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Sample records for 13c nuclear spin

  1. Optical hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in nanodiamond ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical nuclear polarization holds the key for orders of magnitude enhancements of nuclear magnetic resonance signals which, in turn, would enable a wide range of novel applications in biomedical sciences. However, current implementations of DNP require cryogenic temperatures and long times for achieving high polarization. Here we propose and analyze in detail protocols that can achieve rapid hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in randomly oriented ensembles of nanodiamonds at room temperature. Our protocols exploit a combination of optical polarization of electron spins in nitrogen-vacancy centers and the transfer of this polarization to 13C nuclei by means of microwave control to overcome the severe challenges that are posed by the random orientation of the nanodiamonds and their nitrogen-vacancy centers. Specifically, these random orientations result in exceedingly large energy variations of the electron spin levels that render the polarization and coherent control of the nitrogen-vacancy center electron spins as well as the control of their coherent interaction with the surrounding 13C nuclear spins highly inefficient. We address these challenges by a combination of an off-resonant microwave double resonance scheme in conjunction with a realization of the integrated solid effect which, together with adiabatic rotations of external magnetic fields or rotations of nanodiamonds, leads to a protocol that achieves high levels of hyperpolarization of the entire nuclear-spin bath in a randomly oriented ensemble of nanodiamonds even at room temperature. This hyperpolarization together with the long nuclear-spin polarization lifetimes in nanodiamonds and the relatively high density of 13C nuclei has the potential to result in a major signal enhancement in 13C nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and suggests functionalized and hyperpolarized nanodiamonds as a unique probe for molecular imaging both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Strongly polarizing weakly coupled 13C nuclear spins with optically pumped nitrogen-vacancy center

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Bao; Yang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the polarization of nuclear spins surrounding the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has recently attracted widespread attention due to its various applications. Here we present an analytical formula that not only provides a clear physical picture for the recently observed polarization reversal of strongly coupled13C nuclei over a narrow range of magnetic field [H. J. Wang et al., Nat. Commun. 4, 1940 (2013)], but also demonstrates the possibility to strongly polarize weakly coupled13C nuclei. This allows sensitive magnetic field control of the 13C nuclear spin polarization for NMR applications and significant suppression of the 13C nuclear spin noise to prolong the NV spin coherence time. PMID:26521962

  3. Antiferromagnetic nuclear spin helix and topological superconductivity in 13C nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chen-Hsuan; Stano, Peter; Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction arising from the hyperfine coupling between localized nuclear spins and conduction electrons in interacting 13C carbon nanotubes. Using the Luttinger liquid formalism, we show that the RKKY interaction is sublattice dependent, consistent with the spin susceptibility calculation in noninteracting carbon nanotubes, and it leads to an antiferromagnetic nuclear spin helix in finite-size systems. The transition temperature reaches up to tens of mK, due to a strong boost by a positive feedback through the Overhauser field from ordered nuclear spins. Similar to GaAs nanowires, the formation of the helical nuclear spin order gaps out half of the conduction electrons, and is therefore observable as a reduction of conductance by a factor of 2 in a transport experiment. The nuclear spin helix leads to a density wave combining spin and charge degrees of freedom in the electron subsystem, resulting in synthetic spin-orbit interaction, which induces nontrivial topological phases. As a result, topological superconductivity with Majorana fermion bound states can be realized in the system in the presence of proximity-induced superconductivity without the need of fine tuning the chemical potential. We present the phase diagram as a function of system parameters, including the pairing gaps, the gap due to the nuclear spin helix, and the Zeeman field perpendicular to the helical plane.

  4. (13)C-(13)c homonuclear recoupling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance at a moderately high magic-angle-spinning frequency.

    PubMed

    Mithu, Venus Singh; Bakthavatsalam, Subha; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments are widely employed in structure determination of protein assemblies using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Here, we investigate the process of (13)C-(13)C magnetisation transfer at a moderate magic-angle-spinning frequency of 30 kHz using some of the prominent second-order dipolar recoupling schemes. The effect of isotropic chemical-shift difference and spatial distance between two carbons and amplitude of radio frequency on (1)H channel on the magnetisation transfer efficiency of these schemes is discussed in detail.

  5. Relativistic Force Field: Parametrization of (13)C-(1)H Nuclear Spin-Spin Coupling Constants.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we reported a reliable DU8 method for natural bond orbital (NBO)-aided parametric scaling of Fermi contacts to achieve fast and accurate prediction of proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) in (1)H NMR. As sophisticated NMR experiments for precise measurements of carbon-proton SSCCs are becoming more user-friendly and broadly utilized by the organic chemistry community to guide and inform the process of structure determination of complex organic compounds, we have now developed a fast and accurate method for computing (13)C-(1)H SSCCs. Fermi contacts computed with the DU8 basis set are scaled using selected NBO parameters in conjunction with empirical scaling coefficients. The method is optimized for inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) geometries. The parametric scaling is based on a carefully selected training set of 274 ((3)J), 193 ((2)J), and 143 ((1)J) experimental (13)C-(1)H spin-spin coupling constants reported in the literature. The DU8 basis set, optimized for computing Fermi contacts, which by design had evolved from optimization of a collection of inexpensive 3-21G*, 4-21G, and 6-31G(d) bases, offers very short computational (wall) times even for relatively large organic molecules containing 15-20 carbon atoms. The most informative SSCCs for structure determination, i.e., (3)J, were computed with an accuracy of 0.41 Hz (rmsd). The new unified approach for computing (1)H-(1)H and (13)C-(1)H SSCCs is termed "DU8c".

  6. Relativistic Force Field: Parametrization of (13)C-(1)H Nuclear Spin-Spin Coupling Constants.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we reported a reliable DU8 method for natural bond orbital (NBO)-aided parametric scaling of Fermi contacts to achieve fast and accurate prediction of proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) in (1)H NMR. As sophisticated NMR experiments for precise measurements of carbon-proton SSCCs are becoming more user-friendly and broadly utilized by the organic chemistry community to guide and inform the process of structure determination of complex organic compounds, we have now developed a fast and accurate method for computing (13)C-(1)H SSCCs. Fermi contacts computed with the DU8 basis set are scaled using selected NBO parameters in conjunction with empirical scaling coefficients. The method is optimized for inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) geometries. The parametric scaling is based on a carefully selected training set of 274 ((3)J), 193 ((2)J), and 143 ((1)J) experimental (13)C-(1)H spin-spin coupling constants reported in the literature. The DU8 basis set, optimized for computing Fermi contacts, which by design had evolved from optimization of a collection of inexpensive 3-21G*, 4-21G, and 6-31G(d) bases, offers very short computational (wall) times even for relatively large organic molecules containing 15-20 carbon atoms. The most informative SSCCs for structure determination, i.e., (3)J, were computed with an accuracy of 0.41 Hz (rmsd). The new unified approach for computing (1)H-(1)H and (13)C-(1)H SSCCs is termed "DU8c". PMID:26414291

  7. Characterization of hyperfine interaction between an NV electron spin and a first-shell 13C nuclear spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Rama Koteswara; Suter, Dieter

    2016-08-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has attractive properties for a number of quantum technologies that rely on the spin angular momentum of the electron and the nuclei adjacent to the center. The nucleus with the strongest interaction is the 13C nuclear spin of the first shell. Using this degree of freedom effectively hinges on precise data on the hyperfine interaction between the electronic and the nuclear spin. Here, we present detailed experimental data on this interaction, together with an analysis that yields all parameters of the hyperfine tensor, as well as its orientation with respect to the atomic structure of the center.

  8. (1)H and (13)C magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the chicken eggshell.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2012-12-19

    The chicken eggshell, a product of biomineralization, contains inorganic and organic substances whose content changes during the incubation process. Bloch-decay (BD) (1)H, (13)C, and cross-polarization (CP) (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of chicken eggshells were acquired under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Variable contact time (13)C CP MAS NMR experiments revealed the signals of carbonyl groups from organic and inorganic compounds. In the (13)C BD NMR spectra, a single peak at 168.1 ppm was detected, whereas in the (1)H BD spectra, the signals from water and the bicarbonate ion were assigned. A simultaneous decrease of the water signal in the (1)H MAS NMR spectra and an increase of the carbonate ion signal in the (13)C CP MAS NMR spectra of eggshells collected during the incubation period indicate the substitution of calcium ions by hydrogen ions in the calcium carbonate crystalline phase during the incubation of an egg.

  9. Quantitation of a spin polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effect (SPINOE) between a hyperpolarized 13C-labeled cell metabolite and water protons

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Rius, Irene; Bohndiek, Sarah E; Kettunen, Mikko I; Larkin, Timothy J; Basharat, Meer; Seeley, Colm; Brindle, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The spin polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effect (SPINOE) describes the enhancement of spin polarization of solvent nuclei by the hyperpolarized spins of a solute. In this communication we demonstrate that SPINOEs can be observed between [1,4-13C2]fumarate, hyperpolarized using the dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization technique, and solvent water protons. We derive a theoretical expression for the expected enhancement and demonstrate that this fits well with experimental measurements. Although the magnitude of the effect is relatively small (around 2% measured here), the SPINOE increases at lower field strengths, so that at clinically relevant magnetic fields (1.5–3 T) it may be possible to track the passage through the circulation of a bolus containing a hyperpolarized 13C-labeled substrate through the increase in solvent water 1H signal. © 2014 The Authors. Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd. PMID:24523064

  10. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles Loaded with Surfactant: Low Temperature Magic Angle Spinning 13C and 29Si NMR Enhanced by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Lafon, Olivier; Thankamony, Aany S. Lilly; Kokayashi, Takeshi; Carnevale, Diego; Vitzthum, Veronika; Slowing, Igor I.; Kandel, Kapil; Vezin, Herve; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pruski, Marek

    2012-12-21

    We show that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can be used to enhance NMR signals of 13C and 29Si nuclei located in mesoporous organic/inorganic hybrid materials, at several hundreds of nanometers from stable radicals (TOTAPOL) trapped in the surrounding frozen disordered water. The approach is demonstrated using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN), functionalized with 3-(N-phenylureido)propyl (PUP) groups, filled with the surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The DNP-enhanced proton magnetization is transported into the mesopores via 1H–1H spin diffusion and transferred to rare spins by cross-polarization, yielding signal enhancements εon/off of around 8. When the CTAB molecules are extracted, so that the radicals can enter the mesopores, the enhancements increase to εon/off ≈ 30 for both nuclei. A quantitative analysis of the signal enhancements in MSN with and without surfactant is based on a one-dimensional proton spin diffusion model. The effect of solvent deuteration is also investigated.

  11. 13C-1H dipolar-driven 13C-13C recoupling without 13C rf irradiation in nuclear magnetic resonance of rotating solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegoshi, K.; Nakamura, Shinji; Terao, Takehiko

    2003-02-01

    Two recently proposed 13C-13C recoupling methods under magic angle spinning (MAS), resonant interference recoupling (RIR), and 13C-1H dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR), are examined on a common theoretical foundation using the average Hamiltonian theory. In both methods, a rf field is applied on not 13C but 1H to recouple the 13C-1H dipolar interactions, and spectral overlap necessary to conserve energy for 13C-13C polarization transfer is achieved by the 13C-1H dipolar line broadening. While DARR employs time-independent 13C-1H interactions recoupled by suitable rf irradiation to 1H spins, RIR uses time-dependent 13C-1H interactions modulated appropriately by 1H rf irradiation. There are two distinct cases where 13C-1H line broadening realizes 13C-13C spectral overlap. For a pair of a carbonyl or aromatic carbon and an aliphatic carbon, spectral overlap can be achieved between one of the spinning sidebands of the former 13C resonance and the 13C-1H dipolar powder pattern of the latter. On the other hand for a pair of spins with a small chemical shift difference, the two center bands are overlapped with each other due to 13C-1H dipolar broadening. For the former, we show that both RIR and DARR occur in the first order, while for the latter, DARR recoupling is appreciable for time-independent 13C-1H interactions. We refer to the former DARR as the first-order DARR recoupling and the latter as the second-order DARR. Experimentally, we examined the following 13C-1H recoupling methods for DARR: 1H CW irradiation fulfilling a rotary-resonance condition or a modulatory-resonance condition, and 1H π pulses applied synchronously to MAS. For RIR, the FSLG-m2m¯m sequence is applied to 1H. Several one-dimensional DARR and RIR experiments were done for N-acetyl[1,2-13C, 15N] DL-valine, and [2,3-13C] L-alanine. It was found that the polarization transfer rate for RIR is larger than that for DARR except for fast spinning, while the rate for DARR is less sensitive to

  12. Exploring the conformational energy landscape of glassy disaccharides by cross polarization magic angle spinning 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and numerical simulations. II. Enhanced molecular flexibility in amorphous trehalose.

    PubMed

    Lefort, Ronan; Bordat, Patrice; Cesaro, Attilio; Descamps, Marc

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses chemical shift surfaces to simulate experimental (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning spectra for amorphous solid state disaccharides, paying particular attention to the glycosidic linkage atoms in trehalose, sucrose, and lactose. The combination of molecular mechanics with density functional theory/gauge invariant atomic orbital ab initio methods provides reliable structural information on the conformational distribution in the glass. The results are interpreted in terms of an enhanced flexibility that trehalose possesses in the amorphous solid state, at least on the time scale of (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. Implications of these findings for the fragility of trehalose glass and bioprotectant action are discussed. PMID:17212504

  13. Substrate affinities for membrane transport proteins determined by 13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G; Brough, Adrian R; Herbert, Richard B; Rajakarier, J Anton; Henderson, Peter J F; Middleton, David A

    2004-03-17

    We have devised methods in which cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP-MAS) solid-state NMR is exploited to measure rigorous parameters for binding of (13)C-labeled substrates to membrane transport proteins. The methods were applied to two proteins from Escherichia coli: a nucleoside transporter, NupC, and a glucuronide transporter, GusB. A substantial signal for the binding of methyl [1-(13)C]-beta-d-glucuronide to GusB overexpressed in native membranes was achieved with a sample that contained as little as 20 nmol of GusB protein. The data were fitted to yield a K(D) value of 4.17 mM for the labeled ligand and 0.42 mM for an unlabeled ligand, p-nitrophenyl beta-d-glucuronide, which displaced the labeled compound. CP-MAS was also used to measure binding of [1'-(13)C]uridine to overexpressed NupC. The spectrum of NupC-enriched membranes containing [1'-(13)C]uridine exhibited a large peak from substrate bound to undefined sites other than the transport site, which obscured the signal from substrate bound to NupC. In a novel application of a cross-polarization/polarization-inversion (CPPI) NMR experiment, the signal from undefined binding was eliminated by use of appropriate inversion pulse lengths. By use of CPPI in a titration experiment, a K(D) value of 2.6 mM was determined for uridine bound to NupC. These approaches are broadly applicable to quantifying binding of substrates, inhibitors, drugs, and antibiotics to numerous membrane proteins. PMID:15012136

  14. {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin couplings in [2`-{sup 13}C]2`-deoxyribonucleosides: Correlations with molecular structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, T.; Stripe, W.A.; Carmichael, I.; Serianni, A.S.; Wu, J.

    1997-02-19

    2`-Deoxyribonucleosides (2`-deoxyadenosine (1), 2`-depoxycytidine (2), thymidine (3)) singly enriched with {sup 13}C at C2` have been prepared and used to obtain one-, two-, and three-bond {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin-coupling constants involving C2`. Spin couplings in 1-3 involving C1` and C2`are also compared to corresponding values in ribonucleosides in order to assess the effects of nucleoside structure and conformation on J values within the furanose ring. {sup 1}J{sub C2`,H2`R} and {sup 1}J{sub C2`,H2`S} in 1-3 and {sup 1}J{sub C2`,H2`} in ribonucleosides depend on C-H bond orientation: {sup 1}J{sub C1`,H1`} in 1-3 and in ribonucleosides exhibits a similar dependence. The latter couplings appear to be essentially unaffected by N-glycoside torsion. {sup 1}J{sub CC} values depend on the number and distribution of electronegative substituents on the C-C fragment. A modified projection curve is proposed to aid in the interpretation of {sup 2}J{sub C2`,H1`} values; the presence of N substitution at C1` caused a shift to more negative couplings relative to the O-substituted analog. In contrast, {sup 2}J{sub C1`,H2`} is essentially unaffected by the same change in the electronegative substituent at C1`. {sup 2}J{sub CC} values within the furanose ring are determined buy two coupling pathways; in one case (i.e., {sup 2}J{sub C1`,C3`}), the observed coupling is shown to be the algebraic sum of the two couplings arising from each pathway. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. A Cross-Polarization, Magic-Angle-Spinning, 13C-Nuclear-Magnetic-Resonance Study of Polysaccharides in Sugar Beet Cell Walls1

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Catherine M.G.C.; Jarvis, Michael C.

    1999-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments were used to study the rigidity and spatial proximity of polymers in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) cell walls. Proton T1ρ decay and cross-polarization patterns were consistent with the presence of rigid, crystalline cellulose microfibrils with a diameter of approximately 3 nm, mobile pectic galacturonans, and highly mobile arabinans. A direct-polarization, magic-angle-spinning spectrum recorded under conditions adapted to mobile polymers showed only the arabinans, which had a conformation similar to that of beet arabinans in solution. These cell walls contained very small amounts of hemicellulosic polymers such as xyloglucan, xylan, and mannan, and no arabinan or galacturonan fraction closely associated with cellulose microfibrils, as would be expected of hemicelluloses. Cellulose microfibrils in the beet cell walls were stable in the absence of any polysaccharide coating. PMID:10198090

  16. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cardiac metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seeholzer, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques for following the metabolic fate of compounds specifically labeled with /sup 13/C. The goals of the present study are: (1) to develop reliable quantitative procedures for measuring the /sup 13/C enrichment of specific carbon sites in compounds enriched by the metabolism of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates in rat heart, and (2) to use these quantitative measurements of fractional /sup 13/C enrichment within the context of a mathematical flux model describing the carbon flow through the TCA cycle and ancillary pathways, as a means for obtaining unknown flux parameters. Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with various combinations of glucose, acetate, pyruvate, and propionate to achieve steady state flux conditions, followed by perfusion with the same substrates labeled with /sup 13/C in specific carbon sites. The hearts were frozen at different times after addition of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates and neutralized perchloric acid extracts were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The fractional /sup 13/C enrichment (F.E.) of individual carbon sites in different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for saturation and nuclear Overhauser effects. These F.E. measurements by /sup 13/C NMR were validated by the analysis of /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H scalar coupling patterns observed in /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the extracted metabolites. The results obtained from perfusion of hearts glucose plus either (2-/sup 13/C) acetate or (3-/sup 13/C) pyruvate are similar to those obtained by previous investigators using /sup 14/C-labeled substrates.

  17. /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation in gaseous benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Folkendt, M.M.; Weiss-Lopez, B.E.; True, N.S.

    1988-08-25

    The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time, T/sub 1/, measured for benzene protons at densities between 0.81 and 54.4 mol/m/sup 3/ (15 and 980 Torr) at 381 K exhibits a characteristic nonlinear density dependence. Analysis of the density-dependent T/sub 1/ data yields a spin-rotation coupling constant, C/sub eff/, of /vert bar/182.6 (0.4)/vert bar/ Hz and an angular momentum reorientation cross section, sigma, of 131 (1) /Angstrom//sup 2/. The /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation time of singly labeled /sup 13/C benzene is a linear function of density over the density range 1.07-75.12 mol/m/sup 3/ (20-1330 Torr). /sup 13/C T/sub 1/ values are shorter than /sup 1/H T/sub 1/ values by a factor of ca. 100 at comparable densities. The nuclear Overhauser enhancement factor, /eta/, is 0.0 /plus minus/ 0.02 at densities between 11 and 85.3 mol/m/sup 3/ (200 and 1500 Torr), demonstrating that dipole-dipole relaxation is relatively inefficient in this region. The spin-rotation coupling constant, C/sub eff/, for /sup 13/C nuclei in benzene is estimated to be /vert bar/1602 (68)/vert bar/ Hz.

  18. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance study of the complexation of calcium by taurine

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, C.S.; Hammer, B.E.; Danyluk, S.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1980-01-01

    /sup 13/C Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts, /sup 1/J/sub c-c/ scalar coupling constants, spin-lattice relaxation times, and nuclear Overhauser effects were determined for taurine-(1, 2 /sup 13/C) and a taurine-(1 /sup 13/C) and taurine-(2 /sup 13/C) mixture in the presence and absence of calcium. Comparison of taurine titration shifts to values for related compounds reveals some unusual electronic properties of the taurine molecule. Stability constants of 1:1 calcium complexes with taurine zwitterions and anions, as well as their /sup 13/C chemical shifts, were obtained by least squares analysis of titration curves measured in the presence of calcium. The stability constants of calcium-taurine complexes were significantly lower than previous values and led to estimates that only approximately one percent of intracellular calcium of mammalian myocardial cells would exist in a taurine complex.

  19. Control of coherence among the spins of a single electron and the three nearest neighbor {sup 13}C nuclei of a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Shimo-Oka, T.; Miwa, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Mizuochi, N.; Kato, H.; Yamasaki, S.; Jelezko, F.

    2015-04-13

    Individual nuclear spins in diamond can be optically detected through hyperfine couplings with the electron spin of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center; such nuclear spins have outstandingly long coherence times. Among the hyperfine couplings in the NV center, the nearest neighbor {sup 13}C nuclear spins have the largest coupling strength. Nearest neighbor {sup 13}C nuclear spins have the potential to perform fastest gate operations, providing highest fidelity in quantum computing. Herein, we report on the control of coherences in the NV center where all three nearest neighbor carbons are of the {sup 13}C isotope. Coherence among the three and four qubits are generated and analyzed at room temperature.

  20. sup 13 C-enriched ribonucleosides: Synthesis and application of sup 13 C- sup 1 H and sup 13 C- sup 13 C spin-coupling constants to assess furanose and N-glycoside bond conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, P.C.; Serianni, A.S. )

    1990-09-26

    Adenosine (1), cytidine (2), guanosine (3), and uridine (4) have been prepared chemically with {sup 13}C enrichment (99 atom %) at C1{prime} and C2{prime} of the ribose ring. Reliable synthetic protocols have been developed to permit access to millimole quantities of labeled ribonucleosides required for structural studies of stable isotopically labeled oligonucleotides and for in vivo metabolism studies. High-resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra of the enriched ribonucleosides have been obtained, and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C and {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H spin-coupling constants have been measured for pathways within the {beta}-D-ribofuranose ring and across the N-glycoside bond. Related couplings were determined in methyl {alpha}- and {beta}-D-riboruanosides (5,6), and in two conformationally constrained nucleosides, 2,2{prime}-anhydro-(1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl)uracil (7) and 2{prime},3{prime}-O-isopropylidene-2,5{prime}-O-cyclouridine (8). The latter data were used to construct a crude Karplus curve for the {sup 13}C-C-N-{sup 13}C coupling pathway across the N-glycoside bond in 1-4. {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H, {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H, and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C coupling data are used to evaluate current models describing the conformational dynamics of 1-4 in aqueous solution.

  1. {sup 13}C, {sup 1}H, {sup 6}Li magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and Fourier transform infrared study of intercalation electrodes based in ultrasoft carbons obtained below 3100 K

    SciTech Connect

    Alcantara, R.; Madrigal, F.J.F.; Lavela, P.; Tirado, J.L.; Mateos, J.M.J.; Stoyanova, R.; Zhecheva, E.

    1999-01-01

    The past decade has seen an important development of materials for high-performance energy storage systems. Particularly, the field of electrode materials for advanced lithium batteries has attracted the interest of numerous researchers. Petroleum coke samples of different origins and heat treated at different temperatures below 3100 K have been studied by spectroscopic and electrochemical procedures. According to {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (IR), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data, aromatic compounds and surface OH groups are present in green coke samples. The preparation of CMB (combustible) sample from 1673 K leads to a low-temperature graphitization process, as shown by the occurrence of multiphase products containing both turbostatic and graphitized solid. This process is accompanied by the loss of aromatic compounds and surface hydroxyls. The optimization of the lithium intercalation electrodes based in the green coke materials was carried out by thermal treatment at 1023 K under dynamic vacuum conditions. Such pretreatment of the electrode material leads to marked enhancement of reversible capacities without the higher temperatures usually required for other soft carbon materials. Finally, the results of {sup 6}Li MAS NMR and EPR have been correlated with the experimental determination of lithium diffusion coefficients and surface properties. On the basis of these results, spin resonance spectroscopies are found to be a powerful tool to discern between the different petroleum coke samples to select the active electrode material with best performance.

  2. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-06-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ, ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1-40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1-40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16-21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1-40 fibrils in 4 h or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples.

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  4. Spin distribution of the H-cluster in the H(ox)-CO state of the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans: HYSCORE and ENDOR study of (14)N and (13)C nuclear interactions.

    PubMed

    Silakov, Alexey; Wenk, Brian; Reijerse, Eduard; Albracht, Simon P J; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes which catalyze the reversible cleavage of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons. In [FeFe] hydrogenases the active center is a 6Fe6S cluster, referred to as the "H-cluster." It consists of the redox-active binuclear subcluster ([2Fe](H)) coordinated by CN(-) and CO ligands and the cubane-like [4Fe-4S](H) subcluster which is connected to the protein via Cys ligands. One of these Cys ligands bridges to the [2Fe](H) subcluster. The CO-inhibited form of [FeFe] hydrogenase isolated from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was studied using advanced EPR methods. In the H(ox)-CO state the open coordination site at the [2Fe](H) subcluster is blocked by extrinsic CO, giving rise to an EPR-active S = 1/2 species. The CO inhibited state was prepared with (13)CO and illuminated under white light at 273 K. In this case scrambling of the CO ligands occurs. Three (13)C hyperfine couplings of 17.1, 7.4, and 3.8 MHz (isotropic part) were observed and assigned to (13)CO at the extrinsic, the bridging, and the terminal CO-ligand positions of the distal iron, respectively. No (13)CO exchange of the CO ligand to the proximal iron was observed. The hyperfine interactions detected indicate a rather large distribution of the spin density over the terminal and bridging CO ligands attached to the distal iron. Furthermore, (14)N nuclear spin interactions were measured. On the basis of the observed (14)N hyperfine couplings, which result from the CN(-) ligands of the [2Fe](H) subcluster, it has been concluded that there is very little unpaired spin density on the cyanides of the binuclear subcluster.

  5. The 13C nuclear magnetic resonance in graphite intercalation compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Resing, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of graphite intercalation compounds were calculated. For acceptor types, the shifts come mainly from the paramagnetic (Ramsey) intra-atomic terms. They are related to the gross features of the two-dimensional band structures. The calculated anisotropy is about -140 ppm and is independent of the finer details such as charge transfer. For donor types, the carbon 2p pi orbitals are spin-polarized because of mixing with metal conduction electrons, thus there is an additional dipolar contribution which may be correlated with the electronic specific heat. The general agreement with experimental data is satisfactory.

  6. Cross-Polarized Magic-Angle Spinning (sup13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Characterization of Soil Organic Matter Relative to Culturable Bacterial Species Composition and Sustained Biological Control of Pythium Root Rot.

    PubMed

    Boehm, M J; Wu, T; Stone, A G; Kraakman, B; Iannotti, D A; Wilson, G E; Madden, L V; Hoitink, H

    1997-01-01

    We report the use of a model system that examines the dynamics of biological energy availability in organic matter in a sphagnum peat potting mix critical to sustenance of microorganism-mediated biological control of pythium root rot, a soilborne plant disease caused by Pythium ultimum. The concentration of readily degradable carbohydrate in the peat, mostly present as cellulose, was characterized by cross-polarized magic-angle spinning (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A decrease in the carbohydrate concentration in the mix was observed during the initial 10 weeks after potting as the rate of hydrolysis of fluorescein diacetate declined below a critical threshold level required for biological control of pythium root rot. Throughout this period, total microbial biomass and activity, based on rates of [(sup14)C]acetate incorporation into phospholipids, did not change but shifts in culturable bacterial species composition occurred. Species capable of inducing biocontrol were succeeded by pleomorphic gram-positive genera and putative oligotrophs not or less effective in control. We conclude that sustained efficacy of naturally occurring biocontrol agents was limited by energy availability to this microflora within the organic matter contained in the potting mix. We propose that this critical role of organic matter may be a key factor explaining the variability in efficacy typically encountered in the control of pythium root rot with biocontrol agents. PMID:16535481

  7. Cross-Polarized Magic-Angle Spinning (sup13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Characterization of Soil Organic Matter Relative to Culturable Bacterial Species Composition and Sustained Biological Control of Pythium Root Rot

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, M. J.; Wu, T.; Stone, A. G.; Kraakman, B.; Iannotti, D. A.; Wilson, G. E.; Madden, L. V.; Hoitink, H.

    1997-01-01

    We report the use of a model system that examines the dynamics of biological energy availability in organic matter in a sphagnum peat potting mix critical to sustenance of microorganism-mediated biological control of pythium root rot, a soilborne plant disease caused by Pythium ultimum. The concentration of readily degradable carbohydrate in the peat, mostly present as cellulose, was characterized by cross-polarized magic-angle spinning (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A decrease in the carbohydrate concentration in the mix was observed during the initial 10 weeks after potting as the rate of hydrolysis of fluorescein diacetate declined below a critical threshold level required for biological control of pythium root rot. Throughout this period, total microbial biomass and activity, based on rates of [(sup14)C]acetate incorporation into phospholipids, did not change but shifts in culturable bacterial species composition occurred. Species capable of inducing biocontrol were succeeded by pleomorphic gram-positive genera and putative oligotrophs not or less effective in control. We conclude that sustained efficacy of naturally occurring biocontrol agents was limited by energy availability to this microflora within the organic matter contained in the potting mix. We propose that this critical role of organic matter may be a key factor explaining the variability in efficacy typically encountered in the control of pythium root rot with biocontrol agents. PMID:16535481

  8. The use of dynamic nuclear polarization 13C-pyruvate MRS in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam Espe; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Clemmensen, Andreas Ettrup; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an immense development of new targeted anti-cancer drugs. For practicing precision medicine, a sensitive method imaging for non-invasive, assessment of early treatment response and for assisting in developing new drugs is warranted. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a potent technique for non-invasive in vivo investigation of tissue chemistry and cellular metabolism. Hyperpolarization by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is capable of creating solutions of molecules with polarized nuclear spins in a range of biological molecules and has enabled the real-time investigation of in vivo metabolism. The development of this new method has been demonstrated to enhance the nuclear polarization more than 10,000-fold, thereby significantly increasing the sensitivity of the MRS with a spatial resolution to the millimeters and a temporal resolution at the subsecond range. Furthermore, the method enables measuring kinetics of conversion of substrates into cell metabolites and can be integrated with anatomical proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many nuclei and substrates have been hyperpolarized using the DNP method. Currently, the most widely used compound is 13C-pyruvate due to favoring technicalities. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate results in appearance of 13C-lactate, 13C-alanine and 13C-bicarbonate resonance peaks depending on the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. In cancer, the lactate level is increased due to increased glycolysis. The use of DNP enhanced 13C-pyruvate has in preclinical studies shown to be a sensitive method for detecting cancer and for assessment of early treatment response in a variety of cancers. Recently, a first-in-man 31-patient study was conducted with the primary objective to assess the safety of hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate in healthy subjects and prostate cancer patients. The study showed an elevated 13C-lactate/13C-pyruvate ratio in regions of biopsy

  9. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique. PMID:16332107

  10. High-Resolution Correlation Spectroscopy of 13C Spins Near a Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriles, Carlos; Laraoui, Abdelghani; Dolde, Florian; Wracthrup, Joerg; Reinhard, Friedemann; Burk, Christian

    2013-03-01

    We use a pulse protocol to monitor the time evolution of the 13C ensemble in the vicinity of a NV center. We observe time correlations in the nuclear spin dynamics that extend over several milliseconds exceeding the color center coherence lifetime by more than an order of magnitude. Upon Fourier transform, we separate 13C spins exhibiting differing coupling constants with a frequency resolution inversely proportional to the NV spin-lattice relaxation time. Further, we use the nuclear spin of the host nitrogen as a quantum register during the correlation interval and demonstrate that hyperfine-shifted resonances in this spectrum can be separated from the bare carbon peak upon proper initialization of the NV. Intriguingly, we find that the amplitude of the correlation signal exhibits a sharp dependence on the applied magnetic field, virtually disappearing below a critical field common to all centers. The value of this transition field can be `tuned' by properly adjusting the timing within our correlation scheme. We discuss these observations in the context of the `quantum-to-classical' transition proposed recently to explain the combined dynamics of the NV spin and the 13C bath at variable magnetic field. A.L. and C.A.M. acknowledge support from Research Corp., the von Humboldt Foundation, and NSF. F.D., C.B., F.R. and J.W. acknowledge support from the EU, the DFG, and the Volkswagen Foundation.

  11. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H-13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H-13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H-13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H-13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr-Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr-Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C-13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils.

  12. Optimization of 13C dynamic nuclear polarization: isotopic labeling of free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kiswandi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a physics technique that amplifies the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals by transferring the high polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. Thus, the choice of free radical is crucial in DNP as it can directly affect the NMR signal enhancement levels, typically on the order of several thousand-fold in the liquid-state. In this study, we have investigated the efficiency of four variants of the well-known 4-oxo-TEMPO radical (normal 4-oxo-TEMPO plus its 15N-enriched and/or perdeuterated variants) for use in DNP of an important metabolic tracer [1-13C]acetate. Though the variants have significant differences in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, we have found that changing the composition of the TEMPO radical through deuteration or 15N doping yields no significant difference in 13C DNP efficiency at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. On the other hand, deuteration of the solvent causes a significant increase of 13C polarization that is consistent over all the 4-oxo-TEMPO variants. These findings are consistent with the thermal mixing model of DNP. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  13. Impact of Ho(3+)-doping on (13)C dynamic nuclear polarization using trityl OX063 free radical.

    PubMed

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Martins, André; Fidelino, Leila; Khemtong, Chalermchai; Song, Likai; Sherry, A Dean; Lumata, Lloyd

    2016-08-21

    We have investigated the effects of Ho-DOTA doping on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of [1-(13)C] sodium acetate using trityl OX063 free radical at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. Our results indicate that addition of 2 mM Ho-DOTA on 3 M [1-(13)C] sodium acetate sample in 1 : 1 v/v glycerol : water with 15 mM trityl OX063 improves the DNP-enhanced (13)C solid-state nuclear polarization by a factor of around 2.7-fold. Similar to the Gd(3+) doping effect on (13)C DNP, the locations of the positive and negative (13)C maximum polarization peaks in the (13)C microwave DNP sweep are shifted towards each other with the addition of Ho-DOTA on the DNP sample. W-band electron spin resonance (ESR) studies have revealed that while the shape and linewidth of the trityl OX063 ESR spectrum was not affected by Ho(3+)-doping, the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of trityl OX063 was prominently reduced at cryogenic temperatures. The reduction of trityl OX063 electron T1 by Ho-doping is linked to the (13)C DNP improvement in light of the thermodynamic picture of DNP. Moreover, the presence of Ho-DOTA in the dissolution liquid at room temperature has negligible reduction effect on liquid-state (13)C T1, in contrast to Gd(3+)-doping which drastically reduces the (13)C T1. The results here suggest that Ho(3+)-doping is advantageous over Gd(3+) in terms of preservation of hyperpolarized state-an important aspect to consider for in vitro and in vivo NMR or imaging (MRI) experiments where a considerable preparation time is needed to administer the hyperpolarized (13)C liquid.

  14. Impact of Ho(3+)-doping on (13)C dynamic nuclear polarization using trityl OX063 free radical.

    PubMed

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Martins, André; Fidelino, Leila; Khemtong, Chalermchai; Song, Likai; Sherry, A Dean; Lumata, Lloyd

    2016-08-21

    We have investigated the effects of Ho-DOTA doping on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of [1-(13)C] sodium acetate using trityl OX063 free radical at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. Our results indicate that addition of 2 mM Ho-DOTA on 3 M [1-(13)C] sodium acetate sample in 1 : 1 v/v glycerol : water with 15 mM trityl OX063 improves the DNP-enhanced (13)C solid-state nuclear polarization by a factor of around 2.7-fold. Similar to the Gd(3+) doping effect on (13)C DNP, the locations of the positive and negative (13)C maximum polarization peaks in the (13)C microwave DNP sweep are shifted towards each other with the addition of Ho-DOTA on the DNP sample. W-band electron spin resonance (ESR) studies have revealed that while the shape and linewidth of the trityl OX063 ESR spectrum was not affected by Ho(3+)-doping, the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of trityl OX063 was prominently reduced at cryogenic temperatures. The reduction of trityl OX063 electron T1 by Ho-doping is linked to the (13)C DNP improvement in light of the thermodynamic picture of DNP. Moreover, the presence of Ho-DOTA in the dissolution liquid at room temperature has negligible reduction effect on liquid-state (13)C T1, in contrast to Gd(3+)-doping which drastically reduces the (13)C T1. The results here suggest that Ho(3+)-doping is advantageous over Gd(3+) in terms of preservation of hyperpolarized state-an important aspect to consider for in vitro and in vivo NMR or imaging (MRI) experiments where a considerable preparation time is needed to administer the hyperpolarized (13)C liquid. PMID:27424954

  15. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H–13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H–13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H–13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H–13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr–Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr–Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C–13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils. PMID:22743540

  16. [Characterization of biochar by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-yu; Jin, Jie; Yan, Yu; Han, Lan-fang; Kang, Ming-jie; Wang, Zi-ying; Zhao, Ye; Sun, Ke

    2014-12-01

    The wood (willow branch) and grass (rice straw) materials were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300, 450 and 600 °C) to obtain the biochars used in the present study. The biochars were characterized using elementary analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and solid state 13C cross-polarization and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR) to illuminate the structure and composition of the biochars which were derived from the different thermal temperatures and biomass. The results showed that the H/C, O/C and (O+N)/C ratios of the biochars decreased with the increase in the pyrolysis temperatures. The surface polarity and ash content of the grass-derived biochars were higher than those of the wood-derived biochars. The minerals of the wood-derived biochars were mainly covered by the organic matter; in contrast, parts of the mineral surfaces of the grass-derived biochars were not covered by organic matter? The 13C NMR of the low temperature-derived biochars revealed a large contribution of aromatic carbon, aliphatic carbon, carboxyl and carbonyl carbon, while the high temperature-derived biochars contained a large amount of aromatic carbon. Moreover, the wood-derived biochars produced at low heat treatment temperatures contained more lignin residues than grass-derived ones, probably due to the existence of high lignin content in the feedstock soures of wood-derived biochars. The results of the study would be useful for environmental application of biochars.

  17. Characterisation of black carbon-rich samples by (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Etelvino H; Hayes, Michael H B; Deazevedo, Eduardo R; Bonagamba, Tito J

    2006-09-01

    There are difficulties in quantifying and characterising the organic matter (OM) in soils that contain significant amounts of partially oxidised char or charcoal materials. The anthropogenic black carbon (BC), such as that found in the Terra Preta de Indio soils of the Amazon region, is a good example of the OM that is difficult to analyse in such soils. (13)C direct polarisation/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at high MAS frequency, (1)H-(13)C cross polarisation (CP)/MAS with total suppression of spinning sidebands (TOSS), and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filter nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been applied successfully for quantifying the different components of OM. However, because pyrogenic materials present strong local magnetic susceptibility heterogeneities, the use of CSA-filter and TOSS make the pulse sequences very sensitive to imperfections in the pi pulses. In this study, the DP/MAS pulse sequence was replaced by a CP with a radio frequency ramp--variable amplitude CP (VACP)--VACP/MAS pulse sequence, and composite pi pulses were used in the CSA-filter and TOSS pulse sequences. In that way, the component functionalities in a humic acid from a BC soil were successfully determined. The spectrometer time needed was greatly decreased by employing this VACP/MAS technique. This development provides an accurate method for characterising BC-rich samples from different origins. PMID:16688435

  18. Characterisation of black carbon-rich samples by 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Etelvino H.; Hayes, Michael H. B.; Deazevedo, Eduardo R.; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2006-09-01

    There are difficulties in quantifying and characterising the organic matter (OM) in soils that contain significant amounts of partially oxidised char or charcoal materials. The anthropogenic black carbon (BC), such as that found in the Terra Preta de Índio soils of the Amazon region, is a good example of the OM that is difficult to analyse in such soils. 13C direct polarisation/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at high MAS frequency, 1H-13C cross polarisation (CP)/MAS with total suppression of spinning sidebands (TOSS), and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filter nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been applied successfully for quantifying the different components of OM. However, because pyrogenic materials present strong local magnetic susceptibility heterogeneities, the use of CSA-filter and TOSS make the pulse sequences very sensitive to imperfections in the π pulses. In this study, the DP/MAS pulse sequence was replaced by a CP with a radio frequency ramp—variable amplitude CP (VACP)—VACP/MAS pulse sequence, and composite π pulses were used in the CSA-filter and TOSS pulse sequences. In that way, the component functionalities in a humic acid from a BC soil were successfully determined. The spectrometer time needed was greatly decreased by employing this VACP/MAS technique. This development provides an accurate method for characterising BC-rich samples from different origins.

  19. Exploring the conformational energy landscape of glassy disaccharides by cross polarization magic angle spinning 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and numerical simulations. II. Enhanced molecular flexibility in amorphous trehalose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, Ronan; Bordat, Patrice; Cesaro, Attilio; Descamps, Marc

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses chemical shift surfaces to simulate experimental C13 cross polarization magic angle spinning spectra for amorphous solid state disaccharides, paying particular attention to the glycosidic linkage atoms in trehalose, sucrose, and lactose. The combination of molecular mechanics with density functional theory/gauge invariant atomic orbital ab initio methods provides reliable structural information on the conformational distribution in the glass. The results are interpreted in terms of an enhanced flexibility that trehalose possesses in the amorphous solid state, at least on the time scale of C13 nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. Implications of these findings for the fragility of trehalose glass and bioprotectant action are discussed.

  20. Chain packing in glassy polymers by natural-abundance 13C-13C spin diffusion using 2D centerband-only detection of exchange.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manmilan; Schaefer, Jacob

    2011-03-01

    The proximities of specific subgroups of nearest-neighbor chains in glassy polymers are revealed by distance-dependent (13)C-(13)C dipolar couplings and spin diffusion. The measurement of such proximities is practical even with natural-abundance levels of (13)C using a 2D version of centerband-only detection of exchange (CODEX). Two-dimensional CODEX is a relaxation-compensated experiment that avoids the problems associated with variations in T(1)(C)'s due to dynamic site heterogeneity in the glass. Isotropic chemical shifts are encoded in the t(1) preparation times before and after mixing, and variations in T(2)'s are compensated by an S(0) reference (no mixing). Data acquisition involves acquisition of an S(0) reference signal on alternate scans, and the active control of power amplifiers, to achieve stability and accuracy over long accumulation times. The model system to calibrate spin diffusion is the polymer itself. For a mixing time of 200 ms, only (13)C-(13)C pairs separated by one or two bonds (2.5 Å) show cross peaks, which therefore identify reference intrachain proximities. For a mixing time of 1200 ms, 5 Å interchain proximities appear. The resulting cross peaks are used in a simple and direct way to compare nonrandom chain packing for two commercial polycarbonates with decidedly different mechanical properties.

  1. 13C Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and µ-Raman Spectroscopic Characterization of Sicilian Amber.

    PubMed

    Barone, Germana; Capitani, Donatella; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Proietti, Noemi; Raneri, Simona; Longobardo, Ugo; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2016-08-01

    (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and µ-Raman spectroscopy were applied to characterize Sicilian amber samples. The main goal of this work was to supply a complete study of simetite, highlighting discriminating criteria useful to distinguish Sicilian amber from fossil resins from other regions and laying the foundations for building a spectroscopic database of Sicilian amber. With this aim, a private collection of unrefined simetite samples and fossil resins from the Baltic region and Dominican Republic was analyzed. Overall, the obtained spectra permitted simetite to be distinguished from the other resins. In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectroscopic data, allowing the clustering of simetite samples with respect to the Baltic and Dominican samples and to group the simetite samples in two sets, depending on their maturity. Finally, the analysis of loadings allowed for a better understanding of the spectral features that mainly influenced the discriminating characteristics of the investigated ambers.

  2. [Characterization of biochar by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-yu; Jin, Jie; Yan, Yu; Han, Lan-fang; Kang, Ming-jie; Wang, Zi-ying; Zhao, Ye; Sun, Ke

    2014-12-01

    The wood (willow branch) and grass (rice straw) materials were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300, 450 and 600 °C) to obtain the biochars used in the present study. The biochars were characterized using elementary analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and solid state 13C cross-polarization and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR) to illuminate the structure and composition of the biochars which were derived from the different thermal temperatures and biomass. The results showed that the H/C, O/C and (O+N)/C ratios of the biochars decreased with the increase in the pyrolysis temperatures. The surface polarity and ash content of the grass-derived biochars were higher than those of the wood-derived biochars. The minerals of the wood-derived biochars were mainly covered by the organic matter; in contrast, parts of the mineral surfaces of the grass-derived biochars were not covered by organic matter? The 13C NMR of the low temperature-derived biochars revealed a large contribution of aromatic carbon, aliphatic carbon, carboxyl and carbonyl carbon, while the high temperature-derived biochars contained a large amount of aromatic carbon. Moreover, the wood-derived biochars produced at low heat treatment temperatures contained more lignin residues than grass-derived ones, probably due to the existence of high lignin content in the feedstock soures of wood-derived biochars. The results of the study would be useful for environmental application of biochars. PMID:25881450

  3. Photo-CIDNP 13C magic angle spinning NMR on bacterial reaction centres: exploring the electronic structure of the special pair and its surroundings.

    PubMed

    Matysik, J; Schulten, E; Alia; Gast, P; Raap, J; Lugtenburg, J; Hoff, A J; de Groot, H J

    2001-08-01

    Photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarisation (photo-CIDNP) in intact bacterial reaction centres has been observed by 13C-solid state NMR under continuous illumination with white light. Strong intensity enhancement of 13C NMR signals of the aromatic rings allows probing the electronic ground state of the two BChl cofactors of the special pair at the molecular scale with atomic selectivity. Differences between the two BChl cofactors are discussed. Several aliphatic 13C atoms of cofactors, as well as 13C atoms of the imidazole ring of histidine residue(s), show nuclear-spin polarisation to the same extent as the aromatic nuclei of the cofactors. Mechanisms and applications of polarisation transfer are discussed. PMID:11592409

  4. Trans and surface membrane bound zervamicin IIB: 13C-MAOSS-NMR at high spinning speed.

    PubMed

    Raap, J; Hollander, J; Ovchinnikova, T V; Swischeva, N V; Skladnev, D; Kiihne, S

    2006-08-01

    Interactions between (15)N-labelled peptides or proteins and lipids can be investigated using membranes aligned on a thin polymer film, which is rolled into a cylinder and inserted into the MAS-NMR rotor. This can be spun at high speed, which is often useful at high field strengths. Unfortuantely, substrate films like commercially available polycarbonate or PEEK produce severe overlap with peptide and protein signals in (13)C-MAOSS NMR spectra. We show that a simple house hold foil support allows clear observation of the carbonyl, aromatic and C(alpha) signals of peptides and proteins as well as the ester carbonyl and choline signals of phosphocholine lipids. The utility of the new substrate is validated in applications to the membrane active peptide zervamicin IIB. The stability and macroscopic ordering of thin PC10 bilayers was compared with that of thicker POPC bilayers, both supported on the household foil. Sidebands in the (31)P-spectra showed a high degree of alignment of both the supported POPC and PC10 lipid molecules. Compared with POPC, the PC10 lipids are slightly more disordered, most likely due to the increased mobilities of the shorter lipid molecules. This mobility prevents PC10 from forming stable vesicles for MAS studies. The (13)C-peptide peaks were selectively detected in a (13)C-detected (1)H-spin diffusion experiment. Qualitative analysis of build-up curves obtained for different mixing times allowed the transmembrane peptide in PC10 to be distinguished from the surface bound topology in POPC. The (13)C-MAOSS results thus independently confirms previous findings from (15)N spectroscopy [Bechinger, B., Skladnev, D.A., Ogrel, A., Li, X., Rogozhkina, E.V., Ovchinnikova, T.V., O'Neil, J.D.J. and Raap, J. (2001) Biochemistry, 40, 9428-9437]. In summary, application of house hold foil opens the possibility of measuring high resolution (13)C-NMR spectra of peptides and proteins in well ordered membranes, which are required to determine the secondary

  5. 13C Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and µ-Raman Spectroscopic Characterization of Sicilian Amber.

    PubMed

    Barone, Germana; Capitani, Donatella; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Proietti, Noemi; Raneri, Simona; Longobardo, Ugo; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2016-08-01

    (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and µ-Raman spectroscopy were applied to characterize Sicilian amber samples. The main goal of this work was to supply a complete study of simetite, highlighting discriminating criteria useful to distinguish Sicilian amber from fossil resins from other regions and laying the foundations for building a spectroscopic database of Sicilian amber. With this aim, a private collection of unrefined simetite samples and fossil resins from the Baltic region and Dominican Republic was analyzed. Overall, the obtained spectra permitted simetite to be distinguished from the other resins. In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectroscopic data, allowing the clustering of simetite samples with respect to the Baltic and Dominican samples and to group the simetite samples in two sets, depending on their maturity. Finally, the analysis of loadings allowed for a better understanding of the spectral features that mainly influenced the discriminating characteristics of the investigated ambers. PMID:27340217

  6. 13C and 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Glycogen Futile Cycling in Strains of the Genus Fibrobacter

    PubMed Central

    Matheron, Christelle; Delort, Anne-Marie; Gaudet, Geneviève; Forano, Evelyne; Liptaj, Tibor

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the carbon metabolism of three strains of Fibrobacter succinogenes and one strain of Fibrobacter intestinalis. The four strains produced the same amounts of the metabolites succinate, acetate, and formate in approximately the same ratio (3.7/1/0.3). The four strains similarly stored glycogen during all growth phases, and the glycogen-to-protein ratio was close to 0.6 during the exponential growth phase. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of [1-13C]glucose utilization by resting cells of the four strains revealed a reversal of glycolysis at the triose phosphate level and the same metabolic pathways. Glycogen futile cycling was demonstrated by 13C NMR by following the simultaneous metabolism of labeled [13C]glycogen and exogenous unlabeled glucose. The isotopic dilutions of the CH2 of succinate and the CH3 of acetate when the resting cells were metabolizing [1-13C]glucose and unlabeled glycogen were precisely quantified by using 13C-filtered spin-echo difference 1H NMR spectroscopy. The measured isotopic dilutions were not the same for succinate and acetate; in the case of succinate, the dilutions reflected only the contribution of glycogen futile cycling, while in the case of acetate, another mechanism was also involved. Results obtained in complementary experiments are consistent with reversal of the succinate synthesis pathway. Our results indicated that for all of the strains, from 12 to 16% of the glucose entering the metabolic pathway originated from prestored glycogen. Although genetically diverse, the four Fibrobacter strains studied had very similar carbon metabolism characteristics. PMID:12033219

  7. Spin excitations in the quasi-two-dimensional charge-ordered insulator α -(BEDT-TTF ) 2I3 probed via 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kyohei; Hirata, Michihiro; Liu, Dong; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tamura, Masafumi; Kanoda, Kazushi

    2016-08-01

    The spin excitations from the nonmagnetic charge-ordered insulating state of α -(BEDT-TTF ) 2I3 at ambient pressure have been investigated by probing the static and low-frequency dynamic spin susceptibilities via site-selective nuclear magnetic resonance at 13C sites. The site-dependent values of the shift and the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 below the charge-ordering transition temperature (TCO≈135 K ) demonstrate a spin density imbalance in the unit cell, in accord with the charge-density ratio reported earlier. The shift and 1 /T1 show activated temperature dependence with a static (shift) gap ΔS≈47 -52 meV and a dynamic (1 /T1 ) gap ΔR≈40 meV . The sizes of the gaps are well described in terms of a localized spin model, where spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic dimer chains are weakly coupled with each other.

  8. 13C Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of kerogen from Cretaceous black shales thermally altered by basaltic intrusions and laboratory simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennis, L.W.; Maciel, G.E.; Hatcher, P.G.; Simoneit, B.R.T.

    1982-01-01

    Cretaceous black shales from DSDP Leg 41, Site 368 in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean were thermally altered during the Miocene by an intrusive basalt. The sediments overlying and underlying the intrusive body were subjected to high temperatures (up to ~ 500??C) and, as a result, their kerogen was significantly altered. The extent of this alteration has been determined by examination by means of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, using cross polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS). Results indicate that the kerogen becomes progressively more aromatic in the vicinity of the intrusive body. Laboratory heating experiments, simulating the thermal effects of the basaltic intrusion, produced similar results on unaltered shale from the drill core. The 13C CP/MAS results appear to provide a good measure of thermal alteration. ?? 1982.

  9. Nondestructive determination of the 13C content in isotopic diamond by nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, O.; Ruf, T.; Finkelstein, Y.; Cardona, M.; Anthony, T. R.; Belic, D.; Eckert, T.; Jäger, D.; Kneissl, U.; Maser, H.; Moreh, R.; Nord, A.; Pitz, H. H.; Wolpert, A.

    1998-05-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence excited with continuous electron bremsstrahlung from the 4.3 MV Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator is used as a nondestructive method to determine the 13C content x of bulk isotopic diamonds (12C1-x13Cx). The smallest detectable amount of 13C in carbon or low Z matrices is on the order of 0.5 mg. The relative accuracy of absolute mass determinations is about ±7%. Errors are mainly due to uncertainties in the natural widths Γ of the 13C nuclear levels at 3089 and 3684 keV used in the measurements. The results confirm a previous calibration which is based on Raman scattering and the destructive determination of x by mass spectroscopy.

  10. /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C spin-spin coupling in structural investigations. VII. Substitution effects and direct carbon-carbon constants of the triple bond in acetyline derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Krivdin, L.B.; Proidakov, A.G.; Bazhenov, B.N.; Zinchenko, S.V.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1989-01-10

    The effects of substitution on the direct /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C spin-spin coupling constants of the triple bond were studied in 100 derivatives of acetylene. It was established that these parameters exhibit increased sensitivity to the effect of substituents compared with other types of compounds. The main factor which determines their variation is the electronegativity of the substituting groups, and in individual cases the /pi/-electronic effects are appreciable. The effect of the substituents with an element of the silicon subgroup at the /alpha/ position simultaneously at the triple bond or substituent of the above-mentioned type and a halogen atom.

  11. Study of Nuclear Structure of 13C and 20Ne by Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, I.; Campajola, L.; Dell'Aquila, D.; La Commara, M.; Ordine, A.; Rosato, E.; Spadaccini, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2014-12-01

    We report some recent experimental results on the spectroscopy of 13C and 20Ne nuclei by means of low energy nuclear reactions carried out with high resolution electrostatic accelerators. In the case of 13C we investigated the possible existence of a-cluster states above the a emission threshold by means of low energy elastic resonant scattering α+9Be in direct kinematics. Excitation functions show the presence of various resonances that have been reproduced by R-matrix fit. We studied also the structure of 20Ne by means of the 19F(p,α0) reaction at sub-barrier energies. The spectroscopy of 20Ne excited states in the region Ex ≈ 13.5-14.0 MeV can be probed by analyzing experimental angular distributions and excitation functions. This reaction plays an important role also in the CNOF cycle and is an important ingredient to describe hydrogen-induced destruction of fluorine in massive stars. For this reason we investigated the trend of S-factor, that has been compared with results previously reported in the literature.

  12. Laser vaporization generation of Al sup 12 C, Al sup 13 C, Al sup 12 C sub 2 , and Al sup 13 C sub 2 for rare gas matrix electron spin resonance studies: Experimental--theoretical comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, L.B. Jr.; Cobranchi, S.T.; Herlong, J.O.; Arrington, C.A. )

    1990-05-15

    The metal carbide radicals AlC and AlC{sub 2} have been generated by the laser vaporization of aluminum carbide and trapped in neon and argon matrices at 4 K for electron spin resonance (ESR) characterization. These results provide the first experimental evidence showing that AlC has a {sup 4}{Sigma} ground electronic state and that AlC{sub 2} is {ital X} {sup 2}{ital A}{sub 1}. {ital Ab} {ital initio} theoretical calculations were conducted for the geometries and various nuclear hyperfine parameters in both radicals which yielded {ital A} values in reasonable agreement with the observed. In AlC, the three unpaired electrons reside primarily on carbon with the following neon matrix magnetic parameters (MHz): {ital g}{sub {parallel}}=2.000(1); {ital g}{sub {perpendicular}}=2.0010(5); {vert bar}{ital A}{sub {perpendicular}}(Al){vert bar}=33.2(5); {vert bar}{ital A}{sub {parallel}}(Al){vert bar}=3(3); {ital A}{sub {perpendicular}}({sup 13}C)=52.1(5); {ital A}{sub {parallel}}({sup 13}C)=52(2); and {ital D}(zero field splitting)=374(1). For AlC{sub 2}, the spin density resides predominantly in an aluminum 3{ital p}{sub {ital z}}/3{ital s} hybrid directed away from C{sub 2}. The neon magnetic parameters (MHz) are: {ital g}{sub {parallel}}=2.0005(5); {ital g}{sub {perpendicular}}=1.9965(3); {ital A}{sub {perpendicular}}(Al)=941.5(5); {ital A}{sub {parallel}}(Al)=1067(1); {vert bar}{ital A}{sub {parallel}}({sup 13}C){vert bar}=59(1); and {vert bar}{ital A}{sub {perpendicular}}({sup 13}C){vert bar}=52(1).

  13. Variable angle spinning (VAS) NMR study of solvent effects in liquid crystalline solutions of 13C-iodomethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gregory H. J.; Martin, Rachel W.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Pines, Alexander; Shahkhatuni, Aleksan G.; Shahkhatuni, Astghik A.; Panosyan, Henry A.

    2004-11-01

    NMR spectra of 13C-iodomethane oriented in three different liquid crystalline solvents have been collected and analyzed under spinning at various angles with respect to the static magnetic field. For each sample the ratio of homonuclear ( 1H- 1H) to heteronuclear ( 13C- 1H) dipolar couplings, which is a function of the geometry of the solute molecule, does not change significantly with the scaling of the dipolar couplings due to spinning at different angles. This result implies that the 'apparent bond angle deviations' (Δ θa), previously calculated from thermotropic liquid crystals, arise from a solvent effect and are not an artifact from scaling the anisotropic interactions.

  14. Solid-State Selective 13C Excitation and Spin Diffusion NMR to Resolve Spatial Dimensions in Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, M.; Katahira, R.; Gjersing, E.; Davis, M. F.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2012-02-15

    The average spatial dimensions between major biopolymers within the plant cell wall can be resolved using a solid-state NMR technique referred to as a {sup 13}C cross-polarization (CP) SELDOM (selectively by destruction of magnetization) with a mixing time delay for spin diffusion. Selective excitation of specific aromatic lignin carbons indicates that lignin is in close proximity to hemicellulose followed by amorphous and finally crystalline cellulose. {sup 13}C spin diffusion time constants (T{sub SD}) were extracted using a two-site spin diffusion theory developed for {sup 13}C nuclei under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. These time constants were then used to calculate an average lower-limit spin diffusion length between chemical groups within the plant cell wall. The results on untreated {sup 13}C enriched corn stover stem reveal that the lignin carbons are, on average, located at distances {approx}0.7-2.0 nm from the carbons in hemicellulose and cellulose, whereas the pretreated material had larger separations.

  15. Analysis of mutational lesions of acetate metabolism in Neurospora crassa by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G H; Baxter, R L

    1987-01-01

    The adaptation of Neurospora crassa mycelium to growth on acetate as the sole carbon source was examined by using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. Extracts were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance at various times after transfer of the mycelium from medium containing sucrose to medium containing [2-13C]acetate as the sole carbon source. The label was initially seen to enter the alanine, glutamate, and glutamine pools, and after 6 h 13C-enriched trehalose was evident, indicating that gluconeogenesis was occurring. Analysis of the isotopomer ratios in the alanine and glutamate-glutamine pools indicated that substantial glyoxylate cycle activity became evident between 2 and 4 h after transfer. Immediately after transfer of the mycelium to acetate medium, the alanine pool increased to about four times its previous level, only a small fraction of which was enriched with 13C. The quantity of 13C-enriched alanine remained almost constant between 2 and 7.5 h after the transfer, whereas the overall alanine pool decreased to its original level. The selective catabolism of the unenriched alanine leads us to suggest that the alanine pool is partitioned into two compartments during adaptation. Two acetate-nonutilizing mutants were also studied by this technique. An acu-3 strain, deficient for isocitrate lyase (EC 4.1.3.1) activity, showed metabolic changes consistent with this lesion. An acp strain, previously thought to be deficient in an inducible acetate permease, took up [2-13C]acetate but showed no evidence of glyoxylate cycle activity despite synthesizing the necessary enzymes; the lesion was therefore reinterpreted. PMID:2947898

  16. Optical Potential Parameters of Weakly Bound Nuclear System 17F+13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Guang-Peng; Lin, Cheng-Jian; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Liu, Zu-Hua; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Gao-Long; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Wu, Zhen-Dong; Jia, Fei; Jia, Hui-Ming; Xu, Xin-Xing; Bai, Chun-Lin; Yu, Ning

    2008-12-01

    Elastic scattering angular distributions of the 14N+16O system and the angular distributions of transfer reaction 16O(14N,13 C)17 F at ELab = 76.2 MeV and 57MeV have been measured and calculated by means of the exact finite-range distorted-wave Born approximation with the PTOLEMY code. The optical potential parameters for the weakly bound nuclear system 17F+13 C have been deduced and applied to analyse the elastic scattering angular distributions of the similar systems 17F+12C and 17F+14N which are taken from literature. The result shows that the transfer reaction with stable projectile and target combination can be used as an alternative method to extract the optical potential parameters for the weakly bound nuclear system.

