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Sample records for 13c nmr 31p

  1. Metabolic engineering applications of in vivo sup 31 P and sup 13 C NMR studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks, J.V.

    1989-01-01

    With intent to quantify NMR measurements as much as possible, analysis techniques of the in vivo {sup 31}P NMR spectrum are developed. A systematic procedure is formulated for estimating the relative intracellular concentrations of the sugar phosphates in S. cerevisiae from the {sup 31}P NMR spectrum. In addition, in vivo correlation of inorganic phosphate chemical shift with the chemical shifts of 3-phosphoglycerate, {beta}-fructose 1,6-diphosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, and glucose 6-phosphate are determined. Also, a method was developed for elucidation of the cytoplasmic and vacuolar components of inorganic phosphate in the {sup 31}P NMR spectrum of S. cerevisiae. An in vivo correlation relating the inorganic phosphate chemical shift of the vacuole with the chemical shift of the resonance for pyrophosphate and the terminal phosphate of polyphosphate (PP{sub 1}) is established. Transient measurements provided by {sup 31}P NMR are applied to reg1 mutant and standard strains. {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C NMR measurements are used to analyze the performance of recombinant strains in which the glucose phosphorylation step had been altered.

  2. Determination of glucan phosphorylation using heteronuclear 1H, 13C double and 1H, 13C, 31P triple-resonance NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Peter; Nitschke, Felix; Steup, Martin; Mallow, Keven; Specker, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of starch and glycogen are important for their physicochemical properties and also their physiological functions. It is therefore desirable to reliably determine the phosphorylation sites. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR-spectroscopy is in principle a straightforward analytical approach even for complex carbohydrate molecules. With heterogeneous samples from natural sources, however, the task becomes more difficult because a full assignment of the resonances of the carbohydrates is impossible to obtain. Here, we show that the combination of heteronuclear (1) H,(13) C and (1) H,(13) C,(31) P techniques and information derived from spectra of a set of reference compounds can lead to an unambiguous determination of the phosphorylation sites even in heterogeneous samples. PMID:23913630

  3. Determination of glucan phosphorylation using heteronuclear 1H, 13C double and 1H, 13C, 31P triple-resonance NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Peter; Nitschke, Felix; Steup, Martin; Mallow, Keven; Specker, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of starch and glycogen are important for their physicochemical properties and also their physiological functions. It is therefore desirable to reliably determine the phosphorylation sites. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR-spectroscopy is in principle a straightforward analytical approach even for complex carbohydrate molecules. With heterogeneous samples from natural sources, however, the task becomes more difficult because a full assignment of the resonances of the carbohydrates is impossible to obtain. Here, we show that the combination of heteronuclear (1) H,(13) C and (1) H,(13) C,(31) P techniques and information derived from spectra of a set of reference compounds can lead to an unambiguous determination of the phosphorylation sites even in heterogeneous samples.

  4. /sup 31/P NMR saturation-transfer and /sup 13/C NMR kinetic studies of glycolytic regulation during anaerobic and aerobic glycolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell-Burk, S.L.; den Hollander, J.A.; Alger, J.R.; Shulman, R.G.

    1987-11-17

    /sup 31/P NMR saturation-transfer techniques have been employed in glucose-gown derepressed yeast to determine unidirectional fluxes in the upper part of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. The experiments were performed during anaerobic and aerobic glycolysis by saturating the ATP/sub ..gamma../ resonances and monitoring changes in the phosphomonoester signals from glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. These experiments were supplemented with /sup 13/C NMR measurements of glucose utilization rates and /sup 13/C NMR label distribution studies. Combined with data obtained previously from radioisotope measurement, these /sup 31/P and /sup 13/C NMR kinetic studies allowed estimation of the net glycolytic flow in addition to relative flows through phosphofructokinase (PFK) and Fru-1,6-P/sub 2/ase during anaerobic and aerobic glycolysis. The /sup 31/P NMR saturation-transfer results are consistent with previous results obtained from measurements of metabolite levels, radioisotope data, and /sup 13/C NMR studies, providing additional support for in vivo measurement of the flows during glycolysis.

  5. Unique Backbone-Water Interaction Detected in Sphingomyelin Bilayers with 1H/31P and 1H/13C HETCOR MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Gregory P.; Alam, Todd M.

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional 1H/31P dipolar heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to investigate the correlation of the lipid headgroup with various intra- and intermolecular proton environments. Cross-polarization NMR techniques involving 31P have not been previously pursued to a great extent in lipid bilayers due to the long 1H-31P distances and high degree of headgroup mobility that averages the dipolar coupling in the liquid crystalline phase. The results presented herein show that this approach is very promising and yields information not readily available with other experimental methods. Of particular interest is the detection of a unique lipid backbone-water intermolecular interaction in egg sphingomyelin (SM) that is not observed in lipids with glycerol backbones like phosphatidylcholines. This backbone-water interaction in SM is probed when a mixing period allowing magnetization exchange between different 1H environments via the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) is included in the NMR pulse sequence. The molecular information provided by these 1H/31P dipolar HETCOR experiments with NOE mixing differ from those previously obtained by conventional NOE spectroscopy and heteronuclear NOE spectroscopy NMR experiments. In addition, two-dimensional 1H/13C INEPT HETCOR experiments with NOE mixing support the 1H/31P dipolar HETCOR results and confirm the presence of a H2O environment that has nonvanishing dipolar interactions with the SM backbone. PMID:18390621

  6. Early estrogen-induced metabolic changes and their inhibition by actinomycin D and cycloheximide in human breast cancer cells: sup 31 P and sup 13 C NMR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Neeman, M.; Degani, H. )

    1989-07-01

    Metabolic changes following estrogen stimulation and the inhibition of these changes in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide were monitored continuously in perfused human breast cancer T47D clone 11 cells with {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C NMR techniques. The experiments were performed by estrogen rescue of tamoxifen-treated cells. Immediately after perfusion with estrogen-containing medium, a continuous enhancement in the rates of glucose consumption, lactate production by glycolysis, and glutamate synthesis by the Krebs cycle occurred with a persistent 2-fold increase at 4 hr. Pretreatment with either actinomycin D or cycloheximide, at concentrations known to inhibit mRNA and protein synthesis, respectively, and simultaneous treatment with estrogen and each inhibitor prevented the estrogen-induced changes in glucose metabolism. This suggested that the observed estrogen stimulation required synthesis of mRNA and protein. These inhibitors also modulated several metabolic activities that were not related to estrogen stimulation. The observed changes in the in vivo kinetics of glucose metabolism may provide a means for the early detection of the response of human breast cancer cells to estrogen versus tamoxifen treatment.

  7. Coal structure at reactive sites by sup 1 H- sup 13 C- sup 19 F double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, E.W.; Woody, M.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The solid state NMR technique, {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C-{sup 31}P double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy, uses the direct dipolar interaction between {sup 13}C-{sup 31}P spin pairs in organophosphorus substances to identify the subset of carbons within a spherical volume element of 0.4 nm radius centered on the {sup 31}P atom. In combination with chemical manipulation of coals designed to introduce phosphorus containing functionality into the organic matrix, the NMR experiment becomes a method to examine selectively the carbon bonding network at the reactive sites in the coal. This approach generates a statistical structure description of the coal at the reaction centers in contrast to bulk carbon characterization using conventional {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. 3 refs.

  8. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  9. Human in vivo phosphate metabolite imaging with 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, P A; Charles, H C; Roemer, P B; Flamig, D; Engeseth, H; Edelstein, W A; Mueller, O M

    1988-07-01

    Phosphorus (31P) spectroscopic images showing the distribution of high-energy phosphate metabolites in the human brain have been obtained at 1.5 T in scan times of 8.5 to 34 min at 27 and 64 cm3 spatial resolution using pulsed phase-encoding gradient magnetic fields and three-dimensional Fourier transform (3DFT) techniques. Data were acquired as free induction decays with a quadrature volume NMR detection coil of a truncated geometry designed to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio on the coil axis on the assumption that the sample noise represents the dominant noise source, and self-shielded magnetic field gradient coils to minimize eddy-current effects. The images permit comparison of metabolic data acquired simultaneously from different locations in the brain, as well as metabolite quantification by inclusion of a vial containing a standard of known 31P concentration in the image array. Values for the NMR visible adenosine triphosphate in three individuals were about 3 mM of tissue. The ratio of NMR detectable phosphocreatine to ATP in brain was 1.15 +/- 0.17 SD in these experiments. Potential sources of random and systematic error in these and other 31P measurements are identified.

  10. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  11. Dihydroflavanonols from Cedrus deodara, A (13)C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, P K; Agarwal, S K; Rastogi, R P; Osterdahal, B G

    1981-09-01

    High resolution (13)C NMR study of taxifolin, cedeodarin, cedrin and their methyl ethers allowed unambiguous placement of the Me in 5,7-dihydroxyflavanonol nucleus, besides providing other valuable information on the substitution pattern in the molecule.

  12. Localized in vivo13C NMR spectroscopy of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Gruetter, Rolf; Adriany, Gregor; Choi, In-Young; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Lei, Hongxia; Öz, Gülin

    2006-01-01

    Localized 13C NMR spectroscopy provides a new investigative tool for studying cerebral metabolism. The application of 13C NMR spectroscopy to living intact humans and animals presents the investigator with a number of unique challenges. This review provides in the first part a tutorial insight into the ingredients required for achieving a successful implementation of localized 13C NMR spectroscopy. The difficulties in establishing 13C NMR are the need for decoupling of the one-bond 13C–1H heteronuclear J coupling, the large chemical shift range, the low sensitivity and the need for localization of the signals. The methodological consequences of these technical problems are discussed, particularly with respect to (a) RF front-end considerations, (b) localization methods, (c) the low sensitivity, and (d) quantification methods. Lastly, some achievements of in vivo localized 13C NMR spectroscopy of the brain are reviewed, such as: (a) the measurement of brain glutamine synthesis and the feasibility of quantifying glutamatergic action in the brain; (b) the demonstration of significant anaplerotic fluxes in the brain; (c) the demonstration of a highly regulated malate-aspartate shuttle in brain energy metabolism and isotope flux; (d) quantification of neuronal and glial energy metabolism; and (e) brain glycogen metabolism in hypoglycemia in rats and humans. We conclude that the unique and novel insights provided by 13C NMR spectroscopy have opened many new research areas that are likely to improve the understanding of brain carbohydrate metabolism in health and disease. PMID:14679498

  13. A 13C-NMR study of azacryptand complexes.

    PubMed

    Wild, Aljoscha A C; Fennell, Kevin; Morgan, Grace G; Hewage, Chandralal M; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2014-09-28

    An azacryptand has been solubilised in aqueous media containing 50% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide. (13)C-NMR has been used to determine how the azacryptand is affected by zinc binding at pH 10. Using (13)C-NMR and (13)C-enriched bicarbonate we have been able to observe the formation of 4 different carbamate derivatives of the azacryptand at pH 10. The azacryptand was shown to solubilise zinc or cadmium at alkaline pHs. Two moles of zinc are bound per mole of azacryptand and this complex binds 1 mole of carbonate. By replacing the zinc with cadmium-113 we have shown that the (13)C-NMR signal of the (13)C-enriched carbon of the bound carbonate is split into two triplets at 2.2 °C. This shows that two cadmium complexes are formed and in each of these complexes the carbonate group is bound by two magnetically equivalent metal ions. It also demonstrates that these cadmium complexes are not in fast exchange. From temperature studies we show that in the zinc complexes both complexes are in fast exchange with each other but are in slow exchange with free bicarbonate. HOESY is used to determine the position of the carbonate carbon in the complex. The solution and crystal structures of the zinc-carbonate-azacryptand complexes are compared. PMID:25091182

  14. 13C NMR spectra of pyridine chalcone analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, B. Ž.; Mišić-Vuković, M.; Marinković, A. D.; Csanádi, J.

    1999-05-01

    13C NMR spectra of two series of pyridine chalcone analogs were determined in deuterated dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO-d 6). It was established that these compounds were in more stable E-configurations except for the 4-pyridalacetophenone which was in Z-configuration. On the basis of the Hammett correlations of 13C NMR chemical shifts of the ethylenic bond carbon atoms and the σ values for the pyridine "aza" groups, the polarization of ethylenic bonds were discussed. It was established that the opposite effect of the pyridine substituents at the electronic density distribution in pyridalacetophenone and cinnamoylpyridines depends on its direct bonding to the ethylenic carbon or the transmission electronic effects via the carbonyl group, respectively.

  15. Tendencies of 31P chemical shifts changes in NMR spectra of nucleotide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, A V; Rezvukhin, A I

    1984-07-25

    31P NMR chemical shifts of the selected mono- and oligonucleotide derivatives, including the compounds with P-N, P-C, P-S bonds and phosphite nucleotide analogues have been presented. The influence of substituents upon 31P chemical shifts has been discussed. The concrete examples of 31P chemical shifts data application in the field of nucleotide chemistry have been considered.

  16. Double cross polarization /sup 13/C-NMR experiment in solid fossil fuel structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, E.W.; Woody, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Double Cross Polarization /sup 13/C-MAS/NMR experiment has been used to derive a new operational classification of solid fossil fuels based on chemical reactivity. The method requires labeling reactive sites in the organic matrix with a magnetically active isotope not present in the precursor material, and using the local, isolated dipole-dipole interaction between this nucleus and nearby /sup 13/C nuclei to detect via cross polarization the carbon centers in the vicinity of the label. The technique is a marriage of chemistry and spectroscopy and the information content of the DCP spectra is defined by both partners. /sup 1/H-/sup 13/C-/sup 31/P DCP/MAS /sup 13/C-NMR spectroscopy has been used to statistically describe phenolic ortho-substitution patterns of coals via their aryl phosphinate or phosphate derivatives. In these applications of DCP NMR the new, detailed structure and/or reactivity information is realized by detection of carbon resonances one or more bonds removed from the reaction center, but in a volume element of intramolecular dimensions. To the extent that intermolecular contributions to the spectrum are detected, and not recognized as such, the structure/reactivity correlation is weakened. Direct substitution of phosphorus on the aromatic rings in the organic matrix of the coal is not readily accomplished. This environment potentially can be labeled with fluorine in a selective fashion using newly developed reagents. The possibility of determining the changes in average ring substitution patterns as a function of chemical treatment or coal diagenesis emerges. Recent developments in the field of DCP /sup 13/C NMR are presented.

  17. Metabolism of D-glucose in a wall-less mutant of Neurospora crassa examined by /sup 13/C and /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonances: effects of insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, N.J.; McKenzie, M.A.; Adebodun, F.; Jordan, F.; Lenard, J.

    1988-11-15

    /sup 13/C NMR and /sup 31/P NMR have been used to investigate the metabolism of glucose by a wall-less strain of Neurospora crassa (slime), grown in a supplemented nutritionally defined medium and harvested in the early stationary stage of growth. With D-(1-/sup 13/C)- or D-(6-/sup 13/C)glucose as substrates, the major metabolic products identified from /sup 13/C NMR spectra were (2-/sup 13/C)ethanol, (3-/sup 13/C)alanine, and C/sub 1/- and C/sub 6/-labeled trehalose. Several observations suggested the existence of a substantial hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt: (i) a 70% greater yield of ethanol from C/sub 6/- than from C/sub 1/-labeled glucose; (ii) C/sub 1/-labeled glucose yielded 19% C/sub 6/-labeled trehalose, while C/sub 6/-labeled glucose yielded only 4% C/sub 1/-labeled trehalose; (iii) a substantial transfer of /sup 13/C from C/sub 2/-labeled glucose to the C/sub 2/-position of ethanol. /sup 31/P NMR spectra showed millimolar levels of intracellular inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), phosphodiesters, and diphosphates including sugar diphosphates and polyphosphate. Addition of glucose resulted in a decrease in cytoplasmic P/sub i/ and an increase in sugar monophosphates, which continued for at least 30 min. Phosphate resonances corresponding to metabolic intermediates of both the glycolytic and HMP pathways were identified in cell extracts. Addition of insulin (100 nM) with the glucose had the following effects relative to glucose alone: (i) a 24% increase in the rate of ethanol production; (ii) a 38% increase in the rate of alanine production; (iii) a 27% increase in the rate of glucose disappearance. Insulin thus increases the rates of production of ethanol and alanine in these cells, in addition to increasing production of CO/sub 2/ and glycogen, as previously shown.

  18. Tendencies of 31P chemical shifts changes in NMR spectra of nucleotide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, A V; Rezvukhin, A I

    1984-07-25

    31P NMR chemical shifts of the selected mono- and oligonucleotide derivatives, including the compounds with P-N, P-C, P-S bonds and phosphite nucleotide analogues have been presented. The influence of substituents upon 31P chemical shifts has been discussed. The concrete examples of 31P chemical shifts data application in the field of nucleotide chemistry have been considered. PMID:6087290

  19. Dipolar-coupling-mediated total correlation spectroscopy in solid-state 13C NMR: Selection of individual 13C- 13C dipolar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spano, Justin; Wi, Sungsool

    2010-06-01

    Herein is described a useful approach in solid-state NMR, for selecting homonuclear 13C- 13C spin pairs in a multiple- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupled spin system. This method builds upon the zero-quantum (ZQ) dipolar recoupling method introduced by Levitt and coworkers (Marin-Montesinos et al., 2006 [30]) by extending the originally introduced one-dimensional (1D) experiment into a two-dimensional (2D) method with selective irradiation scheme, while moving the 13C- 13C mixing scheme from the transverse to the longitudinal mode, together with a dramatic improvement in the proton decoupling efficiency. Selective spin-pair recoupling experiments incorporating Gaussian and cosine-modulated Gaussian pulses for inverting specific spins were performed, demonstrating the ability to detect informative, simplified/individualized, long-range 13C- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupling interactions more accurately by removing less informative, stronger, short-range 13C- 13C interactions from 2D correlation spectra. The capability of this new approach was demonstrated experimentally on uniformly 13C-labeled Glutamine and a tripeptide sample, GAL.

  20. Ascorbic acid prolongs the viability and stability of isolated perfused lungs: A mechanistic study using 31P and hyperpolarized 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Shaghaghi, Hoora; Kadlecek, Stephen; Siddiqui, Sarmad; Pourfathi, Mehrdad; Hamedani, Hooman; Clapp, Justin; Profka, Harrilla; Rizi, Rahim

    2015-12-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has recently shown promise as a means of more accurately gauging the health of lung grafts and improving graft performance post-transplant. However, reperfusion of ischemic lung promotes the depletion of high-energy compounds and a progressive loss of normal mitochondrial function, and it remains unclear how and to what extent the EVLP approach contributes to this metabolic decline. Although ascorbate has been used to mitigate the effects of ischemia-reperfusion injury, the nature of its effects during EVLP are also not clear. To address these uncertainties, this study monitored the energy status of lungs during EVLP and after the administration of ascorbate using (31)P and hyperpolarized (13)C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance). Our experiments demonstrated that the oxidative phosphorylation capacity and pyruvate dehydrogenase flux of lungs decline during ex vivo perfusion. The addition of ascorbate to the perfusate prolonged lung viability by 80% and increased the hyperpolarized (13)C bicarbonate signal by a factor of 2.7. The effect of ascorbate is apparently due not to its antioxidant quality but rather to its ability to energize cellular respiration given that it increased the lung's energy charge significantly, whereas other antioxidants (glutathione and α-lipoic acid) did not alter energy metabolism. During ascorbate administration, inhibition of mitochondrial complex I with rotenone depressed energy charge and shifted the metabolic state of the lung toward glycolysis; reenergizing the electron transport chain with TMPD (N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine) recovered metabolic activity. This indicates that ascorbate slows the decline of the ex vivo perfused lung's mitochondrial activity through an independent interaction with the electron transport chain complexes.

  1. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  2. The 2D {31P} Spin-Echo-Difference Constant-Time [13C, 1H]-HMQC Experiment for Simultaneous Determination of 3JH3‧P and 3JC4‧P in 13C-Labeled Nucleic Acids and Their Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyperski, Thomas; Fernández, César; Ono, Akira; Wüthrich, Kurt; Kainosho, Masatsune

    1999-10-01

    A two-dimensional {31P} spin-echo-difference constant-time [13C, 1H]-HMQC experiment (2D {31P}-sedct-[13C, 1H]-HMQC) is introduced for measurements of 3JC4‧P and 3JH3‧P scalar couplings in large 13C-labeled nucleic acids and in DNA-protein complexes. This experiment makes use of the fact that 1H-13C multiple-quantum coherences in macromolecules relax more slowly than the corresponding 13C single-quantum coherences. 3JC4‧P and 3JH3‧P are related via Karplus-type functions with the phosphodiester torsion angles β and ɛ, respectively, and their experimental assessment therefore contributes to further improved quality of NMR solution structures. Data are presented for a uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled 14-base-pair DNA duplex, both free in solution and in a 17-kDa protein-DNA complex.

  3. Trans and surface membrane bound zervamicin IIB: 13C-MAOSS-NMR at high spinning speed.

    PubMed

    Raap, J; Hollander, J; Ovchinnikova, T V; Swischeva, N V; Skladnev, D; Kiihne, S

    2006-08-01

    Interactions between (15)N-labelled peptides or proteins and lipids can be investigated using membranes aligned on a thin polymer film, which is rolled into a cylinder and inserted into the MAS-NMR rotor. This can be spun at high speed, which is often useful at high field strengths. Unfortuantely, substrate films like commercially available polycarbonate or PEEK produce severe overlap with peptide and protein signals in (13)C-MAOSS NMR spectra. We show that a simple house hold foil support allows clear observation of the carbonyl, aromatic and C(alpha) signals of peptides and proteins as well as the ester carbonyl and choline signals of phosphocholine lipids. The utility of the new substrate is validated in applications to the membrane active peptide zervamicin IIB. The stability and macroscopic ordering of thin PC10 bilayers was compared with that of thicker POPC bilayers, both supported on the household foil. Sidebands in the (31)P-spectra showed a high degree of alignment of both the supported POPC and PC10 lipid molecules. Compared with POPC, the PC10 lipids are slightly more disordered, most likely due to the increased mobilities of the shorter lipid molecules. This mobility prevents PC10 from forming stable vesicles for MAS studies. The (13)C-peptide peaks were selectively detected in a (13)C-detected (1)H-spin diffusion experiment. Qualitative analysis of build-up curves obtained for different mixing times allowed the transmembrane peptide in PC10 to be distinguished from the surface bound topology in POPC. The (13)C-MAOSS results thus independently confirms previous findings from (15)N spectroscopy [Bechinger, B., Skladnev, D.A., Ogrel, A., Li, X., Rogozhkina, E.V., Ovchinnikova, T.V., O'Neil, J.D.J. and Raap, J. (2001) Biochemistry, 40, 9428-9437]. In summary, application of house hold foil opens the possibility of measuring high resolution (13)C-NMR spectra of peptides and proteins in well ordered membranes, which are required to determine the secondary

  4. Stable isotope-enhanced two- and three-dimensional diffusion ordered 13C-NMR spectroscopy (SIE-DOSY 13C-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable Isotope-Enhanced Diffusion Ordered (SIE-DOSY) 13C-NMR has been applied to 13C-enriched carbohydrates and has been used to determine diffusion coefficients for pentose and hexose monosaccharides, a disaccharide and a trisaccharide. These 2D spectra were obtained with as little as 8 min of acq...

  5. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  6. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra.

  7. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra. PMID:24771296

  8. Pulsed polarization transfer for 13C NMR in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Ad; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Maciel, Gary E.

    A new pulsed polarization transfer experiment method is described for the polarization of 13C spins in a solid by magnetization transfer from protons. The method is directly analogous to the INEPT sequence for liquids introduced by Freeman and Morris. As polarization is transferred in PPT between individual 1H 13C pairs, rather than between spin reservoirs, different opportunities exist for structurally selective experiments. Results on p-diethoxybenzene and coronene are presented.

  9. Labeling strategies for 13C-detected aligned-sample solid-state NMR of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipp, Fabian V.; Sinha, Neeraj; Jairam, Lena; Bradley, Joel; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-12-01

    13C-detected solid-state NMR experiments have substantially higher sensitivity than the corresponding 15N-detected experiments on stationary, aligned samples of isotopically labeled proteins. Several methods for tailoring the isotopic labeling are described that result in spatially isolated 13C sites so that dipole-dipole couplings among the 13C are minimized, thus eliminating the need for homonuclear 13C- 13C decoupling in either indirect or direct dimensions of one- or multi-dimensional NMR experiments that employ 13C detection. The optimal percentage for random fractional 13C labeling is between 25% and 35%. Specifically labeled glycerol and glucose can be used at the carbon sources to tailor the isotopic labeling, and the choice depends on the resonances of interest for a particular study. For investigations of the protein backbone, growth of the bacteria on [2- 13C]-glucose-containing media was found to be most effective.

  10. NMR at cryogenic temperatures: A {sup 13}C NMR study of ferrocene

    SciTech Connect

    Orendt, A.M.; Facelli, J.C.; Jiang, Y.J.; Grant, D.M.

    1998-09-24

    A new cryogenic apparatus is described that can be used to obtain NMR spectra at temperatures down to 8--10 K. The static solid {sup 13}C NMR spectrum of ferrocene is recorded at that temperature. Spectra recorded at higher temperatures show that ferrocene is still freely rotating about its 5-fold symmetry axis on the {sup 13}C NMR time scale at 45--50 K. A comparison of the principal values of the {sup 13}C chemical-shift tensor obtained from the room- and low-temperature spectra of ferrocene indicates that the lowest frequency chemical shift principal component, {delta}{sub 33}, is tilted off this symmetry axis by approximately 12{degree}. Quantum chemical calculations of the chemical-shift tensor, completed on structures of ferrocene from the literature as well as on optimized structures with the cyclopentadienyl rings locked in both the staggered and eclipsed arrangements, predict the angle between the {delta}{sub 33} direction and the rotation axis to be between 11 and 15{degree}, depending upon the geometry used in the calculation. The calculations also predict the sign of the angular perturbation, information not obtained from the experiment. An explanation of this angular change in the {delta}{sub 33} direction is provided by the composition of the molecular orbitals.

  11. Comparison of phosphorus forms in three extracts of dairy feces by solution 31P NMR analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using solution 31P NMR spectroscopy, we compared three extractants, deionized water, sodium acetate buffer (pH 5.0) with fresh sodium dithionite (NaAc-SD), and 0.25 M NaOH-0.05 M EDTA (NaOH-EDTA), for the profile of P compounds in two dairy fecal samples. Phosphorus extracted was 35% for water, and...

  12. Solid State FT-IR and (31)P NMR Spectral Features of Phosphate Compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solid-state spectroscopic techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid-state 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopies, are powerful tools for evaluating metal speciation and transformation mechanisms of P compounds in the environment. Studie...

  13. Characterization of active phosphorus surface sites at synthetic carbonate-free fluorapatite using single-pulse 1H, 31P, and 31P CP MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Jarlbring, Mathias; Sandström, Dan E; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Forsling, Willis

    2006-05-01

    The chemically active phosphorus surface sites defined as PO(x), PO(x)H, and PO(x)H2, where x = 1, 2, or 3, and the bulk phosphorus groups of PO4(3-) at synthetic carbonate-free fluorapatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) have been studied by means of single-pulse 1H,31P, and 31P CP MAS NMR. The changes in composition and relative amounts of each surface species are evaluated as a function of pH. By combining spectra from single-pulse 1H and 31P MAS NMR and data from 31P CP MAS NMR experiments at varying contact times in the range 0.2-3.0 ms, it has been possible to distinguish between resonance lines in the NMR spectra originating from active surface sites and bulk phosphorus groups and also to assign the peaks in the NMR spectra to the specific phosphorus species. In the 31P CP MAS NMR experiments, the spinning frequency was set to 4.2 kHz; in the single-pulse 1H MAS NMR experiments, the spinning frequency was 10 kHz. The 31P CP MAS NMR spectrum of fluorapatite at pH 5.9 showed one dominating resonance line at 2.9 ppm assigned to originate from PO4(3-) groups and two weaker shoulder peaks at 5.4 and 0.8 ppm which were assigned to the unprotonated PO(x) (PO, PO2-, and PO3(2-)) and protonated PO(x)H (PO2H and PO3H-) surface sites. At pH 12.7, the intensity of the peak representing unprotonated PO(x) surface sites has increased 1.7% relative to the bulk peak, while the intensity of the peaks of the protonated species PO(x)H have decreased 1.4% relative to the bulk peak. At pH 3.5, a resonance peak at -4.5 ppm has appeared in the 31P CP MAS NMR spectrum assigned to the surface species PO(x)H2 (PO3H2). The results from the 1H MAS and 31P CP MAS NMR measurements indicated that H+, OH-, and physisorbed H2O at the surface were released during the drying process at 200 degrees C.

  14. Phosphatidylcholine and cholesteryl esters identify the infiltrating behaviour of a clear cell renal carcinoma: 1H, 13C and 31P MRS evidence.

    PubMed

    Tugnoli, V; Poerio, A; Tosi, M R

    2004-08-01

    This study presents a multinuclear (1H, 13C and 31P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy characterization of the total lipid fraction extracted from different regions of a human kidney affected by a clear cell renal carcinoma. It was thus possible to demonstrate that cholesteryl esters and phosphatidylcholine are markers of the tumor infiltration, histologically confirmed, in the kidney medulla. The tumor tissue contains twice the amount of phosphatidylcholine compared to normal cortex. The results appear relevant in light of new clinical applications based on the biochemical composition of human tissues.

  15. Structure and motion of phospholipids in human plasma lipoproteins. A sup 31 P NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, D.B.; Chana, R.S.; Parmar, Y.I.; Treleaven, W.D.; Cushley, R.J. )

    1990-04-24

    The structure and motion of phospholipids in human plasma lipoproteins have been studied by using {sup 31}P NMR. Lateral diffusion coefficients, D{sub T}, obtained from the viscosity dependence of the {sup 31}P NMR line widths, were obtained for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoproteins (HDL{sub 2}, HDL{sub 3}), and egg PC/TO microemulsions at 25{degree}C, for VLDL at 40{degree}C, and for LDL at 45{degree}C. In order to prove the orientation and/or order of the phospholipid head-group, estimates of the residual chemical shift anistropy, {Delta}{sigma}, have been obtained for all the lipoproteins and the microemulsions from the viscosity and field dependence for the {sup 31}P NMR line widths. These results suggest differences in the orientation and/or ordering of the head-group in the HDLs. The dynamic behavior of the phosphate moiety in LDL and HDL{sub 3} has been obtained from the temperature dependence of the {sup 31}P spin-lattice relaxation rates. Values of the correlation time for phosphate group reorientation and the activation energy for the motion are nearly identical in LDL and HDL{sub 3} and are similar to values obtained for phospholipid bilayers. This argues against long-lived protein-lipid interactions being the source of either the slow diffusion in LDL or the altered head-group orientation in the HDLs.

  16. Determination of de novo synthesized amino acids in cellular proteins revisited by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Willker, W; Leibfritz, D

    1997-04-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the absolute amounts to de novo synthesized amino acids in both the perchloric acid extracts and the hydrolyzed protein fractions of F98 glioma cells incubated for 2 h with 5 mmol/l [U-13C]glucose. 13C NMR spectra of the hydrolyzed protein fraction revealed a marked incorporation of 13C-labelled alanine, aspartate and glutamate into the proteins of F98 cells within the incubation period. Additionally, small amounts of 13C-labelled glycine, proline and serine could unambiguously be identified in the protein fraction. Astonishingly, approximately equal amounts of 13C-labelled glutamate and aspartate were incorporated into the cellular proteins, although the cytosolic steady-state concentration of aspartate was below 13C NMR detectability. Hypertonic stress decreased the incorporation of 13C-labelled amino acids into the total protein, albeit their cytosolic concentrations were increased, which reflects an inhibition of protein synthesis under these conditions. On the other hand, hypotonic stress increased the amount of 13C-labelled proline incorporated into the cellular proteins even though the cytosolic concentration of 13C-labelled proline was largely decreased. Apparently, hypoosmotic conditions stimulate the synthesis of proteins or peptides with a high proline content. The results show that already after 2 h of incubation with [U-13C]glucose there is a pronounced flux of 13C label into the cellular proteins, which is usually disregarded if cytosolic fluids are examined only. This means that calculations of metabolic fluxes based on 13C NMR spectroscopic data obtained from perchloric acid extracts of cells or tissues and also from in vivo measurements consider only the labelled 'NMR visible' cytosolic metabolites, which may have to be corrected for fast label flowing off into other compartments.

  17. Method development in quantitative NMR towards metrologically traceable organic certified reference materials used as (31)P qNMR standards.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Hellriegel, Christine; Rueck, Alexander; Wuethrich, Juerg; Jenks, Peter; Obkircher, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) spectroscopy is employed by an increasing number of analytical and industrial laboratories for the assignment of content and quantitative determination of impurities. Within the last few years, it was demonstrated that (1)H qNMR can be performed with high accuracy leading to measurement uncertainties below 1 % relative. It was even demonstrated that the combination of (1)H qNMR with metrological weighing can lead to measurement uncertainties below 0.1 % when highly pure substances are used. Although qNMR reference standards are already available as certified reference materials (CRM) providing traceability on the basis of (1)H qNMR experiments, there is an increasing demand for purity assays on phosphorylated organic compounds and metabolites requiring CRM for quantification by (31)P qNMR. Unfortunately, the number of available primary phosphorus standards is limited to a few inorganic CRM which only can be used for the analysis of water-soluble analytes but fail when organic solvents must be employed. This paper presents the concept of value assignment by (31)P qNMR measurements for the development of CRM and describes different approaches to establish traceability to primary Standard Reference Material from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST SRM). Phosphonoacetic acid is analyzed as a water-soluble CRM candidate, whereas triphenyl phosphate is a good candidate for the use as qNMR reference material in organic solvents. These substances contain both nuclei, (1)H and (31)P, and the concept is to show that it is possible to indirectly quantify a potential phosphorus standard via its protons using (1)H qNMR. The same standard with its assigned purity can then be used for the quantification of an analyte via its phosphorus using (31)P qNMR. For the validation of the concept, triphenyl phosphate and phosphonoacetic acid have been used as (31)P qNMR standards to determine the purity of the analyte

  18. Method development in quantitative NMR towards metrologically traceable organic certified reference materials used as (31)P qNMR standards.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Hellriegel, Christine; Rueck, Alexander; Wuethrich, Juerg; Jenks, Peter; Obkircher, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) spectroscopy is employed by an increasing number of analytical and industrial laboratories for the assignment of content and quantitative determination of impurities. Within the last few years, it was demonstrated that (1)H qNMR can be performed with high accuracy leading to measurement uncertainties below 1 % relative. It was even demonstrated that the combination of (1)H qNMR with metrological weighing can lead to measurement uncertainties below 0.1 % when highly pure substances are used. Although qNMR reference standards are already available as certified reference materials (CRM) providing traceability on the basis of (1)H qNMR experiments, there is an increasing demand for purity assays on phosphorylated organic compounds and metabolites requiring CRM for quantification by (31)P qNMR. Unfortunately, the number of available primary phosphorus standards is limited to a few inorganic CRM which only can be used for the analysis of water-soluble analytes but fail when organic solvents must be employed. This paper presents the concept of value assignment by (31)P qNMR measurements for the development of CRM and describes different approaches to establish traceability to primary Standard Reference Material from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST SRM). Phosphonoacetic acid is analyzed as a water-soluble CRM candidate, whereas triphenyl phosphate is a good candidate for the use as qNMR reference material in organic solvents. These substances contain both nuclei, (1)H and (31)P, and the concept is to show that it is possible to indirectly quantify a potential phosphorus standard via its protons using (1)H qNMR. The same standard with its assigned purity can then be used for the quantification of an analyte via its phosphorus using (31)P qNMR. For the validation of the concept, triphenyl phosphate and phosphonoacetic acid have been used as (31)P qNMR standards to determine the purity of the analyte

  19. Rapid assignment of solution 31P NMR spectra of large proteins by solid-state spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iuga, Adriana; Spoerner, Michael; Ader, Christian; Brunner, Eike; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2006-07-21

    The application of the (31)P NMR spectroscopy to large proteins or protein complexes in solution is hampered by a relatively low intrinsic sensitivity coupled with large line widths. Therefore, the assignment of the phosphorus signals by two-dimensional NMR methods in solution is often extremely time consuming. In contrast, the quality of solid-state NMR spectra is not dependent on the molecular mass and the solubility of the protein. For the complex of Ras with the GTP-analogue GppCH(2)p we show solid-state (31)P NMR methods to be more sensitive by almost one order of magnitude than liquid-state NMR. Thus, solid-state NMR seems to be the method of choice for obtaining the resonance assignment of the phosphorus signals of protein complexes in solution. Experiments on Ras.GDP complexes show that the microcrystalline sample can be substituted by a precipitate of the sample and that unexpectedly the two structural states observed earlier in solution are present in crystals as well.

  20. CD and 31P NMR studies of tachykinin and MSH neuropeptides in SDS and DPC micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Sydney C.; Brown, Taylor C.; Gonzalez, Javier D.; Levonyak, Nicholas S.; Rush, Lydia A.; Cremeens, Matthew E.

    2016-02-01

    Secondary structural characteristics of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide (α-MSH), γ1-MSH, γ2-MSH, and melittin were evaluated with circular dichroism in phosphite buffer, DPC micelles, and SDS micelles. CD spectral properties of γ1-MSH and γ2-MSH as well as 31P NMR of DPC micelles with all the peptides are reported for the first time. Although, a trend in the neuropeptide/micelle CD data appears to show increased α-helix content for the tachykinin peptides (SP, NKA, NKB) and increased β-sheet content for the MSH peptides (α-MSH, γ1-MSH, γ2-MSH) with increasing peptide charge, the lack of perturbed 31P NMR signals for all neuropeptides could suggest that the reported antimicrobial activity of SP and α-MSH might not be related to a membrane disruption mode of action.

  1. 31P NMR investigations on the ferromagnetic quantum critical system YbNi4P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, R.; Khuntia, P.; Krellner, C.; Geibel, C.; Steglich, F.; Baenitz, M.

    2012-04-01

    We studied the heavy-fermion system YbNi4P2, which presents strong ferromagnetic correlations, using the local 31P NMR probe over a wide field (0.2-8.6 T) and temperature (1.8-200 K) range. The 31P NMR Knight shift provides the static spin susceptibility which tracks the bulk susceptibility whereas the spin-lattice relaxation rate 31(1/T1) provides information about the fluctuations of the Yb 4f moment. The Korringa law is valid over a wide range of temperature and field. The Korringa product 31(1/T1TK2S0)≪1 gives evidence for the presence of strong ferromagnetic correlations. A 31(1/T1T)˜T-3/4 behavior was found over two decades in temperature.

  2. Pyrolysis temperature affects phosphorus transformation in biochar: Chemical fractionation and (31)P NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Zhang, You; Shao, Hongbo; Sun, Junna

    2016-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) recycling or reuse by pyrolyzing crop residue has recently elicited increased research interest. However, the effects of feedstock and pyrolysis conditions on P species have not been fully understood. Such knowledge is important in identifying the agronomic and environmental uses of biochar. Residues of three main Chinese agricultural crops and the biochars (produced at 300°C-600°C) derived from these crops were used to determine P transformations during pyrolysis. Hedley sequential fractionation and (31)P NMR analyses were used in the investigation. Our results showed that P transformation in biochar was significantly affected by pyrolysis temperature regardless of feedstock (Wheat straw, maize straw and peanut husk). Pyrolysis treatment transformed water soluble P into a labile (NaHCO3-Pi) or semi-labile pool (NaOH-Pi) and into a stable pool (Dil. HCl P and residual-P). At the same time, organic P was transformed into inorganic P fractions which was identified by the rapid decomposition of organic P detected with solution (31)P NMR. The P transformation during pyrolysis process suggested more stable P was formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. This result was also evidenced by the presence of less soluble or stable P species, such as such as poly-P, crandallite (CaAl3(OH)5(PO4)2) and Wavellite (Al3(OH)3(PO4)2·5H2O), as detected by solid-state (31)P NMR in biochars formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. Furthermore, a significant proportion of less soluble pyrophosphate was identified by solution (2%-35%) and solid-state (8%-53%) (31)P NMR, which was also responsible for the stable P forms at higher pyrolysis temperature although their solubility or stability requires further investigation. Results suggested that a relatively lower pyrolysis temperature retains P availability regardless of feedstock during pyrolysis process.

  3. Compartmentation of Nucleotides in Corn Root Tips Studied by 31P-NMR and HPLC 1

    PubMed Central

    Hooks, Mark A.; Clark, Robert A.; Nieman, Richard H.; Roberts, Justin K. M.

    1989-01-01

    Corn (Zea mays L.) root tips were subjected to different conditions so that nucleotide levels varied over a wide range. Levels of nucleotides in corn root tips were measured using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. Results indicate: (a) Similar amounts of NTP and sugar nucleotides were observed by in vivo NMR and in extracts. In contrast, a significant amount of NDP observed in root tip extracts was not detected by in vivo NMR. Thus, for a given sample, [NTP]/[NDP] ratios determined in vivo by 31P-NMR are always higher than ratios observed in extracts, deviating by ∼4-fold at the highest ratios. The NMR-invisible pool of NDP appeared quite metabolically inert, barely changing in size as total cell NDP changed. We conclude that NDP in corn root tips is compartmented with respect to NMR visibility, and that it is the NMR-visible pool which responds dynamically to metabolic state. The NMR-invisible NDP could either be immobilized (and so have broad, undetectable NMR signals), or be complexed with species that cause the chemical shift of NDP to change (so it does not contribute to the NMR signal of free NDP), or both. (b) 31P-NMR cannot distinguish between bases (A, U, C, and G) of nucleotides. HPLC analysis of root tip extracts showed that the relative amount of each base in the NTP and NDP pools was quite constant in the different samples. (c) In extracts, for each of the nonadenylate nucleotides, [NTP]/[NDP] was linearly proportional to [ATP]/[ADP], indicating near equilibrium in the nucleoside diphosphokinase (NDPK) reaction. However, the apparent equilibrium constants for the phosphorylation of GDP and UDP by ATP were significantly lower than 1, the true equilibrium constant for the NDPK reaction. Thus, for a given sample, [ATP]/[ADP] ∼ [CTP]/[CDP] > [UTP]/[UDP] > [GTP]/[GDP]. This result suggests that the different NDPs in corn root tips do not have equal access to NDPK. PMID:16666649

  4. [sup 31]P NMR study of immobilized artificial membrane surfaces. Structure and dynamics of immobilized phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, X.; Pidgeon, C. )

    1993-11-25

    Chromatography surfaces were prepared by immobilizing a single-chain ether phospholipid at approximately a monolayer density on silica particles. The chromatography particles are denoted as [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3], and they are stable to all solvents. The structure and dynamics of the interphase created by immobilizing phospholipids on silica particles were studied by [sup 31]P NMR methods. [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] spontaneously wets when suspended in both aqueous and organic solvents, and [sup 31]P NMR spectra were obtained in water, methanol, chloroform, acetonitrile, and acetone. [sup 31]P NMR spectra were subjected to line-shape analysis. From line-shape analysis, the correlation times for rapid internal motion ([tau]-PLL) and wobbling ([tau]-PRP) of the phospholipid headgroup were calculated for each solvent. Immobilized phospholipid headgroups comprising the IAM interfacial region undergo rapid reorientation similar to the case of the phospholipids forming liposome membranes with [tau]-PLL approximately 1 ns. Phospholipids in liposome membranes exhibit slower wobbling motion ([tau]-PRP approximately 1 ms) in the plane of the membrane. However, the immobilized phospholipids on [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] surfaces wobble with correlation times [tau]-PRP that depend on the solvent bathing the [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] surface. 41 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Elucidating proline dynamics in spider dragline silk fibre using 2H-13C HETCOR MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangyan; Yarger, Jeffery L; Holland, Gregory P

    2014-05-14

    (2)H-(13)C HETCOR MAS NMR is performed on (2)H/(13)C/(15)N-Pro enriched A. aurantia dragline silk. Proline dynamics are extracted from (2)H NMR line shapes and T1 in a site-specific manner to elucidate the backbone and side chain molecular dynamics for the MaSp2 GPGXX β-turn regions for spider dragline silk in the dry and wet, supercontracted states.

  6. Solid state {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na MAS NMR dipolar dephasing investigations of connectivity in sodium aluminophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    LANG,DAVID P.; ALAM,TODD M.; BENCOE,DENISE N.

    2000-05-01

    Solid state {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na MAS NMR dipolar dephasing experiments have been used to investigate the spatial distribution of aluminum and sodium cations with respect to the phosphate backbone for a series of sodium aluminophosphate glasses, xAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}50Na{sub 2}O{center_dot}(50{minus}x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (0{le} x {le} 17.5). From the {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na connectivity data gathered, information about the medium range order in these glasses is obtained. The expanded connectivity data allows for better identification and interpretation of the new resonances observed in the {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectra with the addition of alumina. The results of the dipolar dephasing experiments show that the sodium-phosphate distribution remains relatively unchanged for the glass series, and that the addition of aluminum occurs primarily through the depolymerization of the phosphate tetrahedral backbone.

  7. Insights into the metabolic response to traumatic brain injury as revealed by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bartnik-Olson, Brenda L.; Harris, Neil G.; Shijo, Katsunori; Sutton, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The present review highlights critical issues related to cerebral metabolism following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the use of 13C labeled substrates and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study these changes. First we address some pathophysiologic factors contributing to metabolic dysfunction following TBI. We then examine how 13C NMR spectroscopy strategies have been used to investigate energy metabolism, neurotransmission, the intracellular redox state, and neuroglial compartmentation following injury. 13C NMR spectroscopy studies of brain extracts from animal models of TBI have revealed enhanced glycolytic production of lactate, evidence of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activation, and alterations in neuronal and astrocyte oxidative metabolism that are dependent on injury severity. Differential incorporation of label into glutamate and glutamine from 13C labeled glucose or acetate also suggest TBI-induced adaptations to the glutamate-glutamine cycle. PMID:24109452

  8. Exploring new Routes for Identifying Phosphorus Species in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems with 31P NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestergren, Johan; Persson, Per; Sundman, Annelie; Ilstedt, Ulrik; Giesler, Reiner; Schleucher, Jürgen; Gröbner, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is the primary growth-limiting nutrient in some of the world's biomes. Rock phosphate is a non-renewable resource and the major source of agricultural fertilizers. Predictions of P consumption indicate that rock phosphate mining may peak within 35 years, with severe impacts on worldwide food production1. Organic P compounds constitute a major fraction of soil P, but little is known about the dynamics and bioavailability of organic P species. Our aim is to develop new liquid and solid state 31P-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) techniques to identify P-species in water and soils; information required for correlating P speciation with plant and soil processes2, and eventually to improve P use. Soil organic P is frequently extracted using NaOH/EDTA, followed by characterization of the extract by solution 31P-NMR. However, the obtained NMR spectra usually have poor resolution due to line broadening caused by the presence of paramagnetic ions. Therefore, we successfully developed an approach to avoid paramagnetic line broadening by precipitation of metal sulfides. Sulfide precipitation dramatically reduces NMR line widths for soil extracts, without affecting P-composition. The resulting highly improved resolution allowed us to apply for the first time 2D 1H,31P-NMR methods to identify different P monoesters in spectral regions which are extremely crowded in 1D NMR spectra.3 By exploiting 2D 1H-31P NMR spectra of soil extracts we were able to unambiguously identify individual organic P species by combining 31P and 1H chemical shifts and coupling constants. This approach is even suitable for a structural characterization of unknown P-components and for tracing degradation pathways between diesters and monoesters3,4.Currently we apply our approach on boreal4 and tropical soils with focus on Burkina Faso. In addition we also monitor P-species in aqueos ecosystems. For this purpose stream water from the Krycklan catchment in northern Sweden5 has been used to

  9. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for ten phenylpiperazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhihui; Yuan, Mu; Zhang, Si; Wu, Jun; Qi, Shuhua; Li, Qingxin

    2005-10-01

    Ten phenylpiperazine derivatives were designed and synthesized. The first complete assignments of (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts for these phenylpiperazine derivatives were achieved by means of 1D and 2D NMR techniques, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra.

  10. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for 10 phenylethanoid glycosides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Huang, Jianshe; Xiao, Qiang; Zhang, Si; Xiao, Zhihui; Li, Qingxin; Long, Lijuan; Huang, Liangmin

    2004-07-01

    Ten phenylethanoid glycosides, including two new ones, isolated from the aerial parts of the mangrove plant Acanthus ilicifolius were identified. The first complete assignments of the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for these glycosides were achieved by means of 2D NMR techniques, including 1H-1H COSY, TOCSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra.

  11. Production and NMR signal optimization of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Amino acids are targeted nutrients for consumption by cancers to sustain their rapid growth and proliferation. 13C-enriched amino acids are important metabolic tracers for cancer diagnostics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Despite this diagnostic potential, 13C NMR of amino acids however is hampered by the inherently low NMR sensitivity of the 13C nuclei. In this work, we have employed a physics technique known as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance the NMR signals of 13C-enriched amino acids. DNP works by transferring the high polarization of electrons to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Using a fast dissolution method in which the frozen polarized samples are dissolved rapidly with superheated water, injectable solutions of 13C-amino acids with highly enhanced NMR signals (by at least 5,000-fold) were produced at room temperature. Factors that affect the NMR signal enhancement levels such as the choice of free radical polarizing agents and sample preparation will be discussed along with the thermal mixing physics model of DNP. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  12. In vivo dephosphorylation of WR-2721 monitored by 31P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Knizner, S.A.; Jacobs, A.J.; Lyon, R.C.; Swenberg, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    The in vivo dephosphorylation of the radioprotective agent S-2-(3-(aminopropylamino))ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) in male CD2F1 mice was measured by 31P NMR spectroscopy after i.p. injection. The disappearance of the WR-2721 phosphate NMR signal with time was concurrent with an increase and splitting of the inorganic phosphate NMR signal. The more acidic inorganic phosphate resonance is shown to be attributed to phosphate (inorganic phosphate) in the urine. Using regression first-order kinetic analysis of data, after i.p. injection of 600 mg/kg, the half-life of WR-2721 was determined to be 40.9 +/- 5.9 (S.D.) min (n = 10).

  13. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for the cyanine dyes SYBR Safe and thiazole orange.

    PubMed

    Evenson, William E; Boden, Lauren M; Muzikar, Katy A; O'Leary, Daniel J

    2012-12-01

    Analysis of (1)H and (13)C NMR and mass spectral data for the fluorescent nucleic acid stain SYBR Safe indicates that it contains a cyanine-based cationic core structure identical to thiazole orange. The difference between these two compounds is the type of N-substitution on the quinolinium ring system (SYBR Safe, n-Pr; thiazole orange, Me). The (1)H and (13)C NMR resonances for both compounds were assigned on the basis of one- and two-dimensional (COSY, ROESY, HSQC, and HMBC) experiments. The preferred conformation of these compounds was computed by ab initio methods and found to be consistent with the NMR data.

  14. 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR lipid profiles of human renal tissues.

    PubMed

    Tugnoli, V; Bottura, G; Fini, G; Reggiani, A; Tinti, A; Trinchero, A; Tosi, M R

    2003-01-01

    Lipids from human renal tissues are studied by means of (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. The total lipid fractions obtained from healthy kidneys, malignant renal cell carcinomas, and benign oncocytomas are characterized and analyzed to elucidate the main differences between the functional and neoplastic tissues. In all cases the lipid components are well identified. The healthy kidney is characterized by high amounts of triglycerides and the presence of cholesterol in its free form. On the contrary, renal cell carcinomas contain high amounts of cholesterol that are almost completely esterified as oleate, suggesting an intracellular localization of the cholesteryl esters synthesis. Cholesteryl esters are considered markers of renal cell carcinomas, thus supporting recent theories that these compounds play a leading role in cell proliferation. Oncocytomas are particularly rich in phosphatidylcholine and, analogous to the healthy kidney, are completely lacking in cholesteryl esters. Healthy kidneys and oncocytomas appear to have other similarities if compared with renal cell carcinomas: a very high fatty acyl/cholesterol ratio, the presence of dolichols, and a higher grade of unsaturation. The (13)C data suggest a new method for the direct evaluation of the saturated/unsaturated fatty acyl ratio.

  15. Characterization of uniformly and atom-specifically 13C-labeled heparin and heparan sulfate polysaccharide precursors using 13C NMR spectroscopy and ESI mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao K. N.; Tran, Vy M.; Victor, Xylophone V.; Skalicky, Jack J.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2010-01-01

    The biological actions of heparin and heparan sulfate, two structurally related glycosaminoglycans, depend on the organization of the complex heparanome. Due to the structural complexity of the heparanome, the sequence of variably sulfonated uronic acid and glucosamine residues is usually characterized by the analysis of smaller oligosaccharide and disaccharide fragments. Even characterization of smaller heparin/heparan sulfate oligosaccharide or disaccharide fragments using simple 1D 1H NMR spectroscopy is often complicated by the extensive signal overlap. 13C NMR signals, on the other hand, overlap less and therefore, 13C NMR spectroscopy can greatly facilitate the structural elucidation of the complex heparanome and provide finer insights into the structural basis for biological functions. This is the first report of the preparation of anomeric carbon-specific 13C-labeled heparin/heparan sulfate precursors from the Escherichia coli K5 strain. Uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled precursors were also produced and characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis of enzymatically fragmented disaccharides revealed that anomeric carbon-specific labeling efforts resulted in a minor loss/scrambling of 13C in the precursor backbone, whereas uniform labeling efforts resulted in greater than 95% 13C isotope enrichment in the precursor backbone. These labeled precursors provided high-resolution NMR signals with great sensitivity and set the stage for studying the heparanome–proteome interactions. PMID:20832774

  16. In vivo 31P-NMR spectroscopy of right ventricle in pigs.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, G G; Steinman, S K; Weiner, M W; Matson, G B

    1992-06-01

    The energy metabolism of the right ventricle (RV) in vivo has been largely unexplored. The goal of this study was to develop and implement techniques for in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the RV free wall. A two-turn, crossover-design elliptical surface coil was constructed to provide high sensitivity across the thin RV wall but minimal sensitivity in the blood-filled RV cavity. In 36 open-chest, anesthetized pigs, 31P spectroscopy of the RV free wall was performed with this coil at a field strength of 2 Tesla. Spectra were obtained from 800 acquisitions in 24 min with an average signal-to-noise ratio of 13.2 for phosphocreatine (PCr). The PCr-to-ATP (PCr/ATP) ratio of porcine RV was 1.42 +/- 0.05 (mean +/- SE), uncorrected for saturation at a repetition time of 1.8 s. With the use of literature values of the time constant of longitudinal relaxation (T1) to correct for partial saturation, the RV PCr/ATP was estimated to lie between 1.7 and 2.3. Decreased RV PCr/ATP was observed during RV ischemia and pressure overload. Thus in vivo 31P spectroscopy of the RV is readily accomplished with an appropriate surface coil and can provide new information about RV energy metabolism. PMID:1621852

  17. Detoxification of organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents through RSDL: efficacy evaluation by (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Elsinghorst, Paul W; Worek, Franz; Koller, Marianne

    2015-03-01

    Intoxication by organophosphorus compounds, especially by pesticides, poses a considerable risk to the affected individual. Countermeasures involve both medical intervention by means of antidotes as well as external decontamination to reduce the risk of dermal absorption. One of the few decontamination options available is Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), which was originally developed for military use. Here, we present a (31)P NMR spectroscopy based methodology to evaluate the detoxification efficacy of RSDL with respect to a series of organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents. Kinetic analysis of the obtained NMR data provided degradation half-lives proving that RSDL is also reasonably effective against organophosphorus pesticides. Unexpected observations of different RSDL degradation patterns are presented in view of its reported oximate-catalyzed mechanism of action.

  18. Detoxification of organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents through RSDL: efficacy evaluation by (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Elsinghorst, Paul W; Worek, Franz; Koller, Marianne

    2015-03-01

    Intoxication by organophosphorus compounds, especially by pesticides, poses a considerable risk to the affected individual. Countermeasures involve both medical intervention by means of antidotes as well as external decontamination to reduce the risk of dermal absorption. One of the few decontamination options available is Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), which was originally developed for military use. Here, we present a (31)P NMR spectroscopy based methodology to evaluate the detoxification efficacy of RSDL with respect to a series of organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents. Kinetic analysis of the obtained NMR data provided degradation half-lives proving that RSDL is also reasonably effective against organophosphorus pesticides. Unexpected observations of different RSDL degradation patterns are presented in view of its reported oximate-catalyzed mechanism of action. PMID:25597861

  19. A 13C-NMR study of exopolysaccharide synthesis in Rhizobium meliloti Su47 strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernier, P.; Portais, J.-C.; Besson, I.; Courtois, J.; Courtois, B.; Barbotin, J.-N.

    1998-02-01

    Metabolic pathways implied in the synthesis of succinoglycan produced by the Su47 strain of R. meliloti were evaluated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy after incubation with [1{-}13C] or [2{-}13C] glucose. The biosynthesis of this polymer by R. meliloti from glucose occurred by a direct polymerisation of the introduced glucose and by the pentose phosphate pathway. Les voies métaboliques impliquées dans la synthèse du succinoglycane produit par la souche Su47 de R. meliloti ont été évaluées par la spectroscopie de RMN du carbone 13 après incubation des cellules avec du [1{-}13C] ou [2{-}13C] glucose. La biosynthèse de ce polymère à partir du glucose se produit par polymérisation directe du glucose et par la voie des pentoses phosphate.

  20. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-06-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ, ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1-40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1-40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16-21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1-40 fibrils in 4 h or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples.

  1. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  2. On the noninvasive measurement of intracellular free magnesium by 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R K; Gupta, P; Yushok, W D; Rose, Z B

    1983-01-01

    We previously introduced a noninvasive measurement of the concentration of free Mg2+ in intact cells and tissues using 31P NMR. To resolve a controversy in the literature concerning the affinity of Mg2+ for ATP used in our procedure, the apparent dissociation constant of MgATP under simulated intracellular conditions has been determined by three independent magnetic resonance methods, including a newly developed combination procedure for determining this value at intracellular ATP levels. The new combination method, which utilizes 31P NMR to determine the degree of Mg2+ chelation of ATP and the dye antipyrylazo III for optical determination of free Mg2+, yielded a value of (50 +/- 10) microM for this apparent dissociation constant at pH 7.2 in the presence of 0.15 M K+ and 25 degrees C. We further show that hydroxyquinolines are not satisfactory indicators for optical determination of the Mg2+-nucleotide dissociation constant. From our determinations a low value of free Mg2+ (less than 1 mM) is established for all of the tissues studied, including perfused heart muscle, contrary to a recent report in the literature. Saturating human erythrocytes with Mg2+ results in an alpha- and beta-phosphorus resonance separation for intracellular ATP that is indistinguishable from that observed in a noncellular MgATP control under similar conditions, showing that MgATP resonances in this cell are unaffected by the cellular environment.

  3. Phospholipid composition of plasma and erythrocyte membranes in animal species by 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Ferlazzo, Alida Maria; Bruschetta, Giuseppe; Di Pietro, Patrizia; Medica, Pietro; Notti, Anna; Rotondo, Enrico

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to provide basal values of phospholipid (PL) composition in different animal species by 31P NMR analysis using detergents. This fast and accurate method allowed a quantitative analysis of PLs without any previous separation. Plasma and erythrocyte membrane PLs were investigated in mammals (pig, cow, horse). Moreover, for the first time, the composition of plasma PLs in avian (chicken and ostrich) was performed by 31P NMR. Significant qualitative and quantitative interspecies differences in plasma PL levels were found. Phosphatidilcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin (SPH) levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in chicken plasma than all the other species tested. In erythrocytes, cow PC and phosphatidylcholine diarachidoyl were significantly lower (P < 0.001) than for pigs and horses, whereas pig PC presented intermediate values among cows and horses. Inorganic phosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels were also significantly different between the species under investigation. The [SPH/total PLs] molar ratios in erythrocytes confirmed interspecies differences in phospholipid composition while the PC/SPH molar ratios could be related to a distinct erythrocyte flexibility and aggregability. Diet and nutrition may contribute primarily to the interspecies differences in plasma PL amounts detected. Significant differences between chicken plasma PC and SPH levels and those of the other animal species could be ascribed to a fat metabolism specific to egg production.

  4. Synthesis of prostanoids; enantiomeric purity of alcohols by a /sup 31/P NMR technique

    SciTech Connect

    Penning, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    The enone, 2,2-diemthyl-3a..beta.., 6a..beta..-dihydro-4H-cyclopenta-1,3-dioxol-4-one, has been synthesized in six steps from cyclopentadiene, resolved using sulfoximine chemistry, and converted into (-)-prostaglandin E/sub 2/ methyl ester in three steps. Introduction of the optically pure omega side-chain using a conjugate addition of a stabilized organocopper reagent, followed by direct alkylation of the enolate with the ..cap alpha.. side-chain allylic iodide in the presence of hexamethylphosphoramide, afforded a trans, vicinally disubstituted cyclopentanone. Deprotection of the C-15 alcohol, followed by aluminum amalgam reduction of the C-10/oxygen bond, provided (-)-PGE/sub 2/ methyl ester in 47% overall yield from the enone. In an extension of previously described work, 2-chloro-3,4-dimethyl-5-phenyl-1,3,2-oxazaphospholidine 2-sulfide, prepared from l-ephedrine and thiophosphoryl chloride, was used to determine the enantiomeric excess of chiral alcohols in conjunction with /sup 31/P NMR. Chiral primary and secondary alcohols added quantitatively to the phospholidine to give diastereomers which could be analyzed by /sup 31/P NMR and HPLC. A number of other phosphorus heterocycles were also explored as potential chiral derivatizing reagents.

  5. Sediment depth attenuation of biogenic phosphorus compounds measured by 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Joakim; Tranvik, Lars; Gogoll, Adolf; Waldeback, Monica; Markides, Karin; Rydin, Emil

    2005-02-01

    Being a major cause of eutrophication and subsequent loss of water quality, the turnover of phosphorus (P) in lake sediments is in need of deeper understanding. A major part of the flux of P to eutrophic lake sediments is organically bound or of biogenic origin. This P is incorporated in a poorly described mixture of autochthonous and allochthonous sediment and forms the primary storage of P available for recycling to the water column, thus regulating lake trophic status. To identify and quantify biogenic sediment P and assess its lability, we analyzed sediment cores from Lake Erken, Sweden, using traditional P fractionation, and in parallel, NaOH extracts were analyzed using 31P NMR. The surface sediments contain orthophosphates (ortho-P) and pyrophosphates (pyro-P), as well as phosphate mono- and diesters. The first group of compounds to disappear with increased sediment depth is pyrophosphate, followed by a steady decline of the different ester compounds. Estimated half-life times of these compound groups are about 10 yr for pyrophosphate and 2 decades for mono- and diesters. Probably, these compounds will be mineralized to ortho-P and is thus potentially available for recycling to the water column, supporting further growth of phytoplankton. In conclusion, 31P NMR is a useful tool to asses the bioavailability of certain P compound groups, and the combination with traditional fractionation techniques makes quantification possible. PMID:15757351

  6. Membrane interactions in small fast-tumbling bicelles as studied by 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Andrea; Kövér, Katalin E; Mäler, Lena

    2015-03-01

    Small fast-tumbling bicelles are ideal for studies of membrane interactions at molecular level; they allow analysis of lipid properties using solution-state NMR. In the present study we used 31P NMR relaxation to obtain detailed information on lipid head-group dynamics. We explored the effect of two topologically different membrane-interacting peptides on bicelles containing either dimyristoylphosphocholine (DMPC), or a mixture of DMPC and dimyristoylphosphoglycerol (DMPG), and dihexanoylphosphocholine (DHPC). KALP21 is a model transmembrane peptide, designed to span a DMPC bilayer and dynorphin B is a membrane surface active neuropeptide. KALP21 causes significant increase in bicelle size, as evidenced by both dynamic light scattering and 31P T2 relaxation measurements. The effect of dynorphin B on bicelle size is more modest, although significant effects on T2 relaxation are observed at higher temperatures. A comparison of 31P T1 values for the lipids with and without the peptides showed that dynorphin B has a greater effect on lipid head-group dynamics than KALP21, especially at elevated temperatures. From the field-dependence of T1 relaxation data, a correlation time describing the overall lipid motion was derived. Results indicate that the positively charged dynorphin B decreases the mobility of the lipid molecules--in particular for the negatively charged DMPG--while KALP21 has a more modest influence. Our results demonstrate that while a transmembrane peptide has severe effects on overall bilayer properties, the surface bound peptide has a more dramatic effect in reducing lipid head-group mobility. These observations may be of general importance for understanding peptide-membrane interactions. PMID:25497765

  7. 13C-NMR spectra and contact time experiment for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The T(CP) and T(1p) time constants for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids were determined to be short with T(CP) values ranging from 0.14 ms to 0.53 ms and T(1p) values ranging from 3.3 ms to 5.9 ms. T(CP) or T(1p) time constants at a contact time of 1 ms are favorable for quantification of 13C-NMR spectra. Because of the short T(CP) values, correction factors for signal intensity for various regions of the 13C-NMR spectra would be necessary at contact times greater than 1.1 ms or less than 0.9 ms. T(CP) and T(1p) values have a limited non-homogeneity within Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids. A pulse delay or repeat time of 700 ms is more than adequate for quantification of these 13C-NMR spectra. Paramagnetic effects in these humic substances are precluded due to low inorganic ash contents, low contents of Fe, Mn, and Co, and low organic free-radical contents. The observed T(CP) values suggest that all the carbon types in Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids are fully cross-polarized before significant proton relaxation occurs. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern fulvic acid is similar to most aquatic fulvic acids as it is predominantly aliphatic, low in aromaticity (fa1 = 24), low in phenolic content, high in carboxyl content, and has no resolution of a methoxyl peak. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern humic acid is also similar to most other aquatic humic acids in that it is also predominantly aliphatic, high in aromaticity (fa1 = 38), moderate in phenolic content, moderate in carboxyl content, and has a clear resolution of a methoxyl carbon region. After the consideration of the necessary 13C-NMR experimental conditions, these spectra are considered to be quantitative. With careful consideration of the previously determined 13C-NMR experimental conditions, quantitative spectra can be obtained for humic substances in the future from the HUMEX site. Possible changes in humic substances due to acidification should be determined from 13C-NMR data.

