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Sample records for 13c off-resonance rotating

  1. 13C-NMR off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation studies of bovine lens gamma-crystallin self association: effect of 'macromolecular crowding'.

    PubMed

    Stevens, A; Wang, S X; Caines, G H; Schleich, T

    1995-01-01

    The NMR technique of 13C off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation, which provides an accurate assessment of the effective rotational correlation time (tau 0, eff) for macromolecular rotational diffusion, was applied to the study of gamma-crystallin association as a function of protein concentration and temperature. Values of the effective rotational correlation time for gamma-crystallin rotational diffusion were obtained at moderate to high protein concentrations (80-350 mg/ml) and at temperatures above, and below, the cold cataract phase transition temperature. With increasing concentration gamma-crystallin was observed to increasingly associate as reflected by larger values of tau 0, eff Decreasing temperature in the range of 35 to 22 degrees C was found to result in no change in the temperature corrected value of tau 0, eff at a gamma-crystallin concentration of 80 mg/ml, whereas at temperatures of 18 degrees C or below, this parameter was approx. twofold larger, suggesting the occurrence of a well defined phase transition, which correlated well with the cold cataract phase transition temperature. At higher protein concentrations, by contrast, tau 0, eff (temperature corrected) was found to increase by approx. 1.6- to 2-times in the temperature interval 35 degrees C to 22 degrees C, a result consistent with the dependence of the cold cataract phase transition temperature on gamma-crystallin concentration. Analysis of intensity ratio dispersion curves, using an assumed model of isodesmic association, permitted the estimation of the association constant characterizing the aggregation under particular conditions of concentration and temperature. The significant increase in the value of the association constant with moderate increases in protein concentration was rationalized by invoking the effect of 'macromolecular crowding'. The results obtained in this study suggest that in the intact lens, where high protein concentrations prevail, gamma

  2. Off-Resonance Acoustic Levitation Without Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Orthogonal acoustic-levitation modes excited at slightly different frequencies to control rotation. Rotation of object in square cross-section acoustic-levitation chamber stopped by detuning two orthogonal (x and y) excitation drivers in plane of square cross section. Detuning done using fundamental degenerate modes or odd harmonic modes.

  3. 13C-1H dipolar-driven 13C-13C recoupling without 13C rf irradiation in nuclear magnetic resonance of rotating solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegoshi, K.; Nakamura, Shinji; Terao, Takehiko

    2003-02-01

    Two recently proposed 13C-13C recoupling methods under magic angle spinning (MAS), resonant interference recoupling (RIR), and 13C-1H dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR), are examined on a common theoretical foundation using the average Hamiltonian theory. In both methods, a rf field is applied on not 13C but 1H to recouple the 13C-1H dipolar interactions, and spectral overlap necessary to conserve energy for 13C-13C polarization transfer is achieved by the 13C-1H dipolar line broadening. While DARR employs time-independent 13C-1H interactions recoupled by suitable rf irradiation to 1H spins, RIR uses time-dependent 13C-1H interactions modulated appropriately by 1H rf irradiation. There are two distinct cases where 13C-1H line broadening realizes 13C-13C spectral overlap. For a pair of a carbonyl or aromatic carbon and an aliphatic carbon, spectral overlap can be achieved between one of the spinning sidebands of the former 13C resonance and the 13C-1H dipolar powder pattern of the latter. On the other hand for a pair of spins with a small chemical shift difference, the two center bands are overlapped with each other due to 13C-1H dipolar broadening. For the former, we show that both RIR and DARR occur in the first order, while for the latter, DARR recoupling is appreciable for time-independent 13C-1H interactions. We refer to the former DARR as the first-order DARR recoupling and the latter as the second-order DARR. Experimentally, we examined the following 13C-1H recoupling methods for DARR: 1H CW irradiation fulfilling a rotary-resonance condition or a modulatory-resonance condition, and 1H π pulses applied synchronously to MAS. For RIR, the FSLG-m2m¯m sequence is applied to 1H. Several one-dimensional DARR and RIR experiments were done for N-acetyl[1,2-13C, 15N] DL-valine, and [2,3-13C] L-alanine. It was found that the polarization transfer rate for RIR is larger than that for DARR except for fast spinning, while the rate for DARR is less sensitive to

  4. Deuterium off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation of macromolecular bound ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Rydzewski, J M; Schleich, T

    1996-01-01

    Deuterated 3-trimethylsilylpropionic acid binding to bovine serum albumin was used as a model system to examine the feasibility and limitations of using the deuterium off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation experiment for the study of equilibrium ligand-binding behavior to proteins. The results of this study demonstrate that the rotational-diffusion behavior of the bound species can be monitored directly, i.e., the observed correlation time of the ligand in the presence of a protein is approximately equal to the correlation time of the ligand in the bound state, provided that the fraction of bound ligand is at least 0.20. The presence of local ligand motion and/or chemical exchange contributions to relaxation in the bound state was inferred from the observation that the correlation time of the bound ligand was somewhat smaller than the correlation time characterizing the overall tumbling of the protein. An approximate value for the fraction of bound ligand was obtained from off-resonance relaxation experiments when supplemental spin-lattice or transverse relaxation times were employed in the analysis. Incorporation of local motion effects for the bound species into the theoretical relaxation formalism enabled the evaluation of an order parameter and an effective correlation time, which in conjunction with a wobbling in a cone model, provided additional information about ligand motion in the bound state. PMID:8785304

  5. Off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice NMR relaxation studies of phosphorus metabolite rotational diffusion in bovine lens homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Caines, G.H.; Schleich, T.; Morgan, C.F. ); Farnsworth, P.N. )

    1990-08-21

    The rotational diffusion behavior of phosphorus metabolites present in calf lens cortical and nuclear homogenates was investigated by the NMR technique of {sup 31}P off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation as a means of assessing the occurrence and extent of phosphorus metabolite-lens protein interactions. {sup 31}P NMR spectra of calf lens homogenates were obtained at 10 and 18{degree}C at 7.05 T. Effective rotational correlation times ({tau}{sub 0,eff}) for the major phosphorus metabolites present in cortical and nuclear bovine calf lens homogenates were derived from nonlinear least-squares analysis of R vs {omega}{sub e} data with the assumption of isotropic reorientational motion. Intramolecular dipole-dipole ({sup 1}H-{sup 31}P, {sup 31}P-{sup 31}P), chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), and solvent (water) translational intermolecular dipole-dipole ({sup 1}H-{sup 31}P) relaxation contributions were assumed in the analyses. A fast-exchange model between free and bound forms, was employed in the analysis of the metabolite R vs {omega}{sub e} curves to yield the fraction of free (unbound) metabolite ({Theta}{sub free}). The results of this study establish the occurrence of significant temperature-dependent (above and below the cold cataract phase transition temperature) binding of ATP (cortex) and PME (nucleus) and p{sub i} (nucleus) in calf lens.

  6. Microwave spectra for the three 13C1 isotopologues of propene and new rotational constants for propene and its 13C1 isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Groner, Peter; Conrad, Andrew R.; Gurusinghe, Ranil; Tubergen, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    New measurements of microwave lines (A and E) of propene and its three 13C1 isotopologues have been made in the 10-22 GHz region with FT accuracy. The revised lines for propene along with many hundreds from the literature were fitted with the ERHAM program for internal rotors to give improved rotational constants. The new constants are A0 = 46280.2904(16), B0 = 9305.24260(30), and C0 = 8134.22685(28) MHz. Lines for the 3-13C1 species were observed in a pure sample; lines for the 1-13C1 and 2-13C1 species were observed in natural abundance. In fitting the limited sets of lines for the 13C1 species, many of the centrifugal distortion constants and most of the tunneling parameters were transferred from the fit of propene itself with 27 parameters. Improved rotational constants for the 13C1 species are reported.

  7. The Rotational Spectrum of Singly and Doubly 13C-SUBSTITUTED Dimethylether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerber, Monika; Endres, Christian P.; Lewen, Frank; Giesen, Thomas F.; Schlemmer, Stephan; Pohl, Roland; Klein, Axel

    2010-06-01

    Dimethylether (DME) is a nearly prolate asymmetric top with two internal rotors (methyl groups) which undergo periodic large amplitude motions and show a complicated torsional splitting of each rotational energy level. Due to its complex spectrum and its high abundance in hot cores such as Orion KL or Sagittarius B2 at temperatures exceeding 100 K, DME is very prominent in astronomical line surveys and contributes to spectral line confusion of such sources. The interpretation of astronomical observations therefore depends on the knowledge of accurate rest frequencies and reliable intensities. Precise predictions for the ground state of DME's main isotopologue are now available up to 2.1 THz In contrast, very little is known about 13C-substituted DME. Only a few data are available on singly 13C-substituted DME, 12CH_3O13CH_3. However, no data are available on doubly 13C-substituted DME, (13CH_3)_2O, yet. While in (13CH_3)_2O the two internal rotating methyl groups are equivalent and the splitting of rotational energy levels into four substates is comparable to the main isotopologue, singly 13C-substituted DME has two non-equivalent internal rotors resulting in torsional splitting of rotational energy levels into five substates. The purpose of our new laboratory measurements is to extend the knowledge on the astrophysically relevant species 12CH_3O13CH_3. To analyze the complicated spectrum resulting from a 13C-enriched sample of DME, containing all different 13C-substituted species as well as the main isotopologue, also precise data on doubly 13C-substituted DME are inevitable. We performed measurements in the frequency region 35-120 GHz using an all solid state spectrometer. Rotational as well as torsional parameters have been obtained for (13CH_3)_2O as well as 12CH_3O13CH_3 by fitting the assigned transitions to an effective rotational Hamiltonian introduced by Peter Groner. C. Comito et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 156, 127-167 (2005) C. P. Endres et al

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Rotational spectrum of 13C methylamine (Motiyenko+,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motiyenko, R. A.; Margules, L.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Smirnov, I. A.; Alekseev, E. A.; Halfen, D. T.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Methylamine (CH3NH2) is a light molecule o interest, which has an intensive rotational spectrum that extends in the submillimeter wave range and far beyond, even at temperatures characteristic for the interstellar medium. It is likely for 13C isotopologue of methylamine to be identified in astronomical surveys, but there is no information available for the 13CH3NH2 millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra. In this context, to provide reliable predictions of 13CH3NH2 spectrum in millimeter and submillimeter wave ranges, we have studied rotational spectra of the 13C methylamine isotopologue in the frequency range from 48 to 945GHz. The spectrum of 13C methylamine was recorded using conventional absorption spectrometers in Lille and Kharkov. The analysis of the rotational spectrum of 13C methylamine in the ground vibrational state was performed on the basis of the group- theoretical high-barrier tunneling Hamiltonian that was developed for methylamine by Ohashi and Hougen. The available multiple observations of the parent methylamine species toward Sgr B2(N) at 1, 2, and 3mm using the Submillimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory were used to make a search for interstellar 13CH3NH2. In the recorded spectra, we have assigned 2721 rotational transitions that belong to the ground vibrational state of the 13CH3NH2. These measurements were fitted to the Hamiltonian model that uses 75 parameters to achieve an overall weighted rms deviation of 0.73. On the basis of these spectroscopic results, predictions of transition frequencies in the frequency range up to 950GHz with J<50 and Ka<20 are presented. The search for interstellar 13C methylamine in available observational data was not successful and therefore only an upper limit of 6.5x1014cm-2 can be derived for the column density of 13CH3NH2 toward Sgr B2(N), assuming the same source size, temperature, linewidth, and systemic velocity as for parent methylamine isotopic species. (2 data files).

  9. High-resolution FTIR analysis and rotational constants for the ν12 band of ethylene-1-13C (13C12CH4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabona, M. G.; Tan, T. L.; Woo, J. Q.

    2014-11-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectrum of the ν12 fundamental band of ethylene-1-13C (or 13C12CH4) was recorded in the frequency range of 1350-1510 cm-1 with an unapodized resolution of 0.0063 cm-1. The upper state (ν12 = 1) and ground state rotational constants derived in the present analysis cover a wide wavenumber range and high J and Ka (J = 41 and Ka = 14). By assigning and fitting 1602 infrared transitions using Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation, upper state (ν12 = 1) constants consisting of three rotational, five quartic and two sextic constants were more accurately determined. The root-mean-square deviation of the fit was 0.00030 cm-1. Ground state rotational constants were also improved from the fit of 808 ground state combination differences (GSCDs) with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.00032 cm-1. The unperturbed A-type ν12 band is centered at 1439.34612(2) cm-1. The inertial defect Δ of 0.05381(8) μÅ2 for the ground state has been derived using the ground state rotational constants obtained from this work.

  10. Tungsten monocarbide, WC: pure rotational spectrum and 13C hyperfine interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Steimle, Timothy C

    2012-01-28

    The J = 1→2 pure rotational transitions in the X(3)Δ(1)(ν = 0) state of (186)W(12)C and (184)W(12)C were recorded using a pump/probe microwave optical double resonance (PPMODR) technique and analyzed to give fine structure parameters. The field-free [17.6]2←X(3)Δ(1) (1, 0) bands of the W(13)C isotopologues were recorded using laser induced fluorescence and analyzed to produce the (13)C(I = 1/2) magnetic hyperfine parameter. Bonding in the [17.6]2(ν = 1) and X(3)Δ(1)(ν = 0) states is discussed and a comparison of the experimentally determined properties of the X(3)Δ(1)(ν = 0) state with those predicted as a prelude to the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) measurements [J. Lee, E. R. Meyer, R. Paudel, J. L. Bohn, and A. E. Leanhardt, J. Mod. Opt. 56, 2005 (2009)] is given.

  11. Tungsten monocarbide, WC: Pure rotational spectrum and 13C hyperfine interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Steimle, Timothy C.

    2012-01-01

    The J = 1 → 2 pure rotational transitions in the X3Δ1(v = 0) state of 186W12C and 184W12C were recorded using a pump/probe microwave optical double resonance (PPMODR) technique and analyzed to give fine structure parameters. The field-free [17.6]2← X3Δ1 (1, 0) bands of the W13C isotopologues were recorded using laser induced fluorescence and analyzed to produce the 13C(I = 1/2) magnetic hyperfine parameter. Bonding in the [17.6]2(v = 1) and X3Δ1(v = 0) states is discussed and a comparison of the experimentally determined properties of the X3Δ1(v = 0) state with those predicted as a prelude to the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) measurements [J. Lee, E. R. Meyer, R. Paudel, J. L. Bohn, and A. E. Leanhardt, J. Mod. Opt. 56, 2005 (2009), 10.1080/09500340903349930] is given.

  12. Combined off-resonance imaging and T2 relaxation in the rotating frame for positive contrast MR imaging of infection in a murine burn model

    PubMed Central

    Andronesi, Ovidiu C.; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Righi, Valeria; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Kesarwani, Meenu; He, Jianxin; Yasuhara, Shingo; Dai, George; Rahme, Laurence G.; Tzika, Aria A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop novel magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods to monitor accumulation of macrophages in inflammation and infection. Positive-contrast MR imaging provides an alternative to negative-contrast MRI, exploiting the chemical shift induced by ultra-small superparamagnetic iron-oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles to nearby water molecules. We introduce a novel combination of off-resonance (ORI) positive-contrast MRI and T2ρ relaxation in the rotating frame (ORI-T2ρ) for positive-contrast MR imaging of USPIO. Materials and Methods We tested ORI-T2ρ in phantoms and imaged in vivo the accumulation of USPIO-labeled macrophages at the infection site in a mouse model of burn trauma and infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). PA infection is clinically important. The USPIO nanoparticles were injected directly in the animals in solution, and macrophage labeling occurred in vivo in the animal model. Results We observed a significant difference between ORI-T2ρ and ORI, which leads us to suggest that ORI-T2ρ is more sensitive in detecting USPIO signal. To this end, the ORI-T2ρ positive contrast method may prove to be of higher utility in future research. Conclusion Our results may have direct implications in the longitudinal monitoring of infection, and open perspectives for testing novel anti-infective compounds. PMID:21031524

  13. High-J Rotational Lines of 13C Isotopologues of HCO^+ Measured by Using Evenson-Type Tunable FIR Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mari; Oishi, Ryo; Moriwaki, Yoshiki; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Amano, Takayoshi

    2015-06-01

    Frequencies of high-J rotational lines of HCO^+ and its isotopologues have been measured precisely by using an Evenson-type spectrometer in Toyama. The tunable far-infrared spectrometer (TuFIR in short) is based on synthesizing terahertz radiation from two mid-infrared CO_2 laser lines and one microwave source. Study of the isotopologues containing H or D, 12C, and 16O were reported last year. In the present work, isotopologues of H or D, 13C, and 16O have been studied. The HCO^+ ions are produced by discharging a 13CO, H_2 (or D_2), and Ar mixture in an extended negative glow discharge cell cooled with liquid nitrogen. Because the low-J rotational lines have been investigated by other groups, our present study was focussed mainly to the measurements of higher-J rotational lines. Currently we have observed the lines J + 1 ← J(J=11, 13-21) for H13CO^+, and J + 1 ← J (J=13-18, 20-22, 24-25) for D13CO^+. Molecular contstants for these isotopologues (B, D, H, L) have been modified. From the analysis of the intensity of each rotational line, we estimate the rotational temperature to be as low as 140K. This low temperature makes it difficult to measure yet higher-J lines. Measurement of other isotopogues such as those containing oxygen isotopes is now in preparation.

  14. One-Shot Measurement of Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times in the Off-Resonance Rotating Frame of Reference with Applications to Breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbanks, Ethan Jefferson

    1994-01-01

    Off-resonance spin locking makes use of the novel relaxation time T_{1rho} ^{rm off}, which may be useful in characterizing breast disease. Knowledge of T _{rm 1rho}^{rm off} is essential for optimization of spin -locking imaging methods. The purpose of this work was to develop an optimal imaging technique for in vivo measurement of T_{rm 1rho}^ {rm off}. Measurement of T _{1rho}^{rm off } using conventional methods requires long exam times which are not suitable for patients. Exam time may be shortened by utilizing a one-shot method developed by Look and Locker, making in vivo measurements possible. The imaging method consisted of a 180^circ inversion pulse followed by a series of small-angle alpha pulses to tip a portion of the longitudinal magnetization into the transverse plane for readout. During each relaxation interval (between alpha pulses), a spin-locking pulse was applied off-resonance to achieve T_ {1rho}^{rm off} relaxation. The value of T_{rm 1rho}^{rm off} was then determined using a three-parameter non-linear least-squares fitting procedure. Values of T_ {1rho}^{rm off} were measured for normal and pathologic breast tissues at several resonant offsets. These measurements revealed that image contrast can be manipulated by altering the resonant offset of the spin-locking pulse. Whereas T _1 relaxation times were nearly identical for normal and cancerous tissues, T_{1 rho}^{rm off} relaxation times differed significantly. These results may be useful in improving image contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  15. Food web structure in two counter-rotating eddies based on δ15N and δ13C isotopic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, A. M.; Muhling, B. A.; Holl, C. M.; Beckley, L. E.; Montoya, J. P.; Strzelecki, J.; Thompson, P. A.; Pesant, S.

    2007-04-01

    We measured the natural inventories of nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes within various ecosystem fractions of two counter-rotating eddies associated with the poleward Leeuwin Current (LC), off Western Australia. Isotopic signatures ( δ15N and δ13C) were used as proxies for trophic transformation of inorganic and organic matter and are the basis for our discussion on food web functions in the two eddies. We present the first measurements of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) isotopic composition for the eastern Indian Ocean. We show that the large autotrophs (sampled within the >5-μm and >20-μm fractions of particulate organic matter (POM)), including a distinctive diatom population in the warm-core (WC) eddy, are likely to have taken up sources of DIN which were primarily nitrate, while the picoplankton are likely to have assimilated a large fraction of recycled ammonium. We show that phytoplankton in the cold-core (CC) eddy had distinctly more enriched δ15N signatures than in the WC eddy, probably due to the higher vertical fluxes of nitrate into the CC eddy. A clear negative correlation between mixed-layer depth and δ15N in POM across both eddies also supports the role of vertical nitrate fluxes in determining the primary δ15N signature of the autotrophs. Within the WC eddy, there was a significant δ13C-enrichment in comparison to the CC eddy across all size fractions of the mesozooplankton community, which, in combination with a low C:N molar ratio the >200- and >500-μm mesozooplankton size fractions, suggests a healthier mesozooplankton community, with greater lipid storage, in the WC eddy. This is consistent with the greater productivity and biomass of large diatoms in the WC eddy. Larval fish from the WC eddy also had an enriched δ13C signature compared to those from the CC eddy. The WC eddy had higher production rates than the CC eddy, and harboured a physiologically healthier population of zooplankton. Paradoxically, this seemed to occur

  16. Variable temperature 1H and 13C NMR study of restricted rotation in N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)acetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, R. Alan; Smith, Melanja H.; Wilson, Heather S.

    2016-06-01

    N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)acetamide shows restricted rotation about the amide bond in both 1H and 13C NMR spectra rendering the two hydroxyethyl groups non-equivalent. A variable temperature study in CD3SOCD3 allowed estimation of the free energy barrier to rotation as 75.6 ± 0.2 kJ mol-1. Previously published data in CDCl3 appears to be erroneous.

  17. Rotational analysis of the Ångström system (B1Σ+-A1Π) in the rare 13C17O isotopologue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakalla, Rafał; Zachwieja, Mirosław

    2012-02-01

    Although yet unobserved in the very rare 13C17O isotopologue, the Ångström system (B1Σ+-A1Π) was obtained under high resolution as an emission spectrum using a conventional spectroscopic technique. The emission from the discharge was observed with a plane grating spectrograph and recorded by a photomultiplier tube. In total, 192 transition wave numbers belonging to two bands (0-1 and 0-2) were precisely measured and rotationally analyzed. This method allowed us to determine the merged rotational constants B0 = 1.8131941(58) cm-1 and D0 = 5.5620(46) × 10-6 cm-1 and the individual molecular constant B1 = 1.471059(47) cm-1, D1 = 5.315(64) × 10-6 cm-1, B2 = 1.451762(13) cm-1, D2 = 7.812(16) × 10-6 cm-1 for the as yet unanalyzed 13C17O molecule B1Σ+ and A1Π states, respectively. The band origins σ of the Ångström system in the 13C17O molecule were also calculated. Numerous rotational perturbations observed in the A1Π state in 13C17O molecule have been identified and analyzed in detail. The suspected candidates responsible for these irregularities were indicated by means of a graph of the rovibronic levels of the neighboring states based on the estimated term value in the 13C17O molecule. The values of these perturbations have also been defined for both the e- and f-parity of the A1Π(v = 1 and 2) state. Simultaneously, the B1Σ+ state was observed to be quite regular up to the observed Jmax level.

  18. Optical hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in nanodiamond ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical nuclear polarization holds the key for orders of magnitude enhancements of nuclear magnetic resonance signals which, in turn, would enable a wide range of novel applications in biomedical sciences. However, current implementations of DNP require cryogenic temperatures and long times for achieving high polarization. Here we propose and analyze in detail protocols that can achieve rapid hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in randomly oriented ensembles of nanodiamonds at room temperature. Our protocols exploit a combination of optical polarization of electron spins in nitrogen-vacancy centers and the transfer of this polarization to 13C nuclei by means of microwave control to overcome the severe challenges that are posed by the random orientation of the nanodiamonds and their nitrogen-vacancy centers. Specifically, these random orientations result in exceedingly large energy variations of the electron spin levels that render the polarization and coherent control of the nitrogen-vacancy center electron spins as well as the control of their coherent interaction with the surrounding 13C nuclear spins highly inefficient. We address these challenges by a combination of an off-resonant microwave double resonance scheme in conjunction with a realization of the integrated solid effect which, together with adiabatic rotations of external magnetic fields or rotations of nanodiamonds, leads to a protocol that achieves high levels of hyperpolarization of the entire nuclear-spin bath in a randomly oriented ensemble of nanodiamonds even at room temperature. This hyperpolarization together with the long nuclear-spin polarization lifetimes in nanodiamonds and the relatively high density of 13C nuclei has the potential to result in a major signal enhancement in 13C nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and suggests functionalized and hyperpolarized nanodiamonds as a unique probe for molecular imaging both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. The rotational spectrum of the CCP (X 2Pi(r)) radical and its 13C isotopologues at microwave, millimeter, and submillimeter wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Halfen, D T; Sun, M; Clouthier, D J; Ziurys, L M

    2009-01-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of CCP (X (2)Pi(r)) has been measured at microwave, millimeter, and submillimeter wavelengths (17-545 GHz), along with its (13)C isotopologues ((13)C(13)CP, C(13)CP, and (13)CCP). The spectra of these species were recorded using a combination of millimeter/submillimeter direct absorption methods and Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) techniques. The phosphorus dicarbides were created in the gas phase from the reaction of red phosphorus and acetylene or methane in argon in an ac discharge for the direct absorption experiments, and using PCl(3) as the phosphorus source in a pulsed dc nozzle discharge for the FTMW measurements. A total of 35 rotational transitions were recorded for the main isotopologue, and between 2 and 8 for the (13)C-substituted species. Both spin-orbit components were identified for CCP, while only the Omega = 12 ladder was observed for (13)C(13)CP, C(13)CP, and (13)CCP. Hyperfine splittings due to phosphorus were observed for each species, as well as carbon-13 hyperfine structure for each of the (13)C-substituted isotopologues. The data were fitted with a Hund's case (a) Hamiltonian, and rotational, fine structure, and hyperfine parameters were determined for each species. The r(m)(1) bond lengths established for CCP, r(C-C) = 1.289(1) A and r(C-P) = 1.621(1) A, imply that there are double bonds between both the two carbon atoms and the carbon and phosphorus atoms. The hyperfine constants suggest that the unpaired electron in this radical is primarily located on the phosphorus nucleus, but with some electron density also on the terminal carbon atom. There appears to be a minor resonance structure where the unpaired electron is on the nucleus of the end carbon. The multiple double bond structure forces the molecule to be linear, as opposed to other main group dicarbides, such as SiC(2), which have cyclic geometries.

  20. Analysis of the Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared Spectrum of trans-Hexatriene-1-13C1; a Semiexperimental Equilibrium Structure for the C6 Backbone for trans-Hexatriene

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Norman C.; Tian, Hengfeng; Blake, Thomas A.

    2012-03-29

    trans-Hexatriene-1-13C1 (tHTE-1-13C1) has been synthesized, and its high-resolution (0.0015 cm-1) infrared spectrum has been recorded. The rotational structure in the C-type bands for v26 at 1011 cm-1 and v30 at 894 cm-1 has been analyzed. To the 1458 ground state combination differences from these bands, ground state rotational constants were fitted to a Watson-type Hamiltonian to give A0 = 0.8728202(9), B0 = 0.0435868(4), and C0 = 0.0415314(2) cm-1. Upper state rotational constants for the v30 band were also fitted. Predictions of the ground state rotational constants for t-HTE-1-13C1 from a B3LYP/cc-pVTZ model with scale factors based on the normal species were in excellent agreement with observations. Similar good agreement was found between predicted and observed ground state rotational constants for the three 13C1 isotopologues of cis-hexatriene (cHTE), as determined from microwave spectroscopy. Equilibrium rotational constants for tHTE and its three 13C1 isotopologues, of which two were predicted, were used to find a semiexperimental equilibrium structure for the C6 backbone of tHTE. This structure shows increased structural effects of pi-electron delocalization in comparison with butadiene.

  1. Analysis of the rotational structure in the high-resolution infrared spectrum of trans-hexatriene-1-13C1: a semiexperimental equilibrium structure for the C6 backbone of trans-hexatriene.

    PubMed

    Craig, Norman C; Tian, Hengfeng; Blake, Thomas A

    2012-03-29

    trans-Hexatriene-1-(13)C(1) (tHTE-1-(13)C(1)) has been synthesized, and its high-resolution (0.0015 cm(-1)) infrared spectrum has been recorded. The rotational structure in the C-type bands for ν(26) at 1011 cm(-1) and ν(30) at 894 cm(-1) has been analyzed. To the 1458 ground state combination differences from these bands, ground state rotational constants were fitted to a Watson-type Hamiltonian to give A(0) = 0.8728202(9), B(0) = 0.0435868(4), and C(0) = 0.0415314(2) cm(-1). Upper state rotational constants for the ν(30) band were also fitted. Predictions of the ground state rotational constants for tHTE-1-(13)C(1) from a B3LYP/cc-pVTZ model with scale factors based on the normal species were in excellent agreement with observations. Similar good agreement was found between predicted and observed ground state rotational constants for the three (13)C(1) isotopologues of cis-hexatriene, as determined from microwave spectroscopy. Equilibrium rotational constants for tHTE and its three (13)C(1) isotopologues, of which two were predicted, were used to find a semiexperimental equilibrium structure for the C(6) backbone of tHTE. This structure shows increased structural effects of π-electron delocalization in comparison with butadiene and some differences from the cis isomer of HTE. Structures predicted with the MP2/cc-pVTZ model are also compared.

  2. Methodology for solid state NMR off-resonance study of molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems.

    PubMed

    Jurga, Kazimierz; Woźniak-Braszak, Aneta; Baranowski, Mikołaj

    2015-10-01

    Methodology for the study of dynamics in heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame was described in the previous paper [1]. Now the methodology for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the rotating frame is presented. The solid state NMR off-resonance experiments were carried out on a homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz for protons. This spectrometer includes a specially designed probe which contains two independently tuned and electrically isolated coils installed in the coaxial position on the dewar. A unique probe design allows working at three slightly differing frequencies off and on resonance for protons and at the frequency of 28.411 MHz for fluorine nuclei with complete absence of their electrical interference. The probe allows simultaneously creating rf magnetic fields at off-resonance frequencies within the range of 30.2-30.6 MHz and at the frequency of 28.411 MHz. Presented heteronuclear cross-relaxation off-resonance experiments in the rotating frame provide information about molecular dynamics.

  3. Laboratory rotational spectrum of singly 13C-substituted dimethyl ether up to 1.5 THz and interstellar detection of 13CH_3O12CH_3 - a fruitful interplay between laboratory work and inter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerber, M.; Bisschop, S.; Endres, C.; Lewen, F.; Schlemmer, S.

    2011-05-01

    Dimethyl ether (CH_3OCH_3) is found in high abundance in star forming regions. However, the interstellar formation process of dimethyl ether still remains unclear up to now. In current gas-grain models gas-phase synthesis via self-methylation of methanol evaporating from grains is discussed in contrast to the surface reaction of CH_3 with successively hydrogenated CO (Garrod & Herbst 2006). An observational test for the formation mechanism has been proposed by Charnley et al. (2004) making use of the 13C fractionation into CO at low temperatures on grains: Comparing the 12C/13C ratio of molecules to the 12CO/13CO ratio allows to distinguish between formation from CO on cold grains and pure gas-phase formation routes. The isotopic ratio of species like dimethyl ether thus can be used as a tracer of the chemical evolution of the observed region. Due to its two methyl groups undergoing large amplitude motions and a relatively strong dipole moment of μ = 1.302 D it shows a strong and dense complex spectrum all over the terahertz region relevant for Herschel and ALMA observations. Accurate transition frequencies are needed to interpret the astronomical spectra. For the main isotopologue extensive data are now available (Endres et al. 2009). However, due to the greatly improved sensitivity of the new observatories isotopic species of abundant molecules like dimethyl ether are appearing in the spectra as well. In this work we present laboratory measurements of singly 13C-substituted dimethyl ether (13CH_3O12CH_3) up to 1.5 THz. More than 1700 transitions of 13CH_3O12CH_3 with rotational quantum numbers up to J = 53 and K = 25 have been analyzed. Based on the laboratory measurements singly 13C-substituted dimethyl ether has been detected for the first time in the spectrum of G327.3-0.6 (Bisschop et al. in prep.) and a preliminary value for the 12C/13C abundance ratio has been determined.

  4. Population transfer driven by far-off-resonant fields.

    PubMed

    Shi, Z C; Wang, W; Yi, X X

    2016-09-19

    For a two-level system, it is believed that a far-off-resonant driving cannot help coherent population transfer between two states. In this work, we propose a scheme to implement the coherent transfer with far-off-resonant driving. The scheme works well with both constant driving and Gaussian driving. The total time to finish population transfer is also minimized by optimizing the detuning and coupling constants. We find that the scheme is sensitive to spontaneous emission much more than dephasing. It might find potential applications in X-ray quantum optics and population transfer in Rydberg atoms as well. PMID:27661932

  5. Seeded excitation avalanches in off-resonantly driven Rydberg gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonelli, C.; Valado, M. M.; Masella, G.; Asteria, L.; Arimondo, E.; Ciampini, D.; Morsch, O.

    2016-08-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the facilitated excitation dynamics in off-resonantly driven Rydberg gases by separating the initial off-resonant excitation phase from the facilitation phase, in which successive facilitation events lead to excitation avalanches. We achieve this by creating a controlled number of initial seed excitations. Greater insight into the avalanche mechanism is obtained from an analysis of the full counting distributions. We also present simple mathematical models and numerical simulations of the excitation avalanches that agree well with our experimental results.

  6. Simulation of the off-resonance effect in one-dimensional heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Fei; Zhou, Zhifa; Miao, Xijia; Mao, Xi-an

    2000-03-01

    When a heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) NMR experiment is performed in one-dimensional mode, due to the wide range in chemical shift of the indirectly detected spin and the limited strength of the radio-frequency field, the off-resonance effect on the intensity of the observed signal can be serious. In this paper, the effect is studied using the spin-density-matrix formalism and simulations of the experimental results are presented. The bilinear rotation-decoupling sequence (BIRD), which is usually used in HMQC experiments, is also discussed. It is shown that the BIRD sequence has a negative effect by virtue of narrowing the excitation band.

  7. Feasibility of Multianimal Hyperpolarized 13C MRS

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Marc S.; Lee, Jaehyuk; Walker, Christopher M.; Chen, Yunyun; Kingsley, Charles V.; De La Cerda, Jorge; Maldonado, Kiersten L.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Bankson, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose There is great potential for real-time investigation of metabolism with MRS and hyperpolarized (HP) 13C agents. Unfortunately, HP technology has high associated costs and efficiency limitations that may constrain in vivo studies involving many animals. To improve the throughput of preclinical investigations, we evaluate the feasibility of performing HP MRS on multiple animals simultaneously. Methods Simulations helped assess the viability of a dual-coil strategy for spatially-localized multivolume MRS.A dual-mouse system was assembled and characterized based on bench- and scanner-based experiments. Enzyme phantoms mixed with HP [1-13C] pyruvate emulated real-time metabolism and offered a controlled mechanism for evaluating system performance. Finally, a normal mouse and a mouse bearing a subcutaneous xenograft of colon cancer were simultaneously scanned in vivo using an agent containing HP [1-13C] pyruvate. Results Geometric separation/rotation, active decoupling, and use of low input impedance preamplifiers permitted an encode-by-channel approach for spatially-localized MRS. A pre-calibrated shim allowed straightforward metabolite differentiation in enzyme phantom and in vivo experiments at 7 T, with performance similar to conventional acquisitions. Conclusion The initial feasibility of multi-animal HP 13C MRS was established. Throughput scales with the number of simultaneously-scanned animals, demonstrating the potential for significant improvements in study efficiency. PMID:24903532

  8. Subwavelength imaging and control of ultrafast optical near-field under resonant- and off-resonant excitation of bowtie nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Boyu; Qin, Jiang; Tao, Haiyan; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lin, Jingquan

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate subwavelength imaging and control of localized near-field distribution under resonant and off-resonant excitation of identical gold bowtie nanostructures through photoemission electron microscopy. Control of the near-field distribution was realized by polarization rotation of single femtosecond laser pulse and variation of the phase delay of two orthogonally polarized femtosecond laser pulses. We show that the localized optical near-field distribution can be well controlled either among the corners of the nano-prisms in the bowtie for resonant excitation or the edges for off-resonant excitation. A better visualization of the PEEM image is achieved for resonant excitation than in the case of off-resonant excitation. The experimental results of the optical near-field distribution control are well reproduced by finite-difference time-domain simulations and understood by linear combination of electric charge distribution of the bowtie by s- and p- polarized light illumination. In addition, a shift of the near-field excitation position with inverted or unchanged phase, alternatively an un-shift of the excitation position but only with inverted phase of the near-field, can be realized by rotating the polarization angle of a single pulse and coherent control of two orthogonally polarized fs laser pulses.

  9. Dynamic formation of Rydberg aggregates at off-resonant excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärttner, Martin; Heeg, Kilian P.; Gasenzer, Thomas; Evers, Jörg

    2013-10-01

    The dynamics of a cloud of ultracold two-level atoms is studied at off-resonant laser driving to a Rydberg state. We find that resonant excitation channels lead to strongly peaked spatial correlations associated with the buildup of asymmetric excitation structures. These aggregates can extend over the entire ensemble volume, but are in general not localized relative to the system boundaries. The characteristic distances between neighboring excitations depend on the laser detuning and on the interaction potential. These properties lead to characteristic features in the spatial excitation density, the Mandel Q parameter, and the total number of excitations. As an application an implementation of the three-atom cswap or Fredkin gate with Rydberg atoms is discussed. The gate not only exploits the Rydberg blockade, but also utilizes the special features of an asymmetric geometric arrangement of the three atoms. We show that continuous-wave off-resonant laser driving is sufficient to create the required spatial arrangement of atoms out of a homogeneous cloud.

  10. Accelerating Sequences in the Presence of Metal by Exploiting the Spatial Distribution of Off-Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew R.; Artz, Nathan S.; Koch, Kevin M.; Samsonov, Alexey; Reeder, Scott B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate feasibility of exploiting the spatial distribution of off-resonance surrounding metallic implants for accelerating multispectral imaging techniques. Theory Multispectral imaging (MSI) techniques perform time-consuming independent 3D acquisitions with varying RF frequency offsets to address the extreme off-resonance from metallic implants. Each off-resonance bin provides a unique spatial sensitivity that is analogous to the sensitivity of a receiver coil, and therefore provides a unique opportunity for acceleration. Methods Fully sampled MSI was performed to demonstrate retrospective acceleration. A uniform sampling pattern across off-resonance bins was compared to several adaptive sampling strategies using a total hip replacement phantom. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to compare noise propagation of two of these strategies. With a total knee replacement phantom, positive and negative off-resonance bins were strategically sampled with respect to the B0 field to minimize aliasing. Reconstructions were performed with a parallel imaging framework to demonstrate retrospective acceleration. Results An adaptive sampling scheme dramatically improved reconstruction quality, which was supported by the noise propagation analysis. Independent acceleration of negative and positive off-resonance bins demonstrated reduced overlapping of aliased signal to improve the reconstruction. Conclusion This work presents the feasibility of acceleration in the presence of metal by exploiting the spatial sensitivities of off-resonance bins. PMID:24431210

  11. New guidelines for δ13C measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Gehre, Matthias; Groning, Manfred; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Toman, Blaza; Verkouteren, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Consistency of δ13C measurements can be improved 39−47% by anchoring the δ13C scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in 13C/12C. It is recommended thatδ13C values of both organic and inorganic materials be measured and expressed relative to VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on a scale normalized by assigning consensus values of −46.6‰ to L-SVEC lithium carbonate and +1.95‰ to NBS 19 calcium carbonate. Uncertainties of other reference material values on this scale are improved by factors up to two or more, and the values of some have been notably shifted:  the δ13C of NBS 22 oil is −30.03%.

  12. Off-resonance energy absorption in a linear Paul trap due to mass selective resonant quenching.

    PubMed

    Sivarajah, I; Goodman, D S; Wells, J E; Narducci, F A; Smith, W W

    2013-11-01

    Linear Paul traps (LPT) are used in many experimental studies such as mass spectrometry, atom-ion collisions, and ion-molecule reactions. Mass selective resonant quenching (MSRQ) is implemented in LPT either to identify a charged particle's mass or to remove unwanted ions from a controlled experimental environment. In the latter case, MSRQ can introduce undesired heating to co-trapped ions of different mass, whose secular motion is off resonance with the quenching ac field, which we call off-resonance energy absorption (OREA). We present simulations and experimental evidence that show that the OREA increases exponentially with the number of ions loaded into the trap and with the amplitude of the off-resonance external ac field. PMID:24289382

  13. In vivo13C spectroscopy in the rat brain using hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjańska, Małgorzata; Iltis, Isabelle; Shestov, Alexander A.; Deelchand, Dinesh K.; Nelson, Christopher; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2010-10-01

    The low sensitivity of 13C spectroscopy can be enhanced using dynamic nuclear polarization. Detection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and its metabolic products has been reported in kidney, liver, and muscle. In this work, the feasibility of measuring 13C signals of hyperpolarized 13C metabolic products in the rat brain in vivo following the injection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate is investigated. Injection of [2- 13C]pyruvate led to the detection of [2- 13C]lactate, but no other downstream metabolites such as TCA cycle intermediates were detected. Injection of [1- 13C]pyruvate enabled the detection of both [1- 13C]lactate and [ 13C]bicarbonate. A metabolic model was used to fit the hyperpolarized 13C time courses obtained during infusion of [1- 13C]pyruvate and to determine the values of VPDH and VLDH.

  14. Multiple locations of peptides in the hydrocarbon core of gel-phase membranes revealed by peptide (13)C to lipid (2)H rotational-echo double-resonance solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Jia, Lihui; Liang, Shuang; Weliky, David P

    2015-01-27

    Membrane locations of peptides and proteins are often critical to their functions. Solid-state rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance is applied to probe the locations of two peptides via peptide (13)CO to lipid (2)H distance measurements. The peptides are KALP, an α-helical membrane-spanning peptide, and HFP, the β-sheet N-terminal fusion peptide of the HIV gp41 fusion protein that plays an important role in HIV-host cell membrane fusion. Both peptides are shown to have at least two distinct locations within the hydrocarbon core of gel-phase membranes. The multiple locations are attributed to snorkeling of lysine side chains for KALP and to the distribution of antiparallel β-sheet registries for HFP. The relative population of each location is also quantitated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clear experimental support of multiple peptide locations within the membrane hydrocarbon core. These data are for gel-phase membranes, but the approach should work for liquid-ordered membranes containing cholesterol and may be applicable to liquid-disordered membranes with appropriate additional analysis to take into account protein and lipid motion. This paper also describes the methodological development of (13)CO-(2)H REDOR using the lyophilized I4 peptide that is α-helical and (13)CO-labeled at A9 and (2)Hα-labeled at A8. The I4 spins are well-approximated as an ensemble of isolated (13)CO-(2)H spin pairs each separated by 5.0 Å with a 37 Hz dipolar coupling. A pulse sequence with rectangular 100 kHz (2)H π pulses results in rapid and extensive buildup of REDOR (ΔS/S0) with a dephasing time (τ). The buildup is well-fit by a simple exponential function with a rate of 24 Hz and an extent close to 1. These parameter values reflect nonradiative transitions between the (2)H spin states during the dephasing period. Each spin pair spends approximately two-thirds of its time in the (13)CO-(2)H (m = ±1) states and

  15. Measurement of J-couplings between chemically equivalent nuclei using off-resonance decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turanov, Alexander; Khitrin, Anatoly

    2016-09-01

    The method of measuring J-couplings between chemically equivalent nuclei in isotopically/magnetically non-equivalent environment, based on off-resonance decoupling, is described. The approach uses intensities, rather than frequencies of the spectral peaks and, therefore, the accuracy of measurement is not limited by spectral resolution.

  16. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c] And [2h3, 13c]Methyl Aryl Sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-03-30

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2,.sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to the labeled compounds of [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide and [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide.

  17. {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin couplings in [2`-{sup 13}C]2`-deoxyribonucleosides: Correlations with molecular structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, T.; Stripe, W.A.; Carmichael, I.; Serianni, A.S.; Wu, J.

    1997-02-19

    2`-Deoxyribonucleosides (2`-deoxyadenosine (1), 2`-depoxycytidine (2), thymidine (3)) singly enriched with {sup 13}C at C2` have been prepared and used to obtain one-, two-, and three-bond {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin-coupling constants involving C2`. Spin couplings in 1-3 involving C1` and C2`are also compared to corresponding values in ribonucleosides in order to assess the effects of nucleoside structure and conformation on J values within the furanose ring. {sup 1}J{sub C2`,H2`R} and {sup 1}J{sub C2`,H2`S} in 1-3 and {sup 1}J{sub C2`,H2`} in ribonucleosides depend on C-H bond orientation: {sup 1}J{sub C1`,H1`} in 1-3 and in ribonucleosides exhibits a similar dependence. The latter couplings appear to be essentially unaffected by N-glycoside torsion. {sup 1}J{sub CC} values depend on the number and distribution of electronegative substituents on the C-C fragment. A modified projection curve is proposed to aid in the interpretation of {sup 2}J{sub C2`,H1`} values; the presence of N substitution at C1` caused a shift to more negative couplings relative to the O-substituted analog. In contrast, {sup 2}J{sub C1`,H2`} is essentially unaffected by the same change in the electronegative substituent at C1`. {sup 2}J{sub CC} values within the furanose ring are determined buy two coupling pathways; in one case (i.e., {sup 2}J{sub C1`,C3`}), the observed coupling is shown to be the algebraic sum of the two couplings arising from each pathway. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Off-resonance magnetisation transfer contrast (MTC) MRI using fast field-cycling (FFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang-Hoon; Davies, Gareth R.; Lurie, David J.

    2010-05-01

    Magnetisation transfer contrast (MTC) is an important MR contrast generating mechanism to characterise the undetectable bound protons indirectly using the decreased signal intensity of the observable free protons. MTC imaging typically employs a range of off-resonance RF pre-saturation pulse with maintaining the RF magnetic field ( B1) at a specified value. However, this presents a technical difficulty, particularly at low field, because the larger offset frequencies tend to be outside the bandwidth of the RF transmit system, causing B1 to vary with the frequency offset. Here, we demonstrate a novel off-resonance irradiation method using fast field-cycling which allows switching of the external magnetic field between several chosen strengths, while holding constant the RF frequency and B1 level. This permits one to avoid the problem of B1 variation as a function of frequency offset. The results obtained by this new technique are in excellent agreement with those obtained by the conventional technique.

  19. Far off-resonant coupling between photonic crystal microcavity and single quantum dot with resonant excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Banihashemi, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Vahid; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Kojima, Takanori; Kojima, Kazunobu; Noda, Susumu

    2013-12-16

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate that with sub-nanowatt coherent s-shell excitation of a single InAs quantum dot, off-resonant coupling of 4.1 nm is possible between L3 photonic crystal microcavity and the quantum dot at 50 K. This resonant excitation reduces strongly the effect of surrounding charges to quantum dot, multiexciton complexes and pure dephasing. It seems that this far off-resonant coupling is the result of increased number of acoustical phonons due to high operating temperature of 50 K. The 4.1 nm detuning is the largest amount for this kind of coupling.

  20. Shaping interactions between polar molecules with far-off-resonant light

    SciTech Connect

    Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2011-05-15

    We show that dressing polar molecules with a far-off-resonant optical field leads to new types of intermolecular potentials, which undergo a crossover from the inverse power to oscillating behavior depending on the intermolecular distance, and whose parameters can be tuned by varying the laser intensity and wavelength. We present analytic expressions for the potential energy surfaces, thereby providing direct access to the parameters of an optical field required to design intermolecular interactions experimentally.

  1. Loading Dynamics and Characteristics of a Far Off-Resonance Optical Dipole Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickelson, P. G.; Martinez, Y. N.; Nagel, S. B.; Traverso, A. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2007-10-01

    We implement an optical dipole trap in a crossed beam configuration for experiments with ultracold strontium. Strontium atoms cooled to nearly 1 μK are loaded into the optical dipole trap from a magneto-optical trap operating on the 689 nm intercombination line. Loading dynamics and characteristics of the far off-resonance dipole trap are explored as part of our group's study of ultracold collisions in strontium.

  2. Off-Resonant Optical Excitation of Gold Nanorods: Nanoscale Imprint of Polarization Surface Charge Distribution.

    PubMed

    Deeb, Claire; Zhou, Xuan; Gérard, Davy; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Jain, Prashant K; Plain, Jérôme; Soppera, Olivier; Royer, Pascal; Bachelot, Renaud

    2011-01-01

    We report on the nanoscale optical characterization of gold nanorods irradiated out of their plasmonic resonance. Our approach is based on the reticulation of a photopolymerizable formulation locally triggered by enhanced electromagnetic fields. The tiny local field enhancement stems from the surface polarization charges associated with the electric field discontinuity at the metal/dielectric interface. This allows us to get a nanoscale signature of the spatial distribution of the surface charge density in metallic nanoparticles irradiated off-resonance.

  3. NOTE: Off-resonance positive contrast imaging of a passive endomyocardial catheter in swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmakumar, Rohan; Koktzoglou, Ioannis; Tang, Richard; Harris, Kathleen R.; Beohar, Nirat; Li, Debiao

    2008-07-01

    The use of off-resonance methods in interventional MRI may be valuable since active devices that provide positive signal enhancements are currently not approved for human use. This study investigated the capacity of a low flip angle steady-state free precession (FLAPS) method for generating off-resonance positive contrast surrounding a susceptibility-shifted endomyocardial Stiletto catheter in excised swine hearts and in live swine. Consistent with theory, discernable positive contrast surrounding the interventional device was visualized under ex-vivo (CNR of 24 ± 2.1 in the left ventricular (LV) chamber and 18 ± 2.7 in LV myocardium) and in-vivo conditions (CNR of 22 ± 3.9 in aorta, 16 ± 4.1 in the LV chamber and 13 ± 0.9 in LV myocardium). The findings show that off-resonance imaging with the FLAPS method may be used for passive device visualization with positive contrast. Further studies are necessary prior to clinical translation.

  4. Correcting for Incomplete Saturation and Off-Resonance Effects in Multiple-Site Saturation-Transfer Kinetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, Peter B.; Monahan, W. Gordon

    2000-09-01

    The effects of incomplete saturation and off-resonance irradiation on nuclear magnetic resonance saturation-transfer measurements of three-site chemical-exchange rates are discussed. A new method that uses double-saturation measurements is compared with two published methods, one that uses single-saturation measurements and one that uses a single-saturation measurement and a double-saturation measurement. Several formulas are compared for measuring the exchange rate constant kDE for exchange from a detected spin D to an exchanging spin E in the presence of exchange from spin D to a competing spin C. For each method, formulas are derived with corrections for incomplete saturation or off-resonance effects, with both corrections, and with neither correction. Exact formulas are available for three exchanging sites with incomplete saturation if there are no off-resonance effects. Off-resonance corrections are imperfect even with complete saturation.

  5. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  6. Effects of off-resonance spins on the performance of the modulated gradient spin echo sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serša, Igor; Bajd, Franci; Mohorič, Aleš

    2016-09-01

    Translational molecular dynamics in various materials can also be studied by diffusion spectra. These can be measured by a constant gradient variant of the modulated gradient spin echo (MGSE) sequence which is composed of a CPMG RF pulse train superimposed to a constant magnetic field gradient. The application of the RF train makes the effective gradient oscillating thus enabling measurements of diffusion spectra in a wide range of frequencies. However, seemingly straightforward implementation of the MGSE sequence proved to be complicated and can give overestimated results for diffusion if not interpreted correctly. In this study, unrestricted diffusion in water and other characteristic materials was analyzed by the MGSE sequence in the frequency range 50-3000 Hz using a 6 T/m diffusion probe. First, it was shown that the MGSE echo train acquired from the entire sample decays faster than the train acquired only from a narrow band at zero frequency of the sample. Then, it was shown that the decay rate is dependent on the band's off-resonance characterized by the ratio Δω0 /ω1 and that with higher off-resonances the decay is faster. The faster decay therefore corresponds to a higher diffusion coefficient if the diffusion is calculated using standard Stejskal-Tanner formula. The result can be explained by complex coherence pathways contributing to the MGSE echo signals when | Δω0 | /ω1 > 0 . In a magnetic field gradient, all the pathways are more diffusion attenuated than the direct coherence pathway and therefore decay faster, which leads to an overestimation of the diffusion coefficient. A solution to this problem was found in an efficient off-resonance signal reduction by using only zero frequency filtered MGSE echo train signals.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Doubly 13C-substituted ethyl cyanide (Margules+,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margules, L.; Belloche, A.; Muller, H. S. P.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Garrod, R. T.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-04-01

    We identified more than 5000 rotational transitions, pertaining to more than 3500 different transition frequencies, in the laboratory for each of the three doubly 13C-substituted isotopomers. The quantum numbers reach J~115 and Ka~35, resulting in accurate spectroscopic parameters and accurate rest frequency calculations beyond 1000 GHz for strong to moderately weak transitions of either isotopomer. All three species are unambiguously detected in our ALMA data. The 12C/13C column density ratio of the isotopomers with one 13C atom to those with two 13C atoms is about 25. Ethyl cyanide is the second molecule after methyl cyanide for which isotopologues containing two 13C atoms have been securely detected in the interstellar medium. The model of our ethyl cyanide data suggests that we should be able to detect vibrational satellites of the main species up to at least v19=1 at 1130K and up to v13+v21=2 at 600K for the isotopologues with one 13C atom in our present ALMA data. Such satellites may be too weak to be identified unambiguously for isotopologues with two 13C atoms. (3 data files).

  8. A method for simultaneous echo planar imaging of hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate and 13C lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen D.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Lustig, Michael; Kerr, Adam B.; Pauly, John M.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2012-04-01

    A rapid echo planar imaging sequence for dynamic imaging of [1-13C] lactate and [1-13C] pyruvate simultaneously was developed. Frequency-based separation of these metabolites was achieved by spatial shifting in the phase-encoded direction with the appropriate choice of echo spacing. Suppression of the pyruvate-hydrate and alanine resonances is achieved through an optimized spectral-spatial RF waveform. Signal sampling efficiency as a function of pyruvate and lactate excitation angle was simulated using two site exchange models. Dynamic imaging is demonstrated in a transgenic mouse model, and phantom validations of the RF pulse frequency selectivity were performed.

  9. Rapidly reconfigurable slow-light system based on off-resonant Raman absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vudyasetu, Praveen K.; Camacho, Ryan M.; Howell, John C.

    2010-11-01

    We present a slow-light system based on dual Raman absorption resonances in warm rubidium vapor. Each Raman absorption resonance is produced by a control beam in an off-resonant Λ system. This system combines all optical control of the Raman absorption and the low-dispersion broadening properties of the double Lorentzian absorption slow light. The bandwidth, group delay, and central frequency of the slow-light system can all be tuned dynamically by changing the properties of the control beam. We demonstrate multiple pulse delays with low distortion and show that such a system has fast switching dynamics and thus fast reconfiguration rates.

  10. Synthesis Of 2h- And 13c-Substituted Dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  11. Synthesis of 2H- and 13C-substituted dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  12. Calculation of total meal d13C from individual food d13C.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variations in the isotopic signature of carbon in biological samples can be used to distinguish dietary patterns and monitor shifts in metabolism. But for these variations to have meaning, the isotopic signature of the diet must be known. We sought to determine if knowledge of the 13C isotopic abund...

  13. In vivo dynamic turnover of cerebral 13C isotopomers from [U- 13C]glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su; Shen, Jun

    2006-10-01

    An INEPT-based 13C MRS method and a cost-effective and widely available 11.7 Tesla 89-mm bore vertical magnet were used to detect dynamic 13C isotopomer turnover from intravenously infused [U- 13C]glucose in a 211 μL voxel located in the adult rat brain. The INEPT-based 1H → 13C polarization transfer method is mostly adiabatic and therefore minimizes signal loss due to B 1 inhomogeneity of the surface coils used. High quality and reproducible data were acquired as a result of combined use of outer volume suppression, ISIS, and the single-shot three-dimensional localization scheme built in the INEPT pulse sequence. Isotopomer patterns of both glutamate C4 at 34.00 ppm and glutamine C4 at 31.38 ppm are dominated first by a doublet originated from labeling at C4 and C5 but not at C3 (with 1JC4C5 = 51 Hz) and then by a quartet originated from labeling at C3, C4, and C5 (with 1JC3C4 = 35 Hz). A lag in the transition of glutamine C4 pattern from doublet-dominance to quartet dominance as compared to glutamate C4 was observed, which provides an independent verification of the precursor-product relationship between neuronal glutamate and glial glutamine and a significant intercompartmental cerebral glutamate-glutamine cycle between neurons and glial cells.

  14. Dipolar-coupling-mediated total correlation spectroscopy in solid-state 13C NMR: Selection of individual 13C- 13C dipolar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spano, Justin; Wi, Sungsool

    2010-06-01

    Herein is described a useful approach in solid-state NMR, for selecting homonuclear 13C- 13C spin pairs in a multiple- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupled spin system. This method builds upon the zero-quantum (ZQ) dipolar recoupling method introduced by Levitt and coworkers (Marin-Montesinos et al., 2006 [30]) by extending the originally introduced one-dimensional (1D) experiment into a two-dimensional (2D) method with selective irradiation scheme, while moving the 13C- 13C mixing scheme from the transverse to the longitudinal mode, together with a dramatic improvement in the proton decoupling efficiency. Selective spin-pair recoupling experiments incorporating Gaussian and cosine-modulated Gaussian pulses for inverting specific spins were performed, demonstrating the ability to detect informative, simplified/individualized, long-range 13C- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupling interactions more accurately by removing less informative, stronger, short-range 13C- 13C interactions from 2D correlation spectra. The capability of this new approach was demonstrated experimentally on uniformly 13C-labeled Glutamine and a tripeptide sample, GAL.

  15. Spectroscopic study and astronomical detection of doubly 13C-substituted ethyl cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Belloche, A.; Müller, H. S. P.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Garrod, R. T.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. We have performed a spectral line survey called Exploring Molecular Complexity with ALMA (EMoCA) toward Sagittarius B2(N) between 84.1 and 114.4 GHz with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in its Cycles 0 and 1. Line intensities of the main isotopic species of ethyl cyanide and its singly 13C-substituted isotopomers observed toward the hot molecular core Sagittarius B2(N2) suggest that the doubly 13C-substituted isotopomers should also be detectable. Aims: We want to determine the spectroscopic parameters of all three doubly 13C-substituted isotopologues of ethyl cyanide to search for them in our ALMA data. Methods: We investigated the laboratory rotational spectra of the three species between 150 GHz and 990 GHz. We searched for emission lines produced by these species in the ALMA spectrum of Sagittarius B2(N2). We modeled their emission and the emission of the 12C and singly 13C-substituted isotopologues assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Results: We identified more than 5000 rotational transitions, pertaining to more than 3500 different transition frequencies, in the laboratory for each of the three doubly 13C-substituted isotopomers. The quantum numbers reach J ≈ 115 and Ka ≈ 35, resulting in accurate spectroscopic parameters and accurate rest frequency calculations beyond 1000 GHz for strong to moderately weak transitions of either isotopomer. All three species are unambiguously detected in our ALMA data. The 12C/13C column density ratio of the isotopomers with one 13C atom to those with two 13C atoms is about 25. Conclusions: Ethyl cyanide is the second molecule after methyl cyanide for which isotopologues containing two 13C atoms have been securely detected in the interstellar medium. The model of our ethyl cyanide data suggests that we should be able to detect vibrational satellites of the main species up to at least ν19 = 1 at ~1130 K and up to ν13 + ν21 = 2 at ~600 K for the isotopologues with one 13C atom in

  16. 13C isotopic fractionation during biodegradation of agricultural wastes.

    PubMed

    Chalk, Phillip M; Inácio, Caio T; Urquiaga, Segundo; Chen, Deli

    2015-01-01

    Significant differences in δ(13)C signatures occur within and between plant tissues and their constituent biochemical entities, and also within and between heterotrophic bacteria and fungi and their metabolic products. Furthermore, (13)C isotopic fractionation occurs during the biodegradation of organic molecules as seen in the substrate, respired CO(2) and the microbial biomass, which could be related to substrate composition and/or microbial metabolism. The (13)C isotopic fractionation observed during the decomposition of a single defined C substrate appears to be due to the intra-molecular heterogeneity in (13)C in the substrate and to (13)C isotopic fractionation during microbial metabolism. Very limited data suggest that the latter may be quantitatively more important than the former. Studies with defined fungi in culture media have highlighted the complexities associated with the interpretation of the observed patterns of (13)C isotopic fractionation when a single defined C source is added to the culture medium which itself contains one or more C sources. Techniques involving (13)C enrichment or paired treatments involving an equivalent C(3)- and C(4)-derived substrate have been devised to overcome the problem of background C in the culture medium and (13)C isotopic fractionation during metabolism. Studies with complex substrates have shown an initial (13)C depletion phase in respired CO(2) followed by a (13)C enrichment phase which may or may not be followed by another (13)C depletion phase. Basic studies involving an integrated approach are required to gain a new insight into (13)C isotopic fractionation during organic residue decomposition, by simultaneous measurements of δ(13)C in all C moieties. New analytical tools to measure real-time changes in δ(13)CO(2) and the intra-molecular δ(13)C distribution within plant biochemical entities offer new opportunities for unravelling the complex interactions between substrate and microbial metabolism with

  17. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra of 13C-glycolaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haykal, I.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) is the simplest sugar and an important intermediate in the path toward forming more complex biologically relevant molecules. Astronomical surveys of interstellar molecules, such as those available with the very sensitive ALMA telescope, require preliminary laboratory investigations of the microwave and submillimeter-wave spectra of molecular species including new isotopologs - to identify these in the interstellar media. Aims: To achieve the detection of the 13C isotopologs of glycolaldehyde in the interstellar medium, their rotational spectra in the millimeter and submillimeter-wave regions were studied. Methods: The spectra of 13CH2OHCHO and CH2OH13CHO were recorded in the 150-945 GHz spectral range in the laboratory using a solid-state submillimeter-wave spectrometer in Lille. The observed line frequencies were measured with an accuracy of 30 kHz up to 700 GHz and of 50 kHz above 700 GHz. We analyzed the spectra with a standard Watson Hamiltonian. Results: About 10 000 new lines were identified for each isotopolog. The spectroscopic parameters were determined for the ground- and the three lowest vibrational states up to 945 and 630 GHz. Previous microwave assignments of 13CH2OHCHO were not confirmed. Conclusions: The provided line-lists and sets of molecular parameters meet the needs for a first astrophysical search of 13C-glycolaldehydes. Full Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A96

  18. Off-resonant many-body quantum carpets in strongly tilted optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Arias, Manuel H.; Madroñero, Javier; Parra-Murillo, Carlos A.

    2016-04-01

    A unit filling Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian embedded in a strong Stark field is studied in the off-resonant regime inhibiting single- and many-particle first-order tunneling resonances. We investigate the occurrence of coherent dipole wavelike propagation along an optical lattice by means of an effective Hamiltonian accounting for second-order tunneling processes. It is shown that dipole wave function evolution in the short-time limit is ballistic and that finite-size effects induce dynamical self-interference patterns known as quantum carpets. We also present the effects of the border right after the first reflection, showing that the wave function diffuses normally with the variance changing linearly in time. This work extends the rich physical phenomenology of tilted one-dimensional lattice systems in a scenario of many interacting quantum particles, the so-called many-body Wannier-Stark system.

  19. Coherent control of atomic excitation using off-resonant strong few-cycle pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pankaj K.; Eleuch, Hichem; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2010-10-15

    We study the dynamics of a two-level system driven by an off-resonance few-cycle pulse which has a phase jump {phi} at t=t{sub 0}, in contrast to many-cycle pulses, under the nonrotating-wave approximation (NRWA). We give a closed form analytical solution for the evolution of the probability amplitude |C{sub a}(t)| for the upper level. Using the appropriate pulse parameters like the phase jump {phi}, jump time t{sub 0}, pulse width {tau}, frequency {nu}, and Rabi frequency {Omega}{sub 0} the population transfer after the pulse is gone can be optimized and, for the pulse considered here, an enhancement factor of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} was obtained.

  20. Long-wavelength approximation in on- and off-resonance transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Komninos, Yannis; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2005-02-01

    In view of the possibilities of laser spectroscopy with very short pulses and relatively high frequencies, we examine aspects of the theory of atom-field interactions that are related to violation of the condition of the long-wavelength approximation (LWA) according to which kr<<1, where r is 'of the order of atomic dimensions' and k is the magnitude of the wave vector. On- and off-resonance transitions are considered, with kr being larger than unity due to the large extent of the two wave functions involved in the coupling matrix element. The implementation of the analysis uses bound-free transition matrix elements with the n=50 and 80 hydrogenic functions as initial states and values of k up to 27 eV, which is sufficient to produce kr>1, thereby rendering the LWA inoperative. In spite of this, it is shown that, for on-resonance transitions, the results from the use of the well-known multipole operators resulting from the LWA [e.g., the electric dipole approximation (EDA)] agree with those from the exact expressions derived here from the application of the multipolar Hamiltonian. This numerical agreement is proven analytically. As a test of the kind of convergence of the multipole series expansion for small values of k and large r, it is shown that the lowest-order ratio of electric dipole to quadrupole matrix elements decreases rapidly within 1.0 atomic unit above threshold. Finally, it is shown that off-resonance couplings lead to differences between the full-interaction operator and the EDA which cannot be neglected. In the extreme case of intrashell couplings for the n=50 shell, calculation shows that the 50p state is coupled to angular momentum states up to l=21, compared to the electric dipole coupling of {delta}l={+-}1.

  1. On- and off-resonance radiation-atom-coupling matrix elements involving extended atomic wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komninos, Yannis; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of our earlier works, we present results concerning the computation of matrix elements of the multipolar Hamiltonian (MPH) between extended wave functions that are obtained numerically. The choice of the MPH is discussed in connection with the broader issue of the form of radiation-atom (or -molecule) interaction that is appropriate for the systematic solution of various problems of matter-radiation interaction. We derive analytic formulas, in terms of the sine-integral function and spherical Bessel functions of various orders, for the cumulative radial integrals that were obtained and calculated by Komninos, Mercouris, and Nicolaides [Phys. Rev. A 71, 023410 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.71.023410]. This development allows the much faster and more accurate computation of such matrix elements, a fact that enhances the efficiency with which the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved nonperturbatively, in the framework of the state-specific expansion approach. The formulas are applicable to the general case where a pair of orbitals with angular parts |ℓ1,m1> and |ℓ2,m2> are coupled radiatively. As a test case, we calculate the matrix elements of the electric field and of the paramagnetic operators for on- and off-resonance transitions, between hydrogenic circular states of high angular momentum, whose quantum numbers are chosen so as to satisfy electric dipole and electric quadrupole selection rules. Because of the nature of their wave function (they are nodeless and the large centrifugal barrier keeps their overwhelming part at large distances from the nucleus), the validity of the electric dipole approximation in various applications where the off-resonance couplings must be considered becomes precarious. For example, for the transition from the circular state with n = 20 to that with n = 21, for which ≈400 a.u., the dipole approximation starts to fail already at XUV wavelengths (λ <125nm).