  17. Position-Specific Isotope Analysis of Xanthines: A (13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Method to Determine the (13)C Intramolecular Composition at Natural Abundance.

    PubMed

    Diomande, Didier G; Martineau, Estelle; Gilbert, Alexis; Nun, Pierrick; Murata, Ariaki; Yamada, Keita; Watanabe, Naoharu; Tea, Illa; Robins, Richard J; Yoshida, Naohiro; Remaud, Gérald S

    2015-07-01

    The natural xanthines caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline are of major commercial importance as flavor constituents in coffee, cocoa, tea, and a number of other beverages. However, their exploitation for authenticity, a requirement in these commodities that have a large origin-based price-range, by the standard method of isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry (irm-MS) is limited. We have now developed a methodology that overcomes this deficit that exploits the power of isotopic quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry combined with chemical modification of the xanthines to enable the determination of positional intramolecular (13)C/(12)C ratios (δ(13)Ci) with high precision. However, only caffeine is amenable to analysis: theobromine and theophylline present substantial difficulties due to their poor solubility. However, their N-methylation to caffeine makes spectral acquisition feasible. The method is confirmed as robust, with good repeatability of the δ(13)Ci values in caffeine appropriate for isotope fractionation measurements at natural abundance. It is shown that there is negligible isotope fractionation during the chemical N-methylation procedure. Thus, the method preserves the original positional δ(13)Ci values. The method has been applied to measure the position-specific variation of the (13)C/(12)C distribution in caffeine. Not only is a clear difference between caffeine isolated from different sources observed, but theobromine from cocoa is found to show a (13)C pattern distinct from that of caffeine. PMID:26067163

  18. Large structure rearrangement of colicin ia channel domain after membrane binding from 2D 13C spin diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenbin; Yao, Xiaolan; Hong, Mei

    2005-05-01

    One of the main mechanisms of membrane protein folding is by spontaneous insertion into the lipid bilayer from the aqueous environment. The bacterial toxin, colicin Ia, is one such protein. To shed light on the conformational changes involved in this dramatic transfer from the polar to the hydrophobic milieu, we carried out 2D magic-angle spinning (13)C NMR experiments on the water-soluble and membrane-bound states of the channel-forming domain of colicin Ia. Proton-driven (13)C spin diffusion spectra of selectively (13)C-labeled protein show unequivocal attenuation of cross-peaks after membrane binding. This attenuation can be assigned to distance increases but not reduction of the diffusion coefficient. Analysis of the statistics of the interhelical and intrahelical (13)C-(13)C distances in the soluble protein structure indicates that the observed cross-peak reduction is well correlated with a high percentage of short interhelical contacts in the soluble protein. This suggests that colicin Ia channel domain becomes open and extended upon membrane binding, thus lengthening interhelical distances. In comparison, cross-peaks with similar intensities between the two states are dominated by intrahelical contacts in the soluble state. This suggests that the membrane-bound structure of colicin Ia channel domain may be described as a "molten globule", in which the helical secondary structure is retained while the tertiary structure is unfolded. This study demonstrates that (13)C spin diffusion NMR is a valuable tool for obtaining qualitative long-range distance constraints on membrane protein folding. PMID:15853348

  19. Structural characterization of ion-vapor deposited hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings by solid state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jiao; Kato, Takahisa; Watanabe, Sadayuki; Hayashi, Hideo; Kawaguchi, Masahiro

    2014-01-07

    In the present study, unique structural heterogeneity was observed in ion-vapor deposited a-C:H coatings by performing {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CPMAS experiments on solid state nuclear magnetic resonance devices. Two distinct types of sp{sup 2} C clusters were discovered: one of them denoted as sp{sup 2} C′ in content of 3–12 at. % was non-protonated specifically localized in hydrogen-absent regions, while the other dominant one denoted as sp{sup 2} C″ was hydrogenated or at least proximate to proton spins. On basis of the notably analogous variation of sp{sup 2} C′ content and Raman parameters as function of substrate bias voltage in the whole range of 0.5 kV–3.5 kV, a model of nano-clustering configuration was proposed that the sp{sup 2} C′ clusters were embedded between sp{sup 2} C″ clusters and amorphous sp{sup 3} C matrix as trapped interfaces or boundaries where the sp{sup 2} carbon bonds were highly distorted. Continuous increase of bias voltage would promote the nano-clustering and re-ordering of dominant sp{sup 2} C″ clusters, thus results in a marked decrease of interspace and a change of the content of sp{sup 2} C′ clusters. Further investigation on the {sup 13}C magnetization recovery showed typical stretched-exponential approximation due to the prominent presence of paramagnetic centers, and the stretched power α varied within 0.6–0.9 from distinct types of sp{sup 2} C clusters. Differently, the magnetization recovery of {sup 1}H showed better bi-exponential approximation with long and short T{sub 1}(H) fluctuated within 40–60 ms and 0.1–0.3 ms approximately in content of 80% ± 5% and 20% ± 5%, respectively, varying with various bias voltages. Meanwhile, the interrupted {sup 13}C saturation recovery with an interval of short T{sub 1}(H) showed that most of quick-relaxing protons were localized in sp{sup 2} C″ clusters. Such a short T{sub 1}(H) was only possibly resulted from a relaxation mechanism

  20. The mobility of chondroitin sulfate in articular and artificial cartilage characterized by 13C magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, Holger A; Schibur, Stephanie; Magalhães, Alvicler; de Azevedo, Eduardo R; Bonagamba, Tito J; Pascui, Ovidiu; Schulz, Ronny; Reichert, Detlef; Huster, Daniel

    2010-06-01

    We have studied the molecular dynamics of one of the major macromolecules in articular cartilage, chondroitin sulfate. Applying (13)C high-resolution magic-angle spinning NMR techniques, the NMR signals of all rigid macromolecules in cartilage can be suppressed, allowing the exclusive detection of the highly mobile chondroitin sulfate. The technique is also used to detect the chondroitin sulfate in artificial tissue-engineered cartilage. The tissue-engineered material that is based on matrix producing chondrocytes cultured in a collagen gel should provide properties as close as possible to those of the natural cartilage. Nuclear relaxation times of the chondroitin sulfate were determined for both tissues. Although T(1) relaxation times are rather similar, the T(2) relaxation in tissue-engineered cartilage is significantly shorter. This suggests that the motions of chondroitin sulfate in natural and artificial cartilage are different. The nuclear relaxation times of chondroitin sulfate in natural and tissue-engineered cartilage were modeled using a broad distribution function for the motional correlation times. Although the description of the microscopic molecular dynamics of the chondroitin sulfate in natural and artificial cartilage required the identical broad distribution functions for the correlation times of motion, significant differences in the correlation times of motion that are extracted from the model indicate that the artificial tissue does not fully meet the standards of the natural ideal. This could also be confirmed by macroscopic biomechanical elasticity measurements. Nevertheless, these results suggest that NMR is a useful tool for the investigation of the quality of artificially engineered tissue. PMID:20091673

  1. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of (13)C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our (13)C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the (13)C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the (13)C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in (13)C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  2. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of 13C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our 13C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the 13C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the 13C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in 13C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  3. Chemistry and biochemistry of 13C hyperpolarized magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Keshari, Kayvan R.; Wilson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of transient chemical phenomena by conventional NMR has proved elusive, particularly for non-1H nuclei. For 13C, hyperpolarization using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique has emerged as a powerful means to improve SNR. The recent development of rapid dissolution DNP methods has facilitated previously impossible in vitro and in vivo study of small molecules. This review presents the basics of the DNP technique, identification of appropriate DNP substrates, and approaches to increase hyperpolarized signal lifetimes. Also addressed are the biochemical events to which DNP-NMR has been applied, with descriptions of several probes that have met with in vivo success. PMID:24363044

  4. High-resolution (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy pattern recognition of fish oil capsules.

    PubMed

    Aursand, Marit; Standal, Inger B; Axelson, David E

    2007-01-10

    13C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy, in conjunction with multivariate analysis of commercial fish oil-related health food products, have been used to provide discrimination concerning the nature, composition, refinement, and/or adulteration or authentication of the products. Supervised (probabilistic neural networks, PNN) and unsupervised (principal component analysis, PCA; Kohonen neural networks; generative topographic mapping, GTM) pattern recognition techniques were used to visualize and classify samples. Simple PCA score plots demonstrated excellent, but not totally unambiguous, class distinctions, whereas Kohonen and GTM visualization provided better results. Quantitative class predictions with accuracies >95% were achieved with PNN analysis. Trout, salmon, and cod oils were completely and correctly classified. Samples reported to be salmon oils and cod liver oils did not cluster with true salmon and cod liver oil samples, indicating mislabeling or adulteration.

  5. Simulation of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for isodon terpenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guochen; Tong, Jianbo; Liu, Shuling

    2008-11-01

    A quantitative structure spectroscopy relationship (QSSR) model of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of 7000 carbon atoms in 350 isodon terpenoid compounds has been developed using atomic electronegativity distance vector (AEDV) and atomic hybridization state index (AHSI). The prediction correlation coefficient ( R) value of the QSSR model based on multiple linear regression analysis was 0.9542. The stability and prediction capacity of the QSSR model have been tested using the leave-one-out cross-validation and test sets methodology. The correlation coefficients R obtained were 0.9540 and 0.9556, respectively, which showed that the predictive potential of the proposed models has good modeling stability and prediction ability.

  6. Determination of 13C/ 12C ratios with (d, p) nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, J.; Tesmer, J. R.; Li, Y. H.; Greco, R.; Grim, G. P.; Obst, A. W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-06-01

    Stable isotope ratios such as 13C/ 12C play an important role in many applications including environment and energy research. Since many surface analysis techniques are plagued with unavoidable hydrocarbon contamination issues during analysis, it is highly desirable that 13C and 12C isotopes be measured simultaneously especially in specimens with a minute amount of 13C, in order to reliably determine 13C/ 12C ratios. In this paper, we report that deuterium induced proton particle reactions, 13C(d, p) 14C and 12C(d, p) 13C, provide a convenient and reliable approach for 13C/ 12C ratio determination. Optimizations on experimental considerations and potential interferences from other common light isotopes are discussed as well as results from the application of this technique to diagnose the performance of a target debris collection in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiment.

  7. Citrate and Sugar Cofermentation in Leuconostoc oenos, a (sup13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, A.; Santos, H.

    1996-01-01

    (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate citrate-glucose cometabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the wine lactic acid bacterium Leuconostoc oenos. The use of isotopically enriched substrates allowed us to identify and quantify in the end products the carbon atoms derived from each of the substrates supplied; furthermore, it was possible to differentiate between products derived from the metabolism of endogenous carbon reserves and those derived from external substrates. Citrate-sugar cometabolism was also monitored in dilute cell suspensions for comparison with the nuclear magnetic resonance results. A clear metabolic shift of the end products from glucose metabolism was observed when citrate was provided along with glucose: ethanol was replaced by acetate, and 2,3-butanediol was produced. Reciprocally, the production of lactate and 2,3-butanediol from citrate was increased in the presence of glucose. When citrate was cometabolized with glucose, a 10-fold reduction in the intracellular concentration of glucose-6-phosphate was observed, a result in line with the observed citrate-induced stimulation of glucose consumption. The presence of citrate provided additional pathways for NADP(sup+) regeneration and allowed the diversion of sugar carbon to reactions in which ATP was synthesized. The increased growth rates and maximal biomass yields of L. oenos growing on citrate-glucose mixtures resulted from increased ATP synthesis both by substrate-level phosphorylation and by a chemiosmotic mechanism. PMID:16535363

  8. Construction and 13C NMR signal-amplification efficiency of a dynamic nuclear polarizer at 6.4 T and 1.4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Taylor, David; McDonald, George; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a rapidly emerging technique in biomedical and metabolic imaging since it amplifies the liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and imaging (MRI) signals by >10,000-fold. Originally used in nuclear scattering experiments, DNP works by creating a non-Boltzmann nuclear spin distribution by transferring the high electron (γ = 28,000 MHz/T) thermal polarization to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation of the sample at high magnetic field and low temperature. A dissolution device is used to rapidly dissolve the frozen sample and consequently produces an injectable ``hyperpolarized'' liquid at physiologically-tolerable temperature. Here we report the construction and performance evaluation of a dissolution DNP hyperpolarizer at 6.4 T and 1.4 K using a continuous-flow cryostat. The solid and liquid-state 13C NMR signal enhancement levels of 13C acetate samples doped with trityl OX063 and 4-oxo-TEMPO free radicals will be discussed and compared with the results from the 3.35 T commercial hyperpolarizer. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  9. /sup 13/C relaxation behavior in a coupled AMX spin system

    SciTech Connect

    Sterk, H.; Koenigsberger, E.

    1986-02-27

    The relaxation behavior of a coupled AMX spin system (cinnamic acid and methyl cinnamate) has been investigated. The description is based on the magnetization modes formalism proposed by Grant. The time evolution of the magnetization, which determines the relaxation behavior, is measured via inversion recovery experiments. The diffusion constants as well as the random fields are fitted by means of a least-squares procedure. To gain verification for these values a cross-check with different independent measurements as well as calculations based on the frictional description of the molecules has been employed. 16 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  10. Quantitative solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometric analyses of wood xylen: effect of increasing carbohydrate content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    Isolated lignin with a low carbohydrate content was spiked with increasing amounts of alpha-cellulose, and then analysed by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using cross-polarization with magic angle spinning (CPMAS) and dipolar dephasing methods in order to assess the quantitative reliability of CPMAS measurement of carbohydrate content and to determine how increasingly intense resonances for carbohydrate carbons affect calculations of the degree of lignin's aromatic ring substitution and methoxyl carbon content. Comparisons were made of the carbohydrate content calculated by NMR with carbohydrate concentrations obtained by phenol-sulfuric acid assay and by the calculation from the known amounts of cellulose added. The NMR methods used in this study yield overestimates for carbohydrate carbons due to resonance area overlap from the aliphatic side chain carbons of lignin. When corrections are made for these overlapping resonance areas, the NMR results agree very well with results obtained by other methods. Neither the calculated methoxyl carbon content nor the degree of aromatic ring substitution in lignin, both calculated from dipolar dephasing spectra, change with cellulose content. Likewise, lignin methoxyl content does not correlate with cellulose abundance when measured by integration of CPMAS spectra. ?? 1992.

  11. Optically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarisation in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Schwartz, Ilai; Chen, Qiong; Schulze-Sünninghausen, David; Carl, Patrick; Höfer, Peter; Retzker, Alexander; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Isoya, Junichi; Luy, Burkhard; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depends strongly on nuclear spin polarisation and, motivated by this observation, dynamical nuclear spin polarisation has recently been applied to enhance MRI protocols (Kurhanewicz et al 2011 Neoplasia 13 81). Nuclear spins associated with the 13C carbon isotope (nuclear spin I = 1/2) in diamond possess uniquely long spin lattice relaxation times (Reynhardt and High 2011 Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spectrosc. 38 37). If they are present in diamond nanocrystals, especially when strongly polarised, they form a promising contrast agent for MRI. Current schemes for achieving nuclear polarisation, however, require cryogenic temperatures. Here we demonstrate an efficient scheme that realises optically induced 13C nuclear spin hyperpolarisation in diamond at room temperature and low ambient magnetic field. Optical pumping of a nitrogen-vacancy centre creates a continuously renewable electron spin polarisation which can be transferred to surrounding 13C nuclear spins. Importantly for future applications we also realise polarisation protocols that are robust against an unknown misalignment between magnetic field and crystal axis.

  12. High-resolution {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of phase transition of Rb,Cs-intercalated single-walled nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhrara, M.; Saih, Y.; Waagberg, T.; Goze-Bac, C.; Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-09-01

    We present 13 C high-resolution magic-angle-turning (MAT) and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance data of Cs and Rb intercalated single walled carbon nanotubes. We find two distinct phases at different intercalation levels. A simple charge transfer is applicable at low intercalation level. The new phase at high intercalation level is accompanied by a hybridization of alkali (s) orbitals with the carbon (sp2) orbitals of the single walled nanotubes, which indicate bundle surface sites is the most probable alkali site.

  13. Ethanol reassimilation and ethanol tolerance in Pitchia stipitis CBS 6054 as studied by [sup 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Skoog, K.; Hahn-Haegerdal, B. ); Degn, H.; Jacobsen, H.S.; Jacobsen, J.P. )

    1992-08-01

    Ethanol reassimilation in Pichia stipitis CBS 6054 was studied by using continuous cultures, and the oxidation of [1-[sup 13]C] ethanol was monitored by in vivo and in vitro [sup 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Acetate was formed when ethanol was reassimilated. The ATP/ADP ratio and the carbon dioxide production decreased, whereas the malate dehydrogenase activity increased, in ethanol-reassimilating cells. The results are discussed in terms of the low ethanol tolerance in P. stipitis compared with that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  14. Application of 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance To Elucidate the Unexpected Biosynthesis of Erythritol by Leuconostoc oenos

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-Da-Cunha, Maria; Firme, Paula; Romão, M. Vitória San; Santos, Helena

    1992-01-01

    Natural-abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) revealed the production of erythritol and glycerol by nongrowing cells of Leuconostoc oenos metabolizing glucose. The ratio of erythritol to glycerol was strongly influenced by the aeration conditions of the medium. The elucidation of the metabolic pathway responsible for erythritol production was achieved by 13C-NMR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy using specifically 13C-labelled d-glucose. The 1H-NMR spectrum of the cell supernatant resulting from the metabolism of [2-13C]glucose showed that only 75% of the glucose supplied was metabolized heterofermentatively and that the remaining 25% was channelled to the production of erythritol. The synthesis of this polyol resulted from the reduction of the C-4 moiety of the intermediate fructose 6-phosphate. Oxygen has an inhibitory effect on the production of erythritol by L. oenos. Preaeration of a suspension of nongrowing cells of L. oenos resulted in 30% less erythritol and in 70% more glycerol formed during the anaerobic metabolism of glucose. The anaerobic production of erythritol from glucose was also found in growing cultures of L. oenos, although to a smaller extent. PMID:16348738

  15. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known C ox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ??0.036 Cox units (??0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ?? 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  16. Nuclear spin circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Vaara, Juha; Rizzo, Antonio; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia

    2014-04-07

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in magneto-optic spectroscopy techniques that use nuclear magnetization as the source of the magnetic field. Here we present a formulation of magnetic circular dichroism (CD) due to magnetically polarized nuclei, nuclear spin-induced CD (NSCD), in molecules. The NSCD ellipticity and nuclear spin-induced optical rotation (NSOR) angle correspond to the real and imaginary parts, respectively, of (complex) quadratic response functions involving the dynamic second-order interaction of the electron system with the linearly polarized light beam, as well as the static magnetic hyperfine interaction. Using the complex polarization propagator framework, NSCD and NSOR signals are obtained at frequencies in the vicinity of optical excitations. Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory calculations on relatively small model systems, ethene, benzene, and 1,4-benzoquinone, demonstrate the feasibility of the method for obtaining relatively strong nuclear spin-induced ellipticity and optical rotation signals. Comparison of the proton and carbon-13 signals of ethanol reveals that these resonant phenomena facilitate chemical resolution between non-equivalent nuclei in magneto-optic spectra.

  17. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  18. Chemical structural studies of natural lignin by dipolar dephasing solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Two natural lignins, one from a gymnosperm wood the other from angiosperm wood, were examined by conventional solid-state and dipolar dephasing 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. The results obtained from both techniques show that the structure of natural lignins is consistent with models of softwood and hardwood lignin. The dipolar dephasing NMR data provide a measure of the degree of substitution on aromatic rings which is consistent with the models. ?? 1987.

  19. Aromatic spectral editing techniques for magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of uniformly (13)C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan K; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Hong, Mei

    2015-11-01

    The four aromatic amino acids in proteins, namely histidine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, have strongly overlapping (13)C chemical shift ranges between 100 and 160ppm, and have so far been largely neglected in solid-state NMR determination of protein structures. Yet aromatic residues play important roles in biology through π-π and cation-π interactions. To better resolve and assign aromatic residues' (13)C signals in magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectra, we introduce two spectral editing techniques. The first method uses gated (1)H decoupling in a proton-driven spin-diffusion (PDSD) experiment to remove all protonated (13)C signals and retain only non-protonated carbon signals in the aromatic region of the (13)C spectra. The second technique uses chemical shift filters and (1)H-(13)C dipolar dephasing to selectively detect the Cα, Cβ and CO cross peaks of aromatic residues while suppressing the signals of all aliphatic residues. We demonstrate these two techniques on amino acids, a model peptide, and the microcrystalline protein GB1, and show that they significantly simplify the 2D NMR spectra and both reveal and permit the ready assignment of the aromatic residues' signals.

  20. 13C and 1H NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) studies of solid polyolefines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudby, M. E. A.; Harris, R. K.; Metcalfe, K.; Packer, K. J.; Smith, P. W. R.

    1983-01-01

    The basis of H-1 and C-13 high-resolution NMR investigations of solid polymers is outlined. The C-13 NMR spectra of solid syndiotactic and isotactic polypropene are discussed and their interpretation in terms of conformation and chain-packing effects are reviewed. The effects of decreasing temperature on the C-13 high-resolution spectrum of an annealed sample of isotactic polypropene is described and interpreted in terms of the crystal structure. The question of the proportion of the sample giving rise to C-13 signals is addressed and some results reported. The main cause for observing only part of the total sample is shown to be the H-1 rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation behavior. The H-1 spin-lattice relaxation and spectral characteristics of a number of polyolefin samples are summarized and the role of spin-diffusion discussed.

  1. Carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C and (14)C activity) of plant samples in the vicinity of the Slovene nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Martina; Vreča, Polona; Krajcar Bronić, Ines

    2012-08-01

    δ(13)C values of various plants (apples, wheat, and maize) collected in the vicinity of the Krško Nuclear Power Plant (Slovenia) during 2008 and 2009 were determined. By measuring dried samples and their carbonized counterparts we showed that no significant isotopic fractionation occurs during the carbonization phase of the sample preparation process in the laboratory. The measured δ(13)C values of the plants were used for δ(13)C correction of their measured (14)C activities.

  2. Catabolism of glucose and lactose in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, studied by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, Irene; Gaspar, Paula; Sánchez, Borja; Gueimonde, Miguel; Margolles, Abelardo; Neves, Ana Rute

    2013-12-01

    Bifidobacteria are widely used as probiotics in several commercial products; however, to date there is little knowledge about their carbohydrate metabolic pathways. In this work, we studied the metabolism of glucose and lactose in the widely used probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 by in vivo (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose was characterized in cells grown in glucose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, the metabolism of lactose specifically labeled with (13)C on carbon 1 of the glucose or the galactose moiety was determined in suspensions of cells grown in lactose. These experiments allowed the quantification of some intermediate and end products of the metabolic pathways, as well as determination of the consumption rate of carbon sources. Additionally, the labeling patterns in metabolites derived from the metabolism of glucose specifically labeled with (13)C on carbon 1, 2, or 3 in cells grown in glucose or lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the glucose moiety ([1-(13)Cglucose]lactose), lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the galactose moiety ([1-(13)Cgalactose]lactose), and [1-(13)C]glucose in lactose-grown cells were determined in cell extracts by (13)C NMR. The NMR analysis showed that the recovery of carbon was fully compatible with the fructose 6-phosphate, or bifid, shunt. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase, acetate kinase, fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase, and pyruvate formate lyase differed significantly between glucose and lactose cultures. The transcriptional analysis of several putative glucose and lactose transporters showed a significant induction of Balat_0475 in the presence of lactose, suggesting a role for this protein as a lactose permease. This report provides the first in vivo experimental evidence of the metabolic flux distribution in the catabolic pathway of glucose and lactose in bifidobacteria and shows that the bifid shunt is the only

  3. Catabolism of Glucose and Lactose in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Studied by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Irene; Gaspar, Paula; Sánchez, Borja; Gueimonde, Miguel; Neves, Ana Rute

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are widely used as probiotics in several commercial products; however, to date there is little knowledge about their carbohydrate metabolic pathways. In this work, we studied the metabolism of glucose and lactose in the widely used probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 by in vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The metabolism of [1-13C]glucose was characterized in cells grown in glucose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, the metabolism of lactose specifically labeled with 13C on carbon 1 of the glucose or the galactose moiety was determined in suspensions of cells grown in lactose. These experiments allowed the quantification of some intermediate and end products of the metabolic pathways, as well as determination of the consumption rate of carbon sources. Additionally, the labeling patterns in metabolites derived from the metabolism of glucose specifically labeled with 13C on carbon 1, 2, or 3 in cells grown in glucose or lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the glucose moiety ([1-13Cglucose]lactose), lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the galactose moiety ([1-13Cgalactose]lactose), and [1-13C]glucose in lactose-grown cells were determined in cell extracts by 13C NMR. The NMR analysis showed that the recovery of carbon was fully compatible with the fructose 6-phosphate, or bifid, shunt. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase, acetate kinase, fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase, and pyruvate formate lyase differed significantly between glucose and lactose cultures. The transcriptional analysis of several putative glucose and lactose transporters showed a significant induction of Balat_0475 in the presence of lactose, suggesting a role for this protein as a lactose permease. This report provides the first in vivo experimental evidence of the metabolic flux distribution in the catabolic pathway of glucose and lactose in bifidobacteria and shows that the bifid shunt is the only pathway

  4. Experimental demonstration of a stimulated polarization wave in a chain of nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Adams, Travis; Khitrin, A. K.

    2007-04-01

    A stimulated wave of polarization, which implements a simple mechanism of quantum amplification, is experimentally demonstrated in a chain of four J-coupled nuclear spins, irradiated by a weak radio-frequency transverse field. The 'quantum domino' dynamics, a wave of flipped spins triggered by a flip of the first spin, has been observed in fully 13C-labelled sodium butyrate.

  5. In Situ Determination of Fructose Isomer Concentrations in Wine Using (13)C Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Cinzia; Aupic, Clara; Lewis, Andrew R; Pinto, B Mario

    2015-09-30

    A practical method for simultaneously quantifying fructose and ethanol contents in wines using (13)C quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) spectroscopy is reported. Less than 0.6 mL of wine is needed, and the method leaves an unmodified sample available for subsequent testing or additional analyses. The relative ratios of the five known fructose isomers in ethanolic solutions at different pH and their variations with the temperature are also reported. The data are correlated with the sweetness of wines. The technique was applied to commercially available wines, and the results are compared to other methods. Sugar levels above 0.6 g/L can also be measured. A simple adaptation of the method permits measurement of different carbohydrates using integration of single peaks for each compound, in combination with an external reference (13)C qNMR spectrum of a sample with a known concentration. The method can be applied at all stages of wine production, including grape must, during fermentation, and before and after bottling.

  6. Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of coalified gymnosperm xylem tissue from Australian brown coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Lerch, H. E.; Bates, A.L.; Verheyen, T.V.

    1989-01-01

    We report here on the use of solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to contrast the average chemical composition of modern degraded gymnosperm woods with fossil gymnosperm woods from Australian brown coals (Miocene). We first established the quantitative nature of the NMR techniques for these samples so that the conventional solid-state 13C NMR spectra and the dipolar dephasing NMR spectra could be used with a high degree of reliability to depict average chemical compositions. The NMR results provide some valuable insights about the early coalification of xylem tissue from gymnosperms. Though the cellulosic components of wood are degraded to varying degrees during peatification and ensuing coalification, it is unlikely that they play a major role in the formation of aromatic structures in coalified woods. The NMR data show that gynmosperm lignin, the primary aromatic contribution to the coal, is altered in part by demethylation of guaiacyl-units to catechol-like structures. The dipolar dephasing NMR data indicate that the lignin also becomes more cross-linked or condensed. ?? 1989.

  7. Investigations of enzymatic alterations of 2,4-dichlorophenol using {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance in combination with site-specific {sup 13}C-labeling: Understanding the environmental fate of this pollutant

    SciTech Connect

    Nanny, M.A.; Bortiatynski, J.M.; Tien, M.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1996-11-01

    The biodegradation of {sup 13}C-labeled 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP labeled at the C-2 and C-6 positions), in the presence and absence of natural organic matter (NOM), by the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, was examined using {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Using this method permitted the chemistry occurring at or near the labeled site to be followed. The formation of alkyl ethers and alkene ethers was observed. No aromatic by-products were detected, indicating that aromatic compounds are quickly degraded. Examining the reaction with time shows the exponential removal of 2,4-DCP and the consequential formation of labeled by-products, whose concentration reaches a maximum just before all 2,4-DCP is consumed. After this, the by-products degrade exponentially. The presence of NOM causes 2,4-DCP to be removed from the aqueous phase more quickly than in its absence and also causes the by-products to reach their maximum concentration much earlier. Degradation of the by-products occurs at a much greater rate in the presence of NOM. One hypothesis for this behavior is that the NOM interacts with 2,4-DCP and its by-products, allowing them to be incorporated into the fungal biomass. {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fungal biomass after NaOH extraction show the presence of alkanes and a small amount of 2,4-DCP.

  8. (14)C, delta(13)C and total C content in soils around a Brazilian PWR nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Dias, Cíntia Melazo; Telles, Everaldo C; Santos, Roberto Ventura; Stenström, Kristina; Nícoli, Iêda Gomes; da Silveira Corrêa, Rosangela; Skog, Göran

    2009-04-01

    Nuclear power plants release (14)C during routine operation mainly as airborne gaseous effluents. Because of the long half-life (5730 years) and biological importance of this radionuclide (it is incorporated in plant tissue by photosynthesis), several countries have monitoring programs in order to quantify and control these emissions. This paper compares the activity of (14)C in soils taken within 1km from a Brazilian nuclear power plant with soils taken within a reference area located 50km away from the reactor site. Analyses of total carbon, delta(13)C and (137)Cs were also performed in order to understand the local soil dynamics. Except for one of the profiles, the isotopic composition of soil organic carbon reflected the actual forest vegetation present in both areas. The (137)Cs data show that the soils from the base of hills are probably allocthonous. The (14)C measurements showed that there is no accumulation due to the operation of the nuclear facility, although excess (14)C was found in the litter taken in the area close to power plant. This indicates that the anthropogenic signal observed in the litter fall has not been transferred yet to the soil. This study is part of an extensive research programme in which other samples including air, vegetation and gaseous effluents (taken in the vent stack of the Brazilian nuclear power reactors Angra I and II) were also analyzed. The present paper aimed to evaluate how (14)C emissions from the nuclear power plant are transferred and stored by soils present in the surroundings of the reactor site. This is the first study concerning anthropogenic (14)C in soils in Brazil.

  9. Electron spin resonance investigations of /sup 11/B/sup 12/C, /sup 11/B/sup 13/C, and /sup 10/B/sup 12/C in neon, argon, and krypton matrices at 4 K: Comparison with theoretical results

    SciTech Connect

    Knight L.B. Jr.; Cobranchi, S.T.; Petty, J.T.; Earl, E.; Feller, D.; Davidson, E.R.

    1989-01-15

    The first spectroscopic study of the diatomic radical BC is reported which confirms previous theoretical predictions of a /sup 4/summation/sup -/ electronic ground state. The nuclear hyperfine interactions (A tensors) obtained for /sup 11/B, /sup 10/B, and /sup 13/C from the electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements are compared with extensive ab initio CI calculations. The BC molecule is one of the first examples of a small high spin radical for such an in-depth experimental--theoretical comparison. The electronic structure of BC obtained from an analysis of the nuclear hyperfine interaction (hfi) is compared to that obtained from a Mulliken-type population analysis conducted on a CI wave function which yields A/sub iso/ and A/sub dip/ results in good agreement with the observed values. The BC radical was generated by the laser vaporization of a boron--carbon mixture and trapped in neon, argon, and krypton matrices at 4 K for a complete ESR characterization. The magnetic parameters (MHz) obtained for /sup 11/B/sup 13/C in solid neon are: g/sub parallel/ = 2.0015(3); g/sub perpendicular/ = 2.0020(3); D(zfs) = 1701(2); /sup 11/B: chemically bondA/sub parallel/chemically bond = 100(1); chemically bondA/sub perpendicular/chemically bond = 79(1); /sup 13/C: chemically bondA/sub parallel/chemically bond = 5(2) and chemically bondA/sub perpendicular/chemically bond = 15(1). Based on comparison with the theoretical results, the most likely choice of signs is that all A values are positive.

  10. Methyl [13C]glucopyranosiduronic acids: effect of COOH ionization and exocyclic structure on NMR spin-couplings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhui; Hu, Xiaosong; Carmichael, Ian; Serianni, Anthony S

    2012-11-01

    Methyl α- and β-D-glucopyranuronides singly labeled with (13)C at C1-C6 were prepared from the corresponding (13)C-labeled methyl D-glucopyranosides, and multiple NMR J-couplings (J(HH), J(CH), and J(CC)) were measured in their protonated and ionized forms in aqueous ((2)H(2)O) solution. Solvated density functional theory (DFT) calculations of J-couplings in structurally related model compounds were performed to determine how well the calculated J-couplings matched the experimental values in saccharides bearing an ionizable substituent. Intraring J(HH) values in both uronide anomers, including (3)J(H4,H5), are unaffected by solution pD, and COOH ionization exerts little effect on J(CH) and J(CC) except for (1)J(C1,H1), (1)J(C4,H4), (1)J(C5,H5), (1)J(C5,C6), and (2)J(C3,C5), where changes of up to 5 Hz were observed. Some of these changes are associated with changes in bond lengths upon ionization; in general, better agreement between theory and experiment was observed for couplings less sensitive to exocyclic C-O bond conformation. Titration of (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts, and some J-couplings, yielded a COOH pK(a) of 3.0 ± 0.1 in both anomers. DFT calculations suggest that substituents proximal to the exocyclic COOH group (i.e., the C4-O4 bond) influence the activation barrier to C5-C6 bond rotation due to transient intramolecular H-bonding. A comparison of J-couplings in the glucopyranuronides to corresponding J-couplings in the glucopyranosides showed that more pervasive changes occur upon conversion from a COOH to a CH(2)OH substituent at C6 than from COOH ionization within the uronides. Twelve J-couplings are affected, with the largest being (1)J(C5,C6) (∼18 Hz larger in the uronides), followed by (2)J(C6,H5) (∼2.5 Hz more negative in the uronides).

  11. Investigation of {sup 6}Li + {sup 13}C scattering and observation of a nuclear quasi-rainbow

    SciTech Connect

    Dem`yanova, A.S.; Ogloblin, A.A.; Osadchii, O.Ya.

    1994-11-01

    Differential cross sections for elastic scattering of {sup 6}Li ions by {sup 13}C at E{sub c.m.s.} = 26 MeV are measured in the range of c.m.s. angles 14 - 163{degrees} at the Kurchatov Institute cyclotron in both direct and inverse kinematics by the {Delta}E-E telescope technique. A broad maximum in the angular distribution that is exhausted completely by the far component is observed at approximately 100{degrees}. The maximum is a typical manifestation of the nuclear rainbow and can be explained by the interference of waves arriving from the two branches of the deflection function (DF). However, for the potential chosen in this study, the DF has a singularity, and nuclear-rainbow scattering cannot formally take place because there is no finite scattering angle. The observed effect, which is referred to as a quasi-rainbow, demonstrates that the principal peculiarities of elastic scattering are the same in the two energy regions that are considered in a direct semiclassical approximation as corresponding to two fundamentally different phenomena: orbiting and the rainbow. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The complete set of spin observables for the (13)C(polarized proton, polarized neutron)(13)N and (15)N(polarized proton, polarized neutron)(15)O reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qun Qun

    1998-12-01

    The 13C(p,n)13N and 15N(p,n)15O reactions have been a puzzle for more than ten years. The ground state transitions are Jπ=1/2- to Jπ=1/2-. These are 'mixed' transitions because they can involve quantum number changes either (/Delta T=1,/ /Delta J=0,/ /Delta/pi=0,/ /Delta S=0), or (/Delta T=1,/ /Delta J=1,/ /Delta/pi=0,/ /Delta S=1); these quantum number changes are refered to as 'Fermi' and 'Gamow-Teller' respectively. Because the quantum number changes are the same as for Fermi and Gamow-Teller beta decay. From the systematics of (p,n) and (n,p) reactions on pure Fermi transitions (e.g. 0 + to 0+) and pure Gamow-Teller transitions (e.g. 0+ to 1+), calibrations have been established of cross section per unit B(F) or unit B(GT), where 'B' refers to doubly reduced matrix elements extracted from beta decay. However, cross sections for the 13C(p,n)13N(g.s.) and 15N(p,n)15O(g.s.) reactions are substantially larger than one would then predict from the known B(F)s and B(GT)s for these transitions. To explore this anomaly, spin observables were used to extract separately the Fermi and Gamow-Teller cross sections for these reactions. To acquire the complete sets of polarization- transfer observables, a new neutron polarimeter was designed, built, commissioned and calibrated. This polarimeter, call the '2π polarimeter' because of its complete azimuthal coverage for scattered neutrons, has very good position and timing resolution (354 ps). The complete sets of spin-transfer coefficients Dij for 13C(p,n)13N (at 0o , 5.5o , and 11o ) and 15N(p,n)15O (at 0o ) at 135 MeV were measured. Following the formalism of Ichimura and Kawahigashi, we extracted the spin-longitudinal, and spin-transverse and spin-independent responses D0,/ Dq,/ Dn and Dp from the measured Dijs. The F and GT fractions of the (p,n) cross sections are then extracted as f F=D0 and fGT=Dn+Dp+Dq=1- d0. Values of Dk for both the 13C(p,n)13N(g.s) and 15N(p,n)15O(g.s.) were extracted. From these responses, we

  13. Interactions between Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism in Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii: In Vivo 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies

    PubMed Central

    Deborde, Catherine; Boyaval, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    In vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate the pathways and the regulation of pyruvate metabolism and pyruvate-lactate cometabolism noninvasively in living-cell suspensions of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii. The most important result of this work concerns the modification of fluxes of pyruvate metabolism induced by the presence of lactate. Pyruvate was temporarily converted to lactate and alanine; the flux to acetate synthesis was maintained, but the flux to propionate synthesis was increased; and the reverse flux of the first part of the Wood-Werkman cycle, up to acetate synthesis, was decreased. Pyruvate was consumed at apparent initial rates of 148 and 90 μmol · min−1 · g−1 (cell dry weight) when it was the sole substrate or cometabolized with lactate, respectively. Lactate was consumed at an apparent initial rate of 157 μmol · min−1 · g−1 when it was cometabolized with pyruvate. P. shermanii used several pathways, namely, the Wood-Werkman cycle, synthesis of acetate and CO2, succinate synthesis, gluconeogenesis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and alanine synthesis, to manage its pyruvate pool sharply. In both types of experiments, acetate synthesis and the Wood-Werkman cycle were the metabolic pathways used most. PMID:10788375

  14. Measurements of nuclear spin dynamics by spin-noise spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kavokin, K. V.; Glazov, M. M.; Vladimirova, M.; Scalbert, D.; Cronenberger, S.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2015-06-15

    We exploit the potential of the spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) for studies of nuclear spin dynamics in n-GaAs. The SNS experiments were performed on bulk n-type GaAs layers embedded into a high-finesse microcavity at negative detuning. In our experiments, nuclear spin polarisation initially prepared by optical pumping is monitored in real time via a shift of the peak position in the electron spin noise spectrum. We demonstrate that this shift is a direct measure of the Overhauser field acting on the electron spin. The dynamics of nuclear spin is shown to be strongly dependent on the electron concentration.

  15. High-spin nuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    High-spin spectroscopy is the study of the changes in nuclear structure, properties, and behavior with increasing angular momentum. It involves the complex interplay between collective and single-particle motion, between shape and deformation changes, particle alignments, and changes in the pairing correlations. A review of progress in theory, experimentation, and instrumentation in this field is given. (DWL)

  16. Use of In Vivo 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy To Elucidate l-Arabinose Metabolism in Yeasts▿

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, César; Neves, Ana Rute; Antunes, Alexandra M. M.; Noronha, João Paulo; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Santos, Helena; Spencer-Martins, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    Candida arabinofermentans PYCC 5603T and Pichia guilliermondii PYCC 3012 were shown to grow well on l-arabinose, albeit exhibiting distinct features that justify an in-depth comparative study of their respective pentose catabolism. Carbon-13 labeling experiments coupled with in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to investigate l-arabinose metabolism in these yeasts, thereby complementing recently reported physiological and enzymatic data. The label supplied in l-[2-13C]arabinose to nongrowing cells, under aerobic conditions, was found on C-1 and C-2 of arabitol and ribitol, on C-2 of xylitol, and on C-1, C-2, and C-3 of trehalose. The detection of labeled arabitol and xylitol constitutes additional evidence for the operation in yeast of the redox catabolic pathway, which is widespread among filamentous fungi. Furthermore, labeling at position C-1 of trehalose and arabitol demonstrates that glucose-6-phosphate is recycled through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). This result was interpreted as a metabolic strategy to regenerate NADPH, the cofactor essential for sustaining l-arabinose catabolism at the level of l-arabinose reductase and l-xylulose reductase. Moreover, the observed synthesis of d-arabitol and ribitol provides a route with which to supply NAD+ under oxygen-limiting conditions. In P. guilliermondii PYCC 3012, the strong accumulation of l-arabitol (intracellular concentration of up to 0.4 M) during aerobic l-arabinose metabolism indicates the existence of a bottleneck at the level of l-arabitol 4-dehydrogenase. This report provides the first experimental evidence for a link between l-arabinose metabolism in fungi and the oxidative branch of the PPP and suggests rational guidelines for the design of strategies for the production of new and efficient l-arabinose-fermenting yeasts. PMID:18245253

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Shift Reagents: Abnormal 13C Shifts Produced by Complexation of Lanthanide Chelates with Saturated Amines and n-Butyl Isocyanide

    PubMed Central

    Marzin, Claude; Leibfritz, Dieter; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Roberts, John D.

    1973-01-01

    Lanthanide-induced shfits of 13C nuclear magnetic resonances are reported for several amines and n-butyl isocyanide. Contact contributions to such shifts, especially of β carbons, are clearly important for the chelates of Eu+3 and Pr+3. The importance of contact terms is shown to change in a rather predictable manner with the structure of the amine. PMID:16592062

  18. Proline Metabolism in the Wild-Type and in a Salt-Tolerant Mutant of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia Studied by 13C-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Roosens, Nancy H.; Willem, Rudolph; Li, Yan; Verbruggen, Ingrid; Biesemans, Monique; Jacobs, Michel

    1999-01-01

    To obtain insight into the link between proline (Pro) accumulation and the increase in osmotolerance in higher plants, we investigated the biochemical basis for the NaCl tolerance of a Nicotiana plumbaginifolia mutant (RNa) that accumulates Pro. Pro biosynthesis and catabolism were investigated in both wild-type and mutant lines. 13C-Nuclear magnetic resonance with [5-13C]glutamate (Glu) as the Pro precursor was used to provide insight into the mechanism of Pro accumulation via the Glu pathway. After 24 h under 200 mm NaCl stress in the presence of [5-13C]Glu, a significant enrichment in [5-13C]Pro was observed compared with non-stress conditions in both the wild type (P2) and the mutant (RNa). Moreover, under the same conditions, [5-13C]Pro was clearly synthesized in higher amounts in RNa than in P2. On the other hand, measurements of enzyme activities indicate that neither the biosynthesis via the ornithine pathway, nor the catabolism via the Pro oxidation pathway were affected in the RNa mutant. Finally, the regulatory effect exerted by Pro on its biosynthesis was evaluated. In P2 plantlets, exogenous Pro markedly reduced the conversion of [5-13C]Glu into [5-13C]Pro, whereas Pro feedback inhibition was not detected in the RNa plantlets. It is proposed that the origin of tolerance in the RNa mutant is due to a mutation leading to a substantial reduction of the feedback inhibition normally exerted in a wild-type (P2) plant by Pro at the level of the Δ-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase enzyme. PMID:10594115

  19. Calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants using frozen density embedding

    SciTech Connect

    Götz, Andreas W.; Autschbach, Jochen; Visscher, Lucas

    2014-03-14

    We present a method for a subsystem-based calculation of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling tensors within the framework of current-spin-density-functional theory. Our approach is based on the frozen-density embedding scheme within density-functional theory and extends a previously reported subsystem-based approach for the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors to magnetic fields which couple not only to orbital but also spin degrees of freedom. This leads to a formulation in which the electron density, the induced paramagnetic current, and the induced spin-magnetization density are calculated separately for the individual subsystems. This is particularly useful for the inclusion of environmental effects in the calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants. Neglecting the induced paramagnetic current and spin-magnetization density in the environment due to the magnetic moments of the coupled nuclei leads to a very efficient method in which the computationally expensive response calculation has to be performed only for the subsystem of interest. We show that this approach leads to very good results for the calculation of solvent-induced shifts of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in hydrogen-bonded systems. Also for systems with stronger interactions, frozen-density embedding performs remarkably well, given the approximate nature of currently available functionals for the non-additive kinetic energy. As an example we show results for methylmercury halides which exhibit an exceptionally large shift of the one-bond coupling constants between {sup 199}Hg and {sup 13}C upon coordination of dimethylsulfoxide solvent molecules.

  20. Calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants using frozen density embedding.

    PubMed

    Götz, Andreas W; Autschbach, Jochen; Visscher, Lucas

    2014-03-14

    We present a method for a subsystem-based calculation of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling tensors within the framework of current-spin-density-functional theory. Our approach is based on the frozen-density embedding scheme within density-functional theory and extends a previously reported subsystem-based approach for the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors to magnetic fields which couple not only to orbital but also spin degrees of freedom. This leads to a formulation in which the electron density, the induced paramagnetic current, and the induced spin-magnetization density are calculated separately for the individual subsystems. This is particularly useful for the inclusion of environmental effects in the calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants. Neglecting the induced paramagnetic current and spin-magnetization density in the environment due to the magnetic moments of the coupled nuclei leads to a very efficient method in which the computationally expensive response calculation has to be performed only for the subsystem of interest. We show that this approach leads to very good results for the calculation of solvent-induced shifts of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in hydrogen-bonded systems. Also for systems with stronger interactions, frozen-density embedding performs remarkably well, given the approximate nature of currently available functionals for the non-additive kinetic energy. As an example we show results for methylmercury halides which exhibit an exceptionally large shift of the one-bond coupling constants between (199)Hg and (13)C upon coordination of dimethylsulfoxide solvent molecules.

  1. Measurement of one-bond 13C α- 1H α residual dipolar coupling constants in proteins by selective manipulation of C αH α spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Graeme; Meenan, Nicola; Bromek, Krystyna; Smith, Brian O.; Bella, Juraj; Uhrín, Dušan

    2006-05-01

    We have developed new 2D and 3D experiments for the measurement of C α-H α residual dipolar coupling constants in 13C and 15N labelled proteins. Two experiments, 2D (HNCO)-( J-CA)NH and 3D (HN)CO-( J-CA)NH, sample the C α-H α splitting by means of C α magnetization, while 2D ( J-HACACO)NH and 3D J-HA(CACO)NH use H α magnetization to achieve a similar result. In the 2D experiments the coupling evolution is superimposed on the evolution of the 15N chemical shifts and the IPAP principle is used to obtain 1H- 15N HSQC-like spectra from which the splitting is determined. The use of a third dimension in 3D experiments reduces spectral overlap to the point where use of an IPAP scheme may not be necessary. The length of the sampling interval in the J-dimension of these experiments is dictated solely by the relaxation properties of C α or H α nuclei. This was made possible by the use of C α selective pulses in combination with either a DPFGSE or modified BIRD pulses. Inclusion of these pulse sequence elements in the J-evolution periods removes unwanted spin-spin interactions. This allows prolonged sampling periods (˜25 ms) yielding higher precision C α-H α splitting determination than is achievable with existing frequency based methods.

  2. Application of (13)C ramp CPMAS NMR with phase-adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) for the quantitative estimation of carbon functional groups in natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Ikeya, Kosuke; Watanabe, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The composition of carbon (C) functional groups in natural organic matter (NOM), such as dissolved organic matter, soil organic matter, and humic substances, is frequently estimated using solid-state (13)C NMR techniques. A problem associated with quantitative analysis using general cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CPMAS) spectra is the appearance of spinning side bands (SSBs) split from the original center peaks of sp (2) hybridized C species (i.e., aromatic and carbonyl C). Ramp CP/phase-adjusted side band suppressing (PASS) is a pulse sequence that integrates SSBs separately and quantitatively recovers them into their inherent center peaks. In the present study, the applicability of ramp CP/PASS to NOM analysis was compared with direct polarization (DPMAS), another quantitative method but one that requires a long operation time, and/or a ramp CP/total suppression side band (ramp CP/TOSS) technique, a popular but non-quantitative method for deleting SSBs. The test materials were six soil humic acid samples with various known degrees of aromaticity and two fulvic acids. There were no significant differences in the relative abundance of alkyl C, O-alkyl C, and aromatic C between the ramp CP/PASS and DPMAS methods, while the signal intensities corresponding to aromatic C in the ramp CP/TOSS spectra were consistently less than the values obtained in the ramp CP/PASS spectra. These results indicate that ramp CP/PASS can be used to accurately estimate the C composition of NOM samples.

  3. Chemical structures of coal lithotypes before and after CO2 adsorption as investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cao, X.; Mastalerz, Maria; Chappell, M.A.; Miller, L.F.; Li, Y.; Mao, J.

    2011-01-01

    Four lithotypes (vitrain, bright clarain, clarain, and fusain) of a high volatile bituminous Springfield Coal from the Illinois Basin were characterized using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR techniques included quantitative direct polarization/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS), cross polarization/total sideband suppression (CP/TOSS), dipolar dephasing, CHn selection, and recoupled C-H long-range dipolar dephasing techniques. The lithotypes that experienced high-pressure CO2 adsorption isotherm analysis were also analyzed to determine possible changes in coal structure as a result of CO2 saturation at high pressure and subsequent evacuation. The main carbon functionalities present in original vitrain, bright clarain, clarain and fusain were aromatic carbons (65.9%-86.1%), nonpolar alkyl groups (9.0%-28.9%), and aromatic C-O carbons (4.1%-9.5%). Among these lithotypes, aromaticity increased in the order of clarain, bright clarain, vitrain, and fusain, whereas the fraction of alkyl carbons decreased in the same order. Fusain was distinct from other three lithotypes in respect to its highest aromatic composition (86.1%) and remarkably small fraction of alkyl carbons (11.0%). The aromatic cluster size in fusain was larger than that in bright clarain. The lithotypes studied responded differently to high pressure CO2 saturation. After exposure to high pressure CO2, vitrain and fusain showed a decrease in aromaticity but an increase in the fraction of alkyl carbons, whereas bright clarain and clarain displayed an increase in aromaticity but a decrease in the fraction of alkyl carbons. Aromatic fused-rings were larger for bright clarain but smaller for fusain in the post-CO2 adsorption samples compared to the original lithotypes. These observations suggested chemical CO2-coal interactions at high pressure and the selectivity of lithotypes in response to CO2 adsorption. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  5. The 2D {31P} Spin-Echo-Difference Constant-Time [13C, 1H]-HMQC Experiment for Simultaneous Determination of 3JH3‧P and 3JC4‧P in 13C-Labeled Nucleic Acids and Their Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyperski, Thomas; Fernández, César; Ono, Akira; Wüthrich, Kurt; Kainosho, Masatsune

    1999-10-01

    A two-dimensional {31P} spin-echo-difference constant-time [13C, 1H]-HMQC experiment (2D {31P}-sedct-[13C, 1H]-HMQC) is introduced for measurements of 3JC4‧P and 3JH3‧P scalar couplings in large 13C-labeled nucleic acids and in DNA-protein complexes. This experiment makes use of the fact that 1H-13C multiple-quantum coherences in macromolecules relax more slowly than the corresponding 13C single-quantum coherences. 3JC4‧P and 3JH3‧P are related via Karplus-type functions with the phosphodiester torsion angles β and ɛ, respectively, and their experimental assessment therefore contributes to further improved quality of NMR solution structures. Data are presented for a uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled 14-base-pair DNA duplex, both free in solution and in a 17-kDa protein-DNA complex.

  6. Detection of tannins in modern and fossil barks and in plant residues by high-resolution solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.A.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Bark samples isolated from brown coal deposits in Victoria, Australia, and buried wood from Rhizophora mangle have been studies by high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Dipolar dephasing 13C NMR appears to be a useful method of detecting the presence of tannins in geochemical samples including barks, buried woods, peats and leaf litter. It is shown that tannins are selectively preserved in bark during coalification to the brown coal stage. ?? 1988.

  7. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We report solid state 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, 1H and cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations. PMID:24832263

  8. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, (1)H and cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals from (15)N,(13)C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations. PMID:24832263

  9. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-01

    We report solid state 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, 1H and cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  10. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, (1)H and cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals from (15)N,(13)C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  11. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Thurber, Kent R. Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, {sup 1}H and cross-polarized {sup 13}C NMR signals from {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T{sub 1e} is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  12. Enhanced forensic discrimination of pollutants by position-specific isotope analysis using isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Julien, Maxime; Nun, Pierrick; Höhener, Patrick; Parinet, Julien; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S

    2016-01-15

    In forensic environmental investigations the main issue concerns the inference of the original source of the pollutant for determining the liable party. Isotope measurements in geochemistry, combined with complimentary techniques for contaminant identification, have contributed significantly to source determination at polluted sites. In this work we have determined the intramolecular (13)C profiles of several molecules well-known as pollutants. By giving additional analytical parameters, position-specific isotope analysis performed by isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (irm-(13)C NMR) spectrometry gives new information to help in answering the major question: what is the origin of the detected contaminant? We have shown that isotope profiling of the core of a molecule reveals both the raw materials and the process used in its manufacture. It also can reveal processes occurring between the contamination site 'source' and the sampling site. Thus, irm-(13)C NMR is shown to be a very good complement to compound-specific isotope analysis currently performed by mass spectrometry for assessing polluted sites involving substantial spills of pollutant.

  13. Enhanced forensic discrimination of pollutants by position-specific isotope analysis using isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Julien, Maxime; Nun, Pierrick; Höhener, Patrick; Parinet, Julien; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S

    2016-01-15

    In forensic environmental investigations the main issue concerns the inference of the original source of the pollutant for determining the liable party. Isotope measurements in geochemistry, combined with complimentary techniques for contaminant identification, have contributed significantly to source determination at polluted sites. In this work we have determined the intramolecular (13)C profiles of several molecules well-known as pollutants. By giving additional analytical parameters, position-specific isotope analysis performed by isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (irm-(13)C NMR) spectrometry gives new information to help in answering the major question: what is the origin of the detected contaminant? We have shown that isotope profiling of the core of a molecule reveals both the raw materials and the process used in its manufacture. It also can reveal processes occurring between the contamination site 'source' and the sampling site. Thus, irm-(13)C NMR is shown to be a very good complement to compound-specific isotope analysis currently performed by mass spectrometry for assessing polluted sites involving substantial spills of pollutant. PMID:26592622

  14. Development of qualitative and quantitative analysis methods in pharmaceutical application with new selective signal excitation methods for 13 C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using 1 H T1rho relaxation time.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Mamiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Most pharmaceutical drug substances and excipients in formulations exist in a crystalline or amorphous form, and an understanding of their state during manufacture and storage is critically important, particularly in formulated products. Carbon 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is useful for studying the chemical and physical state of pharmaceutical solids in a formulated product. We developed two new selective signal excitation methods in (13) C solid-state NMR to extract the spectrum of a target component from such a mixture. These methods were based on equalization of the proton relaxation time in a single domain via rapid intraproton spin diffusion and the difference in proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame ((1) H T1rho) of individual components in the mixture. Introduction of simple pulse sequences to one-dimensional experiments reduced data acquisition time and increased flexibility. We then demonstrated these methods in a commercially available drug and in a mixture of two saccharides, in which the (13) C signals of the target components were selectively excited, and showed them to be applicable to the quantitative analysis of individual components in solid mixtures, such as formulated products, polymorphic mixtures, or mixtures of crystalline and amorphous phases. PMID:23147444

  15. Vibrational 13C-cross-polarization/magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopic and thermal characterization of poly(alanine-glycine) as model for silk I Bombyx mori fibroin.

    PubMed

    Monti, Patrizia; Taddei, Paola; Freddi, Giuliano; Ohgo, Kosuke; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the conformational characterization of poly(alanine-glycine) II (pAG II) as a model for a Bombyx mori fibroin silk I structure. Raman, IR, and 13C-cross-polarization/magic angle spinning NMR spectra of pAG II are discussed in comparison with those of the crystalline fraction of B. mori silk fibroin (chymotryptic precipitate, Cp) with a silk I (silk I-Cp) structure. The spectral data give evidence that silk I-Cp and the synthetic copolypeptide pAG II have similar conformations. Moreover, the spectral findings reveal that silk I-Cp is more crystalline than pAG II; consequently, the latter contains a larger amount of the random coil conformation. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements confirm this result. N-Deuteration experiments on pAG II allow us to attribute the Raman component at 1320 cm(-1) to the amide III mode of a beta-turn type II conformation, thus confirming the results of those who propose a repeated beta-turn type II structure for silk I. The analysis of the Raman spectra in the nuNH region confirms that the silk I structure is characterized by the presence of different types of H-bonding arrangements, in agreement with the above model.

  16. Structure determination of individual electron-nuclear spin complexes in a solid-state matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laraoui, Abdelghani; Pagliero, Daniela; Meriles, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    A spin-based quantum computer will store and process information via ``spin complexes'' formed by a small number of interacting electronic and nuclear spins within a solid-state host. Unlike present electronic circuits, differences in the atomic composition and local geometry make each of these spin clusters distinct from the rest. Integration of these units into a working network thus builds on our ability to determine the cluster atomic structure, a problem we tackle herein with the aid of a magnetic resonance protocol. Using the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond as a model system, we show analytically and numerically that the spatial coordinates of weakly coupled 13C spins can be determined by selectively transferring and retrieving spin polarization. The technique's spatial resolution can reach up to 0.1 nm, limited by the NV spin coherence lifetime. No external magnetic field gradient is required, which makes this imaging scheme applicable to NV-13C complexes buried deep inside the crystal host. Further, this approach can be adapted to nuclear spins other than 13C, and thus applied to the characterization of individual molecules anchored to the diamond surface.

  17. The Contribution of Blood Lactate to Brain Energy Metabolism in Humans Measured by Dynamic 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    BOUMEZBEUR, Fawzi; PETERSEN, Kitt F.; CLINE, Gary W.; MASON, Graeme F.; BEHAR, Kevin L; SHULMAN, Gerald I.; ROTHMAN, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether plasma lactate can be a significant fuel for human brain energy metabolism infusions of [3-13C]lactate and 1H-13C polarization transfer spectroscopy were used to detect the entry and utilization of lactate. During the 2-hour infusion study, 13C incorporation in the amino acid pools of glutamate and glutamine were measured with a 5 minutes time-resolution. With a plasma concentration ([Lac]P) being in the 0.8–2.8 mmol/L range, the tissue lactate concentration ([Lac]B) was assessed as well as the fractional contribution of lactate to brain energy metabolism (CMRlac). From the measured relationship between unidirectional lactate influx (Vin) and plasma and brain lactate concentrations lactate transport constants were calculated using a reversible Michaelis-Menten model. The results show (i) that in the physiological range plasma lactate unidirectional transport (Vin) and concentration in tissue increases close to linearly with the lactate concentration in plasma, (ii) the maximum potential contribution of plasma lactate to brain metabolism is 10% under basal plasma lactate conditions of ~ 1.0 mmol/L and as much as 60% at supra-physiological plasma lactate concentrations when the transporters are saturated, (iii) the half-saturation constant KT is 5.1±2.7 mmol/L and VMAX is 0.40±0.13 μmol/g/min (68% confidence interval), (iv) the majority of plasma lactate is metabolized in neurons similar to glucose. PMID:20962220

  18. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly 13C/15N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive 13C/15N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of 13C/15N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% 13C-glycerol and 0.5% 15N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of 13C/15N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state. PMID:25795666

  19. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-06-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive (13)C/(15)N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of (13)C/(15)N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% (13)C-glycerol and 0.5% (15)N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of (13)C/(15)N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state.

  20. Fragment-based {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals: An alternative to planewave methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Joshua D.; Beran, Gregory J. O.; Monaco, Stephen; Schatschneider, Bohdan

    2015-09-14

    We assess the quality of fragment-based ab initio isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shift predictions for a collection of 25 molecular crystals with eight different density functionals. We explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, combined cluster/fragment, and the planewave gauge-including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) models relative to experiment. When electrostatic embedding is employed to capture many-body polarization effects, the simple and computationally inexpensive two-body fragment model predicts both isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shifts and the chemical shielding tensors as well as both cluster models and the GIPAW approach. Unlike the GIPAW approach, hybrid density functionals can be used readily in a fragment model, and all four hybrid functionals tested here (PBE0, B3LYP, B3PW91, and B97-2) predict chemical shifts in noticeably better agreement with experiment than the four generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals considered (PBE, OPBE, BLYP, and BP86). A set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided based on these benchmark calculations. Statistical cross-validation procedures are used to demonstrate the robustness of these fits.