  8. In vivo 13C NMR metabolite profiling: potential for understanding and assessing conifer seed quality.

    PubMed

    Terskikh, Victor V; Feurtado, J Allan; Borchardt, Shane; Giblin, Michael; Abrams, Suzanne R; Kermode, Allison R

    2005-08-01

    High-resolution 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy was used to profile a range of primary and secondary metabolites in vivo in intact whole seeds of eight different conifer species native to North America, including six of the Pinaceae family and two of the Cupressaceae family. In vivo 13C NMR provided information on the total seed oil content and fatty acid composition of the major storage lipids in a non-destructive manner. In addition, a number of monoterpenes were identified in the 13C NMR spectra of conifer seeds containing oleoresin; these compounds showed marked variability in individual seeds of Pacific silver fir within the same seed lot. In imbibed conifer seeds, the 13C NMR spectra showed the presence of considerable amounts of dissolved sucrose presumed to play a protective role in the desiccation-tolerance of seeds. The free amino acids arginine and asparagine, generated as a result of storage protein mobilization, were detected in vivo during seed germination and early seedling growth. The potential for NMR to profile metabolites in a non-destructive manner in single conifer seeds and seed populations is discussed. It is a powerful tool to evaluate seed quality because of its ability to assess reserve accumulation during seed development or at seed maturity; it can also be used to monitor reserve mobilization, which is critical for seedling emergence. PMID:15996983

  9. Topological Constraints on Chain-Folding Structure of Semicrystalline Polymer as Studied by 13C-13C Double Quantum NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Youlee; Miyoshi, Toshikazu

    Chain-folding process is a prominent feature of long polymer chains during crystallization. Over the last half century, much effort has been paid to reveal the chain trajectory. Even though various chain-folding models as well as theories of crystallization at molecule levels have been proposed, they could be not reconciled due to the limited experimental evidences. Recent development of double quantum NMR with selective isotope labeling identified the chain-trajectory of 13C labeled isotactic poly(1-butene). The systematic experiments covered a wide range of parameters, i.e. kinetics, concentration, and molecular weight (Mw) . It was demonstrated that i) adjacent re-entry site was invariant as a function of crystallization temperature (Tc) , concentration, andMw, ii) long-range order of adjacent re-entry sequence is independence of kinetics at a given concentration while it decreased with increasing the polymer concentration at a given Tc due to the increased interruption between the chains, and iii) high Mw chains led to the multilayer folded structures in single crystals, but the melt state induced the identical short adjacent sequences of long and short polymer over a wide range of Tc due to the entanglements. The behaviors indicated that the topological restriction plays significant roles in the chain-folding process rather than the kinetics. The proposed framework to control the chain-folding structure presents a new perspective into the chain organization by either the intra- or inter-chain interaction. National Science Foundation Grants DMR-1105829 and 1408855.

  10. Measuring Level Alignment at the Metal–Molecule Interface by In Situ Electrochemical 13C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zelakiewicz, Brian S.; Allison, Thomas C.; Tong, Yu ye J.

    2015-03-16

    A new technique to measure energy-level alignment at a metal–molecule interface between the Fermi level of the metal and the frontier orbitals of the molecule is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The method, which combines the electrochemistry of organo-ligand-stabilized Au nanoparticles with 13C NMR spectroscopy (i.e. in situ electrochemical NMR), enables measuring both occupied and unoccupied states.

  11. Natural-abundance sup 13 C NMR study of glycogen repletion in human liver and muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Jue, T.; Rothman, D.L.; Tavitian, B.A.; Shulman, R.G. )

    1989-03-01

    Optimizing the surface-coil design and spectral-acquisition parameters has led to the observation of the {sup 13}C NMR natural abundance glycogen signal in man at 2.1 T. Both the human muscle and hepatic glycogen signals can be detected definitively with a time resolution of {approx}13 min. A {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C concentric surface coil was used. The {sup 1}H outer coil was 11 cm in diameter; the {sup 13}C inner coil was 8 cm in diameter. The coils were tuned to 89.3 MHz and 22.4 MHz, respectively. The {sup 1}H coil was used for optimizing field homogeneity (shimming) the magnet and for single-frequency decoupling of the C{sub 1} glycogen signal. Total power deposition from both the transmitter pulse and the continuous wave decoupling did not exceed the Food and Drug Administration guideline of 8 W/kg of tissue. Experiments were done for which healthy subjects returned to the magnets at different times for {sup 13}C NMR measurement. The spectral difference between experiments was within the noise in the C{sub 1} glycogen region. Because of the spectral reproducibility and the signal sensitivity, hepatic glycogen repletion can be followed. Four hours postprandial, hepatic glycogen increases by 3.8 times from the basal fasted state. The hepatic glycogen data correspond directly to previous biopsy results and support the use of {sup 13}C NMR as a noninvasive probe of human metabolism.

  12. Complete (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift assignments of mono-, di-, and trisaccharides as basis for NMR chemical shift predictions of polysaccharides using the computer program casper.

    PubMed

    Roslund, Mattias U; Säwén, Elin; Landström, Jens; Rönnols, Jerk; Jonsson, K Hanna M; Lundborg, Magnus; Svensson, Mona V; Widmalm, Göran

    2011-08-16

    The computer program casper uses (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data of mono- to trisaccharides for the prediction of chemical shifts of oligo- and polysaccharides. In order to improve the quality of these predictions the (1)H and (13)C, as well as (31)P when applicable, NMR chemical shifts of 30 mono-, di-, and trisaccharides were assigned. The reducing sugars gave two distinct sets of NMR resonances due to the α- and β-anomeric forms. In total 35 (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data sets were obtained from the oligosaccharides. One- and two-dimensional NMR experiments were used for the chemical shift assignments and special techniques were employed in some cases such as 2D (1)H,(13)C-HSQC Hadamard Transform methodology which was acquired approximately 45 times faster than a regular t(1) incremented (1)H,(13)C-HSQC experiment and a 1D (1)H,(1)H-CSSF-TOCSY experiment which was able to distinguish spin-systems in which the target protons were only 3.3Hz apart. The (1)H NMR chemical shifts were subsequently refined using total line-shape analysis with the PERCH NMR software. The acquired NMR data were then utilized in the casper program (http://www.casper.organ.su.se/casper/) for NMR chemical shift predictions of the O-antigen polysaccharides from Klebsiella O5, Shigella flexneri serotype X, and Salmonella arizonae O62. The data were compared to experimental data of the polysaccharides from the two former strains and the lipopolysaccharide of the latter strain showing excellent agreement between predicted and experimental (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

  13. Development of a 13C-optimized 1.5-mm high temperature superconducting NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Vijaykumar; Hooker, Jerris W.; Withers, Richard S.; Nast, Robert E.; Brey, William W.; Edison, Arthur S.

    2013-10-01

    We report a 1.5-mm NMR probe based on high temperature superconductors operating at 14.1 T optimized for 13C detection. The probe has a total sample volume of about 35 microliters (μL) with an active volume of 20 μL and provides exceptional mass sensitivity for 13C detection. The probe also has excellent 1H sensitivity and employs a 2H lock; 15N irradiation capability can be added in the future. The coils are cooled to about 20 K using a standard Agilent cryogenic refrigeration system, and the sample temperature is regulated near room temperature. The coil design considerations are discussed in detail. This probe is ideal for directly detected 13C NMR experiments for natural products chemistry and metabolomics applications, for which 35 μL is an optimal sample volume. The outstanding 13C sensitivity of this probe allowed us to directly determine the 13C connectivity on 1.1 mg of natural abundance histidine using an INADEQUATE experiment. We demonstrated the utility of this probe for 13C-based metabolomics using a synthetic mixture of common natural abundance metabolites whose concentrations ranged from 1 to 5 mM (40-200 nmol).

  14. Quantitative identification of metastable magnesium carbonate minerals by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Surface, J Andrew; Brenner, Allison; Wang, Louis S; Skemer, Philip; Conradi, Mark S; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-01-01

    In the conversion of CO2 to mineral carbonates for the permanent geosequestration of CO2, there are multiple magnesium carbonate phases that are potential reaction products. Solid-state (13)C NMR is demonstrated as an effective tool for distinguishing magnesium carbonate phases and quantitatively characterizing magnesium carbonate mixtures. Several of these mineral phases include magnesite, hydromagnesite, dypingite, and nesquehonite, which differ in composition by the number of waters of hydration or the number of crystallographic hydroxyl groups. These carbonates often form in mixtures with nearly overlapping (13)C NMR resonances which makes their identification and analysis difficult. In this study, these phases have been investigated with solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy, including both static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments. Static spectra yield chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) lineshapes that are indicative of the site-symmetry variations of the carbon environments. MAS spectra yield isotropic chemical shifts for each crystallographically inequivalent carbon and spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, yield characteristic information that assist in species discrimination. These detailed parameters, and the combination of static and MAS analyses, can aid investigations of mixed carbonates by (13)C NMR.

  15. Characterizing biomass fast pyrolysis oils by 13C-NMR and chemometric analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several biomass fast pyrolysis oils were characterized by 13C and DEPT NMR analysis to determine chemical functional group compositions as related to their energy content. Pyrolysis oils were produced from a variety of feedstocks including energy crops, woods, animal wastes and oil seed presscakes,...

  16. Following Glycolysis Using 13C NMR: An Experiment Adaptable to Different Undergraduate Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mega, T. L.; Carlson, C. B.; Cleary, D. A.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a laboratory exercise where the glycolysis of [1-13C] glucose under anaerobic conditions was followed using 13C NMR spectroscopy. The exercise is described in terms of its suitability for a variety of different undergraduate levels, although the emphasis in this paper is on its use in a n advanced chemistry laboratory course. The kinetics of the loss of glucose and the production of ethanol were investigated and found not to fit simple first or second order kinetics. In addition, the relative reaction rates of the two anomeric forms of glucose were analyzed, and it was determined that the a anomeric form reacted faster than the β anomeric form. Using proton-coupled 13C NMR, some of the metabolites were identified including ethanol (major) and glycerol (minor). Reaction and spectroscopic details are included.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Metabolic Mixtures by 2D 13C-Constant-Time TOCSY NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Kerem; Zhang, Fengli; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of organisms can be fully 13C-labeled, which has the advantage that their metabolomes can be studied by high-resolution 2D NMR 13C–13C constant-time (CT) TOCSY experiments. Individual metabolites can be identified via database searching or, in the case of novel compounds, through the reconstruction of their backbone-carbon topology. Determination of quantitative metabolite concentrations is another key task. Because significant peak overlaps in 1D NMR spectra prevents straightforward quantification through 1D peak integrals, we demonstrate here the direct use of 13C–13C CT-TOCSY spectra for metabolite quantification. This is accomplished through the quantum-mechanical treatment of the TOCSY magnetization transfer at short and long mixing times or by the use of analytical approximations, which are solely based on the knowledge of the carbon-backbone topologies. The methods are demonstrated for carbohydrate and amino-acid mixtures. PMID:23773204

  18. 13C CP MAS NMR and GIAO-CHF calculations of coumarins.

    PubMed

    Zolek, Teresa; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wawer, Iwona

    2003-01-01

    13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning NMR spectra were recorded for a series of solid coumarins. Ab initio calculations of shielding constants were performed with the use of GIAO-CHF method. The combined CPMAS NMR and theoretical approach was successful in characterizing solid-state conformations of coumarins; a relationship sigma (ppm) = -1.032 xdelta + 205.28 (R(2) = 0.9845) can be used to obtain structural information for coumarins, for which solid-state NMR or crystal structure data are not available.

  19. High-resolution proton NMR studies of intracellular metabolites in yeast using 13C decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Shulman, Robert G.

    The resolution and specificity of 1H NMR in studies of yeast cellular metabolism were increased by feeding a 13C-labeled substrate and observing 1H difference spectra in the presence and absence of 13C decoupling fields. [2- 13C]Acetate was utilized as a respiratory substrate in an aerobic suspension of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The broad cellular background proton resonances are removed by the technique, leaving only signals from the protons of the substrate, or its metabolites, that are coupled to 13C. Spectra of the yeast suspension after acetate feeding show the disappearance of label from the acetate pool and the subsequent appearance of 13C in glutamate C 3 and C 4 and in aspartate C 3. These results are in accord with the known fluxes of metabolites. Selective single-frequency 13C decoupling was used to provide assignments for the difference signals. The limitations on single-frequency decoupling coming from finite decoupling fields are investigated. The technique shows a potential for application in a wide variety of systems where the resolution of the 13C spectrum may be combined with the sensitivity for proton detection to observe metabolites that have been previously unobservable.

  20. 31P NMR conformational studies of non-palindromic DNA duplexes related to HIV-1 enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisne, C.; Simenel, C.; Hantz, E.; Delepierre, M.

    1998-02-01

    Assignment of all 31P resonances of 16 base-pair DNA duplexes, 5' d(CTGGGGACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTCCCCAG)3', related to the DNA kappaB site of the HIV-1 LTR together with a mutated sequence 5' d(CTGCTCACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTGAGCAG)3' was determined by 2D heteronuclear inverse NMR spectroscopy (HSQC-TOCSY and heteronuclear COSY). ^3JH{3'}-P coupling constants for most of the phosphates of the mutated oligomer were obtained using heteronuclear selective COSY. L'attribution des résonances 31P du fragment d'ADN de seize paires de base 5' d(CTGGGGACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTCCCCAG)3' (16N) correspondant au site kappaB du LTR du HIV-1 et de la séquence mutée 5' d(CTGCTCACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTGAGCAG)3' (16M) a été déterminée à l'aide de méthodes 2D hétéronucléaires à détection indirecte (HSQC-TOCSY et COSY hétéronucléaires). Les constantes de couplage ^3JH{3'}-P ont été mesurées pour la plupart des phosphates de 16 M à l'aide d'expérience COSY hétéronucléaires sélectives.

  1. Investigation of broad resonances in 31P NMR spectra of the human brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    McNamara, R; Arias-Mendoza, F; Brown, T R

    1994-08-01

    Broad resonances that lie underneath the familiar small molecule profile of in vivo 31P NMR spectra can make accurate spectral integration of these mobile phosphates difficult. The two major broad components are the phosphate contained in the hydroxyapatite in cranial bone and the phosphodiester moiety in partially mobile membrane phospholipids. They can be removed with post-acquisition processing but this results in distortion of lineshapes and intensities and interferes with accurate quantitation. We have employed an off-resonance saturation procedure to eliminate the bone resonance and isolate the signal from the membrane phospholipids by subtraction. Selective saturation of the phospholipid resonance increases the clarity of the sharp peaks downfield from the phosphocreatine peak. Selective saturation 3-D chemical shift imaging techniques were used to create a localized phospholipid profile of the entire brain simultaneously. Monitoring localized phospholipid concentration may be important in studying demyelinating diseases. PMID:7848814

  2. Degradation of black phosphorus: a real-time 31P NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Yang, Bingchao; Wan, Bensong; Xi, Xuekui; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Enke; Wu, Guangheng; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, degradation behaviors and mechanisms of black phosphorus (BP) crystals in air under ambient conditions were investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It has been found that the 31P NMR line intensity for BP decreases exponentially during aging even at the very first several hours, suggesting the origin of the degradation of transport properties. In addition to phosphoric acid, new phosphorous acid was also well resolved in the final aging products. Moreover, BP has been found to be stable in water without the presence of oxygen molecules. These findings are relevant for better understanding of degradation behaviors of BP upon aging and should be helpful for overcoming a barrier that might hamper progress toward applications of BP as a 2D material.

  3. 31P-NMR SPECTROSCOPY OF RAT LIVER DURING SIMPLE STORAGE OR CONTINUOUS HYPOTHERMIC PERFUSION1

    PubMed Central

    Rossaro, Lorenzo; Murase, Noriko; Caldwell, Cary; Farghali, Hassan; Casavilla, Adrian; Starzl, Thomas E.; Ho, Chien; Van Thiel, David H.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The ATP content and intracellular pH (pHi)3 of isolated rat liver before, during, and after cold preservation in either UW-lactobionate (UW, n=10) or Euro-Collins (EC, n=8) solutions were monitored using phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy. The 31P-NMR spectra were obtained on a 4.7-Tesla system operating at 81 MHz. Fructose metabolism, liver enzyme release, O2 consumption, and rat survival after liver transplantation were also evaluated. During simple cold storage (SCS), the ATP level declined to undetectable levels with both preservation solutions while the pHi declined to approximately 7.0. In contrast, during continuous hypothermic perfusion (CHP), hepatic ATP levels remained measurable during the 24-hour EC preservation and actually increased significantly (p>0.01) during UW preservation. After reperfusion at 37°C with Krebs-lactate, the SCS livers treated with EC differed significantly from the UW livers in terms of their ATP and pHi as well as their response to a fructose challenge. In contrast, livers undergoing CHP demonstrated similar behaviors with both solutions. These results demonstrate an increase in the hepatic ATP content during CHP which occurs with UW but is not seen with EC. On the other hand, only livers that were simply stored with UW achieved significant survival after transplant, while CHP livers were affected by vascular damage as demonstrated by fatal thrombosis after transplant. These data suggest that ATP content is not the only determinant of good liver function although a system of hypothermic perfusion might further improve liver preservation efficacy should injury to vascular endothelium be avoided. PMID:1402332

  4. P-O-B(3) linkages in borophosphate glasses evidenced by high field (11)B/(31)P correlation NMR.

    PubMed

    Tricot, G; Raguenet, B; Silly, G; Ribes, M; Pradel, A; Eckert, H

    2015-06-01

    The long-standing debate about the presence of P-O-B(3) linkages in glasses has been solved by high-field scalar correlation NMR. Previously suggested by dipolar NMR methods, the presence of such species has been definitively demonstrated by (11)B((31)P) J-HMQC NMR techniques. The results indicate that borophosphate networks contain P-O-B(3) bonds and thus present a higher degree of atomic homogeneity than previously thought. PMID:25891539

  5. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  6. Methylation patterns of aquatic humic substances determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Steelink, C.; Wershaw, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectroscopy is used to examine the hydroxyl group functionality of a series of humic and fulvic acids from different aquatic environments. Samples first are methylated with 13C-labeled diazomethane. The NMR spectra of the diazomethylated samples allow one to distinguish between methyl esters of carboxylic acids, methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls, and methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls adjacent to two substituents. Samples are then permethylated with 13C-labeled methyl iodide/NaH. 13C NMR spectra of permethylated samples show that a significant fraction of the hydroxyl groups is not methylated with diazomethane alone. In these spectra methyl ethers of carbohydrate and aliphatic hydroxyls overlap with methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls. Side reactions of the methyltion procedure including carbon methylation in the CH3I/NaH procedure, are also examined. Humic and fulvic acids from bog, swamp, groundwater, and lake waters showssome differences in their distribution of hydroxyl groups, mainly in the concentrations of phenolic hydroxyls, which may be attributed to their different biogeochemical origins. ?? 1987.

  7. Identification of natural metabolites in mixture: a pattern recognition strategy based on (13)C NMR.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Jane; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc; Purson, Sylvain; Hamzaoui, Mahmoud; Borie, Nicolas; Reynaud, Romain; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2014-03-18

    Because of their highly complex metabolite profile, the chemical characterization of bioactive natural extracts usually requires time-consuming multistep purification procedures to achieve the structural elucidation of pure individual metabolites. The aim of the present work was to develop a dereplication strategy for the identification of natural metabolites directly within mixtures. Exploiting the polarity range of metabolites, the principle was to rapidly fractionate a multigram quantity of a crude extract by centrifugal partition extraction (CPE). The obtained fractions of simplified chemical composition were subsequently analyzed by (13)C NMR. After automatic collection and alignment of (13)C signals across spectra, hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) was performed for pattern recognition. As a result, strong correlations between (13)C signals of a single structure within the mixtures of the fraction series were visualized as chemical shift clusters. Each cluster was finally assigned to a molecular structure with the help of a locally built (13)C NMR chemical shift database. The proof of principle of this strategy was achieved on a simple model mixture of commercially available plant secondary metabolites and then applied to a bark extract of the African tree Anogeissus leiocarpus Guill. & Perr. (Combretaceae). Starting from 5 g of this genuine extract, the fraction series was generated by CPE in only 95 min. (13)C NMR analyses of all fractions followed by pattern recognition of (13)C chemical shifts resulted in the unambiguous identification of seven major compounds, namely, sericoside, trachelosperogenin E, ellagic acid, an epimer mixture of (+)-gallocatechin and (-)-epigallocatechin, 3,3'-di-O-methylellagic acid 4'-O-xylopyranoside, and 3,4,3'-tri-O-methylflavellagic acid 4'-O-glucopyranoside. PMID:24555703

  8. Determination of fructose metabolic pathways in normal and fructose-intolerant children: A sup 13 C NMR study using (U- sup 13 C)fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Gopher, A.; Lapidot, A. ); Vaisman, N. ); Mandel, H. )

    1990-07-01

    An inborn deficiency in the ability of aldolase B to split fructose 1-phosphate is found in humans with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). A stable isotope procedure to elucidate the mechanism of conversion of fructose to glucose in normal children and in HFI children has been developed. A constant infusion of D-(U-{sup 13}C)fructose was given nasogastrically to control and to HFI children. Hepatic fructose conversion to glucose was estimated by examination of {sup 13}C NMR spectra of plasma glucose. Significantly lower values ({approx}3-fold) for fructose conversion to glucose were obtained for the HFI patients as compared to the controls. A quantitative determination of the metabolic pathways of fructose conversion to glucose was derived from {sup 13}C NMR measurement of plasma ({sup 13}C)glucose isotopomer populations. The finding of isotopomer populations of three adjacent {sup 13}C atoms at glucose C-4 ({sup 13}C{sub 3}-{sup 13}C{sub 4}-{sup 13}C{sub 5}) suggests that there is a direct pathway from fructose, by-passing fructose-1-phosphate aldolase, to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The metabolism of fructose by fructose-1-phosphate aldolase activity accounts for only {approx}50% of the total amount of hepatic fructose conversion to glucose. In view of the marked decline by 67% in synthesis of glucose from fructose in HFI subjects found in this study, the extent of ({sup 13}C)glucose formation from a trace amount of (U-{sup 13}C)fructose infused into the patient can be used as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic test for inherent faulty fructose metabolism.

  9. Modified Prony Method to Resolve and Quantify in Vivo31P NMR Spectra of Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, P.; Guidoni, L.; Ragona, R.; Viti, V.; Furman, E.; Degani, H.

    Prony's method, successfully used in processing NMR signals, performs poorly at low signal-to-noise ratios. To overcome this problem, a statistical approach has been adopted by using Prony's method as a sampling device from the distribution associated with the true spectrum. Specifically, Prony's method is applied for each regression order p and number of data points n, both considered in a suitable range, and the estimates of frequencies, amplitudes, and decay factors are pooled separately. A histogram of the pooled frequencies is computed and, looking at the histogram, a lower and an upper frequency bound for each line of interest is determined. All frequency estimates in each of the determined intervals as well as associated decay factors and amplitudes are considered to be independent normal variates. A mean value and a corresponding 95% confidence interval are computed for each parameter. 31P NMR signals from MCF7 human breast cancer cells, inoculated into athymic mice and which developed into tumors, have been processed with traditional methods and with this modified Prony's method. The main components of the phosphomonoester peak, namely those deriving from phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine, are always well resolved with this new approach and their relative amplitudes can be consequently evaluated. Peak intensities of these two signals show different behavior during treatment of tumors with the antiestrogenic drug tamoxifen. The results of this new approach are compared with those obtainable with traditional techniques.

  10. (1) H and (13) C NMR data on natural and synthetic capsaicinoids.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Calvario, Víctor; Garduño-Ramírez, María Luisa; León-Rivera, Ismael; Rios, María Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Capsaicinoids are the compounds responsible for the pungency of chili peppers. These substances have attracted the attention of many research groups in recent decades because of their antinociceptive, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-obesity properties, among others. There are nearly 160 capsaicinoids reported in the literature. Approximately 25 of them are natural products, while the rest are synthetic or semi-synthetic products. A large amount of NMR data for the capsaicinoids is dispersed throughout literature. Therefore, there is a need to organize all this NMR data in a systematic and orderly way. This review summarizes the (1) H and (13) C NMR data on 159 natural and synthetic capsaicinoids, with a brief discussion of some typical and relevant aspects of these NMR data. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26626418

  11. (1) H and (13) C NMR data on natural and synthetic capsaicinoids.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Calvario, Víctor; Garduño-Ramírez, María Luisa; León-Rivera, Ismael; Rios, María Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Capsaicinoids are the compounds responsible for the pungency of chili peppers. These substances have attracted the attention of many research groups in recent decades because of their antinociceptive, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-obesity properties, among others. There are nearly 160 capsaicinoids reported in the literature. Approximately 25 of them are natural products, while the rest are synthetic or semi-synthetic products. A large amount of NMR data for the capsaicinoids is dispersed throughout literature. Therefore, there is a need to organize all this NMR data in a systematic and orderly way. This review summarizes the (1) H and (13) C NMR data on 159 natural and synthetic capsaicinoids, with a brief discussion of some typical and relevant aspects of these NMR data. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Phenyl galactopyranosides - 13C CPMAS NMR and conformational analysis using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wałejko, Piotr; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Bukowicki, Jarosław; Witkowski, Stanisław; Wawer, Iwona

    2015-08-01

    Structural analyses of four compounds (phenyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (1), phenyl β-D-galactopyranoside (2), phenyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-α-D-galactopyranoside (3) and phenyl α-D-galactopyranoside (4)) have been performed using solid-state 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy and theoretical methods. Conformational analysis involved grid search and genetic algorithm (GAAGS). Low-energy conformers found by GAAGS were further optimized by DFT and chemical shifts were calculated using GIAO/DFT approach. 13C CPMAS NMR chemical shift of carbon C2 is indicative of the glycoside torsional angle. Separated or merged resonances of C2 and C6 suggest free rotation of phenyl ring in the solid phase.

  13. Complete (1)H and (13)C signal assignment of prenol-10 with 3D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Misiak, Maria; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Kwasiborska, Maria; Wójcik, Jacek; Ciepichal, Ewa; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2009-10-01

    The complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts of natural abundance prenol-10 is reported for the first time. It was achieved using 3D NMR experiments, which were based on random sampling of the evolution time space followed by multidimensional Fourier transform. This approach makes it possible to acquire 3D NMR spectra in a reasonable time and preserves high resolution in indirectly detected dimensions. It is shown that the interpretation of 3D COSY-HMBC and 3D TOCSY-HSQC spectra is crucial in the structural analysis of prenol-10.

  14. Carbon-13, sup 15 N, and sup 31 P NMR studies on 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine oxidase from Arthrobacter oxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Pust, S.; Vervoort, J.; Decker, K.; Bacher, A.; Mueller, F. )

    1989-01-24

    The interaction between the apoprotein of 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine oxidase from Arthrobacter oxidans and the prosthetic group FAD has been investigated by {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N and {sup 31}P NMR techniques. The FAD prosthetic group was selectively enriched in {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N isotopes by adding isotopically labeled riboflavin derivatives to the growth medium of riboflavin-requiring mutant cells. In the oxidized state the chemical shift of the C(7) and C(8) atoms indicates that the xylene moiety of the isoalloxazine ring is embedded in a hydrophobic environment. The binding of the competitive inhibitor, 6-hydroxy-D-nicotine, influences the resonances of the C(4a) and the N(5) atom strongly. It is suggested that these shifts are due to a strong hydrogen-bonding interaction between the N(5) atom and the inhibitor. On reduction all resonances, except those of the C(10a) and the N(1) atoms, shift upfield, indicating the increased electron density in the ring system. It can unambiguously be concluded from the chemical shift of the N(1) atom that the reduced flavin is anionic. The doublet character of the N(3) and N(5) resonances suggests that bulk water has no access to the active center. The strong downfield shift of the N(1) position indicates that this atom is embedded in a polar environment, but it does not indicate the presence of a positively charged residue. The {sup 31}P NMR spectra show that the resonances of the pyrophosphate group of the bound FAD differ slightly from those of free FAD. Besides the {sup 31}P resonances from FAD, four peaks around 0 ppm are observed that belongs to bound phosphorus residues. The residues are not located close to the isoalloxazine ring.

  15. Using Neural Networks for 13C NMR Chemical Shift Prediction-Comparison with Traditional Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiler, Jens; Maier, Walter; Will, Martin; Meusinger, Reinhard

    2002-08-01

    Interpretation of 13C chemical shifts is essential for structure elucidation of organic molecules by NMR. In this article, we present an improved neural network approach and compare its performance to that of commonly used approaches. Specifically, our recently proposed neural network ( J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 2000, 40, 1169-1176) is improved by introducing an extended hybrid numerical description of the carbon atom environment, resulting in a standard deviation (std. dev.) of 2.4 ppm for an independent test data set of ˜42,500 carbons. Thus, this neural network allows fast and accurate 13C NMR chemical shift prediction without the necessity of access to molecule or fragment databases. For an unbiased test dataset containing 100 organic structures the accuracy of the improved neural network was compared to that of a prediction method based on the HOSE code ( hierarchically ordered spherical description of environment) using S PECI NFO. The results show the neural network predictions to be of quality (std. dev.=2.7 ppm) comparable to that of the HOSE code prediction (std. dev.=2.6 ppm). Further we compare the neural network predictions to those of a wide variety of other 13C chemical shift prediction tools including incremental methods (C HEMD RAW, S PECT OOL), quantum chemical calculation (G AUSSIAN, C OSMOS), and HOSE code fragment-based prediction (S PECI NFO, ACD/CNMR, P REDICTI T NMR) for the 47 13C-NMR shifts of Taxol, a natural product including many structural features of organic substances. The smallest standard deviations were achieved here with the neural network (1.3 ppm) and S PECI NFO (1.0 ppm).

  16. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of two phytosterols from roots of Piper nigrum.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kun; Li, Wei; Koike, Kazuo; Pei, Yuping; Chen, Yingjie; Nikaido, Tamotsu

    2004-03-01

    Using modern NMR techniques, including DQF-COSY, NOESY, HETCOR and HMBC, the full assignments of all 1H and 13C chemical shifts were made for stigmastane-3,6-dione and stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione, isolated from the roots of Piper nigrum (Piperaceae). Their stereochemistry was resolved by a combination of 2D NOESY data and analysis of coupling constants. The two compounds were isolated from the genus Piper for the first time.

  17. (31)P NMR study of post mortem changes in pig muscle.

    PubMed

    Miri, A; Talmant, A; Renou, J P; Monin, G

    1992-01-01

    The rate and the extent of post mortem pH changes in pig muscle largely determine pork quality. Fast pH fall combined with low ultimate pH leads to pale soft exudative (PSE) meat; high ultimate pH leads to dark firm dry (DFD) meat. Post mortem metabolism was studied in pig muscle using(31)P NMR. Fifteen pigs, i.e. 7 Large White pigs and 8 Pietrain pigs, were used. Five pigs of each breed were slaughtered, taking care to minimize preslaughter stress. The other pigs (3 Large Whites and 2 Pietrains) were injected with 0·1 mg adrenaline per kg liveweight before slaughter, in order to increase meat ultimate pH. All the animals were killed by electronarcosis and exsanguination. Three of the adrenaline-treated pigs (1 Large White and 2 Pietrains) gave meat with ultimate pH above 6 (DFD meat). The pigs with normal muscle ultimate pH, i.e. 6 Large Whites and 6 Pietrains, had very variable rates of post mortem muscle metabolism (pH at 30 min after slaughter: 6·17-6·85 in Large Whites; 6·04-6·23 in Pietrains). The relationships between pH and ATP changes were similar in all pigs showing normal muscle ultimate pH, whereas ATP disappeared at a high pH value (on average pH 6·4) in pigs with high ultimate pH. The course of post mortem biochemical changes in a given animal could be predicted rather well by examination of a single(31)P NMR spectrum obtained around 30 min after death. At this time, muscle with a low rate of metabolism simultaneously showed medium to high pH, high ATP content (4-6·8 μmol/g) and rather low Pi content (6-14 μmol/g); muscle with a fast rate of metabolism (PSE-prone muscle) had low pH, low to medium ATP content (1·1-4 μmol/g) and generally high phosphomonoester (PME) content (9-23 μmol/g); muscle with high ultimate pH (DFD-prone muscle) had high pH, low PME content (4-8 μmol/g) and high Pi content (22-27 μmol/g).

  18. Calculation of the 13C NMR shieldings of the C0 2 complexes of aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    1995-04-01

    13C NMR shieldings have been calculated using the random-phase-approximation, localized-orbital local-origins version of ab initio coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory for CO 2 and and for several complexes formed by the reaction of CO 2 with molecular models for aluminosilicate glasses, H 3TOT'H3 3-n, T,T' = Si,Al. Two isomeric forms of the CO 2-aluminosilicate complexes have been considered: (1) "CO 2-like" complexes, in which the CO 2 group is bound through carbon to a bridging oxygen and (2) "CO 3-like" complexes, in which two oxygens of a central CO 3 group form bridging bonds to the two TH 3 groups. The CO 2-like isomer of CO 2-H 3SiOSiH 3 is quite weakly bonded and its 13C isotropic NMR shielding is almost identical to that in free CO 2. As Si is progressively replaced by Al in the - H terminated aluminosilicate model, the CO 2-like isomers show increasing distortion from the free CO 2 geometry and their 13C NMR shieldings decrease uniformly. The calculated 13C shielding value for H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 is only about 6 ppm larger than that calculated for point charge stabilized CO 3-2. However, for a geometry of H 3SiO(CO 2) AlH 3-1, in which the bridging oxygen to C bond length has been artificially increased to that found in the - OH terminated cluster (OH) 3SiO(CO 2)Al(OH) 3-1, the calculated 13C shielding is almost identical to that for free CO 2. The CO 3-like isomers of the CO 2-aluminosili-cate complexes show carbonate like geometries and 13C NMR shieldings about 4-9 ppm larger than those of carbonate for all T,T' pairs. For the Si,Si tetrahedral atom pair the CO 2-like isomer is more stable energetically, while for the Si,Al and Al,Al cases the CO 3-like isomer is more stable. Addition of Na + ions to the CO 3-2 or H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 complexes reduces the 13C NMR shieldings by about 10 ppm. Complexation with either Na + or CO 2 also reduces the 29Si NMR shieldings of the aluminosilicate models, while the changes in 27Al shielding with Na + or CO 2

  19. Metabolic pathways for ketone body production. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of rat liver in vivo using /sup 13/C-multilabeled fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl-Wostl, C.; Seelig, J.

    1986-11-04

    The hormonal regulation of ketogenesis in the liver of living rat has been studied noninvasively with /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance. The spatial selection for the liver was better than 90%, with extrahepatic adipose tissue contribution only a very small amount of signal. The metabolic activities of the liver were investigated by infusion of /sup 13/C-labeled butyrate in the jugular vein of the anesthetized rat. The rate of butyrate infusion was chosen to be close to the maximum oxidative capacity of the rat liver, and the /sup 13/C signal intensities were enhanced by using doubly labeled (1,3-/sup 13/C)butyrate as a substrate. Different /sup 13/C NMR spectra and hence different metabolites were observed depending on the hormonal state of the animal. The /sup 13/C NMR studies demonstrate that even when rate of acetyl-CoA production are high, the disposal of this compound is not identical in fasted and diabetic animals. This supports previous suggestions that the redox state of the mitochondrion represents the most important factor in regulation. For a given metabolic state of the animal, different signal intensities were obtained depending on whether butyrate was labeled at C-1, C-3, or C-1,3. From the ratios of incorporation of /sup 13/C label into the carbons of 3-hydroxybutyrate, it could be estimated that a large fraction of butyrate evaded ..beta..-oxidation to acetyl-CoA but was converted directly to acetoacetyl-CoA. /sup 13/C-labeled glucose could be detected in vivo in the liver of diabetic rats.

  20. Interaction between beta-Purothionin and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol: a (31)P-NMR and infrared spectroscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Julie-Andrée; Kelly, Isabelle; Marion, Didier; Pézolet, Michel; Auger, Michèle

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of beta-purothionin, a small basic and antimicrobial protein from the endosperm of wheat seeds, with multilamellar vesicles of dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) was investigated by (31)P solid-state NMR and infrared spectroscopy. NMR was used to study the organization and dynamics of DMPG in the absence and presence of beta-purothionin. The results indicate that beta-purothionin does not induce the formation of nonlamellar phases in DMPG. Two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy shows that beta-purothionin decreases the lateral diffusion of DMPG in the fluid phase. Infrared spectroscopy was used to investigate the perturbations, induced by beta-purothionin, of the polar and nonpolar regions of the phospholipid bilayers. At low concentration of beta-purothionin, the temperature of the gel-to-fluid phase transition of DMPG increases from 24 degrees C to ~33 degrees C, in agreement with the formation of electrostatic interactions between the cationic protein and the anionic phospholipid. At higher protein concentration, the lipid transition is slightly shifted toward lower temperature and a second transition is observed below 20 degrees C, suggesting an insertion of the protein in the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer. The results also suggest that the presence of beta-purothionin significantly modifies the lipid packing at the surface of the bilayer to increase the accessibility of water molecules in the interfacial region. Finally, orientation measurements indicate that the alpha-helices and the beta-sheet of beta-purothionin have tilt angles of ~60 degrees and 30 degrees, respectively, relative to the normal of the ATR crystal. PMID:12324425

  1. Chemical Characterization and Water Content Determination of Bio-Oils Obtained from Various Biomass Species using 31P NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    David, K.; Ben, H.; Muzzy, J.; Feik, C.; Iisa, K.; Ragauskas, A.

    2012-03-01

    Pyrolysis is a promising approach to utilize biomass for biofuels. One of the key challenges for this conversion is how to analyze complicated components in the pyrolysis oils. Water contents of pyrolysis oils are normally analyzed by Karl Fischer titration. The use of 2-chloro-4,4,5,5,-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by {sup 31}P NMR analysis has been used to quantitatively analyze the structure of hydroxyl groups in lignin and whole biomass. Results: {sup 31}P NMR analysis of pyrolysis oils is a novel technique to simultaneously characterize components and analyze water contents in pyrolysis oils produced from various biomasses. The water contents of various pyrolysis oils range from 16 to 40 wt%. The pyrolysis oils obtained from Loblolly pine had higher guaiacyl content, while that from oak had a higher syringyl content. Conclusion: The comparison with Karl Fischer titration shows that {sup 31}P NMR could also reliably be used to measure the water content of pyrolysis oils. Simultaneously with analysis of water content, quantitative characterization of hydroxyl groups, including aliphatic, C-5 substituted/syringyl, guaiacyl, p-hydroxyl phenyl and carboxylic hydroxyl groups, could also be provided by {sup 31}P NMR analysis.

  2. 31P NMR Kinetics Study of Cardiac Metabolism under Mild Hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudemant, J. F.; Elst, L. V.; Vanhaverbeke, Y.; Muller, R. N.

    The effects of mild hypoxia on the metabolic and mechanical functions of isovolumic perfused rat hearts have been studied. 31P NMR has been used to follow the metabolite concentrations as well as the intracellular pH. Additionally, the energy transfer through the creatine kinase reaction was estimated by the magnetization-transfer technique. The needs of myofibrillar energy and of mitochondrial ATP production have been assessed through mechanical activity and oxygen-consumption rate. It has been observed that mild hypoxia simultaneously impairs contractile and metabolic functions. The aerobic ATP production is maintained under these conditions while anaerobic energy metabolism seems accelerated. The accumulation of some metabolites (ADP and P i) and the decrease of creatine kinase forward flux ( Vfor) tend, however, to prove that ATP availability for myofibrils is lowered. The large aerobic energy production observed must therefore be explained by an energy wastage in the mitochondria. In spite of normal ATP concentration, a contractile dysfunction is observed and can be explained by the P i accumulation, which is known to impair the use of the myofibrillar ATP. Another hypothesis supported by the magnetization transfer experiments is the poor ATP availability resulting from the ATP wastage in the mitochondria and from the inefficient energy transport by the PCr-Cr shuttle.

  3. Activation of dehydrogenase activity and cardiac respiration: A sup 31 P-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, L.A.; Koretsky, A.P.; Balaban, R.S. )

    1988-07-01

    {sup 31}P-NMR studies were performed to determine the tissue phosphate and oxygen consumption effects of known maneuvers on the activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase during work jumps in the perfused rat heart. In control studies of the glucose-perfused heart, work jumps, with pacing, resulted in a 32% increase in oxygen consumption ({dot char}Qo{sub 2}) from 1.72 {plus minus} 0.09 to 2.29 {plus minus} 0.12 mmol O{sub 2}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1}{center dot}g dry wt{sup {minus}1}. During this transition no significant change in the high energy phosphates were detected. In contrast, work jumps did cause changes in the phosphates when the activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase was blocked with 2.5 {mu}g of ruthenium red per milliliter or maximally stimulated with 11 mM pyruvate before the increase in work. The observed increase in {dot char}Qo{sub 2} and inorganic phosphate and calculated increase in ADP are consistent with these phosphates controlling mitochondrial respiration under these conditions. These results suggest that the activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase and/or other dehydrogenases may be an important step in the orchestration of work and {dot char}Qo{sub 2}.

  4. 31P-NMR studies of isolated adult heart cells: effect of myoglobin inactivation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R K; Wittenberg, B A

    1991-10-01

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of isolated adult rat heart cells revealed that the cells maintained high-energy phosphates for up to 6 h in polyamide hollow fibers perfused with well-oxygenated nutrient medium. Glucose plus pyruvate superfused heart cells maintained [phosphocreatine]/[ATP] at 1.4 +/- 0.1, internal pH at 7.09 +/- 0.04 (external pH = 7.25), and intracellular free Mg2+ at 0.51 +/- 0.04 mM. In glucose-containing media, hypoxia was accompanied by a reversible decrease in intracellular ATP and phosphocreatine of approximately 50% and 80%, respectively, while the intracellular free Mg2+ was reversibly increased by 40%. However, inhibition of glycolysis by iodoacetate in aerobic pyruvate-containing medium did not significantly alter high-energy phosphate content. Inactivation of intracellular myoglobin with 1-2 mM sodium nitrite, which reduces the steady-state respiratory oxygen consumption rate by 30%, caused a significant (30%) decrease in intracellular phosphocreatine peak, which was reversed upon removal of sodium nitrite. The nitrite-induced decrease in phosphocreatine was also observed in iodoacetate-treated myocytes but not in oligomycin-treated cells. These results indicate that functional myoglobin enhances high-energy phosphate synthesis in well-oxygenated myocytes. PMID:1928397

  5. Molybdenum modified phosphate glasses studied by 31P MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szumera, Magdalena

    2015-02-25

    Glasses have been synthesized in the system P2O5-SiO2-K2O-MgO-CaO modified by addition of MoO3. Glasses were prepared by conventional fusion method from 40 g batches. The influence of Mo-cations on the analysed glass structure was investigated by means of Raman and (31)P MAS-NMR techniques. It has been found that molybdate units can form Mo[MoO4/MoO6]-O-P and/or Mo[MoO4/MoO6]-O-Si bonds with non-bridging oxygens atoms of Q2 methaphosphate units, resulting in the transformation of chain methaphosphate structure into pyrophosphate and finally into orthophosphate structure. It has been also found that increasing amount of MoO3 in the structure of investigated glasses causes their gradual depolymerization and molybdenum ions in the analysed glass matrix act as modifying cations.

  6. /sup 31/P NMR characterization of graded traumatic brain injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, R.; McIntosh, T.K.; Yamakami, I.; Faden, A.I.

    1988-01-01

    Irreversible tissue injury following central nervous system trauma is believed to result from both mechanical disruption at the time of primary insult, and more delayed autodestructive processes. These delayed events are associated with various biochemical changes, including alterations in phosphate energy metabolism and intracellular pH. Using /sup 31/P NMR, we have monitored the changes in phosphorus energy metabolism and intracellular pH in a single hemisphere of the rat brain over an 8-h period following graded, traumatic, fluid percussion-induced brain injury. Following trauma the ratio of phosphocreatine to inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi) declined in each injury group. This decline was transitory with low injury (1.0 +/- 0.5 atm), biphasic with moderate (2.1 +/- 0.4 atm) and high (3.9 +/- 0.9 atm) injury, and sustained following severe injury (5.9 +/- 0.7 atm). The initial PCr/Pi decline in the moderate and high injury groups was associated with intracellular acidosis; however, the second decline occurred in the absence of any pH changes. Alterations in ATP occurred only in severely injured animals and such changes were associated with marked acidosis and 100% mortality rate. After 4h, the posttraumatic PCr/Pi ratio correlated linearly with the severity of injury. We suggest that a reduced posttraumatic PCr/Pi ratio may be indicative of altered mitochondrial energy production and may predict a reduced capacity of the cell to recover from traumatic injury.

  7. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    PubMed

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom. PMID:26670708

  8. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    PubMed

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom.

  9. Improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme for (1)H and (13)C NMR Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kapaev, Roman R; Toukach, Philip V

    2015-07-21

    The improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme has been developed for the simulation of (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra of oligo- and polysaccharides and their derivatives, including those containing noncarbohydrate constituents found in natural glycans. Besides adding the (1)H NMR calculations, we improved the accuracy and performance of prediction and optimized the mathematical model of the precision estimation. This new approach outperformed other methods of chemical shift simulation, including database-driven, neural net-based, and purely empirical methods and quantum-mechanical calculations at high theory levels. It can process structures with rarely occurring and noncarbohydrate constituents unsupported by the other methods. The algorithm is transparent to users and allows tracking used reference NMR data to original publications. It was implemented in the Glycan-Optimized Dual Empirical Spectrum Simulation (GODESS) web service, which is freely available at the platform of the Carbohydrate Structure Database (CSDB) project ( http://csdb.glycoscience.ru). PMID:26087011

  10. Solid state 13C NMR investigation of impact of annealing in lyophilized glasses.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Suman A; Pikal, Michael J; Utz, Marcel

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of annealing on molecular mobility in lyophilized glasses, composed of a saccharide excipient and a small concentration of aspartame as a model "drug." Changes in molecular dynamics during annealing were monitored through carbon ((13)C) T(1) and T(1 rho) nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of the aspartame and the saccharides. Two different saccharides were studied, sucrose and trehalose. The local mobility of the aspartame guest was found to correlate closely with the overall structural relaxation monitored through calorimetric methods in the aspartame: sucrose formulation. In general terms, annealing leads to longer NMR relaxation times, indicating a slowing of the local dynamics. By contrast, annealing had only a minimal effect on the NMR relaxation times in aspartame: trehalose. Specificity of solid state NMR in detecting molecular mobility in guest and host molecules showed that sucrose provided a homogenous matrix for the guest drug as compared to the trehalose.

  11. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from {sup 31}P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M.Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-10-15

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and {sup 31}P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse {sup 31}P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}ν{sub 1} bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the {sup 31}P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν{sub 1} band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. - Graphical abstract: Carbonated apatite shows an abrupt change in spectral (NMR, Raman) and morphological (AFM) properties at a composition of about one carbonate substitution per unit cell. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystallinity (XRD), particle size (AFM) of carbonated apatites and bone mineral. • Linear relationships among crystallinity, {sup 31}P NMR and Raman inverse bandwidths. • Low and high carbonated apatites use different charge-balancing ion-loss mechanism.

  12. Neuroprotective effects of caffeine in MPTP model of Parkinson's disease: A (13)C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Bagga, Puneet; Chugani, Anup N; Patel, Anant B

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons with an accompanying neuroinflammation leading to loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia. Caffeine, a well-known A2A receptor antagonist is reported to slow down the neuroinflammation caused by activated microglia and reduce the extracellular glutamate in the brain. In this study, we have evaluated the neuroprotective effect of caffeine in the MPTP model of PD by monitoring the region specific cerebral energy metabolism. Adult C57BL6 mice were treated with caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min prior to MPTP (25 mg/kg, i.p.) administration for 8 days. The paw grip strength of mice was assessed in order to evaluate the motor function after various treatments. For metabolic studies, mice were infused with [1,6-(13)C2]glucose, and (13)C labeling of amino acids was monitored using ex vivo(1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy. The paw grip strength was found to be reduced following the MPTP treatment. The caffeine pretreatment showed significant protection against the reduction of paw grip strength in MPTP treated mice. The levels of GABA and myo-inositol were found to be elevated in the striatum of MPTP treated mice. The (13)C labeling of GluC4, GABAC2 and GlnC4 from [1,6-(13)C2]glucose was decreased in the cerebral cortex, striatum, olfactory bulb, thalamus and cerebellum suggesting impaired glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal activity and neurotransmission of the MPTP treated mice. Most interestingly, the pretreatment of caffeine maintained the (13)C labeling of amino acids to the control values in cortical, olfactory bulb and cerebellum regions while it partially retained in striatal and thalamic regions in MPTP treated mice. The pretreatment of caffeine provides a partial neuro-protection against severe striatal degeneration in the MPTP model of PD.

  13. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  14. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from 31P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    PubMed Central

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and 31P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse 31P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO43− ν1 bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO32− range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the 31P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν1 band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. PMID:24273344

  15. Interaction of antiaggregant molecule ajoene with membranes. An ESR and 1H, 2H, 31P-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Debouzy, J C; Neumann, J M; Hervé, M; Daveloose, D; Viret, J; Apitz-Castro, R

    1989-01-01

    The structure of ajoene, a molecule extracted from garlic, has been studied by 1H-NMR and its interaction with model membranes by 1H-, 2H-, 31-P-NMR and ESR experiments. This study clearly shows that the ajoene molecule is located deep in the layer and is close to the interlayer medium. Moreover while NMR experiments show that the membrane structure is only slightly affected by the presence of ajoene, ESR experiments reveal significant modifications in phospholipid dynamics. This interaction, observed before with the phenothiazine derivative, promazine, results in an increase of the membrane fluidity in its hydrophobic part and could be related to clinical properties of ajoene.

  16. Analysis of Hydroperoxides in Solid Polyethylene by MAS (13)C NMR and EPR

    SciTech Connect

    ASSINK,ROGER A.; CELINA,MATHIAS C.; DUNBAR,TIMOTHY D.; ALAM,TODD M.; CLOUGH,ROGER LEE; GILLEN,KENNETH T.

    1999-11-19

    {sup 13}C-enriched polyethylene was subjected to {gamma}-irradiation in the presence of air at 25 and 80 C for total doses ranging from 71 to 355 kGy. Significant quantities of hydroperoxides were detected in the 25 C irradiated sample by {sup 13}C magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. This method of detection was performed on the solid polymer and required no chemical derivatization or addition of solvent. The chemical stability and subsequent products of the hydroperoxide species were studied by annealing the irradiated samples in air at temperatures ranging from 22 to 110 C. A time-temperature superposition analysis provided an activation energy of 108 kJ/mol for the hydroperoxide decomposition process. The primary products of hydroperoxide decomposition were ketones and secondary alcohols with lesser amounts of acids and esters. EPR measurements suggest that the reactive hydroperoxide species reside in the amorphous phase of polyethylene, consistent with degradation occurring in the amorphous phase.

  17. NMR analyses of the cold cataract. III. /sup 13/C acrylamide studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lerman, S.; Megaw, J.M.; Moran, M.N.

    1985-10-01

    /sup 13/C-enriched acrylamide was employed to further delineate the action of this compound in preventing the cold cataract phenomenon when it is incorporated (in vitro) into young human and rabbit lenses. The extent of acrylamide incorporation, in the dark and with concurrent UV exposure, was monitored by /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy. These studies provide further evidence that UV exposure causes permanent acrylamide photobinding within the lens. In such lenses, the gamma crystallin fraction of the soluble lens proteins is affected to the greatest extent. It appears to become aggregated and/or combined with the alpha and beta fractions resulting in an apparent loss of most of the gamma monomers. There is also an age-related effect with respect to the amount of acrylamide that can be incorporated into the lens. The decrease in acrylamide incorporation with age directly parallels the age-related decline in gamma crystallin levels.

  18. Direct measurement of brain glucose concentrations in humans by sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gruetter, R.; Novotny, E.J.; Boulware, S.D.; Rothman, D.L.; Mason, G.F.; Shulman, G.I.; Shulan, R.G.; Tamborlane, W.V. )

    1992-02-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in the normal human brain. It is generally assumed that glucose transport into the brain is not rate-limiting for metabolism. Since brain glucose concentrations cannot be determined directly by radiotracer techniques, the authors used {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy after infusing enriched D-(1-{sup 13}C)glucose to measure brain glucose concentrations at euglycemia and at hyperglycemia in six healthy children. Brain glucose concentrations averaged 1.0 {plus minus} 0.1 {mu}mol/ml at euglycemia and 1.8-2.7 {mu}mol/ml at hyperglycemia. Michaelis-Menten parameters of transport were calculated from the relationship between plasma and brain glucose concentrations. The brain glucose concentrations and transport constants are consistent with transport not being rate-limiting for resting brain metabolism at plasma levels >3 mM.

  19. 13C NMR spectroscopy of the insoluble carbon of carbonaceous chondrites.

    PubMed

    Cronin, J R; Pizzarello, S; Frye, J S

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectra have been obtained of the insoluble carbon residues resulting from HF-digestion of three carbonaceous chondrites, Orgueil (C1), Murchison (CM2), and Allende (CV3). Spectra obtained using the cross polarization magic-angle spinning technique show two major features attributable respectively to carbon in aliphatic/olefinic structures. The spectrum obtained from the Allende sample was weak, presumably as a consequence of its low hydrogen content. Single pulse excitation spectra, which do not depend on 1H-13C polarization transfer for signal enhancement were also obtained. These spectra, which may be more representative of the total carbon in the meteorite samples, indicate a greater content of carbon in aromatic/olefinic structures. These results suggest that extensive polycyclic aromatic sheets are important structural features of the insoluble carbon of all three meteorites. The Orgueil and Murchison materials contain additional hydrogenated aromatic/olefinic and aliphatic groups.

  20. Direct observation of glycogen synthesis in human muscle with sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Jue, T.; Rothman, D.L.; Shulman, G.I.; Tavitian, B.A.; DeFronzo, R.A.; Shulman, R.G. )

    1989-06-01

    On the basis of previous indirect measurements, skeletal muscle has been implicated as the major site of glucose uptake and it has been suggested that muscle glycogen formation is the dominant pathway. However, direct measurements of the rates of glycogen synthesis have not been possible by previous techniques. The authors have developed {sup 13}C NMR methods to measure directly the rate of human muscle glycogen formation from infused, isotopically labeled (1-{sup 13}C)glucose. They show that under conditions of imposed hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, a majority of the infused glucose was converted to muscle glycogen in a normal man. This directly shows that muscle is the major site of glucose disposal under these conditions, and provides quantitation of the glucose flux to muscle glycogen.

  1. 13C NMR spectroscopy of the insoluble carbon of carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Frye, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectra have been obtained of the insoluble carbon residues resulting from HF-digestion of three carbonaceous chondrites, Orgueil (C1), Murchison (CM2), and Allende (CV3). Spectra obtained using the cross polarization magic-angle spinning technique show two major features attributable respectively to carbon in aliphatic/olefinic structures. The spectrum obtained from the Allende sample was weak, presumably as a consequence of its low hydrogen content. Single pulse excitation spectra, which do not depend on 1H-13C polarization transfer for signal enhancement were also obtained. These spectra, which may be more representative of the total carbon in the meteorite samples, indicate a greater content of carbon in aromatic/olefinic structures. These results suggest that extensive polycyclic aromatic sheets are important structural features of the insoluble carbon of all three meteorites. The Orgueil and Murchison materials contain additional hydrogenated aromatic/olefinic and aliphatic groups.

  2. Acid properties of solid acid catalysts characterized by solid-state 31P NMR of adsorbed phosphorous probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Huang, Shing-Jong; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2011-09-01

    A brief review is presented on acidity characterization of solid acid catalysts by means of solid-state phosphor-31 magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P MAS NMR) spectroscopy using phosphor-containing molecules as probes. It is emphasized that such a simple approach using (31)P MAS NMR of adsorbed phosphorous probe molecules, namely trimethylphosphine (TMP) and trialkylphosphine oxides (R(3)PO), represents a unique technique in providing detailed qualitative and quantitative features, viz. type, strength, distribution, and concentration of acid sites in solid acid catalysts. In particular, it will be shown that when applied with a proper choice of probe molecules with varied sizes and results obtained from elemental analysis, the amounts and locations (intracrystalline vs. extracrystalline) of different types (Brønsted vs. Lewis) of acid sites may be determined. In addition, by incorporating the NMR results with that obtained from theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations, correlations between the (31)P chemical shifts (δ(31)P) and acidic strengths of Brønsted and Lewis acid sites may also be derived, facilitating a suitable acidity scale for solid acid catalysts.

  3. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  4. Gated /sup 31/P NMR study of tetanic contraction in rat muscle depleted of phosphocreatine

    SciTech Connect

    Shoubridge, E.A.; Radda, G.K.

    1987-05-01

    Rats were fed a diet containing 1% ..beta..-guanidino-propionic acid (GPA) for 6-12 wk to deplete their muscles of phosphocreatine (PCr). Gated /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained from the gastrocnemius-plantaris muscle at various time points during either a 1- or 3-s isometric tetanic contraction using a surface coil. The energy cost of a 1-s tetanus in unfatigued control rat muscle was 48.4 ..mu..mol ATP x g dry wt/sup -1/ x s/sup -1/ and was largely supplied by PCr; anaerobic glycogenolysis was negligible. In GPA-fed rats PCr was undetectable after 400 ms. This had no effect on initial force generated per gram, which was not significantly different from controls. Developed tension in a 3-s tetanus in GPA-fed rats could be divided into a peak phase (duration 0.8-0.9 s) and a plateau phase (65% peak tension) in which PCr was undetectable and the (ATP) was < 20% of that in control muscle. Energy from glycogenolysis was sufficient to maintain force generation at this submaximal level. Mean net glycogen utilization per 3-s tetanus was 78% greater than in control muscle. However, the observed decrease in intracellular pH was less than that expected from energy budget calculations, suggesting either increased buffering capacity or modulation of ATP hydrolysis in the muscles of GPA-fed rats. The results demonstrate that the transport role of PCr is not essential in contracting muscle in GPA-fed rats. PCr is probably important in this regard in the larger fibers of control muscle. Although fast-twitch muscles depleted of PCr have nearly twice the glycogen reserves of control muscle, glycogenolysis is limited in its capacity to fill the role of PCr as an energy buffer under conditions of maximum ATP turnover.

  5. The Influence of Plant Litter on Soil Water Repellency: Insight from 13C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cesarano, Gaspare; Incerti, Guido; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR, i.e. reduced affinity for water owing to the presence of organic hydrophobic coatings on soil particles) has relevant hydrological implications because low rates of infiltration enhance water runoff, and untargeted diffusion of fertilizers and pesticides. Previous studies investigated the occurrence of SWR in ecosystems with different vegetation cover but did not clarify its relationships with litter biochemical quality. Here, we investigated the capability of different plant litter types to induce SWR by using fresh and decomposed leaf materials from 12 species, to amend a model sandy soil over a year-long microcosm experiment. Water repellency, measured by the Molarity of an Ethanol Droplet (MED) test, was tested for the effects of litter species and age, and compared with litter quality assessed by 13C-CPMAS NMR in solid state and elemental chemical parameters. All litter types were highly water repellent, with MED values of 18% or higher. In contrast, when litter was incorporated into the soil, only undecomposed materials induced SWR, but with a large variability of onset and peak dynamics among litter types. Surprisingly, SWR induced by litter addition was unrelated to the aliphatic fraction of litter. In contrast, lignin-poor but labile C-rich litter, as defined by O-alkyl C and N-alkyl and methoxyl C of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectral regions, respectively, induced a stronger SWR. This study suggests that biochemical quality of plant litter is a major controlling factor of SWR and, by defining litter quality with 13C-CPMAS NMR, our results provide a significant novel contribution towards a full understanding of the relationships between plant litter biochemistry and SWR. PMID:27022916

  6. The Influence of Plant Litter on Soil Water Repellency: Insight from 13C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cesarano, Gaspare; Incerti, Guido; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR, i.e. reduced affinity for water owing to the presence of organic hydrophobic coatings on soil particles) has relevant hydrological implications because low rates of infiltration enhance water runoff, and untargeted diffusion of fertilizers and pesticides. Previous studies investigated the occurrence of SWR in ecosystems with different vegetation cover but did not clarify its relationships with litter biochemical quality. Here, we investigated the capability of different plant litter types to induce SWR by using fresh and decomposed leaf materials from 12 species, to amend a model sandy soil over a year-long microcosm experiment. Water repellency, measured by the Molarity of an Ethanol Droplet (MED) test, was tested for the effects of litter species and age, and compared with litter quality assessed by 13C-CPMAS NMR in solid state and elemental chemical parameters. All litter types were highly water repellent, with MED values of 18% or higher. In contrast, when litter was incorporated into the soil, only undecomposed materials induced SWR, but with a large variability of onset and peak dynamics among litter types. Surprisingly, SWR induced by litter addition was unrelated to the aliphatic fraction of litter. In contrast, lignin-poor but labile C-rich litter, as defined by O-alkyl C and N-alkyl and methoxyl C of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectral regions, respectively, induced a stronger SWR. This study suggests that biochemical quality of plant litter is a major controlling factor of SWR and, by defining litter quality with 13C-CPMAS NMR, our results provide a significant novel contribution towards a full understanding of the relationships between plant litter biochemistry and SWR.

  7. The Influence of Plant Litter on Soil Water Repellency: Insight from 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cesarano, Gaspare; Incerti, Guido; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR, i.e. reduced affinity for water owing to the presence of organic hydrophobic coatings on soil particles) has relevant hydrological implications because low rates of infiltration enhance water runoff, and untargeted diffusion of fertilizers and pesticides. Previous studies investigated the occurrence of SWR in ecosystems with different vegetation cover but did not clarify its relationships with litter biochemical quality. Here, we investigated the capability of different plant litter types to induce SWR by using fresh and decomposed leaf materials from 12 species, to amend a model sandy soil over a year-long microcosm experiment. Water repellency, measured by the Molarity of an Ethanol Droplet (MED) test, was tested for the effects of litter species and age, and compared with litter quality assessed by 13C-CPMAS NMR in solid state and elemental chemical parameters. All litter types were highly water repellent, with MED values of 18% or higher. In contrast, when litter was incorporated into the soil, only undecomposed materials induced SWR, but with a large variability of onset and peak dynamics among litter types. Surprisingly, SWR induced by litter addition was unrelated to the aliphatic fraction of litter. In contrast, lignin-poor but labile C-rich litter, as defined by O-alkyl C and N-alkyl and methoxyl C of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectral regions, respectively, induced a stronger SWR. This study suggests that biochemical quality of plant litter is a major controlling factor of SWR and, by defining litter quality with 13C-CPMAS NMR, our results provide a significant novel contribution towards a full understanding of the relationships between plant litter biochemistry and SWR. PMID:27022916

  8. 13C solid-state NMR chemical shift anisotropy analysis of the anomeric carbon in carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Ying; Luo, Shun-Yuan; Hung, Shang-Cheng; Chan, Sunney I; Tzou, Der-Lii M

    2005-03-21

    (13)C NMR solid-state structural analysis of the anomeric center in carbohydrates was performed on six monosaccharides: glucose (Glc), mannose (Man), galactose (Gal), galactosamine hydrochloride (GalN), glucosamine hydrochloride (GlcN), and N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc). In the 1D (13)C cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) spectrum, the anomeric center C-1 of these carbohydrates revealed two well resolved resonances shifted by 3-5ppm, which were readily assigned to the anomeric alpha and beta forms. From this experiment, we also extracted the (13)C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor elements of the two forms from their spinning sideband intensities, respectively. It was found out that the chemical shift tensor for the alpha anomer was more axially symmetrical than that of the beta form. A strong linear correlation was obtained when the ratio of the axial asymmetry of the (13)C chemical shift tensors of the two anomeric forms was plotted in a semilogarithmic plot against the relative population of the two anomers. Finally, we applied REDOR spectroscopy to discern whether or not there were any differences in the sugar ring conformation between the anomers. Identical two-bond distances of 2.57A (2.48A) were deduced for both the alpha and beta forms in GlcNAc (GlcN), suggesting that the two anomers have essentially identical sugar ring scaffolds in these sugars. In light of these REDOR distance measurements and the strong correlation observed between the ratio of the axial asymmetry parameters of the (13)C chemical shift tensors and the relative population between the two anomeric forms, we concluded that the anomeric effect arises principally from interaction of the electron charge clouds between the C-1-O-5 and the C-1-O-1 bonds in these monosaccharides.

  9. 1H and 13C NMR study on some substituted azolidine derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerioni, Giovanni; Cristiani, Franco; Devillanova, Francesco A.; Diaz, Angelo; Verani, Gaetano

    The 1H and 13C NMR spectra carried out on R overlineN·CH 2·CH 2·X·C O (where for R = H, X = NH, NMe, NEt, CH 2, S, O; for R = Me, X = NMe, CH 2; for R = Et, X = NEt) are reported. The comparison of these results with those obtained for the thionic and selonic isologues shows that sulphur and selenium have a greater deshielding effect on the ring than oxygen. The resonance of the carbons not involved in the π system have been correlated with the σ charges calculated by the DEL RE method.

  10. 13C NMR spectral characterization of epimeric rotenone and some related tetrahydrobenzopyranofurobenzopyranones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.; Abidi, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    The 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectra of epimers of rotenone and four 12a-hydroxy-analogues were examined to determine the stereochemical effect of the B/C ring fusion involving the 6a- and 12a-carbon centers. Chemical shift differences between the epimeric carbon resonances of cis- and trans-6a,12a-compounds were notably larger than those of diastereoisomers derived from the same B/C ring junction stereochemistry. Results of the spectral analysis have been useful for the quantification of mixtures of epimers and for the measurement of rates of epimerization and oxygenation.

  11. The binding of metal ions and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor by 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Sakamoto, Yuko; Ishii, Tomoko; Ohmoto, Taichi

    1991-06-01

    Enalaprilat (MK-422, 1- [ N- [1 (S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]- L-alanyl]- L-proline (1)) and Lisinopril (MK521, N- N- [ (s)-l-carboxy-3- phenylpropyl]- L-lysyl- L-proline, (2)) exhibit the capacity to act as a chelate, unidentate or bridge towards metal ions in aqueous solution, as determined by 13C NMR. By adding metal ions, in the series of Zn 2+, Ni 2+, Pb 2+, Pd 2+ and Cd 2+, the active site of the ACE inhibitor was well defined. MK-521 was more influenced by nuclei that were distant from the active site than MK-422.