  2. sup 13 C-enriched ribonucleosides: Synthesis and application of sup 13 C- sup 1 H and sup 13 C- sup 13 C spin-coupling constants to assess furanose and N-glycoside bond conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, P.C.; Serianni, A.S. )

    1990-09-26

    Adenosine (1), cytidine (2), guanosine (3), and uridine (4) have been prepared chemically with {sup 13}C enrichment (99 atom %) at C1{prime} and C2{prime} of the ribose ring. Reliable synthetic protocols have been developed to permit access to millimole quantities of labeled ribonucleosides required for structural studies of stable isotopically labeled oligonucleotides and for in vivo metabolism studies. High-resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra of the enriched ribonucleosides have been obtained, and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C and {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H spin-coupling constants have been measured for pathways within the {beta}-D-ribofuranose ring and across the N-glycoside bond. Related couplings were determined in methyl {alpha}- and {beta}-D-riboruanosides (5,6), and in two conformationally constrained nucleosides, 2,2{prime}-anhydro-(1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl)uracil (7) and 2{prime},3{prime}-O-isopropylidene-2,5{prime}-O-cyclouridine (8). The latter data were used to construct a crude Karplus curve for the {sup 13}C-C-N-{sup 13}C coupling pathway across the N-glycoside bond in 1-4. {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H, {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H, and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C coupling data are used to evaluate current models describing the conformational dynamics of 1-4 in aqueous solution.

  3. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c]M [2h2m 13c], And [2h3,, 13c] Methyl Aryl Sulfones And Sulfoxides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2004-07-20

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfones and [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfoxides, wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfone or sulfoxide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing methyl aryl sulfones and methyl aryl sulfoxides.

  4. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cardiac metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seeholzer, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques for following the metabolic fate of compounds specifically labeled with /sup 13/C. The goals of the present study are: (1) to develop reliable quantitative procedures for measuring the /sup 13/C enrichment of specific carbon sites in compounds enriched by the metabolism of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates in rat heart, and (2) to use these quantitative measurements of fractional /sup 13/C enrichment within the context of a mathematical flux model describing the carbon flow through the TCA cycle and ancillary pathways, as a means for obtaining unknown flux parameters. Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with various combinations of glucose, acetate, pyruvate, and propionate to achieve steady state flux conditions, followed by perfusion with the same substrates labeled with /sup 13/C in specific carbon sites. The hearts were frozen at different times after addition of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates and neutralized perchloric acid extracts were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The fractional /sup 13/C enrichment (F.E.) of individual carbon sites in different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for saturation and nuclear Overhauser effects. These F.E. measurements by /sup 13/C NMR were validated by the analysis of /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H scalar coupling patterns observed in /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the extracted metabolites. The results obtained from perfusion of hearts glucose plus either (2-/sup 13/C) acetate or (3-/sup 13/C) pyruvate are similar to those obtained by previous investigators using /sup 14/C-labeled substrates.

  5. Evaluating Iron Content and Tissue Microstructure with Off-Resonance Saturation MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmy, Sherif R.

    We present three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, each focused on applying off-resonance saturation (ORS) imaging to a different context or application. Particularly, we are interested in using ORS to evaluate the uptake of superparamagnetic MRI contrast agents in biological tissue, and to evaluate endogenous iron content. This relies on ORS being applied at low off-resonance frequency offsets where most of the negative contrast is due to signal loss from direct saturation of the water content of the sample. Additionally, we wish to combine this information with magnetization transfer contrast, which is obtained by applying ORS at offsets that are far from the resonance frequency, where magnetization transfer (MT) becomes the dominant effect rather than direct saturation (DS). In the first study, we observed the uptake of ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles in a simple model system by imaging the uptake in healthy murine liver in vivo, and by testing different metrics to quantify the uptake. Through this process, we discovered an approach that provides high sensitivity and specificity in low-signal scenarios. In the second study, we evaluated image contrast between brain regions in healthy human adults, and related these to the expected iron content in different regions based on age. Images were evaluated based on different MRI contrast mechanisms including quantitative transverse relaxation rates, as well as parameters obtained from ORS imaging. We also performed a field inhomogeneity adjustment on low-offset ORS data using the information obtained from the coarsely sampled ORS spectrum, and this was sufficient to correct for the inhomogeneities. In the third study, we used transverse relaxation, DS - which is strongly dependent on iron content, and MT contrast, in order to classify ex vivo brain samples having Alzheimer's disease pathology and normal controls, and were able to find strong classifiers. The three studies helped

  6. /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation in gaseous benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Folkendt, M.M.; Weiss-Lopez, B.E.; True, N.S.

    1988-08-25

    The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time, T/sub 1/, measured for benzene protons at densities between 0.81 and 54.4 mol/m/sup 3/ (15 and 980 Torr) at 381 K exhibits a characteristic nonlinear density dependence. Analysis of the density-dependent T/sub 1/ data yields a spin-rotation coupling constant, C/sub eff/, of /vert bar/182.6 (0.4)/vert bar/ Hz and an angular momentum reorientation cross section, sigma, of 131 (1) /Angstrom//sup 2/. The /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation time of singly labeled /sup 13/C benzene is a linear function of density over the density range 1.07-75.12 mol/m/sup 3/ (20-1330 Torr). /sup 13/C T/sub 1/ values are shorter than /sup 1/H T/sub 1/ values by a factor of ca. 100 at comparable densities. The nuclear Overhauser enhancement factor, /eta/, is 0.0 /plus minus/ 0.02 at densities between 11 and 85.3 mol/m/sup 3/ (200 and 1500 Torr), demonstrating that dipole-dipole relaxation is relatively inefficient in this region. The spin-rotation coupling constant, C/sub eff/, for /sup 13/C nuclei in benzene is estimated to be /vert bar/1602 (68)/vert bar/ Hz.

  7. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  8. Off-Resonance Photosensitization of a Photorefractive Polymer Composite Using PbS Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Jong-Sik; Liang, Yichen; Stevens, Tyler E.; Monson, Todd C.; Huber, Dale L.; Mahala, Benjamin D.; Winiarz, Jeffrey G.

    2015-05-26

    The photosensitization of photorefractive polymeric composites for operation at 633 nm is accomplished through the inclusion of narrow band gap semiconductor nanocrystals composed of PbS. Unlike previous studies involving photosensitization of photorefractive polymer composites with inorganic nanocrystals, we employ an off-resonance approach where the first excitonic transition associated with the PbS nanocrystals lies at ~1220 nm and not the wavelength of operation. Using this methodology, internal diffraction efficiencies exceeding 82%, two-beam-coupling gain coefficients of 211 cm–1, and response times of 34 ms have been observed, representing some of the best figures of merit reported for this class of materials. Furthermore, these data demonstrate the ability of semiconductor nanocrystals to compete effectively with traditional organic photosensitizers. In addition to superior performance, this approach also offers an inexpensive and easy means by which to photosensitize composite materials. Additionally, the photoconductive characteristics of the composites used for this study will also be considered.

  9. Off-Resonance Photosensitization of a Photorefractive Polymer Composite Using PbS Nanocrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Moon, Jong-Sik; Liang, Yichen; Stevens, Tyler E.; Monson, Todd C.; Huber, Dale L.; Mahala, Benjamin D.; Winiarz, Jeffrey G.

    2015-05-26

    The photosensitization of photorefractive polymeric composites for operation at 633 nm is accomplished through the inclusion of narrow band gap semiconductor nanocrystals composed of PbS. Unlike previous studies involving photosensitization of photorefractive polymer composites with inorganic nanocrystals, we employ an off-resonance approach where the first excitonic transition associated with the PbS nanocrystals lies at ~1220 nm and not the wavelength of operation. Using this methodology, internal diffraction efficiencies exceeding 82%, two-beam-coupling gain coefficients of 211 cm–1, and response times of 34 ms have been observed, representing some of the best figures of merit reported for this class of materials. Furthermore,more » these data demonstrate the ability of semiconductor nanocrystals to compete effectively with traditional organic photosensitizers. In addition to superior performance, this approach also offers an inexpensive and easy means by which to photosensitize composite materials. Additionally, the photoconductive characteristics of the composites used for this study will also be considered.« less

  10. Dynamic imaging of a single gold nanoparticle in liquid irradiated by off-resonance femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Boutopoulos, Christos; Hatef, Ali; Fortin-Deschênes, Matthieu; Meunier, Michel

    2015-07-21

    Plasmonic nanoparticles can lead to extreme confinement of the light in the near field. This unique ability of plasmonic nanoparticles can be used to generate nanobubbles in liquid. In this work, we demonstrate with single-particle monitoring that 100 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) irradiated by off-resonance femtosecond (fs) laser in the tissue therapeutic optical window (λ = 800 nm), can act as a durable nanolenses in liquid and provoke nanocavitation while remaining intact. We have employed combined ultrafast shadowgraphic imaging, in situ dark field imaging and dynamic tracking of AuNP Brownian motion to ensure the study of individual AuNPs/nanolenses under multiple fs laser pulses. We demonstrate that 100 nm AuNPs can generate multiple, highly confined (radius down to 550 nm) and transient (life time < 50 ns) nanobubbles. The latter is of significant importance for future development of in vivo AuNP-assisted laser nanosurgery and theranostic applications, where AuNP fragmentation should be avoided to prevent side effects, such as cytotoxicity and immune system's response. The experimental results have been correlated with theoretical modeling to provide an insight to the AuNP-safe cavitation mechanism as well as to investigate the deformation mechanism of the AuNPs at high laser fluences. PMID:26104482

  11. Suppression of off-resonant carrier excitations via a standing wave gate beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaubenfels, Thomas; Burkhardt, Karl; Vittorini, Grahame; Brown, Kenneth; Brown, Kenton; Merrill, J. True; Amini, Jason; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa

    2015-05-01

    The motional dynamics of ions in rf traps lead to secular sidebands in their excitation spectra. The relative coupling strengths of the carrier and the sidebands are usually fixed by the Lamb-Dicke factor and ion temperature. We show that the strengths of the carrier resonance and the first order sidebands may be selectively emphasized or suppressed relative to one another. Using 40Ca+ ions trapped in a surface electrode trap, we excite the | S1 / 2 > --> | D5 / 2 > electric quadrupole (E2) transition with laser light that is normally incident to the trap's surface. Retroreflection off the trap surface produces a standing wave. For an E2 transition, the carrier couples to the gradient of the electric field and the sidebands to the magnitude. By moving the ion through the standing wave we alternatively suppress and excite the carrier and sideband transitions with the two sets of fringes 180 degrees out of phase. This technique could be used to suppress off-resonant carrier excitations in two qubit gates, and the fringes themselves provide a measure of the ion displacement that can be used to map out the trapping potentials. This work has been funded by the Georgia Tech Research Institute.

  12. Novel Imaging Contrast Methods for Hyperpolarized 13 C Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen Durant

    Magnetic resonance imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled small molecules has emerged as an extremely powerful tool for the in vivo monitoring of perfusion and metabolism. This work presents methods for improved imaging, parameter mapping, and image contrast generation for in vivo hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Angiography using hyperpolarized urea was greatly improved with a highly T2-weighted acquisition in combination with 15N labeling of the urea amide groups. This is due to the fact that the T2 of [13C]urea is strongly limited by the scalar coupling to the neighboring quadrupolar 14N. The long in vivo T2 values of [13C, 15N2]urea were utilized for sub-millimeter projection angiography using a contrast agent that could be safely injected in concentrations of 10-100 mM while still tolerated in patients with renal insufficiency. This study also presented the first method for in vivo T2 mapping of hyperpolarized 13C compounds. The in vivo T2 of urea was short in the blood and long within the kidneys. This persistent signal component was isolated to the renal filtrate, thus enabling for the first time direct detection of an imaging contrast agent undergoing glomerular filtration. While highly T2-weighted acquisitions select for molecules with short rotational correlation times, high diffusion weighting selects for those with the long translational correlation times. A specialized spin-echo EPI sequence was developed in order to generate highly diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized 13C images on a clinical MRI system operating within clinical peak- RF and gradient amplitude constraints. Low power adiabatic spin echo pulses were developed in order to generate a sufficiently large refocused bandwidth while maintaining low nominal power. This diffusion weighted acquisition gave enhanced tumor contrast-to-noise ratio when imaging [1-13C]lactate after infusion of [1-13C]pyruvate. Finally, the first in-man hyperpolarized 13C MRI clinical trial is discussed.

  13. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  14. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra.

  15. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra. PMID:24771296

  16. Study of Urban environmental quality through Isotopes δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Sosa, E.; Mastachi-Loza, C.; Becerril-Piña, R.; Ramos-Salinas, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    Usually, trees with similar pH values on their bark develop epiphytes of similar species, the acidity to be a factor for growth. The aim of the study was evaluate the air quality through isotope δ13C in order to define the levels of environmental quality in the city of Queretaro, Mexico. In this work were collected at least 4 epiphytes positioned in trees of the species Prosopis Laevigata at 25 sites of Queretaro City. The samples were analyzed for trace elements with an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP). The collecting took place during dry period, in May and early rain June 2011 period, and on four sectors to identify the spatial distribution of pollution, using isotopic analysis of concentration of δ 13C. According with the results there are significant differences among the species in each of the sampled areas. The 5 February Avenue presented greater diversity and richness of δ13C, followed by those who were surveyed in the proximity of the UAQ and finally in the middle-east area. An average value of δ13C-17.92%, followed by those surveyed in the vicinity of the UAQ that correspond to sector I and II with an concentration of δ13C-17.55% and δ13C-17.22%, and finally the samples collected in trees scattered in the East-Sector II and IV with a value of δ13C-17.02% and δ13C-15.62%, respectively. Also were observed differences between the dry and wet period. It is likely that these results of δ 13C in moist period reflect the drag of the isotopes due to rain events that could mark a trend in the dilution of this element, however there is a trend in terms of abundance and composition of finding more impact in those species sampled in dry period, in May and early June 2011.

  17. Site-specific φ- and ψ-torsion angle determination in a uniformly/extensively 13C- and 15N-labeled peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wi, Sungsool; Spano, Justin

    2011-10-01

    A solid-state rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR) NMR method was introduced to identify the ϕ- and ψ-torsion angle from a 1H- 15N or 1H- 13C' spin system of alanine-like residues in a selectively, uniformly, or extensively 15N-/ 13C-labeled peptide. When a C α( i) or a 15N peak is site-specifically obtainable in the NMR spectrum of a uniformly 15N/ 13C-labeled sample system, the ψ- or ϕ-torsion angle specified by the conformational structure of peptide geometry involving 15N( i)- 1H αi - 15N( i + 1) or 13C'( i - 1)- 1H Ni- 13C'( i) spin system can be identified based on 13C α- or 15N-detected 1H α- 15N or 1H N- 13C REDOR experiment. This method will conveniently be utilized to identify major secondary motifs, such as α-helix, β-sheet, and β-turn, from a uniformly 15N-/ 13C-labled peptide sample system. When tested on a 13C-/ 15N-labeled model system of a three amino acid peptide Gly-[U- 13C, 15N]Ala-[U- 13C, 15N]Leu, the ψ-angle of alanine obtained experimentally, ψ = -40 ± 30°, agreed reasonably well with the X-ray determined angle, ψ = -39°.

  18. Dynamic imaging of a single gold nanoparticle in liquid irradiated by off-resonance femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutopoulos, Christos; Hatef, Ali; Fortin-Deschênes, Matthieu; Meunier, Michel

    2015-07-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles can lead to extreme confinement of the light in the near field. This unique ability of plasmonic nanoparticles can be used to generate nanobubbles in liquid. In this work, we demonstrate with single-particle monitoring that 100 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) irradiated by off-resonance femtosecond (fs) laser in the tissue therapeutic optical window (λ = 800 nm), can act as a durable nanolenses in liquid and provoke nanocavitation while remaining intact. We have employed combined ultrafast shadowgraphic imaging, in situ dark field imaging and dynamic tracking of AuNP Brownian motion to ensure the study of individual AuNPs/nanolenses under multiple fs laser pulses. We demonstrate that 100 nm AuNPs can generate multiple, highly confined (radius down to 550 nm) and transient (life time < 50 ns) nanobubbles. The latter is of significant importance for future development of in vivo AuNP-assisted laser nanosurgery and theranostic applications, where AuNP fragmentation should be avoided to prevent side effects, such as cytotoxicity and immune system's response. The experimental results have been correlated with theoretical modeling to provide an insight to the AuNP-safe cavitation mechanism as well as to investigate the deformation mechanism of the AuNPs at high laser fluences.Plasmonic nanoparticles can lead to extreme confinement of the light in the near field. This unique ability of plasmonic nanoparticles can be used to generate nanobubbles in liquid. In this work, we demonstrate with single-particle monitoring that 100 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) irradiated by off-resonance femtosecond (fs) laser in the tissue therapeutic optical window (λ = 800 nm), can act as a durable nanolenses in liquid and provoke nanocavitation while remaining intact. We have employed combined ultrafast shadowgraphic imaging, in situ dark field imaging and dynamic tracking of AuNP Brownian motion to ensure the study of individual AuNPs/nanolenses under multiple fs

  19. Off-Resonance Saturation MRI of Superparamagnetic Nanoprobes: Theoretical Models and Experimental Validations

    PubMed Central

    Khemtong, Chalermchai; Togao, Osamu; Ren, Jimin; Kessinger, Chase W.; Takahashi, Masaya; Sherry, A. Dean; Gao, Jinming

    2011-01-01

    Off-resonance saturation (ORS) is a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method that has shown greatly improved contrast sensitivity for the detection of cancer-specific biomarkers by superparamagnetic nanoprobes in vivo. However, quantitative understanding of the ORS contrast mechanism and its dependence on the structural parameters of superparamagnetic nanoprobes are still lacking. Here we propose a quantitative model of ORS contrast and its experimental validation by superparamagnetic polymeric micelles (SPPM) with precisely controlled structural properties. Size selected, monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticles (6.1 ± 0.2 nm) were used to form a series of SPPM nanoprobes with specifically controlled corona thickness using 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) (DSPE-PEG) with different PEG molecular weights. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering showed that SPPM were uniform in size. The average hydrodynamic diameters of SPPM with PEG lengths of 0.55, 1, 2, and 5 kD were 16.6 ± 2.8, 18.4 ± 2.9, 24.1 ± 3.4, and 28.9 ± 3.4 nm, respectively. MRI experiments at 7T determined that r2 values of SPPM with 0.55, 1, 2, and 5 kD PEG as corona were 201 ± 3, 136 ± 8, 107 ± 5, and 108 ± 8 Fe mM-1s-1, respectively. ORS intensity from Z-spectra of SPPM showed a significant correlation with the inverse of T2 relaxation rates (1/T2, s-1) of the SPPM nanoprobes regardless of the PEG corona thickness. These data provide the fundamental understanding of the structure-property relationships between the SPPM nanostructures and ORS sensitivity, which offers useful mechanistic insights for the future improvement of SPPM nanoprobes in cancer molecular imaging applications. PMID:21277813

  20. [Joint correction for motion artifacts and off-resonance artifacts in multi-shot diffusion magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenchuan; Fang, Sheng; Guo, Hua

    2014-06-01

    Aiming at motion artifacts and off-resonance artifacts in multi-shot diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we proposed a joint correction method in this paper to correct the two kinds of artifacts simultaneously without additional acquisition of navigation data and field map. We utilized the proposed method using multi-shot variable density spiral sequence to acquire MRI data and used auto-focusing technique for image deblurring. We also used direct method or iterative method to correct motion induced phase errors in the process of deblurring. In vivo MRI experiments demonstrated that the proposed method could effectively suppress motion artifacts and off-resonance artifacts and achieve images with fine structures. In addition, the scan time was not increased in applying the proposed method.

  1. Detection of inflammatory cell function using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy of hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine

    PubMed Central

    Najac, Chloé; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Kohanbash, Gary; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Okada, Hideho; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are highly prevalent inflammatory cells that play a key role in tumor development and are considered therapeutic targets. MDSCs promote tumor growth by blocking T-cell-mediated anti-tumoral immune response through depletion of arginine that is essential for T-cell proliferation. To deplete arginine, MDSCs express high levels of arginase, which catalyzes the breakdown of arginine into urea and ornithine. Here, we developed a new hyperpolarized 13C probe, [6-13C]-arginine, to image arginase activity. We show that [6-13C]-arginine can be hyperpolarized, and hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production from [6-13C]-arginine is linearly correlated with arginase concentration in vitro. Furthermore we show that we can detect a statistically significant increase in hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production in MDSCs when compared to control bone marrow cells. This increase was associated with an increase in intracellular arginase concentration detected using a spectrophotometric assay. Hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine could therefore serve to image tumoral MDSC function and more broadly M2-like macrophages. PMID:27507680

  2. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  3. High homogeneity B(1) 30.2 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for off-resonance relaxation times measurements.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, M; Woźniak-Braszak, A; Jurga, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on design and construction of a double coil high-homogeneity ensuring Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for off-resonance relaxation time measurements. NMR off-resonance experiments pose unique technical problems. Long irradiation can overheat the sample, dephase the spins because of B(1) field inhomogeneity and degrade the signal received by requiring the receiver bandwidth to be broader than that needed for normal experiment. The probe proposed solves these problems by introducing a separate off-resonance irradiation coil which is larger than the receiver coil and is wound up on the dewar tube that separates it from the receiver coil thus also thermally protects the sample from overheating. Large size of the irradiation coil also improves the field homogeneity because as a ratio of the sample diameter to the magnet (coil) diameter increases, the field inhomogeneity also increases (Blümich et al., 2008) [1]. The small receiver coil offers maximization of the filling factor and a high signal to the noise ratio.

  4. Phonon-mediated squeezing of the cavity field off-resonantly coupled with a coherently driven quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jia-pei; Huang, Hui; Li, Gao-xiang

    2014-01-21

    We theoretically propose a scheme for the quadrature squeezing of the cavity field via dissipative processes. The effects of the electron-phonon interaction (EPI) on the squeezing are investigated, where the cavity is off-resonantly coupled with a coherently driven quantum dot (QD) which is allowed to interact with an acoustic-phonon reservoir. Under certain conditions, the participation of the phonon induced by both the EPI and the off-resonant coupling of the cavity with the QD enables some dissipative processes to occur resonantly in the dressed-state basis of the QD. The cavity-mode photons emitted or absorbed during the phonon-mediated dissipative processes are correlated, thus leading to the squeezing of the cavity field. A squeezed vacuum reservoir for the cavity field is built up due to the EPI plus the off-resonant coupling between the cavity and the QD. The numerical results obtained with an effective polaron master equation derived using second-order perturbation theory indicate that, in low temperature limit, the degree of squeezing is maximal but the increasing temperature of the phonon reservoir could hinder the squeezing and degrade the degree of the squeezing of the cavity field. In addition, the presence of the photonic crystal could enhance the quadrature squeezing of the cavity field.

  5. IMPROVED LINE DATA FOR THE SWAN SYSTEM {sup 12}C{sup 13}C ISOTOPOLOGUE

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Ram S.; Brooke, James S. A.; Bernath, Peter F.; Sneden, Christopher; Lucatello, Sara E-mail: rr662@york.ac.uk E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu

    2014-03-01

    We present new, accurate predictions for rotational line positions, excitation energies, and transition probabilities of the {sup 12}C{sup 13}C isotopologue Swan d{sup 3}Π-a{sup 3}Π system 0-0, 0–1, 0–2, 1–0, 1–1, 1–2, 2–0, 2–1, and 2–2 vibrational bands. The line positions and energy levels were predicted through new analyses of published laboratory data for the {sup 12}C{sup 13}C lines. Transition probabilities were derived from recent computations of transition dipole moments and related quantities. The {sup 12}C{sup 13}C line data were combined with similar data for {sup 12}C{sub 2,} reported in a companion paper, and applied to produce synthetic spectra of carbon-rich metal-poor stars that have strong C{sub 2} Swan bands. The matches between synthesized and observed spectra were used to estimate band head positions for a few of the {sup 12}C{sup 13}C vibrational bands and to verify that the new computed line data match observed spectra. The much weaker C{sub 2} lines of the bright red giant Arcturus were also synthesized in the band head regions.

  6. Direct 13C-detection for carbonyl relaxation studies of protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pasat, Gabriela; Zintsmaster, John S; Peng, Jeffrey W

    2008-08-01

    We describe a method that uses direct 13C-detection for measuring rotating-frame carbonyl (13CO) relaxation rates to describe protein functional dynamics. Key advantages of method include the following: (i) unique access to 13CO groups that lack a scalar-coupled 15N-1H group; (ii) insensitivity to 15N/1H exchange-broadening that can derail 1H-detected 15N and HNCO methods; (iii) avoidance of artifacts caused by incomplete water suppression. We demonstrate the approach for both backbone and side-chain 13CO groups. Accuracy of the 13C-detected results is supported by their agreement with those obtained from established HNCO-based approaches. Critically, we show that the 13C-detection approach provides access to the 13CO groups of functionally important residues that are invisible via 1H-detected HNCO methods because of exchange-broadening. Hence, the 13C-based method fills gaps inherent in canonical 1H-detected relaxation experiments, and thus provides a novel complementary tool for NMR studies of biomolecular flexibility. PMID:18514001

  7. Structure of B sub 13 C sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bylander, D.M.; Kleinman, L. )

    1991-01-15

    By comparing calculated lattice constants with x-ray data as well as by comparison of calculated free energies, we find that the correct structure of B{sub 13}C{sub 2} is B{sub 12}(CBC) rather than B{sub 11}C(BBC), as had been suggested. We also show that B{sub 12}C{sub 3} is stable against 13B{sub 12}C{sub 3}{r arrow}12B{sub 13}C{sub 2}+15C as is B{sub 13}C{sub 2} against 3B{sub 13}C{sub 2}{r arrow}2B{sub 12}C{sub 3}+15B.

  8. Anomalous 13C enrichment in modern marine organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Claypool, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Marine organic carbon is heavier isotopically (13C enriched) than most land-plant or terrestrial organic C1. Accordingly, ??13C values of organic C in modern marine sediments are routinely interpreted in terms of the relative proportions of marine and terrestrial sources of the preserved organic matter2,3. When independent geochemical techniques are used to evaluate the source of organic matter in Cretaceous or older rocks, those rocks containing mostly marine organic C are found typically to have lighter (more-negative) ??13C values than rocks containing mostly terrestrial organic C. Here we conclude that marine photosynthesis in mid-Cretaceous and earlier oceans generally resulted in a greater fractionation of C isotopes and produced organic C having lighter ??13C values. Modern marine photosynthesis may be occurring under unusual geological conditions (higher oceanic primary production rates, lower PCO2) that limit dissolved CO2 availability and minimize carbon isotope fractionation4. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. Dihydroflavanonols from Cedrus deodara, A (13)C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, P K; Agarwal, S K; Rastogi, R P; Osterdahal, B G

    1981-09-01

    High resolution (13)C NMR study of taxifolin, cedeodarin, cedrin and their methyl ethers allowed unambiguous placement of the Me in 5,7-dihydroxyflavanonol nucleus, besides providing other valuable information on the substitution pattern in the molecule.

  10. Pulsed polarization transfer for 13C NMR in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Ad; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Maciel, Gary E.

    A new pulsed polarization transfer experiment method is described for the polarization of 13C spins in a solid by magnetization transfer from protons. The method is directly analogous to the INEPT sequence for liquids introduced by Freeman and Morris. As polarization is transferred in PPT between individual 1H 13C pairs, rather than between spin reservoirs, different opportunities exist for structurally selective experiments. Results on p-diethoxybenzene and coronene are presented.

  11. Abundance anomaly of the 13C species of CCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, N.; Saruwatari, O.; Sakai, T.; Takano, S.; Yamamoto, S.

    2010-03-01

    Aims: We have observed the N = 1-0 lines of CCH and its 13C isotopic species toward a cold dark cloud, TMC-1 and a star-forming region, L1527, to investigate the 13C abundances and formation pathways of CCH. Methods: The observations have been carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Results: We have successfully detected the lines of 13CCH and C13CH toward the both sources and found a significant intensity difference between the two 13C isotopic species. The [C13CH] /[13CCH] abundance ratios are 1.6 ± 0.4 (3σ) and 1.6 ± 0.1 (3σ) for TMC-1 and L1527, respectively. The abundance difference between C13CH and 13CCH means that the two carbon atoms of CCH are not equivalent in the formation pathway. On the other hand, the [CCH]/[C13CH] and [CCH]/[13CCH] ratios are evaluated to be larger than 170 and 250 toward TMC-1, and to be larger than 80 and 135 toward L1527, respectively. Therefore, both of the 13C species are significantly diluted in comparison with the interstellar 12C/13C ratio of 60. The dilution is discussed in terms of a behavior of 13C in molecular clouds.

  12. Localized in vivo13C NMR spectroscopy of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Gruetter, Rolf; Adriany, Gregor; Choi, In-Young; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Lei, Hongxia; Öz, Gülin

    2006-01-01

    Localized 13C NMR spectroscopy provides a new investigative tool for studying cerebral metabolism. The application of 13C NMR spectroscopy to living intact humans and animals presents the investigator with a number of unique challenges. This review provides in the first part a tutorial insight into the ingredients required for achieving a successful implementation of localized 13C NMR spectroscopy. The difficulties in establishing 13C NMR are the need for decoupling of the one-bond 13C–1H heteronuclear J coupling, the large chemical shift range, the low sensitivity and the need for localization of the signals. The methodological consequences of these technical problems are discussed, particularly with respect to (a) RF front-end considerations, (b) localization methods, (c) the low sensitivity, and (d) quantification methods. Lastly, some achievements of in vivo localized 13C NMR spectroscopy of the brain are reviewed, such as: (a) the measurement of brain glutamine synthesis and the feasibility of quantifying glutamatergic action in the brain; (b) the demonstration of significant anaplerotic fluxes in the brain; (c) the demonstration of a highly regulated malate-aspartate shuttle in brain energy metabolism and isotope flux; (d) quantification of neuronal and glial energy metabolism; and (e) brain glycogen metabolism in hypoglycemia in rats and humans. We conclude that the unique and novel insights provided by 13C NMR spectroscopy have opened many new research areas that are likely to improve the understanding of brain carbohydrate metabolism in health and disease. PMID:14679498

  13. Tackling systematic errors in quantum logic gates with composite rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, Holly K.; Llewellyn, Gavin; Jones, Jonathan A.

    2003-04-01

    We describe the use of composite rotations to combat systematic errors in single-qubit quantum logic gates and discuss three families of composite rotations which can be used to correct off-resonance and pulse length errors. Although developed and described within the context of nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computing, these sequences should be applicable to any implementation of quantum computation.

  14. NMR at cryogenic temperatures: A {sup 13}C NMR study of ferrocene

    SciTech Connect

    Orendt, A.M.; Facelli, J.C.; Jiang, Y.J.; Grant, D.M.

    1998-09-24

    A new cryogenic apparatus is described that can be used to obtain NMR spectra at temperatures down to 8--10 K. The static solid {sup 13}C NMR spectrum of ferrocene is recorded at that temperature. Spectra recorded at higher temperatures show that ferrocene is still freely rotating about its 5-fold symmetry axis on the {sup 13}C NMR time scale at 45--50 K. A comparison of the principal values of the {sup 13}C chemical-shift tensor obtained from the room- and low-temperature spectra of ferrocene indicates that the lowest frequency chemical shift principal component, {delta}{sub 33}, is tilted off this symmetry axis by approximately 12{degree}. Quantum chemical calculations of the chemical-shift tensor, completed on structures of ferrocene from the literature as well as on optimized structures with the cyclopentadienyl rings locked in both the staggered and eclipsed arrangements, predict the angle between the {delta}{sub 33} direction and the rotation axis to be between 11 and 15{degree}, depending upon the geometry used in the calculation. The calculations also predict the sign of the angular perturbation, information not obtained from the experiment. An explanation of this angular change in the {delta}{sub 33} direction is provided by the composition of the molecular orbitals.

  15. Phenyl galactopyranosides - 13C CPMAS NMR and conformational analysis using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wałejko, Piotr; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Bukowicki, Jarosław; Witkowski, Stanisław; Wawer, Iwona

    2015-08-01

    Structural analyses of four compounds (phenyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (1), phenyl β-D-galactopyranoside (2), phenyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-α-D-galactopyranoside (3) and phenyl α-D-galactopyranoside (4)) have been performed using solid-state 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy and theoretical methods. Conformational analysis involved grid search and genetic algorithm (GAAGS). Low-energy conformers found by GAAGS were further optimized by DFT and chemical shifts were calculated using GIAO/DFT approach. 13C CPMAS NMR chemical shift of carbon C2 is indicative of the glycoside torsional angle. Separated or merged resonances of C2 and C6 suggest free rotation of phenyl ring in the solid phase.

  16. Measurement of 13C chemical shift tensor principal values with a magic-angle turning experiment.

    PubMed

    Hu, J Z; Orendt, A M; Alderman, D W; Pugmire, R J; Ye, C; Grant, D M

    1994-08-01

    The magic-angle turning (MAT) experiment introduced by Gan is developed into a powerful and routine method for measuring the principal values of 13C chemical shift tensors in powdered solids. A large-volume MAT probe with stable rotation frequencies down to 22 Hz is described. A triple-echo MAT pulse sequence is introduced to improve the quality of the two-dimensional baseplane. It is shown that measurements of the principal values of chemical shift tensors in complex compounds can be enhanced by using either short contact times or dipolar dephasing pulse sequences to isolate the powder patterns from protonated or non-protonated carbons, respectively. A model compound, 1,2,3-trimethoxybenzene, is used to demonstrate these techniques, and the 13C principal values in 2,3-dimethylnaphthalene and Pocahontas coal are reported as typical examples.

  17. Transport and imaging of brute-force (13)C hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Smith, Bryce A; Mattingly, Mark; Goloshevsky, Artem G; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate transport of hyperpolarized frozen 1-(13)C pyruvic acid from its site of production to a nearby facility, where a time series of (13)C images was acquired from the aqueous dissolution product. Transportability is tied to the hyperpolarization (HP) method we employ, which omits radical electron species used in other approaches that would otherwise relax away the HP before reaching the imaging center. In particular, we attained (13)C HP by 'brute-force', i.e., using only low temperature and high-field (e.g., T<∼2K and B∼14T) to pre-polarize protons to a large Boltzmann value (∼0.4% (1)H polarization). After polarizing the neat, frozen sample, ejection quickly (<1s) passed it through a low field (B<100G) to establish the (1)H pre-polarization spin temperature on (13)C via the process known as low-field thermal mixing (yielding ∼0.1% (13)C polarization). By avoiding polarization agents (a.k.a. relaxation agents) that are needed to hyperpolarize by the competing method of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP), the (13)C relaxation time was sufficient to transport the sample for ∼10min before finally dissolving in warm water and obtaining a (13)C image of the hyperpolarized, dilute, aqueous product (∼0.01% (13)C polarization, a >100-fold gain over thermal signals in the 1T scanner). An annealing step, prior to polarizing the sample, was also key for increasing T1∼30-fold during transport. In that time, HP was maintained using only modest cryogenics and field (T∼60K and B=1.3T), for T1((13)C) near 5min. Much greater time and distance (with much smaller losses) may be covered using more-complete annealing and only slight improvements on transport conditions (e.g., yielding T1∼5h at 30K, 2T), whereas even intercity transfer is possible (T1>20h) at reasonable conditions of 6K and 2T. Finally, it is possible to increase the overall enhancement near d-DNP levels (i.e., 10(2)-fold more) by polarizing below 100mK, where nanoparticle

  18. Transport and imaging of brute-force 13C hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Smith, Bryce A.; Mattingly, Mark; Goloshevsky, Artem G.; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate transport of hyperpolarized frozen 1-13C pyruvic acid from its site of production to a nearby facility, where a time series of 13C images was acquired from the aqueous dissolution product. Transportability is tied to the hyperpolarization (HP) method we employ, which omits radical electron species used in other approaches that would otherwise relax away the HP before reaching the imaging center. In particular, we attained 13C HP by 'brute-force', i.e., using only low temperature and high-field (e.g., T < ∼2 K and B ∼ 14 T) to pre-polarize protons to a large Boltzmann value (∼0.4% 1H polarization). After polarizing the neat, frozen sample, ejection quickly (<1 s) passed it through a low field (B < 100 G) to establish the 1H pre-polarization spin temperature on 13C via the process known as low-field thermal mixing (yielding ∼0.1% 13C polarization). By avoiding polarization agents (a.k.a. relaxation agents) that are needed to hyperpolarize by the competing method of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP), the 13C relaxation time was sufficient to transport the sample for ∼10 min before finally dissolving in warm water and obtaining a 13C image of the hyperpolarized, dilute, aqueous product (∼0.01% 13C polarization, a >100-fold gain over thermal signals in the 1 T scanner). An annealing step, prior to polarizing the sample, was also key for increasing T1 ∼ 30-fold during transport. In that time, HP was maintained using only modest cryogenics and field (T ∼ 60 K and B = 1.3 T), for T1(13C) near 5 min. Much greater time and distance (with much smaller losses) may be covered using more-complete annealing and only slight improvements on transport conditions (e.g., yielding T1 ∼ 5 h at 30 K, 2 T), whereas even intercity transfer is possible (T1 > 20 h) at reasonable conditions of 6 K and 2 T. Finally, it is possible to increase the overall enhancement near d-DNP levels (i.e., 102-fold more) by polarizing below 100 mK, where

  19. A 13C-NMR study of azacryptand complexes.

    PubMed

    Wild, Aljoscha A C; Fennell, Kevin; Morgan, Grace G; Hewage, Chandralal M; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2014-09-28

    An azacryptand has been solubilised in aqueous media containing 50% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide. (13)C-NMR has been used to determine how the azacryptand is affected by zinc binding at pH 10. Using (13)C-NMR and (13)C-enriched bicarbonate we have been able to observe the formation of 4 different carbamate derivatives of the azacryptand at pH 10. The azacryptand was shown to solubilise zinc or cadmium at alkaline pHs. Two moles of zinc are bound per mole of azacryptand and this complex binds 1 mole of carbonate. By replacing the zinc with cadmium-113 we have shown that the (13)C-NMR signal of the (13)C-enriched carbon of the bound carbonate is split into two triplets at 2.2 °C. This shows that two cadmium complexes are formed and in each of these complexes the carbonate group is bound by two magnetically equivalent metal ions. It also demonstrates that these cadmium complexes are not in fast exchange. From temperature studies we show that in the zinc complexes both complexes are in fast exchange with each other but are in slow exchange with free bicarbonate. HOESY is used to determine the position of the carbonate carbon in the complex. The solution and crystal structures of the zinc-carbonate-azacryptand complexes are compared. PMID:25091182

  20. 13C-based metabolic flux analysis: fundamentals and practice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Isotope-based metabolic flux analysis is one of the emerging technologies applied to system level metabolic phenotype characterization in metabolic engineering. Among the developed approaches, (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis has been established as a standard tool and has been widely applied to quantitative pathway characterization of diverse biological systems. To implement (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in practice, comprehending the underlying mathematical and computational modeling fundamentals is of importance along with carefully conducted experiments and analytical measurements. Such knowledge is also crucial when designing (13)C-labeling experiments and properly acquiring key data sets essential for in vivo flux analysis implementation. In this regard, the modeling fundamentals of (13)C-labeling systems and analytical data processing are the main topics we will deal with in this chapter. Along with this, the relevant numerical optimization techniques are addressed to help implementation of the entire computational procedures aiming at (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in vivo.

  1. A scientific workflow framework for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Dalman, Tolga; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2016-08-20

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) with (13)C labeling data is a high-precision technique to quantify intracellular reaction rates (fluxes). One of the major challenges of (13)C MFA is the interactivity of the computational workflow according to which the fluxes are determined from the input data (metabolic network model, labeling data, and physiological rates). Here, the workflow assembly is inevitably determined by the scientist who has to consider interacting biological, experimental, and computational aspects. Decision-making is context dependent and requires expertise, rendering an automated evaluation process hardly possible. Here, we present a scientific workflow framework (SWF) for creating, executing, and controlling on demand (13)C MFA workflows. (13)C MFA-specific tools and libraries, such as the high-performance simulation toolbox 13CFLUX2, are wrapped as web services and thereby integrated into a service-oriented architecture. Besides workflow steering, the SWF features transparent provenance collection and enables full flexibility for ad hoc scripting solutions. To handle compute-intensive tasks, cloud computing is supported. We demonstrate how the challenges posed by (13)C MFA workflows can be solved with our approach on the basis of two proof-of-concept use cases.

  2. Synthesis and applications of {sup 13}C glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Stocking, E.; Khalsa, O.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-12-01

    Due in part to the use of labeled glycerol for the {sup 13}C enrichment of biomolecules, we are currently developing new synthetic routes to various isotopomers of glycerol. Judging from our experience, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment and/or have poor overall yields (12 to 15%). Furthermore, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability is limited by the level of demand. We are presently developing a short de novo synthesis of glycerol from carbon dioxide ({approximately}53% overall yield for four steps) and are examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific {sup 13}C-labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from labeled methanol and carbon dioxide. One application of {sup 13}C glycerol we have examined is enzymatic conversion of glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25 to 50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). We are also pursuing the chemical conversion of {sup 13}C-labeled DHA to DHAP. We are especially interested in {sup 13}C-labeled DHAP because we are investigating its use as a chemo-enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids.

  3. A scientific workflow framework for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Dalman, Tolga; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2016-08-20

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) with (13)C labeling data is a high-precision technique to quantify intracellular reaction rates (fluxes). One of the major challenges of (13)C MFA is the interactivity of the computational workflow according to which the fluxes are determined from the input data (metabolic network model, labeling data, and physiological rates). Here, the workflow assembly is inevitably determined by the scientist who has to consider interacting biological, experimental, and computational aspects. Decision-making is context dependent and requires expertise, rendering an automated evaluation process hardly possible. Here, we present a scientific workflow framework (SWF) for creating, executing, and controlling on demand (13)C MFA workflows. (13)C MFA-specific tools and libraries, such as the high-performance simulation toolbox 13CFLUX2, are wrapped as web services and thereby integrated into a service-oriented architecture. Besides workflow steering, the SWF features transparent provenance collection and enables full flexibility for ad hoc scripting solutions. To handle compute-intensive tasks, cloud computing is supported. We demonstrate how the challenges posed by (13)C MFA workflows can be solved with our approach on the basis of two proof-of-concept use cases. PMID:26721184

  4. {sup 13}C relaxation in an RNA hairpin

    SciTech Connect

    King, G.C. |; Akratos, C.; Xi, Z.; Michnica, M.J.

    1994-12-01

    This initial survey of {sup 13}C relaxation in the {triangle}TAR RNA element has generated a number of interesting results that should prove generally useful for future studies. The most readily comparable study in the literature monitored {sup 13}C relaxation of the methyl groups from unusual bases in tRNA{sup Phe}. The study, which used T{sub 1} and NOE data only, reported order parameters for the methyl group axis that ranged between 0.51 and 0.97-a range similar to that observed here. However, they reported a breakdown of the standard order parameter analysis at higher (118-MHz {sup 13}C) frequencies, which should serve to emphasize the need for a thorough exploration of suitable motional models.

  5. Implication of Formation Mechanisms of HC5N in TMC-1 as Studied by 13C Isotopic Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Kotomi; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Saito, Masao; Sakai, Nami; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kameno, Seiji; Takano, Shuro; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2016-02-01

    We observed the J = 9 ‑ 8 and 16 ‑ 15 rotational transitions of the normal species and five 13C isotopologues of HC5N to study its formation mechanisms toward the cyanopolyyne peak in Taurus Molecular Cloud-1, with the 45-m radio telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. We detected the five 13C isotopologues with high signal-to-noise ratios between 12 and 20, as well as the normal species. The abundance ratios of the five 13C isotopologues of HC5N are found to be 1.00:0.97:1.03:1.05:1.16 (±0.19) (1σ) for [H13CCCCCN]:[HC13CCCCN]:[HCC13CCCN]:[HCCC13CCN]:[HCCCC13CN]. We do not find any significant differences among the five {}13{{C}} isotopologues. The averaged [HC5N]/[13C isotopologues] abundance ratio is determined to be 94 ± 6 (1σ), which is slightly higher than the local interstellar elemental 12C/13C ratio of 60–70. Possible formation pathways are discussed on the basis of these results.

  6. Measuring doubly 13C-substituted ethane by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clog, M.; Ling, C.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is present in non-negligible amounts in most natural gas reservoirs and is used to produce ethylene for petrochemical industries. It is one of the by-products of lipid metabolism and is the arguably simplest molecule that can manifest multiple 13C substitutions. There are several plausible controls on the relative abundances of 13C2H6 in natural gases: thermodynamically controlled homogeneous isotope exchange reactions analogous to those behind carbonate clumped isotope thermometry; inheritance from larger biomolecules that under thermal degradation to produce natural gas; mixing of natural gases that differ markedly in bulk isotopic composition; or combinations of these and/or other, less expected fractionations. There is little basis for predicting which of these will dominate in natural samples. Here, we focus on an analytical techniques that will provide the avenue for exploring these phenomena. The method is based on high-resolution gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometry, using the Thermo 253-Ultra (a new prototype mass spectrometer). This instrument achieves the mass resolution (M/Δ M) up to 27,000, permitting separation of the isobaric interferences of potential contaminants and isotopologues of an analtye or its fragments which share a cardinal mass. We present techniques to analyze several isotopologues of molecular and fragment ions of C2H6. The critical isobaric separations for our purposes include: discrimination of 13C2H6 from 13C12CDH5 at mass 32 and separation of the 13CH3 fragment from 12CH4 at mass 16, both requiring at least a mass resolution of 20000 to make an adequate measurement. Other obvious interferences are either cleanly separated (e.g., O2, O) or accounted for by peak-stripping (CH3OH on mass 32 and NH2 on mass 16). We focus on a set of measurements which constrain: the doubly-substituted isotopologue, 13C2H6, and the 13CH3/12CH3 ratio of the methyl fragment, which constrains the bulk δ 13C. Similar methods can be

  7. Optimized [1-13C]glucose infusion protocol for 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 Tesla of human brain glucose metabolism under euglycemic and hypoglycemic conditions

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Kim C.C.; van der Graaf, Marinette; Tack, Cees J.J.; Klomp, Dennis W.J.; Heerschap, Arend; de Galan, Bastiaan E.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of insulin-induced hypoglycemia on cerebral glucose metabolism is largely unknown. 13C MRS is a unique tool to study cerebral glucose metabolism, but the concurrent requirement for [1-13C]glucose administration limits its use under hypoglycemic conditions. To facilitate 13C MRS data analysis we designed separate [1-13C]glucose infusion protocols for hyperinsulinemic euglycemic and hypoglycemic clamps in such a way that plasma isotopic enrichment of glucose was stable and comparable under both glycemic conditions. 13C MR spectra were acquired with optimized 13C MRS measurement techniques to obtain high quality 13C MR spectra with these protocols. PMID:19913052

  8. Neutron Backgrounds: 13C({alpha}, n) etc

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsui, Tadao

    2005-09-08

    13C({alpha}, n) reaction is the main neutron source in an underground large-volume liquid-scintillator detector KamLAND. {alpha} sources, targets, cross sections, and neutron transport are studied to estimate the backgrounds of v-bare signal.

  9. Spectral editing for in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yun; Shen, Jun

    2012-01-01

    In vivo detection of carboxylic/amide carbons is a promising technique for studying cerebral metabolism and neurotransmission due to the very low RF power required for proton decoupling. In the carboxylic/amide region, however, there is severe spectral overlap between acetate C1 and glutamate C5, complicating studies that use acetate as an astroglia-specific substrate. There are no known in vivo MRS techniques that can spectrally resolve acetate C1 and glutamate C5 singlets. In this study, we propose to spectrally separate acetate C1 and glutamate C5 by a two-step J-editing technique after introducing homonuclear 13C- 13C scalar coupling between carboxylic/amide carbons and aliphatic carbons. By infusing [1,2- 13C 2]acetate instead of [1- 13C]acetate the acetate doublet can be spectrally edited because of the large separation between acetate C2 and glutamate C4 in the aliphatic region. This technique can be applied to studying acetate transport and metabolism in brain in the carboxylic/amide region without spectral interference.

  10. Does the Shuram δ13C excursion record Ediacaran oxygenation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, J. M.; Maloof, A. C.; Schoene, B.; Higgins, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The most negative carbon isotope excursion in Earth history is found in carbonate rocks of the Ediacaran Period (635-542 Ma). Known colloquially as the the 'Shuram' excursion, workers have long noted its tantalizing, broad concordance with the rise of abundant macro-scale fossils in the rock record, variously interpreted as animals, giant protists, macro-algae and lichen, and known as the 'Ediacaran Biota.' Thus, the Shuram excursion has been interpreted by many in the context of a dramatically changing redox state of the Ediacaran oceans - e.g., a result of methane cycling in a low O2 atmosphere, the final destruction of a large pool of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and the step-wise oxidation of the Ediacaran oceans. More recently, diagenetic interpretations of the Shuram excursion - e.g. sedimentary in-growth of very δ13C depleted authigenic carbonates, meteoric alteration of Ediacaran carbonates, late-stage burial diagenesis - have challenged the various Ediacaran redox models. A rigorous geologic context is required to discriminate between these explanatory models, and determine whether the Shuram excursion can be used to evaluate terminal Neoproterozoic oxygenation. Here, we present chemo-stratigraphic data (δ13C, δ18O, δ44/42Ca and redox sensitive trace element abundances) from 12 measured sections of the Ediacaran-aged Wonoka Formation (Fm.) of South Australia that require a syn-depositional age for the extraordinary range of δ13C values (-12 to +4‰) observed in the formation. In some locations, the Wonoka Fm. is ~700 meters (m) of mixed shelf limestones and siliclastics that record the full 16 ‰ δ13C excursion in a remarkably consistent fashion across 100s of square kilometers of basin area. Fabric-altering diagenesis, where present, occurs at the sub-meter vertical scale, only results in sub-permil offsets in δ13C and cannot be used to explain the full δ13C excursion. In other places, the Wonoka Fm. is host to deep (1 km

  11. Synthesis of [1-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [2-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [3-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid] and combinations thereof

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2009-09-01

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, of the formulae ##STR00001## wherein C* is each independently selected from the group consisting of .sup.13C and .sup.12C with the proviso that at least one C* is .sup.13C, each hydrogen of the methylene group can independently be either hydrogen or deuterium, the methyl group includes either zero or three deuterium atoms, Q is from the group of sulfide, sulfinyl, and sulfone, Z is an aryl group from the group of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently from the group of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group from the group of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently from the group of a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, and an alkoxy group, and the methyl group can include either zero or three deuterium atoms.

  12. Synthesis of [1-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [2-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [3-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid] and combinations thereof

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A. , Unkefer; Clifford J. , Alvarez; Marc A.

    2012-06-12

    The present invention is directed to the labeled compounds, ##STR00001## wherein C* is each either .sup.13C and .sup.12C where at least one C* is .sup.13C, each hydrogen of the methylene group is hydrogen or deuterium, the methyl group includes either zero or three deuterium atoms, Q is sulfide, sulfinyl, or sulfone, Z is an aryl group such as 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, or a phenyl group ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently either hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group such as NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently either a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, and an alkoxy group, and the methyl group can include either zero or three deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to the labeled compounds ##STR00003##

  13. Short-term d13C changes in cultivated soils from Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounejeva, E.; Etchevers, J.; Morales Puente, P.; Cienfuegos Alvarado, E.; Sedov, S.; Solleiro, E.; Hidalgo, C.

    2007-05-01

    (generally less than -20%o). The common feature for the soils under the Traditional and Traditional improved treatments was a C3 enrichment of the superficial SOM component compared to the underlying layers as a consequence of the dominance of the cultivated C3 species. A similar but more accentuated negative shift is also observed in the SOM from the forest soil (non-cultivated soil d13C -25.2), so the interpretation is uncertain. In the Traditional Organic treatment a clear and perceptible increment of d13C in the SOM carbon signature was observed. This was attributed mainly to the fact that cows manure may contain a lot of C4 coming from feedstuff rich in corn grain that is provided to the animals during grass shortage periods . However, the maize crop introduced in the rotation during the 3rd year had no major effect on the tepetates carbon isotopic signature. The stable isotopic carbon data corresponding to a short period (4 years) of observation in uniformly managed soil ecosystems showed that d13C changed due to the quality of the residues (relative abundance of C3/C4 species) incorporated to the SOC, but this memory is susceptible to undergo changes in the short term and could be rapidly reversed as a consequence of crop management.

  14. 13C NMR spectra of pyridine chalcone analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, B. Ž.; Mišić-Vuković, M.; Marinković, A. D.; Csanádi, J.

    1999-05-01

    13C NMR spectra of two series of pyridine chalcone analogs were determined in deuterated dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO-d 6). It was established that these compounds were in more stable E-configurations except for the 4-pyridalacetophenone which was in Z-configuration. On the basis of the Hammett correlations of 13C NMR chemical shifts of the ethylenic bond carbon atoms and the σ values for the pyridine "aza" groups, the polarization of ethylenic bonds were discussed. It was established that the opposite effect of the pyridine substituents at the electronic density distribution in pyridalacetophenone and cinnamoylpyridines depends on its direct bonding to the ethylenic carbon or the transmission electronic effects via the carbonyl group, respectively.

  15. Metabolic Imaging in the Anesthetized Rat Brain Using Hyperpolarized [1-13C] Pyruvate and [1-13C] Ethyl Pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Ralph E.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Mayer, Dirk; Chen, Albert; Wilson, David; Kohler, Susan; Bok, Robert; Vigneron, Daniel; Kurhanewicz, John; Tropp, James; Spielman, Daniel; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-01-01

    Formulation, polarization, and dissolution conditions were developed to obtain a stable hyperpolarized solution of [1-13C]-ethyl pyruvate. A maximum tolerated concentration and injection rate were determined, and 13C spectroscopic imaging was used to compare the uptake of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-ethyl pyruvate relative to hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate into anesthetized rat brain. Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-ethyl pyruvate and [1-13C]-pyruvate metabolic imaging in normal brain is demonstrated and quantified in this feasibility and range-finding study. PMID:20432284

  16. Experimental design principles for isotopically instationary 13C labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Nöh, Katharina; Wiechert, Wolfgang

    2006-06-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is a well-established tool in Metabolic Engineering that found numerous applications in recent years. However, one strong limitation of the current method is the requirement of an-at least approximate-isotopic stationary state at sampling time. This requirement leads to a principle lower limit for the duration of a 13C labeling experiment. A new methodological development is based on repeated sampling during the instationary transient of the 13C labeling dynamics. The statistical and computational treatment of such instationary experiments is a completely new terrain. The computational effort is very high because large differential equations have to be solved and, moreover, the intracellular pool sizes play a significant role. For this reason, the present contribution works out principles and strategies for the experimental design of instationary experiments based on a simple example network. Hereby, the potential of isotopically instationary experiments is investigated in detail. Various statistical results on instationary flux identifiability are presented and possible pitfalls of experimental design are discussed. Finally, a framework for almost optimal experimental design of isotopically instationary experiments is proposed which provides a practical guideline for the analysis of large-scale networks.

  17. Two Techniques for Estimating Deglacial Mean-Ocean δ13 C Change from the Same Set of 493 Benthic δ13C Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, C. D.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Gebbie, G.

    2013-12-01

    The crux of carbon redistribution over the deglaciation centers on the ocean, where the isotopic signature of terrestrial carbon (δ13C terrestrial carbon = -25‰) is observed as a 0.3-0.7‰ shift in benthic foraminiferal δ13C. Deglacial mean-ocean δ13C estimates vary due to different subsets of benthic δ13C data and different methods of weighting the mean δ13C by volume. Here, we present a detailed 1-to-1 comparison of two methods of calculating mean δ13C change and uncertainty estimates using the same set of 493 benthic Cibicidoides spp. δ13C measurements for the LGM and Late Holocene. The first method divides the ocean into 8 regions, and uses simple line fits to describe the distribution of δ13C data for each timeslice over 0.5-5 km depth. With these line fits, we estimate the δ13C value at 100-meter intervals and weight those estimates by the regional volume at each depth slice. The mean-ocean δ13C is the sum of these volume-weighted regional δ13C estimates and the uncertainty of these mean-ocean δ13C estimates is computed using Monte Carlo simulations. The whole-ocean δ13C change is estimated using extrapolated surface- and deep-ocean δ13C estimates, and an assumed δ13C value for the Southern Ocean. This method yields an estimated LGM-to-Holocene change of 0.38×0.07‰ for 0.5-5km and 0.35×0.16‰ for the whole ocean (Peterson et al., 2013, submitted to Paleoceanography). The second method reconstructs glacial and modern δ13C by combining the same data compilation as above with a steady-state ocean circulation model (Gebbie, 2013, submitted to Paleoceanography). The result is a tracer distribution on a 4-by-4 degree horizontal resolution grid with 23 vertical levels, and an estimate of the distribution's uncertainty that accounts for the distinct modern and glacial water-mass geometries. From both methods, we compare the regional δ13C estimates (0.5-5 km), surface δ13C estimates (0-0.5 km), deep δ13C estimates (>5 km), Southern Ocean

  18. Measurement of multiple psi torsion angles in uniformly 13C,15N-labeled alpha-spectrin SH3 domain using 3D 15N-13C-13C-15N MAS dipolar-chemical shift correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Jaroniec, Christopher P; Diehl, Annette; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Griffin, Robert G

    2003-06-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous measurement of several backbone torsion angles psi in the uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labeled alpha-Spectrin SH3 domain using two different 3D 15N-13C-13C-15N dipolar-chemical shift magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments. The first NCCN experiment utilizes double quantum (DQ) spectroscopy combined with the INADEQUATE type 13C-13C chemical shift correlation. The decay of the DQ coherences formed between 13C'(i) and 13C(alphai) spin pairs is determined by the "correlated" dipolar field due to 15N(i)-13C(alphai) and 13C'(i)-15N(i+1) dipolar couplings and is particularly sensitive to variations of the torsion angle in the regime |psi| > 140 degrees. However, the ability of this experiment to constrain multiple psi-torsion angles is limited by the resolution of the 13C(alpha)-(13)CO correlation spectrum. This problem is partially addressed in the second approach described here, which is an NCOCA NCCN experiment. In this case the resolution is enhanced by the superior spectral dispersion of the 15N resonances present in the 15N(i+1)-13C(alphai) part of the NCOCA chemical shift correlation spectrum. For the case of the 62-residue alpha-spectrin SH3 domain, we determined 13 psi angle constraints with the INADEQUATE NCCN experiment and 22 psi constraints were measured in the NCOCA NCCN experiment.

  19. Phase-resolved two-dimensional terahertz spectroscopy including off-resonant interactions beyond the χ(3) limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, Carmine; Folpini, Giulia; Reimann, Klaus; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We present the first two-dimensional (2D) terahertz (THz) experiment with three phase-locked THz pulses and a fully phase-resolved detection of the nonlinearly emitted field by electrooptic sampling. In a prototype experiment we study the ultrafast dynamics of nonlinear two-phonon and two-photon interband coherences in the narrow-gap semiconductor InSb. Due to the extraordinarily large optical interband dipole of InSb the experiments were performed in the strongly nonperturbative regime of light-matter interaction allowing for impulsive off-resonant excitation of both two-phonon coherences and two-photon interband coherences, the ultrafast dynamics of which is experimentally observed as a function of the waiting time in the three-pulse 2D experiment. Our novel three-pulse 2D THz spectroscopy paves the way for the detailed investigation of nonlinear quantum coherences in solids and holds potential for an extension to other systems.

  20. Tuning near-field enhancements on an off-resonance nanorod dimer via temporally shaped femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guangqing; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Lu, Yu; Wu, Yanmin; Ou, Yan; Hou, Xun

    2015-11-01

    We theoretically investigated ultrafast thermal dynamics tuning of near-field enhancements on an off-resonance gold nanorod dimer via temporally shaped femtosecond (fs) laser double pulses. The nonequilibrium thermal excitation is self-consistently coupled into a near-field scattering model for exploring the ultrafast near-field enhancement effects. It is revealed that the near electric-field localized within the gold nanorod dimer can be largely promoted via optimizing the temporal separation and the pulse energy ratio of temporally shaped femtosecond laser double pulses. The results are explained as thermal dynamics manipulation of plasmon resonances in the nanorod dimer via tailoring temporally shaped femtosecond laser. This study provides basic understanding for tuning near-field properties on poorly fabricated metallic nano-structures via temporally shaped femtosecond laser, which can find potential applications in the fields such as fs super-resolution near-field imaging, near-field optical tweezers, and fs photothermal therapy.

  1. Quantum theory of the far-off-resonance continuous-wave Raman laser: Heisenberg-Langevin approach

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, P. A.; Murphy, S. K.; Meng, L. S.; Carlsten, J. L.; Ralph, T. C.; White, A. G.; Brasseur, J. K.

    2003-07-01

    We present the quantum theory of the far-off-resonance continuous-wave Raman laser using the Heisenberg-Langevin approach. We show that the simplified quantum Langevin equations for this system are mathematically identical to those of the nondegenerate optical parametric oscillator in the time domain with the following associations: pump {r_reversible} pump, Stokes {r_reversible} signal, and Raman coherence {r_reversible} idler. We derive analytical results for both the steady-state behavior and the time-dependent noise spectra, using standard linearization procedures. In the semiclassical limit, these results match with previous purely semiclassical treatments, which yield excellent agreement with experimental observations. The analytical time-dependent results predict perfect photon statistics conversion from the pump to the Stokes and nonclassical behavior under certain operational conditions.

  2. Fifth- and higher-order off-resonant spectroscopy from anharmonic vibrational modes of molecules in the condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, K.; Tanimura, Y.

    1997-03-01

    After the pioneering work by Tanimura and Mukamel [J. Chem. Phys. 99, 9496 (1993)], the fifth-order off-resonant experiment or the two dimensional Raman spectroscopy has been actively performed around the world. In the original theory the nonlinear dependence of the polarizability on nuclear coordinates is the origin of the fifth- and higher-order signals. These high order off-resonant signals, however, may arise from anharmonicity of adiabatic potentials instead of the nonlinear polarizability. Profiles of the signals should reflect relative importance of the two effects ---the anharmonicity and the nonlinearity. Using the novel Feynman rule on the unified time path, which has been developed extensively by the authors, we succeeded in taking the effects of anharmonicities into the previous theory to obtain reasonably compact analytical expressions for the signals. Comparison of our results for the fifth-order with the experimental data on CS2 suggests some signs of anharmonicity in CS_2. The analytical expression is also obtained for the general (2n+1)th-order if the polarizability is linear. The expression is proportional g_n+1 where gn is the coefficient of the anharmonic potential V(q)= g_3q^3 + g_4q^4 +\\cdots . Here q is the nuclear coordinate. This fact opens a way to detect the (n+1)th-order anharmonicity directly from the (2n+1)th-order experiment. Click here for the abstracts of the full papers (http://fuji.ims.ac.jp/okumura/abst.htm)

  3. Thz Spectroscopy of 13C Isotopic Species of a "weed": Acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2011-06-01

    Our studies of the isotopic species of 13C and D isotopologues of methyl formate (HCOOCH_3), have allowed the detection of more than 600 lines in Orion. This confirms that many observed U-lines are coming from isotopic species of one of the most abundant molecules in space. Since its first detection in 1976 in SgrB2 and in Orion A, acetaldehyde (CH_3CHO) was detected in many other numerous objects. If its deuterated species (CD_3CHO and CH_3CDO) have been previously studied in the millimeterwave range, the data concerning the 13C species are limited to few lines measured in 1957 up to 40 GHz. In this context we decided to study the 13C species of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde molecule displays a large amplitude motion: the hindered rotation of the methyl group with respect to the rest of the molecule. The analysis is performed with the Rho Axis Method. Recent versions of the codes include high orders term in order to reproduce the observed frequencies for large quantum numbers values as J-values as high as 70a,b,. Measurements and analysis of the rotational spectra of 13C isotopic species are in progress in Lille with a solid-state submillimetre-wave spectrometer (50-950 GHz), the first results will be presented. This work is supported by the contract ANR-08-BLAN-0054 and by the Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (PCMI-CNRS). Carvajal, M.; Margulès, L.; Tercero, B.; et al.A&A 500, (2009) 1109 Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.; Demaison J.; et al.,ApJ 714, (2010) 1120. Ikeda, M.; Ohishi, M.; Nummelin, A.; et al., ApJ, 560, (2001) 792 Kleiner, I.; Lopez, J.-C.; Blanco, S.; et al.J. Mol. Spectrosc. 197, (1999) 275 Elkeurti M.; Coudert, L. H.; Medvedev, I. R.; et al.J. Mol. Spectrosc. 263, (2010) 145 Kilb, R.W.; Lin, C.C.; and Wilson, E.B.J. Chem. Phys. 26, (1957) 1695 Kleiner, I. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 260, (2010) 1 Ilyushin, V.V.; Kryvda, A; and Alekseev, E;J. Mol. Spectrosc. 255, (2009) 32

  4. Compartmentation of glycogen metabolism revealed from 13C isotopologue distributions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Stable isotope tracers are used to assess metabolic flux profiles in living cells. The existing methods of measurement average out the isotopic isomer distribution in metabolites throughout the cell, whereas the knowledge of compartmental organization of analyzed pathways is crucial for the evaluation of true fluxes. That is why we accepted a challenge to create a software tool that allows deciphering the compartmentation of metabolites based on the analysis of average isotopic isomer distribution. Results The software Isodyn, which simulates the dynamics of isotopic isomer distribution in central metabolic pathways, was supplemented by algorithms facilitating the transition between various analyzed metabolic schemes, and by the tools for model discrimination. It simulated 13C isotope distributions in glucose, lactate, glutamate and glycogen, measured by mass spectrometry after incubation of hepatocytes in the presence of only labeled glucose or glucose and lactate together (with label either in glucose or lactate). The simulations assumed either a single intracellular hexose phosphate pool, or also channeling of hexose phosphates resulting in a different isotopic composition of glycogen. Model discrimination test was applied to check the consistency of both models with experimental data. Metabolic flux profiles, evaluated with the accepted model that assumes channeling, revealed the range of changes in metabolic fluxes in liver cells. Conclusions The analysis of compartmentation of metabolic networks based on the measured 13C distribution was included in Isodyn as a routine procedure. The advantage of this implementation is that, being a part of evaluation of metabolic fluxes, it does not require additional experiments to study metabolic compartmentation. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the distribution of measured 13C-labeled glucose metabolites is inconsistent with the idea of perfect mixing of hexose phosphates in cytosol. In contrast

  5. The 13C nuclear magnetic resonance in graphite intercalation compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Resing, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of graphite intercalation compounds were calculated. For acceptor types, the shifts come mainly from the paramagnetic (Ramsey) intra-atomic terms. They are related to the gross features of the two-dimensional band structures. The calculated anisotropy is about -140 ppm and is independent of the finer details such as charge transfer. For donor types, the carbon 2p pi orbitals are spin-polarized because of mixing with metal conduction electrons, thus there is an additional dipolar contribution which may be correlated with the electronic specific heat. The general agreement with experimental data is satisfactory.

