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Sample records for 13c t1 relaxation

  1. The T1 ρ13C spin-lattice relaxation time of helical polyguanidines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, A. R.; Stewart, J. R.; Novak, B. M.

    1999-03-01

    The solid state dynamics of three helical polyguanidines differing only in their stereochemistry was investigated by 13C CP/MAS NMR. From these studies, the structures of the polyguanidines were confirmed, and the 13C spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame were measured. The relaxation times of all the polyguanidines indicated that they undergo fast motions, i.e. motions on the fast side of the T1 ρ minimum. The main chain carbon of polyguanidine I-( R/ S), with equal amounts of ( R) and ( S) chiral side chains, has higher activation energy, 10.7 kJ/mol, than the analogous polymers with enantiomerically pure side chains ( I-( R) and I-( S)), 5.1 kJ/mol.

  2. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  3. The T1 ρ13C spin-lattice relaxation time of interpenetrating networks by solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Schueneman, G. T.; Novak, B. M.

    1999-02-01

    Poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) interpenetrated with 5% SiO 2 (PHEMA-IPN) were studied by 13C CP/MAS NMR. From these results, the structure of two polymers were verified by 13C NMR. Spin-lattice relaxation times for the polymer carbons in the rotating frame, T1 ρ, have been measured as a function of temperature. The T1 ρ spin-lattice relaxation times of the α-quarternary and carbonyl in the PHEMA and PHEMA-IPN undergo slow motions, i.e., motions on the slow side of the T1 ρ minimum, while those of the 1-,2-, β-methylene, and 3-methyl undergo fast motions, i.e., motions on the fast side of the T1 ρ minimum. From these T1 ρ spin-lattice relaxation times, we discuss the mobility, the correlation time, and activation energy for the PHEMA and PHEMA-IPN, respectively. The activation energies for the PHEMA-IPN were found to be generally higher than those of PHEMA. The higher activation energy for the side-chain 2-methylene in the PHEMA-IPN is attributed to bonding between the SiO 2 and the hydroxyl group of the PHEMA.

  4. Development of qualitative and quantitative analysis methods in pharmaceutical application with new selective signal excitation methods for 13 C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using 1 H T1rho relaxation time.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Mamiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Most pharmaceutical drug substances and excipients in formulations exist in a crystalline or amorphous form, and an understanding of their state during manufacture and storage is critically important, particularly in formulated products. Carbon 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is useful for studying the chemical and physical state of pharmaceutical solids in a formulated product. We developed two new selective signal excitation methods in (13) C solid-state NMR to extract the spectrum of a target component from such a mixture. These methods were based on equalization of the proton relaxation time in a single domain via rapid intraproton spin diffusion and the difference in proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame ((1) H T1rho) of individual components in the mixture. Introduction of simple pulse sequences to one-dimensional experiments reduced data acquisition time and increased flexibility. We then demonstrated these methods in a commercially available drug and in a mixture of two saccharides, in which the (13) C signals of the target components were selectively excited, and showed them to be applicable to the quantitative analysis of individual components in solid mixtures, such as formulated products, polymorphic mixtures, or mixtures of crystalline and amorphous phases. PMID:23147444

  5. {sup 13}C relaxation in an RNA hairpin

    SciTech Connect

    King, G.C. |; Akratos, C.; Xi, Z.; Michnica, M.J.

    1994-12-01

    This initial survey of {sup 13}C relaxation in the {triangle}TAR RNA element has generated a number of interesting results that should prove generally useful for future studies. The most readily comparable study in the literature monitored {sup 13}C relaxation of the methyl groups from unusual bases in tRNA{sup Phe}. The study, which used T{sub 1} and NOE data only, reported order parameters for the methyl group axis that ranged between 0.51 and 0.97-a range similar to that observed here. However, they reported a breakdown of the standard order parameter analysis at higher (118-MHz {sup 13}C) frequencies, which should serve to emphasize the need for a thorough exploration of suitable motional models.

  6. 13C NMR relaxation in neutral and charged tetra- n-alkyl compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordes, B.; Coletta, F.; Ferrarini, A.; Gottardi, F.; Nordio, P. L.

    1998-05-01

    NMR T1 relaxation times have been measured for 13C nuclei in the alkyl chains of symmetric tetra- n-alkylstannanes dissolved in CDCl 3. The results are interpreted in terms of conformational transitions occurring in the aliphatic chains superimposed to rotational diffusion of the whole molecule. A comparison with analogous tetra- n-alkylammonium salts is performed. Differences are ascribed to changes in the overall rotational diffusion deriving from effects of charge upon formation of ion-pairs and larger aggregates.

  7. Relaxation-Compensated Difference Spin Diffusion NMR for Detecting 13C-13C Long-Range Correlations in Proteins and Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tuo; Williams, Jonathan K.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of long-range distances remains a challenge in solid-state NMR structure determination of biological macromolecules. In 2D and 3D correlation spectra of uniformly 13C-labeled biomolecules, inter-residue, inter-segmental, and intermolecular 13C-13C cross peaks that provide important long-range distance constraints for three-dimensional structures often overlap with short-range cross peaks that only reflect the covalent structure of the molecule. It is therefore desirable to develop new approaches to obtain spectra containing only long-range cross peaks. Here we show that a relaxation-compensated modification of the commonly used 2D 1H-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) experiment allows the clean detection of such long-range cross peaks. By adding a z-filter to keep the total z-period of the experiment constant, we compensate for 13C T1 relaxation. As a result, the difference spectrum between a long- and a scaled short-mixing time spectrum show only long-range correlation signals. We show that one- and two-bond cross peaks equalize within a few tens of milliseconds. Within ~200 ms, the intensity equilibrates within an amino acid residue and a monosaccharide to a value that reflects the number of spins in the local network. With T1 relaxation compensation, at longer mixing times, inter-residue and inter-segmental cross peaks increase in intensity whereas intra-segmental cross-peak intensities remain unchanged relative to each other and can all be subtracted out. Without relaxation compensation, the difference 2D spectra exhibit both negative and positive intensities due to heterogeneous T1 relaxation in most biomolecules, which can cause peak cancellation. We demonstrate this relaxation-compensated difference PDSD approach on amino acids, monosaccharides, a crystalline model peptide, a membrane-bound peptide and a plant cell wall sample. The resulting difference spectra yield clean multi-bond, inter-residue and intermolecular correlation peaks, which are

  8. Effect of Dipolar Cross Correlation on Model-Free Motional Parameters Obtained from 13C Relaxation in AX 2 Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L. Y.; Kemple, M. D.; Landy, S. B.; Buckley, P.