  12. Enantiomeric differentiation of acyclic terpenes by 13C NMR spectroscopy using a chiral lanthanide shift reagent.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Marie-Cécile; Bradesi, Pascale; Casanova, Joseph

    2005-02-01

    The 13C NMR behaviour of ten acyclic terpene alcohols was examined in the presence of a chiral lanthanide shift reagent (CLSR). For each alcohol, we measured the lanthanide-induced shift (LIS) on the signals of the carbons and the splitting of some signals, which allowed the enantiomeric differentiation. As expected, the LIS decreased with the number of bonds between the binding function and the considered carbon. The enantiomeric splitting is observed for several signals in the spectrum of each compound. The influence of the hindrance of the binding function (primary, secondary or tertiary alcohol) and that of the stereochemistry of the double bonds is discussed.

  13. Compartmentalized Cerebral Metabolism of [1,6-13C]Glucose Determined by in vivo 13C NMR Spectroscopy at 14.1 T

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, João M. N.; Lanz, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral metabolism is compartmentalized between neurons and glia. Although glial glycolysis is thought to largely sustain the energetic requirements of neurotransmission while oxidative metabolism takes place mainly in neurons, this hypothesis is matter of debate. The compartmentalization of cerebral metabolic fluxes can be determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy upon infusion of 13C-enriched compounds, especially glucose. Rats under light α-chloralose anesthesia were infused with [1,6-13C]glucose and 13C enrichment in the brain metabolites was measured by 13C NMR spectroscopy with high sensitivity and spectral resolution at 14.1 T. This allowed determining 13C enrichment curves of amino acid carbons with high reproducibility and to reliably estimate cerebral metabolic fluxes (mean error of 8%). We further found that TCA cycle intermediates are not required for flux determination in mathematical models of brain metabolism. Neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle rate (VTCA) and neurotransmission rate (VNT) were 0.45 ± 0.01 and 0.11 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min, respectively. Glial VTCA was found to be 38 ± 3% of total cerebral oxidative metabolism, accounting for more than half of neuronal oxidative metabolism. Furthermore, glial anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation rate (VPC) was 0.069 ± 0.004 μmol/g/min, i.e., 25 ± 1% of the glial TCA cycle rate. These results support a role of glial cells as active partners of neurons during synaptic transmission beyond glycolytic metabolism. PMID:21713114

  14. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26460094

  15. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Solid-state /sup 13/C NMR and X-ray diffraction of dermatan sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, W.T.; Taylor, M.G.; Stevens, E.S.; Morris, E.R.; Rees, D.A.

    1986-05-29

    Dermatan sulfate in the solid state has been studied by /sup 13/C CP/MAS nmr and X-ray diffraction in order to establish the ring conformation of the L-iduronate moiety. The solid state nmr spectrum is similar to the solution spectrum obtained previously, indicating that a ring conformation at least approximating to /sup 1/C/sub 4/ predominates in the solid state. X-ray powder diffraction data from the same sample indicate the presence of the 8-fold helix form previously observed by fiber diffraction, and interpreted in terms of a /sup 4/C/sub 1/ ring form. A likely explanation of the results is that a distorted /sup 1/C/sub 4/ L-iduronate ring conformation, not considered in the initial X-ray analysis, may emerge to provide a satisfactory interpretation of all available physical-chemical data.

  17. /sup 13/C NMR studies of the molecular flexibility of antidepressants

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, S.L.; Andrews, P.R.; Craik, D.J.; Gale, D.J.

    1986-02-01

    The solution dynamics of a series of clinically potent antidepressants have been investigated by measuring /sup 13/C NMR relaxation parameters. Correlation times and internal motional rates were calculated from spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser effects for the protonated carbons in mianserin, imipramine-like antidepressants, and amitriptyline-like antidepressants. These data were interpreted in terms of overall molecular tumbling, internal rotations, and inherent flexibility of these structures. Of particular interest was the conformational variability of the tricyclic nucleus of the tricyclic antidepressants, where the data indicated a fivefold difference in mobility of the dimethylene bridge of imipramine-like antidepressants relative to amitriptyline-like compounds. The implications of such a difference in internal motions is discussed in relation to previous NMR studies and to the reported differences in pharmacological activity of these antidepressants.

  18. Total assignment of 1H and 13C NMR data for the sesquiterpene lactone 15-deoxygoyazensolide.

    PubMed

    Heleno, Vladimir Constantino Gomes; Crotti, Antônio Eduardo Miller; Constantino, Mauricio Gomes; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Lopes, João Luis Callegari

    2004-03-01

    We describe a complete analysis of the 1H and 13C spectra of the anti-inflamatory, schistossomicidal and trypanosomicidal sesquiterpene lactone 15-deoxygoyazensolide. This lactone, with a structure similar to other important ones, was studied by NMR techniques such as COSY, HMQC, HMBC, Jres and NOE experiments. The comparison of the data with some computational results led to an unequivocal assignment of all hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts, even eliminating some previous ambiguities. We were able to determine all hydrogen coupling constants (J) and signal multiplicities and to confirm the stereochemistry. A new method for the determination of the relative position of the lactonization and the position of the ester group on a medium-sized ring by NMR was developed.

  19. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of phenazopyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Burgueño-Tapia, Eleuterio; Mora-Pérez, Yolanda; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2005-03-01

    Phenazopyridine hydrochloride (1), a drug in clinical use for many decades, and some derivatives were studied by one- and two-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR methodology. The assignments, combined with DFT calculations, reveal that the preferred protonation site of the drug is the pyridine ring nitrogen atom. The chemoselective acetylation of phenazopyridine (2) and its influence on the polarization of the azo nitrogen atoms were evidenced by the (15)N NMR spectra. Molecular calculations of the phenazopyridines 2-4 show that the pyridine and phenyl groups are oriented in an antiperiplanar conformation with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the N-b atom and the C-2 amino group preserving the E-azo stereochemistry.

  20. Experimental and calculated 1H, 13C, 15N NMR spectra of famotidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barańska, M.; Czarniecki, K.; Proniewicz, L. M.

    2001-05-01

    Famotidine, 3-[[[2-[(aminoiminomethyl)amino]-4-thiazolyl]methyl]thio]- N-(aminosulfonyl), is a histamine H 2-receptor blocker that has been used mainly for the treatment of peptic ulcers and the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Its NMR spectra in different solvents were reported earlier; however, detailed interpretation has not been done thus far. In this work, experimental 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectra of famotidine dissolved in DMSO-d 6 are shown. The assignment of observed chemical shifts is based on quantum chemical calculation at the Hartree-Fock/6-31G ∗ level. The geometry optimization of the famotidine molecule with two internal hydrogen bonds, i.e. [N(3)-H(23)⋯N(9) and N(3)⋯H(34)-N(20)], is done by using the B3LYP method with the 6-31G ∗ basis set.

  1. Distinguishing bicontinuous lipid cubic phases from isotropic membrane morphologies using (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Yao, Hongwei; Hong, Mei

    2015-04-16

    Nonlamellar lipid membranes are frequently induced by proteins that fuse, bend, and cut membranes. Understanding the mechanism of action of these proteins requires the elucidation of the membrane morphologies that they induce. While hexagonal phases and lamellar phases are readily identified by their characteristic solid-state NMR line shapes, bicontinuous lipid cubic phases are more difficult to discern, since the static NMR spectra of cubic-phase lipids consist of an isotropic (31)P or (2)H peak, indistinguishable from the spectra of isotropic membrane morphologies such as micelles and small vesicles. To date, small-angle X-ray scattering is the only method to identify bicontinuous lipid cubic phases. To explore unique NMR signatures of lipid cubic phases, we first describe the orientation distribution of lipid molecules in cubic phases and simulate the static (31)P chemical shift line shapes of oriented cubic-phase membranes in the limit of slow lateral diffusion. We then show that (31)P T2 relaxation times differ significantly between isotropic micelles and cubic-phase membranes: the latter exhibit 2 orders of magnitude shorter T2 relaxation times. These differences are explained by the different time scales of lipid lateral diffusion on the cubic-phase surface versus the time scales of micelle tumbling. Using this relaxation NMR approach, we investigated a DOPE membrane containing the transmembrane domain (TMD) of a viral fusion protein. The static (31)P spectrum of DOPE shows an isotropic peak, whose T2 relaxation times correspond to that of a cubic phase. Thus, the viral fusion protein TMD induces negative Gaussian curvature, which is an intrinsic characteristic of cubic phases, to the DOPE membrane. This curvature induction has important implications to the mechanism of virus-cell fusion. This study establishes a simple NMR diagnostic probe of lipid cubic phases, which is expected to be useful for studying many protein-induced membrane remodeling phenomena

  2. High resolution 13C-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a deuterated protein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Comellas, Gemma; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution 13C-detected solid-state NMR spectra of the deuterated beta-1 immunoglobulin binding domain of the protein G (GB1) have been collected to show that all 15N, 13C′, 13Cα and 13Cβ sites are resolved in 13C–13C and 15N–13C spectra, with significant improvement in T2 relaxation times and resolution at high magnetic field (750 MHz). The comparison of echo T2 values between deuterated and protonated GB1 at various spinning rates and under different decoupling schemes indicates that 13Cα T2′ times increase by almost a factor of two upon deuteration at all spinning rates and under moderate decoupling strength, and thus the deuteration enables application of scalar-based correlation experiments that are challenging from the standpoint of transverse relaxation, with moderate proton decoupling. Additionally, deuteration in large proteins is a useful strategy to selectively detect polar residues that are often important for protein function and protein–protein interactions. PMID:20803233

  3. Electronic Properties and 13C NMR Structural Study of Y3N@C88

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wujun; Zhang, Jianyuan; Champion, Hunter; Fuhrer, Tim; Azuremendi, Hugo; Zuo, Tianming; Zhang, Jianfei; Harich, Kim; Dorn, Harry C.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report the synthesis, purification, 13C NMR and other characterization studies of Y3N@C88. The 13C NMR, UV-vis and chromatographic data suggest an Y3N@C88 having IPR allowed cage with D2(35)-C88 symmetry. In earlier density functional theory (DFT) computational and X-ray crystallographic studies, it was reported that lanthanide (A3N)6+ clusters are stabilized in D2(35)-C88 symmetry cages and have reduced HOMO-LUMO gaps relative to other trimetallic nitride endohedral metallofullerene cage systems, for example, A3N@C80. In this paper, we report that the non-lanthanide (Y3N)6+ cluster in the D2(35)-C88 cage exhibits a HOMO-LUMO gap consistent with other lanthanide A3N@C88 molecules based on electrochemical measurements and DFT computational study. These results suggests that the reduced HOMO-LUMO gap of A3N@C88 systems is a property dominated by the D2(35)-C88 carbon cage and not f-orbital lanthanide electronic metal cluster (A3N)6+ orbital participation. PMID:21506556

  4. Characterization of different precursors and activated vanadium phosphate catalysts by [sup 31]P NMR spin echo mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Sananes, M.T. Univ. of Liverpool ); Tuel, A.; Volta, J.C. ); Hutchings, G.J. )

    1994-07-01

    In a previous publication, the authors emphasized the use of the spin echo mapping technique applied to [sup 31]P NMR to obtain information on the valence state of vanadium in different environments of phosphorus for several VPO reference structures. In this paper, the authors describe the use of this technique, combined with knowledge of reference phases, to study VPO catalysts prepared from different precursors and used for the oxidation of n-butane into maleic anhydride. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Analysis of monoglycerides, diglycerides, sterols, and free fatty acids in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) oil by 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dayrit, Fabian M; Buenafe, Olivia Erin M; Chainani, Edward T; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S

    2008-07-23

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( (31)P NMR) was used to differentiate virgin coconut oil (VCO) from refined, bleached, deodorized coconut oil (RCO). Monoglycerides (MGs), diglycerides (DGs), sterols, and free fatty acids (FFAs) in VCO and RCO were converted into dioxaphospholane derivatives and analyzed by (31)P NMR. On the average, 1-MG was found to be higher in VCO (0.027%) than RCO (0.019%). 2-MG was not detected in any of the samples down to a detection limit of 0.014%. On the average, total DGs were lower in VCO (1.55%) than RCO (4.10%). When plotted in terms of the ratio [1,2-DG/total DGs] versus total DGs, VCO and RCO samples grouped separately. Total sterols were higher in VCO (0.096%) compared with RCO (0.032%), and the FFA content was 8 times higher in VCO than RCO (0.127% vs 0.015%). FFA determination by (31)P NMR and titration gave comparable results. Principal components analysis shows that the 1,2-DG, 1,3-DG, and FFAs are the most important parameters for differentiating VCO from RCO.

  6. Improvement of (31)P NMR spectral resolution by 8-hydroxyquinoline precipitation of paramagnetic Fe and Mn in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shiming; Xu, Di; Li, Bin; Fan, Chengxin; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2010-04-01

    Solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is currently the main method for the characterization of phosphorus (P) forms in environment samples. However, identification and quantification of P compounds may be hampered by poor resolution of spectra caused by paramagnetic Fe and Mn. In this study, a novel technique was developed to improve spectral resolution by removing paramagnetic Fe and Mn from alkaline extracts via 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HOQ) precipitation. Batch experiments showed that both Fe and Mn were effectively removed by the precipitation at pH 9.0, with the removal efficiencies of 83-91% for Fe and 67-78% for Mn from the extracts of five different environmental samples, while little effect was found on concentration of total P. The (31)P NMR analysis of a model P solution showed that addition of 8-HOQ and its precipitation with metal ions did not alter P forms. Further analyses of the five extracts with (31)P NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the 8-HOQ precipitation was an ideal method compared with the present postextraction techniques, such as bicarbonate dithionate (BD), EDTA and Chelex-100 treatments, by improving spectral resolution to a large extent with no detrimental effects on P forms. PMID:20201571

  7. 1H and 13C resonance designation of antimycin A1 by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.; Adams, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    Complete 1H and 13C resonance assignments of antimycin A1 were accomplished by two-dimensional NMR techniques, viz. 1H homonuclear COSY correlation, heteronuclear 13C-1H chemical shift correlation and long-range heteronuclear 13C-1H COLOC correlation. Antimycin A1 was found to consist of two isomeric components in a 2:1 ratio based on NMR spectroscopic evidence. The structure of the major component was newly assigned as the 8-isopentanoic acid ester. The spectra of the minor component were consistent with the known structure of antimycin A1.

  8. (13)C NMR-based metabolomics for the classification of green coffee beans according to variety and origin.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Furihata, Kazuo; Koda, Masanori; Hu, Fangyu; Kato, Rieko; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2012-10-10

    (13)C NMR-based metabolomics was demonstrated as a useful tool for distinguishing the species and origins of green coffee bean samples of arabica and robusta from six different geographic regions. By the application of information on (13)C signal assignment, significantly different levels of 14 metabolites of green coffee beans were identified in the classifications, including sucrose, caffeine, chlorogenic acids, choline, amino acids, organic acids, and trigonelline, as captured by multivariate analytical models. These studies demonstrate that the species and geographical origin can be quickly discriminated by evaluating the major metabolites of green coffee beans quantitatively using (13)C NMR-based metabolite profiling.

  9. Spectroscopic characterization of the 1-substituted 3,3-diphenyl-4-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)azetidin-2-ones: Application of 13C NMR, 1H- 13C COSY NMR and mass spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Girija S.; Pheko, Tshepo

    2008-08-01

    The article deals with spectroscopic characterization of azetidin-2-ones. The presence of substituents like hydroxyl, fluoro, methoxy and benzhydryl, etc., on the azetidin-2-one ring significantly affects the IR absorption and 13C NMR frequencies of the carbonyl group present in these compounds. The presence of an ester carbonyl group or too many methine protons in the molecule has been observed to limit the scope of IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy in unambiguous assignment of the structure. The application of 13C NMR, 2D NMR ( 1H- 13C COSY) and mass spectroscopy in characterization of complex azetidin-2-ones is discussed. An application of the latter two techniques is described in deciding unequivocally between an azetidin-2-one ring and chroman-2-one ring structure for the product obtained by treatment of the 1-substituted 3,3-diphenyl-4-[2'-( O-diphenylacyl)hydroxyphenyl]-2-azetidinones with ethanolic sodium hydroxide at room temperature.

  10. The Ratio of Acetate-to-Glucose Oxidation in Astrocytes from a Single 13C NMR Spectrum of Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Hooshyar, M. Ali; Pichumani, Kumar; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    The 13C labeling patterns in glutamate and glutamine from brain tissue are quite different after infusion of a mixture of 13C-enriched glucose and acetate. Two processes contribute to this observation, oxidation of acetate by astrocytes but not neurons, and preferential incorporation of α-ketoglutarate into glutamate in neurons, and incorporation of α-ketoglutarate into glutamine in astrocytes. The acetate:glucose ratio, introduced previously for analysis of a single 13C NMR spectrum, provides a useful index of acetate and glucose oxidation in the brain tissue. However, quantitation of relative substrate oxidation at the cell compartment level has not been reported. A simple mathematical method is presented to quantify the ratio of acetate to glucose oxidation in astrocytes, based on the standard assumption that neurons do not oxidize acetate. Mice were infused with [1,2-13C]acetate and [1,6-13C]glucose, and proton decoupled 13C NMR spectra of cortex extracts were acquired. A fit of those spectra to the model indicated that 13C-labeled acetate and glucose contributed approximately equally to acetyl-CoA (0.96) in astrocytes. Since this method relies on a single 13C NMR spectrum, it can be readily applied to multiple physiologic and pathologic conditions. PMID:25231025

  11. Topotecan dynamics, tautomerism and reactivity--1H/13C NMR and ESI MS study.

    PubMed

    Hyz, Karolina; Kawecki, Robert; Bednarek, Elzbieta; Bocian, Wojciech; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech

    2010-08-01

    Topotecan (TPT) is in clinical use as an antitumor agent, hycamtin. Because of this, it requires both biologically and chemically useful information to be available. TPT acts by binding to the covalent complex formed by nicked DNA and topoisomerase I. This has a poisonous effect since inserted into the single-strand nick and TPT inhibits its religation. We used NMR to trace TPT dynamics, tautomerism and solvolysis products in various solvents and conditions. Chemical stability was assessed in methanol and DMSO as compared to water, and the regioselectivity of the N- and O-methylation was studied using various alkylating agents. The reaction products of quaternization of the nitrogen atom and methylation of the oxygen atom were characterized by means of ESI MS, (1)H/(13)C-HMBC and -HSQCAD NMR. We have focused on the NMR characterization of TPT with an anticipation that its aggregation, tumbling properties and the intramolecular dipolar interactions will be a common feature for other compounds described in this article. These features can also be useful in tracing the interactions of this class of topoisomerase I (TopoI) poisons with DNA. Moreover, the results explained shed light on the recently disclosed problem of lack of stability of TPT in the heart tissue homogenate samples using the analytical assays developed for this class of compounds carried out in the presence of methanol. PMID:20623719

  12. 1H-detected 13C Photo-CIDNP as a Sensitivity Enhancement Tool in Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Ho; Sekhar, Ashok; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    NMR is a powerful yet intrinsically insensitive technique. The applicability of NMR to chemical and biological systems would be substantially extended by new approaches going beyond current signal-to-noise capabilities. Here, we exploit the large enhancements arising from 13C photo-chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (13C photo-CIDNP) in solution to improve biomolecular NMR sensitivity in the context of heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy. The 13C-PRINT pulse sequence presented here involves an initial 13C nuclear spin polarization via photo-CIDNP followed by conversion to antiphase coherence and transfer to 1H for detection. We observe substantial enhancements, up to ≫200-fold, relative to the dark (laser off) experiment. Resonances of both side-chain and backbone CH pairs are enhanced for the three aromatic residues Trp, His and Tyr and the Trp-containing σ32 peptide. The sensitivity of this experiment, defined as signal-to-noise per unit time (S/N)t, is unprecedented in the NMR polarization enhancement literature dealing with polypeptides in solution. Up to a 16-fold larger (S/N)t than the 1H-13C SE-HSQC reference sequence is achieved, for the σ32 peptide. This gain leads to a reduction in data collection time up to 256-fold, highlighting the advantages of 1H-detected 13C photo-CIDNP in solution NMR. PMID:21548581

  13. Absolute shielding scale for 31P from gas-phase NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; De Dios, Angel; Keith Jameson, A.

    1990-04-01

    Differences in the 31P nuclear shielding in the zero-pressure limit have been measured in seven compounds. An absolute 31P shielding scale based on the PH 3 molecular beam data is established and the absolute shielding of the standard liquid reference (85% aqueous H 3PO 4) is found to be 328.35 ppm, based on PH 3 being 594.45 ± 0.63 ppm. Comparisons with ab initio calculations show that calculations using local origins (the IGLO method) are in good agreement with experiment.

  14. Simultaneous steady-state and dynamic 13C NMR can differentiate alternative routes of pyruvate metabolism in living cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chendong; Harrison, Crystal; Jin, Eunsook S; Chuang, David T; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R; Merritt, Matthew E; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2014-02-28

    Metabolic reprogramming facilitates cancer cell growth, so quantitative metabolic flux measurements could produce useful biomarkers. However, current methods to analyze flux in vivo provide either a steady-state overview of relative activities (infusion of (13)C and analysis of extracted metabolites) or a dynamic view of a few reactions (hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy). Moreover, although hyperpolarization has successfully quantified pyruvate-lactate exchanges, its ability to assess mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism is unproven in cancer. Here, we combined (13)C hyperpolarization and isotopomer analysis to quantify multiple fates of pyruvate simultaneously. Two cancer cell lines with divergent pyruvate metabolism were incubated with thermally polarized [3-(13)C]pyruvate for several hours, then briefly exposed to hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate during acquisition of NMR spectra using selective excitation to maximize detection of H[(13)C]O3(-) and [1-(13)C]lactate. Metabolites were then extracted and subjected to isotopomer analysis to determine relative rates of pathways involving [3-(13)C]pyruvate. Quantitation of hyperpolarized H[(13)C]O3(-) provided a single definitive metabolic rate, which was then used to convert relative rates derived from isotopomer analysis into quantitative fluxes. This revealed that H[(13)C]O3(-) appearance reflects activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase rather than pyruvate carboxylation followed by subsequent decarboxylation reactions. Glucose substantially altered [1-(13)C]pyruvate metabolism, enhancing exchanges with [1-(13)C]lactate and suppressing H[(13)C]O3(-) formation. Furthermore, inhibiting Akt, an oncogenic kinase that stimulates glycolysis, reversed these effects, indicating that metabolism of pyruvate by both LDH and pyruvate dehydrogenase is subject to the acute effects of oncogenic signaling on glycolysis. The data suggest that combining (13)C isotopomer analyses and dynamic hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy may enable

  15. Simultaneous Steady-state and Dynamic 13C NMR Can Differentiate Alternative Routes of Pyruvate Metabolism in Living Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chendong; Harrison, Crystal; Jin, Eunsook S.; Chuang, David T.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Merritt, Matthew E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming facilitates cancer cell growth, so quantitative metabolic flux measurements could produce useful biomarkers. However, current methods to analyze flux in vivo provide either a steady-state overview of relative activities (infusion of 13C and analysis of extracted metabolites) or a dynamic view of a few reactions (hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy). Moreover, although hyperpolarization has successfully quantified pyruvate-lactate exchanges, its ability to assess mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism is unproven in cancer. Here, we combined 13C hyperpolarization and isotopomer analysis to quantify multiple fates of pyruvate simultaneously. Two cancer cell lines with divergent pyruvate metabolism were incubated with thermally polarized [3-13C]pyruvate for several hours, then briefly exposed to hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate during acquisition of NMR spectra using selective excitation to maximize detection of H[13C]O3− and [1-13C]lactate. Metabolites were then extracted and subjected to isotopomer analysis to determine relative rates of pathways involving [3-13C]pyruvate. Quantitation of hyperpolarized H[13C]O3− provided a single definitive metabolic rate, which was then used to convert relative rates derived from isotopomer analysis into quantitative fluxes. This revealed that H[13C]O3− appearance reflects activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase rather than pyruvate carboxylation followed by subsequent decarboxylation reactions. Glucose substantially altered [1-13C]pyruvate metabolism, enhancing exchanges with [1-13C]lactate and suppressing H[13C]O3− formation. Furthermore, inhibiting Akt, an oncogenic kinase that stimulates glycolysis, reversed these effects, indicating that metabolism of pyruvate by both LDH and pyruvate dehydrogenase is subject to the acute effects of oncogenic signaling on glycolysis. The data suggest that combining 13C isotopomer analyses and dynamic hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy may enable quantitative flux measurements in

  16. A 13C NMR study of the structure of four cinnamic acids and their methyl esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. M. S.; Alkorta, I.; Elguero, J.; Silva, V. L. M.

    2001-09-01

    The 13C NMR spectra, both in DMSO solution and in the solid state of four cinnamic acids ( p-methoxy, p-hydroxy, p-methyl, p-chloro) and their corresponding methyl esters have been recorded. The two main results in the solid state are: (i) the only significant difference between acids and esters chemical shifts concerns the CO group which, on average, appears at 173 ppm in the acids and 168 ppm in the esters; (ii) the signals of the ortho and meta carbons both in the acids and the esters are splitted. The two 'anomalies' disappear in DMSO solution. These observations can be rationalized using simple GIAO/B3LYP/6-31G ∗ calculations.

  17. The effect of sample hydration on 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Wilson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fulvic acids, two of which have been well studied by a number of other groups (Armadale and Suwannee river fulvic acids) have been examined by high resolution solid-state 13C-NMR techniques to delineate the effect of absorbed water. Two main effects of absorbed water were observed: (1) changes in spin lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame and cross polarization times and (2) total loss of signal so that some fulvic acid is effectively in solution. These results suggest that discrepancies in the literature concerning observed relative signal intensities from different structural groups are due to absorbed water and emphasize the necessity for proper precautionary drying before spectroscopic analysis. ?? 1991.

  18. Acetate and Bicarbonate Assimilation and Metabolite Formation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: A 13C-NMR Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Himanshu; Shukla, Manish R.; Chary, Kandala V. R.; Rao, Basuthkar J.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular metabolite analyses by 13C-NMR showed that C. reinhardtii cells assimilate acetate at a faster rate in heterotrophy than in mixotrophy. While heterotrophic cells produced bicarbonate and CO2aq, mixotrophy cells produced bicarbonate alone as predominant metabolite. Experiments with singly 13C-labelled acetate (13CH3-COOH or CH3-13COOH) supported that both the 13C nuclei give rise to bicarbonate and CO2aq. The observed metabolite(s) upon further incubation led to the production of starch and triacylglycerol (TAG) in mixotrophy, whereas in heterotrophy the TAG production was minimal with substantial accumulation of glycerol and starch. Prolonged incubation up to eight days, without the addition of fresh acetate, led to an increased TAG production at the expense of bicarbonate, akin to that of nitrogen-starvation. However, such TAG production was substantially high in mixotrophy as compared to that in heterotrophy. Addition of mitochondrial un-coupler blocked the formation of bicarbonate and CO2aq in heterotrophic cells, even though acetate uptake ensued. Addition of PSII-inhibitor to mixotrophic cells resulted in partial conversion of bicarbonate into CO2aq, which were found to be in equilibrium. In an independent experiment, we have monitored assimilation of bicarbonate via photoautotrophy and found that the cells indeed produce starch and TAG at a much faster rate as compared to that in mixotrophy and heterotrophy. Further, we noticed that the accumulation of starch is relatively more as compared to TAG. Based on these observations, we suggest that acetate assimilation in C. reinhardtii does not directly lead to TAG formation but via bicarbonate/CO2aq pathways. Photoautotrophic mode is found to be the best growth condition for the production of starch and TAG and starch in C. reinhardtii. PMID:25207648

  19. 13C solid-state NMR analysis of heterogeneous structure of beeswax in native state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2005-12-01

    I investigated the molecular structure of natural wax from Japanese bees (Apis cerana japonica) in its native state (neither purified nor recrystallized) by 13C and 1H solid-state NMR. Two strong 13C peaks at 32.9 and 34.0 ppm were attributed to signals from internal-chain methylene carbons [int-(CH2)] in two types of crystal form. The peak at 32.9 ppm was assigned to an orthorhombic crystal form, and that at 34.0 ppm was assigned to a triclinic or monoclinic form. In both crystalline regions, bi-exponential decay of 13C spin-lattice relaxation [T1(C)] for the crystalline peaks due to chain diffusion was observed. 1H spin-lattice relaxation [T1(H)] values for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the crystalline and amorphous regions were identical; this was interpreted as being due to averaging of the T1(H) relaxation rates via spin diffusion. In contrast, although the T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) decay curves for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the amorphous and orthorhombic forms were almost identical, those of the triclinic or monoclinic forms were different. This unhomogeneous character of T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) was interpreted as resulting from differences in the molecular composition of each crystal form. Moreover, two components with long and short 1H spin-spin relaxation [T2(H)] values, arising from the mobile and rigid phases, respectively, were observed at above about -30 °C.

  20. Intracellular pH and inorganic phosphate content of heart in vivo: A sup 31 P-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, L.A.; Swain, J.A.; Portman, M.A.; Balaban, R.S. )

    1988-07-01

    Studies were performed to determine the contribution of red blood cells to the {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the canine heart in vivo and the feasibility of measuring myocardial intracellular phosphate and pH. This was accomplished by replacing whole blood with a perfluorochemical perfusion emulsion blood substitute, Oxypherol, and noting the difference in the {sup 31}P-NMR spectrum of the heart. NMR data were collected with a NMR transmitter-receiver coil on the surface of the distal portion of the left ventricle. These studies demonstrated that a small contribution from 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and phosphodiesters in the blood could be detected. The magnitude and shift of these blood-borne signals permitted the relative quantification of intracellular inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) content as well as intracellular pH. Under resting conditions, the intracellular ATP/P{sub i} was 7.0 {plus minus} 0.08. This corresponds to a free intracellular P{sub 1} content of {approx} 0.8 {mu}mol./g wet wt. The intracellular pH was 7.10 {plus minus} 0.01. Acute respiratory alkalosis and acidosis, with the arterial pH ranging from {approximately}7.0 to 7.7, resulted in only small changes in the intracellular pH. These latter results demonstrate an effective myocardial intracellular proton-buffering mechanism in vivo.

  1. Solid-state (13)C NMR reveals effects of temperature and hydration on elastin.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Ashlee; Stypa, Michael P; Tenn, Brandon K; Kumashiro, Kristin K

    2002-01-01

    Elastin is the principal protein component of the elastic fiber in vertebrate tissue. The waters of hydration in the elastic fiber are believed to play a critical role in the structure and function of this largely hydrophobic, amorphous protein. (13)C CPMAS NMR spectra are acquired for elastin samples with different hydration levels. The spectral intensities in the aliphatic region undergo significant changes as 70% of the water in hydrated elastin is removed. In addition, dramatic differences in the CPMAS spectra of hydrated, lyophilized, and partially dehydrated elastin samples over a relatively small temperature range (-20 degrees C to 37 degrees C) are observed. Results from other experiments, including (13)C T(1) and (1)H T(1 rho) measurements, direct polarization with magic-angle spinning, and static CP of the hydrated and lyophilized elastin preparations, also support the model that there is significant mobility in fully hydrated elastin. Our results support models in which water plays an integral role in the structure and proper function of elastin in vertebrate tissue. PMID:11806948

  2. Partial 13C isotopic enrichment of nucleoside monophosphates: useful reporters for NMR structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Anita I.; Mayer, Michael R.; Prestegard, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of the 13C isotopic labeling patterns of nucleoside monophosphates (NMPs) extracted from Escherichia coli grown in a mixture of C-1 and C-2 glucose is presented. By comparing our results to previous observations on amino acids grown in similar media, we have been able to rationalize the labeling pattern based on the well-known biochemistry of nucleotide biosynthesis. Except for a few notable absences of label (C4 in purines and C3′ in ribose) and one highly enriched site (C1′ in ribose), most carbons are randomly enriched at a low level (an average of 13%). These sparsely labeled NMPs give less complex NMR spectra than their fully isotopically labeled analogs due to the elimination of most 13C–13C scalar couplings. The spectral simplicity is particularly advantageous when working in ordered systems, as illustrated with guanosine diphosphate (GDP) bound to ADP ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) aligned in a liquid crystalline medium. In this system, the absence of scalar couplings and additional long-range dipolar couplings significantly enhances signal to noise and resolution. PMID:16254075

  3. Mapping cerebral glutamate 13C turnover and oxygen consumption by in vivo NMR.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Fahmeed; Brown, Peter; Nixon, Terennce W; Behar, Kevin L

    2003-01-01

    Regional rates of 13C incorporation from glucose to glutamate were detected in anesthetized rat brain in vivo at 7T with high temporal and spatial resolution using NMR method ICED PEPSI (in vivo carbon edited detection with proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging). Time courses of regional glutamate 13C turnover were fitted by a metabolic model to obtain regional tri-carboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) in each voxel (8 microL) of rat cortex. CMRO2 maps obtained for rats under either alpha-chloralose or morphine anesthesia revealed average cortical values of 1.5 +/- 0.2 (n = 3) and 3.2 +/- 0.3 (n = 4) mumol/g/min, respectively. These values of CMRO2 are in good agreement with previous cortical measurements with coarser spatial resolution. The heterogeneity within each map, which depicted predominantly gray and white matter differences, was significantly greater under morphine (higher cortical activity) than under-alpha-chloralose (lower cortical activity) anesthesia. The regional variations in the basal awake state, which are expected to be even greater, should be considered to avoid partial-volume artifacts in functional activation studies of awake subjects. PMID:14562702

  4. Cigarette butt decomposition and associated chemical changes assessed by 13C CPMAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; Cesarano, Gaspare; Gaglione, Salvatore A; Lanzotti, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette butts (CBs) are the most common type of litter on earth, with an estimated 4.5 trillion discarded annually. Apart from being unsightly, CBs pose a serious threat to living organisms and ecosystem health when discarded in the environment because they are toxic to microbes, insects, fish and mammals. In spite of the CB toxic hazard, no studies have addressed the effects of environmental conditions on CB decomposition rate. In this study we investigate the interactive effects of substrate fertility and N transfer dynamics on CB decomposition rate and carbon quality changes. We carried out an experiment using smoked CBs and wood sticks, used as a slow decomposing standard organic substrate, incubated in both laboratory and field conditions for two years. CB carbon quality changes during decomposition was assessed by 13C CPMAS NMR. Our experiment confirmed the low degradation rate of CBs which, on average, lost only 37.8% of their initial mass after two years of decomposition. Although a net N transfer occurred from soil to CBs, contrary to our hypothesis, mass loss in the medium-term (two years) was unaffected by N availability in the surrounding substrate. The opposite held for wood sticks, in agreement with the model that N-rich substrates promote the decomposition of other N-poor natural organic materials with a high C/N ratio. As regards CB chemical quality, after two years of decomposition 13C NMR spectroscopy highlighted very small changes in C quality that are likely to reflect a limited microbial attack.

  5. Cigarette Butt Decomposition and Associated Chemical Changes Assessed by 13C CPMAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; Cesarano, Gaspare; Gaglione, Salvatore A.; Lanzotti, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette butts (CBs) are the most common type of litter on earth, with an estimated 4.5 trillion discarded annually. Apart from being unsightly, CBs pose a serious threat to living organisms and ecosystem health when discarded in the environment because they are toxic to microbes, insects, fish and mammals. In spite of the CB toxic hazard, no studies have addressed the effects of environmental conditions on CB decomposition rate. In this study we investigate the interactive effects of substrate fertility and N transfer dynamics on CB decomposition rate and carbon quality changes. We carried out an experiment using smoked CBs and wood sticks, used as a slow decomposing standard organic substrate, incubated in both laboratory and field conditions for two years. CB carbon quality changes during decomposition was assessed by 13C CPMAS NMR. Our experiment confirmed the low degradation rate of CBs which, on average, lost only 37.8% of their initial mass after two years of decomposition. Although a net N transfer occurred from soil to CBs, contrary to our hypothesis, mass loss in the medium-term (two years) was unaffected by N availability in the surrounding substrate. The opposite held for wood sticks, in agreement with the model that N-rich substrates promote the decomposition of other N-poor natural organic materials with a high C/N ratio. As regards CB chemical quality, after two years of decomposition 13C NMR spectroscopy highlighted very small changes in C quality that are likely to reflect a limited microbial attack. PMID:25625643

  6. Quantitative 13C NMR of whole and fractionated Iowa Mollisols for assessment of organic matter composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaowen; Chua, Teresita; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Thompson, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Both the concentrations and the stocks of soil organic carbon vary across the landscape. Do the amounts of recalcitrant components of soil organic matter (SOM) vary with landscape position? To address this question, we studied four Mollisols in central Iowa, two developed in till and two developed in loess. Two of the soils were well drained and two were poorly drained. We collected surface-horizon samples and studied organic matter in the particulate organic matter (POM) fraction, the clay fractions, and the whole, unfractionated samples. We treated the soil samples with 5 M HF at ambient temperature or at 60 °C for 30 min to concentrate the SOM. To assess the composition of the SOM, we used solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in particular, quantitative 13C DP/MAS (direct-polarization/magic-angle spinning), with and without recoupled dipolar dephasing. Spin counting by correlation of the integral NMR intensity with the C concentration by elemental analysis showed that NMR was ⩾85% quantitative for the majority of the samples studied. For untreated whole-soil samples with <2.5 wt.% C, which is considerably less than in most previous quantitative NMR analyses of SOM, useful spectra that reflected ⩾65% of all C were obtained. The NMR analyses allowed us to conclude (1) that the HF treatment (with or without heat) had low impact on the organic C composition in the samples, except for protonating carboxylate anions to carboxylic acids, (2) that most organic C was observable by NMR even in untreated soil materials, (3) that esters were likely to compose only a minor fraction of SOM in these Mollisols, and (4) that the aromatic components of SOM were enriched to ˜53% in the poorly drained soils, compared with ˜48% in the well drained soils; in plant tissue and particulate organic matter (POM) the aromaticities were ˜18% and ˜32%, respectively. Nonpolar, nonprotonated aromatic C, interpreted as a proxy for charcoal C, dominated the

  7. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H-13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H-13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H-13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H-13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr-Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr-Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C-13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils.

  8. Phosphorus-31, sup 15 N, and sup 13 C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, S.; Leo, G.C.; Sammons, R.D.; Sikorski, J.A. )

    1989-05-02

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph}) of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by {sup 31}P, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts ({delta}) for each of the three nuclei. By {sup 31}P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The {sup 13}C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The {sup 15}N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the {sup 31}P {delta} and the C-P-O bond angle, and the {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N {delta} values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield {sup 31}P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P {sup 31}P {delta} vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the E{sup S3P} binary complex, while the E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph} complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle.

  9. 13C CPMAS NMR studies and DFT calculations of triterpene xylosides isolated from Actaea racemosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Marta K.; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Gliński, Jan A.; Wawer, Iwona

    2011-05-01

    13C CPMAS NMR spectra of four triterpene glycosides: cimigenol xyloside ( 1), 26-deoxyactein ( 2), cimicifugoside H-1 ( 3) and 24-acethylhydroshengmanol xyloside ( 4) were recorded and analyzed to characterize their solid-state structure. Experimental data were supported by theoretical calculations of NMR shielding constants with the GIAO/6-31G**-su1 approach. A number of methods for the conformational search and a number of functionals for the DFT calculations were applied to ( 1). The best method was proven to be MMFF or MMFFAQ for the conformational search and the PBE1PBE functional for the DFT calculations. Extra calculations simulating C16 dbnd O⋯HOH hydrogen bond yield the isotropic shielding closer to the experimental solid-state value. For all the compounds CP kinetics parameters were calculated using either the I-S or the I-I*-S model. The analysis of CP kinetics data for methyl groups revealed differences in the T2 time constant for two methyl groups (C29 and C30) linked at C4.

  10. Identification and quantitative determination of lignans in Cedrus atlantica resins using 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Anne-Marie; Paoli, Mathieu; Castola, Vincent; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange

    2011-03-01

    Identification and quantitative determination of individual components of resin collected on the trunk of 28 Cedrus atlantica trees, grown in Corsica, has been carried out using 13C NMR spectroscopy. Eight resin acids bearing either the pimarane or abietane skeleton, two monoterpene hydrocarbons and four oxygenated neutral diterpenes have been identified, as well as three lignans, scarcely found in resins. Three groups could be distinguished within the 28 resin samples. The nine samples of Group I had their composition dominated by diterpene acids (33.7-45.8%), with abietic acid (6.2-18.7%) and isopimaric acid (5.1-12.6%) being the major components. The four samples of Group II contained resin acids (main components) and lignans in moderate amounts (up to 10.3%). Conversely, lignans (38.8-63.8%) were by far the major components of the 15 samples of Group III. Depending on the sample, the major component was pinoresinol (18.1-38.9%), lariciresinol (17.2-33.7%) or lariciresinol 9'-acetate (16.9-29.1%). Finally, due to the high biological interest in lignans, a rapid procedure, based on 1H NMR spectroscopy, was developed for quantification of lignans in resins of C. atlantica.

  11. Triple resonance experiments for aligned sample solid-state NMR of 13C and 15N labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Neeraj; Grant, Christopher V.; Park, Sang Ho; Brown, Jonathan Miles; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Initial steps in the development of a suite of triple-resonance 1H/13C/15N solid-state NMR experiments applicable to aligned samples of 13C and 15N labeled proteins are described. The experiments take advantage of the opportunities for 13C detection without the need for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling presented by samples with two different patterns of isotopic labeling. In one type of sample, the proteins are ~20% randomly labeled with 13C in all backbone and side chain carbon sites and ~100% uniformly 15N labeled in all nitrogen sites; in the second type of sample, the peptides and proteins are 13C labeled at only the α-carbon and 15N labeled at the amide nitrogen of a few residues. The requirement for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling while detecting 13C signals is avoided in the first case because of the low probability of any two 13C nuclei being bonded to each other; in the second case, the labeled 13Cα sites are separated by at least three bonds in the polypeptide chain. The experiments enable the measurement of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C and 15N–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies associated with the 13Cα and 13C′ backbone sites, which provide orientation constraints complementary to those derived from the 15N labeled amide backbone sites. 13C/13C spin-exchange experiments identify proximate carbon sites. The ability to measure 13C–15N dipolar coupling frequencies and correlate 13C and 15N resonances provides a mechanism for making backbone resonance assignments. Three-dimensional combinations of these experiments ensure that the resolution, assignment, and measurement of orientationally dependent frequencies can be extended to larger proteins. Moreover, measurements of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies for nearly all side chain sites enable the complete three-dimensional structures of proteins to be determined with this approach. PMID:17293139

  12. Chain-Folding Structures of a Semi-crystalline Polymer in Bulk and Single Crystals Elucidated by 13C-13C Double Quantum NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, You-Lee; Miyoshi, Toshikazu

    2014-03-01

    Semi-crystalline polymers are crystallized as folded chains in thin lamellae of ca. 5-20 nm from random coils in the melt and solution states. However, understanding of detailed chain-folding structure and crystallization mechanism are still challenging issue due to various experimental limitations. We recently developed a new strategy using 13C-13C double-quantum (DQ) NMR with selectively 13C isotope labeled isotactic poly(1-butene) form I to investigate chain-trajectory in solution and melt grown crystals at various Tcs. This new method can determine the re-entrance sites, the successive folding number (n) , and the fractions (F) of chain-folding in a wide Tc range. In melt grown crystals at Tc = 95 °C, a comparison of experimental and simulated DQ efficiency determined that the polymer chains alternatively change chain-folding directions and the stems tightly pack via intramolecular interactions, and the fraction (F) of adjacent re-entry structure ranges from 70% at n = 4 to 100% at mixed structures of n = 1 and 2. Furthermore, DQ efficiency is independent of Tc in bulk crystals. This means chain-folding do not change in a wide Tcs. DMR-1105829.

  13. Structural Characterization of Humic Materials Using ^13C NMR Techniques: A Comparison of Solution- and Solid-State Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clewett, Catherine; Alam, Todd; Osantowski, Eric; Pullin, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The analysis of the carbon type distribution and chemical structure of natural organic matter (NOM) by ^13C NMR spectroscopy is an important technique for understanding its origins and reactivity. While prior work has used solution-state NMR techniques, solid-state NMR has the potential to provide this information using less instrument time and sample manipulation, while providing an array of advanced filtering techniques. Analyses of four isolated humic materials with ^13C solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques are described, including three commercially available samples and one fulvic acid sample isolated from the Rio Grande in New Mexico. This study demonstrates the utility of solid-state ^13C NMR for aquatic NOM structural characterization, comparing these results to the existing solution-state determinations. The solid-state ^13C MAS NMR results are used to determine % carbon distribution, estimates of elemental composition (%C, %H, %(O+N)), aromatic fraction (fa), nonprotonated aromatic fraction (faN), an estimate of aromatic cluster size, and ratio of sp^2 to sp^3 carbons. A Gaussian deconvolution method is introduced that allows for a detailed analysis of carbon type.

  14. Using 31P-NMR to investigate dynamics of soil phosphorus compounds in the Rothamsted Long Term Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Martin; Turner, Ben; Granger, Steve; Hooper, Tony; Darch, Tegan; Hawkins, Jane; Yuan, Huimin; McGrath, Steve

    2015-04-01

    The technique of 31P-NMR spectroscopy has done more to advance the knowledge of phosphorus forms (especially organic phosphorus) in environmental samples than any other method. The technique has advanced such that specific compounds can be identified where previously only broad categories such as orthophosphate monoesters and diesters were distinguishable. The Soil Archive and Long Term Experiments at Rothamsted Research, UK, potentially provides an unequalled opportunity to use this technique to observe changes in soil phosphorus compounds with time and under different treatments, thereby enhancing our understanding of phosphorus cycling and use by plants. Some of the earliest work using this technique on soils was carried out by Hawkes et al. in 1984 and this used soils from two of the oldest Rothamsted Long Term Experiments, namely Highfield and Park Grass. Here we revisit the samples studied in this early work and reanalyse them using current methodology to demonstrate how the 31P-NMR technique has advanced. We also present results from a study on the phosphorus chemistry in soils along the Hoosfield acid strip (Rothamsted, UK), where a pH gradient from 3.7 to 7.8 occurs in a single soil with little variation in total phosphorus (mean ± standard deviation 399 ± 27 mg P kg-1). Soil pH was found to be an important factor in determining the proportion of phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters in the soil organic phosphorus, although total organic phosphorus concentrations were a relatively consistent proportion of the total soil phosphorus (36 ± 2%) irrespective of soil pH. Key words. 31P-NMR, soil organic phosphorus, long term experiments, Hoosfield acid strip

  15. DFT calculations of 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    del Rosal, I; Maron, L; Poteau, R; Jolibois, F

    2008-08-14

    Transition metal hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential use as catalysts for hydrogenation. Among other available techniques, structural properties in transition metal (TM) complexes are often probed by NMR spectroscopy. In this paper we will show that it is possible to establish a viable methodological strategy in the context of density functional theory, that allows the determination of 1H NMR chemical shifts of hydride ligands attached to transition metal atoms in mononuclear systems and clusters with good accuracy with respect to experiment. 13C chemical shifts have also been considered in some cases. We have studied mononuclear ruthenium complexes such as Ru(L)(H)(dppm)2 with L = H or Cl, cationic complex [Ru(H)(H2O)(dppm)2]+ and Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2, in which hydride ligands are characterized by a negative 1H NMR chemical shift. For these complexes all calculations are in relatively good agreement compared to experimental data with errors not exceeding 20% except for the hydrogen atom in Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2. For this last complex, the relative error increases to 30%, probably owing to the necessity to take into account dynamical effects of phenyl groups. Carbonyl ligands are often encountered in coordination chemistry. Specific issues arise when calculating 1H or 13C NMR chemical shifts in TM carbonyl complexes. Indeed, while errors of 10 to 20% with respect to experiment are often considered good in the framework of density functional theory, this difference in the case of mononuclear carbonyl complexes culminates to 80%: results obtained with all-electron calculations are overall in very satisfactory agreement with experiment, the error in this case does not exceed 11% contrary to effective core potentials (ECPs) calculations which yield errors always larger than 20%. We conclude that for carbonyl groups the use of ECPs is not recommended, although their use could save time for very large systems, for

  16. DFT calculations of 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    del Rosal, I; Maron, L; Poteau, R; Jolibois, F

    2008-08-14

    Transition metal hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential use as catalysts for hydrogenation. Among other available techniques, structural properties in transition metal (TM) complexes are often probed by NMR spectroscopy. In this paper we will show that it is possible to establish a viable methodological strategy in the context of density functional theory, that allows the determination of 1H NMR chemical shifts of hydride ligands attached to transition metal atoms in mononuclear systems and clusters with good accuracy with respect to experiment. 13C chemical shifts have also been considered in some cases. We have studied mononuclear ruthenium complexes such as Ru(L)(H)(dppm)2 with L = H or Cl, cationic complex [Ru(H)(H2O)(dppm)2]+ and Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2, in which hydride ligands are characterized by a negative 1H NMR chemical shift. For these complexes all calculations are in relatively good agreement compared to experimental data with errors not exceeding 20% except for the hydrogen atom in Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2. For this last complex, the relative error increases to 30%, probably owing to the necessity to take into account dynamical effects of phenyl groups. Carbonyl ligands are often encountered in coordination chemistry. Specific issues arise when calculating 1H or 13C NMR chemical shifts in TM carbonyl complexes. Indeed, while errors of 10 to 20% with respect to experiment are often considered good in the framework of density functional theory, this difference in the case of mononuclear carbonyl complexes culminates to 80%: results obtained with all-electron calculations are overall in very satisfactory agreement with experiment, the error in this case does not exceed 11% contrary to effective core potentials (ECPs) calculations which yield errors always larger than 20%. We conclude that for carbonyl groups the use of ECPs is not recommended, although their use could save time for very large systems, for

  17. 31P{1H}NMR and carbonyl force constants of unsymmetrical bidentate phosphine complexes of group (VI) metal carbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesu Raj, Joe Gerald; Pathak, Devendra Deo; Kapoor, Pramesh N.

    2015-05-01

    In our present work we report synthesis of an unsymmetrical diphos ligand, 1-diphenylphosphino-2-di-m-tolylphosphinoethane and its coordinate complexes with group (VI) metal carbonyls such as Cr(CO)6 Mo(CO)6 and W(CO)6. The synthesized ligand and its complexes have been completely characterized by elemental analyses, FTIR, 1HNMR, 31P{1H}NMR and FAB mass spectrometry methods. Special emphasis has been given to calculations of carbonyl force constants. Based on the spectroscopic evidences it has been confirmed that these metal carbonyl complexes with the ditertiary phosphine ligand showed cis geometry in their molecular structure.

  18. Phytate degradation by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts during the wholemeal dough fermentation: a 31P NMR study.

    PubMed

    Reale, Anna; Mannina, Luisa; Tremonte, Patrizio; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Succi, Mariantonietta; Sorrentino, Elena; Coppola, Raffaele

    2004-10-01

    myo-Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is the main source of phosphorus in cereal grains, and therefore, in bakery products. Different microorganisms such as yeasts and lactic acid bacteria have phytase enzymes able to hydrolyze IP6 during the wholemeal breadmaking. In this paper, the phytase activity of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus curvatus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from southern Italian sourdoughs, is assayed using the (31)P NMR technique. The sourdough technology based on the use of lactic acid bacteria in the breadmaking is finally suggested.

  19. Characterization of a Mixture of CO2 Adsorption Products in Hyperbranched Aminosilica Adsorbents by (13)C Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Mehta, Anil K; Conradi, Mark S; Jones, Christopher W; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-11-17

    Hyperbranched amine polymers (HAS) grown from the mesoporous silica SBA-15 (hereafter "SBA-15-HAS") exhibit large capacities for CO2 adsorption. We have used static in situ and magic-angle spinning (MAS) ex situ (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the adsorption of CO2 by SBA-15-HAS. (13)C NMR distinguishes the signal of gas-phase (13)CO2 from that of the chemisorbed species. HAS polymers possess primary, secondary, and tertiary amines, leading to multiple chemisorption reaction outcomes, including carbamate (RnNCOO(-)), carbamic acid (RnNCOOH), and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) moieties. Carbamates and bicarbonate fall within a small (13)C chemical shift range (162-166 ppm), and a mixture was observed including carbamic acid and carbamate, the former disappearing upon evacuation of the sample. By examining the (13)C-(14)N dipolar coupling through low-field (B0 = 3 T) (13)C{(1)H} cross-polarization MAS NMR, carbamate is confirmed through splitting of the (13)C resonance. A third species that is either bicarbonate or a second carbamate is evident from bimodal T2 decay times of the ∼163 ppm peak, indicating the presence of two species comprising that single resonance. The mixture of products suggests that (1) the presence of amines and water leads to bicarbonate being present and/or (2) the multiple types of amine sites in HAS permit formation of chemically distinct carbamates.

  20. Conditions for (13)C NMR detection of 2-hydroxyglutarate in tissue extracts from isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutated gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pichumani, Kumar; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Ratnakar, James; Mickey, Bruce; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Maher, Elizabeth A; Bachoo, Robert M; Malloy, Craig R; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2015-07-15

    (13)C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy of extracts from patient tumor samples provides rich information about metabolism. However, in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutant gliomas, (13)C labeling is obscured in oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutaric acid (2 HG) by glutamate and glutamine, prompting development of a simple method to resolve the metabolites. J-coupled multiplets in 2 HG were similar to glutamate and glutamine and could be clearly resolved at pH 6. A cryogenically cooled (13)C probe, but not J-resolved heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectroscopy, significantly improved detection of 2 HG. These methods enable the monitoring of (13)C-(13)C spin-spin couplings in 2 HG expressing IDH-mutant gliomas.

  1. Metabolic characterization of Lactococcus lactis deficient in lactate dehydrogenase using in vivo 13C-NMR.

    PubMed

    Neves, A R; Ramos, A; Shearman, C; Gasson, M J; Almeida, J S; Santos, H

    2000-06-01

    The metabolism of glucose by nongrowing cells of Lactococcus lactis strain FI7851, constructed from the wild-type L. lactis strain MG1363 by disruption of the lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene [Gasson, M.J., Benson, K., Swindel, S. & Griffin, H. (1996) Lait 76, 33-40] was studied in a noninvasive manner by 13C-NMR. The kinetics of the build-up and consumption of the pools of intracellular intermediates mannitol 1-phosphate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, 3-phosphoglycerate, and phosphoenolpyruvate as well as the utilization of [1-13C]glucose and formation of products (lactate, acetate, mannitol, ethanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol) were monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 30 s. The metabolism of glucose by the parental wild-type strain was also examined for comparison. A clear shift from typical homolactic fermentation (parental strain) to a mixed acid fermentation (lactate dehdydrogenase deficient; LDHd strain) was observed. Furthermore, high levels of mannitol were transiently produced and metabolized once glucose was depleted. Mannitol 1-phosphate accumulated intracellularly up to 76 mM concentration. Mannitol was formed from fructose 6-phosphate by the combined action of mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphatase. The results show that the formation of mannitol 1-phosphate by the LDHd strain during glucose catabolism is a consequence of impairment in NADH oxidation caused by a highly reduced LDH activity, the transient production of mannitol 1-phosphate serving as a regeneration pathway for NAD+ regeneration. Oxygen availability caused a drastic change in the pattern of intermediates and end-products, reinforcing the key-role of the fulfilment of the redox balance. The flux control coefficients for the step catalysed by mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase were calculated and the implications in the design of metabolic engineering strategies are discussed.

  2. Characterization of Acetate and Pyruvate Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Zea mays by 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Dennis J.; Lee, Rino Y.; Adams, Douglas O.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been applied to the direct observation of acetate and pyruvate metabolism in suspension cultures of Zea mays (var Black Mexican Sweet). Growth of the corn cells in the presence of 2 millimolar [2-13C]acetate resulted in a rapid uptake of the substrate from the medium and initial labeling (0-4 hours) of primarily the intracellular glutamate and malate pools. Further metabolism of these intermediates resulted in labeling of glutamine, aspartate, and alanine. With [1-13C]acetate as the substrate very little incorporation into intermediary metabolites was observed in the 13C NMR spectra due to loss of the label as 13CO2. Uptake of [3-13C]pyruvate by the cells was considerably slower than with [2-13C]acetate; however, the labelling patterns were similar with the exception of increased [3-13C] alanine generation with pyruvate as the substrate. Growth of the cells for up to 96 hours with 2 millimolar [3-13C]pyruvate ultimately resulted in labeling of valine, leucine, isoleucine, threonine, and the polyamine putrescine. PMID:16665721

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H–13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H–13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H–13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H–13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr–Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr–Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C–13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils. PMID:22743540

  4. Sparse (13)C labelling for solid-state NMR studies of P. pastoris expressed eukaryotic seven-transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Chang; Fan, Ying; Munro, Rachel A; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S; Wang, Shenlin

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel sparse (13)C labelling approach for methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris expression system, towards solid-state NMR studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins. The labelling scheme was achieved by co-utilizing natural abundance methanol and specifically (13)C labelled glycerol as carbon sources in the expression medium. This strategy improves the spectral resolution by 1.5 fold, displays site-specific labelling patterns, and has advantages for collecting long-range distance restraints for structure determination of large eukaryotic membrane proteins by solid-state NMR.

  5. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by 13C CP/MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Werner-Zwanziger, Ulrike; Lis, Grzegorz; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance.

  6. Solid-state 13C NMR study of na-cellulose complexes.

    PubMed

    Porro, Fabrizio; Bédué, Olivier; Chanzy, Henri; Heux, Laurent

    2007-08-01

    The interaction of microcrystalline cellulose from cotton and aqueous sodium hydroxide was investigated by 13C NMR solid-state spectroscopy as a function of temperature and sodium hydroxide concentration. When the concentration of NaOH was increased, the initial cellulose spectrum was replaced successively by that of Na-cellulose I followed by that of Na-cellulose II. In Na-cellulose I, each carbon atom occurred as a singlet, thus implying that one glucosyl moiety was the independent magnetic residue in the structure of this allomorph. In addition, the occurrence of the C6 near 62 ppm is an indication of a gt conformation for the hydroxymethyl group of Na-cellulose I. In Na-cellulose II, the analysis of the resonances of C1 and C6 points toward a structure based on a cellotriosyl moiety as the independent magnetic residue, in agreement with the established X-ray analysis that has shown that for this allomorph, the fiber repeat was also that of a cellotriosyl residue. For Na-cellulose II, the occurrence of the C6 in the 60 ppm region indicates an overall gg conformation for the hydroxymethyl groups. A comparison of the spectra recorded at 268 K and at room temperature confirms the stronger interaction of NaOH with cellulose when the temperature is lowered. In the Q region, corresponding to NaOH concentrations of around 9% and temperatures below 277 K, most of the sample was dissolved and no specific solid-state 13C NMR spectrum could be recorded, except for that of a small fraction of undissolved cellulose I. The same experiment run on a wood pulp sample leads to a new spectrum, with spectral characteristics different from those of Na-cellulose I and Na-cellulose II. This new spectrum is assigned to the Q phase, which appears to result from topological constraints that are present in whole wood pulp fibers but not in microcrystalline cellulose. A spectrum recorded for samples in the Na-cellulose III conditions resembled that of Na-cellulose II but of lower

  7. 13C and 113Cd NMR studies of the chelation of metal ions by the calcium binding protein parvalbumin.

    PubMed

    Bjornson, M E; Corson, D C; Sykes, B D

    1985-10-01

    13C NMR spectra are presented for the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (pI 4.25) from carp muscle in several different metal bound forms: with Ca2+ in both the CD and EF calcium binding sites, with Cd2+ in both sites, with 113Cd2+ in both sites, and with 113Cd2+ in the CD site and Lu3+ in the EF site. The different metals differentially shift the 13C NMR resonances of the protein ligands involved in chelation of the metal ion. In addition, direct 13C-113Cd spin-spin coupling is observed which allows the assignment of protein carbonyl and carboxyl 13C NMR resonances to ligands directly interacting with the metal ions in the CD and EF binding sites. The displacement of 113Cd2+ from the EF site by Lu3+ further allows these resonances to be assigned to the CD or EF site. The occupancy of the two sites in the two cadmium species and in the mixed Cd2+/Lu3+ species is verified by 113Cd NMR. The resolution in these 113Cd NMR spectra is sufficient to demonstrate direct interaction between the two metal binding sites.

  8. Intrauterine fetal brain NMR spectroscopy: 1H and 31P studies in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, T.; Kwee, I.L.; Suzuki, N.; Houkin, K. )

    1989-11-01

    Fetal brain metabolism was investigated in utero noninvasively using multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in rats at two representative prenatal stages: early (17-18 days) and late (20-21 days) stages. Phosphorus-31 (31P) spectroscopy revealed that phosphocreatine is significantly lower in the early stage and increases to the level of early neonates by the late prenatal stage. Intracellular pH at the early stage was found to be strikingly high (7.52 +/- 0.21) and decreased to a level similar to that of neonates by the late stage (7.29 +/- 0.07). Phosphomonoester levels at both stages were similar to the values reported for early neonates. Water-suppressed proton (1H) spectroscopy demonstrated a distinctive in vivo fetal brain spectral pattern characterized by low levels of N-acetyl aspartate and high levels of taurine. High-resolution proton spectroscopy and homonuclear chemical-shift correlate spectroscopy of brain perchloric acid extracts confirmed these in vivo findings. In vitro 31P spectroscopy of acidified chloroform methanol extracts showed the characteristic membrane phospholipid profiles of fetal brain. The phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)-to-phosphatidylcholine (PC) ratio (PE/PC) did not show significant changes between the two stages at 0.40 +/- 0.11, a value similar to that of early neonates.

  9. 2D exchange 31P NMR spectroscopy of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) exchange 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to study the slow overall motion of the rod-shaped viruses M13 and tobacco mosaic virus in concentrated gels. Even for short mixing times, observed diagonal spectra differ remarkably from projection spectra and one-dimensional spectra. Our model readily explains this to be a consequence of the T2e anisotropy caused by slow overall rotation of the viruses about their length axis. 2D exchange spectra recorded for 30% (w/w) tobacco mosaic virus with mixing times < 1 s do not show any off-diagonal broadening, indicating that its overall motion occurs in the sub-Hz frequency range. In contrast, the exchange spectra obtained for 30% M13 show significant off-diagonal intensity for mixing times of 0.01 s and higher. A log-gaussian distribution around 25 Hz of overall diffusion coefficients mainly spread between 1 and 10(3) Hz faithfully reproduces the 2D exchange spectra of 30% M13 recorded at various mixing times in a consistent way. A small but notable change in diagonal spectra at increasing mixing time is not well accounted for by our model and is probably caused by 31P spin diffusion. PMID:7756532

  10. Discovering [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR Spectroscopy in the General Chemistry Laboratory through a Sequence of Guided-Inquiry Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Justice, David; Brauer, Shari; Landis, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This sequence of three guided-inquiry labs is designed for a second-semester general chemistry course and challenges students to discover basic theoretical principles associated with [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR spectroscopy. Students learn to identify and explain basic concepts of magnetic resonance and vibrational…

  11. Spectrally edited 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR spectra without diagonal ridge for characterizing 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Anderson, Jason M.; Shanks, Brent H.; Fang, Xiaowen; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Two robust combinations of spectral editing techniques with 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR have been developed for characterizing the aromatic components of 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials. One method (exchange with protonated and nonprotonated spectral editing, EXPANSE) selects cross peaks of protonated and nearby nonprotonated carbons, while the other technique, dipolar-dephased double-quantum/single-quantum (DQ/SQ) NMR, selects signals of bonded nonprotonated carbons. Both spectra are free of a diagonal ridge, which has many advantages: Cross peaks on the diagonal or of small intensity can be detected, and residual spinning sidebands or truncation artifacts associated with the diagonal ridge are avoided. In the DQ/SQ experiment, dipolar dephasing of the double-quantum coherence removes protonated-carbon signals; this approach also eliminates the need for high-power proton decoupling. The initial magnetization is generated with minimal fluctuation by combining direct polarization, cross polarization, and equilibration by 13C spin diffusion. The dipolar dephased DQ/SQ spectrum shows signals from all linkages between aromatic rings, including a distinctive peak from polycondensed aromatics. In EXPANSE NMR, signals of protonated carbons are selected in the first spectral dimension by short cross polarization combined with dipolar dephasing difference. This removes ambiguities of peak assignment to overlapping signals of nonprotonated and protonated aromatic carbons, e.g. near 125 ppm. Spin diffusion is enhanced by dipolar-assisted rotational resonance. Before detection, Csbnd H dipolar dephasing by gated decoupling is applied, which selects signals of nonprotonated carbons. Thus, only cross peaks due to magnetization originating from protonated C and ending on nearby nonprotonated C are retained. Combined with the chemical shifts deduced from the cross-peak position, this double spectral editing defines the bonding environment of aromatic, COO, and Cdbnd O carbons

  12. 500-fold enhancement of in situ (13)C liquid state NMR using gyrotron-driven temperature-jump DNP.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dongyoung; Soundararajan, Murari; Caspers, Christian; Braunmueller, Falk; Genoud, Jérémy; Alberti, Stefano; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-09-01

    A 550-fold increase in the liquid state (13)C NMR signal of a 50μL sample was obtained by first hyperpolarizing the sample at 20K using a gyrotron (260GHz), then, switching its frequency in order to apply 100W for 1.5s so as to melt the sample, finally, turning off the gyrotron to acquire the (13)C NMR signal. The sample stays in its NMR resonator, so the sequence can be repeated with rapid cooling as the entire cryostat stays cold. DNP and thawing of the sample are performed only by the switchable and tunable gyrotron without external devices. Rapid transition from DNP to thawing in one second time scale was necessary especially in order to enhance liquid (1)H NMR signal. PMID:27490302

  13. 500-fold enhancement of in situ 13C liquid state NMR using gyrotron-driven temperature-jump DNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dongyoung; Soundararajan, Murari; Caspers, Christian; Braunmueller, Falk; Genoud, Jérémy; Alberti, Stefano; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-09-01

    A 550-fold increase in the liquid state 13C NMR signal of a 50 μL sample was obtained by first hyperpolarizing the sample at 20 K using a gyrotron (260 GHz), then, switching its frequency in order to apply 100 W for 1.5 s so as to melt the sample, finally, turning off the gyrotron to acquire the 13C NMR signal. The sample stays in its NMR resonator, so the sequence can be repeated with rapid cooling as the entire cryostat stays cold. DNP and thawing of the sample are performed only by the switchable and tunable gyrotron without external devices. Rapid transition from DNP to thawing in one second time scale was necessary especially in order to enhance liquid 1H NMR signal.

