i.e., food) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Bivalve shells typically contain between 0 and 50% metabolic carbon (CM), which has a δ13C value close to the animal's food source. In marine systems, the food source (usually phytoplankton) has a δ13C value typically around -20 ‰ and a d13CDIC value around ~0 ‰. In freshwater systems, these numbers can vary considerably, with food sources ranging from -35 to -10 ‰. Typically, δ13C-DIC values range between -25 to 0‰ and are dependent on numerous factors; carbonate weathering and equilibrium with the atmosphere typically leading to high values and respiration of organic matter and oxidation of methane leading to lower values. Therefore, δ13C-DIC values reflect numerous processes occurring in the watershed. Nevertheless, here we suggest δ13CSHELL values can constrain the lower bounds of riverine δ13C-DIC values, despite the influence of CM. The metabolic end-member δ13C value is typically lower than the DIC end member and consequently will lead to higher calculated δ13C-DIC when using δ13CSHELL values. Therefore, if the CM fraction is set to 0 %, δ13CSHELL values will provide the lowest possible riverine δ13C-DIC values (after accounting for fractionation). Applying this method to modern shells from waters with known δ13C-DIC values (ranging from -3.2 to -12.8 ‰) results in calculated δ13C-DIC values from -6.0 to -12.4 ‰, which is close to measured DIC data from the waters in which the mussel grew. This can then in turn be applied to well-preserved fossil shells. Freshwater unionoid shells from the uppermost Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation and the lower Paleogene Fort Union Formation are exceptionally well preserved. Applying this method to these shells results in δ13C-DIC values ranging from -6 to -11‰, which is consistent

  10. Imaging enzymes at work: metabolic mapping by enzyme histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2010-06-01

    For the understanding of functions of proteins in biological and pathological processes, reporter molecules such as fluorescent proteins have become indispensable tools for visualizing the location of these proteins in intact animals, tissues, and cells. For enzymes, imaging their activity also provides information on their function or functions, which does not necessarily correlate with their location. Metabolic mapping enables imaging of activity of enzymes. The enzyme under study forms a reaction product that is fluorescent or colored by conversion of either a fluorogenic or chromogenic substrate or a fluorescent substrate with different spectral characteristics. Most chromogenic staining methods were developed in the latter half of the twentieth century but still find new applications in modern cell biology and pathology. Fluorescence methods have rapidly evolved during the last decade. This review critically evaluates the methods that are available at present for metabolic mapping in living animals, unfixed cryostat sections of tissues, and living cells, and refers to protocols of the methods of choice.

  11. Impact of Ho(3+)-doping on (13)C dynamic nuclear polarization using trityl OX063 free radical.

    PubMed

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Martins, André; Fidelino, Leila; Khemtong, Chalermchai; Song, Likai; Sherry, A Dean; Lumata, Lloyd

    2016-08-21

    We have investigated the effects of Ho-DOTA doping on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of [1-(13)C] sodium acetate using trityl OX063 free radical at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. Our results indicate that addition of 2 mM Ho-DOTA on 3 M [1-(13)C] sodium acetate sample in 1 : 1 v/v glycerol : water with 15 mM trityl OX063 improves the DNP-enhanced (13)C solid-state nuclear polarization by a factor of around 2.7-fold. Similar to the Gd(3+) doping effect on (13)C DNP, the locations of the positive and negative (13)C maximum polarization peaks in the (13)C microwave DNP sweep are shifted towards each other with the addition of Ho-DOTA on the DNP sample. W-band electron spin resonance (ESR) studies have revealed that while the shape and linewidth of the trityl OX063 ESR spectrum was not affected by Ho(3+)-doping, the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of trityl OX063 was prominently reduced at cryogenic temperatures. The reduction of trityl OX063 electron T1 by Ho-doping is linked to the (13)C DNP improvement in light of the thermodynamic picture of DNP. Moreover, the presence of Ho-DOTA in the dissolution liquid at room temperature has negligible reduction effect on liquid-state (13)C T1, in contrast to Gd(3+)-doping which drastically reduces the (13)C T1. The results here suggest that Ho(3+)-doping is advantageous over Gd(3+) in terms of preservation of hyperpolarized state-an important aspect to consider for in vitro and in vivo NMR or imaging (MRI) experiments where a considerable preparation time is needed to administer the hyperpolarized (13)C liquid.

  12. Impact of Ho(3+)-doping on (13)C dynamic nuclear polarization using trityl OX063 free radical.

    PubMed

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Martins, André; Fidelino, Leila; Khemtong, Chalermchai; Song, Likai; Sherry, A Dean; Lumata, Lloyd

    2016-08-21

    We have investigated the effects of Ho-DOTA doping on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of [1-(13)C] sodium acetate using trityl OX063 free radical at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. Our results indicate that addition of 2 mM Ho-DOTA on 3 M [1-(13)C] sodium acetate sample in 1 : 1 v/v glycerol : water with 15 mM trityl OX063 improves the DNP-enhanced (13)C solid-state nuclear polarization by a factor of around 2.7-fold. Similar to the Gd(3+) doping effect on (13)C DNP, the locations of the positive and negative (13)C maximum polarization peaks in the (13)C microwave DNP sweep are shifted towards each other with the addition of Ho-DOTA on the DNP sample. W-band electron spin resonance (ESR) studies have revealed that while the shape and linewidth of the trityl OX063 ESR spectrum was not affected by Ho(3+)-doping, the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of trityl OX063 was prominently reduced at cryogenic temperatures. The reduction of trityl OX063 electron T1 by Ho-doping is linked to the (13)C DNP improvement in light of the thermodynamic picture of DNP. Moreover, the presence of Ho-DOTA in the dissolution liquid at room temperature has negligible reduction effect on liquid-state (13)C T1, in contrast to Gd(3+)-doping which drastically reduces the (13)C T1. The results here suggest that Ho(3+)-doping is advantageous over Gd(3+) in terms of preservation of hyperpolarized state-an important aspect to consider for in vitro and in vivo NMR or imaging (MRI) experiments where a considerable preparation time is needed to administer the hyperpolarized (13)C liquid. PMID:27424954

  13. A 13C-NMR study of azacryptand complexes.

    PubMed

    Wild, Aljoscha A C; Fennell, Kevin; Morgan, Grace G; Hewage, Chandralal M; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2014-09-28

    An azacryptand has been solubilised in aqueous media containing 50% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide. (13)C-NMR has been used to determine how the azacryptand is affected by zinc binding at pH 10. Using (13)C-NMR and (13)C-enriched bicarbonate we have been able to observe the formation of 4 different carbamate derivatives of the azacryptand at pH 10. The azacryptand was shown to solubilise zinc or cadmium at alkaline pHs. Two moles of zinc are bound per mole of azacryptand and this complex binds 1 mole of carbonate. By replacing the zinc with cadmium-113 we have shown that the (13)C-NMR signal of the (13)C-enriched carbon of the bound carbonate is split into two triplets at 2.2 °C. This shows that two cadmium complexes are formed and in each of these complexes the carbonate group is bound by two magnetically equivalent metal ions. It also demonstrates that these cadmium complexes are not in fast exchange. From temperature studies we show that in the zinc complexes both complexes are in fast exchange with each other but are in slow exchange with free bicarbonate. HOESY is used to determine the position of the carbonate carbon in the complex. The solution and crystal structures of the zinc-carbonate-azacryptand complexes are compared. PMID:25091182

  14. Synthesis and applications of {sup 13}C glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Stocking, E.; Khalsa, O.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-12-01

    Due in part to the use of labeled glycerol for the {sup 13}C enrichment of biomolecules, we are currently developing new synthetic routes to various isotopomers of glycerol. Judging from our experience, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment and/or have poor overall yields (12 to 15%). Furthermore, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability is limited by the level of demand. We are presently developing a short de novo synthesis of glycerol from carbon dioxide ({approximately}53% overall yield for four steps) and are examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific {sup 13}C-labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from labeled methanol and carbon dioxide. One application of {sup 13}C glycerol we have examined is enzymatic conversion of glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25 to 50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). We are also pursuing the chemical conversion of {sup 13}C-labeled DHA to DHAP. We are especially interested in {sup 13}C-labeled DHAP because we are investigating its use as a chemo-enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids.

  15. Imaging of Organ Metabolism in Obesity and Diabetes: Treatment Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hannukainen, J C; Guzzardi, M A; Virtanen, K A; Sanguinetti, E; Nuutila, P; Iozzo, P

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are growing threats for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and heart failure. In order to identify early and effective treatment or prevention targets, it is fundamental to dissect the role of each organ and the sequence of events leading from health to obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The advancements in imaging modalities to evaluate organ-specific metabolism in humans in vivo is substantially contributing to the stratification of risk, identification of organ-specific culprits and development of targeted treatment strategies. This review summarizes the contribution provided by imaging of the heart, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, gut and brain to the understanding of the pathogenesis and cardio-metabolic complications of obesity and diabetes, and to the monitoring of treatment responses in humans. We conclude by suggesting emerging fields of investigation, including the role of cardiac fat in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the conversion of white into brown adipose tissue in the treatment of obesity, the control of weight and energy balance by the brain, the integration between omics and imaging technologies to help establish biomarkers, and the characterization of gut metabolism in relation with the gut microbiome, opening a very promising preventive/therapeutic perspective.

  16. {sup 13}C relaxation in an RNA hairpin

    SciTech Connect

    King, G.C. |; Akratos, C.; Xi, Z.; Michnica, M.J.

    1994-12-01

    This initial survey of {sup 13}C relaxation in the {triangle}TAR RNA element has generated a number of interesting results that should prove generally useful for future studies. The most readily comparable study in the literature monitored {sup 13}C relaxation of the methyl groups from unusual bases in tRNA{sup Phe}. The study, which used T{sub 1} and NOE data only, reported order parameters for the methyl group axis that ranged between 0.51 and 0.97-a range similar to that observed here. However, they reported a breakdown of the standard order parameter analysis at higher (118-MHz {sup 13}C) frequencies, which should serve to emphasize the need for a thorough exploration of suitable motional models.

  17. Time-gated FLIM microscope for corneal metabolic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Susana F.; Batista, Ana; Domingues, José Paulo; Quadrado, Maria João.; Morgado, António Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Detecting corneal cells metabolic alterations may prove a valuable tool in the early diagnosis of corneal diseases. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are autofluorescent metabolic co-factors that allow the assessment of metabolic changes through non-invasive optical methods. These co-factors exhibit double-exponential fluorescence decays, with well-separated short and lifetime components, which are related to their protein-bound and free-states. Corneal metabolism can be assessed by measuring the relative contributions of these two components. For that purpose, we have developed a wide-field time-gated fluorescence lifetime microscope based on structured illumination and one-photon excitation to record FAD lifetime images from corneas. NADH imaging was not considered as its UV excitation peak is regarded as not safe for in vivo measurements. The microscope relies on a pulsed blue diode laser (λ=443 nm) as excitation source, an ultra-high speed gated image intensifier coupled to a CCD camera to acquire fluorescence signals and a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) to implement the Structured Illumination technique. The system has a lateral resolution better than 2.4 μm, a field of view of 160 per 120 μm and an optical sectioning of 6.91 +/- 0.45 μm when used with a 40x, 0.75 NA, Water Immersion Objective. With this setup we were able to measure FAD contributions from ex-vivo chicken corneas collected from a local slaughterhouse..

  18. Measuring long-lived 13C2 state lifetimes at natural abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claytor, Kevin; Theis, Thomas; Feng, Yesu; Warren, Warren

    2014-02-01

    Long-lived disconnected eigenstates (for example, the singlet state in a system with two nearly equivalent carbons, or the singlet-singlet state in a system with two chemically equivalent carbons and two chemically equivalent hydrogens) hold the potential to drastically extend the lifetime of hyperpolarization in molecular tracers for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, a first-principles calculation of the expected lifetime (and thus selection of potential imaging agents) is made very difficult because of the large variety of relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation mechanisms. As a result, all previous measurements relied on costly and time consuming syntheses of 13C labeled compounds. Here we show that it is possible to determine 13C singlet state lifetimes by detecting the naturally abundant doubly-labeled species. This approach allows for rapid and low cost screening of potential molecular biomarkers bearing long-lived states.

  19. Recent Advances in Metabolic Profiling And Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Titus, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a metabolic disease. Cancer cells, being highly proliferative, show significant alterations in metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, respiration, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism. Metabolites like peptides, nucleotides, products of glycolysis, the TCA cycle, fatty acids, and steroids can be an important read out of disease when characterized in biological samples such as tissues and body fluids like urine, serum, etc. The cancer metabolome has been studied since the 1960s by analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Current research is focused on the identification and validation of biomarkers in the cancer metabolome that can stratify high-risk patients and distinguish between benign and advanced metastatic forms of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current state of prostate cancer metabolomics, the biomarkers that show promise in distinguishing indolent from aggressive forms of the disease, the strengths and limitations of the analytical techniques being employed, and future applications of metabolomics in diagnostic imaging and personalized medicine of prostate cancer. PMID:25632377

  20. Neutron Backgrounds: 13C({alpha}, n) etc

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsui, Tadao

    2005-09-08

    13C({alpha}, n) reaction is the main neutron source in an underground large-volume liquid-scintillator detector KamLAND. {alpha} sources, targets, cross sections, and neutron transport are studied to estimate the backgrounds of v-bare signal.

  1. Does the Shuram δ13C excursion record Ediacaran oxygenation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, J. M.; Maloof, A. C.; Schoene, B.; Higgins, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The most negative carbon isotope excursion in Earth history is found in carbonate rocks of the Ediacaran Period (635-542 Ma). Known colloquially as the the 'Shuram' excursion, workers have long noted its tantalizing, broad concordance with the rise of abundant macro-scale fossils in the rock record, variously interpreted as animals, giant protists, macro-algae and lichen, and known as the 'Ediacaran Biota.' Thus, the Shuram excursion has been interpreted by many in the context of a dramatically changing redox state of the Ediacaran oceans - e.g., a result of methane cycling in a low O2 atmosphere, the final destruction of a large pool of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and the step-wise oxidation of the Ediacaran oceans. More recently, diagenetic interpretations of the Shuram excursion - e.g. sedimentary in-growth of very δ13C depleted authigenic carbonates, meteoric alteration of Ediacaran carbonates, late-stage burial diagenesis - have challenged the various Ediacaran redox models. A rigorous geologic context is required to discriminate between these explanatory models, and determine whether the Shuram excursion can be used to evaluate terminal Neoproterozoic oxygenation. Here, we present chemo-stratigraphic data (δ13C, δ18O, δ44/42Ca and redox sensitive trace element abundances) from 12 measured sections of the Ediacaran-aged Wonoka Formation (Fm.) of South Australia that require a syn-depositional age for the extraordinary range of δ13C values (-12 to +4‰) observed in the formation. In some locations, the Wonoka Fm. is ~700 meters (m) of mixed shelf limestones and siliclastics that record the full 16 ‰ δ13C excursion in a remarkably consistent fashion across 100s of square kilometers of basin area. Fabric-altering diagenesis, where present, occurs at the sub-meter vertical scale, only results in sub-permil offsets in δ13C and cannot be used to explain the full δ13C excursion. In other places, the Wonoka Fm. is host to deep (1 km

  2. Monitoring CO[subscript 2] Fixation Using GC-MS Detection of a [superscript 13]C-Label

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Daniel G.; Bridgham, April; Reichert, Kara; Magers, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Much of our understanding of metabolic pathways has resulted from the use of chemical and isotopic labels. In this experiment, a heavy isotope of carbon, [superscript 13]C, is used to label the product of the well-known RuBisCO enzymatic reaction. This is a key reaction in photosynthesis that converts inorganic carbon to organic carbon; a process…

  3. Synthesis of [1-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [2-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [3-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid] and combinations thereof

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2009-09-01

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, of the formulae ##STR00001## wherein C* is each independently selected from the group consisting of .sup.13C and .sup.12C with the proviso that at least one C* is .sup.13C, each hydrogen of the methylene group can independently be either hydrogen or deuterium, the methyl group includes either zero or three deuterium atoms, Q is from the group of sulfide, sulfinyl, and sulfone, Z is an aryl group from the group of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently from the group of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group from the group of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently from the group of a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, and an alkoxy group, and the methyl group can include either zero or three deuterium atoms.

  4. Synthesis of [1-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [2-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [3-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid] and combinations thereof

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A. , Unkefer; Clifford J. , Alvarez; Marc A.