    The importance of dipolar cross correlation in 13C relaxation studies of molecular motion in AX 2 spin systems (A = 13C, X = 1H) was examined. Several different models for the internal motion, including two restricted-diffusion, and two-site jump models, the Kinosita model [K. Kinosita, Jr., S. Kawato, and A. Ikegami, Biophys. J.20, 289 (1977)], and an axially symmetric model, were applied through the Lipari and Szabo [ J. Am. Chem. Soc.104, 4546 (1982)] formalism to calculate errors in 13C T1, obtained from inversion-recovery measurements under proton saturation, and NOE when dipolar cross correlation is neglected. Motional parameters in the Lipari and Szabo formalism, τ m, S2, and τ e, were then determined from T1 and NOE (including the errors) and compared with parameters initially used to simulate the relaxation data. The resulting differences in the motional parameters, while model dependent, were generally small for plausible motions. At larger S2 values (≥ 0.6), the errors in both τ m and S2 were <5%. Errors in τ e increased with S2 but were usually less than 10%. Larger errors in the parameters were found for an axially symmetric model, but with τ m fixed even those were >5% only for the τ m = 1 ns, τ e = 10 ps case. Furthermore, it was observed that deviations in a given motional parameter were mostly of the same sign, which allows bounds to be set on experimentally derived parameters. Relaxation data for the peptide melittin synthesized with gly enriched with 13C at the backbone cu position and with lys enriched with 13C in the side chain were examined in light of the results of the simulations. All in all, it appears that neglect of dipolar cross correlation in 13C T1 (With proton saturation) and NOE measurements in AX 2 systems does not lead to major problems in interpretation of the results in terms of molecular motion.

  9. Earth's magnetic field enabled scalar coupling relaxation of 13C nuclei bound to fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N in amide groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavazza, Enrico; Kubala, Eugen; Gringeri, Concetta V.; Düwel, Stephan; Durst, Markus; Schulte, Rolf F.; Menzel, Marion I.

    2013-02-01

    Scalar coupling relaxation, which is usually only associated with closely resonant nuclei (e.g., 79Br-13C), can be a very effective relaxation mechanism. While working on hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, fast liquid-state polarization decay during transfer to the MRI scanner was observed. This behavior could hypothetically be explained by substantial T1 shortening due to a scalar coupling contribution (type II) to the relaxation caused by the fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N adjacent to the 13C nucleus in the amide group. This contribution is only effective in low magnetic fields (i.e., less than 800 μT) and prevents the use of molecules bearing the 13C-amide group as hyperpolarized MRS/MRI probes. In the present work, this hypothesis is explored both theoretically and experimentally. The results show that high hyperpolarization levels can be retained using either a 15N-labeled amide or by applying a magnetic field during transfer of the sample from the polarizer to the MRI scanner.

  10. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by 13C CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion.

    PubMed

    Hass, Mathias A S; Yilmaz, Ali; Christensen, Hans E M; Led, Jens J

    2009-08-01

    The use of 13C NMR relaxation dispersion experiments to monitor micro-millisecond fluctuations in the protonation states of histidine residues in proteins is investigated. To illustrate the approach, measurements on three specifically 13C labeled histidine residues in plastocyanin (PCu) from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.) are presented. Significant Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is observed for 13C(epsilon1) nuclei in the histidine imidazole rings of A.v. PCu. The chemical shift changes obtained from the CPMG dispersion data are in good agreement with those obtained from the chemical shift titration experiments, and the CPMG derived exchange rates agree with those obtained previously from 15N backbone relaxation measurements. Compared to measurements of backbone nuclei, 13C(epsilon1) dispersion provides a more direct method to monitor interchanging protonation states or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the 13C(epsilon1) dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains are discussed. PMID:19533375

  11. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for 13C NMR relaxation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of 15N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to 13C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and 13C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly 13C -labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  12. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for (13)C NMR relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of (15)N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to (13)C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and (13)C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly (13)C-labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions. PMID:27003380

  13. /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation in gaseous benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Folkendt, M.M.; Weiss-Lopez, B.E.; True, N.S.

    1988-08-25

    The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time, T/sub 1/, measured for benzene protons at densities between 0.81 and 54.4 mol/m/sup 3/ (15 and 980 Torr) at 381 K exhibits a characteristic nonlinear density dependence. Analysis of the density-dependent T/sub 1/ data yields a spin-rotation coupling constant, C/sub eff/, of /vert bar/182.6 (0.4)/vert bar/ Hz and an angular momentum reorientation cross section, sigma, of 131 (1) /Angstrom//sup 2/. The /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation time of singly labeled /sup 13/C benzene is a linear function of density over the density range 1.07-75.12 mol/m/sup 3/ (20-1330 Torr). /sup 13/C T/sub 1/ values are shorter than /sup 1/H T/sub 1/ values by a factor of ca. 100 at comparable densities. The nuclear Overhauser enhancement factor, /eta/, is 0.0 /plus minus/ 0.02 at densities between 11 and 85.3 mol/m/sup 3/ (200 and 1500 Torr), demonstrating that dipole-dipole relaxation is relatively inefficient in this region. The spin-rotation coupling constant, C/sub eff/, for /sup 13/C nuclei in benzene is estimated to be /vert bar/1602 (68)/vert bar/ Hz.

  14. Hyperpolarized 13C urea relaxation mechanism reveals renal changes in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Stokholm Nørlinger, Thomas; Christoffer Hansen, David; Qi, Haiyun; Mose Nielsen, Per; Bonde Bertelsen, Lotte; Henrik Ardenkjaer‐Larsen, Jan; Stødkilde Jørgensen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to assess a novel 13C radial fast spin echo golden ratio single shot method for interrogating early renal changes in the diabetic kidney, using hyperpolarized (HP) [13C,15N2]urea as a T2 relaxation based contrast bio‐probe. Methods A novel HP 13C MR contrast experiment was conducted in a group of streptozotocin type‐1 diabetic rat model and age matched controls. Results A significantly different relaxation time (P = 0.004) was found in the diabetic kidney (0.49 ± 0.03 s) compared with the controls (0.64 ± 0.02 s) and secondly, a strong correlation between the blood oxygen saturation level and the relaxation times were observed in the healthy controls. Conclusion HP [13C,15N2]urea apparent T2 mapping may be a useful for interrogating local renal pO2 status and renal tissue alterations. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. Magn Reson Med 75:515–518, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID:26584247

  15. Effect of lanthanide ions on dynamic nuclear polarization enhancement and liquid-state T1 relaxation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeremy W; Fain, Sean B; Rowland, Ian J

    2012-12-01

    In the dynamic nuclear polarization process, microwave irradiation facilitates exchange of polarization from a radical's unpaired electron to nuclear spins at cryogenic temperatures, increasing polarization by >10,000. Doping samples with Gd(3+) ions further increases the achievable solid-state polarization. However, on dissolution, paramagnetic lanthanide metals can be potent relaxation agents, decreasing liquid-state polarization. Here, the effects of lanthanide metals on the solid and liquid-state magnetic properties of [1-(13)C]pyruvate are studied. The results show that in addition to gadolinium, holmium increases not only the achievable polarization but also the rate of polarization. Liquid-state relaxation studies found that unlike gadolinium, holmium minimally affects T(1). Additionally, results reveal that linear contrast agents dissociate in pyruvic acid, greatly reducing liquid-state T(1). Although macrocyclic agents do not readily dissociate, they yield lower solid-state polarization. Results indicate that polarization with free lanthanides and subsequent chelation during dissolution produces the highest polarization enhancement while minimizing liquid-state relaxation. PMID:22367680