  14. Sequential backbone assignment of uniformly 13C-labeled RNAs by a two-dimensional P(CC)H-TOCSY triple resonance NMR experiment.

    PubMed

    Wijmenga, S S; Heus, H A; Leeuw, H A; Hoppe, H; van der Graaf, M; Hilbers, C W

    1995-01-01

    A new 1H-13C-31P triple resonance experiment is described which allows unambiguous sequential backbone assignment in 13C-labeled oligonucleotides via through-bond coherence transfer from 31P via 13C to 1H. The approach employs INEPT to transfer coherence from 31P to 13C and homonuclear TOCSY to transfer the 13C coherence through the ribose ring, followed by 13C to 1H J-cross-polarisation. The efficiencies of the various possible transfer pathways are discussed. The most efficient route involves transfer of 31Pi coherence via C4'i and C4'i-1, because of the relatively large JPC4' couplings involved. Via the homonuclear and heteronuclear mixing periods, the C4'i and C4'i-1 coherences are subsequently transferred to, amongst others, H1'i and H1'i-1, respectively, leading to a 2D 1H-31P spectrum which allows a sequential assignment in the 31P-1H1' region of the spectrum, i.e. in the region where the proton resonances overlap least. The experiment is demonstrated on a 13C-labeled RNA hairpin with the sequence 5'(GGGC-CAAA-GCCU)3'.

  15. FTIR and {sup 31}P-NMR spectroscopic analyses of surface species in phosphate-catalyzed lactic acid conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, G.C.; Tam, M.S.; Miller, D.J.

    1996-11-01

    The surface species present on silica/alumina-supported sodium phosphates, active catalysts for the conversion of lactic acid to acrylic acid and 2,3-pentanedione, are examined by pre- and postreaction MAS {sup 31}P-NMR and FTIR spectroscopies. Species present following lactic acid conversion are identified by transmission FTIR of phosphates supported on silicon disks (as a model catalyst system) and verified by {sup 31}P-NMR and diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy of actual catalysts used in reaction. Monosodium phosphate (NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) condenses to a mixture of sodium polyphosphate (NaPO{sub 3}){sub n} and sodium trimetaphosphate (Na{sub 3}P{sub 3}O{sub 9}), which exhibit little catalytic activity for converting lactic acid to desired products. Disodium phosphate (Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}) condenses to tetrasodium pyrophosphate (Na{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}), and proton transfer from lactic acid to pyrophosphate results in the formation of sodium lactate. Trisodium phosphate (Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) accepts a proton from lactic acid to form sodium lactate and disodium phosphate, which condenses to pyrophosphate. The presence of pyrophosphate and sodium lactate on supported disodium and trisodium phosphates explains their similar catalytic properties; the larger quantity of sodium lactate present on trisodium phosphate leads to higher conversions at lower temperatures. 40 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Inhibition mechanisms of Zn precipitation on aluminum oxide by glyphosate: a 31P NMR and Zn EXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Yu-Jun; Zhu, Mengqiang; Fan, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Phillips, Brian L; Sparks, Donald L

    2013-05-01

    In this research, the effects of glyphosate (GPS) on Zn sorption/precipitation on γ-alumina were investigated using a batch technique, Zn K-edge EXAFS, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy. The EXAFS analysis revealed that, in the absence of glyphosate, Zn adsorbed on the aluminum oxide surface mainly as bidentate mononuclear surface complexes at pH 5.5, whereas Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) precipitates formed at pH 8.0. In the presence of glyphosate, the EXAFS spectra of Zn sorption samples at pH 5.5 and 8.0 were very similar, both of which demonstrated that Zn did not directly bind to the mineral surface but bonded with the carboxyl group of glyphosate. Formation of γ-alumina-GPS-Zn ternary surface complexes was further suggested by (31)P solid state NMR data which indicated the glyphosate binds to γ-alumina via a phosphonate group, bridging the mineral surface and Zn. Additionally, we showed the sequence of additional glyphosate and Zn can influence the sorption mechanism. At pH 8, Zn-Al LDH precipitates formed if Zn was added first, and no precipitates formed if glyphosate was added first or simultaneously with Zn. In contrast, at pH 5.5, only γ-alumina-GPS-Zn ternary surface complexes formed regardless of whether glyphosate or Zn was added first or both were added simultaneously. PMID:23550510

  17. Inhibition mechanisms of Zn precipitation on aluminum oxide by glyphosate: a 31P NMR and Zn EXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Yu-Jun; Zhu, Mengqiang; Fan, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Phillips, Brian L; Sparks, Donald L

    2013-05-01

    In this research, the effects of glyphosate (GPS) on Zn sorption/precipitation on γ-alumina were investigated using a batch technique, Zn K-edge EXAFS, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy. The EXAFS analysis revealed that, in the absence of glyphosate, Zn adsorbed on the aluminum oxide surface mainly as bidentate mononuclear surface complexes at pH 5.5, whereas Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) precipitates formed at pH 8.0. In the presence of glyphosate, the EXAFS spectra of Zn sorption samples at pH 5.5 and 8.0 were very similar, both of which demonstrated that Zn did not directly bind to the mineral surface but bonded with the carboxyl group of glyphosate. Formation of γ-alumina-GPS-Zn ternary surface complexes was further suggested by (31)P solid state NMR data which indicated the glyphosate binds to γ-alumina via a phosphonate group, bridging the mineral surface and Zn. Additionally, we showed the sequence of additional glyphosate and Zn can influence the sorption mechanism. At pH 8, Zn-Al LDH precipitates formed if Zn was added first, and no precipitates formed if glyphosate was added first or simultaneously with Zn. In contrast, at pH 5.5, only γ-alumina-GPS-Zn ternary surface complexes formed regardless of whether glyphosate or Zn was added first or both were added simultaneously.

  18. 1H and 13C NMR assignments of new methoxylated furanoflavonoids from Lonchocarpus araripensis.

    PubMed

    Lima, Almi F; Mileo, Paulo Graziane M; Andrade-Neto, Manoel; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Silveira, Edilberto R; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia L

    2009-02-01

    Two new polymethoxylated flavonoids, 2',5',6'-trimethoxy-[2'',3'' : 3',4']furano dihydrochalcone and 2,4',4,5-tetramethoxy-[2'',3'' : 6,7]-furanodihydroaurone, were isolated from the root barks of Lonchocarpus araripensis, along with the known compounds 3,4,5,6-tetramethoxy-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-furanoflavan, 3,6-dimethoxy-1'',1''-dimethylcromene-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-flavone, 3',4'-methylenodioxy-5,6-dimethoxy-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-furanoflavone, 3,5,6-trimethoxy-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-furanoflavanone, 3,5,6-trimethoxy-[2'',3'' : 7,8]-furanoflavone, and 6alpha-hydroxy-medicarpin. The complete (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments of the new furan flavonoids were performed using 1D and 2D pulse sequences, including COSY, HSQC, and HMBC experiments, and comparison with spectral data for analog compounds from the literature, particularly for the new furanodihydroaurone because of several inconsistencies on the carbonyl chemical shifts from the literature. PMID:18932264

  19. (13)C-NMR-Based Metabolomic Profiling of Typical Asian Soy Sauces.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ghulam Mustafa; Yuan, Bin; Hussain, Abdullah Ijaz; Wang, Jie; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili

    2016-01-01

    It has been a strong consumer interest to choose high quality food products with clear information about their origin and composition. In the present study, a total of 22 Asian soy sauce samples have been analyzed in terms of (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Spectral data were analyzed by multivariate statistical methods in order to find out the important metabolites causing the discrimination among typical soy sauces from different Asian regions. It was found that significantly higher concentrations of glutamate in Chinese red cooking (CR) soy sauce may be the result of the manual addition of monosodium glutamate (MSG) in the final soy sauce product. Whereas lower concentrations of amino acids, like leucine, isoleucine and valine, observed in CR indicate the different fermentation period used in production of CR soy sauce, on the other hand, the concentration of some fermentation cycle metabolites, such as acetate and sucrose, can be divided into two groups. The concentrations of these fermentation cycle metabolites were lower in CR and Singapore Kikkoman (SK), whereas much higher in Japanese shoyu (JS) and Taiwan (China) light (TL), which depict the influence of climatic conditions. Therefore, the results of our study directly indicate the influences of traditional ways of fermentation, climatic conditions and the selection of raw materials and can be helpful for consumers to choose their desired soy sauce products, as well as for researchers in further authentication studies about soy sauce. PMID:27598115

  20. 13C-NMR analysis of Aspergillus mutants disturbed in pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dijkema, C; Visser, J

    1987-12-10

    The metabolic consequences of two defects in pyruvate metabolism of the hyphal fungus Aspergillus nidulans have been investigated by natural abundance 13C-NMR spectroscopy. A pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (pdh) mutant, grown on acetate, accumulates alanine upon starvation which is derived from mannitol reserves. The L-alanine level increases further upon incubation with the non-permissive substrate D-glucose. L-Glutamate is absent from these spectra as it is required both for the transamination of pyruvate and as a reaction on an impaired energy metabolism in such a pdh-deficient strain. A pyruvate carboxylase (pyc) mutant, grown upon acetate, only starts to accumulate alanine after a long incubation period with D-glucose, due to the long-lasting presence of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzyme, which are both induced by growth on acetate. When this strain is grown on D-fructose and L-glutamate, alanine also accumulates within 3 h upon transfer to D-glucose.

  1. Local structure of spin Peierls compound TiPO4: 47/49Ti and 31P NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Raivo; Heinmaa, Ivo; Leitmäe, Alexander; Joon, Enno; Tsirlin, Alexander; Kremer, Reinhard; Glaum, Robert

    TiPO4 structure is made of slightly corrugated TiO2 ribbon chains of edge-sharing TiO6 octahedra. The almost perfect 1D spin 1/2 Ti3 + chains are well separated by PO4 tetrahedra. By magnetic susceptibility and MAS-NMR measurements [1] it was shown that TiPO4 has nonmagnetic singlet ground state with remarkably high Spin-Peierls (SP) transition temperature. The high-T magnetic susceptibility of TiPO4 follows well that of a S =1/2 Heisenberg chain with very strong nearest-neighbor AF spin-exchange coupling constant of J =965K. On cooling TiPO4 shows two successive phase transitions at 111K and 74K, with incommensurate (IC) SP phase between them. We studied local structure and dynamics in TiPO4 single crystal using 47/49Ti and 31P NMR in the temperature range 40K to 300K, and determined the principal values and orientation of the magnetic shift tensors for 31P and 47,49Ti nuclei. Since 47,49Ti (S =5/2 and S =7/2, respectively) have quadrupolar moments, we also found the principal axis values and orientations of the electric field gradient (efg) tensor in SP phase and at 295K. In SP phase the structure contains 2 magnetically inequivalent P sites and only one Ti site. From the T-dependence of the relaxation rate of 31P and 47Ti nuclei we determined activation energy Ea = 550 K for spin excitations in SP phase. J. Law et al ., PRB 83, 180414(R) (2011).

  2. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of four new steroidal glycosides from a gorgonian coral Junceella juncea.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shuhua; Zhang, Si; Huang, Jianshe; Xiao, Zhihui; Wu, Jun; Li, Qingxin

    2005-03-01

    Four new cholest-type steroidal glycosides, junceellosides A-D, isolated from the EtOH/CH(2)Cl(2) extracts of the South China Sea gorgonian coral Junceella juncea, were identified. Complete assignments of the (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts for these compounds were achieved by means of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY spectra.

  3. NMR studies of bent DNA using {sup 13}C-enriched samples

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, D.P.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Bending of the DNA double helix can be brought about by introducing runs of adenines (A-tracts) in phase with the helical repeat of the DNA. The requirements for bending of DNA by A-tracts are that the length of the A-tract be greater than 3 base pairs and that the A-tracts must be in phase with the helical repeat (every 10 or 11 bp). Other factors, such as the number of adenines in the run, flanking sequences, and whether the A-tracts are phased with respect to the 5{prime}A or the 3{prime}A, have effects upon the degree of bending as assayed by electrophoretic mobility on native polyacrylamide gels. There are a number of models for bending A-tract DNA. The junction-bending model postulates that the structure of A-tracts is similar to the fiber diffraction structure of poly A, in which there is a significant degree of base pair tilt with respect to the helix axis. In this model, bending occurs at the junction between the A-tract and the B-form helix to allow favorable stacking interactions to occur. The bend of the helix could arise as a result of some other perturbation of B-form DNA by A-tracts, such as propeller twist; bending also could be due to a combination of factors. Our goal is to find the structural features of A-tracts responsible for bending of the helix by performing NMR on oligonucleotides containing A-tracts to obtain higher resolution structural data. One of the problems encountered in NMR structure determination of nucleic acids and other macromolecules is the assignment of resonances to nuclei. This procedure can be greatly facilitated through the use of {sup 13}C-enriched nucleic acid samples. We are developing a technique for the enzymatic synthesis of labeled DNA for NMR. The technique we are developing is similar to RNA labeling techniques already in use. The technique involves growth of methylotrophic bacteria on {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH.

  4. Simple method for identification of skeletons of aporphine alkaloids from 13C NMR data using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Rufino, Alessandra R; Brant, Antônio J C; Santos, João B O; Ferreira, Marcelo J P; Emerenciano, Vicente P

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the use of artificial neural networks as a theoretical tool in the structural determination of alkaloids from (13)C NMR chemical shift data, aiming to identify skeletal types of those compounds. For that, 162 aporphine alkaloids belonging to 12 different skeletons were codified with their respective (13)C NMR chemical shifts. Each skeleton pertaining to aporphine alkaloid type was used as output, and the (13)C NMR chemical shifts were used as input data of the net. Analyzing the obtained results, one can then affirm the skeleton to which each one of these compounds belongs with high degree of confidence (over 97%). The relation between the correlation coefficient and the number of epochs and the architecture of net (3-layer MLP or 4-layer MLP) were analyzed, too. The analysis showed that the results predicted by the 3-layer MLP networks trained with a number of the epochs higher than 900 epochs are the best ones. The artificial neural nets were shown to be a simple and efficient tool to solve structural elucidation problems making use of (13)C NMR chemical shift data, even when a similarity between the searched skeletons occurs, offering fast and accurate results to identification of skeletons of organic compounds.

  5. 1H and 13C NMR characterization and secondary structure of the K2 polysaccharide of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 52145.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Maria Michela; De Castro, Cristina; Naldi, Teresa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Tomás, Juan M; Regué, Miguel

    2005-09-26

    The complete (1)H and (13)C NMR characterization of the tetrasaccharide repeating unit from the K2 polysaccharide of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 52145 is reported. [chemical structure] In addition a model for its secondary structure was suggested on the basis of dynamic and molecular calculations.

  6. Complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of standard neo-iota-carrabiose oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Jouanneau, Diane; Boulenguer, Patrick; Mazoyer, Jacques; Helbert, William

    2010-02-26

    Standard Eucheuma denticulatum iota-carrageenan was degraded with the Alteromonas fortis iota-carrageenase. The most abundant products, the neo-iota-carratetraose and neo-iota-carrahexaose were purified by permeation gel chromatography, and their corresponding (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were fully assigned. PMID:20038459

  7. Solid-state 13C NMR and molecular modeling studies of acetyl aleuritolic acid obtained from Croton cajucara Benth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva San Gil, Rosane Aguiar; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; da Cunha Pinto, Angelo; do Espírito Santo Gomes, Fabiano; de Castro Dantas, Tereza Neuma; Maciel, Maria Aparecida Medeiros

    2008-08-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance ( 13C NMR) with magic-angle spinning (MAS) and with cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) spectra, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques were used to obtain structural data from a sample of acetyl aleuritolic acid (AAA) extracted from the stem bark of Croton cajucara Benth. (Euphorbiaceae) and recrystallized from acetone. Since solid-state 13C NMR results suggested the presence of more than one molecule in the unitary cell for the AAA, DSC analysis and molecular modeling calculations were used to access this possibility. The absence of phase transition peaks in the DSC spectra and the dimeric models of AAA simulated using the semi-empirical PM3 method are in agreement with that proposal.

  8. Enzymatic 13C Labeling and Multidimensional NMR Analysis of Miltiradiene Synthesized by Bifunctional Diterpene Cyclase in Selaginella moellendorffii*

    PubMed Central

    Sugai, Yoshinori; Ueno, Yohei; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Oogami, Shingo; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Natsume, Masahiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Diterpenes show diverse chemical structures and various physiological roles. The diversity of diterpene is primarily established by diterpene cyclases that catalyze a cyclization reaction to form the carbon skeleton of cyclic diterpene. Diterpene cyclases are divided into two types, monofunctional and bifunctional cyclases. Bifunctional diterpene cyclases (BDTCs) are involved in hormone and defense compound biosyntheses in bryophytes and gymnosperms, respectively. The BDTCs catalyze the successive two-step type-B (protonation-initiated cyclization) and type-A (ionization-initiated cyclization) reactions of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). We found that the genome of a lycophyte, Selaginella moellendorffii, contains six BDTC genes with the majority being uncharacterized. The cDNA from S. moellendorffii encoding a BDTC-like enzyme, miltiradiene synthase (SmMDS), was cloned. The recombinant SmMDS converted GGDP to a diterpene hydrocarbon product with a molecular mass of 272 Da. Mutation in the type-B active motif of SmMDS abolished the cyclase activity, whereas (+)-copalyl diphosphate, the reaction intermediate from the conversion of GGDP to the hydrocarbon product, rescued the cyclase activity of the mutant to form a diterpene hydrocarbon. Another mutant lacking type-A activity accumulated copalyl diphosphate as the reaction intermediate. When the diterpene hydrocarbon was enzymatically synthesized from [U-13C6]mevalonate, all carbons were labeled with 13C stable isotope (>99%). The fully 13C-labeled product was subjected to 13C-13C COSY NMR spectroscopic analyses. The direct carbon-carbon connectivities observed in the multidimensional NMR spectra demonstrated that the hydrocarbon product by SmMDS is miltiradiene, a putative biosynthetic precursor of tanshinone identified from the Chinese medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza. Hence, SmMDS functions as a bifunctional miltiradiene synthase in S. moellendorffii. In this study, we demonstrate that one-dimensional and

  9. Analysis of 31P MAS NMR spectra and transversal relaxation of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1994-01-01

    Phosphorus magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and transversal relaxation of M13 and TMV are analyzed by use of a model, which includes both local backbone motions of the encapsulated nucleic acid molecules and overall rotational diffusion of the rod-shaped virions about their length axis. Backbone motions influence the sideband intensities by causing a fast restricted reorientation of the phosphodiesters. To evaluate their influence on the observed sideband patterns, we extend the model that we used previously to analyze nonspinning 31P NMR lineshapes (Magusin, P.C.M.M., and M. A. Hemminga. 1993a. Biophys. J. 64:1861-1868) to magic angle spinning NMR experiments. Backbone motions also influence the conformation of the phosphodiesters, causing conformational averaging of the isotropic chemical shift, which offers a possible explanation for the various linewidths of the centerband and the sidebands observed for M13 gels under various conditions. The change of the experimental lineshape of M13 as a function of temperature and hydration is interpreted in terms of fast restricted fluctuation of the dihedral angles between the POC and the OCH planes on both sides of the 31P nucleus in the nucleic acid backbone. Backbone motions also seem to be the main cause of transversal relaxation measured at spinning rates of 4 kHz or higher. At spinning rates less than 2 kHz, transversal relaxation is significantly faster. This effect is assigned to slow, overall rotation of the rod-shaped M13 phage about its length axis. Equations are derived to simulate the observed dependence of T2e on the spinning rate. PMID:8038391

  10. 13C NMR and isotopic (δ13C) investigations on modern vegetation samples: a tool to understand the soil organic matter degradation dynamics and preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Subhadeep; Sanyal, Prasanta; Vardhan Gaur, Harsh

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic carbon, one of the largest reservoirs of carbon, is a heterogeneous mixture of organic compounds with dominant contribution derived from decomposition of plants in various stages. Although general ideas about the processes and mechanisms of soil organic matter (SOM) degradation have been developed, a very few study has linked the SOM with its parent material. In this study we aim to generate reference data set of functional groups from modern vegetation samples (C3 and C4plants) to better understand the degradation dynamics and preferences. The carbon functional groups from modern vegetation samples (eight C3 and nine C4 plants collected from Mohanpur, Nadia, West Bengal, India) were examined by solid state 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Additionally, isotopic investigations (δ13C) has also been carried out on the modern vegetation samples to understand the relationship of bulk isotopic values to the concentration of functional groups. The major functional groups (alkyl C, O-alkyl C, aromatic C, carbonyl C and aldehyde/ketone) of modern vegetation samples form 16%, 65%, 5%, 14% and 1% respectively in C3 plants. Considerable differences has been observed for C4 plants with average values of alkyl C, O-alkyl C, aromatic C, carbonyl C and aldehyde/ketone are 8%, 83%, 3%, 5% and 1% respectively. The concentration of functional groups from the modern vegetational samples can be considered as reference scale to compare with the 13C NMR data derived from the different soil horizons to understand the SOM degradation dynamics. The δ13CV PDB values of modern vegetation samples plotted against the individual concentration of functional groups shows significant correlation in C4 plants, whereas a lack in correlation has been observed for C3 plants. We assume this difference in relationship of δ13CV PDB values with functional groups of C3 and C4plants can be due to the differences in photosynthesis pathways, the fractionation of CO2 and accumulation of the products

  11. Characterization of cerebral glutamine uptake from blood in the mouse brain: implications for metabolic modeling of 13C NMR data

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, Puneet; Behar, Kevin L; Mason, Graeme F; De Feyter, Henk M; Rothman, Douglas L; Patel, Anant B

    2014-01-01

    13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of rodent and human brain using [1-13C]/[1,6-13C2]glucose as labeled substrate have consistently found a lower enrichment (∼25% to 30%) of glutamine-C4 compared with glutamate-C4 at isotopic steady state. The source of this isotope dilution has not been established experimentally but may potentially arise either from blood/brain exchange of glutamine or from metabolism of unlabeled substrates in astrocytes, where glutamine synthesis occurs. In this study, the contribution of the former was evaluated ex vivo using 1H-[13C]-NMR spectroscopy together with intravenous infusion of [U-13C5]glutamine for 3, 15, 30, and 60 minutes in mice. 13C labeling of brain glutamine was found to be saturated at plasma glutamine levels >1.0 mmol/L. Fitting a blood–astrocyte–neuron metabolic model to the 13C enrichment time courses of glutamate and glutamine yielded the value of glutamine influx, VGln(in), 0.036±0.002 μmol/g per minute for plasma glutamine of 1.8 mmol/L. For physiologic plasma glutamine level (∼0.6 mmol/L), VGln(in) would be ∼0.010 μmol/g per minute, which corresponds to ∼6% of the glutamine synthesis rate and rises to ∼11% for saturating blood glutamine concentrations. Thus, glutamine influx from blood contributes at most ∼20% to the dilution of astroglial glutamine-C4 consistently seen in metabolic studies using [1-13C]glucose. PMID:25074745

  12. Variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR study of the molecular structure of honeybee wax and silk.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tsunenori; Tamada, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the native-state crystal structure of beeswax from the Japanese bee, Apis cerana japonica, we determined the relationship between temperature and the 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift of methylene carbon of beeswax, with comparison to n-alkanes and polyethylene in the orthorhombic, monoclinic, or triclinic crystal form. Variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR observations of n-alkanes and polyethylene revealed that the chemical shifts of methylene carbon in the orthorhombic crystal form increased linearly with increasing temperature, that of the triclinic form decreased, and that of the monoclinic form was unaltered. These relations were compared with results of variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR observation of beeswax. Results clarified that the two crystal forms comprising the beeswax in the native state are orthorhombic and monoclinic. The variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR observations were also applied to interpret the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) curve of beeswax. They were used to clarify the structural changes of beeswax for widely various temperatures. For beeswax secreted by the Japanese bee, the transition from the orthorhombic form to the rotator phase occurred at 36 degrees C, that is from the crystalline to the intermediate state at 45 degrees C. Moreover, the variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR spectrum of honeybee silk in the native state was observed. Results demonstrated that the secondary structures of honeybee silk proteins in the native state comprised coexisting alpha-helix and beta-sheet conformations and that the amount of alpha-helices was greater. The alpha-helix content of honeybee silk was compared with that of hornet silk produced by Vespa larvae.

  13. {sup 13}C-NMR study on the structure of isolated Sc{sub 2}@C{sub 84} metallofullerene

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Etsuji; Tansho, Masataka; Tomiyama, Tetsuo; Shinohara, Hisanori; Kawahara, Hironori; Kobayashi, Yuji

    1996-03-06

    Here we report the first {sup 13}C-NMR results on the metallofullerene, Sc{sub 2}@C{sub 84}, which determines an isomer cage structure for the metallofullerene. The Sc{sub 2}@C{sub 84} fullerene was separated and isolated from the various hollow fullerenes (C{sub 60}-C{sub 110}) and other scandium metallofullerenes by the multistage high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method by using two complementary types of HPLC columns. The purity of Sc{sub 2}@C{sub 84} relative to other fullerenes was more than 99.9%. {sup 13}C-NMR measurements were made using a 600 MHz NMR (JEOL JNM-A600) at room temperature in CS{sub 2} solvent. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Method for determining molar concentrations of metabolites in complex solutions from two-dimensional 1H-13C NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ian A; Schommer, Seth C; Hodis, Brendan; Robb, Kate A; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M; Sussman, Michael R; Markley, John L

    2007-12-15

    One-dimensional (1D) (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used extensively for high-throughput analysis of metabolites in biological fluids and tissue extracts. Typically, such spectra are treated as multivariate statistical objects rather than as collections of quantifiable metabolites. We report here a two-dimensional (2D) (1)H-(13)C NMR strategy (fast metabolite quantification, FMQ, by NMR) for identifying and quantifying the approximately 40 most abundant metabolites in biological samples. To validate this technique, we prepared mixtures of synthetic compounds and extracts from Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Medicago sativa. We show that accurate (technical error 2.7%) molar concentrations can be determined in 12 min using our quantitative 2D (1)H-(13)C NMR strategy. In contrast, traditional 1D (1)H NMR analysis resulted in 16.2% technical error under nearly ideal conditions. We propose FMQ by NMR as a practical alternative to 1D (1)H NMR for metabolomics studies in which 50-mg (extract dry weight) samples can be obtained. PMID:17985927

  15. Method for determining molar concentrations of metabolites in complex solutions from two-dimensional 1H-13C NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ian A; Schommer, Seth C; Hodis, Brendan; Robb, Kate A; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M; Sussman, Michael R; Markley, John L

    2007-12-15

    One-dimensional (1D) (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used extensively for high-throughput analysis of metabolites in biological fluids and tissue extracts. Typically, such spectra are treated as multivariate statistical objects rather than as collections of quantifiable metabolites. We report here a two-dimensional (2D) (1)H-(13)C NMR strategy (fast metabolite quantification, FMQ, by NMR) for identifying and quantifying the approximately 40 most abundant metabolites in biological samples. To validate this technique, we prepared mixtures of synthetic compounds and extracts from Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Medicago sativa. We show that accurate (technical error 2.7%) molar concentrations can be determined in 12 min using our quantitative 2D (1)H-(13)C NMR strategy. In contrast, traditional 1D (1)H NMR analysis resulted in 16.2% technical error under nearly ideal conditions. We propose FMQ by NMR as a practical alternative to 1D (1)H NMR for metabolomics studies in which 50-mg (extract dry weight) samples can be obtained.

  16. Origin of the conformational modulation of the 13C NMR chemical shift of methoxy groups in aromatic natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Toušek, Jaromír; Straka, Michal; Sklenář, Vladimír; Marek, Radek

    2013-01-24

    The interpretation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters is essential to understanding experimental observations at the molecular and supramolecular levels and to designing new and more efficient molecular probes. In many aromatic natural compounds, unusual (13)C NMR chemical shifts have been reported for out-of-plane methoxy groups bonded to the aromatic ring (~62 ppm as compared to the typical value of ~56 ppm for an aromatic methoxy group). Here, we analyzed this phenomenon for a series of aromatic natural compounds using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. First, we checked the methodology used to optimize the structure and calculate the NMR chemical shifts in aromatic compounds. The conformational effects of the methoxy group on the (13)C NMR chemical shift then were interpreted by the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Natural Chemical Shift (NCS) approaches, and by excitation analysis of the chemical shifts, breaking down the total nuclear shielding tensor into the contributions from the different occupied orbitals and their magnetic interactions with virtual orbitals. We discovered that the atypical (13)C NMR chemical shifts observed are not directly related to a different conjugation of the lone pair of electrons of the methoxy oxygen with the aromatic ring, as has been suggested. Our analysis indicates that rotation of the methoxy group induces changes in the virtual molecular orbital space, which, in turn, correlate with the predominant part of the contribution of the paramagnetic deshielding connected with the magnetic interactions of the BD(CMet-H)→BD*(CMet-OMet) orbitals, resulting in the experimentally observed deshielding of the (13)C NMR resonance of the out-of-plane methoxy group.

  17. /sup 13/C NMR studies of porphobilinogen synthase: observation of intermediates bound to a 280,000-dalton protein

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, E.K.; Markham, G.D.

    1987-07-14

    /sup 13/C NMR has been used to observe the equilibrium complex of (4-/sup 13/C)-5-aminolevulinate ((4-/sup 13/C)ALA) bound to porphobilinogen (PBG) synthase (5-aminolevulinate dehydratase), a 280,000-dalton protein. (4-/sup 13/C)ALA (chemical shift = 205.9 ppm) forms (3,5-/sup 13/C)PBG (chemical shifts = 121.0 and 123.0 ppm). PBG prepared from a mixture of (4-/sup 13/C)ALA and (/sup 15/N)ALA was used to assign the 121.0 and 123.0 ppm resonances to C/sub 5/ and C/sub 3/, respectively. For the enzyme-bound equilibrium complex formed from holoenzyme and (4-/sup 13/C)ALA, two peaks of equal area with chemical shifts of 121.5 and 127.2 ppm are observed (line widths approx. 50 Hz), indicating that the predominant species is probably a distorted form of PBG. When excess free PBG is present, it is in slow exchange with bound PBG, indicating an exchange rate of < 10 s/sup -1/, which is consistent with the turnover rate of the enzyme. For the complex formed from (4-/sup 13/C)ALA and methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) modified PBG synthase, which does not catalyze PBG formation, the predominant species is a Schiff base adduct (chemical shift = 166.5 ppm, line width approx. 50 Hz). Free ALA is in slow exchange with the Schiff base. Activation of the MMTS-modified enzyme-Schiff base complex with /sup 113/Cd and 2-mercaptoethanol results in the loss of the Schiff base signal and the appearance of bound PBG with the same chemical shifts as for the bound equilibrium complex with Zn(II) enzyme. Neither splitting nor broadening from /sup 113/Cd-/sup 13/C coupling was observed.

  18. DFT study of molecular structures and 13C NMR parameters of two fluorinated biphenyls and their η6-tricarbonylchromium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryff-Keller, Adam; Szczeciński, Przemysław

    2015-07-01

    The molecular structures of 2,2‧-difluoro-6,6‧-dimethylbiphenyl, 4,5-difluoro-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene and of their η6-tricarbonylchromium complexes have been discussed in the light of the results of molecular energy calculations. Also the isotropic magnetic shielding constants and carbon-fluorine spin-spin coupling constants for these objects have been calculated and compared with the experimental values of 13C NMR chemical shifts and J constants. The calculational methods used were: DFT/BHandH/6-311++G(2d,p) and/or DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p). It has been confirmed that experimental 13C NMR chemical shifts for η6-arene tricarbonylchromium complexes can be satisfactorily predicted using both methods, although the method exploiting BHandH functional is not able to reproduce the 13C NMR chemical shifts of Cr(CO)3 carbon atoms. On the other hand, this method provides the J(13C, 19F) values which are close to the experimental ones.

  19. Interactions of glycerol monooleate and dimethylsulphoxide with phospholipids. A differential scanning calorimetry and 31P-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Tilcock, C P; Fisher, D

    1982-03-01

    1. A comparative study has been made of the effects of the fusogens glycerol monooleate and dimethyl-sulphoxide on the polymorphic phase behaviour of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanolamine by differential scanning calorimetry and 31P-NMR techniques. 2. Glycerol monooleate induces a reduction in the temperature, cooperativity and enthalpy of the gel to liquid-crystal transitions of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, whereas dimethylsulphoxide induces an increase in the temperature and enthalpy and a reduction in the cooperativity of the gel to liquid-crystal transitions for those same phospholipids. 3. Glycerol monooleate induces the formation of isotropic and hexagonal (HII) phases when mixed with either dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine or dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanolamine. By contrast, in the presence of dimethylsulphoxide, those same phospholipids retain the lamellar configuration observed in the absence of fusogen. 4. These results are discussed in terms of the mechanisms of chemically induced cell fusion.

  20. sup 31 P NMR measurements of the ADP concentration in yeast cells genetically modified to express creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Brindle, K.; Braddock, P.; Fulton, S. )

    1990-04-03

    Rabbit muscle creatine kinase has been introduced into the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by transforming cells with a multicopy plasmid containing the coding sequence for the enzyme under the control of the yeast phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. The transformed cells showed creating kinase activities similar to those found in mammalian heart muscle. {sup 31}P NMR measurements of the near-equilibrium concentrations of phosphocreatine and cellular pH together with measurements of the total extractable concentrations of phosphocreatine and creatine allowed calculation of the free ADP/ATP ratio in the cell. The calculated ratio of approximately 2 was considerably higher than the ratio of between 0.06 and 0.1 measured directly in cell extracts.

  1. Mechanisms of Peptide-Induced Pore Formation in Lipid Bilayers Investigated by Oriented 31P Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bertelsen, Kresten; Dorosz, Jerzy; Hansen, Sara Krogh; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    There is a considerable interest in understanding the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), but the details of their mode of action is not fully understood. This motivates extensive efforts in determining structural and mechanistic parameters for AMP’s interaction with lipid membranes. In this study we show that oriented-sample 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to probe the membrane perturbations and -disruption by AMPs. For two AMPs, alamethicin and novicidin, we observe that the majority of the lipids remain in a planar bilayer conformation but that a number of lipids are involved in the peptide anchoring. These lipids display reduced dynamics. Our study supports previous studies showing that alamethicin adopts a transmembrane arrangement without significant disturbance of the surrounding lipids, while novicidin forms toroidal pores at high concentrations leading to more extensive membrane disturbance. PMID:23094079

  2. Observation of myo-inositol 1,2-(cyclic) phosphate in a Morris hepatoma by 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Graham, R A; Meyer, R A; Szwergold, B S; Brown, T R

    1987-01-01

    We have identified an unusual resonance at 16.5 ppm in the 31P NMR spectrum of a Morris (7777) hepatoma grown in the inguinal fossa of a Buffalo rat as myoinositol 1,2-(cyclic) phosphate. This compound has been observed in all of the 32 tumors examined as well as in cultured cells derived from the tumor, but it has not been observed in normal rat tissues. Its level in the aqueous phase of chloroform/methanol/water extracts of the tumor is 70 +/- 40 nmol/g, wet weight (n = 4). The presence of a breakdown product of phosphatidylinositol at such high levels in a fast growing tumor may provide an important clue for understanding the metabolic defect that results in the malignant growth of this tumor.

  3. {sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for carbonate ions in cement minerals and the use of {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR in studies of Portland cement including limestone additions

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Herfort, Duncan

    2013-10-15

    {sup 13}C isotropic chemical shifts and chemical shift anisotropy parameters have been determined for a number of inorganic carbonates relevant in cement chemistry from slow-speed {sup 13}C MAS or {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR spectra (9.4 T or 14.1 T) for {sup 13}C in natural abundance. The variation in the {sup 13}C chemical shift parameters is relatively small, raising some doubts that different carbonate species in Portland cement-based materials may not be sufficiently resolved in {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectra. However, it is shown that by combining {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR carbonate anions in anhydrous and hydrated phases can be distinguished, thereby providing valuable information about the reactivity of limestone in cement blends. This is illustrated for three cement pastes prepared from an ordinary Portland cement, including 0, 16, and 25 wt.% limestone, and following the hydration for up to one year. For these blends {sup 29}Si MAS NMR reveals that the limestone filler accelerates the hydration for alite and also results in a smaller fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated Al incorporated in the C-S-H phase. The latter result is more clearly observed in {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra of the cement–limestone blends and suggests that dissolved aluminate species in the cement–limestone blends readily react with carbonate ions from the limestone filler, forming calcium monocarboaluminate hydrate. -- Highlights: •{sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for inorganic carbonates from {sup 13}C MAS NMR. •Narrow {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift range (163–171 ppm) for inorganic carbonates. •Anhydrous and hydrated carbonate species by {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR. •Limestone accelerates the hydration for alite in Portland – limestone cements. •Limestone reduces the amount of aluminium incorporated in the C-S-H phase.

  4. Near-silence of isothiocyanate carbon in (13)C NMR spectra: a case study of allyl isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Rainer; Hillebrand, Roman; Wycoff, Wei; Camasta, Cory; Gates, Kent S

    2015-05-01

    (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) were measured, and the exchange dynamics were studied to explain the near-silence of the ITC carbon in (13)C NMR spectra. The dihedral angles α = ∠(C1-C2-C3-N4) and β = ∠(C2-C3-N4-C5) describe the conformational dynamics (conformation change), and the bond angles γ = ∠(C3-N4-C5) and ε = ∠(N4-C5-S6) dominate the molecular dynamics (conformer flexibility). The conformation space of AITC contains three minima, Cs-M1 and enantiomers M2 and M2'; the exchange between conformers is very fast, and conformational effects on (13)C chemical shifts are small (νM1 - νM2 < 3 ppm). Isotropic chemical shifts, ICS(γ), were determined for sp, sp(x), and sp(2) N-hybridization, and the γ dependencies of δ(N4) and δ(C5) are very large (10-33 ppm). Atom-centered density matrix propagation trajectories show that every conformer can access a large region of the potential energy surface AITC(γ,ε,...) with 120° < γ < 180° and 155° < ε < 180°. Because the extreme broadening of the (13)C NMR signal of the ITC carbon is caused by the structural flexibility of every conformer of AITC, the analysis provides a general explanation for the near-silence of the ITC carbon in (13)C NMR spectra of organic isothiocyanates.

  5. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Estimation of total phenol concentrations in coal liquefaction resids by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, J.T.; Verkade, J.G.

    1992-11-01

    In this study, Iowa State University researchers used {sub 31}P-tagged reagents to derivatize the labile hydrogen functional groups in the THF-soluble portion of 850{degrees}F{sup +} distillation resid materials and the THF-soluble portion of process oils derived from direct coal liquefaction.{sup 31}P-NMR was used to analyze the derivatized samples. NMR peak assignments can be made by comparison to model compounds similarly derivatized. Species can be quantified by integration of the NMR signals. Different {sup 31}P-NMR tagged reagents can be used to produce different degrees of peak resolution in the NMR spectrum. This, in turn, partially dictates the degree of speciation and/or quantification of species, or classes of compounds, that can be accomplished. Iowa State chose a {sup 31}P-tagged reagent (ClPOCMe{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}O) which was shown previously to be particularly useful in the derivatization of phenols. The derivatized samples all exhibited a small group of peaks attributed to amines and a broad group of peaks in the phenol region. The presence of paramagnetic species in the samples caused the NMR signals to broaden. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra confirmed the presence of paramagnetic organic free radicals in selected samples. Various methods were employed to process the NMR data. The complexity and broadness of the phenol peak, however, made speciation of the phenols impractical.

  6. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Estimation of total phenol concentrations in coal liquefaction resids by [sup 31]P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, J.T.; Verkade, J.G. )

    1992-11-01

    In this study, Iowa State University researchers used [sub 31]P-tagged reagents to derivatize the labile hydrogen functional groups in the THF-soluble portion of 850[degrees]F[sup +] distillation resid materials and the THF-soluble portion of process oils derived from direct coal liquefaction.[sup 31]P-NMR was used to analyze the derivatized samples. NMR peak assignments can be made by comparison to model compounds similarly derivatized. Species can be quantified by integration of the NMR signals. Different [sup 31]P-NMR tagged reagents can be used to produce different degrees of peak resolution in the NMR spectrum. This, in turn, partially dictates the degree of speciation and/or quantification of species, or classes of compounds, that can be accomplished. Iowa State chose a [sup 31]P-tagged reagent (ClPOCMe[sub 2]CMe[sub 2]O) which was shown previously to be particularly useful in the derivatization of phenols. The derivatized samples all exhibited a small group of peaks attributed to amines and a broad group of peaks in the phenol region. The presence of paramagnetic species in the samples caused the NMR signals to broaden. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra confirmed the presence of paramagnetic organic free radicals in selected samples. Various methods were employed to process the NMR data. The complexity and broadness of the phenol peak, however, made speciation of the phenols impractical.

  7. Variable angle spinning (VAS) NMR study of solvent effects in liquid crystalline solutions of 13C-iodomethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gregory H. J.; Martin, Rachel W.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Pines, Alexander; Shahkhatuni, Aleksan G.; Shahkhatuni, Astghik A.; Panosyan, Henry A.

    2004-11-01

    NMR spectra of 13C-iodomethane oriented in three different liquid crystalline solvents have been collected and analyzed under spinning at various angles with respect to the static magnetic field. For each sample the ratio of homonuclear ( 1H- 1H) to heteronuclear ( 13C- 1H) dipolar couplings, which is a function of the geometry of the solute molecule, does not change significantly with the scaling of the dipolar couplings due to spinning at different angles. This result implies that the 'apparent bond angle deviations' (Δ θa), previously calculated from thermotropic liquid crystals, arise from a solvent effect and are not an artifact from scaling the anisotropic interactions.

  8. 13C NMR spectra of 1,3-dipyridyl- and pyridylphenylthioureas. Chemical shift assignments and conformational implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudha, L. V.; Sathyanarayana, D. N.; Manogaran, S.

    The 13C NMR spectra of a series of 1,3-dipyridyl- and pyridylphenylthioureas have been obtained. Complete analyses of the experimental spectra have provided the chemical shifts and coupling constants. The spectra of dipyridylthioureas over a temperature range showed important changes which could be attributed to an intramolecular conversion between the two equivalent E,Z and Z,E conformations. The coalescence temperature of the 13C signals leads to a Δ G* of ˜ 58.0 kJ mol -1 for the dynamic process involved. The results show that pyridylphenyl thioureas exist in a single conformation at ambient temperature.

  9. Complexation of oxygen ligands with dimeric rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetate in chloroform: 1H, 13C NMR and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głaszczka, Rafał; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2013-03-01

    The complexation of dimeric rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetylate with 25 ligands containing oxygen atoms: alcohols, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and esters in chloroform solution have been investigated by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. Investigated ligands form 1:1 adducts in our experimental conditions, with stability constants in the order of several hundred mol-1. The exchange of ligands in solution is fast on the NMR spectroscopic timescale. The decrease of longitudinal relaxation times T1 in ligands in the presence of rhodium salt has been tested as the means of determination of the complexation site in ligands. The influence of complexation on chemical shifts in ligands was evaluated by a parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δadd - δlig). These parameters were positive (>0 ppm) and did not exceed 1 ppm for 1H NMR; and varied from ca. -5 to +15 ppm in the case of 13C NMR. The calculation by DFT methods using the B3LYP functional (structure optimization, electronic energy) and B3PW91 functional (shielding), and combinations of the (6-31G(2d), 6-311G++(2d,p), and LANL2DZ basis sets, followed by scaling procedures reproduced satisfactorily 1H and 13C chemical shifts and, with some limitations, allowed to estimate Δδ parameters.

  10. Development of a rapid method for the quantification of cellulose in tobacco by (13)C CP/MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinhui; Hu, Yonghua; Tian, Zhenfeng; Chen, Kaibo; Ge, Shaolin; Xu, Yingbo; Tian, Dong; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A method was developed for rapid quantitative determination of cellulose in tobacco by utilizing (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy ((13)C CP/MAS NMR). Sample powder was loaded into NMR rotor, which was customized rotor containing a matched silicon tube as an intensity reference. (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of tobacco samples were processed with spectral deconvolution to obtain the area of the C-1 resonance at 105.5ppm and the internal standard at 0ppm. The ratio between the area of 105.5ppm and 0ppm of a set of standard cellulose samples was used to construct a calibration curve. The cellulose content of a tobacco sample was determined by comparison of the ratio between the area of 105.5ppm and 0ppm to the calibration curve. Results of this developed method showed good agreement with those obtained from chemical analysis. The proposed method has such advantages of accuracy, quickness and efficiency, and could be an alternative to chemical analyses of cellulose.

  11. /sup 31/P NMR studies of ATP synthesis and hydrolysis kinetics in the intact myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley-Hickman, P.B.; Sako, E.Y.; Mohanakrishnan, P.; Robitaille, P.M.L.; From, A.H.L.; Foker, J.E.; Ugurbil, K.

    1987-11-17

    The origin of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-measurable ATP in equilibrium P/sub i/ exchange and whether it can be used to determine net oxidative ATP synthesis rates in the intact myocardium were examined by detailed measurements of ATP in equilibrium P/sub i/ exchange rates in both directions as a function of the myocardial oxygen consumption rate (MVO/sub 2/) in (1) glucose-perfused, isovolumic rat hearts with normal glycolytic activity and (2) pyruvate-perfused hearts where glycolytic activity was reduced or eliminated either by depletion of their endogenous glycogen or by use of the inhibitor iodoacetate. In glucose-perfused hearts, the P/sub i/ ..-->.. ATP rate measured by the conventional two-site saturation transfer (CST) technique remained constant while MVO2 was increased approximately 2-fold. When the glycolytic activity was reduced, the P/sub i/ ..-->.. ATP rate decreased significantly, demonstrating the existence of a significant glycolytic contribution. The ATP ..-->.. P/sub i/ rates and rate:MVO ratios measured by the multiple-site saturation transfer method at two MVO/sub 2/ levels were equal to the corresponding P/sub i/..-->.. ATP rates and rate:MVO ratios obtained in the absence of a glycolytic contribution. The following conclusions are drawn from these studies: (1) unless the glycolytic contribution to the ATP in equilibrium P/sub i/ exchange is inhibited or is specifically shown not to exist, the myocardial P/sub i/ in equilibrium ATP exchange due to oxidative phosphorylation cannot be studied by NMR; (2) at moderate MVO/sub 2/ levels, the reaction catalyzed by the two glycolytic enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase is near equilibrium; (3) the ATP synthesis by the mitochondrial H/sup +/-ATPase occurs unidirectionally (i.e., the reaction is far out of equilibrium); (4) the operative P:O ratio in the intact myocardium under our conditions is significantly less than the canonically accepted value

  12. Hetergeneous tumour response to photodynamic therapy assessed by in vivo localised 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ceckler, T. L.; Gibson, S. L.; Kennedy, S. D.; Hill, R.; Bryant, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is efficacious in the treatment of small malignant lesions when all cells in the tumour receive sufficient drug, oxygen and light to induce a photodynamic effect capable of complete cytotoxicity. In large tumours, only partial effectiveness is observed presumably because of insufficient light penetration into the tissue. The heterogeneity of the metabolic response in mammary tumours following PDT has been followed in vivo using localised phosphorus NMR spectroscopy. Alterations in nucleoside triphosphates (NTP), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and pH within localised regions of the tumour were monitored over 24-48 h following PDT irradiation of the tumour. Reduction of NTP and increases in Pi were observed at 4-6 h after PDT irradiation in all regions of treated tumours. The uppermost regions of the tumours (those nearest the skin surface and exposed to the greatest light fluence) displayed the greatest and most prolonged reduction of NTP and concomitant increase in Pi resulting in necrosis. The metabolite concentrations in tumour regions located towards the base of the tumour returned a near pre-treatment levels by 24-48 h after irradiation. The ability to follow heterogeneous metabolic responses in situ provides one means to assess the degree of metabolic inhibition which subsequently leads to tumour necrosis. Images Figure 4 PMID:1829953

  13. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by13C CP/MAS NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner-Zwanziger, U.; Lis, G.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Large structure rearrangement of colicin ia channel domain after membrane binding from 2D 13C spin diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenbin; Yao, Xiaolan; Hong, Mei

    2005-05-01

    One of the main mechanisms of membrane protein folding is by spontaneous insertion into the lipid bilayer from the aqueous environment. The bacterial toxin, colicin Ia, is one such protein. To shed light on the conformational changes involved in this dramatic transfer from the polar to the hydrophobic milieu, we carried out 2D magic-angle spinning (13)C NMR experiments on the water-soluble and membrane-bound states of the channel-forming domain of colicin Ia. Proton-driven (13)C spin diffusion spectra of selectively (13)C-labeled protein show unequivocal attenuation of cross-peaks after membrane binding. This attenuation can be assigned to distance increases but not reduction of the diffusion coefficient. Analysis of the statistics of the interhelical and intrahelical (13)C-(13)C distances in the soluble protein structure indicates that the observed cross-peak reduction is well correlated with a high percentage of short interhelical contacts in the soluble protein. This suggests that colicin Ia channel domain becomes open and extended upon membrane binding, thus lengthening interhelical distances. In comparison, cross-peaks with similar intensities between the two states are dominated by intrahelical contacts in the soluble state. This suggests that the membrane-bound structure of colicin Ia channel domain may be described as a "molten globule", in which the helical secondary structure is retained while the tertiary structure is unfolded. This study demonstrates that (13)C spin diffusion NMR is a valuable tool for obtaining qualitative long-range distance constraints on membrane protein folding. PMID:15853348

  15. (31)P Solid-State NMR study of the chemical setting process of a dual-paste injectable brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Legrand, A P; Sfihi, H; Lequeux, N; Lemaître, J

    2009-10-01

    The composition and evolution of a brushite-type calcium phosphate cement was investigated by Solid-State NMR and X-ray during the setting process. The cement is obtained by mixing beta-tricalcium phosphate [Ca(3)(PO(4))(2), beta-TCP] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2).H(2)O, MCPM] in presence of water, with formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate or brushite [CaHPO(2).2H(2)O, DCPD]. Analysis of the initial beta-TCP paste has shown the presence of beta-calcium pyrophosphate [Ca(2)P(2)O(7), beta-CPy] and that of the initial MCPM a mixture of MCPM and dicalcium phosphate [CaHPO(4), DCP]. Follow-up of the chemical composition by (31)P Solid-State NMR enables to show that the chemical setting process appeared to reach an end after 20 min. The constant composition observed at the end of the process was similarly determined.

  16. Triterpenes in the hexane extract of leaves of Olea europaea L.: analysis using 13C-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Emilie; Castola, Vincent; Casanova, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Two neutral triterpenes and a triterpene acid were identified and quantified directly, in the absence of any purification steps, in a precipitate obtained during the industrial extraction of the leaves of Olea europaea L. using 13C-NMR spectroscopy (spectrometer operating at 4.7 T equipped with a 10 mm probe). The method was optimised in order to reduce the duration of analysis with a routine NMR spectrometer. Together with long-chain linear compounds, erythrodiol, uvaol and oleanolic acid accounted for 27.3, 18.3 and 12.5% of the precipitate, respectively.

  17. High-field 13C NMR spectroscopy of tissue in Vivo. A double-resonance surface-coil probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reo, Nicholas V.; Ewy, Coleen S.; Siegfried, Barry A.; Ackerman, Joseph J. H.

    A double-resonance surface-coil NMR probe is described for performance of high-field (8.5 T) proton decoupled carbon-13 experiments with tissue in vivo. The probe may be accommodated in standard, 89 mm i.d. clear bore, commercial spectrometers and is suitable for studies utilizing small laboratory animals such as mice, hamsters, and rats. A coaxial coil design is employed (10 mm diameter 13C coil, 20 mm diameter 1H coil) which provides ca. 40 dB attenuation between the 13C observe and 1H decouple channels. The inherent efficiency of the surface-coil configuration provides a sensitivity comparable to a commercial probe of the same nominal dimension (10 mm Helmholtz coil) and assures adequate decoupling in conductive samples with ca. 3-5 W power. In the absence of 13C isotopic enrichment, NMR spectra of rat leg, liver, and brain in vivo provide signalto-noise sufficient for 10 min time resolution. Administration of 100 mg of 90% 13C-labeled glucose into a peripheral vein of a ca. 300 g rat resulted in a liver glucose resonance which could be monitored with good signal-to-noise and 3 min time resolution.

  18. Solubilization and localization of weakly polar lipids in unsonicated egg phosphatidylcholine: A sup 13 C MAS NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.A. ); Fujito, D.T.; Hammer, C.F. )

    1991-03-19

    The weakly polar lipids cholesteryl ester, triacylglycerol, and diacylglycerol incorporate to a limited extent into the lamellar structure of small unilamellar vesicles. The localization of the carbonyl group(s) at the aqueous interface was detected by ({sup 13}C)carbonyl chemical shift changes relative to the neat unhydrated lipid. This study uses {sup 13}C NMR to investigate the interactions of thes lipids with unsonicated (multilamellar) phosphatidylcholine, a model system for cellular membranes and surfaces of emulsion particles with low curvature. Magic angle spinning reduced the broad lines of the unsonicated dispersions to narrow lines comparable to those from sonicated dispersions. ({sup 13}C)Carbonyl chemical shifts revealed incorporation of the three lipids into the lamellar structure of the unsonicated phospholipids and a partial hydration of the carbonyl groups similar to that observed in small vesicles. Other properties of interfacial weakly polar lipids in multilayers were similar to those in small unilamellar bilayers. There is thus a general tendency of weakly polar lipids to incorparate at least to a small extent into the lamellar structure of phospholipids and take on interfacial properties that are distinct from their bulk-phase properties. This pool of surface-located lipid is likely to be directly involved in enzymatyic transformations and protein-mediated transport. The {sup 13}C magic angle spinning NMR method may be generally useful for determining the orientation of molecules in model membranes.

  19. NMR study of Met-1 human Angiogenin: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment.

    PubMed

    Tsika, Aikaterini C; Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Leonidas, Demetres D; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2016-10-01

    Here, we report the high yield expression and preliminary structural analysis via solution hetero-nuclear NMR spectroscopy of the recombinant Met-1 human Angiogenin. The analysis reveals a well folded as well as, a monomeric polypeptide. Τhe sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances at high percentage was obtained. Also, using TALOS+ its secondary structure elements were determined.

  20. 31P NMR spectroscopy of hypertrophied rat heart: effect of graded global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Clarke, K; Sunn, N; Willis, R J

    1989-12-01

    To investigate the cause for the greater susceptibility of hypertrophied hearts to ischemic injury, we determined the interrelations of total work output, contractile function and energy metabolism in isolated, perfused normal and hypertrophied rat hearts subjected to graded global ischemia. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by giving rats seven daily injections of either triiodothyronine (0.2 mg/kg) or isoproterenol (5 mg/kg). All hearts were perfused at an aortic pressure of 100 mmHg in the isovolumic mode in an NMR spectrometer (7.05 Tesla). Heart rate, developed pressure, and coronary flow were monitored simultaneously with changes in pH, creatine phosphate, ATP and inorganic phosphate. During pre-ischemic perfusion, the total work output (rate-pressure product) of hyperthyroid hearts was 28% higher than that of control hearts, whereas hearts from isoproterenol-treated animals showed no difference. However, when related to unit muscle mass, work was normal in hyperthyroid hearts and 26% lower after isoproterenol. Contractile function per unit myocardium (developed pressure/g wet weight) was lower in the hypertrophied hearts. ATP content was the same in all groups. Creatine phosphate decreased 41% after triiodothyronine and 25% after isoproterenol. Inorganic phosphate levels and intracellular pH were similar in control and isoproterenol-treated rat hearts, but were higher in the hyperthyroid rat hearts. The phosphorylation potential and the free energy change of ATP hydrolysis were lowered by hypertrophy, the levels correlating with the depressed contractile function. At each ischemic flow rate, both work and contractile function per unit myocardium were the same for all hearts, but the relations between flow and phosphorylation potential were different for each type of heart. Thus, at low flow rates, hypertrophied hearts perform the same amount of work and have the same contractile function as control hearts, but with abnormal changes in energy metabolism

  1. Unraveling the 13C NMR Chemical Shifts in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Dependence on Diameter and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Engtrakul, C.; Irurzun, V. M.; Gjersing, E. L.; Holt, J. M.; Larsen, B. A.; Resasco, D. E.; Blackburn, J. L.

    2012-03-14

    The atomic specificity afforded by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy could enable detailed mechanistic information about single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) functionalization as well as the noncovalent molecular interactions that dictate ground-state charge transfer and separation by electronic structure and diameter. However, to date, the polydispersity present in as-synthesized SWCNT populations has obscured the dependence of the SWCNT {sup 13}C chemical shift on intrinsic parameters such as diameter and electronic structure, meaning that no information is gleaned for specific SWCNTs with unique chiral indices. In this article, we utilize a combination of {sup 13}C labeling and density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) to produce an array of {sup 13}C-labeled SWCNT populations with varying diameter, electronic structure, and chiral angle. We find that the SWCNT isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shift decreases systematically with increasing diameter for semiconducting SWCNTs, in agreement with recent theoretical predictions that have heretofore gone unaddressed. Furthermore, we find that the {sup 13}C chemical shifts for small diameter metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs differ significantly, and that the full-width of the isotropic peak for metallic SWCNTs is much larger than that of semiconducting nanotubes, irrespective of diameter.

  2. Direct Speciation of Phosphorus in Alum-Amended Poultry Litter: Solid-State 31P NMR Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, Stefan; Cho, Herman M.; Sims, James T.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2004-02-01

    Amending poultry litter (PL) with aluminum sulfate (alum) has proven to be effective in reducing water-soluble phosphorus (P) in the litter and in runoff from fields that have received PL applications; it has therefore been suggested as a best management practice. Although its effectiveness has been demonstrated on a macroscopic scale in the field, little is known about P speciation in either alumamended or unamended litter. This knowledge is important for the evaluation of the long-term stability and bioavailability of P, which is a necessary prerequisite for the assessment of the sustainability of intensive poultry operations. Both solid state MAS and CP-MAS {sup 31}P NMR as well as {sup 31}P({sup 27}Al) TRAPDOR were used to investigate P speciation in alumamended and unamended PL. The results indicate the presence of a complex mixture of organic and inorganic orthophosphate phases. A calcium phosphate phase, probably a surface precipitate on calcium carbonate, could be identified in both unamended and alum-amended PL, as well as physically bound HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. Phosphate associated with Al was found in the alum-amended PL, most probably a mixture of a poorly ordered wavellite and phosphate surface complexes on aluminum hydroxide that had been formed by the hydrolysis of alum. However, a complex mixture of organic and inorganic phosphate species could not be resolved. Phosphate associated with Al comprised on average 40{+-}14% of the total P in alum-amended PL, whereas calcium phosphate phases comprised on average 7{+-}4% in the alum-amended PL and 14{+-}5% in the unamended PL.

  3. Experimental 25Mg and 13C NMR and Computational Modeling Studies of Amorphous Mg-Ca Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, J. W.; Yazaydin, A. O.; Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Saharay, M.; Bowers, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of synthetic Mg-Ca amorphous carbonates (AMC-ACC) provides direct, element specific structural information about these complicated phases. The 13C, 25Mg, and 43Ca resonances are typically broad and span the chemical shift ranges of all the crystalline polymorphs in the Ca-Mg-CO3-H2O system. In a fashion similar to our previous analysis of 43Ca NMR results for ACC,1 here we integrate new experimental 13C and 25Mg spectra obtained at 20T for samples with Mg/(Ca+Mg) ratios from x=0 to x=1 with quantum chemical calculations of the NMR parameters of the crystalline phases using CASTEP calculations, simulations of the spectra using the SIMPSON software, and classical molecular dynamics calculations. XRD and 13C NMR results are in general agreement with the one-phase/two-phase model of ACC-AMC derived from thermochemical work by others.2 13C-NMR spectra of amorphous materials having intermediate compositions can not be completely fit by mechanical mixing of ACC and AMC end members—requiring a degree of Ca/Mg solid solution. Amorphous samples in two-phase region crystallize to assemblages of dolomite-like (x~0.5) and hydromagnesite-like (x~1) defective structures, but we also observe aragonite co-nucleation in the presence of excess water, indicative of a more complex evolution. While 43Ca NMR of X-ray amorphous materials shows featureless, symmetric, Gaussian line shapes, the large quadrupole moment of 25Mg gives rise to superposition of several quadrupolar line shapes representing different local structural environments. Singularities of static Mg spectra are best explained by local environments similar to nequehonite, hydromagnesite, and landsfordite. The spectra can not exclude minor contributions from anhydrous phases dolomite, huntite, and magnesite. Additional sites having very large quadrupolar coupling and/or site asymmetry are not explained by any known reference phases. CITATIONS (1) Singer, J. W.; Yazaydin, A. O

  4. Compositional differences among Chinese soy sauce types studied by (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ghulam Mustafa; Wang, Xiaohua; Bin Yuan; Wang, Jie; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili

    2016-09-01

    Soy sauce a well known seasoning all over the world, especially in Asia, is available in global market in a wide range of types based on its purpose and the processing methods. Its composition varies with respect to the fermentation processes and addition of additives, preservatives and flavor enhancers. A comprehensive (1)H NMR based study regarding the metabonomic variations of soy sauce to differentiate among different types of soy sauce available on the global market has been limited due to the complexity of the mixture. In present study, (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis like principle component analysis (PCA), and orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was applied to investigate metabonomic variations among different types of soy sauce, namely super light, super dark, red cooking and mushroom soy sauce. The main additives in soy sauce like glutamate, sucrose and glucose were easily distinguished and quantified using (13)C NMR spectroscopy which were otherwise difficult to be assigned and quantified due to serious signal overlaps in (1)H NMR spectra. The significantly higher concentration of sucrose in dark, red cooking and mushroom flavored soy sauce can directly be linked to the addition of caramel in soy sauce. Similarly, significantly higher level of glutamate in super light as compared to super dark and mushroom flavored soy sauce may come from the addition of monosodium glutamate. The study highlights the potentiality of (13)C NMR based metabonomics coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis in differentiating between the types of soy sauce on the basis of level of additives, raw materials and fermentation procedures. PMID:27343582

  5. Dynamic phosphometabolomic profiling of human tissues and transgenic models by 18O-assisted 31P NMR and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nemutlu, Emirhan; Zhang, Song; Gupta, Anu; Juranic, Nenad O.; Macura, Slobodan I.; Terzic, Andre; Jahangir, Arshad

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation screening of disease-related metabolomic phenotypes requires monitoring of both metabolite levels and turnover rates. Stable isotope 18O-assisted 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry uniquely allows simultaneous measurement of phosphometabolite levels and turnover rates in tissue and blood samples. The 18O labeling procedure is based on the incorporation of one 18O into Pi from [18O]H2O with each act of ATP hydrolysis and the distribution of 18O-labeled phosphoryls among phosphate-carrying molecules. This enables simultaneous recording of ATP synthesis and utilization, phosphotransfer fluxes through adenylate kinase, creatine kinase, and glycolytic pathways, as well as mitochondrial substrate shuttle, urea and Krebs cycle activity, glycogen turnover, and intracellular energetic communication. Application of expanded 18O-labeling procedures has revealed significant differences in the dynamics of G-6-P[18O] (glycolysis), G-3-P[18O] (substrate shuttle), and G-1-P[18O] (glycogenolysis) between human and rat atrial myocardium. In human atria, the turnover of G-3-P[18O], which defects are associated with the sudden death syndrome, was significantly higher indicating a greater importance of substrate shuttling to mitochondria. Phosphometabolomic profiling of transgenic hearts deficient in adenylate kinase (AK1−/−), which altered levels and mutations are associated to human diseases, revealed a stress-induced shift in metabolomic profile with increased CrP[18O] and decreased G-1-P[18O] metabolic dynamics. The metabolomic profile of creatine kinase M-CK/ScCKmit−/−-deficient hearts is characterized by a higher G-6-[18O]P turnover rate, G-6-P levels, glycolytic capacity, γ/β-phosphoryl of GTP[18O] turnover, as well as β-[18O]ATP and β-[18O]ADP turnover, indicating altered glycolytic, guanine nucleotide, and adenylate kinase metabolic flux. Thus, 18O-assisted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 31P NMR provide a suitable

  6. A chelate-stabilized ruthenium(sigma-pyrrolato) complex: resolving ambiguities in nuclearity and coordination geometry through 1H PGSE and 31P solid-state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Heather M; Bryce, David L; Fogg, Deryn E

    2006-12-11

    Reaction of RuCl2(PPh3)3 with LiNN' (NN' = 2-[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]pyrrolide) affords a single product, with the empirical formula RuCl[(2,6-iPr2C6H3)N=CHC4H3N](PPh3)2. We identify this species as a sigma-pyrrolato complex, [Ru(NN')(PPh3)2]2(mu-Cl)2 (3b), rather than mononuclear RuCl(NN')(PPh3)2 (3a), on the basis of detailed 1D and 2D NMR characterization in solution and in the solid state. Retention of the chelating, sigma-bound iminopyrrolato unit within 3b, despite the presence of labile (dative) chloride and PPh3 donors, indicates that the chelate effect is sufficient to inhibit sigma --> pi isomerization of 3b to a piano-stool, pi-pyrrolato structure. 2D COSY, SECSY, and J-resolved solid-state 31P NMR experiments confirm that the PPh3 ligands on each metal center are magnetically and crystallographically inequivalent, and 31P CP/MAS NMR experiments reveal the largest 99Ru-31P spin-spin coupling constant (1J(99Ru,31P) = 244 +/- 20 Hz) yet measured. Finally, 31P dipolar-chemical shift spectroscopy is applied to determine benchmark phosphorus chemical shift tensors for phosphine ligands in hexacoordinate ruthenium complexes.

  7. Local structure and molecular motions in imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal as studied by 2H and 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, M.; Chizuwa, M.; Umiyama, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Miyatou, T.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T.; Tansho, M.; Shimizu, T.