  6. The delta 13C record of Devonian to Permian carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buggisch, W.

    2003-04-01

    A δ13Ccarb curve will be presented for samples spanning the time interval from the Silurian/Devonian to the Permian/Triassic boundary. Reliable data are usually based on analyses of brachiopod shells. Because of the huge reservoir of carbon in carbonates, also whole rock samples are suitable for stable carbon isotope analyses if they are not altered by meteoric water or by incorporation of re-oxidized organic carbon during diagenesis. There are several possibilities to test the quality of the data: (1) comparison of the δ13C record of whole rock samples with samples from brachiopod shells, (2) with the organic record, (3) analyses of the same time interval in different sections. If the same pattern of isotope data is observed in separa-ted palaeogeographic settings, it is probably caused by a change in the global carbon reservoir. Reliable δ13C data will be presented for the Devonian, Mississippian and Middle to Late Permian. During Pennsylvanian and Early Permian most carbonates were affected by meteoric diagenesis due to the large glacio-eustatic sea level changes of the Permo-Carboniferous glaciation. Long term variations (mean values for 10 Ma) are known from literature. Devonian δ13C values are about 0 to 2 ppm (V-PDB) they increase up to 5 to 6 ppm during the Mississippian - Pennsylvanian transition and drop sharply at the Permian Triassic boundary. The Devonian - Carboniferous trend is probably at least partly due to the evolution of land plants. Short term variations in the range of 0.1 to 1 Ma modify the long term trend significantly. Large positive excursions of δ13C up to 5 or 6 ppm are known from the Silurian - Devonian boundary and during the Middle Tournaisian of Laurentia and Europe. Many positive excursions of a magnitude of 2 to 3 ppm are observed, some are verified worldwide as for instance at the Frasnian - Famennian boundary which coincides with one of the largest extinction events in earth history. Short time variations in the isotopic

  7. S-Factor of radiative р 13C capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2012-06-01

    The possibility of description of experimental data on the astrophysical S-factor of radiative р 13C capture within the framework of the potential cluster model with forbidden states is analyzed at energies in the range 0.03-0.8 MeV. It is demonstrated that the behavior of the astrophysical S-factor can be explained based on the Е1-transition to the bound 3 P 1 state of the 14N nucleus in the р 13С channel from the 3 S 1 wave of р 13С scattering at resonant energy of 0.55 MeV (l.s.).

  8. Spectrally edited 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR spectra without diagonal ridge for characterizing 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Anderson, Jason M.; Shanks, Brent H.; Fang, Xiaowen; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Two robust combinations of spectral editing techniques with 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR have been developed for characterizing the aromatic components of 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials. One method (exchange with protonated and nonprotonated spectral editing, EXPANSE) selects cross peaks of protonated and nearby nonprotonated carbons, while the other technique, dipolar-dephased double-quantum/single-quantum (DQ/SQ) NMR, selects signals of bonded nonprotonated carbons. Both spectra are free of a diagonal ridge, which has many advantages: Cross peaks on the diagonal or of small intensity can be detected, and residual spinning sidebands or truncation artifacts associated with the diagonal ridge are avoided. In the DQ/SQ experiment, dipolar dephasing of the double-quantum coherence removes protonated-carbon signals; this approach also eliminates the need for high-power proton decoupling. The initial magnetization is generated with minimal fluctuation by combining direct polarization, cross polarization, and equilibration by 13C spin diffusion. The dipolar dephased DQ/SQ spectrum shows signals from all linkages between aromatic rings, including a distinctive peak from polycondensed aromatics. In EXPANSE NMR, signals of protonated carbons are selected in the first spectral dimension by short cross polarization combined with dipolar dephasing difference. This removes ambiguities of peak assignment to overlapping signals of nonprotonated and protonated aromatic carbons, e.g. near 125 ppm. Spin diffusion is enhanced by dipolar-assisted rotational resonance. Before detection, Csbnd H dipolar dephasing by gated decoupling is applied, which selects signals of nonprotonated carbons. Thus, only cross peaks due to magnetization originating from protonated C and ending on nearby nonprotonated C are retained. Combined with the chemical shifts deduced from the cross-peak position, this double spectral editing defines the bonding environment of aromatic, COO, and Cdbnd O carbons

  9. Design of a sup 13 C (1H) RF probe for monitoring the in vivo metabolism of (1- sup 13 C)glucose in primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, B.E.; Sacks, W.; Bigler, R.E.; Hennessy, M.J.; Sacks, S.; Fleischer, A.; Zanzonico, P.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of an RF probe suitable for obtaining proton-decoupled {sup 13}C spectra from a subhuman primate brain is described. Two orthogonal saddle coils, one tuned to the resonant frequency of {sup 13}C and the other to the resonant frequency of 1H, were used to monitor the in vivo metabolism of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose in rhesus monkey brain at 2.1 T. Difference spectra showed the appearance of {sup 13}C-enriched glutamate and glutamine 30 to 40 min after a bolus injection of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose.

  10. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for 13C NMR relaxation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of 15N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to 13C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and 13C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly 13C -labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  11. Measuring changes in substrate utilization in the myocardium in response to fasting using hyperpolarized [1-13C]butyrate and [1-13C]pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaansen, Jessica A. M.; Merritt, Matthew E.; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is often associated with a shift in substrate preference for ATP production. Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has the unique ability to detect real-time metabolic changes in vivo due to its high sensitivity and specificity. Here a protocol using HP [1-13C]pyruvate and [1-13C]butyrate is used to measure carbohydrate versus fatty acid metabolism in vivo. Metabolic changes in fed and fasted Sprague Dawley rats (n = 36) were studied at 9.4 T after tail vein injections. Pyruvate and butyrate competed for acetyl-CoA production, as evidenced by significant changes in [13C]bicarbonate (−48%), [1-13C]acetylcarnitine (+113%), and [5-13C]glutamate (−63%), following fasting. Butyrate uptake was unaffected by fasting, as indicated by [1-13C]butyrylcarnitine. Mitochondrial pseudoketogenesis facilitated the labeling of the ketone bodies [1-13C]acetoacetate and [1-13C]β-hydroxybutyryate, without evidence of true ketogenesis. HP [1-13C]acetoacetate was increased in fasting (250%) but decreased during pyruvate co-injection (−82%). Combining HP 13C technology and co-administration of separate imaging agents enables noninvasive and simultaneous monitoring of both fatty acid and carbohydrate oxidation. This protocol illustrates a novel method for assessing metabolic flux through different enzymatic pathways simultaneously and enables mechanistic studies of the changing myocardial energetics often associated with disease. PMID:27150735

  12. Measuring changes in substrate utilization in the myocardium in response to fasting using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]butyrate and [1-(13)C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Merritt, Matthew E; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is often associated with a shift in substrate preference for ATP production. Hyperpolarized (HP) (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has the unique ability to detect real-time metabolic changes in vivo due to its high sensitivity and specificity. Here a protocol using HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate and [1-(13)C]butyrate is used to measure carbohydrate versus fatty acid metabolism in vivo. Metabolic changes in fed and fasted Sprague Dawley rats (n = 36) were studied at 9.4 T after tail vein injections. Pyruvate and butyrate competed for acetyl-CoA production, as evidenced by significant changes in [(13)C]bicarbonate (-48%), [1-(13)C]acetylcarnitine (+113%), and [5-(13)C]glutamate (-63%), following fasting. Butyrate uptake was unaffected by fasting, as indicated by [1-(13)C]butyrylcarnitine. Mitochondrial pseudoketogenesis facilitated the labeling of the ketone bodies [1-(13)C]acetoacetate and [1-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyryate, without evidence of true ketogenesis. HP [1-(13)C]acetoacetate was increased in fasting (250%) but decreased during pyruvate co-injection (-82%). Combining HP (13)C technology and co-administration of separate imaging agents enables noninvasive and simultaneous monitoring of both fatty acid and carbohydrate oxidation. This protocol illustrates a novel method for assessing metabolic flux through different enzymatic pathways simultaneously and enables mechanistic studies of the changing myocardial energetics often associated with disease. PMID:27150735

  13. /sup 13/C NMR studies of the molecular flexibility of antidepressants

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, S.L.; Andrews, P.R.; Craik, D.J.; Gale, D.J.

    1986-02-01

    The solution dynamics of a series of clinically potent antidepressants have been investigated by measuring /sup 13/C NMR relaxation parameters. Correlation times and internal motional rates were calculated from spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser effects for the protonated carbons in mianserin, imipramine-like antidepressants, and amitriptyline-like antidepressants. These data were interpreted in terms of overall molecular tumbling, internal rotations, and inherent flexibility of these structures. Of particular interest was the conformational variability of the tricyclic nucleus of the tricyclic antidepressants, where the data indicated a fivefold difference in mobility of the dimethylene bridge of imipramine-like antidepressants relative to amitriptyline-like compounds. The implications of such a difference in internal motions is discussed in relation to previous NMR studies and to the reported differences in pharmacological activity of these antidepressants.

  14. The effect of sample hydration on 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Wilson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fulvic acids, two of which have been well studied by a number of other groups (Armadale and Suwannee river fulvic acids) have been examined by high resolution solid-state 13C-NMR techniques to delineate the effect of absorbed water. Two main effects of absorbed water were observed: (1) changes in spin lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame and cross polarization times and (2) total loss of signal so that some fulvic acid is effectively in solution. These results suggest that discrepancies in the literature concerning observed relative signal intensities from different structural groups are due to absorbed water and emphasize the necessity for proper precautionary drying before spectroscopic analysis. ?? 1991.

  15. The economical synthesis of [2'-(13)C, 1,3-(15)N2]uridine; preliminary conformational studies by solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G; Middleton, David A; Henderson, Peter J F; Herbert, Richard B

    2003-06-21

    The synthesis of [2'-(13)C, 1,3-(15)N2]uridine 11 was achieved as follows. An epimeric mixture of D-[1-(13)C]ribose 3 and D-[1-(13)C]arabinose 4 was obtained in excellent yield by condensation of K13CN with D-erythrose 2 using a modification of the Kiliani-Fischer synthesis. Efficient separation of the two aldose epimers was pivotally achieved by a novel ion-exchange (Sm3+) chromatography method. D-[2-(13)C]Ribose 5 was obtained from D-[1-(13)C]arabinose 4 using a Ni(II) diamine complex (nickel chloride plus TEMED). Combination of these procedures in a general cycling manner can lead to the very efficient preparation of specifically labelled 13C-monosaccharides of particular chirality. 15N-labelling was introduced in the preparation of [2'-(13)C, 1,3-(15)N2]uridine 11 via [15N2]urea. Cross polarisation magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) solid-state NMR experiments using rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) were carried out on crystals of the labelled uridine to show that the inter-atomic distance between C-2' and N-1 is closely similar to that calculated from X-ray crystallographic data. The REDOR method will be used now to determine the conformation of bound substrates in the bacterial nucleoside transporters NupC and NupG.

  16. Σ production from targets of ^4He and ^13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrien, R. E.

    1996-10-01

    One of the abiding issues in hypernuclear research has been the question of the formation of nuclear bound states incorporating the Σ-hyperon. The recent increases in beam intensity at the Brookhaven AGS have enabled us to obtain a high statistics study on the production of Σ-hyperons on a ^4He target. Earlier research using stopped kaons at KEK indicated the presence of structure in the (K^-,π^-) reaction, and led to the postulate of a Σ bound state. That structure has now been definitely confirmed in the in-flight kaon experiment at the LESB2 beam line and Moby-Dick spectrometer. An improved measurement of the binding energy of the presumed state will be reported, together with a production cross section. In addition, both (K^-,π^-) and (K^-,π^+) reactions on ^13C have been studied and will be compared to similar measurements on ^9Be.

  17. Phase stability in fMRI time series: effect of noise regression, off-resonance correction and spatial filtering techniques.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Gisela E; Bianciardi, Marta; Brainovich, Valentina; Cassara, Antonino Mario; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2012-02-15

    Although the majority of fMRI studies exploit magnitude changes only, there is an increasing interest regarding the potential additive information conveyed by the phase signal. This integrated part of the complex number furnished by the MR scanners can also be used for exploring direct detection of neuronal activity and for thermography. Few studies have explicitly addressed the issue of the available signal stability in the context of phase time-series, and therefore we explored the spatial pattern of frequency specific phase fluctuations, and evaluated the effect of physiological noise components (heart beat and respiration) on the phase signal. Three categories of retrospective noise reduction techniques were explored and the temporal signal stability was evaluated in terms of a physiologic noise model, for seven fMRI measurement protocols in eight healthy subjects at 3T, for segmented CSF, gray and white matter voxels. We confirmed that for most processing methods, an efficient use of the phase information is hampered by the fact that noise from physiological and instrumental sources contributes significantly more to the phase than to the magnitude instability. Noise regression based on the phase evolution of the central k-space point, RETROICOR, or an orthonormalized combination of these were able to reduce their impact, but without bringing phase stability down to levels expected from the magnitude signal. Similar results were obtained after targeted removal of scan-to-scan variations in the bulk magnetic field by the dynamic off-resonance in k-space (DORK) method and by the temporal off-resonance alignment of single-echo time series technique (TOAST). We found that spatial high-pass filtering was necessary, and in vivo a Gaussian filter width of 20mm was sufficient to suppress physiological noise and bring the phase fluctuations to magnitude levels. Stronger filters brought the fluctuations down to levels dictated by thermal noise contributions, and for 62

  18. The 3 A Band System in the Spectrum of the 13C 16O Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakalla, R.; Kępa, R.; Rytel, M.; Zachwieja, M.

    1999-10-01

    In the emission spectrum of the carbon monoxide 13C16O isotopic molecule three bands comprising about 1820 lines of the 3A band system (c3Π-a3Π) were recorded and analyzed. The 0-0 and 0-1 bands of this system were photographed for the first time and the 0-2 band was rephotographed by using methods of conventional high-resolution spectroscopy. The result of the rotational band analysis includes expanding of the spectrum interpretation up to J = 25 as well as the identification of four previously unobserved branches P13, R13, P31, and R31. Because of strong perturbations in the c3Π (v = 0) state, the calculation of the rovibronic structure constants was performed only for the lower a3Π state. By using a calculation based on a nonlinear least-squares method, an effective Hamiltonian of Brown [J. M. Brown, E. A. Colbourn, J. K. G. Watson, and F. D. Wayne, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 74, 294-318 (1979)] and a separative procedure proposed by Curl-Dane-Watson [R. F. Curl and C. B. Dane, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 128, 406-412 (1988); J. K. G. Watson, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 138, 302-308 (1989)], it was possible to derive the rotational structure constants for the v = 0, 1, and 2 levels for the a3Π state in the 13C16O isotopic molecule. Term values for the c3Π (v = 0) level and the equilibrium molecular constants for the a3Π state also are reported.

  19. The 3A Band System in the Spectrum of the (13)C(16)O Molecule.

    PubMed

    Hakalla; Kepa; Rytel; Zachwieja

    1999-10-01

    In the emission spectrum of the carbon monoxide (13)C(16)O isotopic molecule three bands comprising about 1820 lines of the 3A band system (c(3)Pi-a(3)Pi) were recorded and analyzed. The 0-0 and 0-1 bands of this system were photographed for the first time and the 0-2 band was rephotographed by using methods of conventional high-resolution spectroscopy. The result of the rotational band analysis includes expanding of the spectrum interpretation up to J = 25 as well as the identification of four previously unobserved branches P(13), R(13), P(31), and R(31). Because of strong perturbations in the c(3)Pi (v = 0) state, the calculation of the rovibronic structure constants was performed only for the lower a(3)Pi state. By using a calculation based on a nonlinear least-squares method, an effective Hamiltonian of Brown [J. M. Brown, E. A. Colbourn, J. K. G. Watson, and F. D. Wayne, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 74, 294-318 (1979)] and a separative procedure proposed by Curl-Dane-Watson [R. F. Curl and C. B. Dane, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 128, 406-412 (1988); J. K. G. Watson, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 138, 302-308 (1989)], it was possible to derive the rotational structure constants for the v = 0, 1, and 2 levels for the a(3)Pi state in the (13)C(16)O isotopic molecule. Term values for the c(3)Pi (v = 0) level and the equilibrium molecular constants for the a(3)Pi state also are reported. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  20. Approaches to studies on neuronal/glial relationships by 13C-MRS analysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; McLean, M; Morris, P; Bachelard, H

    1996-01-01

    The use of different 13C-labelled precursors alone or in combination ([1-13C]glucose, [2-13C]glucose, [1-13C]acetate, [2-13C]acetate and [1,2-13C2]acetate) to study neuronal/glial metabolic relationships by MRS is discussed. Glutamine and citrate resonances represent glial metabolism if a combination of [1-13C]glucose + [2-13C]acetate is used, but only for short time periods. A combination of [2-13C]glucose + [2-13C]acetate will label -COO- groups from glucose and -CH2 groups from acetate, respectively, which distinguish well in theory. However, this approach is severely limited by the long T1S of -COO- groups and low S/N. Contributions of the anaplerotic pathway can be assessed using [2-13C]glucose, but again can be limited by the long T1S of -COO- groups. Labelling of glycerol-3-phosphate (believed to be produced in glia) from [1-13C]glucose is difficult to see under normal conditions but has proved useful in, e.g., hypoxia. We believe the most promising approach is the use of [1-13C] glucose with [1,2-13C2]acetate, by analysis of the multiplets ('isotopomers') of the amino acid resonances.

  1. Diode laser spectroscopy of the fundamental bands of 12C14N, 13C14N, 12C15N, 13C15N free radicals in the ground 2 Sigma+ electronic state.

    PubMed

    Hübner, M; Castillo, M; Davies, P B; Röpcke, J

    2005-01-01

    Rotationally resolved spectra of the fundamental band of the CN free radical in four isotopic forms have been measured using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The source of the radical was a microwave discharge in a mixture of isotopically selected methane and nitrogen diluted with argon. The lines were measured to an accuracy of 5 x 10(-4) cm(-1) and fitted to the formula for the vibration rotation spectrum of a diatomic molecule, including quartic distortion constants. The band origins of each of the isotopomers from the five parameter fits were found to be 12C14N: 2042.42115(38) cm(-1), 13C14N: 2000.08479(23) cm(-1), 12C15N: 2011.25594(25) cm(-1), 13C15N: 1968.22093(33) cm(-1) with one standard deviation from the fit given in parenthesis. Some of the lines showed a resolved splitting due to the spin rotation interaction. This was averaged for fitting purposes. The average equilibrium internuclear distance derived from the upsilon = 0 and 1 rotational constants of the four isotopomers is 1.171800(6) A which is in good agreement with the value determined from microwave spectroscopy.

  2. The First in Vivo Observation of 13C- 15N Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2001-12-01

    [5-13C,15N]Glutamine, with 1J(13C-15N) of 16 Hz, was observed in vivo in the brain of spontaneously breathing rats by 13C MRS at 4.7 T. The brain [5-13C]glutamine peak consisted of the doublet from [5-13C,15N]glutamine and the center [5-13C,14N]glutamine peak, resulting in an apparent triplet with a separation of 8 Hz. The time course of formation of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine was monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 20-35 min. This [5-13C,15N]glutamine was formed by glial uptake of released neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate and its reaction with 15NH3 catalyzed by the glia-specific glutamine synthetase. The neurotransmitter glutamate C5 was selectively13C-enriched by intravenous [2,5-13C]glucose infusion to 13C-label whole-brain glutamate C5, followed by [12C]glucose infusion to chase 13C from the small and rapidly turning-over glial glutamate pool, leaving 13C mainly in the neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate pool, which is sequestered in vesicles until release. Hence, the observed [5-13C,15N]glutamine arises from a coupling between 13C of neuronal origin and 15N of glial origin. Measurement of the rate of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine formation provides a novel noninvasive method of studying the kinetics of neurotransmitter uptake into glia in vivo, a process that is crucial for protecting the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity.

  3. Sucrose octabenzoate: assignment of 13C and 1H resonances of the sucrose moiety and the 13C resonances of the carbonyl carbons. Use of 13C-n.m.r. spectroscopy for the study of selective deacylation.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, I J; Haines, A H; Konowicz, P A; Jones, H F

    1990-09-19

    Assignment of the 1H and 13C signals arising from the carbohydrate portion of sucrose octabenzoate has been achieved using homonuclear shift correlation experiments (COSY) and one-bond 1H-13C heteronuclear shift correlation measurements, respectively. The 13C resonances of the carbonyl carbon atoms of the eight benzoyl groups are readily distinguished for solutions in benzene-d6-pyridine-d5 (1:1), and have been assigned by means of three-bond 1H-13C shift correlation studies coupled with measurement of the 13C-n.m.r. spectrum of a sucrose octabenzoate specifically labelled with 13C in some of the carbonyl groups. With this assignment, products of partial deacylation of the octabenzoate may readily be identified by treatment with excess of benzoyl-carbonyl-13C chloride followed by measurement of the 13C-n.m.r. spectrum of the labelled sucrose octabenzoate, so prepared, in the carbonyl region. PMID:2276151

  4. Improvement of the Off-Resonance Saturation, an MRI sequence for positive contrast with SPM particles: Theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delangre, S.; Vuong, Q. L.; Po, C.; Gallez, B.; Gossuin, Y.

    2016-04-01

    The SuperParaMagnetic particles (SPM particles) are used as contrast agents in MRI and produce negative contrast with conventional T2 or T2∗-weighted sequences. Unfortunately, the SPM particle detection on images acquired with such sequences is sometimes difficult because negative contrast can be created by artifacts such as air bubbles or calcification. To overcome this problem, new sequences as Off-Resonance Saturation (ORS) were developed to produce positive contrast with SPM particles. This work explores a new way to optimize the contrast generated by the ORS sequence by increasing the number of saturation pulses applied before the imaging sequence. This modified sequence is studied with numerical simulations and experiments on agarose gel phantoms. A theoretical model able to predict the contrast for different values of the sequence parameters is also developed. The results show that the contrast increases with the saturation pulses number with an optimal value of three saturation pulses in order to avoid artifacts and limit the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) effect. The dependence of the contrast on the SPM particle concentration and sequence parameters is comparable to what was observed for the ORS sequence.

  5. Bottom-up study of the MRI positive contrast created by the Off-Resonance Saturation sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delangre, S.; Vuong, Q. L.; Henrard, D.; Po, C.; Gallez, B.; Gossuin, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPM particles) are used in MRI to highlight regions such as tumors through negative contrast. Unfortunately, sources as air bubbles or tissues interfaces also lead to negative contrast, which complicates the image interpretation. New MRI sequences creating positive contrast in the particle surrounding, such as the Off-Resonance Saturation sequence (ORS), have thus been developed. However, a theoretical study of the ORS sequence is still lacking, which hampers the optimization of this sequence. For this reason, this work provides a self-consistent analytical expression able to predict the dependence of the contrast on the sequence parameters and the SPM particles properties. This expression was validated by numerical simulations and experiments on agarose gel phantoms on a 11.7 T scanner system. It provides a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms leading to positive contrast, which could allow the improvement of the sequence for future in vivo applications. The influence of the SPM particle relaxivities, the SPM particle concentration, the echo time and the saturation pulse parameters on the contrast were investigated. The best contrast was achieved with SPM particles possessing the smallest transverse relaxivity, an optimal particle concentration and for low echo times.

  6. Enhanced off-resonance magnetoelectric response in laser annealed PZT thick film grown on magnetostrictive amorphous metal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palneedi, Haribabu; Maurya, Deepam; Kim, Gi-Yeop; Priya, Shashank; Kang, Suk-Joong L.; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Choi, Si-Young; Ryu, Jungho

    2015-07-01

    A highly dense, 4 μm-thick Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) film is deposited on amorphous magnetostrictive Metglas foil (FeBSi) by granule spray in vacuum process at room temperature, followed by its localized annealing with a continuous-wave 560 nm ytterbium fiber laser radiation. This longer-wavelength laser radiation is able to anneal the whole of thick PZT film layer without any deteriorative effects, such as chemical reaction and/or atomic diffusion, at the interface and crystallization of amorphous Metglas substrate. Greatly enhanced dielectric and ferroelectric properties of the annealed PZT are attributed to its better crystallinity and grain growth induced by laser irradiation. As a result, a colossal off-resonance magnetoelectric (ME) voltage coefficient that is two orders of magnitude larger than previously reported output from PZT/Metglas film-composites is achieved. The present work addresses the problems involved in the fabrication of PZT/Metglas film-composites and opens up emerging possibilities in employing piezoelectric materials with low thermal budget substrates (suitable for integrated electronics) and designing laminate composites for ME based devices.

  7. Enhanced off-resonance magnetoelectric response in laser annealed PZT thick film grown on magnetostrictive amorphous metal substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Palneedi, Haribabu; Maurya, Deepam; Priya, Shashank; Kim, Gi-Yeop; Choi, Si-Young; Kang, Suk-Joong L.; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Ryu, Jungho

    2015-07-06

    A highly dense, 4 μm-thick Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT) film is deposited on amorphous magnetostrictive Metglas foil (FeBSi) by granule spray in vacuum process at room temperature, followed by its localized annealing with a continuous-wave 560 nm ytterbium fiber laser radiation. This longer-wavelength laser radiation is able to anneal the whole of thick PZT film layer without any deteriorative effects, such as chemical reaction and/or atomic diffusion, at the interface and crystallization of amorphous Metglas substrate. Greatly enhanced dielectric and ferroelectric properties of the annealed PZT are attributed to its better crystallinity and grain growth induced by laser irradiation. As a result, a colossal off-resonance magnetoelectric (ME) voltage coefficient that is two orders of magnitude larger than previously reported output from PZT/Metglas film-composites is achieved. The present work addresses the problems involved in the fabrication of PZT/Metglas film-composites and opens up emerging possibilities in employing piezoelectric materials with low thermal budget substrates (suitable for integrated electronics) and designing laminate composites for ME based devices.

  8. A high resolution δ13C record in a modern Porites lobata coral: Insights into controls on skeletal δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Nicola; Finch, Adrian A.; EIMF

    2012-05-01

    δ13C was determined at a high spatial resolution by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) across a 1 year section of a modern Porites lobata coral skeleton from Hawaii. Skeletal δ13C is dominated by large oscillations of 5-7‰ that typically cover skeletal distances equivalent to periods of ˜14-40 days. These variations do not reflect seawater temperature and it is unlikely that they reflect variations in the δ13C of local seawater. We observe no correlation between skeletal δ13C and the pH of the calcification fluid (estimated from previous measurements of skeletal δ11B). We conclude that either the proportion of skeletal carbon derived from metabolic CO2 is not reflected by estimated ECF pH (as the [CO2] in the overlying coral tissue varies) and/or the δ13C composition of the metabolic CO2 is highly variable. We also observe no correlation between skeletal δ13C and previous δ18O SIMS measurements. Variations in skeletal δ13C and δ18O do not have a common timing, providing no evidence that skeletal δ13C and δ18O vary in response to a single factor. This suggests that skeletal δ13C is principally driven by variations in the δ13C composition of metabolic CO2 rather than by the abundance of metabolic CO2, which would also affect skeletal δ18O. The δ13C composition of metabolic CO2 reflects the processes of photosynthesis, heterotrophic feeding and respiration in the overlying coral tissue. Corals catabolise stored lipid reserves to meet energetic demands when photosynthesis conditions are sub-optimal. Variations in the amounts and types of reserves utilised could induce changes in the δ13C composition of metabolic CO2 and the resultant skeleton which are temporally offset from skeletal δ18O records.

  9. [Distribution characteristics of soil humus fractions stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in paddy field under long-term ridge culture].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-hong; Luo, You-jin; Ren, Zhen-jiang; Lü, Jia-ke; Wei, Chao-fu

    2011-04-01

    A 16-year field experiment was conducted in a ridge culture paddy field in the hilly region of Sichuan Basin, aimed to investigate the distribution characteristics of stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in soil humus fractions. The soil organic carbon (SOC) content in the paddy field under different cultivation modes ranked in the order of wide ridge culture > ridge culture > paddy and upland rotation. In soil humus substances (HS), humin (HU) was the main composition, occupying 21% - 30% of the total SOC. In the extracted soil carbon, humic acid (HA) dominated, occupying 17% - 21% of SOC and 38% - 65% of HS. The delta 13C value of SOC ranged from -27.9 per thousand to -25.6 per thousand, and the difference of the delta 13C value between 0-5 cm and 20-40 cm soil layers was about 1.9 per thousand. The delta 13C value of HA under different cultivation modes was 1 per thousand - 2 per thousand lower than that of SOC, and more approached to the delta 13C value of rapeseed and rice residues. As for fulvic acid (FA), its delta 13C value was about 2 per thousand and 4 per thousand higher than that of SOC and HA, respectively. The delta 13C value of HU in plough layer (0-20 cm) and plow layer (20-40 cm) ranged from -23.7 per thousand - -24.9 per thousand and -22.6 per thousand - -24.2 per thousand, respectively, reflecting the admixture of young and old HS. The delta 13C value in various organic carbon fractions was HU>FA>SOC>rapeseed and rice residues>HA. Long-term rice planting benefited the increase of SOC content, and cultivation mode played an important role in affecting the distribution patterns of soil humus delta 13C in plough layer and plow layer. PMID:21774322

  10. [Distribution characteristics of soil humus fractions stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in paddy field under long-term ridge culture].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-hong; Luo, You-jin; Ren, Zhen-jiang; Lü, Jia-ke; Wei, Chao-fu

    2011-04-01

    A 16-year field experiment was conducted in a ridge culture paddy field in the hilly region of Sichuan Basin, aimed to investigate the distribution characteristics of stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in soil humus fractions. The soil organic carbon (SOC) content in the paddy field under different cultivation modes ranked in the order of wide ridge culture > ridge culture > paddy and upland rotation. In soil humus substances (HS), humin (HU) was the main composition, occupying 21% - 30% of the total SOC. In the extracted soil carbon, humic acid (HA) dominated, occupying 17% - 21% of SOC and 38% - 65% of HS. The delta 13C value of SOC ranged from -27.9 per thousand to -25.6 per thousand, and the difference of the delta 13C value between 0-5 cm and 20-40 cm soil layers was about 1.9 per thousand. The delta 13C value of HA under different cultivation modes was 1 per thousand - 2 per thousand lower than that of SOC, and more approached to the delta 13C value of rapeseed and rice residues. As for fulvic acid (FA), its delta 13C value was about 2 per thousand and 4 per thousand higher than that of SOC and HA, respectively. The delta 13C value of HU in plough layer (0-20 cm) and plow layer (20-40 cm) ranged from -23.7 per thousand - -24.9 per thousand and -22.6 per thousand - -24.2 per thousand, respectively, reflecting the admixture of young and old HS. The delta 13C value in various organic carbon fractions was HU>FA>SOC>rapeseed and rice residues>HA. Long-term rice planting benefited the increase of SOC content, and cultivation mode played an important role in affecting the distribution patterns of soil humus delta 13C in plough layer and plow layer.

  11. (13)C-(13)c homonuclear recoupling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance at a moderately high magic-angle-spinning frequency.

    PubMed

    Mithu, Venus Singh; Bakthavatsalam, Subha; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments are widely employed in structure determination of protein assemblies using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Here, we investigate the process of (13)C-(13)C magnetisation transfer at a moderate magic-angle-spinning frequency of 30 kHz using some of the prominent second-order dipolar recoupling schemes. The effect of isotropic chemical-shift difference and spatial distance between two carbons and amplitude of radio frequency on (1)H channel on the magnetisation transfer efficiency of these schemes is discussed in detail.

  12. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Laser analysis of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 in exhaled air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, E. V.

    2002-11-01

    Tunable diode lasers (TDLs) are applied to the diagnostics of gastroenterological diseases using respiratory tests and preparations enriched with the stable 13C isotope. This method of the analysis of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 in exhaled air is based on the selective measurement of the resonance absorption at the vibrational — rotational structure of 12CO2 and 13CO2. The CO2 transmission spectra in the region of 4.35 μm were measured with a PbEuSe double-heterostructure TDL. The accuracy of carbon isotope ratio measurements in CO2 of exhaled air performed with the TDL was ~0.5%. The data of clinical tests of the developed laser-based analyser are presented.

  13. Variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR study of the molecular structure of honeybee wax and silk.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tsunenori; Tamada, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the native-state crystal structure of beeswax from the Japanese bee, Apis cerana japonica, we determined the relationship between temperature and the 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift of methylene carbon of beeswax, with comparison to n-alkanes and polyethylene in the orthorhombic, monoclinic, or triclinic crystal form. Variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR observations of n-alkanes and polyethylene revealed that the chemical shifts of methylene carbon in the orthorhombic crystal form increased linearly with increasing temperature, that of the triclinic form decreased, and that of the monoclinic form was unaltered. These relations were compared with results of variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR observation of beeswax. Results clarified that the two crystal forms comprising the beeswax in the native state are orthorhombic and monoclinic. The variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR observations were also applied to interpret the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) curve of beeswax. They were used to clarify the structural changes of beeswax for widely various temperatures. For beeswax secreted by the Japanese bee, the transition from the orthorhombic form to the rotator phase occurred at 36 degrees C, that is from the crystalline to the intermediate state at 45 degrees C. Moreover, the variable-temperature 13C solid-state NMR spectrum of honeybee silk in the native state was observed. Results demonstrated that the secondary structures of honeybee silk proteins in the native state comprised coexisting alpha-helix and beta-sheet conformations and that the amount of alpha-helices was greater. The alpha-helix content of honeybee silk was compared with that of hornet silk produced by Vespa larvae.

  14. Labeling strategies for 13C-detected aligned-sample solid-state NMR of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipp, Fabian V.; Sinha, Neeraj; Jairam, Lena; Bradley, Joel; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-12-01

    13C-detected solid-state NMR experiments have substantially higher sensitivity than the corresponding 15N-detected experiments on stationary, aligned samples of isotopically labeled proteins. Several methods for tailoring the isotopic labeling are described that result in spatially isolated 13C sites so that dipole-dipole couplings among the 13C are minimized, thus eliminating the need for homonuclear 13C- 13C decoupling in either indirect or direct dimensions of one- or multi-dimensional NMR experiments that employ 13C detection. The optimal percentage for random fractional 13C labeling is between 25% and 35%. Specifically labeled glycerol and glucose can be used at the carbon sources to tailor the isotopic labeling, and the choice depends on the resonances of interest for a particular study. For investigations of the protein backbone, growth of the bacteria on [2- 13C]-glucose-containing media was found to be most effective.

  15. Synthesis of 13C and 15N labeled 2,4-dinitroanisole.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, Bhumasamudram; Field, Jim A; Chorover, Jon; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Abrell, Leif; Mash, Eugene A

    2014-05-30

    Syntheses of [(13)C6]-2,4-dinitroanisole (ring-(13)C6) from [(13)C6]-anisole (ring-(13)C6) and [(15)N2]-2,4-dinitroanisole from anisole using in situ generated acetyl nitrate and [(15)N]-acetyl nitrate, respectively, are described. Treatment of [(13)C6]-anisole (ring-(13)C6) with acetyl nitrate generated in 100% HNO3 gave [(13)C6]-2,4-dinitroanisole (ring-(13)C6) in 83% yield. Treatment of anisole with [(15)N]-acetyl nitrate generated in 10 N [(15)N]-HNO3 gave [(15)N2 ]-2,4-dinitroanisole in 44% yield after two cycles of nitration. Byproducts in the latter reaction included [(15)N]-2-nitroanisole and [(15)N]-4-nitroanisole.

  16. Model of decision system for 13C Isotope Separation column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the model of a decisional system for 13C Isotope Separation column, which is used to detect mission critical situation. The start model was a model of one distributed control system of critical situations that may arise in the operation of the distillation column. The research work it is proposed a model of decision system which implement a temperature sensor inside of liquid nitrogen level in the condenser. The condenser is a part of column where take place the cryogenic process using nitrogen liquid. The work temperature is very low about -192oC, and because the temperature can grow or go down more than 2 degrees is a very critical location inside the column. In this way the column has a deeply monitor and supervised and it take a decision in a proper time when the temperature is grow up or getting down and became a critical situation. For monitor and supervised it was used MatLAB SimuLink. The model, the decision system gives a signal to one sensor when something is wrong in the condenser which is the most critical place of the isotopic column. In this way it creates an alarm that something is getting wrong in the isotopic column.

  17. Inelastic pion scattering by /sup 13/C at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions for inelastically scattered pions were obtained for several states in /sup 13/C at an incident energy of 65 MeV. The data include results from both ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ measurements. In addition, ..pi../sup -/ measurements were made at T/sub ..pi../ = 50 MeV at one angle to give a two point fixed-q excitation function. The data are compared to theory and the data of others. As might be expected, medium corrections are shown to be considerably more important at low energies than at resonance. This is true for inelastic transitions of multipolarity 0,2 and 3. Parameters derived from an analysis of elastic pion scattering and SCX data also provide an adequate description of the inelastic transitions. The charge asymmetry in the cross sections for the 9/2/sup +/ state that was seen at resonance persists at these energies. This result is consistent with an impulse approximation treatment of the spin-flip amplitude. This is true even though the incoming energy of the pions is far below the range where the validity of an impulse treatment is expected. 65 refs., 45 figs.

  18. New optical analyzer for 13C-breath test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Dressler, Matthias; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus; Groninga, Hinrich

    2008-04-01

    Medical breath tests are well established diagnostic tools, predominantly for gastroenterological inspections, but also for many other examinations. Since the composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflect the physical condition of a patient, a breath analysis allows one to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that is based on photoacoustic spectroscopy and uses a DFB diode laser at 2.744 μm. The concentration ratio of the CO II isotopologues is determined by measuring the absorption on a 13CO II line in comparison to a 12CO II line. In the specially selected spectral range the lines have similar strengths, although the concentrations differ by a factor of 90. Therefore, the signals are well comparable. Due to an excellent signal-noise-ratio isotope variations of less than 1% can be resolved as required for the breath test.

  19. Two Categories of 13C/12C Ratios for Higher Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bruce N.; Epstein, Samuel

    1971-01-01

    13C/12C ratios have been determined for plant tissue from 104 species representing 60 families. Higher plants fall into two categories, those with low δPDBI13C values (—24 to —34‰) and those with high δ 13C values (—6 to —19‰). Algae have δ 13C values of —12 to —23‰. Photosynthetic fractionation leading to such values is discussed. PMID:16657626

  20. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra of mono-13C-acetaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Guillemin, J. C.

    2015-07-01

    Context. The acetaldehyde molecule is ubiquitous in the interstellar medium of our galaxy, and due to its dense and complex spectrum, large dipole moment, and several low-lying torsional states, acetaldehyde is considered to be a "weed" molecule for radio astronomy observations. Mono-13C acetaldehydes 13CH3CHO and CH313CHO are likely to be identified in astronomical surveys, such as those available with the very sensitive ALMA telescope. Laboratory measurements and analysis of the millimeter and submillimeter-wave spectra are the prerequisites for the successful radioastronomical search for the new interstellar molecular species, as well as for new isotopologs of already detected interstellar molecules. Aims: In this context, to provide reliable predictions of 13CH3CHO and CH313CHO spectra in millimeter and submillimeter wave ranges, we study rotational spectra of these species in the frequency range from 50 to 945 GHz. Methods: The spectra of mono-13C acetaldehydes were recorded using the spectrometer based on Schottky-diode frequencymultiplication chains in the Lille laboratory. The rotational spectra of 13CH3CHO and CH313CHO molecules were analyzed using the Rho axis method. Results: In the recorded spectra we have assigned 6884 for the 13CH3CHO species and 6458 for CH313CHO species new rotational transitions belonging to the ground, first, and second excited torsional states. These measurements were fitted together with previously published data to the Hamiltonian models that use 91 and 87 parameters to achieve overall weighted rms deviations 0.88 for the 13CH3CHO species and 0.95 for CH313CHO. On the basis of the new spectroscopic results, predictions of transition frequencies in the frequency range up to 1 THz with J ≤ 60 and Ka ≤ 20 are presented for both isotopologs. Full Tables 3-6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/579/A46

  1. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  2. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  3. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  4. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  5. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  6. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  7. Stable isotope-enhanced two- and three-dimensional diffusion ordered 13C-NMR spectroscopy (SIE-DOSY 13C-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable Isotope-Enhanced Diffusion Ordered (SIE-DOSY) 13C-NMR has been applied to 13C-enriched carbohydrates and has been used to determine diffusion coefficients for pentose and hexose monosaccharides, a disaccharide and a trisaccharide. These 2D spectra were obtained with as little as 8 min of acq...

  8. Impact of field strength and iron oxide nanoparticle concentration on the linearity and diagnostic accuracy of off-resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Christian T; Dai, Guangping; Novikov, Mikhail; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Weissleder, Ralph; Rosen, Bruce R; Sosnovik, David E

    2008-06-01

    Off-resonance imaging (ORI) techniques are being increasingly used to image iron oxide imaging agents such as monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MION). However, the diagnostic accuracy, linearity, and field dependence of ORI have not been fully characterized. In this study, the sensitivity, specificity, and linearity of ORI were thus examined as a function of both MION concentration and magnetic field strength (4.7 and 14 T). MION phantoms with and without an air interface as well as MION uptake in a mouse model of healing myocardial infarction were imaged. MION-induced resonance shifts were shown to increase linearly with MION concentration. In contrast, the ORI signal/sensitivity was highly non-linear, initially increasing with MION concentration until T2 became comparable to the TE and decreasing thereafter. The specificity of ORI to distinguish MION-induced resonance shifts from on-resonance water was found to decrease with increasing field because of the increased on-resonance water linewidths (15 Hz at 4.7 T versus 45 Hz at 14 T). Large resonance shifts ( approximately 300 Hz) were observed at air interfaces at 4.7 T, both in vitro and in vivo, and led to poor ORI specificity for MION concentrations less than 150 microg Fe/mL. The in vivo ORI sensitivity was sufficient to detect the accumulation of MION in macrophages infiltrating healing myocardial infarcts, but the specificity was limited by non-specific areas of positive contrast at the air/tissue interfaces of the thoracic wall and the descending aorta. Improved specificity and linearity can, however, be expected at lower fields where decreased on-resonance water linewidths, reduced air-induced resonance shifts, and longer T2 relaxation times are observed. The optimal performance of ORI will thus likely be seen at low fields, with moderate MION concentrations and with sequences containing very short TEs.

  9. Coal structure at reactive sites by sup 1 H- sup 13 C- sup 19 F double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, E.W.; Woody, M.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The solid state NMR technique, {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C-{sup 31}P double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy, uses the direct dipolar interaction between {sup 13}C-{sup 31}P spin pairs in organophosphorus substances to identify the subset of carbons within a spherical volume element of 0.4 nm radius centered on the {sup 31}P atom. In combination with chemical manipulation of coals designed to introduce phosphorus containing functionality into the organic matrix, the NMR experiment becomes a method to examine selectively the carbon bonding network at the reactive sites in the coal. This approach generates a statistical structure description of the coal at the reaction centers in contrast to bulk carbon characterization using conventional {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. 3 refs.

  10. Geochemical Approach to Archaeal Ecology: δ13C of GDGTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtin, S.; Warren, C.; Pearson, A.; Pagani, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade and a half, glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) have increasingly been used to reconstruct environmental temperatures; proxies like TEX86 that correlate the relative abundance of these archaeal cell membrane lipids to sea surface temperature are omnipresent in paleoclimatology literature. While it has become common to make claims about past temperatures using GDGTs, our present understanding of the organisms that synthesize the compounds is still quite limited. The generally accepted theory states that microorganisms like the Thaumarchaeota modify the structure of membrane lipids to increase intermolecular interactions, strengthening the membrane at higher temperatures. Yet to date, culture experiments have been largely restricted to a single species, Nitrosopumilus maritimes, and recent studies on oceanic archaeal rRNA have revealed that these biomarkers are produced in diverse, heterogeneous, and site-specific communities. This brings up questions as to whether different subclasses of GDGTs, and all subsequent proxies, represent adaptation within a single organismal group or a shift in community composition. To investigate whether GDGTs with different chain structures, from the simple isoprenoidal GDGT-0 to Crenarchaeol with its many cyclopentane groups, are sourced from archaea with similar or disparate metabolic pathways—and if that information is inherited in GDGTs trapped in marine sediments—this study examines the stable carbon isotope values (δ13C) of GDGTs extracted from the uppermost meters of sediment in the Orca Basin, Gulf of Mexico, using spooling-wire microcombustion isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (SWiM-IRMS), tackling a fundamental assumption of the TEX86 proxy that influences the way we perceive the veracity of existing temperature records.

  11. Topological Constraints on Chain-Folding Structure of Semicrystalline Polymer as Studied by 13C-13C Double Quantum NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Youlee; Miyoshi, Toshikazu

    Chain-folding process is a prominent feature of long polymer chains during crystallization. Over the last half century, much effort has been paid to reveal the chain trajectory. Even though various chain-folding models as well as theories of crystallization at molecule levels have been proposed, they could be not reconciled due to the limited experimental evidences. Recent development of double quantum NMR with selective isotope labeling identified the chain-trajectory of 13C labeled isotactic poly(1-butene). The systematic experiments covered a wide range of parameters, i.e. kinetics, concentration, and molecular weight (Mw) . It was demonstrated that i) adjacent re-entry site was invariant as a function of crystallization temperature (Tc) , concentration, andMw, ii) long-range order of adjacent re-entry sequence is independence of kinetics at a given concentration while it decreased with increasing the polymer concentration at a given Tc due to the increased interruption between the chains, and iii) high Mw chains led to the multilayer folded structures in single crystals, but the melt state induced the identical short adjacent sequences of long and short polymer over a wide range of Tc due to the entanglements. The behaviors indicated that the topological restriction plays significant roles in the chain-folding process rather than the kinetics. The proposed framework to control the chain-folding structure presents a new perspective into the chain organization by either the intra- or inter-chain interaction. National Science Foundation Grants DMR-1105829 and 1408855.

  12. BEBEtr and BUBI: J-compensated concurrent shaped pulses for 1H-13C experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehni, Sebastian; Luy, Burkhard

    2013-07-01

    Shaped pulses designed for broadband excitation, inversion and refocusing are important tools in modern NMR spectroscopy to achieve robust pulse sequences especially in heteronuclear correlation experiments. A large variety of mostly computer-optimized pulse shapes exist for different desired bandwidths, available rf-field strengths, and tolerance to B1-inhomogeneity. They are usually derived for a single spin 1/2, neglecting evolution due to J-couplings. While pulses with constant resulting phase are selfcompensated for heteronuclear coupling evolution as long as they are applied exclusively on a single nucleus, the situation changes for concurrently applied pulse shapes. Using the example of a 1H,13C two spin system, two J-compensated pulse pairs for the application in INEPT-type transfer elements were optimized: a point-to-point pulse sandwich called BEBEtr, consisting of a broadband excitation and time-reversed excitation pulse, and a combined universal rotation and point-to-point pulse pair called BUBI, which acts as a refocusing pulse on 1H and a corresponding inversion pulse on 13C. After a derivation of quality factors and optimization protocols, a theoretical and experimental comparison with conventionally derived BEBOP, BIBOP, and BURBOP-180° pulses is given. While the overall transfer efficiency of a single pulse pair is only reduced by approximately 0.1%, resulting transfer to undesired coherences is reduced by several percent. In experiments this can lead to undesired phase distortions for pairs of uncompensated pulse shapes and even differences in signal intensities of 5-10% in HSQC and up to 68% in more complex COB-HSQC experiments.

  13. Determination of fructose metabolic pathways in normal and fructose-intolerant children: A sup 13 C NMR study using (U- sup 13 C)fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Gopher, A.; Lapidot, A. ); Vaisman, N. ); Mandel, H. )

    1990-07-01

    An inborn deficiency in the ability of aldolase B to split fructose 1-phosphate is found in humans with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). A stable isotope procedure to elucidate the mechanism of conversion of fructose to glucose in normal children and in HFI children has been developed. A constant infusion of D-(U-{sup 13}C)fructose was given nasogastrically to control and to HFI children. Hepatic fructose conversion to glucose was estimated by examination of {sup 13}C NMR spectra of plasma glucose. Significantly lower values ({approx}3-fold) for fructose conversion to glucose were obtained for the HFI patients as compared to the controls. A quantitative determination of the metabolic pathways of fructose conversion to glucose was derived from {sup 13}C NMR measurement of plasma ({sup 13}C)glucose isotopomer populations. The finding of isotopomer populations of three adjacent {sup 13}C atoms at glucose C-4 ({sup 13}C{sub 3}-{sup 13}C{sub 4}-{sup 13}C{sub 5}) suggests that there is a direct pathway from fructose, by-passing fructose-1-phosphate aldolase, to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The metabolism of fructose by fructose-1-phosphate aldolase activity accounts for only {approx}50% of the total amount of hepatic fructose conversion to glucose. In view of the marked decline by 67% in synthesis of glucose from fructose in HFI subjects found in this study, the extent of ({sup 13}C)glucose formation from a trace amount of (U-{sup 13}C)fructose infused into the patient can be used as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic test for inherent faulty fructose metabolism.

  14. Effects of Off-Resonance Irradiation, Cross-Relaxation, and Chemical Exchange on Steady-State Magnetization and Effective Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, Peter B.; Monahan, W. Gordon

    2000-04-01

    In the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field, recovery of longitudinal magnetization to a steady state is not purely monoexponential. Under reasonable conditions with zero initial magnetization, recovery is nearly exponential and an effective relaxation rate constant R1eff = 1/T1eff can be obtained. Exact and approximate formulas for R1eff and steady-state magnetization are derived from the Bloch equations for spins undergoing cross-relaxation and chemical exchange between two sites in the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field. The relaxation formulas require that the magnetization of one spin is constant, but not necessarily zero, while the other spin relaxes. Extension to three sites with one radiofrequency field is explained. The special cases of off-resonance effects alone and with cross-relaxation or chemical exchange, cross-relaxation alone, and chemical exchange alone are compared. The inaccuracy in saturation transfer measurements of exchange rate constants by published formulas is discussed for the creatine kinase reaction.

  15. Experimental evidence of E × B plasma rotation in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Cortázar, O. D.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.

    2015-12-15

    An experimental observation of a rotating plasma structure in a 2.45 GHz microwave-driven hydrogen discharge is reported. The rotation is presumably produced by E × B drift. The formation of the rotating plasma structure is sensitive to the strength of the off-resonance static magnetic field. The rotation frequency is on the order of 10 kHz and is affected by the neutral gas pressure and applied microwave power.

  16. The Late Pleistocene history of surface water δ13C in the Sulu Sea: Possible relationship to Pacific Deepwater δ13C changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, Braddock K.; Dunbar, Robert B.

    1994-04-01

    A reconstruction of late Pleistocene surface water carbon isotopic (δ13C) variability is presented from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) site 769 in the Sulu Sea in the western tropical Pacific. The Sulu Sea is a shallowly silled back arc basin with a maximum sill depth of 420 m. Site 769 was drilled on a bathymetric high in 3643 m of water and has average late Pleistocene sedimentation rates of 8.5 cm/kyr. The oxygen isotope record (δ18O) of Globigerinoides ruber at site 769 shows a strong correlation with the SPECMAP stacked δ18O record, attesting to the continuity of sediment archive at the site. Surface δ13C displays consistent glacial-interglacial variability which averages ˜0.9‰ and has varied from 0.75 to 1.1‰ over the last 800 kyr. Comparison to surface water δ13C records in the South China Sea and western tropical Pacific suggests that the glacial-interglacial surface δ13C variability is regional in scale. Planktonic δ13C data from ODP site 677 in the eastern Pacific is also coherent with the site 769. Additionally, we have found that the site 769 surface δ13C record is coherent at periods of 100 and 41 kyr with deepwater δ13C records from the Pacific. The highest correlation occurs with the deep eastern Pacific, where benthic δ13C data from cores RC13-110 and ODP site 677 closely match the Sulu Sea surface water record. We evaluate several possible controls of surface water δ13C in the Sulu Sea that may explain the coherent timing with Pacific deepwater δ13C records. These include variations in terrestrial organic matter flux to the basin, the upwelling of subsurface water and productivity changes, and the influx of western Pacific intermediate water to the Sulu Sea. Our preferred explanation involves a region of upper intermediate water upwelling in the far western Pacific which has been shown to outgas CO2 from subsurface waters into surface waters. Upwelling also occurs in the area of Panama Basin site 677. These equatorial upwelling zones

  17. Determination of 13C/ 12C ratios with (d, p) nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, J.; Tesmer, J. R.; Li, Y. H.; Greco, R.; Grim, G. P.; Obst, A. W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-06-01

    Stable isotope ratios such as 13C/ 12C play an important role in many applications including environment and energy research. Since many surface analysis techniques are plagued with unavoidable hydrocarbon contamination issues during analysis, it is highly desirable that 13C and 12C isotopes be measured simultaneously especially in specimens with a minute amount of 13C, in order to reliably determine 13C/ 12C ratios. In this paper, we report that deuterium induced proton particle reactions, 13C(d, p) 14C and 12C(d, p) 13C, provide a convenient and reliable approach for 13C/ 12C ratio determination. Optimizations on experimental considerations and potential interferences from other common light isotopes are discussed as well as results from the application of this technique to diagnose the performance of a target debris collection in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiment.

  18. Sc3CH@C80: selective (13)C enrichment of the central carbon atom.

    PubMed

    Junghans, Katrin; Rosenkranz, Marco; Popov, Alexey A

    2016-05-01

    Sc3CH@C80 is synthesized and characterized by (1)H, (13)C, and (45)Sc NMR. A large negative chemical shift of the proton, -11.73 ppm in the Ih and -8.79 ppm in the D5h C80 cage isomers, is found. (13)C satellites in the (1)H NMR spectrum enabled indirect determination of the (13)C chemical shift for the central carbon at 173 ± 1 ppm. Intensity of the satellites allowed determination of the (13)C content for the central carbon atom. This unique possibility is applied to analyze the cluster/cage (13)C distribution in mechanistic studies employing either (13)CH4 or (13)C powder to enrich Sc3CH@C80 with (13)C. PMID:27109443

  19. Sc3CH@C80: selective 13C enrichment of the central carbon atom†

    PubMed Central

    Junghans, Katrin; Rosenkranz, Marco; Popov, Alexey A.

    2016-01-01

    Sc3CH@C80 is synthesized and characterized by 1H, 13C, and 45Sc NMR. A large negative chemical shift of the proton, −11.73 ppm in the Ih and −8.79 ppm in the D5h C80 cage isomers, is found. 13C satellites in the 1H NMR spectrum enabled indirect determination of the 13C chemical shift for the central carbon at 173 ± 1 ppm. Intensity of the satellites allowed determination of the 13C content for the central carbon atom. This unique possibility is applied to analyze the cluster/cage 13C distribution in mechanistic studies employing either 13CH4 or 13C powder to enrich Sc3CH@C80 with 13C. PMID:27109443

  20. Characterization of uniformly and atom-specifically 13C-labeled heparin and heparan sulfate polysaccharide precursors using 13C NMR spectroscopy and ESI mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao K. N.; Tran, Vy M.; Victor, Xylophone V.; Skalicky, Jack J.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2010-01-01

    The biological actions of heparin and heparan sulfate, two structurally related glycosaminoglycans, depend on the organization of the complex heparanome. Due to the structural complexity of the heparanome, the sequence of variably sulfonated uronic acid and glucosamine residues is usually characterized by the analysis of smaller oligosaccharide and disaccharide fragments. Even characterization of smaller heparin/heparan sulfate oligosaccharide or disaccharide fragments using simple 1D 1H NMR spectroscopy is often complicated by the extensive signal overlap. 13C NMR signals, on the other hand, overlap less and therefore, 13C NMR spectroscopy can greatly facilitate the structural elucidation of the complex heparanome and provide finer insights into the structural basis for biological functions. This is the first report of the preparation of anomeric carbon-specific 13C-labeled heparin/heparan sulfate precursors from the Escherichia coli K5 strain. Uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled precursors were also produced and characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis of enzymatically fragmented disaccharides revealed that anomeric carbon-specific labeling efforts resulted in a minor loss/scrambling of 13C in the precursor backbone, whereas uniform labeling efforts resulted in greater than 95% 13C isotope enrichment in the precursor backbone. These labeled precursors provided high-resolution NMR signals with great sensitivity and set the stage for studying the heparanome–proteome interactions. PMID:20832774

  1. 13C metabolic flux analysis at a genome-scale.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Saratram; Maranas, Costas D

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic models used in 13C metabolic flux analysis generally include a limited number of reactions primarily from central metabolism. They typically omit degradation pathways, complete cofactor balances, and atom transition contributions for reactions outside central metabolism. This study addresses the impact on prediction fidelity of scaling-up mapping models to a genome-scale. The core mapping model employed in this study accounts for (75 reactions and 65 metabolites) primarily from central metabolism. The genome-scale metabolic mapping model (GSMM) (697 reaction and 595 metabolites) is constructed using as a basis the iAF1260 model upon eliminating reactions guaranteed not to carry flux based on growth and fermentation data for a minimal glucose growth medium. Labeling data for 17 amino acid fragments obtained from cells fed with glucose labeled at the second carbon was used to obtain fluxes and ranges. Metabolic fluxes and confidence intervals are estimated, for both core and genome-scale mapping models, by minimizing the sum of square of differences between predicted and experimentally measured labeling patterns using the EMU decomposition algorithm. Overall, we find that both topology and estimated values of the metabolic fluxes remain largely consistent between core and GSM model. Stepping up to a genome-scale mapping model leads to wider flux inference ranges for 20 key reactions present in the core model. The glycolysis flux range doubles due to the possibility of active gluconeogenesis, the TCA flux range expanded by 80% due to the availability of a bypass through arginine consistent with labeling data, and the transhydrogenase reaction flux was essentially unresolved due to the presence of as many as five routes for the inter-conversion of NADPH to NADH afforded by the genome-scale model. By globally accounting for ATP demands in the GSMM model the unused ATP decreased drastically with the lower bound matching the maintenance ATP requirement. A non

  2. Determination of de novo synthesized amino acids in cellular proteins revisited by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Willker, W; Leibfritz, D

    1997-04-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the absolute amounts to de novo synthesized amino acids in both the perchloric acid extracts and the hydrolyzed protein fractions of F98 glioma cells incubated for 2 h with 5 mmol/l [U-13C]glucose. 13C NMR spectra of the hydrolyzed protein fraction revealed a marked incorporation of 13C-labelled alanine, aspartate and glutamate into the proteins of F98 cells within the incubation period. Additionally, small amounts of 13C-labelled glycine, proline and serine could unambiguously be identified in the protein fraction. Astonishingly, approximately equal amounts of 13C-labelled glutamate and aspartate were incorporated into the cellular proteins, although the cytosolic steady-state concentration of aspartate was below 13C NMR detectability. Hypertonic stress decreased the incorporation of 13C-labelled amino acids into the total protein, albeit their cytosolic concentrations were increased, which reflects an inhibition of protein synthesis under these conditions. On the other hand, hypotonic stress increased the amount of 13C-labelled proline incorporated into the cellular proteins even though the cytosolic concentration of 13C-labelled proline was largely decreased. Apparently, hypoosmotic conditions stimulate the synthesis of proteins or peptides with a high proline content. The results show that already after 2 h of incubation with [U-13C]glucose there is a pronounced flux of 13C label into the cellular proteins, which is usually disregarded if cytosolic fluids are examined only. This means that calculations of metabolic fluxes based on 13C NMR spectroscopic data obtained from perchloric acid extracts of cells or tissues and also from in vivo measurements consider only the labelled 'NMR visible' cytosolic metabolites, which may have to be corrected for fast label flowing off into other compartments.

  3. Unraveling the complexity of protein backbone dynamics with combined (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lamley, Jonathan M; Lougher, Matthew J; Sass, Hans Juergen; Rogowski, Marco; Grzesiek, Stephan; Lewandowski, Józef R

    2015-09-14

    Typically, protein dynamics involve a complex hierarchy of motions occurring on different time scales between conformations separated by a range of different energy barriers. NMR relaxation can in principle provide a site-specific picture of both the time scales and amplitudes of these motions, but independent relaxation rates sensitive to fluctuations in different time scale ranges are required to obtain a faithful representation of the underlying dynamic complexity. This is especially pertinent for relaxation measurements in the solid state, which report on dynamics in a broader window of time scales by more than 3 orders of magnitudes compared to solution NMR relaxation. To aid in unraveling the intricacies of biomolecular dynamics we introduce (13)C spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) as a probe of backbone nanosecond-microsecond motions in proteins in the solid state. We present measurements of (13)C'R1ρ rates in fully protonated crystalline protein GB1 at 600 and 850 MHz (1)H Larmor frequencies and compare them to (13)C'R1, (15)N R1 and R1ρ measured under the same conditions. The addition of carbon relaxation data to the model free analysis of nitrogen relaxation data leads to greatly improved characterization of time scales of protein backbone motions, minimizing the occurrence of fitting artifacts that may be present when (15)N data is used alone. We also discuss how internal motions characterized by different time scales contribute to (15)N and (13)C relaxation rates in the solid state and solution state, leading to fundamental differences between them, as well as phenomena such as underestimation of picosecond-range motions in the solid state and nanosecond-range motions in solution.

  4. Origin of the conformational modulation of the 13C NMR chemical shift of methoxy groups in aromatic natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Toušek, Jaromír; Straka, Michal; Sklenář, Vladimír; Marek, Radek

    2013-01-24

    The interpretation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters is essential to understanding experimental observations at the molecular and supramolecular levels and to designing new and more efficient molecular probes. In many aromatic natural compounds, unusual (13)C NMR chemical shifts have been reported for out-of-plane methoxy groups bonded to the aromatic ring (~62 ppm as compared to the typical value of ~56 ppm for an aromatic methoxy group). Here, we analyzed this phenomenon for a series of aromatic natural compounds using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. First, we checked the methodology used to optimize the structure and calculate the NMR chemical shifts in aromatic compounds. The conformational effects of the methoxy group on the (13)C NMR chemical shift then were interpreted by the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Natural Chemical Shift (NCS) approaches, and by excitation analysis of the chemical shifts, breaking down the total nuclear shielding tensor into the contributions from the different occupied orbitals and their magnetic interactions with virtual orbitals. We discovered that the atypical (13)C NMR chemical shifts observed are not directly related to a different conjugation of the lone pair of electrons of the methoxy oxygen with the aromatic ring, as has been suggested. Our analysis indicates that rotation of the methoxy group induces changes in the virtual molecular orbital space, which, in turn, correlate with the predominant part of the contribution of the paramagnetic deshielding connected with the magnetic interactions of the BD(CMet-H)→BD*(CMet-OMet) orbitals, resulting in the experimentally observed deshielding of the (13)C NMR resonance of the out-of-plane methoxy group.

  5. FOURIER TRANSFORM EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY OF THE B {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} (VIOLET) SYSTEM OF {sup 13}C{sup 14}N

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, R. S.; Bernath, P. F.

    2011-06-01

    Emission spectra of the B {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} transition of {sup 13}C{sup 14}N have been observed at high resolution using the Fourier transform spectrometer associated with the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope of the National Solar Observatory. The spectra have been measured in the 21000-30000 cm{sup -1} region and a total of 52 vibrational bands involving vibrational levels up to v = 15 of the ground and excited states have been rotationally analyzed to provide a much improved set of spectroscopic constants. An experimental line list and calculated term values are provided. The results of the present analysis should prove useful in the identification of additional {sup 13}C{sup 14}N lines in comets and cool stars, and will help in the determination of the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C abundance ratio.

  6. Metabolic pathways for ketone body production. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of rat liver in vivo using /sup 13/C-multilabeled fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl-Wostl, C.; Seelig, J.

    1986-11-04

    The hormonal regulation of ketogenesis in the liver of living rat has been studied noninvasively with /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance. The spatial selection for the liver was better than 90%, with extrahepatic adipose tissue contribution only a very small amount of signal. The metabolic activities of the liver were investigated by infusion of /sup 13/C-labeled butyrate in the jugular vein of the anesthetized rat. The rate of butyrate infusion was chosen to be close to the maximum oxidative capacity of the rat liver, and the /sup 13/C signal intensities were enhanced by using doubly labeled (1,3-/sup 13/C)butyrate as a substrate. Different /sup 13/C NMR spectra and hence different metabolites were observed depending on the hormonal state of the animal. The /sup 13/C NMR studies demonstrate that even when rate of acetyl-CoA production are high, the disposal of this compound is not identical in fasted and diabetic animals. This supports previous suggestions that the redox state of the mitochondrion represents the most important factor in regulation. For a given metabolic state of the animal, different signal intensities were obtained depending on whether butyrate was labeled at C-1, C-3, or C-1,3. From the ratios of incorporation of /sup 13/C label into the carbons of 3-hydroxybutyrate, it could be estimated that a large fraction of butyrate evaded ..beta..-oxidation to acetyl-CoA but was converted directly to acetoacetyl-CoA. /sup 13/C-labeled glucose could be detected in vivo in the liver of diabetic rats.

  7. Thz Spectroscopy of Acetaldehyde and Search of 13C Species in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    Acetaldehyde (CH_3CHO) is one of the high priority complex organic molecules for the astrophysical community. There is a lack of data concerning the 13C species since the measurements are limited to 40 GHz up to date. This molecule displays a large amplitude motion: the hindered rotation of the methyl group with respect to the rest of the molecule. The analysis is performed with RAM36 code which used the Rho Axis Method. Last year we presented the analysis of the millimeterwave spectra of the 13CH_3CHO species. We extended the analysis to the THz range of the vibrational ground state for both species. We are also analyzing the first torsional state (≈140 cm-1) for two reasons: first, this permits to remove correlation between parameters. Second, this state contribute to the partition function even at ISM temperature (100--150 K) since there is an influence on the column density determined in case of detection. The searches of these isotopomers are in progress in ORION. This work was supported by the CNES and the Action sur Projets de l'INSU, PCMI. This work was also done under the ANR-08-BLAN-0054. Kilb, R.W.; Lin, C.C.; and Wilson, E.B. J. Chem. Phys. 26, (1957) 1695 Ilyushin, V.V. et al J. Mol. Spectrosc. 259, (2010) 26 Margules, L. et al. FA07, 66th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy (2011)

  8. Synthesis of isotopically labeled R- or S-[.sup.13C, .sup.2H] glycerols

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2008-01-22

    The present invention is directed to asymmetric chiral labeled glycerols including at least one chiral atom, from one to two .sup.13C atoms and from zero to four deuterium atoms bonded directly to a carbon atom, e.g., (2S) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol and (2R) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol, and to the use of such chiral glycerols in the preparation of labeled amino acids.