  1. Solid-state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of simultaneously metabolized acetate and phenol in a soil Pseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Heiman, A.S.; Copper, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was made of the concentration-dependent primary and secondary substrate relationships in the simultaneous metabolism of the ubiquitous pollutant phenol and the naturally occurring substrate acetate by a Pseudomonas sp. soil isolate capable of utilizing either substance as a sole source of carbon and energy. In addition to conventional analytical techniques, solid-state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to follow the cellular distribution of (1-/sup 13/C)acetate in the presence of unlabeled phenol. These results suggest that, when phenol is present as the primary substrate, acetate is preferentially shuttled into fatty acyl chain synthesis, whereas phenol carbon is funnelled into the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Thus, simultaneous use of a xenobiotic compound and a natural substrate apparently does occur, and the relative concentrations of the two substrates do influence the rate and manner in which the compounds are utilized. These results also demonstrate the unique advantage of using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques combined with /sup 13/C labeling of specific sites in substrates when doing microbial degradation studies. In this work, the entire cellular biomass was examined directly without extensive extraction, fractionation, or isolation of subcellular units; thus, there is no uncertainty about chemical alteration of substrate metabolites as a result of these often harsh treatments.

  2. Studies on the mechanism of the peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence reaction: part 2. Further identification of intermediates using 2D EXSY 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, Sarah A; Bos, Richard; Dyson, Gail A; Lim, Kieran F; Russell, Richard A; Watson, Simon P; Hindson, Christopher M; Barnett, Neil W

    2008-05-01

    Further consideration has been given to the reaction pathway of a model peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence system. Again utilising doubly labelled oxalyl chloride and anhydrous hydrogen peroxide, 2D EXSY (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiments allowed for the characterisation of unknown products and key intermediate species on the dark side of the peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence reaction. Exchange spectroscopy afforded elucidation of a scheme comprised of two distinct mechanistic pathways, one of which contributes to chemiluminescence. (13)C NMR experiments carried out at varied reagent molar ratios demonstrated that excess amounts of hydrogen peroxide favoured formation of 1,2-dioxetanedione: the intermediate that, upon thermolysis, has been long thought to interact with a fluorophore to produce light. PMID:18420048

  3. Nuclear spin conversion of water inside fullerene cages detected by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Mamone, Salvatore Concistrè, Maria; Carignani, Elisa; Meier, Benno; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Johannessen, Ole G.; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H.; Lei, Xuegong; Li, Yongjun; Goh, Kelvin; Horsewill, Anthony J.

    2014-05-21

    The water-endofullerene H{sub 2}O@C{sub 60} provides a unique chemical system in which freely rotating water molecules are confined inside homogeneous and symmetrical carbon cages. The spin conversion between the ortho and para species of the endohedral H{sub 2}O was studied in the solid phase by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance. The experimental data are consistent with a second-order kinetics, indicating a bimolecular spin conversion process. Numerical simulations suggest the simultaneous presence of a spin diffusion process allowing neighbouring ortho and para molecules to exchange their angular momenta. Cross-polarization experiments found no evidence that the spin conversion of the endohedral H{sub 2}O molecules is catalysed by {sup 13}C nuclei present in the cages.

  4. Decoupling a hole spin qubit from the nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prechtel, Jonathan H.; Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Houel, Julien; Ludwig, Arne; Valentin, Sascha R.; Wieck, Andreas D.; Warburton, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    A huge effort is underway to develop semiconductor nanostructures as low-noise hosts for qubits. The main source of dephasing of an electron spin qubit in a GaAs-based system is the nuclear spin bath. A hole spin may circumvent the nuclear spin noise. In principle, the nuclear spins can be switched off for a pure heavy-hole spin. In practice, it is unknown to what extent this ideal limit can be achieved. A major hindrance is that p-type devices are often far too noisy. We investigate here a single hole spin in an InGaAs quantum dot embedded in a new generation of low-noise p-type device. We measure the hole Zeeman energy in a transverse magnetic field with 10 neV resolution by dark-state spectroscopy as we create a large transverse nuclear spin polarization. The hole hyperfine interaction is highly anisotropic: the transverse coupling is <1% of the longitudinal coupling. For unpolarized, randomly fluctuating nuclei, the ideal heavy-hole limit is achieved down to nanoelectronvolt energies; equivalently dephasing times up to a microsecond. The combination of large and strong optical dipole makes the single hole spin in a GaAs-based device an attractive quantum platform.

  5. One-bond {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H spin-coupling constants in aldofuranosyl rings. Effect of conformation on coupling magnitude

    SciTech Connect

    Serianni, A.S.; Carmichael, I.; Wu, J.

    1995-08-23

    One-bond {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H spin-coupling constants ({sup 1}J{sub CH}) have been studied in the model furanose 2-deoxy-{beta}-D-glycero-tetrofuranose (1) as a function of ring geometry in order to assess their utility as conformational probes. Ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculations were conducted on the ten envelope forms and the planar form of 1 using the second-order Moller Plesset (MP2) electron correlation treatment with a polarized split-valence (6.31 G*) basis set. The derived structures were used to compute {sup 1}J{sub CH} values in conformers of 1 at the Hartree-Fock and MP2 levels of theory which were subsequently sealed using a factor derived from accurate quadratic configuration interaction (QCISD) calculations. MO results indicate that C-H bond lengths in 1 vary with ring geometry, with a given C-H bond longest when quasi-axial and shortest when quasi-equatorial. Computed {sup 1}J{sub CH} values were found to be sensitive to C-H bond orientation, with greater coupling observed when a C-H bond is quasi-equatorial. Computations conducted on {beta}- D-ribofuranose (3) and 2-deoxy- {beta}-D-erythro-pentofurnaose (4) (HF/6-31G* level) show a C-H bond length/orientation dependence similar to that observed in 1. Experimental (NMR) data are presented which support the proposed correlation. These results suggest a role for {sup 1}J{sub CH} in the conformational analysis of furanose rings which may complement current methods based on {sup 3}J{sub HH}, {sup 3}J{sub CH}, and {sup 3}J{sub CH} values. 32 refs., 7 figs.

  6. 13C-NMR off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation studies of bovine lens gamma-crystallin self association: effect of 'macromolecular crowding'.

    PubMed

    Stevens, A; Wang, S X; Caines, G H; Schleich, T

    1995-01-01

    The NMR technique of 13C off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation, which provides an accurate assessment of the effective rotational correlation time (tau 0, eff) for macromolecular rotational diffusion, was applied to the study of gamma-crystallin association as a function of protein concentration and temperature. Values of the effective rotational correlation time for gamma-crystallin rotational diffusion were obtained at moderate to high protein concentrations (80-350 mg/ml) and at temperatures above, and below, the cold cataract phase transition temperature. With increasing concentration gamma-crystallin was observed to increasingly associate as reflected by larger values of tau 0, eff Decreasing temperature in the range of 35 to 22 degrees C was found to result in no change in the temperature corrected value of tau 0, eff at a gamma-crystallin concentration of 80 mg/ml, whereas at temperatures of 18 degrees C or below, this parameter was approx. twofold larger, suggesting the occurrence of a well defined phase transition, which correlated well with the cold cataract phase transition temperature. At higher protein concentrations, by contrast, tau 0, eff (temperature corrected) was found to increase by approx. 1.6- to 2-times in the temperature interval 35 degrees C to 22 degrees C, a result consistent with the dependence of the cold cataract phase transition temperature on gamma-crystallin concentration. Analysis of intensity ratio dispersion curves, using an assumed model of isodesmic association, permitted the estimation of the association constant characterizing the aggregation under particular conditions of concentration and temperature. The significant increase in the value of the association constant with moderate increases in protein concentration was rationalized by invoking the effect of 'macromolecular crowding'. The results obtained in this study suggest that in the intact lens, where high protein concentrations prevail, gamma

  7. In vivo13C spectroscopy in the rat brain using hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjańska, Małgorzata; Iltis, Isabelle; Shestov, Alexander A.; Deelchand, Dinesh K.; Nelson, Christopher; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2010-10-01

    The low sensitivity of 13C spectroscopy can be enhanced using dynamic nuclear polarization. Detection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and its metabolic products has been reported in kidney, liver, and muscle. In this work, the feasibility of measuring 13C signals of hyperpolarized 13C metabolic products in the rat brain in vivo following the injection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate is investigated. Injection of [2- 13C]pyruvate led to the detection of [2- 13C]lactate, but no other downstream metabolites such as TCA cycle intermediates were detected. Injection of [1- 13C]pyruvate enabled the detection of both [1- 13C]lactate and [ 13C]bicarbonate. A metabolic model was used to fit the hyperpolarized 13C time courses obtained during infusion of [1- 13C]pyruvate and to determine the values of VPDH and VLDH.

  8. Dressed qubits in nuclear spin baths

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Lianao

    2010-04-15

    We present a method to encode a dressed qubit into the product state of an electron spin localized in a quantum dot and its surrounding nuclear spins via a dressing transformation. In this scheme, the hyperfine coupling and a portion of a nuclear dipole-dipole interaction become logic gates, while they are the sources of decoherence in electron-spin qubit proposals. We discuss errors and corrections for the dressed qubits. Interestingly, the effective Hamiltonian of nuclear spins is equivalent to a pairing Hamiltonian, which provides the microscopic mechanism to protect dressed qubits against decoherence.

  9. Liquid-state nuclear spin comagnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledbetter, Micah; Pustelny, Szymon; Budker, Dmitry; Romalis, Michael; Blanchard, John; Pines, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    We discuss liquid-state nuclear spin comagnetometers based on mixtures of mutually miscible solvents, each rich in a different nuclear spin. In one version thereof, thermally polarized ^1H and ^19F nuclear spins in a mixture of pentane and hexafluorobenzene are monitored in 1 mG fields using alkali-vapor magnetometers. In a second version, ^1H and ^129Xe spins in a mixture of pentane and hyperpolarized liquid xenon are monitored with a superconducting quantum interference device. In the former case, we show that magnetic field fluctuations can be suppressed by a factor of about 3400 and that frequency resolution of about 5x10-11 Hz may be realized in roughly one day of integration. We discuss the application of liquid-state nuclear spin comagnetometers to precision measurements such as a search for spin-gravity coupling or a permanent electric dipole moment, as well as to sensitive gyroscopes.

  10. J-GFT NMR for precise measurement of mutually correlated nuclear spin-spin couplings.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Hanudatta S; Garcia, Erwin; Shen, Yang; Szyperski, Thomas

    2007-01-24

    G-matrix Fourier transform (GFT) NMR spectroscopy is presented for accurate and precise measurement of chemical shifts and nuclear spin-spin couplings correlated according to spin system. The new approach, named "J-GFT NMR", is based on a largely extended GFT NMR formalism and promises to have a broad impact on projection NMR spectroscopy. Specifically, constant-time J-GFT (6,2)D (HA-CA-CO)-N-HN was implemented for simultaneous measurement of five mutually correlated NMR parameters, that is, 15N backbone chemical shifts and the four one-bond spin-spin couplings 13Calpha-1Halpha, 13Calpha-13C', 15N-13C', and 15N-1HNu. The experiment was applied for measuring residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in an 8 kDa protein Z-domain aligned with Pf1 phages. Comparison with RDC values extracted from conventional NMR experiments reveals that RDCs are measured with high precision and accuracy, which is attributable to the facts that (i) the use of constant time evolution ensures that signals do not broaden whenever multiple RDCs are jointly measured in a single dimension and (ii) RDCs are multiply encoded in the multiplets arising from the joint sampling. This corresponds to measuring the couplings multiple times in a statistically independent manner. A key feature of J-GFT NMR, i.e., the correlation of couplings according to spin systems without reference to sequential resonance assignments, promises to be particularly valuable for rapid identification of backbone conformation and classification of protein fold families on the basis of statistical analysis of dipolar couplings.

  11. Direct proof by 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance of semi-purified extract and isolation of ent-Catechin from leaves of Eucalyptus cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Sayonara Mendes; Abe, Simone Yae; Bueno, Fernanda Giacomini; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Nakashima, Tomoe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Eucalyptus cinerea F. Muell. ex Benth. is native to Australia and acclimatized to Southern Brazil. Its aromatic leaves are used for ornamental purposes and have great potential for essential oil production, although reports of its use in folk medicine are few. Objective: This study evaluated the composition of E. cinerea leaves using the solid state 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and isolation of the compound from the semipurified extract (SE). Materials and Methods: The SE of E. cinerea leaves was evaluated in the solid state by 13C-NMR spectrum, and the SE was chromatographed on a Sephadex LH-20 column, followed by high-speed counter-current chromatography to isolate the compound. The SE was analyzed by 13C-NMR and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight spectra. Results: Flavan-3-ol units were present, suggesting the presence of proanthocyanidins as well as a gallic acid unit. The uncommon ent-catechin was isolated. Conclusion: The presence of ent-catechin is reported for the first time in this genus and species. PMID:25210302

  12. Dereplication of depsides from the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea by centrifugal partition chromatography combined to 13C nuclear magnetic resonance pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Oettl, Sarah K; Hubert, Jane; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc; Stuppner, Hermann; Renault, Jean-Hugues; Rollinger, Judith M

    2014-10-10

    Lichens produce a diversity of secondary metabolites, among them depsides comprised of two or more hydroxybenzoic acid units linked by ester, ether, or CC-bonds. During classic solid support-based purification processes, depsides are often hydrolyzed and in many cases time, consuming procedures result only in the isolation of decomposition products. In an attempt to avoid extensive purification steps while maintaining metabolite structure integrity, we propose an alternative method to identify the major depsides of a lichen crude extract (Pseudevernia furfuracea var. ceratea (Ach.) D. Hawksw., Parmeliaceae) directly within mixtures. Exploiting the acidic character of depsides and differences in polarity, the extract was fractionated by centrifugal partition chromatography in the pH-zone refining mode resulting in twelve simplified mixtures of depsides. After (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the produced fractions, the major molecular structures were directly identified within the fraction series by using a recently developed pattern recognition method, which combines spectral data alignment and hierarchical clustering analysis. The obtained clusters of (13)C chemical shifts were assigned to their corresponding molecular structures with the help of an in-house (13)C NMR chemical shift database, resulting in six unambiguously identified compounds, namely methyl β-orcinolcarboxylate (1), atranorin (2), 5-chloroatranorin (3), olivetol carboxylic acid (4), olivetoric acid (5), and olivetonide (6). PMID:25220142

  13. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra.

  14. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra. PMID:24771296

  15. New structural information on a humic acid from two-dimensional 1H-13C correlation solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Mao, J D; Xing, B; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2001-05-15

    New information on the chemical structure of a peat humic acid has been obtained using a series of two-dimensional 1H-13C heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR (HETCOR) experiments with different contact times and with spectral editing by dipolar dephasing and 13C transverse relaxation filtering. Carbon-bonded methyl groups (C-CH3) are found to be near both aliphatic and O-alkyl but not aromatic groups. The spectra prove that most OCH3 groups are connected directly with the aromatic rings, as is typical in lignin. As a result, about one-third of the aromatic C-O groups is not phenolic C-OH but C-OCH3. Both protonated and unprotonated anomeric O-C-O carbons are identified in the one- and two-dimensional spectra. COO groups are found predominantly in OCHn-COO environments, but some are also bonded to aromatic rings and aliphatic groups. All models of humic acids in the literature lack at least some of the features observed here. Compositional heterogeneity was studied by introducing 1H spin diffusion into the HETCOR experiment. Comparison with data for a synthetic polymer, polycarbonate, indicates that the separation between O-alkyl and aromatic groups in the humic acid is less than 1.5 nm. However, transverse 13C relaxation filtering under 1H decoupling reveals heterogeneity on a nanometer scale, with the slow-relaxing component being rich in lignin-like aromatic-C-O-CH3 moieties and poor in COO groups.

  16. Determination of methyl 13C-15N dipolar couplings in peptides and proteins by three-dimensional and four-dimensional magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmus, Jonathan J.; Nadaud, Philippe S.; Höfer, Nicole; Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2008-02-01

    We describe three- and four-dimensional semiconstant-time transferred echo double resonance (SCT-TEDOR) magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments for the simultaneous measurement of multiple long-range N15-Cmethyl13 dipolar couplings in uniformly C13, N15-enriched peptides and proteins with high resolution and sensitivity. The methods take advantage of C13 spin topologies characteristic of the side-chain methyl groups in amino acids alanine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, threonine, and valine to encode up to three distinct frequencies (N15-Cmethyl13 dipolar coupling, N15 chemical shift, and Cmethyl13 chemical shift) within a single SCT evolution period of initial duration ˜1/JCC1 (where JCC1≈35Hz, is the one-bond Cmethyl13-C13 J-coupling) while concurrently suppressing the modulation of NMR coherences due to C13-C13 and N15-C13 J-couplings and transverse relaxation. The SCT-TEDOR schemes offer several important advantages over previous methods of this type. First, significant (approximately twofold to threefold) gains in experimental sensitivity can be realized for weak N15-Cmethyl13 dipolar couplings (corresponding to structurally interesting, ˜3.5Å or longer, distances) and typical Cmethyl13 transverse relaxation rates. Second, the entire SCT evolution period can be used for Cmethyl13 and/or N15 frequency encoding, leading to increased spectral resolution with minimal additional coherence decay. Third, the experiments are inherently "methyl selective," which results in simplified NMR spectra and obviates the use of frequency-selective pulses or other spectral filtering techniques. Finally, the N15-C13 cross-peak buildup trajectories are purely dipolar in nature (i.e., not influenced by J-couplings or relaxation), which enables the straightforward extraction of N15-Cmethyl13 distances using an analytical model. The SCT-TEDOR experiments are demonstrated on a uniformly C13, N15-labeled peptide, N-acetyl-valine, and a 56

  17. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Luong, Michel

    2015-09-07

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a “bump” or as a “dip” superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  18. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance detection of interactions of serine hydroxymethyltransferase with C1-tetrahydrofolate synthase and glycine decarboxylase complex activities in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, V; Chatson, K B; Abrams, G D; King, J

    1996-01-01

    In C3 plants, serine synthesis is associated with photorespiratory glycine metabolism involving the tetrahydrofolate (THF)-dependent activities of the glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) and serine hydroxymethyl transferase (SHMT). Alternatively, THF-dependent serine synthesis can occur via the C1-THF synthase/SHMT pathway. We used 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to examine serine biosynthesis by these two pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Columbia wild type. We confirmed the tight coupling of the GDC/ SHMT system and observed directly in a higher plant the flux of formate through the C1-THF synthase/SHMT system. The accumulation of 13C-enriched serine over 24 h from the GDC/SHMT activities was 4-fold greater than that from C1-THF synthase/SHMT activities. Our experiments strongly suggest that the two pathways operate independently in Arabidopsis. Plants exposed to methotrexate and sulfanilamide, powerful inhibitors of THF biosynthesis, reduced serine synthesis by both pathways. The results suggest that continuous supply of THF is essential to maintain high rates of serine metabolism. Nuclear magnetic resonance is a powerful tool for the examination of THF-mediated metabolism in its natural cellular environment. PMID:8819325

  19. Optical nuclear spin polarization in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ai-Xian; Duan, Su-Qing; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Hyperfine interaction between electron spin and randomly oriented nuclear spins is a key issue of electron coherence for quantum information/computation. We propose an efficient way to establish high polarization of nuclear spins and reduce the intrinsic nuclear spin fluctuations. Here, we polarize the nuclear spins in semiconductor quantum dot (QD) by the coherent population trapping (CPT) and the electric dipole spin resonance (EDSR) induced by optical fields and ac electric fields. By tuning the optical fields, we can obtain a powerful cooling background based on CPT for nuclear spin polarization. The EDSR can enhance the spin flip-flop rate which may increase the cooling efficiency. With the help of CPT and EDSR, an enhancement of 1300 times of the electron coherence time can be obtained after a 10-ns preparation time. Project partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundations of China (Grant Nos. 11374039 and 11174042) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB922204 and 2013CB632805).

  20. 13 C solid-state NMR study of the 13 C-labeled peptide, (E)8 GGLGGQGAG(A)6 GGAGQGGYGG as a model for the local structure of Nephila clavipes dragline silk (MaSp1) before and after spinning.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Koji; Yamaguchi, Erika; Knight, David; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2012-06-01

    We prepared the water soluble model peptide, (E)(8) GGLGGQGAG(A)(6) GGAGQGGYGG, to throw light on the local structure of spidroin 1 (MaSpl) protein in spider dragline silk of Nephila clavipes before and after spinning. Solution (13) C NMR showed that the conformation of the peptide in aqueous solution was essentially random coil. Solid-state NMR was used to follow conformation-dependent (13) C chemical shifts in (13) C selectively labeled versions of the peptide. The peptide lyophilized from an aqueous solution at neutral pH (hereafter referred to as "without acid treatment)"was used to mimic the state of the spidroin stored in the spider's silk gland while the peptide precipitated from the acidic solution ("with acid treatment") was used to simulate the role of acid treatment in inducing conformation change in the natural spinning process. In without acid treatment, the fraction of random coil conformation was lowest in the N-terminal region (residues 15-18) when compared with the C-terminus. The conformational change produced by the acid treatment occurred in the sequence, G(15) AG(A)(6) GGAG(27), interposed between pairs of Gly residues pairs, Gly(12,13), and Gly(29,30). The acid treated peptide showed a remarkable decrease in the fraction of random coil conformation from A(20) to A(23) in the poly-Ala region when compared with the peptide without acid treatment. These observations taken together suggest that the peptide can be used as a model for studying the localization of the conformation change in spider silk fibroin in the natural spinning and the role of acid treatment in this process.

  1. Glucuronoxylomannan of Cryptococcus neoformans serotype B: structural analysis by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Turner, S H; Cherniak, R

    1991-04-01

    The major extracellular polysaccharide (glucuronoxylomannan, GXM) from six strains of Cryptococcus neoformans serotype B was characterized by gas-liquid chromatography (g.l.c.), g.l.c.-mass spectrometry (g.l.c.-m.s.), and nuclear magnetic resonance (n.m.r.) spectroscopy. Ultrasonic irradiation (u.i.) was used to reduce the mol.wt. of native GXM from 9.75 x 10(5) to 1.15 x 10(5) without apparent change in its composition (GXM-S). The Xylp:Manp:GlcpA molar ratio of the GXM and GXM-S from the six strains of C. neoformans serotype B is approximately 3.5:3.0:0.6. GXM-S was O-deacetylated (GXM-D) by treatment with NH4OH. The 13C-n.m.r. analysis of GXM-D gave spectra that served as characteristic fingerprints of the structure and also facilitated the assignment of the anomeric carbon resonances to specific structural moieties present in GXM-D. The GXM-D from each serotype B strain was found to be similar by 13C-n.m.r. spectroscopy. The structure contains a linear (1----3)-alpha-D-Manp backbone substituted with 2-O-beta-GlcpA and 2-O-beta-Xylp. beta-Xylp is also O-4 linked to the Manp substituted with GlcpA. In addition, a model for the disposition of the Xylp and GlcpA side chain substituents along the mannopyranan backbone is proposed, based upon results from the combination of g.l.c.-m.s. and 13C-n.m.r. spectroscopy. PMID:1773425

  2. Flexibility at a glycosidic linkage revealed by molecular dynamics, stochastic modeling, and (13)C NMR spin relaxation: conformational preferences of α-L-Rhap-α-(1 → 2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe in water and dimethyl sulfoxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Pendrill, Robert; Engström, Olof; Volpato, Andrea; Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Widmalm, Göran

    2016-01-28

    The monosaccharide L-rhamnose is common in bacterial polysaccharides and the disaccharide α-L-Rhap-α-(1 → 2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe represents a structural model for a part of Shigella flexneri O-antigen polysaccharides. Utilization of [1'-(13)C]-site-specific labeling in the anomeric position at the glycosidic linkage between the two sugar residues facilitated the determination of transglycosidic NMR (3)JCH and (3)JCC coupling constants. Based on these spin-spin couplings the major state and the conformational distribution could be determined with respect to the ψ torsion angle, which changed between water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as solvents, a finding mirrored by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with explicit solvent molecules. The (13)C NMR spin relaxation parameters T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOE of the probe were measured for the disaccharide in DMSO-d6 at two magnetic field strengths, with standard deviations ≤1%. The combination of MD simulation and a stochastic description based on the diffusive chain model resulted in excellent agreement between calculated and experimentally observed (13)C relaxation parameters, with an average error of <2%. The coupling between the global reorientation of the molecule and the local motion of the spin probe is deemed essential if reproduction of NMR relaxation parameters should succeed, since decoupling of the two modes of motion results in significantly worse agreement. Calculation of (13)C relaxation parameters based on the correlation functions obtained directly from the MD simulation of the solute molecule in DMSO as solvent showed satisfactory agreement with errors on the order of 10% or less. PMID:26741055

  3. Quantification of compartmented metabolic fluxes in developing soybean embryos by employing biosynthetically directed fractional (13)C labeling, two-dimensional [(13)C, (1)H] nuclear magnetic resonance, and comprehensive isotopomer balancing.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Ganesh; Fulton, D Bruce; Iyer, Vidya V; Peterson, Joan Marie; Zhou, Ruilian; Westgate, Mark E; Spalding, Martin H; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2004-10-01

    Metabolic flux quantification in plants is instrumental in the detailed understanding of metabolism but is difficult to perform on a systemic level. Toward this aim, we report the development and application of a computer-aided metabolic flux analysis tool that enables the concurrent evaluation of fluxes in several primary metabolic pathways. Labeling experiments were performed by feeding a mixture of U-(13)C Suc, naturally abundant Suc, and Gln to developing soybean (Glycine max) embryos. Two-dimensional [(13)C, (1)H] NMR spectra of seed storage protein and starch hydrolysates were acquired and yielded a labeling data set consisting of 155 (13)C isotopomer abundances. We developed a computer program to automatically calculate fluxes from this data. This program accepts a user-defined metabolic network model and incorporates recent mathematical advances toward accurate and efficient flux evaluation. Fluxes were calculated and statistical analysis was performed to obtain sds. A high flux was found through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (19.99 +/- 4.39 micromol d(-1) cotyledon(-1), or 104.2 carbon mol +/- 23.0 carbon mol per 100 carbon mol of Suc uptake). Separate transketolase and transaldolase fluxes could be distinguished in the plastid and the cytosol, and those in the plastid were found to be at least 6-fold higher. The backflux from triose to hexose phosphate was also found to be substantial in the plastid (21.72 +/- 5.00 micromol d(-1) cotyledon(-1), or 113.2 carbon mol +/-26.0 carbon mol per 100 carbon mol of Suc uptake). Forward and backward directions of anaplerotic fluxes could be distinguished. The glyoxylate shunt flux was found to be negligible. Such a generic flux analysis tool can serve as a quantitative tool for metabolic studies and phenotype comparisons and can be extended to other plant systems.

  4. Determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear coupling constants from 2D 19F-13C correlation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampt, Kirsten A. M.; Aspers, Ruud L. E. G.; Dvortsak, Peter; van der Werf, Ramon M.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.; Jaeger, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorinated organic compounds have become increasingly important within the polymer and the pharmaceutical industry as well as for clinical applications. For the structural elucidation of such compounds, NMR experiments with fluorine detection are of great value due to the favorable NMR properties of the fluorine nucleus. For the investigation of three fluorinated compounds, triple resonance 2D HSQC and HMBC experiments were adopted to fluorine detection with carbon and/or proton decoupling to yield F-C, F-C{H}, F-C{Cacq} and F-C{H,Cacq} variants. Analysis of E.COSY type cross-peak patterns in the F-C correlation spectra led, apart from the chemical shift assignments, to determination of size and signs of the JCH, JCF, and JHF coupling constants. In addition, the fully coupled F-C HMQC spectrum of steroid 1 was interpreted in terms of E.COSY type patterns. This example shows how coupling constants due to different nuclei can be determined together with their relative signs from a single spectrum. The analysis of cross-peak patterns, as presented here, not only provides relatively straightforward routes to the determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear J-couplings in fluorinated compounds, it also provides new and easy ways for the determination of residual dipolar couplings and thus for structure elucidation. The examples and results presented in this study may contribute to a better interpretation and understanding of various F-C correlation experiments and thereby stimulate their utilization.

  5. Estimates of Oil and Gas Potential of Source Rock by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbottom, T. L.; Hockaday, W. C.; Boling, K. S.; Dworkin, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Kerogen is defined as the insoluble fraction of organic matter preserved in sediments. Due to its structural complexity, kerogen is poorly understood, yet it holds vast economic importance as petroleum source rock, and represents the largest organic carbon pool on earth. Kerogen originates from a mixture of organic biomolecules and tends to be dominated by the polymeric components of cell walls and cellular membranes, which undergo interactions with sedimentary minerals at elevated temperature and pressure upon burial. Due to the importance of burial diagenesis to petroleum formation, much of our knowledge of chemical properties of kerogens is related to diagenetic and catagenetic effects. The more common geochemical evaluations of the oil and gas potentials of source rock are based upon proximate analyses such as hydrogen and oxygen indices and thermal stability indices, such as those provided by Fisher assay and Rock Eval®. However, proximate analyses provide limited information regarding the chemical structure of kerogens, and therefore provide little insight to the processes of kerogen formation. NMR spectra of kerogen have been previously shown to be useful in estimating oil and gas potential, and the proposed study seeks to refine nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool in kerogen characterization, specifically for the purpose of oil and gas potential calculations.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of interaction of ligands with Streptococcus faecium dihydrofolate reductase labeled with (. gamma. -/sup 13/C)tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.E.; Groff, J.P.; Cocco, L.; Blakley, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase from Streptococcus faecium has been labeled with (..gamma..-/sup 13/C)tryptophan. We have determined changes occurring in the chemical shifts and line widths of the four resonances of the /sup 13/C NMR spectrum of the labeled enzyme, due to its interaction with various ligands. These include the coenzyme, NPDPH and related nucleotides, folate and its polyglutamate derivatives, and many inhibitors including methotrexate and trimethoprim. In addition, paramagnetic relaxation effects produced by a bound spin-labeled analogue of 2'-phosphoadenosine-5'-diphosphoribose on the tryptophan C/sup ..gamma../ carbons have been measured. Distances calculated from the relaxation data have been compared with corresponding distances in the crystallographic model of the NADPH-methotrexate ternary complex of Lactobacillus casei reductase. The paramagnetic relaxation data indicate that the two downfield resonances (1 and 2) correspond to tryptophans (W/sub A/ and W/sub B/) that are more remote from the catalytic site, and from the crystallographic model these are seen to be Trp-115 and Trp-160. The upfield resonances (3 and 4) that show broadening due to chemical exchange correspond to closer residues (W/sub C/ and W/sub D/), and these are identified with Trp-6 and Trp-22. However, the relaxation data do not permit specific assignments within the nearer and farther pairs. Although resonance 3, which is split due to chemical exchange, was formerly assigned to Trp-6, data obtained for the enzyme in the presence of various ligands are better interpreted if resonance 3 is assigned to Trp-22, which is located on a loop that joins elements of secondary structure and forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity.

  7. (13)C-labeled biochemical probes for the study of cancer metabolism with dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Keshari, Kayvan R

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, advances in metabolic imaging have become dependable tools for the diagnosis and treatment assessment in cancer. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has recently emerged as a promising technology in hyperpolarized (HP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and has reached clinical relevance with the successful visualization of [1-(13)C] pyruvate as a molecular imaging probe in human prostate cancer. This review focuses on introducing representative compounds relevant to metabolism that are characteristic of cancer tissue: aerobic glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism, glutamine addiction and glutamine/glutamate metabolism, and the redox state and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate metabolism. In addition, a brief introduction of probes that can be used to trace necrosis, pH changes, and other pathways relevant to cancer is presented to demonstrate the potential that HP MRI has to revolutionize the use of molecular imaging for diagnosis and assessment of treatments in cancer.

  8. Detection of poly(ethylene glycol) residues from nonionic surfactants in surface water by1h and13c nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Brown, P.A.; Noyes, T.I.

    1991-01-01

    ??? Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) residues were detected in organic solute isolates from surface water by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), 13C NMR spectrometry, and colorimetric assay. PEG residues were separated from natural organic solutes in Clear Creek, CO, by a combination of methylation and chromatographic procedures. The isolated PEG residues, characterized by NMR spectrometry, were found to consist of neutral and acidic residues that also contained poly(propylene glycol) moieties. The 1H NMR and the colorimetric assays for poly(ethylene glycol) residues were done on samples collected in the lower Mississippi River and tributaries between St. Louis, MO, and New Orleans, LA, in July-August and November-December 1987. Aqueous concentrations for poly(ethylene glycol) residues based on colorimetric assay ranged from undetectable to ???28 ??g/L. Concentrations based on 1H NMR spectrometry ranged from undetectable to 145 ??g/L.

  9. Room-temperature in situ nuclear spin hyperpolarization from optically pumped nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    King, Jonathan P.; Jeong, Keunhong; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Shin, Chang S.; Page, Ralph H.; Avalos, Claudia E.; Wang, Hai-Jing; Pines, Alexander

    2015-12-07

    Low detection sensitivity stemming from the weak polarization of nuclear spins is a primary limitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Methods have been developed to enhance nuclear spin polarization but they typically require high magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures or sample transfer between magnets. Here we report bulk, room-temperature hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins observed via high-field magnetic resonance. The technique harnesses the high optically induced spin polarization of diamond nitrogen vacancy centres at room temperature in combination with dynamic nuclear polarization. We observe bulk nuclear spin polarization of 6%, an enhancement of ~170,000 over thermal equilibrium. The signal of the hyperpolarized spins was detected in situ with a standard nuclear magnetic resonance probe without the need for sample shuttling or precise crystal orientation. In conclusion, hyperpolarization via optical pumping/dynamic nuclear polarization should function at arbitrary magnetic fields enabling orders of magnitude sensitivity enhancement for nuclear magnetic resonance of solids and liquids under ambient conditions.

  10. Room-temperature in situ nuclear spin hyperpolarization from optically pumped nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    DOE PAGES

    King, Jonathan P.; Jeong, Keunhong; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Shin, Chang S.; Page, Ralph H.; Avalos, Claudia E.; Wang, Hai-Jing; Pines, Alexander

    2015-12-07

    Low detection sensitivity stemming from the weak polarization of nuclear spins is a primary limitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Methods have been developed to enhance nuclear spin polarization but they typically require high magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures or sample transfer between magnets. Here we report bulk, room-temperature hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins observed via high-field magnetic resonance. The technique harnesses the high optically induced spin polarization of diamond nitrogen vacancy centres at room temperature in combination with dynamic nuclear polarization. We observe bulk nuclear spin polarization of 6%, an enhancement of ~170,000 over thermal equilibrium. The signal ofmore » the hyperpolarized spins was detected in situ with a standard nuclear magnetic resonance probe without the need for sample shuttling or precise crystal orientation. In conclusion, hyperpolarization via optical pumping/dynamic nuclear polarization should function at arbitrary magnetic fields enabling orders of magnitude sensitivity enhancement for nuclear magnetic resonance of solids and liquids under ambient conditions.« less

  11. Beta-hairpin formation in aqueous solution and in the presence of trifluoroethanol: a (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance conformational study of designed peptides.

    PubMed

    Santiveri, Clara M; Pantoja-Uceda, David; Rico, Manuel; Jiménez, M Angeles

    2005-10-15

    In order to check our current knowledge on the principles involved in beta-hairpin formation, we have modified the sequence of a 3:5 beta-hairpin forming peptide with two different purposes, first to increase the stability of the formed 3:5 beta-hairpin, and second to convert the 3:5 beta-hairpin into a 2:2 beta-hairpin. The conformational behavior of the designed peptides was investigated in aqueous solution and in 30% trifluoroethanol (TFE) by analysis of the following nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters: nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) data, and C(alpha)H, (13)C(alpha), and (13)C(beta) conformational shifts. From the differences in the ability to adopt beta-hairpin structures in these peptides, we have arrived to the following conclusions: (i) beta-Hairpin population increases with the statistical propensity of residues to occupy each turn position. (ii) The loop length, and in turn, the beta-hairpin type, can be modified as a function of the type of turn favored by the loop sequence. These two conclusions reinforce previous results about the importance of beta-turn sequence in beta-hairpin folding. (iii) Side-chain packing on each face of the beta-sheet may play a major role in beta-hairpin stability; hence simplified analysis in terms of isolated pair interactions and intrinsic beta-sheet propensities is insufficient. (iv) Contributions to beta-hairpin stability of turn and strand sequences are not completely independent. (v) The burial of hydrophobic surface upon beta-hairpin formation that, in turn, depends on side-chain packing also contributes to beta-hairpin stability. (vi) As previously observed, TFE stabilizes beta-hairpin structures, but the extent of the contribution of different factors to beta-hairpin formation is sometimes different in aqueous solution and in 30% TFE.

  12. Optical quantum memory made from single nuclear spin in nitrogen vacancy in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sen; Wang, Ya; Tran, Thai Hien; Momenzadeh, S. Ali; Stoehr, Rainer; Neumann, Philipp; Kosaka, Hideo; Wrachtrup, Joerg

    2015-03-01

    Quantum repeater is one of the key elements to realize long distance quantum communication. In the heart of a quantum repeater is quantum memory. There are a few requirements for this memory: it needs to couple to flying qubits: photon; it needs to have long coherence time, so quantum error correction algorithm can be performed in the quantum repeater nods; it needs to be stable under optical illuminations. Nitrogen nuclear spin is available for every nitrogen vacancy center(NV) in diamond. Besides it can be a robust quantum memory for spin qubit operations, nitrogen nuclear spin can couple to photon by taking advantage of optically resonant excitation of spin-selective transitions in low temperature. Here we demonstrate the coherent storage of quantum information from photon into nuclear spin. We show this quantum memory fulfils requirements as quantum memory for quantum repeater. Coherent time beyond 5 seconds is measured in 13 C natural abundant sample. Under resonant laser excitations, the excited state quadruple and hyperfine interaction could lead to decoherence of nuclear spin. We show those interactions are low and nuclear spin can keep its coherence over 1000 times resonant laser excitation of electron spin.

  13. Liquid-State Nuclear Spin Comagnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledbetter, M. P.; Pustelny, S.; Budker, D.; Romalis, M. V.; Blanchard, J. W.; Pines, A.

    2012-06-01

    We discuss nuclear spin comagnetometers based on ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance in mixtures of miscible solvents, each rich in a different nuclear spin. In one version thereof, Larmor precession of protons and F19 nuclei in a mixture of thermally polarized pentane and hexafluorobenzene is monitored via a sensitive alkali-vapor magnetometer. We realize transverse relaxation times in excess of 20 s and suppression of magnetic field fluctuations by a factor of 3400. We estimate it should be possible to achieve single-shot sensitivity of about 5×10-9Hz, or about 5×10-11Hz in ≈1 day of integration. In a second version, spin precession of protons and Xe129 nuclei in a mixture of pentane and hyperpolarized liquid xenon is monitored using superconducting quantum interference devices. Application to spin-gravity experiments, electric dipole moment experiments, and sensitive gyroscopes is discussed.

  14. Effects of stereoelectronic interactions on the relativistic spin-orbit and paramagnetic components of the (13)C NMR shielding tensors of dihaloethenes.

    PubMed

    Viesser, Renan V; Ducati, Lucas C; Autschbach, Jochen; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2015-07-15

    In this study, stereoelectronic interactions were considered to explain the experimental difference in the magnitude of the known heavy-atom effect on the (13)C NMR chemical shifts in cis- and trans-1,2-dihaloethene isomers (halo = F, Cl, Br or I). The experimental values were compared to the calculated values with various DFT functionals using both the nonrelativistic approach (NR) and the relativistic approximations SR-ZORA (SR) and SO-ZORA (SO). NBO and NLMO contributions to the (13)C NMR shielding tensors were determined to assess which stereoelectronic interactions have a more important effect on the shielding tensor in each principal axis system (PAS) coordinate. These analyses associated with the orbital rotation model and the HOMO-LUMO energy gap enable rationalization of trends between cis and trans isomers from fluorine to iodine derivatives. Both paramagnetic and SO shielding terms were responsible for the observed trends. It was possible to conclude that the steric interactions between the two iodine atoms and the hyperconjugative interactions involving the halogen lone pairs (LP(X)) and πC[double bond, length as m-dash]C*, σC[double bond, length as m-dash]C* and σC-X* antibonding orbitals are responsible for the lower (13)C NMR shielding for the cis isomers of the bromine and the iodine compounds than that of the trans isomers.

  15. Ascorbic acid prolongs the viability and stability of isolated perfused lungs: A mechanistic study using 31P and hyperpolarized 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Shaghaghi, Hoora; Kadlecek, Stephen; Siddiqui, Sarmad; Pourfathi, Mehrdad; Hamedani, Hooman; Clapp, Justin; Profka, Harrilla; Rizi, Rahim

    2015-12-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has recently shown promise as a means of more accurately gauging the health of lung grafts and improving graft performance post-transplant. However, reperfusion of ischemic lung promotes the depletion of high-energy compounds and a progressive loss of normal mitochondrial function, and it remains unclear how and to what extent the EVLP approach contributes to this metabolic decline. Although ascorbate has been used to mitigate the effects of ischemia-reperfusion injury, the nature of its effects during EVLP are also not clear. To address these uncertainties, this study monitored the energy status of lungs during EVLP and after the administration of ascorbate using (31)P and hyperpolarized (13)C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance). Our experiments demonstrated that the oxidative phosphorylation capacity and pyruvate dehydrogenase flux of lungs decline during ex vivo perfusion. The addition of ascorbate to the perfusate prolonged lung viability by 80% and increased the hyperpolarized (13)C bicarbonate signal by a factor of 2.7. The effect of ascorbate is apparently due not to its antioxidant quality but rather to its ability to energize cellular respiration given that it increased the lung's energy charge significantly, whereas other antioxidants (glutathione and α-lipoic acid) did not alter energy metabolism. During ascorbate administration, inhibition of mitochondrial complex I with rotenone depressed energy charge and shifted the metabolic state of the lung toward glycolysis; reenergizing the electron transport chain with TMPD (N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine) recovered metabolic activity. This indicates that ascorbate slows the decline of the ex vivo perfused lung's mitochondrial activity through an independent interaction with the electron transport chain complexes.

  16. Measurement of untruncated nuclear spin interactions via zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, J. W.; Sjolander, T. F.; King, J. P.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Levine, E. H.; Bajaj, V. S.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF NMR) provides a new regime for the measurement of nuclear spin-spin interactions free from the effects of large magnetic fields, such as truncation of terms that do not commute with the Zeeman Hamiltonian. One such interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling, is a valuable source of spatial information in NMR, though many terms are unobservable in high-field NMR, and the coupling averages to zero under isotropic molecular tumbling. Under partial alignment, this information is retained in the form of so-called residual dipolar couplings. We report zero- to ultralow-field NMR measurements of residual dipolar couplings in acetonitrile-2-13C aligned in stretched polyvinyl acetate gels. This permits the investigation of dipolar couplings as a perturbation on the indirect spin-spin J coupling in the absence of an applied magnetic field. As a consequence of working at zero magnetic field, we observe terms of the dipole-dipole coupling Hamiltonian that are invisible in conventional high-field NMR. This technique expands the capabilities of zero- to ultralow-field NMR and has potential applications in precision measurement of subtle physical interactions, chemical analysis, and characterization of local mesoscale structure in materials.

  17. The spin-temperature theory of dynamic nuclear polarization and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Wollan, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed derivation of the equations governing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and nuclear spin lattice relaxation by use of the spin temperature theory has been carried to second order in a perturbation expansion of the density matrix. Nuclear spin diffusion in the rapid diffusion limit and the effects of the coupling of the electron dipole-dipole reservoir (EDDR) with the nuclear spins are incorporated. The complete expression for the dynamic nuclear polarization has been derived and then examined in detail for the limit of well resolved solid effect transitions. Exactly at the solid effect transition peaks, the conventional solid-effect DNP results are obtained, but with EDDR effects on the nuclear relaxation and DNP leakage factor included. Explicit EDDR contributions to DNP are discussed, and a new DNP effect is predicted.

  18. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the biosynthesis by Microbacterium ammoniaphilum of L-glutamate selectively enriched with carbon-13

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.E.; Han, C.H.; Kollman, V.H.; London, R.E.; Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1982-02-10

    /sup 13/C NMR of isotopically enriched metabolites has been used to study the metabolism of Microbacterium ammoniaphilum, a bacterium which excretes large quantities of L-glutamic acid into the medium. Biosynthesis from 90% (1-/sup 13/C) glucose results in relatively high specificity of the label, with (2,4-/sup 13/C/sub 2/) glutamate as the major product. The predominant biosynthetic pathway for synthesis of glutamate from glucose was determined to be the Embden Meyerhof glycolytic pathway followed by P-enolpyruvate carboxylase and the first third of the Krebs cycle. Different metabolic pathways are associated with different correlations in the enrichment of the carbons, reflected in the spectrum as different /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C scalar multiplet intensities. Hence, intensity and /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C multiplet analysis allows quantitation of the pathways involved. Although blockage of the Krebs cycle at the ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase step is the basis for the accumulation of glutamate, significant Krebs cycle activity was found in glucose grown cells, and extensive Krebs cycle activity in cells metabolizing (1-/sup 13/C) acetate. In addition to the observation of the expected metabolites, the disaccharide ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-trehalose and ..cap alpha..,..beta..-glucosylamine were identified from the /sup 13/C NMR spectra.

  19. Detection and Control of Individual Nuclear Spins Using a Weakly Coupled Electron Spin

    SciTech Connect

    Taminiau, T.H.; Wagenaar, J.J.T.; van der Sar, T.; Jelezko, F.; Dobrovitski, Viatcheslav V.; Hanson, R.

    2012-09-28

    We experimentally isolate, characterize, and coherently control up to six individual nuclear spins that are weakly coupled to an electron spin in diamond. Our method employs multipulse sequences on the electron spin that resonantly amplify the interaction with a selected nuclear spin and at the same time dynamically suppress decoherence caused by the rest of the spin bath. We are able to address nuclear spins with interaction strengths that are an order of magnitude smaller than the electron spin dephasing rate. Our results provide a route towards tomography with single-nuclear-spin sensitivity and greatly extend the number of available quantum bits for quantum information processing in diamond.

  20. Dipolar-coupling-mediated total correlation spectroscopy in solid-state 13C NMR: Selection of individual 13C- 13C dipolar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spano, Justin; Wi, Sungsool

    2010-06-01

    Herein is described a useful approach in solid-state NMR, for selecting homonuclear 13C- 13C spin pairs in a multiple- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupled spin system. This method builds upon the zero-quantum (ZQ) dipolar recoupling method introduced by Levitt and coworkers (Marin-Montesinos et al., 2006 [30]) by extending the originally introduced one-dimensional (1D) experiment into a two-dimensional (2D) method with selective irradiation scheme, while moving the 13C- 13C mixing scheme from the transverse to the longitudinal mode, together with a dramatic improvement in the proton decoupling efficiency. Selective spin-pair recoupling experiments incorporating Gaussian and cosine-modulated Gaussian pulses for inverting specific spins were performed, demonstrating the ability to detect informative, simplified/individualized, long-range 13C- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupling interactions more accurately by removing less informative, stronger, short-range 13C- 13C interactions from 2D correlation spectra. The capability of this new approach was demonstrated experimentally on uniformly 13C-labeled Glutamine and a tripeptide sample, GAL.

  1. Conditions for (13)C NMR detection of 2-hydroxyglutarate in tissue extracts from isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutated gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pichumani, Kumar; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Ratnakar, James; Mickey, Bruce; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Maher, Elizabeth A; Bachoo, Robert M; Malloy, Craig R; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2015-07-15

    (13)C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy of extracts from patient tumor samples provides rich information about metabolism. However, in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutant gliomas, (13)C labeling is obscured in oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutaric acid (2 HG) by glutamate and glutamine, prompting development of a simple method to resolve the metabolites. J-coupled multiplets in 2 HG were similar to glutamate and glutamine and could be clearly resolved at pH 6. A cryogenically cooled (13)C probe, but not J-resolved heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectroscopy, significantly improved detection of 2 HG. These methods enable the monitoring of (13)C-(13)C spin-spin couplings in 2 HG expressing IDH-mutant gliomas.

  2. Nuclear moment of inertia and spin distribution of nuclear levels

    SciTech Connect

    Alhassid, Y.; Fang, L.; Liu, S.; Bertsch, G.F.

    2005-12-15

    We introduce a simple model to calculate the nuclear moment of inertia at finite temperature. This moment of inertia describes the spin distribution of nuclear levels in the framework of the spin-cutoff model. Our model is based on a deformed single-particle Hamiltonian with pairing interaction and takes into account fluctuations in the pairing gap. We derive a formula for the moment of inertia at finite temperature that generalizes the Belyaev formula for zero temperature. We show that a number-parity projection explains the strong odd-even effects observed in shell model Monte Carlo studies of the nuclear moment of inertia in the iron region.

  3. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of 1H, 13C, and 59Co in a Tris(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) Crystalline Lattice Doped with Cr(III)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The study of inorganic crystalline materials by solid-state NMR spectroscopy is often complicated by the low sensitivity of heavy nuclei. However, these materials often contain or can be prepared with paramagnetic dopants without significantly affecting the structure of the crystalline host. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is generally capable of enhancing NMR signals by transferring the magnetization of unpaired electrons to the nuclei. Therefore, the NMR sensitivity in these paramagnetically doped crystals might be increased by DNP. In this paper we demonstrate the possibility of efficient DNP transfer in polycrystalline samples of [Co(en)3Cl3]2·NaCl·6H2O (en = ethylenediamine, C2H8N2) doped with Cr(III) in varying concentrations between 0.1 and 3 mol %. We demonstrate that 1H, 13C, and 59Co can be polarized by irradiation of Cr(III) with 140 GHz microwaves at a magnetic field of 5 T. We further explain our findings on the basis of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of the Cr(III) site and analysis of its temperature-dependent zero-field splitting, as well as the dependence of the DNP enhancement factor on the external magnetic field and microwave power. This first demonstration of DNP transfer from one paramagnetic metal ion to its diamagnetic host metal ion will pave the way for future applications of DNP in paramagnetically doped materials or metalloproteins. PMID:25069794

  4. Transport and imaging of brute-force (13)C hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Smith, Bryce A; Mattingly, Mark; Goloshevsky, Artem G; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate transport of hyperpolarized frozen 1-(13)C pyruvic acid from its site of production to a nearby facility, where a time series of (13)C images was acquired from the aqueous dissolution product. Transportability is tied to the hyperpolarization (HP) method we employ, which omits radical electron species used in other approaches that would otherwise relax away the HP before reaching the imaging center. In particular, we attained (13)C HP by 'brute-force', i.e., using only low temperature and high-field (e.g., T<∼2K and B∼14T) to pre-polarize protons to a large Boltzmann value (∼0.4% (1)H polarization). After polarizing the neat, frozen sample, ejection quickly (<1s) passed it through a low field (B<100G) to establish the (1)H pre-polarization spin temperature on (13)C via the process known as low-field thermal mixing (yielding ∼0.1% (13)C polarization). By avoiding polarization agents (a.k.a. relaxation agents) that are needed to hyperpolarize by the competing method of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP), the (13)C relaxation time was sufficient to transport the sample for ∼10min before finally dissolving in warm water and obtaining a (13)C image of the hyperpolarized, dilute, aqueous product (∼0.01% (13)C polarization, a >100-fold gain over thermal signals in the 1T scanner). An annealing step, prior to polarizing the sample, was also key for increasing T1∼30-fold during transport. In that time, HP was maintained using only modest cryogenics and field (T∼60K and B=1.3T), for T1((13)C) near 5min. Much greater time and distance (with much smaller losses) may be covered using more-complete annealing and only slight improvements on transport conditions (e.g., yielding T1∼5h at 30K, 2T), whereas even intercity transfer is possible (T1>20h) at reasonable conditions of 6K and 2T. Finally, it is possible to increase the overall enhancement near d-DNP levels (i.e., 10(2)-fold more) by polarizing below 100mK, where nanoparticle

  5. Transport and imaging of brute-force 13C hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Smith, Bryce A.; Mattingly, Mark; Goloshevsky, Artem G.; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate transport of hyperpolarized frozen 1-13C pyruvic acid from its site of production to a nearby facility, where a time series of 13C images was acquired from the aqueous dissolution product. Transportability is tied to the hyperpolarization (HP) method we employ, which omits radical electron species used in other approaches that would otherwise relax away the HP before reaching the imaging center. In particular, we attained 13C HP by 'brute-force', i.e., using only low temperature and high-field (e.g., T < ∼2 K and B ∼ 14 T) to pre-polarize protons to a large Boltzmann value (∼0.4% 1H polarization). After polarizing the neat, frozen sample, ejection quickly (<1 s) passed it through a low field (B < 100 G) to establish the 1H pre-polarization spin temperature on 13C via the process known as low-field thermal mixing (yielding ∼0.1% 13C polarization). By avoiding polarization agents (a.k.a. relaxation agents) that are needed to hyperpolarize by the competing method of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP), the 13C relaxation time was sufficient to transport the sample for ∼10 min before finally dissolving in warm water and obtaining a 13C image of the hyperpolarized, dilute, aqueous product (∼0.01% 13C polarization, a >100-fold gain over thermal signals in the 1 T scanner). An annealing step, prior to polarizing the sample, was also key for increasing T1 ∼ 30-fold during transport. In that time, HP was maintained using only modest cryogenics and field (T ∼ 60 K and B = 1.3 T), for T1(13C) near 5 min. Much greater time and distance (with much smaller losses) may be covered using more-complete annealing and only slight improvements on transport conditions (e.g., yielding T1 ∼ 5 h at 30 K, 2 T), whereas even intercity transfer is possible (T1 > 20 h) at reasonable conditions of 6 K and 2 T. Finally, it is possible to increase the overall enhancement near d-DNP levels (i.e., 102-fold more) by polarizing below 100 mK, where

  6. 1H-13C/1H-15N Heteronuclear Dipolar Recoupling by R-Symmetry Sequences Under Fast Magic Angle Spinning for Dynamics Analysis of Biological and Organic Solids

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guangjin; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2011-01-01

    Fast magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is becoming increasingly important in structural and dynamics studies of biological systems and inorganic materials. Superior spectral resolution due to the efficient averaging of the dipolar couplings can be attained at MAS frequencies of 40 kHz and higher with appropriate decoupling techniques, while proton detection gives rise to significant sensitivity gains, therefore making fast MAS conditions advantageous across the board compared with the conventional slow- and moderate-MAS approaches. At the same time, many of the dipolar recoupling approaches that currently constitute the basis for structural and dynamics studies of solid materials and that are designed for MAS frequencies of 20 kHz and below, fail above 30 kHz. In this report, we present an approach for 1H-13C/1H-15N heteronuclear dipolar recoupling under fast MAS conditions using R-type symmetry sequences, which is suitable even for fully protonated systems. A series of rotor-synchronized R-type symmetry pulse schemes are explored for the determination of structure and dynamics in biological and organic systems. The investigations of the performance of the various RNnv-symmetry sequences at the MAS frequency of 40 kHz experimentally and by numerical simulations on [U-13C,15N]-alanine and [U-13C,15N]-N-acetyl-valine, revealed excellent performance for sequences with high symmetry number ratio (N/2n > 2.5). Further applications of this approach are presented for two proteins, sparsely 13C/uniformly 15N enriched CAP-Gly domain of dynactin and U-13C,15N-Tyr enriched C-terminal domain of HIV-1 CA protein. 2D and 3D R1632-based DIPSHIFT experiments carried out at the MAS frequency of 40 kHz, yielded site-specific 1H-13C/1H-15N heteronuclear dipolar coupling constants for CAP-Gly and CTD CA, reporting on the dynamic behavior of these proteins on time scales of nano- to microseconds. The R-symmetry based dipolar recoupling under fast MAS is expected to find

  7. /sup 18/O isotope effect in /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Part 9. Hydrolysis of benzyl phosphate by phosphatase enzymes and in acidic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Parente, J.E.; Risley, J.M.; Van Etten, R.L.

    1984-12-26

    The /sup 18/O isotope-induced shifts in /sup 13/C and /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to establish the position of bond cleavage in the phosphatase-catalyzed and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis reactions of benzyl phosphate. The application of the /sup 18/O-isotope effect in NMR spectroscopy affords a continuous, nondestructive assay method for following the kinetics and position of bond cleavage in the hydrolytic process. The technique provides advantages over most discontinuous methods in which the reaction components must be isolated and converted to volatile derivatives prior to analysis. In the present study, (..cap alpha..-/sup 13/C,ester-/sup 18/O)benzyl phosphate and (ester-/sup 18/O)benzyl phosphate were synthesized for use in enzymatic and nonenzymatic studies. Hydrolysis reactions catalyzed by the alkaline phosphatase from E. coli and by the acid phosphatases isolated from human prostate and human liver were all accompanied by cleavage of the substrate phosphorus-oxygen bond consistent with previously postulated mechanisms involving covalent phosphoenzyme intermediates. An extensive study of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of benzyl phosphate at 75/sup 0/C revealed that the site of bond cleavage is dependent on pH. At pH less than or equal to 1.3, the hydrolysis proceeds with C-O bond cleavage; at 1.3 < pH < 2.0, there is a mixture of C-O and P-O bond scission, the latter progressively predominating as the pH is raised; at pH greater than or equal to 2.0, the hydrolysis proceeds with exclusive P-O bond scission. (S)-(+)-(..cap alpha..-/sup 2/H)Benzyl phosphate was also synthesized. Hydrolysis of this chiral benzyl derivative demonstrated that the acid-catalyzed C-O bond scission of benzyl phosphate proceeds by an A-1 (S/sub N/1) mechanism with 70% racemization and 30% inversion at carbon. 37 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Experimental demonstration of stimulated polarization wave in a chain of nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Adams, Travis; Khitrin, Anatoly

    2007-03-01

    A one-dimensional Ising chain irradiated by weak resonant transverse field is the simplest model of quantum amplifier [Phys. Rev. A 71, 062338 (2005)]. The quantum state of the chain is stationary when all the qubits (spins) are in the same state. However, when the first qubit is flipped, it triggers a stimulated wave of flipped qubits, propagating through the chain. Such ``quantum domino" dynamics induces huge change in the total polarization, a macroscopic observable. Here we present the experimental demonstration of this quantum amplification process on a four-qubit system by using nuclear magnetic resonance technique. The physical system is a linear chain of four ^13C nuclear spins in a molecule of fully ^ 13C-labeled sodium butyrate dissolved in D2O. The pseudopure ground state (with all spins up) is prepared by multi-frequency partial saturation. The wave of flipped spins has been clearly observed when the first spin of the chain is flipped. We define a coefficient of amplification as the relative enhancement of the total polarization change. In our experimental system, the measured coefficient of amplification is about 3.

  9. Nuclear spin effects in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Martin M.; Zelevinsky, Tanya; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Blatt, Sebastian; Zanon-Willette, Thomas; Foreman, Seth M.; Ye Jun

    2007-08-15

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study of the effect of nuclear spin on the performance of optical lattice clocks. With a state-mixing theory including spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions, we describe the origin of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition and the differential g factor between the two clock states for alkaline-earth-metal(-like) atoms, using {sup 87}Sr as an example. Clock frequency shifts due to magnetic and optical fields are discussed with an emphasis on those relating to nuclear structure. An experimental determination of the differential g factor in {sup 87}Sr is performed and is in good agreement with theory. The magnitude of the tensor light shift on the clock states is also explored experimentally. State specific measurements with controlled nuclear spin polarization are discussed as a method to reduce the nuclear spin-related systematic effects to below 10{sup -17} in lattice clocks.

  10. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20-25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier, but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional (13)C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly (13)C-labeled l-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly (13)C-labeled amino acids. PMID:23238592

  11. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20-25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids.

  12. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20–25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier (Thurber et al., J. Magn. Reson. 2008) [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids. PMID:23238592

  13. Nuclear spin physics in quantum dots: An optical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbaszek, Bernhard; Marie, Xavier; Amand, Thierry; Krebs, Olivier; Voisin, Paul; Maletinsky, Patrick; Högele, Alexander; Imamoglu, Atac

    2013-01-01

    The mesoscopic spin system formed by the 104-106 nuclear spins in a semiconductor quantum dot offers a unique setting for the study of many-body spin physics in the condensed matter. The dynamics of this system and its coupling to electron spins is fundamentally different from its bulk counterpart or the case of individual atoms due to increased fluctuations that result from reduced dimensions. In recent years, the interest in studying quantum-dot nuclear spin systems and their coupling to confined electron spins has been further fueled by its importance for possible quantum information processing applications. The fascinating nonlinear (quantum) dynamics of the coupled electron-nuclear spin system is universal in quantum dot optics and transport. In this article, experimental work performed over the last decade in studying this mesoscopic, coupled electron-nuclear spin system is reviewed. Here a special focus is on how optical addressing of electron spins can be exploited to manipulate and read out the quantum-dot nuclei. Particularly exciting recent developments in applying optical techniques to efficiently establish nonzero mean nuclear spin polarizations and using them to reduce intrinsic nuclear spin fluctuations are discussed. Both results critically influence the preservation of electron-spin coherence in quantum dots. This overall recently gained understanding of the quantum-dot nuclear spin system could enable exciting new research avenues such as experimental observations of spontaneous spin ordering or nonclassical behavior of the nuclear spin bath.

  14. Feedback control of nuclear spin bath for a single hole spin in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hongliang; Gong, Zhirui; Yao, Wang

    2014-03-01

    In a semiconductor quantum dot, the nuclear spin bath plays an important role as the ultimate environment of an electron or hole spin at low temperature. Through dynamic nuclear spin polarization driven by an oscillating electric field, we show that feedback controls can be implemented on the nuclear spin bath of a single hole spin. The feedback controls utilize the anisotropic hyperfine interaction between the hole spin and the nuclear spins. The negative feedback can suppress the statistical fluctuations of the nuclear hyperfine field and lead to longer coherence time of the hole spin. Positive feedback can possibly lead to cat like state of nuclear spin bath. The efficiency of the controls schemes is investigated under different parameters and control strategies. The work is supported by the Croucher Foundation under the Croucher Innovation Award, and the Research Grant Council of Hong Kong (HKU706309P, HKU8/CRF/11G).