  16. Effect of Lanthanide Ions on Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhancement and Liquid State T1 Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jeremy; Fain, Sean B.; Rowland, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    In the dynamic nuclear polarization process, microwave irradiation facilitates exchange of polarization from a radical’s unpaired electron to nuclear spins at cryogenic temperatures, increasing polarization by >10000. Doping samples with Gd3+ ions further increases the achievable solid-state polarization. However, upon dissolution, paramagnetic lanthanide metals can be potent relaxation agents, decreasing liquid-state polarization. Here, the effects of lanthanide metals on the solid and liquid-state magnetic properties of [1-13C]pyruvate are studied. The results show that in addition to gadolinium, holmium not only increases the achievable polarization but also the rate of polarization. Liquid-state relaxation studies found that unlike gadolinium, holmium minimally affects T1. Additionally, results reveal that linear contrast agents dissociate in pyruvic acid, greatly reducing liquid-state T1. While macrocyclic agents do not readily dissociate, they yield lower solid-state polarization. Results indicate that polarization with free lanthanides and subsequent chelation during dissolution produces the highest polarization enhancement while minimizing liquid-state relaxation. PMID:22367680

  17. (13)C-(1)H NMR relaxation and fluorescence anisotropy decay study of tyrosine dynamics in motilin.

    PubMed Central

    Damberg, Peter; Jarvet, Jüri; Allard, Peter; Mets, Ulo; Rigler, Rudolf; Gräslund, Astrid

    2002-01-01

    Tyrosine ring dynamics of the gastrointestinal hormone motilin was studied using two independent physical methods: fluorescence polarization anisotropy decay and NMR relaxation. Motilin, a 22-residue peptide, was selectively (13)C labeled in the ring epsilon-carbons of the single tyrosine residue. To eliminate effects of differences in peptide concentration, the same motilin sample was used in both experiments. NMR relaxation rates of the tyrosine ring C(epsilon)-H(epsilon) vectors, measured at four magnetic field strengths (9.4, 11.7, 14.1, and 18.8 Tesla) were used to map the spectral density function. When the data were analyzed using dynamic models with the same number of components, the dynamic parameters from NMR and fluorescence are in excellent agreement. However, the estimated rotational correlation times depend on the choice of dynamic model. The correlation times estimated from the two-component model-free approach and the three-component models were significantly different (1.7 ns and 2.2 ns, respectively). Various earlier studies of protein dynamics by NMR and fluorescence were compared. The rotational correlation times estimated by NMR for samples with high protein concentration were on average 18% longer for folded monomeric proteins than the corresponding times estimated by fluorescence polarization anisotropy decay, after correction for differences in viscosity due to temperature and D(2)O/H(2)O ratio. PMID:12414713

  18. Removal of t1 noise from metabolomic 2D 1H- 13C HSQC NMR spectra by Correlated Trace Denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulding, Simon; Charlton, Adrian J.; Donarski, James; Wilson, Julie C.

    2007-12-01

    The presence of t1 noise artefacts in 2D phase-cycled Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence (HSQC) spectra constrains the use of this experiment despite its superior sensitivity. This paper proposes a new processing algorithm, working in the frequency-domain, for reducing t1 noise. The algorithm has been developed for use in contexts, such as metabolomic studies, where existing denoising techniques cannot always be applied. Two test cases are presented that show the algorithm to be effective in improving the SNR of peaks embedded within t1 noise by a factor of more than 2, while retaining the intensity and shape of genuine peaks.

  19. T1 Relaxation Time in Lungs of Asymptomatic Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Alamidi, Daniel F.; Kindvall, Simon S. I.; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L.; McGrath, Deirdre M.; Young, Simon S.; Naish, Josephine H.; Waterton, John C.; Wollmer, Per; Diaz, Sandra; Olsson, Marita; Hockings, Paul D.; Lagerstrand, Kerstin M.; Parker, Geoffrey J. M.; Olsson, Lars E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Interest in using T1 as a potential MRI biomarker of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has recently increased. Since tobacco smoking is the major risk factor for development of COPD, the aim for this study was to examine whether tobacco smoking, pack-years (PY), influenced T1 of the lung parenchyma in asymptomatic current smokers. Materials and Methods Lung T1 measurements from 35 subjects, 23 never smokers and 12 current smokers were retrospectively analyzed from an institutional review board approved study. All 35 subjects underwent pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements and lung T1, with similar T1 measurement protocols. A backward linear model of T1 as a function of FEV1, FVC, weight, height, age and PY was tested. Results A significant correlation between lung T1 and PY was found with a negative slope of -3.2 ms/year (95% confidence interval [CI] [-5.8, -0.6], p = 0.02), when adjusted for age and height. Lung T1 shortens with ageing among all subjects, -4.0 ms/year (95%CI [-6.3, -1.7], p = 0.001), and among the never smokers, -3.7 ms/year (95%CI [-6.0, -1.3], p = 0.003). Conclusions A correlation between lung T1 and PY when adjusted for both age and height was found, and T1 of the lung shortens with ageing. Accordingly, PY and age can be significant confounding factors when T1 is used as a biomarker in lung MRI studies that must be taken into account to detect underlying patterns of disease. PMID:26958856

  20. Determination of Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Time Using (Super 13)C NMR: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasyna, Zbigniew L.; Jurkiewicz, Antoni

    2004-01-01

    An experiment designed for the physical chemistry laboratory where (super 13)C NMR is applied to determine the spin-lattice relaxation time for carbon atoms in n-hexanol is proposed. It is concluded that students learn the principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy as well as dynamic NMR experiments.

  1. Cryptate 13C and 23Na nuclear magnetic relaxation as a probe of counterion dynamics in aqueous polyacrylate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Maarel, J. R. C.; Van Duijn, D.; De Bleijser, J.; Leyte, J. C.

    1987-03-01

    In a series of fully alkali neutralized polyacrylate solutions the counterions are included by a macrobicyclic ligand (cryptand) to form a well-defined coordination shell. Vapor pressure experiments show the polyacrylate-cryptate system to behave osmotically as an ordinary polyelectrolyte solution. Cryptate 13C and 23Na relaxation show that the influence of polyions on the counter-ion reorientational mobility is moderate. The main 23Na relaxation mechanism is found to be the fluctuating electric field gradient caused by the surrounding ligand.

  2. Dispersion of T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in crude oils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph J; Hürlimann, Martin; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Freed, Denise; Mandal, Soumyajit; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-09-15

    Crude oils, which are complex mixtures of hydrocarbons, can be characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation methods to yield physical properties and chemical compositions. In particular, the field dependence, or dispersion, of T1 relaxation can be used to investigate the presence and dynamics of asphaltenes, the large molecules primarily responsible for the high viscosity in heavy crudes. However, the T2 relaxation dispersion of crude oils, which provides additional insight when measured alongside T1, has yet to be investigated systematically. Here we present the field dependence of T1-T2 correlations of several crude oils with disparate densities. While asphaltene and resin-containing crude oils exhibit significant T1 dispersion, minimal T2 dispersion is seen in all oils. This contrasting behavior between T1 and T2 cannot result from random molecular motions, and thus, we attribute our dispersion results to highly correlated molecular dynamics in asphaltene-containing crude oils. PMID:24919743

  3. Effects of pulmonary inhalation on hyperpolarized krypton-83 magnetic resonance T1 relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupic, K. F.; Elkins, N. D.; Pavlovskaya, G. E.; Repine, J. E.; Meersmann, T.