    2012-06-12

    The present invention is directed to the labeled compounds, ##STR00001## wherein C* is each either .sup.13C and .sup.12C where at least one C* is .sup.13C, each hydrogen of the methylene group is hydrogen or deuterium, the methyl group includes either zero or three deuterium atoms, Q is sulfide, sulfinyl, or sulfone, Z is an aryl group such as 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, or a phenyl group ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently either hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group such as NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently either a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, and an alkoxy group, and the methyl group can include either zero or three deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to the labeled compounds ##STR00003##

  5. Detection of Reduced GABA Synthesis Following Inhibition of GABA Transaminase Using in Vivo Magnetic Resonance Signal of [13C]GABA C1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jehoon; Johnson, Christopher; Shen, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Previous in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis have relied on 13C label incorporation into GABA C2 from [1-13C] or [1,6-13C2]glucose. In this study, the [13C]GABA C1 signal at 182.3 ppm in the carboxylic/amide spectral region of localized in vivo 13C spectra was detected. GABA-transaminase of rat brain was inhibited by administration of gabaculine after pre-labeling of GABA C1 and its metabolic precursors with exogenous [2,5-13C2]glucose. A subsequent isotope chase experiment was performed by infusing unlabeled glucose, which revealed a markedly slow change in the labeling of GABA C1 accompanying the blockade of the GABA shunt. This slow labeling of GABA at elevated GABA concentration was attributed to the relatively small intercompartmental GABA-glutamine cycling flux that constitutes the main route of 13C label loss during the isotope chase. Because this study showed that using low RF power broadband stochastic proton decoupling is feasible at very high field strength, it has important implications for the development of carboxylic/amide 13C MRS methods to study brain metabolism and neurotransmission in human subjects at high magnetic fields. PMID:19540876

  6. Natural isotope correction of MS/MS measurements for metabolomics and (13)C fluxomics.

    PubMed

    Niedenführ, Sebastian; ten Pierick, Angela; van Dam, Patricia T N; Suarez-Mendez, Camilo A; Nöh, Katharina; Wahl, S Aljoscha

    2016-05-01

    Fluxomics and metabolomics are crucial tools for metabolic engineering and biomedical analysis to determine the in vivo cellular state. Especially, the application of (13)C isotopes allows comprehensive insights into the functional operation of cellular metabolism. Compared to single MS, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides more detailed and accurate measurements of the metabolite enrichment patterns (tandem mass isotopomers), increasing the accuracy of metabolite concentration measurements and metabolic flux estimation. MS-type data from isotope labeling experiments is biased by naturally occurring stable isotopes (C, H, N, O, etc.). In particular, GC-MS(/MS) requires derivatization for the usually non-volatile intracellular metabolites introducing additional natural isotopes leading to measurements that do not directly represent the carbon labeling distribution. To make full use of LC- and GC-MS/MS mass isotopomer measurements, the influence of natural isotopes has to be eliminated (corrected). Our correction approach is analyzed for the two most common applications; (13)C fluxomics and isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) based metabolomics. Natural isotopes can have an impact on the calculated flux distribution which strongly depends on the substrate labeling and the actual flux distribution. Second, we show that in IDMS based metabolomics natural isotopes lead to underestimated concentrations that can and should be corrected with a nonlinear calibration. Our simulations indicate that the correction for natural abundance in isotope based fluxomics and quantitative metabolomics is essential for correct data interpretation.

  7. Natural isotope correction of MS/MS measurements for metabolomics and (13)C fluxomics.

    PubMed

    Niedenführ, Sebastian; ten Pierick, Angela; van Dam, Patricia T N; Suarez-Mendez, Camilo A; Nöh, Katharina; Wahl, S Aljoscha

    2016-05-01

    Fluxomics and metabolomics are crucial tools for metabolic engineering and biomedical analysis to determine the in vivo cellular state. Especially, the application of (13)C isotopes allows comprehensive insights into the functional operation of cellular metabolism. Compared to single MS, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides more detailed and accurate measurements of the metabolite enrichment patterns (tandem mass isotopomers), increasing the accuracy of metabolite concentration measurements and metabolic flux estimation. MS-type data from isotope labeling experiments is biased by naturally occurring stable isotopes (C, H, N, O, etc.). In particular, GC-MS(/MS) requires derivatization for the usually non-volatile intracellular metabolites introducing additional natural isotopes leading to measurements that do not directly represent the carbon labeling distribution. To make full use of LC- and GC-MS/MS mass isotopomer measurements, the influence of natural isotopes has to be eliminated (corrected). Our correction approach is analyzed for the two most common applications; (13)C fluxomics and isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) based metabolomics. Natural isotopes can have an impact on the calculated flux distribution which strongly depends on the substrate labeling and the actual flux distribution. Second, we show that in IDMS based metabolomics natural isotopes lead to underestimated concentrations that can and should be corrected with a nonlinear calibration. Our simulations indicate that the correction for natural abundance in isotope based fluxomics and quantitative metabolomics is essential for correct data interpretation. PMID:26479486

  8. Temperature-mediated changes in microbial carbon use efficiency and 13C discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Ballantyne, Ford, IV; Min, Kyungjin; Billings, Sharon A.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding how carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from ecosystems feeds back to climate warming depends in part on our ability to quantify the efficiency with which microorganisms convert organic carbon (C) into either biomass or CO2. Quantifying ecosystem-level respiratory CO2 losses often also requires assumptions about stable C isotope fractionations associated with the microbial transformation of organic substrates. However, the diversity of organic substrates' δ13C and the challenges of measuring microbial C use efficiency (CUE) in their natural environment fundamentally limit our ability to project ecosystem C budgets in a warming climate. Here, we quantify the effect of temperature on C fluxes during metabolic transformations of cellobiose, a common microbial substrate, by a cosmopolitan microorganism growing at a constant rate. Biomass C specific respiration rate increased by 250 % between 13 and 26.5 °C, decreasing CUE from 77 to 56 %. Biomass C specific respiration rate was positively correlated with an increase in respiratory 13C discrimination from 4.4 to 6.7 ‰ across the same temperature range. This first demonstration of a direct link between temperature, microbial CUE, and associated isotope fluxes provides a critical step towards understanding δ13C of respired CO2 at multiple scales, and towards a framework for predicting future ecosystem C fluxes.

  9. Optimization of 13C dynamic nuclear polarization: isotopic labeling of free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kiswandi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a physics technique that amplifies the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals by transferring the high polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. Thus, the choice of free radical is crucial in DNP as it can directly affect the NMR signal enhancement levels, typically on the order of several thousand-fold in the liquid-state. In this study, we have investigated the efficiency of four variants of the well-known 4-oxo-TEMPO radical (normal 4-oxo-TEMPO plus its 15N-enriched and/or perdeuterated variants) for use in DNP of an important metabolic tracer [1-13C]acetate. Though the variants have significant differences in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, we have found that changing the composition of the TEMPO radical through deuteration or 15N doping yields no significant difference in 13C DNP efficiency at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. On the other hand, deuteration of the solvent causes a significant increase of 13C polarization that is consistent over all the 4-oxo-TEMPO variants. These findings are consistent with the thermal mixing model of DNP. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  10. 13C NMR spectra of pyridine chalcone analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, B. Ž.; Mišić-Vuković, M.; Marinković, A. D.; Csanádi, J.

    1999-05-01

    13C NMR spectra of two series of pyridine chalcone analogs were determined in deuterated dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO-d 6). It was established that these compounds were in more stable E-configurations except for the 4-pyridalacetophenone which was in Z-configuration. On the basis of the Hammett correlations of 13C NMR chemical shifts of the ethylenic bond carbon atoms and the σ values for the pyridine "aza" groups, the polarization of ethylenic bonds were discussed. It was established that the opposite effect of the pyridine substituents at the electronic density distribution in pyridalacetophenone and cinnamoylpyridines depends on its direct bonding to the ethylenic carbon or the transmission electronic effects via the carbonyl group, respectively.

  11. Landmarks in the application of 13C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy to studies of neuronal/glial relationships.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, H

    1998-01-01

    The development of the use of carbon isotopes as metabolic tracers is briefly described. 13C-labelled precursors (13CO2, 13CH4) first became available in 1940 and were studied in microorganisms, but their use was limited by very low enrichments and lack of suitable analytical equipment. More success was achieved with 11C and especially 14C, as these radioactive tracers did not need to be highly enriched. Although the stable 13C isotope can be used at a low percentage enrichment in mass spectrometry, its application to magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) requires very highly enriched precursors, due to its low natural abundance and low sensitivity. Despite such limitations, however, the great advantage of 13C-MRS lies in its exquisite chemical specificity, in that labelling of different carbon atoms can be distinguished within the same molecule. Effective exploitation became feasible in the early 1970s with the advent of stable instruments, Fourier transform 13C-MRS, and the availability of highly enriched precursors. Reports of its use in brain research began to appear in the mid-1980s. The applications of 13C isotopomer analysis to research on neuronal/glial relationships are reviewed. The presence of neighbouring 13C-labelled atoms affects the appearance of the resonances (splitting due to C-C coupling), and so allows for unique quantification of rates through different and possibly competing pathways. Isotopomer patterns in resonances labelled from a combination of [1-13C]glucose and [1, 2-13C2]acetate have revealed aspects of neuronal/glial metabolic trafficking on depolarization and under hypoxic conditions in vitro. This approach has now been applied to in vivo studies on inhibition of glial metabolism using fluoroacetate. The results confirm the glial specificity of the toxin and demonstrate that it does not affect entry of acetate. When the glial TCA cycle is inhibited, the ability of the glia to participate in the glutamate/glutamine cycle remains

  12. Construction and 13C NMR signal-amplification efficiency of a dynamic nuclear polarizer at 6.4 T and 1.4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Taylor, David; McDonald, George; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a rapidly emerging technique in biomedical and metabolic imaging since it amplifies the liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and imaging (MRI) signals by >10,000-fold. Originally used in nuclear scattering experiments, DNP works by creating a non-Boltzmann nuclear spin distribution by transferring the high electron (γ = 28,000 MHz/T) thermal polarization to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation of the sample at high magnetic field and low temperature. A dissolution device is used to rapidly dissolve the frozen sample and consequently produces an injectable ``hyperpolarized'' liquid at physiologically-tolerable temperature. Here we report the construction and performance evaluation of a dissolution DNP hyperpolarizer at 6.4 T and 1.4 K using a continuous-flow cryostat. The solid and liquid-state 13C NMR signal enhancement levels of 13C acetate samples doped with trityl OX063 and 4-oxo-TEMPO free radicals will be discussed and compared with the results from the 3.35 T commercial hyperpolarizer. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  13. Catabolism of glucose and lactose in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, studied by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, Irene; Gaspar, Paula; Sánchez, Borja; Gueimonde, Miguel; Margolles, Abelardo; Neves, Ana Rute

    2013-12-01

    Bifidobacteria are widely used as probiotics in several commercial products; however, to date there is little knowledge about their carbohydrate metabolic pathways. In this work, we studied the metabolism of glucose and lactose in the widely used probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 by in vivo (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose was characterized in cells grown in glucose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, the metabolism of lactose specifically labeled with (13)C on carbon 1 of the glucose or the galactose moiety was determined in suspensions of cells grown in lactose. These experiments allowed the quantification of some intermediate and end products of the metabolic pathways, as well as determination of the consumption rate of carbon sources. Additionally, the labeling patterns in metabolites derived from the metabolism of glucose specifically labeled with (13)C on carbon 1, 2, or 3 in cells grown in glucose or lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the glucose moiety ([1-(13)Cglucose]lactose), lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the galactose moiety ([1-(13)Cgalactose]lactose), and [1-(13)C]glucose in lactose-grown cells were determined in cell extracts by (13)C NMR. The NMR analysis showed that the recovery of carbon was fully compatible with the fructose 6-phosphate, or bifid, shunt. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase, acetate kinase, fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase, and pyruvate formate lyase differed significantly between glucose and lactose cultures. The transcriptional analysis of several putative glucose and lactose transporters showed a significant induction of Balat_0475 in the presence of lactose, suggesting a role for this protein as a lactose permease. This report provides the first in vivo experimental evidence of the metabolic flux distribution in the catabolic pathway of glucose and lactose in bifidobacteria and shows that the bifid shunt is the only

  14. Catabolism of Glucose and Lactose in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Studied by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Irene; Gaspar, Paula; Sánchez, Borja; Gueimonde, Miguel; Neves, Ana Rute

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are widely used as probiotics in several commercial products; however, to date there is little knowledge about their carbohydrate metabolic pathways. In this work, we studied the metabolism of glucose and lactose in the widely used probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 by in vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The metabolism of [1-13C]glucose was characterized in cells grown in glucose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, the metabolism of lactose specifically labeled with 13C on carbon 1 of the glucose or the galactose moiety was determined in suspensions of cells grown in lactose. These experiments allowed the quantification of some intermediate and end products of the metabolic pathways, as well as determination of the consumption rate of carbon sources. Additionally, the labeling patterns in metabolites derived from the metabolism of glucose specifically labeled with 13C on carbon 1, 2, or 3 in cells grown in glucose or lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the glucose moiety ([1-13Cglucose]lactose), lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the galactose moiety ([1-13Cgalactose]lactose), and [1-13C]glucose in lactose-grown cells were determined in cell extracts by 13C NMR. The NMR analysis showed that the recovery of carbon was fully compatible with the fructose 6-phosphate, or bifid, shunt. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase, acetate kinase, fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase, and pyruvate formate lyase differed significantly between glucose and lactose cultures. The transcriptional analysis of several putative glucose and lactose transporters showed a significant induction of Balat_0475 in the presence of lactose, suggesting a role for this protein as a lactose permease. This report provides the first in vivo experimental evidence of the metabolic flux distribution in the catabolic pathway of glucose and lactose in bifidobacteria and shows that the bifid shunt is the only pathway

  15. Detection of intracellular lactate with localized diffusion { 1H- 13C}-spectroscopy in rat glioma in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuffer, Josef; Lin, Joseph C.; DelaBarre, Lance; Ugurbil, Kamil; Garwood, Michael

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diffusion characteristic of lactate and alanine in a brain tumor model to that of normal brain metabolites known to be mainly intracellular such as N-acetylaspartate or creatine. The diffusion of 13C-labeled metabolites was measured in vivo with localized NMR spectroscopy at 9.4 T (400 MHz) using a previously described localization and editing pulse sequence known as ACED-STEAM ('adiabatic carbon editing and decoupling'). 13C-labeled glucose was administered and the apparent diffusion coefficients of the glycolytic products, { 1H- 13C}-lactate and { 1H- 13C}-alanine, were determined in rat intracerebral 9L glioma. To obtain insights into { 1H- 13C}-lactate compartmentation (intra- versus extracellular), the pulse sequence used very large diffusion weighting (50 ms/μm 2). Multi-exponential diffusion attenuation of the lactate metabolite signals was observed. The persistence of a lactate signal at very large diffusion weighting provided direct experimental evidence of significant intracellular lactate concentration. To investigate the spatial distribution of lactate and other metabolites, 1H spectroscopic images were also acquired. Lactate and choline-containing compounds were consistently elevated in tumor tissue, but not in necrotic regions and surrounding normal-appearing brain. Overall, these findings suggest that lactate is mainly associated with tumor tissue and that within the time-frame of these experiments at least some of the glycolytic product ([ 13C] lactate) originates from an intracellular compartment.

  16. Two Techniques for Estimating Deglacial Mean-Ocean δ13 C Change from the Same Set of 493 Benthic δ13C Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, C. D.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Gebbie, G.