  15. Tracing bacterial metabolism using multi-nuclear (1H, 2H, and 13C) Solid State NMR: Realizing an Idea Initiated by James Scott

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G.; Fogel, M. L.; Jin, K.; Griffen, P.; Steele, A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 6 years ago, while at the Geophysical Laboratory, James Scott became interested in the application of Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to study bacterial metabolism. As often happens, other experiments intervened and the NMR experiments were not pursued. We have revisited Jame's question and find that using a multi-nuclear approach (1H, 2H, and 13C Solid State NMR) on laboratory cell culture has some distinct advantages. Our experiments involved batch cultures of E. coli (MG1655) harvested at stationary phase. In all experiments the growth medium consisted of MOPS medium for enterobacteria, where the substrate is glucose. In one set of experiments, 10 % of the water was D2O; in another 10 % of the glucose was per-deuterated. The control experiment used both water and glucose at natural isotopic abundance. A kill control of dead E. coli immersed in pure D2O for an extended period exhibited no deuterium incorporation. In both deuterium enriched experiments, considerable incorporation of deuterium into E. coli's biomolecular constituents was detected via 2H Solid State NMR. In the case of the D2O enriched experiment, 58 % of the incorporated deuterium is observed in a sharp peak at a frequency of 0.31 ppm, consistent with D incorporation in the cell membrane lipids, the remainder is observed in a broad peak at a higher frequency (centered at 5.4 ppm, but spanning out to beyond 10 ppm) that is consistent with D incorporation into predominantly DNA and RNA. In the case of the D-glucose experiments, 61 % of the deuterium is observed in a sharp resonance peak at 0.34 ppm, also consistent with D incorporation into membrane lipids, the remainder of the D is observed at a broad resonance peak centered at 4.3 ppm, consistent with D enrichment in glycogen. Deuterium abundance in the E. coli cells grown in 10 % D2O is nearly 2X greater than that grown with 10 % D-glucose. Very subtle differences are observed in both the 1H and 13C solid

  16. In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR Investigation of Supercritical CO2 Incorporation in Smectite-Natural Organic Matter Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Hoyt, David W.; Burton, Sarah D.; Ferguson, Brennan O.; Varga, Tamas; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.

    2014-01-29

    This paper presents an in situ NMR study of clay-natural organic polymer systems (a hectoritehumic acid [HA] composite) under CO2 storage reservoir conditions (90 bars CO2 pressure, 50°C). The 13C and 23Na NMR data show that supercritical CO2 interacts more strongly with the composite than with the base clay and does not react to form other C-containing species over several days at elevated CO2. With and without organic matter, the data suggest that CO2 enters the interlayer space of Na-hectorite equilibrated at 43% relative humidity. The presence of supercritical CO2 also leads to increased 23Na signal intensity, reduced line width at half height, increased basal width, more rapid 23Na T1 relaxation rates, and a shift to more positive resonance frequencies. Larger changes are observed for the hectorite-HA composite than for the base clay. In light of recently reported MD simulations of other polymer-Na-smectite composites, we interpret the observed changes as an increase in the rate of Na+ site hopping in the presence of supercritical CO2, the presence of potential new Na+ sorption sites when the humic acid is present, and perhaps an accompanying increase in the number of Na+ ions actively involved in site hopping. The results suggest that the presence of organic material either in clay interlayers or on external particle surfaces can significantly affect the behavior of supercritical CO2 and the mobility of metal ions in reservoir rocks.

  17. 29Si nuclear spins as a resource for donor spin qubits in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfowicz, Gary; Mortemousque, Pierre-André; Guichard, Roland; Simmons, Stephanie; Thewalt, Mike L. W.; Itoh, Kohei M.; Morton, John J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear spin registers in the vicinity of electron spins in solid state systems offer a powerful resource to address the challenge of scalability in quantum architectures. We investigate here the properties of 29Si nuclear spins surrounding donor atoms in silicon, and consider the use of such spins, combined with the donor nuclear spin, as a quantum register coupled to the donor electron spin. We find the coherence of the nearby 29Si nuclear spins is effectively protected by the presence of the donor electron spin, leading to coherence times in the second timescale—over two orders of magnitude greater than the coherence times in bulk silicon. We theoretically investigate the use of such a register for quantum error correction (QEC), including methods to protect nuclear spins from the ionisation/neutralisation of the donor, which is necessary for the re-initialisation of the ancillae qubits. This provides a route for multi-round QEC using donors in silicon.

  18. Stochastic molecular motions in the nematic, smectic-A, and solid phases of p,p'-di-n-heptyl-azoxybenzene as seen by quasielastic neutron scattering and 13C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Wojciech; Urban, Stanisław; Domenici, Valentina; Geppi, Marco; Veracini, Carlo Alberto; Telling, Mark T F; Gabryś, Barbara J

    2006-05-01

    Molecular rotational dynamics in p,p'-di-n-heptyl-azoxybenzene was studied by means of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and 13C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR. Fast reorientation of the hydrogen nuclei was observed by QENS in the two liquid crystalline (LC) phases nematic and smectic A, as well as in the crystalline phase. The latter could not be restricted to the -CH3 rotations alone, and a clear indication was found of some other reorientation motions persisting in the crystal. Two Lorentz-type components convoluted with the resolution function gave an excellent fit to the QENS spectra in both LC phases. The narrow (slow) component was attributed to the reorientation of the whole molecule around the long axis. The corresponding characteristic time of approximately 130 ps agreed well with the values obtained in recent dielectric relaxation and 2H NMR studies. The full width at half maximum of the broader (fast) component shows a quadratic Q dependence (Q is the momentum transfer). Hence the corresponding motions could be described by a stretched exponential correlation function and were interpreted as various "crankshaft-type" motions within the alkyl tails. The 13C CPMAS experiments fully corroborated the QENS results, sometimes considered ambiguous in complex systems. PMID:16802951

  19. Stochastic molecular motions in the nematic, smectic-A, and solid phases of p,p{sup '}-di-n-heptyl-azoxybenzene as seen by quasielastic neutron scattering and {sup 13}C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning NMR

    SciTech Connect

    ZajaPc, Wojciech; Urban, Stanislaw; Domenici, Valentina; Geppi, Marco; Veracini, Carlo Alberto; Telling, Mark T. F.; Gabrys, Barbara J.

    2006-05-15

    Molecular rotational dynamics in p,p{sup '}-di-n-heptyl-azoxybenzene was studied by means of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and {sup 13}C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR. Fast reorientation of the hydrogen nuclei was observed by QENS in the two liquid crystalline (LC) phases nematic and smectic A, as well as in the crystalline phase. The latter could not be restricted to the -CH{sub 3} rotations alone, and a clear indication was found of some other reorientation motions persisting in the crystal. Two Lorentz-type components convoluted with the resolution function gave an excellent fit to the QENS spectra in both LC phases. The narrow (slow) component was attributed to the reorientation of the whole molecule around the long axis. The corresponding characteristic time of {approx}130 ps agreed well with the values obtained in recent dielectric relaxation and {sup 2}H NMR studies. The full width at half maximum of the broader (fast) component shows a quadratic Q dependence (Q is the momentum transfer). Hence the corresponding motions could be described by a stretched exponential correlation function and were interpreted as various ''crankshaft-type'' motions within the alkyl tails. The {sup 13}C CPMAS experiments fully corroborated the QENS results, sometimes considered ambiguous in complex systems.

  20. Locking electron spins into resonance by electron-nuclear feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, Katja

    2009-03-01

    All basic building blocks for spin-based quantum information processing using electron spins in GaAs quantum dots have recently been realized. Recent experiments have shown single-shot read-out of an individual spin [1], the implementation of the SWAP gate [2] and (magnetically induced) coherent single electron spin rotations [3]. However, the main drawback of using electron spins in a GaAs environment is the short spin coherence time, which is measured to be in the nanosecond range [2,4]. The source of this fast decoherence is the hyperfine interaction of the localized electron spin with the randomly fluctuating nuclear spins of the host lattice. The fluctuations of the nuclear spins have to be reduced to extend the electron spin coherence time. We therefore study the electron-nuclear spin interaction and use magnetically driven spin resonance to control the electron spin and indirectly manipulate the nuclear spins. We apply continuous microwave excitation to the electron spin and observe strong electron-nuclear feedback. One experimental signature of this feedback is the locking of the electron spin system into resonance with the microwaves. Once the electron spin is locked into resonance, this resonance condition remains fullfilled even when the external magnetic field or the microwave frequency is changed. This is due to dynamically build up nuclear polarizations (up to 500 mT) which generally counteract the external magnetic field. Locking of the electron spin system into resonance might indicate that the nuclear polarization exhibits stable configurations where fluctuations of the nuclear distribution are reduced [5]. [4pt] References [0pt] [1] J. M. Elzerman et al. , Nature 430, 431 (2004) [0pt] [2]. J. R. Petta et al., Science 309, 2180 (2005). [0pt] [3] F. H. L. Koppens et al., Nature 442, 766 (2006). [0pt] [4] F. H. L. Koppens et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 236802 (2008). [0pt] [5] J. Danon and Yu. V. Nazarov, private communication.

  1. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  2. Uncovering many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths by central spin decoherence.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen-Long; Wolfowicz, Gary; Zhao, Nan; Li, Shu-Shen; Morton, John J L; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-01-01

    Central spin decoherence caused by nuclear spin baths is often a critical issue in various quantum computing schemes, and it has also been used for sensing single-nuclear spins. Recent theoretical studies suggest that central spin decoherence can act as a probe of many-body physics in spin baths; however, identification and detection of many-body correlations of nuclear spins in nanoscale systems are highly challenging. Here, taking a phosphorus donor electron spin in a (29)Si nuclear spin bath as our model system, we discover both theoretically and experimentally that many-body correlations in nanoscale nuclear spin baths produce identifiable signatures in decoherence of the central spin under multiple-pulse dynamical decoupling control. We demonstrate that under control by an odd or even number of pulses, the central spin decoherence is principally caused by second- or fourth-order nuclear spin correlations, respectively. This study marks an important step toward studying many-body physics using spin qubits.

  3. Production and NMR signal optimization of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Amino acids are targeted nutrients for consumption by cancers to sustain their rapid growth and proliferation. 13C-enriched amino acids are important metabolic tracers for cancer diagnostics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Despite this diagnostic potential, 13C NMR of amino acids however is hampered by the inherently low NMR sensitivity of the 13C nuclei. In this work, we have employed a physics technique known as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance the NMR signals of 13C-enriched amino acids. DNP works by transferring the high polarization of electrons to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Using a fast dissolution method in which the frozen polarized samples are dissolved rapidly with superheated water, injectable solutions of 13C-amino acids with highly enhanced NMR signals (by at least 5,000-fold) were produced at room temperature. Factors that affect the NMR signal enhancement levels such as the choice of free radical polarizing agents and sample preparation will be discussed along with the thermal mixing physics model of DNP. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  4. Pulsed polarization transfer for 13C NMR in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Ad; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Maciel, Gary E.

    A new pulsed polarization transfer experiment method is described for the polarization of 13C spins in a solid by magnetization transfer from protons. The method is directly analogous to the INEPT sequence for liquids introduced by Freeman and Morris. As polarization is transferred in PPT between individual 1H 13C pairs, rather than between spin reservoirs, different opportunities exist for structurally selective experiments. Results on p-diethoxybenzene and coronene are presented.

  5. 13C Magic angle spinning NMR analysis and quantum chemical modeling of the bathochromic shift of astaxanthin in alpha-crustacyanin, the blue carotenoprotein complex in the carapace of the lobster Homarus gammarus.

    PubMed

    Weesie, R J; Jansen, F J; Merlin, J C; Lugtenburg, J; Britton, G; de Groot, H J

    1997-06-17

    Selective isotope enrichment, 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR, and semiempirical quantum chemical modeling, have been used to analyze ligand-protein interactions associated with the bathochromic shift of astaxanthin in alpha-crustacyanin, the blue carotenoprotein complex from the carapace of the lobster Homarus gammarus. Spectra of alpha-crustacyanin were obtained after reconstitution with astaxanthins labeled with 13C at positions 4,4', 12,12', 13,13', or 20,20'. The data reveal substantial downfield shifts of 4.9 and 7.0 ppm at positions 12 and 12' in the complex, respectively. In contrast, at the 13 and 13' positions, small upfield shifts of 1.9 ppm were observed upon binding to the protein. These data are in line with previously obtained results for positions 14,14' (3.9 and 6.8 ppm downfield) and 15,15' (0.6 ppm upfield) and confirm the unequal perturbation of both halves after binding of the chromophore. However, these results also show that the main perturbation is of symmetrical origin, since the chemical shift differences exhibit a similar pattern in both halves of the astaxanthin molecule. A small downfield shift of 2.4 ppm was detected for the 4 and 4' positions. Finally, the 20,20' methyl groups are shifted 0.4 ppm upfield by the protein. The full data set provides convincing evidence that charge polarization is of importance for the bathochromic shift. The NMR shifts are compared with calculated charge densities for astaxanthin subjected to variations in protonation states of the ring-functional groups, as models of ligand-protein interactions. Taking into account the color shift and other available optical data, the current model for the mechanisms of interaction with the protein was refined. The results point toward a mechanism in which the astaxanthin is charged and subject to strong electrostatic polarizations originating from both keto groups, most likely a double protonation. PMID:9200677

  6. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of a single nuclear spin.

    PubMed

    Delgado, F; Fernández-Rossier, J

    2011-08-12

    Detection of a single nuclear spin constitutes an outstanding problem in different fields of physics such as quantum computing or magnetic imaging. Here we show that the energy levels of a single nuclear spin can be measured by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). We consider two different systems, a magnetic adatom probed with scanning tunneling microscopy and a single Bi dopant in a silicon nanotransistor. We find that the hyperfine coupling opens new transport channels which can be resolved at experimentally accessible temperatures. Our simulations evince that IETS yields information about the occupations of the nuclear spin states, paving the way towards transport-detected single nuclear spin resonance.

  7. Nuclear spin polarized H and D by means of spin-exchange optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, Jörn; Grosshauser, Carsten; Kilian, Wolfgang; Nagengast, Wolfgang; Ranzenberger, Bernd; Rith, Klaus; Schmidt, Frank

    1998-01-01

    Optically pumped spin-exchange sources for polarized hydrogen and deuterium atoms have been demonstrated to yield high atomic flow and high electron spin polarization. For maximum nuclear polarization the source has to be operated in spin temperature equilibrium, which has already been demonstrated for hydrogen. In spin temperature equilibrium the nuclear spin polarization PI equals the electron spin polarization PS for hydrogen and is even larger than PS for deuterium. We discuss the general properties of spin temperature equilibrium for a sample of deuterium atoms. One result are the equations PI=4PS/(3+PS2) and Pzz=PSṡPI, where Pzz is the nuclear tensor polarization. Furthermore we demonstrate that the deuterium atoms from our source are in spin temperature equilibrium within the experimental accuracy.

  8. The branchings of the main s-process: their sensitivity to α-induced reactions on 13C and 22Ne and to the uncertainties of the nuclear network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisterzo, S.; Gallino, R.; Käppeler, F.; Wiescher, M.; Imbriani, G.; Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S.; Görres, J.; deBoer, R. J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper provides a detailed analysis of the main component of the slow neutron capture process (the s-process), which accounts for the solar abundances of half of the nuclei with 90 ≲ A ≲ 208. We examine the impact of the uncertainties of the two neutron sources operating in low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars: the 13C(α, n)16O reaction, which releases neutrons radiatively during interpulse periods (kT ˜ 8 keV), and the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg reaction, partially activated during the convective thermal pulses (TPs). We focus our attention on the branching points that mainly influence the abundance of s-only isotopes. In our AGB models, the 13C is fully consumed radiatively during interpulse. In this case, we find that the present uncertainty associated with the 13C(α, n)16O reaction has marginal effects on s-only nuclei. On the other hand, a reduction of this rate may increase the amount of residual (or unburned) 13C at the end of the interpulse: in this condition, the residual 13C is burned at higher temperature in the convective zone powered by the following TP. The neutron burst produced by the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg reaction has major effects on the branches along the s-path. The contributions of s-only isotopes with 90 ≲ A ≤ 204 are reproduced within solar and nuclear uncertainties, even if the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg rate is varied by a factor of 2. Improved β-decay and neutron capture rates of a few key radioactive nuclides would help to attain a comprehensive understanding of the solar main component.

  9. sup 13 C and sup 15 N nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of the ionization state of substrates bound to bovine dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Selinsky, B.S.; Perlman, M.E.; London, R.E. ); Unkefer, C.J. ); Mitchell, J. ); Blakley, R.L. Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis )

    1990-02-06

    The state of protonation of substrates bound to mammalian dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) has significance for the mechanism of catalysis. To investigate this, dihydrofolate and dihydropteroylpentaglutamate have been synthesized with {sup 15}N enrichment at N-5. {sup 15}N NMR studies have been performed on the binary complexes formed by bovine DHFR with these compounds and with (5-{sup 15}N)dihydrobiopterin. The results indicate that there is no protonation at N-5 in the binary complexes, and this was confirmed by {sup 13}C NMR studies with folate and dihydrofolate synthesized with {sup 13}C enrichment at C-6. The chemical shift displacements produced by complex formation are in the same direction as those which result from deprotonation of the N-3/C-4-O amide group and are consistent with at least partial loss of the proton from N-3. This would be possible if, as crystallographic data indicate, there is interaction of N-3 and the 2-amino group of the bound ligands with the carboxylate of the active site glutamate residue (Glu{sup 30}).

  10. The binding of amide substrate analogues to phospholipase A2. Studies by 13C-nuclear-magnetic-resonance and infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Slaich, P K; Primrose, W U; Robinson, D H; Wharton, C W; White, A J; Drabble, K; Roberts, G C

    1992-01-01

    (R)-(2-dodecanamidoisohexyl)phosphocholine (DAHPC), labelled with 13C at the amide carbonyl group, has been synthesized and its binding to bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) studied by n.m.r. and i.r. spectroscopy. Two-dimensional 1H-n.m.r. spectra show that, in the presence of Ca2+, DAHPC binds to the active site of the enzyme in a similar manner to other phospholipid amide substrate analogues. The environment of the labelled carbonyl group has been investigated by a combination of 13C n.m.r. and difference-Fourier-transform i.r. spectroscopy. The carbonyl resonance shifts 3 p.p.m. downfield on the binding of DAHPC to PLA2. The carbonyl absorption frequency decreases by 14-18 cm-1, accompanied by a marked sharpening of the absorption band. These results indicate that the carbonyl bond undergoes significant polarization in the enzyme-ligand complex, facilitated by the enzyme-bound Ca2+ ion. This suggests that ground-state strain is likely to promote catalysis in the case of substrate binding. Simple calculations, based on the i.r. data, indicate that the carbonyl bond is weakened by 5-9 kJ.mol-1. This is the first report of observation of the amide vibration of a bound ligand against the strong background of protein amide vibrations. PMID:1445261

  11. Identification of Flavonoid Glycosides in Rosa chinensis Flowers by Liquid Chromatography-tandem Mass Spectrometry in Combination with 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Lin-Sen; Xue, Ying; Zhang, Jian-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Feng; Liang, Jian; Jiang, Yan; Liu, Yi-Ming; Liao, Xun

    2012-01-01

    Flowers of Rosa chinensis are widely used in traditional Chinese medicine as well as in food industry. Flavonoid glycosides are believed to be the major components in R. chinensis that are responsible for its antioxidant activities. In this work, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC- MS/MS) method was developed for analysis of flavonoid glycosides presented in ethyl acetate extract of dried R. chinensis flowers. Twelve flavonoid glycosides were separated and detected. By comparing the retention times, UV spectra, and tandem MS fragments with those of respective authentic compounds, eight flavonoid glycosides were unequivocally identified. Although the other four were also identified as flavonoid glycosides, the glycosylation positions could not be determined due to lack of authentic compounds. Fortunately, the glycosylation effects were clearly observed in the 13C NMR spectrum of the extract. The detailed structural information was, therefore, obtained to identify the four flavonoid glycosides as quercetin-3-O-D-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-D-xyloside, kaempferol-3-O-D-xyloside and quercetin-3-O-D-(6″-coumaroyl)-galactoside. These flavonoid glycosides were detected and identified for the first time in this botanic material. This work reports on the first use of 13C NMR of a mixture to enhance a rapid HPLC-MS/MS analysis. The proposed analytical protocol was validated with a mixture of authentic flavonoid glycosides. PMID:22749452

  12. Enzymatic synthesis and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance conformational studies of disaccharides containing. beta. -D-galactopyranosyl and. beta. -D-(1-/sup 13/C)Galactopyranosyl residues

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, H.A.; Barker, R.

    1980-02-05

    Partially purified UDPgalactosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.22) from bovine milk has been used to synthesize millimolar amounts of compounds such as Gal..beta..(1..-->..4)Glc, Gal..beta..(1..-->..4)GlcNAc-..beta..-hexanolamine, and Gal..beta..(1..-->..4)-GlcNAc..beta..(1..-->..4)GlcNAc. The same method has been used to prepare similar compounds containing /sup 13/C-enriched galactopyranosyl moieties. Gal..beta..(1..-->..4)GlcNAc-..beta..-hexanolamine was also synthesized in a solid-phase system in which the GlcNAc-..beta..-hexanolamine glycoside was covalently linked to agarose beads. At pH 7.0 and at 1 to 5 mM Mn/sup 2 + +/ the yields of the galactosyl saccharides are greater than 90% by using 10% excess of UDPGal donor. The use of a 90% enriched (1-/sup 13/C)galactosyl residue allowed the determination of the most abundant conformer about the galactopyranosyl-glycoside linkage by analysis of the carbon-carbon coupling constants from Cl to Gal to the C3', C4', and C5' of GlcNAc or Glc. 3 figures, 1 table.

  13. Electron Spin Dephasing and Decoherence by Interaction with Nuclear Spins in Self-Assembled Quantum Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; vonAllmen, Paul; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Klimeck, Gerhard; Whale, K. Birgitta

    2004-01-01

    Electron spin dephasing and decoherence by its interaction with nuclear spins in self-assembled quantum dots are investigated in the framework of the empirical tight-binding model. Electron spin dephasing in an ensemble of dots is induced by the inhomogeneous precession frequencies of the electron among dots, while electron spin decoherence in a single dot arises from the inhomogeneous precession frequencies of nuclear spins in the dot. For In(x)Ga(1-x) As self-assembled dots containing 30000 nuclei, the dephasing and decoherence times are predicted to be on the order of 100 ps and 1 (micro)s.

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization assisted spin diffusion for the solid effect case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovav, Yonatan; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon

    2011-02-01

    The dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process in solids depends on the magnitudes of hyperfine interactions between unpaired electrons and their neighboring (core) nuclei, and on the dipole-dipole interactions between all nuclei in the sample. The polarization enhancement of the bulk nuclei has been typically described in terms of a hyperfine-assisted polarization of a core nucleus by microwave irradiation followed by a dipolar-assisted spin diffusion process in the core-bulk nuclear system. This work presents a theoretical approach for the study of this combined process using a density matrix formalism. In particular, solid effect DNP on a single electron coupled to a nuclear spin system is considered, taking into account the interactions between the spins as well as the main relaxation mechanisms introduced via the electron, nuclear, and cross-relaxation rates. The basic principles of the DNP-assisted spin diffusion mechanism, polarizing the bulk nuclei, are presented, and it is shown that the polarization of the core nuclei and the spin diffusion process should not be treated separately. To emphasize this observation the coherent mechanism driving the pure spin diffusion process is also discussed. In order to demonstrate the effects of the interactions and relaxation mechanisms on the enhancement of the nuclear polarization, model systems of up to ten spins are considered and polarization buildup curves are simulated. A linear chain of spins consisting of a single electron coupled to a core nucleus, which in turn is dipolar coupled to a chain of bulk nuclei, is considered. The interaction and relaxation parameters of this model system were chosen in a way to enable a critical analysis of the polarization enhancement of all nuclei, and are not far from the values of 13C nuclei in frozen (glassy) organic solutions containing radicals, typically used in DNP at high fields. Results from the simulations are shown, demonstrating the complex dependences of the DNP

  15. Spin Modes in Nuclei and Nuclear Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2011-05-06

    Spin modes in stable and unstable exotic nuclei are studied and important roles of tensor and three-body forces on nuclear structure are discussed. New shell model Hamiltonians, which have proper tensor components, are shown to explain shell evolutions toward drip-lines and spin properties of both stable and exotic nuclei, for example, Gamow-Teller transitions in {sup 12}C and {sup 14}C and an anomalous M1 transition in {sup 17}C. The importance and the necessity of the repulsive monopole corrections in isospin T = 1 channel to the microscopic two-body interactions are pointed out. The corrections are shown to lead to the proper shell evolutions in neutron-rich isotopes. The three-body force, in particular the Fujita-Miyazawa force induced by {Delta} excitations, is pointed out to be responsible for the repulsive corrections among the valence neutrons. The important roles of the three-body force on the energies and transitions in exotic oxygen and calcium isotopes are demonstrated.

  16. Chemometric Model Development and Comparison of Raman and (13)C Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Chemometric Methods for Quantification of Crystalline/Amorphous Warfarin Sodium Fraction in the Formulations.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ziyaur; Mohammad, Adil; Akhtar, Sohail; Siddiqui, Akhtar; Korang-Yeboah, Maxwell; Khan, Mansoor A

    2015-08-01

    Warfarin sodium (WS) exists in multiple solid-state forms. The solid-state forms differ in physicochemical properties, and crystalline changes in the drug formulation may influence on the drug product quality and/or clinical performance. It is, therefore, critically important to have a good and reliable analytical method to monitor and quantitate this transformation during stability studies. The aim of the present research was to investigate Raman spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C ssNMR) methods in conjunction with chemometry to quantitate the amorphous and crystalline WS fractions in the drug products. Compositionally identical formulations of amorphous and crystalline WS were prepared, and mixed in various proportions to make 0%-100% amorphous/crystalline sample matrices. Raman and (13)C ssNMR spectra were collected and subjected to partial-least-squares and principle component regressions after mathematical treatment of the data. The model performance parameters such as root-mean-square error of prediction, standard error of prediction, and bias were low for Raman models in comparison to (13)C ssNMR models. Models predicted values of the independent sample matrices match closely with the actual values at high level of crystalline WS. Thus, the developed methods provide means to control and quantitate the WS forms fraction in the drug product.

  17. Solid-state 13C NMR and molecular modeling studies of acetyl aleuritolic acid obtained from Croton cajucara Benth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva San Gil, Rosane Aguiar; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; da Cunha Pinto, Angelo; do Espírito Santo Gomes, Fabiano; de Castro Dantas, Tereza Neuma; Maciel, Maria Aparecida Medeiros

    2008-08-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance ( 13C NMR) with magic-angle spinning (MAS) and with cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) spectra, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques were used to obtain structural data from a sample of acetyl aleuritolic acid (AAA) extracted from the stem bark of Croton cajucara Benth. (Euphorbiaceae) and recrystallized from acetone. Since solid-state 13C NMR results suggested the presence of more than one molecule in the unitary cell for the AAA, DSC analysis and molecular modeling calculations were used to access this possibility. The absence of phase transition peaks in the DSC spectra and the dimeric models of AAA simulated using the semi-empirical PM3 method are in agreement with that proposal.

  18. Room temperature hyperpolarization of nuclear spins in bulk

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi, Kenichiro; Negoro, Makoto; Nishida, Shinsuke; Kagawa, Akinori; Morita, Yasushi; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a means of transferring spin polarization from electrons to nuclei, can enhance the nuclear spin polarization (hence the NMR sensitivity) in bulk materials at most 660 times for 1H spins, using electron spins in thermal equilibrium as polarizing agents. By using electron spins in photo-excited triplet states instead, DNP can overcome the above limit. We demonstrate a 1H spin polarization of 34%, which gives an enhancement factor of 250,000 in 0.40 T, while maintaining a bulk sample (∼0.6 mg, ∼0.7 × 0.7 × 1 mm3) containing >1019 1H spins at room temperature. Room temperature hyperpolarization achieved with DNP using photo-excited triplet electrons has potentials to be applied to a wide range of fields, including NMR spectroscopy and MRI as well as fundamental physics. PMID:24821773

  19. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26460094

  20. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Optical manipulation of a multilevel nuclear spin in ZnO: Master equation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buß, J. H.; Rudolph, J.; Wassner, T. A.; Eickhoff, M.; Hägele, D.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the dynamics and optical control of a large quantum mechanical solid state spin system consisting of a donor electron spin strongly coupled to the 9/2 nuclear spin of 115In in the semiconductor ZnO. Comparison of electron spin dynamics observed by time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy with density matrix theory reveals nuclear spin pumping via optically oriented electron spins, coherent spin-spin interaction, and quantization effects of the ten nuclear spin levels. Modulation of the optical electron spin orientation at frequencies above 1 MHz gives evidence for fast optical manipulation of the nuclear spin state.

  2. New insights into the structure and chemistry of Titan's tholins via 13C and 15N solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derenne, S.; Coelho, C.; Anquetil, C.; Szopa, C.; Quirico, E.; Bonhomme, C.

    2012-09-01

    Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, is characterized by a dense atmosphere, mainly composed of N2 (ca. 97 %) and CH4 (ca. 2 %). In the upper atmosphere, methane and nitrogen molecules undergo dissociation under the influence of solar UV radiation and electron impacts, followed by recombination reactions leading to a large variety of organic molecules. Some of these compounds form a thick, orange-coloured haze composed of solid organic aerosols that subsequently fall to the surface or remain in suspension in the atmosphere. To gain insight into the chemical composition and structural nature of these complex organic compounds, analogous materials, termed Titan's tholins, are produced in the laboratory, in particular using plasma discharge in gaseous N2 - CH4 mixtures with similar proportions as in Titan's atmosphere. Titan's tholins have been analysed using a wide variety of techniques which provided a wealth of information about potential functional groups and structural building blocks present within the tholin samples. Taken together, the results converge on a structure based on a CxHyNz chemistry that can contain a variety of C-C, C-N, N-H etc single or multiple bonds. It is now necessary to build on that information to refine the chemical and structural models for the Titan's tholins. Here we used solid state NMR techniques to investigate the carbon and nitrogen bonding environments in a 13C- and 15Nenriched sample.

  3. Monolayer to interdigitated partial bilayer smectic C transition in thiophene-based spacer mesogens: X-ray diffraction and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Kesava Reddy, M; Varathan, E; Lobo, Nitin P; Roy, Arun; Narasimhaswamy, T; Ramanathan, K V

    2015-10-01

    Mesophase organization of molecules built with thiophene at the center and linked via flexible spacers to rigid side arm core units and terminal alkoxy chains has been investigated. Thirty homologues realized by varying the span of the spacers as well as the length of the terminal chains have been studied. In addition to the enantiotropic nematic phase observed for all the mesogens, the increase of the spacer as well as the terminal chain lengths resulted in the smectic C phase. The molecular organization in the smectic phase as investigated by temperature dependent X-ray diffraction measurements revealed an interesting behavior that depended on the length of the spacer vis-a-vis the length of the terminal chain. Thus, a tilted interdigitated partial bilayer organization was observed for molecules with a shorter spacer length, while a tilted monolayer arrangement was observed for those with a longer spacer length. High-resolution solid state (13)C NMR studies carried out for representative mesogens indicated a U-shape for all the molecules, indicating that intermolecular interactions and molecular dynamics rather than molecular shape are responsible for the observed behavior. Models for the mesophase organization have been considered and the results understood in terms of segregation of incompatible parts of the mesogens combined with steric frustration leading to the observed lamellar order.

  4. Preparation of nuclear spin singlet states using spin-lock induced crossing.

    PubMed

    DeVience, Stephen J; Walsworth, Ronald L; Rosen, Matthew S

    2013-10-25

    We introduce a broadly applicable technique to create nuclear spin singlet states in organic molecules and other many-atom systems. We employ a novel pulse sequence to produce a spin-lock induced crossing (SLIC) of the spin singlet and triplet energy levels, which enables triplet-singlet polarization transfer and singlet-state preparation. We demonstrate the utility of the SLIC method by producing a long-lived nuclear spin singlet state on two strongly coupled proton pairs in the tripeptide molecule phenylalanine-glycine-glycine dissolved in D(2)O and by using SLIC to measure the J couplings, chemical shift differences, and singlet lifetimes of the proton pairs. We show that SLIC is more efficient at creating nearly equivalent nuclear spin singlet states than previous pulse sequence techniques, especially when triplet-singlet polarization transfer occurs on the same time scale as spin-lattice relaxation.

  5. Design and test of a double-nuclear RF coil for 1H MRI and 13C MRSI at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, Omar; Kwak, Tiffany; Cao, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2016-06-01

    RF coil operation at the ultrahigh field of 7 T is fraught with technical challenges that limit the advancement of novel human in vivo applications at 7 T. In this work, a hybrid technique combining a microstrip transmission line and a lumped-element L-C loop coil to form a double-nuclear RF coil for proton magnetic resonance imaging and carbon magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T was proposed and investigated. Network analysis revealed a high Q-factor and excellent decoupling between the coils. Proton images and localized carbon spectra were acquired with high sensitivity. The successful testing of this novel double-nuclear coil demonstrates the feasibility of this hybrid design for double-nuclear MR imaging and spectroscopy studies at the ultrahigh field of 7 T.

  6. Local and bulk (13)C hyperpolarization in nitrogen-vacancy-centred diamonds at variable fields and orientations.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A; Bretschneider, Christian O; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Kanda, Hisao; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Gershoni, David; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Polarizing nuclear spins is of fundamental importance in biology, chemistry and physics. Methods for hyperpolarizing (13)C nuclei from free electrons in bulk usually demand operation at cryogenic temperatures. Room temperature approaches targeting diamonds with nitrogen-vacancy centres could alleviate this need; however, hitherto proposed strategies lack generality as they demand stringent conditions on the strength and/or alignment of the magnetic field. We report here an approach for achieving efficient electron-(13)C spin-alignment transfers, compatible with a broad range of magnetic field strengths and field orientations with respect to the diamond crystal. This versatility results from combining coherent microwave- and incoherent laser-induced transitions between selected energy states of the coupled electron-nuclear spin manifold. (13)C-detected nuclear magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that this hyperpolarization can be transferred via first-shell or via distant (13)Cs throughout the nuclear bulk ensemble. This method opens new perspectives for applications of diamond nitrogen-vacancy centres in nuclear magnetic resonance, and in quantum information processing. PMID:26404169

  7. Local and bulk 13C hyperpolarization in nitrogen-vacancy-centred diamonds at variable fields and orientations

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Bretschneider, Christian O.; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Kanda, Hisao; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Gershoni, David; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Polarizing nuclear spins is of fundamental importance in biology, chemistry and physics. Methods for hyperpolarizing 13C nuclei from free electrons in bulk usually demand operation at cryogenic temperatures. Room temperature approaches targeting diamonds with nitrogen-vacancy centres could alleviate this need; however, hitherto proposed strategies lack generality as they demand stringent conditions on the strength and/or alignment of the magnetic field. We report here an approach for achieving efficient electron-13C spin-alignment transfers, compatible with a broad range of magnetic field strengths and field orientations with respect to the diamond crystal. This versatility results from combining coherent microwave- and incoherent laser-induced transitions between selected energy states of the coupled electron–nuclear spin manifold. 13C-detected nuclear magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that this hyperpolarization can be transferred via first-shell or via distant 13Cs throughout the nuclear bulk ensemble. This method opens new perspectives for applications of diamond nitrogen-vacancy centres in nuclear magnetic resonance, and in quantum information processing. PMID:26404169

  8. Decoupling a hole spin qubit from the nuclear spins.

    PubMed

    Prechtel, Jonathan H; Kuhlmann, Andreas V; Houel, Julien; Ludwig, Arne; Valentin, Sascha R; Wieck, Andreas D; Warburton, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    A huge effort is underway to develop semiconductor nanostructures as low-noise hosts for qubits. The main source of dephasing of an electron spin qubit in a GaAs-based system is the nuclear spin bath. A hole spin may circumvent the nuclear spin noise. In principle, the nuclear spins can be switched off for a pure heavy-hole spin. In practice, it is unknown to what extent this ideal limit can be achieved. A major hindrance is that p-type devices are often far too noisy. We investigate here a single hole spin in an InGaAs quantum dot embedded in a new generation of low-noise p-type device. We measure the hole Zeeman energy in a transverse magnetic field with 10 neV resolution by dark-state spectroscopy as we create a large transverse nuclear spin polarization. The hole hyperfine interaction is highly anisotropic: the transverse coupling is <1% of the longitudinal coupling. For unpolarized, randomly fluctuating nuclei, the ideal heavy-hole limit is achieved down to nanoelectronvolt energies; equivalently dephasing times up to a microsecond. The combination of large and strong optical dipole makes the single hole spin in a GaAs-based device an attractive quantum platform. PMID:27454044

  9. Quantum dot spin coherence governed by a strained nuclear environment.

    PubMed

    Stockill, R; Le Gall, C; Matthiesen, C; Huthmacher, L; Clarke, E; Hugues, M; Atatüre, M

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a confined electron and the nuclei of an optically active quantum dot provides a uniquely rich manifestation of the central spin problem. Coherent qubit control combines with an ultrafast spin-photon interface to make these confined spins attractive candidates for quantum optical networks. Reaching the full potential of spin coherence has been hindered by the lack of knowledge of the key irreversible environment dynamics. Through all-optical Hahn echo decoupling we now recover the intrinsic coherence time set by the interaction with the inhomogeneously strained nuclear bath. The high-frequency nuclear dynamics are directly imprinted on the electron spin coherence, resulting in a dramatic jump of coherence times from few tens of nanoseconds to the microsecond regime between 2 and 3 T magnetic field and an exponential decay of coherence at high fields. These results reveal spin coherence can be improved by applying large magnetic fields and reducing strain inhomogeneity.

  10. Quantum dot spin coherence governed by a strained nuclear environment.

    PubMed

    Stockill, R; Le Gall, C; Matthiesen, C; Huthmacher, L; Clarke, E; Hugues, M; Atatüre, M

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a confined electron and the nuclei of an optically active quantum dot provides a uniquely rich manifestation of the central spin problem. Coherent qubit control combines with an ultrafast spin-photon interface to make these confined spins attractive candidates for quantum optical networks. Reaching the full potential of spin coherence has been hindered by the lack of knowledge of the key irreversible environment dynamics. Through all-optical Hahn echo decoupling we now recover the intrinsic coherence time set by the interaction with the inhomogeneously strained nuclear bath. The high-frequency nuclear dynamics are directly imprinted on the electron spin coherence, resulting in a dramatic jump of coherence times from few tens of nanoseconds to the microsecond regime between 2 and 3 T magnetic field and an exponential decay of coherence at high fields. These results reveal spin coherence can be improved by applying large magnetic fields and reducing strain inhomogeneity. PMID:27615704

  11. Quantum dot spin coherence governed by a strained nuclear environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockill, R.; Le Gall, C.; Matthiesen, C.; Huthmacher, L.; Clarke, E.; Hugues, M.; Atatüre, M.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between a confined electron and the nuclei of an optically active quantum dot provides a uniquely rich manifestation of the central spin problem. Coherent qubit control combines with an ultrafast spin-photon interface to make these confined spins attractive candidates for quantum optical networks. Reaching the full potential of spin coherence has been hindered by the lack of knowledge of the key irreversible environment dynamics. Through all-optical Hahn echo decoupling we now recover the intrinsic coherence time set by the interaction with the inhomogeneously strained nuclear bath. The high-frequency nuclear dynamics are directly imprinted on the electron spin coherence, resulting in a dramatic jump of coherence times from few tens of nanoseconds to the microsecond regime between 2 and 3 T magnetic field and an exponential decay of coherence at high fields. These results reveal spin coherence can be improved by applying large magnetic fields and reducing strain inhomogeneity.

  12. 1H-detected 13C Photo-CIDNP as a Sensitivity Enhancement Tool in Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Ho; Sekhar, Ashok; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    NMR is a powerful yet intrinsically insensitive technique. The applicability of NMR to chemical and biological systems would be substantially extended by new approaches going beyond current signal-to-noise capabilities. Here, we exploit the large enhancements arising from 13C photo-chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (13C photo-CIDNP) in solution to improve biomolecular NMR sensitivity in the context of heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy. The 13C-PRINT pulse sequence presented here involves an initial 13C nuclear spin polarization via photo-CIDNP followed by conversion to antiphase coherence and transfer to 1H for detection. We observe substantial enhancements, up to ≫200-fold, relative to the dark (laser off) experiment. Resonances of both side-chain and backbone CH pairs are enhanced for the three aromatic residues Trp, His and Tyr and the Trp-containing σ32 peptide. The sensitivity of this experiment, defined as signal-to-noise per unit time (S/N)t, is unprecedented in the NMR polarization enhancement literature dealing with polypeptides in solution. Up to a 16-fold larger (S/N)t than the 1H-13C SE-HSQC reference sequence is achieved, for the σ32 peptide. This gain leads to a reduction in data collection time up to 256-fold, highlighting the advantages of 1H-detected 13C photo-CIDNP in solution NMR. PMID:21548581

  13. Enantiodiscrimination and extraction of short and long range homo- and hetero-nuclear residual dipolar couplings by a spin selective correlation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Nilamoni; Suryaprakash, N.

    2010-08-01

    A two dimensional correlation experiment for the measurement of short and long range homo- and hetero- nuclear residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) from the broad and featureless proton NMR spectra including 13C satellites is proposed. The method employs a single natural abundant 13C spin as a spy nucleus to probe all the coupled protons and permits the determination of RDCs of negligible strengths. The technique has been demonstrated for the study of organic chiral molecules aligned in chiral liquid crystal, where additional challenge is to unravel the overlapped spectrum of enantiomers. The significant advantage of the method is demonstrated in better chiral discrimination using homonuclear RDCs as additional parameters.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with single spin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Müller, C; Kong, X; Cai, J-M; Melentijević, K; Stacey, A; Markham, M; Twitchen, D; Isoya, J; Pezzagna, S; Meijer, J; Du, J F; Plenio, M B; Naydenov, B; McGuinness, L P; Jelezko, F

    2014-08-22

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging at the ultimate sensitivity limit of single molecules or single nuclear spins requires fundamentally new detection strategies. The strong coupling regime, when interaction between sensor and sample spins dominates all other interactions, is one such strategy. In this regime, classically forbidden detection of completely unpolarized nuclei is allowed, going beyond statistical fluctuations in magnetization. Here we realize strong coupling between an atomic (nitrogen-vacancy) sensor and sample nuclei to perform nuclear magnetic resonance on four (29)Si spins. We exploit the field gradient created by the diamond atomic sensor, in concert with compressed sensing, to realize imaging protocols, enabling individual nuclei to be located with Angstrom precision. The achieved signal-to-noise ratio under ambient conditions allows single nuclear spin sensitivity to be achieved within seconds.

  15. Polarization of nuclear spins by a cold nanoscale resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Mark C.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2011-12-15

    A cold nanoscale resonator coupled to a system of nuclear spins can induce spin relaxation. In the low-temperature limit where spin-lattice interactions are ''frozen out,'' spontaneous emission by nuclear spins into a resonant mechanical mode can become the dominant mechanism for cooling the spins to thermal equilibrium with their environment. We provide a theoretical framework for the study of resonator-induced cooling of nuclear spins in this low-temperature regime. Relaxation equations are derived from first principles, in the limit where energy donated by the spins to the resonator is quickly dissipated into the cold bath that damps it. A physical interpretation of the processes contributing to spin polarization is given. For a system of spins that have identical couplings to the resonator, the interaction Hamiltonian conserves spin angular momentum, and the resonator cannot relax the spins to thermal equilibrium unless this symmetry is broken by the spin Hamiltonian. The mechanism by which such a spin system becomes ''trapped'' away from thermal equilibrium can be visualized using a semiclassical model, which shows how an indirect spin-spin interaction arises from the coupling of multiple spins to one resonator. The internal spin Hamiltonian can affect the polarization process in two ways: (1) By modifying the structure of the spin-spin correlations in the energy eigenstates, and (2) by splitting the degeneracy within a manifold of energy eigenstates, so that zero-frequency off-diagonal terms in the density matrix are converted to oscillating coherences. Shifting the frequencies of these coherences sufficiently far from zero suppresses the development of resonator-induced correlations within the manifold during polarization from a totally disordered state. Modification of the spin-spin correlations by means of either mechanism affects the strength of the fluctuating spin dipole that drives the resonator. In the case where product states can be chosen as energy

  16. Role of the electron spin in determining the coherence of the nuclear spins in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüst, Gunter; Munsch, Mathieu; Maier, Franziska; Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Loss, Daniel; Poggio, Martino; Warburton, Richard J.

    2016-10-01

    A huge effort is underway to develop semiconductor nanostructures as low-noise qubits. A key source of dephasing for an electron spin qubit in GaAs and in naturally occurring Si is the nuclear spin bath. The electron spin is coupled to each nuclear spin by the hyperfine interaction. The same interaction also couples two remote nuclear spins via a common coupling to the delocalized electron. It has been suggested that this interaction limits both electron and nuclear spin coherence, but experimental proof is lacking. We show that the nuclear spin decoherence time decreases by two orders of magnitude on occupying an empty quantum dot with a single electron, recovering to its original value for two electrons. In the case of one electron, agreement with a model calculation verifies the hypothesis of an electron-mediated nuclear spin–nuclear spin coupling. The results establish a framework to understand the main features of this complex interaction in semiconductor nanostructures.

  17. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasly, Mahmoud; Lin, Zhichao; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of 75As, 69Ga and 71Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  18. Robust dynamical decoupling sequences for individual-nuclear-spin addressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, J.; Wang, Z.-Y.; Haase, J. F.; Plenio, M. B.

    2015-10-01

    We propose the use of non-equally-spaced decoupling pulses for high-resolution selective addressing of nuclear spins by a quantum sensor. The analytical model of the basic operating principle is supplemented by detailed numerical studies that demonstrate the high degree of selectivity and the robustness against static and dynamic control-field errors of this scheme. We exemplify our protocol with a nitrogen-vacancy-center-based sensor to demonstrate that it enables the identification of individual nuclear spins that form part of a large spin ensemble.

  19. Quantum dot spin coherence governed by a strained nuclear environment

    PubMed Central

    Stockill, R.; Le Gall, C.; Matthiesen, C.; Huthmacher, L.; Clarke, E.; Hugues, M.; Atatüre, M.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a confined electron and the nuclei of an optically active quantum dot provides a uniquely rich manifestation of the central spin problem. Coherent qubit control combines with an ultrafast spin–photon interface to make these confined spins attractive candidates for quantum optical networks. Reaching the full potential of spin coherence has been hindered by the lack of knowledge of the key irreversible environment dynamics. Through all-optical Hahn echo decoupling we now recover the intrinsic coherence time set by the interaction with the inhomogeneously strained nuclear bath. The high-frequency nuclear dynamics are directly imprinted on the electron spin coherence, resulting in a dramatic jump of coherence times from few tens of nanoseconds to the microsecond regime between 2 and 3 T magnetic field and an exponential decay of coherence at high fields. These results reveal spin coherence can be improved by applying large magnetic fields and reducing strain inhomogeneity. PMID:27615704

  20. Measurement of multiple psi torsion angles in uniformly 13C,15N-labeled alpha-spectrin SH3 domain using 3D 15N-13C-13C-15N MAS dipolar-chemical shift correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Jaroniec, Christopher P; Diehl, Annette; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Griffin, Robert G

    2003-06-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous measurement of several backbone torsion angles psi in the uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labeled alpha-Spectrin SH3 domain using two different 3D 15N-13C-13C-15N dipolar-chemical shift magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments. The first NCCN experiment utilizes double quantum (DQ) spectroscopy combined with the INADEQUATE type 13C-13C chemical shift correlation. The decay of the DQ coherences formed between 13C'(i) and 13C(alphai) spin pairs is determined by the "correlated" dipolar field due to 15N(i)-13C(alphai) and 13C'(i)-15N(i+1) dipolar couplings and is particularly sensitive to variations of the torsion angle in the regime |psi| > 140 degrees. However, the ability of this experiment to constrain multiple psi-torsion angles is limited by the resolution of the 13C(alpha)-(13)CO correlation spectrum. This problem is partially addressed in the second approach described here, which is an NCOCA NCCN experiment. In this case the resolution is enhanced by the superior spectral dispersion of the 15N resonances present in the 15N(i+1)-13C(alphai) part of the NCOCA chemical shift correlation spectrum. For the case of the 62-residue alpha-spectrin SH3 domain, we determined 13 psi angle constraints with the INADEQUATE NCCN experiment and 22 psi constraints were measured in the NCOCA NCCN experiment.

  1. Highly selective detection of individual nuclear spins with rotary echo on an electron spin probe

    SciTech Connect

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Jelezko, F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-10-26

    We consider an electronic spin, such as a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, weakly coupled to a large number of nuclear spins, and subjected to the Rabi driving with a periodically alternating phase. We show that by switching the driving phase synchronously with the precession of a given nuclear spin, the interaction to this spin is selectively enhanced, while the rest of the bath remains decoupled. The enhancement is of resonant character. The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength. Thus, the resonance can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10–100 in comparison with the existing detection methods. Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations. As a result, the method can be applied to a wide range of solid-state systems.

  2. Highly selective detection of individual nuclear spins with rotary echo on an electron spin probe

    DOE PAGES

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Jelezko, F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-10-26

    We consider an electronic spin, such as a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, weakly coupled to a large number of nuclear spins, and subjected to the Rabi driving with a periodically alternating phase. We show that by switching the driving phase synchronously with the precession of a given nuclear spin, the interaction to this spin is selectively enhanced, while the rest of the bath remains decoupled. The enhancement is of resonant character. The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength. Thus, the resonancemore » can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10–100 in comparison with the existing detection methods. Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations. As a result, the method can be applied to a wide range of solid-state systems.« less

  3. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    PubMed

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom. PMID:26670708

  4. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    PubMed

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom.

  5. International conference on spin observables of nuclear probes: Summary talk

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, G.T.

    1988-01-01

    A selected summary of the presentation and discussions at the 4th Telluride Conference is presented. The summary deals mainly with the effects of nuclear spin and isospin on the interaction between nucleons and their consequences in nuclear structure. 11 figs.

  6. Rotor Design for High Pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Turcu, Romulus V.F.; Hoyt, David W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sears, Jesse A.; Loring, John S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-01-01

    High pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a sample spinning rate exceeding 2.1 kHz and pressure greater than 165 bar has never been realized. In this work, a new sample cell design is reported, suitable for constructing cells of different sizes. Using a 7.5 mm high pressure MAS rotor as an example, internal pressure as high as 200 bar at a sample spinning rate of 6 kHz is achieved. The new high pressure MAS rotor is re-usable and compatible with most commercial NMR set-ups, exhibiting low 1H and 13C NMR background and offering maximal NMR sensitivity. As an example of its many possible applications, this new capability is applied to determine reaction products associated with the carbonation reaction of a natural mineral, antigorite ((Mg,Fe2+)3Si2O5(OH)4), in contact with liquid water in water-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 150 bar and 50 deg C. This mineral is relevant to the deep geologic disposal of CO2, but its iron content results in too many sample spinning sidebands at low spinning rate. Hence, this chemical system is a good case study to demonstrate the utility of the higher sample spinning rates that can be achieved by our new rotor design. We expect this new capability will be useful for exploring solid-state, including interfacial, chemistry at new levels of high-pressure in a wide variety of fields.

  7. Characterization of a Mixture of CO2 Adsorption Products in Hyperbranched Aminosilica Adsorbents by (13)C Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Mehta, Anil K; Conradi, Mark S; Jones, Christopher W; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-11-17

    Hyperbranched amine polymers (HAS) grown from the mesoporous silica SBA-15 (hereafter "SBA-15-HAS") exhibit large capacities for CO2 adsorption. We have used static in situ and magic-angle spinning (MAS) ex situ (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the adsorption of CO2 by SBA-15-HAS. (13)C NMR distinguishes the signal of gas-phase (13)CO2 from that of the chemisorbed species. HAS polymers possess primary, secondary, and tertiary amines, leading to multiple chemisorption reaction outcomes, including carbamate (RnNCOO(-)), carbamic acid (RnNCOOH), and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) moieties. Carbamates and bicarbonate fall within a small (13)C chemical shift range (162-166 ppm), and a mixture was observed including carbamic acid and carbamate, the former disappearing upon evacuation of the sample. By examining the (13)C-(14)N dipolar coupling through low-field (B0 = 3 T) (13)C{(1)H} cross-polarization MAS NMR, carbamate is confirmed through splitting of the (13)C resonance. A third species that is either bicarbonate or a second carbamate is evident from bimodal T2 decay times of the ∼163 ppm peak, indicating the presence of two species comprising that single resonance. The mixture of products suggests that (1) the presence of amines and water leads to bicarbonate being present and/or (2) the multiple types of amine sites in HAS permit formation of chemically distinct carbamates.

  8. Vanishing current hysteresis under competing nuclear spin pumping processes in a quadruplet spin-blockaded double quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Amaha, S.; Hatano, T.; Tarucha, S.; Gupta, J. A.; Austing, D. G.

    2015-04-27

    We investigate nuclear spin pumping with five-electron quadruplet spin states in a spin-blockaded weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Two types of hysteretic steps in the leakage current are observed on sweeping the magnetic field and are associated with bidirectional polarization of nuclear spin. Properties of the steps are understood in terms of bias-voltage-dependent conditions for the mixing of quadruplet and doublet spin states by the hyperfine interaction. The hysteretic steps vanish when up- and down-nuclear spin pumping processes are in close competition.

  9. Anomalous organic magnetoresistance from competing carrier-spin-dependent interactions with localized electronic and nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatté, Michael E.

    Transport of carriers through disordered electronic energy landscapes occurs via hopping or tunneling through various sites, and can enhance the effects of carrier spin dynamics on the transport. When incoherent hopping preserves the spin orientation of carriers, the magnetic-field-dependent correlations between pairs of spins influence the charge conductivity of the material. Examples of these phenomena have been identified in hopping transport in organic semiconductors and colloidal quantum dots, as well as tunneling through oxide barriers in complex oxide devices, among other materials. The resulting room-temperature magnetic field effects on the conductivity or electroluminescence require external fields of only a few milliTesla. These magnetic field effects can be dramatically modified by changes in the local spin environment. Recent theoretical and experimental work has identified a regime for low-field magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors in which the spin-relaxing effects of localized nuclear spins and electronic spins interfere1. The regime is studied experimentally by the controlled addition of localized electronic spins, through the addition of a stable free radical (galvinoxyl) to a material (MEH-PPV) that exhibits substantial room-temperature magnetoresistance (20 initially suppressed by the doping, as the localized electronic spin mixes one of the two spins whose correlation controls the transport. At intermediate doping, when one spin is fully decohered but the other is not, there is a regime where the magnetoresistance is insensitive to the doping level. For much greater doping concentrations the magnetoresistance is fully suppressed as both spins that control the charge conductivity of the material are mixed. The behavior is described within a theoretical model describing the effect of carrier spin dynamics on the current. Generalizations to amorphous and other disordered crystalline semiconductors will also be described. This work was

  10. Quantum and classical correlations in electron-nuclear spin echo

    SciTech Connect

    Zobov, V. E.

    2014-11-15

    The quantum properties of dynamic correlations in a system of an electron spin surrounded by nuclear spins under the conditions of free induction decay and electron spin echo have been studied. Analytical results for the time evolution of mutual information, classical part of correlations, and quantum part characterized by quantum discord have been obtained within the central-spin model in the high-temperature approximation. The same formulas describe discord in both free induction decay and spin echo although the time and magnetic field dependences are different because of difference in the parameters entering into the formulas. Changes in discord in the presence of the nuclear polarization β{sub I} in addition to the electron polarization β{sub S} have been calculated. It has been shown that the method of reduction of the density matrix to a two-spin electron-nuclear system provides a qualitatively correct description of pair correlations playing the main role at β{sub S} ≈ β{sub I} and small times. At large times, such correlations decay and multispin correlations ensuring nonzero mutual information and zero quantum discord become dominant.

  11. Nuclear spin warm up in bulk n -GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotur, M.; Dzhioev, R. I.; Vladimirova, M.; Jouault, B.; Korenev, V. L.; Kavokin, K. V.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the spin-lattice relaxation in n -type insulating GaAs is dramatically accelerated at low magnetic fields. The origin of this effect, which cannot be explained in terms of well-known diffusion-limited hyperfine relaxation, is found in the quadrupole relaxation, induced by fluctuating donor charges. Therefore, quadrupole relaxation, which governs low field nuclear spin relaxation in semiconductor quantum dots, but was so far supposed to be harmless to bulk nuclei spins in the absence of optical pumping, can be studied and harnessed in the much simpler model environment of n -GaAs bulk crystal.

  12. Theoretical aspects of Magic Angle Spinning - Dynamic Nuclear Polarization.

    PubMed

    Mentink-Vigier, Frederic; Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Vega, Shimon; Feintuch, Akiva

    2015-09-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) combined with Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has been proven in recent years to be a very powerful method for increasing solid-state NMR signals. Since the advent of biradicals such as TOTAPOL to increase the nuclear polarization new classes of radicals, with larger molecular weight and/or different spin properties have been developed. These have led to unprecedented signal gain, with varying results for different experimental parameters, in particular the microwave irradiation strength, the static field, and the spinning frequency. Recently it has been demonstrated that sample spinning imposes DNP enhancement processes that differ from the active DNP mechanism in static samples as upon sample spinning the DNP enhancements are the results of energy level anticrossings occurring periodically during each rotor cycle. In this work we present experimental results with regards to the MAS frequency dependence of the DNP enhancement profiles of four nitroxide-based radicals at two different sets of temperature, 110 and 160K. In fact, different magnitudes of reduction in enhancement are observed with increasing spinning frequency. Our simulation code for calculating MAS-DNP powder enhancements of small model spin systems has been improved to extend our studies of the influence of the interaction and relaxation parameters on powder enhancements. To achieve a better understanding we simulated the spin dynamics of a single three-spin system {ea-eb-n} during its steady state rotor periods and used the Landau-Zener formula to characterize the influence of the different anti-crossings on the polarizations of the system and their necessary action for reaching steady state conditions together with spin relaxation processes. Based on these model calculations we demonstrate that the maximum steady state nuclear polarization cannot become larger than the maximum polarization difference between the two electrons during the steady state rotor cycle. This

  13. Theoretical aspects of Magic Angle Spinning - Dynamic Nuclear Polarization.

    PubMed

    Mentink-Vigier, Frederic; Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Vega, Shimon; Feintuch, Akiva

    2015-09-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) combined with Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has been proven in recent years to be a very powerful method for increasing solid-state NMR signals. Since the advent of biradicals such as TOTAPOL to increase the nuclear polarization new classes of radicals, with larger molecular weight and/or different spin properties have been developed. These have led to unprecedented signal gain, with varying results for different experimental parameters, in particular the microwave irradiation strength, the static field, and the spinning frequency. Recently it has been demonstrated that sample spinning imposes DNP enhancement processes that differ from the active DNP mechanism in static samples as upon sample spinning the DNP enhancements are the results of energy level anticrossings occurring periodically during each rotor cycle. In this work we present experimental results with regards to the MAS frequency dependence of the DNP enhancement profiles of four nitroxide-based radicals at two different sets of temperature, 110 and 160K. In fact, different magnitudes of reduction in enhancement are observed with increasing spinning frequency. Our simulation code for calculating MAS-DNP powder enhancements of small model spin systems has been improved to extend our studies of the influence of the interaction and relaxation parameters on powder enhancements. To achieve a better understanding we simulated the spin dynamics of a single three-spin system {ea-eb-n} during its steady state rotor periods and used the Landau-Zener formula to characterize the influence of the different anti-crossings on the polarizations of the system and their necessary action for reaching steady state conditions together with spin relaxation processes. Based on these model calculations we demonstrate that the maximum steady state nuclear polarization cannot become larger than the maximum polarization difference between the two electrons during the steady state rotor cycle. This

  14. Detection of kestoses and kestose-related oligosaccharides in extracts of Festuca arundinacea, Dactylis glomerate L. , and Asparagus officinalis L. root cultures and invertase by sup 13 C and sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, K.L.; Feather, M.S.; Gracz, H.; Wong, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Previous studies show that {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to detect and identify mixtures of 1-kestose and neokestose after conversion to the acetate derivatives. In this study, unequivocal assignments are made for the anomeric carbon and proton signals for the above two trisaccharide acetates as well as for 6-kestose hendecaacetate and for nystose tetradecaacetate (a 1-kestose-derived tetrasaccharide). A number of oligosaccharide fractions were isolated from several plant species, converted to the acetates, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra obtained. Using the above reference data, the following information was obtained. The trisaccharide fraction from Dactylis gomerata L. stem tissue and Asparagus officinalis L. roots contain both 1-kestose and neokestose, and the tetrasaccharide fractions contain three components, one of which is nystose. Penta- and hexasaccharide acetates were also isolated from A. officinalis L. roots and were found to contain, respectively, four and at least five components. All components of both of the above species appear to contain a kestose residue and to be produced by the sequential addition of fructofuranosyl units to these. The trisaccharide fraction from Festuca arundinacea is complex, and contains at least five different components, two of which appear to be 1-kestose and neokestose.

  15. Quantitative (13)C Solid-State NMR Spectra by Multiple-Contact Cross-polarization for Drug Delivery: From Active Principles to Excipients and Drug Carriers.