    2015-04-01

    The local structure and molecular motion of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal were investigated using solid-state 2H and 13C NMR. The imidazolium ion undergoes isotropic rotation, which is correlated with a defect in the crystal, as observed by 2H NMR broadline spectra above 263 K. A 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in the regular site was observed from 2H NMR quadrupole Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra. The Grotthuss mechanism was accompanied by a 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in regular sites. Moreover, the proton transfer associated with the imidazolium ion of the defective crystal is important for proton conductivity of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal.

  8. 1H and 13C NMR assignments of three nitrogen containing compounds from the mangrove endophytic fungus (ZZF08).

    PubMed

    Tao, Yiwen; Zeng, Xianjian; Mou, Chengbo; Li, Jun; Cai, Xiaoling; She, Zhigang; Zhou, Shining; Lin, Yongcheng

    2008-05-01

    A new natural product, named phomopsin A, 1-(meta-hydroxyphenyl)-4-hydroxy-3-isoquinolone (1), together with two known compounds cytochalasin H (2) and glucosylceramide (3), was isolated from the mangrove endophytic fungus Phomopsis sp. (ZZF08) obtained from the South China Sea coast. The structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR experiments including COSY, HMQC, and HMBC. According to NMR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, it was found that some assignments about (1)H and (13)C NMR data for cytochalasin H (2) were probably uncorrected in the previous reports. In our cytotoxicity assays, compound 1 showed moderate cytotoxicity toward KB cells with IC(50) at 28.0 microg ml(-1) and KBv200 cells with IC(50) at 16.8 microg ml(-1), and compound 2 exhibited strong cytotoxicity toward KB cells and KBv200 cells with IC(50) less than 1.25 microg ml(-1).

  9. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for two anthraquinones and two xanthones from the mangrove fungus (ZSUH-36).

    PubMed

    Shao, Changlun; She, Zhigang; Guo, Zhiyong; Peng, Hong; Cai, Xiaoling; Zhou, Shining; Gu, Yucheng; Lin, Yongcheng

    2007-05-01

    We report the unambiguous assignments of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of one new natural product, namely, 6,8-di-O-methyl versiconol (1) together with one known anthraquinone aversin (2) and two xanthones 5-methoxysterigmatocystin (3) and sterigmatocystin (4). These compounds were all isolated from the mangrove endophytic fungus ZSUH-36 from the South China Sea. 1D and 2D NMR experiments including COSY, HMQC and HMBC were used to elucidate the structures. Variations in the (1)H NMR spectrum of 6,8-di-O-methyl versiconol (1) were also observed in the temperature range 25-75 degrees C. In addition, the plausible biogenetic path from 1 to 2 is discussed.

  10. Characterizing crystal disorder of trospium chloride: a comprehensive,(13) C CP/MAS NMR, DSC, FTIR, and XRPD study.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, Martina; Sturcova, Adriana; Brus, Jiri; Benes, Hynek; Skorepova, Eliska; Kratochvil, Bohumil; Cejka, Jan; Sedenkova, Ivana; Kobera, Libor; Policianova, Olivia; Sturc, Antonin

    2013-04-01

    Analysis of C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray powder diffraction data of trospium chloride (TCl) products crystallized from different mixtures of water-ethanol [φ(EtOH) = 0.5-1.0] at various temperatures (0°C, 20°C) and initial concentrations (saturated solution, 30%-50% excess of solvent) revealed extensive structural variability of TCl. Although (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectra indicated broad variety of structural phases arising from molecular disorder, temperature-modulated DSC identified presence of two distinct components in the products. FTIR spectra revealed alterations in the hydrogen bonding network (ionic hydrogen bond formation), whereas the X-ray diffraction reflected unchanged unit cell parameters. These results were explained by a two-component character of TCl products in which a dominant polymorphic form is accompanied by partly separated nanocrystalline domains of a secondary phase that does not provide clear Bragg reflections. These phases slightly differ in the degree of molecular disorder, in the quality of crystal lattice and hydrogen bonding network. It is also demonstrated that, for the quality control of such complex products, (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy combined with factor analysis (FA) can satisfactorily be used for categorizing the individual samples: FA of (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectra found clear relationships between the extent of molecular disorder and crystallization conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 102:1235-1248, 2013.

  11. Effect of Ca:Mg ratio on precipitated P species identified using 31P solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manimel Wadu, M.

    2009-04-01

    M.C.W. Manimel Wadu1, O.O Akinremi1, S. Kroeker2 1Department of Soil Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2N2, Canada 2Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2N2, Canada Agronomic efficiency of added P fertilizer is reduced by the precipitation reactions with the exchangeable Ca and Mg in calcareous soils. We hypothesized that the ratio of Ca to Mg on the soil exchange complex will affect the species of P that is precipitated and its solubility in the soil. A laboratory experiment was conducted using a model calcareous soil system which was composed of resin (Amberlite IRP69) and sand coated with CaCO3 packed into a column. The resin was pre saturated with Ca and Mg in order to achieve five different saturation ratios of Ca:Mg approximately as 100:0, 70:30, 50:50, 30:70 and 0:100. Monoammonium Phosphate was applied to the soil surface to simulate one-dimensional diffusive transport. The column was then incubated for 2 weeks. Chemical analysis for water and acid soluble P, pH, NH4, Ca and Mg was performed on 2mm sections of the soil to a depth of 10 cm. This paper will present and discuss the distribution of P along the soil column. Unlike similar studies that have speculated on the precipitation of P, this study will identify and quantify the P species that is formed using 31P solid state NMR technique. Such knowledge will be helpful in understanding the effect of Ca and Mg on P availability in calcareous system and the role of each cation on P precipitation. Key words: P fertilizers, Ca, Mg, model system, solid state NMR

  12. Uranyl nitrate inhibits lactate gluconeogenesis in isolated human and mouse renal proximal tubules: A {sup 13}C-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Renault, Sophie; Faiz, Hassan; Gadet, Rudy; Ferrier, Bernard; Martin, Guy; Baverel, Gabriel; Conjard-Duplany, Agnes

    2010-01-01

    As part of a study on uranium nephrotoxicity, we investigated the effect of uranyl nitrate in isolated human and mouse kidney cortex tubules metabolizing the physiological substrate lactate. In the millimolar range, uranyl nitrate reduced lactate removal and gluconeogenesis and the cellular ATP level in a dose-dependent fashion. After incubation in phosphate-free Krebs-Henseleit medium with 5 mM L-[1-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[2-{sup 13}C]-, or L-[3-{sup 13}C]lactate, substrate utilization and product formation were measured by enzymatic and NMR spectroscopic methods. In the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate, glucose production and the intracellular ATP content were significantly reduced in both human and mouse tubules. Combination of enzymatic and NMR measurements with a mathematical model of lactate metabolism revealed an inhibition of fluxes through lactate dehydrogenase and the gluconeogenic enzymes in the presence of 3 mM uranyl nitrate; in human and mouse tubules, fluxes were lowered by 20% and 14% (lactate dehydrogenase), 27% and 32% (pyruvate carboxylase), 35% and 36% (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase), and 39% and 45% (glucose-6-phosphatase), respectively. These results indicate that natural uranium is an inhibitor of renal lactate gluconeogenesis in both humans and mice.

  13. Dynamic structures of intact chicken erythrocyte chromatins as studied by 1H-31P cross-polarization NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Akutsu, H; Nishimoto, S; Kyogoku, Y

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic properties of DNA in intact chicken erythrocyte cells, nuclei, nondigested chromatins, digested soluble chromatins, H1, H5-depleted soluble chromatins and nucleosome cores were investigated by means of single-pulse and 1H-31P cross-polarization NMR. The temperature dependence of the phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy was identical for the former three in the presence of 3 mM MgCl2, suggesting that the local higher order structure is identical for these chromatins. The intrinsic phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy of the nucleosome cores was -159 ppm. The chemical shift anisotropy of DNA in the chromatins can be further averaged by the motion of the linker DNA. The spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame of the proton spins (T1p) of the nondigested chromatins was measured at various locking fields. The result was analyzed on the assumption of the isotropic motion to get a rough value of the correlation time of the motion efficient for the relaxation, which was eventually ascribed to the segmental motion of the linker DNA with restricted amplitude. The 30 nm filament structure induced by NaCl was shown to be dynamically different from that induced by MgCl2. Side-by-side compaction of 30-nm filaments was suggested to be induced in the MgCl2 concentration range higher than 0.3 mM. Biological significance of the dynamic structure was discussed in connection with the results obtained. PMID:7948693

  14. CO2 induced acute respiratory acidosis and brain tissue intracellular pH: a 31P NMR study in swine.

    PubMed

    Martoft, L; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, H; Forslid, A; Pedersen, H D; Jørgensen, P F

    2003-07-01

    High concentration carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is used to promote pre-slaughter anaesthesia in swine and poultry, as well as short-lasting surgical anaesthesia and euthanasia in laboratory animals. Questions related to animal welfare have been raised, as CO(2) anaesthesia does not set in momentarily. Carbon dioxide promotes anaesthesia by lowering the intracellular pH in the brain cells, but the dynamics of the changes in response to a high concentration of CO(2) is not known. Based on (31)P NMR spectroscopy, we describe CO(2)-induced changes in intracellular pH in the brains of five pigs inhaling 90% CO(2) in ambient air for a period of 60 s, and compare the results to changes in arterial blood pH, P(CO2), O(2) saturation and HCO(3)(-) concentration. The intracellular pH paralleled the arterial pH and P(CO2) during inhalation of CO(2); and it is suggested that the acute reaction to CO(2) inhalation mainly reflects respiratory acidosis, and not metabolic regulation as for example transmembrane fluxes of H(+)/HCO(3)(-). The intracellular pH decreased to approximately 6.7 within the 60 s inhalation period, and the situation was metabolically reversible after the end of CO(2) inhalation. The fast decrease in intracellular pH supports the conclusion that high concentration CO(2) leads to anaesthesia soon after the start of inhalation. PMID:12869287

  15. Influence of temperature on 31P NMR chemical shifts of phospholipids and their metabolites I. In chloroform-methanol-water.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Rosendo; Stolowich, Neal; Yappert, M Cecilia

    2008-09-01

    Spectral overlap of (31)P NMR resonances and the lack of reproducibility in chemical shifts corresponding to phospholipids in organic solvents challenge the accuracy of band assignments and quantification. To alleviate these problems, the use of temperature coefficients is proposed. Changes in temperature enable the resolution of overlapped resonances and provide a facile approach for the computation of temperature coefficients. The coefficients were evaluated for various glycero- and sphingo-phospholipids. Their values suggest that differences in H-bonding between the phosphate and the head groups are responsible for the changes of chemical shift with temperature. Among parent phospholipids, and in addition to sphingomyelin, the smallest temperature coefficient values (closest to zero) were observed for phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, dihydrosphingomyelin, and cardiolipin. The highest values were exhibited by phospholipids with protonated head groups, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine. The lowest and, in fact, negative values were measured for phospholipids with an exposed phosphate group: phosphatidic acid, ceramide-1-phosphate, and dihydroceramide-1-phosphate. Diacyl, alkyl-acyl, and alkenyl-acyl phospholipids with the same head group exhibited comparable coefficients but differed slightly in chemical shifts. Compared to their parent glycerophospholipids, all lyso analogs had greater temperature coefficients, possibly due to the presence of an extra OH capable of forming a H-bond with the phosphate group. PMID:18534182

  16. Solid-State Selective 13C Excitation and Spin Diffusion NMR to Resolve Spatial Dimensions in Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, M.; Katahira, R.; Gjersing, E.; Davis, M. F.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2012-02-15

    The average spatial dimensions between major biopolymers within the plant cell wall can be resolved using a solid-state NMR technique referred to as a {sup 13}C cross-polarization (CP) SELDOM (selectively by destruction of magnetization) with a mixing time delay for spin diffusion. Selective excitation of specific aromatic lignin carbons indicates that lignin is in close proximity to hemicellulose followed by amorphous and finally crystalline cellulose. {sup 13}C spin diffusion time constants (T{sub SD}) were extracted using a two-site spin diffusion theory developed for {sup 13}C nuclei under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. These time constants were then used to calculate an average lower-limit spin diffusion length between chemical groups within the plant cell wall. The results on untreated {sup 13}C enriched corn stover stem reveal that the lignin carbons are, on average, located at distances {approx}0.7-2.0 nm from the carbons in hemicellulose and cellulose, whereas the pretreated material had larger separations.

  17. Differentiation of histidine tautomeric states using 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-08-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all 13C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When 15N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the 13C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of 13C, 15N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture.

  18. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: insights from solid-state 13C NMR and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions...

  19. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  20. (13)C, (15)N CPMAS NMR and GIAO DFT calculations of stereoisomeric oxindole alkaloids from Cat's Claw (Uncaria tomentosa).

    PubMed

    Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wolniak, Michał; Pisklak, Maciej; Gliński, Jan A; Davey, Matthew H; Wawer, Iwona

    2008-11-01

    Oxindole alkaloids, isolated from the bark of Uncaria tomentosa [Willd. ex Schult.] Rubiaceae, are considered to be responsible for the biological activity of this herb. Five pentacyclic and two tetracyclic alkaloids were studied by solid-state NMR and theoretical GIAO DFT methods. The (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra were recorded for mitraphylline, isomitraphylline, pteropodine (uncarine C), isopteropodine (uncarine E), speciophylline (uncarine D), rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline. Theoretical GIAO DFT calculations of shielding constants provide arguments for identification of asymmetric centers and proper assignment of NMR spectra. These alkaloids are 7R/7S and 20R/20S stereoisomeric pairs. Based on the (13)C CP MAS chemical shifts the 7S alkaloids (delta C3 70-71ppm) can be easily and conveniently distinguished from 7R (deltaC3 74.5-74.9ppm), also 20R (deltaC20 41.3-41.7ppm) from the 20S (deltaC20 36.3-38.3ppm). The epiallo-type isomer (3R, 20S) of speciophylline is characterized by a larger (15)N MAS chemical shift of N4 (64.6ppm) than the allo-type (3S, 20S) of isopteropodine (deltaN4 53.3ppm). (15)N MAS chemical shifts of N1-H in pentacyclic alkaloids are within 131.9-140.4ppm.

  1. A solution NMR study of the selectively 13C, 15N-labeled peptaibol chrysospermin C in methanol.

    PubMed

    Anders, R; Wenschuh, H; Soskic, V; Fischer-Frühholz, S; Ohlenschläger, O; Dornberger, K; Brown, L R

    1998-07-01

    The conformation of the 19-residue peptaibol chrysospermin C in methanol has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy using selective 15N and 13C labeling of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) residues. Complete 1H and 13C sequential assignments, including stereospecific assignments for the heavily overlapped resonances from the two Cbeta methyl groups of the eight Aib residues, are reported for a peptaibol for the first time. An Aib residue followed by a Pro is an exception to previous suggestions regarding stereospecific assignment of the two Cbeta methyl groups of Aib residues. Local nuclear Overhauser effects and 3J(HNC') and 3J(HNCbeta) scalar couplings indicate that the phi angles of the Aib residues are restricted sterically to local conformations consistent with right-handed helices. Despite these constraints on the eight Aib residues, the NMR data for chrysospermin C in methanol are generally most consistent with an ensemble of transient conformations, including backbone conformations inconsistent with helical structures. Initial NMR measurements for chrysospermin C bound to micelles suggest structural and dynamic differences relative to alamethicin bound to micelles which may be related to differences in gating voltages for formation of ion channels.

  2. Humic acids as proxies for assessing different Mediterranean forest soils signatures using solid-state CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Regina M B O; Fernández-Getino, Ana P; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-06-01

    Humic acids (HAs) of four representative forest soils profiles from Central Spain (two with different vegetation - pine and oak - but same parent material - granitie, and two with same vegetation - holm oak - but different parent material - granite and limestone) were investigated by solid-state cross polarization with magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The objectives included the investigation of the impact of different forest properties on HA composition, assessing how the structural characteristics of the HA vary with soil depth, and evaluating the role of HA as surrogates for mapping the different forest soils signatures using structural data derived from (13)C NMR spectroscopy. On average, alkyl C is the dominant C constituent (38-48% of the total NMR peak area) in all HA samples, followed by aromatic (12-22%) and O-alkyl C (12-19%), and finally carboxyl C (7.0-10%). The NMR data also indicated that HA composition is likely to be differently affected by the soil physico-chemical properties and type of forest vegetation. The structural characteristics of the HA from soil under oak did not differ broadly downward in the profile, whereas soil HA under pine forest exhibits a somewhat higher recalcitrant nature as a consequence of a higher degree of decomposition. The soil HA from holm oak forests differed from the other two forest soils, exhibiting a progressive decomposition of the alkyl C structures with increasing depth, while the carbohydrate-like indicator (O-alkyl C) is apparently being protected from mineralization in the horizons below the ground level. Overall, these differences in soil HA NMR signatures are an important diagnostic tool for understanding the role of different soil environmental factors on the structural composition of HA from Mediterranean forest soils. PMID:23332874

  3. Humic acids as proxies for assessing different Mediterranean forest soils signatures using solid-state CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Regina M B O; Fernández-Getino, Ana P; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-06-01

    Humic acids (HAs) of four representative forest soils profiles from Central Spain (two with different vegetation - pine and oak - but same parent material - granitie, and two with same vegetation - holm oak - but different parent material - granite and limestone) were investigated by solid-state cross polarization with magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The objectives included the investigation of the impact of different forest properties on HA composition, assessing how the structural characteristics of the HA vary with soil depth, and evaluating the role of HA as surrogates for mapping the different forest soils signatures using structural data derived from (13)C NMR spectroscopy. On average, alkyl C is the dominant C constituent (38-48% of the total NMR peak area) in all HA samples, followed by aromatic (12-22%) and O-alkyl C (12-19%), and finally carboxyl C (7.0-10%). The NMR data also indicated that HA composition is likely to be differently affected by the soil physico-chemical properties and type of forest vegetation. The structural characteristics of the HA from soil under oak did not differ broadly downward in the profile, whereas soil HA under pine forest exhibits a somewhat higher recalcitrant nature as a consequence of a higher degree of decomposition. The soil HA from holm oak forests differed from the other two forest soils, exhibiting a progressive decomposition of the alkyl C structures with increasing depth, while the carbohydrate-like indicator (O-alkyl C) is apparently being protected from mineralization in the horizons below the ground level. Overall, these differences in soil HA NMR signatures are an important diagnostic tool for understanding the role of different soil environmental factors on the structural composition of HA from Mediterranean forest soils.

  4. Unraveling the complexity of protein backbone dynamics with combined (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lamley, Jonathan M; Lougher, Matthew J; Sass, Hans Juergen; Rogowski, Marco; Grzesiek, Stephan; Lewandowski, Józef R

    2015-09-14

    Typically, protein dynamics involve a complex hierarchy of motions occurring on different time scales between conformations separated by a range of different energy barriers. NMR relaxation can in principle provide a site-specific picture of both the time scales and amplitudes of these motions, but independent relaxation rates sensitive to fluctuations in different time scale ranges are required to obtain a faithful representation of the underlying dynamic complexity. This is especially pertinent for relaxation measurements in the solid state, which report on dynamics in a broader window of time scales by more than 3 orders of magnitudes compared to solution NMR relaxation. To aid in unraveling the intricacies of biomolecular dynamics we introduce (13)C spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) as a probe of backbone nanosecond-microsecond motions in proteins in the solid state. We present measurements of (13)C'R1ρ rates in fully protonated crystalline protein GB1 at 600 and 850 MHz (1)H Larmor frequencies and compare them to (13)C'R1, (15)N R1 and R1ρ measured under the same conditions. The addition of carbon relaxation data to the model free analysis of nitrogen relaxation data leads to greatly improved characterization of time scales of protein backbone motions, minimizing the occurrence of fitting artifacts that may be present when (15)N data is used alone. We also discuss how internal motions characterized by different time scales contribute to (15)N and (13)C relaxation rates in the solid state and solution state, leading to fundamental differences between them, as well as phenomena such as underestimation of picosecond-range motions in the solid state and nanosecond-range motions in solution.

  5. Hydrothermal carbon from biomass: structural differences between hydrothermal and pyrolyzed carbons via 13C solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Falco, Camillo; Perez Caballero, Fernando; Babonneau, Florence; Gervais, Christel; Laurent, Guillaume; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; Baccile, Niki

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to better describe the structure of the hydrothermal carbon (HTC) process and put it in relationship with the more classical pyrolytic carbons. Indeed, despite the low energetic impact and the number of applications described so far for HTC, very little is known about the structure, reaction mechanism, and the way these materials relate to coals. Are HTC and calcination processes equivalent? Are the structures of the processed materials related to each other in any way? Which is the extent of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) inside HTC? In this work, the effect of hydrothermal treatment and pyrolysis are compared on glucose, a good model carbohydrate; a detailed single-quantum double-quantum (SQ-DQ) solid state (13)C NMR study of the HTC and calcined HTC is used to interpret the spectral region corresponding to the signal of furanic and arene groups. These data are compared to the spectroscopic signatures of calcined glucose, starch, and xylose. A semiquantitative analysis of the (13)C NMR spectra provides an estimation of the furanic-to-arene ratio which varies from 1:1 to 4:1 according to the processing conditions and carbohydrate employed. In addition, we formulate some hypothesis, validated by DFT (density functional theory) modeling associated with (13)C NMR chemical shifts calculations, about the possible furan-rich structural intermediates that occur in the coalification process leading to condensed polyaromatic structures. In combination with a broad parallel study on the HTC processing conditions effect on glucose, cellulose, and raw biomass (Falco, C.; Baccile, N.; Titirici, M.-M. Green Chem., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1GC15742F), we propose a broad reaction scheme and in which we show that, through HTC, it is possible to tune the furan-to-arene ratio composing the aromatic core of the produced HTC carbons, which is not possible if calcination is used alone, in the temperature range below 350 °C. PMID:22050004

  6. Phase behavior and 13C NMR spectroscopic analysis of the mixed methane + ethane + propane hydrates in mesoporous silica gels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungmin; Cha, Inuk; Seo, Yongwon

    2010-11-25

    In this study, the phase behavior and quantitative determination of hydrate composition and cage occupancy for the mixed CH(4) + C(2)H(6) + C(3)H(8) hydrates were closely investigated through the experimental measurement of three-phase hydrate (H)-water-rich liquid (L(W))-vapor (V) equilibria and (13)C NMR spectra. To examine the effect of pore size and salinity, we measured hydrate phase equilibria for the quaternary CH(4) (90%) + C(2)H(6) (7%) + C(3)H(8) (3%) + water mixtures in silica gel pores of nominal diameters of 6.0, 15.0, and 30.0 nm and for the quinary CH(4) (90%) + C(2)H(6) (7%) + C(3)H(8) (3%) + NaCl + water mixtures of two different NaCl concentrations (3 and 10 wt %) in silica gel pores of a nominal 30.0 nm diameter. The value of hydrate-water interfacial tension for the CH(4) (90%) + C(2)H(6) (7%) + C(3)H(8) (3%) hydrate was found to be 47 ± 4 mJ/m(2) from the relation of the dissociation temperature depression with the pore size of silica gels at a given pressure. At a specified temperature, three-phase H-L(W)-V equilibrium curves of pore hydrates were shifted to higher pressure regions depending on pore sizes and NaCl concentrations. From the cage-dependent (13)C NMR chemical shifts of enclathrated guest molecules, the mixed CH(4) (90%) + C(2)H(6) (7%) + C(3)H(8) (3%) gas hydrate was confirmed to be structure II. The cage occupancies of each guest molecule and the hydration number of the mixed gas hydrates were also estimated from the (13)C NMR spectra.

  7. 13C, 2h NMR studies of structural and dynamical modifications of glucose-exposed porcine aortic elastin.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Moshe C; Bilici, Kübra; Morgan, Steven W; Wang, Yunjie; Zhang, Yanhang; Boutis, Gregory S

    2015-04-01

    Elastin, the principal component of the elastic fiber of the extracellular matrix, imparts to vertebrate tissues remarkable resilience and longevity. This work focuses on elucidating dynamical and structural modifications of porcine aortic elastin exposed to glucose by solid-state NMR spectroscopic and relaxation methodologies. Results from macroscopic stress-strain tests are also presented and indicate that glucose-treated elastin is mechanically stiffer than the same tissue without glucose treatment. These measurements show a large hysteresis in the stress-strain behavior of glucose-treated elastin-a well-known signature of viscoelasticity. Two-dimensional relaxation NMR methods were used to investigate the correlation time, distribution, and population of water in these samples. Differences are observed between the relative populations of water, whereas the measured correlation times of tumbling motion of water across the samples were similar. (13)C magic-angle-spinning NMR methods were applied to investigate structural and dynamical modifications after glucose treatment. Although some overall structure is preserved, the process of glucose exposure results in more heterogeneous structures and slower mobility. The correlation times of tumbling motion of the (13)C-(1)H internuclear vectors in the glucose-treated sample are larger than in untreated samples, pointing to their more rigid structure. The (13)C cross-polarization spectra reveal a notably increased α-helical character in the alanine motifs after glucose exposure. Results from molecular dynamics simulations are provided that add further insight into dynamical and structural changes of a short repeat, [VPGVG]5, an alanine pentamer, desmosine, and isodesmosine sites with and without glucose. The simulations point to changes in the entropic and energetic contributions in the retractive forces of VPGVG and AAAAA motifs. The most notable change is the increase of the energetic contribution in the retractive

  8. 13C, 2H NMR Studies of Structural and Dynamical Modifications of Glucose-Exposed Porcine Aortic Elastin

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Moshe C.; Bilici, Kübra; Morgan, Steven W.; Wang, Yunjie; Zhang, Yanhang; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Elastin, the principal component of the elastic fiber of the extracellular matrix, imparts to vertebrate tissues remarkable resilience and longevity. This work focuses on elucidating dynamical and structural modifications of porcine aortic elastin exposed to glucose by solid-state NMR spectroscopic and relaxation methodologies. Results from macroscopic stress-strain tests are also presented and indicate that glucose-treated elastin is mechanically stiffer than the same tissue without glucose treatment. These measurements show a large hysteresis in the stress-strain behavior of glucose-treated elastin—a well-known signature of viscoelasticity. Two-dimensional relaxation NMR methods were used to investigate the correlation time, distribution, and population of water in these samples. Differences are observed between the relative populations of water, whereas the measured correlation times of tumbling motion of water across the samples were similar. 13C magic-angle-spinning NMR methods were applied to investigate structural and dynamical modifications after glucose treatment. Although some overall structure is preserved, the process of glucose exposure results in more heterogeneous structures and slower mobility. The correlation times of tumbling motion of the 13C-1H internuclear vectors in the glucose-treated sample are larger than in untreated samples, pointing to their more rigid structure. The 13C cross-polarization spectra reveal a notably increased α-helical character in the alanine motifs after glucose exposure. Results from molecular dynamics simulations are provided that add further insight into dynamical and structural changes of a short repeat, [VPGVG]5, an alanine pentamer, desmosine, and isodesmosine sites with and without glucose. The simulations point to changes in the entropic and energetic contributions in the retractive forces of VPGVG and AAAAA motifs. The most notable change is the increase of the energetic contribution in the retractive force

  9. Detailed Chemical Composition of Condensed Tannins via Quantitative (31)P NMR and HSQC Analyses: Acacia catechu, Schinopsis balansae, and Acacia mearnsii.

    PubMed

    Crestini, Claudia; Lange, Heiko; Bianchetti, Giulia

    2016-09-23

    The chemical composition of Acacia catechu, Schinopsis balansae, and Acacia mearnsii proanthocyanidins has been determined using a novel analytical approach that rests on the concerted use of quantitative (31)P NMR and two-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. This approach has offered significant detailed information regarding the structure and purity of these complex and often elusive proanthocyanidins. More specifically, rings A, B, and C of their flavan-3-ol units show well-defined and resolved absorbance regions in both the quantitative (31)P NMR and HSQC spectra. By integrating each of these regions in the (31)P NMR spectra, it is possible to identify the oxygenation patterns of the flavan-3-ol units. At the same time it is possible to acquire a fingerprint of the proanthocyanidin sample and evaluate its purity via the HSQC information. This analytical approach is suitable for both the purified natural product proanthocyanidins and their commercial analogues. Overall, this effort demonstrates the power of the concerted use of these two NMR techniques for the structural elucidation of natural products containing labile hydroxy protons and a carbon framework that can be traced out via HSQC. PMID:27551744

  10. Biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone. 1. Identification of biosynthetic precursors using /sup 13/C labeling and NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.R.; Hanners, J.L.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1988-09-28

    The biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in the methylotropic bacterium methylobacterium AM1 has been investigated using /sup 13/C-labelling of the products and NMR spectroscopy. The data indicated that the quinoline portion of PQQ is formed by a novel condensation of N-1, C-2, -3, and -4 of glutamate with a symmetrical six-carbon ring derived from the shikimate pathway. It is postulated that tyrosine is the shikimate-derived percursor, since pyrrole could be formed by the internal cyclization of the amino acid backbone. 18 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Characterization of aging in organic materials on atomic-, meso- and macro-length scales by {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, R.A.; Jamison, G.M.; Alam, T.M.; Gillen, K.T.

    1997-10-01

    A fundamental understanding of aging in an organic material requires that one understand how aging affects the chemical structure of a material, and how these chemical changes are related to the material`s macroscopic properties. This level of understanding is usually achieved by examining the material on a variety of length scales ranging from atomic to meso-scale to macroscopic. The authors are developing and applying several {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiments to characterize the aging process of organic materials over a broad range of length scales. Examples of studies which range from atomic to macroscopic will be presented.

  12. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy in the analysis of conjugate metabolites in the bile of fish exposed to petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Hellou, J.; Banoub, J.H.; Payne, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The first natural abundance /sup 13/C NMR investigation of a complex mixture of conjugate metabolites obtained from the gall bladder bile of fish exposed to hydrocarbons is presented. Cunners were exposed to water accommodated No. 2 fuel oil containing about 68% saturates and 22% aromatics. Spectral analysis indicated that the hydrocarbon derivatives were present predominantly as ..beta..-glucuronides, with the oxygen at carbon-1 of glucuronic acid preferentially attached to an aliphatic carbon. The conjugate metabolites were enriched in aromatic-type carbons when compared to the fuel oil or the aromatic fraction of oil.

  13. Use of solid-state 13C NMR in structural studies of humic acids and humin from Holocene sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; VanderHart, D.L.; Earl, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    13C NMR spectra of solid humic substances in Holocene sediments have been obtained using cross polarization with magic-angle sample spinning techniques. The results demonstrate that this technique holds great promise for structural characterizations of complex macromolecular substances such as humin and humic acids. Quantifiable distinctions can be made between structural features of aquatic and terrestrial humic substances. The aliphatic carbons of the humic substances are dominant components suggestive of input from lipid-like materials. An interesting resemblance is also noted between terrestrial humic acid and humin spectra. ?? 1980.

  14. Identification and quantitative determination of carbohydrates in ethanolic extracts of two conifers using 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Emilie; Castola, Vincent; Casanova, Joseph

    2008-04-01

    We developed a method for the direct identification and quantification of carbohydrates in raw vegetable extracts using (13)C NMR spectroscopy without any preliminary step of precipitation or reduction of the components. This method has been validated (accuracy, precision and response linearity) using pure compounds and artificial mixtures before being applied to authentic ethanolic extracts of pine needles, pine wood and pine cones and fir twigs. We determined that carbohydrates represented from 15% to 35% of the crude extracts in which pinitol was the principal constituent accompanied by arabinitol, mannitol, glucose and fructose.

  15. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for 13C NMR relaxation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of 15N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to 13C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and 13C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly 13C -labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  16. Ionization behavior of polyphosphoinositides determined via the preparation of pH titration curves using solid-state 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Graber, Zachary T; Kooijman, Edgar E

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the degree of ionization of lipid titratable groups is important for the evaluation of protein-lipid and lipid-lipid interactions. The degree of ionization is commonly evaluated by acid-base titration, but for lipids localized in a multicomponent membrane interface this is not a suitable technique. For phosphomonoester-containing lipids such as the polyphosphoinositides, phosphatidic acid, and ceramide-1-phosphate, this is more conveniently accomplished by (31)P NMR. Here, we describe a solid-state (31)P NMR procedure to construct pH titration curves to determine the degree of ionization of phosphomonoester groups in polyphosphoinositides. This procedure can also be used, with suitable sample preparation conditions, for other important signaling lipids. Access to a solid-state, i.e., magic angle spinning, capable NMR spectrometer is assumed. The procedures described here are valid for a Bruker instrument, but can be adapted for other spectrometers as needed.

  17. ¹¹³Cd NMR experiments reveal an unusual metal cluster in the solution structure of the yeast splicing protein Bud31p.

    PubMed

    van Roon, Anne-Marie M; Yang, Ji-Chun; Mathieu, Daniel; Bermel, Wolfgang; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Neuhaus, David

    2015-04-13

    Establishing the binding topology of structural zinc ions in proteins is an essential part of their structure determination by NMR spectroscopy. Using (113)Cd NMR experiments with (113)Cd-substituted samples is a useful approach but has previously been limited mainly to very small protein domains. Here we used (113)Cd NMR spectroscopy during structure determination of Bud31p, a 157-residue yeast protein containing an unusual Zn3Cys9 cluster, demonstrating that recent hardware developments make this approach feasible for significantly larger systems.

  18. Noninvasive measurements of glycogen in perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer NMR and comparison to (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Corin O; Cao, Jin; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Damon, Bruce M; Cherrington, Alan D; Gore, John C

    2015-06-01

    Liver glycogen represents an important physiological form of energy storage. It plays a key role in the regulation of blood glucose concentrations, and dysregulations in hepatic glycogen metabolism are linked to many diseases including diabetes and insulin resistance. In this work, we develop, optimize, and validate a noninvasive protocol to measure glycogen levels in isolated perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy. Model glycogen solutions were used to determine optimal saturation pulse parameters which were then applied to intact perfused mouse livers of varying glycogen content. Glycogen measurements from serially acquired CEST Z-spectra of livers were compared with measurements from interleaved natural abundance (13)C NMR spectra. Experimental data revealed that CEST-based glycogen measurements were highly correlated with (13)C NMR glycogen spectra. Monte Carlo simulations were then used to investigate the inherent (i.e., signal-to-noise-based) errors in the quantification of glycogen with each technique. This revealed that CEST was intrinsically more precise than (13)C NMR, although in practice may be prone to other errors induced by variations in experimental conditions. We also observed that the CEST signal from glycogen in liver was significantly less than that observed from identical amounts in solution. Our results demonstrate that CEST provides an accurate, precise, and readily accessible method to noninvasively measure liver glycogen levels and their changes. Furthermore, this technique can be used to map glycogen distributions via conventional proton magnetic resonance imaging, a capability universally available on clinical and preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners vs (13)C detection, which is limited to a small fraction of clinical-scale MRI scanners. PMID:25946616

  19. Noninvasive measurements of glycogen in perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer NMR and comparison to (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Corin O; Cao, Jin; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Damon, Bruce M; Cherrington, Alan D; Gore, John C

    2015-06-01

    Liver glycogen represents an important physiological form of energy storage. It plays a key role in the regulation of blood glucose concentrations, and dysregulations in hepatic glycogen metabolism are linked to many diseases including diabetes and insulin resistance. In this work, we develop, optimize, and validate a noninvasive protocol to measure glycogen levels in isolated perfused mouse livers using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy. Model glycogen solutions were used to determine optimal saturation pulse parameters which were then applied to intact perfused mouse livers of varying glycogen content. Glycogen measurements from serially acquired CEST Z-spectra of livers were compared with measurements from interleaved natural abundance (13)C NMR spectra. Experimental data revealed that CEST-based glycogen measurements were highly correlated with (13)C NMR glycogen spectra. Monte Carlo simulations were then used to investigate the inherent (i.e., signal-to-noise-based) errors in the quantification of glycogen with each technique. This revealed that CEST was intrinsically more precise than (13)C NMR, although in practice may be prone to other errors induced by variations in experimental conditions. We also observed that the CEST signal from glycogen in liver was significantly less than that observed from identical amounts in solution. Our results demonstrate that CEST provides an accurate, precise, and readily accessible method to noninvasively measure liver glycogen levels and their changes. Furthermore, this technique can be used to map glycogen distributions via conventional proton magnetic resonance imaging, a capability universally available on clinical and preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners vs (13)C detection, which is limited to a small fraction of clinical-scale MRI scanners.

  20. Monitoring biodegradation of poly(butylene sebacate) by Gel Permeation Chromatography, (1)H-NMR and (31)P-NMR techniques.

    PubMed

    Siotto, Michela; Zoia, Luca; Tosin, Maurizio; Degli Innocenti, Francesco; Orlandi, Marco; Mezzanotte, Valeria

    2013-02-15

    The increasing use of new generation plastics has been accompanied by the development of standard methods for studying their biodegradability. Generally, test methods are based on the measurement of CO(2) production, i.e. the mineralization degree of the tested materials. However, in order to describe the biodegradation process, the determination of the residual amount of tested material which remains in the environment and its chemical characterization can be very important. In this study, the biodegradation in soil of a model polyester (poly(butylene sebacate)) was monitored. Gel Permeation Chromatography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((31)P-NMR and (1)H-NMR) were used in order to obtain information about the polyester structure and the possible by-products that can be found in soil during and at the end of the incubation. The polyester mineralization (i.e. the CO(2) production) was tested according to ASTM 5988 standard method for 245 days. When the polyester mineralization was about 21% and 37% (after 78 and 140 days of incubation) and at the end of the process (63% of mineralization, 100% if compared to the cellulose used as reference material), the soil was extracted with chloroform (solvent of the tested substance) and the extracts were analyzed using GPC and NMR acquisitions. The analytical acquisitions showed high molecular weight polyester in soil during the incubation (78 and 140 days): the polyester concentration decreased but its structure remained almost the same with a slow decreasing in molecular weight. At the end of the test (245 days) no film of the polyester could be extracted from the soil: NMR acquisitions and GPC analyses of the extracts suggested a strong degraded structure of the residual polyester. Even if at the end of the process only 63% of carbon had been lost by mineralization, the whole of the added polyester seems to have disappeared after about eight months of incubation, suggesting substantial biomass formation.

  1. (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments for two new steroids from the coral Chromonephthea sp.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hua-Wei; Liao, Xiao-Jian; Xu, Shi-Hai

    2009-04-01

    Two new steroids isolated from EtOH extracts of the South China Sea soft coral Chromonephthea sp. were identified. One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiments including COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY were used for the determination of their structure.

  2. 13C NMR Metabolomic Evaluation of Immediate and Delayed Mild Hypothermia in Cerebrocortical Slices After Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Segal, Mark; Kelly, Mark J.S.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Kim, Myungwon; James, Thomas L.; Litt, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Background Mild brain hypothermia (32°C–34°C) after human neonatal asphyxia improves neurodevelopmental outcomes. Astrocytes but not neurons have pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and an acetate uptake transporter. 13C NMR spectroscopy of rodent brain extracts after administering [1-13C]glucose and [1,2-13C]acetate can distinguish metabolic differences between glia and neurons, and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) entry via pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and PC. Methods Neonatal rat cerebrocortical slices receiving a 13C-acetate/glucose mixture underwent a 45-min asphyxia simulation via oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) followed by 6 h of recovery. Protocols in three groups of N = 3 experiments were identical except for temperature management. The three temperature groups were: normothermia (37°C), hypothermia (32°C for 3.75 h beginning at OGD start), and delayed hypothermia (32°C for 3.75 h, beginning 15 min after OGD start). Multivariate analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance metabolite quantifications included principal component analyses and the L1-Penalized Regularized Regression algorithm known as the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO). Results The most significant metabolite difference (p < 0.0056) was [2-13C]glutamine’s higher final/control ratio for the Hypothermia group (1.75 ± 0.12) compared to ratios for the Delayed (1.12 ± 0.12) and Normothermia group (0.94 ± 0.06), implying a higher PC/PDH ratio for glutamine formation. LASSO found the most important metabolites associated with adenosine triphosphate preservation: [3,4-13C]glutamate—produced via PDH entry, [2-13C]taurine--an important osmolyte, and phosphocreatine. Final principal component analyses scores plots suggested separate cluster formation for the hypothermia group, but with insufficient data for statistical significance. Conclusions Starting mild hypothermia simultaneously with OGD, compared with delayed starting or no hypothermia, has higher PC throughput

  3. Organophosphates in agrogray soils with periodic water logging according to the data of 31P NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, I. V.; Kovaleva, N. O.

    2011-01-01

    The composition of organic phosphorus compounds was studied using the 31P NMR spectroscopy method in agrogray soils with periodic water logging. The phosphorus content was determined by the specific difference between the hydrological and the redox regimes of these soils. The phosphorus of the organic compounds in the agrogray soils with contrasting water regimes is composed mostly of phosphoric monoesters and diesters, including nucleic and teichoic acids. The relative distribution of the monoesters and inorganic orthophosphates is shown depending on the climate and the soil's position in the relief. The area of the monoester peaks increases by two times and that of the mineral orthophosphate decreases by six times in the agro-gray soils of Bryansk opolie with an optimal regime of moistening and evaporation in comparison with the agro-gray gleyed soils of Kolomna opolie. As the degree of the soil hydromorphism in the sequence of deeply gleyed soils and gleyic soils increased, the portion of monoesters decreased. Favorable conditions for the microbial activity are formed in soils with a contrasting redox regime, and this is expressed in the accumulation of labile diesters. Inverse relationships were found between the distributions of the mono- and diesters in iron-manganic nodules and in the soils enclosing them; this was caused by the different mechanisms of the stabilization of the stable and labile phosphorus containing compounds. A high percentage of mineral orthophosphate in the nodules allows assuming the presence of chemisorbed orthophosphate ions in organomineral phosphate-metal-humus complexes. The transformation of iron-manganic nodules under the influence of drying demonstrates the more direct participation of microorganisms in the nodules' formation than the contribution of the physicochemical processes.

  4. Assessing the phosphate distribution in bioactive phosphosilicate glasses by 31P solid-state NMR and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Stevensson, Baltzar; Mathew, Renny; Edén, Mattias

    2014-07-24

    Melt-derived bioactive phosphosilicate glasses are widely utilized as bone-grafting materials for various surgical applications. However, the insight into their structural features over a medium-range scale up to ∼ 1 nm remains limited. We present a comprehensive assessment of the spatial distribution of phosphate groups across the structures of 11 Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 glasses that encompass both bioactive and nonbioactive compositions, with the P contents and silicate network connectivities varied independently. Both parameters are known to strongly influence the bioactivity of the glass in vitro. The phosphate distribution was investigated by double-quantum (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments under magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The details of the phosphate-ion dispersion were probed by evaluating the MD-derived glass models against various scenarios of randomly distributed, as well as clustered, phosphate groups. From comparisons of the P-P interatomic-distance spreads and the statistics of small phosphate clusters assessed for variable cutoff radii, we conclude that the spatial arrangement of the P atoms in phosphosilicate glasses is well-approximated by a statistical distribution, particularly across a short-range scale of ≤ 450 pm. The primary distinction is reflected in slightly closer P-P interatomic contacts in the MD-derived structures over the distance span of 450-600 pm relative to that of randomly distributed phosphate groups. The nature of the phosphate-ion dispersion remains independent of the silicate network polymerization and nearly independent of the P content of the glass throughout our explored parameter space of 1-6 mol % P2O5 and silicate network connectivities up to 2.9.

  5. Ab Initio Calculations of Possible γ-Gauche Effects in the 13C-NMR for Methine and Carbonyl Carbons in Precise Polyethylene Acrylic Acid Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd

    2013-07-29

    The impacts of local polymer chain conformations on the methine and carbonyl 13C-NMR chemical shifts for polyethylene acrylic acid p(E-AA) copolymers were predicted using ab initio methods. Using small molecular cluster models, the magnitude and sign of the γ-gauche torsional angle effect, along with the impact of local tetrahedral structure distortions near the carbonyl group, on the 13C-NMR chemical shifts were determined. These 13C-NMR chemical shift variations were compared to the experimental trends observed for precise p(E-AA) copolymers as a function acid group spacing and degree of zinc-neutralization in the corresponding p(E-AA) ionomers. These ab initio calculations address the future ability of 13C-NMR chemical shift variations to provide information about the local chain conformations in p(E-AA) copolymer materials.

  6. The effect of ethanol on hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine: (31)P-NMR and (19)F-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Celikbag, Yusuf; Via, Brian K; Adhikari, Sushil; Buschle-Diller, Gisela; Auad, Maria L

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of ethanol and temperature on the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced from hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine (Pinus spp.) carried out at 250, 300, 350 and 390°C for 30min. Water and water/ethanol mixture (1/1, wt/wt) were used as liquefying solvent in the HTL experiments. HTL in water and water/ethanol is donated as W-HTL and W/E-HTL, respectively. It was found that 300°C and water/ethanol solvent was the optimum liquefaction temperature and solvent, yielding up to 68.1wt.% bio-oil and 2.4wt.% solid residue. (31)P-NMR analysis showed that biopolyol produced by W-HTL was rich in phenolic OH while W/E-HTL produced more aliphatic OH rich biopolyols. Moreover, biopolyols with higher hydroxyl concentration were produced by W/E-HTL. Carbonyl groups were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, which showed that ethanol reduced the concentration of carbonyl groups. PMID:27126078

  7. The effect of ethanol on hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine: (31)P-NMR and (19)F-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Celikbag, Yusuf; Via, Brian K; Adhikari, Sushil; Buschle-Diller, Gisela; Auad, Maria L

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of ethanol and temperature on the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced from hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine (Pinus spp.) carried out at 250, 300, 350 and 390°C for 30min. Water and water/ethanol mixture (1/1, wt/wt) were used as liquefying solvent in the HTL experiments. HTL in water and water/ethanol is donated as W-HTL and W/E-HTL, respectively. It was found that 300°C and water/ethanol solvent was the optimum liquefaction temperature and solvent, yielding up to 68.1wt.% bio-oil and 2.4wt.% solid residue. (31)P-NMR analysis showed that biopolyol produced by W-HTL was rich in phenolic OH while W/E-HTL produced more aliphatic OH rich biopolyols. Moreover, biopolyols with higher hydroxyl concentration were produced by W/E-HTL. Carbonyl groups were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, which showed that ethanol reduced the concentration of carbonyl groups.

  8. 13C and 1H NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) studies of solid polyolefines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudby, M. E. A.; Harris, R. K.; Metcalfe, K.; Packer, K. J.; Smith, P. W. R.

    1983-01-01

    The basis of H-1 and C-13 high-resolution NMR investigations of solid polymers is outlined. The C-13 NMR spectra of solid syndiotactic and isotactic polypropene are discussed and their interpretation in terms of conformation and chain-packing effects are reviewed. The effects of decreasing temperature on the C-13 high-resolution spectrum of an annealed sample of isotactic polypropene is described and interpreted in terms of the crystal structure. The question of the proportion of the sample giving rise to C-13 signals is addressed and some results reported. The main cause for observing only part of the total sample is shown to be the H-1 rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation behavior. The H-1 spin-lattice relaxation and spectral characteristics of a number of polyolefin samples are summarized and the role of spin-diffusion discussed.

  9. Recognition of Membrane Sterols by Polyene Antifungals Amphotericin B and Natamycin, A 13C MAS NMR Study

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, Filip; Griffin, David C.; Loraine, Jessica; Rittig, Michael; Delves-Broughton, Joss; Bonev, Boyan B.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular action of polyene macrolides with antifungal activity, amphotericin B and natamycin, involves recognition of sterols in membranes. Physicochemical and functional studies have contributed details to understanding the interactions between amphotericin B and ergosterol and, to a lesser extent, with cholesterol. Fewer molecular details are available on interactions between natamycin with sterols. We use solid state 13C MAS NMR to characterize the impact of amphotericin B and natamycin on mixed lipid membranes of DOPC/cholesterol or DOPC/ergosterol. In cholesterol-containing membranes, amphotericin B addition resulted in marked increase in both DOPC and cholesterol 13C MAS NMR linewidth, reflecting membrane insertion and cooperative perturbation of the bilayer. By contrast, natamycin affects little either DOPC or cholesterol linewidth but attenuates cholesterol resonance intensity preferentially for sterol core with lesser impact on the chain. Ergosterol resonances, attenuated by amphotericin B, reveal specific interactions in the sterol core and chain base. Natamycin addition selectively augmented ergosterol resonances from sterol core ring one and, at the same time, from the end of the chain. This puts forward an interaction model similar to the head-to-tail model for amphotericin B/ergosterol pairing but with docking on opposite sterol faces. Low toxicity of natamycin is attributed to selective, non-cooperative sterol engagement compared to cooperative membrane perturbation by amphotericin B. PMID:27379235

  10. Evolution of organic matter during composting of different organic wastes assessed by CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Caricasole, P.; Provenzano, M.R.; Senesi, N.

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, the evolution of organic matter (OM) during composting of different mixtures of various organic wastes was assessed by means of chemical analyses and CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy measured during composting. The trends of temperatures and C/N ratios supported the correct evolution of the processes. The CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectra of all composting substrates indicated a reduction in carbohydrates and an increase in aromatic, phenolic, carboxylic and carbonylic C which suggested a preference by microorganisms for easily degradable C molecules. The presence of hardly degradable pine needles in one of the substrates accounted for the lowest increase in alkyl C and the lowest reduction in carbohydrates and carboxyl C as opposite to another substrate characterized by the presence of a highly degradable material such as spent yeast from beer production, which showed the highest increase of the alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio. The highest increase of COOH deriving by the oxidative degradation of cellulose was shown by a substrate composed by about 50% of plant residues. The smallest increases in alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio and in polysaccharides were associated to the degradation of proteins and lipids which are major components of sewage sludge. Results obtained were related to the different composition of fresh organic substrates and provided evidence of different OM evolution patterns as a function of the initial substrate composition.

  11. The retrogradation properties of glutinous rice and buckwheat starches as observed with FT-IR, 13C NMR and DSC.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Wang, Changjun; Zhang, Kunsheng; Li, Lin

    2014-03-01

    The experiment was conducted to study the retrogradation properties of glutinous rice and buckwheat starch with wavelengths of maximum absorbance, FT-IR, (13)C NMR, and DSC. The results show that the starches in retrograded glutinous rice starch and glutinous rice amylopectin could not form double helix. The IR results show that protein inhabits in glutinous rice and maize starches in a different way and appearance of C-H symmetric stretching vibration at 2852 cm(-1) in starch might be appearance of protein. Retrogradation untied the protein in glutinous amylopectin. Enthalpies of sweet potato and maize granules are higher than those of their retrograded starches. The (13)C NMR results show that retrogradation of those two starches leads to presence of β-anomers and retrogradation might decompose lipids in glutinous rice amylopectin into small molecules. Glutinous rice starch was more inclined to retrogradation than buckwheat starch. The DSC results show that the second peak temperatures for retrograded glutinous rice and buckwheat starches should be assigned to protein. The SEM results show that an obvious layer structure exists in retrograded glutinous rice amylopectin.

  12. (13)C NMR characterization of triacylglycerols of Moringa oleifera seed oil: an "oleic-vaccenic acid" oil.

    PubMed

    Vlahov, Giovanna; Chepkwony, Paul Kiprono; Ndalut, Paul K

    2002-02-27

    The composition of acyl chains and their positions in the triacylglycerols of the oil extracted from seeds of Moringa oleifera were studied by (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The unsaturated chains of M. oleifera seed oil were found to comprise only mono-unsaturated fatty acids and, in particular, two omega-9 mono-unsaturated acids, (cis-9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) and cis-11-eicosenoic acids) and one omega-7 mono-unsaturated acid (cis-11-octadecenoic acid (vaccenic acid)). The mono-unsaturated fatty acids were detected as separated resonances in the spectral regions where the carbonyl and olefinic carbons resonate according to the 1,3- and 2-positions on the glycerol backbone. The unambiguous detection of vaccenic acid was also achieved through the resonance of the omega-3 carbon. The (13)C NMR methodology enabled the simultaneous detection of oleate, vaccenate, and eicosenoate chains according to their positions on the glycerol backbone (1,3- and 2-positions) through the carboxyl, olefinic, and methylene envelope carbons of the triacylglycerol acyl chains. PMID:11853466

  13. {sup 31}P NMR study of the complexation of TBP with lanthanides and actinides in solution and in a clay matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Hartzell, C.J.

    1994-07-24

    Goal was to use NMR to study TBP/lanthanide complexes in the interlayer or on edge sites of clays. Work in this laboratory yielded details of the complexation of Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} with TBP in hexane solution; this information is crucial to interpretation of results of NMR studies of the complexes exchanged into clays. The solution {sup 31}P-chemical shift values were improved by repeating the studies on the lanthanide salts dissolved directly into neat TBP. NMR studies of these neat solutions of the Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex and the Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex show that the {sup 31}P chemical shift remains relatively constant for TBP: lanthanide ratios below 3: 1. At higher ratios, the chemical shift approaches that of free TBP, indicating rapid exchange of TBP between the free and complexed state. Exchange of these complexes into the clay hectorite yielded discrete {sup 31}P-NMR signals for the Eu{lg_bullet}TBP complex at -190 ppm and free TBP at -6 ppm. Adsorption of the Pr{lg_bullet}TBP complex yielded broad signals at 76 ppm for the complex and -6 ppm for free TBP. There was no evidence of exchange between the incorporated complex and the free TBP.

  14. In vivo 31P NMR OSIRIS of bioenergetic changes in rabbit kidneys during and after ischaemia: effect of pretreatment with an indeno-indole compound.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, V; Jonsson, O; Pettersson, S; Scherstén, T; Soussi, B

    1998-04-01

    Changes in energy phosphates of rabbit kidneys subjected to ischaemia-reperfusion have been measured in vivo with volume selective 31P NMR spectroscopy. The effects of pretreatment with a new lipid peroxidation inhibitor (indeno-indol derivate--code name H290/51) on the bioenergetic changes were analysed. The left kidney was moved to a subcutaneous pocket to facilitate exact positioning over the surface coil. A 1H NMR image was acquired and a 3.5-mL cube selected for 31P NMR spectra. 31P NMR spectra were recorded before occlusion of the left renal artery, during 1 h of ischaemia and 2 hours of reperfusion. Ischaemia induced drastic changes in the levels of inorganic phosphates and ATP as well as intracellular acidosis. A normalization was observed during reperfusion. Two hours after reperfusion significantly higher values for beta-ATP/Pi and intracellular pH were recorded in the animals pretreated with H290/51. The present technique allows quantitative analyses of changes in kidney bioenergetics in vivo during different experimental conditions. The importance of ischaemia-reperfusion induced lipid peroxidation for mitochondrial function is emphasized.

  15. Effects of pH and cholesterol on DMPA membranes: a solid state 2H- and 31P-NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Pott, T; Maillet, J C; Dufourc, E J

    1995-01-01

    The effect of pH and cholesterol on the dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) model membrane system has been investigated by solid state 2H- and 31P-NMR. It has been shown that each of the three protonation states of the DMPA molecule corresponds to a 31P-NMR powder pattern with characteristic delta sigma values; this implies additionally that the proton exchange on the membrane surface is slow on the NMR time scale (millisecond range). Under these conditions, the 2H-labeled lipid chains sense only one magnetic environment, indicating that the three spectra detected by 31P-NMR are related to charge-dependent local dynamics or orientations of the phosphate headgroup or both. Chain ordering in the fluid phase is also found to depend weakly on the charge at the interface. In addition, it has also been found that the first pK of the DMPA membrane is modified by changes in the lipid lateral packing (gel or fluid phases or in the presence of cholesterol) in contrast to the second pK. The incorporation of 30 mol% cholesterol affects the phosphatidic acid bilayer in a way similar to what has been reported for phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol membranes, but to an extent comparable to 10-20 mol % sterol in phosphatidylcholines. However, the orientation and molecular order parameter of cholesterol in DMPA are similar to those found in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. PMID:8580333

  16. Bonded Cumomer Analysis of Human Melanoma Metabolism Monitored by 13C NMR Spectroscopy of Perfused Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Shestov, Alexander A; Mancuso, Anthony; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Guo, Lili; Nelson, David S; Roman, Jeffrey C; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Leeper, Dennis B; Blair, Ian A; Glickson, Jerry D

    2016-03-01

    A network model for the determination of tumor metabolic fluxes from (13)C NMR kinetic isotopomer data has been developed and validated with perfused human DB-1 melanoma cells carrying the BRAF V600E mutation, which promotes oxidative metabolism. The model generated in the bonded cumomer formalism describes key pathways of tumor intermediary metabolism and yields dynamic curves for positional isotopic enrichment and spin-spin multiplets. Cells attached to microcarrier beads were perfused with 26 mm [1,6-(13)C2]glucose under normoxic conditions at 37 °C and monitored by (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Excellent agreement between model-predicted and experimentally measured values of the rates of oxygen and glucose consumption, lactate production, and glutamate pool size validated the model. ATP production by glycolytic and oxidative metabolism were compared under hyperglycemic normoxic conditions; 51% of the energy came from oxidative phosphorylation and 49% came from glycolysis. Even though the rate of glutamine uptake was ∼ 50% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux, the rate of ATP production from glutamine was essentially zero (no glutaminolysis). De novo fatty acid production was ∼ 6% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux was 3.6% of glycolysis, and three non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway exchange fluxes were calculated. Mass spectrometry was then used to compare fluxes through various pathways under hyperglycemic (26 mm) and euglycemic (5 mm) conditions. Under euglycemic conditions glutamine uptake doubled, but ATP production from glutamine did not significantly change. A new parameter measuring the Warburg effect (the ratio of lactate production flux to pyruvate influx through the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier) was calculated to be 21, close to upper limit of oxidative metabolism. PMID:26703469

  17. Intermolecular Interactions in Crystalline Theobromine as Reflected in Electron Deformation Density and (13)C NMR Chemical Shift Tensors.

    PubMed

    Bouzková, Kateřina; Babinský, Martin; Novosadová, Lucie; Marek, Radek

    2013-06-11

    An understanding of the role of intermolecular interactions in crystal formation is essential to control the generation of diverse crystalline forms which is an important concern for pharmaceutical industry. Very recently, we reported a new approach to interpret the relationships between intermolecular hydrogen bonding, redistribution of electron density in the system, and NMR chemical shifts (Babinský et al. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 497). Here, we employ this approach to characterize a full set of crystal interactions in a sample of anhydrous theobromine as reflected in (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs). The important intermolecular contacts are identified by comparing the DFT-calculated NMR CSTs for an isolated theobromine molecule and for clusters composed of several molecules as selected from the available X-ray diffraction data. Furthermore, electron deformation density (EDD) and shielding deformation density (SDD) in the proximity of the nuclei involved in the proposed interactions are calculated and visualized. In addition to the recently reported observations for hydrogen bonding, we focus here particularly on the stacking interactions. Although the principal relations between the EDD and CST for hydrogen bonding (HB) and stacking interactions are similar, the real-space consequences are rather different. Whereas the C-H···X hydrogen bonding influences predominantly and significantly the in-plane principal component of the (13)C CST perpendicular to the HB path and the C═O···H hydrogen bonding modulates both in-plane components of the carbonyl (13)C CST, the stacking modulates the out-of-plane electron density resulting in weak deshielding (2-8 ppm) of both in-plane principal components of the CST and weak shielding (∼ 5 ppm) of the out-of-plane component. The hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions may add to or subtract from one another to produce total values observed experimentally. On the example of theobromine, we demonstrate

  18. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments. PMID:27074782

  19. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments.

  20. Characterization of alkyl carbon in forest soils by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy and dipolar dephasing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kogel-Knabner, I.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Samples obtained from forest soils at different stages of decomposition were treated sequentially with chloroform/methanol (extraction of lipids), sulfuric acid (hydrolysis), and sodium chlorite (delignification) to enrich them in refractory alkyl carbon. As revealed by NMR spectroscopy, this treatment yielded residues with high contents of alkyl carbon. In the NMR spectra of residues obtained from litter samples, resonances for carbohydrates are also present, indicating that these carbohydrates are tightly bound to the alkyl carbon structures. During decomposition in the soils this resistant carbohydrate fraction is lost almost completely. In the litter samples the alkyl carbon shows a dipolar dephasing behavior indicative of two structural components, a rigid and a more mobile component. As depth and decomposition increase, only the rigid component is observed. This fact could be due to selective degradation of the mobile component or to changes in molecular mobility during decomposition, e.g., because of an increase in cross linking or contact with the mineral matter of the soil.

  1. 13C MAS NMR studies of crystalline cholesterol and lipid mixtures modeling atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, W; Hamilton, J A

    1996-01-01

    Cholesterol and cholesteryl esters are the predominant lipids of atherosclerotic plaques. To provide fundamental data for the quantitative study of plaque lipids in situ, crystalline cholesterol (CHOL) and CHOL/cholesteryl ester (CE) mixtures with other lipids were studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle-sample spinning. Highly distinctive spectra for three different crystalline structures of CHOL were obtained. When CHOL crystals were mixed with isotropic CE oil, solubilized CHOL (approximately 13 mol % CHOL) was detected by characteristic resonances such as C5, C6, and C3; the excess crystalline CHOL (either anhydrous or monohydrate) remained in its original crystalline structure, without being affected by the coexisting CE. By use of 13C-enriched CHOL, the solubility of CHOL in the CE liquid-crystalline phase (approximately 8 mol %) was measured. When phosphatidylcholine was hydrated in presence of CHOL and CE, magic-angle-sampling nuclear magnetic resonance revealed liquid-crystalline CHOL/phosphatidylcholine multilayers with approximately an equal molar ratio of CHOL/phosphatidylcholine. Excess CHOL existed in the monohydrate crystalline form, and CE in separate oil or crystalline phases, depending on the temperature. The magic-angle-sampling nuclear magnetic resonance protocol for identifying different lipid phases was applied to intact (ex vivo) atherosclerotic plaques of cholesterol-fed rabbits. Liquid, liquid-crystalline, and solid phases of CE were characterized. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8913623

  2. Substituent effects in the 13C NMR chemical shifts of alpha-mono-substituted acetonitriles.

    PubMed

    Reis, Adriana K C A; Rittner, Roberto

    2007-03-01

    13C chemical shifts empirical calculations, through a very simple additivity relationship, for the alpha-methylene carbon of some alpha-mono-substituted acetonitriles, Y-CH(2)-CN (Y=H, F, Cl, Br, I, OMe, OEt, SMe, SEt, NMe(2), NEt(2), Me and Et), lead to similar, or even better, results in comparison to the reported values obtained through Quantum Mechanics methods. The observed deviations, for some substituents, are very similar for both approaches. This divergence between experimental and calculated, either empirically or theoretically, values are smaller than for the corresponding acetones, amides, acetic acids and methyl esters, which had been named non-additivity effects (or intramolecular interaction chemical shifts, ICS) and attributed to some orbital interactions. Here, these orbital interactions do not seem to be the main reason for the non-additivity effects in the empirical calculations, which must be due solely to the magnetic anisotropy of the heavy atom present in the substituent. These deviations, which were also observed in the theoretical calculations, were attributed in that case to the non-inclusion of relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling in the Hamiltonian. Some divergence is also observed for the cyano carbon chemical shifts, probably due to the same reasons.

  3. Plant Resources, (13)C-NMR Spectral Characteristic and Pharmacological Activities of Dammarane-Type Triterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jingya; Zheng, Chang; Qu, Lu; Liu, Yanxia; Han, Lifeng; Yu, Haiyang; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Dammarane-type triterpenoids (DTT) widely distribute in various medicinal plants. They have generated a great amount of interest in the field of new drug research and development. Generally, DTT are the main bioactive ingredients abundant in Araliaceae plants, such as Panax ginseng, P. japonicas, P. notoginseng, and P. quinquefolium. Aside from Araliaceae, DTT also distribute in other families, including Betulaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Meliaceae, Rhamnaceae, and Scrophulariaceae. Until now, about 136 species belonging to 46 families have been reported to contain DTT. In this article, the genus classifications of plant sources of the botanicals that contain DTT are reviewed, with particular focus on the NMR spectral features and pharmacological activities based on literature reports, which may be benefit for the development of new drugs or food additives. PMID:27529202

  4. Recent applications of /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy to biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in conjunction with carbon-13 labelling, is a powerful new analytical technique for the study of metabolic pathways and structural components in intact organelles, cells, and tissues. The technique can provide, rapidly and non-destructively, unique information about: the architecture and dynamics of structural components; the nature of the intracellular environment; and metabolic pathways and relative fluxes of individual carbon atoms. With the aid of results recently obtained by us and those reported by a number of other laboratories, the problems and potentialities of the technique will be reviewed with emphasis on: the viscosities of intracellular fluids; the structure and dynamics of the components of membranes; and the primary and secondary metabolic pathways of carbon in microorganisms, plants, and mammalian cells in culture.

  5. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and elemental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, S.M.; Chen, C.R.; Xu, Z.H.; Nelson, P.N.; Boyd, S.E.; Meszaros, I.; Chan, K.Y.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state {sup 13}C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  6. Hydration properties of regioselectively etherified celluloses monitored by 2H and 13C solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Schöbitz, Michael; Schaller, Jens

    2012-06-20

    The hydration properties of 2,3-O-hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and 2,3-O-hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) were analyzed by multi-nuclear solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy. By 13C single-pulse (SP) MAS and cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, differences between the immobile regions and all parts of the polysaccharides were detected as a function of hydration. Complementary information about the water environments was observed by 2H MAS NMR. By this approach it was demonstrated that side chains in 2,3-O-HPC and 2,3-O-HEC were easier to hydrate than the cellulose backbone. Furthermore the motion of water was more restricted (slower) in 2,3-O-HPC than in 2,3-O-HEC. For both polysaccharides the hydration could be explained by a two-step process: in step one increased ordering of the immobile regions occurs after which the entire polymer is hydrated in step two.

  7. Quantitative (13)C Solid-State NMR Spectra by Multiple-Contact Cross-polarization for Drug Delivery: From Active Principles to Excipients and Drug Carriers.