    2013-12-01

    The crux of carbon redistribution over the deglaciation centers on the ocean, where the isotopic signature of terrestrial carbon (δ13C terrestrial carbon = -25‰) is observed as a 0.3-0.7‰ shift in benthic foraminiferal δ13C. Deglacial mean-ocean δ13C estimates vary due to different subsets of benthic δ13C data and different methods of weighting the mean δ13C by volume. Here, we present a detailed 1-to-1 comparison of two methods of calculating mean δ13C change and uncertainty estimates using the same set of 493 benthic Cibicidoides spp. δ13C measurements for the LGM and Late Holocene. The first method divides the ocean into 8 regions, and uses simple line fits to describe the distribution of δ13C data for each timeslice over 0.5-5 km depth. With these line fits, we estimate the δ13C value at 100-meter intervals and weight those estimates by the regional volume at each depth slice. The mean-ocean δ13C is the sum of these volume-weighted regional δ13C estimates and the uncertainty of these mean-ocean δ13C estimates is computed using Monte Carlo simulations. The whole-ocean δ13C change is estimated using extrapolated surface- and deep-ocean δ13C estimates, and an assumed δ13C value for the Southern Ocean. This method yields an estimated LGM-to-Holocene change of 0.38×0.07‰ for 0.5-5km and 0.35×0.16‰ for the whole ocean (Peterson et al., 2013, submitted to Paleoceanography). The second method reconstructs glacial and modern δ13C by combining the same data compilation as above with a steady-state ocean circulation model (Gebbie, 2013, submitted to Paleoceanography). The result is a tracer distribution on a 4-by-4 degree horizontal resolution grid with 23 vertical levels, and an estimate of the distribution's uncertainty that accounts for the distinct modern and glacial water-mass geometries. From both methods, we compare the regional δ13C estimates (0.5-5 km), surface δ13C estimates (0-0.5 km), deep δ13C estimates (>5 km), Southern Ocean

  17. Forward Modeling of Fluctuating Dietary 13C Signals to Validate 13C Turnover Models of Milk and Milk Components from a Diet-Switch Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Alexander; Schneider, Stephan; Auerswald, Karl; Bellof, Gerhard; Schnyder, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Isotopic variation of food stuffs propagates through trophic systems. But, this variation is dampened in each trophic step, due to buffering effects of metabolic and storage pools. Thus, understanding of isotopic variation in trophic systems requires knowledge of isotopic turnover. In animals, turnover is usually quantified in diet-switch experiments in controlled conditions. Such experiments usually involve changes in diet chemical composition, which may affect turnover. Furthermore, it is uncertain if diet-switch based turnover models are applicable under conditions with randomly fluctuating dietary input signals. Here, we investigate if turnover information derived from diet-switch experiments with dairy cows can predict the isotopic composition of metabolic products (milk, milk components and feces) under natural fluctuations of dietary isotope and chemical composition. First, a diet-switch from a C3-grass/maize diet to a pure C3-grass diet was used to quantify carbon turnover in whole milk, lactose, casein, milk fat and feces. Data were analyzed with a compartmental mixed effects model, which allowed for multiple pools and intra-population variability, and included a delay between feed ingestion and first tracer appearance in outputs. The delay for milk components and whole milk was ∼12 h, and that of feces ∼20 h. The half-life (t½) for carbon in the feces was 9 h, while lactose, casein and milk fat had a t½ of 10, 18 and 19 h. The 13C kinetics of whole milk revealed two pools, a fast pool with a t½ of 10 h (likely representing lactose), and a slower pool with a t½ of 21 h (likely including casein and milk fat). The diet-switch based turnover information provided a precise prediction (RMSE ∼0.2 ‰) of the natural 13C fluctuations in outputs during a 30 days-long period when cows ingested a pure C3 grass with naturally fluctuating isotope composition. PMID:24392000

  18. Measurement of multiple psi torsion angles in uniformly 13C,15N-labeled alpha-spectrin SH3 domain using 3D 15N-13C-13C-15N MAS dipolar-chemical shift correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Jaroniec, Christopher P; Diehl, Annette; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Griffin, Robert G

    2003-06-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous measurement of several backbone torsion angles psi in the uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labeled alpha-Spectrin SH3 domain using two different 3D 15N-13C-13C-15N dipolar-chemical shift magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments. The first NCCN experiment utilizes double quantum (DQ) spectroscopy combined with the INADEQUATE type 13C-13C chemical shift correlation. The decay of the DQ coherences formed between 13C'(i) and 13C(alphai) spin pairs is determined by the "correlated" dipolar field due to 15N(i)-13C(alphai) and 13C'(i)-15N(i+1) dipolar couplings and is particularly sensitive to variations of the torsion angle in the regime |psi| > 140 degrees. However, the ability of this experiment to constrain multiple psi-torsion angles is limited by the resolution of the 13C(alpha)-(13)CO correlation spectrum. This problem is partially addressed in the second approach described here, which is an NCOCA NCCN experiment. In this case the resolution is enhanced by the superior spectral dispersion of the 15N resonances present in the 15N(i+1)-13C(alphai) part of the NCOCA chemical shift correlation spectrum. For the case of the 62-residue alpha-spectrin SH3 domain, we determined 13 psi angle constraints with the INADEQUATE NCCN experiment and 22 psi constraints were measured in the NCOCA NCCN experiment.

  19. Comparing Soil and Bison δ13C to Field Estimates of C4 Plant Abundances in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, D.; Still, C. J.; Cotton, J.; Powell, B.

    2015-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope data (i.e., δ13C) from soils and herbivore tissue are commonly used as a proxy for the relative abundance of C4 and C3 plants at a site. These data are also increasingly used to represent other climatologically relevant properties of vegetated environments, such as productivity, aridity, water use efficiency, and tree cover. The δ13C values of soils and herbivore tissues are generally assumed to resemble their source vegetation, after accounting for diverse fractionation processes during litter decomposition and tissue metabolism and turnover. However, δ13C values have rarely been compared to source vegetation at a regional to continental scale. As a result, the quality of δ13C as a proxy has not been thoroughly evaluated, and the importance of modifying factors have not been assessed at biogeographically relevant scales. To address some of these issues, we combined three multi-source datasets from North America: herbaceous C4 plant abundances from thousands of vegetation plots, hundreds of soil δ13C measurements, and hundreds of bison collagen, hair, and enamel δ13C data (tissues with different turnover rates). These datasets were resampled to common grid for comparison. A stronger relationship with C4 vegetation existed for bison as compared to soil δ13C. To determine which factors might explain deviations in the vegetation plot and isotopic data, we used statistical models to quantify the influence of soil variables, mean annual precipitation and temperature, tree cover, presence of invasives, and fire frequency in conjunction with plot-based C4 abundance data. Our bison model was only improved by the addition of invasives. In contrast, our soil model was significantly improved when accounting for tree cover (C3 vegetation and shade), precipitation, various soil parameters, and invasive grasses, suggesting that soils are more likely to be biased from source vegetation in ways that could influence interpretation as a proxy at broad

  20. Metabolic alterations in bladder cancer: applications for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Whyard, Terry; Waltzer, Wayne C; Waltzer, Douglas; Romanov, Victor

    2016-02-01

    Treatment planning, outcome and prognosis are strongly related to the adequate tumor staging for bladder cancer (BC). Unfortunately, a large discrepancy exists between the preoperative clinical and final pathologic staging. Therefore, an advanced imaging-based technique is crucial for adequate staging. Although Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is currently the best in vivo imaging technique for BC staging because of its excellent soft-tissue contrast and absence of ionizing radiation it lacks cancer-specificity. Tumor-specific positron emission tomography (PET), which is based on the Warburg effect (preferential uptake of glucose by cancer cells), exploits the radioactively-labeled glucose analogs, i.e., FDG. Although FDG-PET is highly cancer specific, it lacks resolution and contrast quality comparable with MRI. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI enables the detection of low concentrations of metabolites containing protons. BC is an attractive target for glucose CEST MRI because, in addition to the typical systemic administration, glucose might also be directly applied into the bladder to reduce toxicity-related complications. As a first stage of the development of a contrast-specific BC imaging technique we have studied glucose uptake by bladder epithelial cells and have observed that glucose is, indeed, consumed by BC cells with higher intensity than by non-transformed urothelial cells. This effect might be partly explained by increased expression of glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3 in transformed cells as compared to normal urothelium. We also detected higher lactate production by BC cells which is another cancer-specific manifestation of the Warburg effect. In addition, we have observed other metabolic alterations in BC cells as compared to non-transformed cells: in particular, increased pyruvate synthesis. When glucose was substituted by glutamine in culture media, preferential uptake of glutamine by BC cells was observed. The preferential

  1. Combining combing and secondary ion mass spectrometry to study DNA on chips using (13)C and (15)N labeling.

    PubMed

    Cabin-Flaman, Armelle; Monnier, Anne-Francoise; Coffinier, Yannick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Gibouin, David; Wirtz, Tom; Boukherroub, Rabah; Migeon, Henri-Noël; Bensimon, Aaron; Jannière, Laurent; Ripoll, Camille; Norris, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry ( D-SIMS) imaging of combed DNA - the combing, imaging by SIMS or CIS method - has been developed previously using a standard NanoSIMS 50 to reveal, on the 50 nm scale, individual DNA fibers labeled with different, non-radioactive isotopes in vivo and to quantify these isotopes. This makes CIS especially suitable for determining the times, places and rates of DNA synthesis as well as the detection of the fine-scale re-arrangements of DNA and of molecules associated with combed DNA fibers. Here, we show how CIS may be extended to (13)C-labeling via the detection and quantification of the (13)C (14)N (-) recombinant ion and the use of the (13)C: (12)C ratio, we discuss how CIS might permit three successive labels, and we suggest ideas that might be explored using CIS. PMID:27429742

  2. Combining combing and secondary ion mass spectrometry to study DNA on chips using 13C and 15N labeling

    PubMed Central

    Cabin-Flaman, Armelle; Monnier, Anne-Francoise; Coffinier, Yannick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Gibouin, David; Wirtz, Tom; Boukherroub, Rabah; Migeon, Henri-Noël; Bensimon, Aaron; Jannière, Laurent; Ripoll, Camille; Norris, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry ( D-SIMS) imaging of combed DNA – the combing, imaging by SIMS or CIS method – has been developed previously using a standard NanoSIMS 50 to reveal, on the 50 nm scale, individual DNA fibers labeled with different, non-radioactive isotopes in vivo and to quantify these isotopes. This makes CIS especially suitable for determining the times, places and rates of DNA synthesis as well as the detection of the fine-scale re-arrangements of DNA and of molecules associated with combed DNA fibers. Here, we show how CIS may be extended to 13C-labeling via the detection and quantification of the 13C 14N - recombinant ion and the use of the 13C: 12C ratio, we discuss how CIS might permit three successive labels, and we suggest ideas that might be explored using CIS. PMID:27429742

  3. An in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the relationship between diet and adipose tissue composition.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E L; Frost, G; Barnard, M L; Bryant, D J; Taylor-Robinson, S D; Simbrunner, J; Coutts, G A; Burl, M; Bloom, S R; Sales, K D; Bell, J D

    1996-02-01

    13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a noninvasive technique used in the study of lipids. We applied 13C MRS to assess the effects of long-term dietary variation on adipose tissue composition in humans. In vivo 13C MRS was used to analyze the fatty acid composition of adipose tissue in 88 healthy volunteers with significantly different diets (38 vegans, 11 vegetarians, and 39 omnivores) assessed by analysis of dietary records. Results were compared with the serum lipid profile. 13C MRS revealed clear differences in the adipose tissue composition of vegans, which contained more unsaturated (P < 0.01) and fewer saturated fatty acids (P < 0.01) compared with omnivores and vegetarians. The vegan subjects had a significantly lower intake of saturated fatty acids and higher intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids than either the omnivore or the vegetarian groups (P < 0.01). These findings were associated with significantly lower levels of serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol in the vegan group compared with the omnivores. Our results demonstrate the use of 13C MRS for the noninvasive study of adipose tissue composition and its application to the study of the interaction between long-term dietary and metabolic risk factors in humans. PMID:8835401

  4. The 13C/12C isotopic signal of day-respired CO2 in variegated leaves of Pelargonium × hortorum.

    PubMed

    Tcherkez, Guillaume; Mauve, Caroline; Lamothe, Marlene; Le Bras, Camille; Grapin, Agnes

    2011-02-01

    In leaves, although it is accepted that CO(2) evolved by dark respiration after illumination is naturally (13) C-enriched compared to organic matter or substrate sucrose, much uncertainty remains on whether day respiration produces (13) C-depleted or (13) C-enriched CO(2). Here, we applied equations described previously for mesocosm CO(2) exchange to investigate the carbon isotope composition of CO(2) respired by autotrophic and heterotrophic tissues of Pelargonium × hortorum leaves, taking advantage of leaf variegation. Day-respired CO(2) was slightly (13) C-depleted compared to organic matter both under 21% O(2) and 2% O(2). Furthermore, most, if not all CO(2) molecules evolved in the light came from carbon atoms that had been fixed previously before the experiments, in both variegated and green leaves. We conclude that the usual definition of day respiratory fractionation, that assumes carbon fixed by current net photosynthesis is the respiratory substrate, is not valid in Pelargonium leaves under our conditions. In variegated leaves, total organic matter was slightly (13) C-depleted in white areas and so were most primary metabolites. This small isotopic difference between white and green areas probably came from the small contribution of photosynthetic CO(2) refixation and the specific nitrogen metabolism in white leaf areas. PMID:20955224

  5. The 13C/12C isotopic signal of day-respired CO2 in variegated leaves of Pelargonium × hortorum.

    PubMed

    Tcherkez, Guillaume; Mauve, Caroline; Lamothe, Marlene; Le Bras, Camille; Grapin, Agnes

    2011-02-01

    In leaves, although it is accepted that CO(2) evolved by dark respiration after illumination is naturally (13) C-enriched compared to organic matter or substrate sucrose, much uncertainty remains on whether day respiration produces (13) C-depleted or (13) C-enriched CO(2). Here, we applied equations described previously for mesocosm CO(2) exchange to investigate the carbon isotope composition of CO(2) respired by autotrophic and heterotrophic tissues of Pelargonium × hortorum leaves, taking advantage of leaf variegation. Day-respired CO(2) was slightly (13) C-depleted compared to organic matter both under 21% O(2) and 2% O(2). Furthermore, most, if not all CO(2) molecules evolved in the light came from carbon atoms that had been fixed previously before the experiments, in both variegated and green leaves. We conclude that the usual definition of day respiratory fractionation, that assumes carbon fixed by current net photosynthesis is the respiratory substrate, is not valid in Pelargonium leaves under our conditions. In variegated leaves, total organic matter was slightly (13) C-depleted in white areas and so were most primary metabolites. This small isotopic difference between white and green areas probably came from the small contribution of photosynthetic CO(2) refixation and the specific nitrogen metabolism in white leaf areas.

  6. An in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the relationship between diet and adipose tissue composition.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E L; Frost, G; Barnard, M L; Bryant, D J; Taylor-Robinson, S D; Simbrunner, J; Coutts, G A; Burl, M; Bloom, S R; Sales, K D; Bell, J D

    1996-02-01

    13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a noninvasive technique used in the study of lipids. We applied 13C MRS to assess the effects of long-term dietary variation on adipose tissue composition in humans. In vivo 13C MRS was used to analyze the fatty acid composition of adipose tissue in 88 healthy volunteers with significantly different diets (38 vegans, 11 vegetarians, and 39 omnivores) assessed by analysis of dietary records. Results were compared with the serum lipid profile. 13C MRS revealed clear differences in the adipose tissue composition of vegans, which contained more unsaturated (P < 0.01) and fewer saturated fatty acids (P < 0.01) compared with omnivores and vegetarians. The vegan subjects had a significantly lower intake of saturated fatty acids and higher intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids than either the omnivore or the vegetarian groups (P < 0.01). These findings were associated with significantly lower levels of serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol in the vegan group compared with the omnivores. Our results demonstrate the use of 13C MRS for the noninvasive study of adipose tissue composition and its application to the study of the interaction between long-term dietary and metabolic risk factors in humans.

  7. The 13C nuclear magnetic resonance in graphite intercalation compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Resing, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of graphite intercalation compounds were calculated. For acceptor types, the shifts come mainly from the paramagnetic (Ramsey) intra-atomic terms. They are related to the gross features of the two-dimensional band structures. The calculated anisotropy is about -140 ppm and is independent of the finer details such as charge transfer. For donor types, the carbon 2p pi orbitals are spin-polarized because of mixing with metal conduction electrons, thus there is an additional dipolar contribution which may be correlated with the electronic specific heat. The general agreement with experimental data is satisfactory.