    PubMed

    Saïdi, Fadila; Taulelle, Francis; Martineau, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    In this contribution, we present an analysis of the main parameters influencing the efficiency of the (1)H → (13)C multiple-contact cross-polarization nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment in the context of solid pharmaceutical materials. Using the optimum experimental conditions, quantitative (13)C NMR spectra are then obtained for porous metal-organic frameworks (potential drug carriers) and for components present in drug formulations (active principle ingredient and excipients, amorphous or crystalline). Finally, we show that mixtures of components can also be quantified with this method and, hence, that it represents an ideal tool for quantification of pharmaceutical formulations by (13)C cross-polarization under magic-angle spinning NMR in the industry as it is robust and easy to set up, much faster than direct (13)C polarization and is efficient for samples at natural abundance. PMID:27372550

  16. Optical Polarization of Nuclear Spins in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Abram L.; Klimov, Paul V.; Ivády, Viktor; Szász, Krisztián; Christle, David J.; Koehl, William F.; Gali, Ádám; Awschalom, David D.

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate optically pumped dynamic nuclear polarization of 29Si nuclear spins that are strongly coupled to paramagnetic color centers in 4 H - and 6 H -SiC. The 9 9 % ±1 % degree of polarization that we observe at room temperature corresponds to an effective nuclear temperature of 5 μ K . By combining ab initio theory with the experimental identification of the color centers' optically excited states, we quantitatively model how the polarization derives from hyperfine-mediated level anticrossings. These results lay a foundation for SiC-based quantum memories, nuclear gyroscopes, and hyperpolarized probes for magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. High-spin nuclear structure data on the Internet

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B. |

    1997-12-31

    The study of nuclear structure at fast nuclear rotations, using fusion-evaporation reactions, started in the early sixties but since the experimental observation of superdeformation about a decade ago it has become one of the most pursued research topics in nuclear physics. Large gamma-ray detector arrays GAMMASPHERE, EUROGAM, and GASP were developed during the last few years and these continue to produce a wealth of new, information about the properties of nuclei at high spins, including superdeformation. It is considered vital to compile, evaluate and systematize published data on many thousands of levels and gamma rays and associated nuclear bands obtained in such studies and make these available to the research community in conveniently retrievable and modern formats. This talk will describe the numerical, bibliographic and other high-spin related databases that are already accessible via INTERNET. Present limitations and ways to improve the current status and display of such databases will also be discussed.

  18. Measuring (13)C-(2)D dipolar couplings with a universal REDOR dephasing curve

    PubMed

    Gullion

    2000-09-01

    A (13)C-observe REDOR experiment is described which allows (13)C-(2)D dipolar couplings to be obtained by a universal dipolar dephasing curve. Previous (13)C-observe REDOR experiments on (13)C-(2)D spin pairs generally relied on numerical simulations to obtain the dipolar coupling. The REDOR experiment described in this article is based on a deuterium composite pulse, and the data analysis eliminates the need for numerical simulations and is the same as the traditional REDOR analysis performed on pairs of spin-12 nuclei. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10968975

  19. Nuclear Spin Gyroscope Based on an Atomic Comagnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kornack, T.W.; Ghosh, R.K.; Romalis, M.V.

    2005-12-02

    We describe a nuclear spin gyroscope based on an alkali-metal-noble-gas comagnetometer. Optically pumped alkali-metal vapor is used to polarize the noble-gas atoms and detect their gyroscopic precession. Spin precession due to magnetic fields as well as their gradients and transients can be cancelled in this arrangement. The sensitivity is enhanced by using a high-density alkali-metal vapor in a spin-exchange relaxation free regime. With a K-{sup 3}He comagnetometer we demonstrate rotation sensitivity of 5x10{sup -7} rad s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2}, equivalent to a magnetic field sensitivity of 2.5 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. The rotation signal can be increased by a factor of 10 using {sup 21}Ne with a smaller magnetic moment. The comagnetometer is also a promising tool in searches for anomalous spin couplings beyond the standard model.

  20. Characterization of the International Humic Substances Society standard and reference fulvic and humic acids by solution state carbon-13 (13C) and hydrogen-1 (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Folan, Daniel W.; MacCarthy, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Standard and reference samples of the International Humic Substances Society have been characterized by solution state carbon-13 and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Samples included the Suwannee River, soil, and peat standard fulvic and humic acids, the Leonardite standard humic acid, the Nordic aquatic reference fulvic and humic acids, and the Summit Hill soil reference humic acid. Aqueous-solution carbon-13 NMR analyses included the measurement of spin-lattice relaxation times, measurement of nuclear Overhauser enhancement factors, measurement of quantitative carbon distributions, recording of attached proton test spectra, and recording of spectra under nonquantitative conditions. Distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer carbon-13 NMR spectra also were recorded on the Suwannee River fulvic acid in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide. Hydrogen-1 NMR spectra were recorded on sodium salts of the samples in deuterium oxide. The carbon aromaticities of the samples ranged from 0.24 for the Suwannee River fulvic acid to 0.58 for the Leonardite humic acid.

  1. Nuclear tetrahedral configurations at spin zero

    SciTech Connect

    Zberecki, Krzysztof; Magierski, Piotr; Heenen, Paul-Henri

    2009-01-15

    The possibility of the existence of stable tetrahedral deformations at spin zero is investigated using the Skyrme-HFBCS approach and the generator coordinate method (GCM). The study is limited to nuclei in which the tetrahedral mode has been predicted to be favored on the basis of non-self-consistent models. Our results indicate that a clear identification of tetrahedral deformations is unlikely because they are strongly mixed with the axial octupole mode. However, the excitation energies related to the tetrahedral mode are systematically lower than those of the axial octupole mode in all the nuclei included in this study.

  2. Study of the interactions between sucrose and metal ions (Mg2+ and K+) and their simultaneous quantification in ternary mixture by mid-infrared and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, Philippe; Jhurry, Dhanjay; Sers, Sandrine; Cadet, Frédéric

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, a ternary aqueous mixture of sucrose and two metal ions (Mg(2+) and K(+)) has been examined by mid-infrared spectroscopy coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) and the partial least-squares regression method (PLS). PCA was first used for the description of Fourier transform mid-infrared (mid-FTIR) spectral data of the complex samples. The resulting factorial map, set up with the two most influential component axes, features distinct concentration distribution specific to each component. Prediction equations that linked sucrose, magnesium, and potassium concentrations to the spectral data were established by the partial least-squares regression method. A quite good correlation was obtained between the first 5 axes and the concentration variables, with coefficient values ranging from 0.984 to 0.997. It was thus possible to predict specifically both metal ion concentrations in the ternary mixture with relatively good accuracy. The ternary mixtures of sucrose, Mg(2+), and K(+) were also subjected to (13)C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) analysis. From the relative displacements of chemical shifts of the carbon atoms of sucrose, it was possible to determine the influence of each metal ion present in the mixture. PMID:15282047

  3. Astroglial Contribution to Brain Energy Metabolism in Humans Revealed by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Elucidation of the Dominant Pathway for Neurotransmitter Glutamate Repletion and Measurement of Astrocytic Oxidative Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lebon, Vincent; Petersen, Kitt F.; Cline, Gary W.; Shen, Jun; Mason, Graeme F.; Dufour, Sylvie; Behar, Kevin L.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Rothman, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a crucial role for glial metabolism in maintaining proper synaptic function and in the etiology of neurological disease. However, the study of glial metabolism in humans has been hampered by the lack of noninvasive methods. To specifically measure the contribution of astroglia to brain energy metabolism in humans, we used a novel noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic approach. We measured carbon 13 incorporation into brain glutamate and glutamine in eight volunteers during an intravenous infusion of [2-13C] acetate, which has been shown in animal models to be metabolized specifically in astroglia. Mathematical modeling of the three established pathways for neurotransmitter glutamate repletion indicates that the glutamate/glutamine neurotransmitter cycle between astroglia and neurons (0.32 ± 0.07 μmol · gm−1 · min−1) is the major pathway for neuronal glutamate repletion and that the astroglial TCA cycle flux (0.14 ± 0.06 μmol · gm−1 · min−1) accounts for ~14% of brain oxygen consumption. Up to 30% of the glutamine transferred to the neurons by the cycle may derive from replacement of oxidized glutamate by anaplerosis. The further application of this approach could potentially enlighten the role of astroglia in supporting brain glutamatergic activity and in neurological and psychiatric disease. PMID:11880482

  4. Determination of the tautomeric equilibria of pyridoyl benzoyl β-diketones in the liquid and solid state through the use of deuterium isotope effects on (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Borisov, Eugeny V; Lindon, John C

    2015-02-01

    The tautomeric equilibria for 2-pyridoyl-, 3-pyridoyl-, and 4-pyridoyl-benzoyl methane have been investigated using deuterium isotope effects on (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts both in the liquid and the solid state. Equilibria are established both in the liquid and the solid state. In addition, in the solution state the 2-bond and 3-bond J((1)H-(13)C) coupling constants have been used to confirm the equilibrium positions. The isotope effects due to deuteriation at the OH position are shown to be superior to chemical shift in determination of equilibrium positions of these almost symmetrical -pyridoyl-benzoyl methanes. The assignments of the NMR spectra are supported by calculations of the chemical shifts at the DFT level. The equilibrium positions are shown to be different in the liquid and the solid state. In the liquid state the 4-pyridoyl derivative is at the B-form (C-1 is OH), whereas the 2-and 3-pyridoyl derivatives are in the A-form. In the solid state all three compounds are on the B-form. The 4-pyridoyl derivative shows unusual deuterium isotope effects in the solid, which are ascribed to a change of the crystal structure of the deuteriated compound. PMID:24070650

  5. Search for an Atomic EDM with Optical-Coupling Nuclear Spin Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, K.; Uchida, M.; Inoue, T.; Hatakeyama, N.; Yoshimi, A.

    2007-06-13

    We have constructed a nuclear spin oscillator of a new type, that employs a feedback scheme based on an optical spin detection and suceeding spin control by a transverse field application. This spin oscillator parallels the conventional spin maser in many points, but exhibits advantages and requirements that are different from those with the spin maser. By means of the optical-coupling nuclear spin oscillator, an experimental setup to search for an electric dipole moment (EDM) in a spin 1/2 diamagnetic atom 129Xe is being developed.

  6. Electronic states and molecular dynamics of single-component molecular conductors [M (tmdt) 2] (M =Ni , Pt) studied by 13C and 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Rina; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Yoshimura, Masahide; Gangi, Hiro; Kanoda, Kazushi; Zhou, Biao; Idobata, Yuki; Kobayashi, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The molecular conductors [M(tmdt) 2] (M =Ni , Pt) consisting of single molecular species are investigated with 13C NMR and 1H NMR. The temperature dependences of the 13C NMR shift and relaxation rate provide microscopic evidence for the metallic nature with appreciable electron correlations. Both compounds exhibit an anomalous frequency-dependent enhancement in the 1H nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate in a wide temperature range. These observations signify the presence of extraordinary molecular motions with low energy excitations.

  7. Nonlocal Nuclear Spin Quieting in Quantum Dot Molecules: Optically Induced Extended Two-Electron Spin Coherence Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Colin M.; Ross, Aaron M.; Kim, Danny; Gammon, Daniel; Bracker, Allan S.; Sham, L. J.; Steel, Duncan G.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the extension of coherence between all four two-electron spin ground states of an InAs quantum dot molecule (QDM) via nonlocal suppression of nuclear spin fluctuations in two vertically stacked quantum dots (QDs), while optically addressing only the top QD transitions. Long coherence times are revealed through dark-state spectroscopy as resulting from nuclear spin locking mediated by the exchange interaction between the QDs. Line shape analysis provides the first measurement of the quieting of the Overhauser field distribution correlating with reduced nuclear spin fluctuations.

  8. Probing the dynamics of a nuclear spin bath in diamond through time-resolved central spin magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Dréau, A; Jamonneau, P; Gazzano, O; Kosen, S; Roch, J-F; Maze, J R; Jacques, V

    2014-09-26

    Using fast electron spin resonance spectroscopy of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect in diamond, we demonstrate real-time readout of the Overhauser field produced by its nuclear spin environment under ambient conditions. These measurements enable narrowing the Overhauser field distribution by postselection, corresponding to a conditional preparation of the nuclear spin bath. Correlations of the Overhauser field fluctuations are quantitatively inferred by analyzing the Allan deviation over consecutive measurements. This method allows us to extract the dynamics of weakly coupled nuclear spins of the reservoir.

  9. Probing the Dynamics of a Nuclear Spin Bath in Diamond through Time-Resolved Central Spin Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréau, A.; Jamonneau, P.; Gazzano, O.; Kosen, S.; Roch, J.-F.; Maze, J. R.; Jacques, V.

    2014-09-01

    Using fast electron spin resonance spectroscopy of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect in diamond, we demonstrate real-time readout of the Overhauser field produced by its nuclear spin environment under ambient conditions. These measurements enable narrowing the Overhauser field distribution by postselection, corresponding to a conditional preparation of the nuclear spin bath. Correlations of the Overhauser field fluctuations are quantitatively inferred by analyzing the Allan deviation over consecutive measurements. This method allows us to extract the dynamics of weakly coupled nuclear spins of the reservoir.

  10. Nonlocal Nuclear Spin Quieting in Quantum Dot Molecules: Optically Induced Extended Two-Electron Spin Coherence Time.

    PubMed

    Chow, Colin M; Ross, Aaron M; Kim, Danny; Gammon, Daniel; Bracker, Allan S; Sham, L J; Steel, Duncan G

    2016-08-12

    We demonstrate the extension of coherence between all four two-electron spin ground states of an InAs quantum dot molecule (QDM) via nonlocal suppression of nuclear spin fluctuations in two vertically stacked quantum dots (QDs), while optically addressing only the top QD transitions. Long coherence times are revealed through dark-state spectroscopy as resulting from nuclear spin locking mediated by the exchange interaction between the QDs. Line shape analysis provides the first measurement of the quieting of the Overhauser field distribution correlating with reduced nuclear spin fluctuations. PMID:27563998

  11. Hyperpolarized (13)C Magnetic Resonance and Its Use in Metabolic Assessment of Cultured Cells and Perfused Organs.

    PubMed

    Lumata, Lloyd; Yang, Chendong; Ragavan, Mukundan; Carpenter, Nicholas; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Merritt, Matthew E

    2015-01-01

    Diseased tissue is often characterized by abnormalities in intermediary metabolism. Observing these alterations in situ may lead to an improved understanding of pathological processes and novel ways to monitor these processes noninvasively in human patients. Although (13)C is a stable isotope safe for use in animal models of disease as well as human subjects, its utility as a metabolic tracer has largely been limited to ex vivo analyses employing analytical techniques like mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Neither of these techniques is suitable for noninvasive metabolic monitoring, and the low abundance and poor gyromagnetic ratio of conventional (13)C make it a poor nucleus for imaging. However, the recent advent of hyperpolarization methods, particularly dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), makes it possible to enhance the spin polarization state of (13)C by many orders of magnitude, resulting in a temporary amplification of the signal sufficient for monitoring kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in living tissue through magnetic resonance spectroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging. Here, we review DNP techniques to monitor metabolism in cultured cells, perfused hearts, and perfused livers, focusing on our experiences with hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. We present detailed approaches to optimize the DNP procedure, streamline biological sample preparation, and maximize detection of specific metabolic activities. We also discuss practical aspects in the choice of metabolic substrates for hyperpolarization studies and outline some of the current technical and conceptual challenges in the field, including efforts to use hyperpolarization to quantify metabolic rates in vivo.

  12. Investigation of the Possibility of Using Nuclear Magnetic Spin Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dent, William V., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the program to investigate a "Gasdynamic fusion propulsion system for space exploration" is to develop a fusion propulsion system for a manned mission to the planet mars. A study using Deuterium and Tritium atoms are currently in progress. When these atoms under-go fusion, the resulting neutrons and alpha particles are emitted in random directions (isotropically). The probable direction of emission is equal for all directions, thus resulting in wasted energy, massive shielding and cooling requirements, and serious problems with the physics of achieving fusion. If the nuclear magnetic spin moments of the deuterium and tritium nuclei could be precisely aligned at the moment of fusion, the stream of emitted neutrons could be directed out the rear of the spacecraft for thrust and the alpha particles directed forward into an electromagnet ot produce electricity to continue operating the fusion engine. The following supporting topics are discussed: nuclear magnetic moments and spin precession in magnetic field, nuclear spin quantum mechanics, kinematics of nuclear reactions, and angular distribution of particles.

  13. Theoretical grounds of relativistic methods for calculation of spin-spin coupling constants in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakova, I. L.; Rusakov, Yu Yu; Krivdin, L. B.

    2016-04-01

    The theoretical grounds of the modern relativistic methods for quantum chemical calculation of spin-spin coupling constants in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra are considered. Examples and prospects of application of relativistic calculations of these constants in the structural studies of organic and heteroorganic compounds are discussed. Practical recommendations on relativistic calculations of spin-spin coupling constants using the available software are given. The bibliography includes 622 references.

  14. Storing entanglement of nuclear spins via Uhrig dynamical decoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Soumya Singha; Mahesh, T. S.; Agarwal, G. S.

    2011-06-15

    Stroboscopic spin flips have already been shown to prolong the coherence times of quantum systems under noisy environments. Uhrig's dynamical decoupling scheme provides an optimal sequence for a quantum system interacting with a dephasing bath. Several experimental demonstrations have already verified the efficiency of such dynamical decoupling schemes in preserving single-qubit coherences. In this work we describe the experimental study of Uhrig's dynamical decoupling in preserving two-qubit entangled states using an ensemble of spin-1/2 nuclear pairs in solution state. We find that the performance of odd-order Uhrig sequences in preserving entanglement is superior to both even-order Uhrig sequences and periodic spin-flip sequences. We also find that there exists an optimal order of the Uhrig sequence in which a singlet state can be stored at high correlation for about 30 seconds.

  15. Visualization of enantiomers using natural abundant (13)C-filtered single and double quantum selective refocusing experiments: Application to small chiral molecules.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nilamoni; Baishya, Bikash; Suryaprakash, N

    2009-09-01

    The routine use of proton NMR for the visualization of enantiomers, aligned in the chiral liquid crystal solvent poly-gamma-benzyl-l-glutamate (PBLG), is restricted due to severe loss of resolution arising from large number of pair wise interaction of nuclear spins. In the present study, we have designed two experimental techniques for their visualization utilizing the natural abundance (13)C edited selective refocusing of single quantum (CH-SERF) and double quantum (CH-DQSERF) coherences. The methods achieve chiral discrimination and aid in the simultaneous determination of homonuclear couplings between active and passive spins and heteronuclear couplings between the excited protons and the participating (13)C spin. The CH-SERF also overcomes the problem of overlap of central transitions of the methyl selective refocusing (SERF) experiment resulting in better chiral discrimination. Theoretical description of the evolution of magnetization in both the sequences has been discussed using polarization operator formalism.

  16. Nuclear spin-spin relaxation in 3He-Ne films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Neil S.; Stachiowak, Piotr; Parks, Charles

    2003-05-01

    NMR measurements of the nuclear spin-spin relaxation times are reported for commensurate monolayers of 3He and 3He-Ne films on boron nitride for temperatures 0.1spin exchange term. Values of the vacancy formation energy for the monolayer coverage and the atom-vacancy exchange rate are also obtained from the experimental observations.

  17. Multiple locations of peptides in the hydrocarbon core of gel-phase membranes revealed by peptide (13)C to lipid (2)H rotational-echo double-resonance solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Jia, Lihui; Liang, Shuang; Weliky, David P

    2015-01-27

    Membrane locations of peptides and proteins are often critical to their functions. Solid-state rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance is applied to probe the locations of two peptides via peptide (13)CO to lipid (2)H distance measurements. The peptides are KALP, an α-helical membrane-spanning peptide, and HFP, the β-sheet N-terminal fusion peptide of the HIV gp41 fusion protein that plays an important role in HIV-host cell membrane fusion. Both peptides are shown to have at least two distinct locations within the hydrocarbon core of gel-phase membranes. The multiple locations are attributed to snorkeling of lysine side chains for KALP and to the distribution of antiparallel β-sheet registries for HFP. The relative population of each location is also quantitated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clear experimental support of multiple peptide locations within the membrane hydrocarbon core. These data are for gel-phase membranes, but the approach should work for liquid-ordered membranes containing cholesterol and may be applicable to liquid-disordered membranes with appropriate additional analysis to take into account protein and lipid motion. This paper also describes the methodological development of (13)CO-(2)H REDOR using the lyophilized I4 peptide that is α-helical and (13)CO-labeled at A9 and (2)Hα-labeled at A8. The I4 spins are well-approximated as an ensemble of isolated (13)CO-(2)H spin pairs each separated by 5.0 Å with a 37 Hz dipolar coupling. A pulse sequence with rectangular 100 kHz (2)H π pulses results in rapid and extensive buildup of REDOR (ΔS/S0) with a dephasing time (τ). The buildup is well-fit by a simple exponential function with a rate of 24 Hz and an extent close to 1. These parameter values reflect nonradiative transitions between the (2)H spin states during the dephasing period. Each spin pair spends approximately two-thirds of its time in the (13)CO-(2)H (m = ±1) states and

  18. Metabolism of D-glucose in a wall-less mutant of Neurospora crassa examined by /sup 13/C and /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonances: effects of insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, N.J.; McKenzie, M.A.; Adebodun, F.; Jordan, F.; Lenard, J.

    1988-11-15

    /sup 13/C NMR and /sup 31/P NMR have been used to investigate the metabolism of glucose by a wall-less strain of Neurospora crassa (slime), grown in a supplemented nutritionally defined medium and harvested in the early stationary stage of growth. With D-(1-/sup 13/C)- or D-(6-/sup 13/C)glucose as substrates, the major metabolic products identified from /sup 13/C NMR spectra were (2-/sup 13/C)ethanol, (3-/sup 13/C)alanine, and C/sub 1/- and C/sub 6/-labeled trehalose. Several observations suggested the existence of a substantial hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt: (i) a 70% greater yield of ethanol from C/sub 6/- than from C/sub 1/-labeled glucose; (ii) C/sub 1/-labeled glucose yielded 19% C/sub 6/-labeled trehalose, while C/sub 6/-labeled glucose yielded only 4% C/sub 1/-labeled trehalose; (iii) a substantial transfer of /sup 13/C from C/sub 2/-labeled glucose to the C/sub 2/-position of ethanol. /sup 31/P NMR spectra showed millimolar levels of intracellular inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), phosphodiesters, and diphosphates including sugar diphosphates and polyphosphate. Addition of glucose resulted in a decrease in cytoplasmic P/sub i/ and an increase in sugar monophosphates, which continued for at least 30 min. Phosphate resonances corresponding to metabolic intermediates of both the glycolytic and HMP pathways were identified in cell extracts. Addition of insulin (100 nM) with the glucose had the following effects relative to glucose alone: (i) a 24% increase in the rate of ethanol production; (ii) a 38% increase in the rate of alanine production; (iii) a 27% increase in the rate of glucose disappearance. Insulin thus increases the rates of production of ethanol and alanine in these cells, in addition to increasing production of CO/sub 2/ and glycogen, as previously shown.

  19. Assignment of the ferriheme resonances of high- and low-spin forms of the symmetrical hemin-reconstituted nitrophorins 1-4 by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy: the dynamics of heme ruffling deformations.

    PubMed

    Shokhireva, Tatiana K; Shokhirev, Nikolai V; Berry, Robert E; Zhang, Hongjun; Walker, F Ann

    2008-08-01

    The four major nitrophorins (NPs) of the adult blood-sucking insect Rhodnius prolixus have been reconstituted with the "symmetrical hemin" 2,4-dimethyldeuterohemin, and their NMR spectra have been investigated as the high-spin (S=5/2) aqua and low-spin (S=1/2) N-methylimidazole (NMeIm) and cyanide complexes. The NMeIm complexes allow assignment of the high-spin hemin resonances by saturation transfer difference spectroscopy. The cyanide complexes were investigated as paramagnetic analogues of the NO complexes. It is shown that the hemin ring is highly distorted from planarity, much more so for NP2 than for NP1 and NP4 (with ruffling being the major distortion mode), for both high- and low-spin forms. For the cyanide complexes, the conformation of the distorted ring changes on the NMR timescale to yield chemical exchange (exchange spectroscopy, EXSY) cross peaks for NP1sym(CN), NP3sym(CN) and NP4sym(CN) but not for NP2sym(CN). These changes in nonplanar conformation are visualized as a "rolling" of the ruffled macrocycle ridges through some number of degrees, the lowest-energy ruffling mode. This probably occurs in response to slow protein dynamics that cause the I120 and L132 side chains in the distal heme pocket to move in opposite directions (up and away vs. down and toward the hemin ring). This in turn changes the out-of-plane displacements of the 2M and 3M of the symmetrical hemin on the NMR timescale. Two other types of dynamics, i.e., changes in heme seating and NMeIm rotation, are also observed. The highly distorted heme and the dynamics it causes are unique to the NPs and a few other heme proteins with highly distorted macrocycles. PMID:18458965

  20. New guidelines for δ13C measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Gehre, Matthias; Groning, Manfred; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Toman, Blaza; Verkouteren, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Consistency of δ13C measurements can be improved 39−47% by anchoring the δ13C scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in 13C/12C. It is recommended thatδ13C values of both organic and inorganic materials be measured and expressed relative to VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on a scale normalized by assigning consensus values of −46.6‰ to L-SVEC lithium carbonate and +1.95‰ to NBS 19 calcium carbonate. Uncertainties of other reference material values on this scale are improved by factors up to two or more, and the values of some have been notably shifted:  the δ13C of NBS 22 oil is −30.03%.

  1. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  2. Optically controlled electron-nuclear spin dynamics in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Edwin; Economou, Sophia

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, a large number of experiments involving coherent and incoherent control of electron spins in quantum dots have revealed the important role of the nuclear spins of the host material. Experiments with optical controls, both pulsed and continuous wave, have shown that the feedback of the nuclear spins on the electron spin strongly affects the electron spin response. However, a microscopic theory of this mechanism is not available at present. We introduce a formalism that allows us to investigate this system without invoking any phenomenological spin-flip rates for the nuclei. We derive the electron-nuclear dynamics under the influence of external periodic pulsed control to second order in the electron-nuclear hyperfine coupling. Our formalism should have wide applications in both coherently and incoherently driven electron spins interacting with a nuclear spin bath, including self-assembled and gated quantum dots. Work (EB) supported by LPS-CMTC and CNAM.

  3. Molecular properties in the Tamm-Dancoff approximation: indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chi Y.; Ryley, Matthew S.; Peach, Michael J. G.; Tozer, David J.; Helgaker, Trygve; Teale, Andrew M.

    2015-07-01

    The Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) can be applied to the computation of excitation energies using time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TD-HF) and time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT). In addition to simplifying the resulting response equations, the TDA has been shown to significantly improve the calculation of triplet excitation energies in these theories, largely overcoming issues associated with triplet instabilities of the underlying reference wave functions. Here, we examine the application of the TDA to the calculation of another response property involving triplet perturbations, namely the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constant. Particular attention is paid to the accuracy of the triplet spin-dipole and Fermi-contact components. The application of the TDA in HF calculations leads to vastly improved results. For DFT calculations, the TDA delivers improved stability with respect to geometrical variations but does not deliver higher accuracy close to equilibrium geometries. These observations are rationalised in terms of the ground- and excited-state potential energy surfaces and, in particular, the severity of the triplet instabilities associated with each method. A notable feature of the DFT results within the TDA is their similarity across a wide range of different functionals. The uniformity of the TDA results suggests that some conventional evaluations may exploit error cancellations between approximations in the functional forms and those arising from triplet instabilities. The importance of an accurate treatment of correlation for evaluating spin-spin coupling constants is highlighted by this comparison.

  4. Nuclear spin imaging with hyperpolarized nuclei created by brute force method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masayoshi; Kunimatsu, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Kohri, Hideki; Ohta, Takeshi; Utsuro, Masahiko; Yosoi, Masaru; Ono, Satoshi; Fukuda, Kohji; Takamatsu, Kunihiko; Ueda, Kunihiro; Didelez, Jean-P.; Prossati, Giorgio; de Waard, Arlette

    2011-05-01

    We have been developing a polarized HD target for particle physics at the SPring-8 under the leadership of the RCNP, Osaka University for the past 5 years. Nuclear polarizaton is created by means of the brute force method which uses a high magnetic field (~17 T) and a low temperature (~ 10 mK). As one of the promising applications of the brute force method to life sciences we started a new project, "NSI" (Nuclear Spin Imaging), where hyperpolarized nuclei are used for the MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). The candidate nuclei with spin ½hslash are 3He, 13C, 15N, 19F, 29Si, and 31P, which are important elements for the composition of the biomolecules. Since the NMR signals from these isotopes are enhanced by orders of magnitudes, the spacial resolution in the imaging would be much more improved compared to the practical MRI used so far. Another advantage of hyperpolarized MRI is that the MRI is basically free from the radiation, while the problems of radiation exposure caused by the X-ray CT or PET (Positron Emission Tomography) cannot be neglected. In fact, the risk of cancer for Japanese due to the radiation exposure through these diagnoses is exceptionally high among the advanced countries. As the first step of the NSI project, we are developing a system to produce hyperpolarized 3He gas for the diagnosis of serious lung diseases, for example, COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). The system employs the same 3He/4He dilution refrigerator and superconducting solenoidal coil as those used for the polarized HD target with some modification allowing the 3He Pomeranchuk cooling and the following rapid melting of the polarized solid 3He to avoid the depolarization. In this report, the present and future steps of our project will be outlined with some latest experimental results.

  5. Manipulation of the nuclear spin ensemble in a quantum dot with chirped magnetic resonance pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsch, Mathieu; Wüst, Gunter; Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Xue, Fei; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.; Poggio, Martino; Warburton, Richard J.

    2014-09-01

    The nuclear spins in nanostructured semiconductors play a central role in quantum applications. The nuclear spins represent a useful resource for generating local magnetic fields but nuclear spin noise represents a major source of dephasing for spin qubits. Controlling the nuclear spins enhances the resource while suppressing the noise. NMR techniques are challenging: the group III and V isotopes have large spins with widely different gyromagnetic ratios; in strained material there are large atom-dependent quadrupole shifts; and nanoscale NMR is hard to detect. We report NMR on 100,000 nuclear spins of a quantum dot using chirped radiofrequency pulses. Following polarization, we demonstrate a reversal of the nuclear spin. We can flip the nuclear spin back and forth a hundred times. We demonstrate that chirped NMR is a powerful way of determining the chemical composition, the initial nuclear spin temperatures and quadrupole frequency distributions for all the main isotopes. The key observation is a plateau in the NMR signal as a function of sweep rate: we achieve inversion at the first quantum transition for all isotopes simultaneously. These experiments represent a generic technique for manipulating nanoscale inhomogeneous nuclear spin ensembles and open the way to probe the coherence of such mesoscopic systems.

  6. High-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-10-01

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure rotor loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve by abrading the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other removable plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal loss of pressure for 72 h. As an application example, in situ13C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg 2SiO 4) reacted with supercritical CO 2 and H 2O at 150 bar and 50 °C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  7. High-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, David W; Turcu, Romulus V F; Sears, Jesse A; Rosso, Kevin M; Burton, Sarah D; Felmy, Andrew R; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-10-01

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure rotor loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve by abrading the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other removable plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal loss of pressure for 72 h. As an application example, in situ(13)C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg(2)SiO(4)) reacted with supercritical CO(2) and H(2)O at 150 bar and 50°C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. PMID:21862372

  8. Coal structure at reactive sites by sup 1 H- sup 13 C- sup 19 F double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, E.W.; Woody, M.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The solid state NMR technique, {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C-{sup 31}P double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy, uses the direct dipolar interaction between {sup 13}C-{sup 31}P spin pairs in organophosphorus substances to identify the subset of carbons within a spherical volume element of 0.4 nm radius centered on the {sup 31}P atom. In combination with chemical manipulation of coals designed to introduce phosphorus containing functionality into the organic matrix, the NMR experiment becomes a method to examine selectively the carbon bonding network at the reactive sites in the coal. This approach generates a statistical structure description of the coal at the reaction centers in contrast to bulk carbon characterization using conventional {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. 3 refs.

  9. Solid effect in magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corzilius, Björn; Smith, Albert A.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2012-08-01

    For over five decades, the solid effect (SE) has been heavily utilized as a mechanism for performing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Nevertheless, it has not found widespread application in contemporary, high magnetic field DNP experiments because SE enhancements display an ω _0 ^{ - 2} field dependence. In particular, for nominally forbidden zero and double quantum SE transitions to be partially allowed, it is necessary for mixing of adjacent nuclear spin states to occur, and this leads to the observed field dependence. However, recently we have improved our instrumentation and report here an enhancement of ɛ = 91 obtained with the organic radical trityl (OX063) in magic angle spinning experiments performed at 5 T and 80 K. This is a factor of 6-7 higher than previous values in the literature under similar conditions. Because the solid effect depends strongly on the microwave field strength, we attribute this large enhancement to larger microwave field strengths inside the sample volume, achieved with more efficient coupling of the gyrotron to the sample chamber. In addition, we develop a theoretical model to explain the dependence of the buildup rate of enhanced nuclear polarization and the steady-state enhancement on the microwave power. Buildup times and enhancements were measured as a function of 1H concentration for both trityl and Gd-DOTA. Comparison of the results indicates that for trityl the initial polarization step is the slower, rate-determining step. However, for Gd-DOTA the spread of nuclear polarization via homonuclear 1H spin diffusion is rate-limiting. Finally, we discuss the applicability of the solid effect at fields > 5 T and the requirements to address the unfavorable field dependence of the solid effect.

  10. Coherent control of a single ²⁹Si nuclear spin qubit.

    PubMed

    Pla, Jarryd J; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A; Tan, Kuan Y; Dehollain, Juan P; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard; Jamieson, David N; Dzurak, Andrew S; Morello, Andrea

    2014-12-12

    Magnetic fluctuations caused by the nuclear spins of a host crystal are often the leading source of decoherence for many types of solid-state spin qubit. In group-IV semiconductor materials, the spin-bearing nuclei are sufficiently rare that it is possible to identify and control individual host nuclear spins. This Letter presents the first experimental detection and manipulation of a single ²⁹Si nuclear spin. The quantum nondemolition single-shot readout of the spin is demonstrated, and a Hahn echo measurement reveals a coherence time of T₂=6.3(7)  ms—in excellent agreement with bulk experiments. Atomistic modeling combined with extracted experimental parameters provides possible lattice sites for the ²⁹Si atom under investigation. These results demonstrate that single ²⁹Si nuclear spins could serve as a valuable resource in a silicon spin-based quantum computer.

  11. Voltage-induced conversion of helical to uniform nuclear spin polarization in a quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornich, Viktoriia; Stano, Peter; Zyuzin, Alexander A.; Loss, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    We study the effect of bias voltage on the nuclear spin polarization of a ballistic wire, which contains electrons and nuclei interacting via hyperfine interaction. In equilibrium, the localized nuclear spins are helically polarized due to the electron-mediated Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction. Focusing here on nonequilibrium, we find that an applied bias voltage induces a uniform polarization, from both helically polarized and unpolarized spins available for spin flips. Once a macroscopic uniform polarization in the nuclei is established, the nuclear spin helix rotates with frequency proportional to the uniform polarization. The uniform nuclear spin polarization monotonically increases as a function of both voltage and temperature, reflecting a thermal activation behavior. Our predictions offer specific ways to test experimentally the presence of a nuclear spin helix polarization in semiconducting quantum wires.

  12. Nuclear Spin Maser at Highly Stabilized Low Magnetic Field and Search for Atomic EDM

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimi, A.; Asahi, K.; Inoue, T.; Uchida, M.; Hatakeyama, N.; Tsuchiya, M.; Kagami, S.

    2009-08-04

    A nuclear spin maser is operated at a low static field through an active feedback scheme based on an optical nuclear spin detection and succeeding spin control by a transverse field application. The frequency stability of this optical-coupling spin maser is improved by installation of a low-noise current source for a solenoid magnet producing a static magnetic field in the maser operation. Experimental devices for application of the maser to EDM experiment are being developed.

  13. Nuclear spin-spin coupling in a van der Waals-bonded system: xenon dimer.

    PubMed

    Vaara, Juha; Hanni, Matti; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2013-03-14

    Nuclear spin-spin coupling over van der Waals bond has recently been observed via the frequency shift of solute protons in a solution containing optically hyperpolarized (129)Xe nuclei. We carry out a first-principles computational study of the prototypic van der Waals-bonded xenon dimer, where the spin-spin coupling between two magnetically non-equivalent isotopes, J((129)Xe - (131)Xe), is observable. We use relativistic theory at the four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock and Dirac-density-functional theory levels using novel completeness-optimized Gaussian basis sets and choosing the functional based on a comparison with correlated ab initio methods at the nonrelativistic level. J-coupling curves are provided at different levels of theory as functions of the internuclear distance in the xenon dimer, demonstrating cross-coupling effects between relativity and electron correlation for this property. Calculations on small Xe clusters are used to estimate the importance of many-atom effects on J((129)Xe - (131)Xe). Possibilities of observing J((129)Xe - (131)Xe) in liquid xenon are critically examined, based on molecular dynamics simulation. A simplistic spherical model is set up for the xenon dimer confined in a cavity, such as in microporous materials. It is shown that the on the average shorter internuclear distance enforced by the confinement increases the magnitude of the coupling as compared to the bulk liquid case, rendering J((129)Xe - (131)Xe) in a cavity a feasible target for experimental investigation. PMID:23514495

  14. Revision of Spin Echoes in Pure Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriles, C. A.

    2001-04-01

    Goldman's spin-1/2 formalism has been used for describing the response of an I=3/2 spin system to a two-pulse sequence in a pure nuclear quadrupole resonance experiment. A detailed analysis of the polarization evolution and quadrupolar echo generation is carried out through the use of explicit expressions for secular homo- and heteronuclear dipolar interactions. In striking contrast with previous studies, it is predicted that Van Vleck's second moments governing a classical solid-echo or Hahn sequence differ from those obtained by equivalent means in magnetic resonance. In fact, it is shown that, although measured moments still complement each other, the combined use of standard sequences does not allow the separate determination of homo- and heteronuclear dipolar contributions to the linewidth, not even in an indirect manner. In this context, the importance and potential usefulness of a crossed coil probe are also briefly discussed.

  15. Nuclear Hydrogen for Peak Electricity Production and Spinning Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    2005-01-20

    Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen. The key strategic question is this: ''What are the early markets for nuclear hydrogen?'' The answer determines (1) whether there are incentives to implement nuclear hydrogen technology today or whether the development of such a technology could be delayed by decades until a hydrogen economy has evolved, (2) the industrial partners required to develop such a technology, and (3) the technological requirements for the hydrogen production system (rate of production, steady-state or variable production, hydrogen purity, etc.). Understanding ''early'' markets for any new product is difficult because the customer may not even recognize that the product could exist. This study is an initial examination of how nuclear hydrogen could be used in two interconnected early markets: the production of electricity for peak and intermediate electrical loads and spinning reserve for the electrical grid. The study is intended to provide an initial description that can then be used to consult with potential customers (utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, etc.) to better determine the potential real-world viability of this early market for nuclear hydrogen and provide the starting point for a more definitive assessment of the concept. If this set of applications is economically viable, it offers several unique advantages: (1) the market is approximately equivalent in size to the existing nuclear electric enterprise in the United States, (2) the entire market is within the utility industry and does not require development of an external market for hydrogen or a significant hydrogen infrastructure beyond the utility site, (3) the technology and scale match those of nuclear hydrogen production, (4) the market exists today, and (5) the market is sufficient in size to justify development of nuclear hydrogen production techniques independent of the development of any other market for hydrogen. These characteristics make it an ideal

  16. Suppression of nuclear spin bath fluctuations in self-assembled quantum dots induced by inhomogeneous strain.

    PubMed

    Chekhovich, E A; Hopkinson, M; Skolnick, M S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2015-02-23

    Interaction with nuclear spins leads to decoherence and information loss in solid-state electron-spin qubits. One particular, ineradicable source of electron decoherence arises from decoherence of the nuclear spin bath, driven by nuclear-nuclear dipolar interactions. Owing to its many-body nature nuclear decoherence is difficult to predict, especially for an important class of strained nanostructures where nuclear quadrupolar effects have a significant but largely unknown impact. Here, we report direct measurement of nuclear spin bath coherence in individual self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots: spin-echo coherence times in the range 1.2-4.5 ms are found. Based on these values, we demonstrate that strain-induced quadrupolar interactions make nuclear spin fluctuations much slower compared with lattice-matched GaAs/AlGaAs structures. Our findings demonstrate that quadrupolar effects can potentially be used to engineer optically active III-V semiconductor spin-qubits with a nearly noise-free nuclear spin bath, previously achievable only in nuclear spin-0 semiconductors, where qubit network interconnection and scaling are challenging.

  17. Suppression of nuclear spin bath fluctuations in self-assembled quantum dots induced by inhomogeneous strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekhovich, E. A.; Hopkinson, M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Tartakovskii, A. I.

    2015-02-01

    Interaction with nuclear spins leads to decoherence and information loss in solid-state electron-spin qubits. One particular, ineradicable source of electron decoherence arises from decoherence of the nuclear spin bath, driven by nuclear-nuclear dipolar interactions. Owing to its many-body nature nuclear decoherence is difficult to predict, especially for an important class of strained nanostructures where nuclear quadrupolar effects have a significant but largely unknown impact. Here, we report direct measurement of nuclear spin bath coherence in individual self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots: spin-echo coherence times in the range 1.2-4.5 ms are found. Based on these values, we demonstrate that strain-induced quadrupolar interactions make nuclear spin fluctuations much slower compared with lattice-matched GaAs/AlGaAs structures. Our findings demonstrate that quadrupolar effects can potentially be used to engineer optically active III-V semiconductor spin-qubits with a nearly noise-free nuclear spin bath, previously achievable only in nuclear spin-0 semiconductors, where qubit network interconnection and scaling are challenging.

  18. Suppression of nuclear spin bath fluctuations in self-assembled quantum dots induced by inhomogeneous strain.

    PubMed

    Chekhovich, E A; Hopkinson, M; Skolnick, M S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2015-01-01

    Interaction with nuclear spins leads to decoherence and information loss in solid-state electron-spin qubits. One particular, ineradicable source of electron decoherence arises from decoherence of the nuclear spin bath, driven by nuclear-nuclear dipolar interactions. Owing to its many-body nature nuclear decoherence is difficult to predict, especially for an important class of strained nanostructures where nuclear quadrupolar effects have a significant but largely unknown impact. Here, we report direct measurement of nuclear spin bath coherence in individual self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots: spin-echo coherence times in the range 1.2-4.5 ms are found. Based on these values, we demonstrate that strain-induced quadrupolar interactions make nuclear spin fluctuations much slower compared with lattice-matched GaAs/AlGaAs structures. Our findings demonstrate that quadrupolar effects can potentially be used to engineer optically active III-V semiconductor spin-qubits with a nearly noise-free nuclear spin bath, previously achievable only in nuclear spin-0 semiconductors, where qubit network interconnection and scaling are challenging. PMID:25704639

  19. Hyperfine-enhanced gyromagnetic ratio of a nuclear spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangtawesin, S.; McLellan, C. A.; Myers, B. A.; Bleszynski Jayich, A. C.; Awschalom, D. D.; Petta, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear spin gyromagnetic ratio can be enhanced by hyperfine coupling to the electronic spin. Here we show wide tunability of this enhancement on a 15N nuclear spin intrinsic to a single nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond. We perform control of the nuclear spin near the ground state level anti-crossing (GSLAC), where the enhancement of the gyromagnetic ratio from the ground state hyperfine coupling is maximized. We demonstrate a two order of magnitude enhancement of the effective nuclear gyromagnetic ratio compared to the value obtained at 500 G, a typical operating field that is suitable for nuclear spin polarization. Finally, we show that with strong enhancements, the nuclear spin ultimately suffers dephasing from the inhomogeneous broadening of the NMR transition frequency at the GSLAC.

  20. Solid-State NMR Study of Paramagnetic Bis(alaninato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) and Bis(1-amino(cyclo)alkane-1-carboxylato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) Complexes: Reflection of Stereoisomerism and Molecular Mobility in (13)C and (2)H Fast Magic Angle Spinning Spectra.

    PubMed

    Szalontai, Gábor; Csonka, Róbert; Speier, Gábor; Kaizer, József; Sabolović, Jasmina

    2015-05-18

    Solid-state stereochemistry and mobility of paramagnetic copper(II) complexes formed by aliphatic amino acids (l-alanine, d,l-alanine, 1-amino-2-methyl-alanine) and 1-amino(cyclo)alkane-1-carboxylic acids (alkane = propane, butane, pentane, hexane) as bidentate ligands has been studied by (13)C and (2)H solid-state fast magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. We examined the prospective method to characterize solid-state paramagnetic compounds in a routine way. Both (13)C and (2)H MAS spectra can distinguish d,l and l,l diastereomers of natural and polydeuterated bis([Dn]alaninato)copper(II) (n = 0, 2, 8) complexes with axial and/or equatorial methyl positions (conformations) primarily due to different Fermi-contact (FC) contributions. The three-bond hyperfine couplings clearly show Karplus-like dependence on the torsional angles which turned out to be a useful assignment aid. Density functional theory calculations of the FC term and crystal structures were also used to aid the final assignments. The correlations obtained for bis(alaninato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) complexes were successfully used to characterize other complexes. The usefulness of the (2)H MAS spectra of the deuterated complexes was underlined. Even the spectra of the easily exchangeable amine protons contained essential stereochemical information. In the case of a dimer structure of bis(1-aminohexane-1-carboxylato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) both the (13)C and (2)H resolutions were good enough to confirm the presence of the cis and trans forms in the asymmetric unit. With regard to the internal solid-state motions in the crystal lattice, the obtained quadrupolar tensor parameters were similar for the d,l- and l,l-alaninato isomers and also for the cis-trans forms suggesting similar crystal packing effects, static amine deuterons involved in hydrogen bonding, and fast rotating methyl groups.

  1. Dynamics of entanglement of two electron spins interacting with nuclear spin baths in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragar, Igor; Cywiński, Łukasz

    2015-04-01

    We study the dynamics of entanglement of two electron spins in two quantum dots, in which each electron is interacting with its nuclear spin environment. Focusing on the case of uncoupled dots, and starting from either Bell or Werner states of two qubits, we calculate the decay of entanglement due to the hyperfine interaction with the nuclei. We mostly focus on the regime of magnetic fields in which the bath-induced electron spin flips play a role, for example, their presence leads to the appearance of entanglement sudden death at finite time for two qubits initialized in a Bell state. For these fields, the intrabath dipolar interactions and spatial inhomogeneity of hyperfine couplings are irrelevant on the time scale of coherence (and entanglement) decay, and most of the presented calculations are performed using the uniform-coupling approximation to the exact hyperfine Hamiltonian. We provide a comprehensive overview of entanglement decay in this regime, considering both free evolution of the qubits, and an echo protocol with simultaneous application of π pulses to the two spins. All the currently relevant for experiments bath states are considered: the thermal state, narrowed states (characterized by diminished uncertainty of one of the components of the Overhauser field) of two uncorrelated baths, and a correlated narrowed state with a well-defined value of the z component of the Overhauser field interdot gradient. While we mostly use concurrence to quantify the amount of entanglement in a mixed state of the two electron spins, we also show that their entanglement dynamics can be reconstructed from measurements of the currently relevant for experiments entanglement witnesses and the fidelity of quantum teleportation, performed using a partially disentangled state as a resource.

  2. Microwave Field Distribution in a Magic Angle Spinning Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Probe

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P.; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B1S) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4 mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B1S field is 13µT/W1/2, where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5 W the corresponding value is γ SB1S = 0.84 MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement (ε) vs. ω1S/(2π) for a sample of 13C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment. PMID:21382733

  3. Self-Polarization and Dynamical Cooling of Nuclear Spins in Double Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudner, M. S.; Levitov, L. S.

    2007-07-01

    The spin-blockade regime of double quantum dots features coupled dynamics of electron and nuclear spins resulting from the hyperfine interaction. We explain observed nuclear self-polarization via a mechanism based on feedback of the Overhauser shift on electron energy levels, and propose to use the instability toward self-polarization as a vehicle for controlling the nuclear spin distribution. In the dynamics induced by a properly chosen time-dependent magnetic field, nuclear spin fluctuations can be suppressed significantly below the thermal level.

  4. /sup 13/C NMR studies of the molecular flexibility of antidepressants

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, S.L.; Andrews, P.R.; Craik, D.J.; Gale, D.J.

    1986-02-01

    The solution dynamics of a series of clinically potent antidepressants have been investigated by measuring /sup 13/C NMR relaxation parameters. Correlation times and internal motional rates were calculated from spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser effects for the protonated carbons in mianserin, imipramine-like antidepressants, and amitriptyline-like antidepressants. These data were interpreted in terms of overall molecular tumbling, internal rotations, and inherent flexibility of these structures. Of particular interest was the conformational variability of the tricyclic nucleus of the tricyclic antidepressants, where the data indicated a fivefold difference in mobility of the dimethylene bridge of imipramine-like antidepressants relative to amitriptyline-like compounds. The implications of such a difference in internal motions is discussed in relation to previous NMR studies and to the reported differences in pharmacological activity of these antidepressants.

  5. Dynamical decoupling design for identifying weakly coupled nuclear spins in a bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-09-01

    Identifying weakly coupled nuclear spins around single electron spins is a key step toward implementing quantum information processing using coupled electron-nuclei spin systems or sensing like single-spin nuclear magnetic resonance detection using diamond defect spins. Dynamical decoupling control of the center electron spin with periodic pulse sequences [e.g., the Carre-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence] has been successfully used to identify single nuclear spins and to resolve structure of nuclear spin clusters. Here, we design a type of pulse sequence by replacing the repetition unit (a single π pulse) of the CPMG sequence with a group of nonuniformly spaced π pulses. Using the nitrogen-vacancy center system in diamond, we theoretically demonstrate that the designed pulse sequence improves the resolution of nuclear spin noise spectroscopy, and more information about the surrounding nuclear spins is extracted. The principle of dynamical decoupling design proposed in this paper is useful in many systems (e.g., defect spin qubit in solids, trapped ion, and superconducting qubit) for high-resolution noise spectroscopy.

  6. Quantum information processing with electronic and nuclear spins in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, Paul Victor

    Traditional electronic and communication devices operate by processing binary information encoded as bits. Such digital devices have led to the most advanced technologies that we encounter in our everyday lives and they influence virtually every aspect of our society. Nonetheless, there exists a much richer way to encode and process information. By encoding information in quantum mechanical states as qubits, phenomena such as coherence and entanglement can be harnessed to execute tasks that are intractable to digital devices. Under this paradigm, it should be possible to realize quantum computers, quantum communication networks and quantum sensors that outperform their classical counterparts. The electronic spin states of color-center defects in the semiconductor silicon carbide have recently emerged as promising qubit candidates. They have long-lived quantum coherence up to room temperature, they can be controlled with mature magnetic resonance techniques, and they have a built-in optical interface operating near the telecommunication bands. In this thesis I will present two of our contributions to this field. The first is the electric-field control of electron spin qubits. This development lays foundation for quantum electronics that operate via electrical gating, much like traditional electronics. The second is the universal control and entanglement of electron and nuclear spin qubits in an ensemble under ambient conditions. This development lays foundation for quantum devices that have a built-in redundancy and can operate in real-world conditions. Both developments represent important steps towards practical quantum devices in an electronic grade material.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies on covalent modification of amino acids thiol and amino residues by monofunctional aryl 13C-isocyanates, models of skin and respiratory sensitizers: transformation of thiocarbamates into urea adducts.

    PubMed

    Fleischel, Olivier; Giménez-Arnau, Elena; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre

    2009-06-01

    Exposure to aryl isocyanates, intermediates in the manufacture of polyurethanes, provokes lung sensitization and asthma but also occupational allergic contact dermatitis, sensitization occurring from a single accidental exposure. The initial step in the sensitization process is believed to be the covalent binding of the -N triple bond C triple bond O group with nucleophilic residues on proteins. While a wide knowledge exists on the reactivity of skin sensitizers toward amino acids, little is known about respiratory sensitizers such as aryl isocyanates. (13)C-Labeled monofunctional aryl isocyanates were synthesized, and their reactivities toward nucleophilic amino acids, GSH, and a model peptide were studied by (13)C and [(1)H-(13)C] NMR spectroscopy. An acetonitrile/buffer solution was used as a solvent to avoid the hampering of the follow up of the reactivity by the isocyanate hydrolysis competing reaction. The compounds reacted with thiol groups, through the formation of thiocarbamate bonds and with amino groups to form urea derivatives. The reactivity was confirmed with GSH, containing both free amino and thiol groups, and with a model peptide, particularly in the case of the reaction with lysine. The use of (13)C NMR to follow the aryl isocyanates reversible conjugation with thiol groups is also reported. Particularly, it is shown that thiocarbamate adducts can be converted into adducts of the urea kind by reaction with amino groups. These results confirmed the hypothesis by which thiol-containing peptides/proteins may act as carriers of isocyanates for possible reaction at a later time and/or place with other nucleophiles and confirmed the role of lysine as a good competing nucleophilic amino acid. The reactivity of aryl isocyanates with thiol and amino groups needs thus to be considered in their assigned sensitization processes.

  8. Nuclear Spin Orientation Dependence of Magnetoconductance: A New Method for Measuring the Spin of Charged Excitations in the QHE

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.R.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Vitkalov, S.A.

    1998-12-01

    A new method for measuring the spin of the electrically charged ground state excitations m the Q$j~j quantum Hall effect ia proposed and demonstmted for the tirst time in GaAs/AIGaAs nndtiquantum wells. The method is &sed on the nuclear spin orientation dependence of" the 2D dc conductivity y in the quantum Hall regime due to the nuclear hyperfine interaction. As a demonstration of this method the spin of the electrically charged excitations of the ground state is determined at filling factor v = 1.

  9. Nuclear depolarization and absolute sensitivity in magic-angle spinning cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Mentink-Vigier, Frédéric; Paul, Subhradip; Lee, Daniel; Feintuch, Akiva; Hediger, Sabine; Vega, Shimon; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2015-09-14

    Over the last two decades solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance has witnessed a breakthrough in increasing the nuclear polarization, and thus experimental sensitivity, with the advent of Magic Angle Spinning Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (MAS-DNP). To enhance the nuclear polarization of protons, exogenous nitroxide biradicals such as TOTAPOL or AMUPOL are routinely used. Their efficiency is usually assessed as the ratio between the NMR signal intensity in the presence and the absence of microwave irradiation εon/off. While TOTAPOL delivers an enhancement εon/off of about 60 on a model sample, the more recent AMUPOL is more efficient: >200 at 100 K. Such a comparison is valid as long as the signal measured in the absence of microwaves is merely the Boltzmann polarization and is not affected by the spinning of the sample. However, recent MAS-DNP studies at 25 K by Thurber and Tycko (2014) have demonstrated that the presence of nitroxide biradicals combined with sample spinning can lead to a depolarized nuclear state, below the Boltzmann polarization. In this work we demonstrate that TOTAPOL and AMUPOL both lead to observable depolarization at ≈110 K, and that the magnitude of this depolarization is radical dependent. Compared to the static sample, TOTAPOL and AMUPOL lead, respectively, to nuclear polarization losses of up to 20% and 60% at a 10 kHz MAS frequency, while Trityl OX63 does not depolarize at all. This experimental work is analyzed using a theoretical model that explains how the depolarization process works under MAS and gives new insights into the DNP mechanism and into the spin parameters, which are relevant for the efficiency of a biradical. In light of these results, the outstanding performance of AMUPOL must be revised and we propose a new method to assess the polarization gain for future radicals.

  10. Nuclear Spin Locking and Extended Two-Electron Spin Decoherence Time in an InAs Quantum Dot Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Colin; Ross, Aaron; Steel, Duncan; Sham, L. J.; Bracker, Allan; Gammon, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The spin eigenstates for two electrons confined in a self-assembled InAs quantum dot molecule (QDM) consist of the spin singlet state, S, with J = 0 and the triplet states T-, T0 and T+, with J = 1. When a transverse magnetic field (Voigt geometry) is applied, the two-electron system can be initialized to the different states with appropriate laser excitation. Under the excitation of a weak probe laser, non-Lorentzian lineshapes are obtained when the system is initialized to either T- or T+, where T- results in a ``resonance locking'' lineshape while T+ gives a ``resonance avoiding '' lineshape: two different manifestations of hysteresis showing the importance of memory in the system. These observations signify dynamic nuclear spin polarization (DNSP) arising from a feedback mechanism involving hyperfine interaction between lattice nuclei and delocalized electron spins, and Overhauser shift due to nuclear spin polarization. Using pump configurations that generate coherent population trapping, the isolation of the electron spin from the optical excitation shows the stabilization of the nuclear spin ensemble. The dark-state lineshape measures the lengthened electron spin decoherence time, from 1 ns to 1 μs. Our detailed spectra highlight the potential of QDM for realizing a two-qubit gate. This work is supported by NSF, ARO, AFOSR, DARPA, and ONR.

  11. Optimization of 1H spin density for dynamic nuclear polarization using photo-excited triplet electron spins.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Akinori; Murokawa, Yu; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2009-03-01

    In dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using photo-excited triplet electron spins, known as Microwave-Induced Optical Nuclear Polarization (MIONP), the attainable (1)H polarization is determined by the ratio of the buildup rate and the spin-lattice relaxation rate, in turn depend on the (1)H spin density. It is shown that the final (1)H polarization can be enhanced by diluting the (1)H spins with partial deuteration. The DNP experiments are demonstrated in 0.05 mol% pentacene-doped p-terphenyl for various (1)H abundances. It is also shown that the (1)H spin diffusion coefficient can be determined by examining the initial buildup rate of (1)H polarization for various repetition rates of the DNP sequence.

  12. Low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization with helium-cooled samples and nitrogen-driven magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent; Tycko, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We describe novel instrumentation for low-temperature solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS), focusing on aspects of this instrumentation that have not been described in detail in previous publications. We characterize the performance of an extended interaction oscillator (EIO) microwave source, operating near 264 GHz with 1.5 W output power, which we use in conjunction with a quasi-optical microwave polarizing system and a MAS NMR probe that employs liquid helium for sample cooling and nitrogen gas for sample spinning. Enhancement factors for cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals in the 100-200 range are demonstrated with DNP at 25K. The dependences of signal amplitudes on sample temperature, as well as microwave power, polarization, and frequency, are presented. We show that sample temperatures below 30K can be achieved with helium consumption rates below 1.3 l/h. To illustrate potential applications of this instrumentation in structural studies of biochemical systems, we compare results from low-temperature DNP experiments on a calmodulin-binding peptide in its free and bound states.

  13. Low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization with helium-cooled samples and nitrogen-driven magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent; Tycko, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We describe novel instrumentation for low-temperature solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS), focusing on aspects of this instrumentation that have not been described in detail in previous publications. We characterize the performance of an extended interaction oscillator (EIO) microwave source, operating near 264 GHz with 1.5 W output power, which we use in conjunction with a quasi-optical microwave polarizing system and a MAS NMR probe that employs liquid helium for sample cooling and nitrogen gas for sample spinning. Enhancement factors for cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals in the 100-200 range are demonstrated with DNP at 25K. The dependences of signal amplitudes on sample temperature, as well as microwave power, polarization, and frequency, are presented. We show that sample temperatures below 30K can be achieved with helium consumption rates below 1.3 l/h. To illustrate potential applications of this instrumentation in structural studies of biochemical systems, we compare results from low-temperature DNP experiments on a calmodulin-binding peptide in its free and bound states. PMID:26920835

  14. Low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization with helium-cooled samples and nitrogen-driven magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent; Tycko, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We describe novel instrumentation for low-temperature solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS), focusing on aspects of this instrumentation that have not been described in detail in previous publications. We characterize the performance of an extended interaction oscillator (EIO) microwave source, operating near 264 GHz with 1.5 W output power, which we use in conjunction with a quasi-optical microwave polarizing system and a MAS NMR probe that employs liquid helium for sample cooling and nitrogen gas for sample spinning. Enhancement factors for cross-polarized 13C NMR signals in the 100-200 range are demonstrated with DNP at 25 K. The dependences of signal amplitudes on sample temperature, as well as microwave power, polarization, and frequency, are presented. We show that sample temperatures below 30 K can be achieved with helium consumption rates below 1.3 l/h. To illustrate potential applications of this instrumentation in structural studies of biochemical systems, we compare results from low-temperature DNP experiments on a calmodulin-binding peptide in its free and bound states.

  15. Dynamic nuclear polarization from current-induced electron spin polarization in n-InGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, Christopher; Norman, Benjamin; Kato, Yuichiro; Awschalom, David; Sih, Vanessa

    2014-03-01

    Control of the nuclear spin system could prove useful for applications in spintronics or spin-based quantum computation for intermediate term data storage and for the suppression of electron spin dephasing resulting from hyperfine coupling. We investigate the role of nuclear spins in materials with electrically generated spin polarization. The electron spin polarization generated by electrical current in a non-magnetic semiconductor is transferred via dynamic nuclear polarization to the nuclei. The resulting nuclear field is interrogated using Larmor magnetometry. We measure the nuclear field as a function of applied magnetic field, current magnitude and direction, and temperature. An unexpected spatial asymmetry in saturated nuclear field is found. The direction of the nuclear polarization is determined by the directions of the electron spin alignment and external magnetic field, allowing electronic control over the sign of the nuclear alignment direction. Careful study of the nuclear field also enables characterization of the current-induced electron spin polarization in situations that are otherwise experimentally inaccessible. Work supported by AFOSR, NSF and ONR.