  9. Open-Source Automated Parahydrogen Hyperpolarizer for Molecular Imaging Using (13)C Metabolic Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Aaron M; Shchepin, Roman V; Truong, Milton L; Wilkens, Ken; Pham, Wellington; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-08-16

    An open-source hyperpolarizer producing (13)C hyperpolarized contrast agents using parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) for biomedical and other applications is presented. This PHIP hyperpolarizer utilizes an Arduino microcontroller in conjunction with a readily modified graphical user interface written in the open-source processing software environment to completely control the PHIP hyperpolarization process including remotely triggering an NMR spectrometer for efficient production of payloads of hyperpolarized contrast agent and in situ quality assurance of the produced hyperpolarization. Key advantages of this hyperpolarizer include: (i) use of open-source software and hardware seamlessly allowing for replication and further improvement as well as readily customizable integration with other NMR spectrometers or MRI scanners (i.e., this is a multiplatform design), (ii) relatively low cost and robustness, and (iii) in situ detection capability and complete automation. The device performance is demonstrated by production of a dose (∼2-3 mL) of hyperpolarized (13)C-succinate with %P13C ∼ 28% and 30 mM concentration and (13)C-phospholactate at %P13C ∼ 15% and 25 mM concentration in aqueous medium. These contrast agents are used for ultrafast molecular imaging and spectroscopy at 4.7 and 0.0475 T. In particular, the conversion of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate to (13)C-lactate in vivo is used here to demonstrate the feasibility of ultrafast multislice (13)C MRI after tail vein injection of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate in mice. PMID:27478927

  10. Measuring (13)C-(2)D dipolar couplings with a universal REDOR dephasing curve

    PubMed

    Gullion

    2000-09-01

    A (13)C-observe REDOR experiment is described which allows (13)C-(2)D dipolar couplings to be obtained by a universal dipolar dephasing curve. Previous (13)C-observe REDOR experiments on (13)C-(2)D spin pairs generally relied on numerical simulations to obtain the dipolar coupling. The REDOR experiment described in this article is based on a deuterium composite pulse, and the data analysis eliminates the need for numerical simulations and is the same as the traditional REDOR analysis performed on pairs of spin-12 nuclei. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10968975

  11. In vivo hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopic imaging with 1H decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Albert P.; Tropp, James; Hurd, Ralph E.; Van Criekinge, Mark; Carvajal, Lucas G.; Xu, Duan; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2009-03-01

    Application of 13C MRS in vivo on whole body MR system has been limited due to the low static field (and consequent low signal to noise ratio—SNR) of these scanners; thus there have been few reports of 1H decoupled 13C MRS in vivo using a clinical MR platform. The recent development of techniques to retain highly polarized spins in solution following DNP in a solid matrix has provided a mechanism to use endogenous pre-polarized 13C labeled substrates to study real time cellular metabolism in vivo with high SNR. In a recent in vivo hyperpolarized metabolic imaging study using 13C pyruvate, it has been demonstrated that the line shape (signal decay) of the resonances observed are greatly affected by JCH coupling in addition to inhomogeneous broadening. This study demonstrates the feasibility of improving hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging in vivo by incorporating 1H decoupling on a clinical whole body 3 T MR scanner. No reduction of T1 of a pre-polarized 13C substrate ([1- 13C] lactate) in solution was observed when 1H decoupling was applied with WALTZ16 sequence. Narrower linewidth for the [1- 13C] lactate resonance was observed in hyperpolarized 13C MRSI data in vivo with 1H decoupling.

  12. New study of the astrophysical reaction 13C(a,n)16O via the 13C(7Li,t)17O transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegriti, Maria Grazia; Hammache, F.; Roussel, P.; Audouin, L.; Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S.; Gaudefroy, L.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schujl, A.; Stanoiu, M.; Tatischeff, V.; Vilmay, M.

    PoS(NIC-IX)161 , , [1] , L. Gaudefroy[2] , J. Kiener[3] , A. Lefebvre-Schuhl[3] , M. Stanoiu[4] , V. The cross section of the 13 C(α,n)16 O reaction is a key ingredient for the comprehension of the s-process (slow neutron captures) in stars. This reaction is considered as the main neutron source for the s-process in low-mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars (1-3 solar mass) [1, 2, 3]. At the α-13 C energies of astrophysical interest (Ecm around 190 keV, corresponding to a tem- perature of 108 K) the contribution of the 17 O α-decay subthreshold resonance at 6.356 MeV to the 13 C(α,n)16 O cross section should be taken into account. The effect of this resonance is controversial after the different analyses of the Kubono et al. measurement [4] of the 6.356 MeV α-spectroscopic factor (Sα ) via the transfer reaction 13 C(6 Li,d)17 O . In order to further investigate the contribution of the 6.356 MeV resonance to the 13 C(α,n)16 O cross section, we performed a new measurement of its Sα factor via a different α-transfer reac- tion, namely the 13 C(7 Li,t)17 O reaction. The experiment was performed at the Orsay Tandem by using a 7 Li beam of 28 and 34 MeV on a 13C target. The angular distribution for the transfer dif- ferential cross section was measured by detecting the tritons at the focal plane of the SPLITPOLE spectrometer. The analysis procedure used in order to extract the yield of the 6.356 MeV level will be described. Preliminary results of the angular distribution will be shown.

  13. A Large Metabolic Carbon Ccontribution to the δ13C Record in Marine Aragonitic Bivalve Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, D. P.; Lorrain, A.; Dehairs, F.

    2006-12-01

    The stable carbon isotopic signature archived in bivalve shells was originally thought to record the δ13C of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC). However, more recent studies have shown that the incorporation of isotopically light metabolic carbon (M) significantly affects the δ13C signal recorded in biogenic carbonates. To assess the M contribution to Mercenaria mercenaria shells collected in North Carolina, USA, we sampled seawater δ13C-DIC, tissue, hemolymph and shell δ13C. We found up to a 4‰ decrease through ontogeny in shell δ13C in a 23 year old individual. There was no correlation between shell height or age and tissue δ13C. Thus, the ontogenic decrease observed in the shell δ13C could not be attributed to changes in food sources as the animal ages leading to more negative metabolic CO2, since this would require a negative relationship between tissue δ13C and shell height. Hemolymph δ13C, on the other hand, did exhibit a negative relationship with height, but the δ13C values were more positive than expected, indicating that hemolymph may not be a good proxy of extrapallial fluid δ13C. Nevertheless, the hemolymph data indicate that respired CO2 does influence the δ13C of internal fluids and that the amount of respired CO2 is related to the age of the bivalve. The percent metabolic C incorporated into the shell (%M) was significantly higher (up to 37%) than has been found in other bivalve shells, which usually contain less than 10 %M. Attempts to use shell biometrics to predict %M could not explain more than ~60% of the observed variability. Moreover, there were large differences in the %M between different sites. Thus, the metabolic effect on shell δ13C cannot easily be accounted for to allow reliable δ13C-DIC reconstructions. However, there does seem to be a common effect of size, as all sites had indistinguishable slopes between the %M and shell height (+0.19% per mm of shell height).

  14. Preliminary studies of a canine 13C-aminopyrine demethylation blood test.

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, E M; Steiner, J M; Williams, D A; Klein, P D

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether a 13C-aminopyrine demethylation blood test is technically feasible in clinically healthy dogs, whether oral administration of 13C-aminopyrine causes a detectable increase in percent dose/min (PCD) of 13C administered as 13C-aminopyrine and recovered in gas extracted from blood, and whether gas extraction efficiency has an impact on PCD. A dose of 2 mg/kg body weight of 13C-aminopyrine dissolved in deionized water was administered orally to 6 clinically healthy dogs. Blood samples were taken from each dog 0, 30, 60, and 120 min after administration of the 13C-aminopyrine. Carbon dioxide was extracted from blood samples by addition of acid and analyzed by fractional mass spectrometry. None of the 6 dogs showed any side effects after 13C-aminopyrine administration. All 6 dogs showed a measurable increase of the PCD in gas samples extracted from blood samples at 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min after 13C-aminopyrine administration. Coefficients of variation between the triplicate samples were statistically significantly higher for the %CO2, a measure of extraction efficiency, than for PCD values (P < 0.0001). The 13C-aminopyrine demethylation blood test described here is technically feasible. Oral administration of 13C-aminopyrine did not lead to gross side effects in the 6 dogs. Clinically healthy dogs show a measurable increase of PCD in gas extracted from blood samples after oral administration of 13C-aminopyrine. Efficiency of CO2 extraction from blood samples does not have an impact on PCD determined from these blood samples. This test may prove useful to evaluate hepatic function in dogs. PMID:11227194

  15. Economical synthesis of 13C-labeled opiates, cocaine derivatives and selected urinary metabolites by derivatization of the natural products.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, Huiling; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2015-01-01

    The illegal use of opiates and cocaine is a challenge world-wide, but some derivatives are also valuable pharmaceuticals. Reference samples of the active ingredients and their metabolites are needed both for controlling administration in the clinic and to detect drugs of abuse. Especially, (13)C-labeled compounds are useful for identification and quantification purposes by mass spectroscopic techniques, potentially increasing accuracy by minimizing ion alteration/suppression effects. Thus, the synthesis of [acetyl-(13)C4]heroin, [acetyl-(13)C4-methyl-(13)C]heroin, [acetyl-(13)C2-methyl-(13)C]6-acetylmorphine, [N-methyl-(13)C-O-metyl-(13)C]codeine and phenyl-(13)C6-labeled derivatives of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine and cocaethylene was undertaken to provide such reference materials. The synthetic work has focused on identifying (13)C atom-efficient routes towards these derivatives. Therefore, the (13)C-labeled opiates and cocaine derivatives were made from the corresponding natural products.

  16. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique. PMID:16332107

  17. Chain packing in glassy polymers by natural-abundance 13C-13C spin diffusion using 2D centerband-only detection of exchange.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manmilan; Schaefer, Jacob

    2011-03-01

    The proximities of specific subgroups of nearest-neighbor chains in glassy polymers are revealed by distance-dependent (13)C-(13)C dipolar couplings and spin diffusion. The measurement of such proximities is practical even with natural-abundance levels of (13)C using a 2D version of centerband-only detection of exchange (CODEX). Two-dimensional CODEX is a relaxation-compensated experiment that avoids the problems associated with variations in T(1)(C)'s due to dynamic site heterogeneity in the glass. Isotropic chemical shifts are encoded in the t(1) preparation times before and after mixing, and variations in T(2)'s are compensated by an S(0) reference (no mixing). Data acquisition involves acquisition of an S(0) reference signal on alternate scans, and the active control of power amplifiers, to achieve stability and accuracy over long accumulation times. The model system to calibrate spin diffusion is the polymer itself. For a mixing time of 200 ms, only (13)C-(13)C pairs separated by one or two bonds (2.5 Å) show cross peaks, which therefore identify reference intrachain proximities. For a mixing time of 1200 ms, 5 Å interchain proximities appear. The resulting cross peaks are used in a simple and direct way to compare nonrandom chain packing for two commercial polycarbonates with decidedly different mechanical properties.

  18. Natural (13) C distribution in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) and consequences for allocation pattern.

    PubMed

    Lamade, Emmanuelle; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Darlan, Nuzul Hijri; Rodrigues, Rosario Lobato; Fresneau, Chantal; Mauve, Caroline; Lamothe-Sibold, Marlène; Sketriené, Diana; Ghashghaie, Jaleh

    2016-01-01

    Oil palm has now become one of the most important crops, palm oil representing nearly 25% of global plant oil consumption. Many studies have thus addressed oil palm ecophysiology and photosynthesis-based models of carbon allocation have been used. However, there is a lack of experimental data on carbon fixation and redistribution within palm trees, and important C-sinks have not been fully characterized yet. Here, we carried out extensive measurement of natural (13) C-abundance (δ(13) C) in oil palm tissues, including fruits at different maturation stages. We find a (13) C-enrichment in heterotrophic organs compared to mature leaves, with roots being the most (13) C-enriched. The δ(13) C in fruits decreased during maturation, reflecting the accumulation in (13) C-depleted lipids. We further used observed δ(13) C values to compute plausible carbon fluxes using a steady-state model of (13) C-distribution including metabolic isotope effects ((12) v/(13) v). The results suggest that fruits represent a major respiratory loss (≈39% of total tree respiration) and that sink organs such as fruits are fed by sucrose from leaves. That is, glucose appears to be a quantitatively important compound in palm tissues, but computations indicate that it is involved in dynamic starch metabolism rather that C-exchange between organs. PMID:26228944

  19. Evaluation of 13C isotopic tracers for metabolic flux analysis in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, Christian M.; Walther, Jason L.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is the most comprehensive means of characterizing cellular metabolic states. Uniquely labeled isotopic tracers enable more focused analyses to probe specific reactions within the network. As a result, the choice of tracer largely determines the precision with which one can estimate metabolic fluxes, especially in complex mammalian systems that require multiple substrates. Here we have experimentally determined metabolic fluxes in a tumor cell line, successfully recapitulating the hallmarks of cancer cell metabolism. Using these data, we computationally evaluated specifically labeled 13C glucose and glutamine tracers for their ability to precisely and accurately estimate fluxes in central carbon metabolism. These methods enabled us to to identify the optimal tracer for analyzing individual fluxes, specific pathways, and central carbon metabolism as a whole. [1,2-13C2]glucose provided the most precise estimates for glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the overall network. Tracers such as [2-13C]glucose and [3-13C]glucose also outperformed the more commonly used [1-13C]glucose. [U-13C5]glutamine emerged as the preferred isotopic tracer for analysis of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. These results provide valuable, quantitative information on the performance of 13C-labeled substrates and can aid in the design of more informative MFA experiments in mammalian cell culture. PMID:19622376

  20. Application of Good's buffers to pH imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C MRI.

    PubMed

    Flavell, Robert R; von Morze, Cornelius; Blecha, Joseph E; Korenchan, David E; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sriram, Renuka; Gordon, Jeremy W; Chen, Hsin-Yu; Subramaniam, Sukumar; Bok, Robert A; Wang, Zhen J; Vigneron, Daniel B; Larson, Peder E; Kurhanewicz, John; Wilson, David M

    2015-09-25

    N-(2-Acetamido)-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (ACES), one of Good's buffers, was applied to pH imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Rapid NMR- and MRI-based pH measurements were obtained by exploiting the sensitive pH-dependence of its (13)C chemical shift within the physiologic range.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of a Tropical Freshwater Cyanobacterium, Limnothrix sp. Strain P13C2

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Boon Fei; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong

    2016-01-01

    A nonaxenic unialgal culture of Limnothrix sp. strain P13C2 was obtained through multiple subculturing of an inoculum obtained from a tropical freshwater lake. Here, we report the genome of P13C2 of 4.6 Mbp, extracted from the metagenome of this coculture. PMID:27795269

  2. Natural (13) C distribution in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) and consequences for allocation pattern.

    PubMed

    Lamade, Emmanuelle; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Darlan, Nuzul Hijri; Rodrigues, Rosario Lobato; Fresneau, Chantal; Mauve, Caroline; Lamothe-Sibold, Marlène; Sketriené, Diana; Ghashghaie, Jaleh

    2016-01-01

    Oil palm has now become one of the most important crops, palm oil representing nearly 25% of global plant oil consumption. Many studies have thus addressed oil palm ecophysiology and photosynthesis-based models of carbon allocation have been used. However, there is a lack of experimental data on carbon fixation and redistribution within palm trees, and important C-sinks have not been fully characterized yet. Here, we carried out extensive measurement of natural (13) C-abundance (δ(13) C) in oil palm tissues, including fruits at different maturation stages. We find a (13) C-enrichment in heterotrophic organs compared to mature leaves, with roots being the most (13) C-enriched. The δ(13) C in fruits decreased during maturation, reflecting the accumulation in (13) C-depleted lipids. We further used observed δ(13) C values to compute plausible carbon fluxes using a steady-state model of (13) C-distribution including metabolic isotope effects ((12) v/(13) v). The results suggest that fruits represent a major respiratory loss (≈39% of total tree respiration) and that sink organs such as fruits are fed by sucrose from leaves. That is, glucose appears to be a quantitatively important compound in palm tissues, but computations indicate that it is involved in dynamic starch metabolism rather that C-exchange between organs.

  3. 29 CFR 2580.412-36 - Application of 13(c) to “party in interest”.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... members covered by such plan.” (b) A basic question presented is whether the effect of 13(c) is to... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Application of 13(c) to âparty in interestâ. 2580.412-36... 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Prohibition Against Bonding by Parties Interested in the Plan §...

  4. Refined Analysis of Brain Energy Metabolism Using In Vivo Dynamic Enrichment of 13C Multiplets

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani M., Masoumeh; Duarte, João M. N.; Kunz, Nicolas; Gruetter, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with the infusion of 13C-labeled precursors is a unique approach to study in vivo brain energy metabolism. Incorporating the maximum information available from in vivo localized 13C spectra is of importance to get broader knowledge on cerebral metabolic pathways. Metabolic rates can be quantitatively determined from the rate of 13C incorporation into amino acid neurotransmitters such as glutamate and glutamine using suitable mathematical models. The time course of multiplets arising from 13C-13C coupling between adjacent carbon atoms was expected to provide additional information for metabolic modeling leading to potential improvements in the estimation of metabolic parameters. The aim of the present study was to extend two-compartment neuronal/glial modeling to include dynamics of 13C isotopomers available from fine structure multiplets in 13C spectra of glutamate and glutamine measured in vivo in rats brain at 14.1 T, termed bonded cumomer approach. Incorporating the labeling time courses of 13C multiplets of glutamate and glutamine resulted in elevated precision of the estimated fluxes in rat brain as well as reduced correlations between them. PMID:26969691

  5. Deglacial change in terrestrial carbon storage estimated by benthic δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, C. D.; Lisiecki, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial carbon storage is dramatically decreased during glacial periods due to cold temperatures, increased aridity, and the presence of large ice sheets on land. Most of the carbon released by the terrestrial biosphere is stored in the glacial ocean, where the isotopic signature of terrestrial carbon (δ13C terrestrial carbon = -25‰) is observed as a 0.32-0.7‰ depletion in benthic foraminiferal δ13C. The wide range in estimated δ13C change is due to different subsets of benthic δ13C data and different methods of weighting the mean δ13C by volume. We estimate the glacial-interglacial δ13C change of marine DIC using benthic Cibicides spp. δ13C records from 356 core sites (five to eight times as many as previous studies). We divide the ocean into 9 regions to generate linear regressions of regional δ13C versus depth (0.5-5 km) for the late Holocene (0-6 ka) and LGM (18-21 ka) and estimate a mean δ13C decrease of 0.53 +/-0.06‰ (2σ), equivalent to 715-885 Pg C. Our estimate is in good agreement with a vegetation reconstruction estimate of ~750-1050 Pg C [Crowley, 1995] and a recent model estimate of ~670 Pg C [Kohler, 2010] and is ~66% larger than the previous whole ocean δ13C estimate of 0.32‰ [Duplessy et al., 1988]. To evaluate the uncertainty of our estimate, we used a bootstrapping approach (100,000 iterations) to generate realistic error estimates for our different regional line-fits of δ13C vs. depth for both the LGM and Holocene time slices. We propagated the bootstrapped linear regressions through all of our calculations to estimate a 95% confidence interval for global δ13C change (+/-0.06‰) and the uncertainty contribution from each region. The largest sources of uncertainty in our estimate are the South Pacific (35% of variance) and Indian Ocean (36% of variance) because they are the regions with the largest volumes and sparsest δ13C data. Additionally, we note that mean benthic δ13C change could in part reflect glacial

  6. Variation in woody plant delta(13)C along a topoedaphic gradient in a subtropical savanna parkland.

    PubMed

    Bai, Edith; Boutton, Thomas W; Liu, Feng; Wu, X Ben; Archer, Steven R

    2008-06-01

    delta(13)C values of C(3) plants are indicators of plant carbon-water relations that integrate plant responses to environmental conditions. However, few studies have quantified spatial variation in plant delta(13)C at the landscape scale. We determined variation in leaf delta(13)C, leaf nitrogen per leaf area (N(area)), and specific leaf area (SLA) in April and August 2005 for all individuals of three common woody species within a 308 x 12-m belt transect spanning an upland-lowland topoedaphic gradient in a subtropical savanna in southern Texas. Clay content, available soil moisture, and soil total N were all negatively correlated with elevation. The delta(13)C values of Prosopis glandulosa (deciduous N(2)-fixing tree legume), Condalia hookeri (evergreen shrub), and Zanthoxylum fagara (evergreen shrub) leaves increased 1-4 per thousand with decreasing elevation, with the delta(13)C value of P. glandulosa leaves being 1-3 per thousand higher than those of the two shrub species. Contrary to theory and results from previous studies, delta(13)C values were highest where soil water was most available, suggesting that some other variable was overriding or interacting with water availability. Leaf N(area) was positively correlated with leaf delta(13)C of all species (p < 0.01) and appeared to exert the strongest control over delta(13)C along this topoedaphic gradient. Since leaf N(area) is positively related to photosynthetic capacity, plants with high leaf N(area) are likely to have low p (I)/p (a) ratios and therefore higher delta(13)C values, assuming stomatal conductance is constant. Specific leaf area was not correlated significantly with leaf delta(13)C. Following a progressive growing season drought in July/August, leaf delta(13)C decreased. The lower delta(13)C in August may reflect the accumulation of (13)C-depleted epicuticular leaf wax. We suggest control of leaf delta(13)C along this topoedaphic gradient is mediated by leaf N(area) rather than by stomatal

  7. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance study of the complexation of calcium by taurine

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, C.S.; Hammer, B.E.; Danyluk, S.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1980-01-01

    /sup 13/C Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts, /sup 1/J/sub c-c/ scalar coupling constants, spin-lattice relaxation times, and nuclear Overhauser effects were determined for taurine-(1, 2 /sup 13/C) and a taurine-(1 /sup 13/C) and taurine-(2 /sup 13/C) mixture in the presence and absence of calcium. Comparison of taurine titration shifts to values for related compounds reveals some unusual electronic properties of the taurine molecule. Stability constants of 1:1 calcium complexes with taurine zwitterions and anions, as well as their /sup 13/C chemical shifts, were obtained by least squares analysis of titration curves measured in the presence of calcium. The stability constants of calcium-taurine complexes were significantly lower than previous values and led to estimates that only approximately one percent of intracellular calcium of mammalian myocardial cells would exist in a taurine complex.

  8. Fish Movement and Dietary History Derived from Otolith (delta)13C

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P K; Finlay, J C; Power, M E; Phillis, C C; Ramon, C E; Eaton, G F; Ingram, B L

    2005-09-08

    Habitat use and food web linkages are critical data for fish conservation and habitat restoration efforts, particularly for threatened salmonids species. Otolith microchemistry has been shown to be a powerful tool for reconstructing fish movement, but over small distances (kilometers), geology-derived differences in otolith chemistry are rare. Here, we demonstrate that otolith {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio (i.e. {delta}{sup 13}C) of anadromous steelhead trout can be used to distinguish residence in small streams from residence in larger streams and rivers. While previous research has shown that water dissolved inorganic carbon {delta}{sup 13}C is the primary source of carbon in otoliths, the downstream change in food {delta}{sup 13}C in this watershed appears to be the primary control on otolith {delta}{sup 13}C. As a result, this method can also be applied to the problem of reconstructing feeding history at a location.

  9. A 13C-NMR study of exopolysaccharide synthesis in Rhizobium meliloti Su47 strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernier, P.; Portais, J.-C.; Besson, I.; Courtois, J.; Courtois, B.; Barbotin, J.-N.

    1998-02-01

    Metabolic pathways implied in the synthesis of succinoglycan produced by the Su47 strain of R. meliloti were evaluated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy after incubation with [1{-}13C] or [2{-}13C] glucose. The biosynthesis of this polymer by R. meliloti from glucose occurred by a direct polymerisation of the introduced glucose and by the pentose phosphate pathway. Les voies métaboliques impliquées dans la synthèse du succinoglycane produit par la souche Su47 de R. meliloti ont été évaluées par la spectroscopie de RMN du carbone 13 après incubation des cellules avec du [1{-}13C] ou [2{-}13C] glucose. La biosynthèse de ce polymère à partir du glucose se produit par polymérisation directe du glucose et par la voie des pentoses phosphate.

  10. An alternative and robust synthesis of [(13) C4 ]Baraclude® (entecavir).

    PubMed

    Easter, John A; Burrell, Richard C; Bonacorsi, Samuel J

    2013-10-01

    Stable isotope-labeled [(13) C4 ]entecavir (1) was prepared in 11 steps. Commercially available [(13) C]guanidine hydrochloride and diethyl[1,2,3-(13) C3 ]malonate were condensed to yield 2-amino[2,4,5,6-(13) C4 ]pyrimidine-4,6-diol (8). This was converted to the desired purine (7) in five steps. Introduction of the chiral epoxide was followed by subsequent deprotection to give [(13) C4 ]entecavir (1), in an overall yield of 5.7% from labeled precursors. The chemical purity of the title compound was determined to be >99% by HPLC. The isotopic distribution was determined by mass spectrometry to be 282[M + 4], 98.4%; 281[M + 3], 1.6%; and 278[M + 0], <0.1%.

  11. Overexpression of a homogeneous oligosaccharide with 13C labeling by genetically engineered yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Sayoko; Chiba, Yasunori; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Kato, Koichi

    2011-08-01

    This report describes a novel method for overexpression of (13)C-labeled oligosaccharides using genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, in which a homogeneous high-mannose-type oligosaccharide accumulates because of deletions of genes encoding three enzymes involved in the processing pathway of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides in the Golgi complex. Using uniformly (13)C-labeled glucose as the sole carbon source in the culture medium of these engineered yeast cells, high yields of the isotopically labeled Man(8)GlcNAc(2) oligosaccharide could be successfully harvested from glycoprotein extracts of the cells. Furthermore, (13)C labeling at selected positions of the sugar residues in the oligosaccharide could be achieved using a site-specific (13)C-enriched glucose as the metabolic precursor, facilitating NMR spectral assignments. The (13)C-labeling method presented provides the technical basis for NMR analyses of structures, dynamics, and interactions of larger, branched oligosaccharides.

  12. Multi-band frequency encoding method for metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Morze, Cornelius; Reed, Galen; Shin, Peter; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Bok, Robert; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2011-08-01

    A new method was developed for simultaneous spatial localization and spectral separation of multiple compounds based on a single echo, by designing the acquisition to place individual compounds in separate frequency encoding bands. This method was specially designed for rapid and robust metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized 13C substrates and their metabolic products, and was investigated in phantom studies and studies in normal mice and transgenic models of prostate cancer to provide rapid metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and its metabolic products [1- 13C]lactate and [1- 13C]alanine at spatial resolutions up to 3 mm in-plane. Elevated pyruvate and lactate signals in the vicinity of prostatic tissues were observed in transgenic tumor mice. The multi-band frequency encoding technique enabled rapid metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized 13C compounds with important advantages over prior approaches, including less complicated acquisition and reconstruction methods.

  13. Fish movement and dietary history derived from otolith δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, P. K.; Finlay, J. C.; Power, M. E.; Phillis, C. C.; Ramon, C. E.; Eaton, G. F.; Ingram, B. L.

    2005-12-01

    Habitat use and food web linkages are critical data for fish conservation and habitat restoration efforts, particularly for threatened salmonids species. Otolith microchemistry has been shown to be a powerful tool for reconstructing fish movement, but over small distances (kilometers), geology-derived differences in otolith chemistry are rare. Here, we demonstrate that otolith 13C/12C ratio (i.e. δ13C) of anadromous steelhead trout can be used to distinguish residence in small streams from residence in larger streams and rivers. While previous research has shown that water dissolved inorganic carbon d13C is the primary source of carbon in otoliths, the downstream change in food δ13C in this watershed appears to be the primary control on otolith δ13C. As a result, this method can also be applied to the problem of reconstructing feeding history at a location.

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-06-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ, ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1-40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1-40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16-21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1-40 fibrils in 4 h or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples.

  15. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  16. 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements with hyperpolarized [1‐13C] pyruvate can be used to detect the expression of transgenic pyruvate decarboxylase activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dzien, Piotr; Tee, Sui‐Seng; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Lyons, Scott K.; Larkin, Timothy J.; Timm, Kerstin N.; Hu, De‐En; Wright, Alan; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Serrao, Eva M.; Marco‐Rius, Irene; Mannion, Elizabeth; D'Santos, Paula; Kennedy, Brett W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization can increase the sensitivity of the 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiment by at least four orders of magnitude and offers a novel approach to the development of MRI gene reporters based on enzymes that metabolize 13C‐labeled tracers. We describe here a gene reporter based on the enzyme pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1), which catalyzes the decarboxylation of pyruvate to produce acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. Methods Pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis (zmPDC) and a mutant that lacked enzyme activity were expressed using an inducible promoter in human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells. Enzyme activity was measured in the cells and in xenografts derived from the cells using 13C MRS measurements of the conversion of hyperpolarized [1‐13C] pyruvate to H13 CO3–. Results Induction of zmPDC expression in the cells and in the xenografts derived from them resulted in an approximately two‐fold increase in the H13 CO3–/[1‐13C] pyruvate signal ratio following intravenous injection of hyperpolarized [1‐13C] pyruvate. Conclusion We have demonstrated the feasibility of using zmPDC as an in vivo reporter gene for use with hyperpolarized 13C MRS. Magn Reson Med 76:391–401, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26388418

  17. Compartmentalized Cerebral Metabolism of [1,6-13C]Glucose Determined by in vivo 13C NMR Spectroscopy at 14.1 T

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, João M. N.; Lanz, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral metabolism is compartmentalized between neurons and glia. Although glial glycolysis is thought to largely sustain the energetic requirements of neurotransmission while oxidative metabolism takes place mainly in neurons, this hypothesis is matter of debate. The compartmentalization of cerebral metabolic fluxes can be determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy upon infusion of 13C-enriched compounds, especially glucose. Rats under light α-chloralose anesthesia were infused with [1,6-13C]glucose and 13C enrichment in the brain metabolites was measured by 13C NMR spectroscopy with high sensitivity and spectral resolution at 14.1 T. This allowed determining 13C enrichment curves of amino acid carbons with high reproducibility and to reliably estimate cerebral metabolic fluxes (mean error of 8%). We further found that TCA cycle intermediates are not required for flux determination in mathematical models of brain metabolism. Neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle rate (VTCA) and neurotransmission rate (VNT) were 0.45 ± 0.01 and 0.11 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min, respectively. Glial VTCA was found to be 38 ± 3% of total cerebral oxidative metabolism, accounting for more than half of neuronal oxidative metabolism. Furthermore, glial anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation rate (VPC) was 0.069 ± 0.004 μmol/g/min, i.e., 25 ± 1% of the glial TCA cycle rate. These results support a role of glial cells as active partners of neurons during synaptic transmission beyond glycolytic metabolism. PMID:21713114

  18. Foliar d13C within a temperate deciduous forest: spatial, temporal, and species sources of variation

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T; TaylorJr, G. E.

    1992-04-01

    Foliar {sup 13}C-abundance ({delta}{sup 13}C) was analyzed in the dominant trees of a temperate deciduous forest in east Tennessee (Walker Branch Watershed) to investigate the variation in foliar {delta}{sup 13}C as a function of time (within-year and between years), space (canopy height, watershed topography and habitat) and species (deciduous and coniferous taxa). Various hypotheses were tested by analyzing (i) samples collected from the field during the growing season and (ii) foliar tissues maintained in an archived collection. The {delta}{sup 13}C-value for leaves from the tops of trees was 2 to 3%. more positive than for leaves sampled at lower heights in the canopy. Quercus prinus leaves sampled just prior to autumn leaf fall had significantly more negative {delta}{sup 13}C-values than those sampled during midsummer. On the more xeric ridges, needles of Pinus spp. had more positive {delta}{sup 13}C-values than leaves from deciduous species. Foliar {delta}{sup 13}C-values differed significantly as a function of topography. Deciduous leaves from xeric sites (ridges and slopes) had more positive {delta}{sup 13}C-values than those from mesic (riparian and cove) environments. On the more xeric sites, foliar {delta}{sup 13}C was significantly more positive in 1988 (a dry year) relative to that in 1989 (a year with above-normal precipitation). In contrast, leaf {delta}{sup 13}C in trees from mesic valley bottoms did not differ significantly among years with disparate precipitation. Patterns in foliar {delta}{sup 13}C indicated a higher ratio of net CO{sub 2} assimilation to transpiration (A/E) for trees in more xeric versus mesic habitats, and for trees in xeric habitats during years of drought versus years of normal precipitation. However, A/E (units of mmol CO{sub 2} fixed/mol H{sub 2}O transpired) calculated on the basis of {delta}{sup 13}C-values for leaves from the more xeric sites was higher in a wet year (6.6 {+-} 1.2) versus a dry year (3.4 {+-} 0.4). This

  19. Anomalous 13C isotope abundances in C3S and C4H observed toward the cold interstellar cloud, Taurus Molecular Cloud-1.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Nami; Takano, Shuro; Sakai, Takeshi; Shiba, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Yasuki; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the abundances of the (13)C isotopic species of C3S and C4H in the cold molecular cloud, Taurus Molecular Cloud-1 (Cyanopolyyne Peak), by radioastronomical observations of their rotational emission lines. The CCCS/(13)CCCS and CCCS/C(13)CCS ratios are determined to be >206 and 48 ± 15, respectively. The CC(13)CS line is identified with the aid of laboratory microwave spectroscopy, and the range of the CCCS/CC(13)CS ratio is found to be from 30 to 206. The abundances of at least two (13)C isotopic species of C3S are thus found to be different. Similarly, it is found that the abundances of the four (13)C isotopic species of C4H are not equivalent. The CCCCH/(13)CCCCH, CCCCH/C(13)CCCH, CCCCH/CC(13)CCH, and CCCCH/CCC(13)CH ratios are evaluated to be 141 ± 44, 97 ± 27, 82 ± 15, and 118 ± 23, respectively. Here the errors denote 3 times the standard deviation. These results will constrain the formation pathways of C3S and C4H, if the nonequivalence is caused during the formation processes of these molecules. The exchange reactions after the formation of these two molecules may also contribute to the nonequivalence. In addition, we have confirmed that the (12)C/(13)C ratio of some species are significantly higher than the interstellar elemental (12)C/(13)C ratio of 60-70. The observations of the (13)C isotopic species provide us with rich information on chemical processes in cold interstellar clouds.

  20. Controls on 13C of ecosystem respired CO2 in Southeastern US forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, B.; Chanton, J.; Smith, M.

    2006-12-01

    Pine-dominated southeastern United States forests constitute the largest documented carbon sink among North American or European forests. The extent of large-scale (hundreds of kilometers) spatial variability in the isotopic composition of ecosystem respired CO2 in this region is unresolved. We determined the δ13C of ecosystem (δCr), soil (δCs), and foliage (δCf) respired CO2 over a 2 year period (i) in a rotation-aged pine plantation and a (ii) 80 year old naturally regenerated pine forest in Florida, and contrasted our results with those from similar investigations in a pine plantation and naturally regenerated hardwood forest in North Carolina. We related δCr, δCf, and δCs to environmental factors using a time lag of 5 days. This time lag was based on metabolic pool turnover times determined with a year-long slash pine labeling experiment. Despite large variability in aboveground meteorological conditions, the isotopic composition of ecosystem respired carbon remained relatively constant. The isotopic composition of foliage soluble carbohydrates exhibited the same order of variability as δCr. Soil and stem water δ 18O profiles at both Florida sites indicate that the plants' primary water uptake zone is below the surficial layer of highly variable moisture content. This suggests that the plants are less responsive to variability in aboveground meteorological conditions due to reliable access to groundwater. In contrast, the forests studied in North Carolina derive water primarily from the variable surficial zone, and exhibited a time-lagged response to aboveground conditions. These results highlight that successful regional-scale generalizations of δCr based on local measurements must account for spatial variability in plant physiological responses to meteorological conditions and surface soil water conditions.

  1. 13C18O in Earth's Atmosphere: a New Proxy for Constraining CO Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W.; Eiler, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    Despite its low average mixing ratio (70-100 ppbv), carbon monoxide plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry. It is the major sink of OH radicals, and thus strongly influences the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere, and the lifetimes of many other atmospheric trace gases (e.g., methane, NHMCs and HCFCs). At present, the budget of atmospheric CO is constrained by its mixing ratio, δ13C, δ18O, δ17O values, inventory analysis and inverse modeling. However, the major sources of CO (CH4-oxidation, NMHC-oxidation, biomass burning, anthropogenic emissions and the ocean) vary in flux and isotopic composition, and some overlap one another in isotopic composition. Therefore, its atmospheric budget cannot be rigorously defined by inversion of the existing isotopic and concentration records. Here we introduce measurements of the abundance anomaly of the 13C18O isotopologue of carbon monoxide as an additional constraint on its atmospheric budget. We define the 13C18O anomaly as the deviation of its actual abundance from its expected statistical abundance,Δ13C18O=(([13C18O]actual/[12C16O]actual)/([13C18O]stati stical /[12C16O]statistical)-1)×1000. Abundances of 13C18O are measured by quantitatively oxidizing CO to CO2 over the Schutze reagent, and then measuring mass 47 (mainly 13C18O16O) in the product CO2, which is proportional to the abundance of 13C18O in the starting CO. External precision of Δ13C18O for repeated measurements of pure CO averages 0.03‰(one standard deviation). We expect Δ13C18O in atmospheric carbon monoxide to be sensitive to: mixing between CO of different isotopic compositions, thermodynamic fractionations, diffusion, and kinetic isotope effects accompanying chemical reactions. We have investigated the thermodynamic fractionation of Δ13C18O by performing measurements on carbon monoxide samples catalytically equilibrated at high temperatures (300-1000°C). Measured Δ13C18O values, ranging from ~0.08‰ to ~0.47‰, vary as a function

  2. High-resolution proton NMR studies of intracellular metabolites in yeast using 13C decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Shulman, Robert G.

    The resolution and specificity of 1H NMR in studies of yeast cellular metabolism were increased by feeding a 13C-labeled substrate and observing 1H difference spectra in the presence and absence of 13C decoupling fields. [2- 13C]Acetate was utilized as a respiratory substrate in an aerobic suspension of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The broad cellular background proton resonances are removed by the technique, leaving only signals from the protons of the substrate, or its metabolites, that are coupled to 13C. Spectra of the yeast suspension after acetate feeding show the disappearance of label from the acetate pool and the subsequent appearance of 13C in glutamate C 3 and C 4 and in aspartate C 3. These results are in accord with the known fluxes of metabolites. Selective single-frequency 13C decoupling was used to provide assignments for the difference signals. The limitations on single-frequency decoupling coming from finite decoupling fields are investigated. The technique shows a potential for application in a wide variety of systems where the resolution of the 13C spectrum may be combined with the sensitivity for proton detection to observe metabolites that have been previously unobservable.

  3. Diurnal variation of the delta 13C of pine needle respired CO2 evolved in darkness.

    PubMed

    Prater, James L; Mortazavi, Behzad; Chanton, Jeffrey P

    2006-02-01

    The delta 13C of pine needle CO2 evolved in darkness (delta 13Cr) for slash pine trees (Pinus elliottii) was determined by placing recently collected pine needles in darkness and collecting respired CO2 over a short time period (<15 min). Delta 13Cr measurements were made over several 24 h periods to test the hypothesis that significant variation in delta 13Cr would be observed during a diurnal cycle. The delta 13Cr measurements from the 24 h time series trials showed a consistent midday 13C-enrichment (5-10 per thousand) relative to bulk biomass. The delta 13Cr values became more 13C-depleted at night and following shading, and approached bulk-biomass delta 13C values by dawn. The effect of night-time respired 13C-enriched CO2 on the delta 13C value of the remaining assimilate is shown to be minimal (13C depleted by 0.22 per thousand) under field conditions for P. elliottii needles.

  4. 13C Incorporation into Signature Fatty Acids as an Assay for Carbon Allocation in Arbuscular Mycorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Pål Axel; van Aarle, Ingrid M.; Gavito, Mayra E.; Bengtson, Per; Bengtsson, Göran

    2005-01-01

    The ubiquitous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi consume significant amounts of plant assimilated C, but this C flow has been difficult to quantify. The neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1ω5 is a quantitative signature for most arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in roots and soil. We measured carbon transfer from four plant species to the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices by estimating 13C enrichment of 16:1ω5 and compared it with 13C enrichment of total root and mycelial C. Carbon allocation to mycelia was detected within 1 day in monoxenic arbuscular mycorrhizal root cultures labeled with [13C]glucose. The 13C enrichment of neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1ω5 extracted from roots increased from 0.14% 1 day after labeling to 2.2% 7 days after labeling. The colonized roots usually were more enriched for 13C in the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1ω5 than for the root specific neutral lipid fatty acid 18:2ω6,9. We labeled plant assimilates by using 13CO2 in whole-plant experiments. The extraradical mycelium often was more enriched for 13C than was the intraradical mycelium, suggesting rapid translocation of carbon to and more active growth by the extraradical mycelium. Since there was a good correlation between 13C enrichment in neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1ω5 and total 13C in extraradical mycelia in different systems (r2 = 0.94), we propose that the total amount of labeled C in intraradical and extraradical mycelium can be calculated from the 13C enrichment of 16:1ω5. The method described enables evaluation of C flow from plants to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to be made without extraction, purification and identification of fungal mycelia. PMID:15870350

  5. Clinical NOE 13C MRS for neuropsychiatric disorders of the frontal lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailasuta, Napapon; Robertson, Larry W.; Harris, Kent C.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Allen, Peter S.; Ross, Brian D.

    2008-12-01

    In this communication, a scheme is described whereby in vivo 13C MRS can safely be performed in the frontal lobe, a human brain region hitherto precluded on grounds of SAR, but important in being the seat of impaired cognitive function in many neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders. By combining two well known features of 13C NMR—the use of low power NOE and the focus on 13C carbon atoms which are only minimally coupled to protons, we are able to overcome the obstacle of SAR and develop means of monitoring the 13C fluxes of critically important metabolic pathways in frontal brain structures of normal volunteers and patients. Using a combination of low-power WALTZ decoupling, variants of random noise for nuclear overhauser effect enhancement it was possible to reduce power deposition to 20% of the advised maximum specific absorption rate (SAR). In model solutions 13C signal enhancement achieved with this scheme were comparable to that obtained with WALTZ-4. In human brain, the low power procedure effectively determined glutamine, glutamate and bicarbonate in the posterior parietal brain after [1- 13C] glucose infusion. The same 13C enriched metabolites were defined in frontal brain of human volunteers after administration of [1- 13C] acetate, a recognized probe of glial metabolism. Time courses of incorporation of 13C into cerebral glutamate, glutamine and bicarbonate were constructed. The results suggest efficacy for measurement of in vivo cerebral metabolic rates of the glutamate-glutamine and tricarboxylic acid cycles in 20 min MR scans in previously inaccessible brain regions in humans at 1.5T. We predict these will be clinically useful biomarkers in many human neuropsychiatric and genetic conditions.

  6. Determination of the Orientation and Dynamics of Ergosterol in Model Membranes Using Uniform 13C Labeling and Dynamically Averaged 13C Chemical Shift Anisotropies as Experimental Restraints

    PubMed Central

    Soubias, O.; Jolibois, F.; Massou, S.; Milon, A.; Réat, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new strategy was established to determine the average orientation and dynamics of ergosterol in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. It is based on the analysis of chemical shift anisotropies (CSAs) averaged by the molecular dynamics. Static 13C CSA tensors were computed by quantum chemistry, using the gauge-including atomic-orbital approach within Hartree-Fock theory. Uniformly 13C-labeled ergosterol was purified from Pichia pastoris cells grown on labeled methanol. After reconstitution into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipids, the complete 1H and 13C assignment of ergosterol's resonances was performed using a combination of magic-angle spinning two-dimensional experiments. Dynamically averaged CSAs were determined by standard side-band intensity analysis for isolated 13C resonances (C3 and ethylenic carbons) and by off-magic-angle spinning experiments for other carbons. A set of 18 constraints was thus obtained, from which the sterol's molecular order parameter and average orientation could be precisely defined. The validity of using computed CSAs in this strategy was verified on cholesterol model systems. This new method allowed us to quantify ergosterol's dynamics at three molar ratios: 16 mol % (Ld phase), 30 mol % (Lo phase), and 23 mol % (mixed phases). Contrary to cholesterol, ergosterol's molecular diffusion axis makes an important angle (14°) with the inertial axis of the rigid four-ring system. PMID:15923221

  7. Position-Specific Isotope Analysis of Xanthines: A (13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Method to Determine the (13)C Intramolecular Composition at Natural Abundance.

    PubMed

    Diomande, Didier G; Martineau, Estelle; Gilbert, Alexis; Nun, Pierrick; Murata, Ariaki; Yamada, Keita; Watanabe, Naoharu; Tea, Illa; Robins, Richard J; Yoshida, Naohiro; Remaud, Gérald S

    2015-07-01

    The natural xanthines caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline are of major commercial importance as flavor constituents in coffee, cocoa, tea, and a number of other beverages. However, their exploitation for authenticity, a requirement in these commodities that have a large origin-based price-range, by the standard method of isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry (irm-MS) is limited. We have now developed a methodology that overcomes this deficit that exploits the power of isotopic quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry combined with chemical modification of the xanthines to enable the determination of positional intramolecular (13)C/(12)C ratios (δ(13)Ci) with high precision. However, only caffeine is amenable to analysis: theobromine and theophylline present substantial difficulties due to their poor solubility. However, their N-methylation to caffeine makes spectral acquisition feasible. The method is confirmed as robust, with good repeatability of the δ(13)Ci values in caffeine appropriate for isotope fractionation measurements at natural abundance. It is shown that there is negligible isotope fractionation during the chemical N-methylation procedure. Thus, the method preserves the original positional δ(13)Ci values. The method has been applied to measure the position-specific variation of the (13)C/(12)C distribution in caffeine. Not only is a clear difference between caffeine isolated from different sources observed, but theobromine from cocoa is found to show a (13)C pattern distinct from that of caffeine. PMID:26067163

  8. Synthesis of D-[U-{sup 13}C]Glucal, D-[U-{sup 13}C] Galactal, and L-[U-{sup 13}C]Fucose for NMR structure studies of oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.; Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III

    1996-12-31

    The role of carbohydrates is well recognized in a variety of important biological phenomena such as cell surface recognition. Recent advances in carbohydrate chemistry, including the development of solid phase synthesis methods, have helped to provide significant quantities of material by offering general protocols for synthesis of well-defined, pure material. However, the study of the solution structure of oligosaccharides by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been hampered by the lack of enriched {sup 13}C material. In an effort to help alleviate this situation, we have been interested in the construction of the title compounds from a single economical carbon source, D-[U-{sup 13}C]glucose. Details of the syntheses will be provided.

  9. Synthesis of [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methacrylic acid, [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methyl methacrylate and/or related compounds

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Marc A.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2008-01-22

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds of the formulae ##STR00001## wherein Q is selected from the group consisting of --S--, --S(.dbd.O)--, and --S(.dbd.O).sub.2--, Z is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group selected from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently selected from the group consisting of a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, an aryl, and an alkoxy group, and X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group, and a fully-deuterated C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group. The present invention is also directed to a process of preparing labeled compounds, e.g., process of preparing [.sup.13C]methacrylic acid by reacting a (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13CH.sub.2)-- aryl sulfone precursor with .sup.13CHI to form a (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13C(.sup.13CH.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfone intermediate, and, reacting the (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13C(.sup.13CH.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfone intermediate with sodium hydroxide, followed by acid to form [.sup.13C]methacrylic acid. The present invention is further directed to a process of preparing [.sup.2H.sub.8]methyl methacrylate by reacting a (HOOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate with CD.sub.3I to form a (.sup.2H.sub.3COOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate, and heating the(.sup.2H.sub.3COOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate at temperatures and for time sufficient to form [.sup.2H.sub.8]methyl methacrylate.

  10. Two new organic reference materials for δ13C and δ15N measurements and a new value for the δ13C of NBS 22 oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Geilmann, Heike; Brand, Willi A.; Bohlke, John Karl

    2003-01-01

    Analytical grade L-glutamic acid is chemically stable and has a C/N mole ratio of 5, which is close to that of many of natural biological materials, such as blood and animal tissue. Two L-glutamic acid reference materials with substantially different 13C and 15N abundances have been prepared for use as organic reference materials for C and N isotopic measurements. USGS40 is analytical grade L-glutamic acid and has a δ13C value of −26.24‰ relative to VPDB and a δ15N value of −4.52‰ relative to N2 in air. USGS41 was prepared by dissolving analytical grade L-glutamic acid with L-glutamic acid enriched in 13C and 15N. USGS41 has a δ13C value of +37.76‰ and a δ15N value of +47.57‰. The δ13C and δ15N values of both materials were measured against the international reference materials NBS 19 calcium carbonate (δ13C = +1.95‰), L-SVEC lithium carbonate (δ13C = −46.48‰), IAEA-N-1 ammonium sulfate (δ15N = 0.43‰), and USGS32 potassium nitrate (δ15N = 180‰) by on-line combustion continuous-flow and off-line dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Both USGS40 and USGS41 are isotopically homogeneous; reproducibility of δ13C is better than 0.13‰, and that of δ15N is better than 0.13‰ in 100-μg amounts. These two isotopic reference materials can be used for (i) calibrating local laboratory reference materials, and (ii) quantifying drift with time, mass-dependent fractionations, and isotope-ratio-scale contraction in the isotopic analysis of various biological materials. Isotopic results presented in this paper yield a δ13C value for NBS 22 oil of −29.91‰, in contrast to the commonly accepted value of −29.78‰ for which off-line blank corrections probably have not been quantified satisfactorily.

  11. A roadmap for interpreting 13C metabolite labeling patterns from cells

    PubMed Central

    Buescher, Joerg M.; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.; Boros, Laszlo G.; Burgess, Shawn C.; Brunengraber, Henri; Clish, Clary B.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Feron, Olivier; Frezza, Christian; Ghesquiere, Bart; Gottlieb, Eyal; Hiller, Karsten; Jones, Russell G.; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Kimmelman, Alec C.; Locasale, Jason W.; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Maddocks, Oliver D. K.; Malloy, Craig; Metallo, Christian M.; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Munger, Joshua; Nöh, Katharina; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Ralser, Markus; Sauer, Uwe; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; St-Pierre, Julie; Tennant, Daniel A.; Wittmann, Christoph; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Vazquez, Alexei; Vousden, Karen; Young, Jamey D.; Zamboni, Nicola; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Measuring intracellular metabolism has increasingly led to important insights in biomedical research. 13C tracer analysis, although less information-rich than quantitative 13C flux analysis that requires computational data integration, has been established as a time-efficient method to unravel relative pathway activities, qualitative changes in pathway contributions, and nutrient contributions. Here, we review selected key issues in interpreting 13C metabolite labeling patterns, with the goal of drawing accurate conclusions from steady state and dynamic stable isotopic tracer experiments. PMID:25731751

  12. Novel biological insights through metabolomics and 13C-flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Nicola; Sauer, Uwe

    2009-10-01

    Metabolomics and (13)C-flux analysis have become instrumental for analyzing cellular metabolism and its regulation. Driven primarily by technical advances in mass spectrometry-based analytics, they provide unmatched readouts on metabolic state and activity. Functional genomics leverages metabolomics for the discovery of novel enzymes and unexpected secondary activities of annotated enzymes. (13)C-flux analyses are frequently used for empirical elucidation of pathways in poorly characterized species and for network-wide analysis of mechanisms that realize energy and redox balancing. Integration of metabolomics, (13)C-flux analysis and other data enable the condition-dependent characterization of regulatory circuits that ultimately govern the metabolic phenotype.

  13. Stable Carbon Isotopes (δ 13C) in Coral Skeletons: Experimental Approach and Applications for Paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottoli, A. G.

    2004-12-01

    Scleractinian corals obtain fixed carbon via photosynthesis by their endosymbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) and via hetertrophy (injestion of zooplankton, δ 13C ≈ -17 to -22‰ ). Carbon dioxide (CO2) used for photosynthesis is obtained from seawater (δ 13C ≈ 0%) or from respired CO2 within the coral host. The δ 13C of the carbon used in the formation of the underlying coral skeleton is fractionated as a result of both of these metabolic processes. Here I have pooled evidence from several field and tank experiments on the effect of photosynthesis and heterotrophy of coral skeletal δ 13C. In the experiments, decreases in light levels due to shading or depth resulted in a significant decrease in skeletal δ 13C in all species studied (Pavona gigantea, Pavona clavus, Porites compressa). Decreases in photosynthesis in bleached corals also resulted in a decrease in skeletal δ 13C compared to non-bleached corals growing under the same conditions and at the same location. Skeletal δ 13C also decreased at higher than normal light levels most likely due to photoinhibition. Thus, decreases in photosynthesis due to reduced light levels, due to bleaching-induced decreases in chlorophyll a concentrations, or due to photodamage-induced decreases in functional cholorphyll a, results in significant δ 13C decreases. Comprehensive interpretation of all of the data showed that changes in photosynthesis itself can drive the changes in δ 13C. In field experiments, the addition of natural concentrations of zooplankton to the diet resulted in decreases in skeletal δ 13C. Such a decrease was more pronounced with depth and in P. gigantea compared to P. clavus. In situ feeding experiments have since confirmed these findings. However under tank conditions with unaturally high feeding rates, enhanced nitrogen supply in the diet can disrupt the coral-algal symbiosis, stimlate zooxanthellae growth and photosynthesis, and cause an incrase in skeletal δ 13C. It is proposed that under

  14. Local structure and molecular motions in imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal as studied by 2H and 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, M.; Chizuwa, M.; Umiyama, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Miyatou, T.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T.; Tansho, M.; Shimizu, T.

    2015-04-01

    The local structure and molecular motion of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal were investigated using solid-state 2H and 13C NMR. The imidazolium ion undergoes isotropic rotation, which is correlated with a defect in the crystal, as observed by 2H NMR broadline spectra above 263 K. A 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in the regular site was observed from 2H NMR quadrupole Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra. The Grotthuss mechanism was accompanied by a 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in regular sites. Moreover, the proton transfer associated with the imidazolium ion of the defective crystal is important for proton conductivity of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal.

  15. Rovibrational constants of the ground state and v8 = 1 state of 13C2HD3 by high-resolution FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, L. L.; Tan, T. L.

    2016-06-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of the c-type ν8 band of 13C2HD3 was recorded for the first time at a unapodized resolution of 0.0063 cm-1 in the wavenumber region of 830-1000 cm-1. Through the fitting of a total of 1057 assigned infrared transitions using Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation, rovibrational constants for the upper state (v8 = 1) up to five quartic centrifugal distortion terms were derived for the first time with a root-mean-square (rms) deviation of 0.00073 cm-1. The band center of ν8 of 13C2HD3 was found to be 913.011021(55) cm-1. Ground state rovibrational constants up to five quartic terms of 13C2HD3 were also determined from a fit of 453 ground state combination-differences from the present infrared measurements with an rms deviation of 0.00072 cm-1 for the first time. The uncertainty of the measured infrared lines was estimated to be ±0.0012 cm-1. From the ground state rotational constants, the inertial defect of 13C2HD3 was calculated to be 0.06973(16) uÅ2, showing the high planarity of the molecule.

  16. 13C/12C ratios in CO2 extracted from Antarctic ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedli, H.; Moor, E.; Oeschger, H.; Siegenthaler, U.; Stauffer, B.

    Air is extracted from bubbles of polar ice samples by a dry extraction method, and the 13C/12C ratio is measured on CO2 separated from the air. Ice samples of typically 700 g are crushed at ca. -20°C, the evolving air is trapped cryogenically, and CO2 is frozen out from this air for mass-spectrometric isotope analysis. First δ13C and δ 18O results of CO2 from Antarctic ice cores are presented, and δ13C is discussed in relation to atmospheric CO2 variations. δ13C of 400 to 800 year old ice is ca. 1.1 %o higher than the 1980 atmospheric value, which agrees well with model-based estimations. The measurement of three ca. 50,000 yr old samples yielded astonishingly low values, but contamination cannot be excluded.

  17. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  18. Strongly polarizing weakly coupled 13C nuclear spins with optically pumped nitrogen-vacancy center

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Bao; Yang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the polarization of nuclear spins surrounding the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has recently attracted widespread attention due to its various applications. Here we present an analytical formula that not only provides a clear physical picture for the recently observed polarization reversal of strongly coupled13C nuclei over a narrow range of magnetic field [H. J. Wang et al., Nat. Commun. 4, 1940 (2013)], but also demonstrates the possibility to strongly polarize weakly coupled13C nuclei. This allows sensitive magnetic field control of the 13C nuclear spin polarization for NMR applications and significant suppression of the 13C nuclear spin noise to prolong the NV spin coherence time. PMID:26521962

  19. 13C-DEPLETED MICROBIAL LIPIDS INDICATE SEASONAL METHANOTROPHIC ACTIVITY IN SHALLOW ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compound specific isotope analysis was combined with phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis to identify methanotrophic activity in members of the sedimentary microbial community in the Altamaha and Savannah River estuaries in Georgia. 13C-depleted PLFAs indicate methane utilizat...

  20. Real-time assessment of Krebs cycle metabolism using hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Marie A; Atherton, Helen J; Ball, Daniel R; Cole, Mark A; Heather, Lisa C; Griffin, Julian L; Clarke, Kieran; Radda, George K; Tyler, Damian J

    2009-08-01

    The Krebs cycle plays a fundamental role in cardiac energy production and is often implicated in the energetic imbalance characteristic of heart disease. In this study, we measured Krebs cycle flux in real time in perfused rat hearts using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). [2-(13)C]Pyruvate was hyperpolarized and infused into isolated perfused hearts in both healthy and postischemic metabolic states. We followed the enzymatic conversion of pyruvate to lactate, acetylcarnitine, citrate, and glutamate with 1 s temporal resolution. The appearance of (13)C-labeled glutamate was delayed compared with that of other metabolites, indicating that Krebs cycle flux can be measured directly. The production of (13)C-labeled citrate and glutamate was decreased postischemia, as opposed to lactate, which was significantly elevated. These results showed that the control and fluxes of the Krebs cycle in heart disease can be studied using hyperpolarized [2-(13)C]pyruvate.

  1. Insights into the metabolic response to traumatic brain injury as revealed by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bartnik-Olson, Brenda L.; Harris, Neil G.; Shijo, Katsunori; Sutton, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The present review highlights critical issues related to cerebral metabolism following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the use of 13C labeled substrates and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study these changes. First we address some pathophysiologic factors contributing to metabolic dysfunction following TBI. We then examine how 13C NMR spectroscopy strategies have been used to investigate energy metabolism, neurotransmission, the intracellular redox state, and neuroglial compartmentation following injury. 13C NMR spectroscopy studies of brain extracts from animal models of TBI have revealed enhanced glycolytic production of lactate, evidence of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activation, and alterations in neuronal and astrocyte oxidative metabolism that are dependent on injury severity. Differential incorporation of label into glutamate and glutamine from 13C labeled glucose or acetate also suggest TBI-induced adaptations to the glutamate-glutamine cycle. PMID:24109452

  2. Separation of extra- and intracellular metabolites using hyperpolarized 13C diffusion weighted MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelsch, Bertram L.; Sriram, Renuka; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Leon Swisher, Christine; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Wang, Zhen J.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-09-01

    This work demonstrates the separation of extra- and intracellular components of glycolytic metabolites with diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using b-values of up to 15,000 s mm-2, a multi-exponential signal response was measured for hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate and lactate. By fitting the fast and slow asymptotes of these curves, their extra- and intracellular weighted diffusion coefficients were determined in cells perfused in a MR compatible bioreactor. In addition to measuring intracellular weighted diffusion, extra- and intracellular weighted hyperpolarized 13C metabolites pools are assessed in real-time, including their modulation with inhibition of monocarboxylate transporters. These studies demonstrate the ability to simultaneously assess membrane transport in addition to enzymatic activity with the use of diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C MR. This technique could be an indispensible tool to evaluate the impact of microenvironment on the presence, aggressiveness and metastatic potential of a variety of cancers.

  3. An economical method for (15)N/(13)C isotopic labeling of proteins expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, E; Krishna, N R

    2001-07-01

    We report a new and cost-effective approach to prepare (15)N/(13)C labeled proteins for NMR using the Pichia pastoris expression system. Four protocols (P1 to P4) were defined and compared using recombinant Ovine interferon-tau (rOvIFN-tau). Our results demonstrate that in order to get full incorporation of (15)N and (13)C, the isotopes are not totally required during the initial growth phase of P. pastoris culture. The addition of small amounts of (15)N and (13)C compounds 6 h prior to the methanol induction phase is sufficient to obtain 99% incorporation of heavy isotopes into the protein. Our optimized protocol P4 is two-thirds less costly than the classical method using (15)N and (13)C isotopes during the entire growth phase.

  4. Abundance Anomaly of the 13C Isotopic Species of c-C3H2 in the Low-mass Star Formation Region L1527

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kento; Sakai, Nami; Tokudome, Tomoya; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Takano, Shuro; Lefloch, Bertrand; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Bachiller, Rafael; Caux, Emmanuel; Vastel, Charlotte; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-07-01

    The rotational spectral lines of c-C3H2 and two kinds of the 13C isotopic species, c-{}13{{CCCH}}2 ({C}2v symmetry) and c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2 (Cs symmetry), have been observed in the 1–3 mm band toward the low-mass star-forming region L1527. We have detected 7, 3, and 6 lines of c-C3H2, c-{}13{{CCCH}}2, and c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2, respectively, with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and 34, 6, and 13 lines, respectively, with the IRAM 30 m telescope, where seven, two, and two transitions, respectively, are observed with both telescopes. With these data, we have evaluated the column densities of the normal and 13C isotopic species. The [c-C3H2]/[c-{}13{{CCCH}}2] ratio is determined to be 310 ± 80, while the [c-C3H2]/[c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2] ratio is determined to be 61 ± 11. The [c-C3H2]/[c-{}13{{CCCH}}2] and [c-C3H2]/[c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2] ratios expected from the elemental 12C/13C ratio are 60–70 and 30–35, respectively, where the latter takes into account the statistical factor of 2 for the two equivalent carbon atoms in c-C3H2. Hence, this observation further confirms the dilution of the 13C species in carbon-chain molecules and their related molecules, which are thought to originate from the dilution of 13C+ in the gas-phase C+ due to the isotope exchange reaction: {}13{{{C}}}++{CO}\\to {}13{CO}+{{{C}}}+. Moreover, the abundances of the two 13C isotopic species are different from each other. The ratio of c-{}13{{CCCH}}2 species relative to c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2 is determined to be 0.20 ± 0.05. If 13C were randomly substituted for the three carbon atoms, the [c-{}13{{CCCH}}2]/[c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2] ratio would be 0.5. Hence, the observed ratio indicates that c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2 exists more favorably. Possible origins of the different abundances are discussed. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope and the NRO 45 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain). NRO is a branch of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

  5. Soil compaction effects on water status of ponderosa pine assessed through 13C/12C composition.

    PubMed

    Gomez, G Armando; Singer, Michael J; Powers, Robert F; Horwath, William R

    2002-05-01

    Soil compaction is a side effect of forest reestablishment practices resulting from use of heavy equipment and site preparation. Soil compaction often alters soil properties resulting in changes in plant-available water. The use of pressure chamber methods to assess plant water stress has two drawbacks: (1) the measurements are not integrative; and (2) the method is difficult to apply extensively to establish seasonal soil water status. We evaluated leaf carbon isotopic composition (delta13C) as a means of assessing effects of soil compaction on water status and growth of young ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa var. ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws) stands across a range of soil textures. Leaf delta13C in cellulose and whole foliar tissue were highly correlated. Leaf delta13C in both whole tissue and cellulose (holocellulose) was up to 1.0 per thousand lower in trees growing in non-compacted (NC) loam or clay soils than in compacted (SC) loam or clay soils. Soil compaction had the opposite effect on leaf delta13C in trees growing on sandy loam soil, indicating that compaction increased water availability in this soil type. Tree growth response to compaction also varied with soil texture, with no effect, a negative effect and a positive effect as a result of compaction of loam, clay and sandy loam soils, respectively. There was a significant correlation between 13C signature and tree growth along the range of soil textures. Leaf delta13C trends were correlated with midday stem water potentials. We conclude that leaf delta13C can be used to measure retrospective water status and to assess the impact of site preparation on tree growth. The advantage of the leaf delta13C approach is that it provides an integrative assessment of past water status in different aged leaves.

  6. (13)C-Breath testing in animals: theory, applications, and future directions.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D; Welch, Kenneth C

    2016-04-01

    The carbon isotope values in the exhaled breath of an animal mirror the carbon isotope values of the metabolic fuels being oxidized. The measurement of stable carbon isotopes in carbon dioxide is called (13)C-breath testing and offers a minimally invasive method to study substrate oxidation in vivo. (13)C-breath testing has been broadly used to study human exercise, nutrition, and pathologies since the 1970s. Owing to reduced use of radioactive isotopes and the increased convenience and affordability of (13)C-analyzers, the past decade has witnessed a sharp increase in the use of breath testing throughout comparative physiology--especially to answer questions about how and when animals oxidize particular nutrients. Here, we review the practical aspects of (13)C-breath testing and identify the strengths and weaknesses of different methodological approaches including the use of natural abundance versus artificially-enriched (13)C tracers. We critically compare the information that can be obtained using different experimental protocols such as diet-switching versus fuel-switching. We also discuss several factors that should be considered when designing breath testing experiments including extrinsic versus intrinsic (13)C-labelling and different approaches to model nutrient oxidation. We use case studies to highlight the myriad applications of (13)C-breath testing in basic and clinical human studies as well as comparative studies of fuel use, energetics, and carbon turnover in multiple vertebrate and invertebrate groups. Lastly, we call for increased and rigorous use of (13)C-breath testing to explore a variety of new research areas and potentially answer long standing questions related to thermobiology, locomotion, and nutrition. PMID:26660654

  7. Multi-year estimates of plant and ecosystem 13C discrimination at AmeriFlux sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, X.; Lai, C.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Bush, S.; Randerson, J. T.; Law, B. E.; Schauer, A. J.; Ehleringer, J.