    2011-07-01

    The 83Kr magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation time T1 of krypton gas in contact with model surfaces was previously found to be highly sensitive to surface composition, surface-to-volume ratio, and surface temperature. The work presented here explored aspects of pulmonary 83Kr T1 relaxation measurements in excised lungs from healthy rats using hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr with approximately 4.4% spin polarization. MR spectroscopy without spatial resolution was applied to the ex vivo lungs that actively inhale hp 83Kr through a custom designed ventilation system. Various inhalation schemes were devised to study the influence of anatomical dead space upon the measured 83Kr T1 relaxation times. The longitudinal 83Kr relaxation times in the distal airways and the respiratory zones were independent of the lung inhalation volume, with T1 = 1.3 s and T1 = 1.0 s, depending only on the applied inhalation scheme. The obtained data were highly reproducible between different specimens. Further, the 83Kr T1 relaxation times in excised lungs were unaffected by the presence of up to 40% oxygen in the hp gas mixture. The results support the possible importance of 83Kr as a biomarker for evaluating lung function.

  4. Effects of Pulmonary Inhalation on Hyperpolarized Krypton-83 Magnetic Resonance T1 Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, K.F.; Elkins, N.D.; Pavlovskaya, G.E.; Repine, J.E.; Meersmann, T.

    2011-01-01

    The 83Kr magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation time T1 of krypton gas in contact with model surfaces was previously found to be highly sensitive to surface composition, surface to volume ratio, and surface temperature. The current work explored aspects of pulmonary 83Kr T1 relaxation measurements in excised lungs from healthy rats using hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr with approximately 4.4 % spin polarization. MR spectroscopy without spatial resolution was applied to the ex vivo lungs that actively inhale hp 83Kr through a custom designed ventilation system. Various inhalation schemes were devised to explore the influence of anatomical dead space upon the measured 83Kr T1 relaxation times. The longitudinal 83Kr relaxation times in the distal airways and the respiratory zones were independent of the lung inhalation volume, with T1 = 1.3 s and T1 = 1.0 s, depending only on the applied inhalation scheme. The obtained data was highly reproducible between different specimens. Further, the 83Kr T1 relaxation times in excised lungs were unaffected by the presence of up to 40% oxygen in the hp gas mixture. The results support the possible importance of 83Kr as a biomarker for evaluating lung function. PMID:21628780

  5. Capturing fast relaxing spins with SWIFT adiabatic rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation (T1ρ ) mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Nissi, M J; Idiyatullin, D; Michaeli, S; Garwood, M; Ellermann, J

    2016-04-01

    Rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation, with the characteristic time constant T1ρ , provides a means to access motion-restricted (slow) spin dynamics in MRI. As a result of their restricted motion, these spins are sometimes characterized by a short transverse relaxation time constant T2 and thus can be difficult to detect directly with conventional image acquisition techniques. Here, we introduce an approach for three-dimensional adiabatic T1ρ mapping based on a magnetization-prepared sweep imaging with Fourier transformation (MP-SWIFT) sequence, which captures signal from almost all water spin populations, including the extremely fast relaxing pool. A semi-analytical procedure for T1ρ mapping is described. Experiments on phantoms and musculoskeletal tissue specimens (tendon, articular and epiphyseal cartilages) were performed at 9.4 T for both the MP-SWIFT and fast spin echo (FSE) read outs. In the phantom with liquids having fast molecular tumbling and a single-valued T1ρ time constant, the measured T1ρ values obtained with MP-SWIFT and FSE were similar. Conversely, in normal musculoskeletal tissues, T1ρ values measured with MP-SWIFT were much shorter than the values obtained with FSE. Studies of biological tissue specimens demonstrated that T1ρ -weighted SWIFT provides higher contrast between normal and diseased tissues relative to conventional acquisitions. Adiabatic T1ρ mapping with SWIFT readout captures contributions from the otherwise undetected fast relaxing spins, allowing more informative T1ρ measurements of normal and diseased states. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26811973

  6. T 1 Relaxation Measurement of Ex-Vivo Breast Cancer Tissues at Ultralow Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Hwang, Seong-min; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Lim, Sanghyun; Han, Jae Ho; Yim, Hyunee; Kim, Jang-Hee; Jung, Yong Sik; Kim, Ku Sang

    2015-01-01

    We investigated T1 relaxations of ex-vivo cancer tissues at low magnetic fields in order to check the possibility of achieving a T1 contrast higher than those obtained at high fields. The T1 relaxations of fifteen pairs (normal and cancerous) of breast tissue samples were measured at three magnetic fields, 37, 62, and 122 μT, using our superconducting quantum interference device-based ultralow field nuclear magnetic resonance setup, optimally developed for ex-vivo tissue studies. A signal reconstruction based on Bayesian statistics for noise reduction was exploited to overcome the low signal-to-noise ratio. The ductal and lobular-type tissues did not exhibit meaningful T1 contrast values between normal and cancerous tissues at the three different fields. On the other hand, an enhanced T1 contrast was obtained for the mucinous cancer tissue. PMID:25705658

  7. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-01

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach. PMID:20681586

  8. Hypothalamic involvement assessed by T1 relaxation time in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zellini, Francesco; Niepel, Graham; Tench, Christopher R; Constantinescu, Cris S

    2009-12-01

    Recent work in multiple sclerosis, focusing on neuropathological abnormalities, found a frequent and severe hypothalamic involvement. The possible clinical implications are disturbances in sleep and sexual activity, depression, memory impairment and fatigue. Despite this there are no magnetic resonance imaging studies focusing on in vivo hypothalamic pathology in multiple sclerosis. Our objective was to investigate magnetic resonance imaging-detectable abnormalities related to pathological changes in the hypothalamus of patients with multiple sclerosis, and to subsequently explore the relationship with fatigue. We used T1 relaxation time as a sensitive measure of pathology. Using region of interest analysis, median T1 values in the hypothalamus were measured in 44 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and in 13 healthy controls. Fatigue was assessed using the Fatigue Severity Scale, and patients were divided in two subgroups, fatigued and non-fatigued, according to Fatigue Severity Scale scores. We found a significantly higher T1 relaxation time in the hypothalamus of multiple sclerosis patients compared with controls (p = 0.027). There was a significant correlation between T1 values and fatigue severity (rho 0.437, p = 0.008), and median T1 values were different among the study groups. Our results show that pathological involvement of the hypothalamus in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis is detectable using magnetic resonance imaging, and that the pathology measured by quantitative T1 might reflect fatigue. PMID:19995847