  16. Static and dynamic interaction between π and d electrons in organic superconductor β″-(BEDT-TTF)4[(H3O ) Fe (C2O4)3] .C6H5Br studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Y.; Futami, Y.; Kawamoto, A.; Matsui, K.; Goto, T.; Sasaki, T.; Benmansour, S.; Gómez-García, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of 13C NMR experiments in an organic superconductor with localized Fe spins β″-(BEDT-TTF) 4[(H3O ) Fe (C2O4)3] .C6H5Br . We reveal the antiferromagnetic coupling between Fe d spins and π spins, which creates an exchange field antiparallel to the external field direction at the π electrons. In addition to the static effects of Fe spins, we show from the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate measurement that the magnetic fluctuations generated by Fe spins are suppressed at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. These conditions are suitable to stabilize the field-induced superconductivity by the field compensation mechanism. After the suppression of Fe-spin dynamics by a magnetic field of 19 T, we observed the underlying π -electron contribution. We discuss a possible anomaly in the π -electron system.

  17. Toward higher nuclearity: tetranuclear cobalt(II) metallogrid exhibiting spin crossover.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Qi; Wang, Yi-Tong; Cui, Ai-Li; Kou, Hui-Zhong

    2014-03-01

    Supramolecular strategy was employed to achieve the highest nuclearity Co(II) cluster exhibiting spin-crossover (SCO) behavior. Magnetic susceptibility characterization of the Co4(II) complex shows that two different spin-transition processes occur. The SCO behavior is directed by the partially deprotonated polydentate ligand, which favors the structural distortion required by the spin transition. PMID:24555696

  18. In vivo hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopic imaging with 1H decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Albert P.; Tropp, James; Hurd, Ralph E.; Van Criekinge, Mark; Carvajal, Lucas G.; Xu, Duan; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2009-03-01

    Application of 13C MRS in vivo on whole body MR system has been limited due to the low static field (and consequent low signal to noise ratio—SNR) of these scanners; thus there have been few reports of 1H decoupled 13C MRS in vivo using a clinical MR platform. The recent development of techniques to retain highly polarized spins in solution following DNP in a solid matrix has provided a mechanism to use endogenous pre-polarized 13C labeled substrates to study real time cellular metabolism in vivo with high SNR. In a recent in vivo hyperpolarized metabolic imaging study using 13C pyruvate, it has been demonstrated that the line shape (signal decay) of the resonances observed are greatly affected by JCH coupling in addition to inhomogeneous broadening. This study demonstrates the feasibility of improving hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging in vivo by incorporating 1H decoupling on a clinical whole body 3 T MR scanner. No reduction of T1 of a pre-polarized 13C substrate ([1- 13C] lactate) in solution was observed when 1H decoupling was applied with WALTZ16 sequence. Narrower linewidth for the [1- 13C] lactate resonance was observed in hyperpolarized 13C MRSI data in vivo with 1H decoupling.

  19. Robust Quantum-Network Memory Using Decoherence-Protected Subspaces of Nuclear Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiserer, Andreas; Kalb, Norbert; Blok, Machiel S.; van Bemmelen, Koen J. M.; Taminiau, Tim H.; Hanson, Ronald; Twitchen, Daniel J.; Markham, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The realization of a network of quantum registers is an outstanding challenge in quantum science and technology. We experimentally investigate a network node that consists of a single nitrogen-vacancy center electronic spin hyperfine coupled to nearby nuclear spins. We demonstrate individual control and readout of five nuclear spin qubits within one node. We then characterize the storage of quantum superpositions in individual nuclear spins under repeated application of a probabilistic optical internode entangling protocol. We find that the storage fidelity is limited by dephasing during the electronic spin reset after failed attempts. By encoding quantum states into a decoherence-protected subspace of two nuclear spins, we show that quantum coherence can be maintained for over 1000 repetitions of the remote entangling protocol. These results and insights pave the way towards remote entanglement purification and the realization of a quantum repeater using nitrogen-vacancy center quantum-network nodes.

  20. Feasibility of Multianimal Hyperpolarized 13C MRS

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Marc S.; Lee, Jaehyuk; Walker, Christopher M.; Chen, Yunyun; Kingsley, Charles V.; De La Cerda, Jorge; Maldonado, Kiersten L.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Bankson, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose There is great potential for real-time investigation of metabolism with MRS and hyperpolarized (HP) 13C agents. Unfortunately, HP technology has high associated costs and efficiency limitations that may constrain in vivo studies involving many animals. To improve the throughput of preclinical investigations, we evaluate the feasibility of performing HP MRS on multiple animals simultaneously. Methods Simulations helped assess the viability of a dual-coil strategy for spatially-localized multivolume MRS.A dual-mouse system was assembled and characterized based on bench- and scanner-based experiments. Enzyme phantoms mixed with HP [1-13C] pyruvate emulated real-time metabolism and offered a controlled mechanism for evaluating system performance. Finally, a normal mouse and a mouse bearing a subcutaneous xenograft of colon cancer were simultaneously scanned in vivo using an agent containing HP [1-13C] pyruvate. Results Geometric separation/rotation, active decoupling, and use of low input impedance preamplifiers permitted an encode-by-channel approach for spatially-localized MRS. A pre-calibrated shim allowed straightforward metabolite differentiation in enzyme phantom and in vivo experiments at 7 T, with performance similar to conventional acquisitions. Conclusion The initial feasibility of multi-animal HP 13C MRS was established. Throughput scales with the number of simultaneously-scanned animals, demonstrating the potential for significant improvements in study efficiency. PMID:24903532

  1. The structure of heparin oligosaccharide fragments with high anti-(factor Xa) activity containing the minimal antithrombin III-binding sequence. Chemical and 13C nuclear-magnetic-resonance studies.

    PubMed Central

    Casu, B; Oreste, P; Torri, G; Zoppetti, G; Choay, J; Lormeau, J C; Petitou, M; Sinäy, P

    1981-01-01

    The chemical composition and the 13C n.m.r. spectra of heparin oligosaccharides (essentially octasaccharides), having high affinity for antithrombin III and high anti-(Factor Xa) activity, prepared by three independent approaches (extraction, partial deaminative cleavage with HNO2 and partial depolymerization with bacterial heparinase), leading to different terminal residues, have been studied and compared with those of the corresponding inactive species. Combined wit chemical data, the spectra of the active oligosaccharides and of their fragmentation products afforded information on composition and sequence. The three types of active oligosaccharides were shown to have the common hexasaccharide core I-Aa-G-As*-Is-As, where I and alpha-L-idopyranosyl-uronic acid, Aa = 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranose, G = beta-D-glucopyranosyl-uronic acid, Is = alpha-L-idopyranosyluronic acid 2-O-sulphate, As = 2-deoxy-2-sulphamino-alpha-D-glucopyranose 6-O-sulphate. The fourth residue (As*) is an unusually substituted amino sugar resistant to mild deamination. The 13C spectra of the active species are characterized by signals from the above atypical amino sugar, the most evident of which is at 57.7 p.p.m. These signals, compared with those of appropriate synthetic model compounds, are compatible with the recently proposed 3-O-sulphation of the residue As* [Lindahl, Bäckström, Thunberg & Leder (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 6551-6555]. PMID:7325974

  2. A 3D-printed high power nuclear spin polarizer.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Coffey, Aaron M; Walkup, Laura L; Gust, Brogan M; LaPierre, Cristen D; Koehnemann, Edward; Barlow, Michael J; Rosen, Matthew S; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-01-29

    Three-dimensional printing with high-temperature plastic is used to enable spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) and hyperpolarization of xenon-129 gas. The use of 3D printed structures increases the simplicity of integration of the following key components with a variable temperature SEOP probe: (i) in situ NMR circuit operating at 84 kHz (Larmor frequencies of (129)Xe and (1)H nuclear spins), (ii) <0.3 nm narrowed 200 W laser source, (iii) in situ high-resolution near-IR spectroscopy, (iv) thermoelectric temperature control, (v) retroreflection optics, and (vi) optomechanical alignment system. The rapid prototyping endowed by 3D printing dramatically reduces production time and expenses while allowing reproducibility and integration of "off-the-shelf" components and enables the concept of printing on demand. The utility of this SEOP setup is demonstrated here to obtain near-unity (129)Xe polarization values in a 0.5 L optical pumping cell, including ∼74 ± 7% at 1000 Torr xenon partial pressure, a record value at such high Xe density. Values for the (129)Xe polarization exponential build-up rate [(3.63 ± 0.15) × 10(-2) min(-1)] and in-cell (129)Xe spin-lattice relaxation time (T1 = 2.19 ± 0.06 h) for 1000 Torr Xe were in excellent agreement with the ratio of the gas-phase polarizations for (129)Xe and Rb (PRb ∼ 96%). Hyperpolarization-enhanced (129)Xe gas imaging was demonstrated with a spherical phantom following automated gas transfer from the polarizer. Taken together, these results support the development of a wide range of chemical, biochemical, material science, and biomedical applications.

  3. Determination of de novo synthesized amino acids in cellular proteins revisited by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Willker, W; Leibfritz, D

    1997-04-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the absolute amounts to de novo synthesized amino acids in both the perchloric acid extracts and the hydrolyzed protein fractions of F98 glioma cells incubated for 2 h with 5 mmol/l [U-13C]glucose. 13C NMR spectra of the hydrolyzed protein fraction revealed a marked incorporation of 13C-labelled alanine, aspartate and glutamate into the proteins of F98 cells within the incubation period. Additionally, small amounts of 13C-labelled glycine, proline and serine could unambiguously be identified in the protein fraction. Astonishingly, approximately equal amounts of 13C-labelled glutamate and aspartate were incorporated into the cellular proteins, although the cytosolic steady-state concentration of aspartate was below 13C NMR detectability. Hypertonic stress decreased the incorporation of 13C-labelled amino acids into the total protein, albeit their cytosolic concentrations were increased, which reflects an inhibition of protein synthesis under these conditions. On the other hand, hypotonic stress increased the amount of 13C-labelled proline incorporated into the cellular proteins even though the cytosolic concentration of 13C-labelled proline was largely decreased. Apparently, hypoosmotic conditions stimulate the synthesis of proteins or peptides with a high proline content. The results show that already after 2 h of incubation with [U-13C]glucose there is a pronounced flux of 13C label into the cellular proteins, which is usually disregarded if cytosolic fluids are examined only. This means that calculations of metabolic fluxes based on 13C NMR spectroscopic data obtained from perchloric acid extracts of cells or tissues and also from in vivo measurements consider only the labelled 'NMR visible' cytosolic metabolites, which may have to be corrected for fast label flowing off into other compartments.

  4. All-electrical control of a singlet-triplet qubit coupled to a single nuclear spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, N. Tobias; Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Baczewski, Andrew; Gamble, John; Rudolph, Martin; Nielsen, Erik; Muller, Richard; Carroll, Malcolm

    Donor nuclear spins in isotopically purified silicon have very long coherence times, suggesting that they may form high-quality quantum memories. We propose that coupling these nuclear spins to few-electron quantum dots could enable nuclear spin readout and two-qubit operations of the joint quantum dot and nuclear spin system without the need for electron spin resonance. As a step towards this goal, our group recently demonstrated coherent singlet/triplet electron spin rotations induced by the hyperfine interaction between electronic spin degrees of freedom and a single nuclear spin in isotopically purified silicon. In this talk, I will discuss the feasibility of universal all-electrical control of such a singlet/triplet electron spin qubit and explore the decoherence mechanisms that we expect to dominate. Finally, I will examine the relative merits of AC and pulsed DC gating schemes. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  5. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c] And [2h3, 13c]Methyl Aryl Sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-03-30

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2,.sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to the labeled compounds of [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide and [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide.

  6. Frequency selective detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, Samuel D.; Jakobsson, Andreas; Smith, John A. S.; Althoefer, Kaspar A.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) technique that can be used to detect the presence of quadrupolar nuclei, such as the 14N nucleus prevalent in many explosives and narcotics. The technique has been hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and is further aggravated by the presence of RF interference (RFI). To ensure accurate detection, proposed detectors should exploit the rich form of the NQR signal. Furthermore, the detectors should also be robust to any remaining residual interference, left after suitable RFI mitigation has been employed. In this paper, we propose a new NQR data model, particularly for the realistic case where multiple pulse sequences are used to generate trains of spin echoes. Furthermore, we refine two recently proposed approximative maximum likelihood (AML) detectors, enabling the algorithm to optimally exploit the data model of the entire echo train and also incorporate knowledge of the temperature dependent spin-echo decay time. The AML-based detectors ensure accurate detection and robustness against residual RFI, even when the temperature of the sample is not precisely known, by exploiting the dependencies of the NQR resonant lines on temperature. Further robustness against residual interference is gained as the proposed detector is frequency selective; exploiting only those regions of the spectrum where the NQR signal is expected. Extensive numerical evaluations based on both simulated and measured NQR data indicate that the proposed Frequency selective Echo Train AML (FETAML) detector offers a significant improvement as compared to other existing detectors.

  7. HYPERPOLARIZED 13C MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ITS USE IN METABOLIC ASSESSMENT OF CULTURED CELLS AND PERFUSED ORGANS

    PubMed Central

    Lumata, Lloyd; Yang, Chendong; Ragavan, Mukundan; Carpenter, Nicholas; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Merritt, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Diseased tissue is often characterized by abnormalities in intermediary metabolism. Observing these alterations in situ may lead to an improved understanding of pathological processes and novel ways to monitor these processes non-invasively in human patients. Although 13C is a stable isotope safe for use in animal models of disease as well as human subjects, its utility as a metabolic tracer has largely been limited to ex vivo analyses employing analytical techniques like mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Neither of these techniques is suitable for non-invasive metabolic monitoring, and the low abundance and poor gyromagnetic ratio of conventional 13C make it a poor nucleus for imaging. However, the recent advent of hyperpolarization methods, particularly dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), make it possible to enhance the spin polarization state of 13C by many orders of magnitude, resulting in a temporary amplification of the signal sufficient for monitoring kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in living tissue through magnetic resonance spectroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging. Here we review DNP techniques to monitor metabolism in cultured cells, perfused hearts, and perfused livers, focusing on our experiences with hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. We present detailed approaches to optimize the DNP procedure, streamline biological sample preparation, and maximize detection of specific metabolic activities. We also discuss practical aspects in the choice of metabolic substrates for hyperpolarization studies, and outline some of the current technical and conceptual challenges in the field, including efforts to use hyperpolarization to quantify metabolic rates in vivo. PMID:26358902

  8. Atomic-Scale Nuclear Spin Imaging Using Quantum-Assisted Sensors in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajoy, A.; Bissbort, U.; Lukin, M. D.; Walsworth, R. L.; Cappellaro, P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear spin imaging at the atomic level is essential for the understanding of fundamental biological phenomena and for applications such as drug discovery. The advent of novel nanoscale sensors promises to achieve the long-standing goal of single-protein, high spatial-resolution structure determination under ambient conditions. In particular, quantum sensors based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have recently been used to detect nanoscale ensembles of external nuclear spins. While NV sensitivity is approaching single-spin levels, extracting relevant information from a very complex structure is a further challenge since it requires not only the ability to sense the magnetic field of an isolated nuclear spin but also to achieve atomic-scale spatial resolution. Here, we propose a method that, by exploiting the coupling of the NV center to an intrinsic quantum memory associated with the nitrogen nuclear spin, can reach a tenfold improvement in spatial resolution, down to atomic scales. The spatial resolution enhancement is achieved through coherent control of the sensor spin, which creates a dynamic frequency filter selecting only a few nuclear spins at a time. We propose and analyze a protocol that would allow not only sensing individual spins in a complex biomolecule, but also unraveling couplings among them, thus elucidating local characteristics of the molecule structure.

  9. Sensitizing solid state nuclear magnetic resonance of dilute nuclei by spin-diffusion assisted polarization transfers.

    PubMed

    Lupulescu, Adonis; Frydman, Lucio

    2011-10-01

    Recent years have witnessed efforts geared at increasing the sensitivity of NMR experiments, by relying on the suitable tailoring and exploitation of relaxation phenomena. These efforts have included the use of paramagnetic agents, enhanced (1)H-(1)H incoherent and coherent transfers processes in 2D liquid state spectroscopy, and homonuclear (13)C-(13)C spin diffusion effects in labeled solids. The present study examines some of the opportunities that could open when exploiting spontaneous (1)H-(1)H spin-diffusion processes, to enhance relaxation and to improve the sensitivity of dilute nuclei in solid state NMR measurements. It is shown that polarization transfer experiments executed under sufficiently fast magic-angle-spinning conditions, enable a selective polarization of the dilute low-γ spins by their immediate neighboring protons. Repolarization of the latter can then occur during the time involved in monitoring the signal emitted by the low-γ nuclei. The basic features involved in the resulting approach, and its potential to improve the effective sensitivity of solid state NMR measurements on dilute nuclei, are analyzed. Experimental tests witness the advantages that could reside from utilizing this kind of approach over conventional cross-polarization processes. These measurements also highlight a number of limitations that will have to be overcome for transforming selective polarization transfers of this kind into analytical methods of choice.

  10. Quantum Control of Nuclear Spins Coupled to Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangtawesin, Sorawis

    This dissertation presents experiments on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. The NV center is an optically active color center formed by one substitutional nitrogen atom and an adjacent vacancy in the diamond lattice. Its ground state spin triplet transitions are accessible in the microwave regime and their corresponding excited state transitions exhibit spin-dependent fluorescence that allows for optical spin state readout. We present methods for the deterministic placement and the fine tuning of the NV center population in bulk diamond via ion implantation. We demonstrate quantum control of the nuclear spin in diamond through manipulation of the NV center electronic spin. By utilizing the hyperfine coupling between the electronic and nuclear spins, fast phase gates on the intrinsic nitrogen nuclear spin can be achieved within half a microsecond, a speed that far exceeds that of the gates performed with conventional nuclear magnetic resonance pulses. The hyperfine coupling also results in an enhancement of the effective nuclear gyromagnetic ratio. We demonstrate the tunability of this enhancement by changing the magnetic field. Finally, we discuss preliminary experiments aimed towards coupling a single NV center to higher nuclear spin systems.

  11. 13C MAS NMR studies of crystalline cholesterol and lipid mixtures modeling atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, W; Hamilton, J A

    1996-01-01

    Cholesterol and cholesteryl esters are the predominant lipids of atherosclerotic plaques. To provide fundamental data for the quantitative study of plaque lipids in situ, crystalline cholesterol (CHOL) and CHOL/cholesteryl ester (CE) mixtures with other lipids were studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle-sample spinning. Highly distinctive spectra for three different crystalline structures of CHOL were obtained. When CHOL crystals were mixed with isotropic CE oil, solubilized CHOL (approximately 13 mol % CHOL) was detected by characteristic resonances such as C5, C6, and C3; the excess crystalline CHOL (either anhydrous or monohydrate) remained in its original crystalline structure, without being affected by the coexisting CE. By use of 13C-enriched CHOL, the solubility of CHOL in the CE liquid-crystalline phase (approximately 8 mol %) was measured. When phosphatidylcholine was hydrated in presence of CHOL and CE, magic-angle-sampling nuclear magnetic resonance revealed liquid-crystalline CHOL/phosphatidylcholine multilayers with approximately an equal molar ratio of CHOL/phosphatidylcholine. Excess CHOL existed in the monohydrate crystalline form, and CE in separate oil or crystalline phases, depending on the temperature. The magic-angle-sampling nuclear magnetic resonance protocol for identifying different lipid phases was applied to intact (ex vivo) atherosclerotic plaques of cholesterol-fed rabbits. Liquid, liquid-crystalline, and solid phases of CE were characterized. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8913623

  12. Recursive polarization of nuclear spins in diamond at arbitrary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Pagliero, Daniela; Laraoui, Abdelghani; Henshaw, Jacob D.; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2014-12-15

    We introduce an alternate route to dynamically polarize the nuclear spin host of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. Our approach articulates optical, microwave, and radio-frequency pulses to recursively transfer spin polarization from the NV electronic spin. Using two complementary variants of the same underlying principle, we demonstrate nitrogen nuclear spin initialization approaching 80% at room temperature both in ensemble and single NV centers. Unlike existing schemes, our approach does not rely on level anti-crossings and is thus applicable at arbitrary magnetic fields. This versatility should prove useful in applications ranging from nanoscale metrology to sensitivity-enhanced NMR.

  13. Influence of nuclear spin on chemical reactions: Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    1983-01-01

    The course of chemical reactions involving radical pairs may depend on occurrence and orientation of nuclear spins in the pairs. The influence of nuclear spins is maximized when the radical pairs are confined to a space that serves as a cage that allows a certain degree of independent diffusional and rotational motion of the partners of the pair but that also encourages reencounters of the partners within a period which allows the nuclear spins to operate on the odd electron spins of the pair. Under the proper conditions, the nuclear spins can induce intersystem crossing between triplet and singlet states of radical pairs. It is shown that this dependence of intersystem crossing on nuclear spin leads to a magnetic isotope effect on the chemistry of radical pairs which provides a means of separating isotopes on the basis of nuclear spins rather than nuclear masses and also leads to a magnetic field effect on the chemistry of radical pairs which provides a means of influencing the course of polymerization by the application of weak magnetic fields. PMID:16593273

  14. Nuclear Spin Relaxation Times for Methane-Helium ``Slush'' at 4 MHz using Pulsed NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamida, J. A.; Sullivan, N. S.

    2006-09-01

    We report measurements of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and spin-spin relaxation times (T2) for small grains of methane suspended in liquid helium (methane-helium "slush") for temperatures 2 Kspin-spin relaxation rate 1/T2 is consistent with internal diffusion as opposed to surface scattering, which has been shown to be dominant for hydrogen-helium "slush". The most interesting feature observed for methane-helium mixtures is the existence of three different time scales for samples aged at 4.2 K. The possible origins of this distribution of relaxation times are discussed.

  15. A 3D-Printed High Power Nuclear Spin Polarizer

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Coffey, Aaron M.; Walkup, Laura L.; Gust, Brogan M.; LaPierre, Cristen D.; Koehnemann, Edward; Barlow, Michael J.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Goodson, Boyd M.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing with high-temperature plastic is used to enable spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) and hyperpolarization of xenon-129 gas. The use of 3D printed structures increases the simplicity of integration of the following key components with a variable temperature SEOP probe: (i) in situ NMR circuit operating at 84 kHz (Larmor frequencies of 129Xe and 1H nuclear spins), (ii) <0.3 nm narrowed 200 W laser source, (iii) in situ high-resolution near-IR spectroscopy, (iv) thermoelectric temperature control, (v) retroreflection optics, and (vi) optomechanical alignment system. The rapid prototyping endowed by 3D printing dramatically reduces production time and expenses while allowing reproducibility and integration of “off-the-shelf” components and enables the concept of printing on demand. The utility of this SEOP setup is demonstrated here to obtain near-unity 129Xe polarization values in a 0.5 L optical pumping cell, including ~74 ± 7% at 1000 Torr xenon partial pressure, a record value at such high Xe density. Values for the 129Xe polarization exponential build-up rate [(3.63 ± 0.15) × 10−2 min−1] and in-cell 129Xe spin−lattice relaxation time (T1 = 2.19 ± 0.06 h) for 1000 Torr Xe were in excellent agreement with the ratio of the gas-phase polarizations for 129Xe and Rb (PRb ~ 96%). Hyperpolarization-enhanced 129Xe gas imaging was demonstrated with a spherical phantom following automated gas transfer from the polarizer. Taken together, these results support the development of a wide range of chemical, biochemical, material science, and biomedical applications. PMID:24400919

  16. Vanadium bisimide bonding investigated by X-ray crystallography, 51V and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and V L(3,2)-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    La Pierre, Henry S; Minasian, Stefan G; Abubekerov, Mark; Kozimor, Stosh A; Shuh, David K; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G; Toste, F Dean

    2013-10-01

    Syntheses of neutral halide and aryl vanadium bisimides are described. Treatment of VCl2(NtBu)[NTMS(N(t)Bu)], 2, with PMe3, PEt3, PMe2Ph, or pyridine gave vanadium bisimides via TMSCl elimination in good yield: VCl(PMe3)2(N(t)Bu)2 3, VCl(PEt3)2(N(t)Bu)2 4, VCl(PMe2Ph)2(N(t)Bu)2 5, and VCl(Py)2(N(t)Bu)2 6. The halide series (Cl-I) was synthesized by use of TMSBr and TMSI to give VBr(PMe3)2(N(t)Bu)2 7 and VI(PMe3)2(N(t)Bu)2 8. The phenyl derivative was obtained by reaction of 3 with MgPh2 to give VPh(PMe3)2(N(t)Bu)2 9. These neutral complexes are compared to the previously reported cationic bisimides [V(PMe3)3(N(t)Bu)2][Al(PFTB)4] 10, [V(PEt3)2(N(t)Bu)2][Al(PFTB)4] 11, and [V(DMAP)(PEt3)2(N(t)Bu)2][Al(PFTB)4] 12 (DMAP = dimethylaminopyridine, PFTB = perfluoro-tert-butoxide). Characterization of the complexes by X-ray diffraction, (13)C NMR, (51)V NMR, and V L(3,2)-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy provides a description of the electronic structure in comparison to group 6 bisimides and the bent metallocene analogues. The electronic structure is dominated by π bonding to the imides, and localization of electron density at the nitrogen atoms of the imides is dictated by the cone angle and donating ability of the axial neutral supporting ligands. This phenomenon is clearly seen in the sensitivity of (51)V NMR shift, (13)C NMR Δδ(αβ), and L3-edge energy to the nature of the supporting phosphine ligand, which defines the parameters for designing cationic group 5 bisimides that would be capable of breaking stronger σ bonds. Conversely, all three methods show little dependence on the variable equatorial halide ligand. Furthermore, this analysis allows for quantification of the electronic differences between vanadium bisimides and the structurally analogous mixed Cp/imide system CpV(N(t)Bu)X2 (Cp = C5H5(1-)). PMID:24024833

  17. Boundary between the thermal and statistical polarization regimes in a nuclear spin ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, B. E.; Cadeddu, D.; Xue, F.; Peddibhotla, P.; Poggio, M.

    2014-07-28

    As the number of spins in an ensemble is reduced, the statistical fluctuations in its polarization eventually exceed the mean thermal polarization. This transition has now been surpassed in a number of recent nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, which achieve nanometer-scale detection volumes. Here, we measure nanometer-scale ensembles of nuclear spins in a KPF{sub 6} sample using magnetic resonance force microscopy. In particular, we investigate the transition between regimes dominated by thermal and statistical nuclear polarization. The ratio between the two types of polarization provides a measure of the number of spins in the detected ensemble.

  18. Voltage control of electron-nuclear spin correlation time in a single quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, J.; Bouet, L.; Bennett, A. J.; Amand, T.; Stevenson, R. M.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kunz, S.; Marie, X.; Shields, A. J.; Urbaszek, B.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate bias control of the efficiency of the hyperfine coupling between a single electron in an InAs quantum dot and the surrounding nuclear spins monitored through the positively charged exciton X+ emission. In applied longitudinal magnetic fields, we vary simultaneously the correlation time of the hyperfine interaction and the nuclear spin relaxation time and thereby the amplitude of the achieved dynamic nuclear polarization under optical pumping conditions. In applied transverse magnetic fields, a change in the applied bias allows a switch from the anomalous Hanle effect to the standard electron spin depolarization curves.

  19. Quantum state transfer between an optomechanical cavity and a diamond nuclear spin ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhi-Bo; Wang, Hong-Ling; Yan, Run-Ying

    2016-08-01

    We explore an efficient scheme for transferring quantum state between an optomechanical cavity and nuclear spins of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, where quantum information can be efficiently stored (retrieved) into (from) the nuclear spin ensemble assisted by a mechanical resonator in a dispersive regime. Our scheme works for a broad range of cavity frequencies and might have potential applications in employing the nuclear spin ensemble as a memory in quantum information processing. The feasibility of our protocol is analyzed using currently available parameters.

  20. Accessing long-lived nuclear singlet states between chemically equivalent spins without breaking symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yesu; Davis, Ryan M.; Warren, Warren S.

    2013-01-01

    Long-lived nuclear spin states could greatly enhance the applicability of hyperpolarized nuclear magnetic resonance. Using singlet states between inequivalent spin pairs has been shown to extend the signal lifetime by more than an order of magnitude compared to the spin lattice relaxation time (T1), but they have to be prevented from evolving into other states. In the most interesting case the singlet is between chemically equivalent spins, as it can then be inherently an eigenstate. However this presents major challenges in the conversion from bulk magnetization to singlet. In the only case demonstrated so far, a reversible chemical reaction to break symmetry was required. Here we present a pulse sequence technique that interconverts between singlet spin order and bulk magnetization without breaking the symmetry of the spin system. This technique is independent of field strength and is applicable to a broad range of molecules. PMID:23505397

  1. Positioning nuclear spins in interacting clusters for quantum technologies and bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Haase, Jan F.; Casanova, Jorge; Plenio, Martin B.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a method to measure the hyperfine vectors between a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center and an environment of interacting nuclear spins. Our protocol enables the generation of tunable electron-nuclear coupling Hamiltonians while suppressing unwanted internuclear interactions. In this manner, each nucleus can be addressed and controlled individually, thereby permitting the reconstruction of the individual hyperfine vectors. With this ability the three-dimensional (3D) structure of spin ensembles and spins in biomolecules can be identified without the necessity of varying the direction of applied magnetic fields. We demonstrate examples including the complete reconstruction of an interacting spin cluster in diamond and 3D imaging of all the nuclear spins in a biomolecule.

  2. Decoupling a spin qubit from high-frequency Larmor dynamics of a GaAs nuclear spin bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Filip K.; Martins, Frederico; Nissen, Peter D.; Rudner, Mark S.; Marcus, Charles M.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Barnes, Edwin; Fallahi, Saeed; Gardner, Geoffrey C.; Manfra, Michael J.

    We present a technique of decoupling a spin qubit in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure from low- and high-frequency noise arising from hyperfine interaction of electrons with nuclear spins. We use Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequences in which we synchronize the repetition rate of π pulses to difference Larmor frequencies of 69Ga, 71Ga and 75As nuclei. This decouples the qubit both from low-frequency noise due to diffusion of nuclear spins and from noise at selected high frequencies, allowing us to apply more than a thousand π pulses in a sequence. We demonstrate a coherence time of a singlet-triplet qubit of 0.87 ms, i.e. five orders of magnitude longer than the inhomogeneous dephasing time intrinsic to GaAs. Support through IARPA-MQCO, Army Research Office, LPS-MPO-CMTC, the Villum Foundation and the Danish National Research Foundation is acknowledged.

  3. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  4. Sensitivity of nuclear-quadrupole double-resonance detection of half-integer spin nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-10-01

    The sensitivity of the Slusher and Hahn's nuclear quadrupole double resonance technique is calculated in general for an arbitrary nuclear spin S of the quadrupole nuclei and for an arbitrary asymmetry parameter η of the electric field gradient tensor. The nuclear spin S = 5/2 ( 17O, 25Mg, …) is treated in details. The influence of the cross-relaxation rate between the quadrupole nuclei and the abundant spin system on the sensitivity of double resonance is discussed. The results of the theoretical analysis are applied in the analysis of the 1H- 17O nuclear quadrupole double resonance spectra in p-toluenesulfonamide and 2-nitrobenzoic acid. The 17O nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies from a sulfonamide group are determined for the first time. The proton-oxygen cross-relaxation rates and the proton local frequency in zero external magnetic field are experimentally determined from the nuclear quadrupole double resonance spectra.

  5. The determination of the in situ structure by nuclear spin contrast variation

    SciTech Connect

    Stuhrmann, H.B.; Nierhaus, K.H.

    1994-12-31

    Polarized neutron scattering from polarized nuclear spins in hydrogenous substances opens a new way of contrast variation. The enhanced contrast due to proton spin polarization was used for the in situ structure determination of tRNA of the functional complex of the E.coli ribosome.

  6. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  7. Nuclear-Spin Gyroscope Based on an Atomic Co-Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romalis, Michael; Komack, Tom; Ghost, Rajat

    2008-01-01

    An experimental nuclear-spin gyroscope is based on an alkali-metal/noblegas co-magnetometer, which automatically cancels the effects of magnetic fields. Whereas the performances of prior nuclear-spin gyroscopes are limited by sensitivity to magnetic fields, this gyroscope is insensitive to magnetic fields and to other external perturbations. In addition, relative to prior nuclear-spin gyroscopes, this one exhibits greater sensitivity to rotation. There is commercial interest in development of small, highly sensitive gyroscopes. The present experimental device could be a prototype for development of nuclear spin gyroscopes suitable for navigation. In comparison with fiber-optic gyroscopes, these gyroscopes would draw less power and would be smaller, lighter, more sensitive, and less costly.

  8. Infrared spectroscopy of chloromethyl radical in solid parahydrogen and its nuclear spin conversion.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Tsubouchi, Masaaki; Momose, Takamasa

    2013-10-01

    We present high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of chloromethyl radical produced by in situ UV photolysis of chloroiodomethane isolated in solid parahydrogen. The radicals were stable over a few days in solid parahydrogen kept at 3.6 K. Analysis of the rotation-vibration spectra revealed that the radical exhibited quantized one-dimensional rotational motion about the C-Cl bond, while the ortho and para nuclear spin species were still clearly distinguishable in the spectra. Temporal change of the spectra indicated that the nuclear spin conversion between the ortho and para nuclear spin species of the radical in solid parahydrogen occurred in a time scale of a few hours at 3.6 K. It was also found that the nuclear spin conversion became significantly slower in a higher concentration of chloroiodomethane.

  9. Refined Analysis of Brain Energy Metabolism Using In Vivo Dynamic Enrichment of 13C Multiplets

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani M., Masoumeh; Duarte, João M. N.; Kunz, Nicolas; Gruetter, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with the infusion of 13C-labeled precursors is a unique approach to study in vivo brain energy metabolism. Incorporating the maximum information available from in vivo localized 13C spectra is of importance to get broader knowledge on cerebral metabolic pathways. Metabolic rates can be quantitatively determined from the rate of 13C incorporation into amino acid neurotransmitters such as glutamate and glutamine using suitable mathematical models. The time course of multiplets arising from 13C-13C coupling between adjacent carbon atoms was expected to provide additional information for metabolic modeling leading to potential improvements in the estimation of metabolic parameters. The aim of the present study was to extend two-compartment neuronal/glial modeling to include dynamics of 13C isotopomers available from fine structure multiplets in 13C spectra of glutamate and glutamine measured in vivo in rats brain at 14.1 T, termed bonded cumomer approach. Incorporating the labeling time courses of 13C multiplets of glutamate and glutamine resulted in elevated precision of the estimated fluxes in rat brain as well as reduced correlations between them. PMID:26969691

  10. Knight shift and nuclear spin relaxation in Fe/n -GaAs heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, K. D.; Geppert, C. C.; Patel, S. J.; Hu, Q. O.; Palmstrøm, C. J.; Crowell, P. A.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the dynamically polarized nuclear spin system in Fe/n -GaAs heterostructures using the response of the electron-spin system to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in lateral spin-valve devices. The hyperfine interaction is known to act more strongly on donor-bound electron states than on those in the conduction band. We provide a quantitative model of the temperature dependence of the occupation of donor sites. With this model we calculate the ratios of the hyperfine and quadrupolar nuclear relaxation rates of each isotope. For all temperatures measured, quadrupolar relaxation limits the spatial extent of nuclear spin polarization to within a Bohr radius of the donor sites and is directly responsible for the isotope dependence of the measured NMR signal amplitude. The hyperfine interaction is also responsible for the 2 kHz Knight shift of the nuclear resonance frequency that is measured as a function of the electron-spin accumulation. The Knight shift is shown to provide a measurement of the electron-spin polarization that agrees qualitatively with standard spin transport measurements.

  11. Toward understanding of H3+ isotopic and nuclear spin fractionations in cold space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, E.; Asvany, O.; Harju, J.; Schlemmer, S.

    2007-12-01

    Two levels of statistical theories describing the H3+ plus H2 system and its isotopic variants at temperatures of astronomical interest (~ 10 K) are presented. The canonical approach accounting for the nuclear spins describes the system in a simple and convenient way. The microcanonical approach based on total energy, total angular momentum and total nuclear spin conservations yields state-to-state details. Non-thermal effects and astronomical implications are discussed.

  12. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus and process for high-resolution in situ investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-11-24

    A continuous-flow (CF) magic angle sample spinning (CF-MAS) NMR rotor and probe are described for investigating reaction dynamics, stable intermediates/transition states, and mechanisms of catalytic reactions in situ. The rotor includes a sample chamber of a flow-through design with a large sample volume that delivers a flow of reactants through a catalyst bed contained within the sample cell allowing in-situ investigations of reactants and products. Flow through the sample chamber improves diffusion of reactants and products through the catalyst. The large volume of the sample chamber enhances sensitivity permitting in situ .sup.13C CF-MAS studies at natural abundance.

  13. A method for simultaneous echo planar imaging of hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate and 13C lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen D.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Lustig, Michael; Kerr, Adam B.; Pauly, John M.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2012-04-01

    A rapid echo planar imaging sequence for dynamic imaging of [1-13C] lactate and [1-13C] pyruvate simultaneously was developed. Frequency-based separation of these metabolites was achieved by spatial shifting in the phase-encoded direction with the appropriate choice of echo spacing. Suppression of the pyruvate-hydrate and alanine resonances is achieved through an optimized spectral-spatial RF waveform. Signal sampling efficiency as a function of pyruvate and lactate excitation angle was simulated using two site exchange models. Dynamic imaging is demonstrated in a transgenic mouse model, and phantom validations of the RF pulse frequency selectivity were performed.

  14. Spectroscopy of composite solid-state spin environments for improved metrology with spin ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Gill, Nir; Pham, Linh; Belthangady, Chinmay; Lesage, David; Cappellaro, Paola; Maze, Jeronimo; Lukin, Mikhail; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald

    2012-02-01

    For precision coherent measurements with ensembles of quantum spins the relevant Figure-of-Merit (FOM) is the product of spin density and coherence lifetime, which is generally limited by the dynamics of spin coupling to the environment. Significant effort has been invested in understanding the causes of decoherence in a diverse range of spin systems in order to increase the FOM and improve measurement sensitivity. Here, we apply a coherent spectroscopic technique to characterize the dynamics of a composite solid-state spin environment consisting of Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) color centers in room temperature diamond coupled to baths of electronic spin (N) and nuclear spin (13C) impurities. For diamond samples with a wide range of NV densities and impurity spin concentrations we employ a dynamical decoupling technique to minimize coupling to the environment, and find similar values for the FOM, which is three orders of magnitude larger than previously achieved in any room-temperature solid-state spin system, and thus should enable greatly improved precision spin metrology. We also identify a suppression of electronic spin bath dynamics in the presence of a nuclear spin bath of sufficient nuclear spin concentration. This suppression could inform efforts to engineer samples with even larger FOM for solid-state spin ensemble metrology and collective quantum information processing.

  15. Determination of the Orientation and Dynamics of Ergosterol in Model Membranes Using Uniform 13C Labeling and Dynamically Averaged 13C Chemical Shift Anisotropies as Experimental Restraints

    PubMed Central

    Soubias, O.; Jolibois, F.; Massou, S.; Milon, A.; Réat, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new strategy was established to determine the average orientation and dynamics of ergosterol in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. It is based on the analysis of chemical shift anisotropies (CSAs) averaged by the molecular dynamics. Static 13C CSA tensors were computed by quantum chemistry, using the gauge-including atomic-orbital approach within Hartree-Fock theory. Uniformly 13C-labeled ergosterol was purified from Pichia pastoris cells grown on labeled methanol. After reconstitution into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipids, the complete 1H and 13C assignment of ergosterol's resonances was performed using a combination of magic-angle spinning two-dimensional experiments. Dynamically averaged CSAs were determined by standard side-band intensity analysis for isolated 13C resonances (C3 and ethylenic carbons) and by off-magic-angle spinning experiments for other carbons. A set of 18 constraints was thus obtained, from which the sterol's molecular order parameter and average orientation could be precisely defined. The validity of using computed CSAs in this strategy was verified on cholesterol model systems. This new method allowed us to quantify ergosterol's dynamics at three molar ratios: 16 mol % (Ld phase), 30 mol % (Lo phase), and 23 mol % (mixed phases). Contrary to cholesterol, ergosterol's molecular diffusion axis makes an important angle (14°) with the inertial axis of the rigid four-ring system. PMID:15923221

  16. Computation of indirect nuclear spin-spin couplings with reduced complexity in pure and hybrid density functional approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luenser, Arne; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2016-09-01

    We present a (sub)linear-scaling algorithm to determine indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants at the Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham density functional levels of theory. Employing efficient integral algorithms and sparse algebra routines, an overall (sub)linear scaling behavior can be obtained for systems with a non-vanishing HOMO-LUMO gap. Calculations on systems with over 1000 atoms and 20 000 basis functions illustrate the performance and accuracy of our reference implementation. Specifically, we demonstrate that linear algebra dominates the runtime of conventional algorithms for 10 000 basis functions and above. Attainable speedups of our method exceed 6 × in total runtime and 10 × in the linear algebra steps for the tested systems. Furthermore, a convergence study of spin-spin couplings of an aminopyrazole peptide upon inclusion of the water environment is presented: using the new method it is shown that large solvent spheres are necessary to converge spin-spin coupling values.

  17. Description of 158Er at Ultrahigh Spin in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2012-01-01

    Rotational bands in 158Er at ultrahigh spin have been studied in the framework of relativistic and nonrelativistic nuclear density-functional theories. Consistent results are obtained across the theoretical models used but some puzzles remain when confronted with experiment. Namely, the many-body configurations which provide good description of experimental transition quadrupole moments and dynamic moments of inertia require substantial increase of the spins of observed bands as compared with experimental estimates, which are still subject to large uncertainties. If, however, the theoretical spin assignments turned out to be correct, experimental band 1 in 158Er would be the highest spin structure ever observed.

  18. Metabolic pathways for ketone body production. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of rat liver in vivo using /sup 13/C-multilabeled fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl-Wostl, C.; Seelig, J.

    1986-11-04

    The hormonal regulation of ketogenesis in the liver of living rat has been studied noninvasively with /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance. The spatial selection for the liver was better than 90%, with extrahepatic adipose tissue contribution only a very small amount of signal. The metabolic activities of the liver were investigated by infusion of /sup 13/C-labeled butyrate in the jugular vein of the anesthetized rat. The rate of butyrate infusion was chosen to be close to the maximum oxidative capacity of the rat liver, and the /sup 13/C signal intensities were enhanced by using doubly labeled (1,3-/sup 13/C)butyrate as a substrate. Different /sup 13/C NMR spectra and hence different metabolites were observed depending on the hormonal state of the animal. The /sup 13/C NMR studies demonstrate that even when rate of acetyl-CoA production are high, the disposal of this compound is not identical in fasted and diabetic animals. This supports previous suggestions that the redox state of the mitochondrion represents the most important factor in regulation. For a given metabolic state of the animal, different signal intensities were obtained depending on whether butyrate was labeled at C-1, C-3, or C-1,3. From the ratios of incorporation of /sup 13/C label into the carbons of 3-hydroxybutyrate, it could be estimated that a large fraction of butyrate evaded ..beta..-oxidation to acetyl-CoA but was converted directly to acetoacetyl-CoA. /sup 13/C-labeled glucose could be detected in vivo in the liver of diabetic rats.

  19. Classical nature of nuclear spin noise near clock transitions of Bi donors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wen-Long; Wolfowicz, Gary; Li, Shu-Shen; Morton, John J. L.; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-10-01

    Whether a quantum bath can be approximated as classical Gaussian noise is a fundamental issue in central spin decoherence and also of practical importance in designing noise-resilient quantum control. Spin qubits based on bismuth donors in silicon have tunable interactions with nuclear spin baths and are first-order insensitive to magnetic noise at so-called clock transitions (CTs). This system is therefore ideal for studying the quantum/classical Gaussian nature of nuclear spin baths since the qubit-bath interaction strength determines the back-action on the baths and hence the adequacy of a Gaussian noise model. We develop a Gaussian noise model with noise correlations determined by quantum calculations and compare the classical noise approximation to the full quantum bath theory. We experimentally test our model through a dynamical decoupling sequence of up to 128 pulses, finding good agreement with simulations and measuring electron spin coherence times approaching 1 s—notably using natural silicon. Our theoretical and experimental study demonstrates that the noise from a nuclear spin bath is analogous to classical Gaussian noise if the back-action of the qubit on the bath is small compared to the internal bath dynamics, as is the case close to CTs. However, far from the CTs, the back-action of the central spin on the bath is such that the quantum model is required to accurately model spin decoherence.

  20. Synthesis Of 2h- And 13c-Substituted Dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  1. Synthesis of 2H- and 13C-substituted dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  2. Calculation of total meal d13C from individual food d13C.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variations in the isotopic signature of carbon in biological samples can be used to distinguish dietary patterns and monitor shifts in metabolism. But for these variations to have meaning, the isotopic signature of the diet must be known. We sought to determine if knowledge of the 13C isotopic abund...

  3. In vivo dynamic turnover of cerebral 13C isotopomers from [U- 13C]glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su; Shen, Jun

    2006-10-01

    An INEPT-based 13C MRS method and a cost-effective and widely available 11.7 Tesla 89-mm bore vertical magnet were used to detect dynamic 13C isotopomer turnover from intravenously infused [U- 13C]glucose in a 211 μL voxel located in the adult rat brain. The INEPT-based 1H → 13C polarization transfer method is mostly adiabatic and therefore minimizes signal loss due to B 1 inhomogeneity of the surface coils used. High quality and reproducible data were acquired as a result of combined use of outer volume suppression, ISIS, and the single-shot three-dimensional localization scheme built in the INEPT pulse sequence. Isotopomer patterns of both glutamate C4 at 34.00 ppm and glutamine C4 at 31.38 ppm are dominated first by a doublet originated from labeling at C4 and C5 but not at C3 (with 1JC4C5 = 51 Hz) and then by a quartet originated from labeling at C3, C4, and C5 (with 1JC3C4 = 35 Hz). A lag in the transition of glutamine C4 pattern from doublet-dominance to quartet dominance as compared to glutamate C4 was observed, which provides an independent verification of the precursor-product relationship between neuronal glutamate and glial glutamine and a significant intercompartmental cerebral glutamate-glutamine cycle between neurons and glial cells.

  4. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Mariani, Manuel; Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella; Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore; Corti, Maurizio; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Borsa, Ferdinando

    2015-05-01

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac)3NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac)3NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr8 closed ring and in Cr7Cd and Cr8Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  5. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Mariani, Manuel; Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella; Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore; Corti, Maurizio Borsa, Ferdinando

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  6. Noise-Resilient Quantum Computing with a Nitrogen-Vacancy Center and Nuclear Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, J.; Wang, Z.-Y.; Plenio, M. B.

    2016-09-01

    Selective control of qubits in a quantum register for the purposes of quantum information processing represents a critical challenge for dense spin ensembles in solid-state systems. Here we present a protocol that achieves a complete set of selective electron-nuclear gates and single nuclear rotations in such an ensemble in diamond facilitated by a nearby nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center. The protocol suppresses internuclear interactions as well as unwanted coupling between the NV center and other spins of the ensemble to achieve quantum gate fidelities well exceeding 99%. Notably, our method can be applied to weakly coupled, distant spins representing a scalable procedure that exploits the exceptional properties of nuclear spins in diamond as robust quantum memories.

  7. Density-Functional and Coupled-Cluster Singles-and-Doubles Calculations of the Nuclear Shielding and Indirect Nuclear Spin-Spin Coupling Constants of o-Benzyne.

    PubMed

    Helgaker, Trygve; Jaszuński, Michał

    2007-01-01

    Density-functional theory (DFT) and coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles (CCSD) theory are applied to compute the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding and indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants of o-benzyne, whose biradical nature makes it difficult to study both experimentally and theoretically. Because of near-equilibrium triplet instabilities that follow from its biradical character, the calculated DFT NMR properties of o-benzyne are unusually sensitive to details of the exchange-correlation functional. However, this sensitivity is greatly reduced if these properties are calculated at the equilibrium of the chosen functional. A strong correlation is demonstrated between the quality of the calculated indirect spin-spin coupling constants and the quality of the calculated lowest triplet excitation energy in o-benzyne. Orbital-unrelaxed coupled-cluster theory should be less affected by such instabilities, and the CCSD NMR properties were only calculated at the experimental equilibrium geometry. For the shielding constants, the results in best agreement with experimental results are obtained with CCSD theory and with the Keal-Tozer KT1 and KT2 functionals. For the triply bonded carbon atoms, these models yield an isotropic shielding of 1.3, -3.3, and -1.2 ppm, respectively, compared with the experimentally observed shielding of 3.7 ppm for incarcerated o-benzyne. For the indirect spin-spin coupling constants, the CCSD model and the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional both yield reliable results; for the most interesting spin-spin coupling constant, (1)J (C⋮C), we obtain 210 and 209 Hz with these two models, respectively, somewhat above the recently reported experimental value of 177.9 ± 0.7 Hz for o-benzyne inside a molecular container, suggesting large incarceration effects.

  8. Triple resonance experiments for aligned sample solid-state NMR of 13C and 15N labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Neeraj; Grant, Christopher V.; Park, Sang Ho; Brown, Jonathan Miles; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Initial steps in the development of a suite of triple-resonance 1H/13C/15N solid-state NMR experiments applicable to aligned samples of 13C and 15N labeled proteins are described. The experiments take advantage of the opportunities for 13C detection without the need for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling presented by samples with two different patterns of isotopic labeling. In one type of sample, the proteins are ~20% randomly labeled with 13C in all backbone and side chain carbon sites and ~100% uniformly 15N labeled in all nitrogen sites; in the second type of sample, the peptides and proteins are 13C labeled at only the α-carbon and 15N labeled at the amide nitrogen of a few residues. The requirement for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling while detecting 13C signals is avoided in the first case because of the low probability of any two 13C nuclei being bonded to each other; in the second case, the labeled 13Cα sites are separated by at least three bonds in the polypeptide chain. The experiments enable the measurement of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C and 15N–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies associated with the 13Cα and 13C′ backbone sites, which provide orientation constraints complementary to those derived from the 15N labeled amide backbone sites. 13C/13C spin-exchange experiments identify proximate carbon sites. The ability to measure 13C–15N dipolar coupling frequencies and correlate 13C and 15N resonances provides a mechanism for making backbone resonance assignments. Three-dimensional combinations of these experiments ensure that the resolution, assignment, and measurement of orientationally dependent frequencies can be extended to larger proteins. Moreover, measurements of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies for nearly all side chain sites enable the complete three-dimensional structures of proteins to be determined with this approach. PMID:17293139

  9. Quadrupolar effects on nuclear spins of neutral arsenic donors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Pflüger, Moritz P. D.; Mortemousque, Pierre-André; Itoh, Kohei M.; Brandt, Martin S.

    2016-04-01

    We present electrically detected electron nuclear double resonance measurements of the nuclear spins of ionized and neutral arsenic donors in strained silicon. In addition to a reduction of the hyperfine coupling, we find significant quadrupole interactions of the nuclear spin of the neutral donors of the order of 10 kHz. By comparing these to the quadrupole shifts due to crystal fields measured for the ionized donors, we identify the effect of the additional electron on the electric field gradient at the nucleus. This extra component is expected to be caused by the coupling to electric field gradients created due to changes in the electron wave function under strain.

  10. High Resolution 13C MRI With Hyperpolarized Urea: In Vivo T2 Mapping and 15N Labeling Effects

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Galen D.; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Koelsch, Bertram L.; Van Criekinge, Mark; Smith, Kenneth J.; Shang, Hong; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    13C steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging and effective spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping were performed using hyperpolarized [13C] urea and [13C, 15N2] urea injected intravenously in rats. 15N labeling gave large T2 increases both in solution and in vivo due to the elimination of a strong scalar relaxation pathway. The T2 increase was pronounced in the kidney, with [13C, 15N2] urea giving T2 values of 6.3±1.3 s in the cortex and medulla, and 11±2 s in the renal pelvis. The measured T2 in the aorta was 1.3±0.3 s. [13C] urea showed shortened T2 values in the kidney of 0.23±0.03 s compared to 0.28±0.03 s measured in the aorta. The enhanced T2 of [13C, 15N2] urea was utilized to generate large signal enhancement by SSFP acquisitions with flip angles approaching the fully refocused regime. Projection images at 0.94 mm in-plane resolution were acquired with both urea isotopes, with [13C, 15N2] urea giving a greater than four-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio [13C] over urea. PMID:24235273

  11. Quantum data bus in dipolar coupled nuclear spin qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jingfu; Ditty, Michael; Ryan, Colm A.; Laforest, Martin; Moussa, Osama; Baugh, Jonathan; Burgarth, Daniel; Chandrashekar, C. M.; Laflamme, Raymond

    2009-07-15

    We implement an iterative quantum state transfer exploiting the natural dipolar couplings in a spin chain of a liquid-crystal NMR system. During each iteration, a finite part of the amplitude of the state is transferred and, by applying an external operation on only the last two spins, the transferred state is made to accumulate on the spin at the end point. The transfer fidelity reaches one asymptotically through increasing the number of iterations. We also implement the inverted version of the scheme which can transfer an arbitrary state from the end point to any other position of the chain and entangle any pair of spins in the chain, acting as a full quantum data bus.

  12. Σ production from targets of ^4He and ^13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrien, R. E.

    1996-10-01

    One of the abiding issues in hypernuclear research has been the question of the formation of nuclear bound states incorporating the Σ-hyperon. The recent increases in beam intensity at the Brookhaven AGS have enabled us to obtain a high statistics study on the production of Σ-hyperons on a ^4He target. Earlier research using stopped kaons at KEK indicated the presence of structure in the (K^-,π^-) reaction, and led to the postulate of a Σ bound state. That structure has now been definitely confirmed in the in-flight kaon experiment at the LESB2 beam line and Moby-Dick spectrometer. An improved measurement of the binding energy of the presumed state will be reported, together with a production cross section. In addition, both (K^-,π^-) and (K^-,π^+) reactions on ^13C have been studied and will be compared to similar measurements on ^9Be.

  13. Spin-orbit interaction in relativistic nuclear structure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebran, J.-P.; Mutschler, A.; Khan, E.; Vretenar, D.

    2016-08-01

    Relativistic self-consistent mean-field (SCMF) models naturally account for the coupling of the nucleon spin to its orbital motion, whereas nonrelativistic SCMF methods necessitate a phenomenological ansatz for the effective spin-orbit potential. Recent experimental studies aim to explore the isospin properties of the effective spin-orbit interaction in nuclei. SCMF models are very useful in the interpretation of the corresponding data; however, standard relativistic mean-field and nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock models use effective spin-orbit potentials with different isovector properties, mainly because exchange contributions are not treated explicitly in the former. The impact of exchange terms on the effective spin-orbit potential in relativistic mean-field models is analyzed, and it is shown that it leads to an isovector structure similar to the one used in standard nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock models. Data on the isospin dependence of spin-orbit splittings in spherical nuclei could be used to constrain the isovector-scalar channel of relativistic mean-field models. The reproduction of the empirical kink in the isotope shifts of even Pb nuclei by relativistic effective interactions points to the occurrence of pseudospin symmetry in the single-neutron spectra in these nuclei.

  14. Suppression of Spin Noise in Diamond for improved Sensing and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Erik; Lee, Junghyun; Singh, Swati; Pham, My Linh; Arai, Keigo; Walsworth, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    Increasing the coherence time of nitrogen vacancy (NV) center spins in diamond is of great interest for quantum information, sensing and metrology applications. However, achieving long coherence times remains a challenge in dense samples, where the NV's T2 is limited by electronic spin-spin interaction of the nitrogen donors in the lattice. In these samples, nuclear spin impurities associated with the 13C isotopes can suppress the dominant nitrogen electronic spin bath by reducing the flip-flop rates and enhancing the NV's coherence time. We investigate this spin bath suppression effect both experimentally and theoretically and provide a pathway to engineering high density NV samples with sufficiently long coherence times.

  15. Insights into the metabolic response to traumatic brain injury as revealed by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bartnik-Olson, Brenda L.; Harris, Neil G.; Shijo, Katsunori; Sutton, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The present review highlights critical issues related to cerebral metabolism following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the use of 13C labeled substrates and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study these changes. First we address some pathophysiologic factors contributing to metabolic dysfunction following TBI. We then examine how 13C NMR spectroscopy strategies have been used to investigate energy metabolism, neurotransmission, the intracellular redox state, and neuroglial compartmentation following injury. 13C NMR spectroscopy studies of brain extracts from animal models of TBI have revealed enhanced glycolytic production of lactate, evidence of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activation, and alterations in neuronal and astrocyte oxidative metabolism that are dependent on injury severity. Differential incorporation of label into glutamate and glutamine from 13C labeled glucose or acetate also suggest TBI-induced adaptations to the glutamate-glutamine cycle. PMID:24109452

  16. 13C isotopic fractionation during biodegradation of agricultural wastes.

    PubMed

    Chalk, Phillip M; Inácio, Caio T; Urquiaga, Segundo; Chen, Deli

    2015-01-01

    Significant differences in δ(13)C signatures occur within and between plant tissues and their constituent biochemical entities, and also within and between heterotrophic bacteria and fungi and their metabolic products. Furthermore, (13)C isotopic fractionation occurs during the biodegradation of organic molecules as seen in the substrate, respired CO(2) and the microbial biomass, which could be related to substrate composition and/or microbial metabolism. The (13)C isotopic fractionation observed during the decomposition of a single defined C substrate appears to be due to the intra-molecular heterogeneity in (13)C in the substrate and to (13)C isotopic fractionation during microbial metabolism. Very limited data suggest that the latter may be quantitatively more important than the former. Studies with defined fungi in culture media have highlighted the complexities associated with the interpretation of the observed patterns of (13)C isotopic fractionation when a single defined C source is added to the culture medium which itself contains one or more C sources. Techniques involving (13)C enrichment or paired treatments involving an equivalent C(3)- and C(4)-derived substrate have been devised to overcome the problem of background C in the culture medium and (13)C isotopic fractionation during metabolism. Studies with complex substrates have shown an initial (13)C depletion phase in respired CO(2) followed by a (13)C enrichment phase which may or may not be followed by another (13)C depletion phase. Basic studies involving an integrated approach are required to gain a new insight into (13)C isotopic fractionation during organic residue decomposition, by simultaneous measurements of δ(13)C in all C moieties. New analytical tools to measure real-time changes in δ(13)CO(2) and the intra-molecular δ(13)C distribution within plant biochemical entities offer new opportunities for unravelling the complex interactions between substrate and microbial metabolism with

  17. Nuclear spin-spin coupling anisotropy in the van der Waals-bonded 129Xe dimer.

    PubMed

    Jokisaari, Jukka; Vaara, Juha

    2013-07-21

    The spin-spin coupling constant, J, in the van der Waals-bonded (129)Xe-(129)Xe dimer cannot be determined experimentally because of the magnetic equivalence of the two nuclei. In contrast, the anisotropy of the coupling tensor, ΔJ, can be obtained from the so called effective dipole-dipole coupling determined in a solid state inclusion compound whose cages accommodate two xenon atoms. For the determination of the experimental ΔJ((129)Xe, (129)Xe) we exploited the data reported earlier in this journal. [D. H. Brouwer et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2007, 9, 1093.] The experimental value and the value obtained from relativistic first-principles computation are in perfect agreement. To the best of our knowledge this is the first investigation of spin-spin coupling anisotropy in a van der Waals-bonded system. PMID:23743998

  18. Nuclear spin-spin coupling anisotropy in the van der Waals-bonded 129Xe dimer.

    PubMed

    Jokisaari, Jukka; Vaara, Juha

    2013-07-21

    The spin-spin coupling constant, J, in the van der Waals-bonded (129)Xe-(129)Xe dimer cannot be determined experimentally because of the magnetic equivalence of the two nuclei. In contrast, the anisotropy of the coupling tensor, ΔJ, can be obtained from the so called effective dipole-dipole coupling determined in a solid state inclusion compound whose cages accommodate two xenon atoms. For the determination of the experimental ΔJ((129)Xe, (129)Xe) we exploited the data reported earlier in this journal. [D. H. Brouwer et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2007, 9, 1093.] The experimental value and the value obtained from relativistic first-principles computation are in perfect agreement. To the best of our knowledge this is the first investigation of spin-spin coupling anisotropy in a van der Waals-bonded system.

  19. Clinical NOE 13C MRS for neuropsychiatric disorders of the frontal lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailasuta, Napapon; Robertson, Larry W.; Harris, Kent C.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Allen, Peter S.; Ross, Brian D.

    2008-12-01

    In this communication, a scheme is described whereby in vivo 13C MRS can safely be performed in the frontal lobe, a human brain region hitherto precluded on grounds of SAR, but important in being the seat of impaired cognitive function in many neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders. By combining two well known features of 13C NMR—the use of low power NOE and the focus on 13C carbon atoms which are only minimally coupled to protons, we are able to overcome the obstacle of SAR and develop means of monitoring the 13C fluxes of critically important metabolic pathways in frontal brain structures of normal volunteers and patients. Using a combination of low-power WALTZ decoupling, variants of random noise for nuclear overhauser effect enhancement it was possible to reduce power deposition to 20% of the advised maximum specific absorption rate (SAR). In model solutions 13C signal enhancement achieved with this scheme were comparable to that obtained with WALTZ-4. In human brain, the low power procedure effectively determined glutamine, glutamate and bicarbonate in the posterior parietal brain after [1- 13C] glucose infusion. The same 13C enriched metabolites were defined in frontal brain of human volunteers after administration of [1- 13C] acetate, a recognized probe of glial metabolism. Time courses of incorporation of 13C into cerebral glutamate, glutamine and bicarbonate were constructed. The results suggest efficacy for measurement of in vivo cerebral metabolic rates of the glutamate-glutamine and tricarboxylic acid cycles in 20 min MR scans in previously inaccessible brain regions in humans at 1.5T. We predict these will be clinically useful biomarkers in many human neuropsychiatric and genetic conditions.