  8. The delta 13C record of Devonian to Permian carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buggisch, W.

    2003-04-01

    A δ13Ccarb curve will be presented for samples spanning the time interval from the Silurian/Devonian to the Permian/Triassic boundary. Reliable data are usually based on analyses of brachiopod shells. Because of the huge reservoir of carbon in carbonates, also whole rock samples are suitable for stable carbon isotope analyses if they are not altered by meteoric water or by incorporation of re-oxidized organic carbon during diagenesis. There are several possibilities to test the quality of the data: (1) comparison of the δ13C record of whole rock samples with samples from brachiopod shells, (2) with the organic record, (3) analyses of the same time interval in different sections. If the same pattern of isotope data is observed in separa-ted palaeogeographic settings, it is probably caused by a change in the global carbon reservoir. Reliable δ13C data will be presented for the Devonian, Mississippian and Middle to Late Permian. During Pennsylvanian and Early Permian most carbonates were affected by meteoric diagenesis due to the large glacio-eustatic sea level changes of the Permo-Carboniferous glaciation. Long term variations (mean values for 10 Ma) are known from literature. Devonian δ13C values are about 0 to 2 ppm (V-PDB) they increase up to 5 to 6 ppm during the Mississippian - Pennsylvanian transition and drop sharply at the Permian Triassic boundary. The Devonian - Carboniferous trend is probably at least partly due to the evolution of land plants. Short term variations in the range of 0.1 to 1 Ma modify the long term trend significantly. Large positive excursions of δ13C up to 5 or 6 ppm are known from the Silurian - Devonian boundary and during the Middle Tournaisian of Laurentia and Europe. Many positive excursions of a magnitude of 2 to 3 ppm are observed, some are verified worldwide as for instance at the Frasnian - Famennian boundary which coincides with one of the largest extinction events in earth history. Short time variations in the isotopic

  9. S-Factor of radiative р 13C capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2012-06-01

    The possibility of description of experimental data on the astrophysical S-factor of radiative р 13C capture within the framework of the potential cluster model with forbidden states is analyzed at energies in the range 0.03-0.8 MeV. It is demonstrated that the behavior of the astrophysical S-factor can be explained based on the Е1-transition to the bound 3 P 1 state of the 14N nucleus in the р 13С channel from the 3 S 1 wave of р 13С scattering at resonant energy of 0.55 MeV (l.s.).

  10. Hypermetabolic state in the 7-month-old triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and the effect of lipoic acid: a 13C-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Sancheti, Harsh; Patil, Ishan; Kanamori, Keiko; Díaz Brinton, Roberta; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Ai-Ling; Cadenas, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by age-dependent biochemical, metabolic, and physiologic changes. These age-dependent changes ultimately converge to impair cognitive functions. This study was carried out to examine the metabolic changes by probing glucose and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism in a 7-month-old triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). The effect of lipoic acid, an insulin-mimetic agent, was also investigated to examine its ability in modulating age-dependent metabolic changes. Seven-month-old 3xTg-AD mice were given intravenous infusion of [1-(13)C]glucose followed by an ex vivo (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance to determine the concentrations of (13)C-labeled isotopomers of glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, gamma aminobutyric acid, and N-acetylaspartate. An intravenous infusion of [1-(13)C]glucose+[1,2-(13)C]acetate was given for different periods of time to distinguish neuronal and astrocytic metabolism. Enrichments of glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate were calculated after quantifying the total ((12)C+(13)C) concentrations by high-performance liquid chromatography. A hypermetabolic state was clearly evident in 7-month-old 3xTg-AD mice in contrast to the hypometabolic state reported earlier in 13-month-old mice. Hypermetabolism was evidenced by prominent increase of (13)C labeling and enrichment in the 3xTg-AD mice. Lipoic acid feeding to the hypermetabolic 3xTg-AD mice brought the metabolic parameters to the levels of nonTg mice.

  11. Hypermetabolic state in the 7-month-old triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and the effect of lipoic acid: a 13C-NMR study

    PubMed Central

    Sancheti, Harsh; Patil, Ishan; Kanamori, Keiko; Díaz Brinton, Roberta; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Ai-Ling; Cadenas, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by age-dependent biochemical, metabolic, and physiologic changes. These age-dependent changes ultimately converge to impair cognitive functions. This study was carried out to examine the metabolic changes by probing glucose and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism in a 7-month-old triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). The effect of lipoic acid, an insulin-mimetic agent, was also investigated to examine its ability in modulating age-dependent metabolic changes. Seven-month-old 3xTg-AD mice were given intravenous infusion of [1-13C]glucose followed by an ex vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to determine the concentrations of 13C-labeled isotopomers of glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, gamma aminobutyric acid, and N-acetylaspartate. An intravenous infusion of [1-13C]glucose+[1,2-13C]acetate was given for different periods of time to distinguish neuronal and astrocytic metabolism. Enrichments of glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate were calculated after quantifying the total (12C+13C) concentrations by high-performance liquid chromatography. A hypermetabolic state was clearly evident in 7-month-old 3xTg-AD mice in contrast to the hypometabolic state reported earlier in 13-month-old mice. Hypermetabolism was evidenced by prominent increase of 13C labeling and enrichment in the 3xTg-AD mice. Lipoic acid feeding to the hypermetabolic 3xTg-AD mice brought the metabolic parameters to the levels of nonTg mice. PMID:25099753

  12. Hypermetabolic state in the 7-month-old triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and the effect of lipoic acid: a 13C-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Sancheti, Harsh; Patil, Ishan; Kanamori, Keiko; Díaz Brinton, Roberta; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Ai-Ling; Cadenas, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by age-dependent biochemical, metabolic, and physiologic changes. These age-dependent changes ultimately converge to impair cognitive functions. This study was carried out to examine the metabolic changes by probing glucose and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism in a 7-month-old triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). The effect of lipoic acid, an insulin-mimetic agent, was also investigated to examine its ability in modulating age-dependent metabolic changes. Seven-month-old 3xTg-AD mice were given intravenous infusion of [1-(13)C]glucose followed by an ex vivo (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance to determine the concentrations of (13)C-labeled isotopomers of glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, gamma aminobutyric acid, and N-acetylaspartate. An intravenous infusion of [1-(13)C]glucose+[1,2-(13)C]acetate was given for different periods of time to distinguish neuronal and astrocytic metabolism. Enrichments of glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate were calculated after quantifying the total ((12)C+(13)C) concentrations by high-performance liquid chromatography. A hypermetabolic state was clearly evident in 7-month-old 3xTg-AD mice in contrast to the hypometabolic state reported earlier in 13-month-old mice. Hypermetabolism was evidenced by prominent increase of (13)C labeling and enrichment in the 3xTg-AD mice. Lipoic acid feeding to the hypermetabolic 3xTg-AD mice brought the metabolic parameters to the levels of nonTg mice. PMID:25099753

  13. Influence of different proton pump inhibitors on activity of cytochrome P450 assessed by [(13)C]-aminopyrine breath test.

    PubMed

    Kodaira, Chise; Uchida, Shinya; Yamade, Mihoko; Nishino, Masafumi; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Namiki, Noriyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hishida, Akira; Furuta, Takahisa

    2012-03-01

    Aminopyrine is metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) in the liver. The investigators evaluated influences of different PPIs on CYP activity as assessed by the [(13)C]-aminopyrine breath test ([(13)C]-ABT). Subjects were 15 healthy volunteers with different CYP2C19 status (5 rapid metabolizers [RMs], 5 intermediate metabolizers [IMs], and 5 poor metabolizers [PMs]). Breath samples were collected before and every 15 to 30 minutes for 3 hours after oral ingestion of [(13)C]-aminopyrine 100 mg on day 8 of each of the following regimens: control; omeprazole 20 mg and 80 mg, lansoprazole 30 mg, and rabeprazole 20 mg. Changes in carbon isotope ratios in carbon dioxide ((13)CO(2)/(12)CO(2)) in breath samples were measured by infrared spectrometry and expressed as delta-over-baseline (DOB) ratios (‰). Mean areas under the curve of DOB from 0 to 3 h (AUC(0-3h) of DOB) were significantly decreased by omeprazole 20 mg and lansoprazole 30 mg but not by rabeprazole 20 mg. Conversely, higher PPI dose (ie, omeprazole 80 mg) seemed to further decrease AUC(0-3h) of DOB in RMs but increased it in PMs. Omeprazole and lansoprazole at the standard doses inhibit CYP activity but rabeprazole does not, whereas high-dose omeprazole seems to induce CYPs. PMID:21415279

  14. Quantitative imaging of subcellular metabolism with stable isotopes and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Matthew L; Lechene, Claude P

    2013-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) is the quantitative imaging of stable isotope labels in cells with a new type of secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS). The power of the methodology is attributable to (i) the immense advantage of using non-toxic stable isotope labels, (ii) high resolution imaging that approaches the resolution of usual transmission electron microscopy and (iii) the precise quantification of label down to 1 part-per-million and spanning several orders of magnitude. Here we review the basic elements of MIMS and describe new applications of MIMS to the quantitative study of metabolic processes including protein and nucleic acid synthesis in model organisms ranging from microbes to humans.

  15. Quantitative imaging of subcellular metabolism with stable isotopes and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) is the quantitative imaging of stable isotope labels in cells with a new type of secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS). The power of the methodology is attributable to (i) the immense advantage of using non-toxic stable isotope labels, (ii) high resolution imaging that approaches the resolution of usual transmission electron microscopy and (iii) the precise quantification of label down to 1 part-per-million and spanning several orders of magnitude. Here we review the basic elements of MIMS and describe new applications of MIMS to the quantitative study of metabolic processes including protein and nucleic acid synthesis in model organisms ranging from microbes to humans. PMID:23660233

  16. Σ production from targets of ^4He and ^13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrien, R. E.

    1996-10-01

    One of the abiding issues in hypernuclear research has been the question of the formation of nuclear bound states incorporating the Σ-hyperon. The recent increases in beam intensity at the Brookhaven AGS have enabled us to obtain a high statistics study on the production of Σ-hyperons on a ^4He target. Earlier research using stopped kaons at KEK indicated the presence of structure in the (K^-,π^-) reaction, and led to the postulate of a Σ bound state. That structure has now been definitely confirmed in the in-flight kaon experiment at the LESB2 beam line and Moby-Dick spectrometer. An improved measurement of the binding energy of the presumed state will be reported, together with a production cross section. In addition, both (K^-,π^-) and (K^-,π^+) reactions on ^13C have been studied and will be compared to similar measurements on ^9Be.

  17. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra of 13C-glycolaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haykal, I.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) is the simplest sugar and an important intermediate in the path toward forming more complex biologically relevant molecules. Astronomical surveys of interstellar molecules, such as those available with the very sensitive ALMA telescope, require preliminary laboratory investigations of the microwave and submillimeter-wave spectra of molecular species including new isotopologs - to identify these in the interstellar media. Aims: To achieve the detection of the 13C isotopologs of glycolaldehyde in the interstellar medium, their rotational spectra in the millimeter and submillimeter-wave regions were studied. Methods: The spectra of 13CH2OHCHO and CH2OH13CHO were recorded in the 150-945 GHz spectral range in the laboratory using a solid-state submillimeter-wave spectrometer in Lille. The observed line frequencies were measured with an accuracy of 30 kHz up to 700 GHz and of 50 kHz above 700 GHz. We analyzed the spectra with a standard Watson Hamiltonian. Results: About 10 000 new lines were identified for each isotopolog. The spectroscopic parameters were determined for the ground- and the three lowest vibrational states up to 945 and 630 GHz. Previous microwave assignments of 13CH2OHCHO were not confirmed. Conclusions: The provided line-lists and sets of molecular parameters meet the needs for a first astrophysical search of 13C-glycolaldehydes. Full Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A96

  18. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; Wu, R.; Yao, B.; Zhao, Y.; Lin, G.; Wu, B.; Lu, Q.; Meng, P.

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, hypothesized to be the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs, while processes such as fractionating foliar metabolism and preferentially loading into phloem of 13C-enriched sugars may contribute to the overall autotrophic-heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.

  19. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of early metabolic tumor response to therapies targeting choline metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mignion, Lionel; Danhier, Pierre; Magat, Julie; Porporato, Paolo E; Masquelier, Julien; Gregoire, Vincent; Muccioli, Giulio G; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard; Jordan, Bénédicte F

    2016-04-15

    The cholinic phenotype, characterized by elevated phosphocholine and a high production of total-choline (tCho)-containing metabolites, is a metabolic hallmark of cancer. It can be exploited for targeted therapy. Non-invasive imaging biomarkers are required to evaluate an individual's response to targeted anticancer agents that usually do not rapidly cause tumor shrinkage. Because metabolic changes can manifest at earlier stages of therapy than changes in tumor size, the aim of the current study was to evaluate (1)H-MRS and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) as markers of tumor response to the modulation of the choline pathway in mammary tumor xenografts. Inhibition of choline kinase activity was achieved with the direct pharmacological inhibitor H-89, indirect inhibitor sorafenib and down-regulation of choline-kinase α (ChKA) expression using specific short-hairpin RNA (shRNA). While all three strategies significantly decreased tCho tumor content in vivo, only sorafenib and anti-ChKA shRNA significantly repressed tumor growth. The increase of apparent-diffusion-coefficient of water (ADCw) measured by DW-MRI, was predictive of the induced necrosis and inhibition of the tumor growth in sorafenib treated mice, while the absence of change in ADC values in H89 treated mice predicted the absence of effect in terms of tumor necrosis and tumor growth. In conclusion, (1)H-choline spectroscopy can be useful as a pharmacodynamic biomarker for choline targeted agents, while DW-MRI can be used as an early marker of effective tumor response to choline targeted therapies. DW-MRI combined to choline spectroscopy may provide a useful non-invasive marker for the early clinical assessment of tumor response to therapies targeting choline signaling. PMID:26595604

  20. The First in Vivo Observation of 13C- 15N Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2001-12-01

    [5-13C,15N]Glutamine, with 1J(13C-15N) of 16 Hz, was observed in vivo in the brain of spontaneously breathing rats by 13C MRS at 4.7 T. The brain [5-13C]glutamine peak consisted of the doublet from [5-13C,15N]glutamine and the center [5-13C,14N]glutamine peak, resulting in an apparent triplet with a separation of 8 Hz. The time course of formation of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine was monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 20-35 min. This [5-13C,15N]glutamine was formed by glial uptake of released neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate and its reaction with 15NH3 catalyzed by the glia-specific glutamine synthetase. The neurotransmitter glutamate C5 was selectively13C-enriched by intravenous [2,5-13C]glucose infusion to 13C-label whole-brain glutamate C5, followed by [12C]glucose infusion to chase 13C from the small and rapidly turning-over glial glutamate pool, leaving 13C mainly in the neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate pool, which is sequestered in vesicles until release. Hence, the observed [5-13C,15N]glutamine arises from a coupling between 13C of neuronal origin and 15N of glial origin. Measurement of the rate of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine formation provides a novel noninvasive method of studying the kinetics of neurotransmitter uptake into glia in vivo, a process that is crucial for protecting the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity.

  1. Bleached Porites compressa and Montipora capitata corals catabolize δ13C-enriched lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottoli, Andréa G.; Rodrigues, Lisa J.

    2011-09-01

    Corals rely on stored energy reserves (i.e., lipids, carbohydrates, and protein) to survive bleaching events. To better understand the physiological implications of coral bleaching on lipid catabolism and/or synthesis, we measured the δ13C of coral total lipids (δ13CTL) in experimentally bleached (treatment) and non-bleached (control) Porites compressa and Montipora capitata corals immediately after bleaching and after 1.5 and 4 months of recovery on the reef. Overall δ13CTL values in treatment corals were significantly lower than in control corals because of a 1.9 and 3.4‰ decrease in δ13CTL immediately after bleaching in P. compressa and M. capitata, respectively. The decrease in δ13CTL coincided with decreases in total lipid concentration, indicating that corals catabolized δ13C-enriched lipids. Since storage lipids are primarily depleted during bleaching, we hypothesize that they are isotopically enriched relative to other lipid classes. This work further helps clarify our understanding of changes to coral metabolism and biogeochemistry when bleached and helps elucidate how lipid classes may influence recovery from bleaching and ultimately coral survival.

  2. Microwave spectra for the three 13C1 isotopologues of propene and new rotational constants for propene and its 13C1 isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Groner, Peter; Conrad, Andrew R.; Gurusinghe, Ranil; Tubergen, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    New measurements of microwave lines (A and E) of propene and its three 13C1 isotopologues have been made in the 10-22 GHz region with FT accuracy. The revised lines for propene along with many hundreds from the literature were fitted with the ERHAM program for internal rotors to give improved rotational constants. The new constants are A0 = 46280.2904(16), B0 = 9305.24260(30), and C0 = 8134.22685(28) MHz. Lines for the 3-13C1 species were observed in a pure sample; lines for the 1-13C1 and 2-13C1 species were observed in natural abundance. In fitting the limited sets of lines for the 13C1 species, many of the centrifugal distortion constants and most of the tunneling parameters were transferred from the fit of propene itself with 27 parameters. Improved rotational constants for the 13C1 species are reported.