    2011-12-01

    We estimated plant and ecosystem 13C discrimination continuously at 8 AmeriFlux sites (Howland Forest, Harvard Forest, Wind River Forest, Rannells Prairie, Freeman Ranch, Chestnut Ridge, Metolius, and Marys River fir) over 8 years (2002-2009). We used an observation-based approach from weekly measurements of eddy covariance CO2 fluxes and their 13C/12C ratios to estimate photosynthetic 13C discrimination (△A) and respiration (δ13CR) on seasonal and interannual time scales. The coordinated, systematic flask sampling across the AmeriFlux subnetwork were used for cross-site synthesis of monthly flux estimates [Dang et al. Combining tower mixing ratio and community model data to estimate regional-scale net ecosystem carbon exchange by boundary layer inversion over 4 flux towers in the U.S.A., Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, in press]. Here, we evaluated environmental factors that also influenced temporal variability in △A and δ13CR from daily to interannual time scales, comparing atmospheric 13C/12C measurements, leaf and needle organic matter, and tree ring cellulose. Across these major biomes that dominate the continent, we show differential ecophysiological responses to environmental stresses, among which water availability appeared to be a dominant factor. Our decadal measurement period provided robust estimates of atmospheric 13C discrimination by terrestrial ecosystems, but also suggest regions where enhanced monitoring efforts are required (e.g., 13C/12C emission from fire and urban metabolism; increased temporal resolution of 13C measurements in stress-sensitive ecosystems) to make atmospheric 13C/12C measurements an effective constraint for continental-scale assessments of the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  8. Tracing the biosynthetic source of essential amino acids in marine turtles using delta13C fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Karen E; Kelez, Shaleyla; Larsen, Thomas; Choy, C Anela; Popp, Brian N

    2014-05-01

    Plants, bacteria, and fungi produce essential amino acids (EAAs) with distinctive patterns of delta13C values that can be used as naturally occurring fingerprints of biosynthetic origin of EAAs in a food web. Because animals cannot synthesize EAAs and must obtain them from food, their tissues reflect delta13C(EAA) patterns found in diet, but it is not known how microbes responsible for hindgut fermentation in some herbivores influence the delta13C values of EAAs in their hosts' tissues. We examined whether distinctive delta13C fingerprints of hindgut flora are evident in the tissues of green turtles (Chelonia mydas), which are known to be facultative hindgut fermenters. We determined delta13C(EAA) values in tissues of green turtles foraging herbivorously in neritic habitats of Hawaii and compared them with those from green, olive ridley, and loggerhead turtles foraging carnivorously in oceanic environments of the central and southeast Pacific Ocean. Results of multivariate statistical analysis revealed two distinct groups that could be distinguished based on unique delta13C(EAA) patterns. A three-end-member predictive linear discriminant model indicated that delta13C(EAA) fingerprints existed in the tissues of carnivorous turtles that resembled patterns found in microalgae, which form the base of an oceanic food web, whereas herbivorous turtles derive EAAs from a bacterial or seagrass source. This study demonstrates the capacity for delta13C fingerprinting to establish the biosynthetic origin of EAAs in higher consumers, and that marine turtles foraging on macroalgal diets appear to receive nutritional supplementation from bacterial symbionts in their digestive system. PMID:25000760

  9. Elucidating proline dynamics in spider dragline silk fibre using 2H-13C HETCOR MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangyan; Yarger, Jeffery L; Holland, Gregory P

    2014-05-14

    (2)H-(13)C HETCOR MAS NMR is performed on (2)H/(13)C/(15)N-Pro enriched A. aurantia dragline silk. Proline dynamics are extracted from (2)H NMR line shapes and T1 in a site-specific manner to elucidate the backbone and side chain molecular dynamics for the MaSp2 GPGXX β-turn regions for spider dragline silk in the dry and wet, supercontracted states.

  10. Tracing the biosynthetic source of essential amino acids in marine turtles using delta13C fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Karen E; Kelez, Shaleyla; Larsen, Thomas; Choy, C Anela; Popp, Brian N

    2014-05-01

    Plants, bacteria, and fungi produce essential amino acids (EAAs) with distinctive patterns of delta13C values that can be used as naturally occurring fingerprints of biosynthetic origin of EAAs in a food web. Because animals cannot synthesize EAAs and must obtain them from food, their tissues reflect delta13C(EAA) patterns found in diet, but it is not known how microbes responsible for hindgut fermentation in some herbivores influence the delta13C values of EAAs in their hosts' tissues. We examined whether distinctive delta13C fingerprints of hindgut flora are evident in the tissues of green turtles (Chelonia mydas), which are known to be facultative hindgut fermenters. We determined delta13C(EAA) values in tissues of green turtles foraging herbivorously in neritic habitats of Hawaii and compared them with those from green, olive ridley, and loggerhead turtles foraging carnivorously in oceanic environments of the central and southeast Pacific Ocean. Results of multivariate statistical analysis revealed two distinct groups that could be distinguished based on unique delta13C(EAA) patterns. A three-end-member predictive linear discriminant model indicated that delta13C(EAA) fingerprints existed in the tissues of carnivorous turtles that resembled patterns found in microalgae, which form the base of an oceanic food web, whereas herbivorous turtles derive EAAs from a bacterial or seagrass source. This study demonstrates the capacity for delta13C fingerprinting to establish the biosynthetic origin of EAAs in higher consumers, and that marine turtles foraging on macroalgal diets appear to receive nutritional supplementation from bacterial symbionts in their digestive system.

  11. (13)C-Breath testing in animals: theory, applications, and future directions.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D; Welch, Kenneth C

    2016-04-01

    The carbon isotope values in the exhaled breath of an animal mirror the carbon isotope values of the metabolic fuels being oxidized. The measurement of stable carbon isotopes in carbon dioxide is called (13)C-breath testing and offers a minimally invasive method to study substrate oxidation in vivo. (13)C-breath testing has been broadly used to study human exercise, nutrition, and pathologies since the 1970s. Owing to reduced use of radioactive isotopes and the increased convenience and affordability of (13)C-analyzers, the past decade has witnessed a sharp increase in the use of breath testing throughout comparative physiology--especially to answer questions about how and when animals oxidize particular nutrients. Here, we review the practical aspects of (13)C-breath testing and identify the strengths and weaknesses of different methodological approaches including the use of natural abundance versus artificially-enriched (13)C tracers. We critically compare the information that can be obtained using different experimental protocols such as diet-switching versus fuel-switching. We also discuss several factors that should be considered when designing breath testing experiments including extrinsic versus intrinsic (13)C-labelling and different approaches to model nutrient oxidation. We use case studies to highlight the myriad applications of (13)C-breath testing in basic and clinical human studies as well as comparative studies of fuel use, energetics, and carbon turnover in multiple vertebrate and invertebrate groups. Lastly, we call for increased and rigorous use of (13)C-breath testing to explore a variety of new research areas and potentially answer long standing questions related to thermobiology, locomotion, and nutrition.

  12. Extreme (13)C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite.

    PubMed

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C13C as light as -69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to -125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane. PMID:25948095

  13. sup 13 C and sup 18 O isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates: I. Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Biological carbonates frequently precipitate out of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C equilibrium with ambient waters. Two patterns of isotopic disequilibrium are particularly common. Kinetic disequilibria, so designated because they apparently result from kinetic isotope effects during CO{sub 2} hydration and hydroxylation, involve simultaneous depletions of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C as large as 4{per thousand} and 10 to 15{per thousand}, respectively. Rapid skeletogenesis favors strong kinetic effects, and approximately linear correlations between skeletal {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C are common in carbonates showing mainly the kinetic pattern. Metabolic effects involve additional positive or negative modulation of skeletal {delta}{sup 13}C, reflecting changes in the {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic carbon, caused mainly by photosynthesis and respiration. Kinetic isotope disequilibria tend to be fairly consistent in rapidly growing parts of photosynthetic corals, and time dependent isotopic variations therefore reflect changes in environmental conditions. {delta}{sup 18}O variations from Galapagos corals yields meaningful clues regarding seawater temperature, while {delta}{sup 13}C variations reflect changes in photosynthesis, modulated by cloudiness.

  14. Development of a 13C-optimized 1.5-mm high temperature superconducting NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Vijaykumar; Hooker, Jerris W.; Withers, Richard S.; Nast, Robert E.; Brey, William W.; Edison, Arthur S.

    2013-10-01

    We report a 1.5-mm NMR probe based on high temperature superconductors operating at 14.1 T optimized for 13C detection. The probe has a total sample volume of about 35 microliters (μL) with an active volume of 20 μL and provides exceptional mass sensitivity for 13C detection. The probe also has excellent 1H sensitivity and employs a 2H lock; 15N irradiation capability can be added in the future. The coils are cooled to about 20 K using a standard Agilent cryogenic refrigeration system, and the sample temperature is regulated near room temperature. The coil design considerations are discussed in detail. This probe is ideal for directly detected 13C NMR experiments for natural products chemistry and metabolomics applications, for which 35 μL is an optimal sample volume. The outstanding 13C sensitivity of this probe allowed us to directly determine the 13C connectivity on 1.1 mg of natural abundance histidine using an INADEQUATE experiment. We demonstrated the utility of this probe for 13C-based metabolomics using a synthetic mixture of common natural abundance metabolites whose concentrations ranged from 1 to 5 mM (40-200 nmol).

  15. Metabolism of [13C5]hydroxyproline in vitro and in vivo: implications for primary hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Juquan; Johnson, Lynnette C.; Knight, John; Callahan, Michael F.; Riedel, Travis J.; Holmes, Ross P.

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyproline (Hyp) metabolism is a key source of glyoxylate production in the body and may be a major contributor to excessive oxalate production in the primary hyperoxalurias where glyoxylate metabolism is impaired. Important gaps in our knowledge include identification of the tissues with the capacity to degrade Hyp and the development of model systems to study this metabolism and how to suppress it. The expression of mRNA for enzymes in the pathway was examined in 15 different human tissues. Expression of the complete pathway was identified in liver, kidney, pancreas, and small intestine. HepG2 cells also expressed these mRNAs and enzymes and were shown to metabolize Hyp in the culture medium to glycolate, glycine, and oxalate. [18O]- and [13C5]Hyp were synthesized and evaluated for their use with in vitro and in vivo models. [18O]Hyp was not suitable because of an apparent tautomerism of [18O]glyoxylate between enol and hydrated forms, which resulted in a loss of isotope. [13C5]Hyp, however, was metabolized to [13C2]glycolate, [13C2]glycine, and [13C2]oxalate in vitro in HepG2 cells and in vivo in mice infused with [13C5]Hyp. These model systems should be valuable tools for exploring various aspects of Hyp metabolism and will be useful in determining whether blocking Hyp catabolism is an effective therapy in the treatment of primary hyperoxaluria. PMID:22207577

  16. (13) C Breath Tests Are Feasible in Patients With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Devices.

    PubMed

    Bednarsch, Jan; Menk, Mario; Malinowski, Maciej; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Pratschke, Johann; Stockmann, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Temporary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been established as an essential part of therapy in patients with pulmonary or cardiac failure. As physiological gaseous exchange is artificially altered in this patient group, it is debatable whether a (13) C-breath test can be carried out. In this proof of technical feasibility report, we assess the viability of the (13) C-breath test LiMAx (maximum liver function capacity) in patients on ECMO therapy. All breath probes for the test device were obtained directly via the membrane oxygenator. Data of four patients receiving liver function assessment with the (13) C-breath test LiMAx while having ECMO therapy were analyzed. All results were compared with validated scenarios of the testing procedures. The LiMAx test could successfully be carried out in every case without changing ECMO settings. Clinical course of the patients ranging from multiorgan failure to no sign of liver insufficiency was in accordance with the results of the LiMAx liver function test. The (13) C-breath test is technically feasible in the context of ECMO. Further evaluation of (13) C-breath test in general would be worthwhile. The LiMAx test as a (13) C-breath test accessing liver function might be of particular predictive interest if patients with ECMO therapy develop multiorgan failure. PMID:26527580

  17. Directly detected 55Mn MRI: Application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized 13C MRI development

    PubMed Central

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D.; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 (55Mn) MRI using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized 13C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the 55Mn and 13C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective “13C” MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, 55Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical 13C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large 13C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d= 8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7M) was scanned rapidly by 55Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for 13C, using a balanced SSFP acquisition. The requisite penetration of RF magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for 55Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image SNR of ~60 at 0.5cm3 spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP 13C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  18. The paper trail of the 13C of atmospheric CO2 since the industrial revolution period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakir, Dan

    2011-07-01

    The 13C concentration in atmospheric CO2 has been declining over the past 150 years as large quantities of 13C-depleted CO2 from fossil fuel burning are added to the atmosphere. Deforestation and other land use changes have also contributed to the trend. Looking at the 13C variations in the atmosphere and in annual growth rings of trees allows us to estimate CO2 uptake by land plants and the ocean, and assess the response of plants to climate. Here I show that the effects of the declining 13C trend in atmospheric CO2 are recorded in the isotopic composition of paper used in the printing industry, which provides a well-organized archive and integrated material derived from trees' cellulose. 13C analyses of paper from two European and two American publications showed, on average, a - 1.65 ± 1.00‰ trend between 1880 and 2000, compared with - 1.45 and - 1.57‰ for air and tree-ring analyses, respectively. The greater decrease in plant-derived 13C in the paper we tested than in the air is consistent with predicted global-scale increases in plant intrinsic water-use efficiency over the 20th century. Distinct deviations from the atmospheric trend were observed in both European and American publications immediately following the World War II period.

  19. Kinetic isotope effects significantly influence intracellular metabolite 13C labeling patterns and flux determination

    PubMed Central

    Wasylenko, Thomas M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous mathematical modeling of carbon-labeling experiments allows estimation of fluxes through the pathways of central carbon metabolism, yielding powerful information for basic scientific studies as well as for a wide range of applications. However, the mathematical models that have been developed for flux determination from 13C labeling data have commonly neglected the influence of kinetic isotope effects on the distribution of 13C label in intracellular metabolites, as these effects have often been assumed to be inconsequential. We have used measurements of the 13C isotope effects on the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme from the literature to model isotopic fractionation at the pyruvate node and quantify the modeling errors expected to result from the assumption that isotope effects are negligible. We show that under some conditions kinetic isotope effects have a significant impact on the 13C labeling patterns of intracellular metabolites, and the errors associated with neglecting isotope effects in 13C-metabolic flux analysis models can be comparable in size to measurement errors associated with GC–MS. Thus, kinetic isotope effects must be considered in any rigorous assessment of errors in 13C labeling data, goodness-of-fit between model and data, confidence intervals of estimated metabolic fluxes, and statistical significance of differences between estimated metabolic flux distributions. PMID:23828762

  20. Extreme (13)C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite.

    PubMed

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-05-07

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C13C as light as -69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to -125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane.

  1. Extreme 13C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E.; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C13C as light as −69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to −125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane. PMID:25948095

  2. Temperature and density evolution during decay in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance plasma: Off-resonant and resonant cases

    SciTech Connect

    Cortázar, O. D.

    2013-09-15

    Time resolved electron temperature and density measurements during the decay stage in a hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma are presented for a resonance and off-resonance magnetic field configurations. The measurements are conducted on a ECR plasma generator excited at 2.45 GHz denominated test-bench for ion-sources plasma studies at ESS Bilbao. The plasma parameters evolution is studied by Langmuir probe diagnostic with synchronized sample technique developed for repetitive pulsed plasmas with a temporal resolution of 200 ns in typical decay processes of about 40 μs. An afterglow transient is clearly observed in the reflected microwave power signal from the plasma. Simultaneously, the electron temperature evolution shows rebounding peaks that may be related to the interplay between density drop and microwave coupling with deep impact on the Electron Energy Distribution Function. The correlation of such structures with the plasma absorbed power and the coupling quality is also reported.

  3. Temperature and density evolution during decay in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance plasma: off-resonant and resonant cases.

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Megía-Macías, A; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A

    2013-09-01

    Time resolved electron temperature and density measurements during the decay stage in a hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma are presented for a resonance and off-resonance magnetic field configurations. The measurements are conducted on a ECR plasma generator excited at 2.45 GHz denominated test-bench for ion-sources plasma studies at ESS Bilbao. The plasma parameters evolution is studied by Langmuir probe diagnostic with synchronized sample technique developed for repetitive pulsed plasmas with a temporal resolution of 200 ns in typical decay processes of about 40 μs. An afterglow transient is clearly observed in the reflected microwave power signal from the plasma. Simultaneously, the electron temperature evolution shows rebounding peaks that may be related to the interplay between density drop and microwave coupling with deep impact on the Electron Energy Distribution Function. The correlation of such structures with the plasma absorbed power and the coupling quality is also reported.

  4. Light-shift suppression in a miniaturized Mx optically pumped Cs magnetometer array with enhanced resonance signal using off-resonant laser pumping.

    PubMed

    Scholtes, Theo; Schultze, Volkmar; IJsselsteijn, Rob; Woetzel, Stefan; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2012-12-31

    The performance of an optically pumped Mx magnetometer with miniaturized Cs cell at earth's magnetic field strength (50 μT) is investigated. Operation using detuned high intensity laser light is shown to be superior to the conventional resonant operation in terms of the projected shot-noise-limited ( 50 fT/√Hz) and the actual noise-limited sensitivity using a noise compensation method. The Zeeman light shift effect, emerging due to the off-resonant circularly polarized laser radiation and leading to a strong orientational dependence of the measurement, is suppressed by averaging two identical magnetometer configurations pumped with oppositely circularly polarized light. A residual heading error within the range of 14 nT, limited by the present experimental characterization setup, was achieved.

  5. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Single atoms transferring between a magneto-optical trap and a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Wang, Jing; Yang, Bao-Dong; Zhang, Tian-Cai; Wang, Jun-Min

    2009-08-01

    Based on our work on single cesium atoms trapped in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap (MOT), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is remarkably improved. Also a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap (FORT) formed by a strongly-focused 1064 nm single frequency Nd:YVO4 laser beam is introduced. One cesium atom is prepared in the MOT, and then it can transfer successfully between the MOT and the FORT which is overlapped with the MOT. Utilizing the effective transfer, the lifetime of single atoms trapped in the FORT is measured to be 6.9 ± 0.3 s. Thus we provide a system where the atomic qubit can be coherently manipulated.

  6. Determination of glucan phosphorylation using heteronuclear 1H, 13C double and 1H, 13C, 31P triple-resonance NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Peter; Nitschke, Felix; Steup, Martin; Mallow, Keven; Specker, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of starch and glycogen are important for their physicochemical properties and also their physiological functions. It is therefore desirable to reliably determine the phosphorylation sites. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR-spectroscopy is in principle a straightforward analytical approach even for complex carbohydrate molecules. With heterogeneous samples from natural sources, however, the task becomes more difficult because a full assignment of the resonances of the carbohydrates is impossible to obtain. Here, we show that the combination of heteronuclear (1) H,(13) C and (1) H,(13) C,(31) P techniques and information derived from spectra of a set of reference compounds can lead to an unambiguous determination of the phosphorylation sites even in heterogeneous samples. PMID:23913630

  7. Determination of glucan phosphorylation using heteronuclear 1H, 13C double and 1H, 13C, 31P triple-resonance NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Peter; Nitschke, Felix; Steup, Martin; Mallow, Keven; Specker, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of starch and glycogen are important for their physicochemical properties and also their physiological functions. It is therefore desirable to reliably determine the phosphorylation sites. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR-spectroscopy is in principle a straightforward analytical approach even for complex carbohydrate molecules. With heterogeneous samples from natural sources, however, the task becomes more difficult because a full assignment of the resonances of the carbohydrates is impossible to obtain. Here, we show that the combination of heteronuclear (1) H,(13) C and (1) H,(13) C,(31) P techniques and information derived from spectra of a set of reference compounds can lead to an unambiguous determination of the phosphorylation sites even in heterogeneous samples.

  8. Stable isotopic signatures (δ13C, δD) of methane from European landfill sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, P.; Lubina, C.; KöNigstedt, R.; Fischer, H.; Veltkamp, A. C.; Zwaagstra, O.

    1998-04-01

    The stable isotopic signatures (δ13C, δD) of CH4 from four German and Dutch landfill sites have been characterized using different techniques for isotope analysis (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry). Samples taken directly from the gas collection systems show fairly uniform, biogenic δ13C-δD isotopic signatures [δ13C = (-59.0±2.2)‰ VPDB (n = 104); δD = (-304±10)‰ VSMOW (n = 46)]. In contrast, emission samples taken with static chambers on soil-covered landfill areas exhibit a considerable δ13C-δD variability, mainly due to the influence of aerobic bacterial CH4 oxidation, which occurs when the biogas CH4 encounters atmospheric oxygen available in the uppermost region of the cover soil. Soil gas samples from the landfill covers clearly show the progressive isotopic enrichment within the aerobic regions of the soil. Isotope fractionation factors due to CH4 oxidation were determined to be α(δ13C) = 1.008±0.004 and α(δD) = 1.039±0.026. On average, about 80% (70-97%) of CH4 is oxidized during the transport through cover soils, while no significant CH4 oxidation was found in uncovered areas consisting of freshly dumped waste. Area-integrated δ13C values of total emissions were derived from upwind-downwind measurements around the landfill and show very little temporal and site-to-site variation (δ13C = (-55.4±1.4)‰ VPDB (n = 13; four different landfills)). CH4 budgets were established for two landfill sites, indicating that projected CH4 surface emissions from uncovered and covered areas are significantly lower compared to total CH4 production (for a landfill without gas collection) or compared to the difference between CH4 production and recovery (for a landfill with a gas collection system). For these two landfill sites the overall fraction of CH4 oxidation is estimated to be 46 and 39% (53%) of total CH4 production (minus recovery). Furthermore, the δ13C balance (comparing the δ13C values of the

  9. The use of dynamic nuclear polarization 13C-pyruvate MRS in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam Espe; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Clemmensen, Andreas Ettrup; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an immense development of new targeted anti-cancer drugs. For practicing precision medicine, a sensitive method imaging for non-invasive, assessment of early treatment response and for assisting in developing new drugs is warranted. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a potent technique for non-invasive in vivo investigation of tissue chemistry and cellular metabolism. Hyperpolarization by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is capable of creating solutions of molecules with polarized nuclear spins in a range of biological molecules and has enabled the real-time investigation of in vivo metabolism. The development of this new method has been demonstrated to enhance the nuclear polarization more than 10,000-fold, thereby significantly increasing the sensitivity of the MRS with a spatial resolution to the millimeters and a temporal resolution at the subsecond range. Furthermore, the method enables measuring kinetics of conversion of substrates into cell metabolites and can be integrated with anatomical proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many nuclei and substrates have been hyperpolarized using the DNP method. Currently, the most widely used compound is 13C-pyruvate due to favoring technicalities. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate results in appearance of 13C-lactate, 13C-alanine and 13C-bicarbonate resonance peaks depending on the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. In cancer, the lactate level is increased due to increased glycolysis. The use of DNP enhanced 13C-pyruvate has in preclinical studies shown to be a sensitive method for detecting cancer and for assessment of early treatment response in a variety of cancers. Recently, a first-in-man 31-patient study was conducted with the primary objective to assess the safety of hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate in healthy subjects and prostate cancer patients. The study showed an elevated 13C-lactate/13C-pyruvate ratio in regions of biopsy

  10. Late Quaternary Biomass Changes from 13C Measurements in a Highland Peatbog from Equatorial Africa (Burundi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aucour, Anne-Marie; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Bonnefille, Raymonde

    1994-03-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of total organic matter were measured in two cores collected from the Kashiru peatbog in Burundi, Equatorial Africa. The record, which spans at least the last 40,000 yr, documents the C 3-C 4 biomass balance in the organic sediment. Among the major modern peat formers, most plants are C 3 species and are characterized by δ 13C values of -25.5 ± 2.3% (vs PDB). The C 4 plants, which are characterized by higher δ 13C values (-11.3 ± 0.7%) belong to the Gramineae ( Miscanthidium sp.) and Cyperaceae families ( Cyperus latifolius, C. papyrus, Pycreus nigricans). In the fossil record, δ 13C values of total organic matter vary between -28 and -15% in response to the relative fluxes of C 3 and C 4 plants. Before 30,000 yr B.P., low δ 13C values (-23.5 ± 1.1%) match high arboreal pollen contents. From 30,000 to 15,000 yr B.P., higher δ 13C values (-17.6 ± 1.1%) correspond to a significant increase in percentages of grass pollen. During this episode, a short and sharp shift toward lighter carbon isotopic compositions at 21,000 yr B.P. is synchronous with higher input of arboreal pollen. From 15,000 to 12,000 yr B.P., the 13C content decreases (δ 13C = -22.9 ± 1.4%). This shift, which cannot be explained by an increase in the arboreal vegetation, could be explained by the spreading of C 3 Gramineae or C 3 Cyperaceae. The interval from 12,000 to 7000 yr B.P. is poorly documented in these cores due to much lower organic matter accumulation. Low δ 13C values (δ 13C = -25.2 ± 1.3%) are observed from 7000 to 5000 yr B.P., when the pollen data show development of C 3 mountain forest. The Late Holocene is characterized by a mixed C 3-C 4 organic matter accumulation (δ 13C = -20.9 ± 1.6%). This study depicts a change in the dominant photosynthetic pathway among the herbaceous components, notably at the glacial-interglacial transition, when C 3 plants were favored by increased water supply and/or higher atmospheric CO 2 concentration.

  11. Chain-Folding Structures of a Semi-crystalline Polymer in Bulk and Single Crystals Elucidated by 13C-13C Double Quantum NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, You-Lee; Miyoshi, Toshikazu

    2014-03-01

    Semi-crystalline polymers are crystallized as folded chains in thin lamellae of ca. 5-20 nm from random coils in the melt and solution states. However, understanding of detailed chain-folding structure and crystallization mechanism are still challenging issue due to various experimental limitations. We recently developed a new strategy using 13C-13C double-quantum (DQ) NMR with selectively 13C isotope labeled isotactic poly(1-butene) form I to investigate chain-trajectory in solution and melt grown crystals at various Tcs. This new method can determine the re-entrance sites, the successive folding number (n) , and the fractions (F) of chain-folding in a wide Tc range. In melt grown crystals at Tc = 95 °C, a comparison of experimental and simulated DQ efficiency determined that the polymer chains alternatively change chain-folding directions and the stems tightly pack via intramolecular interactions, and the fraction (F) of adjacent re-entry structure ranges from 70% at n = 4 to 100% at mixed structures of n = 1 and 2. Furthermore, DQ efficiency is independent of Tc in bulk crystals. This means chain-folding do not change in a wide Tcs. DMR-1105829.

  12. On the use of phloem sap δ13C to estimate canopy carbon discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascher, Katherine; Máguas, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2010-05-01

    Although the carbon stable isotope composition (d13C) of bulk leaf material is a good integrative parameter of photosynthetic discrimination and can be used as a reliable ecological index of plant functioning; it is not a good tracer of short-term changes in photosynthetic discrimination. In contrast, d13C of phloem sap is potentially useful as an indicator of short-term changes in canopy photosynthetic discrimination. However, recent research indicates that d13C signatures may be substantially altered by metabolic processes downstream of initial leaf-level carbon fixation (e.g. post-photosynthetic fractionation). Accordingly, before phloem sap d13C can be used as a proxy for canopy level carbon discrimination an understanding of factors influencing the degree and magnitude of post-photosynthetic fractionation and how these vary between species is of paramount importance. In this study, we measured the d13C signature along the basipetal transport pathway in two co-occurring tree species in the field - an understory invasive exotic legume, Acacia longifolia, and a native pine, Pinus pinaster. We measured d13C of bulk leaf and leaf water soluble organic matter (WSOM), phloem sap sampled at two points along the plant axis and leaf and root dark respiration. In general, species differences in photosynthetic discrimination resulted in more enriched d13C values in the water-conserving P. pinaster relative to the water-spending A. longifolia. Post-photosynthetic fractionation led to differences in d13C of carbon pools along the plant axis with progressively more depleted d13C from the canopy to the trunk (~6.5 per mil depletion in A. longifolia and ~0.8per mil depletion in P. pinaster). Leaf and root respiration, d13C, were consistently enriched relative to putative substrates. We hypothesize that the pronounced enrichment of leaf respired CO2 relative to leaf WSOM may have left behind relatively depleted carbon to be loaded into the phloem resulting in d13C depletion

  13. An overview of methods using 13C for improved compound identification in metabolomics and natural products

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Stupp, Gregory S.; Ajredini, Ramadan; Lee-McMullen, Brittany; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    Compound identification is a major bottleneck in metabolomics studies. In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations, resonance overlap often hinders unambiguous database matching or de novo compound identification. In liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), discriminating between biological signals and background artifacts and reliable determination of molecular formulae are not always straightforward. We have designed and implemented several NMR and LC-MS approaches that utilize 13C, either enriched or at natural abundance, in metabolomics applications. For LC-MS applications, we describe a technique called isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA), which utilizes samples that are isotopically labeled with 5% (test) and 95% (control) 13C. This labeling strategy leads to characteristic isotopic patterns that allow the differentiation of biological signals from artifacts and yield the exact number of carbons, significantly reducing possible molecular formulae. The relative abundance between the test and control samples for every IROA feature can be determined simply by integrating the peaks that arise from the 5 and 95% channels. For NMR applications, we describe two 13C-based approaches. For samples at natural abundance, we have developed a workflow to obtain 13C–13C and 13C–1H statistical correlations using 1D 13C and 1H NMR spectra. For samples that can be isotopically labeled, we describe another NMR approach to obtain direct 13C–13C spectroscopic correlations. These methods both provide extensive information about the carbon framework of compounds in the mixture for either database matching or de novo compound identification. We also discuss strategies in which 13C NMR can be used to identify unknown compounds from IROA experiments. By combining technologies with the same samples, we can identify important biomarkers and corresponding metabolites of interest. PMID:26379677

  14. The Fate of Oral Glucosamine Traced by 13C Labeling in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, George R.; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Noyszewski, Elizabeth A.; Hall, Jeffery O.; Sharma, Akella V.; Callaway, D. Allen; Reddy, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Objective: It has remained ambiguous as to whether oral dosing of glucosamine (GlcN) would make its way to the joint and affect changes in the cartilage, particularly the integrity of cartilage and chondrocyte function. The objective of this study was to trace the fate of orally dosed GlcN and determine definitively if GlcN was incorporated into cartilage proteoglycans. Design: Two dogs were treated with 13C-GlcN-HCl by oral dosing (500 mg/dog/d for 2 weeks and 250 mg/dog/d for 3 weeks). Cartilage was harvested from the tibial plateau and femoral condyles along with tissue specimens from the liver, spleen, heart, kidney, skin, skeletal muscle, lung, and costal cartilage. Percentages of 13C and 13C-GlcN present in each tissue sample were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Results: In the case of dog 1 (2-week treatment), there was an increase of 2.3% of 13C present in the articular cartilage compared to the control and an increase of 1.6% of 13C in dog 2 compared to control. As to be expected, the highest percentage of 13C in the other tissues tested was found in the liver, and the remaining tissues had percentages of 13C less than that of articular cartilage. Conclusion: The results are definitive and for the first time provide conclusive evidence that orally given GlcN can make its way through the digestive tract and be used by chondrocytes in joint cartilage, thereby potentially having an effect on the available GlcN for proteoglycan biosynthesis. PMID:26069586

  15. High-resolution FTIR spectroscopic analysis of the ν11 and ν2 + ν7 bands of 13C2D4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabona, M. G.; Tan, T. L.

    2016-06-01

    The FTIR spectrum of the ν11 band of 13C2D4 was recorded at a resolution of 0.0063 cm-1 in the 2130-2250 cm-1 region. This band was perturbed by the unobserved ν2 + ν7 band. By fitting 862 infrared transitions for the ν11 band with a rms deviation of 0.0024 cm-1 using a Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation including a Coriolis coupling constant, the rovibrational constants for the ν11 = 1 state and three rotational constants for the ν2 = ν7 = 1 state of 13C2D4 were derived for the first time. The band centers of ν11 and ν2 + ν7 were determined to be 2193.75982(25) cm-1 and 2184.613(11) cm-1 respectively.

  16. s-processing in AGB stars revisited. I. Does the main component constrain the neutron source in the {sup 13}C pocket?

    SciTech Connect

    Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; Maiorca, E.; Käppeler, F.; Palmerini, S. E-mail: maurizio.busso@fisica.unipg.it

    2014-05-20

    Slow neutron captures at A ≳ 85 are mainly guaranteed by the reaction {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, requiring proton injections from the envelope. These were so far assumed to involve a small mass (≲ 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉}), but models with rotation suggest that in such tiny layers excessive {sup 14}N hampers s-processing. Furthermore, s-element abundances in galaxies require {sup 13}C-rich layers substantially extended in mass (≳ 4 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉}). We therefore present new calculations aimed at clarifying those issues and at understanding whether the solar composition helps to constrain the {sup 13}C 'pocket' extension. We show that: (1) mixing 'from bottom to top' (as in magnetic buoyancy or other forced mechanisms) can form a {sup 13}C reservoir substantially larger than assumed so far, covering most of the He-rich layers; (2) on the basis of this idea, stellar models at a fixed metallicity reproduce the main s-component as accurately as before; and (3) they make nuclear contributions from unknown nucleosynthesis processes (LEPP) unnecessary, against common assumptions. These models also avoid problems of mixing at the envelope border and fulfil requirements from C-star luminosities. They yield a large production of nuclei below A = 100, so that {sup 86,} {sup 87}Sr may be fully synthesized by AGB stars, while {sup 88}Sr, {sup 89}Y, and {sup 94}Zr are contributed more efficiently than before. Finally, we suggest tests suitable for providing a final answer regarding the extension of the {sup 13}C pocket.

  17. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in Soils - revealed using 13C-labelled methane tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riekie, G. J.; Baggs, E. M.; Killham, K. S.; Smith, J. U.

    2008-12-01

    In marine sediments, anaerobic methane oxidation is a significant biogeochemical process limiting methane flux from ocean to atmosphere. To date, evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation in terrestrial environments has proved elusive, and its significance is uncertain. In this study, an isotope dilution method specifically designed to detect the process of anaerobic methane oxidation in methanogenic wetland soils is applied. Methane emissions of soils from three contrasting permanently waterlogged sites in Scotland are investigated in strictly anoxic microcosms to which 13C- labelled methane is added, and changes in the concentration and 12C/13C isotope ratios of methane and carbon dioxide are subsequently measured and used to calculate separate the separate components of the methane flux. The method used takes into account the 13C-methane associated with methanogenesis, and the amount of methane dissolved in the soil. The calculations make no prior assumptions about the kinetics of methane production or oxidation. The results indicate that methane oxidation can take place in anoxic soil environments. The clearest evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation is provided by soils from a minerotrophic fen site (pH 6.0) in Bin Forest underlain by ultra-basic and serpentine till. In the fresh soil anoxic microcosms, net consumption methane was observed, and the amount of headspace 13C-CO2 increased at a greater rate than the 12+13C-CO2, further proof of methane oxidation. A net increase in methane was measured in microcosms of soil from Murder Moss, an alkaline site, pH 6.5, with a strong calcareous influence. However, the 13C-CH4 data provided evidence of methane oxidation, both in the disappearance of C- CH4 and appearance of smaller quantities of 13C-CO2. The least alkaline (pH 5.5) microcosms, of Gateside Farm soil - a granitic till - exhibited net methanogenesis and the changes in 13C-CH4 and 13C-CO2 here followed the pattern expected if no methane is consumed

  18. Depletion of 13C in Cretaceous marine organic matter: Source, diagenetic, or environmental sigal?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.; Arthur, M.A.; Claypool, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Geochemical studies of Cretaceous strata rich in organic carbon (OC) from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) sites and several land sections reveal several consistent relationships among amount of OC, hydrocarbon generating potential of kerogen (measured by pyrolysis as the hydrogen index, HI), and the isotopic composition of the OC. First, there is a positive correlation between HI and OC in strata that contain more than about 1% OC. Second, percent OC and HI often are negatively correlated with carbon isotopic composition (?? 13C) of kerogen. The relationship between HI and OC indicates that as the amount of organic matter increases, this organic matter tends to be more lipid rich reflecting the marine source of the organic matter. Cretaceous samples that contain predominantly marine organic matter tend to be isotopically lighter than those that contain predominantly terrestrial organic matter. Average ?? 13C values for organic matter from most Cretaceous sites are between -26 and -28???, and values heavier than about -25??? occur at very few sites. Most of the ?? 13C values of Miocene to Holocene OC-rich strata and modern marine plankton are between -16 to -23???. Values of ??13C of modern terrestrial organic matter are mostly between -23 and -33???. The depletion of terrestial OC in 13C relative to marine planktonic OC is the basis for numerous statements in the literature that isotopically light Cretaceous organic matter is of terrestrial origin, even though other organic geochemical and(or) optical indicators show that the organic matter is mainly of marine origin. A difference of about 5??? in ?? 13C between modern and Cretaceous OC-rich marine strata suggests either that Cretaceous marine planktonic organic matter had the same isotopic signature as modern marine plankton and that signature has been changed by diagenesis, or that OC derived from Cretaceous marine plankton was isotopically lighter by about 5??? relative to modern plankton OC. Diagenesis does

  19. Monitoring electron donor metabolism under variable electron acceptor conditions using 13C-labeled lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Three sets of flow-through columns constructed with aquifer sediment from Hanford (WA) were used to study reduction of Cr(VI) to poorly soluble Cr(III) under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing/fermentative, and iron-reducing conditions with lactate as the electron donor. In order to understand the relationship between electron donors and biomarkers, and to determine the differences in carbon isotope fractionation resulting from different microbial metabolic processes, we monitored the variation in carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in total organic carbon (TOC), and in lactate, acetate and propionate. The greatest enrichment in 13C in columns was observed under denitrifying conditions. The δ13C of DIC increased by ~1750 to ~2000‰ fifteen days after supplementation of natural abundance lactate with a 13C-labeled lactate tracer (for an influent δ13C of ~2250‰ for the lactate) indicating almost complete oxidation of the electron donor. The denitrifying columns were among the most active columns and had the highest cell counts and the denitrification rate was highly correlated with Cr(VI) reduction rate. δ13C values of DIC ranged from ~540 to ~1170‰ for iron-reducing conditions. The lower enrichment in iron columns was related to the lower biological activity observed with lower yields of RNA and cell numbers in the column effluents. The carbon isotope shift in the sulfate-reducing ~198 to ~1960‰ for sulfate-reducing conditions reflecting the lower levels of the lactate in these columns. Additionally, in two of the sulfate columns, almost complete fermentation of the lactate occurred, producing acetate and propionate with the labeled carbon signature, but relatively smaller amounts of inorganic carbon. For all electron-accepting conditions, TOC yielded similar δ13C values as lactate stock solutions. Differences in C use efficiency, metabolic rate or metabolic pathway contributed to the differing TOC δ13C to DIC δ13C ratios between treatments

  20. Multi-objective experimental design for (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouvin, Jeroen; Cajot, Simon; D'Huys, Pieter-Jan; Ampofo-Asiama, Jerry; Anné, Jozef; Van Impe, Jan; Geeraerd, Annemie; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2015-10-01

    (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis is an excellent technique to resolve fluxes in the central carbon metabolism but costs can be significant when using specialized tracers. This work presents a framework for cost-effective design of (13)C-tracer experiments, illustrated on two different networks. Linear and non-linear optimal input mixtures are computed for networks for Streptomyces lividans and a carcinoma cell line. If only glucose tracers are considered as labeled substrate for a carcinoma cell line or S. lividans, the best parameter estimation accuracy is obtained by mixtures containing high amounts of 1,2-(13)C2 glucose combined with uniformly labeled glucose. Experimental designs are evaluated based on a linear (D-criterion) and non-linear approach (S-criterion). Both approaches generate almost the same input mixture, however, the linear approach is favored due to its low computational effort. The high amount of 1,2-(13)C2 glucose in the optimal designs coincides with a high experimental cost, which is further enhanced when labeling is introduced in glutamine and aspartate tracers. Multi-objective optimization gives the possibility to assess experimental quality and cost at the same time and can reveal excellent compromise experiments. For example, the combination of 100% 1,2-(13)C2 glucose with 100% position one labeled glutamine and the combination of 100% 1,2-(13)C2 glucose with 100% uniformly labeled glutamine perform equally well for the carcinoma cell line, but the first mixture offers a decrease in cost of $ 120 per ml-scale cell culture experiment. We demonstrated the validity of a multi-objective linear approach to perform optimal experimental designs for the non-linear problem of (13)C-metabolic flux analysis. Tools and a workflow are provided to perform multi-objective design. The effortless calculation of the D-criterion can be exploited to perform high-throughput screening of possible (13)C-tracers, while the illustrated benefit of multi

  1. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  2. Origin differentiation of heroin sample and its acetylating agent with (13)C isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daming; Sun, Wei; Yuan, Zengping; Ju, Huangxian; Shi, Xuejun; Wang, Chonghu

    2005-01-01

    A novel method for deducing the origins of heroin and the reagent used for acetylation was established based on delta(13)C determinations of heroin and its hydrolysate, morphine, using gas chromatography (13)C isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). The alkaline and acid hydrolysis conditions of heroin were optimized. Both yield and purity of morphine produced could meet the requirement for a GC-C-IRMS analysis. Using (2-diethylaminoethyl-2,2- diphenylvalerate) as internal standard the determinations of heroin and morphine contents were performed with a GC method in a linear range of 0.2 to 2.0 mg ml(1) that was required to gain the isotope ratio results. The hydrolysis and synthesis of heroin did not change the delta(13)C value of morphine. The precision for delta(13)C detection of both heroin and morphine was sufficient for origin differentiation of heroin samples. The information about the origins of acetylation reagents could be deduced from the difference of delta(13)C values between heroin and morphine. The results for origin differentiation of 10 heroin samples grouped into different regions and their acetylating agents were satisfactory.

  3. Elucidation of intrinsic biosynthesis yields using 13C-based metabolism analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of 13C-based metabolism analysis for the assessment of intrinsic product yields — the actual carbon contribution from a single carbon substrate to the final product via a specific biosynthesis route — in the following four cases. First, undefined nutrients (such as yeast extract) in fermentation may contribute significantly to product synthesis, which can be quantified through an isotopic dilution method. Second, product and biomass synthesis may be dependent on the co-metabolism of multiple-carbon sources. 13C labeling experiments can track the fate of each carbon substrate in the cell metabolism and identify which substrate plays a main role in product synthesis. Third, 13C labeling can validate and quantify the contribution of the engineered pathway (versus the native pathway) to the product synthesis. Fourth, the loss of catabolic energy due to cell maintenance (energy used for functions other than production of new cell components) and low P/O ratio (Phosphate/Oxygen Ratio) significantly reduces product yields. Therefore, 13C-metabolic flux analysis is needed to assess the influence of suboptimal energy metabolism on microbial productivity, and determine how ATP/NAD(P)H are partitioned among various cellular functions. Since product yield is a major determining factor in the commercialization of a microbial cell factory, we foresee that 13C-isotopic labeling experiments, even without performing extensive flux calculations, can play a valuable role in the development and verification of microbial cell factories. PMID:24642094

  4. A Peptide-Based Method for 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis in Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Amit; Nilmeier, Jerome; Weaver, Daniel; Adams, Paul D.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Petzold, Christopher J.; Martín, Héctor García

    2014-01-01

    The study of intracellular metabolic fluxes and inter-species metabolite exchange for microbial communities is of crucial importance to understand and predict their behaviour. The most authoritative method of measuring intracellular fluxes, 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C MFA), uses the labeling pattern obtained from metabolites (typically amino acids) during 13C labeling experiments to derive intracellular fluxes. However, these metabolite labeling patterns cannot easily be obtained for each of the members of the community. Here we propose a new type of 13C MFA that infers fluxes based on peptide labeling, instead of amino acid labeling. The advantage of this method resides in the fact that the peptide sequence can be used to identify the microbial species it originates from and, simultaneously, the peptide labeling can be used to infer intracellular metabolic fluxes. Peptide identity and labeling patterns can be obtained in a high-throughput manner from modern proteomics techniques. We show that, using this method, it is theoretically possible to recover intracellular metabolic fluxes in the same way as through the standard amino acid based 13C MFA, and quantify the amount of information lost as a consequence of using peptides instead of amino acids. We show that by using a relatively small number of peptides we can counter this information loss. We computationally tested this method with a well-characterized simple microbial community consisting of two species. PMID:25188426

  5. Elucidation of intrinsic biosynthesis yields using 13C-based metabolism analysis.

    PubMed

    Varman, Arul M; He, Lian; You, Le; Hollinshead, Whitney; Tang, Yinjie J

    2014-03-19

    This paper discusses the use of 13C-based metabolism analysis for the assessment of intrinsic product yields - the actual carbon contribution from a single carbon substrate to the final product via a specific biosynthesis route - in the following four cases. First, undefined nutrients (such as yeast extract) in fermentation may contribute significantly to product synthesis, which can be quantified through an isotopic dilution method. Second, product and biomass synthesis may be dependent on the co-metabolism of multiple-carbon sources. 13C labeling experiments can track the fate of each carbon substrate in the cell metabolism and identify which substrate plays a main role in product synthesis. Third, 13C labeling can validate and quantify the contribution of the engineered pathway (versus the native pathway) to the product synthesis. Fourth, the loss of catabolic energy due to cell maintenance (energy used for functions other than production of new cell components) and low P/O ratio (Phosphate/Oxygen Ratio) significantly reduces product yields. Therefore, 13C-metabolic flux analysis is needed to assess the influence of suboptimal energy metabolism on microbial productivity, and determine how ATP/NAD(P)H are partitioned among various cellular functions. Since product yield is a major determining factor in the commercialization of a microbial cell factory, we foresee that 13C-isotopic labeling experiments, even without performing extensive flux calculations, can play a valuable role in the development and verification of microbial cell factories.

  6. [Correlations between leaf delta13C and physiological parameters of desert plant Reaumuria soongorica].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian-Ying; Chen, Fa-Hu; Xia, Dun-Sheng; Sun, Hui-Ling; Duan, Zheng-Hu; Wang, Gang

    2008-05-01

    Reaumuria soongorica is a dominant species in the desert shrubbery vegetation in arid regions of northwestern China, playing an important role in the maintenance of the stability and continuity of desert ecosystem. In this paper, a total of 407 individuals in 21 natural populations of R. soongorica were selected from its main distribution areas to measure the leaf stable carbon isotope composition (delta13C) and nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, water, proline and chlorophyll contents, with the correlations between the delta13C value and the test physiological parameters analyzed. The results showed that leaf delta13C value was significantly correlated with the contents of leaf potassium, water, and proline (P <0.001), and the correlation with leaf potassium content was most profound (r = 0.793), followed by that with leaf water content (r = -0.786), indicating that the variation of leaf delta13C value could reflect the nutritional status of the plants, and also, their water-deficient degree. The different distribution trends in leaf delta13C value of R. soongorica were likely caused by stomatal conductance, rather than by nutrient-related changes in photosynthetic efficiency under extremely low available water conditions.

  7. Natural-abundance sup 13 C NMR study of glycogen repletion in human liver and muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Jue, T.; Rothman, D.L.; Tavitian, B.A.; Shulman, R.G. )

    1989-03-01

    Optimizing the surface-coil design and spectral-acquisition parameters has led to the observation of the {sup 13}C NMR natural abundance glycogen signal in man at 2.1 T. Both the human muscle and hepatic glycogen signals can be detected definitively with a time resolution of {approx}13 min. A {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C concentric surface coil was used. The {sup 1}H outer coil was 11 cm in diameter; the {sup 13}C inner coil was 8 cm in diameter. The coils were tuned to 89.3 MHz and 22.4 MHz, respectively. The {sup 1}H coil was used for optimizing field homogeneity (shimming) the magnet and for single-frequency decoupling of the C{sub 1} glycogen signal. Total power deposition from both the transmitter pulse and the continuous wave decoupling did not exceed the Food and Drug Administration guideline of 8 W/kg of tissue. Experiments were done for which healthy subjects returned to the magnets at different times for {sup 13}C NMR measurement. The spectral difference between experiments was within the noise in the C{sub 1} glycogen region. Because of the spectral reproducibility and the signal sensitivity, hepatic glycogen repletion can be followed. Four hours postprandial, hepatic glycogen increases by 3.8 times from the basal fasted state. The hepatic glycogen data correspond directly to previous biopsy results and support the use of {sup 13}C NMR as a noninvasive probe of human metabolism.

  8. Evaluation of a [13C]-Dextromethorphan Breath Test to Assess CYP2D6 Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, J. Steven; Pearce, Robin E.; Gaedigk, Andrea; Modak, Anil; Rosen, David I.

    2016-01-01

    A [13C]-dextromethorphan ([13C]-DM) breath test was evaluated to assess its feasibility as a rapid, phenotyping assay for CYP2D6 activity. [13C]-DM (0.5 mg/kg) was administered orally with water or potassium bicarbonate-sodium bicarbonate to 30 adult Caucasian volunteers (n = 1 each): CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (2 null alleles; PM-0) and extensive metabolizers with 1 (EM-1) or 2 functional alleles (EM-2). CYP2D6 phenotype was determined by 13CO2 enrichment measured by infrared spectrometry (delta-over-baseline [DOB] value) in expired breath samples collected before and up to 240 minutes after [13C]-DM ingestion and by 4-hour urinary metabolite ratio. The PM-0 group was readily distinguishable from either EM group by both the breath test and urinary metabolite ratio. Using a single point determination of phenotype at 40 minutes and defining PMs as subjects with a DOB ≤ 0.5, the sensitivity of the method was 100%; specificity was 95% with 95% accuracy and resulted in the misclassification of 1 EM-1 individual as a PM. Modification of the initial protocol (timing of potassium bicarbonate-sodium bicarbonate administration relative to dose) yielded comparable results, but there was a tendency toward increased DOB values. Although further development is required, these studies suggest that the [13C]-DM breath test offers promise as a rapid, minimally invasive phenotyping assay for CYP2D6 activity. PMID:18728242

  9. A Method to Constrain Genome-Scale Models with 13C Labeling Data

    PubMed Central

    García Martín, Héctor; Kumar, Vinay Satish; Weaver, Daniel; Ghosh, Amit; Chubukov, Victor; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    Current limitations in quantitatively predicting biological behavior hinder our efforts to engineer biological systems to produce biofuels and other desired chemicals. Here, we present a new method for calculating metabolic fluxes, key targets in metabolic engineering, that incorporates data from 13C labeling experiments and genome-scale models. The data from 13C labeling experiments provide strong flux constraints that eliminate the need to assume an evolutionary optimization principle such as the growth rate optimization assumption used in Flux Balance Analysis (FBA). This effective constraining is achieved by making the simple but biologically relevant assumption that flux flows from core to peripheral metabolism and does not flow back. The new method is significantly more robust than FBA with respect to errors in genome-scale model reconstruction. Furthermore, it can provide a comprehensive picture of metabolite balancing and predictions for unmeasured extracellular fluxes as constrained by 13C labeling data. A comparison shows that the results of this new method are similar to those found through 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C MFA) for central carbon metabolism but, additionally, it provides flux estimates for peripheral metabolism. The extra validation gained by matching 48 relative labeling measurements is used to identify where and why several existing COnstraint Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) flux prediction algorithms fail. We demonstrate how to use this knowledge to refine these methods and improve their predictive capabilities. This method provides a reliable base upon which to improve the design of biological systems. PMID:26379153

  10. Production and NMR signal optimization of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Amino acids are targeted nutrients for consumption by cancers to sustain their rapid growth and proliferation. 13C-enriched amino acids are important metabolic tracers for cancer diagnostics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Despite this diagnostic potential, 13C NMR of amino acids however is hampered by the inherently low NMR sensitivity of the 13C nuclei. In this work, we have employed a physics technique known as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance the NMR signals of 13C-enriched amino acids. DNP works by transferring the high polarization of electrons to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Using a fast dissolution method in which the frozen polarized samples are dissolved rapidly with superheated water, injectable solutions of 13C-amino acids with highly enhanced NMR signals (by at least 5,000-fold) were produced at room temperature. Factors that affect the NMR signal enhancement levels such as the choice of free radical polarizing agents and sample preparation will be discussed along with the thermal mixing physics model of DNP. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  11. Nondestructive determination of the 13C content in isotopic diamond by nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, O.; Ruf, T.; Finkelstein, Y.; Cardona, M.; Anthony, T. R.; Belic, D.; Eckert, T.; Jäger, D.; Kneissl, U.; Maser, H.; Moreh, R.; Nord, A.; Pitz, H. H.; Wolpert, A.

    1998-05-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence excited with continuous electron bremsstrahlung from the 4.3 MV Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator is used as a nondestructive method to determine the 13C content x of bulk isotopic diamonds (12C1-x13Cx). The smallest detectable amount of 13C in carbon or low Z matrices is on the order of 0.5 mg. The relative accuracy of absolute mass determinations is about ±7%. Errors are mainly due to uncertainties in the natural widths Γ of the 13C nuclear levels at 3089 and 3684 keV used in the measurements. The results confirm a previous calibration which is based on Raman scattering and the destructive determination of x by mass spectroscopy.

  12. *d13C composition of primary producers and role of detritus in a freshwater coastal ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keough, J.R.; Hagley, C.A.; Sierszen, M.

    1998-01-01

    Stable-isotope ratio signatures of primary producers in a coastal wetland and in adjacent offshore waters of western Lake Superior indicated that phytoplankton are the primary source of carbon for the grazing food web of this ecosystem. This study outlines the possible roles of other autotrophs in this regard. Isotopic signatures of macrophytes reflected their life-form-associated constraints on diffusion of inorganic carbon. Data indicated that differences between wetland and lake phytoplankton may be explained by the isotopic signatures of their dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) sources. Results of an in situ experiment showed that respiration associated with macrophyte decomposition is capable of enriching surrounding water with significant amounts of *d13C-depleted DIC and lowering the net *d13C ratio of DIC in water in low-turbulence situations. The *d13C ratio for wetland phytoplankton may be depleted relative to pelagic algae because the fixed carbon is derived from decomposing detritus.

  13. [The clinical application of 13C-breath tests in pancreatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Cherniavskiĭ, V V

    2014-11-01

    Maldigestion persists in most patients with chronic pancreatitis (GP). The objective lipase and amylase insufficiency diagnosis is needed to achieve an adequate clinical response to oral pancreatic enzyme substitution therapy. The novel data is presented in the article about the role of 13C-mixed triglyceride and 13C-corn starch breath tests as a tools for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency diagnosis, for evaluating fat and starch malabsorbtion in CP patients. 135 patients were included in the investigation. It has been shown, that 13C-breath tests could be useful tools in clinical practice for CP diagnosis. They are well correlate with fecal elastase-1 level, has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of lipase and amylase deficiency. Tests make it possible to choose the initial pancreatic enzyme dosage and are beneficial during the treatment for pancreatic enzyme dose correction.

  14. Food webs in Mongolian grasslands: the analysis of 13C and 15N natural abundances.

    PubMed

    Kohzu, Ayato; Iwata, T; Kato, M; Nishikawa, J; Wada, Eitaro; Amartuvshin, N; Namkhaidorj, B; Fujita, N

    2009-09-01

    Overgrazing often lowers species richness and productivity of grassland communities. For Mongolian grassland ecosystems, a lack of detailed information about food-web structures makes it difficult to predict the effects of overgrazing on species diversity and community composition. We analysed the delta13C and delta15N signatures of herbaceous plants, arthropods (grouped by feeding habit), wild and domestic mammals, and humans in central Mongolia to understand the predominant food-web pathways in this grassland ecosystem. The delta13C and delta15N values of mammals showed little variation within species, but varied considerably with slope position for arthropods. The apparent isotopic discrimination between body tissue and hair of mammals was estimated as 2.0 per thousand for delta13C and 2.1 per thousand for delta15N, which was large enough to cause overestimation of the trophic level of mammals if not taken into account when using hair samples to measure isotopic enrichment.

  15. Following Glycolysis Using 13C NMR: An Experiment Adaptable to Different Undergraduate Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mega, T. L.; Carlson, C. B.; Cleary, D. A.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a laboratory exercise where the glycolysis of [1-13C] glucose under anaerobic conditions was followed using 13C NMR spectroscopy. The exercise is described in terms of its suitability for a variety of different undergraduate levels, although the emphasis in this paper is on its use in a n advanced chemistry laboratory course. The kinetics of the loss of glucose and the production of ethanol were investigated and found not to fit simple first or second order kinetics. In addition, the relative reaction rates of the two anomeric forms of glucose were analyzed, and it was determined that the a anomeric form reacted faster than the β anomeric form. Using proton-coupled 13C NMR, some of the metabolites were identified including ethanol (major) and glycerol (minor). Reaction and spectroscopic details are included.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Metabolic Mixtures by 2D 13C-Constant-Time TOCSY NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Kerem; Zhang, Fengli; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of organisms can be fully 13C-labeled, which has the advantage that their metabolomes can be studied by high-resolution 2D NMR 13C–13C constant-time (CT) TOCSY experiments. Individual metabolites can be identified via database searching or, in the case of novel compounds, through the reconstruction of their backbone-carbon topology. Determination of quantitative metabolite concentrations is another key task. Because significant peak overlaps in 1D NMR spectra prevents straightforward quantification through 1D peak integrals, we demonstrate here the direct use of 13C–13C CT-TOCSY spectra for metabolite quantification. This is accomplished through the quantum-mechanical treatment of the TOCSY magnetization transfer at short and long mixing times or by the use of analytical approximations, which are solely based on the knowledge of the carbon-backbone topologies. The methods are demonstrated for carbohydrate and amino-acid mixtures. PMID:23773204

  17. Animal /sup 13/C//sup 12/C correlates with trophic level in pelagic food webs

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, G.H.; Mearns, A.J.; Young, D.R.; Olson, R.J.; Schafer, H.A.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1983-01-01

    Whatever the underlying cause(s), our observations further substantiate the existence of small but progressive increases in animal tissue /sup 13/C//sup 12/C with increasing trophic level. Such a relationship has significant implications for the use of stable carbon isotope natural abundance in animal tissues or remains, in order to interpret the tropic structure and food base of past as well as present-day animal communities. The delta/sup 13/C of the marine animal tissues analyzed ranged from -20.6 to -15.8%. The macro-fauna from the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean had higher isotope values than the net plankton collected from the same area. The average increases in delta/sup 13/C per trophic level were 0.73 and 1.38% for the California coastal waters and for the eastern tropical Pacific, respectively. These isotopic increases approximate closely those previously reported to occur within single trophic level steps.

  18. Anthropogenic and solar forcing in δ13C time pattern of coralline sponges.

    PubMed

    Madonia, Paolo; Reitner, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a re-analysis of a previously published carbon isotope data-set related to coralline sponges in the Caribbean Sea. The original interpretation led to the discrimination between a pre-industrial period, with a signal controlled by solar-induced climatic variations, followed by the industrial era, characterized by a progressive δ(13)C negative shift due to the massive anthropogenic carbon emissions. Our re-analysis allowed to extract from the raw isotopic data evidence of a solar forcing still visible during the industrial era, with a particular reference to the 88-year Gleissberg periods. These signals are related to slope changes in both the δ(13)C versus time and the δ(13)C versus carbon emission curves.

  19. Ruminant Methane δ (13C/12C) - Values: Relation to Atmospheric Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Fleet

    1981-03-01

    The δ (13C/12C) - values of methane produced by fistulated steers, dairy cattle, and wethers, and dairy and beef cattle herds show a bimodal distribution that appears to be correlated with the plant type (C3 or C4, that is, producing either a three- or a four-carbon acid in the first step of photosynthesis) consumed by the animals. These results indicate that cattle and sheep, on a global basis, release methane with an average δ (13C/12C) value of -60 and -63 per mil, respectively. Together they are a source of atmospheric methane whose δ (13C/12C) is similar to published values for marsh gas and cannot explain the 20 per mil higher values for atmospheric methane.

  20. Neuroprotective effects of caffeine in MPTP model of Parkinson's disease: A (13)C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Bagga, Puneet; Chugani, Anup N; Patel, Anant B

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons with an accompanying neuroinflammation leading to loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia. Caffeine, a well-known A2A receptor antagonist is reported to slow down the neuroinflammation caused by activated microglia and reduce the extracellular glutamate in the brain. In this study, we have evaluated the neuroprotective effect of caffeine in the MPTP model of PD by monitoring the region specific cerebral energy metabolism. Adult C57BL6 mice were treated with caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min prior to MPTP (25 mg/kg, i.p.) administration for 8 days. The paw grip strength of mice was assessed in order to evaluate the motor function after various treatments. For metabolic studies, mice were infused with [1,6-(13)C2]glucose, and (13)C labeling of amino acids was monitored using ex vivo(1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy. The paw grip strength was found to be reduced following the MPTP treatment. The caffeine pretreatment showed significant protection against the reduction of paw grip strength in MPTP treated mice. The levels of GABA and myo-inositol were found to be elevated in the striatum of MPTP treated mice. The (13)C labeling of GluC4, GABAC2 and GlnC4 from [1,6-(13)C2]glucose was decreased in the cerebral cortex, striatum, olfactory bulb, thalamus and cerebellum suggesting impaired glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal activity and neurotransmission of the MPTP treated mice. Most interestingly, the pretreatment of caffeine maintained the (13)C labeling of amino acids to the control values in cortical, olfactory bulb and cerebellum regions while it partially retained in striatal and thalamic regions in MPTP treated mice. The pretreatment of caffeine provides a partial neuro-protection against severe striatal degeneration in the MPTP model of PD.

  1. Habitat-specific differences in plasticity of foliar δ13C in temperate steppe grasses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Zhang, Lirong; Niu, Haishan; Sun, Yue; Xu, Xingliang

    2014-01-01

    A decrease in foliar δ13C with increasing precipitation is a common tendency in steppe plants. However, the rate of decrease has been reported to differ between different species or populations. We here hypothesized that plant populations in the same habitat of temperate steppes may not differ in foliar δ13C response patterns to precipitation, but could differ in the levels of plasticity of foliar δ13C across different habitats. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted controlled watering experiments in northeast China at five sites along a west–east transect at latitude 44°N, which show substantial interannual fluctuations and intra-annual changes in precipitation among them. In 2001, watering treatment (six levels, three replicates) was assigned to 18 plots at each site. The responses of foliar δ13C to precipitation (i.e., the sum of watering and rainfall) were determined in populations of several grass species that were common across all sites. Although similar linear regression slopes were observed for populations of different species growing at the same site, significantly different slopes were obtained for populations of the same species growing at different sites. Further, the slope of the line progressively decreased from Site I to Site V for all species in this study. These results suggest habitat-specific differences in plasticity of foliar δ13C in temperate steppe grasses. This indicates that species' δ13C response to precipitation is conservative at the same site due to their long-term acclimation, but the mechanism responsible behind this needs further investigations. PMID:25035804

  2. The 13C/2H-glucose test for determination of small intestinal lactase activity.

    PubMed

    Vonk, R J; Stellaard, F; Priebe, M G; Koetse, H A; Hagedoorn, R E; De Bruijn, S; Elzinga, H; Lenoir-Wijnkoop, I; Antoine, J M

    2001-03-01

    To diagnose hypolactasia, determination of lactase enzyme activity in small intestinal biopsy material is considered to be the golden standard. Because of its strongly invasive character and the sampling problems, alternative methods have been looked for. We analysed the 13C-glucose response in serum after consumption of 25 g of naturally enriched 13C-lactose. As an internal standard, 0.5 g of 2H-glucose was added and the 2H-glucose response in serum was measured simultaneously. The studies were performed in healthy volunteers with a background of genetically determined lactase nonpersistence (n = 12; low lactase activity) and lactase persistence (n = 27; high lactase activity). The results were compared with those of the lactose hydrogen breath test, the lactose 13CO2 breath test and the previously described 13C-lactose digestion test. After consumption of 13C-lactose and 2H-glucose, the mean ratio 13C-glucose/2H-glucose concentration in serum at 45-75 min was 0.26 +/- 0.09 in the low lactase activity group and 0.93 +/- 0.17 in the high lactase activity group (P < 0.01). Threshold of the ratio between digesters and maldigesters was calculated as 0.46. Accuracy of the new test was superior to all other tests. We conclude that the 13C/2H-glucose test has the potential of determining the small intestinal lactase activity in vivo and of estimating the amount of lactose which is digested in the small intestine. PMID:11264650

  3. Analysis of mutational lesions of acetate metabolism in Neurospora crassa by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G H; Baxter, R L

    1987-01-01

    The adaptation of Neurospora crassa mycelium to growth on acetate as the sole carbon source was examined by using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. Extracts were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance at various times after transfer of the mycelium from medium containing sucrose to medium containing [2-13C]acetate as the sole carbon source. The label was initially seen to enter the alanine, glutamate, and glutamine pools, and after 6 h 13C-enriched trehalose was evident, indicating that gluconeogenesis was occurring. Analysis of the isotopomer ratios in the alanine and glutamate-glutamine pools indicated that substantial glyoxylate cycle activity became evident between 2 and 4 h after transfer. Immediately after transfer of the mycelium to acetate medium, the alanine pool increased to about four times its previous level, only a small fraction of which was enriched with 13C. The quantity of 13C-enriched alanine remained almost constant between 2 and 7.5 h after the transfer, whereas the overall alanine pool decreased to its original level. The selective catabolism of the unenriched alanine leads us to suggest that the alanine pool is partitioned into two compartments during adaptation. Two acetate-nonutilizing mutants were also studied by this technique. An acu-3 strain, deficient for isocitrate lyase (EC 4.1.3.1) activity, showed metabolic changes consistent with this lesion. An acp strain, previously thought to be deficient in an inducible acetate permease, took up [2-13C]acetate but showed no evidence of glyoxylate cycle activity despite synthesizing the necessary enzymes; the lesion was therefore reinterpreted. PMID:2947898

  4. The 13C/2H-glucose test for determination of small intestinal lactase activity.

    PubMed

    Vonk, R J; Stellaard, F; Priebe, M G; Koetse, H A; Hagedoorn, R E; De Bruijn, S; Elzinga, H; Lenoir-Wijnkoop, I; Antoine, J M

    2001-03-01

    To diagnose hypolactasia, determination of lactase enzyme activity in small intestinal biopsy material is considered to be the golden standard. Because of its strongly invasive character and the sampling problems, alternative methods have been looked for. We analysed the 13C-glucose response in serum after consumption of 25 g of naturally enriched 13C-lactose. As an internal standard, 0.5 g of 2H-glucose was added and the 2H-glucose response in serum was measured simultaneously. The studies were performed in healthy volunteers with a background of genetically determined lactase nonpersistence (n = 12; low lactase activity) and lactase persistence (n = 27; high lactase activity). The results were compared with those of the lactose hydrogen breath test, the lactose 13CO2 breath test and the previously described 13C-lactose digestion test. After consumption of 13C-lactose and 2H-glucose, the mean ratio 13C-glucose/2H-glucose concentration in serum at 45-75 min was 0.26 +/- 0.09 in the low lactase activity group and 0.93 +/- 0.17 in the high lactase activity group (P < 0.01). Threshold of the ratio between digesters and maldigesters was calculated as 0.46. Accuracy of the new test was superior to all other tests. We conclude that the 13C/2H-glucose test has the potential of determining the small intestinal lactase activity in vivo and of estimating the amount of lactose which is digested in the small intestine.