    PubMed

    Saïdi, Fadila; Taulelle, Francis; Martineau, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    In this contribution, we present an analysis of the main parameters influencing the efficiency of the (1)H → (13)C multiple-contact cross-polarization nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment in the context of solid pharmaceutical materials. Using the optimum experimental conditions, quantitative (13)C NMR spectra are then obtained for porous metal-organic frameworks (potential drug carriers) and for components present in drug formulations (active principle ingredient and excipients, amorphous or crystalline). Finally, we show that mixtures of components can also be quantified with this method and, hence, that it represents an ideal tool for quantification of pharmaceutical formulations by (13)C cross-polarization under magic-angle spinning NMR in the industry as it is robust and easy to set up, much faster than direct (13)C polarization and is efficient for samples at natural abundance. PMID:27372550

  8. Vacuolar glyphosate-sequestration correlates with glyphosate resistance in ryegrass (Lolium spp.) from Australia, South America, and Europe: a 31P NMR investigation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xia; d'Avignon, D André; Ackerman, Joseph J H; Collavo, Alberto; Sattin, Maurizio; Ostrander, Elizabeth L; Hall, Erin L; Sammons, R Douglas; Preston, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Lolium spp., ryegrass, variants from Australia, Brazil, Chile, and Italy showing differing levels of glyphosate resistance were examined by (31)P NMR. Extents of glyphosate (i) resistance (LD(50)), (ii) inhibition of 5-enopyruvyl-shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) activity (IC(50)), and (iii) translocation were quantified for glyphosate-resistant (GR) and glyphosate-sensitive (GS) Lolium multiflorum Lam. variants from Chile and Brazil. For comparison, LD(50) and IC(50) data for Lolium rigidum Gaudin variants from Italy were also analyzed. All variants showed similar cellular uptake of glyphosate by (31)P NMR. All GR variants showed glyphosate sequestration within the cell vacuole, whereas there was minimal or no vacuole sequestration in the GS variants. The extent of vacuole sequestration correlated qualitatively with the level of resistance. Previous (31)P NMR studies of horseweed ( Conyza canadensis (L.) Cronquist) revealed that glyphosate sequestration imparted glyphosate resistance. Data presented herein suggest that glyphosate vacuolar sequestration is strongly contributing, if not the major contributing, resistance mechanism in ryegrass as well.

  9. Probing the interface of core shell particles of GaPO 4 and AlPO 4 by 31P MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulshreshtha, S. K.; Jayakumar, O. D.; Vishwanadh, B.; Sudarsan, V.

    2011-02-01

    Hexagonal GaPO 4, pseudo-hexagonal AlPO 4 and the core shell particles of these phosphates have been prepared in ethylene glycol medium at 180 °C, followed by annealing at 900 °C for 24 h and investigated by powder X-ray diffraction and 31P Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) techniques. The 31P NMR studies of these core shell particles showed a multi-component NMR pattern consisting of five peaks originating due to the distinct structural configurations formed by the varying number of Al 3+ and Ga 3+ as the next nearest neighbors around the probe 31P nuclei of the PO 4 tetrahedron. Existence of different PO 4 structural units with varying number of Al 3+ and Ga 3+ as its next nearest neighbors around P nucleus at the interface of the core shell particles has been confirmed. These results clearly indicate the bond formation at the interface between the core and shell material for these particles.

  10. 1H and 13C NMR signal assignment of cucurbitacin derivatives from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrader and Ecballium elaterium L. (Cucurbitaceae).

    PubMed

    Seger, Christoph; Sturm, Sonja; Mair, Maria-Elisabeth; Ellmerer, Ernst P; Stuppner, Hermann

    2005-06-01

    2D NMR-derived 1H and 13C NMR signal assignments of six structurally closely related cucurbitacin derivatives are presented. The investigated 2-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylcucurbitacins I, J, K, and L were obtained from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrader whereas the aglyca cucurbitacin E and I were isolated from Ecballium elaterium L.

  11. 31P NMR relaxation of cortical bone mineral at multiple magnetic field strengths and levels of demineralization.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Alan C; Wright, Alexander C; Wehrli, Suzanne L; Ong, Henry H; Li, Cheng; Wehrli, Felix W

    2013-09-01

    Recent work has shown that solid-state (1) H and (31) P MRI can provide detailed insight into bone matrix and mineral properties, thereby potentially enabling differentiation of osteoporosis from osteomalacia. However, (31) P MRI of bone mineral is hampered by unfavorable relaxation properties. Hence, accurate knowledge of these properties is critical to optimizing MRI of bone phosphorus. In this work, (31) P MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was predicted on the basis of T1 and T2 * (effective transverse relaxation time) measured in lamb bone at six field strengths (1.5-11.7 T) and subsequently verified by 3D ultra-short echo-time and zero echo-time imaging. Further, T1 was measured in deuterium-exchanged bone and partially demineralized bone. (31) P T2 * was found to decrease from 220.3 ± 4.3 µs to 98.0 ± 1.4 µs from 1.5 to 11.7 T, and T1 to increase from 12.8 ± 0.5 s to 97.3 ± 6.4 s. Deuteron substitution of exchangeable water showed that 76% of the (31) P longitudinal relaxation rate is due to (1) H-(31) P dipolar interactions. Lastly, hypomineralization was found to decrease T1, which may have implications for (31) P MRI based mineralization density quantification. Despite the steep decrease in the T2 */T1 ratio, SNR should increase with field strength as B0 (0.4) for sample-dominated noise and as B0 (1.1) for coil-dominated noise. This was confirmed by imaging experiments. PMID:23505120

  12. Electronic states and molecular dynamics of single-component molecular conductors [M (tmdt) 2] (M =Ni , Pt) studied by 13C and 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Rina; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Yoshimura, Masahide; Gangi, Hiro; Kanoda, Kazushi; Zhou, Biao; Idobata, Yuki; Kobayashi, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The molecular conductors [M(tmdt) 2] (M =Ni , Pt) consisting of single molecular species are investigated with 13C NMR and 1H NMR. The temperature dependences of the 13C NMR shift and relaxation rate provide microscopic evidence for the metallic nature with appreciable electron correlations. Both compounds exhibit an anomalous frequency-dependent enhancement in the 1H nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate in a wide temperature range. These observations signify the presence of extraordinary molecular motions with low energy excitations.

  13. Complete assignments of (1)H and (13)C NMR data for two 3beta,8beta-epoxymexicanolides from the fruit of a Chinese mangrove Xylocarpus granatum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Xiao, Zhihui; Song, Yang; Zhang, Si; Xiao, Qiang; Ma, Cha; Ding, Haixin; Li, Qingxin

    2006-01-01

    Three 3beta,8beta-epoxymexicanolides, including xyloccensin K, 6-acetoxycedrodorin and a new one named xyloccensin W, were isolated from the fruit of a Chinese mangrove Xylocarpus granatum. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analyses. The first complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR data for xyloccensin W was achieved by means of 2D NMR techniques, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY spectra. In addition, the confusion of (1)H and (13)C NMR data previously reported for xyloccensin K was clarified.

  14. 13C and 1H chemical shift assignments and conformation confirmation of trimedlure-Y via 2-D NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warthen, J. D.; Waters, R. M.; McGovern, T. P.

    The conformation of 1,1-dimethylethyl 5-chloro- cis-2-methylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate (trimedlure-Y) was confirmed as 1,2,5 equatorial, axial, equatorial via 13C, 1H, APT, CSCM and COSY NMR analyses. The carbon and proton nuclei in trimedlure-Y and the previously unassigned eight cyclohexyl protons (1.50-2.60 ppm) in 1,1-dimethylethyl 5-chloro- trans-2-methylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate (trimedlure-B 1; 1,2,5 equatorial, equatorial, equatorial) were also characterized by these methods. The effects of the 2-CH 3 in the axial or equatorial conformation upon the chemical shifts of the other nuclei in the molecule are discussed.

  15. Interactions of D-cellobiose with selected chloride salts: A 13C NMR and FT-IR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasekara, Ananda S.; Wiredu, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The interactions of cellulose model compound D-cellobiose with chloride salts of Zn2 +, Ca2 +, Li+, Sn2 +, La3 +, Mg2 +, K+ and NH4+ were evaluated by measuring the 13C NMR chemical shift changes (Δδ) of the disaccharide due to the addition of salts in D2O. The KCl and NH4Cl showed similar Δδ changes due to interactions only with the Cl- anion. Whereas other chloride salts showed interactions with both cation and anion. Among these salts the total interactions are in the order: Zn2 + > Sn2 + > Li+ > Ca2 + ~ La3 + > Mg2 +. The FT-IR spectra of D-cellobiose-chloride salt 1:2 mixtures also indicate that KCl and NH4Cl interacts similarly with D-cellobiose in the solid state.

  16. 13C direct detected COCO-TOCSY: A tool for sequence specific assignment and structure determination in protonless NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balayssac, Stéphane; Jiménez, Beatriz; Piccioli, Mario

    2006-10-01

    A novel experiment is proposed to provide inter-residue sequential correlations among carbonyl spins in 13C detected, protonless NMR experiments. The COCO-TOCSY experiment connects, in proteins, two carbonyls separated from each other by three, four or even five bonds. The quantitative analysis provides structural information on backbone dihedral angles ϕ as well as on the side chain dihedral angles of Asx and Glx residues. This is the first dihedral angle constraint that can be obtained via a protonless approach. About 75% of backbone carbonyls in Calbindin D 9K, a 75 aminoacid dicalcium protein, could be sequentially connected via a COCO-TOCSY spectrum. 49 3J values were measured and related to backbone ϕ angles. Structural information can be extended to the side chain orientation of aminoacids containing carbonyl groups. Additionally, long range homonuclear coupling constants, 4JCC and 5JCC, could be measured. This constitutes an unprecedented case for proteins of medium and small size.

  17. Brominated Compounds from Marine Sponges of the Genus Aplysina and a Compilation of Their 13C NMR Spectral Data

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Narlize Silva; Montes, Ricardo Carneiro; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; da Cunha, Emidio V. L.; de Athayde-Filho, Petronio Filgueiras; Rodrigues, Luis Cezar; da Silva Dias, Celidarque; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria

    2011-01-01

    Aplysina is the best representative genus of the family Aplysinidae. Halogenated substances are its main class of metabolites. These substances contribute greatly to the chemotaxonomy and characterization of the sponges belonging to this genus. Due to their pharmacological activities, these alkaloids are of special interest. The chemistry of halogenated substances and of the alkaloids has long been extensively studied in terrestrial organisms, while the number of marine organisms studied has just started to increase in the last decades. This review describes 101 halogenated substances from 14 species of Aplysina from different parts of the world. These substances can be divided into the following classes: bromotyramines (A), cavernicolins (B), hydroverongiaquinols (C), bromotyrosineketals (D), bromotyrosine lactone derivatives (E), oxazolidones (F), spiroisoxazolines (G), verongiabenzenoids (H), verongiaquinols (I), and dibromocyclohexadienes (J). A compilation of their 13C NMR data is also part of the review. For this purpose 138 references were consulted. PMID:22163189

  18. Investigation of gamma-irradiated vegetable seeds with high-resolution solid-state 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Michel; Maron, Sébastien; Foray, Marie Françoise; Berger, Maurice; Guillermo, Armel

    2004-04-01

    13C solid-state NMR was used to investigate the effects of gamma radiation on vegetable seeds, Pisum sativum and Latuca sativa, at absorbed doses that inhibit their germination. By combining single-pulse excitation and cross-polarization experiments under magic angle spinning, both liquid and solid domains of seeds can be characterized. We showed that the liquid domains, mostly made of triacylglycerols (TAG), of vegetable seeds are not sensitive to radiation. The main structural changes have been observed in the embryonic axes of seeds when the seeds are water-imbibed before irradiation. These results rule out a starting hypothesis concerning the potential role of TAG contained in oil bodies as a potential source of aldehydes that could further react with DNA moiety.

  19. Solid state 13C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy of the cocoon silk of two common spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramanti, Emilia; Catalano, Donata; Forte, Claudia; Giovanneschi, Mario; Masetti, Massimo; Veracini, Carlo Alberto

    2005-11-01

    The structure of the silk from cocoons of two common spiders, Araneus diadematus (family Araneidae) and Achaearanea tepidariorum (family Theridiidae) was investigated by means of 13C solid state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopies. The combined use of these two techniques allowed us to highlight differences in the two samples. The cocoon silk of Achaearanea tepidariorum is essentially constituted by helical and β-sheet structures, whereas that of Araneus diadematus shows a more complex structure, containing also β-strands and β-turns. Moreover, the former silk is essentially crystalline while the latter contains more mobile domains. The structural differences of the two cocoon silks are ascribed to the different habitat of the two species.

  20. Quantification of taxanes in a leaf and twig extract from Taxus baccata L. using 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Mathieu; Bighelli, Ange; Castola, Vincent; Tomi, Félix; Casanova, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    In the course of our ongoing work on the chemical characterization of Taxus baccata L. growing wild in Corsica, we have developed and validated a method for direct quantification of taxane derivatives by (13)C NMR using 10-deacetylbaccatin III as reference compound and 1,6-hexanediol as internal standard. We have observed good accuracy (relative errors between 0.3% and 3.5%), linearity (R(2) = 0.999) and precision (reproducibility 8.5 mg ± 1.1%) of the measurements. The experimental procedure was applied to the quantification of six identified taxanes in a fraction of chromatography of a methanol extract of T. baccata leaves. This method can be applied to other compounds bearing the taxane skeleton.

  1. Enantiomeric differentiation of oxygenated p-menthane derivatives by 13C NMR using Yb(hfc)3.

    PubMed

    Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Blanc, Marie-Cécile; Vellutini, Muriel; Bradesi, Pascale; Casanova, Joseph; Tomi, Félix

    2008-12-01

    The (13)C NMR behaviour of 21 p-menthanic terpene bearing an oxygenated function (alcohol, ketone, acetate) was examined in the presence of a chiral lanthanide shift reagent (Yb(hfc)(3)). For each monocyclic compound, we measured the lanthanide-induced shift (LIS) on the signals of the carbons and the splitting of signals allowing the enantiomeric differentiation. Some general features were found about their LIS behaviour: experimental data establishing distinct patterns for carvomenthone-like compounds and menthone-like compounds. The enantiomeric splitting was observed for the majority of signals in the spectrum of each compound. In the case of alcohols and acetates, the influence of the relative stereochemistry (cis vs trans) of isopropyl(ene) and the binding function was discussed.

  2. Identification of Li-Ion Battery SEI Compounds through (7)Li and (13)C Solid-State MAS NMR Spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huff, Laura A; Tavassol, Hadi; Esbenshade, Jennifer L; Xing, Wenting; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-13

    Solid-state (7)Li and (13)C MAS NMR spectra of cycled graphitic Li-ion anodes demonstrate SEI compound formation upon lithiation that is followed by changes in the SEI upon delithiation. Solid-state (13)C DPMAS NMR shows changes in peaks associated with organic solvent compounds (ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate, EC/DMC) upon electrochemical cycling due to the formation of and subsequent changes in the SEI compounds. Solid-state (13)C NMR spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time measurements of lithiated Li-ion anodes and reference poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) powders, along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry results, indicate that large-molecular-weight polymers are formed in the SEI layers of the discharged anodes. MALDI-TOF MS and NMR spectroscopy results additionally indicate that delithiated anodes exhibit a larger number of SEI products than is found in lithiated anodes. PMID:26653886

  3. Temperature dependence of the folding and unfolding kinetics of the GCN4 leucine zipper via 13C(alpha)-NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Holtzer, M E; Bretthorst, G L; d'Avignon, D A; Angeletti, R H; Mints, L; Holtzer, A

    2001-01-01

    Studies by one-dimensional NMR are reported on the interconversion of folded and unfolded forms of the GCN4 leucine zipper in neutral saline buffer. The peptide bears 99% 13C(alpha) labels at three sites: V9, L12, and G31. Time-domain 13C(alpha)-NMR spectra are interpreted by global Bayesian lineshape analysis to extract the rate constants for both unfolding and folding as functions of temperature in the range 47-71 degrees C. The data are well fit by the assumption that the same rate constants apply at each labeled site, confirming that only two conformational states need be considered. Results show that 1) both processes require a free energy of activation; 2) unfolding is kinetically enthalpy-opposed and entropy-driven, while folding is the opposite; and 3) the transition state dimer ensemble averages approximately 40% helical. The activation parameters for unfolding, derived from NMR data at the elevated temperatures where both conformations are populated, lead to estimates of the rate constant at low temperatures (5-15 degrees C) that agree with extant values determined by stopped-flow CD via dilution from denaturing media. However, the corresponding estimated values for the folding rate constant are larger by two to three orders of magnitude than those obtained by stopped flow. We propose that this apparent disagreement is caused by the necessity, in the stopped-flow experiment, for initiation of new helices as the highly denaturant-unfolded molecule adjusts to the newly created benign solvent conditions. This must reduce the success rate of collisions in producing the folded molecule. In the NMR determinations, however, the unfolded chains always have a small, but essential, helix content that makes such initiation unnecessary. Support for this hypothesis is adduced from recent extant experiments on the helix-coil transition in single-chain helical peptides and from demonstration that the folding rate constants for coiled coils, as obtained by stopped flow

  4. Effects of osmotic stress on Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus: 13C-edited 1H-NMR studies of osmolyte turnover.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, R A; Roberts, M F

    1999-04-19

    In vivo NMR studies of the thermophilic archaeon Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, with sodium formate as the substrate for methanogenesis, were used to monitor formate utilization, methane production, and osmolyte pool synthesis and turnover under different conditions. The rate of formate conversion to CO2 and H2 decreased for cells adapted to higher external NaCl, consistent with the slower doubling times for cells adapted to high external NaCl. However, when cells grown at one NaCl concentration were resuspended at a different NaCl, formate utilization rates increased. Production of methane from 13C pools varied little with external NaCl in nonstressed culture, but showed larger changes when cells were osmotically shocked. In the absence of osmotic stress, all three solutes used for osmotic balance in these cells, l-alpha-glutamate, beta-glutamate, and Nepsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine, had 13C turnover rates that increased with external NaCl concentration. Upon hyperosmotic stress, there was a net synthesis of alpha-glutamate (over a 30-min time-scale) with smaller amounts of beta-glutamate and little if any of the zwitterion Nepsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine. This is a marked contrast to adapted growth in high NaCl where Nepsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine is the dominant osmolyte. Hypoosmotic shock selectively enhanced beta-glutamate and Nepsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine turnover. These results are discussed in terms of the osmoadaptation strategies of M. thermolithotrophicus.

  5. Molecular level investigations of phosphate sorption on corundum (α-Al2O3) by 31P solid state NMR, ATR-FTIR and quantum chemical calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Pierre-Louis, Andro-Marc; Kwon, Kideok D.; Kubicki, James D.; Strongin, Daniel R.; Phillips, Brian L.

    2013-04-01

    Phosphate sorption at the corundum (α-Al2O3)/water interface was investigated as a function of phosphate concentration (0.1-1 mM) and pH (3-11) by 31P solid state NMR spectroscopy, ATR-FTIR, and quantum chemical calculation. The 31P NMR spectra indicate that under these experimental conditions phosphate adsorbs onto corundum mainly as inner-sphere complexes that yield a peak at δP = -2.8 ppm with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 9.2 ppm, with a small amount aluminum phosphate surface precipitates as suggested by an NMR signal observed from δP = -12 to -20 ppm. We employed 31P{27Al} rotational echo adiabatic passage double resonance (REAPDOR) to further analyze the phosphate adsorption samples prepared at pH 5 and 9 in order to determine the phosphate/Al coordination. To aid interpretation of the NMR data, a series of bidentate and monodentate structural models of phosphate adsorbed on corundum (0 0 1) and (0 1 2) surfaces were calculated using density function theory (DFT). By comparing the experimental REAPDOR curves and those simulated from these models, we can assign the dominant peaks to bidentate binuclear surface complexes. Formation of bidentate binuclear surface complexes is supported by the ATR/FTIR spectra combined with DFT calculation, which further suggests a mixture of non-protonated bidentate and mono-protonated bidentate surface complexes on the corundum surface at pH 5. At pH 9, both NMR and ATR/FTIR indicate the formation of bidentate surface complexes on corundum surface.

  6. [31P-NMR analysis of high energy phosphorous compounds (ATP and phosphocreatine) in the living rat brain--effects of halothane anesthesia and a hypoxic condition].

    PubMed

    Yuasa, T; Miyatake, T; Kuwabara, T; Umeda, M; Eguchi, K

    1983-11-01

    31phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) measurements have provided new and valuable insights for studying the metabolism of living systems. The aim of this paper is to introduce a technique of application of 31P-NMR measurements using a surface coil method, and to discuss the effects of halothane anesthesia and hypoxic hypoxia on the energetic metabolism of intact rat brains. All measurements were made using a JEOL FX 270 spectrometer with a super conducting magnet of 54-mm bore diameter. The magnetic field intensity of this machine is 6.3 tesla, and the resonance frequency used for 31P was 109.14 MHz. We remodelled an ordinary probe to take a live rat, and the animals were made to inhale anesthetic halothane or mixture of oxygen and nitrogen at various concentrations controlled by a flow regulator. The best conditions for measurements with our surface coil method were determined in this study as follows: (1) 90 degrees pulse width and selectivity, Fig. 1 shows signal selectivity in depthwise direction changed with 90 degrees pulse width, which was set to 20 microseconds. (2) Sensitivity and resolution; To obtain a spectrum of 31P-NMR from a rat brain 500 accumulations of free induction decays were considered suitable for both time and space resolution. Fig. 2 shows variations of signal intensity with pulse repetition time, which was set to 2 sec. It took about 17 min for averaging to get a spectrogram. (3) Quantitative accuracy and qualification; As shown in Fig. 3, a linear relationship was found between the signal intensity of beta-phosphate of ATP and the concentration of ATP solutions, thus proving the quantitative accuracy of our systems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6661335

  7. Probing lipid-cholesterol interactions in DOPC/eSM/Chol and DOPC/DPPC/Chol model lipid rafts with DSC and (13)C solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Kim, Jihyun; Holland, Gregory P

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between cholesterol (Chol) and phospholipids in bilayers was investigated for the ternary model lipid rafts, DOPC/eSM/Chol and DOPC/DPPC/Chol, with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) solid-state NMR. The enthalpy and transition temperature (Tm) of the Lα liquid crystalline phase transition from DSC was used to probe the thermodynamics of the different lipids in the two systems as a function of Chol content. The main chain (13)C (CH2)n resonance is resolved in the (13)C CP-MAS NMR spectra for the unsaturated (DOPC) and saturated (eSM or DPPC) chain lipid in the ternary lipid raft mixtures. The (13)C chemical shift of this resonance can be used to detect differences in chain ordering and overall interactions with Chol for the different lipid constituents in the ternary systems. The combination of DSC and (13)C CP-MAS NMR results indicate that there is a preferential interaction between SM and Chol below Tm for the DOPC/eSM/Chol system when the Chol content is ≤20mol%. In contrast, no preferential interaction between Chol and DPPC is observed in the DOPC/DPPC/Chol system above or below Tm. Finally, (13)C CP-MAS NMR resolves two Chol environments in the DOPC/eSM/Chol system below Tm at Chol contents >20mol% while, a single Chol environment is observed for DOPC/DPPC/Chol at all compositions.

  8. A novel approach to the rapid assignment of (13)C NMR spectra of major components of vegetable oils such as avocado, mango kernel and macadamia nut oils.

    PubMed

    Retief, Liezel; McKenzie, Jean M; Koch, Klaus R

    2009-09-01

    Assignment of (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of major fatty acid components of South African produced vegetable oils was attempted using a method in which the vegetable oil was spiked with a standard triacylglycerol. This proved to be inadequate and therefore a new rapid and potentially generic graphical linear correlation method is proposed for assignment of the (13)C NMR spectra of major fatty acid components of apricot kernel, avocado pear, grapeseed, macadamia nut, mango kernel and marula vegetable oils. In this graphical correlation method, chemical shifts of fatty acids present in a known standard triacylglycerol is plotted against the corresponding chemical shifts of fatty acids present in the vegetable oils. This new approach (under carefully defined conditions and concentrations) was found especially useful for spectrally crowded regions where significant peak overlap occurs and was validated with the well-known (13)C NMR spectrum of olive oil which has been extensively reported in the literature. In this way, a full assignment of the (13)C{1H} NMR spectra of the vegetable oils, as well as tripalmitolein was readily achieved and the resonances belonging to the palmitoleic acid component of the triacylglycerols in the case of macadamia nut and avocado pear oil resonances were also assigned for the first time in the (13)C NMR spectra of these oils.

  9. A novel approach to the rapid assignment of (13)C NMR spectra of major components of vegetable oils such as avocado, mango kernel and macadamia nut oils.

    PubMed

    Retief, Liezel; McKenzie, Jean M; Koch, Klaus R

    2009-09-01

    Assignment of (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of major fatty acid components of South African produced vegetable oils was attempted using a method in which the vegetable oil was spiked with a standard triacylglycerol. This proved to be inadequate and therefore a new rapid and potentially generic graphical linear correlation method is proposed for assignment of the (13)C NMR spectra of major fatty acid components of apricot kernel, avocado pear, grapeseed, macadamia nut, mango kernel and marula vegetable oils. In this graphical correlation method, chemical shifts of fatty acids present in a known standard triacylglycerol is plotted against the corresponding chemical shifts of fatty acids present in the vegetable oils. This new approach (under carefully defined conditions and concentrations) was found especially useful for spectrally crowded regions where significant peak overlap occurs and was validated with the well-known (13)C NMR spectrum of olive oil which has been extensively reported in the literature. In this way, a full assignment of the (13)C{1H} NMR spectra of the vegetable oils, as well as tripalmitolein was readily achieved and the resonances belonging to the palmitoleic acid component of the triacylglycerols in the case of macadamia nut and avocado pear oil resonances were also assigned for the first time in the (13)C NMR spectra of these oils. PMID:19544589

  10. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, S M; Chen, C R; Xu, Z H; Nelson, P N; Boyd, S E; Meszaros, I; Chan, K Y

    2013-11-01

    Using solid state (13)C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  11. In situ measurement of magnesium carbonate formation from CO2 using static high-pressure and -temperature 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Surface, J Andrew; Skemer, Philip; Hayes, Sophia E; Conradi, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    We explore a new in situ NMR spectroscopy method that possesses the ability to monitor the chemical evolution of supercritical CO(2) in relevant conditions for geological CO(2) sequestration. As a model, we use the fast reaction of the mineral brucite, Mg(OH)(2), with supercritical CO(2) (88 bar) in aqueous conditions at 80 °C. The in situ conversion of CO(2) into metastable and stable carbonates is observed throughout the reaction. After more than 58 h of reaction, the sample was depressurized and analyzed using in situ Raman spectroscopy, where the laser was focused on the undisturbed products through the glass reaction tube. Postreaction, ex situ analysis was performed on the extracted and dried products using Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and magic-angle spinning (1)H-decoupled (13)C NMR. These separate methods of analysis confirmed a spatial dependence of products, possibly caused by a gradient of reactant availability, pH, and/or a reaction mechanism that involves first forming hydroxy-hydrated (basic, hydrated) carbonates that convert to the end-product, anhydrous magnesite. This carbonation reaction illustrates the importance of static (unmixed) reaction systems at sequestration-like conditions. PMID:22676479

  12. (13)C-detected NMR experiments for automatic resonance assignment of IDPs and multiple-fixing SMFT processing.

    PubMed

    Dziekański, Paweł; Grudziąż, Katarzyna; Jarvoll, Patrik; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) have recently attracted much interest, due to their role in many biological processes, including signaling and regulation mechanisms. High-dimensional (13)C direct-detected NMR experiments have proven exceptionally useful in case of IDPs, providing spectra with superior peak dispersion. Here, two such novel experiments recorded with non-uniform sampling are introduced, these are 5D HabCabCO(CA)NCO and 5D HNCO(CA)NCO. Together with the 4D (HACA)CON(CA)NCO, an extension of the previously published 3D experiments (Pantoja-Uceda and Santoro in J Biomol NMR 59:43-50, 2014. doi: 10.1007/s10858-014-9827-1), they form a set allowing for complete and reliable resonance assignment of difficult IDPs. The processing is performed with sparse multidimensional Fourier transform based on the concept of restricting (fixing) some of spectral dimensions to a priori known resonance frequencies. In our study, a multiple-fixing method was developed, that allows easy access to spectral data. The experiments were tested on a resolution-demanding alpha-synuclein sample. Due to superior peak dispersion in high-dimensional spectrum and availability of the sequential connectivities between four consecutive residues, the overwhelming majority of resonances could be assigned automatically using the TSAR program. PMID:25902761

  13. (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments for five anthraquinones from the mangrove endophytic fungus Halorosellinia sp. (No. 1403).

    PubMed

    Xia, Xue-Kui; Huang, Hua-Rong; She, Zhi-Gang; Shao, Chang-Lun; Liu, Fan; Cai, Xiao-Ling; Vrijmoed, L L P; Lin, Yong-Cheng

    2007-11-01

    We report the unambiguous assignments of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of two new natural products, namely, 1,4,5,6,7,9-hexahydroxy-2-methoxy-7-methyl-5beta,9beta,8abeta, 6alpha,10aalpha-hexahydroanthracen-10 (10aH)-one (1) and 1,4,6-trihydroxy-2-methoxy-7-methylanthracene-9, 10-dione (2), together with three known anthraquinones. These compounds were all isolated from the marine endophytic fungus No. 1403 collected from the South China Sea. Compounds 3 and 4 were isolated from the marine fungus for the first time. The structures were elucidated by the spectroscopic methods 1D and 2D NMR including COSY, HMQC, HMBC and NOE, and HREIMS. In our cytotoxicity assays, compound 5 showed cytotoxicity toward KB and KBv-200 cells with IC(50) of 1.40 and 2.58 microg/ml, respectively. In addition, the plausible biogenic relationship of compounds 1, 2, 3 and 4 is discussed.

  14. 13C MAS NMR evidence for a homogeneously ordered environment of tyrosine M210 in reaction centres of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shochat, S.; Gast, P.; Hoff, A. J.; Boender, G. J.; van Leeuwen, S.; van Liemt, W. B. S.; Vijgenboom, E.; Raap, J.; Lugtenburg, J.; de Groot, H. J. M.

    1995-01-01

    The initial electron transfer time in the photosynthetic reaction centre of Rhodobacter sphaeroides is highly sensitive to the replacement of tyrosine M210 by a tryptophan residue. Low-temperature magic angle spinning 13C NMR is used to study Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 (M)Y210W mutant reaction centres that are labelled with [4'- 13C]tyrosine. The response of (M)Y210 in R26 is assigned unambiguously to the most upfield narrow signal (linewidth 34 Hz) at σi = 152.2 ppm, in the region where non-hydrogen bonded tyrosine signals are expected. From the comparison with the signal of labelled R26 it follows that the chemical environment of the (M)Y210 label is unique. The Y(M)210 is in a structurally and electrostatically homogeneous region on the sensitivity scale of the MAS NMR technique. The environment of M210 is structurally stable and the observation of a narrow line shows that the (M)Y210 side chain can be considered static with respect to rotational diffusion on time scales as long as 10 -2s. The narrow signals from the remaining labels in the protein interior for the 2.4.1 (M)Y210W mutant are remarkably similar to those observed for R26. Using a commonly accepted ratio of 150 ppm shift per positive charge equivalent for aromatic carbons, the chemical shift differences between mutant and R26 translate into small variations of the order of 10 -3 electronic equivalents of charge polarization. Also the linewidths are similar, except for a narrow response at σi = 156.4 ppm that sharpens slightly in the (M)Y210W mutant. Thus, the influence of the (M)Y210W mutation on the global electrostatic properties and structure of the protein, as probed by the tyrosine labels, is minimal. This strongly argues against an explanation of slow and non-exponential electron transfer kinetics in the (M)Y210W RC in terms of loss of structural integrity upon mutation. In contrast, the NMR results strongly support current opinions that (M)Y210 contributes to the fine-tuning of the

  15. A simple mathematical model and practical approach for evaluating citric acid cycle fluxes in perfused rat hearts by 13C-NMR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tran-Dinh, S; Hoerter, J A; Mateo, P; Bouet, F; Herve, M

    1997-04-15

    We propose a simple mathematical model and a practical approach for evaluating the flux constant and the absolute value of flux in the citric acid cycle in perfused organs by 13C-NMR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. We demonstrate that 13C-NMR glutamate spectra are independent of the relative sizes of the mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments and the exchange rates of glutamates, unless there is a difference in 13C chemical shifts of glutamate carbons between the two compartments. Wistar rat hearts (five beating and four KCl-arrested hearts) were aerobically perfused with 100% enriched [2-(13)C]acetate and the kinetics of glutamate carbon labeling from perchloric acid extracts were studied at various perfusion times. Under our experimental conditions, the citric acid cycle flux constant, which represents the fraction of glutamate in exchange with the citric acid cycle per unit time, is about 0.350 +/- 0.003 min(-1) for beating hearts and 0.0741 +/- 0.004 min(-1) for KCl-arrested hearts. The absolute values of the citric acid flux for beating hearts and for KCl-arrested hearts are 1.06 +/- 0.06 micromol x min(-1) x mg(-1) and 0.21 +/- 0.02 micromol x min(-1) x g(-1), respectively. The fraction of unlabeled acetate determined from the proton signal of the methyl group is small and essentially the same in beating and arrested hearts (7.4 +/- 1.7% and 8.8 +/- 2.1%, respectively). Thus, the large difference in the Glu C2/C4 between beating and arrested hearts is not due to the important contribution from anaplerotic sources in arrested hearts but simply to a substantial difference in citric acid cycle fluxes. Our model fits the experimental data well, indicating a fast exchange between 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate in the mitochondria of rat hearts. Analysis of the flux constant, calculated from the half-time of glutamate C4 labeling given in the literature, allows for a comparison of the citric acid flux for various working conditions in different animal species.

  16. The mobility of chondroitin sulfate in articular and artificial cartilage characterized by 13C magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, Holger A; Schibur, Stephanie; Magalhães, Alvicler; de Azevedo, Eduardo R; Bonagamba, Tito J; Pascui, Ovidiu; Schulz, Ronny; Reichert, Detlef; Huster, Daniel

    2010-06-01

    We have studied the molecular dynamics of one of the major macromolecules in articular cartilage, chondroitin sulfate. Applying (13)C high-resolution magic-angle spinning NMR techniques, the NMR signals of all rigid macromolecules in cartilage can be suppressed, allowing the exclusive detection of the highly mobile chondroitin sulfate. The technique is also used to detect the chondroitin sulfate in artificial tissue-engineered cartilage. The tissue-engineered material that is based on matrix producing chondrocytes cultured in a collagen gel should provide properties as close as possible to those of the natural cartilage. Nuclear relaxation times of the chondroitin sulfate were determined for both tissues. Although T(1) relaxation times are rather similar, the T(2) relaxation in tissue-engineered cartilage is significantly shorter. This suggests that the motions of chondroitin sulfate in natural and artificial cartilage are different. The nuclear relaxation times of chondroitin sulfate in natural and tissue-engineered cartilage were modeled using a broad distribution function for the motional correlation times. Although the description of the microscopic molecular dynamics of the chondroitin sulfate in natural and artificial cartilage required the identical broad distribution functions for the correlation times of motion, significant differences in the correlation times of motion that are extracted from the model indicate that the artificial tissue does not fully meet the standards of the natural ideal. This could also be confirmed by macroscopic biomechanical elasticity measurements. Nevertheless, these results suggest that NMR is a useful tool for the investigation of the quality of artificially engineered tissue. PMID:20091673

  17. Photo-CIDNP 13C magic angle spinning NMR on bacterial reaction centres: exploring the electronic structure of the special pair and its surroundings.

    PubMed

    Matysik, J; Schulten, E; Alia; Gast, P; Raap, J; Lugtenburg, J; Hoff, A J; de Groot, H J

    2001-08-01

    Photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarisation (photo-CIDNP) in intact bacterial reaction centres has been observed by 13C-solid state NMR under continuous illumination with white light. Strong intensity enhancement of 13C NMR signals of the aromatic rings allows probing the electronic ground state of the two BChl cofactors of the special pair at the molecular scale with atomic selectivity. Differences between the two BChl cofactors are discussed. Several aliphatic 13C atoms of cofactors, as well as 13C atoms of the imidazole ring of histidine residue(s), show nuclear-spin polarisation to the same extent as the aromatic nuclei of the cofactors. Mechanisms and applications of polarisation transfer are discussed. PMID:11592409

  18. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of (13)C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our (13)C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the (13)C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the (13)C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in (13)C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  19. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of 13C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our 13C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the 13C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the 13C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in 13C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  20. Synthesis of D-[U-{sup 13}C]Glucal, D-[U-{sup 13}C] Galactal, and L-[U-{sup 13}C]Fucose for NMR structure studies of oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.; Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III

    1996-12-31

    The role of carbohydrates is well recognized in a variety of important biological phenomena such as cell surface recognition. Recent advances in carbohydrate chemistry, including the development of solid phase synthesis methods, have helped to provide significant quantities of material by offering general protocols for synthesis of well-defined, pure material. However, the study of the solution structure of oligosaccharides by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been hampered by the lack of enriched {sup 13}C material. In an effort to help alleviate this situation, we have been interested in the construction of the title compounds from a single economical carbon source, D-[U-{sup 13}C]glucose. Details of the syntheses will be provided.

  1. Comprehensive determination of protein tyrosine pKa values for photoactive yellow protein using indirect 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Oktaviani, Nur Alia; Pool, Trijntje J; Kamikubo, Hironari; Slager, Jelle; Scheek, Ruud M; Kataoka, Mikio; Mulder, Frans A A

    2012-02-01

    Upon blue-light irradiation, the bacterium Halorhodospira halophila is able to modulate the activity of its flagellar motor and thereby evade potentially harmful UV radiation. The 14 kDa soluble cytosolic photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is believed to be the primary mediator of this photophobic response, and yields a UV/Vis absorption spectrum that closely matches the bacterium's motility spectrum. In the electronic ground state, the para-coumaric acid (pCA) chromophore of PYP is negatively charged and forms two short hydrogen bonds to the side chains of Glu-46 and Tyr-42. The resulting acid triad is central to the marked pH dependence of the optical-absorption relaxation kinetics of PYP. Here, we describe an NMR approach to sequence-specifically follow all tyrosine side-chain protonation states in PYP from pH 3.41 to 11.24. The indirect observation of the nonprotonated (13)C(γ) resonances in sensitive and well-resolved two-dimensional (13)C-(1)H spectra proved to be pivotal in this effort, as observation of other ring-system resonances was hampered by spectral congestion and line-broadening due to ring flips. We observe three classes of tyrosine residues in PYP that exhibit very different pK(a) values depending on whether the phenolic side chain is solvent-exposed, buried, or hydrogen-bonded. In particular, our data show that Tyr-42 remains fully protonated in the pH range of 3.41-11.24, and that pH-induced changes observed in the photocycle kinetics of PYP cannot be caused by changes in the charge state of Tyr-42. It is therefore very unlikely that the pCA chromophore undergoes changes in its electrostatic interactions in the electronic ground state. PMID:22325281

  2. Thermal unfolding in a GCN4-like leucine zipper: 13C alpha NMR chemical shifts and local unfolding curves.

    PubMed Central

    Holtzer, M E; Lovett, E G; d'Avignon, D A; Holtzer, A

    1997-01-01

    13C alpha chemical shifts and site-specific unfolding curves are reported for 12 sites on a 33-residue, GCN4-like leucine zipper peptide (GCN4-lzK), ranging over most of the chain and sampling most heptad positions. Data were derived from NMR spectra of nine synthetic, isosequential peptides bearing 99% 13C alpha at sites selected to avoid spectral overlap in each peptide. At each site, separate resonances appear for unfolded and folded forms, and most sites show resonances for two folded forms near room temperature. The observed chemical shifts suggest that 1) urea-unfolded GCN4-lzK chains are randomly coiled; 2) thermally unfolded chains include significant transient structure, except at the ends; 3) the coiled-coli structure in the folded chains is atypical near the C-terminus; 4) only those interior sites surrounded by canonical interchain salt bridges fail to show two folded forms. Local unfolding curves, obtained from integrated resonance intensities, show that 1) sites differ in structure content and in melting temperature, so the equilibrium population must comprise more than two molecular conformations; 2) there is significant end-fraying, even at the lowest temperatures, but thermal unfolding is not a progressive unwinding from the ends; 3) residues 9-16 are in the lowest melting region; 4) heptad position does not dictate stability; 5) significant unfolding occurs below room temperature, so the shallow, linear decline in backbone CD seen there has conformational significance. It seems that only a relatively complex array of conformational states could underlie these findings. PMID:9251820

  3. Synthetic, Infrared And Nmr (1H And 13C) Spectral Studies Of N-(Substituted Phenyl)-Methanesulphonamides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayalakshmi, K. L.; Gowda, B. Thimme

    2004-08-01

    Twenty two N-(substituted phenyl)-methanesulphonamides of the general formula, CH3SO2NHR, where R = 4-XC6H4(X = H, CH3, F, Cl, Br or NO2), i-XC6H4(X=CH3, Cl orNO2 and i=2 or 3) and i, j-X2C6H3(i, j-X2 = 2,3-(CH3)2, 2,4-(CH3)2, 2,5-(CH3)2, 2,6-(CH3)2, 3,5-(CH3)2, 2,3-Cl2, 2,4- Cl2, 2,5-Cl2, 2,6-Cl2 or 3,4-Cl2) were prepared, characterized and their infrared spectra in the solid state and the NMR (1H and 13C) spectra in solution studied. The N-H stretching vibrations absorb in the range, 3298 - 3232 cm-1. Asymmetric and symmetric SO2 stretching vibrations appear as strong absorptions in the ranges, 1331 - 1317 cm-1 and 1157 - 1139 cm-1, respectively. The sulphonamides exhibit S-N stretching vibrations in the range, 926 - 833 cm-1. The effect of substitution in the phenyl ring in terms of electron withdrawing and electron donating groups is non-systematic. The 1H and 13C chemical shifts of N-(substituted phenyl)-methanesulphonamides are assigned to various protons and carbons of the compounds. Further, incremental shifts of the ring protons and carbons due to CH3SO2- and CH3SO2NH- groups in the N-(phenyl)-methanesulphonamide are computed and used to calculate the 1H and 13C chemical shifts of various protons and carbons of N-(substituted phenyl)-methanesulphonamides, by adding substituent contributions to the corresponding aromatic proton or carbon chemical shifts of either aniline, substituted anilines, benzene or substituted benzenes, in different ways, as per the principle of substituent addition. The computed values by different procedures agree well with each other and with the experimental chemical shifts. The correlation of these incremental shifts with the Hammett substituent parameters is poor.

  4. Methyl [13C]glucopyranosiduronic acids: effect of COOH ionization and exocyclic structure on NMR spin-couplings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhui; Hu, Xiaosong; Carmichael, Ian; Serianni, Anthony S

    2012-11-01

    Methyl α- and β-D-glucopyranuronides singly labeled with (13)C at C1-C6 were prepared from the corresponding (13)C-labeled methyl D-glucopyranosides, and multiple NMR J-couplings (J(HH), J(CH), and J(CC)) were measured in their protonated and ionized forms in aqueous ((2)H(2)O) solution. Solvated density functional theory (DFT) calculations of J-couplings in structurally related model compounds were performed to determine how well the calculated J-couplings matched the experimental values in saccharides bearing an ionizable substituent. Intraring J(HH) values in both uronide anomers, including (3)J(H4,H5), are unaffected by solution pD, and COOH ionization exerts little effect on J(CH) and J(CC) except for (1)J(C1,H1), (1)J(C4,H4), (1)J(C5,H5), (1)J(C5,C6), and (2)J(C3,C5), where changes of up to 5 Hz were observed. Some of these changes are associated with changes in bond lengths upon ionization; in general, better agreement between theory and experiment was observed for couplings less sensitive to exocyclic C-O bond conformation. Titration of (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts, and some J-couplings, yielded a COOH pK(a) of 3.0 ± 0.1 in both anomers. DFT calculations suggest that substituents proximal to the exocyclic COOH group (i.e., the C4-O4 bond) influence the activation barrier to C5-C6 bond rotation due to transient intramolecular H-bonding. A comparison of J-couplings in the glucopyranuronides to corresponding J-couplings in the glucopyranosides showed that more pervasive changes occur upon conversion from a COOH to a CH(2)OH substituent at C6 than from COOH ionization within the uronides. Twelve J-couplings are affected, with the largest being (1)J(C5,C6) (∼18 Hz larger in the uronides), followed by (2)J(C6,H5) (∼2.5 Hz more negative in the uronides).

  5. Characterization of pyrogenic organic matter by 2-dimenstional HETeronucleus CORelation solid-state 13C NMR (HETCOR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    technique was used for monitoring the chemical changes occurring during charring of biomass derived from model compounds, fire-affected and unaffected NOM. The 2D 13C HETCOR NMR spectrum of the fire- unaffected soils revealed that most of the carboxyl C occurs as ester or amide. Aside from cross peaks typically seen in spectra of NOM, the spectrum of the respective fire-affected counterpart shows additional signals assignable to PyOM.

  6. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus combines intrinsic phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities: A sup 31 P NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Shashidhar, M.S.; Kuppe, A. ); Volwerk, J.J.; Griffith, O.H.

    1990-09-04

    The inositol phosphate products formed during the cleavage of phosphatidylinositol by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus were analyzed by {sup 31}P NMR. {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy can distinguish between the inositol phosphate species and phosphatidylinositol. Chemical shift values (with reference to phosphoric acid) observed are {minus}0.41, 3.62, 4.45, and 16.30 ppm for phosphatidylinositol, myo-inositol 1-monophosphate, myo-inositol 2-monophosphate, and myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate, respectively. It is shown that under a variety of experimental conditions this phospholipase C cleaves phosphatidylinositol via an intramolecular phosphotransfer reaction producing diacylglycerol and D-myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate. The authors also report the new and unexpected observation that the phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from B. cereus is able to hydrolyze the inositol cyclic phosphate to form D-myo-inositol 1-monophosphate. The enzyme, therefore, possesses phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities. The second reaction requires thousandfold higher enzyme concentrations to be observed by {sup 31}P NMR. This reaction was shown to be regiospecific in that only the 1-phosphate was produced and stereospecific in that only D-myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate was hydrolyzed. Inhibition with a monoclonal antibody specific for the B.cereus phospholipase C showed that the cyclic phosphodiesterase activity is intrinsic to the bacterial enzyme. They propose a two-step mechanism for the phosphatidyl-inositol-specific phospholipase C from B. cereus involving sequential phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities. This mechanism bears a resemblance to the well-known two-step mechanism of pancreatic ribonuclease, RNase A.

  7. Glycerin-Induced Conformational Changes in Bombyx mori Silk Fibroin Film Monitored by 13C CP/MAS NMR and 1H DQMAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Endo, Masanori; Hirayama, Misaki; Arai, Hiroki; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the stiff and brittle characteristics of pure Bombyx mori (B. mori) silk fibroin (SF) film in the dry state, glycerin (Glyc) has been used as a plasticizer. However, there have been very limited studies on the structural characterization of the Glyc-blended SF film. In this study, 13C Cross Polarization/Magic Angle Spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS NMR) was used to monitor the conformational changes in the films by changing the Glyc concentration. The presence of only 5 wt % Glyc in the film induced a significant conformational change in SF where Silk I* (repeated type II β-turn and no α-helix) newly appeared. Upon further increase in Glyc concentration, the percentage of Silk I* increased linearly up to 9 wt % Glyc and then tended to be almost constant (30%). This value (30%) was the same as the fraction of Ala residue within the Silk I* form out of all Ala residues of SF present in B. mori mature silkworm. The 1H DQMAS NMR spectra of Glyc-blended SF films confirmed the appearance of Silk I* in the Glyc-blended SF film. A structural model of Glyc-SF complex including the Silk I* form was proposed with the guidance of the Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation using 1H–1H distance constraints obtained from the 1H Double-Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (DQMAS) NMR spectra. PMID:27618034

  8. Unilateral NMR, 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy and micro-analytical techniques for studying the materials and state of conservation of an ancient Egyptian wooden sarcophagus.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Noemi; Presciutti, Federica; Di Tullio, Valeria; Doherty, Brenda; Marinelli, Anna Maria; Provinciali, Barbara; Macchioni, Nicola; Capitani, Donatella; Miliani, Costanza

    2011-03-01

    A multi-technique approach was employed to study a decorated Egyptian wooden sarcophagus (XXV-XXVI dynasty, Third Intermediate Period), belonging to the Museo del Vicino Oriente of the Sapienza University of Rome. Portable non-invasive unilateral NMR was applied to evaluate the conservation state of the sarcophagus. Moreover, using unilateral NMR, a non-invasive analytical protocol was established to detect the presence of organic substances on the surface and/or embedded in the wooden matrix. This protocol allowed for an educated sampling campaign aimed at further investigating the state of degradation of the wood and the presence of organic substances by (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy. The composition of the painted layer was analysed by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), Raman and surface enhanced (resonance) Raman spectroscopy (SERS/SERRS), infrared and GC-MS techniques, evidencing original components such as clay minerals, Egyptian green, indigo, natural gums, and also highlighting restoration pigments and alteration compounds. The identification of the wood, of great value for the reconstruction of the history of the artwork, was achieved by means of optical microscopy.

  9. Glycerin-Induced Conformational Changes in Bombyx mori Silk Fibroin Film Monitored by (13)C CP/MAS NMR and ¹H DQMAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Endo, Masanori; Hirayama, Misaki; Arai, Hiroki; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the stiff and brittle characteristics of pure Bombyx mori (B. mori) silk fibroin (SF) film in the dry state, glycerin (Glyc) has been used as a plasticizer. However, there have been very limited studies on the structural characterization of the Glyc-blended SF film. In this study, (13)C Cross Polarization/Magic Angle Spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS NMR) was used to monitor the conformational changes in the films by changing the Glyc concentration. The presence of only 5 wt % Glyc in the film induced a significant conformational change in SF where Silk I* (repeated type II β-turn and no α-helix) newly appeared. Upon further increase in Glyc concentration, the percentage of Silk I* increased linearly up to 9 wt % Glyc and then tended to be almost constant (30%). This value (30%) was the same as the fraction of Ala residue within the Silk I* form out of all Ala residues of SF present in B. mori mature silkworm. The ¹H DQMAS NMR spectra of Glyc-blended SF films confirmed the appearance of Silk I* in the Glyc-blended SF film. A structural model of Glyc-SF complex including the Silk I* form was proposed with the guidance of the Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation using ¹H-¹H distance constraints obtained from the ¹H Double-Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (DQMAS) NMR spectra. PMID:27618034

  10. Improving the accuracy of computed 13C NMR shift predictions by specific environment error correction: fragment referencing.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Keith G; Spivey, Alan C

    2013-11-15

    The accuracy of both Gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO) and continuous set of gauge transformations (CSGT) (13)C NMR spectra prediction by Density Functional Theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31G** level is shown to be usefully enhanced by employing a 'fragment referencing' method for predicting chemical shifts without recourse to empirical scaling. Fragment referencing refers to a process of reducing the error in calculating a particular NMR shift by consulting a similar molecule for which the error in the calculation is easily deduced. The absolute accuracy of the chemical shifts predicted when employing fragment referencing relative to conventional techniques (e.g., using TMS or MeOH/benzene dual referencing) is demonstrated to be improved significantly for a range of substrates, which illustrates the superiority of the technique particularly for systems with similar chemical shifts arising from different chemical environments. The technique is particularly suited to molecules of relatively low molecular weight containing 'non-standard' magnetic environments, e.g., α to halogen atoms, which are poorly predicted by other methods. The simplicity and speed of the technique mean that it can be employed to resolve routine structural assignment problems that require a degree of accuracy not provided by standard incremental or hierarchically ordered spherical description of environment (HOSE) algorithms. The approach is also demonstrated to be applicable when employing the MP2 method at 6-31G**, cc-pVDZ, aug-cc-pVDZ, and cc-pVTZ levels, although none of these offer advantage in terms of accuracy of prediction over the B3LYP/6-31G** DFT method.

  11. Structure and equilibria of Ca 2+-complexes of glucose and sorbitol from multinuclear ( 1H, 13C and 43Ca) NMR measurements supplemented with molecular modelling calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallagi, A.; Dudás, Cs.; Csendes, Z.; Forgó, P.; Pálinkó, I.; Sipos, P.

    2011-05-01

    Ca 2+-complexation of D-glucose and D-sorbitol have been investigated with the aid of multinuclear ( 1H, 13C and 43Ca) NMR spectroscopy and ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Formation constants of the forming 1:1 complexes have been estimated from one-dimensional 13C NMR spectra obtained at constant ionic strength (1 M NaCl). Binding sites were identified from 2D 1H- 43Ca NMR spectra. 2D NMR measurements and ab initio calculations indicated that Ca 2+ ions were bound in a tridentate manner via the glycosidic OH, the ethereal oxygen in the ring and the OH on the terminal carbon for the α- and β-anomers of glucose and for sorbitol simultaneous binding of four hydroxide moieties (C1, C2, C4 and C6) was suggested.

  12. Effects of insulin on perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic and untreated rats: /sup 13/C NMR assay of pyruvate kinase flux

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.M.

    1987-01-27

    The effects of insulin in vitro on perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic rats and their untreated littermates during gluconeogenesis from either (3-/sup 13/C)alanine + ethanol or (2-/sup 13/C)pyruvate + NH/sub 4/Cl + ethanol were studied by /sup 13/C NMR. A /sup 13/C NMR determination of the rate of pyruvate kinase flux under steady-state conditions of active gluconeogenesis was developed; this assay includes a check on the reuse of recycled pyruvate. The preparations studied provided gradations of pyruvate kinase flux within the confines of the assay's requirement of active gluconeogenesis. By this determination, the rate of pyruvate kinase flux was 0.74 +/- 0.04 of the gluconeogenic rate in liver from 24-h-fasted controls; in liver from 12-h fasted controls, relative pyruvate kinase flux increased to 1.0 +/- 0.2. In diabetic liver, this flux was undetectable by the authors NMR method. Insulin's hepatic influence in vitro was greatest in the streptozotocin model of type 1 diabetes: upon treatment of diabetic liver with 7 nM insulin in vitro, a partial reversal of many of the differences noted between diabetic and control liver was demonstrated by /sup 13/C NMR. A major effect of insulin in vitro upon diabetic liver was the induction of a large increase in the rate of pyruvate kinase flux, bringing relative and absolute fluxes up to the levels measured in 24-h-fasted controls. By way of comparison, the effects of ischemia on diabetic liver were studied by /sup 13/C NMR to test whether changes in allosteric effectors under these conditions could also increase pyruvate kinase flux. A large increase in this activity was demonstrated in ischemic diabetic liver.

  13. 13C NMR detects conformational change in the 100-kD membrane transporter ClC-ec1

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sherwin J.; Cheng, Ricky C.; Chew, Thomas A.; Khantwal, Chandra M.; Liu, Corey W.; Gong, Shimei; Nakamoto, Robert K.; Maduke, Merritt

    2015-01-01

    CLC transporters catalyze the exchange of Cl- for H+ across cellular membranes. To do so, they must couple Cl- and H+ binding and unbinding to protein conformational change. However, the sole conformational changes distinguished crystallographically are small movements of a glutamate side chain that locally gates the ion-transport pathways. Therefore, our understanding of whether and how global protein dynamics contribute to the exchange mechanism has been severely limited. To overcome the limitations of crystallography, we used solution-state 13C-methyl NMR with labels on methionine, lysine, and engineered cysteine residues to investigate substrate (H+) dependent conformational change outside the restraints of crystallization. We show that methyl labels in several regions report H+-dependent spectral changes. We identify one of these regions as Helix R, a helix that extends from the center of the protein, where it forms the part of the inner gate to the Cl--permeation pathway, to the extracellular solution. The H+-dependent spectral change does not occur when a label is positioned just beyond Helix R, on the unstructured C-terminus of the protein. Together, the results suggest that H+ binding is mechanistically coupled to closing of the intracellular access-pathway for Cl-. PMID:25631353

  14. Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers

    SciTech Connect

    Cozar, O.; Filip, C.; Tripon, C.; Cioica, N.; Coţa, C.; Nagy, E. M.

    2013-11-13

    The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

  15. Combined (Super 31)P and (Super 1)H NMR Experiments in the Structural Elucidation of Polynuclear Thiolate Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerrada, Elena; Laguna, Mariano

    2005-01-01

    A facile synthesis of two gold(I) complexes with 1,2-benzenedithiolate ligand and two different bidentate phosphines are described. A detailed sequence of NMR experiments is suggested to determine the structure of the compounds.

  16. Aromatic spectral editing techniques for magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of uniformly (13)C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan K; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Hong, Mei

    2015-11-01

    The four aromatic amino acids in proteins, namely histidine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, have strongly overlapping (13)C chemical shift ranges between 100 and 160ppm, and have so far been largely neglected in solid-state NMR determination of protein structures. Yet aromatic residues play important roles in biology through π-π and cation-π interactions. To better resolve and assign aromatic residues' (13)C signals in magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectra, we introduce two spectral editing techniques. The first method uses gated (1)H decoupling in a proton-driven spin-diffusion (PDSD) experiment to remove all protonated (13)C signals and retain only non-protonated carbon signals in the aromatic region of the (13)C spectra. The second technique uses chemical shift filters and (1)H-(13)C dipolar dephasing to selectively detect the Cα, Cβ and CO cross peaks of aromatic residues while suppressing the signals of all aliphatic residues. We demonstrate these two techniques on amino acids, a model peptide, and the microcrystalline protein GB1, and show that they significantly simplify the 2D NMR spectra and both reveal and permit the ready assignment of the aromatic residues' signals.

  17. Hydration behaviour of POPC/C(12)-Bet mixtures investigated by sorption gravimetry, (31)P NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, H; Weichert, H; Klose, G; Heremans, K

    2012-02-01

    The hydration behaviour of mixtures of the zwitterionic phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleolyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and the zwitterionic surfactant N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecyl-betain (C(12)-Bet) was investigated by sorption gravimetry, solid-state (31)P NMR-spectroscopy and small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD). Negative excess hydration (dehydration) was found for almost all hydration degrees investigated. This behaviour is explained by the formation of an inner salt between the dipoles of phospholipid and surfactant headgroups that show a reverse sequence of partial charges with respect to the hydrocarbon backbone. The formation of an inner-salt most probably reduces potential water binding sites. Moreover, NMR data suggest that the incorporation of the zwitterionic surfactant into the phospholipid membrane is correlated with reorientation of the phosphate axis towards the membrane director as well as with reduced lateral and wobbling diffusion. PMID:22285958

  18. Ab initio study of {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts for the chromophores of rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin. 2. Comprehensive analysis of the {sup 13}C chemical shifts of protonated all-trans-retinylidene Schiff base

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Minoru; Wada, Mitsuhito; Inoue, Yoshio; Tamura, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yoichi

    1996-02-01

    Theoretical analysis was performed for the {sup 13}C chemical shifts of the retinal chromophore in bacteriorhodopsin (bR) by means of ab initio NMR shielding calculation, based on the localized orbital/ local origin method. In order to comprehensively investigate the correlation between the {sup 13}C chemical shieldings of the unsaturated carbons and physicochemical perturbations relating to the spectral tuning of bacteriorhodopsin, the following three factors are taken into account in the present calculation: (1) change in strength of the hydrogen bonding between protonated retinylidene Schiff base and its counterion, (2) conformational changes about single bonds of the conjugated chain, and (3) electrostatic interactions between the Schiff base and electric dipoles. On the basis of these calculations, we successfully find a molecular model for which the shielding calculation almost completely reproduces the observed chemical shift data for the chromophore of bR. 47 refs., 13 figs.

  19. 1H-13C HSQC NMR spectroscopy for estimating procyanidin/prodelphinidin and cis/trans flavan-3-ol ratios of condensed tannin samples: correlation with thiolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies with a diverse array of 22 condensed tannin (CT) fractions from 9 plant species demonstrated that procyanidin/prodelphinidin (PC/PD) and cis/trans flavan-3-ol ratios can be appraised by 1H-13C HSQC NMR. The method was developed from fractions containing 44 to ~100% CT, PC/PD ratios ranging f...

  20. Estimation of procyanidin/prodelphinidin and cis/trans flavanol ratios of condensed tannin fractions by 1H-13C HSQC NMR spectroscopy: Correlation with thiolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integration of cross-peak contours of H/C-2’,6’ signals from prodelphinidin (PD) and of H/C-6’ signals from procyanidin (PC) units in 1H-13C HSQC nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of condensed tannins yielded nuclei-adjusted PC/PD estimates that were highly correlated with PC/PD ratios obtain...

  1. A Discovery-Based Hydrochlorination of Carvone Utilizing a Guided-Inquiry Approach to Determine the Product Structure from [superscript 13]C NMR Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelter, Michael W.; Walker, Natalie M.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment describes a discovery-based method for the regio- and stereoselective hydrochlorination of carvone, appropriate for a 3-h second-semester organic chemistry laboratory. The product is identified through interpretation of the [superscript 13]C NMR and DEPT spectra are obtained on an Anasazi EFT-60 at 15 MHz as neat samples. A…

  2. Solid state 13C NMR studies of methane dehydroaromatization reaction on Mo/HZSM-5 and W/HZSM-5 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Ma, Ding; Deng, Feng; Luo, Qing; Zhang, Mingjin; Bao, Xinhe; Ye, Chaohui

    2002-12-21

    Methane dehydroaromatization on Mo/HZSM-5 and W/HZSM-5 catalysts was studied by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy, both variation of the state of transition metal component and products such as ethane, benzene, ethene adsorbed on or in zeolite were observed after high temperature (900-1000 K) reaction.

  3. Molecular structure, vibrational and 13C NMR spectra of two ent-kaurenes spirolactone type diterpenoids rabdosinate and rabdosin B: A combined experimental and density functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Xueliang

    2015-01-01

    The title compounds, rabdosinate and rabdosin B, were isolated from the leaves of Isodon japonica, and characterized by IR-NMR spectroscopy. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies and gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO-13C) chemical shift values of the title compounds have been calculated by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. In addition, obtained results were related to the linear regression of experimental 13C NMR chemical shifts values. The integral equation formalism polarized continuum model (IEFPCM) was used in treating chloroform solvation effects on optimized structural parameters and 13C chemical shifts. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), HOMO-LUMO analysis were performed by the B3LYP method.

  4. A study of the molecular conformations and the vibrational, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the anticancer drug tamoxifen and triphenylethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Khan, Ibrahim

    2016-08-01

    The structural stability and the vibrational spectra of the anticancer drug tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were investigated by the DFT B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) calculations. Tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were predicted to exist predominantly as non-planar structures. The vibrational frequencies and the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the low energy structures of tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were computed at the DFT B3LYP level of theory. Complete vibrational assignments were provided by combined theoretical and experimental data of tamoxifen and triphenylethylene. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of both molecules were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the two molecules. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for tamoxifen is 0.29 and 4.72 ppm, whereas for triphenylethylene, it is 0.16 and 2.70 ppm, respectively.

  5. Molecular structure, vibrational and 13C NMR spectra of two ent-kaurenes spirolactone type diterpenoids rabdosinate and rabdosin B: a combined experimental and density functional methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Xueliang

    2015-01-25

    The title compounds, rabdosinate and rabdosin B, were isolated from the leaves of Isodon japonica, and characterized by IR-NMR spectroscopy. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies and gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO-13C) chemical shift values of the title compounds have been calculated by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. In addition, obtained results were related to the linear regression of experimental 13C NMR chemical shifts values. The integral equation formalism polarized continuum model (IEFPCM) was used in treating chloroform solvation effects on optimized structural parameters and 13C chemical shifts. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), HOMO-LUMO analysis were performed by the B3LYP method. PMID:25123947

  6. Molecular structure, vibrational and 13C NMR spectra of two ent-kaurenes spirolactone type diterpenoids rabdosinate and rabdosin B: a combined experimental and density functional methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Xueliang

    2015-01-25

    The title compounds, rabdosinate and rabdosin B, were isolated from the leaves of Isodon japonica, and characterized by IR-NMR spectroscopy. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies and gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO-13C) chemical shift values of the title compounds have been calculated by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. In addition, obtained results were related to the linear regression of experimental 13C NMR chemical shifts values. The integral equation formalism polarized continuum model (IEFPCM) was used in treating chloroform solvation effects on optimized structural parameters and 13C chemical shifts. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), HOMO-LUMO analysis were performed by the B3LYP method.

  7. Trimethylphosphine-Assisted Surface Fingerprinting of Metal Oxide Nanoparticle by (31)P Solid-State NMR: A Zinc Oxide Case Study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yung-Kang; Ye, Lin; Qu, Jin; Zhang, Li; Fu, Yingyi; Teixeira, Ivo F; McPherson, Ian James; He, Heyong; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2016-02-24

    Nano metal oxides are becoming widely used in industrial, commercial and personal products (semiconductors, optics, solar cells, catalysts, paints, cosmetics, sun-cream lotions, etc.). However, the relationship of surface features (exposed planes, defects and chemical functionalities) with physiochemical properties is not well studied primarily due to lack of a simple technique for their characterization. In this study, solid state (31)P MAS NMR is used to map surfaces on various ZnO samples with the assistance of trimethylphosphine (TMP) as a chemical probe. As similar to XRD giving structural information on a crystal, it is demonstrated that this new surface-fingerprint technique not only provides qualitative (chemical shift) but also quantitative (peak intensity) information on the concentration and distribution of cations and anions, oxygen vacancies and hydroxyl groups on various facets from a single deconvoluted (31)P NMR spectrum. On the basis of this technique, a new mechanism for photocatalytic •OH radical generation from direct surface-OH oxidation is revealed, which has important implications regarding the safety of using nano oxides in personal care products. PMID:26812527

  8. On the use of 31P NMR for the quantification of hydrosoluble phosphorus-containing compounds in coral host tissues and cultured zooxanthellae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinot, Claire; Gaysinski, Marc; Thomas, Olivier P.; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Grover, Renaud

    2016-02-01

    31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was assessed to investigate the phosphorus-containing compounds present in the tissues of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata as well as of cultured zooxanthellae (CZ). Results showed that phosphorus-containing compounds observed in CZ were mainly phosphate and phosphate esters. Phosphate accounted for 19 ± 2% of the total phosphorus compounds observed in CZ maintained under low P-levels (0.02 μM). Adding 5 mM of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (KH2PO4) to the CZ culture medium led to a 3.1-fold increase in intracellular phosphate, while adding 5 mM of dissolved organic phosphorus led to a reduction in the concentration of phosphorus compounds, including a 2.5-fold intracellular phosphate decrease. In sharp contrast to zooxanthellae, the host mainly contained phosphonates, and to a lesser extent, phosphate esters and phosphate. Two-months of host starvation decreased the phosphate content by 2.4 fold, while bleaching of fed corals did not modify this content. Based on 31P NMR analyses, this study highlights the importance of phosphonates in the composition of coral host tissues, and illustrates the impact of phosphorus availability on the phosphorus composition of host tissues and CZ, both through feeding of the host and inorganic phosphorus enrichment of the CZ.