  3. Sucrose octabenzoate: assignment of 13C and 1H resonances of the sucrose moiety and the 13C resonances of the carbonyl carbons. Use of 13C-n.m.r. spectroscopy for the study of selective deacylation.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, I J; Haines, A H; Konowicz, P A; Jones, H F

    1990-09-19

    Assignment of the 1H and 13C signals arising from the carbohydrate portion of sucrose octabenzoate has been achieved using homonuclear shift correlation experiments (COSY) and one-bond 1H-13C heteronuclear shift correlation measurements, respectively. The 13C resonances of the carbonyl carbon atoms of the eight benzoyl groups are readily distinguished for solutions in benzene-d6-pyridine-d5 (1:1), and have been assigned by means of three-bond 1H-13C shift correlation studies coupled with measurement of the 13C-n.m.r. spectrum of a sucrose octabenzoate specifically labelled with 13C in some of the carbonyl groups. With this assignment, products of partial deacylation of the octabenzoate may readily be identified by treatment with excess of benzoyl-carbonyl-13C chloride followed by measurement of the 13C-n.m.r. spectrum of the labelled sucrose octabenzoate, so prepared, in the carbonyl region. PMID:2276151

  4. A deuterium and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation of blood flow and carbohydrate metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Bosch, C.S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the development and application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques for this study of whole tissue metabolism, tissue perfusion and blood flow. The feasibility of spin imaging deuterium-enriched tissue water is demonstrated in cat brain in vivo and in situ. The potential application of D{sub 2}O administration to deuterium-flow-imaging is considered. NMR investigations of hepatic carbohydrate metabolism were performed in rat liver in vivo and in situ. A coaxial, double-surface-coil, double-resonance probe was developed for carbon detection while decoupling neighboring proton scalar interactions ({sup 13}C-({sup 1}H)) in hepatic tissue within the living animal. Hormonal and substrate regulation of hepatic glucose and glycogen metabolism was investigated by monitoring the metabolic fate of an administered c-dose of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose. Label flux was directed primarily into newly-synthesized {sup 13}C-labeled glycogen. A multiple resonance ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P) liver perfusion probe was designed for complimentary carbohydrate metabolic studies in rat liver in vitro. A description of the {sup 13}C-({sup 1}H)/{sup 31}P NMR perfusion probe is given. The surgical technique used for liver excision and peripheral life-support apparatus required to maintain hepatic function are also detailed.

  5. 13C-labeled gluconate tracing as a direct and accurate method for determining the pentose phosphate pathway split ratio in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Kleijn, Roelco J; van Winden, Wouter A; Ras, Cor; van Gulik, Walter M; Schipper, Dick; Heijnen, Joseph J

    2006-07-01

    In this study we developed a new method for accurately determining the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) split ratio, an important metabolic parameter in the primary metabolism of a cell. This method is based on simultaneous feeding of unlabeled glucose and trace amounts of [U-13C]gluconate, followed by measurement of the mass isotopomers of the intracellular metabolites surrounding the 6-phosphogluconate node. The gluconate tracer method was used with a penicillin G-producing chemostat culture of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. For comparison, a 13C-labeling-based metabolic flux analysis (MFA) was performed for glycolysis and the PPP of P. chrysogenum. For the first time mass isotopomer measurements of 13C-labeled primary metabolites are reported for P. chrysogenum and used for a 13C-based MFA. Estimation of the PPP split ratio of P. chrysogenum at a growth rate of 0.02 h(-1) yielded comparable values for the gluconate tracer method and the 13C-based MFA method, 51.8% and 51.1%, respectively. A sensitivity analysis of the estimated PPP split ratios showed that the 95% confidence interval was almost threefold smaller for the gluconate tracer method than for the 13C-based MFA method (40.0 to 63.5% and 46.0 to 56.5%, respectively). From these results we concluded that the gluconate tracer method permits accurate determination of the PPP split ratio but provides no information about the remaining cellular metabolism, while the 13C-based MFA method permits estimation of multiple fluxes but provides a less accurate estimate of the PPP split ratio.

  6. Ratio of 18o Versus 13c As Indicator of Ecological and Physiological Adaptability In The Coral Genus Madracis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, C.; Bak, R. P. M.

    Scleractinian corals hosting endosymbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) occur over a wide depth range within the photic zone of coral reefs. While some corals occur within a very narrow range others can be found over the whole reef slope. Within the genus Madracis we compared the skeletal 13C and 18O of three species that are very distinct in their distributional depth range. The species M. pharensis occurs over a wide range between 5 and > 60 m depth, while M. mirabilis and M. formosa are restricted to a narrow range growing shallow (<20 m) or deep (> 40 m), respectively. We hypothesize, that the distinct distributional depth range of the three species is due to physiological adaptation to the respective light regimes, and that this species specific adaptation must be reflected in the skeletal 18O and 13C signals. Skeletal isotope fractionation is controlled by kinetic (both 13C and 18O ) and metabolic (13C only) isotope effects. Apart from environmental factors (temperature and salinity), the calcification rate and P:R ratio control isotope fractionation. This means, that (1) the efficiency with which corals under various light regimes photosynthesize and calcify and (2) the linkage between photosynthesis and calcification become apparent when applying skeletal 13C versus 18O of the 3 Madracis species according to the model of McConnaughey (Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 53: 151-162, 1989). Comparing e.g. 13C vs. 18O ratios of M. pharensis (broad depth range) and M. formosa (narrow range, deep) sampled at 50 m depth, stable isotopes of M. pharensis plot on the kinetic line, while the isotopes of the deep adapted M. formosa are offset from the kinetic line. This indicates, that M. pharensis is hardly growing and is hence at its distributional depth limit, while M. formosa has even in 50 m depth a positive P:R ratio and skeletal growth. Therefore, the ratio of 13C and 18O might be useful as `proxy' in coral physiology and ecology. Vice versa an ecological approach in questions

  7. Novel Peak Assignments of in Vivo 13C MRS in Human Brain at 1.5 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blüml, Stefan; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Moreno, Angel; Ross, Brian D.

    2000-04-01

    13C MRS studies at natural abundance and after intravenous 1-13C glucose infusion were performed on a 1.5-T clinical scanner in four subjects. Localization to the occipital cortex was achieved by a surface coil. In natural abundance spectra glucose C3β,5β, myo-inositol, glutamate C1,2,5, glutamine C1,2,5, N-acetyl-aspartate C1-4,Cdbnd O, creatine CH2, CH3, and CCdbnd N, taurine C2,3, bicarbonate HCO-3 were identified. After glucose infusion 13C enrichment of glucose C1α,1β, glutamate C1-4, glutamine C1-4, aspartate C2,3, N-acetyl-aspartate C2,3, lactate C3, alanine C3, and HCO-3 were observed. The observation of 13C enrichment of resonances resonating at >150 ppm is an extension of previously published studies and will provide a more precise determination of metabolic rates and substrate decarboxylation in human brain.

  8. Screening and Selection of High Carotenoid Producing in Vitro Tomato Cell Culture Lines for [13C]-Carotenoid Production

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Nancy J.; Campbell, Jessica K.; Rogers, Randy B.; Rupassara, S. Indumathie; Garlick, Peter J.; Lila, Mary Ann; Erdman, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically labeled tomato carotenoids, phytoene, phytofluene, and lycopene, are needed for mammalian bioavailability and metabolism research but are currently commercially unavailable. The goals of this work were to establish and screen multiple in vitro tomato cell lines for carotenoid production, test the best producers with or without the bleaching herbicides, norflurazon and 2-(4-chlorophenyl-thio)-triethylamine (CPTA), and to use the greatest carotenoid accumulator for in vitro 13C-labeling. Different Solanum lycopersicum allelic variants for high lycopene and varying herbicide treatments were compared for carotenoid accumulation in callus and suspension culture, and cell suspension cultures of the hp-1 line were chosen for isotopic labeling. When grown with [U]-13C-glucose and treated with CPTA, hp-1 suspensions yielded highly enriched 13C-lycopene with 45% of lycopene in the M+40 form and 88% in the M+35 to M+40 isotopomer range. To the authors’ knowledge this is the first report of highly enriched 13C-carotenoid production from in vitro plant cell culture. PMID:20731353

  9. (13)C-(13)c homonuclear recoupling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance at a moderately high magic-angle-spinning frequency.

    PubMed

    Mithu, Venus Singh; Bakthavatsalam, Subha; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments are widely employed in structure determination of protein assemblies using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Here, we investigate the process of (13)C-(13)C magnetisation transfer at a moderate magic-angle-spinning frequency of 30 kHz using some of the prominent second-order dipolar recoupling schemes. The effect of isotropic chemical-shift difference and spatial distance between two carbons and amplitude of radio frequency on (1)H channel on the magnetisation transfer efficiency of these schemes is discussed in detail.

  10. Program for PET image alignment: Effects on calculated differences in cerebral metabolic rates for glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.L.; London, E.D.; Links, J.M.; Cascella, N.G. )

    1990-12-01

    A program was developed to align positron emission tomography images from multiple studies on the same subject. The program allowed alignment of two images with a fineness of one-tenth the width of a pixel. The indications and effects of misalignment were assessed in eight subjects from a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover study on the effects of cocaine on regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose. Visual examination of a difference image provided a sensitive and accurate tool for assessing image alignment. Image alignment within 2.8 mm was essential to reduce variability of measured cerebral metabolic rates for glucose. Misalignment by this amount introduced errors on the order of 20% in the computed metabolic rate for glucose. These errors propagate to the difference between metabolic rates for a subject measured in basal versus perturbed states.

  11. Imaging Glycosylation In Vivo by Metabolic Labeling and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wainman, Yéléna A.; Wright, Alan; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; McGuire, Sarah; Hu, De‐En; Bulat, Flaviu; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Stöckmann, Henning; Leeper, Finian J.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glycosylation is a ubiquitous post‐translational modification, present in over 50 % of the proteins in the human genome,1 with important roles in cell–cell communication and migration. Interest in glycome profiling has increased with the realization that glycans can be used as biomarkers of many diseases,2 including cancer.3 We report here the first tomographic imaging of glycosylated tissues in live mice by using metabolic labeling and a gadolinium‐based bioorthogonal MRI probe. Significant N‐azidoacetylgalactosamine dependent T 1 contrast was observed in vivo two hours after probe administration. Tumor, kidney, and liver showed significant contrast, and several other tissues, including the pancreas, spleen, heart, and intestines, showed a very high contrast (>10‐fold). This approach has the potential to enable the rapid and non‐invasive magnetic resonance imaging of glycosylated tissues in vivo in preclinical models of disease. PMID:27346899

  12. Imaging Glycosylation In Vivo by Metabolic Labeling and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wainman, Yéléna A.; Wright, Alan; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; McGuire, Sarah; Hu, De‐En; Bulat, Flaviu; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Stöckmann, Henning; Leeper, Finian J.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glycosylation is a ubiquitous post‐translational modification, present in over 50 % of the proteins in the human genome,1 with important roles in cell–cell communication and migration. Interest in glycome profiling has increased with the realization that glycans can be used as biomarkers of many diseases,2 including cancer.3 We report here the first tomographic imaging of glycosylated tissues in live mice by using metabolic labeling and a gadolinium‐based bioorthogonal MRI probe. Significant N‐azidoacetylgalactosamine dependent T 1 contrast was observed in vivo two hours after probe administration. Tumor, kidney, and liver showed significant contrast, and several other tissues, including the pancreas, spleen, heart, and intestines, showed a very high contrast (>10‐fold). This approach has the potential to enable the rapid and non‐invasive magnetic resonance imaging of glycosylated tissues in vivo in preclinical models of disease. PMID:26633082

  13. Regional, seasonal and interspecific variation in 15N and 13C in sympatric mouse lemurs.

    PubMed

    Rakotondranary, S Jacques; Struck, Ulrich; Knoblauch, Christian; Ganzhorn, Jörg U

    2011-11-01

    Madagascar provides some of the rare examples where two or more primate species of the same genus and with seemingly identical niche requirements occur in sympatry. If congeneric primate species co-occur in other parts of the world, they differ in size in a way that is consistent with Hutchinson's rule for coexisting species, or they occupy different ecological niches. In some areas of Madagascar, mouse lemurs do not follow these "rules" and thus seem to violate one of the principles of community ecology. In order to understand the mechanisms that allow coexistence of sympatric congeneric species without obvious niche differentiation, we studied food composition of two identical sized omnivorous mouse lemur species, Microcebus griseorufus and M. murinus with the help of stable isotope analyses (δ(15)N and δ(13)C). The two species are closely related sister species. During the rich season, when food seems abundant, the two species do not differ in their nitrogen isotope composition, indicating that the two species occupy the same trophic level. But they differ in their δ(13)C values, indicating that M. griseorufus feeds more on C(4) and CAM (Crassulacean-acid-metabolism) plants than M. murinus. During the lean season, M. murinus has lower δ(15)N values, indicating that the two species feed at different trophic levels during times of food shortage. Hybrids between the two species showed intermediate food composition. The results reflect subtle differences in foraging or metabolic adaptations that are difficult to quantify by traditional observations but that represent possibilities to allow coexistence of species. PMID:21881908

  14. Regional, seasonal and interspecific variation in 15N and 13C in sympatric mouse lemurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakotondranary, S. Jacques; Struck, Ulrich; Knoblauch, Christian; Ganzhorn, Jörg U.

    2011-11-01

    Madagascar provides some of the rare examples where two or more primate species of the same genus and with seemingly identical niche requirements occur in sympatry. If congeneric primate species co-occur in other parts of the world, they differ in size in a way that is consistent with Hutchinson's rule for coexisting species, or they occupy different ecological niches. In some areas of Madagascar, mouse lemurs do not follow these "rules" and thus seem to violate one of the principles of community ecology. In order to understand the mechanisms that allow coexistence of sympatric congeneric species without obvious niche differentiation, we studied food composition of two identical sized omnivorous mouse lemur species, Microcebus griseorufus and M. murinus with the help of stable isotope analyses ( δ 15N and δ 13C). The two species are closely related sister species. During the rich season, when food seems abundant, the two species do not differ in their nitrogen isotope composition, indicating that the two species occupy the same trophic level. But they differ in their δ 13C values, indicating that M. griseorufus feeds more on C4 and CAM (Crassulacean-acid-metabolism) plants than M. murinus. During the lean season, M. murinus has lower δ 15N values, indicating that the two species feed at different trophic levels during times of food shortage. Hybrids between the two species showed intermediate food composition. The results reflect subtle differences in foraging or metabolic adaptations that are difficult to quantify by traditional observations but that represent possibilities to allow coexistence of species.

  15. Labeling strategies for 13C-detected aligned-sample solid-state NMR of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipp, Fabian V.; Sinha, Neeraj; Jairam, Lena; Bradley, Joel; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-12-01

    13C-detected solid-state NMR experiments have substantially higher sensitivity than the corresponding 15N-detected experiments on stationary, aligned samples of isotopically labeled proteins. Several methods for tailoring the isotopic labeling are described that result in spatially isolated 13C sites so that dipole-dipole couplings among the 13C are minimized, thus eliminating the need for homonuclear 13C- 13C decoupling in either indirect or direct dimensions of one- or multi-dimensional NMR experiments that employ 13C detection. The optimal percentage for random fractional 13C labeling is between 25% and 35%. Specifically labeled glycerol and glucose can be used at the carbon sources to tailor the isotopic labeling, and the choice depends on the resonances of interest for a particular study. For investigations of the protein backbone, growth of the bacteria on [2- 13C]-glucose-containing media was found to be most effective.

  16. Synthesis of 13C and 15N labeled 2,4-dinitroanisole.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, Bhumasamudram; Field, Jim A; Chorover, Jon; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Abrell, Leif; Mash, Eugene A

    2014-05-30

    Syntheses of [(13)C6]-2,4-dinitroanisole (ring-(13)C6) from [(13)C6]-anisole (ring-(13)C6) and [(15)N2]-2,4-dinitroanisole from anisole using in situ generated acetyl nitrate and [(15)N]-acetyl nitrate, respectively, are described. Treatment of [(13)C6]-anisole (ring-(13)C6) with acetyl nitrate generated in 100% HNO3 gave [(13)C6]-2,4-dinitroanisole (ring-(13)C6) in 83% yield. Treatment of anisole with [(15)N]-acetyl nitrate generated in 10 N [(15)N]-HNO3 gave [(15)N2 ]-2,4-dinitroanisole in 44% yield after two cycles of nitration. Byproducts in the latter reaction included [(15)N]-2-nitroanisole and [(15)N]-4-nitroanisole.