  5. Variation of delta13C in Aegiceras corniculatum seedling induced by cadmium application.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lili; Yan, Chongling; Wu, Guirong; Guo, Xiaoyin; Ye, Binbin

    2008-08-01

    To test whether the values of delta13C in mangrove plants are affected by Cd application, the seedlings of Aegiceras corniculatum, a dominant mangrove species, were cultured in soil supplied with CdCl2 solution at the concentration of 0, 0.5, 2.5, 5, 20, 30 and 50 CdCl2 mg/kg wet soils. Plants were grown in 10 replicate pots with 5 propagules each. After 5 months of Cd exposure, three pots contained 15 seedlings with average shoot heights were selected for each treatment. Leaves and roots of seedling were sampled respectively and analyzed for delta(13)C. Growth traits (fresh weight, shoot height and root length), total chlorophyll content, and Cd concentrations in leaf, root and dry soil were determined. After 5 months of the seedling growth, the concentrations of Cd in dry soil were 0.47, 0.83, 2.77, 4.54, 18.89, 29.79 and 47.35 mg/kg respectively. The values of delta13C in roots and leaves were affected to some extent by Cd application. Although root delta(13)C showed more sensitive to Cd compared with leaves, the values of delta13C in roots were not significantly affected by Cd until Cd level higher than 29.78 mg/kg which was not expected to exist in natural environments. Minor variation in delta13C values observed in roots and leaves was likely due to limited Cd uptake by seedlings and subsequent lack of negative impacts on photosynthesis. PMID:18386175

  6. Kinetic modeling of hyperpolarized 13C 1-pyruvate metabolism in normal rats and TRAMP mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierhut, Matthew L.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Chen, Albert P.; Bok, Robert; Albers, Mark J.; Zhang, Vickie; Tropp, Jim; Park, Ilwoo; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Kurhanewicz, John; Hurd, Ralph E.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2010-01-01

    PurposeTo investigate metabolic exchange between 13C 1-pyruvate, 13C 1-lactate, and 13C 1-alanine in pre-clinical model systems using kinetic modeling of dynamic hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopic data and to examine the relationship between fitted parameters and dose-response. Materials and methodsDynamic 13C spectroscopy data were acquired in normal rats, wild type mice, and mice with transgenic prostate tumors (TRAMP) either within a single slice or using a one-dimensional echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (1D-EPSI) encoding technique. Rate constants were estimated by fitting a set of exponential equations to the dynamic data. Variations in fitted parameters were used to determine model robustness in 15 mm slices centered on normal rat kidneys. Parameter values were used to investigate differences in metabolism between and within TRAMP and wild type mice. ResultsThe kinetic model was shown here to be robust when fitting data from a rat given similar doses. In normal rats, Michaelis-Menten kinetics were able to describe the dose-response of the fitted exchange rate constants with a 13.65% and 16.75% scaled fitting error (SFE) for kpyr→lac and kpyr→ala, respectively. In TRAMP mice, kpyr→lac increased an average of 94% after up to 23 days of disease progression, whether the mice were untreated or treated with casodex. Parameters estimated from dynamic 13C 1D-EPSI data were able to differentiate anatomical structures within both wild type and TRAMP mice. ConclusionsThe metabolic parameters estimated using this approach may be useful for in vivo monitoring of tumor progression and treatment efficacy, as well as to distinguish between various tissues based on metabolic activity.

  7. Identification of natural metabolites in mixture: a pattern recognition strategy based on (13)C NMR.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Jane; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc; Purson, Sylvain; Hamzaoui, Mahmoud; Borie, Nicolas; Reynaud, Romain; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2014-03-18

    Because of their highly complex metabolite profile, the chemical characterization of bioactive natural extracts usually requires time-consuming multistep purification procedures to achieve the structural elucidation of pure individual metabolites. The aim of the present work was to develop a dereplication strategy for the identification of natural metabolites directly within mixtures. Exploiting the polarity range of metabolites, the principle was to rapidly fractionate a multigram quantity of a crude extract by centrifugal partition extraction (CPE). The obtained fractions of simplified chemical composition were subsequently analyzed by (13)C NMR. After automatic collection and alignment of (13)C signals across spectra, hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) was performed for pattern recognition. As a result, strong correlations between (13)C signals of a single structure within the mixtures of the fraction series were visualized as chemical shift clusters. Each cluster was finally assigned to a molecular structure with the help of a locally built (13)C NMR chemical shift database. The proof of principle of this strategy was achieved on a simple model mixture of commercially available plant secondary metabolites and then applied to a bark extract of the African tree Anogeissus leiocarpus Guill. & Perr. (Combretaceae). Starting from 5 g of this genuine extract, the fraction series was generated by CPE in only 95 min. (13)C NMR analyses of all fractions followed by pattern recognition of (13)C chemical shifts resulted in the unambiguous identification of seven major compounds, namely, sericoside, trachelosperogenin E, ellagic acid, an epimer mixture of (+)-gallocatechin and (-)-epigallocatechin, 3,3'-di-O-methylellagic acid 4'-O-xylopyranoside, and 3,4,3'-tri-O-methylflavellagic acid 4'-O-glucopyranoside. PMID:24555703

  8. {sup 13}C-enrichment at carbons 8 and 2 of uric acid after {sup 13}C-labeled folate dose in man

    SciTech Connect

    Baggott, Joseph E.; Gorman, Gregory S.; Morgan, Sarah L.; Tamura, Tsunenobu . E-mail: tamurat@uab.edu

    2007-09-21

    To evaluate folate-dependent carbon incorporation into the purine ring, we measured {sup 13}C-enrichment independently at C{sub 2} and C{sub 8} of urinary uric acid (the final catabolite of purines) in a healthy male after an independent oral dose of [6RS]-5-[{sup 13}C]-formyltetrahydrofolate ([6RS]-5-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate) or 10-H{sup 13}CO-7,8-dihydrofolate (10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate). The C{sub 2} position was {sup 13}C-enriched more than C{sub 8} after [6RS]-5-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate, and C{sub 2} was exclusively enriched after 10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate. The enrichment of C{sub 2} was greater from [6RS]-5-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate than 10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate using equimolar bioactive doses. Our data suggest that formyl C of [6RS]-10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate was not equally utilized by glycinamide ribotide transformylase (enriches C{sub 8}) and aminoimidazolecarboxamide ribotide (AICAR) transformylase (enriches C{sub 2}), and the formyl C of 10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate was exclusively used by AICAR transformylase. 10-HCO-H{sub 2}folate may function in vivo as the predominant substrate for AICAR transformylase in humans.

  9. Simultaneous steady-state and dynamic 13C NMR can differentiate alternative routes of pyruvate metabolism in living cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chendong; Harrison, Crystal; Jin, Eunsook S; Chuang, David T; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R; Merritt, Matthew E; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2014-02-28

    Metabolic reprogramming facilitates cancer cell growth, so quantitative metabolic flux measurements could produce useful biomarkers. However, current methods to analyze flux in vivo provide either a steady-state overview of relative activities (infusion of (13)C and analysis of extracted metabolites) or a dynamic view of a few reactions (hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy). Moreover, although hyperpolarization has successfully quantified pyruvate-lactate exchanges, its ability to assess mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism is unproven in cancer. Here, we combined (13)C hyperpolarization and isotopomer analysis to quantify multiple fates of pyruvate simultaneously. Two cancer cell lines with divergent pyruvate metabolism were incubated with thermally polarized [3-(13)C]pyruvate for several hours, then briefly exposed to hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate during acquisition of NMR spectra using selective excitation to maximize detection of H[(13)C]O3(-) and [1-(13)C]lactate. Metabolites were then extracted and subjected to isotopomer analysis to determine relative rates of pathways involving [3-(13)C]pyruvate. Quantitation of hyperpolarized H[(13)C]O3(-) provided a single definitive metabolic rate, which was then used to convert relative rates derived from isotopomer analysis into quantitative fluxes. This revealed that H[(13)C]O3(-) appearance reflects activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase rather than pyruvate carboxylation followed by subsequent decarboxylation reactions. Glucose substantially altered [1-(13)C]pyruvate metabolism, enhancing exchanges with [1-(13)C]lactate and suppressing H[(13)C]O3(-) formation. Furthermore, inhibiting Akt, an oncogenic kinase that stimulates glycolysis, reversed these effects, indicating that metabolism of pyruvate by both LDH and pyruvate dehydrogenase is subject to the acute effects of oncogenic signaling on glycolysis. The data suggest that combining (13)C isotopomer analyses and dynamic hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy may enable

  10. Simultaneous Steady-state and Dynamic 13C NMR Can Differentiate Alternative Routes of Pyruvate Metabolism in Living Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chendong; Harrison, Crystal; Jin, Eunsook S.; Chuang, David T.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Merritt, Matthew E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming facilitates cancer cell growth, so quantitative metabolic flux measurements could produce useful biomarkers. However, current methods to analyze flux in vivo provide either a steady-state overview of relative activities (infusion of 13C and analysis of extracted metabolites) or a dynamic view of a few reactions (hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy). Moreover, although hyperpolarization has successfully quantified pyruvate-lactate exchanges, its ability to assess mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism is unproven in cancer. Here, we combined 13C hyperpolarization and isotopomer analysis to quantify multiple fates of pyruvate simultaneously. Two cancer cell lines with divergent pyruvate metabolism were incubated with thermally polarized [3-13C]pyruvate for several hours, then briefly exposed to hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate during acquisition of NMR spectra using selective excitation to maximize detection of H[13C]O3− and [1-13C]lactate. Metabolites were then extracted and subjected to isotopomer analysis to determine relative rates of pathways involving [3-13C]pyruvate. Quantitation of hyperpolarized H[13C]O3− provided a single definitive metabolic rate, which was then used to convert relative rates derived from isotopomer analysis into quantitative fluxes. This revealed that H[13C]O3− appearance reflects activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase rather than pyruvate carboxylation followed by subsequent decarboxylation reactions. Glucose substantially altered [1-13C]pyruvate metabolism, enhancing exchanges with [1-13C]lactate and suppressing H[13C]O3− formation. Furthermore, inhibiting Akt, an oncogenic kinase that stimulates glycolysis, reversed these effects, indicating that metabolism of pyruvate by both LDH and pyruvate dehydrogenase is subject to the acute effects of oncogenic signaling on glycolysis. The data suggest that combining 13C isotopomer analyses and dynamic hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy may enable quantitative flux measurements in

  11. Using Headspace Equilibration to Measure the d13C of Soil-Respired CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, M. A.; Powers, E.; Marshall, J.

    2007-12-01

    Soil respiration is an important component of the global carbon cycle and can account for as much as 70% of ecosystem respiration. Soil gas flux measurements have been combined with stable isotope analysis to examine ecosystem properties and processes such as water-use efficiency and the role of above ground weather in controlling soil respiration. However, current methods of measuring the δ13C of soil-respired CO2 are either inherently inaccurate or time-consuming and tedious. An alternative method of obtaining this value offers a potential solution to these problems. In this method, plastic chambers are fitted with rubber septa to allow for sample collection, then inverted and partially buried in soil. The chamber headspace is allowed to come to equilibrium with soil air. In this study we tested the viability of this method by examining whether frequent resampling of respiration chambers affected δ13C measurements, whether headspace CO2 concentration and δ13C values approached equilibrium asymptotically, and whether simulated and actual diel temperature cycles affected estimates of δ13C. All experiments were conducted on respiration chambers inverted in potting soil and placed in a Conviron growth chamber, with the exception of one field test that was conducted on respiration chambers installed in a Northern Idaho experimental forest. Samples were collected with a syringe and stored in glass vials for analysis by a ratioing mass spectrometer. We found that resampling respiration chambers as frequently as every 10 minutes had no significant effect on final δ13C values, that both chamber CO2 concentrations and δ13C values exhibited an asymptotic approach to equilibrium, and that the equilibrium value was offset from the initial flux by the amount we expected, approximately 4 ‰. However, we also found that diel temperature variation affected both headspace CO2 concentration and δ13C in the lab and in the field. We concluded that if this method is used in

  12. 13C-NMR spectra and contact time experiment for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The T(CP) and T(1p) time constants for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids were determined to be short with T(CP) values ranging from 0.14 ms to 0.53 ms and T(1p) values ranging from 3.3 ms to 5.9 ms. T(CP) or T(1p) time constants at a contact time of 1 ms are favorable for quantification of 13C-NMR spectra. Because of the short T(CP) values, correction factors for signal intensity for various regions of the 13C-NMR spectra would be necessary at contact times greater than 1.1 ms or less than 0.9 ms. T(CP) and T(1p) values have a limited non-homogeneity within Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids. A pulse delay or repeat time of 700 ms is more than adequate for quantification of these 13C-NMR spectra. Paramagnetic effects in these humic substances are precluded due to low inorganic ash contents, low contents of Fe, Mn, and Co, and low organic free-radical contents. The observed T(CP) values suggest that all the carbon types in Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids are fully cross-polarized before significant proton relaxation occurs. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern fulvic acid is similar to most aquatic fulvic acids as it is predominantly aliphatic, low in aromaticity (fa1 = 24), low in phenolic content, high in carboxyl content, and has no resolution of a methoxyl peak. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern humic acid is also similar to most other aquatic humic acids in that it is also predominantly aliphatic, high in aromaticity (fa1 = 38), moderate in phenolic content, moderate in carboxyl content, and has a clear resolution of a methoxyl carbon region. After the consideration of the necessary 13C-NMR experimental conditions, these spectra are considered to be quantitative. With careful consideration of the previously determined 13C-NMR experimental conditions, quantitative spectra can be obtained for humic substances in the future from the HUMEX site. Possible changes in humic substances due to acidification should be determined from 13C-NMR data.

  13. Environmental correlates of large-scale spatial variation in the δ13C of marine animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Carolyn; Jennings, Jon. T. Barry, Simon

    2009-02-01

    Carbon stable isotopes can be used to trace the sources of energy supporting food chains and to estimate the contribution of different sources to a consumer's diet. However, the δ13C signature of a consumer is not sufficient to infer source without an appropriate isotopic baseline, because there is no way to determine if differences in consumer δ13C reflect source changes or baseline variation. Describing isotopic baselines is a considerable challenge when applying stable isotope techniques at large spatial scales and/or to interconnected food chains in open marine environments. One approach is to use filter-feeding consumers to integrate the high frequency and small-scale variation in the isotopic signature of phytoplankton and provide a surrogate baseline, but it can be difficult to sample a single consumer species at large spatial scales owing to rarity and/or discontinuous distribution. Here, we use the isotopic signature of a widely distributed filter-feeder (the queen scallop Aequipecten opercularis) in the north-eastern Atlantic to develop a model linking base δ13C to environmental variables. Remarkably, a single variable model based on bottom temperature has good predictive power and predicts scallop δ13C with mean error of only 0.6‰ (3%). When the model was used to predict an isotopic baseline in parts of the overall study region where scallop were not consistently sampled, the model accounted for 76% and 79% of the large-scale spatial variability (10 1-10 4 km) of the δ13C of two fish species (dab Limanda limanda and whiting Merlangus merlangius) and 44% of the δ13C variability in a mixed fish community. The results show that source studies would be significantly biased if a single baseline were applied to food webs at larger scales. Further, when baseline δ13C cannot be directly measured, a calculated baseline value can eliminate a large proportion of the unexplained variation in δ13C at higher trophic levels.

  14. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for the cyanine dyes SYBR Safe and thiazole orange.

    PubMed

    Evenson, William E; Boden, Lauren M; Muzikar, Katy A; O'Leary, Daniel J

    2012-12-01

    Analysis of (1)H and (13)C NMR and mass spectral data for the fluorescent nucleic acid stain SYBR Safe indicates that it contains a cyanine-based cationic core structure identical to thiazole orange. The difference between these two compounds is the type of N-substitution on the quinolinium ring system (SYBR Safe, n-Pr; thiazole orange, Me). The (1)H and (13)C NMR resonances for both compounds were assigned on the basis of one- and two-dimensional (COSY, ROESY, HSQC, and HMBC) experiments. The preferred conformation of these compounds was computed by ab initio methods and found to be consistent with the NMR data.

  15. Coupling aboveground and belowground activities using short term fluctuations in 13C composition of soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Parent, F.; Grossiord, C.; Plain, C.; Longdoz, B.; Granier, A.

    2011-12-01

    There is a growing amount of evidence that belowground processes in forest ecosystems are tightly coupled to aboveground activities. Soil CO2 efflux, the largest flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, is dominated by root respiration and by respiration of microorganisms that find the carbohydrates required to fulfil their energetic costs in the rhizosphere. A close coupling between aboveground photosynthetic activity and soil CO2 efflux is therefore expected. The isotopic signature of photosynthates varies with time because photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination is dynamically controlled by environmental factors. This temporal variation of δ13C of photosynthate is thought to be transferred along the tree-soil continuum and it will be retrieved in soil CO2 efflux after a time lag that reflects the velocity of carbon transport from canopy to belowground. However, isotopic signature of soil CO2 efflux is not solely affected by photosynthetic carbon discrimination, bur also by post photosynthetic fractionation, and especially by fractionation processes affecting CO2 during the transport from soil layers to surface. Tunable diode laser spectrometry is a useful tool to quantify short-term variation in δ13C of soil CO2 efflux and of CO2 in the soil atmosphere. We set up hydrophobic tubes to measure the vertical profile of soil CO2 concentration and its δ13C composition in a temperate beech forest, and we monitored simultaneously δ13C of trunk and soil CO2 efflux, δ13C of phloem exudate and δ13C of leaf sugars. We evidenced that temporal changes in δ13C of soil CO2 and soil CO2 efflux reflected changes in environmental conditions that affect photosynthetic discrimination and that soil CO2 was 4.4% enriched compared to soil CO2 efflux according to diffusion fractionation. However, this close coupling can be disrupted when advective transport of CO2 took place. We also reported evidences that temporal variations in the isotopic composition of soil CO2 efflux reflect

  16. BEBE(tr) and BUBI: J-compensated concurrent shaped pulses for 1H-13C experiments.

    PubMed

    Ehni, Sebastian; Luy, Burkhard

    2013-07-01

    Shaped pulses designed for broadband excitation, inversion and refocusing are important tools in modern NMR spectroscopy to achieve robust pulse sequences especially in heteronuclear correlation experiments. A large variety of mostly computer-optimized pulse shapes exist for different desired bandwidths, available rf-field strengths, and tolerance to B1-inhomogeneity. They are usually derived for a single spin 1/2, neglecting evolution due to J-couplings. While pulses with constant resulting phase are selfcompensated for heteronuclear coupling evolution as long as they are applied exclusively on a single nucleus, the situation changes for concurrently applied pulse shapes. Using the example of a (1)H,(13)C two spin system, two J-compensated pulse pairs for the application in INEPT-type transfer elements were optimized: a point-to-point pulse sandwich called BEBE(tr), consisting of a broadband excitation and time-reversed excitation pulse, and a combined universal rotation and point-to-point pulse pair called BUBI, which acts as a refocusing pulse on (1)H and a corresponding inversion pulse on (13)C. After a derivation of quality factors and optimization protocols, a theoretical and experimental comparison with conventionally derived BEBOP, BIBOP, and BURBOP-180° pulses is given. While the overall transfer efficiency of a single pulse pair is only reduced by approximately 0.1%, resulting transfer to undesired coherences is reduced by several percent. In experiments this can lead to undesired phase distortions for pairs of uncompensated pulse shapes and even differences in signal intensities of 5-10% in HSQC and up to 68% in more complex COB-HSQC experiments.

  17. Methyl [13C]glucopyranosiduronic acids: effect of COOH ionization and exocyclic structure on NMR spin-couplings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhui; Hu, Xiaosong; Carmichael, Ian; Serianni, Anthony S

    2012-11-01

    Methyl α- and β-D-glucopyranuronides singly labeled with (13)C at C1-C6 were prepared from the corresponding (13)C-labeled methyl D-glucopyranosides, and multiple NMR J-couplings (J(HH), J(CH), and J(CC)) were measured in their protonated and ionized forms in aqueous ((2)H(2)O) solution. Solvated density functional theory (DFT) calculations of J-couplings in structurally related model compounds were performed to determine how well the calculated J-couplings matched the experimental values in saccharides bearing an ionizable substituent. Intraring J(HH) values in both uronide anomers, including (3)J(H4,H5), are unaffected by solution pD, and COOH ionization exerts little effect on J(CH) and J(CC) except for (1)J(C1,H1), (1)J(C4,H4), (1)J(C5,H5), (1)J(C5,C6), and (2)J(C3,C5), where changes of up to 5 Hz were observed. Some of these changes are associated with changes in bond lengths upon ionization; in general, better agreement between theory and experiment was observed for couplings less sensitive to exocyclic C-O bond conformation. Titration of (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts, and some J-couplings, yielded a COOH pK(a) of 3.0 ± 0.1 in both anomers. DFT calculations suggest that substituents proximal to the exocyclic COOH group (i.e., the C4-O4 bond) influence the activation barrier to C5-C6 bond rotation due to transient intramolecular H-bonding. A comparison of J-couplings in the glucopyranuronides to corresponding J-couplings in the glucopyranosides showed that more pervasive changes occur upon conversion from a COOH to a CH(2)OH substituent at C6 than from COOH ionization within the uronides. Twelve J-couplings are affected, with the largest being (1)J(C5,C6) (∼18 Hz larger in the uronides), followed by (2)J(C6,H5) (∼2.5 Hz more negative in the uronides).

  18. Spatio-temporal variability of Δ13C in tree-rings of Aleppo pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Castillo, Jorge; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Voltas, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    Aim: To study the spatiotemporal variability of Δ13C using a tree-ring network of Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill.) in the eastern part of the Iberian Peninsula. In this study, we tried to understand some of the environmental drivers behind changes in Δ13C as well as to decide the most optimal sites to infer paleoclimatic information using such variables. We also try to understand key physiological aspects of P. halepensis. Methods: In order to do that, we have collected biannual Δ13C time series (1950-1998) together with mean annual precipitation (MAP), tree-ring width (TRW) and remote sensing (NDVI) data, for 7 different locations along a precipitation gradient. We assessed how correlations between variables changed along that gradient. In addition to that, we have also looked at how that precipitation gradient changed along the years and thus its relationships with the Δ13C at the spatial level, giving us an idea whether changes in MAP at each site could affect the relationship between these two variables. Results: We found that a log model better explains the relationship between Δ13C and MAP and that it reaches a saturation point at values above 800 mm of MAP. Similarly, we found that, in the drier sites, correlations between Δ13C and precipitation were higher than in wetter ones. In addition, the coefficient of variation (CV) of Δ13C was a good indicator of the correlation between Δ13C and MAP. Similarly, the mean and the CV of TRW and summer NDVI were good indicators of the level of such correlation between Δ13C and MAP. On the other hand, the inter-site analysis of the data suggested that during dry years exists a stronger relationship between Δ13C and precipitation than in wet years. Discussion: Our results pointed out that the threshold for water limitation for Aleppo pine was around MAP=800 mm, an amount that might be sufficient for the tree to grow during most of the growing season without altering its water use efficiency (WUE) by closing

  19. Pre-treatment Effects on Coral Skeletal δ 13C and δ 18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottoli, A. G.; Gibb, O.; Wellington, G. M.

    2003-12-01

    Pre-treatment protocols for coral skeletal stable carbon (δ 13C) and oxygen (δ 18O) isotope analyses include no treatment, bleach (NaOH), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), or vacuum roasting prior to analysis. Such pre-treatments are used to remove organic material prior to isotopic analyses. Researchers that do not pre-treat samples argue that such treatments result in non-linear shifts in coral skeletal δ 13C and δ 18O thus increasing the analytical error in the δ 13C and δ 18O values. Vacuum roasting does cause isotopic shifts and is no longer practiced. However, both no pre-treatment and pre-treatment (with either NaOH or H2O2) coral δ 13C and δ 18O values continue to be published in the literature. In all previous studies of the effects of NaOH and H2O2 pre-treatments on coral δ 13C and δ 18O, the samples sizes were typically small and the exact time interval being sampled and compared was not specifically controlled. Here, we evaluated the effects of NaOH and H2O2 pre-treatments on coral skeletal δ 13C and δ 18O in Pavona clavus and Pavona gigantea from Panama, and Porites compressa from Hawaii. In Panama, at least five coral fragments from five different colonies of each species were stained on November 1978 and April 1979 then collected in November 1979. In Hawaii, at least five coral fragments from five different colonies at 1.7 and 7 m depths were stained on 1 September and 21 November 1996 then collected 2 March 1997. For each fragment, a bulk skeletal sample was extracted representing the entire growth interval between the two stain lines yielding at least 24 mg of material. Sampling between the stain lines ensured that all of the fragments from a given site and species were sampled over the same time interval and avoided any potential contamination from the tissue layer. Eight milligram subsamples from each fragment were subjected to 24 hours of the following treatments: NaOH, H2O2, Milli-Q filtered water (control), or no pre-treatment (control

  20. OpenMebius: An Open Source Software for Isotopically Nonstationary 13C-Based Metabolic Flux Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Furusawa, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of metabolic flux by 13C-based metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) provides valuable information regarding cell physiology. Bioinformatics tools have been developed to estimate metabolic flux distributions from the results of tracer isotopic labeling experiments using a 13C-labeled carbon source. Metabolic flux is determined by nonlinear fitting of a metabolic model to the isotopic labeling enrichment of intracellular metabolites measured by mass spectrometry. Whereas 13C-MFA is conventionally performed under isotopically constant conditions, isotopically nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis (INST-13C-MFA) has recently been developed for flux analysis of cells with photosynthetic activity and cells at a quasi-steady metabolic state (e.g., primary cells or microorganisms under stationary phase). Here, the development of a novel open source software for INST-13C-MFA on the Windows platform is reported. OpenMebius (Open source software for Metabolic flux analysis) provides the function of autogenerating metabolic models for simulating isotopic labeling enrichment from a user-defined configuration worksheet. Analysis using simulated data demonstrated the applicability of OpenMebius for INST-13C-MFA. Confidence intervals determined by INST-13C-MFA were less than those determined by conventional methods, indicating the potential of INST-13C-MFA for precise metabolic flux analysis. OpenMebius is the open source software for the general application of INST-13C-MFA. PMID:25006579

  1. OpenMebius: an open source software for isotopically nonstationary 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Kajihata, Shuichi; Furusawa, Chikara; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of metabolic flux by (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) provides valuable information regarding cell physiology. Bioinformatics tools have been developed to estimate metabolic flux distributions from the results of tracer isotopic labeling experiments using a (13)C-labeled carbon source. Metabolic flux is determined by nonlinear fitting of a metabolic model to the isotopic labeling enrichment of intracellular metabolites measured by mass spectrometry. Whereas (13)C-MFA is conventionally performed under isotopically constant conditions, isotopically nonstationary (13)C metabolic flux analysis (INST-(13)C-MFA) has recently been developed for flux analysis of cells with photosynthetic activity and cells at a quasi-steady metabolic state (e.g., primary cells or microorganisms under stationary phase). Here, the development of a novel open source software for INST-(13)C-MFA on the Windows platform is reported. OpenMebius (Open source software for Metabolic flux analysis) provides the function of autogenerating metabolic models for simulating isotopic labeling enrichment from a user-defined configuration worksheet. Analysis using simulated data demonstrated the applicability of OpenMebius for INST-(13)C-MFA. Confidence intervals determined by INST-(13)C-MFA were less than those determined by conventional methods, indicating the potential of INST-(13)C-MFA for precise metabolic flux analysis. OpenMebius is the open source software for the general application of INST-(13)C-MFA.

  2. Economical synthesis of 13C-labeled opiates, cocaine derivatives and selected urinary metabolites by derivatization of the natural products.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, Huiling; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2015-01-01

    The illegal use of opiates and cocaine is a challenge world-wide, but some derivatives are also valuable pharmaceuticals. Reference samples of the active ingredients and their metabolites are needed both for controlling administration in the clinic and to detect drugs of abuse. Especially, (13)C-labeled compounds are useful for identification and quantification purposes by mass spectroscopic techniques, potentially increasing accuracy by minimizing ion alteration/suppression effects. Thus, the synthesis of [acetyl-(13)C4]heroin, [acetyl-(13)C4-methyl-(13)C]heroin, [acetyl-(13)C2-methyl-(13)C]6-acetylmorphine, [N-methyl-(13)C-O-metyl-(13)C]codeine and phenyl-(13)C6-labeled derivatives of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine and cocaethylene was undertaken to provide such reference materials. The synthetic work has focused on identifying (13)C atom-efficient routes towards these derivatives. Therefore, the (13)C-labeled opiates and cocaine derivatives were made from the corresponding natural products. PMID:25816077

  3. Leaf and twig delta13C during growth in relation to biochemical composition and respired CO2.

    PubMed

    Eglin, Thomas; Fresneau, Chantal; Lelarge-Trouverie, Caroline; Francois, Christophe; Damesin, Claire

    2009-06-01

    In deciduous trees, the delta(13)C values of leaves are known to diverge during growth from those of woody organs. The main purpose of this study is to determine whether the divergence in delta(13)C between leaves and current-year twigs of Fagus sylvatica (L.) is influenced by changes (i) in the relative contents of organic matter fractions and (ii) in the delta(13)C of respired CO(2). The delta(13)C values of bulk matter, extractive-free matter, lignin, holocellulose, starch, soluble sugars, water-soluble fraction and respired CO(2), as well as their relative contents in bulk matter were determined. The delta(13)C values of biochemical fractions and respired CO(2) showed very similar temporal variations for both leaves and twigs. Variations in bulk matter delta(13)C during growth were, therefore, poorly explained by changes in biochemical composition or in respiratory fractionation and were attributed to the transition from (13)C-enriched reserves (mainly starch) to (13)C-depleted new photoassimilates. The divergence between leaves and twigs was related to higher values of soluble sugar delta(13)C in twigs. However, the difference between lignin and holocellulose delta(13)C varied during growth. This phenomenon was attributed to the delay between holocellulose and lignin deposition. These results may have implications for analysis of organic matter delta(13)C in trees and forest ecosystems.

  4. The Late Devonian Frasnian-Famennian (F/F) biotic crisis: Insights from δ13C carb, δ13C org and 87Sr / 86Sr isotopic systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daizhao; Qing, Hairuo; Li, Renwei

    2005-06-01

    A severe biotic crisis occurred during the Late Devonian Frasnian-Famennian (F/F) transition (± 367 Myr). Here we present δ13C carb, δ13C org and 87Sr / 86Sr isotopic systematics, from identical samples of two sections across F/F boundary in South China, which directly demonstrate large and frequent climatic fluctuations (˜200 kyr) from warming to cooling during the F/F transition. These climate fluctuations are interpreted to have been induced initially by increased volcanic outgassing, and subsequent enhanced chemical weathering linked to the rapid expansion of vascular plants on land, which would have increased riverine delivery to oceans and primary bioproductivity, and subsequent burial of organic matter, thereby resulting in climate cooling. Such large and frequent climatic fluctuations, together with volcanic-induced increases in nutrient (e.g., biolimiting Fe), toxin (sulfide) and anoxic water supply, and subsequent enhanced riverine fluxes and microbial bloom, were likely responsible for the stepwise faunal demise of F/F biotic crisis.

  5. Triple resonance experiments for aligned sample solid-state NMR of 13C and 15N labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Neeraj; Grant, Christopher V.; Park, Sang Ho; Brown, Jonathan Miles; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Initial steps in the development of a suite of triple-resonance 1H/13C/15N solid-state NMR experiments applicable to aligned samples of 13C and 15N labeled proteins are described. The experiments take advantage of the opportunities for 13C detection without the need for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling presented by samples with two different patterns of isotopic labeling. In one type of sample, the proteins are ~20% randomly labeled with 13C in all backbone and side chain carbon sites and ~100% uniformly 15N labeled in all nitrogen sites; in the second type of sample, the peptides and proteins are 13C labeled at only the α-carbon and 15N labeled at the amide nitrogen of a few residues. The requirement for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling while detecting 13C signals is avoided in the first case because of the low probability of any two 13C nuclei being bonded to each other; in the second case, the labeled 13Cα sites are separated by at least three bonds in the polypeptide chain. The experiments enable the measurement of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C and 15N–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies associated with the 13Cα and 13C′ backbone sites, which provide orientation constraints complementary to those derived from the 15N labeled amide backbone sites. 13C/13C spin-exchange experiments identify proximate carbon sites. The ability to measure 13C–15N dipolar coupling frequencies and correlate 13C and 15N resonances provides a mechanism for making backbone resonance assignments. Three-dimensional combinations of these experiments ensure that the resolution, assignment, and measurement of orientationally dependent frequencies can be extended to larger proteins. Moreover, measurements of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies for nearly all side chain sites enable the complete three-dimensional structures of proteins to be determined with this approach. PMID:17293139

  6. Determination of the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon in water; RSIL lab code 1710

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singleton, Glenda L.; Revesz, Kinga; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 1710 is to present a method to determine the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of water. The DIC of water is precipitated using ammoniacal strontium chloride (SrCl2) solution to form strontium carbonate (SrCO3). The δ13C is analyzed by reacting SrCO3 with 100-percent phosphoric acid (H3PO4) to liberate carbon quantitatively as carbon dioxide (CO2), which is collected, purified by vacuum sublimation, and analyzed by dual inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (DI-IRMS). The DI-IRMS is a DuPont double-focusing mass spectrometer. One ion beam passes through a slit in a forward collector and is collected in the rear collector. The other measurable ion beams are collected in the front collector. By changing the ion-accelerating voltage under computer control, the instrument is capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 45 or 46 in the rear collector and m/z 44 and 46 or 44 and 45, respectively, in the front collector. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z 44 = CO2 = 12C16O16O, m/z 45 = CO2 = 13C16O16O primarily, and m/z 46 = CO2 = 12C16O18O primarily. The data acquisition and control software calculates δ13C values.

  7. Strength and limits using 13C phospholipid fatty acid analysis in soil ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watzinger, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    This presentation on microbial phospholipid biomarkers, their isotope analysis and their ability to reveal soil functions summarizes experiences gained by the author for more than 10 years. The amount and composition of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) measured in environmental samples strongly depend on the methodology. To achieve comparable results the extraction, separation and methylation method must be kept constant. PLFAs patterns are sensitive to microbial community shifts even though the taxonomic resolution of PLFAs is low. The possibility to easily link lipid biomarkers with stable isotope techniques is identified as a major advantage when addressing soil functions. Measurement of PLFA isotopic ratios is sensitive and enables detecting isotopic fractionation. The difference between the carbon isotopic ratio of single PLFAs and their substrate (δ13C) can vary between -6 and +11‰. This difference derives from the fractionation during biosynthesis and from substrate inhomogeneity. Consequently, natural abundance studies are restricted to quantifying substrate uptake of the total microbial biomass. In contrast, artificial labelling enables quantifying carbon uptake into single PLFAs, but labelling success depends on homogeneous and undisturbed label application. Current developments in microbial ecology (e.g. 13C and 15N proteomics) and isotope techniques (online monitoring of CO2 isotope ratios) will likely improve soil functional interpretations in the future. 13C PLFA analysis will continue to contribute because it is affordable, sensitive and allows frequent sampling combined with the use of small amounts of 13C label.

  8. Differential growth of the fungus Absidia cylindrospora on 13C/15N-labelled media.

    PubMed

    Crotty, F V; Blackshaw, R P; Murray, P J

    2011-06-15

    Many studies utilise enrichment of stable isotopes as tracers to follow the interactions occurring within soil food webs and methods have been developed to enrich bacteria, soil fauna and plant litter, Here for the first time we attempt to enrich a soil fungus to 99 atom% with (13)C and (15)N stable isotopes. In this study our objectives were to (a) assess whether the saprotrophic zygomycete fungus Absidia cylindrospora could grow on a medium enriched to 99 atom% with (13)C-glucose and (15)N-ammonium chloride, (b) to determine the level of enrichment obtained, and (c) to examine the change in growth rate of this fungus while it was growing on the dually enriched medium. To achieve this, the fungus was grown on agar enriched with (13)C and (15)N to 99 atom% and its growth rate monitored. The results showed that A. cylindrospora would grow on the highly labelled growth medium, but that its rate of growth was affected compared with the rate on either natural abundance media or media highly enriched with a single isotope ((13)C or (15)N). The implications of these results is that although the fungus is able to utilise these heavier isotopes, the biochemical processes involved in growth are affected, and consideration should be given to these differences when using stable isotope tracers in, for example, soil food web studies.

  9. Critical appraisal of 13C breath tests for microsomal liver function: aminopyrine revisited.

    PubMed

    Pijls, Kirsten E; de Vries, Hanne; Nikkessen, Suzan; Bast, Aalt; Wodzig, Will K W H; Koek, Ger H

    2014-04-01

    As liver diseases are a major health problem and especially the incidence of metabolic liver diseases like non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rising, the demand for non-invasive tests is growing to replace liver biopsy. Non-invasive tests such as carbon-labelled breath tests can provide a valuable contribution to the evaluation of metabolic liver function. This review aims to critically appraise the value of the (13) C-labelled microsomal breath tests for the evaluation of metabolic liver function, and to discuss the role of cytochrome P450 enzymes in the metabolism of the different probe drugs, especially of aminopyrine. Although a number of different probe drugs have been used in breath tests, the perfect drug to assess the functional metabolic capacity of the liver has not been found. Data suggest that both the (13) C(2) -aminopyrine and the (13) C-methacetin breath test can play a role in assessing the capacity of the microsomal liver function and may be useful in the follow-up of patients with chronic liver diseases. Furthermore, CYP2C19 seems to be an important enzyme in the N-demethylation of aminopyrine, and polymorphisms in this gene may influence breath test values, which should be kept in mind when performing the (13) C(2) -aminopyrine breath test in clinical practice.

  10. First airborne samples of a volcanic plume for δ13C of CO2 determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Tobias P.; Lopez, Taryn M.

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic degassing is one of the main natural sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. Carbon isotopes of volcanic gases enable the determination of CO2 sources including mantle, organic or carbonate sediments, and atmosphere. Until recently, this work required sample collection from vents followed by laboratory analyses. Isotope ratio infrared analyzers now enable rapid analyses of plume δ13C-CO2, in situ and in real time. Here we report the first analyses of δ13C-CO2 from airborne samples. These data combined with plume samples from the vent area enable extrapolation to the volcanic source δ13C. We performed our experiment at the previously unsampled and remote Kanaga Volcano in the Western Aleutians. We find a δ13C source composition of -4.4‰, suggesting that CO2 from Kanaga is primarily sourced from the upper mantle with minimal contributions from subducted components. Our method is widely applicable to volcanoes where remote location or activity level precludes sampling using traditional methods.

  11. 13C Tracking after 13CO2 Supply Revealed Diurnal Patterns of Wood Formation in Aspen.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, Amir; Linden, Pernilla; Hedenström, Mattias; Moritz, Thomas; Niittylä, Totte

    2015-06-01

    Wood of trees is formed from carbon assimilated in the photosynthetic tissues. Determining the temporal dynamics of carbon assimilation, subsequent transport into developing wood, and incorporation to cell walls would further our understanding of wood formation in particular and tree growth in general. To investigate these questions, we designed a (13)CO2 labeling system to study carbon transport and incorporation to developing wood of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides). Tracking of (13)C incorporation to wood over a time course using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed diurnal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis. The dark period had a differential effect on (13)C incorporation to lignin and cell wall carbohydrates. No (13)C was incorporated into aromatic amino acids of cell wall proteins in the dark, suggesting that cell wall protein biosynthesis ceased during the night. The results show previously unrecognized temporal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis, suggest diurnal cycle as a possible cue in the regulation of carbon incorporation to wood, and establish a unique (13)C labeling method for the analysis of wood formation and secondary growth in trees.

  12. 13C-n.m.r. analysis of some sulphate derivatives of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Hirano, S; Hasegawa, M; Kinugawa, J

    1991-10-01

    Positions of substitution with sulphate in three water-soluble sulphated derivatives of chitosan were analysed by 13C n.m.r. The structures of N-acetylchitosan 3,6-O-disulphate, sodium chitosan N-, 6-O-disulphate, and sodium chitosan 6-O-monosulphate were confirmed.

  13. Ethane's 12C/13C Ratio in Titan: Implications for Methane Replenishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Nixon, C. A.; Romani, P. N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Sada, P. V.; Lunsford, A. W.; Boyle, R. J.; Hesman, B. E.; McCabe, G. H.

    2009-09-01

    As the main destination of carbon in the destruction of methane in the atmosphere of Titan, ethane provides information about the carbon isotopic composition of the reservoir from which methane is replenished. If the amount of methane entering the atmosphere is presently equal to the amount converted to ethane, the 12C/13C ratio in ethane should be close to the ratio in the reservoir. We have measured the 12C/13C ratio in ethane both with Cassini CIRS1 and from the ground2 and find that it is very close to the telluric standard and outer planet values (89), consistent with a primordial origin for the methane reservoir. The lower 12C/13C ratio measured for methane by Huygens GCMS (82.3) can be explained if the conversion of CH4 to CH3 (and C2H6) favors 12C over 13C with a carbon kinetic isotope effect of 1.08. The time required for the atmospheric methane to reach equilibrium, i.e., for replenishment to equal destruction, is approximately 5 methane atmospheric lifetimes. 1Nixon et al., Icarus 195, 778 (2008). 2Jennings et al., Journal of Physical Chemistry A, in press (2009).

  14. 26. EAST (CANADIAN) APPROACH TO BRIDGE, SHOWING FOURLEG BENT C13C14 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. EAST (CANADIAN) APPROACH TO BRIDGE, SHOWING FOUR-LEG BENT C13-C14 AT CENTER. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Blue Water Bridge, Spanning St. Clair River at I-69, I-94, & Canadian Route 402, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  15. 13CFLUX2—high-performance software suite for 13C-metabolic flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weitzel, Michael; Nöh, Katharina; Dalman, Tolga; Niedenführ, Sebastian; Stute, Birgit; Wiechert, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Summary: 13C-based metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) is the state-of-the-art method to quantitatively determine in vivo metabolic reaction rates in microorganisms. 13CFLUX2 contains all tools for composing flexible computational 13C-MFA workflows to design and evaluate carbon labeling experiments. A specially developed XML language, FluxML, highly efficient data structures and simulation algorithms achieve a maximum of performance and effectiveness. Support of multicore CPUs, as well as compute clusters, enables scalable investigations. 13CFLUX2 outperforms existing tools in terms of universality, flexibility and built-in features. Therewith, 13CFLUX2 paves the way for next-generation high-resolution 13C-MFA applications on the large scale. Availability and implementation: 13CFLUX2 is implemented in C++ (ISO/IEC 14882 standard) with Java and Python add-ons to run under Linux/Unix. A demo version and binaries are available at www.13cflux.net. Contact: info@13cflux.net or k.noeh@fz-juelich.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23110970

  16. In vivo 13C NMR metabolite profiling: potential for understanding and assessing conifer seed quality.

    PubMed

    Terskikh, Victor V; Feurtado, J Allan; Borchardt, Shane; Giblin, Michael; Abrams, Suzanne R; Kermode, Allison R

    2005-08-01

    High-resolution 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy was used to profile a range of primary and secondary metabolites in vivo in intact whole seeds of eight different conifer species native to North America, including six of the Pinaceae family and two of the Cupressaceae family. In vivo 13C NMR provided information on the total seed oil content and fatty acid composition of the major storage lipids in a non-destructive manner. In addition, a number of monoterpenes were identified in the 13C NMR spectra of conifer seeds containing oleoresin; these compounds showed marked variability in individual seeds of Pacific silver fir within the same seed lot. In imbibed conifer seeds, the 13C NMR spectra showed the presence of considerable amounts of dissolved sucrose presumed to play a protective role in the desiccation-tolerance of seeds. The free amino acids arginine and asparagine, generated as a result of storage protein mobilization, were detected in vivo during seed germination and early seedling growth. The potential for NMR to profile metabolites in a non-destructive manner in single conifer seeds and seed populations is discussed. It is a powerful tool to evaluate seed quality because of its ability to assess reserve accumulation during seed development or at seed maturity; it can also be used to monitor reserve mobilization, which is critical for seedling emergence. PMID:15996983

  17. Quantitative identification of metastable magnesium carbonate minerals by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Surface, J Andrew; Brenner, Allison; Wang, Louis S; Skemer, Philip; Conradi, Mark S; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-01-01

    In the conversion of CO2 to mineral carbonates for the permanent geosequestration of CO2, there are multiple magnesium carbonate phases that are potential reaction products. Solid-state (13)C NMR is demonstrated as an effective tool for distinguishing magnesium carbonate phases and quantitatively characterizing magnesium carbonate mixtures. Several of these mineral phases include magnesite, hydromagnesite, dypingite, and nesquehonite, which differ in composition by the number of waters of hydration or the number of crystallographic hydroxyl groups. These carbonates often form in mixtures with nearly overlapping (13)C NMR resonances which makes their identification and analysis difficult. In this study, these phases have been investigated with solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy, including both static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments. Static spectra yield chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) lineshapes that are indicative of the site-symmetry variations of the carbon environments. MAS spectra yield isotropic chemical shifts for each crystallographically inequivalent carbon and spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, yield characteristic information that assist in species discrimination. These detailed parameters, and the combination of static and MAS analyses, can aid investigations of mixed carbonates by (13)C NMR.

  18. Characterizing biomass fast pyrolysis oils by 13C-NMR and chemometric analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several biomass fast pyrolysis oils were characterized by 13C and DEPT NMR analysis to determine chemical functional group compositions as related to their energy content. Pyrolysis oils were produced from a variety of feedstocks including energy crops, woods, animal wastes and oil seed presscakes,...

  19. Methylation patterns of aquatic humic substances determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Steelink, C.; Wershaw, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectroscopy is used to examine the hydroxyl group functionality of a series of humic and fulvic acids from different aquatic environments. Samples first are methylated with 13C-labeled diazomethane. The NMR spectra of the diazomethylated samples allow one to distinguish between methyl esters of carboxylic acids, methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls, and methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls adjacent to two substituents. Samples are then permethylated with 13C-labeled methyl iodide/NaH. 13C NMR spectra of permethylated samples show that a significant fraction of the hydroxyl groups is not methylated with diazomethane alone. In these spectra methyl ethers of carbohydrate and aliphatic hydroxyls overlap with methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls. Side reactions of the methyltion procedure including carbon methylation in the CH3I/NaH procedure, are also examined. Humic and fulvic acids from bog, swamp, groundwater, and lake waters showssome differences in their distribution of hydroxyl groups, mainly in the concentrations of phenolic hydroxyls, which may be attributed to their different biogeochemical origins. ?? 1987.

  20. Carbon fluxes to the soil in a mature temperate forest assessed by 13C isotope tracing.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Katharina; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Saurer, Matthias; Körner, Christian

    2004-11-01

    Photosynthetic carbon uptake and respiratory C release from soil are major components of the global carbon balance. The use of 13C depleted CO2)(delta13C = -30 per thousand) in a free air CO2 enrichment experiment in a mature deciduous forest permitted us to trace the carbon transfer from tree crowns to the rhizosphere of 100-120 years old trees. During the first season of CO2 enrichment the CO2 released from soil originated substantially from concurrent assimilation. The small contribution of recent carbon in fine roots suggests a much slower fine root turnover than is often assumed. 13C abundance in soil air correlated best with temperature data taken from 4 to 10 days before air sampling time and is thus rapidly available for root and rhizosphere respiration. The spatial variability of delta13C in soil air showed relationships to above ground tree types such as conifers versus broad-leaved trees. Considering the complexity and strong overlap of roots from different individuals in a forest, this finding opens an exciting new possibility of associating respiration with different species. What might be seen as signal noise does in fact contain valuable information on the spatial heterogeneity of tree-soil interaction.

  1. Loggerhead turtle movements reconstructed from 18O and 13C profiles from commensal barnacle shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killingley, John S.; Lutcavage, Molly

    1983-03-01

    Commensal barnacles, Chelonibia testudinaria, from logger-head turtles have 18O and 13C variations in their calcitic shells that record the environments in which the turtles live. Isotopic profiles from the barnacle shells can thus be interpreted to reconstruct movements of the host turtle between open ocean and brackish-water regimes.

  2. Assessment of liver function in dogs using the 13C-galactose breath test.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Wyse, C A; Goodfellow, M R; Yam, P S; Preston, T; Papasouliotis, K; Hall, E J

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of the 13C-galactose breath test (13C-GBT) in assessing canine liver function by applying it to a group of healthy dogs, and to a group with clinicopathological evidence of liver dysfunction. Breath samples were collected 30 min before ingestion of 13C-galactose, and then at regular intervals thereafter for 6 h. The proportion of 13CO2/12CO2 in the breath samples was measured by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. There was no significant difference in recovery of 13CO2 in the diseased group, compared to the healthy controls, but there was considerable inter-subject variation in both groups, possibly due to differences in the rate of gastric emptying, which could preclude detection of alterations in hepatic metabolism of galactose. The results of this study do not support the application of the 13C-GBT for assessment of canine liver function. PMID:19546016

  3. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for ten phenylpiperazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhihui; Yuan, Mu; Zhang, Si; Wu, Jun; Qi, Shuhua; Li, Qingxin

    2005-10-01

    Ten phenylpiperazine derivatives were designed and synthesized. The first complete assignments of (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts for these phenylpiperazine derivatives were achieved by means of 1D and 2D NMR techniques, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra.

  4. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for 10 phenylethanoid glycosides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Huang, Jianshe; Xiao, Qiang; Zhang, Si; Xiao, Zhihui; Li, Qingxin; Long, Lijuan; Huang, Liangmin

    2004-07-01

    Ten phenylethanoid glycosides, including two new ones, isolated from the aerial parts of the mangrove plant Acanthus ilicifolius were identified. The first complete assignments of the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for these glycosides were achieved by means of 2D NMR techniques, including 1H-1H COSY, TOCSY, HSQC and HMBC spectra.

  5. Coral 13C/12C records of vertical seafloor displacement during megathrust earthquakes west of Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagan, Michael K.; Sosdian, Sindia M.; Scott-Gagan, Heather; Sieh, Kerry; Hantoro, Wahyoe S.; Natawidjaja, Danny H.; Briggs, Richard W.; Suwargadi, Bambang W.; Rifai, Hamdi

    2015-12-01

    The recent surge of megathrust earthquakes and tsunami disasters has highlighted the need for a comprehensive understanding of earthquake cycles along convergent plate boundaries. Space geodesy has been used to document recent crustal deformation patterns with unprecedented precision, however the production of long paleogeodetic records of vertical seafloor motion is still a major challenge. Here we show that carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the skeletons of massive Porites corals from west Sumatra record abrupt changes in light exposure resulting from coseismic seafloor displacements. Validation of the method is based on the coral δ13C response to uplift (and subsidence) produced by the March 2005 Mw 8.6 Nias-Simeulue earthquake, and uplift further south around Sipora Island during a M ∼ 8.4 megathrust earthquake in February 1797. At Nias, the average step-change in coral δ13C was 0.6 ± 0.1 ‰ /m for coseismic displacements of +1.8 m and -0.4 m in 2005. At Sipora, a distinct change in Porites microatoll growth morphology marks coseismic uplift of 0.7 m in 1797. In this shallow water setting, with a steep light attenuation gradient, the step-change in microatoll δ13C is 2.3 ‰ /m, nearly four times greater than for the Nias Porites. Considering the natural variability in coral skeletal δ13C, we show that the lower detection limit of the method is around 0.2 m of vertical seafloor motion. Analysis of vertical displacement for well-documented earthquakes suggests this sensitivity equates to shallow events exceeding Mw ∼ 7.2 in central megathrust and back-arc thrust fault settings. Our findings indicate that the coral 13C /12C paleogeodesy technique could be applied to convergent tectonic margins throughout the tropical western Pacific and eastern Indian oceans, which host prolific coral reefs, and some of the world's greatest earthquake catastrophes. While our focus here is the link between coral δ13C, light exposure and coseismic crustal deformation, the

  6. Diethers enriched in 13C suggest carbon-limitation at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. S.; Hayes, J. M.; Summons, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    Active and inactive carbonate vent structures from the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) contain up to 0.6% organic carbon including diverse lipids. Values of δ 13C for total organic carbon (TOC) range from -18.7‰ vs. VPDB at the active, high-temperature vent known as "The Beehive" (90° C), to -3.1‰ at Marker 7 (active, 70° C). Samples with relatively high levels of 13C also contained high amounts of isoprenoidal and nonisoprenoidal diethers. Samples more depleted in 13C lacked or contained low amounts of these diethers. The correlation between high 13C and abundant diethers is supported by compound-specific isotopic analyses. Archaeal and bacterial diethers are enriched in 13C relative to photosynthetically derived marine carbon. The biomarkers sn-2 hydroxyarchaeol, sn-3 hydroxyarchaeol, and dihydroxyarchaeol - considered diagnostic for methane-cycling archaea - had δ values ranging from -8.5 to +4.8‰ . Phylogenetic data confirms the presence at these vents of a single group of methanogens, related to the Methanosarcinales (Schrenk et al., 2004). Diethers with non-isoprenoidal alkyl chains are also present, are of presumed bacterial origin, and may indicated the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Values of δ for these compounds range from -7.3 to +1.0‰ . At the Beehive vent, diether lipids are absent and the TOC is depleted in 13C. Coexistence of isotopically similar hydroxyarchaeols and nonisoprenoidal glycerol diethers is typical of marine, cold-seep environments at which concentrations of H2 are low and methane is oxidized anaerobically. At the LCHF, however, concentrations of H2 in pore waters reach 15 mM (Proskurowski et al., 2003). This H2, produced by serpentinization reactions, drives production (rather than oxidation) of methane. Simultaneously, sulfate-reducing bacteria can flourish as carbon-fixing autotrophs. Under such conditions, carbon may be the limiting substrate, its nearly complete consumption accounting for the enrichment of

  7. Precise and traceable (13)C/(12)C isotope amount ratios by multicollector ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Santamaria-Fernandez, Rebeca; Carter, David; Hearn, Ruth

    2008-08-01

    A new method for the measurement of SI traceable carbon isotope amount ratios using a multicollector inductively coupled mass spectrometer (MC-ICPMS) is reported for the first time. Carbon (13)C/(12)C isotope amount ratios have been measured for four reference materials with carbon isotope amount ratios ranging from 0.010659 (delta(13)C(VPDB) = -46.6 per thousand) to 0.011601 (delta(13)C(VPDB) = +37 per thousand). Internal normalization by measuring boron (11)B/(10)B isotope amount ratios has been used to correct for the effects of instrumental mass bias. Absolute (13)C/(12)C ratios have been measured and corrected for instrumental mass bias and full uncertainty budgets have been calculated using the Kragten approach. Corrected (13)C/(12)C ratios for NIST RM8545 (Lithium Carbonate LSVEC), NIST RM8573 (L-Glutamic Acid USGS40), NIST RM8542 (IAEA-CH6 Sucrose) and NIST RM8574 (L-Glutamic Acid USGS41) differed from reference values by 0.06-0.20%. Excellent linear correlation (R = 0.9997) was obtained between corrected carbon isotope amount ratios and expected carbon isotope amount ratios of the four chosen NIST RMs. The method has proved to be linear within this range (from (13)C/(12)C = 0.010659 to (13)C/(12)C =0.011601), and therefore, it is suitable for the measurement of carbon isotope amount ratios within the natural range of variation of organic carbon compounds, carbonates, elemental carbon, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. In addition, a CO2 gas sample previously characterized in-house by conventional dual inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometry has been analyzed and excellent agreement has been found between the carbon isotope amount ratio value measured by MC-ICPMS and the IRMS measurements. Absolute values for carbon isotope amount ratios traceable to the SI are given for each NIST RM, and the combined uncertainty budget (including instrumental error and each parameter contributing to Russell expression for mass bias correction) has been found to be < 0

  8. Vertical δ13C and δ15N changes during pedogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunn, Melanie; Spielvogel, Sandra; Wells, Andrew; Condron, Leo; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2015-04-01

    The natural abundance of soil organic matter (SOM) stable C and N isotope ratios are subjected to vertical changes throughout the soil profile. This vertical distribution is a widely reported phenomenon across varieties of ecosystems and constitutes important insights of soil carbon cycling. In most ecosystems, SOM becomes enriched in heavy isotopes by several per mill in the first few centimeters of the topsoil. The enrichment of 13C in SOM with soil depth is attributed to biological and physical-chemical processes in soil e.g., plant physiological impacts, microbial decomposition, sorption and transport processes. Such vertical trends in 13C and 15N abundance have rarely been related to SOM composition during pedogenesis. The aims of our study were to investigate short and long-term δ13C and δ15N depth changes and their interrelations under progressing pedogenesis and ecosystem development. We sampled soils across the well studied fordune progradation Haast-chronosequence, a dune ridge system under super-humid climate at the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island (43° 53' S, 169° 3' E). Soils from 11 sites with five replicates each covered a time span of around 2870 yr of soil development (from Arenosol to Podzol). Vertical changes of δ13C and δ15N values of SOM were investigated in the organic layers and in 1-cm depth intervals of the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil. With increasing soil depth SOM became enriched in δ13C by 1.9 ± SE 0.1 o and in δ15N by 6.0 ± 0.4 ‰˙Litter δ13C values slightly decreased with increasing soil age (r = -0.61; p = 0.00) likely due to less efficient assimilation linked to nutrient limitations. Fractionation processes during mycorrhizal transfer appeared to affect δ15N values in the litter. We found a strong decrease of δ15N in the early succession stages ≤ 300 yr B.P. (r = -0.95; p = 0.00). Positive relations of vertical 13C and 15N enrichment with soil age might be related to decomposition and appeared to be

  9. Control of Mercury Accumulation And Mobility in a Forest Soil as Indicated by δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajracharya, U.; Jackson, B.; Feng, X.

    2015-12-01

    Mobility and cycling of mercury (Hg) in soils is important. Hg leaching results in its transport to wetlands, where Hg methylates and bioaccumulates through aquatic food webs. It has been shown that Hg cycle in soil is controlled by organic matter (OM) quantity as well as quality. The latter is indicated by increase of Hg/C ratio as C/N decreases by decomposition. Here we investigate the Hg-C relationship in a temperate forest soil in Hanover, NH, with a focus of examining the control of OM quality on soil Hg accumulation and mobility. We use δ13C as an indicator of carbon quality. The soil samples from A, B and C horizons were separated into six particle size fractionations from <25 µm to 1 mm. Both the bulk soil and particle size separates were analyzed for Hg concentrations, carbon content (C%), δ13C, and Hg partition coefficient (Kd =mg gSoil-1/mg Lsolution-1). We found that the bulk Hg concentration decreases significantly with increasing δ13C (R2=0.90, p <0.0001), but Hg/C increases with δ13C (R2=0.59, p =0.009). Both Hg/C and δ13C increase with soil depth, and at a given horizon, they both increase with decreasing particle size. These results indicate that high Hg/C ratios are associated with aged, decomposed, and low quality OM. Mostly likely, this accumulation of Hg in older OM is a result of retention of Hg upon carbon loss during soil respiration. However, the relationship between particle size and Hg/C is significantly different among different horizons; the most prominent relationship occurs at the deepest C horizon. This cross effect of horizon and particle size cannot be explained by normal aging of the OM through decomposition, pointing to mechanisms of changing in Hg bonding characteristics with OM aging or particle aggregation. The measured Kd value decreased with increasing δ13C (R2=0.43, p =0.0031), indicating that Hg associated with older OM is more subject to leaching compared to younger, fresher OM. This association can also be

  10. Millimeter-Wave Observations of Circumstellar 14N/15N and 12C/13C Ratios: New Insights into J-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adande, Gilles; Ziurys, Lucy M.; Woolf, Neville

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of 14N/15N and 12C/13C isotopic ratios have been conducted towards circumstellar envelopes of a sample of evolved stars using the J = 3→2 rotational transitions of the isotopologues of HCN, observed with the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Towards the J-type stars Y CVn and RY Dra, where 12C/13C ~ 3, the 14N/15N ratios were found to be 120-180 and 225, respectively. The 14N/15N ratio is thus anomalously low relative to interstellar values and a factor ~100 lower than equilibrium values predicted from the CNO cycle. Combining these results with previous chemical and isotopic prior observations of these stars, we conclude that two anomalous behaviors are likely to have occurred in Y CVn and RY Dra. First, the stellar envelope failed to participate in the normal mixing seen in low mass red giants, in which C and then O are substantially converted to N. Secondly, both the carbon enrichment and anomalous isotopic composition of both 13C and15N could have been caused by a plume of hot gas, hydrogen poor but enriched in 12C, from a helium flash mixing into the envelope.

  11. Effects of stereoelectronic interactions on the relativistic spin-orbit and paramagnetic components of the (13)C NMR shielding tensors of dihaloethenes.

    PubMed

    Viesser, Renan V; Ducati, Lucas C; Autschbach, Jochen; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2015-07-15

    In this study, stereoelectronic interactions were considered to explain the experimental difference in the magnitude of the known heavy-atom effect on the (13)C NMR chemical shifts in cis- and trans-1,2-dihaloethene isomers (halo = F, Cl, Br or I). The experimental values were compared to the calculated values with various DFT functionals using both the nonrelativistic approach (NR) and the relativistic approximations SR-ZORA (SR) and SO-ZORA (SO). NBO and NLMO contributions to the (13)C NMR shielding tensors were determined to assess which stereoelectronic interactions have a more important effect on the shielding tensor in each principal axis system (PAS) coordinate. These analyses associated with the orbital rotation model and the HOMO-LUMO energy gap enable rationalization of trends between cis and trans isomers from fluorine to iodine derivatives. Both paramagnetic and SO shielding terms were responsible for the observed trends. It was possible to conclude that the steric interactions between the two iodine atoms and the hyperconjugative interactions involving the halogen lone pairs (LP(X)) and πC[double bond, length as m-dash]C*, σC[double bond, length as m-dash]C* and σC-X* antibonding orbitals are responsible for the lower (13)C NMR shielding for the cis isomers of the bromine and the iodine compounds than that of the trans isomers.

  12. Comparison of sustained off-resonance irradiation collisionally activated dissociation and multipole storage-assisted dissociation for top-down protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Keller, Karin M; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Hettich, Robert L; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2004-04-01

    Tandem mass spectrometric data acquired for small (8-18 kDa) intact proteins by sustained off-resonance irradiation collisionally activated dissociation (SORI-CAD) and multipole storage-assisted dissociation (MSAD) were compared, and the results indicate that the two activation methods do not always provide the same fragmentation patterns. In MSAD experiments, the charge state distribution made available by the ionization conditions may dictate the range of fragment ions that can be generated. In addition, conditions of high space charge within the hexapole impair transmission and/or trapping of high m/z species, which can result in loss of important precursor and product ions. Finally, the non-resonant nature of activation in MSAD can provide access to secondary dissociation processes that are not available by SORI. Because of these considerations, MSAD is less reliable than SORI for generating sequence tag data. However, it appears that MSAD samples 'preferred' cleavage processes (i.e. those occurring at D and P residues) just as well as SORI, which implies that MSAD data may be somewhat more compatible with search algorithms that utilize unprocessed fragment ion masses.

  13. Comparison of sustained off-resonance irradiation collisionally activated dissociation and multipole storage-assisted dissociation for top-down protein analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Karin M; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2004-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometric data acquired for small (8--18 kDa) intact proteins by sustained off-resonance irradiation collisionally activated dissociation (SORI-CAD) and multipole storage-assisted dissociation (MSAD) were compared, and the results indicate that the two activation methods do not always provide the same fragmentation patterns. In MSAD experiments, the charge state distribution made available by the ionization conditions may dictate the range of fragment ions that can be generated. In addition, conditions of high space charge within the hexapole impair transmission and/or trapping of high m/z species, which can result in loss of important precursor and product ions. Finally, the non-resonant nature of activation in MSAD can provide access to secondary dissociation processes that are not available by SORI. Because of these considerations, MSAD is less reliable than SORI for generating sequence tag data. However, it appears that MSAD samples 'preferred' cleavage processes (i.e. those occurring at D and P residues) just as well as SORI, which implies that MSAD data may be somewhat more compatible with search algorithms that utilize unprocessed fragment ion masses.

  14. SIMS measurements of intrashell δ13C in the cultured planktic foraminifer Orbulina universa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Lael; Kozdon, Reinhard; Valley, John W.; Mora, Claudia I.; Spero, Howard J.

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we present experimental results from the planktic foraminifer Orbulina universa, cultured in the laboratory. We demonstrate that the δ13C of shell calcite precipitated in 13C-labeled seawater for 24 h can be resolved and accurately measured using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). Specimens maintained at 20 °C were transferred from ambient seawater (δ13CDIC = +1.3‰) into seawater with δ13CDIC = +51.5‰ and enriched [Ba2+] for 24 h. Specimens were then transferred into ambient seawater with elevated [87Sr] for 6-9 h of calcification, followed by a transfer back into unlabeled ambient seawater until gametogenesis. This technique produced O. universa shells with calcite layers of distinct geochemical signatures. We quantify the spatial positions of trace element labels in the shells using laser ablation ICP-MS depth profiling. Using fragments from the same shells, we quantify intrashell δ13Ccalcite using SIMS with a 6 or 8 μm spot (2 SD range ±0.5‰ to 1.7‰). Measured δ13Ccalcite values in O. universa shell layers precipitated in ambient seawater are within 2‰ of predicted δ13Ccalcite values. In 13C-labeled bands of calcite, 6 μm SIMS spot measurements are within 2‰ of predicted δ13Ccalcite values, whereas 8 μm SIMS spots yield intermediate, mixed values. The spatial agreement between trace element and carbon isotope data suggests that 13C and cation tracers are synchronously incorporated into shell calcite. These results demonstrate the ability of SIMS δ13C measurements to resolve ∼10 μm features in foraminifer shell calcite using a 6 μm spot, and highlight the potential of this technique for addressing questions about ecology, biomineralization, and paleoceanography.

  15. 13C solid-state NMR chemical shift anisotropy analysis of the anomeric carbon in carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Ying; Luo, Shun-Yuan; Hung, Shang-Cheng; Chan, Sunney I; Tzou, Der-Lii M

    2005-03-21

    (13)C NMR solid-state structural analysis of the anomeric center in carbohydrates was performed on six monosaccharides: glucose (Glc), mannose (Man), galactose (Gal), galactosamine hydrochloride (GalN), glucosamine hydrochloride (GlcN), and N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc). In the 1D (13)C cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) spectrum, the anomeric center C-1 of these carbohydrates revealed two well resolved resonances shifted by 3-5ppm, which were readily assigned to the anomeric alpha and beta forms. From this experiment, we also extracted the (13)C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor elements of the two forms from their spinning sideband intensities, respectively. It was found out that the chemical shift tensor for the alpha anomer was more axially symmetrical than that of the beta form. A strong linear correlation was obtained when the ratio of the axial asymmetry of the (13)C chemical shift tensors of the two anomeric forms was plotted in a semilogarithmic plot against the relative population of the two anomers. Finally, we applied REDOR spectroscopy to discern whether or not there were any differences in the sugar ring conformation between the anomers. Identical two-bond distances of 2.57A (2.48A) were deduced for both the alpha and beta forms in GlcNAc (GlcN), suggesting that the two anomers have essentially identical sugar ring scaffolds in these sugars. In light of these REDOR distance measurements and the strong correlation observed between the ratio of the axial asymmetry parameters of the (13)C chemical shift tensors and the relative population between the two anomeric forms, we concluded that the anomeric effect arises principally from interaction of the electron charge clouds between the C-1-O-5 and the C-1-O-1 bonds in these monosaccharides.