  9. Strain-dependent T1 Relaxation Profiles in Articular Cartilage by MRI at Microscopic Resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yang; Wang, Nian; Lee, Jihyun; Badar, Farid

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the dependency of T1 relaxation on mechanical strain in articular cartilage, quantitative MRI T1 imaging experiments were carried out on cartilage before/after the tissue was immersed in gadolinium contrast agent and when the tissue was being compressed (up to ~ 48% strains). The spatial resolution across the cartilage depth was 17.6μm. The T1 profile in native tissue (without the presence of gadolinium ions) was strongly strain-dependent, which is also depth-dependent. At the modest strains (e.g., 14% strain), T1 reduced by up to 68% in the most surface portion of the tissue. Further compression (e.g., 45% strain) reduced T1 mostly in the middle and deep portions of the tissue. For the gadolinium-immersed tissue, both modest and heavy compressions (up to 48% strain) increased T1 slightly but significantly, although the overall shapes of the T1 profiles remained approximately the same regardless of the amount of strains. The complex relationships between the T1 profiles and the mechanical strains were a direct consequence of the depth-dependent proteoglycan concentration in the tissue, which determined the tissue’s mechanical properties. This finding has potential implications in the use of gadolinium contrast agent in clinical MRI of cartilage (the dGEMRIC procedure), when the loading or loading history of patients is considered. PMID:21452280

  10. Serial changes in the T1 magnetic relaxation parameter after myocardial infarction in man.

    PubMed Central

    Been, M; Smith, M A; Ridgway, J P; Douglas, R H; de Bono, D P; Best, J J; Muir, A L

    1988-01-01

    A low field resistive nuclear magnetic resonance imaging system (0.08 Tesla) was used to study the in vivo changes in the relaxation parameter T1 of the left ventricular myocardium from the first day to six months after acute myocardial infarction in 41 consecutive patients admitted to a coronary care unit. T1 maps were constructed from transverse and coronal images at various times after infarction. Thrombolytic treatment had been successful in 28 patients. Thirty three of the 34 patients studied within two weeks of infarction had a significantly increased T1 value but this developed only after the third day in four. At day 1-3 the mean (1 SD) maximum T1 was 413 (29) ms (n = 23) compared with 430 (41) ms (n = 22) at day 4-7, 433 (35) ms (n = 24) at day 8-14, 420 (34) at one month (n = 22), 388 (39) (n = 20) at three months, and 361 (24) (n = 14) at six months. The number of regions of interest with an increased T1 followed a similar time course. Although the increase in T1 measured at three months correlated with the initial maximum creatine kinase and with the left ventricular ejection fraction measured at one month, the number of regions with abnormal T1 from day 4 through to one month correlated best with left ventricular ejection fraction. There was no significant difference in T1 between patients with or without reperfusion. The rise in T1 over the first few days together with the prolonged time course of T1 increase suggests that the increase in T1 may reflect cellular infiltration as much or more than tissue oedema. Images Fig 3 PMID:3342143

  11. COPD Patients Have Short Lung Magnetic Resonance T1 Relaxation Time.

    PubMed

    Alamidi, Daniel F; Morgan, Alexandra R; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L; Nordenmark, Lars H; Hockings, Paul D; Lagerstrand, Kerstin M; Young, Simon S; Naish, Josephine H; Waterton, John C; Maguire, Niall C; Olsson, Lars E; Parker, Geoffrey J M

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide attractive biomarkers for assessment of pulmonary disease in clinical trials as it is free from ionizing radiation, minimally invasive and allows regional information. The aim of this study was to characterize lung MRI T1 relaxation time as a biomarker of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); and specifically its relationship to smoking history, computed tomography (CT), and pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements in comparison to healthy age-matched controls. Lung T1 and inter-quartile range (IQR) of T1 maps from 24 COPD subjects and 12 healthy age-matched non-smokers were retrospectively analyzed from an institutional review board approved study. The subjects underwent PFTs and two separate MR imaging sessions at 1.5 tesla to test T1 repeatability. CT scans were performed on the COPD subjects. T1 repeatability (intraclass correlation coefficient) was 0.72 for repeated scans acquired on two visits. The lung T1 was significantly shorter (p < 0.0001) and T1 IQR was significantly larger (p = 0.0002) for the COPD subjects compared to healthy controls. Lung T1 significantly (p = 0.001) correlated with lung density assessed with CT. Strong significant correlations (p < 0.0001) between lung T1 and all PFT measurements were observed. Cigarette exposure did not correlate with lung T1 in COPD subjects. In conclusion, lung MRI T1 mapping shows potential as a repeatable, radiation free, non-invasive imaging technique in the evaluation of COPD. PMID:26488310

  12. Paramagnetic NMR relaxation in polymeric matrixes: sensitivity enhancement and selective suppression of embedded species (1H and 13C PSR filter).

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Megia, Eduardo; Correa, Juan; Novoa-Carballal, Ramon; Riguera, Ricardo

    2007-12-12

    A study of the practical applications of the addition of paramagnetic spin relaxation (PSR) ions to a variety of polymers (PLL, PAA, PGA, PVP, and polysaccharides such as hyaluronic acid, chitosan, mannan, and dextran) in solution (D2O and DMSO-d6) is described. Use of Gd(III), Cu(II), and Mn(II) allows a reduction of up to 500% in the 1H longitudinal relaxation times (T1), and so in the time necessary for recording quantitative NMR spectra (sensitivity enhancement) neither an increase of the spectral line width nor chemical shift changes resulted from addition of any of the PSR agents tested. Selective suppression of the 1H and 13C NMR signals of certain components (low MW molecules and polymers) in the spectrum of a mixture was attained thanks to their different sensitivity [transverse relaxation times (T2)] to Gd(III) (PSR filter). Illustration of this strategy with block copolymers (PGA-g-PEG) and mixtures of polymers and low MW molecules (i.e., lactose-hyaluronic acid, dextran-PAA, PVP-glutamic acid) in 1D and 2D NMR experiments (COSY and HMQC) is presented. In those mixtures where PSR and CPMG filters alone failed in the suppression of certain components (i.e., PVP-mannan-hyaluronic acid) due to their similarity of 1H T2 values and sensitivities to Gd(III), use of the PSR filter in combination with CPMG sequences (PSR-CPMG filter) successfully resulted in the sequential suppression of the components (hyaluronic acid first and then mannan). PMID:18004845

  13. Flexibility at a glycosidic linkage revealed by molecular dynamics, stochastic modeling, and (13)C NMR spin relaxation: conformational preferences of α-L-Rhap-α-(1 → 2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe in water and dimethyl sulfoxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Pendrill, Robert; Engström, Olof; Volpato, Andrea; Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Widmalm, Göran