  17. Model of decision system for 13C Isotope Separation column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the model of a decisional system for 13C Isotope Separation column, which is used to detect mission critical situation. The start model was a model of one distributed control system of critical situations that may arise in the operation of the distillation column. The research work it is proposed a model of decision system which implement a temperature sensor inside of liquid nitrogen level in the condenser. The condenser is a part of column where take place the cryogenic process using nitrogen liquid. The work temperature is very low about -192oC, and because the temperature can grow or go down more than 2 degrees is a very critical location inside the column. In this way the column has a deeply monitor and supervised and it take a decision in a proper time when the temperature is grow up or getting down and became a critical situation. For monitor and supervised it was used MatLAB SimuLink. The model, the decision system gives a signal to one sensor when something is wrong in the condenser which is the most critical place of the isotopic column. In this way it creates an alarm that something is getting wrong in the isotopic column.

  18. Inelastic pion scattering by /sup 13/C at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions for inelastically scattered pions were obtained for several states in /sup 13/C at an incident energy of 65 MeV. The data include results from both ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ measurements. In addition, ..pi../sup -/ measurements were made at T/sub ..pi../ = 50 MeV at one angle to give a two point fixed-q excitation function. The data are compared to theory and the data of others. As might be expected, medium corrections are shown to be considerably more important at low energies than at resonance. This is true for inelastic transitions of multipolarity 0,2 and 3. Parameters derived from an analysis of elastic pion scattering and SCX data also provide an adequate description of the inelastic transitions. The charge asymmetry in the cross sections for the 9/2/sup +/ state that was seen at resonance persists at these energies. This result is consistent with an impulse approximation treatment of the spin-flip amplitude. This is true even though the incoming energy of the pions is far below the range where the validity of an impulse treatment is expected. 65 refs., 45 figs.

  19. New optical analyzer for 13C-breath test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Dressler, Matthias; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus; Groninga, Hinrich

    2008-04-01

    Medical breath tests are well established diagnostic tools, predominantly for gastroenterological inspections, but also for many other examinations. Since the composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflect the physical condition of a patient, a breath analysis allows one to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that is based on photoacoustic spectroscopy and uses a DFB diode laser at 2.744 μm. The concentration ratio of the CO II isotopologues is determined by measuring the absorption on a 13CO II line in comparison to a 12CO II line. In the specially selected spectral range the lines have similar strengths, although the concentrations differ by a factor of 90. Therefore, the signals are well comparable. Due to an excellent signal-noise-ratio isotope variations of less than 1% can be resolved as required for the breath test.

  20. Citrate and Sugar Cofermentation in Leuconostoc oenos, a (sup13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, A.; Santos, H.

    1996-01-01

    (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate citrate-glucose cometabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the wine lactic acid bacterium Leuconostoc oenos. The use of isotopically enriched substrates allowed us to identify and quantify in the end products the carbon atoms derived from each of the substrates supplied; furthermore, it was possible to differentiate between products derived from the metabolism of endogenous carbon reserves and those derived from external substrates. Citrate-sugar cometabolism was also monitored in dilute cell suspensions for comparison with the nuclear magnetic resonance results. A clear metabolic shift of the end products from glucose metabolism was observed when citrate was provided along with glucose: ethanol was replaced by acetate, and 2,3-butanediol was produced. Reciprocally, the production of lactate and 2,3-butanediol from citrate was increased in the presence of glucose. When citrate was cometabolized with glucose, a 10-fold reduction in the intracellular concentration of glucose-6-phosphate was observed, a result in line with the observed citrate-induced stimulation of glucose consumption. The presence of citrate provided additional pathways for NADP(sup+) regeneration and allowed the diversion of sugar carbon to reactions in which ATP was synthesized. The increased growth rates and maximal biomass yields of L. oenos growing on citrate-glucose mixtures resulted from increased ATP synthesis both by substrate-level phosphorylation and by a chemiosmotic mechanism. PMID:16535363

  1. Two Categories of 13C/12C Ratios for Higher Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bruce N.; Epstein, Samuel

    1971-01-01

    13C/12C ratios have been determined for plant tissue from 104 species representing 60 families. Higher plants fall into two categories, those with low δPDBI13C values (—24 to —34‰) and those with high δ 13C values (—6 to —19‰). Algae have δ 13C values of —12 to —23‰. Photosynthetic fractionation leading to such values is discussed. PMID:16657626

  2. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  3. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  4. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  5. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  6. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  7. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  8. Uranyl nitrate inhibits lactate gluconeogenesis in isolated human and mouse renal proximal tubules: A {sup 13}C-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Renault, Sophie; Faiz, Hassan; Gadet, Rudy; Ferrier, Bernard; Martin, Guy; Baverel, Gabriel; Conjard-Duplany, Agnes

    2010-01-01

    As part of a study on uranium nephrotoxicity, we investigated the effect of uranyl nitrate in isolated human and mouse kidney cortex tubules metabolizing the physiological substrate lactate. In the millimolar range, uranyl nitrate reduced lactate removal and gluconeogenesis and the cellular ATP level in a dose-dependent fashion. After incubation in phosphate-free Krebs-Henseleit medium with 5 mM L-[1-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[2-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[3-{sup 13}C]lactate, substrate utilization and product formation were measured by enzymatic and NMR spectroscopic methods. In the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate, glucose production and the intracellular ATP content were significantly reduced in both human and mouse tubules. Combination of enzymatic and NMR measurements with a mathematical model of lactate metabolism revealed an inhibition of fluxes through lactate dehydrogenase and the gluconeogenic enzymes in the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate; in human and mouse tubules, fluxes were lowered by 20% and 14% (lactate dehydrogenase), 27% and 32% (pyruvate carboxylase), 35% and 36% (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase), and 39% and 45% (glucose-6-phosphatase), respectively. These results indicate that natural uranium is an inhibitor of renal lactate gluconeogenesis in both humans and mice.

  9. Stable isotope-enhanced two- and three-dimensional diffusion ordered 13C-NMR spectroscopy (SIE-DOSY 13C-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable Isotope-Enhanced Diffusion Ordered (SIE-DOSY) 13C-NMR has been applied to 13C-enriched carbohydrates and has been used to determine diffusion coefficients for pentose and hexose monosaccharides, a disaccharide and a trisaccharide. These 2D spectra were obtained with as little as 8 min of acq...

  10. Methanogenesis produces strong 13C enrichment in stromatolites of Lagoa Salgada, Brazil: a modern analogue for Palaeo-/Neoproterozoic stromatolites?

    PubMed

    Birgel, D; Meister, P; Lundberg, R; Horath, T D; Bontognali, T R R; Bahniuk, A M; de Rezende, C E; Vasconcelos, C; McKenzie, J A

    2015-05-01

    Holocene stromatolites characterized by unusually positive inorganic δ(13) CPDB values (i.e. up to +16‰) are present in Lagoa Salgada, a seasonally brackish to hypersaline lagoon near Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Such positive values cannot be explained by phototrophic fixation of CO2 alone, and they suggest that methanogenesis was a dominating process during the growth of the stromatolites. Indeed, up to 5 mm methane was measured in the porewater. The archaeal membrane lipid archaeol showing δ(13) C values between -15 and 0‰ suggests that archaea are present and producing methane in the modern lagoon sediment. Moreover, (13) C-depleted hopanoids diplopterol and 3β-methylated C32 17β(H),21β(H)-hopanoic acid (both -40‰) are preserved in lagoon sediments and are most likely derived from aerobic methanotrophic bacteria thriving in the methane-enriched water column. Loss of isotopically light methane through the water column would explain the residual (13) C-enriched pool of dissolved inorganic carbon from where the carbonate constituting the stromatolites precipitated. The predominance of methanogenic archaea in the lagoon is most likely a result of sulphate limitation, suppressing the activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria under brackish conditions in a seasonally humid tropical environment. Indeed, sulphate-reduction activity is very low in the modern sediments. In absence of an efficient carbonate-inducing metabolic process, we propose that stromatolite formation in Lagoa Salgada was abiotically induced, while the (13) C-enriched organic and inorganic carbon pools are due to methanogenesis. Unusually, (13) C-enriched stromatolitic deposits also appear in the geological record of prolonged periods in the Palaeo- and Neoproterozoic. Lagoa Salgada represents a possible modern analogue to conditions that may have been widespread in the Proterozoic, at times when low sulphate concentrations in sea water allowed methanogens to prevail over sulphate

  11. Impact of Gd3+ doping and glassing solvent deuteration on 13C DNP at 5 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lama, Bimala; Niedbalski, Peter; Goderya, Mudrekh; Long, Joanna; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique which can be used to amplify signals in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by several thousand-fold. The most commonly available DNP system typically operates at the W-band field or 3.35 T, at which it has been shown that 13C NMR signal can be enhanced by deuteration and Gd3+ doping. In this work, we have investigated the applicability of these procedures at 5 T. Our results indicate that the deuteration of the glassing matrix still yields an enhancement of 13C DNP when 4-oxo-TEMPO free radical is used. The effect is attributed to the lower heat load of the deuterons compared to protons. An addition of a trace amount of Gd3+ gives a modest enhancement of the signal when trityl OX063 is used, albeit with a less pronounced relative enhancement compared to the results obtained at 3.35 T. The results suggest that the enhancement obtained via Gd3+ doping may become saturated at higher field. These results will be discussed using a thermodynamic model of DNP. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  12. Coal structure at reactive sites by sup 1 H- sup 13 C- sup 19 F double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, E.W.; Woody, M.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The solid state NMR technique, {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C-{sup 31}P double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy, uses the direct dipolar interaction between {sup 13}C-{sup 31}P spin pairs in organophosphorus substances to identify the subset of carbons within a spherical volume element of 0.4 nm radius centered on the {sup 31}P atom. In combination with chemical manipulation of coals designed to introduce phosphorus containing functionality into the organic matrix, the NMR experiment becomes a method to examine selectively the carbon bonding network at the reactive sites in the coal. This approach generates a statistical structure description of the coal at the reaction centers in contrast to bulk carbon characterization using conventional {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. 3 refs.

  13. Topological Constraints on Chain-Folding Structure of Semicrystalline Polymer as Studied by 13C-13C Double Quantum NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Youlee; Miyoshi, Toshikazu

    Chain-folding process is a prominent feature of long polymer chains during crystallization. Over the last half century, much effort has been paid to reveal the chain trajectory. Even though various chain-folding models as well as theories of crystallization at molecule levels have been proposed, they could be not reconciled due to the limited experimental evidences. Recent development of double quantum NMR with selective isotope labeling identified the chain-trajectory of 13C labeled isotactic poly(1-butene). The systematic experiments covered a wide range of parameters, i.e. kinetics, concentration, and molecular weight (Mw) . It was demonstrated that i) adjacent re-entry site was invariant as a function of crystallization temperature (Tc) , concentration, andMw, ii) long-range order of adjacent re-entry sequence is independence of kinetics at a given concentration while it decreased with increasing the polymer concentration at a given Tc due to the increased interruption between the chains, and iii) high Mw chains led to the multilayer folded structures in single crystals, but the melt state induced the identical short adjacent sequences of long and short polymer over a wide range of Tc due to the entanglements. The behaviors indicated that the topological restriction plays significant roles in the chain-folding process rather than the kinetics. The proposed framework to control the chain-folding structure presents a new perspective into the chain organization by either the intra- or inter-chain interaction. National Science Foundation Grants DMR-1105829 and 1408855.

  14. Using Position-Specific 13C and 14C Labeling and 13C-PLFA Analysis to Assess Microbial Transformations of Free Versus Sorbed Alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, C.; Herschbach, J.; Bore, E. K.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Dippold, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Sorption of charged or partially charged low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil sciences, to compare the transformation mechanisms of sorbed and non-sorbed alanine in soil. Alanine as an amino acid links C- and N-cycles in soil and therefore is a model substance for the pool of LMWOS. To assess transformations of sorbed alanine, we added position-specific and uniformly 13C and 14C labeled alanine tracer to soil that had previously been sterilized by γ-radiation. The labeled soil was added to non-sterilized soil from the same site and incubated. Soil labeled with the same tracers without previous sorption was prepared and incubated as well. We captured the respired CO2 and determined its 14C-activity at increasing time intervals. The incorporation of 14C into microbial biomass was determined by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE), and utilization of individual C positions by distinct microbial groups was evaluated by 13C-phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA). A dual peak in the respired CO2 revealed two sorption mechanisms. To compare the fate of individual C atoms independent of their concentration and pool size in soil, we applied the divergence index (DI). The DI reveals the convergent or divergent behavior of C from individual molecule positions during microbial utilization. Alanine C-1 position was mainly oxidized to CO2, while its C-2 and C-3 were preferentially incorporated in microbial biomass and PLFA. This indicates that sorption by the COOH group does not protect this group from preferential oxidation. Microbial metabolism was determinative for the preferential oxidation of individual molecule positions. The use of position-specific labeling revealed mechanisms and kinetics of microbial utilization of sorbed and non

  15. Multimodal optical imaging system for in vivo investigation of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Gorczynska, Iwona; Fujimoto, James G; Boas, David A; Sakadžić, Sava

    2015-12-01

    Improving our understanding of brain function requires novel tools to observe multiple physiological parameters with high resolution in vivo. We have developed a multimodal imaging system for investigating multiple facets of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in small animals. The system was custom designed and features multiple optical imaging capabilities, including 2-photon and confocal lifetime microscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser speckle imaging, and optical intrinsic signal imaging. Here, we provide details of the system's design and present in vivo observations of multiple metrics of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism, including oxygen partial pressure, microvascular blood flow, and NADH autofluorescence.

  16. Multimodal optical imaging system for in vivo investigation of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Gorczynska, Iwona; Fujimoto, James G.; Boas, David A.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2015-01-01

    Improving our understanding of brain function requires novel tools to observe multiple physiological parameters with high resolution in vivo. We have developed a multimodal imaging system for investigating multiple facets of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in small animals. The system was custom designed and features multiple optical imaging capabilities, including 2-photon and confocal lifetime microscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser speckle imaging, and optical intrinsic signal imaging. Here, we provide details of the system’s design and present in vivo observations of multiple metrics of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism, including oxygen partial pressure, microvascular blood flow, and NADH autofluorescence. PMID:26713212

  17. Imaging collagen remodeling and sensing transplanted autologous fibroblast metabolism in mouse dermis using multimode nonlinear optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin; Cao, Ning; Jiang, Xingshan; Xie, Shusen; Xiong, Shuyuan

    2008-06-01

    Collagen remodeling and transplanted autologous fibroblast metabolic states in mouse dermis after cellular injection are investigated using multimode nonlinear optical imaging. Our findings show that the technique can image the progress of collagen remodeling in mouse dermis. It can also image transplanted autologous fibroblasts in their collagen matrix environment in the dermis, because of metabolic activity. It was also found that the approach can provide two-photon ratiometric redox fluorometry based on autologous fibroblast fluorescence from reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme and oxidized flavoproteins for sensing the autologous fibroblast metabolic state. These results show that the multimode nonlinear optical imaging technique may have potential in a clinical setting as an in vivo diagnostic and monitoring system for cellular therapy in plastic surgery.

  18. Metabolic brain imaging correlated with clinical features of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.; Chawluk, J.; Powlis, W.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Nineteen adults with brain tumors have been studied with positron emission tomography utilizing FDG. Fourteen had biopsy proven cerebral malignant glioma, one each had meningioma, hemangiopericytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), two had unbiopsied lesions, and one patient had an area of biopsy proven radiation necrosis. Three different patterns of glucose metabolism are observed: marked increase in metabolism at the site of the known tumor in (10 high grade gliomas and the PNET), lower than normal metabolism at the tumor (in 1 grade II glioma, 3 grade III gliomas, 2 unbiopsied low density nonenhancing lesions, and the meningioma), no abnormality (1 enhancing glioma, the hemangiopericytoma and the radiation necrosis.) The metabolic rate of the tumor or the surrounding brain did not appear to be correlated with the history of previous irradiation or chemotherapy. Decreased metabolism was frequently observed in the rest of the affected hemisphere and in the contralateral cerebellum. Tumors of high grade or with enhancing CT characteristics were more likely to show increased metabolism. Among the patients with proven gliomas, survival after PETT scan tended to be longer for those with low metabolic activity tumors than for those with highly active tumors. The authors conclude that PETT may help to predict the malignant potential of tumors, and may add useful clinical information to the CT scan.