  16. Large and unexpected enrichment in stratospheric 16O13C18O and its meridional variation.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Laurence Y; Affek, Hagit P; Hoag, Katherine J; Guo, Weifu; Wiegel, Aaron A; Atlas, Elliot L; Schauffler, Sue M; Okumura, Mitchio; Boering, Kristie A; Eiler, John M

    2009-07-14

    The stratospheric CO(2) oxygen isotope budget is thought to be governed primarily by the O((1)D)+CO(2) isotope exchange reaction. However, there is increasing evidence that other important physical processes may be occurring that standard isotopic tools have been unable to identify. Measuring the distribution of the exceedingly rare CO(2) isotopologue (16)O(13)C(18)O, in concert with (18)O and (17)O abundances, provides sensitivities to these additional processes and, thus, is a valuable test of current models. We identify a large and unexpected meridional variation in stratospheric (16)O(13)C(18)O, observed as proportions in the polar vortex that are higher than in any naturally derived CO(2) sample to date. We show, through photochemical experiments, that lower (16)O(13)C(18)O proportions observed in the midlatitudes are determined primarily by the O((1)D)+CO(2) isotope exchange reaction, which promotes a stochastic isotopologue distribution. In contrast, higher (16)O(13)C(18)O proportions in the polar vortex show correlations with long-lived stratospheric tracer and bulk isotope abundances opposite to those observed at midlatitudes and, thus, opposite to those easily explained by O((1)D)+CO(2). We believe the most plausible explanation for this meridional variation is either an unrecognized isotopic fractionation associated with the mesospheric photochemistry of CO(2) or temperature-dependent isotopic exchange on polar stratospheric clouds. Unraveling the ultimate source of stratospheric (16)O(13)C(18)O enrichments may impose additional isotopic constraints on biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange, biosphere productivity, and their respective responses to climate change.

  17. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    PubMed

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom. PMID:26670708

  18. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    PubMed

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom.

  19. Terrestrial biosphere changes over the last 120 kyr and their impact on ocean δ 13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogakker, B. A. A.; Smith, R. S.; Singarayer, J. S.; Marchant, R.; Prentice, I. C.; Allen, J. R. M.; Anderson, R. S.; Bhagwat, S. A.; Behling, H.; Borisova, O.; Bush, M.; Correa-Metrio, A.; de Vernal, A.; Finch, J. M.; Fréchette, B.; Lozano-Garcia, S.; Gosling, W. D.; Granoszewski, W.; Grimm, E. C.; Grüger, E.; Hanselman, J.; Harrison, S. P.; Hill, T. R.; Huntley, B.; Jiménez-Moreno, G.; Kershaw, P.; Ledru, M.-P.; Magri, D.; McKenzie, M.; Müller, U.; Nakagawa, T.; Novenko, E.; Penny, D.; Sadori, L.; Scott, L.; Stevenson, J.; Valdes, P. J.; Vandergoes, M.; Velichko, A.; Whitlock, C.; Tzedakis, C.

    2015-03-01

    A new global synthesis and biomization of long (>40 kyr) pollen-data records is presented, and used with simulations from the HadCM3 and FAMOUS climate models to analyse the dynamics of the global terrestrial biosphere and carbon storage over the last glacial-interglacial cycle. Global modelled (BIOME4) biome distributions over time generally agree well with those inferred from pollen data. The two climate models show good agreement in global net primary productivity (NPP). NPP is strongly influenced by atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations through CO2 fertilization. The combined effects of modelled changes in vegetation and (via a simple model) soil carbon result in a global terrestrial carbon storage at the Last Glacial Maximum that is 210-470 Pg C less than in pre-industrial time. Without the contribution from exposed glacial continental shelves the reduction would be larger, 330-960 Pg C. Other intervals of low terrestrial carbon storage include stadial intervals at 108 and 85 ka BP, and between 60 and 65 ka BP during Marine Isotope Stage 4. Terrestrial carbon storage, determined by the balance of global NPP and decomposition, influences the stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of seawater because terrestrial organic carbon is depleted in 13C. Using a simple carbon-isotope mass balance equation we find agreement in trends between modelled ocean δ13C based on modelled land carbon storage, and palaeo-archives of ocean δ13C, confirming that terrestrial carbon storage variations may be important drivers of ocean δ13C changes.

  20. Response of δ13C in plant and soil respiration to a water pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Y.; Buchmann, N.; Barnard, R. L.

    2011-05-01

    Stable carbon isotopes have been used to assess the coupling between changes in environmental conditions and the response of soil or ecosystem respiration, usually by studying the time-lagged response of δ13C of respired CO2 (δ13CR) to changes in photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination (Δi). However, the lack of a systematic response of δ13CR to environmental changes in field studies stresses the need to better understand the mechanisms to this response. We experimentally created a wide range of carbon allocation and respiration conditions in Fagus sylvatica mesocosms, by growing saplings under different temperatures and girdling combinations. After a period of drought, a water pulse was applied and the short-term responses of δ13C in soil CO2 efflux (δ13CRsoil) and δ13C in aboveground plant respiration (δ13CRabove) were measured, as well as leaf gas exchange rates and soil microbial biomass δ13C responses. Both δ13CRsoil and δ 13CRabove values of all the trees decreased immediately after the water pulse. These responses were not driven by changes in Δi, but rather by a fast release of C stored in roots and shoots. Changes in δ13CRsoil associated with the water pulse were significantly positively correlated with changes in stomatal conductance, showing a strong impact of the plant component on δ13CRsoil. However, three days after the water pulse in girdled trees, changes in δ13CRsoil were related to changes in microbial biomass δ13C, suggesting that changes in the carbon source respired by soil microorganisms also contributed to the response of δ13CRsoil. Our study shows that improving our mechanistic understanding of the responses of δ13CR to changes in environmental conditions requires the understanding of not only the plant's physiological responses, but also the responses of soil microorganisms and of plant-microbial interactions.

  1. Microbial metabolism in soil at low temperatures: Mechanisms unraveled by position-specific 13C labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bore, Ezekiel

    2016-04-01

    Microbial transformation of organic substances in soil is the most important process of the C cycle. Most of the current studies base their information about transformation of organic substances on incubation studies under laboratory conditions and thus, we have a profound knowledge on SOM transformations at ambient temperatures. However, metabolic pathway activities at low temperature are not well understood, despite the fact that the processes are relevant for many soils globally and seasonally. To analyze microbial metabolism at low soil temperatures, isotopomeres of position-specifically 13C labeled glucose were incubated at three temperature; 5, -5 -20 oC. Soils were sampled after 1, 3 and 10 days and additionally after 30 days for samples at -20 °C. The 13C from individual molecule position was quantifed in respired CO2, bulk soil, extractable organic C and extractable microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) and cell membranes of microbial communities classified by 13C phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. 13CO2 released showed a dominance of the flux from C-1 position at 5 °C. Consequently, at 5 °C, pentose phosphate pathway activity is a dominant metabolic pathway of glucose metabolization. In contrast to -5 °C and -20 oC, metabolic behaviors completely switched towards a preferential respiration of the glucose C-4 position. With decreasing temperature, microorganism strongly shifted towards metabolization of glucose via glycolysis which indicates a switch to cellular maintenance. High recoveries of 13C in extractable microbial biomass at -5 °C indicates optimal growth condition for the microorganisms. PLFA analysis showed high incorporation of 13C into Gram negative bacteria at 5 °C but decreased with temperature. Gram positive bacteria out-competed Gram negatives with decreasing temperature. This study revealed a remarkable microbial activity at temperatures below 0 °C, differing significantly from that at ambient

  2. Double cross polarization /sup 13/C-NMR experiment in solid fossil fuel structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, E.W.; Woody, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Double Cross Polarization /sup 13/C-MAS/NMR experiment has been used to derive a new operational classification of solid fossil fuels based on chemical reactivity. The method requires labeling reactive sites in the organic matrix with a magnetically active isotope not present in the precursor material, and using the local, isolated dipole-dipole interaction between this nucleus and nearby /sup 13/C nuclei to detect via cross polarization the carbon centers in the vicinity of the label. The technique is a marriage of chemistry and spectroscopy and the information content of the DCP spectra is defined by both partners. /sup 1/H-/sup 13/C-/sup 31/P DCP/MAS /sup 13/C-NMR spectroscopy has been used to statistically describe phenolic ortho-substitution patterns of coals via their aryl phosphinate or phosphate derivatives. In these applications of DCP NMR the new, detailed structure and/or reactivity information is realized by detection of carbon resonances one or more bonds removed from the reaction center, but in a volume element of intramolecular dimensions. To the extent that intermolecular contributions to the spectrum are detected, and not recognized as such, the structure/reactivity correlation is weakened. Direct substitution of phosphorus on the aromatic rings in the organic matrix of the coal is not readily accomplished. This environment potentially can be labeled with fluorine in a selective fashion using newly developed reagents. The possibility of determining the changes in average ring substitution patterns as a function of chemical treatment or coal diagenesis emerges. Recent developments in the field of DCP /sup 13/C NMR are presented.

  3. 13C NMR and isotopic (δ13C) investigations on modern vegetation samples: a tool to understand the soil organic matter degradation dynamics and preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Subhadeep; Sanyal, Prasanta; Vardhan Gaur, Harsh

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic carbon, one of the largest reservoirs of carbon, is a heterogeneous mixture of organic compounds with dominant contribution derived from decomposition of plants in various stages. Although general ideas about the processes and mechanisms of soil organic matter (SOM) degradation have been developed, a very few study has linked the SOM with its parent material. In this study we aim to generate reference data set of functional groups from modern vegetation samples (C3 and C4plants) to better understand the degradation dynamics and preferences. The carbon functional groups from modern vegetation samples (eight C3 and nine C4 plants collected from Mohanpur, Nadia, West Bengal, India) were examined by solid state 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Additionally, isotopic investigations (δ13C) has also been carried out on the modern vegetation samples to understand the relationship of bulk isotopic values to the concentration of functional groups. The major functional groups (alkyl C, O-alkyl C, aromatic C, carbonyl C and aldehyde/ketone) of modern vegetation samples form 16%, 65%, 5%, 14% and 1% respectively in C3 plants. Considerable differences has been observed for C4 plants with average values of alkyl C, O-alkyl C, aromatic C, carbonyl C and aldehyde/ketone are 8%, 83%, 3%, 5% and 1% respectively. The concentration of functional groups from the modern vegetational samples can be considered as reference scale to compare with the 13C NMR data derived from the different soil horizons to understand the SOM degradation dynamics. The δ13CV PDB values of modern vegetation samples plotted against the individual concentration of functional groups shows significant correlation in C4 plants, whereas a lack in correlation has been observed for C3 plants. We assume this difference in relationship of δ13CV PDB values with functional groups of C3 and C4plants can be due to the differences in photosynthesis pathways, the fractionation of CO2 and accumulation of the products

  4. Quantitative rotating frame relaxometry methods in MRI.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Irtiza Ali; Sepponen, Raimo

    2016-06-01

    Macromolecular degeneration and biochemical changes in tissue can be quantified using rotating frame relaxometry in MRI. It has been shown in several studies that the rotating frame longitudinal relaxation rate constant (R1ρ ) and the rotating frame transverse relaxation rate constant (R2ρ ) are sensitive biomarkers of phenomena at the cellular level. In this comprehensive review, existing MRI methods for probing the biophysical mechanisms that affect the rotating frame relaxation rates of the tissue (i.e. R1ρ and R2ρ ) are presented. Long acquisition times and high radiofrequency (RF) energy deposition into tissue during the process of spin-locking in rotating frame relaxometry are the major barriers to the establishment of these relaxation contrasts at high magnetic fields. Therefore, clinical applications of R1ρ and R2ρ MRI using on- or off-resonance RF excitation methods remain challenging. Accordingly, this review describes the theoretical and experimental approaches to the design of hard RF pulse cluster- and adiabatic RF pulse-based excitation schemes for accurate and precise measurements of R1ρ and R2ρ . The merits and drawbacks of different MRI acquisition strategies for quantitative relaxation rate measurement in the rotating frame regime are reviewed. In addition, this review summarizes current clinical applications of rotating frame MRI sequences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. 13C-13C and 15N-13C correlation spectroscopy of membrane-associated and uniformly labeled human immunodeficiency virus and influenza fusion peptides: Amino acid-type assignments and evidence for multiple conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, Michele L.; Gabrys, Charles M.; Struppe, Jochem O.; Weliky, David P.

    2008-02-01

    Many viruses which cause disease including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and influenza are "enveloped" by a membrane and infection of a host cell begins with joining or "fusion" of the viral and target cell membranes. Fusion is catalyzed by viral proteins in the viral membrane. For HIV and for the influenza virus, these fusion proteins contain an ˜20-residue apolar "fusion peptide" that binds to target cell membranes and plays a critical role in fusion. For this study, the HIV fusion peptide (HFP) and influenza virus fusion peptide (IFP) were chemically synthesized with uniform C13, N15 labeling over large contiguous regions of amino acids. Two-dimensional C13-C13 and N15-C13 spectra were obtained for the membrane-bound fusion peptides and an amino acid-type C13 assignment was obtained for the labeled residues in HFP and IFP. The membrane used for the HFP sample had a lipid headgroup and cholesterol composition comparable to that of host cells of the virus, and the C13 chemical shifts were more consistent with β strand conformation than with helical conformation. The membrane used for the IFP sample did not contain cholesterol, and the chemical shifts of the dominant peaks were more consistent with helical conformation than with β strand conformation. There were additional peaks in the IFP spectrum whose shifts were not consistent with helical conformation. An unambiguous C13 and N15 assignment was obtained in an HFP sample with more selective labeling, and two shifts were identified for the Leu-9 CO, Gly-10 N, and Gly-10 Cα nuclei. These sets of two shifts may indicate two β strand registries such as parallel and antiparallel. Although most spectra were obtained on a 9.4T instrument, one C13-C13 correlation spectrum was obtained on a 16.4T instrument and was better resolved than the comparable 9.4T spectrum. More selective labeling and higher field may, therefore, be approaches to obtaining unambiguous assignments for membrane-associated fusion peptides.

  6. A Polymer-Based Magnetic Resonance Tracer for Visualization of Solid Tumors by 13C Spectroscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Iida, Mitsuru; Miura, Iwao; Inubushi, Toshiro; Morikawa, Shigehiro

    2014-01-01

    Morphological imaging precedes lesion-specific visualization in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) because of the superior ability of this technique to depict tissue morphology with excellent spatial and temporal resolutions. To achieve lesion-specific visualization of tumors by MRI, we investigated the availability of a novel polymer-based tracer. Although the 13C nucleus is a candidate for a detection nucleus because of its low background signal in the body, the low magnetic resonance sensitivity of the nucleus needs to be resolved before developing a 13C-based tracer. In order to overcome this problem, we enriched polyethylene glycol (PEG), a biocompatible polymer, with 13C atoms. 13C-PEG40,000 (13C-PEG with an average molecular weight of 40 kDa) emitted a single 13C signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio due to its ability to maintain signal sharpness, as was confirmed by in vivo investigation, and displayed a chemical shift sufficiently distinct from that of endogenous fat. 13C-PEG40,000 intravenously injected into mice showed long retention in circulation, leading to its effective accumulation in tumors reflecting the well-known phenomenon that macromolecules accumulate in tumors because of leaky tumor capillaries. These properties of 13C-PEG40,000 allowed visualization of tumors in mice by 13C spectroscopic imaging. These findings suggest that a technique based on 13C-PEG is a promising strategy for tumor detection. PMID:25007334

  7. Multidimensional solid-state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of pectic polysaccharides in uniformly 13C-labeled Arabidopsis primary cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2012-07-08

    Plant cell wall (CW) polysaccharides are responsible for the mechanical strength and growth of plant cells; however, the high-resolution structure and dynamics of the CW polysaccharides are still poorly understood because of the insoluble nature of these molecules. Here, we use 2D and 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to investigate the structural role of pectins in the plant CW. Intact and partially depectinated primary CWs of Arabidopsis thaliana were uniformly labeled with 13C and their NMR spectra were compared. Recent 13C resonance assignment of the major polysaccharides in Arabidopsis thaliana CWs allowed us to determine the effects of depectination on the intermolecular packing and dynamics of the remaining wall polysaccharides. 2D and 3D correlation spectra show the suppression of pectin signals, confirming partial pectin removal by chelating agents and sodium carbonate. Importantly, higher cross peaks are observed in 2D and 3D 13C spectra of the depectinated CW, suggesting higher rigidity and denser packing of the remaining wall polysaccharides compared with the intact CW. 13C spin–lattice relaxation times and 1H rotating-frame spin–lattice relaxation times indicate that the polysaccharides are more rigid on both the nanosecond and microsecond timescales in the depectinated CW. Taken together, these results indicate that pectic polysaccharides are highly dynamic and endow the polysaccharide network of the primary CW with mobility and flexibility, which may be important for pectin functions. This study demonstrates the capability of multidimensional SSNMR to determine the intermolecular interactions and dynamic structures of complex plant materials under near-native conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Forward Modeling of Fluctuating Dietary 13C Signals to Validate 13C Turnover Models of Milk and Milk Components from a Diet-Switch Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Alexander; Schneider, Stephan; Auerswald, Karl; Bellof, Gerhard; Schnyder, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Isotopic variation of food stuffs propagates through trophic systems. But, this variation is dampened in each trophic step, due to buffering effects of metabolic and storage pools. Thus, understanding of isotopic variation in trophic systems requires knowledge of isotopic turnover. In animals, turnover is usually quantified in diet-switch experiments in controlled conditions. Such experiments usually involve changes in diet chemical composition, which may affect turnover. Furthermore, it is uncertain if diet-switch based turnover models are applicable under conditions with randomly fluctuating dietary input signals. Here, we investigate if turnover information derived from diet-switch experiments with dairy cows can predict the isotopic composition of metabolic products (milk, milk components and feces) under natural fluctuations of dietary isotope and chemical composition. First, a diet-switch from a C3-grass/maize diet to a pure C3-grass diet was used to quantify carbon turnover in whole milk, lactose, casein, milk fat and feces. Data were analyzed with a compartmental mixed effects model, which allowed for multiple pools and intra-population variability, and included a delay between feed ingestion and first tracer appearance in outputs. The delay for milk components and whole milk was ∼12 h, and that of feces ∼20 h. The half-life (t½) for carbon in the feces was 9 h, while lactose, casein and milk fat had a t½ of 10, 18 and 19 h. The 13C kinetics of whole milk revealed two pools, a fast pool with a t½ of 10 h (likely representing lactose), and a slower pool with a t½ of 21 h (likely including casein and milk fat). The diet-switch based turnover information provided a precise prediction (RMSE ∼0.2 ‰) of the natural 13C fluctuations in outputs during a 30 days-long period when cows ingested a pure C3 grass with naturally fluctuating isotope composition. PMID:24392000

  9. Rotational spectrum and internal dynamics of methylpyruvate.

    PubMed

    Velino, Biagio; Favero, Laura B; Ottaviani, Paolo; Maris, Assimo; Caminati, Walther

    2013-01-24

    The rotational spectra of five isotopologues (normal and all monosubstituted (13)C species) of methylpyruvate have been measured with the pulsed jet Fourier transform microwave technique. Rotational transitions are split into quintets due to the internal rotations of the two methyl groups. The corresponding barriers to internal rotation have been determined to be V(3)(H(3)C-O) = 4.883(8) kJ mol(-1) and V(3)(H(3)C-C) = 4.657(8) kJ mol(-1), respectively. Information on the skeletal heavy atom structure has been obtained from the 15 available rotational constants.

  10. Isotopic variability of cave bears (δ15N, δ13C) across Europe during MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajcarz, Magdalena; Pacher, Martina; Krajcarz, Maciej T.; Laughlan, Lana; Rabeder, Gernot; Sabol, Martin; Wojtal, Piotr; Bocherens, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Collagen, the organic fraction of bone, records the isotopic parameters of consumed food for carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). This relationship of isotopic signature between diet and tissue is an important tool for the study of dietary preferences of modern and fossil animal species. Since the first information on the isotopic signature of cave bear was reported, numerous data from Europe have become available. The goal of this work is to track the geographical variation of cave bear collagen isotopic values in Europe during Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (about 60,000-25,000 yr BP). In this study the results of new δ13C and δ15N isotopic analyses of cave bear collagen from four Central-Eastern European sites are presented, as well as a review of all published isotopic data for cave bears of the same period. The main conclusion is a lack of geographical East-West pattern in the variations of δ13C and δ15N values of cave bear collagen. Moreover, no relationship was found between cave bear taxonomy and isotopic composition. The cave bears from Central-Eastern Europe exhibit δ13C and δ15N values near the average of the range of Central, Western and Southern European cave bears. Despite the fact that most cave bear sites follow an altitudinal gradient, separate groups of sites exhibit shift in absolute values of δ13C, what disturbs an altitude-related isotopic pattern. The most distinct groups are: high Alpine sites situated over 1500 m a.s.l. - in terms of δ13C; and two Romanian sites Peştera cu Oase and Urşilor - in case of δ15N. Although the cave bear isotopic signature is driven by altitude, the altitudinal adjustment of isotopic data is not enough to explain the isotopic dissimilarity of these cave bears. The unusually high δ15N signature of mentioned Romanian sites is an isolated case in Europe. Cave bears from relatively closely situated Central-Eastern European sites and other Romanian sites are more similar to Western European than to Romanian

  11. Synthesis and applications of selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Shen, L.X.; Lewis, H.; Cai, Z.; Tinoci, I. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    Spectral overlap is a substantial problem in NMR studies of RNA molecules >30 nucleotides. To overcome this difficulty, we synthesized selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs and adapted several isotope-edited two- and three-dimensional NMR experiments originally developed for protein studies. We optimized protocols for synthesis of multi-gram quantities of CTP, UTp, ATP, and GTP using a combination of synthetic organic and enzymatic methods. Uracil is prepared in 40 to 50% yield from {sup 13}C-cyanide in two steps. Using acetyl- tribenzoyl-ribose and standard chemistry uracil is then attached to the sugar (90% yield). The tribenzoyl-uridine intermediate is converted into uridine or cytidine quantitatively, depending on the deblocking protocol. Labeled purines are synthesized using simple pyrimidine precursors and reacting with {sup 13}C-formic acid (80% yield). Purine nucleosides are then synthesized using uridine phosphorylase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase. The nucleosides were converted to NMPs by treatment with POC1{sub 3} in triethylphosphate. We converted NMPs to NTPs by standard enzymatic methods. Selectively labeled RNAs were synthesized by run-off transcription using {sup 13}C-labeled NTPs. Several different strategies help solve over-lap problems in larger RNAs. Isotope-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments such as {omega}1-1/2 X-filtered NOESY simplify NMR spectra by dividing the normal NOESY spectrum into two subspectra-one involving NOEs from protons bound to {sup 12}C and one from protons bound to {sup 13}C. For example, we labeled A and U residues of a 34-nucleotide pseudoknot, and the {sup 12}C subspectrum of the 1/2 X-filtered NOESY contained NOEs only from G and C residues (along with adenine 2H); the {sup 13}C subspectrum contained NOEs only from A and U residues. Each subspectrum has less overlap than the NOESY of an unlabeled sample; the editing strategy allows each resonance to be identified by residue type (A, C, G, or U).

  12. Diploptene δ13C values from contemporary thermokarst lake sediments show complex spatial variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Kimberley L.; Pancost, Richard D.; Edwards, Mary E.; Anthony, Katey M. Walter; Langdon, Peter G.; Chaves Torres, Lidia

    2016-05-01

    Cryospheric changes in northern high latitudes are linked to significant greenhouse gas flux to the atmosphere, for example, methane that originates from organic matter decomposition in thermokarst lakes. The set of pathways that link methane production in sediments, via oxidation in the lake system, to the flux of residual methane to the atmosphere is complex and exhibits temporal and spatial variation. The isotopic signal of bacterial biomarkers (hopanoids, e.g. diploptene) in sediments has been used to identify contemporary ocean-floor methane seeps and, in the geological record, periods of enhanced methane production (e.g. the PETM). The biomarker approach could potentially be used to assess temporal changes in lake emissions through the Holocene via the sedimentary biomarker record. However, there are no data on the consistency of the signal of isotopic depletion in relation to source or on the amount of noise (unexplained variation) in biomarker values from modern lake sediments. We assessed methane oxidation as represented by the isotopic signal of biomarkers from methane oxidising bacteria (MOB) in multiple surface sediment samples in three distinct areas known to emit varying levels of methane in two shallow Alaskan thermokarst lakes. Diploptene was present and had δ13C values lower than -38 ‰ in all sediments analysed, suggesting methane oxidation was widespread. However, there was considerable variation in δ13C values within each area. The most 13C-depleted diploptene was found in an area of high methane ebullition in Ace Lake (diploptene δ13C values between -68.2 and -50.1 ‰). In contrast, significantly higher diploptene δ13C values (between -42.9 and -38.8 ‰) were found in an area of methane ebullition in Smith Lake. δ13C values of diploptene between -56.8 and -46.9 ‰ were found in the centre of Smith Lake, where ebullition rates are low but diffusive methane efflux occurs. The small-scale heterogeneity of the samples may reflect patchy

  13. Regioselective Syntheses of [13C]4-Labelled Sodium 1-Carboxy-2-(2-ethylhexyloxycarbonyl)ethanesulfonate and Sodium 2-Carboxy-1-(2-ethylhexyloxycarbonyl)ethanesulfonate from [13C]4-Maleic Anhydride

    PubMed Central

    Barsamian, Adam L.; Perkins, Matt J.; Field, Jennifer A.; Blakemore, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    The entitled monohydrolysis products, also known as α- and β-ethylhexyl sulfosuccinate ('EHSS'), of the surfactant diisooctyl sulfosuccinate ('DOSS') were synthesized in stable isotope labelled form from [13C]4-maleic anhydride. Sodium [13C]4-1-carboxy-2-(2-ethylhexyloxycarbonyl)ethanesulfonate (α-EHSS) was prepared by the method of Larpent by reaction of 2-ethylhexan-1-ol with [13C]4-maleic anhydride followed by regioselective conjugate addition of sodium bisulfite to the resulting monoester (38% overall yield). The regiochemical outcome of bisulfite addition was confirmed by a combination of 13C/13C (INADEQUATE) and 1H/13C (HMBC) NMR spectral correlation experiments. Sodium [13C]4-2-carboxy-1-(2-ethylhexyloxycarbonyl)ethanesulfonate (β-EHSS) was prepared in four steps by reaction of 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol (PMBOH) with [13C]4-maleic anhydride, regioselective sodium bisulfite addition, DCC mediated esterification with 2-ethylhexan-1-ol, and PMB ester deprotection with trifluoroacetic acid (13% overall yield). The regiochemical outcome of the second synthesis was confirmed by a combination of 1JCC scalar coupling constant analysis and 1H/13C (HMBC) NMR spectral correlation. The materials prepared are required as internal standards for the LC-MS/MS trace analysis of the degradation products of DOSS, the anionic surfactant found in Corexit, the oil dispersant used during emergency response efforts connected to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill of April 2010. PMID:24700711

  14. The Fourier transform microwave spectrum of the arsenic dicarbide radical (CCAs: X (2)Pi(1/2)) and its (13)C isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Sun, M; Clouthier, D J; Ziurys, L M

    2009-12-14

    The pure rotational spectrum of the CCAs radical in its ground electronic and spin state, X (2)Pi(12), has been measured using Fourier transform microwave techniques in the frequency range of 12-40 GHz. This species was created in a supersonic expansion from a reaction mixture of AsCl(3) and C(2)H(2) or CH(4) diluted in high pressure argon, using a pulsed nozzle containing a dc discharge source. Three rotational transitions were measured for the main isotopologue, (12)C(12)CAs, in the Omega=12 ladder; both lambda-doubling and arsenic (I=32) hyperfine interactions were observed in these spectra. In addition, two to four rotational transitions were recorded for the (13)C(13)CAs, (13)C(12)CAs, and (12)C(13)CAs species. In these three isotopologues, hyperfine splittings were also resolved arising from the (13)C nuclei (I=12), creating complex spectral patterns. The CCAs spectra were analyzed with a case (a) Hamiltonian, and effective rotational, lambda-doubling, and arsenic and carbon-13 hyperfine constants were determined for the Omega=12 ladder. From the effective rotational constants of the four isotopologues, an r(m) ((1)) structure has been derived with r(C-C)=1.287 A and r(C-As)=1.745 A. These bond lengths indicate that the predominant structure for arsenic dicarbide is C=C=As, with some contributing C[Triple Bond]C and C[Triple Bond]As triple bond characters. The hyperfine constants established in this work indicate that about 23 of the unpaired electron density lies on the arsenic atom, with the remaining percentage on the terminal carbon. The value of the arsenic quadrupole coupling constant (eqQ=-202 MHz) suggests that the As-C bond has a mixture of covalent and ionic characters, consistent with theoretical predictions that both pi backbonding and electron transfer play a role in creating a linear, as opposed to a cyclic, structure for certain heteroatom dicarbides.

  15. Solid state {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR structural investigation of a poly(ethylene oxide) hydrogel

    SciTech Connect

    Badiger, M.V.; Graham, N.B.; Law, R.V.; Snape, C.E.

    1993-12-31

    A cross-linked poly (ethylene oxide)/polyurethane hydrogel cross-linked with 1,2,6 hexane-triol and designated PEG4050/1HT [measured M{sup n} of 4050 for poly (ethylene oxide) glycol (PEG) and a mole ratio of 1:1 for the PEG to the 1,2,6 hexane-triol] has been characterized by high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR. {sup 1}H thermal (T{sub 1}) and rotating frame (T{sub 1{rho}}) and {sup 13}CT{sub 1} relaxation times were determined for the powdered dry and swollen hydrogel with the standard variants of the cross-polarization pulse sequence which was used in conjunction with magic-angle spinning (MAS). The rotating frame relaxation measurements confirmed that crystalline and amorphous regions were present in the dry hydrogel but showed unabiguously that the crystalline regions are confined to the poly (ethylene oxide) chains, Upon hydration, there is a decrease in the cross polarization efficiency from the enhanced mobility by the poly (ethylene oxide) chains are affected to a much greater extent that the urethane and hexane segments, the characteristic time constant, T{sub CH} increasing by more than order of magnitude compared to no more than a factor of two for the latter. Clearly, the hydration involves hydrogen bonding between the water and principally the oxygens in the poly (ethylene oxide) chains. The {sup 1}H MAS spectra of the dry and hydrated samples confirmed that considerable averaging of the dipolar interactions occurs on hydration to give a well-resolved spectrum.

  16. Analysis of Hydroperoxides in Solid Polyethylene by MAS (13)C NMR and EPR

    SciTech Connect

    ASSINK,ROGER A.; CELINA,MATHIAS C.; DUNBAR,TIMOTHY D.; ALAM,TODD M.; CLOUGH,ROGER LEE; GILLEN,KENNETH T.

    1999-11-19

    {sup 13}C-enriched polyethylene was subjected to {gamma}-irradiation in the presence of air at 25 and 80 C for total doses ranging from 71 to 355 kGy. Significant quantities of hydroperoxides were detected in the 25 C irradiated sample by {sup 13}C magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. This method of detection was performed on the solid polymer and required no chemical derivatization or addition of solvent. The chemical stability and subsequent products of the hydroperoxide species were studied by annealing the irradiated samples in air at temperatures ranging from 22 to 110 C. A time-temperature superposition analysis provided an activation energy of 108 kJ/mol for the hydroperoxide decomposition process. The primary products of hydroperoxide decomposition were ketones and secondary alcohols with lesser amounts of acids and esters. EPR measurements suggest that the reactive hydroperoxide species reside in the amorphous phase of polyethylene, consistent with degradation occurring in the amorphous phase.

  17. NMR analyses of the cold cataract. III. /sup 13/C acrylamide studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lerman, S.; Megaw, J.M.; Moran, M.N.

    1985-10-01

    /sup 13/C-enriched acrylamide was employed to further delineate the action of this compound in preventing the cold cataract phenomenon when it is incorporated (in vitro) into young human and rabbit lenses. The extent of acrylamide incorporation, in the dark and with concurrent UV exposure, was monitored by /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy. These studies provide further evidence that UV exposure causes permanent acrylamide photobinding within the lens. In such lenses, the gamma crystallin fraction of the soluble lens proteins is affected to the greatest extent. It appears to become aggregated and/or combined with the alpha and beta fractions resulting in an apparent loss of most of the gamma monomers. There is also an age-related effect with respect to the amount of acrylamide that can be incorporated into the lens. The decrease in acrylamide incorporation with age directly parallels the age-related decline in gamma crystallin levels.

  18. Direct measurement of brain glucose concentrations in humans by sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gruetter, R.; Novotny, E.J.; Boulware, S.D.; Rothman, D.L.; Mason, G.F.; Shulman, G.I.; Shulan, R.G.; Tamborlane, W.V. )

    1992-02-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in the normal human brain. It is generally assumed that glucose transport into the brain is not rate-limiting for metabolism. Since brain glucose concentrations cannot be determined directly by radiotracer techniques, the authors used {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy after infusing enriched D-(1-{sup 13}C)glucose to measure brain glucose concentrations at euglycemia and at hyperglycemia in six healthy children. Brain glucose concentrations averaged 1.0 {plus minus} 0.1 {mu}mol/ml at euglycemia and 1.8-2.7 {mu}mol/ml at hyperglycemia. Michaelis-Menten parameters of transport were calculated from the relationship between plasma and brain glucose concentrations. The brain glucose concentrations and transport constants are consistent with transport not being rate-limiting for resting brain metabolism at plasma levels >3 mM.

  19. 13C NMR spectroscopy of the insoluble carbon of carbonaceous chondrites.

    PubMed

    Cronin, J R; Pizzarello, S; Frye, J S

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectra have been obtained of the insoluble carbon residues resulting from HF-digestion of three carbonaceous chondrites, Orgueil (C1), Murchison (CM2), and Allende (CV3). Spectra obtained using the cross polarization magic-angle spinning technique show two major features attributable respectively to carbon in aliphatic/olefinic structures. The spectrum obtained from the Allende sample was weak, presumably as a consequence of its low hydrogen content. Single pulse excitation spectra, which do not depend on 1H-13C polarization transfer for signal enhancement were also obtained. These spectra, which may be more representative of the total carbon in the meteorite samples, indicate a greater content of carbon in aromatic/olefinic structures. These results suggest that extensive polycyclic aromatic sheets are important structural features of the insoluble carbon of all three meteorites. The Orgueil and Murchison materials contain additional hydrogenated aromatic/olefinic and aliphatic groups.

  20. Measuring long-lived 13C2 state lifetimes at natural abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claytor, Kevin; Theis, Thomas; Feng, Yesu; Warren, Warren

    2014-02-01

    Long-lived disconnected eigenstates (for example, the singlet state in a system with two nearly equivalent carbons, or the singlet-singlet state in a system with two chemically equivalent carbons and two chemically equivalent hydrogens) hold the potential to drastically extend the lifetime of hyperpolarization in molecular tracers for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, a first-principles calculation of the expected lifetime (and thus selection of potential imaging agents) is made very difficult because of the large variety of relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation mechanisms. As a result, all previous measurements relied on costly and time consuming syntheses of 13C labeled compounds. Here we show that it is possible to determine 13C singlet state lifetimes by detecting the naturally abundant doubly-labeled species. This approach allows for rapid and low cost screening of potential molecular biomarkers bearing long-lived states.

  1. Correlation of 13C /12C and 34S /32S secular variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veizer, Ján; Holser, William T.; Wilgus, Cheryl K.

    1980-04-01

    Statistical evaluation of 3056 δ13C measurements in carbonate rocks and fossils shows that they record a 2‰ 13C depletion from the late Proterozoic to the early Paleozoic, a 2.5‰ enrichment to the Permian, and a 1.5‰ depletion to the Cenozoic. These variations, not controlled primarily by facies or alteration phenomena, correlate negatively with the δ34S sulfate secular trend, as confirmed by collation of 1083 δ34S measurements. The correlation suggests that the biologically mediated redox fluxes of the C and S cycles have been approximately balanced through this long span of geological time, generally levelling available oxygen. Such a redox system is consistent with the controlling mechanism proposed by GARRELS and PERRY (1974). Consequently, the sedimentary reservoirs of C organic as well as S bacteriological'have varied through geological time.

  2. [DELAYED RESULTS OF ENZYME REPLACEMENT THERAPY, PRESCRIBED BY RESULTS OF 13C-TRIGLYCERIDE BREATH TEST].

    PubMed

    Chernyavskiy, V V; Gvozdetska, L S

    2015-01-01

    Maldigestion persists in most patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). The objective lipase and amylase insufficiency diagnosis is needed to achieve an adequate clinical response to oral pancreatic enzyme substitution therapy. The novel data is presented in the article about the role of 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test as a tool for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency diagnosis, for evaluating fat malabsorbtion in CP patients. 135 patients were included in the investigation. Delayed results of enzyme replacement therapy were estimated after 1 and 2 year of surveillance. It has been shown, that partial recovery of exocrine pancreatic function is possible, and replacement therapy leads to patients nutritional status improving. Thus 13C-triglyceride breath test could be useful tool in clinical practice for CP diagnosis. The test make it possible to choose the initial pancreatic enzyme dosage and are beneficial during the treatment for pancreatic enzyme dose correction. PMID:26827447

  3. Optical Potential Parameters of Weakly Bound Nuclear System 17F+13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Guang-Peng; Lin, Cheng-Jian; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Liu, Zu-Hua; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Gao-Long; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Wu, Zhen-Dong; Jia, Fei; Jia, Hui-Ming; Xu, Xin-Xing; Bai, Chun-Lin; Yu, Ning

    2008-12-01

    Elastic scattering angular distributions of the 14N+16O system and the angular distributions of transfer reaction 16O(14N,13 C)17 F at ELab = 76.2 MeV and 57MeV have been measured and calculated by means of the exact finite-range distorted-wave Born approximation with the PTOLEMY code. The optical potential parameters for the weakly bound nuclear system 17F+13 C have been deduced and applied to analyse the elastic scattering angular distributions of the similar systems 17F+12C and 17F+14N which are taken from literature. The result shows that the transfer reaction with stable projectile and target combination can be used as an alternative method to extract the optical potential parameters for the weakly bound nuclear system.

  4. Calculation of the 13C NMR shieldings of the C0 2 complexes of aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    1995-04-01

    13C NMR shieldings have been calculated using the random-phase-approximation, localized-orbital local-origins version of ab initio coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory for CO 2 and and for several complexes formed by the reaction of CO 2 with molecular models for aluminosilicate glasses, H 3TOT'H3 3-n, T,T' = Si,Al. Two isomeric forms of the CO 2-aluminosilicate complexes have been considered: (1) "CO 2-like" complexes, in which the CO 2 group is bound through carbon to a bridging oxygen and (2) "CO 3-like" complexes, in which two oxygens of a central CO 3 group form bridging bonds to the two TH 3 groups. The CO 2-like isomer of CO 2-H 3SiOSiH 3 is quite weakly bonded and its 13C isotropic NMR shielding is almost identical to that in free CO 2. As Si is progressively replaced by Al in the - H terminated aluminosilicate model, the CO 2-like isomers show increasing distortion from the free CO 2 geometry and their 13C NMR shieldings decrease uniformly. The calculated 13C shielding value for H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 is only about 6 ppm larger than that calculated for point charge stabilized CO 3-2. However, for a geometry of H 3SiO(CO 2) AlH 3-1, in which the bridging oxygen to C bond length has been artificially increased to that found in the - OH terminated cluster (OH) 3SiO(CO 2)Al(OH) 3-1, the calculated 13C shielding is almost identical to that for free CO 2. The CO 3-like isomers of the CO 2-aluminosili-cate complexes show carbonate like geometries and 13C NMR shieldings about 4-9 ppm larger than those of carbonate for all T,T' pairs. For the Si,Si tetrahedral atom pair the CO 2-like isomer is more stable energetically, while for the Si,Al and Al,Al cases the CO 3-like isomer is more stable. Addition of Na + ions to the CO 3-2 or H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 complexes reduces the 13C NMR shieldings by about 10 ppm. Complexation with either Na + or CO 2 also reduces the 29Si NMR shieldings of the aluminosilicate models, while the changes in 27Al shielding with Na + or CO 2

  5. Reconstructing past climate using a multi-specific 13C-approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Aguilera, Mónica; Voltas, Jordi

    2010-05-01

    Carbon isotope composition (δ13C) in tree-rings has become routinely used in palaeoclimatic research for the assessment of changes in water availability in seasonally dry climates. Long tree-ring chronologies, however, are relatively scarce, whereas the original climate signal of wood δ13C is usually well preserved in fossil charcoal [1, 4] Accordingly, charcoal δ13C records are an alternative to classic dendroclimatology to characterize past changes in water availability (e.g. precipitation). In this work, we explore the potential for palaeoenvironmental research of two co-occuring Mediterranean species with contrasting strategies to cope with drought [2]: Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill.) and holm oak (Quercus ilex L.). We hypothesize that the differential sensitivity of pine and oak to climate variables can be exploited to refine palaeoclimate reconstructions based on δ13C in wood or charcoal. For this purpose, we put together published tree-core-δ13C data from 40 sites across Spain [2, 3] and new δ13C data from 15 sites where both species co-existed in mixed stands. The sites were selected to represent the range of variation in thermal and precipitation regimes for these species, while avoiding any correlation between precipitation and temperature across sites. Five dominant or codominant trees were selected per site, and microcores including the most recently formed tree rings were obtained with a Trephor tool [5]. Fragments were oven-dried at 60 ° C for 48 h and milled separately to a fine powder using a ball mill (Retsch MM301, Haan, Germany) for δ13C analysis. Current meteorological data (monthly estimates of air mean temperature (minimum, mean and maximum), precipitation and solar radiation) was obtained from the Digital Climatic Atlas of the Iberian Peninsula (http://opengis.uab.es/wms/iberia/index.htm) (spatial resolution of 200 m). A family of models (either linear or exponential) best predicting monthly and annual precipitation from δ13C

  6. Direct observation of glycogen synthesis in human muscle with sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Jue, T.; Rothman, D.L.; Shulman, G.I.; Tavitian, B.A.; DeFronzo, R.A.; Shulman, R.G. )

    1989-06-01

    On the basis of previous indirect measurements, skeletal muscle has been implicated as the major site of glucose uptake and it has been suggested that muscle glycogen formation is the dominant pathway. However, direct measurements of the rates of glycogen synthesis have not been possible by previous techniques. The authors have developed {sup 13}C NMR methods to measure directly the rate of human muscle glycogen formation from infused, isotopically labeled (1-{sup 13}C)glucose. They show that under conditions of imposed hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, a majority of the infused glucose was converted to muscle glycogen in a normal man. This directly shows that muscle is the major site of glucose disposal under these conditions, and provides quantitation of the glucose flux to muscle glycogen.

  7. 13C NMR spectroscopy of the insoluble carbon of carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Frye, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectra have been obtained of the insoluble carbon residues resulting from HF-digestion of three carbonaceous chondrites, Orgueil (C1), Murchison (CM2), and Allende (CV3). Spectra obtained using the cross polarization magic-angle spinning technique show two major features attributable respectively to carbon in aliphatic/olefinic structures. The spectrum obtained from the Allende sample was weak, presumably as a consequence of its low hydrogen content. Single pulse excitation spectra, which do not depend on 1H-13C polarization transfer for signal enhancement were also obtained. These spectra, which may be more representative of the total carbon in the meteorite samples, indicate a greater content of carbon in aromatic/olefinic structures. These results suggest that extensive polycyclic aromatic sheets are important structural features of the insoluble carbon of all three meteorites. The Orgueil and Murchison materials contain additional hydrogenated aromatic/olefinic and aliphatic groups.

  8. Determination of 15N/14N and 13C/12C in Solid and Aqueous Cyanides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The stable isotopic compositions of nitrogen and carbon in cyanide compounds can be determined by combusting aliquots in sealed tubes to form N2 gas and CO2 gas and analyzing the gases by mass spectrometry. Free cyanide (CN-aq + HCNaq) in simple solutions can also be analyzed by first precipitating the cyanide as copper(II) ferrocyanide and then combusting the precipitate. Reproducibility is ??0.5??? or better for both ??15N and ??13C. If empirical corrections are made on the basis of carbon yields, the reproducibility of ??13C can be improved to ??0.2???. The analytical methods described herein are sufficiently accurate and precise to apply stable isotope techniques to problems of cyanide degradation in natural waters and industrial process solutions.

  9. C-13/C-12 ratio in methane from the flooded Amazon forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, Stanley C.; Blake, Donald R.; Rowland, F. Sherwood

    1987-01-01

    The C1-C4 hydrocarbon concentrations and the C-13/C-12 ratio in CH4 detected in air samples collected in the Amazon region (3.5 deg S latitude and 5.9 deg W longitude) are analyzed. It is observed that the CH4 concentrations of each sample are enhanced over the background concentration for remote locations, and the C-13/C-12 ratio in this biogenic methane is depleted in C-13 relative to atmospheric CH4. It is concluded, from the C2-C4 hydrocarbon data, that minor yields of C2-C4 hyrocarbons are released coincident with CH4; however, the minor yields do not contribute to the regionally enhanced concentrations of hydrocarbons found in Amazonia and the global atmosphere release of C2-C4 compounds.

  10. Experimental study of the 13C+12C fusion reaction at deep sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudor, D.; Chilug, A. I.; Straticiuc, M.; Trache, L.; Chesneanu, D.; Toma, S.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Gomoiu, C.; Zhang, N. T.; Tang, X.; Li, Y. J.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy-ion fusion reactions between light nuclei such as carbon and oxygen isotopes have been studied because of their significance for a wide variety of stellar burning scenarios. One important stellar reaction is 12C+12C, but it is difficult to measure it in the Gamow window because of very low cross sections and several resonances occurring. Hints can be obtained from the study of 13C+12C reaction. We have measured this process by an activation method for energies down to Ecm=2.5 MeV using 13C beams from the Bucharest 3 MV tandetron and gamma-ray deactivation measurements in our low and ultralow background laboratories, the latter located in a salt mine about 100 km north of Bucharest. Results obtained so far are shown and discussed in connection with the possibility to go even further down in energy and with the interpretation of the reaction mechanism at such deep sub-barrier energies.

  11. [DELAYED RESULTS OF ENZYME REPLACEMENT THERAPY, PRESCRIBED BY RESULTS OF 13C-TRIGLYCERIDE BREATH TEST].

    PubMed

    Chernyavskiy, V V; Gvozdetska, L S

    2015-01-01

    Maldigestion persists in most patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). The objective lipase and amylase insufficiency diagnosis is needed to achieve an adequate clinical response to oral pancreatic enzyme substitution therapy. The novel data is presented in the article about the role of 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test as a tool for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency diagnosis, for evaluating fat malabsorbtion in CP patients. 135 patients were included in the investigation. Delayed results of enzyme replacement therapy were estimated after 1 and 2 year of surveillance. It has been shown, that partial recovery of exocrine pancreatic function is possible, and replacement therapy leads to patients nutritional status improving. Thus 13C-triglyceride breath test could be useful tool in clinical practice for CP diagnosis. The test make it possible to choose the initial pancreatic enzyme dosage and are beneficial during the treatment for pancreatic enzyme dose correction.

  12. Sensitivity and specificity of an abbreviated 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test for measurement of pancreatic exocrine function

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Viola; Wolfram, Kristina U; Rosien, Ulrich; Layer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background A modified 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test (13C -MTGT) detects moderate pancreatic exocrine insufficiency noninvasively and reliably, but it requires prolonged breath sampling (6 hours (hr)). Objective We aimed to investigate whether 13C -MTGT can be abbreviated, to optimize clinical usability. Methods We analyzed the 13C-MTGT of 200 consecutive patients, retrospectively. Cumulative 1–5 hr 13C-exhalation values were compared with the standard parameter (6-hr cumulative 13C-exhalation). We determined the sensitivity and specificity of shortened breath sampling periods, by comparison with the normal values from 10 healthy volunteers, whom also underwent a secretin test to quantitate pancreatic secretion. Moreover, we evaluated the influence of gastric emptying (GE), using a 13C-octanoic acid breath test in a subset (N = 117). Results The 1–5 hr cumulative 13C-exhalation tests correlated highly and significantly with the standard parameter (p < 0.0001). Sensitivity for detection of impaired lipolysis was high (≥77%), but the specificity was low (≥38%) for the early measurements. Both parameters were high after 4 hrs (88% and 94%, respectively) and 5 hrs (98% and 91%, respectively). Multivariate linear correlation analysis confirmed that GE strongly influenced early postprandial 13C-exhalation during the 13C-MTGT. Conclusion Shortening of the 13C -MTGT from 6 to 4 hrs of duration was associated with similar diagnostic accuracy, yet increased clinical usability. The influence of GE on early postprandial results of the 13C-MTGT precluded further abbreviation of the test. PMID:25083286

  13. 13C 12C exchange between calcite and graphite: A possible thermometer in Grenville marbles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valley, J.W.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The fractionation of 13C between calcite and graphite, ??(Cc-Gr). is consistently small (2.6-4.8 permil) in 34 assemblages from upper amphibolite- and granulite-facies marbles of the Grenville Province. In 25 samples from the Adirondack Mountains, New York, it decreases regularly with increasing metamorphic temperature. The fractionations are independent of absolute ??13C values of calcite (-2.9 to +5.0). For T = 600-800??C, the Adirondack data are described by ??(Cc-Gr) = -0.00748T (??C) + 8.68. This good correlation between ?? and T suggests that carbon isotope equilibrium was attained in these high-grade marbles and that the theoretical calculations of this fractionation by Bottinga are approximately 2 permil too large in this temperature range. Because of the relatively high temperature sensitivity suggested by these results and by Bottinga's calculations, and the pressure independence of isotope fractionation, ??(Cc-Gr) may provide a very good thermometer for high-grade marbles. Comparison of this field calibration for ??(Cc-Gr) vs temperature with results from other terranes supports the utility of ??(Cc-Gr) for geothermometry and suggests that graphite is much more sluggish to exchange than calcite, that exchange between calcite and graphite occurs at temperatures as low as 300??C, and that equilibrium may normally be attained only when peak metamorphic temperatures are greater than 500-600??C. Because 13C exchange is an unavoidable metamorphic process at temperatures above 300??C, high values of ??13C(Gr) in moderate- to high-grade carbonate-bearing rocks do not provide a sufficient criterion to infer an abiogenic origin for the graphite. ?? 1981.

  14. 13C-18O isotope signatures and ‘clumped isotope’ thermometry in foraminifera and coccoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Eagle, Robert A.; Thiagarajan, Nivedita; Gagnon, Alexander C.; Bauch, Henning; Halloran, Paul R.; Eiler, John M.

    2010-10-01

    Accurate constraints on past ocean temperatures and compositions are critical for documenting climate change and resolving its causes. Most proxies for temperature are not thermodynamically based, appear to be subject to biological processes, require regional calibrations, and/or are influenced by fluid composition. As a result, their interpretation becomes uncertain when they are applied in settings not necessarily resembling those in which they were empirically calibrated. Independent proxies for past temperature could provide an important means of testing and/or expanding on existing reconstructions. Here we report measurements of abundances of stable isotopologues of calcitic and aragonitic benthic and planktic foraminifera and coccoliths, relate those abundances to independently estimated growth temperatures, and discuss the possible scope of equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects. The proportions of 13C- 18O bonds in these samples exhibits a temperature dependence that is generally similar to that previously been reported for inorganic calcite and other biologically precipitated carbonate-containing minerals (apatite from fish, reptile, and mammal teeth; calcitic brachiopods and molluscs; aragonitic coral and mollusks). Most species that exhibit non-equilibrium 18O/ 16O (δ 18O) and 13C/ 12C (δ 13C) ratios are characterized by 13C- 18O bond abundances that are similar to inorganic calcite and are generally indistinguishable from apparent equilibrium, with possible exceptions among benthic foraminiferal samples from the Arctic Ocean where temperatures are near-freezing. Observed isotope ratios in biogenic carbonates can be explained if carbonate minerals generally preserve a state of ordering that reflects the extent of isotopic equilibration of the dissolved inorganic carbon species.

  15. Accurate diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori. 13C-urea breath test.

    PubMed

    Graham, D Y; Klein, P D

    2000-12-01

    The preferred schema for management of Helicobacter pylori infection is diagnosis, treatment, and confirmation of cure. The 13C-urea breath test is ideal for active H. pylori infection for those in whom endoscopy is not required (e.g., those in whom cancer is not suspected) because it offers the combination of simplicity, accuracy, reliability, and absence of exposure to radioactivity. New versions of the test also offer increasing simplicity and lower costs. PMID:11190073

  16. Analysis of defect structure in silicon. Characterization of samples from UCP ingot 5848-13C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natesh, R.; Guyer, T.; Stringfellow, G. B.

    1982-01-01

    Statistically significant quantitative structural imperfection measurements were made on samples from ubiquitous crystalline process (UCP) Ingot 5848 - 13 C. Important trends were noticed between the measured data, cell efficiency, and diffusion length. Grain boundary substructure appears to have an important effect on the conversion efficiency of solar cells from Semix material. Quantitative microscopy measurements give statistically significant information compared to other microanalytical techniques. A surface preparation technique to obtain proper contrast of structural defects suitable for QTM analysis was perfected.

  17. Measuring DNA synthesis rates with [1-13C]glycine.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Abramson, F P

    1998-05-01

    We have devised and evaluated a stable-isotopic method for measuring DNA synthesis rates. The probe is [1-13C]-glycine that is incorporated into purines via de novo biosynthesis. The human hepatoma cell line HEP G2 was grown in medium containing [1-13C]glycine, the cells were harvested at various times, and the DNA was extracted. Following hydrolysis to the nucleosides, a reversed-phase HPLC separation was used to provide separate peaks for deoxythymidine (dT), deoxyadenosine (dA), and deoxyguanosine (dG). The HPLC effluent was continuously fed into a chemical reaction interface and an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (HPLC/CRI/IRMS). The isotope ratio of the CO2 produced in the CRI was used to monitor for enrichment. The cells were grown continuously for 5 days in labeled medium and also in a 1-day pulse labeling experiment where the washout of label was observed for the subsequent 9 days. As predicted from the role of glycine in de novo purine biosynthesis, the isotope ratio of the pyrimidine dT did not change. However, for the two purines, dA and dG, the characteristic log growth behavior of the cells was observed in their 13C/12C ratios and good agreement in the doubling time was obtained for each type of experiment. Parallel experiments that measured the HEP G2 doubling time in culture using tritiated thymidine incorporation and direct cell counts were carried out compare to our new method with established ones. We believe that the use of [1-13C]-glycine and the HPLC/CRI/IRMS is a highly sensitive and selective approach that forms the basis of a method that can measure DNA synthesis rates using a nonradioactive, nontoxic tracer. PMID:9599574

  18. Using Neural Networks for 13C NMR Chemical Shift Prediction-Comparison with Traditional Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiler, Jens; Maier, Walter; Will, Martin; Meusinger, Reinhard

    2002-08-01

    Interpretation of 13C chemical shifts is essential for structure elucidation of organic molecules by NMR. In this article, we present an improved neural network approach and compare its performance to that of commonly used approaches. Specifically, our recently proposed neural network ( J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 2000, 40, 1169-1176) is improved by introducing an extended hybrid numerical description of the carbon atom environment, resulting in a standard deviation (std. dev.) of 2.4 ppm for an independent test data set of ˜42,500 carbons. Thus, this neural network allows fast and accurate 13C NMR chemical shift prediction without the necessity of access to molecule or fragment databases. For an unbiased test dataset containing 100 organic structures the accuracy of the improved neural network was compared to that of a prediction method based on the HOSE code ( hierarchically ordered spherical description of environment) using S PECI NFO. The results show the neural network predictions to be of quality (std. dev.=2.7 ppm) comparable to that of the HOSE code prediction (std. dev.=2.6 ppm). Further we compare the neural network predictions to those of a wide variety of other 13C chemical shift prediction tools including incremental methods (C HEMD RAW, S PECT OOL), quantum chemical calculation (G AUSSIAN, C OSMOS), and HOSE code fragment-based prediction (S PECI NFO, ACD/CNMR, P REDICTI T NMR) for the 47 13C-NMR shifts of Taxol, a natural product including many structural features of organic substances. The smallest standard deviations were achieved here with the neural network (1.3 ppm) and S PECI NFO (1.0 ppm).

  19. Design, total synthesis, and evaluation of C13-C14 cyclopropane analogues of (+)-discodermolide.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amos B; Xian, Ming; Liu, Fenghua

    2005-10-13

    [structure: see text] The design, total synthesis, and biological evaluation of two C13-C14-cyclopropyl analogues [(+)-1 and (+)-2] of (+)-discodermolide have been achieved. Key features of the syntheses include highly stereoselective, hydroxyl-directed cyclopropanations of vinyl iodides and higher order cuprate-mediated cross-coupling reactions between cyclopropyl iodides and alkyl iodides. Biological evaluation revealed that neither orientation of the cyclopropyl methylene completely substitutes for the C14 methyl found in (+)-discodermolide (3).

  20. Hyperpolarized 13C urea relaxation mechanism reveals renal changes in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Stokholm Nørlinger, Thomas; Christoffer Hansen, David; Qi, Haiyun; Mose Nielsen, Per; Bonde Bertelsen, Lotte; Henrik Ardenkjaer‐Larsen, Jan; Stødkilde Jørgensen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to assess a novel 13C radial fast spin echo golden ratio single shot method for interrogating early renal changes in the diabetic kidney, using hyperpolarized (HP) [13C,15N2]urea as a T2 relaxation based contrast bio‐probe. Methods A novel HP 13C MR contrast experiment was conducted in a group of streptozotocin type‐1 diabetic rat model and age matched controls. Results A significantly different relaxation time (P = 0.004) was found in the diabetic kidney (0.49 ± 0.03 s) compared with the controls (0.64 ± 0.02 s) and secondly, a strong correlation between the blood oxygen saturation level and the relaxation times were observed in the healthy controls. Conclusion HP [13C,15N2]urea apparent T2 mapping may be a useful for interrogating local renal pO2 status and renal tissue alterations. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. Magn Reson Med 75:515–518, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID:26584247

  1. EDGE2D Simulations of JET{sup 13}C Migration Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan; J.P. Coad; G. Corrigan; G.F. Matthews; J. Spence

    2004-06-16

    Material migration has received renewed interest due to tritium retention associated with carbon transport to remote vessel locations. Those results influence the desirability of carbon usage on ITER. Subsequently, additional experiments have been performed, including tracer experiments attempting to identify material migration from specific locations. In this paper, EDGE2D models a well-diagnosed JET{sup 13}C tracer migration experiment. The role of SOL flows upon the migration patterns is identified.

  2. Bioattenuation in groundwater impacted by landfill leachate traced with δ13C.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Hossein; Clark, Ian

    2011-01-01

    The impact on groundwater imparted by the infiltration of high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leachate from capped, unlined landfills can be attenuated by biogeochemical reactions beyond the waste source, although such reactive loss in the aquifer is difficult to distinguish from conservative advective dispersion. Compound-specific measurement of δ(13)C in carbon species, including CH(4), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and the major DOC compounds (acetate, humic acid, and fulvic acid) provides a constraint in this assessment that can assist in exercises of modeling and prediction of leachate transport. The Trail Road municipal landfill near Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, hosts an unlined sector which produces a highly enriched leachate (DOC >4500 mg/L) that provides a good site to examine reactive attenuation within the receptor aquifer. Acetate, a sentinel component of leachate DOC (~1000 mg C/L), is absent in impacted groundwater. Mass balance calculations together with reaction modeling suggest continued acetate fermentation with calcite control on DIC and δ(13)C(DIC) evolution. In groundwater within 50 m of the landfill, methane concentrations are elevated (~10 mg/L), consistent with acetate fermentation, whereas δ(13)C(CH4) measurements in deeper groundwater range down to -51‰ compared with -60‰ in the landfill demonstrating oxidative loss. DOC in the deep aquifer is remarkably depleted to values less than -40‰ suggesting methanotrophic bacteria selectively consume isotopically light CH(4) to fix carbon. Continued reaction of leachate DOC in groundwater is demonstrated by evolution away from conservative mixing lines on diagrams of δ(13)C vs. concentrations of DIC and DOC. PMID:21306357

  3. Measuring Level Alignment at the Metal–Molecule Interface by In Situ Electrochemical 13C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zelakiewicz, Brian S.; Allison, Thomas C.; Tong, Yu ye J.

    2015-03-16

    A new technique to measure energy-level alignment at a metal–molecule interface between the Fermi level of the metal and the frontier orbitals of the molecule is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The method, which combines the electrochemistry of organo-ligand-stabilized Au nanoparticles with 13C NMR spectroscopy (i.e. in situ electrochemical NMR), enables measuring both occupied and unoccupied states.

  4. On the status of IAEA delta-13C stable isotope reference materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assonov, Sergey; Groening, Manfred; Fajgelj, Ales

    2016-04-01

    For practical reasons all isotope measurements are performed on relative scales realized through the use of international, scale-defining primary standards. In fact these standards were materials (artefacts, similar to prototypes of meter and kg) selected based on their properties. The VPDB delta-13C scale is realised via two highest-level reference materials NBS19 and LSVEC, the first defining the scale and the second aimed to normalise lab-to-lab calibrations. These two reference materials (RMs) have been maintained and distributed by IAEA and NIST. The priority task is to maintain these primary RMs at the required uncertainty level, thus ensuring the long-term scale consistency. The second task is to introduce replacements when needed (currently for exhausted NBS19, work in progress). The next is to produce a family of lower level RMs (secondary, tertiary) addressing needs of various applications (with different delta values, in different physical-chemical forms) and their needs for the uncertainty; these RMs should be traceable to the highest level RMs. Presently three is a need for a range of RMs addressing existing and newly emerging analytical techniques (e.g. optical isotopic analysers) in form of calibrated CO2 gases with different delta-13C values. All that implies creating a family of delta-13C stable isotope reference materials. Presently IAEA works on replacement for NBS19 and planning new RMs. Besides, we found that LSVEC (introduced as second anchor for the VPDB scale in 2006) demonstrate a considerable scatter of its delta-13C value which implies a potential bias of the property value and increased value uncertainty which may conflict with uncertainty requirements for atmospheric monitoring. That is not compatible with the status of LSVEC, and therefore it should be replaced as soon as possible. The presentation will give an overview of the current status, the strategic plan of developments and the near future steps.

  5. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of two phytosterols from roots of Piper nigrum.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kun; Li, Wei; Koike, Kazuo; Pei, Yuping; Chen, Yingjie; Nikaido, Tamotsu

    2004-03-01

    Using modern NMR techniques, including DQF-COSY, NOESY, HETCOR and HMBC, the full assignments of all 1H and 13C chemical shifts were made for stigmastane-3,6-dione and stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione, isolated from the roots of Piper nigrum (Piperaceae). Their stereochemistry was resolved by a combination of 2D NOESY data and analysis of coupling constants. The two compounds were isolated from the genus Piper for the first time.

  6. Tracing solid waste leachate in groundwater using δ13 C from dissolved inorganic carbon.

    PubMed

    Haarstad, Ketil; Mæhlum, Trond

    2013-01-01

    Tracers can be used to monitor emissions of leachate from landfills in order to detect hydrological pathways and to evaluate environmental pollution. We investigated the stable carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C-Σ CO (2)) in dissolved inorganic carbon and tritium ((3)H) in water, in addition to the tracers of pollution commonly found in relatively high concentrations in leachate, such as chloride (Cl), organic matter (COD), nitrogen (total and NH(4)-N), iron (Fe), electrical conductivity (EC) and pH. The sampling was performed at seven landfills in the south-eastern part of Norway during a period of 5 years. The objective was to evaluate the potential for tracing leachate in the environment with emphasis on groundwater pollution. By measuring the δ(13)C-Σ CO (2) in leachates, groundwaters and surface waters, the influence of leachate can be identified. The value of δ(13)C-Σ CO (2) varied from-5.5 to 25.9 ‰ in leachate, from-25.4 to 14.7 ‰ in groundwater and from-19.7 to-13.1 ‰ in creeks. A comparison of the carbon isotope ratio with COD, EC and the concentrations of total and NH (4)-N, Cl and Fe showed that δ(13)C-Σ CO (2) is a good tracer for leachate due to higher sensitivity compared to other parameters. The mean concentrations of all the studied parameters were higher in the leachate samples; however, only the carbon isotope ratio showed significant differences between all the groups with strong and middle pollution and samples with low pollution, showing that it can be used as a convenient tracer for leachate in groundwater and surface water. The carbon isotope ratio showed strong correlation between nitrogen, EC and bicarbonate, but not with pH. Tritium was only sporadically found in measureable concentrations and is not considered as a suitable tracer at the sampled locations.

  7. Reflections on the application of 13C-MRS to research on brain metabolism.

    PubMed

    Morris, Peter; Bachelard, Herman

    2003-01-01

    The power of (13)C-MRS lies in its unique chemical specificity, enabling detection and quantification of metabolic intermediates which would not be so readily monitored using conventional radiochemical techniques. Examples from animal studies, by examination of tissue extracts from the whole brain, brain slices and cultured cells, include observation of intermediates such as citrate and triose phosphates which have yielded novel information on neuronal/glial relationships. The use of (13)C-labelled acetate as a specific precursor for glial metabolism provided evidence in support of the view that some of the GABA produced in the brain is derived from glial glutamine. Such studies have also provided direct evidence on the contribution of anaplerotic pathways to intermediary metabolism. Analogous studies are now being performed on the human brain, where (13)C-acetate is used to quantitate the overall contribution of glial cells to intermediary metabolism, and use of (13)C-glucose enables direct calculation of rates of flux through the TCA (F(TCA)) and of the glutamate-glutamine cycle (F(CYC)), leading to the conclusion that the rate of glial recycling of glutamate accounts for some 50% of F(TCA). The rate of 0.74 micromol min(-1) g(-1) for F(TCA) is compatible with PET rates of CMRglc of 0.3-0.4 micromol min(-1) g(-1) (since each glucose molecule yields two molecules of pyruvate entering the TCA). Our brain activation studies showed a 60% increase in F(TCA), which is very similar to the increases in CBF and in CMRglc observed in PET activation studies.