    2016-01-28

    The monosaccharide L-rhamnose is common in bacterial polysaccharides and the disaccharide α-L-Rhap-α-(1 → 2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe represents a structural model for a part of Shigella flexneri O-antigen polysaccharides. Utilization of [1'-(13)C]-site-specific labeling in the anomeric position at the glycosidic linkage between the two sugar residues facilitated the determination of transglycosidic NMR (3)JCH and (3)JCC coupling constants. Based on these spin-spin couplings the major state and the conformational distribution could be determined with respect to the ψ torsion angle, which changed between water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as solvents, a finding mirrored by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with explicit solvent molecules. The (13)C NMR spin relaxation parameters T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOE of the probe were measured for the disaccharide in DMSO-d6 at two magnetic field strengths, with standard deviations ≤1%. The combination of MD simulation and a stochastic description based on the diffusive chain model resulted in excellent agreement between calculated and experimentally observed (13)C relaxation parameters, with an average error of <2%. The coupling between the global reorientation of the molecule and the local motion of the spin probe is deemed essential if reproduction of NMR relaxation parameters should succeed, since decoupling of the two modes of motion results in significantly worse agreement. Calculation of (13)C relaxation parameters based on the correlation functions obtained directly from the MD simulation of the solute molecule in DMSO as solvent showed satisfactory agreement with errors on the order of 10% or less. PMID:26741055

  14. Obtaining T1-T2 distribution functions from 1-dimensional T1 and T2 measurements: The pseudo 2-D relaxation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Nathan H.; Röding, Magnus; Galvosas, Petrik; Miklavcic, Stanley J.; Nydén, Magnus

    2016-08-01

    We present the pseudo 2-D relaxation model (P2DRM), a method to estimate multidimensional probability distributions of material parameters from independent 1-D measurements. We illustrate its use on 1-D T1 and T2 relaxation measurements of saturated rock and evaluate it on both simulated and experimental T1-T2 correlation measurement data sets. Results were in excellent agreement with the actual, known 2-D distribution in the case of the simulated data set. In both the simulated and experimental case, the functional relationships between T1 and T2 were in good agreement with the T1-T2 correlation maps from the 2-D inverse Laplace transform of the full 2-D data sets. When a 1-D CPMG experiment is combined with a rapid T1 measurement, the P2DRM provides a double-shot method for obtaining a T1-T2 relationship, with significantly decreased experimental time in comparison to the full T1-T2 correlation measurement.

  15. Obtaining T1-T2 distribution functions from 1-dimensional T1 and T2 measurements: The pseudo 2-D relaxation model.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Nathan H; Röding, Magnus; Galvosas, Petrik; Miklavcic, Stanley J; Nydén, Magnus

    2016-08-01

    We present the pseudo 2-D relaxation model (P2DRM), a method to estimate multidimensional probability distributions of material parameters from independent 1-D measurements. We illustrate its use on 1-D T1 and T2 relaxation measurements of saturated rock and evaluate it on both simulated and experimental T1-T2 correlation measurement data sets. Results were in excellent agreement with the actual, known 2-D distribution in the case of the simulated data set. In both the simulated and experimental case, the functional relationships between T1 and T2 were in good agreement with the T1-T2 correlation maps from the 2-D inverse Laplace transform of the full 2-D data sets. When a 1-D CPMG experiment is combined with a rapid T1 measurement, the P2DRM provides a double-shot method for obtaining a T1-T2 relationship, with significantly decreased experimental time in comparison to the full T1-T2 correlation measurement. PMID:27344611

  16. Modeling T1 and T2 relaxation in bovine white matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barta, R.; Kalantari, S.; Laule, C.; Vavasour, I. M.; MacKay, A. L.; Michal, C. A.

    2015-10-01

    The fundamental basis of T1 and T2 contrast in brain MRI is not well understood; recent literature contains conflicting views on the nature of relaxation in white matter (WM). We investigated the effects of inversion pulse bandwidth on measurements of T1 and T2 in WM. Hybrid inversion-recovery/Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill experiments with broad or narrow bandwidth inversion pulses were applied to bovine WM in vitro. Data were analysed with the commonly used 1D-non-negative least squares (NNLS) algorithm, a 2D-NNLS algorithm, and a four-pool model which was based upon microscopically distinguishable WM compartments (myelin non-aqueous protons, myelin water, non-myelin non-aqueous protons and intra/extracellular water) and incorporated magnetization exchange between adjacent compartments. 1D-NNLS showed that different T2 components had different T1 behaviours and yielded dissimilar results for the two inversion conditions. 2D-NNLS revealed significantly more complicated T1/T2 distributions for narrow bandwidth than for broad bandwidth inversion pulses. The four-pool model fits allow physical interpretation of the parameters, fit better than the NNLS techniques, and fits results from both inversion conditions using the same parameters. The results demonstrate that exchange cannot be neglected when analysing experimental inversion recovery data from WM, in part because it can introduce exponential components having negative amplitude coefficients that cannot be correctly modeled with nonnegative fitting techniques. While assignment of an individual T1 to one particular pool is not possible, the results suggest that under carefully controlled experimental conditions the amplitude of an apparent short T1 component might be used to quantify myelin water.

  17. Metabolic T1 dynamics and longitudinal relaxation enhancement in vivo at ultrahigh magnetic fields on ischemia.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Noam; Rosenberg, Jens T; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Grant, Samuel C; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-11-01

    Interruptions in cerebral blood flow may lead to devastating neural outcomes. Magnetic resonance has a central role in diagnosing and monitoring these insufficiencies, as well as in understanding their underlying metabolic consequences. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in particular can probe ischemia via the signatures of endogenous metabolites including lactic acid (Lac), N-acetylaspartate, creatine (Cre), and cholines. Typically, MRS reports on these metabolites' concentrations. This study focuses on establishing the potential occurrence of in vivo longitudinal relaxation enhancement (LRE) effects-a phenomenon involving a reduction of the apparent T1 with selective bandwidth excitations- in a rat stroke model at 21.1 T. Statistically significant reductions in Cre's apparent T1s were observed at all the examined post-ischemia time points for both ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres, thereby establishing the existence of LREs for this metabolite in vivo. Ischemia-dependent LRE trends were also noted for Lac in the ipsilateral hemisphere only 24 hours after ischemia. Metabolic T1s were also found to vary significantly as a function of post-stroke recovery time, with the most remarkable and rapid changes observed for Lac T1s. The potential of such measurements to understand stroke at a molecular level and assist in its diagnosis, is discussed. PMID:25204392

  18. Metabolic T1 dynamics and longitudinal relaxation enhancement in vivo at ultrahigh magnetic fields on ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Noam; Rosenberg, Jens T; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Grant, Samuel C; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Interruptions in cerebral blood flow may lead to devastating neural outcomes. Magnetic resonance has a central role in diagnosing and monitoring these insufficiencies, as well as in understanding their underlying metabolic consequences. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in particular can probe ischemia via the signatures of endogenous metabolites including lactic acid (Lac), N-acetylaspartate, creatine (Cre), and cholines. Typically, MRS reports on these metabolites' concentrations. This study focuses on establishing the potential occurrence of in vivo longitudinal relaxation enhancement (LRE) effects—a phenomenon involving a reduction of the apparent T1 with selective bandwidth excitations— in a rat stroke model at 21.1 T. Statistically significant reductions in Cre's apparent T1s were observed at all the examined post-ischemia time points for both ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres, thereby establishing the existence of LREs for this metabolite in vivo. Ischemia-dependent LRE trends were also noted for Lac in the ipsilateral hemisphere only 24 hours after ischemia. Metabolic T1s were also found to vary significantly as a function of post-stroke recovery time, with the most remarkable and rapid changes observed for Lac T1s. The potential of such measurements to understand stroke at a molecular level and assist in its diagnosis, is discussed. PMID:25204392

  19. THE INTERACTION OF PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION REAGENTS WITH INTRA- AND INTERMOLECULAR HYDROGEN BONDED PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intermolecular electron-nuclear 13-C relaxation times (T(1)sup e's) from solutions containing the paramagnetic relaxation reagent (PARR), Cr(acac)3, used in conjunction with 13-C T(1)'s in diamagnetic solutions (intramolecular 13-C - (1)H dipolar T(1)'s) provide a significant inc...