  9. 31P NMR characterization and efficiency of new types of water-insoluble phosphate fertilizers to supply plant-available phosphorus in diverse soil types.

    PubMed

    Erro, Javier; Baigorri, Roberto; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Garcia-Mina, Jose M

    2011-03-01

    Hydroponic plant experiments demonstrated the efficiency of a type of humic acid-based water-insoluble phosphate fertilizers, named rhizosphere controlled fertilizers (RCF), to supply available phosphorus (P) to different plant species. This effect was well correlated to the root release of specific organic acids. In this context, the aims of this study are (i) to study the chemical nature of RCF using solid-state (31)P NMR and (ii) to evaluate the real efficiency of RCF matrix as a source of P for wheat plants cultivated in an alkaline and acid soil in comparison with traditional water-soluble (simple superphosphate, SSP) and water-insoluble (dicalcium phosphate, DCP) P fertilizers. The (31)P NMR study revealed the formation of multimetal (double and triple, MgZn and/or MgZnCa) phosphates associated with chelating groups of the humic acid through the formation of metal bridges. With regard to P fertilizer efficiency, the results obtained show that the RCF matrix produced higher plant yields than SSP in both types of soil, with DCP and the water-insoluble fraction from the RCF matrix (WI) exhibiting the best results in the alkaline soil. By contrast, in the acid soil, DCP showed very low efficiency, WI performed on a par with SSP, and RCF exhibited the highest efficiency, thus suggesting a protector effect of humic acid from soil fixation. PMID:21254775

  10. On the use of 31P NMR for the quantification of hydrosoluble phosphorus-containing compounds in coral host tissues and cultured zooxanthellae

    PubMed Central

    Godinot, Claire; Gaysinski, Marc; Thomas, Olivier P.; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Grover, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was assessed to investigate the phosphorus-containing compounds present in the tissues of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata as well as of cultured zooxanthellae (CZ). Results showed that phosphorus-containing compounds observed in CZ were mainly phosphate and phosphate esters. Phosphate accounted for 19 ± 2% of the total phosphorus compounds observed in CZ maintained under low P-levels (0.02 μM). Adding 5 mM of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (KH2PO4) to the CZ culture medium led to a 3.1-fold increase in intracellular phosphate, while adding 5 mM of dissolved organic phosphorus led to a reduction in the concentration of phosphorus compounds, including a 2.5-fold intracellular phosphate decrease. In sharp contrast to zooxanthellae, the host mainly contained phosphonates, and to a lesser extent, phosphate esters and phosphate. Two-months of host starvation decreased the phosphate content by 2.4 fold, while bleaching of fed corals did not modify this content. Based on 31P NMR analyses, this study highlights the importance of phosphonates in the composition of coral host tissues, and illustrates the impact of phosphorus availability on the phosphorus composition of host tissues and CZ, both through feeding of the host and inorganic phosphorus enrichment of the CZ. PMID:26902733

  11. 31P NMR characterization and efficiency of new types of water-insoluble phosphate fertilizers to supply plant-available phosphorus in diverse soil types.

    PubMed

    Erro, Javier; Baigorri, Roberto; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Garcia-Mina, Jose M

    2011-03-01

    Hydroponic plant experiments demonstrated the efficiency of a type of humic acid-based water-insoluble phosphate fertilizers, named rhizosphere controlled fertilizers (RCF), to supply available phosphorus (P) to different plant species. This effect was well correlated to the root release of specific organic acids. In this context, the aims of this study are (i) to study the chemical nature of RCF using solid-state (31)P NMR and (ii) to evaluate the real efficiency of RCF matrix as a source of P for wheat plants cultivated in an alkaline and acid soil in comparison with traditional water-soluble (simple superphosphate, SSP) and water-insoluble (dicalcium phosphate, DCP) P fertilizers. The (31)P NMR study revealed the formation of multimetal (double and triple, MgZn and/or MgZnCa) phosphates associated with chelating groups of the humic acid through the formation of metal bridges. With regard to P fertilizer efficiency, the results obtained show that the RCF matrix produced higher plant yields than SSP in both types of soil, with DCP and the water-insoluble fraction from the RCF matrix (WI) exhibiting the best results in the alkaline soil. By contrast, in the acid soil, DCP showed very low efficiency, WI performed on a par with SSP, and RCF exhibited the highest efficiency, thus suggesting a protector effect of humic acid from soil fixation.

  12. On the use of 31P NMR for the quantification of hydrosoluble phosphorus-containing compounds in coral host tissues and cultured zooxanthellae.

    PubMed

    Godinot, Claire; Gaysinski, Marc; Thomas, Olivier P; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Grover, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    (31)P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was assessed to investigate the phosphorus-containing compounds present in the tissues of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata as well as of cultured zooxanthellae (CZ). Results showed that phosphorus-containing compounds observed in CZ were mainly phosphate and phosphate esters. Phosphate accounted for 19 ± 2% of the total phosphorus compounds observed in CZ maintained under low P-levels (0.02 μM). Adding 5 mM of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (KH2PO4) to the CZ culture medium led to a 3.1-fold increase in intracellular phosphate, while adding 5 mM of dissolved organic phosphorus led to a reduction in the concentration of phosphorus compounds, including a 2.5-fold intracellular phosphate decrease. In sharp contrast to zooxanthellae, the host mainly contained phosphonates, and to a lesser extent, phosphate esters and phosphate. Two-months of host starvation decreased the phosphate content by 2.4 fold, while bleaching of fed corals did not modify this content. Based on (31)P NMR analyses, this study highlights the importance of phosphonates in the composition of coral host tissues, and illustrates the impact of phosphorus availability on the phosphorus composition of host tissues and CZ, both through feeding of the host and inorganic phosphorus enrichment of the CZ. PMID:26902733

  13. In vivo 31P NMR Study of the Metabolism of Murine Mammary 16/C Adenocarcinoma and Its Response to Chemotherapy, X-Radiation, and Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evanochko, W. T.; Ng, T. C.; Lilly, M. B.; Lawson, A. J.; Corbett, T. H.; Durant, J. R.; Glickson, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    31P NMR spectroscopy with surface coils has been used to monitor, in vivo, the phosphate metabolism of subcutaneously implanted mammary 16/C adenocarcinoma in C3H/He mice. This model tumor was studied during untreated tumor growth and after treatment with adriamycin, hyperthermia, and x-radiation. The mammary 16/C tumor exhibited a Gompertzian growth pattern. Levels of high-energy phosphate metabolites--phosphocreatine and ATP--decreased with increases in tumor mass. There was a concomitant increase in the level of Pi and a decrease in the apparent pH of the tumor. These spectral changes appear to reflect changes in tumor vascularization that accompany tumor growth, the tumor becoming progressively more hypoxic. Partial response of this tumor to chemotherapy with adriamycin was reflected in a small but measurable increase in the phosphocreatine resonance, a decrease in Pi, and a return of the intratumor pH to neutral. Hyperthermia resulted in progressive conversion of the 31P NMR spectrum to that of a dead tumor (high levels of Pi, small levels of residual sugar phosphates and pyridine dinucleotides, and acidic pH). X-irradiation (14.0 Gy) led to disappearance of the phosphocreatine peak within 15 min of treatment. Subsequently, this resonance grew back beyond its pretreatment level. As the tumor receded, its spectrum reflected the characteristics of aerobically metabolizing tissue (high levels of phosphocreatine and ATP and low levels of Pi and sugar phosphates).

  14. Studies of uptake and suppresion of Mn/sup 2 +/ migration in highly vacuolated sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L) cells by /sup 31/P NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Roby, C.; Bligny, R.; Douce, R.; Pfeffer, P.E.

    1987-04-01

    Recent /sup 31/P NMR studies have demonstrated that Mn/sup 2 +/ appears to invade the cells of heterogeneous excised tissue of corn root tips sequentially, first entering the cytoplasmic compartment, where it complexes with nucleotides and P/sub i/. Under aerobic conditions, further migration across the tonoplast, followed by vacoule trapping was visualized through paramagnetic broadening of the vacoular P/sub i/ resonance. Cultured cells such as Acer pseudoplatanus L offer better opportunities for studying cellular activity by /sup 31/P NMR because of their homogeneity and uniformly rapid response to various metabolic disturbances. In contrast to excised root tissue, Mn/sup 2 +/ showed no measurable accumulation in the cytoplasmic compartments of these cells under aerobic conditions. However, a rapid crossing of the large tonoplast resulted in immediate vacuolar metal ion sequestration. Anoxia did not foster leakage of Mn/sup 2 +/ from the vacuole to the cytoplasm, while hypoxia completely halted all movement of Mn/sup 2 +/ across the plasmalema. This disparity in terms of cell and tissue morphology, membrane permeability and possible tissue trapping of metal ions will be discussed.

  15. [FTIR and 13C NMR Analysis of Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) in the Treatment Process of Tannery Wastewater].

    PubMed

    Fan, Chun-hui; Zhang, Ying-chao; Tang, Ze-heng; Wang, Jia-hong

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, the wastewater quantity discharged yearly from tannery industry is around 0. 2 billion t in China. The contaminants of tannery wastewater include macromolecular organic matters, such as grease, fur scraps and collagen, and the alkaline wastewater appears to be of high content of salt and COD. The quality of tannery wastewater is monitored strictly among all kinds of industry wastewater. In the treatment process of tannery wastewater, the quality of inlet and outlet water is generally analyzed. In fact, the transformation behavior of contaminants should be additionally checked to optimize the treatment conditions. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is commonly existed in water-bodies and helpful to understand the physicochemical characteristics, while the related work should be further studied on tannery wastewater. The approaches of elemental analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis (TG), Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) were used to reveal the characteristics of DOM in the treatment process of tannery wastewater. The results showed the carbon content of DOM samples increased gradually, atomic ratios of H/C increased firstly and then decreased, indicating the organic matters were decomposed into chain structures firstly, finally forming the component hard to degraded. The pyrolysis process of DOM mainly proceeded in the regions of 110~530 °C (aliphatic compound, protein, etc. ) and 530~800 °C (aromatic ring, single bond of C-C, etc. ). The functional groups of DOM included -OH, -NH2, C=O and so on, and the aromatic substances were detected, shown from FTIR figures, in the later period of the reaction, caused by the metabolism effect of micro-organism. The content of alkoxy-C increased to the maximum in the second biochemical pond, and the minimum content of aromatic-C appeared in the second biochemical pond, suggesting the transformation behavior of carbon functional groups. The investigation on DOM in tannery

  16. Soil organic degradation: bridging the gap between Rock-Eval pyrolysis and chemical characterization (CPMAS 13C NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Remy; Sebag, David; Verrecchia, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Being a source of mineral nutrients, organic matter contributes to soil chemical fertility and acts on soil physical fertility through its role in soil structure. Soil organic matter (SOM) is a key component of soils. Despite the paramount importance of SOM, information on its chemistry and behaviour in soils is incomplete. Numerous methods are used to characterize and monitor OM dynamics in soils using different approaches (Kogel-Knabner, 2000). Two of the main approaches are evaluated and compared in this study. Rock-Eval pyrolysis (RE pyrolysis) provides a description of a SOM's general evolution using its thermal resistance. The second tool (13C CPMAS NMR) aims to give precise and accurate chemical information on OM characterization. The RE pyrolysis technique was designed for petroleum exploration (Lafargue et al., 1998) and because of its simplicity, it has been applied to a variety of other materials such as soils or Recent sediments (Disnar et al., 2000; Sebag, 2006). Recently, RE pyrolysis became a conventional tool to study OM dynamics in soils. In RE pyrolysis, a peak deconvolution is applied to the pyrolysis signal in order to get four main components related to major classes of organic constituents. These components differ in origin and resistance to pyrolysis: labile biological constituents (F1), resistant biological constituents (F2), immature non-biotic constituents (F3) and a mature refractory fraction (F4) (Sebag, 2006; Coppard, 2006). Main advantages of the technique are its repeatability, and rapidity to provide an overview of OM properties and stocks. However, do the four major classes used in the literature reflect a pertinent chemical counterpart? To answer this question, we used 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in the solid state (13C CPMAS NMR) to collect direct information on structural and conformational characteristics of OM. NMR resonances were assigned to chemical structures according to five dominant forms: alkyl C, O

  17. Spin-echo methods for the determination of 31P transverse relaxation times of the ATP NMR signals in vivo.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, K; Jung, W I; Bunse, M; Lutz, O; Küper, K; Dietze, G

    1994-01-01

    31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) examinations of the calf muscles of healthy volunteers were performed to determine T2 of the coupled ATP signals by use of the Hahn spin-echo and the frequency-selective spin-echo method. Additional measurements with the J-coupling refocused double echo are presented. The most reliable determination of T2 relaxation times is possible with the frequency-selective spin echo. The other methods yield substantially wrong results. Theoretical explanations are given how J-coupling and pulse-angle deviations affect the signals and therefore the T2 determinations. The calculations for a weakly coupled homonuclear AX spin system are shown because they demonstrate most of the relevant facts. In addition, some important results for a homonuclear AMX spin system, which the ATP is considered to be, are given.

  18. A gradient scheme suitable for localized shimming and in vivo 1H/31P STEAM and ISIS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yongbi, N M; Payne, G S; Leach, M O

    1994-12-01

    A gradient scheme is presented which may be used for STEAM or ISIS localization. One application of the scheme is to perform single-shot STEAM shimming prior to data acquisition with STEAM and ISIS, using identical gradient amplitudes and durations. Using conventional STEAM to shim for ISIS can produce line-shape distortions induced by different eddy currents in the two sequences; with this gradient scheme the problem is minimized. Line-shape improvements of STEAM and ISIS localized data obtained after volume localized shimming with the proposed STEAM sequence are demonstrated. The localization performance of the STEAM and ISIS sequences are demonstrated on phantoms and in vivo for 1H and 31P metabolites. PMID:7869899

  19. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for two oxaphenalenones bacillosporin C and D from the mangrove endophytic fungus SBE-14.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiyong; Shao, Changlun; She, Zhigang; Cai, Xiaoling; Liu, Fan; Vrijimoed, L L P; Lin, Yongcheng

    2007-05-01

    The complete (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments are reported for the novel natural product Bacillosporin D together with the known compound Bacillosporin C. These compounds containing seven rings were isolated from the mangrove endophytic fungus SBE-14 from the South China Sea. 1D and 2D NMR experiments, including COSY, HMQC and HMBC were used to the determination of the structures and NMR assignments. It is proposed that 1 was biogenetically produced by transforming 2. Transforming a lactone to an anhydride is unusual in nature.

  20. The economical synthesis of [2'-(13)C, 1,3-(15)N2]uridine; preliminary conformational studies by solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G; Middleton, David A; Henderson, Peter J F; Herbert, Richard B

    2003-06-21

    The synthesis of [2'-(13)C, 1,3-(15)N2]uridine 11 was achieved as follows. An epimeric mixture of D-[1-(13)C]ribose 3 and D-[1-(13)C]arabinose 4 was obtained in excellent yield by condensation of K13CN with D-erythrose 2 using a modification of the Kiliani-Fischer synthesis. Efficient separation of the two aldose epimers was pivotally achieved by a novel ion-exchange (Sm3+) chromatography method. D-[2-(13)C]Ribose 5 was obtained from D-[1-(13)C]arabinose 4 using a Ni(II) diamine complex (nickel chloride plus TEMED). Combination of these procedures in a general cycling manner can lead to the very efficient preparation of specifically labelled 13C-monosaccharides of particular chirality. 15N-labelling was introduced in the preparation of [2'-(13)C, 1,3-(15)N2]uridine 11 via [15N2]urea. Cross polarisation magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) solid-state NMR experiments using rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) were carried out on crystals of the labelled uridine to show that the inter-atomic distance between C-2' and N-1 is closely similar to that calculated from X-ray crystallographic data. The REDOR method will be used now to determine the conformation of bound substrates in the bacterial nucleoside transporters NupC and NupG.

  1. Interaction between a recombinant prion protein and organo-mineral complexes as evidenced by CPMAS 13C-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, F.; Scotti, R.; Gianfreda, L.; Conte, P.; Rao, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    Prion proteins (PrP) are the main responsible for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE). The TSE etiological agent is a misfolded form of the normal cellular prion protein. The amyloidal aggregates accumulated in the brain of infected animals and mainly composed of PrPSc exhibit resistance to protease attack and many conventional inactivating procedures. The prion protein diseases cause an environmental issue because the environment and in particular the soil compartment can be contaminated and then become a potential reservoir and diffuser of TSEs infectivity as a consequence of (i) accidental dispersion from storage plants of meat and bone meal, (ii) incorporation of contaminated material in fertilizers, (iii) possible natural contamination of pasture soils by grazing herds, and (v) burial of carcasses. The environmental problem can be even more relevant because very low amounts of PrPSc are able to propagate the disease. Several studies evidenced that infectious prion protein remains active in soils for years. Contaminated soils result, thus, a possible critical route of TSE transmission in wild animals. Soil can also protect prion protein toward degradation processes due to the presence of humic substances and inorganic components such as clays. Mineral and organic colloids and the more common association between clay minerals and humic substances can contribute to the adsorption/entrapment of molecules and macromolecules. The polymerization of organic monomeric humic precursors occurring in soil in the presence of oxidative enzymes or manganese and iron oxides, is considered one of the most important processes contributing to the formation of humic substances. The process is very fast and produces a population of polymeric products of different molecular structures, sizes, shapes and complexity. Other molecules and possibly biomacromolecules such as proteins may be involved. The aim of the present work was to study by CPMAS 13C-NMR the interactions

  2. Microscopic structure of heterogeneous lipid-based formulations revealed by 13C high-resolution solid-state and 1H PFG NMR methods.

    PubMed

    Guillermo, Armel; Gerbaud, Guillaume; Bardet, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Lipid-based formulations such as lip glosses that are very alike on the base of their components may have significant differences in their expected macroscopic properties as cosmetics. To differentiate such formulations, high-resolution (13)C NMR was performed under magic angle spinning to investigate the properties at both molecular and microscopic levels. Temperature studies were carried out and no polymorphism in the solid domains could be evidenced after the thermal treatment performed for obtaining the commercial lip glosses. (13)C NMR spectra also showed that some waxes remain partially solubilized in the oils of formulations. The microscopic structure of the wax-oil liquid domains was worked out on the basis of restricted diffusion properties obtained with proton pulsed-field gradient NMR. Changing a single wax component, in two identical formulations, yields significant morphological differences. In the first one the liquid phase appears as a continuum whereas in the second one, the liquid phase is fractionated into micrometric droplets.

  3. Solid state {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR structural investigation of a poly(ethylene oxide) hydrogel

    SciTech Connect

    Badiger, M.V.; Graham, N.B.; Law, R.V.; Snape, C.E.

    1993-12-31

    A cross-linked poly (ethylene oxide)/polyurethane hydrogel cross-linked with 1,2,6 hexane-triol and designated PEG4050/1HT [measured M{sup n} of 4050 for poly (ethylene oxide) glycol (PEG) and a mole ratio of 1:1 for the PEG to the 1,2,6 hexane-triol] has been characterized by high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR. {sup 1}H thermal (T{sub 1}) and rotating frame (T{sub 1{rho}}) and {sup 13}CT{sub 1} relaxation times were determined for the powdered dry and swollen hydrogel with the standard variants of the cross-polarization pulse sequence which was used in conjunction with magic-angle spinning (MAS). The rotating frame relaxation measurements confirmed that crystalline and amorphous regions were present in the dry hydrogel but showed unabiguously that the crystalline regions are confined to the poly (ethylene oxide) chains, Upon hydration, there is a decrease in the cross polarization efficiency from the enhanced mobility by the poly (ethylene oxide) chains are affected to a much greater extent that the urethane and hexane segments, the characteristic time constant, T{sub CH} increasing by more than order of magnitude compared to no more than a factor of two for the latter. Clearly, the hydration involves hydrogen bonding between the water and principally the oxygens in the poly (ethylene oxide) chains. The {sup 1}H MAS spectra of the dry and hydrated samples confirmed that considerable averaging of the dipolar interactions occurs on hydration to give a well-resolved spectrum.

  4. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin–epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time 13C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio

    2015-01-01

    Summary The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  5. Alkaline Hydrolysis/Polymerization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: Characterization of Products by 13C and 15N NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Thorne, P.G.; Cox, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis has been investigated as a nonbiological procedure for the destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in explosives contaminated soils and munitions scrap. Nucleophilic substitutions of the nitro and methyl groups of TNT by hydroxide ion are the initial steps in the alkaline degradation of TNT. Potential applications of the technique include both in situ surface liming and ex situ alkaline treatment of contaminated soils. A number of laboratory studies have reported the formation of an uncharacterized polymeric material upon prolonged treatment of TNT in base. As part of an overall assessment of alkaline hydrolysis as a remediation technique, and to gain a better understanding of the chemical reactions underlying the hydrolysis/polymerization process, the soluble and precipitate fractions of polymeric material produced from the calcium hydroxide hydrolysis of unlabeled and 15N-labeled TNT were analyzed by elemental analysis and 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectra indicated that reactions leading to polymerization included nucleophilic displacement of nitro groups by hydroxide ion, formation of ketone, carboxyl, alcohol, ether, and other aliphatic carbons, conversion of methyl groups to diphenyl methylene carbons, and recondensation of aromatic amines and reduced forms of nitrite, including ammonia and possibly hydroxylamine, into the polymer. Compared to the distribution of carbons in TNT as 14% sp 3- and 86% sp2-hybridized, the precipitate fraction from hydrolysis of unlabeled TNT contained 33% sp3- and 67% sp 2-hybridized carbons. The concentration of nitrogen in the precipitate was 64% of that in TNT. The 15N NMR spectra showed that, in addition to residual nitro groups, forms of nitrogen present in the filtrate and precipitate fractions include aminohydroquinone, primary amide, indole, imine, and azoxy, among others. Unreacted nitrite was recovered in the filtrate fraction. The toxicities and susceptibilities to

  6. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin-epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time (13)C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization.

    PubMed

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio; Mele, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  7. Computational identification of a phospholipidosis toxicophore using (13)C and (15)N NMR-distance based fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Svetoslav H; Wilkes, Jon G; Buzatu, Dan A; Kruhlak, Naomi L; Willard, James M; Hanig, Joseph P; Beger, Richard D

    2014-12-01

    Modified 3D-SDAR fingerprints combining (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shifts augmented with inter-atomic distances were used to model the potential of chemicals to induce phospholipidosis (PLD). A curated dataset of 328 compounds (some of which were cationic amphiphilic drugs) was used to generate 3D-QSDAR models based on tessellations of the 3D-SDAR space with grids of different density. Composite PLS models averaging the aggregated predictions from 100 fully randomized individual models were generated. On each of the 100 runs, the activities of an external blind test set comprised of 294 proprietary chemicals were predicted and averaged to provide composite estimates of their PLD-inducing potentials (PLD+ if PLD is observed, otherwise PLD-). The best performing 3D-QSDAR model utilized a grid with a density of 8ppm×8ppm in the C-C region, 8ppm×20ppm in the C-N region and 20ppm×20ppm in the N-N region. The classification predictive performance parameters of this model evaluated on the basis of the external test set were as follows: accuracy=0.70, sensitivity=0.73 and specificity=0.66. A projection of the most frequently occurring bins on the standard coordinate space suggested a toxicophore composed of an aromatic ring with a centroid 3.5-7.5Å distant from an amino-group. The presence of a second aromatic ring separated by a 4-5Å spacer from the first ring and at a distance of between 5.5Å and 7Å from the amino-group was also associated with a PLD+ effect. These models provide comparable predictive performance to previously reported models for PLD with the added benefit of being based entirely on non-confidential, publicly available training data and with good predictive performance when tested in a rigorous, external validation exercise.

  8. Structural and {sup 31}P NMR investigation of Bi(MM'){sub 2}PO{sub 6} statistic solid solutions: Deconvolution of lattice constraints and cationic influences

    SciTech Connect

    Colmont, Marie; Delevoye, Laurent; Ketatni, El Mostafa; Montagne, Lionel; Mentre, Olivier . E-mail: mentre@ensc-lille.fr

    2006-07-15

    Two solid solutions BiM{sub x} Mg{sub (2-x)}PO{sub 6} (with M {sup 2+}=Zn or Cd) have been studied through {sup 31}P MAS NMR. The analysis has been performed on the basis of refined crystal structures through X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. The BiZn {sub x} Mg{sub (2-x)}PO{sub 6} does not provide direct evidence for sensitive changes in the phosphorus local symmetry. This result is in good agreement with structural data which show nearly unchanged lattices and atomic separations through the Zn{sup 2+} for Mg{sup 2+} substitution. On the other hand, the Cd{sup 2+} for Mg{sup 2+} substitution behaves differently. Indeed, up to five resonances are observed, each corresponding to one of the five first-cationic neighbour distributions, i.e. 4Mg/0Cd, 3Mg/1Cd, 2Mg/2Cd, 1Mg/3Cd and 0Mg/4Cd. Their intensities match rather well the expected weight for each configuration of the statistical Cd{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+} mixed occupancy. The match is further improved when one takes into account the influence of the 2nd cationic sphere that is available from high-field NMR data (18.8 T). Finally, the fine examination of the chemical shift for each resonance versus x allows to de-convolute the mean Z/a {sup 2} effective field into two sub-effects: a lattice constraint-only term and a chemical-only term whose effects are directly quantifiable. - Graphical abstract: First (CdMg){sub 4} cationic sphere influence on the {sup 31}P NMR signal in Bi(Cd,Mg){sub 2}PO{sub 6}. Display Omitted.

  9. 1H and 13C NMR studies of glycine in anisotropic media: Double-quantum transitions and the effects of chiral interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, Christoph; Kuchel, Philip W.

    2011-07-01

    The 1H NMR spectrum of glycine in stretched gelatin gel and in cromolyn liquid crystal displays a well-resolved doublet due to 1H- 1H dipolar interaction. Multiple spectra were obtained within a wide range of offset frequencies of partially saturating radio-frequency (RF) radiation to generate steady-state irradiation envelopes or z-spectra of glycine. Maximal suppression of the doublet occurred when the irradiation was applied exactly at the centre frequency, between the two glycine peaks. This phenomenon is due to double-quantum transitions and is similar to our previous work on quadrupolar nuclei 2H (HDO) and 23Na +. When the 13C isotopomer glycine-2- 13C was used, the same effect was found in twice, split by 1JCH + 2 DCH. Additional signals in 1H and 13C NMR due to prochiral-chiral interactions were found when glycine-2- 13C was dissolved in chiral anisotropic gelatin and κ-carrageenan gels. The NMR spectra were successfully simulated assuming a 2JHH coupling constant of -16.5 Hz and two distinct dipolar coupling constants for the - 13CH 2- group ( DC,HA, and DC,HB).

  10. Major Groove Width Variations in RNA Structures Determined by NMR and Impact of 13C residual chemical shift anisotropy and 1H-13C residual dipolar coupling on refinement

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, Blanton S; Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Barton, Shawn; Kinde, Benyam; Starck, Patrice; Singh, Rashmi; Bax, Ad

    2010-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid structure determination by NMR spectroscopy relies primarily on local structural restraints provided by 1H-1H NOEs and J-couplings. When employed loosely, these restraints are broadly compatible with A- and B-like helical geometries and give rise to calculated structures that are highly sensitive to the force fields employed during refinement. A survey of recently reported NMR structures reveals significant variations in helical parameters, particularly the major groove width. Although helical parameters observed in high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of isolated A-form RNA helices are sensitive to crystal packing effects, variations among the published X-ray structures are significantly smaller than those observed in NMR structures. Here we show that restraints derived from aromatic 1H-13C residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and residual chemical shift anisotropies (RCSAs) can overcome NMR restraint and force field deficiencies and afford structures with helical properties similar to those observed in high-resolution X-ray structures. PMID:20549304

  11. Combining solid-state and solution-state 31P NMR to study in vivo phosphorus metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Cholli, A L; Yamane, T; Jelinski, L W

    1985-01-01

    Otherwise unavailable information concerning the distribution of phosphorylated compounds in biological systems is obtained by a combined solid-state/solution-state NMR approach, illustrated here for oocytes from Rana pipiens. General methodology is developed, and further extensions are proposed. The following conclusions pertain to the specific system under examination. (i) Nucleoside phosphates can be observed by magic-angle sample spinning of the lyophilized material. (ii) The solid-state NMR technique of dipolar decoupling provides no additional resolution of the phospholipid and phosphoprotein components of the yolk. However, cellular death produces sufficient pH changes to cause the phospholipid and protein phosphate peaks to become resolvable. The concentration of nucleoside phosphates also decreases. (iii) The phospholipid and phosphoprotein components are shown by computer simulation to be present in a ratio of 40:60, respectively. (iv) The amounts of inorganic phosphate, nucleoside phosphates, and sugar phosphates are determined by solution-state NMR observation of the perchloric acid extract of the oocytes. PMID:3871524

  12. In vivo /sup 31/P NMR studies of corn root tissue and its uptake of toxic metals. [Zea mays L

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeffer, P.E.; Tu, S.I.; Gerasimowicz, W.V.; Cavanaugh, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Excised corn root tissue has been evaluated for its viability, integrity of compartmentation, intracellular pH gradients, total mobile phosphorus content and nucleotide concentrations under different levels of acidity, and mineral stresses using in vivo /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 21 to 23/sup 0/C. Perfusion with Al/sup 3 +/ ion at low pH (4.0) for 20 hours caused the overall concentration of nucleotides in the cytoplasm to decrease significantly relative to the control. Respiratory activity as measured by O/sub 2/ uptake decreased by a comparable amount over this time period. The addition of glucose to the Al-containing perfusate negated the inhibitory effects on the respiratory system. Treatment of the tissue with paramagnetic manganese ion while perfusing in the presence of O/sub 2/ allowed for the observation of the sequence of events leading to the irreversible trapping of Mn/sup 2 +/ in the vacuole. Pretreatment of the roots with Mg/sup 2 +/ prevented Mn/sup 2 +/ migration to the vacuole over the time period of this experiment. Hypoxia prevented all but a limited uptake of Mn/sup 2 +/ into the cytoplasm of the root tips. No evidence of Mn/sup 2 +/ complexation of either cytoplasmic or vacuole Pi suggests that the energy derived from O/sub 2/ consuming processes is necessary for the facilitated movement of this divalent cation.

  13. Solid-state (13)C NMR and synchrotron SAXS/WAXS studies of uniaxially-oriented polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Afeworki, Mobae; Brant, Pat; Lustiger, Arnold; Norman, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We report solid-state (13)C NMR and synchrotron wide-and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments (WAXS, SAXS) on metallocene linear low density polyethylene films (e.g., Exceed™ 1018 mLLDPE; nominally 1MI, 0.918 density ethylene-hexene metallocene copolymer) as a function of uniaxial draw ratio, λ. Combined, these experiments provide an unambiguous, quantitative molecular view of the orientation of both the crystalline and amorphous phases in the samples as a function of draw. Together with previously reported differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), gas transport measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), optical birefringence, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) as well as other characterization techniques, this study of the state of orientation in both phases provides insight concerning the development of unusually high barrier properties of the most oriented samples (λ=10). In this work, static (non-spinning) solid-state NMR measurements indicate that in the drawn Exceed(TM) films both the crystalline and amorphous regions are highly oriented. In particular, chemical shift data show the amorphous phase is comprised increasingly of so-called "taut tie chains" (or tie chains under any state of tautness) in the mLLDPE with increasing draw ratio - the resonance lines associated with the amorphous phase shift to where the crystalline peaks are observed. In the sample with highest total draw (λ=10), virtually all of the chains in the non-crystalline region have responded and aligned in the machine (draw) direction. Both monoclinic and orthorhombic crystalline peaks are observed in high-resolution, solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR measurements of the oriented PE films. The orientation is comparable to that obtained for ultra-high molecular weight HDPE fibers described as "ultra-oriented" in the literature. Furthermore, the presence of a monoclinic peak in cold-drawn samples suggests that there is an appreciable internal stress associated

  14. In Situ 13C NMR at Elevated-Pressures and -Temperatures Investigating the Conversion of CO2 to Magnesium and Calcium Carbonate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surface, J. A.; Conradi, M. S.; Skemer, P. A.; Hayes, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We have constructed specialized NMR hardware to conduct in situ elevated-pressure, elevated-temperature 13C NMR studies of unmixed heterogeneous mixtures of solids, liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. Specifically, our aim is to monitor CO2 uptake in both ultramafic rocks and in more porous geological materials to understand the mechanisms of chemisorption as a function of temperature, pressure and pH. In this in situ NMR probe, we are able to simulate processes at geologically relevant fluid pressures and temperatures, monitoring the kinetics of CO2 conversion to carbonates. The in situ NMR experiments consist of heterogeneous mixtures of rock, salty brine solution, and moderate pressure CO2 gas at elevated temperatures. The purpose of studying these reactions is to determine efficacy of carbonate formation in various geological reservoirs. Via 13C NMR, we have spectroscopically characterized and quantified the conversion of CO2 to magnesium carbonate and calcium carbonate minerals. When CO2 reacts with the calcium or magnesium in a mineral or rock sample, the 13C chemical shift, linewidth, lineshape, and relaxation times change dramatically. This change can be monitored in situ and provide instantaneous and continuous characterization that maps the chemistry that is taking place. For example, on the pathway to MgCO3 formation, there are a number of phases of Mg(OH)x(H2O)y(CO3)z that are apparent via NMR spectroscopy. We will demonstrate that NMR can be used for quantitative characterization of multiple metastable mineral phases in pure forms and in mixtures. Results are confirmed via powder XRD and Raman spectroscopy of aquo- hydro- carbonato- magnesium species and calcium carbonate species. We also have monitored the 13C spectroscopy to analyze the phase of CO2 (liquid, supercritical, or gas) and its conversion into other forms, such as bicarbonate and carbonate species, providing a "window" into the in situ pH of the reacting system. Reference: 'In Situ

  15. Characterizing phosphorus speciation of Chesapeake Bay sediments using chemical extraction, 31P NMR, and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Joshi, Sunendra R; Hou, Guangjin; Burdige, David J; Sparks, Donald L; Jaisi, Deb P

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient contamination has been one of the lingering issues in the Chesapeake Bay because the bay restoration is complicated by temporally and seasonally variable nutrient sources and complex interaction between imported and regenerated nutrients. Differential reactivity of sedimentary phosphorus (P) pools in response to imposed biogeochemical conditions can record past sediment history and therefore a detailed sediment P speciation may provide information on P cycling particularly the stability of a P pool and the formation of one pool at the expense of another. This study examined sediment P speciation from three sites in the Chesapeake Bay: (i) a North site in the upstream bay, (ii) a middle site in the central bay dominated by seasonally hypoxic bottom water, and (iii) a South site at the bay-ocean boundary using a combination of sequential P extraction (SEDEX) and spectroscopic techniques, including (31)P NMR, P X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES), and Fe extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Results from sequential P extraction reveal that sediment P is composed predominantly of ferric Fe-bound P and authigenic P, which was further confirmed by solid-state (31)P NMR, XANES, and EXAFS analyses. Additionally, solution (31)P NMR results show that the sediments from the middle site contain high amounts of organic P such as monoesters and diesters, compared to the other two sites, but that these compounds rapidly decrease with sediment depth indicating remineralized P could have precipitated as authigenic P. Fe EXAFS enabled to identify the changes in Fe mineral composition and P sinks in response to imposed redox condition in the middle site sediments. The presence of lepidocrocite, vermiculite, and Fe smectite in the middle site sediments indicates that some ferric Fe minerals can still be present along with pyrite and vivianite, and that ferric Fe-bound P pool can be a major P sink in anoxic sediments. These results provide

  16. Characterizing phosphorus speciation of Chesapeake Bay sediments using chemical extraction, 31P NMR, and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Joshi, Sunendra R; Hou, Guangjin; Burdige, David J; Sparks, Donald L; Jaisi, Deb P

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient contamination has been one of the lingering issues in the Chesapeake Bay because the bay restoration is complicated by temporally and seasonally variable nutrient sources and complex interaction between imported and regenerated nutrients. Differential reactivity of sedimentary phosphorus (P) pools in response to imposed biogeochemical conditions can record past sediment history and therefore a detailed sediment P speciation may provide information on P cycling particularly the stability of a P pool and the formation of one pool at the expense of another. This study examined sediment P speciation from three sites in the Chesapeake Bay: (i) a North site in the upstream bay, (ii) a middle site in the central bay dominated by seasonally hypoxic bottom water, and (iii) a South site at the bay-ocean boundary using a combination of sequential P extraction (SEDEX) and spectroscopic techniques, including (31)P NMR, P X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES), and Fe extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Results from sequential P extraction reveal that sediment P is composed predominantly of ferric Fe-bound P and authigenic P, which was further confirmed by solid-state (31)P NMR, XANES, and EXAFS analyses. Additionally, solution (31)P NMR results show that the sediments from the middle site contain high amounts of organic P such as monoesters and diesters, compared to the other two sites, but that these compounds rapidly decrease with sediment depth indicating remineralized P could have precipitated as authigenic P. Fe EXAFS enabled to identify the changes in Fe mineral composition and P sinks in response to imposed redox condition in the middle site sediments. The presence of lepidocrocite, vermiculite, and Fe smectite in the middle site sediments indicates that some ferric Fe minerals can still be present along with pyrite and vivianite, and that ferric Fe-bound P pool can be a major P sink in anoxic sediments. These results provide

  17. 13C-NMR of ribosyl A-A-A, A-A-G, and A-U-G. Synthesis and assignment.

    PubMed

    Stone, M P; Winkle, S A; McFarland, G D; Yoo, M C; Borer, P N

    1985-11-01

    The three RNA trinucleotides; ApApA, ApApG, and ApUpG, have been synthesized in sufficient quantity to obtain natural abundance 13C(1H)-NMR spectra at strand concentrations between 4 and 100 mM. Comparisons between 70 degrees C spectra of the three trimers and their consistuent dimers ApA, ApG, ApU, and UpG allow secure assignments to be made for most of the resonances. This paper describes the syntheses and 13C assignments of the oligomers.

  18. High-resolution solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy of the paramagnetic metal-organic frameworks, STAM-1 and HKUST-1.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Daniel M; Jamieson, Lauren E; Mohideen, M Infas H; McKinlay, Alistair C; Smellie, Iain A; Cadou, Romain; Keddie, Neil S; Morris, Russell E; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2013-01-21

    Solid-state (13)C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is used to investigate the structure of the Cu(II)-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), HKUST-1 and STAM-1, and the structural changes occurring within these MOFs upon activation (dehydration). NMR spectroscopy is an attractive technique for the investigation of these materials, owing to its high sensitivity to local structure, without any requirement for longer-range order. However, interactions between nuclei and unpaired electrons in paramagnetic systems (e.g., Cu(II)-based MOFs) pose a considerable challenge, not only for spectral acquisition, but also in the assignment and interpretation of the spectral resonances. Here, we exploit the rapid T(1) relaxation of these materials to obtain (13)C NMR spectra using a spin-echo pulse sequence at natural abundance levels, and employ frequency-stepped acquisition to ensure uniform excitation of resonances over a wide frequency range. We then utilise selective (13)C isotopic labelling of the organic linker molecules to enable an unambiguous assignment of NMR spectra of both MOFs for the first time. We show that the monomethylated linker can be recovered from STAM-1 intact, demonstrating not only the interesting use of this MOF as a protecting group, but also the ability (for both STAM-1 and HKUST-1) to recover isotopically-enriched linkers, thereby reducing significantly the overall cost of the approach.

  19. The 'Nuts and Bolts' of 13C NMR Spectroscopy at Elevated-Pressures and -Temperatures for Monitoring In Situ CO2 Conversion to Metal Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. K.; Surface, J. A.; Skemer, P. A.; Conradi, M. S.; Hayes, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We will present details of newly-constructed specialized NMR designed to conduct in situ elevated-pressure, elevated-temperature 13C NMR studies on unmixed slurries of minerals in the presence of CO2 or other gases. This static probe is capable of achieving 300 bar, 300C conditions, and it is designed to spectroscopically examine 13C signals in mixtures of solids, liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. Ultimately, our aim is to monitor CO2 uptake in both ultramafic rocks and in more porous geological materials to understand the mechanisms of chemisorption as a function of temperature, pressure and pH. We will give details of the hardware setup, and we will show a variety of static in situ NMR, as well as ex situ 'magic-angle spinning' NMR to show the analyses that are possible of minerals in pure form and in mixtures. In addition, specific NMR pulse sequences, techniques, and modeling will be described in detail. In this in situ NMR probe, we are able to simulate processes at geologically relevant fluid pressures and temperatures, monitoring the kinetics of CO2 conversion to carbonates. The in situ NMR experiments consist of heterogeneous mixtures of rock, salty brine solution, and moderate pressure CO2 gas at elevated temperatures. The purpose of studying these reactions is to determine conditions that affect the efficacy of carbonate formation in various targeted geological reservoirs (i.e., peroditite, or others). Via 13C NMR, we have spectroscopically characterized and quantified the conversion of CO2 to magnesium carbonate and calcium carbonate minerals, including metastable intermediates (such as hydromagnesite, or dypingite in the case of magnesium carbonate species, or vaterite in the case of calcium carbonate species). Such species are distinguishable from a combination of the 13C isotropic chemical shift, the static 13C lineshape, and changes in spin-lattice (T1) relaxation times. We will demonstrate that NMR can be used for quantitative

  20. Structure and Membrane Interactions of the Antibiotic Peptide Dermadistinctin K by Multidimensional Solution and Oriented 15N and 31P Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Verly, Rodrigo M.; Moraes, Cléria Mendonça de; Resende, Jarbas M.; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fábio C.L.; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    DD K, a peptide first isolated from the skin secretion of the Phyllomedusa distincta frog, has been prepared by solid-phase chemical peptide synthesis and its conformation was studied in trifluoroethanol/water as well as in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecylphosphocholine micelles or small unilamellar vesicles. Multidimensional solution NMR spectroscopy indicates an α-helical conformation in membrane environments starting at residue 7 and extending to the C-terminal carboxyamide. Furthermore, DD K has been labeled with 15N at a single alanine position that is located within the helical core region of the sequence. When reconstituted into oriented phosphatidylcholine membranes the resulting 15N solid-state NMR spectrum shows a well-defined helix alignment parallel to the membrane surface in excellent agreement with the amphipathic character of DD K. Proton-decoupled 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy indicates that the peptide creates a high level of disorder at the level of the phospholipid headgroup suggesting that DD K partitions into the bilayer where it severely disrupts membrane packing. PMID:19289046

  1. Rate equation for creatine kinase predicts the in vivo reaction velocity: /sup 31/P NMR surface coil studies in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle of the living rat

    SciTech Connect

    Bittl, J.A.; DeLayre, J.; Ingwall, J.S.

    1987-09-22

    Brain, heart, and skeletal muscle contain four different creatine kinase isozymes and various concentrations of substrates for the creatine kinase reaction. To identify if the velocity of the creatine kinase reaction under cellular conditions is regulated by enzyme activity and substrate concentrations as predicted by the rate equation, the authors used /sup 31/P NMR and spectrophotometric techniques to measure reaction velocity, enzyme content, isozyme distribution, and concentrations of substrates in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle of living rat under basal or resting conditions. The total tissue activity of creatine kinase in the direction of MgATP synthesis provided an estimate for V/sub max/ and exceeded the NMR-determined in vivo reaction velocities by an order of magnitude. The isozyme composition varied among the three tissues: >99% BB for brain; 14% MB, 61% MM, and 25% mitochondrial for heart; and 98% MM and 2% mitochondrial for skeletal muscle. The NMR-determined reaction velocities agreed with predicted values from the creatine kinase rate equation. The concentrations of free creatine and cytosolic MgADP, being less than or equal to the dissociation constants for each isozyme, were dominant terms in the creatine kinase rate equation for predicting the in vivo reaction velocity. Thus, they observed that the velocity of the creatine kinase reaction is regulated by total tissue enzyme activity and by the concentrations of creatine and MgADP in a manner that is independent of isozyme distribution.

  2. A [sup 13]C NMR study of ethylene adsorbed on reduced and oxygen-covered Ag surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Plischke, J.K.; Benesi, A.J.; Vannice, M.A. )

    1992-11-01

    [sup 13]C-enriched ethylene was adsorbed on both clean and oxygen-covered Ag particles dispersed on [eta]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Irreversibly adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4] on O-covered Ag exhibited an upfield shift of [minus]20 ppm relative to gas-phase C[sub 2]H[sub 4], whereas a narrower line and smaller shift of [minus]5 ppm occurred for C[sub 2]H[sub 4] reversibly adsorbed on reduced Ag. In addition to the resonance at 103 ppm for irreversibly adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4], CP/MAS NMR spectra also gave resonances at 179, 170, 164, 159, and 19 ppm for the O-covered Ag sample. The CP/MAS spectrum for Ag acetate powder clearly identified the 179- and 19-ppm peaks as those associated with the carboxyl and methyl carbons of the acetate anion, and the peaks at 159, 164, and 170 ppm were assigned to oxalate, formate, and carbonate (or possibly acetic anhydride) species, respectively, based on previous studies. When heated to 473 K the adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4] disappeared and only acetate and oxalate groups were observed, and continued heating to 573 K removed almost all resonances. No C[sub 2]H[sub 4]O was unambiguously detected, thus with this unpromoted Ag catalyst utilizing a high-surface-area alumina the observable surface species appeared to be those associated with complete combustion, with acetate and oxalate predominating during reaction. These results directly confirm the presence of an Ag acetate species which has been proposed previously to be an intermediate in complete combustion, and the presence of the other three species support earlier tentative assignments based on IR and TPR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts at 61, 28, and 13 ppm were indicative of alkoxy species formed on Bronsted-acid sites on the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] surface. 58 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Analysis of brain metabolism changes induced by acute potassium cyanide intoxication by 31P NMR in vivo using chronically implanted surface coils.

    PubMed

    Decorps, M; Lebas, J F; Leviel, J L; Confort, S; Remy, C; Benabid, A L

    1984-03-12

    Chronic implantation of surface coils on the skull has been developed to record 31P NMR spectra of the brain in unanesthetized rats. Intraperitoneal sublethal potassium cyanide doses induce strong and reversible changes in high-energy phosphate compounds in the brain, similar in part to those induced by ischemia. These effects are dose-dependent as far as phosphocreatine, inorganic orthophosphates and pH are concerned; ATP does not seem to be altered by KCN doses ranging from 3 to 5 mg/kg but starts decreasing at a dose of 6 mg/kg. The fraction of Mg2+ complexed ATP which could be estimated as about 90% was not affected by KCN intoxication. For high doses (6 mg/kg) a new peak, appearing on the upfield side of the inorganic phosphate peak, may correspond to an acidic compartment, the significance of which is discussed.

  4. The investigation of membrane binding by amphibian peptide agonists of CCK2R using (31)P and (2)H solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Patrick J; Separovic, Frances; Bowie, John H

    2014-05-01

    It has been proposed that some neuropeptides may be anchored to the cell membranes prior to attaching to the adjacent active sites of transmembrane receptors. The three amphibian skin neuropeptides signiferin 1 [RLCIPYIIPC(OH)] (smooth muscle active and immunomodulator), riparin 1.1 [[RLCIPVIFPC(OH)] (immunomodulator) and rothein 1 [SVSNIPESIGF(OH)] (immunomodulator) act via CCK2 transmembrane receptors. A combination of (31)P and (2)H solid state NMR studies of each of these three peptides in eukaryotic phospholipid models at 25°C shows that rothein 1 does not interact with the membrane at all. In contrast, both of the cyclic disulfides signiferin 1 and riparin 1.1 interact with phospholipid head groups and partially penetrate into the upper leaflet of the model bilayer, but to different extents. These interactions are not sufficiently effective to cause disruption of the lipid bilayer since the peptides are not antimicrobial, anticancer, antifungal nor active against enveloped viruses. PMID:24582625

  5. Analysis of brain metabolism changes induced by acute potassium cyanide intoxication by 31P NMR in vivo using chronically implanted surface coils.

    PubMed

    Decorps, M; Lebas, J F; Leviel, J L; Confort, S; Remy, C; Benabid, A L

    1984-03-12

    Chronic implantation of surface coils on the skull has been developed to record 31P NMR spectra of the brain in unanesthetized rats. Intraperitoneal sublethal potassium cyanide doses induce strong and reversible changes in high-energy phosphate compounds in the brain, similar in part to those induced by ischemia. These effects are dose-dependent as far as phosphocreatine, inorganic orthophosphates and pH are concerned; ATP does not seem to be altered by KCN doses ranging from 3 to 5 mg/kg but starts decreasing at a dose of 6 mg/kg. The fraction of Mg2+ complexed ATP which could be estimated as about 90% was not affected by KCN intoxication. For high doses (6 mg/kg) a new peak, appearing on the upfield side of the inorganic phosphate peak, may correspond to an acidic compartment, the significance of which is discussed. PMID:6705916

  6. 31P NMR analysis of intracellular pH of Swiss Mouse 3T3 cells: effects of extracellular Na+ and K+ and mitogenic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Civan, M M; Williams, S R; Gadian, D G; Rozengurt, E

    1986-01-01

    Swiss mouse 3T3 cells grown on microcarrier beads were superfused with electrolyte solution during continuous NMR analysis. Conventional 31P and 19F probes of intracellular pH (pHc) were found to be impracticable. Cells were therefore superfused with 1 to 4 mM 2-deoxyglucose, producing a large intracellular, pH-sensitive signal of 2-deoxyglucose phosphate (2DGP). The intracellular incorporation of 2DGP inhibited the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. However, intracellular ATP was at least in part retained and the cellular responsivity to changes in extracellular ionic composition and to the application of growth factors proved intact. Transient replacement of external Na+ with choline or K+ reversibly acidified the intracellular fluids. Quiescent cells and mitogenically stimulated cells displayed the same dependence of shifts in pHc on external Na+ concentration (CoNa). PHc also depended on intracellular Na+ concentration (CcNa). Increasing ccNa by withdrawing external K+ (thereby inhibiting the Na,K-pump) caused reversible intracellular acidification; subsequently reducing CoNa produced a larger acid shift in pHc than with external K+ present. Comparison of separate preparations indicated that pHc was higher in stimulated than in quiescent cells. Transient administration of mitogens also reversibly alkalinized quiescent cells studied continuously. This study documents the feasibility of monitoring pHc of Swiss mouse 3T3 cells using 31P NMR analysis of 2DGP. The results support the concept of a Na/H antiport operative in these cells, both in quiescence and after mitogenic stimulation. The data document by an independent technique that cytoplasmic alkalinization is an early event in mitogenesis, and that full activity of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway is not required for the expression of this event.

  7. Geometries and tautomerism of OHN hydrogen bonds in aprotic solution probed by H/D isotope effects on (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, Peter M; Guo, Jing; Koeppe, Benjamin; Golubev, Nikolai S; Denisov, Gleb S; Smirnov, Sergei N; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-10-14

    The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of 17 OHN hydrogen-bonded complexes formed by CH(3)(13)COOH(D) with 14 substituted pyridines, 2 amines, and N-methylimidazole have been measured in the temperature region between 110 and 150 K using CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl mixture as solvent. The slow proton and hydrogen bond exchange regime was reached, and the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group were measured. In combination with the analysis of the corresponding (1)H chemical shifts, it was possible to distinguish between OHN hydrogen bonds exhibiting a single proton position and those exhibiting a fast proton tautomerism between molecular and zwitterionic forms. Using H-bond correlations, we relate the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group with the OHN hydrogen bond geometries.

  8. Systematic Comparison of Sets of 13C NMR Spectra That Are Potentially Identical. Confirmation of the Configuration of a Cuticular Hydrocarbon from the Cane Beetle Antitrogus parvulus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A systematic process is introduced to compare 13C NMR spectra of two (or more) candidate samples of known structure to a natural product sample of unknown structure. The process is designed for the case where the spectra involved can reasonably be expected to be very similar, perhaps even identical. It is first validated by using published 13C NMR data sets for the natural product 4,6,8,10,16,18-hexamethyldocosane. Then the stereoselective total syntheses of two candidate isomers of the related 4,6,8,10,16-pentamethyldocosane natural product are described, and the process is applied to confidently assign the configuration of the natural product as (4S,6R,8R,10S,16S). This is accomplished even though the chemical shift differences between this isomer and its (16R)-epimer are only ±5–10 ppb (±0.005–0.01 ppm). PMID:25019530

  9. Combined analysis by GC (RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR of the supercritical fluid extract of Abies alba twigs.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Emilie; Marongiu, Bruno; Castola, Vincent; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Casanova, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    Two samples (leaves and twigs) of Abies alba Miller from Corsica were extracted using supercritical CO2 and their chemical compositions were compared with those of the essential oils obtained from the same batch of plant material. In total 45 components were identified using combined analysis by GC (RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR. It was observed that the contents of monoterpenes (mainly represented by limonene, alpha-pinene and camphene) were significantly lower in the supercritical fluid extract (SFE) than in the essential oil (EO). Conversely, the proportions of sesquiterpenes were much higher in CO2 extracts than in essential oils (around 30% vs 4%). Cis-abienol, a diterpene alcohol, was identified only in SFE, and the proportions of this constituent (7.5% and 17.3%) were determined using quantitative 13C NMR since it was under estimated using the standard conditions of GC. PMID:21299139

  10. Identification of archaeological triterpenic resins by the non-separative techniques FTIR and 13C NMR: the case of Pistacia resin (mastic) in comparison with frankincense.

    PubMed

    Bruni, Silvia; Guglielmi, Vittoria

    2014-01-01

    The use of spectroscopic techniques such as Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) using the J-mod experiment is proposed as an effective alternative to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the analysis and identification of natural resin samples found in archaeological environments. The spectral features of the most common diterpenic and triterpenic resins and also two gum-resins are reported and discussed for both techniques. The analytical procedure based on the combined use of FTIR and (13)C NMR is then applied to two archaeological samples from the Milano of the Roman age allowing their identification as Pistacia resin, or mastic, as confirmed by the traditional GC-MS method, and also elucidating some effects of aging on such material.

  11. Combined analysis by GC (RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR of the supercritical fluid extract of Abies alba twigs.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Emilie; Marongiu, Bruno; Castola, Vincent; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Casanova, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    Two samples (leaves and twigs) of Abies alba Miller from Corsica were extracted using supercritical CO2 and their chemical compositions were compared with those of the essential oils obtained from the same batch of plant material. In total 45 components were identified using combined analysis by GC (RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR. It was observed that the contents of monoterpenes (mainly represented by limonene, alpha-pinene and camphene) were significantly lower in the supercritical fluid extract (SFE) than in the essential oil (EO). Conversely, the proportions of sesquiterpenes were much higher in CO2 extracts than in essential oils (around 30% vs 4%). Cis-abienol, a diterpene alcohol, was identified only in SFE, and the proportions of this constituent (7.5% and 17.3%) were determined using quantitative 13C NMR since it was under estimated using the standard conditions of GC.

  12. Chemical composition of the essential oil from Corsican Mentha aquatica--combined analysis by GC(RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sutour, Sylvain; Tomi, Félix; Bradesi, Pascale; Casanova, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    The essential oil (EO) of M. aquatica L. growing wild in Corsica was isolated by dry vapor distillation and submitted to combined analysis by column chromatography over silica gel, GC(RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The composition was dominated byoxygenated monoterpenes and characterized by the occurrence of menthofuran (50.7%) as the major component. In parallel, seven laboratory-distilled oil samples isolated from individual plants collected in Corsica were analyzed by GC(RI) and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Onlyquantitative differences were observed between the samples. Beside the usual terpenes, various p-menthane lactones (mintlactone, isomintlactone, hydroxymintlactone, menthofurolactone and epimenthofurolactone) have been identified in all the oil samples.

  13. Mechanism of formation of humus coatings on mineral surfaces 3. Composition of adsorbed organic acids from compost leachate on alumina by solid-state 13C NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Llaguno, E.C.; Leenheer, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The adsorption of compost leachate DOC on alumina is used as a model for elucidation of the mechanism of formation of natural organic coatings on hydrous metal oxide surfaces in soils and sediments. Compost leachate DOC is composed mainly of organic acid molecules. The solid-state 13C NMR spectra of these organic acids indicate that they are very similar in composition to aquatic humic substances. Changes in the solid-state 13C NMR spectra of compost leachate DOC fractions adsorbed on alumina indicate that the DOC molecules are most likely adsorbed on metal oxide surfaces through a combination of polar and hydrophobic interaction mechanisms. This combination of polar and hydrophobic mechanism leads to the formation of bilayer coatings of the leachate molecules on the oxide surfaces.

  14. Direct identification and quantitative determination of costunolide and dehydrocostuslactone in the fixed oil of Laurus novocanariensis by 13C-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Bernard; Castilho, Paula; Tomi, Félix; Rodrigues, Ana Isabel; do Ceu Costa, Maria; Casanova, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The fixed oil of Laurus novocanariensis (previously L. azorica) contains mostly glycerides together with minor non-saponifiable compounds. The direct identification and quantitative determination of costunolide and dehydrocostuslactone, two sesquiterpene lactones components of the oil that exhibit biological activities, is described. The analysis was carried out using 13C-NMR spectroscopy (signal acquisition with inverse gated decoupling of protons; diglyme as internal standard) without separation, derivatisation or any sample preparation.

  15. Identification and quantitative determination of eudesmane-type acids from the essential oil of Dittrichia viscosa sp. viscosa using 13C-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Marie-Cécile; Bradesi, Pascale; Casanova, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    A procedure that allows the identification and quantitative determination of eudesmane-type acids in the acidic part of the essential oil of Dittrichia viscosa sp. viscosa is described. The method involves the computer-aided analysis of the 13C-NMR spectrum of the mixture without the requirement of previous separation or derivatisation. The quantitative procedure was verified with costic acid standard and applied to three other acids which possess the same eudesmane framework.

  16. Variable temperature 1H and 13C NMR study of restricted rotation in N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)acetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, R. Alan; Smith, Melanja H.; Wilson, Heather S.

    2016-06-01

    N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)acetamide shows restricted rotation about the amide bond in both 1H and 13C NMR spectra rendering the two hydroxyethyl groups non-equivalent. A variable temperature study in CD3SOCD3 allowed estimation of the free energy barrier to rotation as 75.6 ± 0.2 kJ mol-1. Previously published data in CDCl3 appears to be erroneous.

  17. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for 6-demethylvermistatin and two penicillide derivatives from the mangrove fungus Guignardia sp. (No. 4382) from the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xue-Kui; Liu, Fan; She, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Li-Guo; Li, Meng-Feng; Vrijmoed, L L P; Lin, Yong-Cheng

    2008-07-01

    One new compound 6-demethylvermistatin (1), together with two known compounds, the penicillide derivatives (2) and (3) were isolated from the mangrove fungus Guignardia sp. No. 4382 obtained from the South China Sea. Their structures were assigned using high-resolution electron ionization mass spectrometry(HREIMS), (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra, DEPT, and by 2D COSY, HMQC, and HMBC experiments. The absolute configuration of 1 was established by comparison of its CD with that of vermistatin.

  18. Hydrogen bonding induced distortion of CO3 units and kinetic stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate: results from 2D (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Kaseman, Derrick C; Colas, Bruno; Jacob, Dorrit E; Clark, Simon M

    2016-07-27

    Systematic correlation in alkaline-earth carbonate compounds between the deviation of the CO3 units from the perfect D3h symmetry and their (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters is established. The (13)C NMR CSA parameters of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) are measured using two-dimensional (13)C phase adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) NMR spectroscopy and are analyzed on the basis of this correlation. The results indicate a distortion of the CO3 units in ACC in the form of an in-plane displacement of the C atom away from the centroid of the O3 triangle, resulting from hydrogen bonding with the surrounding H2O molecules, without significant out-of-plane displacement. Similar distortion for all C atoms in the structure of ACC suggests a uniform spatial disposition of H2O molecules around the CO3 units forming a hydrogen-bonded amorphous network. This amorphous network is stabilized against crystallization by steric frustration, while additives such as Mg presumably provide further stabilization by increasing the energy of dehydration. PMID:27276013

  19. Effects of stereoelectronic interactions on the relativistic spin-orbit and paramagnetic components of the (13)C NMR shielding tensors of dihaloethenes.

    PubMed

    Viesser, Renan V; Ducati, Lucas C; Autschbach, Jochen; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2015-07-15

    In this study, stereoelectronic interactions were considered to explain the experimental difference in the magnitude of the known heavy-atom effect on the (13)C NMR chemical shifts in cis- and trans-1,2-dihaloethene isomers (halo = F, Cl, Br or I). The experimental values were compared to the calculated values with various DFT functionals using both the nonrelativistic approach (NR) and the relativistic approximations SR-ZORA (SR) and SO-ZORA (SO). NBO and NLMO contributions to the (13)C NMR shielding tensors were determined to assess which stereoelectronic interactions have a more important effect on the shielding tensor in each principal axis system (PAS) coordinate. These analyses associated with the orbital rotation model and the HOMO-LUMO energy gap enable rationalization of trends between cis and trans isomers from fluorine to iodine derivatives. Both paramagnetic and SO shielding terms were responsible for the observed trends. It was possible to conclude that the steric interactions between the two iodine atoms and the hyperconjugative interactions involving the halogen lone pairs (LP(X)) and πC[double bond, length as m-dash]C*, σC[double bond, length as m-dash]C* and σC-X* antibonding orbitals are responsible for the lower (13)C NMR shielding for the cis isomers of the bromine and the iodine compounds than that of the trans isomers.

  20. In vivo, large-scale preparation of uniformly (15)N- and site-specifically (13)C-labeled homogeneous, recombinant RNA for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Le, My T; Brown, Rachel E; Simon, Anne E; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of how ribonucleic acid (RNA) structures fold to form intricate, three-dimensional structures has provided fundamental insights into understanding the biological functions of RNA. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a particularly useful high-resolution technique to investigate the dynamic structure of RNA. Effective study of RNA by NMR requires enrichment with isotopes of (13)C or (15)N or both. Here, we present a method to produce milligram quantities of uniformly (15)N- and site-specifically (13)C-labeled RNAs using wild-type K12 and mutant tktA Escherichia coli in combination with a tRNA-scaffold approach. The method includes a double selection protocol to obtain an E. coli clone with consistently high expression of the recombinant tRNA-scaffold. We also present protocols for the purification of the tRNA-scaffold from a total cellular RNA extract and the excision of the RNA of interest from the tRNA-scaffold using DNAzymes. Finally, we showcase NMR applications to demonstrate the benefit of using in vivo site-specifically (13)C-labeled RNA. PMID:26577743

  1. Rapid adaptation of rat brain and liver metabolism to a ketogenic diet: an integrated study using 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Maggie; Beauvieux, Marie-Christine; Naulin, Jérôme; El Hamrani, Dounia; Gallis, Jean-Louis; Cunnane, Stephen C; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2015-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective alternative treatment for refractory epilepsy in children, but the mechanisms by which it reduces seizures are poorly understood. To investigate how the KD modifies brain metabolism, we infused control (CT) and 7-day KD rats with either [1-13C]glucose (Glc) or [2,4-13C2]β-hydroxybutyrate (β-HB). Specific enrichments of amino acids (AAs) measured by 1H- and 13C-NMR in total brain perchloric acid extracts were similar between CT and KD rats after [1-13C]Glc infusion whereas they were higher in KD rats after [2,4-13C2]β-HB infusion. This suggests better metabolic efficiency of ketone body utilization on the KD. The relative rapid metabolic adaptation to the KD included (1) 11%-higher brain γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)/glutamate (Glu) ratio versus CT, (2) liver accumulation of the ketogenic branched-chain AAs (BCAAs) leucine (Leu) and isoleucine (ILeu), which were never detected in CT, and (3) higher brain Leu and ILeu contents. Since Glu and GABA are excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, respectively, higher brain GABA/Glu ratio could contribute to the mechanism by which the KD reduces seizures in epilepsy. Increased BCAA on the KD may also contribute to better seizure control. PMID:25785828

  2. Analysis of dynamics and mechanism of ligand binding to Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin. A 13C and 19F NMR study.

    PubMed

    Krishna Sastry, M V; Swamy, M J; Surolia, A

    1988-10-15

    Binding of 13C-labeled N-acetylgalactosamine (13C-GalNAc) and N-trifluoroacetylgalactosamine (19F-GalNAc) to Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin has been studied using 13C and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Binding of these saccharides resulted in broadening of the resonances, and no change in chemical shift was observed, suggesting that the alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc experience a magnetically equivalent environment in the lectin combining site. The alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc were found to be in slow exchange between free and protein bound states. Binding of 13C-GalNAc was studied as a function of temperature. From the temperature dependence of the line broadening, the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were evaluated. The association rate constants obtained for the alpha-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc (k+1 = 1.01 x 10(5) M-1.s-1 and 0.698 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, respectively) are in close agreement with those obtained for the corresponding beta-anomers (k+1 = 0.95 x 10(5) M-1.s-1 and 0.65 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, respectively), suggesting that the two anomers bind to the lectin by a similar mechanism. In addition these values are several orders of magnitude slower than those obtained for diffusion controlled processes. The dissociation rate constants obtained are 49.9, 56.9, 42, and 43 s-1, respectively, for the alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc. A two-step mechanism has been proposed for the interaction of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc with A. integrifolia lectin in view of the slow association rates and high activation entropies. The thermodynamic parameters obtained for the association and dissociation reactions suggest that the binding process is entropically favored and that there is a small enthalpic contribution.

  3. 13C CP/MAS NMR Studies of Hemoprotein Models with and without an Axial Hindered Base: (13)C Shielding Tensors and Comparison with Hemoproteins and X-ray Structural Data.

    PubMed

    Gerothanassis, I. P.; Momenteau, M.; Barrie, P. J.; Kalodimos, C. G.; Hawkes, G. E.