  20. The magnetic field dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Mance, Deni; Baldus, Marc; Gast, Peter; Huber, Martina; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2015-06-21

    We develop a theoretical description of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) in solids under Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) to describe the magnetic field dependence of the DNP effect. The treatment is based on an efficient scheme for numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation, which explicitly takes into account the variation of magnetic interactions during the sample spinning. The dependence of the cross-effect MAS-DNP on various parameters, such as the hyperfine interaction, electron-electron dipolar interaction, microwave field strength, and electron spin relaxation rates, is analyzed. Electron spin relaxation rates are determined by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, and calculations are compared to experimental data. Our results suggest that the observed nuclear magnetic resonance signal enhancements provided by MAS-DNP can be explained by discriminating between “bulk” and “core” nuclei and by taking into account the slow DNP build-up rate for the bulk nuclei.

  1. Protein carbon-13 spin systems by a single two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, B.H.; Westler, W.M.; Darba, P.; Markley, J.L.

    1988-05-13

    By applying a two-dimensional double-quantum carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance experiment to a protein uniformly enriched to 26% carbon-13, networks of directly bonded carbon atoms were identified by virtue of their one-bond spin-spin couplings and were classified by amino acid type according to their particular single- and double-quantum chemical shift patterns. Spin systems of 75 of the 98 amino acid residues in a protein, oxidized Anabaena 7120 ferredoxin (molecular weight 11,000), were identified by this approach, which represents a key step in an improved methodology for assigning protein nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Missing spin systems corresponded primarily to residues located adjacent to the paramagnetic iron-sulfur cluster. 25 references, 2 figures.

  2. Separation and conversion dynamics of nuclear-spin isomers of gaseous methanol

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhen-Dong; Ge, Meihua; Zheng, Yujun

    2015-01-01

    All symmetrical molecules with non-zero nuclear spin exist in nature as nuclear-spin isomers (NSIs). However, owing to the lack of experimental information, knowledge is rare about interconversions of NSIs of gaseous molecules with torsional symmetry. Here we report our separation and conversion observations on NSI-torsion-specific transition systems of gaseous methanol from a light-induced drift experiment involving partially spatial separation of the ortho and para isomers. We find that vibrationally excited molecules of the methanol spin isomer have a smaller collision cross-section than their ground-state counterparts. Interconversion of the enriched ortho isomer with the para isomer, which is generally considered improbable, has been quantitatively studied by sensitive detections of the spectral intensities. Rather counterintuitively, this reveals that the interconversion is inhibited with increasing pressure. Our results suggest that the spin conversion mechanism in methanol is via a quantum relaxation process with the quantum Zeno effect induced by molecular collisions. PMID:25880882

  3. Coherent manipulation of an ensemble of nuclear spins in diamond for high precision rotation sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskula, Jean-Christophe; Saha, Kasturi; Ajoy, Ashok; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Gyroscopes find wide applications in everyday life from navigation and inertial sensing to rotation sensors in hand-held devices and automobiles. Current devices, based on either atomic or solid-state systems, impose a choice between long-time stability and high sensitivity in a miniaturized system. We are building a solid-state spin gyroscope associated with the Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond take advantage of the efficient optical initialization and measurement offered by the NV electronic spin and the stability and long coherence time of the nuclear spin, which is preserved even at high defect density. In addition, we also investigate electro-magnetic noise monitoring and feedback schemes based on the coupling between the NV electronic and nuclear spin to achieve higher stability.

  4. Use of Nuclear Spin Noise Spectroscopy to Monitor Slow Magnetization Buildup at Millikelvin Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Peat, David; Owers‐Bradley, John

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At ultralow temperatures, longitudinal nuclear magnetic relaxation times become exceedingly long and spectral lines are very broad. These facts pose particular challenges for the measurement of NMR spectra and spin relaxation phenomena. Nuclear spin noise spectroscopy is used to monitor proton spin polarization buildup to thermal equilibrium of a mixture of glycerol, water, and copper oxide nanoparticles at 17.5 mK in a static magnetic field of 2.5 T. Relaxation times determined in such a way are essentially free from perturbations caused by excitation radiofrequency pulses, radiation damping, and insufficient excitation bandwidth. The experimental spin‐lattice relaxation times determined on resonance by saturation recovery with spin noise detection are consistently longer than those determined by using pulse excitation. These longer values are in better accordance with the expected field dependence trend than those obtained by on‐resonance experiments with pulsed excitation. PMID:27305629

  5. Structure and Bonding in Chlorine-Functionalized Nanodiamond--Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Panich, Alexander M; Sergeev, Nikolay A; Olszewski, Marcin; Froumin, Natalya; Dideykin, Arthur T; Sokolov, Vasiliy V; Vul', Alexander Ya

    2015-02-01

    We report on investigation of detonation nanodiamond annealed at 800C°in chlorine atmosphere by means of 1H, 13C and 35Cl nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results of these methods are found to be consistent with each other and evidence formation of chlorine-carbon groups and sp2 carbon shell on the nanodiamond surface. The data obtained provide detailed information about the structure and bonding in this diamond nanoparticle. Interaction of nuclear spins with unpaired electron spins of dangling bonds results in fast 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation.

  6. 19F nuclear spin relaxation and spin diffusion effects in the single-ion magnet LiYF4:Ho3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, B. Z.; Vanyunin, M. V.; Graf, M. J.; Lago, J.; Borsa, F.; Lascialfari, A.; Tkachuk, A. M.; Barbara, B.

    2008-11-01

    Temperature and magnetic field dependences of the 19F nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in a single crystal of LiYF4 doped with holmium are described by an approach based on a detailed consideration of the magnetic dipole-dipole interactions between nuclei and impurity paramagnetic ions and nuclear spin diffusion processes. The observed non-exponential long time recovery of the nuclear magnetization after saturation at intermediate temperatures is in agreement with predictions of the spin-diffusion theory in a case of the diffusion limited relaxation. At avoided level crossings in the spectrum of electron-nuclear states of Ho3 + ions, rates of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation increase due to quasi-resonant energy exchange between nuclei and paramagnetic ions in contrast to the predominant role played by electronic cross-relaxation processes in the low-frequency ac-susceptibility.

  7. Probing the Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, J. J. T.; den Haan, A. M. J.; de Voogd, J. M.; Bossoni, L.; de Jong, T. A.; de Wit, M.; Bastiaans, K. M.; Thoen, D. J.; Endo, A.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Zaanen, J.; Oosterkamp, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are measured on copper using magnetic-resonance force microscopy performed at temperatures down to 42 mK. The low temperature is verified by comparison with the Korringa relation. Measuring spin-lattice relaxation times locally at very low temperatures opens up the possibility to measure the magnetic properties of inhomogeneous electron systems realized in oxide interfaces, topological insulators, and other strongly correlated electron systems such as high-Tc superconductors.

  8. The performance of hybrid density functional theory for the calculation of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in substituted hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Lutnaes, Ola B; Ruden, Torgeir A; Helgaker, Trygve

    2004-10-01

    Density functional theory, in particular, with the Becke-3-parameter-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid functional, has been shown to be a promising method for the calculation of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants. However, no systematic investigation has so far been undertaken to evaluate the capability of B3LYP to calculate these coupling constants accurately, taking properly into account the vibrational contributions. In this work, vibrationally corrected indirect spin-spin coupling constants were calculated using the B3LYP functional for 10 rigid unsubstituted and substituted hydrocarbons: ethyne, ethene, allene, cyclopropene, cyclopropane, cyclobutene, pyrrole, furan, thiophene and benzene. The resulting spin-spin constants were compared with the available experimental values. The basis sets in these calculations give indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants of ethyne that are almost converged to the basis-set limit, making the intrinsic error of the computational method and the error in equilibrium geometry the main sources of error. On average, the B3LYP functional overestimates the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in hydrocarbons by 10%.

  9. Characterizing crystal disorder of trospium chloride: a comprehensive,(13) C CP/MAS NMR, DSC, FTIR, and XRPD study.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, Martina; Sturcova, Adriana; Brus, Jiri; Benes, Hynek; Skorepova, Eliska; Kratochvil, Bohumil; Cejka, Jan; Sedenkova, Ivana; Kobera, Libor; Policianova, Olivia; Sturc, Antonin

    2013-04-01

    Analysis of C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray powder diffraction data of trospium chloride (TCl) products crystallized from different mixtures of water-ethanol [φ(EtOH) = 0.5-1.0] at various temperatures (0°C, 20°C) and initial concentrations (saturated solution, 30%-50% excess of solvent) revealed extensive structural variability of TCl. Although (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectra indicated broad variety of structural phases arising from molecular disorder, temperature-modulated DSC identified presence of two distinct components in the products. FTIR spectra revealed alterations in the hydrogen bonding network (ionic hydrogen bond formation), whereas the X-ray diffraction reflected unchanged unit cell parameters. These results were explained by a two-component character of TCl products in which a dominant polymorphic form is accompanied by partly separated nanocrystalline domains of a secondary phase that does not provide clear Bragg reflections. These phases slightly differ in the degree of molecular disorder, in the quality of crystal lattice and hydrogen bonding network. It is also demonstrated that, for the quality control of such complex products, (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy combined with factor analysis (FA) can satisfactorily be used for categorizing the individual samples: FA of (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectra found clear relationships between the extent of molecular disorder and crystallization conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 102:1235-1248, 2013.

  10. Nuclear spin relaxation in ordered bimetallic chain compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shoji

    2000-01-01

    A theoretical interpretation is given to recent proton spin relaxation-time ( T1) measurements on NiCu(C 7H 6N 2O 6)(H 2O) 3·2H 2O, which is an ideal one-dimensional ferrimagnetic Heisenberg model system of alternating spins 1 and {1}/{2}. The relaxation rate T1-1 is formulated in terms of the spin-wave theory and is evaluated by the use of a quantum Monte Carlo method. Calculations of the temperature and applied-field ( H) dependences of T1-1 are in total agreement with the experimental findings. T1 behaves as T1-1∝ H-1/2, which turns out an indirect observation of the quadratic dispersion relations dominating the low-energy physics of quantum ferrimagnets.

  11. High-fidelity transfer and storage of photon states in a single nuclear spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sen; Wang, Ya; Rao, D. D. Bhaktavatsala; Hien Tran, Thai; Momenzadeh, Ali S.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Wang, Ping; Yang, Wen; Stöhr, Rainer; Neumann, Philipp; Kosaka, Hideo; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    Long-distance quantum communication requires photons and quantum nodes that comprise qubits for interaction with light and good memory capabilities, as well as processing qubits for the storage and manipulation of photons. Owing to the unavoidable photon losses, robust quantum communication over lossy transmission channels requires quantum repeater networks. A necessary and highly demanding prerequisite for these networks is the existence of quantum memories with long coherence times to reliably store the incident photon states. Here we demonstrate the high-fidelity (˜98%) coherent transfer of a photon polarization state to a single solid-state nuclear spin that has a coherence time of over 10 s. The storage process is achieved by coherently transferring the polarization state of a photon to an entangled electron-nuclear spin state of a nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond. The nuclear spin-based optical quantum memory demonstrated here paves the way towards an absorption-based quantum repeater network.

  12. Probing the C₆₀ triplet state coupling to nuclear spins inside and out.

    PubMed

    Filidou, Vasileia; Mamone, Salvatore; Simmons, Stephanie; Karlen, Steven D; Anderson, Harry L; Kay, Christopher W M; Bagno, Alessandro; Rastrelli, Federico; Murata, Yasujiro; Komatsu, Koichi; Lei, Xuegong; Li, Yongjun; Turro, Nicholas J; Levitt, Malcolm H; Morton, John J L

    2013-09-13

    The photoexcitation of functionalized fullerenes to their paramagnetic triplet electronic state can be studied by pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, whereas the interactions of this state with the surrounding nuclear spins can be observed by a related technique: electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR). In this study, we present EPR and ENDOR studies on a functionalized exohedral fullerene system, dimethyl[9-hydro (C60-Ih)[5,6]fulleren-1(9H)-yl]phosphonate (DMHFP), where the triplet electron spin has been used to hyperpolarize, couple and measure two nuclear spins. We go on to discuss the extension of these methods to study a new class of endohedral fullerenes filled with small molecules, such as H₂@C₆₀, and we relate the results to density functional calculations. PMID:23918718

  13. High-fidelity transfer and storage of photon states in a single nuclear spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sen; Wang, Ya; Rao, D. D. Bhaktavatsala; Hien Tran, Thai; Momenzadeh, Ali S.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Wang, Ping; Yang, Wen; Stöhr, Rainer; Neumann, Philipp; Kosaka, Hideo; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    Long-distance quantum communication requires photons and quantum nodes that comprise qubits for interaction with light and good memory capabilities, as well as processing qubits for the storage and manipulation of photons. Owing to the unavoidable photon losses, robust quantum communication over lossy transmission channels requires quantum repeater networks. A necessary and highly demanding prerequisite for these networks is the existence of quantum memories with long coherence times to reliably store the incident photon states. Here we demonstrate the high-fidelity (∼98%) coherent transfer of a photon polarization state to a single solid-state nuclear spin that has a coherence time of over 10 s. The storage process is achieved by coherently transferring the polarization state of a photon to an entangled electron–nuclear spin state of a nitrogen–vacancy centre in diamond. The nuclear spin-based optical quantum memory demonstrated here paves the way towards an absorption-based quantum repeater network.

  14. Interaction of Strain and Nuclear Spins in Silicon: Quadrupolar Effects on Ionized Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Hrubesch, Florian M.; Künzl, Markus; Becker, Hans-Werner; Itoh, Kohei M.; Stutzmann, Martin; Hoehne, Felix; Dreher, Lukas; Brandt, Martin S.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear spins of ionized donors in silicon have become an interesting quantum resource due to their very long coherence times. Their perfect isolation, however, comes at a price, since the absence of the donor electron makes the nuclear spin difficult to control. We demonstrate that the quadrupolar interaction allows us to effectively tune the nuclear magnetic resonance of ionized arsenic donors in silicon via strain and determine the two nonzero elements of the S tensor linking strain and electric field gradients in this material to S11=1.5 ×1022 V /m2 and S44=6 ×1022 V /m2 . We find a stronger benefit of dynamical decoupling on the coherence properties of transitions subject to first-order quadrupole shifts than on those subject to only second-order shifts and discuss applications of quadrupole physics including mechanical driving of magnetic resonance, cooling of mechanical resonators, and strain-mediated spin coupling.

  15. Site-specific φ- and ψ-torsion angle determination in a uniformly/extensively 13C- and 15N-labeled peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wi, Sungsool; Spano, Justin

    2011-10-01

    A solid-state rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR) NMR method was introduced to identify the ϕ- and ψ-torsion angle from a 1H- 15N or 1H- 13C' spin system of alanine-like residues in a selectively, uniformly, or extensively 15N-/ 13C-labeled peptide. When a C α( i) or a 15N peak is site-specifically obtainable in the NMR spectrum of a uniformly 15N/ 13C-labeled sample system, the ψ- or ϕ-torsion angle specified by the conformational structure of peptide geometry involving 15N( i)- 1H αi - 15N( i + 1) or 13C'( i - 1)- 1H Ni- 13C'( i) spin system can be identified based on 13C α- or 15N-detected 1H α- 15N or 1H N- 13C REDOR experiment. This method will conveniently be utilized to identify major secondary motifs, such as α-helix, β-sheet, and β-turn, from a uniformly 15N-/ 13C-labled peptide sample system. When tested on a 13C-/ 15N-labeled model system of a three amino acid peptide Gly-[U- 13C, 15N]Ala-[U- 13C, 15N]Leu, the ψ-angle of alanine obtained experimentally, ψ = -40 ± 30°, agreed reasonably well with the X-ray determined angle, ψ = -39°.

  16. Effect of electron spin dynamics on solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization performance.

    PubMed

    Siaw, Ting Ann; Fehr, Matthias; Lund, Alicia; Latimer, Allegra; Walker, Shamon A; Edwards, Devin T; Han, Song-I

    2014-09-21

    For the broadest dissemination of solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization (ssDNP) enhanced NMR as a material characterization tool, the ability to employ generic mono-nitroxide radicals as spin probes is critical. A better understanding of the factors contributing to ssDNP efficiency is needed to rationally optimize the experimental condition for the practically accessible spin probes at hand. This study seeks to advance the mechanistic understanding of ssDNP by examining the effect of electron spin dynamics on ssDNP performance at liquid helium temperatures (4-40 K). The key observation is that bi-radicals and mono-radicals can generate comparable nuclear spin polarization at 4 K and 7 T, which is in contrast to the observation for ssDNP at liquid nitrogen temperatures (80-150 K) that finds bi-radicals to clearly outperform mono-radicals. To rationalize this observation, we analyze the change in the DNP-induced nuclear spin polarization (Pn) and the characteristic ssDNP signal buildup time as a function of electron spin relaxation rates that are modulated by the mono- and bi-radical spin concentration. Changes in Pn are consistent with a systematic variation in the product of the electron spin-lattice relaxation time and the electron spin flip-flop rate that constitutes an integral saturation factor of an inhomogeneously broadened EPR spectrum. We show that the comparable Pn achieved with both radical species can be reconciled with a comparable integral EPR saturation factor. Surprisingly, the largest Pn is observed at an intermediate spin concentration for both mono- and bi-radicals. At the highest radical concentration, the stronger inter-electron spin dipolar coupling favors ssDNP, while oversaturation diminishes Pn, as experimentally verified by the observation of a maximum Pn at an intermediate, not the maximum, microwave (μw) power. At the maximum μw power, oversaturation reduces the electron spin population differential that must be upheld between

  17. Theory for cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic-angle spinning in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: the importance of level crossings.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-28

    We present theoretical calculations of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) due to the cross effect in nuclear magnetic resonance under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Using a three-spin model (two electrons and one nucleus), cross effect DNP with MAS for electron spins with a large g-anisotropy can be seen as a series of spin transitions at avoided crossings of the energy levels, with varying degrees of adiabaticity. If the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T(1e) is large relative to the MAS rotation period, the cross effect can happen as two separate events: (i) partial saturation of one electron spin by the applied microwaves as one electron spin resonance (ESR) frequency crosses the microwave frequency and (ii) flip of all three spins, when the difference of the two ESR frequencies crosses the nuclear frequency, which transfers polarization to the nuclear spin if the two electron spins have different polarizations. In addition, adiabatic level crossings at which the two ESR frequencies become equal serve to maintain non-uniform saturation across the ESR line. We present analytical results based on the Landau-Zener theory of adiabatic transitions, as well as numerical quantum mechanical calculations for the evolution of the time-dependent three-spin system. These calculations provide insight into the dependence of cross effect DNP on various experimental parameters, including MAS frequency, microwave field strength, spin relaxation rates, hyperfine and electron-electron dipole coupling strengths, and the nature of the biradical dopants.

  18. Theory for cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic-angle spinning in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: The importance of level crossings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-01

    We present theoretical calculations of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) due to the cross effect in nuclear magnetic resonance under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Using a three-spin model (two electrons and one nucleus), cross effect DNP with MAS for electron spins with a large g-anisotropy can be seen as a series of spin transitions at avoided crossings of the energy levels, with varying degrees of adiabaticity. If the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1e is large relative to the MAS rotation period, the cross effect can happen as two separate events: (i) partial saturation of one electron spin by the applied microwaves as one electron spin resonance (ESR) frequency crosses the microwave frequency and (ii) flip of all three spins, when the difference of the two ESR frequencies crosses the nuclear frequency, which transfers polarization to the nuclear spin if the two electron spins have different polarizations. In addition, adiabatic level crossings at which the two ESR frequencies become equal serve to maintain non-uniform saturation across the ESR line. We present analytical results based on the Landau-Zener theory of adiabatic transitions, as well as numerical quantum mechanical calculations for the evolution of the time-dependent three-spin system. These calculations provide insight into the dependence of cross effect DNP on various experimental parameters, including MAS frequency, microwave field strength, spin relaxation rates, hyperfine and electron-electron dipole coupling strengths, and the nature of the biradical dopants.

  19. Theory for cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic-angle spinning in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: the importance of level crossings.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-28

    We present theoretical calculations of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) due to the cross effect in nuclear magnetic resonance under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Using a three-spin model (two electrons and one nucleus), cross effect DNP with MAS for electron spins with a large g-anisotropy can be seen as a series of spin transitions at avoided crossings of the energy levels, with varying degrees of adiabaticity. If the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T(1e) is large relative to the MAS rotation period, the cross effect can happen as two separate events: (i) partial saturation of one electron spin by the applied microwaves as one electron spin resonance (ESR) frequency crosses the microwave frequency and (ii) flip of all three spins, when the difference of the two ESR frequencies crosses the nuclear frequency, which transfers polarization to the nuclear spin if the two electron spins have different polarizations. In addition, adiabatic level crossings at which the two ESR frequencies become equal serve to maintain non-uniform saturation across the ESR line. We present analytical results based on the Landau-Zener theory of adiabatic transitions, as well as numerical quantum mechanical calculations for the evolution of the time-dependent three-spin system. These calculations provide insight into the dependence of cross effect DNP on various experimental parameters, including MAS frequency, microwave field strength, spin relaxation rates, hyperfine and electron-electron dipole coupling strengths, and the nature of the biradical dopants. PMID:22938251

  20. Theory for cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic-angle spinning in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: The importance of level crossings

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We present theoretical calculations of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) due to the cross effect in nuclear magnetic resonance under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Using a three-spin model (two electrons and one nucleus), cross effect DNP with MAS for electron spins with a large g-anisotropy can be seen as a series of spin transitions at avoided crossings of the energy levels, with varying degrees of adiabaticity. If the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1e is large relative to the MAS rotation period, the cross effect can happen as two separate events: (i) partial saturation of one electron spin by the applied microwaves as one electron spin resonance (ESR) frequency crosses the microwave frequency and (ii) flip of all three spins, when the difference of the two ESR frequencies crosses the nuclear frequency, which transfers polarization to the nuclear spin if the two electron spins have different polarizations. In addition, adiabatic level crossings at which the two ESR frequencies become equal serve to maintain non-uniform saturation across the ESR line. We present analytical results based on the Landau-Zener theory of adiabatic transitions, as well as numerical quantum mechanical calculations for the evolution of the time-dependent three-spin system. These calculations provide insight into the dependence of cross effect DNP on various experimental parameters, including MAS frequency, microwave field strength, spin relaxation rates, hyperfine and electron-electron dipole coupling strengths, and the nature of the biradical dopants. PMID:22938251

  1. Novel Imaging Contrast Methods for Hyperpolarized 13 C Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen Durant

    Magnetic resonance imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled small molecules has emerged as an extremely powerful tool for the in vivo monitoring of perfusion and metabolism. This work presents methods for improved imaging, parameter mapping, and image contrast generation for in vivo hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Angiography using hyperpolarized urea was greatly improved with a highly T2-weighted acquisition in combination with 15N labeling of the urea amide groups. This is due to the fact that the T2 of [13C]urea is strongly limited by the scalar coupling to the neighboring quadrupolar 14N. The long in vivo T2 values of [13C, 15N2]urea were utilized for sub-millimeter projection angiography using a contrast agent that could be safely injected in concentrations of 10-100 mM while still tolerated in patients with renal insufficiency. This study also presented the first method for in vivo T2 mapping of hyperpolarized 13C compounds. The in vivo T2 of urea was short in the blood and long within the kidneys. This persistent signal component was isolated to the renal filtrate, thus enabling for the first time direct detection of an imaging contrast agent undergoing glomerular filtration. While highly T2-weighted acquisitions select for molecules with short rotational correlation times, high diffusion weighting selects for those with the long translational correlation times. A specialized spin-echo EPI sequence was developed in order to generate highly diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized 13C images on a clinical MRI system operating within clinical peak- RF and gradient amplitude constraints. Low power adiabatic spin echo pulses were developed in order to generate a sufficiently large refocused bandwidth while maintaining low nominal power. This diffusion weighted acquisition gave enhanced tumor contrast-to-noise ratio when imaging [1-13C]lactate after infusion of [1-13C]pyruvate. Finally, the first in-man hyperpolarized 13C MRI clinical trial is discussed.

  2. Spin-exchange narrowing in a nuclear magnetic transverse oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Bulatowicz, Michael; Walker, Thad

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate spin exchange narrowing in synchronously pumped Xe NMR. The Xe NMR is driven by spin exchange with Rb atoms whose polarization is square-wave modulated at the Xe NMR frequency. On resonance, the nuclei precess in phase with the Rb polarization. Off resonance, however, the spin-exchange fields from the Rb cause the Xe to develop a static orthogonal spin component. This induces broadening in the NMR line while also dramatically suppressing the phase shift between the precessing Rb and Xe polarizations. We can compensate for this effect by adding an oscillating magnetic field oriented along the optical pumping axis and 180 degrees out of phase with the Rb polarization. This narrows the NMR line width to approximately the T1 limit, and nearly restores the usual relationship between detuning and phase shift. These results suggest the possibility of using the alkali field with appropriate magnetic field feedback along the bias field direction to narrow the NMR linewidth below the usual T1 limit. Support by the NSF and Northrop Grumman Co.

  3. Inelastic pion scattering by /sup 13/C at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions for inelastically scattered pions were obtained for several states in /sup 13/C at an incident energy of 65 MeV. The data include results from both ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ measurements. In addition, ..pi../sup -/ measurements were made at T/sub ..pi../ = 50 MeV at one angle to give a two point fixed-q excitation function. The data are compared to theory and the data of others. As might be expected, medium corrections are shown to be considerably more important at low energies than at resonance. This is true for inelastic transitions of multipolarity 0,2 and 3. Parameters derived from an analysis of elastic pion scattering and SCX data also provide an adequate description of the inelastic transitions. The charge asymmetry in the cross sections for the 9/2/sup +/ state that was seen at resonance persists at these energies. This result is consistent with an impulse approximation treatment of the spin-flip amplitude. This is true even though the incoming energy of the pions is far below the range where the validity of an impulse treatment is expected. 65 refs., 45 figs.

  4. Diamond-nitrogen-vacancy electronic and nuclear spin-state anticrossings under weak transverse magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevenson, Hannah; Chen, Edward H.; Dolde, Florian; Teale, Carson; Englund, Dirk; Braje, Danielle

    2016-08-01

    We report on detailed studies of electronic and nuclear spin states in the diamond-nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center under weak transverse magnetic fields. We numerically predict and experimentally verify a previously unobserved NV hyperfine level anticrossing (LAC) occurring at bias fields of tens of gauss—two orders of magnitude lower than previously reported LACs at ˜500 and ˜1000 G axial magnetic fields. We then discuss how the NV ground-state Hamiltonian can be manipulated in this regime to tailor the NV's sensitivity to environmental factors and to map into the nuclear spin state.

  5. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c]M [2h2m 13c], And [2h3,, 13c] Methyl Aryl Sulfones And Sulfoxides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2004-07-20

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfones and [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfoxides, wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfone or sulfoxide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing methyl aryl sulfones and methyl aryl sulfoxides.

  6. Quantitative identification of metastable magnesium carbonate minerals by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Surface, J Andrew; Brenner, Allison; Wang, Louis S; Skemer, Philip; Conradi, Mark S; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-01-01

    In the conversion of CO2 to mineral carbonates for the permanent geosequestration of CO2, there are multiple magnesium carbonate phases that are potential reaction products. Solid-state (13)C NMR is demonstrated as an effective tool for distinguishing magnesium carbonate phases and quantitatively characterizing magnesium carbonate mixtures. Several of these mineral phases include magnesite, hydromagnesite, dypingite, and nesquehonite, which differ in composition by the number of waters of hydration or the number of crystallographic hydroxyl groups. These carbonates often form in mixtures with nearly overlapping (13)C NMR resonances which makes their identification and analysis difficult. In this study, these phases have been investigated with solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy, including both static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments. Static spectra yield chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) lineshapes that are indicative of the site-symmetry variations of the carbon environments. MAS spectra yield isotropic chemical shifts for each crystallographically inequivalent carbon and spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, yield characteristic information that assist in species discrimination. These detailed parameters, and the combination of static and MAS analyses, can aid investigations of mixed carbonates by (13)C NMR.

  7. Kramers-degenerated NV+113C spin systems in diamond: analytical description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizovtsev, Alexander P.; Kilin, Sergei Y.; Pushkarchuk, Alexander L.; Kuten, Semen A.

    2013-02-01

    Spin systems consisted of single electronic spin S=1 of the NV center and nearby nuclear spins I=1/2 of 13C atoms disposed in diamond lattice near the center can be used as a small register of a quantum computer or as a sensor of a magnetic field. At odd number of nuclear spins eigenvalues of the spin systems at zero external magnetic field are at least twofold degenerated (Kramers degeneration) due to time reversal invariance of the spin Hamiltonian. This degeneracy is lifted only by external magnetic field regardless of the presence of any electric (crystal) field which can also lift the degeneracy thus hindering measurement of the magnetic field. Therefore, the Kramers-degenerated spin systems can be very perspective for measurement of a local magnetic field by the NV-based single-spin quantum magnetometer. Here, we are considering analytically the simplest Kramers-degenerated spin system NV+113C consisting of a single electron spin S=1 of the NV сenter coupled by hyperfine interaction with a single nuclear spin I=1/2 of 13C atom disposed in arbitrary site of diamond lattice. Simple approximate analytical expressions are obtained for eigenvalues and eigenstates of the spin system.

  8. Spin and Isospin Dependent Interactions in Classical Molecular Simulations of Dense Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amason, Charlee; Caplan, Matt; Horowitz, Cj

    2015-10-01

    A neutron star is the hot, incredibly dense remnant of a massive star gone supernova. Extreme conditions on neutron stars allow for the formation of exotically shaped nuclear matter, known colloquially as ``nuclear pasta.'' Competition between the strong nuclear force and the repulsive Coulomb force results in frustration of the neutron star crust, ultimately resulting in these pasta shapes. Previous work at Indiana University has used classical molecular dynamic simulations to model the formation of this pasta. For this project, we introduce a similar model with a new spin dependent interaction. Using this model, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of both symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter with 400 particles. The energies found are similar to those in chiral effective field theory calculations. When we include Coulomb interactions, the model produces pasta shapes. Future work will incorporate this spin potential into larger pasta simulations. Supported by the National Science Foundation REU at Indiana University.

  9. NMR Investigation of Optical Polarization of Nuclear Spins in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paravastu, Anant; Hayes, Sophia; Schwickert, Birgit; Reimer, Jeffrey; Dinh, Long; Balooch, Mehdi

    2003-03-01

    Light-induced nuclear spin alignments have been measured in GaAs as a function of photon energy, irradiation time, and sample temperature using NMR spectroscopy at 9.4 Tesla and 10 to 50 K. Significant optical enhancements were observed at a range of photon energies, starting just below the band gap and persisting through 100 meV above the gap. Irradiation above the band gap resulted in thermally activated NMR signal enhancements while sub band gap irradiation did not. Short and long irradiation time dependencies revealed insights into the nature of cross relaxation between electronic nuclear spins, contradicting mechanisms based on either localized electron-nuclear contact at defect sites or cross relaxation between nuclei and free electrons. We propose that the presence of a mobile or delocalized enabling electronic species characterized by a long electron-nuclear correlation time, such as an exciton, is necessary in any mechanism which explains the data.

  10. 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements with hyperpolarized [1‐13C] pyruvate can be used to detect the expression of transgenic pyruvate decarboxylase activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dzien, Piotr; Tee, Sui‐Seng; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Lyons, Scott K.; Larkin, Timothy J.; Timm, Kerstin N.; Hu, De‐En; Wright, Alan; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Serrao, Eva M.; Marco‐Rius, Irene; Mannion, Elizabeth; D'Santos, Paula; Kennedy, Brett W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization can increase the sensitivity of the 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiment by at least four orders of magnitude and offers a novel approach to the development of MRI gene reporters based on enzymes that metabolize 13C‐labeled tracers. We describe here a gene reporter based on the enzyme pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1), which catalyzes the decarboxylation of pyruvate to produce acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. Methods Pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis (zmPDC) and a mutant that lacked enzyme activity were expressed using an inducible promoter in human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells. Enzyme activity was measured in the cells and in xenografts derived from the cells using 13C MRS measurements of the conversion of hyperpolarized [1‐13C] pyruvate to H13 CO3–. Results Induction of zmPDC expression in the cells and in the xenografts derived from them resulted in an approximately two‐fold increase in the H13 CO3–/[1‐13C] pyruvate signal ratio following intravenous injection of hyperpolarized [1‐13C] pyruvate. Conclusion We have demonstrated the feasibility of using zmPDC as an in vivo reporter gene for use with hyperpolarized 13C MRS. Magn Reson Med 76:391–401, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26388418

  11. Compartmentalized Cerebral Metabolism of [1,6-13C]Glucose Determined by in vivo 13C NMR Spectroscopy at 14.1 T

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, João M. N.; Lanz, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral metabolism is compartmentalized between neurons and glia. Although glial glycolysis is thought to largely sustain the energetic requirements of neurotransmission while oxidative metabolism takes place mainly in neurons, this hypothesis is matter of debate. The compartmentalization of cerebral metabolic fluxes can be determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy upon infusion of 13C-enriched compounds, especially glucose. Rats under light α-chloralose anesthesia were infused with [1,6-13C]glucose and 13C enrichment in the brain metabolites was measured by 13C NMR spectroscopy with high sensitivity and spectral resolution at 14.1 T. This allowed determining 13C enrichment curves of amino acid carbons with high reproducibility and to reliably estimate cerebral metabolic fluxes (mean error of 8%). We further found that TCA cycle intermediates are not required for flux determination in mathematical models of brain metabolism. Neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle rate (VTCA) and neurotransmission rate (VNT) were 0.45 ± 0.01 and 0.11 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min, respectively. Glial VTCA was found to be 38 ± 3% of total cerebral oxidative metabolism, accounting for more than half of neuronal oxidative metabolism. Furthermore, glial anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation rate (VPC) was 0.069 ± 0.004 μmol/g/min, i.e., 25 ± 1% of the glial TCA cycle rate. These results support a role of glial cells as active partners of neurons during synaptic transmission beyond glycolytic metabolism. PMID:21713114

  12. Hydrogen bonding induced distortion of CO3 units and kinetic stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate: results from 2D (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Kaseman, Derrick C; Colas, Bruno; Jacob, Dorrit E; Clark, Simon M

    2016-07-27

    Systematic correlation in alkaline-earth carbonate compounds between the deviation of the CO3 units from the perfect D3h symmetry and their (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters is established. The (13)C NMR CSA parameters of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) are measured using two-dimensional (13)C phase adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) NMR spectroscopy and are analyzed on the basis of this correlation. The results indicate a distortion of the CO3 units in ACC in the form of an in-plane displacement of the C atom away from the centroid of the O3 triangle, resulting from hydrogen bonding with the surrounding H2O molecules, without significant out-of-plane displacement. Similar distortion for all C atoms in the structure of ACC suggests a uniform spatial disposition of H2O molecules around the CO3 units forming a hydrogen-bonded amorphous network. This amorphous network is stabilized against crystallization by steric frustration, while additives such as Mg presumably provide further stabilization by increasing the energy of dehydration. PMID:27276013

  13. Producing Radical-Free Hyperpolarized Perfusion Agents for In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Using Spin-Labeled Thermoresponsive Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tian; Mishkovsky, Mor; Junk, Matthias J N; Münnemann, Kerstin; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) provides a way to tremendously improve the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. Once the spins are hyperpolarized by dissolution DNP, the radicals used as polarizing agents become undesirable since their presence is an additional source of nuclear spin relaxation and their toxicity might be an issue. This study demonstrates the feasibility of preparing a hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]2-methylpropan-2-ol (tert-butanol) solution free of persistent radicals by using spin-labeled thermoresponsive hydrophilic polymer networks as polarizing agents. The hyperpolarized (13) C signal can be detected for up to 5 min before the spins fully relax to their thermal equilibrium. This approach extends the applicability of spin-labeled thermoresponsive hydrogel to the dissolution DNP field and highlights its potential as polarizing agent for preparing neat slowly relaxing contrast agents. The hydrogels are especially suited to hyperpolarize deuterated alcohols which can be used for in vivo perfusion imaging. PMID:27184565

  14. Coupled nuclear spin relaxation and internal rotations in magnesium fluosilicate hexahydrate.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utton, D. B.; Tsang, T.

    1972-01-01

    Both proton and fluorine nuclear spin-lattice relaxations have been studied by the 180- to 90-deg pulse method in magnesium fluosilicate hexahydrate at 25 and 13 MHz over the temperature range from 170 to 350 K. Observed nonexponential behavior of the nuclear magnetic relaxation is explained by internal rotations of the doubly charged negative fluosilicate ions and doubly charged positive magnesium hexahydrate ions.

  15. A Study of the Nuclear Structure at High Energy and Low Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekstad, J.; Henriquez, A.; Ingebretsen, F.; Midttun, G.; Skaali, B.; Øyan, R.; Wikne, J.; Engeland, T.; Thorsteinsen, T. F.; Hammaren, E.; Liukkonen, E.

    1983-01-01

    A novel method to study nuclear structure at low spin as a function of temperature is developed and used on 146,148Sm, 154,156Gd and 160,162Dy, by means of the (3He, α) reaction. The nuclear level density for a wide energy range is also studied. The γ-multiplicities and the first generation γ-ray spectra indicate a structure change in deformed nuclei at about 6 MeV.

  16. Effect of nuclear spin on chemical reactions and internal molecular rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Sterna, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    Part I of this dissertation is a study of the magnetic isotope effect, and results are presented for the separation of /sup 13/C and /sup 12/C isotopes. Two models are included in the theoretical treatment of the effect. In the first model the spin states evolve quantum mechanically, and geminate recombination is calculated by numerically integrating the collision probability times the probability the radical pair is in a singlet state. In the second model the intersystem crossing is treated via first-order rate constants which are average values of the hyperfine couplings. Using these rate constants and hydrodynamic diffusion equations, an analytical solution, which accounts for all collisions, is obtained for the geminate recombination. The two reactions studied are photolysis of benzophenone and toluene and the photolytic decomposition of dibenzylketone (1,3-diphenyl-2-propanone). No magnetic isotope effect was observed in the benzophenone reaction. /sup 13/C enrichment was observed for the dibenzylketone reaction, and this enrichment was substantially enhanced at intermediate viscosities and low temperatures. Part II of this dissertation is a presentation of theory and results for the use of Zeeman spin-lattice relaxation as a probe of methyl group rotation in the solid state. Experimental results are presented for the time and angular dependences of rotational polarization, the methyl group magnetic moment, and methyl-methyl steric interactions. The compounds studied are 2,6-dimethylphenol, methyl iodide, 1,4,5,8-tetramethylanthracene, 1,4,5,8-tetramethylnaphthalene, 1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene, and 2,3-dimethylmaleicanhydride.

  17. Synthesis of an Isotopically Labeled Naphthalene Derivative That Supports a Long-Lived Nuclear Singlet State

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of an octa-alkoxy substituted isotopically labeled naphthalene derivative, shown to have excellent properties in singlet NMR experiments, is described. This highly substituted naphthalene system, which incorporates an adjacent 13C spin pair, is readily accessed from a commercially available 13C2-labeled building block via sequential thermal alkynyl- and arylcyclobutenone rearrangements. The synthetic route incorporates a simple desymmetrization approach leading to a small difference in the chemical shifts of the 13C spin pair, a design constraint crucial for accessing nuclear singlet order. PMID:25898076

  18. Coherent Population Trapping of a Single Nuclear Spin Under Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jamonneau, P; Hétet, G; Dréau, A; Roch, J-F; Jacques, V

    2016-01-29

    We demonstrate coherent population trapping of a single nuclear spin in a room-temperature solid. To this end, we exploit a three-level system with a Λ configuration in the microwave domain, which consists of nuclear spin states addressed through their hyperfine coupling to the electron spin of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect in diamond. Moreover, the Λ-scheme relaxation is externally controlled through incoherent optical pumping and separated in time from consecutive coherent microwave excitations. Such a scheme allows us (i) to monitor the sequential accumulation of population into the dark state and (ii) to reach a novel regime of coherent population trapping dynamics for which periodic arrays of dark resonances can be observed, owing to multiple constructive interferences. This Letter offers new prospects for quantum state preparation, information storage in hybrid quantum systems, and metrology. PMID:26871331

  19. A Search for Nonstandard Neutron Spin Interactions using Dual Species Xenon Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James; Fu, Changbo; Yan, Haiyang; Smith, Erick; Snow, Mike; Walker, Thad

    2012-06-01

    NMR measurements using polarized noble gases can constrain possible exotic spin-dependent interactions involving nucleons. A differential measurement insensitive to magnetic field fluctuations can be performed using a mixture of two polarized species with different ratios of nucleon spin to magnetic moment. We used the NMR cell test station at Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) (developed to evaluate dual species xenon vapor cells for the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope) to search for NMR frequency shifts of xenon-129 and xenon-131 when a non-magnetic zirconia rod is modulated near the NMR cell. We simultaneously excited both Xe isotopes and detected free-induction-decay transients. In combination with theoretical calculations of the neutron spin contribution to the nuclear angular momentum, the measurements put a new upper bound on possible monopole-dipole interactions of the neutron for ranges around 1mm. This work is supported by the NGC Internal Research and Development (IRAD) funding, the Department of Energy, and the NSF.

  20. Coherent transfer of nuclear spin polarization in field-cycling NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2013-12-28

    Coherent polarization transfer effects in a coupled spin network have been studied over a wide field range. The transfer mechanism is based on exciting zero-quantum coherences between the nuclear spin states by means of non-adiabatic field jump from high to low magnetic field. Subsequent evolution of these coherences enables conversion of spin order in the system, which is monitored after field jump back to high field. Such processes are most efficient when the spin system passes through an avoided level crossing during the field variation. The polarization transfer effects have been demonstrated for N-acetyl histidine, which has five scalar coupled protons; the initial spin order has been prepared by applying RF-pulses at high magnetic field. The observed oscillatory transfer kinetics is taken as a clear indication of a coherent mechanism; level crossing effects have also been demonstrated. The experimental data are in very good agreement with the theoretical model of coherent polarization transfer. The method suggested is also valid for other types of initial polarization in the spin system, most notably, for spin hyperpolarization.

  1. Coherent transfer of nuclear spin polarization in field-cycling NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L

    2013-12-28

    Coherent polarization transfer effects in a coupled spin network have been studied over a wide field range. The transfer mechanism is based on exciting zero-quantum coherences between the nuclear spin states by means of non-adiabatic field jump from high to low magnetic field. Subsequent evolution of these coherences enables conversion of spin order in the system, which is monitored after field jump back to high field. Such processes are most efficient when the spin system passes through an avoided level crossing during the field variation. The polarization transfer effects have been demonstrated for N-acetyl histidine, which has five scalar coupled protons; the initial spin order has been prepared by applying RF-pulses at high magnetic field. The observed oscillatory transfer kinetics is taken as a clear indication of a coherent mechanism; level crossing effects have also been demonstrated. The experimental data are in very good agreement with the theoretical model of coherent polarization transfer. The method suggested is also valid for other types of initial polarization in the spin system, most notably, for spin hyperpolarization. PMID:24387362

  2. 13C solid-state NMR chemical shift anisotropy analysis of the anomeric carbon in carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Ying; Luo, Shun-Yuan; Hung, Shang-Cheng; Chan, Sunney I; Tzou, Der-Lii M

    2005-03-21

    (13)C NMR solid-state structural analysis of the anomeric center in carbohydrates was performed on six monosaccharides: glucose (Glc), mannose (Man), galactose (Gal), galactosamine hydrochloride (GalN), glucosamine hydrochloride (GlcN), and N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc). In the 1D (13)C cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) spectrum, the anomeric center C-1 of these carbohydrates revealed two well resolved resonances shifted by 3-5ppm, which were readily assigned to the anomeric alpha and beta forms. From this experiment, we also extracted the (13)C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor elements of the two forms from their spinning sideband intensities, respectively. It was found out that the chemical shift tensor for the alpha anomer was more axially symmetrical than that of the beta form. A strong linear correlation was obtained when the ratio of the axial asymmetry of the (13)C chemical shift tensors of the two anomeric forms was plotted in a semilogarithmic plot against the relative population of the two anomers. Finally, we applied REDOR spectroscopy to discern whether or not there were any differences in the sugar ring conformation between the anomers. Identical two-bond distances of 2.57A (2.48A) were deduced for both the alpha and beta forms in GlcNAc (GlcN), suggesting that the two anomers have essentially identical sugar ring scaffolds in these sugars. In light of these REDOR distance measurements and the strong correlation observed between the ratio of the axial asymmetry parameters of the (13)C chemical shift tensors and the relative population between the two anomeric forms, we concluded that the anomeric effect arises principally from interaction of the electron charge clouds between the C-1-O-5 and the C-1-O-1 bonds in these monosaccharides.

  3. Reanalysis of nuclear spin matrix elements for dark matter spin-dependent scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannoni, M.

    2013-04-01

    We show how to include in the existing calculations for nuclei other than Xe129 and Xe131 the corrections to the isovector coupling arising in chiral effective field theory recently found in Menendez et al. [Phys. Rev. D 86, 103511 (2012)PRVDAQ1550-7998]. The dominant, momentum-independent, two-body current effect can be taken into account by formally redefining the static spin matrix elements ⟨Sp,n⟩. By further using the normalized form factor at q≠0 built with the one-body level structure functions, we show that the weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP)-nucleus cross section and the upper limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross sections coincide with the ones derived by using the exact functions at the two-body level. We explicitly show it in the case of XENON100 limits on the WIMP-neutron cross section, and we recalculate the limits on the WIMP-proton spin-dependent cross section set by COUPP. We also give practical formulas to obtain ⟨Sp,n⟩ given the structure functions in the various formalisms and notations existing in the literature. We argue that the standard treatment of the spin-dependent cross section in terms of three independent isospin functions, S00(q), S11(q), and S01(q), is redundant in the sense that the interference function S01(q) is the double product |S01(q)|=2S00(q)S11(q) even when including the new effective field theory corrections.

  4. Nuclear orientation of radon isotopes by spin-exchange optical pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano, M.; Calaprice, F.P.; Pitt, M.L.; Clayhold, J.; Happer, W.; Kadar-Kallen, M.; Musolf, M.; Ulm, G.; Wendt, K.; Chupp, T.

    1988-05-23

    This paper reports the first demonstration of nuclear orientation of radon atoms. The method employed was spin exchange with potassium atoms polarized by optical pumping. The radon isotopes were produced at the ISOLDE isotope separator of CERN. The nuclear alignment of /sup 209/Rn and /sup 223/Rn has been measured by observation of ..gamma..-ray anisotropies and the magnetic dipole moment for /sup 209/Rn has been measured by the nuclear-magnetic-resonance method to be chemically bond..mu..chemically bond = 0.838 81(39)..mu../sub N/.

  5. 13C solid-state NMR analysis of heterogeneous structure of beeswax in native state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2005-12-01

    I investigated the molecular structure of natural wax from Japanese bees (Apis cerana japonica) in its native state (neither purified nor recrystallized) by 13C and 1H solid-state NMR. Two strong 13C peaks at 32.9 and 34.0 ppm were attributed to signals from internal-chain methylene carbons [int-(CH2)] in two types of crystal form. The peak at 32.9 ppm was assigned to an orthorhombic crystal form, and that at 34.0 ppm was assigned to a triclinic or monoclinic form. In both crystalline regions, bi-exponential decay of 13C spin-lattice relaxation [T1(C)] for the crystalline peaks due to chain diffusion was observed. 1H spin-lattice relaxation [T1(H)] values for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the crystalline and amorphous regions were identical; this was interpreted as being due to averaging of the T1(H) relaxation rates via spin diffusion. In contrast, although the T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) decay curves for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the amorphous and orthorhombic forms were almost identical, those of the triclinic or monoclinic forms were different. This unhomogeneous character of T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) was interpreted as resulting from differences in the molecular composition of each crystal form. Moreover, two components with long and short 1H spin-spin relaxation [T2(H)] values, arising from the mobile and rigid phases, respectively, were observed at above about -30 °C.

  6. Synthesis of D-[U-{sup 13}C]Glucal, D-[U-{sup 13}C] Galactal, and L-[U-{sup 13}C]Fucose for NMR structure studies of oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.; Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III

    1996-12-31

    The role of carbohydrates is well recognized in a variety of important biological phenomena such as cell surface recognition. Recent advances in carbohydrate chemistry, including the development of solid phase synthesis methods, have helped to provide significant quantities of material by offering general protocols for synthesis of well-defined, pure material. However, the study of the solution structure of oligosaccharides by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been hampered by the lack of enriched {sup 13}C material. In an effort to help alleviate this situation, we have been interested in the construction of the title compounds from a single economical carbon source, D-[U-{sup 13}C]glucose. Details of the syntheses will be provided.

  7. An overview of methods using 13C for improved compound identification in metabolomics and natural products

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Stupp, Gregory S.; Ajredini, Ramadan; Lee-McMullen, Brittany; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    Compound identification is a major bottleneck in metabolomics studies. In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations, resonance overlap often hinders unambiguous database matching or de novo compound identification. In liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), discriminating between biological signals and background artifacts and reliable determination of molecular formulae are not always straightforward. We have designed and implemented several NMR and LC-MS approaches that utilize 13C, either enriched or at natural abundance, in metabolomics applications. For LC-MS applications, we describe a technique called isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA), which utilizes samples that are isotopically labeled with 5% (test) and 95% (control) 13C. This labeling strategy leads to characteristic isotopic patterns that allow the differentiation of biological signals from artifacts and yield the exact number of carbons, significantly reducing possible molecular formulae. The relative abundance between the test and control samples for every IROA feature can be determined simply by integrating the peaks that arise from the 5 and 95% channels. For NMR applications, we describe two 13C-based approaches. For samples at natural abundance, we have developed a workflow to obtain 13C–13C and 13C–1H statistical correlations using 1D 13C and 1H NMR spectra. For samples that can be isotopically labeled, we describe another NMR approach to obtain direct 13C–13C spectroscopic correlations. These methods both provide extensive information about the carbon framework of compounds in the mixture for either database matching or de novo compound identification. We also discuss strategies in which 13C NMR can be used to identify unknown compounds from IROA experiments. By combining technologies with the same samples, we can identify important biomarkers and corresponding metabolites of interest. PMID:26379677

  8. The Fate of Oral Glucosamine Traced by 13C Labeling in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, George R.; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Noyszewski, Elizabeth A.; Hall, Jeffery O.; Sharma, Akella V.; Callaway, D. Allen; Reddy, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Objective: It has remained ambiguous as to whether oral dosing of glucosamine (GlcN) would make its way to the joint and affect changes in the cartilage, particularly the integrity of cartilage and chondrocyte function. The objective of this study was to trace the fate of orally dosed GlcN and determine definitively if GlcN was incorporated into cartilage proteoglycans. Design: Two dogs were treated with 13C-GlcN-HCl by oral dosing (500 mg/dog/d for 2 weeks and 250 mg/dog/d for 3 weeks). Cartilage was harvested from the tibial plateau and femoral condyles along with tissue specimens from the liver, spleen, heart, kidney, skin, skeletal muscle, lung, and costal cartilage. Percentages of 13C and 13C-GlcN present in each tissue sample were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Results: In the case of dog 1 (2-week treatment), there was an increase of 2.3% of 13C present in the articular cartilage compared to the control and an increase of 1.6% of 13C in dog 2 compared to control. As to be expected, the highest percentage of 13C in the other tissues tested was found in the liver, and the remaining tissues had percentages of 13C less than that of articular cartilage. Conclusion: The results are definitive and for the first time provide conclusive evidence that orally given GlcN can make its way through the digestive tract and be used by chondrocytes in joint cartilage, thereby potentially having an effect on the available GlcN for proteoglycan biosynthesis. PMID:26069586

  9. Spin Noise Detection of Nuclear Hyperpolarization at 1.2 K.

    PubMed

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Bornet, Aurélien; Bechmann, Matthias; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami; Müller, Norbert

    2015-12-21

    We report proton spin noise spectra of a hyperpolarized solid sample of commonly used "DNP (dynamic nuclear polarization) juice" containing TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxide) and irradiated by a microwave field at a temperature of 1.2 K in a magnetic field of 6.7 T. The line shapes of the spin noise power spectra are sensitive to the variation of the microwave irradiation frequency and change from dip to bump, when the electron Larmor frequency is crossed, which is shown to be in good accordance with theory by simulations. Small but significant deviations from these predictions are observed, which can be related to spin noise and radiation damping phenomena that have been reported in thermally polarized systems. The non-linear dependence of the spin noise integral on nuclear polarization provides a means to monitor hyperpolarization semi-quantitatively without any perturbation of the spin system by radio frequency irradiation. PMID:26477605

  10. Advances and applications of dynamic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Baltisberger, J.H.

    1993-06-01

    This dissertation describes nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and theory which have been developed to study quadrupolar nuclei (those nuclei with spin greater than one-half) in the solid state. Primarily, the technique of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, the improvement in both the resolution (two-dimensional pure-absorptive phase methods and DAS angle choice) and sensitivity (pulse-sequence development), along with effective spinning speed enhancement (again through choice of DAS conditions or alternative multiple pulse schemes) of dynamic-angle spinning experiment was realized with both theory and experimental examples. The application of DAS to new types of nuclei (specifically the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 85}Rb nuclear spins) and materials (specifically amorphous solids) has also greatly expanded the possibilities of the use of DAS to study a larger range of materials. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate both recent advances and applications of the DAS technique, and by no means represents a comprehensive study of any particular chemical problem.

  11. Spin Noise Detection of Nuclear Hyperpolarization at 1.2 K

    PubMed Central

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Bornet, Aurélien; Bechmann, Matthias; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami; Müller, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    We report proton spin noise spectra of a hyperpolarized solid sample of commonly used “DNP (dynamic nuclear polarization) juice” containing TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxide) and irradiated by a microwave field at a temperature of 1.2 K in a magnetic field of 6.7 T. The line shapes of the spin noise power spectra are sensitive to the variation of the microwave irradiation frequency and change from dip to bump, when the electron Larmor frequency is crossed, which is shown to be in good accordance with theory by simulations. Small but significant deviations from these predictions are observed, which can be related to spin noise and radiation damping phenomena that have been reported in thermally polarized systems. The non-linear dependence of the spin noise integral on nuclear polarization provides a means to monitor hyperpolarization semi-quantitatively without any perturbation of the spin system by radio frequency irradiation. PMID:26477605

  12. Natural reference for nuclear high-spin states

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, Neil; Ollier, James; Simpson, John

    2009-08-15

    We suggest two new representations of the data on rotational nuclei. The first is reference-free and the second arises from a natural reference related to the variable moment of inertia model parameters of the ground-state band of the system. As such, neither representation contains any free parameters. By defining a 'configuration spin' we show how a new ground-state band reference can be applied. Its use allows a complete description of the changes associated with the first, and higher, band crossings. We apply these new representations to discuss the nature of the first band crossing along even-even isotopic chains in the erbium and osmium isotopes and to odd-even nuclei in the vicinity of {sup 158}Er.

  13. Spin-orbit decomposition of ab initio nuclear wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Calvin W.

    2015-03-01

    Although the modern shell-model picture of atomic nuclei is built from single-particle orbits with good total angular momentum j , leading to j -j coupling, decades ago phenomenological models suggested that a simpler picture for 0 p -shell nuclides can be realized via coupling of the total spin S and total orbital angular momentum L . I revisit this idea with large-basis, no-core shell-model calculations using modern ab initio two-body interactions and dissect the resulting wave functions into their component L - and S -components. Remarkably, there is broad agreement with calculations using the phenomenological Cohen-Kurath forces, despite a gap of nearly 50 years and six orders of magnitude in basis dimensions. I suggest that L -S decomposition may be a useful tool for analyzing ab initio wave functions of light nuclei, for example, in the case of rotational bands.

  14. Nuclear Spin Relaxation and Molecular Interactions of a Novel Triazolium-Based Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Jesse J; Schneider, Yanika; Kail, Brian W; Luebke, David R; Nulwala, Hunaid; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2013-04-11

    Nuclear spin relaxation, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques are used to determine supramolecular arrangement of 3-methyl-1-octyl-4-phenyl-1H-triazol-1,2,3-ium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [OMPhTz][Tf{sub 2}N], an example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid. The results obtained showed first-order thermodynamic dependence for nuclear spin relaxation of the anion. First-order relaxation dependence is interpreted as through-bond dipolar relaxation. Greater than first-order dependence was found in the aliphatic protons, aromatic carbons (including nearest neighbors), and carbons at the end of the aliphatic tail. Greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of spin relaxation rates is interpreted as relaxation resulting from at least one mechanism additional to through-bond dipolar relaxation. In rigid portions of the cation, an additional spin relaxation mechanism is attributed to anisotropic effects, while greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of the octyl side chain’s spin relaxation rates is attributed to cation–cation interactions. Little interaction between the anion and the cation was observed by spin relaxation studies or by ESI-MS. No extended supramolecular structure was observed in this study, which was further supported by MS and SAXS. nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) factors are used in conjunction with spin–lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1}) measurements to calculate rotational correlation times for C–H bonds (the time it takes for the vector represented by the bond between the two atoms to rotate by one radian). The rotational correlation times are used to represent segmental reorientation dynamics of the cation. A combination of techniques is used to determine the segmental interactions and dynamics of this example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid.

  15. Atomic-scale nuclear spin imaging using quantum-assisted sensors in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajoy, Ashok; Bissbort, Ulf; Liu, Yixiang; Marseglia, Luca; Saha, Kasturi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in materials fabrication and coherent control have brought quantum magnetometers based on electronic spin defects in diamond close to single nuclear spin sensitivity. These quantum sensors have the potential to be a revolutionary tool in proteomics, thus helping drug discovery: They can overcome some of the challenges plaguing other experimental techniques (x-ray and NMR) and allow single protein reconstruction in their natural conditions. While the sensitivity of diamond-based magnetometers approaches the single nuclear spin level, the outstanding challenge is to resolve contributions arising from distinct nuclear spins in a dense sample and use the acquired signal to reconstruct their positions. This talk describes a strategy to boost the spatial resolution of NV-based magnetic resonance imaging, by combining the use of a quantum memory intrinsic to the NV system with Hamiltonian engineering by coherent quantum control. The proposed strategy promises to make diamond-based quantum sensors an invaluable technology for bioimaging, as they could achieve the reconstruction of biomolecules local structure without the need to crystallize them, to synthesize large ensembles or to alter their natural environment.

  16. Angstrom-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Single Molecules via Wave-Function Fingerprints of Nuclear Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wen-Long; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2016-08-01

    Single-molecule sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and angstrom resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the highest challenges in magnetic microscopy. Recent development in dynamical-decoupling- (DD) enhanced diamond quantum sensing has enabled single-nucleus NMR and nanoscale NMR. Similar to conventional NMR and MRI, current DD-based quantum sensing utilizes the "frequency fingerprints" of target nuclear spins. The frequency fingerprints by their nature cannot resolve different nuclear spins that have the same noise frequency or differentiate different types of correlations in nuclear-spin clusters, which limit the resolution of single-molecule MRI. Here we show that this limitation can be overcome by using "wave-function fingerprints" of target nuclear spins, which is much more sensitive than the frequency fingerprints to the weak hyperfine interaction between the targets and a sensor under resonant DD control. We demonstrate a scheme of angstrom-resolution MRI that is capable of counting and individually localizing single nuclear spins of the same frequency and characterizing the correlations in nuclear-spin clusters. A nitrogen-vacancy-center spin sensor near a diamond surface, provided that the coherence time is improved by surface engineering in the near future, may be employed to determine with angstrom resolution the positions and conformation of single molecules that are isotope labeled. The scheme in this work offers an approach to breaking the resolution limit set by the "frequency gradients" in conventional MRI and to reaching the angstrom-scale resolution.

  17. New method to study spin conversion of a nuclear-spin rotor with low tunnel splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandemaele, Greta; Coppens, Paul; van Gerven, Lieven

    1986-03-01

    A new method is developed to measure the spin conversion time τcon in low-tunnel-frequency systems. The experiment uses field cycling and consists of three steps: saturation of the tunnel reservoir by Zeeman-tunnel resonance; waiting, away from resonance, during a variable time interval tw; and measurement of the decreased tunnel temperature TT, by use of a saturated Zeeman reservoir. A plot of TT vs tw yields τcon. τcon of CH3 rotors in copper acetate is measured at 15, 12.5, and 6 K and turns out to be extremely long, at least 20T1. This discrepancy is discussed and compared with the one found in lithium acetate.

  18. Few-second-long correlation times in a quantum dot nuclear spin bath probed by frequency-comb nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeber, A. M.; Hopkinson, M.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Nilsson, J.; Stevenson, R. M.; Bennett, A. J.; Shields, A. J.; Burkard, G.; Tartakovskii, A. I.; Skolnick, M. S.; Chekhovich, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    One of the key challenges in spectroscopy is the inhomogeneous broadening that masks the homogeneous spectral lineshape and the underlying coherent dynamics. Techniques such as four-wave mixing and spectral hole-burning are used in optical spectroscopy, and spin-echo in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the high-power pulses used in spin-echo and other sequences often create spurious dynamics obscuring the subtle spin correlations important for quantum technologies. Here we develop NMR techniques to probe the correlation times of the fluctuations in a nuclear spin bath of individual quantum dots, using frequency-comb excitation, allowing for the homogeneous NMR lineshapes to be measured without high-power pulses. We find nuclear spin correlation times exceeding one second in self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots--four orders of magnitude longer than in strain-free III-V semiconductors. This observed freezing of the nuclear spin fluctuations suggests ways of designing quantum dot spin qubits with a well-understood, highly stable nuclear spin bath.