  20. Estimation of free copper ion concentrations in blood serum using T1 relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blicharska, Barbara; Witek, Magdalena; Fornal, Maria; MacKay, Alex L.

    2008-09-01

    The water proton relaxation rate constant R1 = 1/ T1 (at 60 MHz) of blood serum is substantially increased by the presence of free Cu 2+ ions at concentrations above normal physiological levels. Addition of chelating agents to serum containing paramagnetic Cu 2+ nulls this effect. This was demonstrated by looking at the effect of adding a chelating agent—D-penicillamine (D-PEN) to CuSO 4 and CuCl 2 aqueous solutions as well as to rabbit blood serum. We propose that the measurement of water proton spin-lattice relaxation rate constants before and after chelation may be used as an alternative approach for monitoring the presence of free copper ions in blood serum. This method may be used in the diagnosis of some diseases (leukaemia, liver diseases and particularly Wilson's disease) because, in contrast to conventional methods like spectrophotometry which records the total number of both bound and free ions, the proton relaxation technique is sensitive solely to free paramagnetic ions dissolved in blood serum. The change in R1 upon chelation was found to be less than 0.06 s -1 for serum from healthy subjects but greater than 0.06 s -1 for serum from untreated Wilson's patients.

  1. NMR relaxation in natural soils: Fast Field Cycling and T1-T2 Determination by IR-MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Pohlmeier, A.; Stapf, S.; van Dusschoten, D.

    2009-04-01

    Soils are natural porous media of highest importance for food production and sustainment of water resources. For these functions, prominent properties are their ability of water retainment and transport, which are mainly controlled by pore size distribution. The latter is related to NMR relaxation times of water molecules, of which the longitudinal relaxation time can be determined non-invasively by fast-field cycling relaxometry (FFC) and both are obtainable by inversion recovery - multi-echo- imaging (IR-MEMS) methods. The advantage of the FFC method is the determination of the field dependent dispersion of the spin-lattice relaxation rate, whereas MRI at high field is capable of yielding spatially resolved T1 and T2 times. Here we present results of T1- relaxation time distributions of water in three natural soils, obtained by the analysis of FFC data by means of the inverse Laplace transformation (CONTIN)1. Kaldenkirchen soil shows relatively broad bimodal distribution functions D(T1) which shift to higher relaxation rates with increasing relaxation field. These data are compared to spatially resolved T1- and T2 distributions, obtained by IR-MEMS. The distribution of T1 corresponds well to that obtained by FFC.

  2. Rapid and simple determination of T1 relaxation times in time-domain NMR by Continuous Wave Free Precession sequence.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Monaretto, Tatiana; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times have been widely used in time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) to determine several physicochemical properties of petroleum, polymers, and food products. The measurement of T2 through the CPMG pulse sequence has been used in most of these applications because it denotes a rapid, robust method. On the other hand, T1 has been occasionally used in TD-NMR due to the long measurement time required to collect multiple points along the T1 relaxation curve. Recently, several rapid methods to measure T1 have been proposed. Those methods based upon single shot, known as Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) pulse sequences, have been employed in the simultaneous measurement of T1 and T2 in a rapid fashion. However, these sequences can be used exclusively in instrument featuring short dead time because the magnitude of the signal at thermal equilibrium is required. In this paper, we demonstrate that a special CWFP sequence with a low flip angle can be a simple and rapid method to measure T1 regardless of instruments dead time. Experimental results confirmed that the method called CWFP-T1 may be used to measure both single T1 value and T1 distribution in heterogeneous samples. Therefore, CWFP-T1 sequence can be a feasible alternative to CPMG in the determination of physicochemical properties, particularly in processes where fast protocols are requested such as industrial applications. PMID:27376553

  3. Rapid and simple determination of T1 relaxation times in time-domain NMR by Continuous Wave Free Precession sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Monaretto, Tatiana; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times have been widely used in time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) to determine several physicochemical properties of petroleum, polymers, and food products. The measurement of T2 through the CPMG pulse sequence has been used in most of these applications because it denotes a rapid, robust method. On the other hand, T1 has been occasionally used in TD-NMR due to the long measurement time required to collect multiple points along the T1 relaxation curve. Recently, several rapid methods to measure T1 have been proposed. Those methods based upon single shot, known as Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) pulse sequences, have been employed in the simultaneous measurement of T1 and T2 in a rapid fashion. However, these sequences can be used exclusively in instrument featuring short dead time because the magnitude of the signal at thermal equilibrium is required. In this paper, we demonstrate that a special CWFP sequence with a low flip angle can be a simple and rapid method to measure T1 regardless of instruments dead time. Experimental results confirmed that the method called CWFP-T1 may be used to measure both single T1 value and T1 distribution in heterogeneous samples. Therefore, CWFP-T1 sequence can be a feasible alternative to CPMG in the determination of physicochemical properties, particularly in processes where fast protocols are requested such as industrial applications.

  4. Changes in dynamics of SRE-RNA on binding to the VTS1p-SAM domain studied by 13C NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Oberstrass, Florian C; Allain, Frédéric H-T; Ravindranathan, Sapna

    2008-09-10

    RNA recognition by proteins is often accompanied by significant changes in RNA dynamics in addition to conformational changes. However, there are very few studies which characterize the changes in molecular motions in RNA on protein binding. We present a quantitative (13)C NMR relaxation study of the changes in RNA dynamics in the pico-nanosecond time scale and micro-millisecond time scale resulting from interaction of the stem-loop SRE-RNA with the VTS1p-SAM domain. (13)C relaxation rates of the protonated carbons of the nucleotide base and anomeric carbons have been analyzed by employing the model-free formalism, for a fully (13)C/(15)N-labeled sample of the SRE-RNA in the free and protein-bound forms. In the free RNA, the nature of molecular motions are found to be distinctly different in the stem and the loop region. On binding to the protein, the nature of motions becomes more homogeneous throughout the RNA, with many residues showing increased flexibility at the aromatic carbon sites, while the anomeric carbon sites become more rigid. Surprisingly, we also observe indications of a slow collective motion of the RNA in the binding pocket of the protein. The observation of increased motions on binding is interesting in the context of growing evidence that binding does not always lead to motional restrictions and the resulting entropy gain could favor the free energy of association. PMID:18698768

  5. Evidence for Biomass Burning from 14C and 13C/12C Measurements at T-0 and T-1 during MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Tackett, M. J.; Sturchio, N. C.; Heraty, L. J.; Martinez, N.; Hardy, K.; Guilderson, T.