    1996-04-24

    13C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectra of several carbonmonoxide (93-99% (13)C enriched) hemoprotein models with 1,2-dimethylimidazole (1,2-diMeIm) and 1-methylimidazole (1-MeIm) as axial ligands are reported. This enables the (13)CO spinning sideband manifold to be measured and hence the principal components of the (13)CO chemical shift tensor to be obtained. Negative polar interactions in the binding pocket of the cap porphyrin model and inhibition of Fe-->CO back-donation result in a reduction in shielding anisotropy; on the contrary, positive distal polar interactions result in an increase in the shielding anisotropy and asymmetry parameter in some models. It appears that the axial hindered base 1,2-dimethylimidazole has little direct effect on the local geometry at the CO site, despite higher rates of CO desorption being observed for such complexes. This suggests that the mechanism by which steric interactions are released for the 1,2-diMeIm complexes compared to 1-MeIm complexes does not involve a significant increase in bending of the Fe-C-O unit. The asymmetry of the shielding tensor of all the heme model compounds studied is smaller than that found for horse myoglobin and rabbit hemoglobin.

  4. A 31P NMR spectroscopy study of Xenopus laevis heart perfused in vitro with creatinol-O-phosphate, phosphocreatine, adenosine triphosphate, fructose diphosphate and ouabain.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J I; Rossini, P; Schweizer, M P; Bernardi, M; Moretti, V; Re, L; Rossini, L

    1993-09-01

    Xenopus laevis heart was studied by 31P NMR using a 200 MHz proton spectrometer; hearts were perfused, at pH 7.35 and room temperature, with normal oxygenated or K(+)-enriched Ringer. Solution was later added with creatinol-O-phosphate (COP), phosphocreatine (PCr), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP) and ouabain. NMR spectra of the heart show organic phosphomono- and phosphodi-esters, inorganic phosphate, PCr, overlapping alpha-ATP/ADP and gamma-ATP/beta-ADP, and beta-ATP signals. Their chemical shift positions and areas showed no significant changes in the course of 1.5 h perfusions with either solution, except in a few preparations, whether the heart was beating or reversibly arrested. While COP reduced the signals in beating hearts, the same spectra exhibited no consistent, substantial changes under PCr, ATP and FDP 1 to 10 mM, pH 7.35 perfusion with either solution, nor when ouabain mumol was added. The spectra are briefly discussed in comparison with those observed in the perfused heart of mammals (mostly rat), and particularly with those obtained in the frog (Rana temporaria) heart, both by analysing the bioenergetic equilibria on the basis of total tissue substrate levels measured in extracts of freeze-clamped tissue, and by evaluating cytochrome-b, flavin and pyridine nucleotide in vitro oxido-reduction read-outs in separate, similar experimental settings.

  5. Chemical and nanometer-scale structure of kerogen and its change during thermal maturation investigated by advanced solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, J.; Fang, X.; Lan, Y.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Xu, L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used advanced and quantitative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate structural changes in a series of type II kerogen samples from the New Albany Shale across a range of maturity (vitrinite reflectance R0 from 0.29% to 1.27%). Specific functional groups such as CH3, CH2, alkyl CH, aromatic CH, aromatic C-O, and other nonprotonated aromatics, as well as "oil prone" and "gas prone" carbons, have been quantified by 13C NMR; atomic H/C and O/C ratios calculated from the NMR data agree with elemental analysis. Relationships between NMR structural parameters and vitrinite reflectance, a proxy for thermal maturity, were evaluated. The aromatic cluster size is probed in terms of the fraction of aromatic carbons that are protonated (???30%) and the average distance of aromatic C from the nearest protons in long-range H-C dephasing, both of which do not increase much with maturation, in spite of a great increase in aromaticity. The aromatic clusters in the most mature sample consist of ???30 carbons, and of ???20 carbons in the least mature samples. Proof of many links between alkyl chains and aromatic rings is provided by short-range and long-range 1H-13C correlation NMR. The alkyl segments provide most H in the samples; even at a carbon aromaticity of 83%, the fraction of aromatic H is only 38%. While aromaticity increases with thermal maturity, most other NMR structural parameters, including the aromatic C-O fractions, decrease. Aromaticity is confirmed as an excellent NMR structural parameter for assessing thermal maturity. In this series of samples, thermal maturation mostly increases aromaticity by reducing the length of the alkyl chains attached to the aromatic cores, not by pronounced growth of the size of the fused aromatic ring clusters. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Correcting human heart 31P NMR spectra for partial saturation. Evidence that saturation factors for PCr/ATP are homogeneous in normal and disease states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottomley, Paul A.; Hardy, Christopher J.; Weiss, Robert G.

    Heart PCr/ATP ratios measured from spatially localized 31P NMR spectra can be corrected for partial saturation effects using saturation factors derived from unlocalized chest surface-coil spectra acquired at the heart rate and approximate Ernst angle for phosphor creatine (PCr) and again under fully relaxed conditions during each 31P exam. To validate this approach in studies of normal and disease states where the possibility of heterogeneity in metabolite T1 values between both chest muscle and heart and normal and disease states exists, the properties of saturation factors for metabolite ratios were investigated theoretically under conditions applicable in typical cardiac spectroscopy exams and empirically using data from 82 cardiac 31P exams in six study groups comprising normal controls ( n = 19) and patients with dilated ( n = 20) and hypertrophic ( n = 5) cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease ( n = 16), heart transplants ( n = 19), and valvular heart disease ( n = 3). When TR ≪ T1,(PCr), with T1(PCr) ⩾ T1(ATP), the saturation factor for PCr/ATP lies in the range 1.5 ± 0.5, regardless of the T1 values. The precise value depends on the ratio of metabolite T1 values rather than their absolute values and is insensitive to modest changes in TR. Published data suggest that the metabolite T1 ratio is the same in heart and muscle. Our empirical data reveal that the saturation factors do not vary significantly with disease state, nor with the relative fractions of muscle and heart contributing to the chest surface-coil spectra. Also, the corrected myocardial PCr/ATP ratios in each normal or disease state bear no correlation with the corresponding saturation factors nor the fraction of muscle in the unlocalized chest spectra. However, application of the saturation correction (mean value, 1.36 ± 0.03 SE) significantly reduced scatter in myocardial PCr/ATP data by 14 ± 11% (SD) ( p ⩽ 0.05). The findings suggest that the relative T1 values of PCr and ATP are

  7. Delineation of conformational preferences in human salivary statherin by 1H, 31P NMR and CD studies: sequential assignment and structure-function correlations.

    PubMed

    Naganagowda, G A; Gururaja, T L; Levine, M J

    1998-08-01

    Membrane-induced solution structure of human salivary statherin, a 43 amino acid residue acidic phosphoprotein, has been investigated by two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (2D 1H NMR) spectroscopy. NMR assignments and structural analysis of this phosphoprotein was accomplished by analyzing the pattern of sequential and medium range NOEs, alphaCH chemical shift perturbations and deuterium exchange measurements of the amide proton resonances. The NMR data revealed three distinct structural motifs in the molecule: (1) an alpha-helical structure at the N-terminal domain comprising Asp1-Tyr16, (2) a polyproline type II (PPII) conformation predominantly occurring at the middle proline-rich domain spanning Gly19-Gln35, and (3) a 3(10)-helical structure at the C-terminal Pro36-Phe43 sequence. Presence of a few weak dalphaN(i,i+2) NOEs suggests that N-terminus also possesses minor population of 3(10)-helical conformation. Of the three secondary structural elements, helical structure formed by the N-terminal residues, Asp1-Ile11 appears to be more rigid as observed by the relatively very slow exchange of amide hydrogens of Glu5-Ile11. 31P NMR experiments clearly indicated that N-terminal domain of statherin exists mainly in disordered state in water whereas, upon addition of structure stabilizing co-solvent, 2,2,2-trifluorethanol (TFE), it showed a strong propensity for helical conformation. Calcium ion interaction studies suggested that the disordered N-terminal region encompassing the two vicinal phosphoserines is essential for the binding of calcium ions in vivo. Results from the circular dichroism (CD) experiments were found to be consistent with and complimentary to the NMR data and provided an evidence that non-aqueous environment such as TFE, could induce the protein to fold into helical conformation. The findings that the statherin possesses blended solvent sensitive secondary structural elements and the requirement of non-structured N-terminal region

  8. Detection of modifications in the glucose metabolism induced by genetic mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by 13C- and H-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Herve, M; Buffin-Meyer, B; Bouet, F; Son, T D

    2000-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy may offer a suitable technique to characterize the glucose metabolism in response to genetic mutations in cells. The effects of various genetic modifications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast were investigated using 13C- and 1H-NMR spectroscopy associated with biochemical techniques. Cells were incubated with [1-13C]glucose in order to study glucose consumption and the formation of various end-products (ethanol, trehalose, glycerol, glutamate and amino acids) as a function of time. Two types of genetic modifications were studied in S. cerevisiae. A genetic modification deleted the N-terminal part of the TFC7 protein which is the smallest subunit (tau55) of the TFIIIC transcription factor. One secondary effect of this mutation was a large deletion of mitochondrial DNA giving the rho-phenotype. The other genetic modification corresponded to the disruption of the HUF gene; the mutated cells were rho+ like the reference strain. Both mutations increase the glycolysis rate and glycerol synthesis and decrease trehalose production. The most modified cells, which contain both TFC7 deletion and HUF gene disruption, utilize glucose in the most extreme manner as in these cells the largest production of the two glycolytic products (ethanol and glycerol) and the smallest trehalose formation occur. The HUF gene disruption serves as a positive modulator of glycolysis and respiration. However, the TFC7 deletion, associated with the phenotype rho-, induces the most damage in the cellular function, dramatically altering the behaviour of the Krebs cycle. The cycle becomes blocked at the level of 2-oxoglutarate, detected by a characteristic pattern of the 13C-NMR glutamate spectra. These NMR spectra corroborate the phenotypic data, the rho-phenotype corresponding to deletions of mitochondria DNA which block all mitochondria protein synthesis and render the cells unable to derive energy from respiration. Moreover, as a consequence of the Krebs cycle blocking, alanine

  9. Characterization and Comparison of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oils from Pinewood, Rapeseed Cake, and Wheat Straw Using 13C NMR and Comprehensive GC × GC

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis bio-oils are feasible energy carriers and a potential source of chemicals. Detailed characterization of bio-oils is essential to further develop its potential use. In this study, quantitative 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) was used to characterize fast pyrolysis bio-oils originated from pinewood, wheat straw, and rapeseed cake. The combination of both techniques provided new information on the chemical composition of bio-oils for further upgrading. 13C NMR analysis indicated that pinewood-based bio-oil contained mostly methoxy/hydroxyl (≈30%) and carbohydrate (≈27%) carbons; wheat straw bio-oil showed to have high amount of alkyl (≈35%) and aromatic (≈30%) carbons, while rapeseed cake-based bio-oil had great portions of alkyl carbons (≈82%). More than 200 compounds were identified and quantified using GC × GC coupled to a flame ionization detector (FID) and a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Nonaromatics were the most abundant and comprised about 50% of the total mass of compounds identified and quantified via GC × GC. In addition, this analytical approach allowed the quantification of high value-added phenolic compounds, as well as of low molecular weight carboxylic acids and aldehydes, which exacerbate the unstable and corrosive character of the bio-oil.

  10. Characterization and Comparison of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oils from Pinewood, Rapeseed Cake, and Wheat Straw Using 13C NMR and Comprehensive GC × GC

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis bio-oils are feasible energy carriers and a potential source of chemicals. Detailed characterization of bio-oils is essential to further develop its potential use. In this study, quantitative 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) was used to characterize fast pyrolysis bio-oils originated from pinewood, wheat straw, and rapeseed cake. The combination of both techniques provided new information on the chemical composition of bio-oils for further upgrading. 13C NMR analysis indicated that pinewood-based bio-oil contained mostly methoxy/hydroxyl (≈30%) and carbohydrate (≈27%) carbons; wheat straw bio-oil showed to have high amount of alkyl (≈35%) and aromatic (≈30%) carbons, while rapeseed cake-based bio-oil had great portions of alkyl carbons (≈82%). More than 200 compounds were identified and quantified using GC × GC coupled to a flame ionization detector (FID) and a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Nonaromatics were the most abundant and comprised about 50% of the total mass of compounds identified and quantified via GC × GC. In addition, this analytical approach allowed the quantification of high value-added phenolic compounds, as well as of low molecular weight carboxylic acids and aldehydes, which exacerbate the unstable and corrosive character of the bio-oil. PMID:27668136

  11. The conformational stability, solvation and the assignments of the experimental infrared, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2015-05-01

    The structure, vibrational and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine were investigated by the B3LYP/6-311G∗∗ calculations. The molecule was predicted to have the non-planar cis (NCCN ∼ 0°) structures being about 2-6 kcal/mol lower in energy than the corresponding trans (NCCN ∼ 180°) forms. The calculated NCCN (9.6°) and CNCC (-132.2°) torsional angles were in a good qualitative agreement with the reported X-ray angles (3.1 and 13.0°, -102.67 and -77.9°, respectively, for H-bonded dimers). The Gibbs energy of solution of lidocaine in formamide, water, dimethylsulfoxide, acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol and chloroform solutions was estimated at the B3LYP level. The predicted affinity of lidocaine toward the alcohols, acetonitrile and chloroform solutions was in excellent agreement with the reported experimental solubility of the drug in organic solvents. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of lidocaine in only one conformation at room temperature. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of lidocaine were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the drug. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for lidocaine is 0.47 and 8.26 ppm, respectively.

  12. Simultaneous cross polarization to 13C and 15N with 1H detection at 60 kHz MAS solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bibhuti B.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe high resolution MAS solid-state NMR experiments that utilize 1H detection with 60 kHz magic angle spinning; simultaneous cross-polarization from 1H to 15N and 13C nuclei; bidirectional cross-polarization between 13C and 15N nuclei; detection of both amide nitrogen and aliphatic carbon 1H; and measurement of both 13C and 15N chemical shifts through multi-dimensional correlation experiments. Three-dimensional experiments correlate amide 1H and alpha 1H selectively with 13C or 15N nuclei in a polypeptide chain. Two separate three-dimensional spectra correlating 1Hα/13Cα/1HN and 1HN/15N/1Hα are recorded simultaneously in a single experiment, demonstrating that a twofold savings in experimental time is potentially achievable. Spectral editing using bidirectional coherence transfer pathways enables simultaneous magnetization transfers between 15N, 13Cα(i) and 13C‧(i-1), facilitating intra- and inter-residue correlations for sequential resonance assignment. Non-uniform sampling is integrated into the experiments, further reducing the length of experimental time.

  13. Expression, purification, and mass spectrometric analysis of 15N, 13C-labeled RGD-hirudin, expressed in Pichia pastoris, for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yinong; Zhang, Yanling; Wu, Yi; Wang, Jue; Liu, Xingang; Dai, Linsen; Wang, Longsheng; Yu, Min; Mo, Wei

    2012-01-01

    A novel recombinant hirudin, RGD-hirudin, inhibits the activity of thrombin and the aggregation of platelets. Here, we successfully expressed (15)N, (13)C-labeled RGD-hirudin in Pichia pastoris in a fermenter. The protein was subsequently purified to yield sufficient quantities for structural and functional studies. The purified protein was characterized by HPLC and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. Analysis revealed that the protein was pure and uniformly labeled with (15)N and (13)C. A bioassay showed that the anti-thrombin activity and the anti-platelet aggregation ability of the labeled protein were the same as those of unlabeled RGD-hirudin. Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy has been used to determine almost complete backbone (15)N, (13)C and (1)H resonance assignments of the r-RGD-Hirudin. The (15)N-(1)H HSQC spectrum of uniformly (15)N, (13)C-labeled RGD-hirudin allowed successful assignment of the signals. Examples of the quality of the data are provided for the (15)N-(l)H correlation spectrum, and by selected planes of the CBCA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and HNCO experiments. These results provide a basis for further studies on the structure-function relationship of RGD-hirudin with thrombin and platelets. PMID:22879918

  14. /sup 13/C NMR analysis of the effects of electron radiation on graphite/polyetherimide composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, M.W.

    1989-03-01

    Initial investigations have been made into the use of high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the characterization of radiation effects in graphite and Kevlar fibers, polymers, and the fiber/matrix interface in graphite/polyetherimide composites. Sample preparation techniques were refined. Essential equipment has been procured. A new NMR probe was constructed to increase the proton signal-to-noise ratio. Problem areas have been identified and plans developed to resolve them.

  15. Glutamatergic and GABAergic energy metabolism measured in the rat brain by (13) C NMR spectroscopy at 14.1 T.

    PubMed

    Duarte, João M N; Gruetter, Rolf

    2013-09-01

    Energy metabolism supports both inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission processes. This study investigated the specific contribution of astrocytic metabolism to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis and inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission that remained to be ilucidated in vivo. Therefore, we measured (13)C incorporation into brain metabolites by dynamic (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 14.1 T in rats under α-chloralose anaesthesia during infusion of [1,6-(13)C]glucose. The enhanced sensitivity at 14.1 T allowed to quantify incorporation of (13) C into the three aliphatic carbons of GABA non-invasively. Metabolic fluxes were determined with a mathematical model of brain metabolism comprising glial, glutamatergic and GABAergic compartments. GABA synthesis rate was 0.11 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min. GABA-glutamine cycle was 0.053 ± 0.003 μmol/g/min and accounted for 22 ± 1% of total neurotransmitter cycling between neurons and glia. Cerebral glucose oxidation was 0.47 ± 0.02 μmol/g/min, of which 35 ± 1% and 7 ± 1% was diverted to the glutamatergic and GABAergic tricarboxylic acid cycles, respectively. The remaining fraction of glucose oxidation was in glia, where 12 ± 1% of the TCA cycle flux was dedicated to oxidation of GABA. 16 ± 2% of glutamine synthesis was provided to GABAergic neurons. We conclude that substantial metabolic activity occurs in GABAergic neurons and that glial metabolism supports both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in the living rat brain. PMID:23745684

  16. Structural studies of pyrido[1,2- c]pyrimidine derivatives by 13C CPMAS NMR, X-ray diffraction and GIAO/DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisklak, Maciej; Król, Marek; Herold, Franciszek; Wolska, Irena; Wawer, Iwona

    2008-12-01

    New 1-aryl- or 1-heteroaryl-piperazinylbutyl derivatives with pyrido[1,2- c]pyrimidine imide moiety, with the expected higher selectivity to 5-HT 1A receptors, have been synthesized. Five hydrochlorides and one base were studied by solid-state 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. 13C chemical shifts indicated that the piperazine ring nitrogen N-1 was protonated. The crystal structure of the base (with 4'F, 3″-CF 3 substituents) was determined by X-ray crystallography. The pyridopyrimidine fragment is essentially planar, and aromatic substituent at C4 is twisted by 59.0°. The crystals are stabilized mainly by the C dbnd O…H sbnd C interactions. The analysis was completed by theoretical calculations of the shielding constants at the GIAO/DFT (B3LYP/6-311+G ∗∗) level.

  17. The spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman and 1H, 13C NMR) and theoretical studies of cinnamic acid and alkali metal cinnamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowska, Monika; Świsłocka, Renata; Lewandowski, Włodzimierz

    2007-05-01

    The effect of alkali metals (Li → Na → K → Rb → Cs) on the electronic structure of cinnamic acid (phenylacrylic acid) was studied. In this research many miscellaneous analytical methods, which complement one another, were used: infrared (FT-IR), Raman (FT-Raman), nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H, 13C NMR) and quantum mechanical calculations. The spectroscopic studies lead to conclusions concerning the distribution of the electronic charge in molecule, the delocalization energy of π-electrons and the reactivity of metal complexes. The change of metal along with the series: Li → Na → K → Rb → Cs caused: (1) the change of electronic charge distribution in cinnamate anion what is seen via the occurrence of the systematic shifts of several bands in the experimental and theoretical IR and Raman spectra of cinnamates, (2) systematic chemical shifts for protons 1H and 13C nuclei.

  18. Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(I) complexes of cinnamic acid: FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowska, M.; Świsłocka, R.; Lewandowski, W.

    2011-05-01

    The effect of zinc, cadmium(II) and mercury(I) ions on the electronic structure of cinnamic acid (phenylacrylic acid) was studied. In this research many miscellaneous analytical methods, which complement one another, were used: infrared (FT-IR), Raman (FT-Raman), nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H, 13C NMR) and quantum mechanical calculations. The spectroscopic studies provide some knowledge on the distribution of the electronic charge in molecule, the delocalization energy of π-electrons and the reactivity of metal complexes. In the series of Zn(II) → Cd(II) → Hg(I) cinnamates: (1) systematic shifts of several bands in the experimental and theoretical IR and Raman spectra and (2) regular chemical shifts for protons 1H and 13C nuclei were observed.

  19. Solid state structure by X-ray and 13C CP/MAS NMR of new 5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowska, Kinga; Maciejewska, Dorota; Dobrzycki, Łukasz; Socha, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (1) and 6-acetyl-5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (2), structurally related, were synthesized using both conventional and microwave-assisted approach. An impact of acetyl groups on the molecular structure of coumarin derivatives has been examined. Crystals of 2 were investigated using single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. Compound 2 crystallizes forming two polymorphs (denoted as 2_1 and 2_2), both belonging to P21/c space group. Both polymorphs are comparably stable and can be formed simultaneously during crystallization process. The solid state structure was also analysed using the fully resolved 13C CP/MAS NMR. The double signals with the intensity ratio of about 1:1 which were observed in the 13C CP/MAS NMR spectrum of compound 1 must arise due to the presence of two conformers of 1. In contrast, NMR spectrum recorded for powder mixture of two polymorphs of compound 2 displays no signal splitting. This is related to structural similarities of molecules in both polymorphs.

  20. Multidimensional solid-state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of pectic polysaccharides in uniformly 13C-labeled Arabidopsis primary cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2012-07-08

    Plant cell wall (CW) polysaccharides are responsible for the mechanical strength and growth of plant cells; however, the high-resolution structure and dynamics of the CW polysaccharides are still poorly understood because of the insoluble nature of these molecules. Here, we use 2D and 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to investigate the structural role of pectins in the plant CW. Intact and partially depectinated primary CWs of Arabidopsis thaliana were uniformly labeled with 13C and their NMR spectra were compared. Recent 13C resonance assignment of the major polysaccharides in Arabidopsis thaliana CWs allowed us to determine the effects of depectination on the intermolecular packing and dynamics of the remaining wall polysaccharides. 2D and 3D correlation spectra show the suppression of pectin signals, confirming partial pectin removal by chelating agents and sodium carbonate. Importantly, higher cross peaks are observed in 2D and 3D 13C spectra of the depectinated CW, suggesting higher rigidity and denser packing of the remaining wall polysaccharides compared with the intact CW. 13C spin–lattice relaxation times and 1H rotating-frame spin–lattice relaxation times indicate that the polysaccharides are more rigid on both the nanosecond and microsecond timescales in the depectinated CW. Taken together, these results indicate that pectic polysaccharides are highly dynamic and endow the polysaccharide network of the primary CW with mobility and flexibility, which may be important for pectin functions. This study demonstrates the capability of multidimensional SSNMR to determine the intermolecular interactions and dynamic structures of complex plant materials under near-native conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Functional pools of fast and slow twitch fibers observed by /sup 31/P-NMR during exercise of flexor wrist muscles in man

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Park, C.R.; Brown, R.L.; Chance, B.

    1987-05-01

    Functional compartments of fast and slow twitch fibers have been observed by /sup 31/P-NMR spectroscopy during exercise of the wrist flexor muscles in a sedentary, young male subject. Values of Pi, phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenine nucleotides were determined at rest and during an exercise protocol. The subject flexed his wrist muscles at 20% of maximum strength every 5 sec for 6 min and then increased his effort in the next two 6 min intervals to 40% and 60% of maximum. With exercise, the Pi/PCr rose rapidly to the exceptionally high value of 2.2 at 60% effort. As the Pi increased, the initial single peak (pH 7.0-6.9) split into two distinct components with pH values of 6.8 and 6.3. Quantitatively, distribution of the Pi was 40% in the pH 6.8 peak and 60% in the pH 6.3 peak as determined by area estimation following curve fitting. This presumably reflects two pools of Pi corresponding to the oxidative (slow twitch, high pH) and glycolytic (fast twitch, low pH) fibers. In the second identical exercise sequence which followed immediately, only one Pi peak (pH 6.8-6.9) appeared. This suggested that the glycolytic contribution to energy production was largely exhausted and the residual energy was derived from oxidative metabolism. During exercise at high levels, total phosphate decreased due primarily to loss of NMR visible adenine nucleotides. Similar phenomena have been observed in three other sedentary individuals, but not in trained athletes.

  2. Geographical characterization of greek virgin olive oils (cv. Koroneiki) using 1H and 31P NMR fingerprinting with canonical discriminant analysis and classification binary trees.

    PubMed

    Petrakis, Panos V; Agiomyrgianaki, Alexia; Christophoridou, Stella; Spyros, Apostolos; Dais, Photis

    2008-05-14

    This work deals with the prediction of the geographical origin of monovarietal virgin olive oil (cv. Koroneiki) samples from three regions of southern Greece, namely, Peloponnesus, Crete, and Zakynthos, and collected in five harvesting years (2001-2006). All samples were chemically analyzed by means of 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy and characterized according to their content in fatty acids, phenolics, diacylglycerols, total free sterols, free acidity, and iodine number. Biostatistical analysis showed that the fruiting pattern of the olive tree complicates the geographical separation of oil samples and the selection of significant chemical compounds. In this way the inclusion of the harvesting year improved the classification of samples, but increased the dimensionality of the data. Discriminant analysis showed that the geographical prediction at the level of three regions is very high (87%) and becomes (74%) when we pass to the thinner level of six sites (Chania, Sitia, and Heraklion in Crete; Lakonia and Messinia in Peloponnesus; Zakynthos). The use of classification and binary trees made possible the construction of a geographical prediction algorithm for unknown samples in a self-improvement fashion, which can be readily extended to other varieties and areas.

  3. Facilitated transport of Mn2+ in sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells and excised maize root tips. A comparative 31P n.m.r. study in vivo.

    PubMed

    Roby, C; Bligny, R; Douce, R; Tu, S I; Pfeffer, P E

    1988-06-01

    Movement of paramagnetic Mn2+ into sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells has been indirectly examined by observing the line broadening exhibited in its 31P n.m.r. spectra. Mn2+ was observed to pass into the vacuole, while exhibiting a very minor accumulation in the cytoplasm. With time, gradual leakage of phosphate from the vacuole to the cytoplasm was observed along with an increase in glucose-6-phosphate. Anoxia did not appear to affect the relative distribution of Mn2+ in the cytoplasm and vacuole. Under hypoxic conditions restriction of almost all movement of Mn2+ across the plasmalemma as well as the tonoplast was observed. In contrast, maize root tips showed entry and complete complexation of nucleotide triphosphate by Mn2+ during hypoxia. The rate of passage of Mn2+ across the tonoplast in both sycamore and maize root cells is approximately the same. However, the rates of facilitated movement across the respective plasma membranes appear to differ. More rapid movement of Mn2+ across the plasmalemma in maize root tip cells allows a gradual build-up of metal ion in the cytoplasm prior to its diffusion across the tonoplast. Sycamore cells undergo a slower uptake of Mn2+ into their cytoplasms (comparable with the rate of diffusion through the tonoplast), so little or no observable accumulation of Mn2+ is observed in this compartment.

  4. Intra- and extracellular pH of the brain in vivo studied by 31P-NMR during hyper- and hypocapnia.

    PubMed

    Portman, M A; Lassen, N A; Cooper, T G; Sills, A M; Potchen, E J

    1991-12-01

    Studies were performed to determine the pH relationships among the extracellular, intracellular, and arterial blood compartments in the brain in vivo. Resolution of the extracellular monophosphate resonance peak from the intracellular peak in 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of sheep brain with the calvarium intact enabled pH measurement in these respective compartments. Sheep were then subjected to both hyper- and hypoventilation, which resulted in a wide range of arterial PCO2 and pH values. Linear regression analysis of pH in these compartments yielded slopes of 0.56 +/- 0.05 for extracellular pH (pHe) vs. arterial pH, 0.43 +/- 0.078 for intracellular pH (pHi) vs. pHe, and 0.23 +/- 0.056 for pHi vs. arterial pH. These data indicate that CO2 buffering capacity is different and decreases from the intracellular to extracellular to arterial blood compartments. Separation of the extracellular space from the vascular space may be a function of the blood-brain barrier, which contributes to the buffering capability of the extracellular compartment. A marked decrease in the pH gradient between the extracellular and intracellular space occurs during hypercarbia and may influence mechanisms of central respiratory control.

  5. Conformational transitions of the phosphodiester backbone in native DNA: two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning 31P-NMR of DNA fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Song, Z; Antzutkin, O N; Lee, Y K; Shekar, S C; Rupprecht, A; Levitt, M H

    1997-01-01

    Solid-state 31P-NMR is used to investigate the orientation of the phosphodiester backbone in NaDNA-, LiDNA-, MgDNA-, and NaDNA-netropsin fibers. The results for A- and B-DNA agree with previous interpretations. We verify that the binding of netropsin to NaDNA stabilizes the B form, and find that in NaDNA, most of the phosphate groups adopt a conformation typical of the A form, although there are minor components with phosphate orientations close to the B form. For LiDNA and MgDNA samples, on the other hand, we find phosphate conformations that are in variance with previous models. These samples display x-ray diffraction patterns that correspond to C-DNA. However, we find two distinct phosphate orientations in these samples, one resembling that in B-DNA, and one displaying a twist of the PO4 groups about the O3-P-O4 bisectors. The latter conformation is not in accordance with previous models of C-DNA structure. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 14 PMID:9284321

  6. Probing polymorphism and reactivity in the organic solid state using 13C NMR spectroscopy: Studies of p-Formyl- trans-cinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Thomas, John M.

    1991-09-01

    p-Formyl- trans-cinnamic acid (p-FCA) is known to exist in two different crystal phases (denoted β and γ). When crystals of the β phase of p-FCA are exposed to UV radiation, a solid state dimerization reaction occurs to produce 4,4'-diformyl-β-truxinic acid. In contrast, crystals of the γ phase of p-FCA are photostable. It is shown in this paper that high resolution solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for distinguishing the β and γ phases of p-FCA, and can be used to investigate, in detail, the chemical transformation that occurs upon UV irradiation of the β phase. Specifically, the 13C NMR spectra presented here were recorded using the TOSS (total suppression of sidebands) pulse sequence; this is based upon the standard 13C CPMAS (cross polarization/magic angle sample spinning/high power 1H decoupling) method, but has the additional feature that all orders of spinning sidebands are eliminated from the spectrum. The photoproduct obtained from UV irradiation of β-p-FCA contains a significant noncrystalline component (assessed via powder X-ray diffraction), and our NMR studies suggest that this noncrystalline component of the photoproduct contains some amount of the γ phase of the monomer p-FCA. A mechanism is proposed to explain the fact that UV irradiation of β-p-FCA can generate, in addition to the expected photodimer, an impurity amount of the γ phase of p-FCA.

  7. Carbanion substituent effects on 1-disubstituted 4-(4'-pyridyl)pyridinium methylide structures using 13C NMR spectroscopy and DFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depature, Ludovic; Surpateanu, Gheorghe

    2003-11-01

    The structure of 1-disubstituted 4-(4'-pyridyl)pyridinium methylides or 4,4'-bipyridinium monoylides ( 2- 5) with a wide range of carbanion substituents, were determined using 13C NMR signals in dimethylsufoxide (DMSO- d6) solution. For the first time, we developed a systematic determination of 13C NMR chemical shifts of the ylidic carbon using a long-range correlated ( 1H- 13C) HMBC experiments. The chemical shift values are discussed in terms of magnetic and/or electronic effects of the ylidic carbon substituents. From the extracted NMR parameters and the results of accompanying quantum chemical DFT calculations for a three-dimensional (3D)-structure representation, we found a long distance electronic effect where the aromatic heterocycle C2C6 and C4 centers are perturbed according to the electron acceptor strengths of ylidic carbon substituents in all monoylides ( 2- 5c) capable to stabilize in a planar conformation. No significant perturbation on C2C6 and C4 centers are found in all other monoylides ( 2- 5a, b) that adopted a non-planar conformation. Good similar linear dependences of the chemical shift variation Δ (calculated by the differences of analogous C2C6 and C4 chemical shifts in non-planar and planar monoylides) with the ylidic carbon chemical shifts modulated by the strength of electron acceptor substituents pointed out the resonance interaction or the delocalization phenomena of the ylidic carbon charge on the heterocycle.

  8. Experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR) and computational (density functional theory) studies on 3-bromophenylboronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, M.; Kose, E.; Atac, A.; Sas, E. B.; Asiri, A. M.; Kurt, M.

    2014-11-01

    Structurally, boronic acids are trivalent boron-containing organic compounds that possess one alkyl substituent (i.e., C-Br bond) and two hydroxyl groups to fill the remaining valences on the boron atom. We studied 3-bromophenylboronic acid (3BrPBA); a derivative of boronic acid. This study includes the experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR, UV-Vis) techniques and theoretical (DFT-density functional theory) calculations. The experimental data are recorded, FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-10 cm-1) in the solid phase. 1H and 13C NMR spectra are recorded in DMSO solution. UV-Vis spectrum is recorded in the range of 200-400 nm for each solution (in ethanol and water). The theoretical calculations are computed DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The optimum geometry is also obtained from inside for possible four conformers using according to position of hydrogen atoms after the scan coordinate of these structures. The fundamental vibrations are assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and parallel quantum solutions (PQS) program. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts are racked on by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is used to find HOMO and LUMO energies, excitation energies, oscillator strengths. The density of state of the studied molecule is investigated as total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and overlap population density of state (OPDOS or COOP) diagrams have been presented. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPs) and thermodynamic properties are performed. At the end of this work, the results are ensured beneficial for the literature contribution.

  9. Secondary structure and side-chain sup 1 H and sup 13 C resonance assignments of calmodulin in solution by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Spera, S.; Barbato, G.; Kay, L.E.; Bax, A. ); Krinks, M. )

    1991-09-24

    Heteronuclear 2D and 3D NMR experiments were carried out on recombinant Drosophila calmodulin (CaM), a protein of 148 residues and with molecular mass of 16.7 kDa, that is uniformly labeled with {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C to a level of > 95%. Nearly complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C side-chain assignments for all amino acid residues are obtained by using the 3D HCCH-COSY and HCCH-TOCSY experiments that rely on large heteronuclear one-bond scalar couplings to transfer magnetization and establish through-bond connectivities. The secondary structure of this protein in solution has been elucidated by a qualitative interpretation of nuclear Overhauser effects, hydrogen exchange data, and {sup 3}J{sub HNH{alpha}} coupling constants. A clear correlation between the {sup 13}C{alpha} chemical shift and secondary structure is found. The secondary structure in the two globular domains of Drosophila CaM in solution is essentially identical with that of the X-ray crystal structure of mammalian CaM which consists of two pairs of a helix-loop-helix motif in each globular domain. The existence of a short antiparallel {beta}-sheet between the two loops in each domain has been confirmed. The eight {alpha}-helix segments identified from the NMR data are located at Glu-6 to Phe-19, thr-29 to Ser-38, Glu-45 to Glu-54, Phe-65 to Lys-77, Glu-82 to Asp-93, Ala-102 to Asn-111, Asp-118 to Glu-127, and Tyr-138 to Thr-146. Although the crystal structure has a long central helix from Phe-65 to Phe-92 that connects the two globular domains, NMR data indicate that residues Asp-78 to Ser-81 of this central helix adopt a nonhelical conformation with considerable flexibility.

  10. Selective 13C labeling of nucleotides for large RNA NMR spectroscopy using an E. coli strain disabled in the TCA cycle

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Chandar S.; Sama, Jacob N.; Jackson, Melantha E.; Chen, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is an ideal organism to tailor-make labeled nucleotides for biophysical studies of RNA. Recently, we showed that adding labeled formate enhanced the isotopic enrichment at protonated carbon sites in nucleotides. In this paper, we show that growth of a mutant E. coli strain DL323 (lacking succinate and malate dehydrogenases) on 13C-2-glycerol and 13C-1,3-glycerol enables selective labeling at many useful sites for RNA NMR spectroscopy. For DL323 E. coli grown in 13C-2-glycerol without labeled formate, all the ribose carbon atoms are labeled except the C3′ and C5′ carbon positions. Consequently the C1′, C2′ and C4′ positions remain singlet. In addition, only the pyrimidine base C6 atoms are substantially labeled to ~96% whereas the C2 and C8 atoms of purine are labeled to ~5%. Supplementing the growth media with 13C-formate increases the labeling at C8 to ~88%, but not C2. Not unexpectedly, addition of exogenous formate is unnecessary for attaining the high enrichment levels of ~88% for the C2 and C8 purine positions in a 13C-1,3-glycerol based growth. Furthermore, the ribose ring is labeled in all but the C4′ carbon position, such that the C2′ and C3′ positions suffer from multiplet splitting but the C5′ position remains singlet and the C1′ position shows a small amount of residual C1′–C2′ coupling. As expected, all the protonated base atoms, except C6, are labeled to ~90%. In addition, labeling with 13C-1,3-glycerol affords an isolated methylene ribose with high enrichment at the C5′ position (~90%) that makes it particularly attractive for NMR applications involving CH2-TROSY modules without the need for decoupling the C4′ carbon. To simulate the tumbling of large RNA molecules, perdeuterated glycerol was added to a mixture of the four nucleotides, and the methylene TROSY experiment recorded at various temperatures. Even under conditions of slow tumbling, all the expected carbon correlations were observed

  11. 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR assignments of StnII-Y111N, a highly impaired mutant of the sea anemone actinoporin Sticholysin II.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Cea, Miguel A; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Martínez-del-Pozo, Alvaro; Gavilanes, José G; Bruix, Marta

    2010-04-01

    Sticholysin II is an actinoporin of 175 amino acids produced by the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. Several studies with different mutants have been performed to characterize its molecular properties and activity. As a first step towards a 3D structural characterization and its interaction with membrane models at a residue level, herein we report the nearly complete NMR (15)N, (13)C and (1)H chemical shifts assignments of the Y111N variant at pH 4.0 and 25 degrees C (BMRB No. 16630). The assignment is complete for the biologically relevant residues, specially for those implicated in membrane interactions.

  12. (1) H and (13) C NMR spectral assignment of N,N'-disubstituted thiourea and urea derivatives active against nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Chayah, Mariem; Camacho, M Encarnación; Carrión, M Dora; Gallo, Miguel A

    2016-10-01

    The (1) H and (13) C NMR resonances of seventeen N-alkyl and aryl-N'-[3-hydroxy-3-(2-nitro-5-substitutedphenyl)propyl]-thioureas and ureas (1-17), and seventeen N-alkyl or aryl-N'-[3-(2-amino-5-substitutedphenyl)-3-hydroxypropyl]-thioureas and ureas (18-34), designed as NOS inhibitors, were assigned completely using the concerted application of one- and two-dimensional experiments (DEPT, HSQC and HMBC). NOESY studies confirm the preferred conformation of these compounds. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shift Assignments and Conformational Analysis for the Two Diastereomers of the Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase Inhibitor Brodifacoum

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, John R.; Cho, Herman M.

    2009-10-01

    Proton and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments and 1H-1H scalar couplings for the two diastereomers of the vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) inhibitor brodifacoum have been determined from acetone solutions containing both diastereomers. Data were obtained from homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra acquired at 1H frequencies of 750 and 900 MHz over a 268-303 K temperature range. Conformations inferred from scalar coupling and 1-D NOE measurements exhibit large differences between the diastereomers. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  14. 13C CPMAS NMR study of the structure of p- t-butylcalix[4]arene-alkylbenzene clathrates in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanobe, Takeshi; Nakamura, Ichinari; Hibino, Kazunobu; Komoto, Ta-i.; Kurosu, Hiromichi; Ando, Isao; Nakamoto, Yoshiaki; Ishida, Shin-ichiro

    1995-08-01

    The NMR chemical shifts measured by the 13C CPMAS method for clathrates of p- t-butylcalix[4]arenes including mobile alkylbenzenes in the solid state revealed that the alkyl groups of the guest molecules are located in the cavity of p- t-butylcalix[4]arene, depending on the size of the alkyl group. It was found that n-alkylbenzenes are easily incorporated into p- t-butylcalix[4]arene in the order of toluene > ethylbenzene ⩾ n-propylbenzene. For isopropylbenzene, the bulky isopropyl group prevents incorporation into the cavity of the host molecule.

  15. Composition and chemical variability of the leaf oil from Corsican Juniperus thurifera. Integrated analysis by GC(RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Ottavioli, Josephine; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange

    2010-12-01

    The composition of 16 samples of leaf oil from Corsican Juniperus thurifera was investigated by integrated techniques, GC, GC-MS and 13C NMR. K-means partitioning and PCA analysis of the data allowed the definition of a main group (14 samples) dominated by limonene (mean = 52.2%, SD = 6.4) and alpha-pinene (mean = 7.2%, SD = 3.8). Limonene and beta-elemol (up to 19.7%) were identified as the major components of two atypic samples.

  16. Hepatic lipid profiling of deer mice fed ethanol using {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy: A dose-dependent subchronic study

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.

    2012-11-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse is a 2nd major cause of liver disease resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by a wide spectrum of pathologies starting from fat accumulation (steatosis) in early reversible stage to inflammation with or without fibrosis and cirrhosis in later irreversible stages. Previously, we reported significant steatosis in the livers of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup −}) vs. hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol daily for 2 months [Bhopale et al., 2006, Alcohol 39, 179–188]. However, ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 4% ethanol also showed a significant mortality. Therefore, a dose-dependent study was conducted to understand the mechanism and identify lipid(s) involved in the development of ethanol-induced fatty liver. ADH{sup −} and ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 1, 2 or 3.5% ethanol daily for 2 months and fatty infiltration in the livers were evaluated by histology and by measuring dry weights of extracted lipids. Lipid metabolomic changes in extracted lipids were determined by proton ({sup 1}H) and {sup 31}phosphorus ({sup 31}P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR data was analyzed by hierarchical clustering (HC) and principle component analysis (PCA) for pattern recognition. Extensive vacuolization by histology and significantly increased dry weights of total lipids found only in the livers of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls suggest a dose-dependent formation of fatty liver in ADH{sup −} deer mouse model. Analysis of NMR data of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls shows increases for total cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), triacylglycerides and unsaturation, and decreases for free cholesterol, phospholipids and allylic and diallylic protons. Certain classes of neutral lipids (cholesterol esters, fatty acyl chain (-COCH{sub 2}-) and FAMEs) were

  17. Modeling Ti/Ge Distribution in LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 NASICON Series by (31)P MAS NMR and First-Principles DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Diez-Gómez, Virginia; Arbi, Kamel; Sanz, Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Ti/Ge distribution in rhombohedral LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 NASICON series has been analyzed by (31)P magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Nuclear magnetic resonance is an excellent probe to follow Ti/Ge disorder, as it is sensitive to the atomic scale environment without long-range periodicity requirements. In the samples considered here, PO4 units are surrounded by four Ti/Ge octahedra, and then, five different components ascribed to P(OTi)4, P(OTi)3(OGe), P(OTi)2(OGe)2, P(OTi)(OGe)3, and P(OGe)4 environments are expected in (31)P MAS NMR spectra of R3̅c NASICON samples. However, (31)P MAS NMR spectra of analyzed series display a higher number of signals, suggesting that, although the overall symmetry remains R3̅c, partial substitution causes a local decrement in symmetry. With the aid of first-principles DFT calculations, 10 detected (31)P NMR signals have been assigned to different Ti4-nGen arrangements in the R3 subgroup symmetry. In this assignment, the influence of octahedra of the same or different R2(PO4)3 structural units has been considered. The influence of bond distances, angles and atom charges on (31)P NMR chemical shieldings has been discussed. Simulation of the LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 series suggests that detection of 10 P environments is mainly due to the existence of two oxygen types, O1 and O2, whose charges are differently affected by Ge and Ti occupation of octahedra. From the quantitative analysis of detected components, a random Ti/Ge distribution has been deduced in next nearest neighbor (NNN) sites that surround tetrahedral PO4 units. This random distribution was supported by XRD data displaying Vegard's law.

  18. Solid state {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectroscopy and conductivity measurements on NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Risskov Sørensen, Daniel; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Skou, Eivind M.

    2014-11-15

    A systematic study of composite powders of niobium oxide phosphate (NbOPO{sub 4}) and phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) has been performed in order to characterize the material's ability to perform as an electrolyte material in medium temperature fuel cells and electrolyzers. Powders of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} contents between 13.1 and 74.2 M% were produced and characterized with powder X-ray diffraction, {sup 31}P MAS NMR and impedance spectroscopy. NMR revealed that a significant degree of dehydration and vaporization of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} takes place above 200 °C, and increases with temperature. At 500 °C the NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} has reacted to form niobium pyrophosphate (Nb{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 15}). Impedance spectroscopy showed an increase in conductivity with increasing acid concentration, whereas the conductivity decreased slightly with increasing temperature. The highest conductivity measured was 2.5·10{sup −3} S/cm for a sample containing 74.2 M% of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Lastly, it was shown that NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own. - Graphical abstract: Conductivity of NbOPO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composites as a function of equivalent P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content. The conductivity is insignificant for pure NbOPO{sub 4}. - Highlights: • Composites have been made from NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • The composites composition has been investigated with solid state NMR. • The composites have shown clear signs of acid dehydration upon heating. • The conductivity of the composites increases for increasing acid content. • NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own.

  19. Observation of cytoplasmic and vacuolar malate in maize root tips by sup 13 C-NMR spectroscopy. [Zea mays L

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.; Roberts, J.K.M. )

    1989-01-01

    The accumulation of malate by maize (Zea mays L.) root tips perfused with KH{sup 13}CO{sub 3} was followed by {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectra contained distinct signals from two pools of malate in maize root tips, one at a pH {approximately}5.3 (assigned to the vacuole) and one at a pH > 6.5 (assigned to the cytoplasm). The ratio of cytoplasmic to vacuolar malate was lower in 12 millimeter long root tips than in 2 millimeter root tips. The relatively broad width of the signals from C1- and C4-labeled vacuolar malate indicated heterogeneity in vacuolar pH. During the 3 hour KH{sup 13}CO{sub 3} treatment, {sup 13}C-malate accumulated first primarily in the cytoplasm, increasing to a fairly constant level of {approximately}6 millimolar by 1 hour. After a lag, vacuolar malate increased throughout the experiment.

  20. Molecular interactions of a model bile salt and porcine bile with (1,3:1,4)-β-glucans and arabinoxylans probed by (13)C NMR and SAXS.

    PubMed

    Gunness, Purnima; Flanagan, Bernadine M; Mata, Jitendra P; Gilbert, Elliot P; Gidley, Michael J

    2016-04-15

    Two main classes of interaction between soluble dietary fibres (SDFs), such as (1,3:1,4)-β-D-glucan (βG) and arabinoxylan (AX) and bile salt (BS) or diluted porcine bile, were identified by (13)C NMR and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Small chemical shift differences of BS NMR resonances were consistent with effective local concentration or dilution of BS micelles mostly by βG, suggesting dynamic interactions; whilst the reduced line widths/intensities observed were mostly caused by wheat AX and the highest molecular size and concentrations of βG. SAXS showed evidence of changes in βG but not AX in the presence of BS micelles, at >13 nm length scale consistent with molecular level interactions. Thus intermolecular interactions between SDF and BS depend on both SDF source and its molecular weight and may occur alone or in combination. PMID:26617003

  1. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of three new polyhydroxylated sterols from the South China Sea gorgonian Subergorgia suberosa.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shu-Hua; Zhang, Si; Wang, Yi-Fei; Li, Ming-Yi

    2007-12-01

    Three new polyhydroxylated sterols, 3beta,6alpha,11,20beta,24-pentahydroxy- 9,11-seco-5alpha-24-ethylcholest-7,28-diene-9-one (1), 3-(1',2'-ethandiol)-24- methylcholest-8(9),22E-diene-3beta,5alpha,6alpha,7alpha,11alpha-pentaol (2), 24-methylcholest-7,22 E-diene-3beta,5alpha,6beta,25-tetraol (3) together with five known sterols, were isolated from the EtOH/CH2Cl2 extract of the South China Sea gorgonian Subergorgia suberosa. The complete assignments of the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for these new compounds were achieved by means of 1D and 2D NMR techniques, including HSQC, HMBC, 1H--1H COSY, and NOESY spectra.

  2. Solution Structures of the Prototypical 18 kDa Translocator Protein Ligand, PK 11195, Elucidated with 1H/13C NMR Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Eighteen kilodalton translocator protein (TSPO) is an important target for drug discovery and for clinical molecular imaging of brain and peripheral inflammatory processes. PK 11195 [1a; 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide] is the major prototypical high-affinity ligand for TSPO. Elucidation of the solution structure of 1a is of interest for understanding small-molecule ligand interactions with the lipophilic binding site of TSPO. Dynamic 1H/13C NMR spectroscopy of 1a revealed four quite stable but interconverting rotamers, due to amide bond and 2-chlorophenyl group rotation. These rotamers have been neglected in previous descriptions of the structure of 1a and of the binding of 1a to TSPO. Here, we used quantum chemistry at the level of B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p) to calculate 13C and 1H chemical shifts for the rotamers of 1a and for the very weak TSPO ligand, N-desmethyl-PK 11195 (1b). These data, plus experimental NMR data, were then used to characterize the structures of rotamers of 1a and 1b in organic solution. Energy barriers for both the amide bond and 2′-chlorophenyl group rotation of 1a were determined from dynamic 1H NMR to be similar (ca.17 to 18 kcal/mol), and they compared well with those calculated at the level of B3LYP/6-31G*. Furthermore, the computed barrier for Z to E rotation is considerably lower in 1a(18.7 kcal/mol) than in 1b (25.4 kcal/mol). NMR (NOE) unequivocally demonstrated that the E rotamer of 1a is the more stable in solution by about 0.4 kcal/mol. These detailed structural findings will aid future TSPO ligand design and support the notion that TSPO prefers to bind ligands as amide E-rotamers. PMID:22860199

  3. 13C NMR and fluorescence analysis of tryptophan dynamics in wild-type and two single-Trp variants of Escherichia coli thioredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Kemple, M D; Yuan, P; Nollet, K E; Fuchs, J A; Silva, N; Prendergast, F G

    1994-01-01

    The rotational motion of tryptophan side chains in oxidized and reduced wild-type (WT) Escherichia coli thioredoxin and in two single-tryptophan variants of E. coli thioredoxin was studied in solution in the temperature range 20-50 degrees C from 13C-NMR relaxation rate measurements at 75.4 and 125.7 MHz and at 20 degrees C from steady-state and time-resolved trp fluorescence anisotropy measurements. Tryptophan enriched with 13C at the delta 1 and epsilon 3 sites of the indole ring was incorporated into WT thioredoxin and into two single-trp mutants, W31F and W28F, in which trp-28 or trp-31 of WT thioredoxin was replaced, respectively, with phenylalanine. The NMR relaxation data were interpreted using the Lipari and Szabo "model-free" approach (G. Lipari and A. Szabo. 1982. J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 104:4546-4559) with trp steady-state anisotropy data included for the variants at 20 degrees C. Values for the correlation time for the overall rotational motion (tau m) from NMR of oxidized and reduced WT thioredoxin at 35 degrees C agree well with those given by Stone et al. (Stone, M. J., K. Chandrasekhar, A. Holmgren, P. E. Wright, and H. J. Dyson. 1993. Biochemistry. 32:426-435) from 15N NMR relaxation rates, and the dependence of tau m on viscosity and temperature was in accord with the Stokes-Einstein relationship. Order parameters (S2) near 1 were obtained for the trp side chains in the WT proteins even at 50 degrees C. A slight increase in the amplitude of motion (decrease in S2) of trp-31, which is near the protein surface, but not of trp-28, which is partially buried in the protein matrix, was observed in reduced relative to oxidized WT thioredoxin. For trp-28 in W31F, order parameters near 1 (S2 > or = 0.8) at 20 degrees C were found, whereas trp-31 in W28F yielded the smallest order parameters (S2 approximately 0.6) of any of the cases. Analysis of time-resolved anisotropy decays in W28F and W31F yielded S2 values in good agreement with NMR, but gave tau m values

  4. 13C NMR studies of gluconeogenesis in rat liver cells: Utilization of labeled glycerol by cells from euthyroid and hyperthyroid rats

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, S. M.; Ogawa, S.; Shulman, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    The gluconeogenic pathway from [2-13C]glycerol and [1,3-13C]glycerol has been followed in suspensions of isolated rat hepatocytes at 25°C by 13C NMR at 90.5 MHz. The flow of label through the major pathway from glycerol to L-glycerol 3-phosphate and into glucose was followed in cells from control and triiodothyronine-treated rats. Treatment increased the rates of glucose formation and glycerol consumption 2-fold and decreased the αGP level to 40%. We calculate that ≈60% of the flux is through the mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase in cells from triiodothyronine-treated rats, compared with ≈15% in cells from the controls. Equal distribution of label between the trioses of glucose was obtained and, because the C3-C4 spin-spin coupling gives the distribution of labeled carbons in the same molecule, it was possible to measure the amount of triose from unlabeled fructose incorporated into the glucose labeled at carbons 1, 3, 4, and 6. About 10% of the hexoses had flowed through the pentose cycle and back into the hexose pathway in cells from fasted rats. From the distribution of label at glucose carbons not labeled via the major pathway and from the carbon spin-spin splitting patterns observed, we conclude that transketolase is reversible whereas transaldolase is essentially irreversible in the nonoxidative pentose branch. PMID:287001

  5. Solid-state 13C NMR studies of a large fossil gymnosperm from the Yallourn Open Cut, Latrobe Valley, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    A series of samples taken from the cross section of a 3-m-diameter fossilized gymnospermous log (Araucariaceae) in the Yallourn Seam of the Australian brown coals was examined by solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate chemical changes related to the combined processes of peatification and coalification. The results show that cellulosic materials were degraded and lost on the periphery of the log, however, the degree of such degradation in the central core is substantially less. The lignin is uniformly altered by coalification reactions to a macromolecular substance displaying decreased aryl ether linkages but significantly greater amounts of carbon linkages compared to modern lignin. Changes in the methoxyl carbon contents of lignin in cross section reveal demethylation reactions, but these do not appear to be related to degree of carbon linking. Both the degredation of cellulosic materials and demethylation of lignin appear to be early diagenetic processes occurring during peatification independently of the coalification reactions. ?? 1989.

  6. A comparison of dissolved humic substances from seawater with Amazon River counterparts by sup 13 C-NMR spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hedges, J.I. ); Hatcher, P.G. ); Ertel, J.R. ); Meyers-Schulte, K.J. )

    1992-04-01

    Although dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater constitutes one of the major reservoirs of reduced carbon on earth, the biochemical and geographic origins of this material and its hydrophobic humic component remain unclear. Rivers have been suggested as a potentially important source of marine DOM, but this implication has not yet been systematically tested by direct comparisons of the bulk structural characteristics of DOM isolated from representative ocean reservoirs and their major river sources. The authors report here such a comparison and find that dissolved humic substances isolated from surface and deep seawater in the East Equatorial and north Central Pacific are enriched in nitrogen and {sup 13}C and depleted in unsaturated carbon with respect to counterparts from the Amazon River system. Based on these observations, riverine dissolved humic substances appear to comprise a small fraction of seawater humic substances and therefore must be efficiently and rapidly removed from the ocean.

  7. Automated feature extraction for the classification of human in vivo 13C NMR spectra using statistical pattern recognition and wavelets.

    PubMed

    Tate, A R; Watson, D; Eglen, S; Arvanitis, T N; Thomas, E L; Bell, J D

    1996-06-01

    If magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is to become a useful tool in clinical medicine, it will be necessary to find reliable methods for analyzing and classifying MRS data. Automated methods are desirable because they can remove user bias and can deal with large amounts of data, allowing the use of all the available information. In this study, techniques for automatically extracting features for the classification of MRS in vivo data are investigated. Among the techniques used were wavelets, principal component analysis, and linear discriminant function analysis. These techniques were tested on a set of 75 in vivo 13C spectra of human adipose tissue from subjects from three different dietary groups (vegan, vegetarian, and omnivore). It was found that it was possible to assign automatically 94% of the vegans and omnivores to their correct dietary groups, without the need for explicit identification or measurement of peaks.

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolism. Applications of proton and 13C NMR to the study of glutamate metabolism in cultured glial cells and human brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Portais, J C; Pianet, I; Allard, M; Merle, M; Raffard, G; Kien, P; Biran, M; Labouesse, J; Caille, J M; Canioni, P

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of cells from the central nervous system both in vitro on perchloric acid extracts obtained either from cultured tumoral cells (C6 rat glioma) or rat astrocytes in primary culture, and in vivo within the human brain. Analysis of carbon 13 NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts prepared from cultured cells in the presence of NMR [1-13C] glucose as substrate allowed determination of the glutamate and glutamine enrichments in both normal and tumoral cells. Preliminary results indicated large changes in the metabolism of these amino acids (and also of aspartate and alanine) in the C6 cell as compared to its normal counterpart. Localized proton NMR spectra of the human brain in vivo were obtained at 1.5 T, in order to evaluate the content of various metabolites, including glutamate, in peritumoral edema from a selected volume of 2 x 2 x 2 cm3. N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine, creatine, choline and inositol derivative resonances were observed in 15 min spectra. N-acetyl-aspartate was found to be at a lower level in contrast to glutamate which was detected at a higher level in the injured area as compared to the contralateral unaffected side. PMID:1674432

  9. Mathematical models for determining metabolic fluxes through the citric acid and the glyoxylate cycles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by 13C-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tran-Dinh, S; Bouet, F; Huynh, Q T; Herve, M

    1996-12-15

    We propose, first, a practical method for studying the isotopic transformation of glutamate or any other metabolite isotopomers in the citric acid and the glyoxylate cycles; second, two mathematical models, one for evaluating the flux through the citric acid cycle and the other for evaluating the flux through the latter coupled to the glyoxylate cycle in yeast. These models are based on the analysis of 13C-NMR spectra of glutamate obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, NCYC strain, fed with 100% enriched [2-13C]acetate. The population of each glutamate isotopomer, the change in intensity of each multiplet component or the enrichment of any glutamate carbon is expressed by a specific analytical equation from which the flux in the citric acid and the glyoxylate cycles can be deduced. The aerobic metabolism of 100% [2-13C]acetate in acetate-grown S. cerevisiae cells was studied as a function of time using 13C-NMR. 1H-NMR and biochemical techniques. The C1 and C6 doublet and singlet of labeled trehalose increase continuously with time indicating that there is no isotopic transformation between trehalose isotopomers even though the corresponding formation rates are different. By contrast, the glutamate C4 singlet increases then decreases with time. The C4 doublet, which is lower than the singlet for t < 60 min, increases continuously and becomes higher than the singlet for t > 90 min. A similar observation was made for the C2 resonance singlet and doublet. In addition, the glutamate C2 multiplet consists of only seven instead of nine peaks as in random labeling. These results agree well with our models and demonstrate that, in the presence of acetate, anaplerotic carbon sources involved in the synthesis of acetyl-CoA are negligible in yeast. The flux in the citric acid cycle was deduced from a plot of the C4 area versus incubation time, while the flux within the glyoxylate cycle was determined from the relative intensity of the glutamate C4 doublet and singlet. The

  10. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Byg, Inge; Damager, Iben; Diaz, Jerome; Engelsen, Søren B; Ulvskov, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by (13)C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by (2)H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose-galacturonic acid (Rha-GalA) backbone in RG-I. Potential food ingredient uses of RG-I by tailoring of its structure are discussed.

  11. Construction and 13C NMR signal-amplification efficiency of a dynamic nuclear polarizer at 6.4 T and 1.4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Taylor, David; McDonald, George; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a rapidly emerging technique in biomedical and metabolic imaging since it amplifies the liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and imaging (MRI) signals by >10,000-fold. Originally used in nuclear scattering experiments, DNP works by creating a non-Boltzmann nuclear spin distribution by transferring the high electron (γ = 28,000 MHz/T) thermal polarization to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation of the sample at high magnetic field and low temperature. A dissolution device is used to rapidly dissolve the frozen sample and consequently produces an injectable ``hyperpolarized'' liquid at physiologically-tolerable temperature. Here we report the construction and performance evaluation of a dissolution DNP hyperpolarizer at 6.4 T and 1.4 K using a continuous-flow cryostat. The solid and liquid-state 13C NMR signal enhancement levels of 13C acetate samples doped with trityl OX063 and 4-oxo-TEMPO free radicals will be discussed and compared with the results from the 3.35 T commercial hyperpolarizer. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  12. Mechanism of Au(III) reduction by chitosan: comprehensive study with 13C and 1H NMR analysis of chitosan degradation products.

    PubMed

    Pestov, Alexander; Nazirov, Alexander; Modin, Evgeny; Mironenko, Alexander; Bratskaya, Svetlana

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism of Au(III) reduction by chitosan has been proposed on the basis of comprehensive study of kinetics of Au(III) reduction and chitosan chain degradation using UV-vis spectroscopy and viscosimetry, and identification of reaction products using colloid titration and (13)C, (1)H NMR spectroscopy. We have shown that formation of gold nanoparticles in H[AuCl4]/chitosan solutions starts with hydrolysis of chitosan catalyzed by Au(III). The products of chitosan hydrolysis rather than chitosan itself act as the main reducing species. According to (13)C and (1)H NMR spectroscopy data, chitosan/Au(0) composites contain chitosan with reduced molecular weight and acetylation degree, whereas water-soluble by-products consist of chitosan oligomers with higher acetylation degree, derivatives of glucosamine acids, and formate ion. Chitosan degradation has significantly contributed to the decrease of its efficiency as a gold nanoparticles stabilizer. The gold particle size increased from 6.9 nm to 16.2 nm, when Au(III)/chitosan molar ratio changed from 1:80 to 1:10.

  13. Backbone 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR assignments for the Cyanothece 51142 protein cce_0567: a protein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Sofia, Heidi J.

    2008-06-01

    The recently sequenced genome of the diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 (contig 83.1_1_243_746) contains the sequence for an hypothetical protein that falls into the DUF683 family. As observed for the other 54 DUF683 proteins currently listed in the GenBank database, this 78-residue (9.0 kDa) protein in Cyanothece is also found in a nitrogen fixation gene cluster suggesting that it is involved in the process. To date no structural information exists for any of the proteins in the DUF683 family. In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 may play in nitrogen fixation and to obtain structural information for a member of the DUF683 protein family, a construct containing DUF683 from Cyanothece 51142 was generated, expressed, purified, and the solution properties characterized. A total rotational correlation time (tc) of 17.1 ns was estimated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy suggesting a molecular weight of ~ 40 kDa, an observation dictating that DUF683 is a tetramer in solution. Using triple-labeled (2H, 13C, 15N) and residue-specific 15N-labeled amino acids (L, K, V, and E/Q) samples, most of the backbone and side chain resonances for DUF683 were assigned. The 13C alpha chemical shifts and NOESY NMR data indicate that the protein is helical from K18-E75.

  14. Backbone dynamics of a model membrane protein: 13C NMR spectroscopy of alanine methyl groups in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein.

    PubMed

    Henry, G D; Weiner, J H; Sykes, B D

    1986-02-11

    The filamentous coliphage M13 possesses multiple copies of a 50-residue coat protein which is inserted into the inner membrane of Escherichia coli during infection. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure and dynamics of M13 coat protein solubilized in detergent micelles. A comparison of backbone dynamics within the hydrophobic core region and the hydrophilic terminal domains was obtained by biosynthetic incorporation of [3-13C]alanine. Alanine is distributed throughout the protein and accounts for 10 residues (i.e., 20% of the total). Similar 13C NMR spectra of the protein have been obtained in two anionic detergents, sodium deoxycholate and sodium dodecyl sulfate, although the structures and physical properties of these solubilizing agents are quite different. The N-terminal alanine residues, assigned by pH titration, and the penultimate residue, assigned by carboxypeptidase A digestion, give rise to analogous peaks in both detergent systems. The pKa of Ala-1 (approximately 8.8) and the relaxation parameters of individual carbon atoms (T1, T2, and the nuclear Overhauser enhancement) are also generally similar, suggesting a similarity in the overall protein structure. Relaxation data have been analyzed according to the model-free approach of Lipari and Szabo [Lipari, G., & Szabo, A. (1982) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 104, 4546-4559]. The overall correlation times were obtained by fitting the three experimental relaxation values for a given well-resolved single carbon atom to obtain a unique value for the generalized order parameter, S2, and the effective correlation time, tau e. The former parameter reflects the spatial restriction of motion, and the latter, the rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Structural characterization and molecular order of rodlike mesogens with three- and four-ring core by XRD and 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M Kesava; Reddy, K Subramanyam; Yoga, K; Prakash, M; Narasimhaswamy, T; Mandal, A B; Lobo, Nitin P; Ramanathan, K V; Rao, D S Shankar; Prasad, S Krishna

    2013-05-01

    Structural characterizations using XRD and (13)C NMR spectroscopy of two rodlike mesogens consisting of (i) three phenyl ring core with a polar cyano terminal and (ii) four phenyl ring core with flexible dodecyl terminal chain are presented. The three-ring-core mesogen with cyano terminal exhibits enantiotropic smectic A phase while the four-ring mesogen reveals polymesomorphism and shows enantiotropic nematic, smectic C, and tilted hexatic phases. The molecular organization in the three-ring mesogen is found to be partial bilayer smectic Ad type, and the interdigitation of the molecules in the neighboring layers is attributed to the presence of the polar terminal group. For the four-ring mesogen, the XRD results confirm the existence of the smectic C and the tilted hexatic mesophases. A thermal variation of the layer spacing across the smectic C phase followed by a discrete jump at the transition to the tilted hexatic phase is also observed. The tilt angles have been estimated to be about 45° in the smectic C phase and about 40° in tilted hexatic phase. (13)C NMR results indicate that in the mesophase the molecules are aligned parallel to the magnetic field. From the (13)C-(1)H dipolar couplings determined from the 2D experiments, the overall order parameter for the three-ring mesogen in its smectic A phase has been estimated to be 0.72 while values ranging from 0.88 to 0.44 have been obtained for the four-ring mesogen as it passes from the tilted hexatic to the nematic phase. The orientations of the different rings of the core unit with respect to each other and also with respect to the long axis of the molecule have also been obtained. PMID:23627902

  16. Introducing NMR to a General Chemistry Audience: A Structural-Based Instrumental Laboratory Relating Lewis Structures, Molecular Models, and [superscript 13]C NMR Data