  19. Investigation of a new model of dipolar-coupled nuclear spin relaxation and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorte, Eric G.

    This work presents the results of various investigations using various techniques of hyperpolarizing the nuclei of atoms. Hyperpolarization implies magnetic order in excess of the thermal order obtained naturally as described by Curie's law. The main portion of this work presents the results of a detailed experimental exploration of predictions arising from a new model of transverse nuclear spin relaxation in quantum systems, based on possible manifestations of microscopic chaos in quantum systems. Experiments have been carried out on a number of hyperpolarized xenon samples, each differing in its relative percentage of xenon isotopes in order to vary the homonuclear and heteronuclear dipole couplings in the spin system. The experiments were performed under a variety of conditions in an attempt to observe the behaviors predicted by the model. Additionally, much more extensive measurements were made on a number of samples of solid CaF2 in both single crystal and powder forms. These samples, although thermally polarized, were observed with superior signal to noise ratios than even the hyperpolarized xenon solids, allowing for more precise measurements for comparison to the theory. This work thus contains the first experimental evidence for the majority of the model's predictions. Additionally, this work contains the first precise measurements of the frequency-shift enhancement parameters for 129Xe and krypton in the presence of spin-polarized Rb. The determination of these important numbers will be useful to many groups who utilize spin-exchange optical pumping in their labs. This work built on the prior knowledge of a precise number for the frequency-shift enhancement parameter of 3He in Rb vapor. Finally, I detail work using NMR to detect nuclear-spin polarization enhancement in silicon phosphorus by a novel, photo-induced hyperpolarization technique developed by the Boehme research group at the University of Utah. Significant nuclear polarization enhancements were

  20. Solid-state 13C NMR study of banana liquid crystals - 3: Alkyl-tail-group packing environments of an acute-angle bent-core molecule in the hexagonal columnar and cubic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosu, Hiromichi; Endo, Yumi; Kimura, Saori; Hashimoto, Tomoko; Harada, Motoi; Lee, Eun-Woo; Sone, Masato; Watanabe, Junji; Kang, Sungmin

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements were performed on the hexagonal columnar and cubic phases of an acute-angle banana-shaped molecule, N(1,7)-S30. In the hexagonal columnar phase, three peaks appear at the NMR chemical shifts assigned to the internal methylene carbons of alkyl tails, indicating that the two alkyl tails have different packing structures, and one of the tails has two different conformations within a single molecule. Combined cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning and pulse saturation transfer/magic-angle spinning measurements show that one of the alkyl chains is located inside and the other is located outside the columnar structure. In the cubic phase, pulse saturation transfer/magic-angle spinning measurement shows that only one peak appears at the NMR chemical shifts assigned to the internal methylene carbons of alkyl tails, indicating that both of the alkyl chains are located outside the cubic structure.

  1. Double-quantum homonuclear rotary resonance: Efficient dipolar recovery in magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, N. C.; Bildsøe, H.; Jakobsen, H. J.; Levitt, M. H.

    1994-08-01

    We describe an efficient method for the recovery of homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions in magic-angle spinning NMR. Double-quantum homonuclear rotary resonance (2Q-HORROR) is established by fulfilling the condition ωr=2ω1, where ωr is the sample rotation frequency and ω1 is the nutation frequency around an applied resonant radio frequency (rf) field. This resonance can be used for double-quantum filtering and measurement of homonuclear dipolar interactions in the presence of magic-angle spinning. The spin dynamics depend only weakly on crystallite orientation allowing good performance for powder samples. Chemical shift effects are suppressed to zeroth order. The method is demonstrated for singly and doubly 13C labeled L-alanine.

  2. Study of Urban environmental quality through Isotopes δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Sosa, E.; Mastachi-Loza, C.; Becerril-Piña, R.; Ramos-Salinas, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    Usually, trees with similar pH values on their bark develop epiphytes of similar species, the acidity to be a factor for growth. The aim of the study was evaluate the air quality through isotope δ13C in order to define the levels of environmental quality in the city of Queretaro, Mexico. In this work were collected at least 4 epiphytes positioned in trees of the species Prosopis Laevigata at 25 sites of Queretaro City. The samples were analyzed for trace elements with an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP). The collecting took place during dry period, in May and early rain June 2011 period, and on four sectors to identify the spatial distribution of pollution, using isotopic analysis of concentration of δ 13C. According with the results there are significant differences among the species in each of the sampled areas. The 5 February Avenue presented greater diversity and richness of δ13C, followed by those who were surveyed in the proximity of the UAQ and finally in the middle-east area. An average value of δ13C-17.92%, followed by those surveyed in the vicinity of the UAQ that correspond to sector I and II with an concentration of δ13C-17.55% and δ13C-17.22%, and finally the samples collected in trees scattered in the East-Sector II and IV with a value of δ13C-17.02% and δ13C-15.62%, respectively. Also were observed differences between the dry and wet period. It is likely that these results of δ 13C in moist period reflect the drag of the isotopes due to rain events that could mark a trend in the dilution of this element, however there is a trend in terms of abundance and composition of finding more impact in those species sampled in dry period, in May and early June 2011.

  3. High-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-10-01

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure rotor loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve by abrading the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other removable plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal loss of pressure for 72 h. Finally, as an application example, in situ13C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacted with supercritical CO2 and H2O at 150 bar and 50 °C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  4. High resolution 13C-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a deuterated protein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Comellas, Gemma; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution 13C-detected solid-state NMR spectra of the deuterated beta-1 immunoglobulin binding domain of the protein G (GB1) have been collected to show that all 15N, 13C′, 13Cα and 13Cβ sites are resolved in 13C–13C and 15N–13C spectra, with significant improvement in T2 relaxation times and resolution at high magnetic field (750 MHz). The comparison of echo T2 values between deuterated and protonated GB1 at various spinning rates and under different decoupling schemes indicates that 13Cα T2′ times increase by almost a factor of two upon deuteration at all spinning rates and under moderate decoupling strength, and thus the deuteration enables application of scalar-based correlation experiments that are challenging from the standpoint of transverse relaxation, with moderate proton decoupling. Additionally, deuteration in large proteins is a useful strategy to selectively detect polar residues that are often important for protein function and protein–protein interactions. PMID:20803233

  5. Probing the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot via full counting statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Nie, Yi-Hang; Chen, Jingzhe; Ren, Wei

    2015-03-15

    We study theoretically the full counting statistics of electron transport through a quantum dot weakly coupled to two ferromagnetic leads, in which an effective nuclear-spin magnetic field originating from the configuration of nuclear spins is considered. We demonstrate that the quantum coherence between the two singly-occupied eigenstates and the spin polarization of two ferromagnetic leads play an important role in the formation of super-Poissonian noise. In particular, the orientation and magnitude of the effective field have a significant influence on the variations of the values of high-order cumulants, and the variations of the skewness and kurtosis values are more sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective field than the shot noise. Thus, the high-order cumulants of transport current can be used to qualitatively extract information on the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot. - Highlights: • The effective nuclear-spin magnetic field gives rise to the off-diagonal elements of the reduced density matrix of single QD. • The off-diagonal elements of reduced density matrix of the QD have a significant impact on the high-order current cumulants. • The high-order current cumulants are sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field. • The FCS can be used to detect the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single QD.

  6. New formulation of Magnetization Equation for Flowing Nuclear Spin under NMR/MRI Excitation(I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Dilip; Emetere, Moses; Omotosho, Victor

    2015-03-01

    We have obtained for the first time from the Bloch NMR equations the correct dependence of the single component of magnetization, My and Mz at resonance (NMR/MRI) on relaxation times, rf B1 field (pulsed or continuous), blood(nuclear spin) flow velocity, etc. in the rotating frame of reference. The equations are applicable for both CW and pulsed NMR experiments with or without flow of spins. Our approaches can be extended easily to include gradient fields and diffusion of spins, if needed in NMR/MRI experiments. We also discuss the application of our equations to a specific case of MR excitation scheme: Free induction decay. The first time new equations of single component of MR magnetization and further equations that can be derived with the methodologies used here, can be applied towards accurate simulation of MR images/signals and extraction of parameters of clinical importance through comparison of the measured and the simulated images/signals.

  7. QUANTUM SIMULATION. Localization-delocalization transition in the dynamics of dipolar-coupled nuclear spins.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A; Suter, Dieter; Kaiser, Robin

    2015-08-21

    Nonequilibrium dynamics of many-body systems are important in many scientific fields. Here, we report the experimental observation of a phase transition of the quantum coherent dynamics of a three-dimensional many-spin system with dipolar interactions. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on a solid-state system of spins at room-temperature, we quench the interaction Hamiltonian to drive the evolution of the system. Depending on the quench strength, we then observe either localized or extended dynamics of the system coherence. We extract the critical exponents for the localized cluster size of correlated spins and diffusion coefficient around the phase transition separating the localized from the delocalized dynamical regime. These results show that NMR techniques are well suited to studying the nonequilibrium dynamics of complex many-body systems. PMID:26293957

  8. Detection of inflammatory cell function using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy of hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine

    PubMed Central

    Najac, Chloé; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Kohanbash, Gary; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Okada, Hideho; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are highly prevalent inflammatory cells that play a key role in tumor development and are considered therapeutic targets. MDSCs promote tumor growth by blocking T-cell-mediated anti-tumoral immune response through depletion of arginine that is essential for T-cell proliferation. To deplete arginine, MDSCs express high levels of arginase, which catalyzes the breakdown of arginine into urea and ornithine. Here, we developed a new hyperpolarized 13C probe, [6-13C]-arginine, to image arginase activity. We show that [6-13C]-arginine can be hyperpolarized, and hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production from [6-13C]-arginine is linearly correlated with arginase concentration in vitro. Furthermore we show that we can detect a statistically significant increase in hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production in MDSCs when compared to control bone marrow cells. This increase was associated with an increase in intracellular arginase concentration detected using a spectrophotometric assay. Hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine could therefore serve to image tumoral MDSC function and more broadly M2-like macrophages. PMID:27507680

  9. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  10. Structure of B sub 13 C sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bylander, D.M.; Kleinman, L. )

    1991-01-15

    By comparing calculated lattice constants with x-ray data as well as by comparison of calculated free energies, we find that the correct structure of B{sub 13}C{sub 2} is B{sub 12}(CBC) rather than B{sub 11}C(BBC), as had been suggested. We also show that B{sub 12}C{sub 3} is stable against 13B{sub 12}C{sub 3}{r arrow}12B{sub 13}C{sub 2}+15C as is B{sub 13}C{sub 2} against 3B{sub 13}C{sub 2}{r arrow}2B{sub 12}C{sub 3}+15B.

  11. Anomalous 13C enrichment in modern marine organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Claypool, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Marine organic carbon is heavier isotopically (13C enriched) than most land-plant or terrestrial organic C1. Accordingly, ??13C values of organic C in modern marine sediments are routinely interpreted in terms of the relative proportions of marine and terrestrial sources of the preserved organic matter2,3. When independent geochemical techniques are used to evaluate the source of organic matter in Cretaceous or older rocks, those rocks containing mostly marine organic C are found typically to have lighter (more-negative) ??13C values than rocks containing mostly terrestrial organic C. Here we conclude that marine photosynthesis in mid-Cretaceous and earlier oceans generally resulted in a greater fractionation of C isotopes and produced organic C having lighter ??13C values. Modern marine photosynthesis may be occurring under unusual geological conditions (higher oceanic primary production rates, lower PCO2) that limit dissolved CO2 availability and minimize carbon isotope fractionation4. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  12. Dihydroflavanonols from Cedrus deodara, A (13)C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, P K; Agarwal, S K; Rastogi, R P; Osterdahal, B G

    1981-09-01

    High resolution (13)C NMR study of taxifolin, cedeodarin, cedrin and their methyl ethers allowed unambiguous placement of the Me in 5,7-dihydroxyflavanonol nucleus, besides providing other valuable information on the substitution pattern in the molecule.

  13. Anisotropic nuclear spin interactions for the morphology analysis of proteins in solution by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tate, Shin-Ichi

    2008-01-01

    Determining the relative orientation of domains within a protein is an important problem in structural biology, which has been difficult to address by either X-ray crystallography or NMR. The structure of a multidomain protein in a crystal lattice can be altered by crystal packing forces, resulting in different domain arrangements from those in solution. On the other hand, conventional NMR primarily provides short-range structural information, including proton-proton distances derived from nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) and torsion angles through vicinal spin couplings. Thus, NMR cannot always determine the precise interdomain arrangements due to the sparsely observed spin interactions between domains. However, the weak alignment of proteins in solution has enabled a new NMR technique to determine the domain arrangement based on the different structural information, which defines the orientation of a structural unit in protein against the magnetic field. This technique relies on the anisotropic nuclear spin interactions that only occur for a molecule in a weakly aligned state. In this review, the basics of the new NMR approach are described with focusing on its application to domain orientation analysis. We also describe our recently established NMR approach using the same spin interactions, which expands the domain arrangement analysis to higher-molecular weight proteins over 100 kDa.

  14. Nuclear-driven electron spin rotations in a coupled silicon quantum dot and single donor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Jacobson, Noah Tobias; Rudolph, Martin; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Wendt, Joel R.; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael P.; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    Single donors in silicon are very good qubits. However, a central challenge is to couple them to one another. To achieve this, many proposals rely on using a nearby quantum dot (QD) to mediate an interaction. In this work, we demonstrate the coherent coupling of electron spins between a single 31P donor and an enriched 28Si metal-oxide-semiconductor few-electron QD. We show that the electron-nuclear spin interaction can drive coherent rotations between singlet and triplet electron spin states. Moreover, we are able to tune electrically the exchange interaction between the QD and donor electrons. The combination of single-nucleus-driven rotations and voltage-tunable exchange provides all elements for future all-electrical control of a spin qubit, and requires only a single dot and no additional magnetic field gradients. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. 1H nuclear spin relaxation of liquid water from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Calero, C; Martí, J; Guàrdia, E

    2015-02-01

    We have investigated the nuclear spin relaxation properties of (1)H in liquid water with the help of molecular dynamics simulations. We have computed the (1)H nuclear spin relaxation times T1 and T2 and determined the contribution of the different interactions to the relaxation at different temperatures and for different classical water models (SPC/E, TIP3P, TIP4P, and TIP4P/2005). Among the water models considered, the TIP4P/2005 model exhibits the best agreement with the experiment. The same analysis was performed with Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of bulk water at T = 330 K, which provided results close to the experimental values at room temperature. To complete the study, we have successfully accounted for the temperature-dependence of T1 and T2 in terms of a simplified model, which considers the reorientation in finite angle jumps and the diffusive translation of water molecules.

  16. Analysis of Hydroperoxides in Solid Polyethylene by MAS (13)C NMR and EPR

    SciTech Connect

    ASSINK,ROGER A.; CELINA,MATHIAS C.; DUNBAR,TIMOTHY D.; ALAM,TODD M.; CLOUGH,ROGER LEE; GILLEN,KENNETH T.

    1999-11-19

    {sup 13}C-enriched polyethylene was subjected to {gamma}-irradiation in the presence of air at 25 and 80 C for total doses ranging from 71 to 355 kGy. Significant quantities of hydroperoxides were detected in the 25 C irradiated sample by {sup 13}C magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. This method of detection was performed on the solid polymer and required no chemical derivatization or addition of solvent. The chemical stability and subsequent products of the hydroperoxide species were studied by annealing the irradiated samples in air at temperatures ranging from 22 to 110 C. A time-temperature superposition analysis provided an activation energy of 108 kJ/mol for the hydroperoxide decomposition process. The primary products of hydroperoxide decomposition were ketones and secondary alcohols with lesser amounts of acids and esters. EPR measurements suggest that the reactive hydroperoxide species reside in the amorphous phase of polyethylene, consistent with degradation occurring in the amorphous phase.

  17. 13C NMR spectroscopy of the insoluble carbon of carbonaceous chondrites.

    PubMed

    Cronin, J R; Pizzarello, S; Frye, J S

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectra have been obtained of the insoluble carbon residues resulting from HF-digestion of three carbonaceous chondrites, Orgueil (C1), Murchison (CM2), and Allende (CV3). Spectra obtained using the cross polarization magic-angle spinning technique show two major features attributable respectively to carbon in aliphatic/olefinic structures. The spectrum obtained from the Allende sample was weak, presumably as a consequence of its low hydrogen content. Single pulse excitation spectra, which do not depend on 1H-13C polarization transfer for signal enhancement were also obtained. These spectra, which may be more representative of the total carbon in the meteorite samples, indicate a greater content of carbon in aromatic/olefinic structures. These results suggest that extensive polycyclic aromatic sheets are important structural features of the insoluble carbon of all three meteorites. The Orgueil and Murchison materials contain additional hydrogenated aromatic/olefinic and aliphatic groups.

  18. 13C NMR spectroscopy of the insoluble carbon of carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Frye, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectra have been obtained of the insoluble carbon residues resulting from HF-digestion of three carbonaceous chondrites, Orgueil (C1), Murchison (CM2), and Allende (CV3). Spectra obtained using the cross polarization magic-angle spinning technique show two major features attributable respectively to carbon in aliphatic/olefinic structures. The spectrum obtained from the Allende sample was weak, presumably as a consequence of its low hydrogen content. Single pulse excitation spectra, which do not depend on 1H-13C polarization transfer for signal enhancement were also obtained. These spectra, which may be more representative of the total carbon in the meteorite samples, indicate a greater content of carbon in aromatic/olefinic structures. These results suggest that extensive polycyclic aromatic sheets are important structural features of the insoluble carbon of all three meteorites. The Orgueil and Murchison materials contain additional hydrogenated aromatic/olefinic and aliphatic groups.

  19. Abundance anomaly of the 13C species of CCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, N.; Saruwatari, O.; Sakai, T.; Takano, S.; Yamamoto, S.

    2010-03-01

    Aims: We have observed the N = 1-0 lines of CCH and its 13C isotopic species toward a cold dark cloud, TMC-1 and a star-forming region, L1527, to investigate the 13C abundances and formation pathways of CCH. Methods: The observations have been carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Results: We have successfully detected the lines of 13CCH and C13CH toward the both sources and found a significant intensity difference between the two 13C isotopic species. The [C13CH] /[13CCH] abundance ratios are 1.6 ± 0.4 (3σ) and 1.6 ± 0.1 (3σ) for TMC-1 and L1527, respectively. The abundance difference between C13CH and 13CCH means that the two carbon atoms of CCH are not equivalent in the formation pathway. On the other hand, the [CCH]/[C13CH] and [CCH]/[13CCH] ratios are evaluated to be larger than 170 and 250 toward TMC-1, and to be larger than 80 and 135 toward L1527, respectively. Therefore, both of the 13C species are significantly diluted in comparison with the interstellar 12C/13C ratio of 60. The dilution is discussed in terms of a behavior of 13C in molecular clouds.

  20. Localized in vivo13C NMR spectroscopy of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Gruetter, Rolf; Adriany, Gregor; Choi, In-Young; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Lei, Hongxia; Öz, Gülin

    2006-01-01

    Localized 13C NMR spectroscopy provides a new investigative tool for studying cerebral metabolism. The application of 13C NMR spectroscopy to living intact humans and animals presents the investigator with a number of unique challenges. This review provides in the first part a tutorial insight into the ingredients required for achieving a successful implementation of localized 13C NMR spectroscopy. The difficulties in establishing 13C NMR are the need for decoupling of the one-bond 13C–1H heteronuclear J coupling, the large chemical shift range, the low sensitivity and the need for localization of the signals. The methodological consequences of these technical problems are discussed, particularly with respect to (a) RF front-end considerations, (b) localization methods, (c) the low sensitivity, and (d) quantification methods. Lastly, some achievements of in vivo localized 13C NMR spectroscopy of the brain are reviewed, such as: (a) the measurement of brain glutamine synthesis and the feasibility of quantifying glutamatergic action in the brain; (b) the demonstration of significant anaplerotic fluxes in the brain; (c) the demonstration of a highly regulated malate-aspartate shuttle in brain energy metabolism and isotope flux; (d) quantification of neuronal and glial energy metabolism; and (e) brain glycogen metabolism in hypoglycemia in rats and humans. We conclude that the unique and novel insights provided by 13C NMR spectroscopy have opened many new research areas that are likely to improve the understanding of brain carbohydrate metabolism in health and disease. PMID:14679498

  1. Discrimination of nuclear spin isomers exploiting the excited state dynamics of a quinodimethane derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Obaid, Rana; Kinzel, Daniel; Oppel, Markus González, Leticia

    2014-10-28

    Despite the concept of nuclear spin isomers (NSIs) exists since the early days of quantum mechanics, only few approaches have been suggested to separate different NSIs. Here, a method is proposed to discriminate different NSIs of a quinodimethane derivative using its electronic excited state dynamics. After electronic excitation by a laser field with femtosecond time duration, a difference in the behavior of several quantum mechanical operators can be observed. A pump-probe experimental approach for separating these different NSIs is then proposed.

  2. Humic acids as proxies for assessing different Mediterranean forest soils signatures using solid-state CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Regina M B O; Fernández-Getino, Ana P; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-06-01

    Humic acids (HAs) of four representative forest soils profiles from Central Spain (two with different vegetation - pine and oak - but same parent material - granitie, and two with same vegetation - holm oak - but different parent material - granite and limestone) were investigated by solid-state cross polarization with magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The objectives included the investigation of the impact of different forest properties on HA composition, assessing how the structural characteristics of the HA vary with soil depth, and evaluating the role of HA as surrogates for mapping the different forest soils signatures using structural data derived from (13)C NMR spectroscopy. On average, alkyl C is the dominant C constituent (38-48% of the total NMR peak area) in all HA samples, followed by aromatic (12-22%) and O-alkyl C (12-19%), and finally carboxyl C (7.0-10%). The NMR data also indicated that HA composition is likely to be differently affected by the soil physico-chemical properties and type of forest vegetation. The structural characteristics of the HA from soil under oak did not differ broadly downward in the profile, whereas soil HA under pine forest exhibits a somewhat higher recalcitrant nature as a consequence of a higher degree of decomposition. The soil HA from holm oak forests differed from the other two forest soils, exhibiting a progressive decomposition of the alkyl C structures with increasing depth, while the carbohydrate-like indicator (O-alkyl C) is apparently being protected from mineralization in the horizons below the ground level. Overall, these differences in soil HA NMR signatures are an important diagnostic tool for understanding the role of different soil environmental factors on the structural composition of HA from Mediterranean forest soils. PMID:23332874

  3. Humic acids as proxies for assessing different Mediterranean forest soils signatures using solid-state CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Regina M B O; Fernández-Getino, Ana P; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-06-01

    Humic acids (HAs) of four representative forest soils profiles from Central Spain (two with different vegetation - pine and oak - but same parent material - granitie, and two with same vegetation - holm oak - but different parent material - granite and limestone) were investigated by solid-state cross polarization with magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The objectives included the investigation of the impact of different forest properties on HA composition, assessing how the structural characteristics of the HA vary with soil depth, and evaluating the role of HA as surrogates for mapping the different forest soils signatures using structural data derived from (13)C NMR spectroscopy. On average, alkyl C is the dominant C constituent (38-48% of the total NMR peak area) in all HA samples, followed by aromatic (12-22%) and O-alkyl C (12-19%), and finally carboxyl C (7.0-10%). The NMR data also indicated that HA composition is likely to be differently affected by the soil physico-chemical properties and type of forest vegetation. The structural characteristics of the HA from soil under oak did not differ broadly downward in the profile, whereas soil HA under pine forest exhibits a somewhat higher recalcitrant nature as a consequence of a higher degree of decomposition. The soil HA from holm oak forests differed from the other two forest soils, exhibiting a progressive decomposition of the alkyl C structures with increasing depth, while the carbohydrate-like indicator (O-alkyl C) is apparently being protected from mineralization in the horizons below the ground level. Overall, these differences in soil HA NMR signatures are an important diagnostic tool for understanding the role of different soil environmental factors on the structural composition of HA from Mediterranean forest soils.

  4. Relativistic theory of nuclear spin-rotation tensor with kinetically balanced rotational London orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-10-01

    Both kinetically balanced (KB) and kinetically unbalanced (KU) rotational London orbitals (RLO) are proposed to resolve the slow basis set convergence in relativistic calculations of nuclear spin-rotation (NSR) coupling tensors of molecules containing heavy elements [Y. Xiao and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134104 (2013)]. While they perform rather similarly, the KB-RLO Ansatz is clearly preferred as it ensures the correct nonrelativistic limit even with a finite basis. Moreover, it gives rise to the same "direct relativistic mapping" between nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and NSR coupling tensors as that without using the London orbitals [Y. Xiao, Y. Zhang, and W. Liu, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 600 (2014)].

  5. Relativistic theory of nuclear spin-rotation tensor with kinetically balanced rotational London orbitals.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yunlong; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-10-28

    Both kinetically balanced (KB) and kinetically unbalanced (KU) rotational London orbitals (RLO) are proposed to resolve the slow basis set convergence in relativistic calculations of nuclear spin-rotation (NSR) coupling tensors of molecules containing heavy elements [Y. Xiao and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134104 (2013)]. While they perform rather similarly, the KB-RLO Ansatz is clearly preferred as it ensures the correct nonrelativistic limit even with a finite basis. Moreover, it gives rise to the same "direct relativistic mapping" between nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and NSR coupling tensors as that without using the London orbitals [Y. Xiao, Y. Zhang, and W. Liu, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 600 (2014)].

  6. Quantitative 13C NMR of whole and fractionated Iowa Mollisols for assessment of organic matter composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaowen; Chua, Teresita; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Thompson, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Both the concentrations and the stocks of soil organic carbon vary across the landscape. Do the amounts of recalcitrant components of soil organic matter (SOM) vary with landscape position? To address this question, we studied four Mollisols in central Iowa, two developed in till and two developed in loess. Two of the soils were well drained and two were poorly drained. We collected surface-horizon samples and studied organic matter in the particulate organic matter (POM) fraction, the clay fractions, and the whole, unfractionated samples. We treated the soil samples with 5 M HF at ambient temperature or at 60 °C for 30 min to concentrate the SOM. To assess the composition of the SOM, we used solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in particular, quantitative 13C DP/MAS (direct-polarization/magic-angle spinning), with and without recoupled dipolar dephasing. Spin counting by correlation of the integral NMR intensity with the C concentration by elemental analysis showed that NMR was ⩾85% quantitative for the majority of the samples studied. For untreated whole-soil samples with <2.5 wt.% C, which is considerably less than in most previous quantitative NMR analyses of SOM, useful spectra that reflected ⩾65% of all C were obtained. The NMR analyses allowed us to conclude (1) that the HF treatment (with or without heat) had low impact on the organic C composition in the samples, except for protonating carboxylate anions to carboxylic acids, (2) that most organic C was observable by NMR even in untreated soil materials, (3) that esters were likely to compose only a minor fraction of SOM in these Mollisols, and (4) that the aromatic components of SOM were enriched to ˜53% in the poorly drained soils, compared with ˜48% in the well drained soils; in plant tissue and particulate organic matter (POM) the aromaticities were ˜18% and ˜32%, respectively. Nonpolar, nonprotonated aromatic C, interpreted as a proxy for charcoal C, dominated the

  7. Diffusion-mediated nuclear spin phase decoherence in cylindrically porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Michael J.; Kauppinen, Risto A.

    2016-08-01

    In NMR or MRI of complex materials, including biological tissues and porous materials, magnetic susceptibility differences within the material result in local magnetic field inhomogeneities, even if the applied magnetic field is homogeneous. Mobile nuclear spins move though the inhomogeneous field, by translational diffusion and other mechanisms, resulting in decoherence of nuclear spin phase more rapidly than transverse relaxation alone. The objective of this paper is to simulate this diffusion-mediated decoherence and demonstrate that it may substantially reduce coherence lifetimes of nuclear spin phase, in an anisotropic fashion. We do so using a model of cylindrical pores within an otherwise homogeneous material, and calculate the resulting magnetic field inhomogeneities. Our simulations show that diffusion-mediated decoherence in a system of parallel cylindrical pores is anisotropic, with coherence lifetime minimised when the array of cylindrical pores is perpendicular to B0. We also show that this anisotropy of coherence lifetime is reduced if the orientations of cylindrical pores are disordered within the system. In addition we characterise the dependence on B0, the magnetic susceptibility of the cylindrical pores relative to the surroundings, the diffusion coefficient and cylinder wall thickness. Our findings may aid in the interpretation of NMR and MRI relaxation data.

  8. Quantum cognition: The possibility of processing with nuclear spins in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2015-11-01

    The possibility that quantum processing with nuclear spins might be operative in the brain is explored. Phosphorus is identified as the unique biological element with a nuclear spin that can serve as a qubit for such putative quantum processing-a neural qubit-while the phosphate ion is the only possible qubit-transporter. We identify the "Posner molecule", Ca9(PO4)6, as the unique molecule that can protect the neural qubits on very long times and thereby serve as a (working) quantum-memory. A central requirement for quantum-processing is quantum entanglement. It is argued that the enzyme catalyzed chemical reaction which breaks a pyrophosphate ion into two phosphate ions can quantum entangle pairs of qubits. Posner molecules, formed by binding such phosphate pairs with extracellular calcium ions, will inherit the nuclear spin entanglement. A mechanism for transporting Posner molecules into presynaptic neurons during vesicle endocytosis is proposed. Quantum measurements can occur when a pair of Posner molecules chemically bind and subsequently melt, releasing a shower of intra-cellular calcium ions that can trigger further neurotransmitter release and enhance the probability of post-synaptic neuron firing. Multiple entangled Posner molecules, triggering non-local quantum correlations of neuron firing rates, would provide the key mechanism for neural quantum processing. Implications, both in vitro and in vivo, are briefly mentioned.

  9. Characterization of high-tannin fractions from humus by carbon-13 cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Klaus; Preston, Caroline M

    2002-01-01

    Condensed tannins can be found in various parts of many plants. Unlike lignin there has been little study of their fate as they enter the soil organic matter pool and their influence on nutrient cycling, especially through their protein-binding properties. We extracted and characterized tannin-rich fractions from humus collected in 1998 from a black spruce [Picea mariana (Mill.) Britton et al.] forest in Canada where a previous study (1995) showed high levels (3.8% by weight) of condensed tannins. A reference tannin purified from black spruce needles was characterized by solution 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a pure procyanidin with mainly cis stereochemistry and an average chain length of four to five units. The colorimetric proanthocyanidin (PA) assay, standardized against the black spruce tannin, showed that both extracted humus fractions had higher tannin contents than the original humus (2.84% and 11.17% vs. 0.08%), and accounted for 32% of humus tannin content. Consistent with the results from the chemical assay, the aqueous fraction showed higher tannin signals in the 13C cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectrum than the emulsified one. As both tannin-rich humus fractions were depleted in N and high in structures derived from lignin and cutin, they did not have properties consistent with recaldtrant tannin-protein complexes proposed as a mechanism for N sequestration in humus. Further studies are needed to establish if tannin-protein structures in humus can be detected or isolated, or if tannins contribute to forest management problems observed in these ecosystems by binding to and slowing down the activity of soil enzymes.

  10. Dodecahedranes and the significance of nuclear spin statistics for substructures under SU (m)↓SO(3) × 20 duality, within the specialised Racah symmetry chains for NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temme, F. P.

    1992-12-01

    Realisation of the invariance properties of the p ⩽ 2 number partitional inventory components of the 20-fold spin algebra associated with [A] 20 nuclear spin clusters under SU2 × L20 allows the mappings {[λ] → Γ} to be derived. In addition, recent general inner tensor product expressions under Ln, for n even (odd), also facilitates the evaluation of many higher [λ] ( L20; p = 3) correlative mappings onto SU3↓SO(3) × L↓20T  A 5 subduced symmetry from SU2 duality, thus providing results that determine the nature of adapted NMR bases for both dodecahedrane and its d 20 analogue. The significance of this work lies in the pertinence of nuclear spin statistics to both selective MQ-NMR and to other spectroscopic aspects of cage clusters, e.g., [ 13C] n, n = 20, 60, fullerenes. Mappings onto Ln irreps sets of specific p ⩽ 3 number partitions arise in combinatorial treatment of {M iti} Rota fields, defining scalar invariants in the context of Cayley algebra. Inclusion of the Ln group in the specific Racah chain for NMR symmetry gives rise to significant further physical insight.

  11. A NEW METHOD FOR EXTRACTING SPIN-DEPENDENT NEUTRON STRUCTURE FUNCTIONS FROM NUCLEAR DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Y.F.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2009-01-01

    High-energy electrons are currently the best probes of the internal structure of nucleons (protons and neutrons). By collecting data on electrons scattering off light nuclei, such as deuterium and helium, one can extract structure functions (SFs), which encode information about the quarks that make up the nucleon. Spin-dependent SFs, which depend on the relative polarization of the electron beam and the target nucleus, encode quark spins. Proton SFs can be measured directly from electron-proton scattering, but those of the neutron must be extracted from proton data and deuterium or helium-3 data because free neutron targets do not exist. At present, there is no reliable method for accurately determining spin-dependent neutron SFs in the low-momentum-transfer regime, where nucleon resonances are prominent and the functions are not smooth. The focus of this study was to develop a new method for extracting spin-dependent neutron SFs from nuclear data. An approximate convolution formula for nuclear SFs reduces the problem to an integral equation, for which a recursive solution method was designed. The method was then applied to recent data from proton and deuterium scattering experiments to perform a preliminary extraction of spin-dependent neutron SFs in the resonance region. The extraction method was found to reliably converge for arbitrary test functions, and the validity of the extraction from data was verifi ed using a Bjorken integral, which relates integrals of SFs to a known quantity. This new information on neutron structure could be used to assess quark-hadron duality for the neutron, which requires detailed knowledge of SFs in all kinematic regimes.

  12. Characterization of Acetate and Pyruvate Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Zea mays by 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Dennis J.; Lee, Rino Y.; Adams, Douglas O.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been applied to the direct observation of acetate and pyruvate metabolism in suspension cultures of Zea mays (var Black Mexican Sweet). Growth of the corn cells in the presence of 2 millimolar [2-13C]acetate resulted in a rapid uptake of the substrate from the medium and initial labeling (0-4 hours) of primarily the intracellular glutamate and malate pools. Further metabolism of these intermediates resulted in labeling of glutamine, aspartate, and alanine. With [1-13C]acetate as the substrate very little incorporation into intermediary metabolites was observed in the 13C NMR spectra due to loss of the label as 13CO2. Uptake of [3-13C]pyruvate by the cells was considerably slower than with [2-13C]acetate; however, the labelling patterns were similar with the exception of increased [3-13C] alanine generation with pyruvate as the substrate. Growth of the cells for up to 96 hours with 2 millimolar [3-13C]pyruvate ultimately resulted in labeling of valine, leucine, isoleucine, threonine, and the polyamine putrescine. PMID:16665721

  13. Nuclear-spin-induced cotton-mouton effect in a strong external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li-Juan; Vaara, Juha

    2014-08-01

    Novel, high-sensitivity and high-resolution spectroscopic methods can provide site-specific nuclear information by exploiting nuclear magneto-optic properties. We present a first-principles electronic structure formulation of the recently proposed nuclear-spin-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in a strong external magnetic field (NSCM-B). In NSCM-B, ellipticity is induced in a linearly polarized light beam, which can be attributed to both the dependence of the symmetric dynamic polarizability on the external magnetic field and the nuclear magnetic moment, as well as the temperature-dependent partial alignment of the molecules due to the magnetic fields. Quantum-chemical calculations of NSCM-B were conducted for a series of molecular liquids. The overall order of magnitude of the induced ellipticities is predicted to be 10(-11) -10(-6) rad T(-1)  M(-1)  cm(-1) for fully spin-polarized nuclei. In particular, liquid-state heavy-atom systems should be promising for experiments in the Voigt setup.

  14. A 13C-NMR study of azacryptand complexes.

    PubMed

    Wild, Aljoscha A C; Fennell, Kevin; Morgan, Grace G; Hewage, Chandralal M; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2014-09-28

    An azacryptand has been solubilised in aqueous media containing 50% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide. (13)C-NMR has been used to determine how the azacryptand is affected by zinc binding at pH 10. Using (13)C-NMR and (13)C-enriched bicarbonate we have been able to observe the formation of 4 different carbamate derivatives of the azacryptand at pH 10. The azacryptand was shown to solubilise zinc or cadmium at alkaline pHs. Two moles of zinc are bound per mole of azacryptand and this complex binds 1 mole of carbonate. By replacing the zinc with cadmium-113 we have shown that the (13)C-NMR signal of the (13)C-enriched carbon of the bound carbonate is split into two triplets at 2.2 °C. This shows that two cadmium complexes are formed and in each of these complexes the carbonate group is bound by two magnetically equivalent metal ions. It also demonstrates that these cadmium complexes are not in fast exchange. From temperature studies we show that in the zinc complexes both complexes are in fast exchange with each other but are in slow exchange with free bicarbonate. HOESY is used to determine the position of the carbonate carbon in the complex. The solution and crystal structures of the zinc-carbonate-azacryptand complexes are compared. PMID:25091182

  15. 13C-based metabolic flux analysis: fundamentals and practice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Isotope-based metabolic flux analysis is one of the emerging technologies applied to system level metabolic phenotype characterization in metabolic engineering. Among the developed approaches, (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis has been established as a standard tool and has been widely applied to quantitative pathway characterization of diverse biological systems. To implement (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in practice, comprehending the underlying mathematical and computational modeling fundamentals is of importance along with carefully conducted experiments and analytical measurements. Such knowledge is also crucial when designing (13)C-labeling experiments and properly acquiring key data sets essential for in vivo flux analysis implementation. In this regard, the modeling fundamentals of (13)C-labeling systems and analytical data processing are the main topics we will deal with in this chapter. Along with this, the relevant numerical optimization techniques are addressed to help implementation of the entire computational procedures aiming at (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in vivo.

  16. A scientific workflow framework for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Dalman, Tolga; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2016-08-20

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) with (13)C labeling data is a high-precision technique to quantify intracellular reaction rates (fluxes). One of the major challenges of (13)C MFA is the interactivity of the computational workflow according to which the fluxes are determined from the input data (metabolic network model, labeling data, and physiological rates). Here, the workflow assembly is inevitably determined by the scientist who has to consider interacting biological, experimental, and computational aspects. Decision-making is context dependent and requires expertise, rendering an automated evaluation process hardly possible. Here, we present a scientific workflow framework (SWF) for creating, executing, and controlling on demand (13)C MFA workflows. (13)C MFA-specific tools and libraries, such as the high-performance simulation toolbox 13CFLUX2, are wrapped as web services and thereby integrated into a service-oriented architecture. Besides workflow steering, the SWF features transparent provenance collection and enables full flexibility for ad hoc scripting solutions. To handle compute-intensive tasks, cloud computing is supported. We demonstrate how the challenges posed by (13)C MFA workflows can be solved with our approach on the basis of two proof-of-concept use cases.

  17. Synthesis and applications of {sup 13}C glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Stocking, E.; Khalsa, O.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-12-01

    Due in part to the use of labeled glycerol for the {sup 13}C enrichment of biomolecules, we are currently developing new synthetic routes to various isotopomers of glycerol. Judging from our experience, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment and/or have poor overall yields (12 to 15%). Furthermore, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability is limited by the level of demand. We are presently developing a short de novo synthesis of glycerol from carbon dioxide ({approximately}53% overall yield for four steps) and are examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific {sup 13}C-labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from labeled methanol and carbon dioxide. One application of {sup 13}C glycerol we have examined is enzymatic conversion of glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25 to 50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). We are also pursuing the chemical conversion of {sup 13}C-labeled DHA to DHAP. We are especially interested in {sup 13}C-labeled DHAP because we are investigating its use as a chemo-enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids.

  18. A scientific workflow framework for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Dalman, Tolga; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2016-08-20

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) with (13)C labeling data is a high-precision technique to quantify intracellular reaction rates (fluxes). One of the major challenges of (13)C MFA is the interactivity of the computational workflow according to which the fluxes are determined from the input data (metabolic network model, labeling data, and physiological rates). Here, the workflow assembly is inevitably determined by the scientist who has to consider interacting biological, experimental, and computational aspects. Decision-making is context dependent and requires expertise, rendering an automated evaluation process hardly possible. Here, we present a scientific workflow framework (SWF) for creating, executing, and controlling on demand (13)C MFA workflows. (13)C MFA-specific tools and libraries, such as the high-performance simulation toolbox 13CFLUX2, are wrapped as web services and thereby integrated into a service-oriented architecture. Besides workflow steering, the SWF features transparent provenance collection and enables full flexibility for ad hoc scripting solutions. To handle compute-intensive tasks, cloud computing is supported. We demonstrate how the challenges posed by (13)C MFA workflows can be solved with our approach on the basis of two proof-of-concept use cases. PMID:26721184

  19. 13C Tracking after 13CO2 Supply Revealed Diurnal Patterns of Wood Formation in Aspen.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, Amir; Linden, Pernilla; Hedenström, Mattias; Moritz, Thomas; Niittylä, Totte

    2015-06-01

    Wood of trees is formed from carbon assimilated in the photosynthetic tissues. Determining the temporal dynamics of carbon assimilation, subsequent transport into developing wood, and incorporation to cell walls would further our understanding of wood formation in particular and tree growth in general. To investigate these questions, we designed a (13)CO2 labeling system to study carbon transport and incorporation to developing wood of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides). Tracking of (13)C incorporation to wood over a time course using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed diurnal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis. The dark period had a differential effect on (13)C incorporation to lignin and cell wall carbohydrates. No (13)C was incorporated into aromatic amino acids of cell wall proteins in the dark, suggesting that cell wall protein biosynthesis ceased during the night. The results show previously unrecognized temporal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis, suggest diurnal cycle as a possible cue in the regulation of carbon incorporation to wood, and establish a unique (13)C labeling method for the analysis of wood formation and secondary growth in trees.

  20. 13C CP MAS NMR and GIAO-CHF calculations of coumarins.

    PubMed

    Zolek, Teresa; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wawer, Iwona

    2003-01-01

    13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning NMR spectra were recorded for a series of solid coumarins. Ab initio calculations of shielding constants were performed with the use of GIAO-CHF method. The combined CPMAS NMR and theoretical approach was successful in characterizing solid-state conformations of coumarins; a relationship sigma (ppm) = -1.032 xdelta + 205.28 (R(2) = 0.9845) can be used to obtain structural information for coumarins, for which solid-state NMR or crystal structure data are not available.

  1. I: Low Frequency NMR and NQR Using a dc SQUID. II: Variable-temperature 13C CP/MAS of Organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegeweid, M.A.

    1995-11-29

    NMR and NQR at low frequencies are difficult prospects due to small nuclear spin polarization. Furthermore, the sensitivity'of the inductive pickup circuitry of standard spectrometers is reduced as the frequency is lowered. I have used a cw-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) spectrometer, which has no such frequency dependence, to study the local atomic environment of {sup 14}N via the quadrupolar interaction. Because {sup 14}N has spin I = 1 and a 0-6 MHz frequency range, it is not possible to obtain well-resolved spectra in high magnetic fields. I have used a technique to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances via their effect on neighboring protons mediated by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to study peptides and narcotics. The sensitivity of the SQUID is not enough to measure low-frequency surface (or other low spin density) systems. The application of spin-polarized xenon has been previously used to enhance polarization in conventional NMR experiments. Because xenon only polarizes spins with which it is in contact, it is surface selective. While differences in chemical shifts between surface and bulk spins are not large, it is expected that the differences in quadrupole coupling constant should be very large due to the drastic change of the electric field gradient surrounding spins at the surface. With this in mind, I have taken preliminary steps to measure SQUID detected polarization transfer from Xe to another spin species at 4.2 K and in small magnetic fields (<50 G). In this regime, the spin-lattice relaxation of xenon is dependent on the applied magnetic field. The results of our efforts to characterize the relaxation of xenon are presented. The final section describes the solid-state variable-temperature (VT) one- and two-dimensional {sup 13}C cross polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of Hf({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, Zr({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3}({eta}{sup 1}-C

  2. Spectrally edited 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR spectra without diagonal ridge for characterizing 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Anderson, Jason M.; Shanks, Brent H.; Fang, Xiaowen; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Two robust combinations of spectral editing techniques with 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR have been developed for characterizing the aromatic components of 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials. One method (exchange with protonated and nonprotonated spectral editing, EXPANSE) selects cross peaks of protonated and nearby nonprotonated carbons, while the other technique, dipolar-dephased double-quantum/single-quantum (DQ/SQ) NMR, selects signals of bonded nonprotonated carbons. Both spectra are free of a diagonal ridge, which has many advantages: Cross peaks on the diagonal or of small intensity can be detected, and residual spinning sidebands or truncation artifacts associated with the diagonal ridge are avoided. In the DQ/SQ experiment, dipolar dephasing of the double-quantum coherence removes protonated-carbon signals; this approach also eliminates the need for high-power proton decoupling. The initial magnetization is generated with minimal fluctuation by combining direct polarization, cross polarization, and equilibration by 13C spin diffusion. The dipolar dephased DQ/SQ spectrum shows signals from all linkages between aromatic rings, including a distinctive peak from polycondensed aromatics. In EXPANSE NMR, signals of protonated carbons are selected in the first spectral dimension by short cross polarization combined with dipolar dephasing difference. This removes ambiguities of peak assignment to overlapping signals of nonprotonated and protonated aromatic carbons, e.g. near 125 ppm. Spin diffusion is enhanced by dipolar-assisted rotational resonance. Before detection, Csbnd H dipolar dephasing by gated decoupling is applied, which selects signals of nonprotonated carbons. Thus, only cross peaks due to magnetization originating from protonated C and ending on nearby nonprotonated C are retained. Combined with the chemical shifts deduced from the cross-peak position, this double spectral editing defines the bonding environment of aromatic, COO, and Cdbnd O carbons

  3. Analysis of states in {sup 13}C populated in {sup 9}Be + {sup 4}He resonant scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.; Curtis, N.; Kokalova, Tz.; Wheldon, C.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Scuderi, V.; Torresi, D.; Grassi, L.; Jelavic Malenica, D.; Koncul, M.; Mijatovic, T.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Szilner, S.; Tokic, V.; Milin, M.

    2011-09-15

    Measurements of {sup 9}Be + {alpha} resonant scattering have been performed using the thick-target approach with a {sup 4}He gas volume and a large-area silicon strip detector. {sup 9}Be beam energies in the range 12 to 21.4 MeV were used to measure the {sup 13}C excitation energy spectrum between 13.2 and 16.2 MeV. An R-matrix analysis has been performed to characterize the spins and widths of {sup 13}C resonances, some of which have been proposed to be associated with a 3{alpha}+n molecular band.

  4. An approximate analytical expression for the nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation rate of half-integer spins in liquids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation process of half-integer spins in liquid samples is known to exhibit multi-exponential behaviors. Within the framework of Redfield's relaxation theory, exact analytical expressions for describing such a process exist only for spin-3/2 nuclei. As a result, analyses of nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with spin >3/2 must rely on numerical diagonalization of the Redfield relaxation matrix over the entire motional range. In this work we propose an approximate analytical expression that can be used to analyze nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data of any half-integer spin in liquids over the entire motional range. The proposed equation yields results that are in excellent agreement with the exact numerical calculations. PMID:27343483

  5. A spinning thermometer to monitor microwave heating and glass transitions in dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Miéville, Pascal; Vitzthum, Veronika; Caporini, Marc A; Jannin, Sami; Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2011-11-01

    As previously demonstrated by Thurber and Tycko, the peak position of (79)Br in potassium bromide (KBr) allows one to determine the temperature of a spinning sample. We propose to adapt the original design by using a compact KBr tablet placed at the bottom of the magic angle spinning rotor, separated from the sample under investigation by a thin disk made of polytetrafluoroethylene (or 'Teflon'®). This design allows spinning the sample up to at least 16 kHz. The KBr tablet can remain in the rotor when changing the sample under investigation. Calibration in the range of 98 < T < 320 K has been carried out in a static rotor by inserting a platinum thermometer. The accuracy is better than ± 0.9 K, even in the presence of microwave irradiation. Irradiation with 5 W microwaves at 263 GHz leads to a small temperature increase of 3.6 ± 1.4 K in either static or spinning samples. The dynamic nuclear polarization enhancement decreases with increasing temperature, in particular when a frozen glassy sample undergoes a glass transition.

  6. Sensing of single nuclear spins in random thermal motion with proximate nitrogen-vacancy centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruderer, M.; Fernández-Acebal, P.; Aurich, R.; Plenio, M. B.

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have emerged as valuable tools for sensing and polarizing spins. Motivated by potential applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine, we show that NV-based sensors are capable of detecting single spin targets even if they undergo diffusive motion in an ambient thermal environment. Focusing on experimentally relevant diffusion regimes, we derive an effective model for the NV-target interaction, where parameters entering the model are obtained from numerical simulations of the target motion. The practicality of our approach is demonstrated by analyzing two realistic experimental scenarios: (i) time-resolved sensing of a fluorine nuclear spin bound to an N-heterocyclic carbene-ruthenium (NHC-Ru) catalyst that is immobilized on the diamond surface and (ii) detection of an electron spin label by an NV center in a nanodiamond, both attached to a vibrating chemokine receptor in thermal motion. We find in particular that the detachment of a fluorine target from the NHC-Ru carrier molecule can be monitored with a time resolution of a few seconds.

  7. {sup 13}C relaxation in an RNA hairpin

    SciTech Connect

    King, G.C. |; Akratos, C.; Xi, Z.; Michnica, M.J.

    1994-12-01

    This initial survey of {sup 13}C relaxation in the {triangle}TAR RNA element has generated a number of interesting results that should prove generally useful for future studies. The most readily comparable study in the literature monitored {sup 13}C relaxation of the methyl groups from unusual bases in tRNA{sup Phe}. The study, which used T{sub 1} and NOE data only, reported order parameters for the methyl group axis that ranged between 0.51 and 0.97-a range similar to that observed here. However, they reported a breakdown of the standard order parameter analysis at higher (118-MHz {sup 13}C) frequencies, which should serve to emphasize the need for a thorough exploration of suitable motional models.

  8. Impact of hadronic and nuclear corrections on global analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Accardi, Alberto; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2014-02-01

    We present the first results of a new global next-to-leading order analysis of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from the most recent world data on inclusive polarized deep-inelastic scattering, focusing in particular on the large-x and low-Q^2 regions. By directly fitting polarization asymmetries we eliminate biases introduced by using polarized structure function data extracted under nonuniform assumptions for the unpolarized structure functions. For analysis of the large-x data we implement nuclear smearing corrections for deuterium and 3He nuclei, and systematically include target mass and higher twist corrections to the g_1 and g_2 structure functions at low Q^2. We also explore the effects of Q^2 and W^2 cuts in the data sets, and the potential impact of future data on the behavior of the spin-dependent parton distributions at large x.

  9. Nuclear shell model calculations of the spin-dependent neutralino- nucleus cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ressell, M.T.; Aufderheide, M.B.; Bloom, S.D.; Mathews, G.J.; Resler, D.A. ); Griest, K. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-11-01

    We describe nuclear shell model calculations of the spin-dependent elastic cross sections of supersymmetric particles on several nuclei, including [sup 73]Ge and [sup 29]Si, which are being used in the construction of dark matter detectors. To check the accuracy of the wave functions we have calculated excited state energy spectra, magnetic moments, and spectroscopic factors for each of the nuclei. Our results differ significantly from previous estimates based upon the independent single particle shell model and the odd group model. These differences are especially evident if the naive quark model estimates of the quark contribution to nucleon spin are correct. We also discuss the modifications that occur when finite momentum transfer between the neutralino and nucleus is included.

  10. Spin disorder in maghemite nanoparticles investigated using polarized neutrons and nuclear resonant scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Herlitschke, Marcus; Disch, Sabrina; Sergueev, I.; Schlage, Kai; Wetterskog, Erik; Bergstrom, Lennart; Hermann, Raphael P.

    2016-01-01

    The manuscript reports the investigation of spin disorder in maghemite nanoparticles of different shape by a combination of polarized small-angle neutron scattering (SANSPOL) and nuclear forward scattering (NFS) techniques. Both methods are sensitive to magnetization on the nanoscale. SANSPOL allows for investigation of the particle morphology and spatial magnetization distribution and NFS extends this nanoscale information to the atomic scale, namely the orientation of the hyperfine field experienced by the iron nuclei. The studied nanospheres and nanocubes with diameters of 7.4nm and 10.6 nm, respectively, exhibit a significant spin disorder. This effect leads to a reduction of the magnetization to 44% and 58% of the theoretical maghemite bulk value, observed consistently by both techniques.

  11. Magic radio-frequency dressing of nuclear spins in high-accuracy optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Zanon-Willette, Thomas; de Clercq, Emeric; Arimondo, Ennio

    2012-11-30

    A Zeeman-insensitive optical clock atomic transition is engineered when nuclear spins are dressed by a nonresonant radio-frequency field. For fermionic species as (87)Sr, (171)Yb, and (199)Hg, particular ratios between the radio-frequency driving amplitude and frequency lead to "magic" magnetic values where a net cancelation of the Zeeman clock shift and a complete reduction of first-order magnetic variations are produced within a relative uncertainty below the 10(-18) level. An Autler-Townes continued fraction describing a semiclassical radio-frequency dressed spin is numerically computed and compared to an analytical quantum description including higher-order magnetic field corrections to the dressed energies.

  12. Effects of Barrier-Induced Nuclear Spin Magnetization Inhomogeneities on Diffusion-Attenuated MR Signal

    PubMed Central

    Sukstanskii, A.L.; Ackerman, J.J.H.; Yablonskiy, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the transverse nuclear spin magnetization, appearing in a single compartment with impermeable boundaries in a Stejskal-Tanner gradient pulse MR experiment, is analyzed in detail. At short diffusion times the presence of diffusion-restrictive barriers (membranes) reduces effective diffusivity near the membranes and leads to an inhomogeneous spin magnetization distribution (the edge-enhancement effect). In this case, the signal reveals a quasi-two-compartment behavior and can be empirically modeled remarkably well by a biexponential function. The current results provide a framework for interpreting experimental MR data on various phenoma, including water diffusion in giant axons, metabolite diffusion in the brain, and hyperpolarized gas diffusion in lung airways. PMID:14523959

  13. Magic radio-frequency dressing of nuclear spins in high-accuracy optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Zanon-Willette, Thomas; de Clercq, Emeric; Arimondo, Ennio

    2012-11-30

    A Zeeman-insensitive optical clock atomic transition is engineered when nuclear spins are dressed by a nonresonant radio-frequency field. For fermionic species as (87)Sr, (171)Yb, and (199)Hg, particular ratios between the radio-frequency driving amplitude and frequency lead to "magic" magnetic values where a net cancelation of the Zeeman clock shift and a complete reduction of first-order magnetic variations are produced within a relative uncertainty below the 10(-18) level. An Autler-Townes continued fraction describing a semiclassical radio-frequency dressed spin is numerically computed and compared to an analytical quantum description including higher-order magnetic field corrections to the dressed energies. PMID:23368116

  14. Self-consistent collective coordinate method in nuclear rotation and wobbling motion at high spin

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, K. )

    1994-06-01

    We propose a method, using the self-consistent collective coordinate method based on the time-dependent Hartree-Bogoliubov theory, to describe nuclear rotation and wobbling motion in triaxially deformed nuclei beyond the random-phase approximation to higher orders. In this perturbation method, the zero modes can be eliminated by imposing constraints to determine the intrinsic frame: a spin-orientation frame or a principal axis frame. The basic equations on the collective submanifold are derived as canonical conditions and equations of collective submanifold. These equations are solved by an iterative method expanded with collective variables. In lowest order, the basic equations in both the principal-axis frame and the spin-orientation frame lead to the same result as that derived by Marshalek.

  15. Nuclear Spin relaxation mediated by Fermi-edge electrons in n-type GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotur, M.; Dzhioev, R. I.; Kavokin, K. V.; Korenev, V. L.; Namozov, B. R.; Pak, P. E.; Kusrayev, Yu. G.

    2014-03-01

    A method based on the optical orientation technique was developed to measure the nuclear-spin lattice relaxation time T 1 in semiconductors. It was applied to bulk n-type GaAs, where T 1 was measured after switching off the optical excitation in magnetic fields from 400 to 1200 G at low (< 30 K) temperatures. The spin-lattice relaxation of nuclei in the studied sample with n D = 9 × 1016 cm-3 was found to be determined by hyperfine scattering of itinerant electrons (Korringa mechanism) which predicts invariability of T 1 with the change in magnetic field and linear dependence of the relaxation rate on temperature. This result extends the experimentally verified applicability of the Korringa relaxation law in degenerate semiconductors, previously studied in strong magnetic fields (several Tesla), to the moderate field range.

  16. Spin disorder in maghemite nanoparticles investigated using polarized neutrons and nuclear resonant scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Herlitschke, Marcus; Disch, Sabrina; Sergueev, I.; Schlage, Kai; Wetterskog, Erik; Bergstrom, Lennart; Hermann, Raphael P.

    2016-01-01

    The manuscript reports the investigation of spin disorder in maghemite nanoparticles of different shape by a combination of polarized small-angle neutron scattering (SANSPOL) and nuclear forward scattering (NFS) techniques. Both methods are sensitive to magnetization on the nanoscale. SANSPOL allows for investigation of the particle morphology and spatial magnetization distribution and NFS extends this nanoscale information to the atomic scale, namely the orientation of the hyperfine field experienced by the iron nuclei. The studied nanospheres and nanocubes with diameters of 7.4nm and 10.6 nm, respectively, exhibit a significant spin disorder. This effect leads to a reduction of the magnetization tomore » 44% and 58% of the theoretical maghemite bulk value, observed consistently by both techniques.« less

  17. Measuring doubly 13C-substituted ethane by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clog, M.; Ling, C.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is present in non-negligible amounts in most natural gas reservoirs and is used to produce ethylene for petrochemical industries. It is one of the by-products of lipid metabolism and is the arguably simplest molecule that can manifest multiple 13C substitutions. There are several plausible controls on the relative abundances of 13C2H6 in natural gases: thermodynamically controlled homogeneous isotope exchange reactions analogous to those behind carbonate clumped isotope thermometry; inheritance from larger biomolecules that under thermal degradation to produce natural gas; mixing of natural gases that differ markedly in bulk isotopic composition; or combinations of these and/or other, less expected fractionations. There is little basis for predicting which of these will dominate in natural samples. Here, we focus on an analytical techniques that will provide the avenue for exploring these phenomena. The method is based on high-resolution gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometry, using the Thermo 253-Ultra (a new prototype mass spectrometer). This instrument achieves the mass resolution (M/Δ M) up to 27,000, permitting separation of the isobaric interferences of potential contaminants and isotopologues of an analtye or its fragments which share a cardinal mass. We present techniques to analyze several isotopologues of molecular and fragment ions of C2H6. The critical isobaric separations for our purposes include: discrimination of 13C2H6 from 13C12CDH5 at mass 32 and separation of the 13CH3 fragment from 12CH4 at mass 16, both requiring at least a mass resolution of 20000 to make an adequate measurement. Other obvious interferences are either cleanly separated (e.g., O2, O) or accounted for by peak-stripping (CH3OH on mass 32 and NH2 on mass 16). We focus on a set of measurements which constrain: the doubly-substituted isotopologue, 13C2H6, and the 13CH3/12CH3 ratio of the methyl fragment, which constrains the bulk δ 13C. Similar methods can be

  18. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Byg, Inge; Damager, Iben; Diaz, Jerome; Engelsen, Søren B; Ulvskov, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by (13)C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by (2)H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose-galacturonic acid (Rha-GalA) backbone in RG-I. Potential food ingredient uses of RG-I by tailoring of its structure are discussed.

  19. Multi-scales nuclear spin relaxation of liquids in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korb, Jean-Pierre

    2010-03-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T(ω) is a rich source of dynamical information for characterizing the molecular dynamics of liquids in confined environments. Varying the magnetic field changes the Larmor frequency ω, and thus the fluctuations to which the nuclear spin relaxation is sensitive. Moreover, this method permits a more complete characterization of the dynamics than the usual measurements as a function of temperature at fixed magnetic field strength, because many common solvent liquids have phase transitions that may alter significantly the character of the dynamics over the temperature range usually studied. Further, the magnetic field dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T(ω), provides a good test of the theories that relate the measurement to the microdynamical behavior of the liquid. This is especially true in spatially confined systems where the effects of reduced dimensionality may force more frequent reencounters of the studied proton spin-bearing molecules with paramagnetic impurities at the pore surfaces that may alter the correlation functions that enter the relaxation equations in a fundamental way. We show by low field NMR relaxation that changing the amount of surface paramagnetic impurities leads to striking different pore-size dependences of the relaxation times T and T of liquids in pores. Here, we focus mainly on high surface area porous materials including calibrated porous silica glasses, granular packings, heterogeneous catalytic materials, cement-based materials and natural porous materials such as clay minerals and rocks. Recent highlights NMR relaxation works are reviewed for these porous materials, like continuous characterization of the evolving microstructure of various cementitious materials and measurement of wettability in reservoir carbonate rocks. Although, the recent applications of 2-dimensional T-T and T-z-store-T correlation experiments for characterization of

  20. Optimized [1-13C]glucose infusion protocol for 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 Tesla of human brain glucose metabolism under euglycemic and hypoglycemic conditions

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Kim C.C.; van der Graaf, Ma