  19. 13C NMR Metabolomic Evaluation of Immediate and Delayed Mild Hypothermia in Cerebrocortical Slices After Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Segal, Mark; Kelly, Mark J.S.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Kim, Myungwon; James, Thomas L.; Litt, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Background Mild brain hypothermia (32°C–34°C) after human neonatal asphyxia improves neurodevelopmental outcomes. Astrocytes but not neurons have pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and an acetate uptake transporter. 13C NMR spectroscopy of rodent brain extracts after administering [1-13C]glucose and [1,2-13C]acetate can distinguish metabolic differences between glia and neurons, and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) entry via pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and PC. Methods Neonatal rat cerebrocortical slices receiving a 13C-acetate/glucose mixture underwent a 45-min asphyxia simulation via oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) followed by 6 h of recovery. Protocols in three groups of N = 3 experiments were identical except for temperature management. The three temperature groups were: normothermia (37°C), hypothermia (32°C for 3.75 h beginning at OGD start), and delayed hypothermia (32°C for 3.75 h, beginning 15 min after OGD start). Multivariate analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance metabolite quantifications included principal component analyses and the L1-Penalized Regularized Regression algorithm known as the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO). Results The most significant metabolite difference (p < 0.0056) was [2-13C]glutamine’s higher final/control ratio for the Hypothermia group (1.75 ± 0.12) compared to ratios for the Delayed (1.12 ± 0.12) and Normothermia group (0.94 ± 0.06), implying a higher PC/PDH ratio for glutamine formation. LASSO found the most important metabolites associated with adenosine triphosphate preservation: [3,4-13C]glutamate—produced via PDH entry, [2-13C]taurine--an important osmolyte, and phosphocreatine. Final principal component analyses scores plots suggested separate cluster formation for the hypothermia group, but with insufficient data for statistical significance. Conclusions Starting mild hypothermia simultaneously with OGD, compared with delayed starting or no hypothermia, has higher PC throughput

  20. Assessing microbial utilization of free versus sorbed Alanine by using position-specific 13C labeling and 13C-PLFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, Jennifer; Apostel, Carolin; Spielvogel, Sandra; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Dippold, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Microbial utilization is a key transformation process of soil organic matter (SOM). Sorption of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces blocks or delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil science, combined with 13C-phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, to assess microbial utilization of sorbed and non-sorbed Alanine in soil. Alanine has various functional groups enabling different sorption mechanisms via its positive charge (e.g. to clay minerals by cation exchange), as well as via its negative charge (e.g. to iron oxides by ligand exchange). To assess changes in the transformation pathways caused by sorption, we added uniformly and position-specifically 13C and 14C labeled Alanine to the Ap of a loamy Luvisol in a short-term (10 days) incubation experiment. To allow for sorption of the tracer solution to an aliquot of this soil, microbial activity was minimized in this subsample by sterilizing the soil by γ-radiation. After shaking, the remaining solutions were filtered and the non-sorbed Alanine was removed with Millipore water and then added to non-sterilized soil. For the free Alanine treatment, solutions with Alanine of similar amount and isotopic composition were prepared, added to the soil and incubated as well. The respired CO2 was trapped in NaOH and its 14C-activity was determined at increasing times intervals. Microbial utilization of Alanine's individual C positions was evaluated in distinct microbial groups classified by 13C-PLFA analysis. Sorption to soil minerals delayed respiration to CO2 and reduced initial respiration rate by 80%. Irrespective of sorption, the highest amount was respired from the carboxylic position (C-1), whereas the amino-bound (C-2) and the methylic position (C-3) were preferentially incorporated into PLFA of microorganisms due to the

  1. The Late Pleistocene history of surface water δ13C in the Sulu Sea: Possible relationship to Pacific Deepwater δ13C changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, Braddock K.; Dunbar, Robert B.

    1994-04-01

    A reconstruction of late Pleistocene surface water carbon isotopic (δ13C) variability is presented from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) site 769 in the Sulu Sea in the western tropical Pacific. The Sulu Sea is a shallowly silled back arc basin with a maximum sill depth of 420 m. Site 769 was drilled on a bathymetric high in 3643 m of water and has average late Pleistocene sedimentation rates of 8.5 cm/kyr. The oxygen isotope record (δ18O) of Globigerinoides ruber at site 769 shows a strong correlation with the SPECMAP stacked δ18O record, attesting to the continuity of sediment archive at the site. Surface δ13C displays consistent glacial-interglacial variability which averages ˜0.9‰ and has varied from 0.75 to 1.1‰ over the last 800 kyr. Comparison to surface water δ13C records in the South China Sea and western tropical Pacific suggests that the glacial-interglacial surface δ13C variability is regional in scale. Planktonic δ13C data from ODP site 677 in the eastern Pacific is also coherent with the site 769. Additionally, we have found that the site 769 surface δ13C record is coherent at periods of 100 and 41 kyr with deepwater δ13C records from the Pacific. The highest correlation occurs with the deep eastern Pacific, where benthic δ13C data from cores RC13-110 and ODP site 677 closely match the Sulu Sea surface water record. We evaluate several possible controls of surface water δ13C in the Sulu Sea that may explain the coherent timing with Pacific deepwater δ13C records. These include variations in terrestrial organic matter flux to the basin, the upwelling of subsurface water and productivity changes, and the influx of western Pacific intermediate water to the Sulu Sea. Our preferred explanation involves a region of upper intermediate water upwelling in the far western Pacific which has been shown to outgas CO2 from subsurface waters into surface waters. Upwelling also occurs in the area of Panama Basin site 677. These equatorial upwelling zones

  2. Determination of 13C/ 12C ratios with (d, p) nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, J.; Tesmer, J. R.; Li, Y. H.; Greco, R.; Grim, G. P.; Obst, A. W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-06-01

    Stable isotope ratios such as 13C/ 12C play an important role in many applications including environment and energy research. Since many surface analysis techniques are plagued with unavoidable hydrocarbon contamination issues during analysis, it is highly desirable that 13C and 12C isotopes be measured simultaneously especially in specimens with a minute amount of 13C, in order to reliably determine 13C/ 12C ratios. In this paper, we report that deuterium induced proton particle reactions, 13C(d, p) 14C and 12C(d, p) 13C, provide a convenient and reliable approach for 13C/ 12C ratio determination. Optimizations on experimental considerations and potential interferences from other common light isotopes are discussed as well as results from the application of this technique to diagnose the performance of a target debris collection in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiment.

  3. Sc3CH@C80: selective (13)C enrichment of the central carbon atom.

    PubMed

    Junghans, Katrin; Rosenkranz, Marco; Popov, Alexey A

    2016-05-01

    Sc3CH@C80 is synthesized and characterized by (1)H, (13)C, and (45)Sc NMR. A large negative chemical shift of the proton, -11.73 ppm in the Ih and -8.79 ppm in the D5h C80 cage isomers, is found. (13)C satellites in the (1)H NMR spectrum enabled indirect determination of the (13)C chemical shift for the central carbon at 173 ± 1 ppm. Intensity of the satellites allowed determination of the (13)C content for the central carbon atom. This unique possibility is applied to analyze the cluster/cage (13)C distribution in mechanistic studies employing either (13)CH4 or (13)C powder to enrich Sc3CH@C80 with (13)C. PMID:27109443

  4. Sc3CH@C80: selective 13C enrichment of the central carbon atom†

    PubMed Central

    Junghans, Katrin; Rosenkranz, Marco; Popov, Alexey A.

    2016-01-01

    Sc3CH@C80 is synthesized and characterized by 1H, 13C, and 45Sc NMR. A large negative chemical shift of the proton, −11.73 ppm in the Ih and −8.79 ppm in the D5h C80 cage isomers, is found. 13C satellites in the 1H NMR spectrum enabled indirect determination of the 13C chemical shift for the central carbon at 173 ± 1 ppm. Intensity of the satellites allowed determination of the 13C content for the central carbon atom. This unique possibility is applied to analyze the cluster/cage 13C distribution in mechanistic studies employing either 13CH4 or 13C powder to enrich Sc3CH@C80 with 13C. PMID:27109443

  5. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging and quantification of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Oliver T.; Ittrich, Harald; Peldschus, Kersten; Kaul, Michael G.; Tromsdorf, Ulrich I.; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Nikolic, Marija S.; Mollwitz, Birgit; Merkel, Martin; Bigall, Nadja C.; Sapra, Sameer; Reimer, Rudolph; Hohenberg, Heinz; Weller, Horst; Eychmüller, Alexander; Adam, Gerhard; Beisiegel, Ulrike; Heeren, Joerg

    2009-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals have physical properties that are well suited for biomedical imaging. Previously, we have shown that iron oxide nanocrystals embedded within the lipid core of micelles show optimized characteristics for quantitative imaging. Here, we embed quantum dots and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of lipoproteins-micelles that transport lipids and other hydrophobic substances in the blood-and show that it is possible to image and quantify the kinetics of lipoprotein metabolism in vivo using fluorescence and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. The lipoproteins were taken up by liver cells in wild-type mice and displayed defective clearance in knock-out mice lacking a lipoprotein receptor or its ligand, indicating that the nanocrystals did not influence the specificity of the metabolic process. Using this strategy it is possible to study the clearance of lipoproteins in metabolic disorders and to improve the contrast in clinical imaging.

  6. Characterization of uniformly and atom-specifically 13C-labeled heparin and heparan sulfate polysaccharide precursors using 13C NMR spectroscopy and ESI mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao K. N.; Tran, Vy M.; Victor, Xylophone V.; Skalicky, Jack J.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2010-01-01

    The biological actions of heparin and heparan sulfate, two structurally related glycosaminoglycans, depend on the organization of the complex heparanome. Due to the structural complexity of the heparanome, the sequence of variably sulfonated uronic acid and glucosamine residues is usually characterized by the analysis of smaller oligosaccharide and disaccharide fragments. Even characterization of smaller heparin/heparan sulfate oligosaccharide or disaccharide fragments using simple 1D 1H NMR spectroscopy is often complicated by the extensive signal overlap. 13C NMR signals, on the other hand, overlap less and therefore, 13C NMR spectroscopy can greatly facilitate the structural elucidation of the complex heparanome and provide finer insights into the structural basis for biological functions. This is the first report of the preparation of anomeric carbon-specific 13C-labeled heparin/heparan sulfate precursors from the Escherichia coli K5 strain. Uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled precursors were also produced and characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis of enzymatically fragmented disaccharides revealed that anomeric carbon-specific labeling efforts resulted in a minor loss/scrambling of 13C in the precursor backbone, whereas uniform labeling efforts resulted in greater than 95% 13C isotope enrichment in the precursor backbone. These labeled precursors provided high-resolution NMR signals with great sensitivity and set the stage for studying the heparanome–proteome interactions. PMID:20832774

  7. Imaging Sensitivity of Quiescent Cancer Cells to Metabolic Perturbations in Bone Marrow Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Cavnar, Stephen P.; Xiao, Annie; Gibbons, Anne E.; Rickelmann, Andrew D.; Neely, Taylor; Luker, Kathryn E.; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant cells from breast cancer and other common cancers such as prostate and melanoma may persist in bone marrow as quiescent, non-dividing cells that remain viable for years or even decades before resuming proliferation to cause recurrent disease. This phenomenon, referred to clinically as tumor dormancy, poses tremendous challenges to curing patients with breast cancer. Quiescent tumor cells resist chemotherapy drugs that predominantly target proliferating cells, limiting success of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant therapies. We recently developed a 3D spheroid model of quiescent breast cancer cells in bone marrow for mechanistic and drug testing studies. We combined this model with optical imaging methods for label-free detection of cells preferentially utilizing glycolysis versus oxidative metabolism to investigate the metabolic state of co-culture spheroids with different bone marrow stromal and breast cancer cells. Through imaging and biochemical assays, we identified different metabolic states of bone marrow stromal cells that control metabolic status and flexibilities of co-cultured breast cancer cells. We tested metabolic stresses and targeted inhibition of specific metabolic pathways to identify approaches to preferentially eliminate quiescent breast cancer cells from bone marrow environments. These studies establish an integrated imaging approach to analyze metabolism in complex tissue environments to identify new metabolically-targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27478871

  8. Utilization of low molecular weight organics by soil microorganisms: combination of 13C-labelling with PLFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna; Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Microbial metabolisation is the main transformation pathway of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), but detailed knowledge concerning the fate of LMWOS in soils is strongly limited. Considering that various LMWOS classes enter biochemical cycles at different steps, we hypothesise that the percentage of their LMWOS-Carbon (C) used for microbial biomass (MB) production and consequently medium-term stabilisation in soil is different. We traced the three main groups of LMWOS: amino acids, sugars and carboxylic acids, by uniformly labelled 13C-alanine, -glutamate, -glucose, -ribose, -acetate and -palmitate. Incorporation of 13C from these LMWOS into MB (fumigation-extraction method) and into phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) (Bligh-Dyer extraction, purification and GC-C-IRMS measurement) was investigated under field conditions 3 d and 10 d after LMWOS application. The activity of microbial utilization of LMWOS for cell membrane construction was estimated by replacement of PLFA-C with 13C. Decomposition of LMWOS-C comprised 20-65% of the total label, whereas incorporation of 13C into MB amounted to 20-50% of initially applied 13C on day three and was reduced to 5-30% on day 10. Incorporation of 13C-labelled LMWOS into MB followed the trend sugars > carboxylic acids > amino acids. Differences in microbial utilisation between LMWOS were observed mainly at day 10. Thus, instead of initial rapid uptake, further metabolism within microbial cells accounts for the individual fate of C from different LMWOS in soils. Incorporation of 13C from each LMWOS into each PLFA occurred, which reflects the ubiquitous ability of all functional microbial groups for LMWOS utilization. The preferential incorporation of palmitate can be attributed to its role as a direct precursor for many fatty acids (FAs) and PLFA formation. Higher incorporation of alanine and glucose compared to glutamate, ribose and acetate reflect the preferential use of glycolysis-derived substances in the FAs

  9. U13C cell extract of Pichia pastoris--a powerful tool for evaluation of sample preparation in metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Stefan; Haberhauer-Troyer, Christina; Klavins, Kristaps; Russmayer, Hannes; Steiger, Matthias G; Gasser, Brigitte; Sauer, Michael; Mattanovich, Diethard; Hann, Stephan; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2012-11-01

    Quantitative metabolic profiling is preceded by dedicated sample preparation protocols. These multistep procedures require detailed optimization and thorough validation. In this work, a uniformly (13)C-labeled (U(13)C) cell extract was used as a tool to evaluate the recoveries and repeatability precisions of the cell extraction and the extract treatment. A homogenous set of biological replicates (n = 15 samples of Pichia pastoris) was prepared for these fundamental experiments. A range of less than 30 intracellular metabolites, comprising amino acids, nucleotides, and organic acids were measured both in monoisotopic (12)C and U(13)C form by LC-MS/MS employing triple quadrupole MS, reversed phase chromatography, and HILIC. Recoveries of the sample preparation procedure ranging from 60 to 100% and repeatability precisions below 10% were obtained for most of the investigated metabolites using internal standardization approaches. Uncertainty budget calculations revealed that for this complex quantification task, in the optimum case, total combined uncertainty of 12% could be achieved. The optimum case would be represented by metabolites, easy to extract from yeast with high and precise recovery. In other cases the total combined uncertainty was significantly higher.

  10. The influence of diet on the δ 13C of shell carbon in the pulmonate snail Helix aspersa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, Lowell D.