  8. A comparison of quantitative methods for clinical imaging with hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Charlie J; McLean, Mary A; Schulte, Rolf F; Robb, Fraser J; Gill, Andrew B; McGlashan, Nicholas; Graves, Martin J; Schwaiger, Markus; Lomas, David J; Brindle, Kevin M; Gallagher, Ferdia A

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enables the metabolism of hyperpolarized (13)C-labelled molecules, such as the conversion of [1-(13)C]pyruvate to [1-(13)C]lactate, to be dynamically and non-invasively imaged in tissue. Imaging of this exchange reaction in animal models has been shown to detect early treatment response and correlate with tumour grade. The first human DNP study has recently been completed, and, for widespread clinical translation, simple and reliable methods are necessary to accurately probe the reaction in patients. However, there is currently no consensus on the most appropriate method to quantify this exchange reaction. In this study, an in vitro system was used to compare several kinetic models, as well as simple model-free methods. Experiments were performed using a clinical hyperpolarizer, a human 3 T MR system, and spectroscopic imaging sequences. The quantitative methods were compared in vivo by using subcutaneous breast tumours in rats to examine the effect of pyruvate inflow. The two-way kinetic model was the most accurate method for characterizing the exchange reaction in vitro, and the incorporation of a Heaviside step inflow profile was best able to describe the in vivo data. The lactate time-to-peak and the lactate-to-pyruvate area under the curve ratio were simple model-free approaches that accurately represented the full reaction, with the time-to-peak method performing indistinguishably from the best kinetic model. Finally, extracting data from a single pixel was a robust and reliable surrogate of the whole region of interest. This work has identified appropriate quantitative methods for future work in the analysis of human hyperpolarized (13)C data.

  9. Prediction of successive steps of SOM formation in aggregates and density fractions based on the 13C natural abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Aggregate formation is a key process of soil development, which promotes carbon (C) stabilization by hindering decomposition of particulate organic matter (POM) and its interactions with mineral particles. C stabilization processes lead to 13C fractionation and consequently to various δ13C values of soil organic matter (SOM) fractions. Differences in δ13C within the aggregates and fractions may have two reasons: 1) preferential stabilization of organic compounds with light or heavy δ13C and/or 2) stabilization of organic materials after passing one or more microbial utilization cycles, leading to heavier δ13C in remaining C. We hypothesized that: 1) 13C enrichment between the SOM fractions corresponds to successive steps of SOM formation; 2) 13C fractionation (but not the δ13C signature) depends mainly on the transformation steps and not on the C precursors. Consequently, minimal differences between Δ13C of SOM fractions between various ecosystems correspond to maximal probability of the SOM formation pathways. We tested these hypotheses on three soils formed from cover loam during 45 years of growth of coniferous or deciduous forests or arable crops. Organic C pools in large macroaggregates, small macroaggregates, and microaggregates were fractionated sequentially for four density fractions to obtain free POM with ρ

  10. Prehistoric variability of metal and /sup 13/C//sup 12/C content in bone: dietary and gender factors

    SciTech Connect

    Bumsted, M.P.; Boutton, T.W.; Barnes, R.M.; Armelagos, G.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Wolf Creek population from the Middle Missouri region was analyzed to determine if delta /sup 13/C and elemental composition will vary in a population, and what the nature of the variation is. It was concluded that: (1) delta /sup 13/C composition is different between remnant bone protein and soft tissues; (2) delta /sup 13/C varies between interior Amerindian populations primarily because of the presence or absence of maize horticulture; and (3) delta /sup 13/C clusters by sex in a C/sub 4/ population. 43 references, 11 figures. (ACR)

  11. 13C editing of glutamate in human brain using J-refocused coherence transfer spectroscopy at 4.1 T.

    PubMed

    Pan, J W; Mason, G F; Vaughan, J T; Chu, W J; Zhang, Y; Hetherington, H P

    1997-03-01

    The method of single quantum 13C editing is analyzed and implemented with water suppressed J-refocused coherence transfer spectroscopy. Analysis of the 13C inversion pulse demonstrates that it is optimally placed into the second echo of the J-refocused sequence. We have used this method to acquire 13C-edited spectra of glutamate from phantoms and in vivo. The turnover of 13C4-labeled glutamate in human brain in vivo was observed in parasagittal gray matter using a volume head coil at 4.1 T with a time resolution of 5.3 min.

  12. Transmembrane Exchange of Hyperpolarized 13C-Urea in Human Erythrocytes: Subminute Timescale Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Guilhem; Puckeridge, Max; Liangfeng, Guo; Tan, Yee Ling; Jacob, Chacko; Garland, Marc; Kuchel, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    The rate of exchange of urea across the membranes of human erythrocytes (red blood cells) was quantified on the 1-s to 2-min timescale. 13C-urea was hyperpolarized and subjected to rapid dissolution and the previously reported (partial) resolution of 13C NMR resonances from the molecules inside and outside red blood cells in suspensions was observed. This enabled a stopped-flow type of experiment to measure the (initially) zero-trans transport of urea with sequential single-pulse 13C NMR spectra, every second for up to ∼2 min. Data were analyzed using Bayesian reasoning and a Markov chain Monte Carlo method with a set of simultaneous nonlinear differential equations that described nuclear magnetic relaxation combined with transmembrane exchange. Our results contribute to quantitative understanding of urea-exchange kinetics in the whole body; and the methodological approach is likely to be applicable to other cellular systems and tissues in vivo. PMID:24209840

  13. Temperature-mediated changes in microbial carbon use efficiency and 13C discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Ballantyne, Ford, IV; Min, Kyungjin; Billings, Sharon A.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding how carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from ecosystems feeds back to climate warming depends in part on our ability to quantify the efficiency with which microorganisms convert organic carbon (C) into either biomass or CO2. Quantifying ecosystem-level respiratory CO2 losses often also requires assumptions about stable C isotope fractionations associated with the microbial transformation of organic substrates. However, the diversity of organic substrates' δ13C and the challenges of measuring microbial C use efficiency (CUE) in their natural environment fundamentally limit our ability to project ecosystem C budgets in a warming climate. Here, we quantify the effect of temperature on C fluxes during metabolic transformations of cellobiose, a common microbial substrate, by a cosmopolitan microorganism growing at a constant rate. Biomass C specific respiration rate increased by 250 % between 13 and 26.5 °C, decreasing CUE from 77 to 56 %. Biomass C specific respiration rate was positively correlated with an increase in respiratory 13C discrimination from 4.4 to 6.7 ‰ across the same temperature range. This first demonstration of a direct link between temperature, microbial CUE, and associated isotope fluxes provides a critical step towards understanding δ13C of respired CO2 at multiple scales, and towards a framework for predicting future ecosystem C fluxes.

  14. Decarboxylation of [1-(13)C]leucine by hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Guitton, J; Tinardon, F; Lamrini, R; Lacan, P; Desage, M; Francina, A

    1998-08-01

    The decarboxylation of [1-13C]leucine by hydroxyl radicals was studied by using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) to follow the production of 13CO2. A Fenton reaction between a (Fe2+)-porphyrin and hydrogen peroxide under aerobic conditions yielded hydroxyl radicals. The decarboxylation rates (VLeu) measured by GC-IRMS were dependent on [1-13C]leucine, porphyrin and hydrogen peroxide concentrations. The 13CO2 production was also dependent on bicarbonate or carbon dioxide added in the reaction medium. Bicarbonate facilitated 13CO2 production, whereas carbon dioxide decreased 13CO2 production. Proton effects on some decarboxylation intermediates could explain bicarbonate or carbon dioxide effects. No effect on the decarboxylation rates was observed in the presence of the classical hydroxyl radicals scavengers dimethyl sulfoxide, mannitol, and uric acid. By contrast, a competitive effect with a strong decrease of the decarboxylation rates was observed in the presence of various amino acids: unlabeled leucine, valine, phenylalanine, cysteine, lysine, and histidine. Two reaction products, methyl-4 oxo-2 pentanoate and methyl-3 butanoate were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in comparison with standards. The present results suggest that [1-13C]leucine can participate to the coordination sphere of (Fe2+)-porphyrin, with a caged process of the hydroxyl radicals which cannot get out of the coordination sphere. PMID:9680180

  15. Improved CRDS δ13C Stability Through New Calibration Application For CO2 And CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, Chris; Arata, Caleb; Saad, Nabil; Leggett, Graham; Miles, Natasha; Richardson, Scott; Davis, Ken

    2015-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratio measurements of CO2 and CH4 provide valuable insight into global and regional sources and sinks of the two most important greenhouse gases. Methodologies based on Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) have been developed and are capable of delivering δ13C measurements with a precision better than 0.12 permil for CO2 and 0.4 permil for CH4 (1 hour window, 5 minute average). Here we present a method to further improve this measurement stability. We have developed a two-point calibration method which corrects for δ13C drift due to a dependence on carbon species concentration. This method calibrates for both carbon species concentration as well as δ13C. In addition, we further demonstrate that this added stability is especially valuable when using carbon isotope data in linear regression models such as Keeling plots, where even small amounts of error can be magnified to give inconclusive results. Furthermore, we show how this method is used to validate multiple instruments simultaneously and can be used to create the standard samples needed for field calibrations.

  16. Food webs in Mongolian grasslands: the analysis of 13C and 15N natural abundances.

    PubMed

    Kohzu, Ayato; Iwata, T; Kato, M; Nishikawa, J; Wada, Eitaro; Amartuvshin, N; Namkhaidorj, B; Fujita, N

    2009-09-01

    Overgrazing often lowers species richness and productivity of grassland communities. For Mongolian grassland ecosystems, a lack of detailed information about food-web structures makes it difficult to predict the effects of overgrazing on species diversity and community composition. We analysed the delta13C and delta15N signatures of herbaceous plants, arthropods (grouped by feeding habit), wild and domestic mammals, and humans in central Mongolia to understand the predominant food-web pathways in this grassland ecosystem. The delta13C and delta15N values of mammals showed little variation within species, but varied considerably with slope position for arthropods. The apparent isotopic discrimination between body tissue and hair of mammals was estimated as 2.0 per thousand for delta13C and 2.1 per thousand for delta15N, which was large enough to cause overestimation of the trophic level of mammals if not taken into account when using hair samples to measure isotopic enrichment. PMID:19507080

  17. [Characterization of biochar by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-yu; Jin, Jie; Yan, Yu; Han, Lan-fang; Kang, Ming-jie; Wang, Zi-ying; Zhao, Ye; Sun, Ke

    2014-12-01

    The wood (willow branch) and grass (rice straw) materials were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300, 450 and 600 °C) to obtain the biochars used in the present study. The biochars were characterized using elementary analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and solid state 13C cross-polarization and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR) to illuminate the structure and composition of the biochars which were derived from the different thermal temperatures and biomass. The results showed that the H/C, O/C and (O+N)/C ratios of the biochars decreased with the increase in the pyrolysis temperatures. The surface polarity and ash content of the grass-derived biochars were higher than those of the wood-derived biochars. The minerals of the wood-derived biochars were mainly covered by the organic matter; in contrast, parts of the mineral surfaces of the grass-derived biochars were not covered by organic matter? The 13C NMR of the low temperature-derived biochars revealed a large contribution of aromatic carbon, aliphatic carbon, carboxyl and carbonyl carbon, while the high temperature-derived biochars contained a large amount of aromatic carbon. Moreover, the wood-derived biochars produced at low heat treatment temperatures contained more lignin residues than grass-derived ones, probably due to the existence of high lignin content in the feedstock soures of wood-derived biochars. The results of the study would be useful for environmental application of biochars.

  18. Further evidence for a dynamically generated secondary bow in 13C+12C rainbow scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.; Ogloblin, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    The existence of a secondary bow is confirmed for 13C+12C nuclear rainbow scattering in addition to the 16O+12C system. This is found by studying the experimental angular distribution of 13C+12C scattering at the incident 13C energy EL=250 MeV with an extended double-folding (EDF) model that describes all the diagonal and off-diagonal coupling potentials derived from the microscopic wave functions for 12C using a density-dependent nucleon-nucleon force. The Airy minimum at θ ≈70°, which is not reproduced by a conventional folding potential, is revealed to be a secondary bow generated dynamically by a coupling to the excited state 2+ (4.44 MeV) of 12C. The essential importance of the quadruple Y 2 term (reorientation term) of potential of the excited state 2+ of 12C for the emergence of a secondary bow is found. The mechanism of the secondary bow is intuitively explained by showing how the trajectories are refracted dynamically into the classically forbidden angular region beyond the rainbow angle of the primary rainbow.

  19. SUMOFLUX: A Generalized Method for Targeted 13C Metabolic Flux Ratio Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kogadeeva, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic fluxes are a cornerstone of cellular physiology that emerge from a complex interplay of enzymes, carriers, and nutrients. The experimental assessment of in vivo intracellular fluxes using stable isotopic tracers is essential if we are to understand metabolic function and regulation. Flux estimation based on 13C or 2H labeling relies on complex simulation and iterative fitting; processes that necessitate a level of expertise that ordinarily preclude the non-expert user. To overcome this, we have developed SUMOFLUX, a methodology that is broadly applicable to the targeted analysis of 13C-metabolic fluxes. By combining surrogate modeling and machine learning, we trained a predictor to specialize in estimating flux ratios from measurable 13C-data. SUMOFLUX targets specific flux features individually, which makes it fast, user-friendly, applicable to experimental design and robust in terms of experimental noise and exchange flux magnitude. Collectively, we predict that SUMOFLUX's properties realistically pave the way to high-throughput flux analyses. PMID:27626798

  20. Optimization of 13C dynamic nuclear polarization: isotopic labeling of free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kiswandi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a physics technique that amplifies the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals by transferring the high polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. Thus, the choice of free radical is crucial in DNP as it can directly affect the NMR signal enhancement levels, typically on the order of several thousand-fold in the liquid-state. In this study, we have investigated the efficiency of four variants of the well-known 4-oxo-TEMPO radical (normal 4-oxo-TEMPO plus its 15N-enriched and/or perdeuterated variants) for use in DNP of an important metabolic tracer [1-13C]acetate. Though the variants have significant differences in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, we have found that changing the composition of the TEMPO radical through deuteration or 15N doping yields no significant difference in 13C DNP efficiency at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. On the other hand, deuteration of the solvent causes a significant increase of 13C polarization that is consistent over all the 4-oxo-TEMPO variants. These findings are consistent with the thermal mixing model of DNP. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  1. SUMOFLUX: A Generalized Method for Targeted 13C Metabolic Flux Ratio Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kogadeeva, Maria; Zamboni, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic fluxes are a cornerstone of cellular physiology that emerge from a complex interplay of enzymes, carriers, and nutrients. The experimental assessment of in vivo intracellular fluxes using stable isotopic tracers is essential if we are to understand metabolic function and regulation. Flux estimation based on 13C or 2H labeling relies on complex simulation and iterative fitting; processes that necessitate a level of expertise that ordinarily preclude the non-expert user. To overcome this, we have developed SUMOFLUX, a methodology that is broadly applicable to the targeted analysis of 13C-metabolic fluxes. By combining surrogate modeling and machine learning, we trained a predictor to specialize in estimating flux ratios from measurable 13C-data. SUMOFLUX targets specific flux features individually, which makes it fast, user-friendly, applicable to experimental design and robust in terms of experimental noise and exchange flux magnitude. Collectively, we predict that SUMOFLUX's properties realistically pave the way to high-throughput flux analyses. PMID:27626798

  2. Fecal /sup 13/C analysis for the detection and quantitation of intestinal malabsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeller, D.A.; Klein, P.D.; MacLean, W.C. Jr.; Watkins, J.B.; Van Santen, E.

    1981-03-01

    The use of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ breath tests and fecal analyses for the detection and quantitation of intestinal malabsorption has been extensively documented in adult subjects. The use of stable isotopes has extended the range of breath test applications to include pediatric and obstetric subjects. Here we report a fecal /sup 13/C analysis that can be used in conjunction with /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ breath tests. Twenty-four-hour fecal samples were collected before and after the administration of a labeled substrate. The samples were homogenized and combusted to CO/sub 2/, and the /sup 13/C abundance was determined by high-precision, differential isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The isotopic variation between successive 24 hr fecal samples was 0.6 per thousand (0.0006 atom percent). This variation limited the sensitivity of the fecal analysis to 13 ..mu..mol of /sup 13/C label per mole of fecal carbon. Simultaneous cholyglycine /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ breath tests and fecal assays were performed in five children. One child with bacterial overgrowth had an abnormal breath test and a normal fecal test. Of three children with ileal dysfunction, only one had an abnormal breath test, whereas the fecal test was abnormal in all three. Both the breath test and fecal test were abnormal for a child who had undergone an ileal resection. Both tests were normal for a child with ulcerative colitis.

  3. Late Ordovician land plant spore 13C fractionation records atmospheric CO2 and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beerling, D. J.; Nelson, D. M.; Pearson, A.; Wellman, C.

    2008-12-01

    Molecular systematics and spore wall ultrastructure studies indicate that late Ordovician diad and triad fossil spores were likely produced by plants most closely related to liverworts. Here, we report the first δ13C estimates of Ordovician fossil land plant spores, which were obtained using a spooling wire micro-combustion device interfaced with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (Sessions et al., 2005, Analytical Chemistry, 77, 6519). The spores all originate from Saudi Arabia on the west of Gondwana and date to before (Cardadoc, ca. 460 Ma), during (443Ma) and after (Llandovery, ca. 440Ma) the Hirnantian glaciation. We use these numbers along with marine carbonate δ13C records to estimate atmospheric CO2 by implementing a theoretical model that captures the strong CO2-dependency of 13C fractionation in non-vascular land plants (Fletcher et al., 2008, Nature Geoscience, 1, 43). Although provisional at this stage, reconstructed CO2 changes are consistent with the Kump et al. (2008) (Paleo. Paleo. Paleo. 152, 173) 'weathering hypothesis' whereby pre-Hirnantian cooling is caused by relatively low CO2 (ca. 700ppm) related to enhanced weathering of young basaltic rocks during the early phase of the Taconic uplift, with background values subsequently rising to around double this value by the earliest Silurian. Further analyses will better constrain atmospheric CO2 change during the late Ordovician climatic perturbation and address controversial hypotheses concerning the causes and timing of the Earth system transition into an icehouse state.

  4. Methanogenic capabilities of ANME-archaea deduced from (13) C-labelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Sebastian; Blumenberg, Martin; Michaelis, Walter; Siegert, Michael; Krüger, Martin; Seifert, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) are ubiquitous in marine sediments where sulfate dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) occurs. Despite considerable progress in the understanding of AOM, physiological details are still widely unresolved. We investigated two distinct microbial mat samples from the Black Sea that were dominated by either ANME-1 or ANME-2. The (13) C lipid stable isotope probing (SIP) method using labelled substances, namely methane, bicarbonate, acetate, and methanol, was applied, and the substrate-dependent methanogenic capabilities were tested. Our data provide strong evidence for a versatile physiology of both, ANME-1 and ANME-2. Considerable methane production rates (MPRs) from CO2 -reduction were observed, particularly from ANME-2 dominated samples and in the presence of methane, which supports the hypothesis of a co-occurrence of methanotrophy and methanogenesis in the AOM systems (AOM/MPR up to 2:1). The experiments also revealed strong methylotrophic capabilities through (13) C-assimilation from labelled methanol, which was independent of the presence of methane. Additionally, high MPRs from methanol were detected in both of the mat samples. As demonstrated by the (13) C-uptake into lipids, ANME-1 was found to thrive also under methane free conditions. Finally, C35 -isoprenoid hydrocarbons were identified as new lipid biomarkers for ANME-1, most likely functioning as a hydrogen sink during methanogenesis.

  5. Extreme 13C depletion of CCl2F2 in firn air samples from NEEM, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuiderweg, A.; Holzinger, R.; Martinerie, P.; Schneider, R.; Kaiser, J.; Witrant, E.; Etheridge, D.; Rubino, M.; Petrenko, V.; Blunier, T.; Röckmann, T.

    2012-07-01

    A series of 12 high volume air samples collected from the S2 firn core during the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) 2009 campaign have been measured for mixing ratio and stable carbon isotope composition of the chlorofluorocarbon CFC-12 (CCl2F2). While the mixing ratio measurements compare favorably to other firn air studies, the isotope results show extreme 13C depletion at the deepest measurable depth (65 m), to values lower than δ13C = -80‰ vs. VPDB (the international stable carbon isotope scale), compared to present day surface tropospheric measurements near -40‰. Firn air modeling was used to interpret these measurements. Reconstructed atmospheric time series indicate even larger depletions (to -120‰) near 1950 AD, with subsequent rapid enrichment of the atmospheric reservoir of the compound to the present day value. Mass-balance calculations show that this change must have been caused by a large change in the isotopic composition of anthropogenic CFC-12 emissions, probably due to technological changes in the CFC production process over the last 80 yr. Propagating the mass-balance calculations into the future demonstrates that as emissions decrease to zero, isotopic fractionation by the stratospheric sinks will lead to continued 13C enrichment in atmospheric CFC-12.

  6. Potential of δ13C in Pollen to Serve as Paleotemperature Proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. P.; Foelber, K.; Schubert, B.; Jahren, A.

    2010-12-01

    Fossil pollen is an invaluable indicator of vegetation composition, is notably resilient against diagenetic alteration, and can be found in large quantities within highly chronologically-resolved substrates such as lake sediments. In addition, several recent isotopic techniques have made possible the analysis of small quantities (approaching <100 pollen grains) while nanomaterials hold promise for efficient shape-sorting of pollen assemblages. Because environmental conditions affect the stable isotope signature of plant tissues, we explored the potential for the δ13C value of pollen produced by plants growing under diverse climate regimes to reflect paleotemperature. We examined the relationship between temperature and δ13C of the pollen produced in several settings including: laboratory growth chambers, single-genus field comparisons, and whole-community comparisons from botanical gardens. In each of these settings the relationship between growing season temperature and the δ13C of pollen produced resulted in a positive correlation with R2 > 0.5; our presentation will discuss the practical implementation of stable isotopes in pollen as a paleotemperature proxy, both in terms of substrate recovery and produced-certainty of temperature estimates.

  7. delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope ratios in amphetamine synthesized from benzaldehyde and nitroethane.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael; Salouros, Helen; Cawley, Adam T; Robertson, James; Heagney, Aaron C; Arenas-Queralt, Andrea

    2010-06-15

    Previous work in these laboratories and by Butzenlechner et al. and Culp et al. has demonstrated that the delta(2)H isotope value of industrial benzaldehyde produced by the catalytic oxidation of toluene is profoundly positive, usually in the range +300 per thousand to +500 per thousand. Synthetic routes leading to amphetamine, methylamphetamine or their precursors and commencing with such benzaldehyde may be expected to exhibit unusually positive delta(2)H values. Results are presented for delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope values of 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene synthesized from an industrial source of benzaldehyde, having a positive delta(2)H isotope value, by a Knoevenagel condensation with nitroethane. Results are also presented for delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope values for amphetamine prepared from the resulting 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene. The values obtained were compared with delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope values obtained for an amphetamine sample prepared using a synthetic route that did not involve benzaldehyde. Finally, results are presented for samples of benzaldehyde, 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene and amphetamine that had been seized at a clandestine amphetamine laboratory.

  8. High resolution 13C-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a deuterated protein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Comellas, Gemma; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution 13C-detected solid-state NMR spectra of the deuterated beta-1 immunoglobulin binding domain of the protein G (GB1) have been collected to show that all 15N, 13C′, 13Cα and 13Cβ sites are resolved in 13C–13C and 15N–13C spectra, with significant improvement in T2 relaxation times and resolution at high magnetic field (750 MHz). The comparison of echo T2 values between deuterated and protonated GB1 at various spinning rates and under different decoupling schemes indicates that 13Cα T2′ times increase by almost a factor of two upon deuteration at all spinning rates and under moderate decoupling strength, and thus the deuteration enables application of scalar-based correlation experiments that are challenging from the standpoint of transverse relaxation, with moderate proton decoupling. Additionally, deuteration in large proteins is a useful strategy to selectively detect polar residues that are often important for protein function and protein–protein interactions. PMID:20803233

  9. Chemical Shift Separation with Controlled Aliasing for Hyperpolarized 13C Metabolic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Peter J.; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Uecker, Martin; Reed, Galen D.; Kerr, Adam B.; Tropp, James; Ohliger, Michael A.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Pauly, John M.; Lustig, Michael; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A chemical shift separation technique for hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging with high spatial and temporal resolution was developed. Specifically, a fast 3D pulse sequence and a reconstruction method were implemented to acquire signals from multiple 13C species simultaneously with subsequent separation into individual images. Methods A stack of flyback-EPI readouts and a set of multiband excitation RF pulses were designed to spatially modulate aliasing patterns of the acquired metabolite images, which translated the chemical shift separation problem into parallel imaging reconstruction problem. An eight-channel coil array was used for data acquisition and a parallel imaging method based on nonlinear inversion was developed to separate the aliased images. Results Simultaneous acquisitions of pyruvate and lactate in a phantom study and in vivo rat experiments were performed. The results demonstrated successful separation of the metabolite distributions into individual images having high spatial resolution. Conclusion This method demonstrated the ability to provide accelerated metabolite imaging in hyperpolarized 13C MR utilizing multi-channel coils, tailored readout, and specialized RF pulses. PMID:25298086

  10. 13C Tracers for Glucose Degrading Pathway Discrimination in Gluconobacter oxydans 621H

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Steffen; Richhardt, Janine; Bringer, Stephanie; Bott, Michael; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Oldiges, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans 621H is used as an industrial production organism due to its exceptional ability to incompletely oxidize a great variety of carbohydrates in the periplasm. With glucose as the carbon source, up to 90% of the initial concentration is oxidized periplasmatically to gluconate and ketogluconates. Growth on glucose is biphasic and intracellular sugar catabolism proceeds via the Entner–Doudoroff pathway (EDP) and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Here we studied the in vivo contributions of the two pathways to glucose catabolism on a microtiter scale. In our approach we applied specifically 13C labeled glucose, whereby a labeling pattern in alanine was generated intracellularly. This method revealed a dynamic growth phase-dependent pathway activity with increased activity of EDP in the first and PPP in the second growth phase, respectively. Evidence for a growth phase-independent decarboxylation-carboxylation cycle around the pyruvate node was obtained from 13C fragmentation patterns of alanine. For the first time, down-scaled microtiter plate cultivation together with 13C-labeled substrate was applied for G. oxydans to elucidate pathway operation, exhibiting reasonable labeling costs and allowing for sufficient replicate experiments. PMID:26404385

  11. Assessing microbial utilization of free versus sorbed Alanine by using position-specific 13C labeling and 13C-PLFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, Jennifer; Apostel, Carolin; Spielvogel, Sandra; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Dippold, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Microbial utilization is a key transformation process of soil organic matter (SOM). Sorption of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces blocks or delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil science, combined with 13C-phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, to assess microbial utilization of sorbed and non-sorbed Alanine in soil. Alanine has various functional groups enabling different sorption mechanisms via its positive charge (e.g. to clay minerals by cation exchange), as well as via its negative charge (e.g. to iron oxides by ligand exchange). To assess changes in the transformation pathways caused by sorption, we added uniformly and position-specifically 13C and 14C labeled Alanine to the Ap of a loamy Luvisol in a short-term (10 days) incubation experiment. To allow for sorption of the tracer solution to an aliquot of this soil, microbial activity was minimized in this subsample by sterilizing the soil by γ-radiation. After shaking, the remaining solutions were filtered and the non-sorbed Alanine was removed with Millipore water and then added to non-sterilized soil. For the free Alanine treatment, solutions with Alanine of similar amount and isotopic composition were prepared, added to the soil and incubated as well. The respired CO2 was trapped in NaOH and its 14C-activity was determined at increasing times intervals. Microbial utilization of Alanine's individual C positions was evaluated in distinct microbial groups classified by 13C-PLFA analysis. Sorption to soil minerals delayed respiration to CO2 and reduced initial respiration rate by 80%. Irrespective of sorption, the highest amount was respired from the carboxylic position (C-1), whereas the amino-bound (C-2) and the methylic position (C-3) were preferentially incorporated into PLFA of microorganisms due to the

  12. Enhancing Phospholipid Fatty Acid Profiling of Soil Bacterial Communities via Substrate- Specific 13C-labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evershed, R. P.; Maxfield, P. J.; Bingham, E. M.; Dildar, N.; Brennand, E. L.; Hornibrook, E.

    2008-12-01

    A range of culture-independent methods, has recently emerged to study environmental microorganisms in situ[1]. One such method is phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, wherein these ubiquitous membrane lipids provide a powerful tool for the study of unculturable soil microorganisms. PLFA analyses have been used to investigate the impacts of a wide range of environmental factors on the soil microbial community. An acknowledged shortcoming of the PLFAs approach is the lack the chemotaxonoic specificity, which restricts the ability of the method to probe the activities of specific functional groups of the microbial community selectively. However, the selectivity of PLFAs analyses can be enhanced by incubating soils with 13C- labelled substrates followed by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry to reveal the specific PLFAs incorporating the 13C-label. The application of this approach will be demonstrated through our recent work on methanotrophic bacteria in soils. We applied this approach initially to mineral soils[2] and then extended chemotaxonomic assessments by using a combination of 13C-labelled PLFAs and hopanoids [3]. We have used this approach to explore the properties of high affinity methanotrophs in a range of environments, investigating the relationship between methane oxidation rates and the nature and magnitude of the methanotrophic community for the first time[4,5] More recently we extended the technique using a novel time series 13C-labelling of PLFAs[6] to estimate the rate and progression of 13C- label incorporation and turnover of methanotrophic populations. This modified approach has been used to investigate the impacts of various environmental variables, e.g. soil type, vegetation cover and land use, on the methanotrophic biomass[7.8]. The unique nature of the 13CH4 as a gaseous substate/carbon source means that can be readily introduced into soils via a specific subset of the soil microbial biomass, thereby offering many

  13. Trans and surface membrane bound zervamicin IIB: 13C-MAOSS-NMR at high spinning speed.

    PubMed

    Raap, J; Hollander, J; Ovchinnikova, T V; Swischeva, N V; Skladnev, D; Kiihne, S

    2006-08-01

    Interactions between (15)N-labelled peptides or proteins and lipids can be investigated using membranes aligned on a thin polymer film, which is rolled into a cylinder and inserted into the MAS-NMR rotor. This can be spun at high speed, which is often useful at high field strengths. Unfortuantely, substrate films like commercially available polycarbonate or PEEK produce severe overlap with peptide and protein signals in (13)C-MAOSS NMR spectra. We show that a simple house hold foil support allows clear observation of the carbonyl, aromatic and C(alpha) signals of peptides and proteins as well as the ester carbonyl and choline signals of phosphocholine lipids. The utility of the new substrate is validated in applications to the membrane active peptide zervamicin IIB. The stability and macroscopic ordering of thin PC10 bilayers was compared with that of thicker POPC bilayers, both supported on the household foil. Sidebands in the (31)P-spectra showed a high degree of alignment of both the supported POPC and PC10 lipid molecules. Compared with POPC, the PC10 lipids are slightly more disordered, most likely due to the increased mobilities of the shorter lipid molecules. This mobility prevents PC10 from forming stable vesicles for MAS studies. The (13)C-peptide peaks were selectively detected in a (13)C-detected (1)H-spin diffusion experiment. Qualitative analysis of build-up curves obtained for different mixing times allowed the transmembrane peptide in PC10 to be distinguished from the surface bound topology in POPC. The (13)C-MAOSS results thus independently confirms previous findings from (15)N spectroscopy [Bechinger, B., Skladnev, D.A., Ogrel, A., Li, X., Rogozhkina, E.V., Ovchinnikova, T.V., O'Neil, J.D.J. and Raap, J. (2001) Biochemistry, 40, 9428-9437]. In summary, application of house hold foil opens the possibility of measuring high resolution (13)C-NMR spectra of peptides and proteins in well ordered membranes, which are required to determine the secondary

  14. Using Position-Specific 13C and 14C Labeling and 13C-PLFA Analysis to Assess Microbial Transformations of Free Versus Sorbed Alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, C.; Herschbach, J.; Bore, E. K.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Dippold, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Sorption of charged or partially charged low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil sciences, to compare the transformation mechanisms of sorbed and non-sorbed alanine in soil. Alanine as an amino acid links C- and N-cycles in soil and therefore is a model substance for the pool of LMWOS. To assess transformations of sorbed alanine, we added position-specific and uniformly 13C and 14C labeled alanine tracer to soil that had previously been sterilized by γ-radiation. The labeled soil was added to non-sterilized soil from the same site and incubated. Soil labeled with the same tracers without previous sorption was prepared and incubated as well. We captured the respired CO2 and determined its 14C-activity at increasing time intervals. The incorporation of 14C into microbial biomass was determined by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE), and utilization of individual C positions by distinct microbial groups was evaluated by 13C-phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA). A dual peak in the respired CO2 revealed two sorption mechanisms. To compare the fate of individual C atoms independent of their concentration and pool size in soil, we applied the divergence index (DI). The DI reveals the convergent or divergent behavior of C from individual molecule positions during microbial utilization. Alanine C-1 position was mainly oxidized to CO2, while its C-2 and C-3 were preferentially incorporated in microbial biomass and PLFA. This indicates that sorption by the COOH group does not protect this group from preferential oxidation. Microbial metabolism was determinative for the preferential oxidation of individual molecule positions. The use of position-specific labeling revealed mechanisms and kinetics of microbial utilization of sorbed and non

  15. Hyperfine structure in the J = 1-0 transitions of DCO^+, DNC, and HN13C: astronomical observations and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tak, F. F. S.; Müller, H. S. P.; Harding, M. E.; Gauss, J.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Knowledge of the hyperfine structure of molecular lines is useful for estimating reliable column densities from observed emission, and essential for the derivation of kinematic information from line profiles. Aims: Deuterium bearing molecules are especially useful in this regard, because they are good probes of the physical and chemical structure of molecular cloud cores on the verge of star formation. However, the necessary spectroscopic data are often missing, especially for molecules which are too unstable for laboratory study. Methods: We have observed the ground-state (J = 1{-}0) rotational transitions of DCO^+, HN13C and DNC with the IRAM 30 m telescope toward the dark cloud LDN 1512 which has exceptionally narrow lines permitting hyperfine splitting to be resolved in part. The measured splittings of 50-300 kHz are used to derive nuclear quadrupole and spin-rotation parameters for these species. The measurements are supplemented by high-level quantum-chemical calculations using coupled-cluster techniques and large atomic-orbital basis sets. Results: We find eQq = + 151.12 (400) kHz and CI = -1.12 (43) kHz for DCO^+, eQq = 272.5 (51) kHz for HN13C, and eQq(D) =265.9 (83) kHz and eQq(N) = 288.2 (71) kHz for DNC. The numbers for DNC are consistent with previous laboratory data, while our constants for DCO+ are somewhat smaller than previous results based on astronomical data. For both DCO+ and DNC, our results are more accurate than previous determinations. Our results are in good agreement with the corresponding best theoretical estimates, which amount to eQq = 156.0 kHz and CI = -0.69 kHz for DCO^+, eQq = 279.5 kHz for HN13C, and eQq(D) = 257.6 kHz and eQq(N) = 309.6 kHz for DNC. We also derive updated rotational constants for HN13C: B = 43 545.6000 (47) MHz and D = 93.7 (20) kHz. Conclusions: The hyperfine splittings of the DCO^+, DNC and HN13C J = 1{-}0 lines range over 0.47-1.28 km s-1, which is comparable to typical line widths in pre

  16. [COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE USE OF 13C-LABELED MIXED TRIGLYCERIDE AND 13C-STARCH BREATH TESTS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PANCREATITIS AFTER CHOLECYSTECTOMY].

    PubMed

    Sirchak, Ye S

    2015-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive study of 96 patients after cholecystectomy are provided. The higher sensitivity and informativeness of the 13C-labeled mixed triglyceride breath .test compared with 13C-starch breath test for determining functional pancreatic insufficiency in patients after cholecystectomy in early stages of its formation was set. PMID:27491156

  17. Physical and biogeochemical correlates of spatio-temporal variation in the δ13C of marine macroalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Andrew P.; Hyndes, Glenn A.; Carvalho, Matheus C.; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon isotope ratios (13C/12C) can be used to trace sources of production supporting food chains, as δ13C undergoes relatively small and predictable increases (∼0.5‰) through each trophic level. However, for this technique to be precise, variation in δ13C signatures of different sources of production (baseline sources) must be clearly defined and distinct from each other. Despite this, δ13C in the primary producers of marine systems are highly variable over space and time, due to the complexity of physical and biogeochemical processes that drive δ13C variation at the base of these foodwebs. We measured spatial and temporal variation in the δ13C of two species of macroalgae that are important dietary components of grazers over temperate reefs: the small kelp Ecklonia radiata, and the red alga Plocamium preissianum, and related any variation to a suite of physical and biogeochemical variables. Patterns in δ13C variation, over different spatial (10 s m to 100 km) and temporal scales (weeks to seasons), differed greatly between taxa, but these were partly explained by the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and light. However, while the δ13C in E. radiata was not related to water temperature, a highly significant proportion of the spatio-temporal variation in δ13C of P. preissianum was explained by temperature alone. Accordingly, we applied this relationship to project (across temperate Australasia) and forecast (in time, south-western Australia) patterns in P. preissianum δ13C. The mean projected δ13C for P. preissianum in the study region varied by only ∼1‰ over a 12-month period, compared to ∼3‰ over 2000 km. This illustrates the potential scale in the shift of δ13C in baseline food sources over broad scales, and its implications to food web studies. While we show that those relationships differ across taxonomic groups, we recommend developing models to explain variability in δ13C of other baseline sources to facilitate the

  18. Direct uptake of organic carbon by grass roots and allocation in leaves and phytoliths: 13C labeling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, A.; Balesdent, J.; Cazevieille, P.; Chevassus-Rosset, C.; Signoret, P.; Mazur, J.-C.; Harutyunyan, A.; Doelsch, E.; Basile-Doelsch, I.; Miche, H.; Santos, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the rhizosphere, the uptake of low molecular weight carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) by plant roots has been well documented. While organic N uptake relatively to total uptake is important, organic C uptake is supposed to be low relatively to the plant's C budget. Recently, radiocarbon analyses demonstrated that a fraction of C from the soil was occluded in amorphous silica micrometric particles that precipitate in plant cells (phytoliths). Here, we investigated whether and in which extent organic C absorbed by grass roots, under the form of either intact amino acids (AAs) or microbial metabolites, can feed the organic C occluded in phytoliths. For this purpose we added 13C- and 15N-labeled AAs to the silicon-rich hydroponic solution of the grass Festuca arundinacea. The experiment was designed to prevent C leakage from the labeled nutritive solution to the chamber atmosphere. After 14 days of growth, the 13C and 15N enrichments (13C-excess and 15N-excess) in the roots, stems and leaves, and phytoliths, as well as the 13C-excess in AAs extracted from roots and stems and leaves, were quantified relatively to a control experiment in which no labelled AAs were added. The net uptake of 13C derived from the labeled AAs supplied to the nutritive solution (AA-13C) by Festuca arundinacea represented 4.5 % of the total AA-13C supply. AA-13C fixed in the plant represented only 0.13 % of total C. However, the experimental conditions may have underestimated the extent of the process under natural and field conditions. Previous studies showed that 15N and 13C can be absorbed by the roots in several organic and inorganic forms. In the present experiment, the fact that phenylalanine and methionine, that were supplied in high amount to the nutritive solution, were more 13C-enriched than other AAs in the roots and stems and leaves strongly suggested that part of AA-13C was absorbed and translocated in its original AA form. The concentration of AA-13C represented only 0.15 % of the

  19. Scaling-up13C separation by infrared multiphoton dissociation of the CHClF2/Br2 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. C.; Wu, B.; Liu, J. L.; Jing, Y.; Chu, M. X.; Xue, L. L.; Ma, P. H.

    1995-06-01

    13C separation at a laboratory scaled-up level by the13C-selective InfraRed MultiPhoton Dissociation (IRMPD) of CHClF2 in the presence of Br2 has been investigated in a flow reactor. With a complete scaled-up system including a flow reactor, an industrially reliable TEA CO2 laser with longer pulse duration and a product-separation set-up for13C separation, it has been attempted to optimize the parameters suitable for large-scale production of the carbon isotope. The optimization of13C separation parameters, such as laser fluence, laser frequency and the partial pressure of CHClF2 and Br2 was tested under static conditions. By irradiation with longer pulses, a lower optimum pressure for a high13C-production rate was determined. Furthermore, the separation process was scaled in the flow system to examine the13C-production rates,13C atomic fractions in the CBr2F2 products and13C depletions in the CHClF2 reactants at different flow rates and laser repetition frequencies. The data obtained from the flow tests demonstrated a 40 mg/h production rate for CBr2F2 at 65%13C by using a 40 W (4 J, 10 Hz) laser beam focused with a lens of 120 cm focal length. If the reliable TEA CO2 laser is operated with 100 W (10 J, 10 Hz) output, the production rate of CBr2F2 for13C at 60% of 200 mg/h can be attained. The measurements of the spatial profile of the focused laser beam imply a 2 g/h production rate for the 60%13C product for an incident power of 200 W (20 J, 10 Hz).

  20. 13C MAS NMR evidence for a homogeneously ordered environment of tyrosine M210 in reaction centres of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shochat, S.; Gast, P.; Hoff, A. J.; Boender, G. J.; van Leeuwen, S.; van Liemt, W. B. S.; Vijgenboom, E.; Raap, J.; Lugtenburg, J.; de Groot, H. J. M.

    1995-01-01

    The initial electron transfer time in the photosynthetic reaction centre of Rhodobacter sphaeroides is highly sensitive to the replacement of tyrosine M210 by a tryptophan residue. Low-temperature magic angle spinning 13C NMR is used to study Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 (M)Y210W mutant reaction centres that are labelled with [4'- 13C]tyrosine. The response of (M)Y210 in R26 is assigned unambiguously to the most upfield narrow signal (linewidth 34 Hz) at σi = 152.2 ppm, in the region where non-hydrogen bonded tyrosine signals are expected. From the comparison with the signal of labelled R26 it follows that the chemical environment of the (M)Y210 label is unique. The Y(M)210 is in a structurally and electrostatically homogeneous region on the sensitivity scale of the MAS NMR technique. The environment of M210 is structurally stable and the observation of a narrow line shows that the (M)Y210 side chain can be considered static with respect to rotational diffusion on time scales as long as 10 -2s. The narrow signals from the remaining labels in the protein interior for the 2.4.1 (M)Y210W mutant are remarkably similar to those observed for R26. Using a commonly accepted ratio of 150 ppm shift per positive charge equivalent for aromatic carbons, the chemical shift differences between mutant and R26 translate into small variations of the order of 10 -3 electronic equivalents of charge polarization. Also the linewidths are similar, except for a narrow response at σi = 156.4 ppm that sharpens slightly in the (M)Y210W mutant. Thus, the influence of the (M)Y210W mutation on the global electrostatic properties and structure of the protein, as probed by the tyrosine labels, is minimal. This strongly argues against an explanation of slow and non-exponential electron transfer kinetics in the (M)Y210W RC in terms of loss of structural integrity upon mutation. In contrast, the NMR results strongly support current opinions that (M)Y210 contributes to the fine-tuning of the

  1. Vibrationally and rotationally nonadiabatic calculations on H3+ using coordinate-dependent vibrational and rotational masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, Leonardo G.; Mohallem, José Rachid; Alijah, Alexander; Pavanello, Michele; Adamowicz, Ludwik; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    Using the core-mass approach, we have generated a vibrational-mass surface for the triatomic H3+. The coordinate-dependent masses account for the off-resonance nonadiabatic coupling and permit a very accurate determination of the rovibrational states using a single potential energy surface. The new, high-precision measurements of 12 rovibrational transitions in the ν2 bending fundamental of H3+ by Wu [Phys. Rev. A1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.88.032507 88, 032507 (2013)] are used to scale this surface empirically and to derive state-dependent vibrational and rotational masses that reproduce the experimental transition energies to 10-3cm-1. Rotational term values for J≤10 are presented for the two lowest vibrational states and equivalent transitions in D3+ considered.

  2. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H-13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H-13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H-13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H-13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr-Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr-Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C-13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils.

  3. The Ratio of Acetate-to-Glucose Oxidation in Astrocytes from a Single 13C NMR Spectrum of Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Hooshyar, M. Ali; Pichumani, Kumar; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    The 13C labeling patterns in glutamate and glutamine from brain tissue are quite different after infusion of a mixture of 13C-enriched glucose and acetate. Two processes contribute to this observation, oxidation of acetate by astrocytes but not neurons, and preferential incorporation of α-ketoglutarate into glutamate in neurons, and incorporation of α-ketoglutarate into glutamine in astrocytes. The acetate:glucose ratio, introduced previously for analysis of a single 13C NMR spectrum, provides a useful index of acetate and glucose oxidation in the brain tissue. However, quantitation of relative substrate oxidation at the cell compartment level has not been reported. A simple mathematical method is presented to quantify the ratio of acetate to glucose oxidation in astrocytes, based on the standard assumption that neurons do not oxidize acetate. Mice were infused with [1,2-13C]acetate and [1,6-13C]glucose, and proton decoupled 13C NMR spectra of cortex extracts were acquired. A fit of those spectra to the model indicated that 13C-labeled acetate and glucose contributed approximately equally to acetyl-CoA (0.96) in astrocytes. Since this method relies on a single 13C NMR spectrum, it can be readily applied to multiple physiologic and pathologic conditions. PMID:25231025

  4. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  5. High Resolution 13C MRI With Hyperpolarized Urea: In Vivo T2 Mapping and 15N Labeling Effects

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Galen D.; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Koelsch, Bertram L.; Van Criekinge, Mark; Smith, Kenneth J.; Shang, Hong; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    13C steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging and effective spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping were performed using hyperpolarized [13C] urea and [13C, 15N2] urea injected intravenously in rats. 15N labeling gave large T2 increases both in solution and in vivo due to the elimination of a strong scalar relaxation pathway. The T2 increase was pronounced in the kidney, with [13C, 15N2] urea giving T2 values of 6.3±1.3 s in the cortex and medulla, and 11±2 s in the renal pelvis. The measured T2 in the aorta was 1.3±0.3 s. [13C] urea showed shortened T2 values in the kidney of 0.23±0.03 s compared to 0.28±0.03 s measured in the aorta. The enhanced T2 of [13C, 15N2] urea was utilized to generate large signal enhancement by SSFP acquisitions with flip angles approaching the fully refocused regime. Projection images at 0.94 mm in-plane resolution were acquired with both urea isotopes, with [13C, 15N2] urea giving a greater than four-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio [13C] over urea. PMID:24235273

  6. Specific 13C functional pathways as diagnostic targets in gastroenterology breath-tests: tricks for a correct interpretation.

    PubMed

    Pizzoferrato, M; Del Zompo, F; Mangiola, F; Lopetuso, L R; Petito, V; Cammarota, G; Gasbarrini, A; Scaldaferri, F

    2013-01-01

    Breath tests are non-invasive, non-radioactive, safe, simple and effective tests able to determine significant metabolic alterations due to specific diseases or lack of specific enzymes. Carbon isotope (13)C, the stable-non radioactive isotope of carbon, is the most used substrate in breath testing, in which (13)C/(12)C ratio is measured and expressed as a delta value, a differences between readings and a fixed standard. (13)C/(12)C ratio is measured with isotope ratio mass spectrometry or non-dispersive isotope-selective infrared spectrometer and generally there is a good agreement between these techniques in the isotope ratio estimation. (13)C/(12)C ratio can be expressed as static measurement (like delta over baseline in urea breath test) or as dynamic measurement as percent dose recovery, but more dosages are necessary. (13)C Breath-tests are involved in many fields of interest within gastroenterology, such as detection of Helicobacter pylori infection, study of gastric emptying, assessment of liver and exocrine pancreatic functions, determination of oro-caecal transit time, evaluation of absorption and to a lesser extend detection of bacterial overgrowth. The use of every single test in a clinical setting is vary depending on accuracy and substrate costs. This review is meant to present (13)C the meaning of (13)C/(12)C ratio and static and dynamic measure and, finally, the instruments dedicated to its use in gastroenterology. A brief presentation of (13)C breath tests in gastroenterology is also provided. PMID:24443068

  7. Effect of posture on 13C-urea breath test in partial gastrectomy patients

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shu-Ming; Zhang, Fan; Shi, Dong-Mei; Xiang, Ping; Xiao, Li; Huang, Yi-Qin; Zhang, Gan-Sheng; Bao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether posture affects the accuracy of 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) detection in partial gastrectomy patients. METHODS: We studied 156 consecutive residual stomach patients, including 76 with H. pylori infection (infection group) and 80 without H. pylori infection (control group). H. pylori infection was confirmed if both the rapid urease test and histology were positive during gastroscopy. The two groups were divided into four subgroups according to patients’ posture during the 13C-UBT: subgroup A, sitting position; subgroup B, supine position; subgroup C, right lateral recumbent position; and subgroup D, left lateral recumbent position. Each subject underwent the following modified 13C-UBT: 75 mg of 13C-urea (powder) in 100 mL of citric acid solution was administered, and a mouth wash was performed immediately; breath samples were then collected at baseline and at 5-min intervals up to 30 min while the position was maintained. Seven breath samples were collected for each subject. The cutoff value was 2.0‰. RESULTS: The mean delta over baseline (DOB) values in the subgroups of the infection group were similar at 5 min (P > 0.05) and significantly higher than those in the corresponding control subgroups at all time points (P < 0.01). In the infection group, the mean DOB values in subgroup A were higher than those in other subgroups within 10 min and peaked at the 10-min point (12.4‰ ± 2.4‰). The values in subgroups B and C both reached their peaks at 15 min (B, 13.9‰ ± 1.5‰; C, 12.2‰ ± 1.7‰) and then decreased gradually until the 30-min point. In subgroup D, the value peaked at 20 min (14.7‰ ± 1.7‰). Significant differences were found between the values in subgroups D and B at both 25 min (t = 2.093, P = 0.043) and 30 min (t = 2.141, P = 0.039). At 30 min, the value in subgroup D was also significantly different from those in subgroups A and C (D vs C: t = 6.325, P = 0.000; D vs A: t

  8. (1)H and (13)C magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the chicken eggshell.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2012-12-19

    The chicken eggshell, a product of biomineralization, contains inorganic and organic substances whose content changes during the incubation process. Bloch-decay (BD) (1)H, (13)C, and cross-polarization (CP) (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of chicken eggshells were acquired under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Variable contact time (13)C CP MAS NMR experiments revealed the signals of carbonyl groups from organic and inorganic compounds. In the (13)C BD NMR spectra, a single peak at 168.1 ppm was detected, whereas in the (1)H BD spectra, the signals from water and the bicarbonate ion were assigned. A simultaneous decrease of the water signal in the (1)H MAS NMR spectra and an increase of the carbonate ion signal in the (13)C CP MAS NMR spectra of eggshells collected during the incubation period indicate the substitution of calcium ions by hydrogen ions in the calcium carbonate crystalline phase during the incubation of an egg.

  9. Effects of fasting on serial measurements of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate metabolism in tumors.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Eva M; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Gallagher, Ferdia A; Kettunen, Mikko I; Kennedy, Brett W C; Vowler, Sarah L; Burling, Keith A; Brindle, Kevin M

    2016-08-01

    Imaging of the metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate has shown considerable promise in preclinical studies in oncology, particularly for the assessment of early treatment response. The repeatability of measurements of (13) C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate was determined in a murine lymphoma model in fasted and non-fasted animals. The fasted state showed lower intra-individual variability, although the [1-(13) C]lactate/[1-(13) C]pyruvate signal ratio was significantly greater in fasted than in non-fasted mice, which may be explained by the higher tumor lactate concentrations in fasted animals. These results indicate that the fasted state may be preferable for the measurement of (13) C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate, as it reduces the variability and therefore should make it easier to detect the effects of therapy. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27309986

  10. Effects of fasting on serial measurements of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate metabolism in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Eva M.; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Gallagher, Ferdia A.; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Kennedy, Brett W. C.; Vowler, Sarah L.; Burling, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the metabolism of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate has shown considerable promise in preclinical studies in oncology, particularly for the assessment of early treatment response. The repeatability of measurements of 13C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate was determined in a murine lymphoma model in fasted and non‐fasted animals. The fasted state showed lower intra‐individual variability, although the [1‐13C]lactate/[1‐13C]pyruvate signal ratio was significantly greater in fasted than in non‐fasted mice, which may be explained by the higher tumor lactate concentrations in fasted animals. These results indicate that the fasted state may be preferable for the measurement of 13C label exchange between pyruvate and lactate, as it reduces the variability and therefore should make it easier to detect the effects of therapy. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27309986

  11. Conditions for (13)C NMR detection of 2-hydroxyglutarate in tissue extracts from isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutated gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pichumani, Kumar; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Ratnakar, James; Mickey, Bruce; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Maher, Elizabeth A; Bachoo, Robert M; Malloy, Craig R; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2015-07-15

    (13)C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy of extracts from patient tumor samples provides rich information about metabolism. However, in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutant gliomas, (13)C labeling is obscured in oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutaric acid (2 HG) by glutamate and glutamine, prompting development of a simple method to resolve the metabolites. J-coupled multiplets in 2 HG were similar to glutamate and glutamine and could be clearly resolved at pH 6. A cryogenically cooled (13)C probe, but not J-resolved heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectroscopy, significantly improved detection of 2 HG. These methods enable the monitoring of (13)C-(13)C spin-spin couplings in 2 HG expressing IDH-mutant gliomas.

  12. Testing compound-specific δ13C of amino acids in mussels as a new approach to determine the average 13C values of primary production in littoral ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhshoori, N. L.; Larsen, T.; McCarthy, M.

    2012-12-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids (CSI-AA) is a technique used to decouple trophic enrichment patterns from source changes at the base of the food web. With this new emerging tool, it is possible to precisely determine both trophic position and δ15N or δ13C source values in higher feeding organisms. While most work to date has focused on nitrogen (N) isotopic values, early work has suggested that δ13C CSI-AA has great potential as a new tracer both to a record δ13C values of primary production (unaltered by trophic transfers), and also to "fingerprint" specific carbon source organisms. Since essential amino acids (EAA) cannot be made de novo in metazoans but must be obtained from diet, the δ13C value of the primary producer is preserved through the food web. Therefore, the δ13C values of EAAs act as a unique signature of different primary producers and can be used to fingerprint the dominant carbon (C) source driving primary production at the base of the food web. In littoral ecosystems, such as the California Upwelling System (CUS), the likely dominant C sources of suspended particulate organic matter (POM) pool are kelp, upwelling phytoplankton or estuarine phytoplankton. While bulk isotopes of C and N are used extensively to resolve relative consumer hierarchy or shifting diet in a food web, we found that the δ13C bulk values in mussels cannot distinguish exact source in littoral ecosystems. Here we show 15 sites within the CUS, between Cape Blanco, OR and La Jolla, CA where mussels were sampled and analyzed for both bulk δ13C and CSI-AA. We found no latitudinal trends, but rather average bulk δ13C values for the entire coastal record were highly consistent (-15.7 ± 0.9‰). The bulk record would suggest either nutrient provisioning from kelp or upwelled phytoplankton, but 13C-AA fingerprinting confines these two sources to upwelling. This suggests that mussels are recording integrated coastal phytoplankton values, with the enriched

  13. {sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for carbonate ions in cement minerals and the use of {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR in studies of Portland cement including limestone additions

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Herfort, Duncan

    2013-10-15

    {sup 13}C isotropic chemical shifts and chemical shift anisotropy parameters have been determined for a number of inorganic carbonates relevant in cement chemistry from slow-speed {sup 13}C MAS or {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR spectra (9.4 T or 14.1 T) for {sup 13}C in natural abundance. The variation in the {sup 13}C chemical shift parameters is relatively small, raising some doubts that different carbonate species in Portland cement-based materials may not be sufficiently resolved in {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectra. However, it is shown that by combining {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR carbonate anions in anhydrous and hydrated phases can be distinguished, thereby providing valuable information about the reactivity of limestone in cement blends. This is illustrated for three cement pastes prepared from an ordinary Portland cement, including 0, 16, and 25 wt.% limestone, and following the hydration for up to one year. For these blends {sup 29}Si MAS NMR reveals that the limestone filler accelerates the hydration for alite and also results in a smaller fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated Al incorporated in the C-S-H phase. The latter result is more clearly observed in {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra of the cement–limestone blends and suggests that dissolved aluminate species in the cement–limestone blends readily react with carbonate ions from the limestone filler, forming calcium monocarboaluminate hydrate. -- Highlights: •{sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for inorganic carbonates from {sup 13}C MAS NMR. •Narrow {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift range (163–171 ppm) for inorganic carbonates. •Anhydrous and hydrated carbonate species by {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR. •Limestone accelerates the hydration for alite in Portland – limestone cements. •Limestone reduces the amount of aluminium incorporated in the C-S-H phase.

  14. Solution Structures of the Prototypical 18 kDa Translocator Protein Ligand, PK 11195, Elucidated with 1H/13C NMR Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Eighteen kilodalton translocator protein (TSPO) is an important target for drug discovery and for clinical molecular imaging of brain and peripheral inflammatory processes. PK 11195 [1a; 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide] is the major prototypical high-affinity ligand for TSPO. Elucidation of the solution structure of 1a is of interest for understanding small-molecule ligand interactions with the lipophilic binding site of TSPO. Dynamic 1H/13C NMR spectroscopy of 1a revealed four quite stable but interconverting rotamers, due to amide bond and 2-chlorophenyl group rotation. These rotamers have been neglected in previous descriptions of the structure of 1a and of the binding of 1a to TSPO. Here, we used quantum chemistry at the level of B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p) to calculate 13C and 1H chemical shifts for the rotamers of 1a and for the very weak TSPO ligand, N-desmethyl-PK 11195 (1b). These data, plus experimental NMR data, were then used to characterize the structures of rotamers of 1a and 1b in organic solution. Energy barriers for both the amide bond and 2′-chlorophenyl group rotation of 1a were determined from dynamic 1H NMR to be similar (ca.17 to 18 kcal/mol), and they compared well with those calculated at the level of B3LYP/6-31G*. Furthermore, the computed barrier for Z to E rotation is considerably lower in 1a(18.7 kcal/mol) than in 1b (25.4 kcal/mol). NMR (NOE) unequivocally demonstrated that the E rotamer of 1a is the more stable in solution by about 0.4 kcal/mol. These detailed structural findings will aid future TSPO ligand design and support the notion that TSPO prefers to bind ligands as amide E-rotamers. PMID:22860199

  15. Characteristics of 14C and 13C of carbonate aerosols in dust storm events in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Jie, Dongmei; Shi, Meinan; Gao, Pan; Shen, Zhenxing; Uchida, Masao; Zhou, Liping; Liu, Kexin; Hu, Ke; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    In contrast with its decrease in western China deserts, the dust storm event in eastern China, Korea, and Japan shows an increase in frequency. Although the drylands in northeastern China have been recognized as an important dust source, the relative contributions of dust transport from the drylands and deserts are inconclusive, thus the quantification of dust storm sources in downwind area remains a challenge. We measured the 14C and 13C contents in carbonates of dust samples from six sites in China, which were collected for the duration of dust storm events in drylands, deserts, and urban areas. The δ13C of the dryland dust samples considerably varied in a range of - 9.7 to - 5.0‰, which partly overlapped the desert dust carbonate δ13C ranges. The 14C content of the dryland dust carbonates showed a narrow range of 60.9 ± 4.0 (as an average and 1 SD of five samples) percent modern carbon (pMC), indicating the enrichment of modern carbonate. Dust samples in desert regions contained relatively aged carbonates with the depleting 14C showing of 28.8 ± 3.3 pMC. After the long-range transport of the western China desert dust plume, the carbonates collected at the southern China remained the depletion of 14C (33.5 ± 5.3 pMC) as in the desert regions. On the other hand, the samples of dust storm events at the urban areas of eastern China showed an enrichment of 14C contents (46.2 ± 5.0 pMC, n = 7), which might be explained by the stronger contribution of modern-carbonate-rich dryland dust.

  16. Statistical signal analysis of the Phanerozoic ð13C curve: implications for Earth system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachan, A.; Kump, L. R.; Payne, J.; Saltzman, M.; Thomas, E.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, vast amounts of carbon isotopic data have been collected allowing the construction of the Phanerozoic δ13C curve in unprecedented detail. Our dataset comprises 8143 points spanning the last 541 m.y., with a mean spacing of 66 k.y. The average δ13C of Phanerozoic carbonate is 1 ‰ ± 2 ‰, in accordance with the canonical values measured in the past. However, the record also shows numerous, highly resolved, large (± 6 ‰) excursions whose magnitude declines through time, especially going into the late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. When the magnitude - distribution of the excursions is tabulated we find that it follows a power law: plotting the min-max differences vs. number of bins in which a particular value occurs reveals that the data fall on a semilogarithmic line with a slope of -0.23 and R2 = 0.99. The result is insensitive to outliers: smoothing the data with lowess, spline, Savitzky-Golay, and Butterworth filters yields similar results. The continuity from small variation to large perturbations, both positive and negative, suggests that, despite the numerous proposed causes for individual carbon isotopic evens, there is likely an underlying mechanism which governs the magnitude of δ13C response to perturbations. We suggest that a mechanism acting to amplify carbon cycle perturbations is the key to explaining the power-law distribution, and identify the anoxia-productivity feedback as the most likely candidate. Establishment of sulfidic conditions is accompanied by increased release of phosphate to the water column, which allows for further productivity, and thus acts as a destabilizing, positive, feedback. This feedback would act to increase carbon cycle swings irrespective of their proximal trigger. The decline in frequency of anoxic-sulfidic bottom waters in the world's oceans, and potential disappearance in the Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic, may account for a reduction in the Earth system's gain and increase in its resilience.

  17. Line Positions and Intensities for the ν12 Band of 13C12CH_6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Sung, Keeyoon; Crawford, Timothy J.; Mantz, Arlan; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of mono-substituted 13C-ethane (13C12CH_6) in the 12.2 μm region were recorded with a Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer. The spectra were obtained for four sample pressures at three different temperatures between 130 and 208 K using a 99% 13C-enriched ethane sample contained in a 20.38-cm long coolable absorption cell. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting technique was used to fit the same intervals in the four spectra simultaneously to determine line positions and intensities. Similar to our previous analyses of 12C_2H_6 spectra in this same region, constraints were applied to accurately fit each pair of doublet components arising from torsional Coriolis interaction of the excited ν12 = 1 state with the nearby torsional ν_6 = 3 state. Line intensities corresponding to each spectrum temperature (130 K, 178 K and 208 K) are reported for 1660 ν12 absorption lines for which the assignments are known, and integrated intensities are estimated as the summation of the measured values. The measured line positions and intensities (re-scaled to 296 K) are compared with values in recent editions of spectroscopic databases. K. Sung, A. W. Mantz, L. R. Brown, et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc., 162 (2010) 124-134. D. C. Benner, C. P. Rinsland, V. Malathy Devi, M. A. H. Smith and D. Atkins, JQSRT, 53 (1995) 705-721. V. Malathy Devi, C. P. Rinsland, D. Chris Benner, et al., JQSRT, 111 (2010) 1234-1251 V. Malathy Devi, D. Chris Benner, C. P. Rinsland, et al., JQSRT, 111 (2010) 2481-2504. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the College of William and Mary, NASA Langley Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. Global patterns in leaf 13C discrimination and implications for studies of past and future climate.

    PubMed

    Diefendorf, Aaron F; Mueller, Kevin E; Wing, Scott L; Koch, Paul L; Freeman, Katherine H

    2010-03-30

    Fractionation of carbon isotopes by plants during CO(2) uptake and fixation (Delta(leaf)) varies with environmental conditions, but quantitative patterns of Delta(leaf) across environmental gradients at the global scale are lacking. This impedes interpretation of variability in ancient terrestrial organic matter, which encodes climatic and ecological signals. To address this problem, we converted 3,310 published leaf delta(13)C values into mean Delta(leaf) values for 334 woody plant species at 105 locations (yielding 570 species-site combinations) representing a wide range of environmental conditions. Our analyses reveal a strong positive correlation between Delta(leaf) and mean annual precipitation (MAP; R(2) = 0.55), mirroring global trends in gross primary production and indicating stomatal constraints on leaf gas-exchange, mediated by water supply, are the dominant control of Delta(leaf) at large spatial scales. Independent of MAP, we show a lesser, negative effect of altitude on Delta(leaf) and minor effects of temperature and latitude. After accounting for these factors, mean Delta(leaf) of evergreen gymnosperms is lower (by 1-2.7 per thousand) than for other woody plant functional types (PFT), likely due to greater leaf-level water-use efficiency. Together, environmental and PFT effects contribute to differences in mean Delta(leaf) of up to 6 per thousand between biomes. Coupling geologic indicators of ancient precipitation and PFT (or biome) with modern Delta(leaf) patterns has potential to yield more robust reconstructions of atmospheric delta(13)C values, leading to better constraints on past greenhouse-gas perturbations. Accordingly, we estimate a 4.6 per thousand decline in the delta(13)C of atmospheric CO(2) at the onset of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, an abrupt global warming event approximately 55.8 Ma. PMID:20231481

  19. Acetate and Bicarbonate Assimilation and Metabolite Formation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: A 13C-NMR Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Himanshu; Shukla, Manish R.; Chary, Kandala V. R.; Rao, Basuthkar J.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular metabolite analyses by 13C-NMR showed that C. reinhardtii cells assimilate acetate at a faster rate in heterotrophy than in mixotrophy. While heterotrophic cells produced bicarbonate and CO2aq, mixotrophy cells produced bicarbonate alone as predominant metabolite. Experiments with singly 13C-labelled acetate (13CH3-COOH or CH3-13COOH) supported that both the 13C nuclei give rise to bicarbonate and CO2aq. The observed metabolite(s) upon further incubation led to the production of starch and triacylglycerol (TAG) in mixotrophy, whereas in heterotrophy the TAG production was minimal with substantial accumulation of glycerol and starch. Prolonged incubation up to eight days, without the addition of fresh acetate, led to an increased TAG production at the expense of bicarbonate, akin to that of nitrogen-starvation. However, such TAG production was substantially high in mixotrophy as compared to that in heterotrophy. Addition of mitochondrial un-coupler blocked the formation of bicarbonate and CO2aq in heterotrophic cells, even though acetate uptake ensued. Addition of PSII-inhibitor to mixotrophic cells resulted in partial conversion of bicarbonate into CO2aq, which were found to be in equilibrium. In an independent experiment, we have monitored assimilation of bicarbonate via photoautotrophy and found that the cells indeed produce starch and TAG at a much faster rate as compared to that in mixotrophy and heterotrophy. Further, we noticed that the accumulation of starch is relatively more as compared to TAG. Based on these observations, we suggest that acetate assimilation