    2002-02-01

    The influence of diet and atmospheric CO 2 on the carbon isotope composition of shell aragonite and shell-bound organic carbon in the pulmonate snail Helix aspersa raised in the laboratory was investigated. Three separate groups of snails were raised on romaine lettuce (C3 plant, δ 13C=-25.8‰), corn (C4 plant, δ 13C=-10.5‰), and sour orange ( 12C-enriched C3 plant, δ 13C=-39.1‰). The isotopic composition of body tissues closely tracked the isotopic composition of the snail diet as demonstrated previously. However, the isotopic composition of the acid insoluble organic matrix extracted from the aragonite shells does not track diet in all groups. In snails that were fed corn the isotopic composition of the organic matrix was more negative than the body by as much as 5‰ whereas the matrix was approximately 1‰ heavier than the body tissues in snails fed a diet of C3 plant material. These results indicate that isotopic composition of the organic matrix carbon cannot be used as an isotopic substrate for paleodietary reconstructions without first determining the source of the carbon and any associated fractionations. The isotopic composition of the shell aragonite is offset from the body tissues by 12.3‰ in each of the culture groups. This offset was not influenced by the consumption of carbonate and is not attributable to the diffusion of atmospheric CO 2 into the hemolymph. The carbon isotopic composition of shell aragonite is best explained in terms of equilibrium fractionations associated with exchange between metabolic CO 2 and HCO 3 in the hemolymph and the fractionation associated with carbonate precipitation. These results differ from previous studies, based primarily on samples collected in the field, that have suggested atmospheric carbon dioxide contributes significantly to the shell δ 13C. The culture results indicate that the δ 13C of aragonite is a good recorder of the isotopic composition of the snail body tissue, and therefore a better

  11. Synthesis of isotopically labeled R- or S-[.sup.13C, .sup.2H] glycerols

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2008-01-22

    The present invention is directed to asymmetric chiral labeled glycerols including at least one chiral atom, from one to two .sup.13C atoms and from zero to four deuterium atoms bonded directly to a carbon atom, e.g., (2S) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol and (2R) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol, and to the use of such chiral glycerols in the preparation of labeled amino acids.

  12. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; et al

    2014-09-10

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has anmore » exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic – heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.« less

  13. Tracing carbon assimilation in endosymbiotic deep-sea hydrothermal vent Mytilid fatty acids by 13C-fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riou, V.; Bouillon, S.; Serrão Santos, R.; Dehairs, F.; Colaço, A.

    2010-09-01

    Bathymodiolus azoricus mussels thrive at Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents, where part of their energy requirements are met via an endosymbiotic association with chemolithotrophic and methanotrophic bacteria. In an effort to describe phenotypic characteristics of the two bacterial endosymbionts and to assess their ability to assimilate CO2, CH4 and multi-carbon compounds, we performed experiments in aquaria using 13C-labeled NaHCO3 (in the presence of H2S), CH4 or amino-acids and traced the incorporation of 13C into total and phospholipid fatty acids (tFA and PLFA, respectively). 14:0; 15:0; 16:0; 16:1(n - 7)c+t; 18:1(n - 13)c+t and (n - 7)c+t; 20:1(n - 7); 20:2(n - 9,15); 18:3(n - 7) and (n - 5,10,13) PLFA were labeled in the presence of H13CO3- (+H2S) and 13CH4, while the 12:0 compound became labeled only in the presence of H13CO3- (+H2S). In contrast, the 17:0; 18:0; 16:1(n - 9); 16:1(n - 8) and (n - 6); 18:1(n - 8); and 18:2(n - 7) PLFA were only labeled in the presence of 13CH4. Some of these symbiont-specific fatty acids also appeared to be labeled in mussel gill tFA when incubated with 13C-enriched amino acids, and so were mussel-specific fatty acids such as 22:2(n - 7,15). Our results provide experimental evidence for the potential of specific fatty acid markers to distinguish between the two endosymbiotic bacteria, shedding new light on C1 and multi-carbon compound metabolic pathways in B. azoricus and its symbionts.

  14. Survival of free-living Acholeplasma in aerated pig manure slurry revealed by 13C-labeled bacterial biomass probing

    PubMed Central

    Hanajima, Dai; Aoyagi, Tomo; Hori, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on microbial community succession and/or predominant taxa during the composting process; however, the ecophysiological roles of microorganisms are not well understood because microbial community structures are highly diverse and dynamic. Bacteria are the most important contributors to the organic-waste decomposition process, while decayed bacterial cells can serve as readily digested substrates for other microbial populations. In this study, we investigated the active bacterial species responsible for the assimilation of dead bacterial cells and their components in aerated pig manure slurry by using 13C-labeled bacterial biomass probing. After 3 days of forced aeration, 13C-labeled and unlabeled dead Escherichia coli cell suspensions were added to the slurry. The suspensions contained 13C-labeled and unlabeled bacterial cell components, possibly including the cell wall and membrane, as well as intracellular materials. RNA extracted from each slurry sample 2 h after addition of E. coli suspension was density-resolved by isopycnic centrifugation and analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, followed by cloning and sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. In the heavy isotopically labeled RNA fraction, the predominant 13C-assimilating population was identified as belonging to the genus Acholeplasma, which was not detected in control heavy RNA. Acholeplasma spp. have limited biosynthetic capabilities and possess a wide variety of transporters, resulting in their metabolic dependence on external carbon and energy sources. The prevalence of Acholeplasma spp. was further confirmed in aerated pig manure slurry from four different pig farms by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes; their relative abundance was ∼4.4%. Free-living Acholeplasma spp. had a competitive advantage for utilizing dead bacterial cells and their components more rapidly relative to other microbial populations, thus allowing the survival and prevalence

  15. Measuring (13)C-(2)D dipolar couplings with a universal REDOR dephasing curve

    PubMed

    Gullion

    2000-09-01

    A (13)C-observe REDOR experiment is described which allows (13)C-(2)D dipolar couplings to be obtained by a universal dipolar dephasing curve. Previous (13)C-observe REDOR experiments on (13)C-(2)D spin pairs generally relied on numerical simulations to obtain the dipolar coupling. The REDOR experiment described in this article is based on a deuterium composite pulse, and the data analysis eliminates the need for numerical simulations and is the same as the traditional REDOR analysis performed on pairs of spin-12 nuclei. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10968975

  16. Preserved pontine glucose metabolism in Alzheimer disease: A reference region for functional brain image (PET) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Frey, K.A.; Foster, N.L.; Kuhl, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Our goal was to examine regional preservation of energy metabolism in Alzheimer disease (AD) and to evaluate effects of PET data normalization to reference regions. Regional metabolic rates in the pons, thalamus, putamen, sensorimotor cortex, visual cortex, and cerebellum (reference regions) were determined stereotaxically and examined in 37 patients with probable AD and 22 normal controls based on quantitative {sup 18}FDG-PET measurements. Following normalization of metabolic rates of the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain to each reference region, distinctions of the two groups were assessed. The pons showed the best preservation of glucose metabolism in AD. Other reference regions showed relatively preserved metabolism compared with the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain, but had significant metabolic reduction. Data normalization to the pons not only enhanced statistical significance of metabolic reduction in the parietotemporal association cortex, but also preserved the presence of global cerebral metabolic reduction indicated in analysis of the quantitative data. Energy metabolism in the pons in probable AD is well preserved. The pons is a reliable reference for data normalization and will enhance diagnostic accuracy and efficiency of quantitative and nonquantitative functional brain imaging. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. New study of the astrophysical reaction 13C(a,n)16O via the 13C(7Li,t)17O transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegriti, Maria Grazia; Hammache, F.; Roussel, P.; Audouin, L.; Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S.; Gaudefroy, L.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schujl, A.; Stanoiu, M.; Tatischeff, V.; Vilmay, M.

    PoS(NIC-IX)161 , , [1] , L. Gaudefroy[2] , J. Kiener[3] , A. Lefebvre-Schuhl[3] , M. Stanoiu[4] , V. The cross section of the 13 C(α,n)16 O reaction is a key ingredient for the comprehension of the s-process (slow neutron captures) in stars. This reaction is considered as the main neutron source for the s-process in low-mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars (1-3 solar mass) [1, 2, 3]. At the α-13 C energies of astrophysical interest (Ecm around 190 keV, corresponding to a tem- perature of 108 K) the contribution of the 17 O α-decay subthreshold resonance at 6.356 MeV to the 13 C(α,n)16 O cross section should be taken into account. The effect of this resonance is controversial after the different analyses of the Kubono et al. measurement [4] of the 6.356 MeV α-spectroscopic factor (Sα ) via the transfer reaction 13 C(6 Li,d)17 O . In order to further investigate the contribution of the 6.356 MeV resonance to the 13 C(α,n)16 O cross section, we performed a new measurement of its Sα factor via a different α-transfer reac- tion, namely the 13 C(7 Li,t)17 O reaction. The experiment was performed at the Orsay Tandem by using a 7 Li beam of 28 and 34 MeV on a 13C target. The angular distribution for the transfer dif- ferential cross section was measured by detecting the tritons at the focal plane of the SPLITPOLE spectrometer. The analysis procedure used in order to extract the yield of the 6.356 MeV level will be described. Preliminary results of the angular distribution will be shown.

  18. Multiphoton fluorescence imaging of NADH to quantify metabolic changes in epileptic tissue in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Thomas H.; Zinter, Joseph; Spencer, Dennis D.; Williamson, Anne; Levene, Michael J.

    2007-02-01

    A powerful advantage of multiphoton microscopy is its ability to image endogenous fluorophores such as the ubiquitous coenzyme NADH in discrete cellular populations. NADH is integral in both oxidative and non-oxidative cellular metabolism. NADH loses fluorescence upon oxidation to NAD +; thus changes in NADH fluorescence can be used to monitor metabolism. Recent studies have suggested that hypo metabolic astrocytes play an important role in cases of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Current theories suggest this may be due to defective and/or a reduced number of mitochondria or dysfunction of the neuronal-astrocytic metabolic coupling. Measuring NADH fluorescence changes following chemical stimulation enables the quantification of the cellular distribution of metabolic anomalies in epileptic brain tissue compared to healthy tissue. We present what we believe to be the first multiphoton microscopy images of NADH from the human brain. We also present images of NADH fluorescence from the hippocampus of the kainate-treated rat TLE model. In some experiments, human and rat astrocytes were selectively labeled with the fluorescent dye sulforhodamine 101 (SR101). Our results demonstrate that multiphoton microscopy is a powerful tool for assaying the metabolic pathologies associated with temporal lobe epilepsy in humans and in rodent models.

  19. In vivo imaging of cerebral energy metabolism with two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscopy of NADH

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Sakadžić, Sava; Wu, Weicheng; Becker, Wolfgang; Kasischke, Karl A.; Boas, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive, specific measurement of cellular energy metabolism is crucial for understanding cerebral pathophysiology. Here, we present high-resolution, in vivo observations of autofluorescence lifetime as a biomarker of cerebral energy metabolism in exposed rat cortices. We describe a customized two-photon imaging system with time correlated single photon counting detection and specialized software for modeling multiple-component fits of fluorescence decay and monitoring their transient behaviors. In vivo cerebral NADH fluorescence suggests the presence of four distinct components, which respond differently to brief periods of anoxia and likely indicate different enzymatic formulations. Individual components show potential as indicators of specific molecular pathways involved in oxidative metabolism. PMID:23412419

  20. Preliminary studies of a canine 13C-aminopyrine demethylation blood test.

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, E M; Steiner, J M; Williams, D A; Klein, P D

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether a 13C-aminopyrine demethylation blood test is technically feasible in clinically healthy dogs, whether oral administration of 13C-aminopyrine causes a detectable increase in percent dose/min (PCD) of 13C administered as 13C-aminopyrine and recovered in gas extracted from blood, and whether gas extraction efficiency has an impact on PCD. A dose of 2 mg/kg body weight of 13C-aminopyrine dissolved in deionized water was administered orally to 6 clinically healthy dogs. Blood samples were taken from each dog 0, 30, 60, and 120 min after administration of the 13C-aminopyrine. Carbon dioxide was extracted from blood samples by addition of acid and analyzed by fractional mass spectrometry. None of the 6 dogs showed any side effects after 13C-aminopyrine administration. All 6 dogs showed a measurable increase of the PCD in gas samples extracted from blood samples at 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min after 13C-aminopyrine administration. Coefficients of variation between the triplicate samples were statistically significantly higher for the %CO2, a measure of extraction efficiency, than for PCD values (P < 0.0001). The 13C-aminopyrine demethylation blood test described here is technically feasible. Oral administration of 13C-aminopyrine did not lead to gross side effects in the 6 dogs. Clinically healthy dogs show a measurable increase of PCD in gas extracted from blood samples after oral administration of 13C-aminopyrine. Efficiency of CO2 extraction from blood samples does not have an impact on PCD determined from these blood samples. This test may prove useful to evaluate hepatic function in dogs. PMID:11227194

  1. Synthesis of aromatic (13)C/(2)H-α-ketoacid precursors to be used in selective phenylalanine and tyrosine protein labelling.

    PubMed

    Lichtenecker, R J

    2014-10-14

    Recent progress in protein NMR spectroscopy revealed aromatic residues to be valuable information sources for performing structure and motion analysis of high molecular weight proteins. However, the applied NMR experiments require tailored isotope labelling patterns in order to regulate spin-relaxation pathways and optimize magnetization transfer. We introduced a methodology to use α-ketoacids as metabolic amino acid precursors in cell-based overexpression of phenylalanine and/or tyrosine labelled proteins in a recent publication, which we have now developed further by providing synthetic routes to access the corresponding side-chain labelled precursors. The target compounds allow for selective introduction of (13)C-(1)H spin systems in a highly deuterated chemical environment and feature alternating (12)C-(13)C-(12)C ring-patterns. The resulting isotope distribution is especially suited to render straightforward (13)C spin relaxation experiments possible, which provide insight into the dynamic properties of the corresponding labelled proteins.

  2. Environmental controls over methanol production, emission, and δ13C values from Lycopersicon esculentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P.; Giebel, B. M.; Mak, J. E.; Riemer, D. D.; Swart, P. K.; Lerdau, M.

    2009-12-01

    Phytogenic methanol is the dominant source of methanol to the atmosphere, where it is the second most abundant organic compound. Beyond methanol’s role in atmospheric chemistry, it is an indicator of plant function and is linked to plant wound response. Methanol emissions are considered to be a by-product of cell wall expansion and, more specifically, the demethylation of pectin by pectin methylesterase (PME) in cell walls. Production of methanol was investigated in mature and immature tomato Lycopersicon esculentum via measurement of methanol flux, foliar PME activity, and methanol extraction from leaf, root, and stem tissues. δ13C values for mature and immature methanol emissions were also measured using a GC-IRMS system. Environmental control over methanol production and emission was studied by changing temperature and light while holding stomatal conductance constant. As seen previously, mature leaf methanol emissions were significantly less than immature emissions. Surprisingly, preliminary results suggest mature leaf methanol production to be similar to immature leaves, indicating an enhanced metabolic sink for methanol in mature leaves. These data enhance our understanding of methanol production, a term which is not well constrained in current methanol flux models.

  3. Analogy between mission critical detection in distributed systems and 13C isotope separation column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, Maria L.; Secara, Mihai

    2015-02-01

    Carbon represents the fourth most abundant chemical element in the world, having two stable and one radioactive isotope. The 13 Carbon isotopes, with a natural abundance of 1.1%, plays an important role in numerous applications, such as the study of human metabolism changes, molecular structure studies, non-invasive respiratory tests, Alzheimer tests, air pollution and global warming effects on plants [2]. Distributed systems are increasingly being applied in critical real-time applications and their complexity forces programmers to use design methods which guarantee correctness and increase the maintainability of the products. Objectoriented methodologies are widely used to cope with complexity in any kind of system, but most of them lack a formal foundation to allow the analysis and verification of designs, which is one of the main requirements for dealing with concurrent and reactive systems. This research is intended to make an analogy between two tips of industrial processes, one 13C Isotope Separation Column and other one distributed systems. We try to highlight detection of "mission critical "situations for this two processes and show with one is more critical and needs deeply supervisyon [1], [3].

  4. Combining position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis: first steps towards soil fluxomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics is one of the most important challenges in soil science. Transformation of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) is a key step in biogeochemical cycles because 1) all high molecular substances pass this stage during their decomposition and 2) only LMWOS will be taken up by microorganisms. Previous studies on LMWOS were focused on determining net fluxes through the LMWOS pool, but they rarely identified transformations. As LMWOS are the preferred C and energy source for microorganisms, the transformations of LMWOS are dominated by biochemical pathways of the soil microorganisms. Thus, understanding fluxes and transformations in soils requires a detailed knowledge on the biochemical pathways and its controlling factors. Tracing C fate in soil by isotopes became on of the most applied and promising biogeochemistry tools. Up to now, studies on LMWOS were nearly exclusively based on uniformly labeled organic substances i.e. all C atoms in the molecules were labeled with 13C or 14C. However, this classical approach did not allow the differentiation between use of intact initial substances in any process, or whether they were transformed to metabolites. The novel tool of position-specific labeling enables to trace molecule atoms separately and thus to determine the cleavage of molecules - a prerequisite for metabolic tracing. Position-specific labeling of LMWOS and quantification of 13CO2 and 13C<