    2007-12-01

    Both stable carbon isotopic and radiocarbon characterizations of aerosols can yield important information regarding the sources of carbonaceous aerosols in urban and regional environments. Biomass derived materials are labeled due to their recent photochemical activity in radiocarbon and vary depending upon the photochemical pathway (either C-4 or C-3) in stable carbon-13 content. C-4 being enriched over C-3. During the MILAGRO campaign, quartz filter samples were taken at 12 hour intervals from 5 am to 5 pm (day) and from 5 pm to 5 am (night) during the month of March 2006. These samples were taken at the two super-sites, T-0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) and T-1 (Universidad Technologica de Tecamac, State of Mexico). The total carbon content was analyzed for stable carbon isotopic composition as well as for radiocarbon. Stable isotope mass spectroscopy was used to determine the carbon-13 to carbon-12 isotopic ratios on carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide was then converted to graphite for analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Results are presented for the carbon-13 content relative to the PDB standard and radiocarbon is given relative to recent carbon. The results for total radiocarbon content show that the carbonaceous aerosol content in Mexico City has more than half of the carbon coming from biomass derived sources. These can include inflow of biomass burning aerosols into the T-0 site as well as the input from local burning of biofuels and trash containing biomass derived materials (paper, boxes, etc.). Data also indicate that at the T-1 site biomass burning of C-4 grasses appears to be significant in that the carbon-13 values observed are enriched. Also at T-1 the radiocarbon levels are also found to be slightly higher indicating regional biomass burning as a significant contributor to aerosol carbon in the 0.1 to 1.0 micron size fraction. Some day

  6. NMR spin-lattice relaxation time T(1) of thin films obtained by magnetic resonance force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Saun, Seung-Bo; Won, Soonho; Kwon, Sungmin; Lee, Soonchil

    2015-05-01

    We obtained the NMR spectrum and the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) for thin film samples by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). The samples were CaF2 thin films which were 50 nm and 150 nm thick. T1 was measured at 18 K using a cyclic adiabatic inversion method at a fixed frequency. A comparison of the bulk and two thin films showed that T1 becomes shorter as the film thickness decreases. To make the comparison as accurate as possible, all three samples were loaded onto different beams of a multi-cantilever array and measured in the same experimental environment. PMID:25828244

  7. NMR spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of thin films obtained by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saun, Seung-Bo; Won, Soonho; Kwon, Sungmin; Lee, Soonchil

    2015-05-01

    We obtained the NMR spectrum and the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) for thin film samples by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). The samples were CaF2 thin films which were 50 nm and 150 nm thick. T1 was measured at 18 K using a cyclic adiabatic inversion method at a fixed frequency. A comparison of the bulk and two thin films showed that T1 becomes shorter as the film thickness decreases. To make the comparison as accurate as possible, all three samples were loaded onto different beams of a multi-cantilever array and measured in the same experimental environment.

  8. Surface-NMR measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 in a homogeneous sand aquifer in Skive, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walbrecker, Jan O.; Behroozmand, Ahmad A.

    2012-12-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (surface NMR) is a geophysical technique used in the exploration of shallow aquifers. It is based on measuring the NMR response of water molecules to excitation by electromagnetic pulses. By increasing the moment of applied pulses, successively deeper regions of an aquifer can be probed. The longitudinal relaxation time T1, determined from the NMR experiment, depends on pore size and can be potentially used to estimate hydraulic conductivity. A novel scheme was recently proposed that was shown theoretically to be more reliable for acquiring surface-NMR T1 data than traditional acquisition. In this proof-of-concept study we provide the first empirical evidence for the superiority of the novel scheme. We chose a survey site close to Skive, Denmark, where proximate boreholes indicate a homogeneous sandy aquifer in the top 30 m. The homogeneous composition implies that the distribution of pore sizes does not vary significantly across the formation. Because pore size is reflected by the T1 relaxation time, we therefore assume that the homogeneous aquifer can be characterized by a single T1 independent of the applied pulse moment (i.e., sampled depth region)—this is the benchmark condition we tested with our surface-NMR measurements. We collected surface-NMR T1 data employing the traditional as well as the novel acquisition scheme at various pulse moments. For each pulse moment we infer a T1 relaxation time based on extensively sampled data (14 delay-time data points). The T1 relaxation times obtained using the novel scheme show a constant value of about 820 ms (± 38 ms) for all pulse moments. In contrast, the T1 relaxation times determined using the traditional scheme vary significantly between 530 and 750 ms with pulse moment, which in an inversion would result in a spatial variation of T1 across the aquifer. The results based on the novel scheme are consistent with a homogeneous aquifer, which we expect based on the borehole

  9. Tumor T1 Relaxation Time for Assessing Response to Bevacizumab Anti-Angiogenic Therapy in a Mouse Ovarian Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sheela P.; Lu, Chunhua; Han, Lin; Hobbs, Brian P.; Pradeep, Sunila; Choi, Hyun J.; Bankson, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether T1 relaxation time of tumors may be used to assess response to bevacizumab anti-angiogenic therapy. Procedures: 12 female nude mice bearing subcutaneous SKOV3ip1-LC ovarian tumors were administered bevacizumab (6.25ug/g, n=6) or PBS (control, n=6) therapy twice a week for two weeks. T1 maps of tumors were generated before, two days, and 2 weeks after initiating therapy. Tumor weight was assessed by MR and at necropsy. Histology for microvessel density, proliferation, and apoptosis was performed. Results Bevacizumab treatment resulted in tumor growth inhibition (p<0.04, n=6), confirming therapeutic efficacy. Tumor T1 relaxation times increased in bevacizumab treated mice 2 days and 2 weeks after initiating therapy (p<.05, n=6). Microvessel density decreased 59% and cell proliferation (Ki67+) decreased 50% in the bevacizumab treatment group (p<.001, n=6), but not apoptosis. Conclusions Findings suggest that increased tumor T1 relaxation time is associated with response to bevacizumab therapy in ovarian cancer model and might serve as an early indicator of response. PMID:26098849

  10. New technique for single-scan T1 measurements using solid echoes. [for spin-lattice relaxation time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W. K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple technique for single-scan T1 measurements in solids is proposed and analyzed for single exponential spin-lattice relaxation. In this technique, the direct spin heating caused by the sampling process is significantly reduced in comparison with conventional techniques by utilizing the 'solid echo' to refocus the magnetization. The applicability of this technique to both the solid and liquid phases is demonstrated.

  11. Measurement of T1/T2 relaxation times in overlapped regions from homodecoupled 1H singlet signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañar, Laura; Nolis, Pau; Virgili, Albert; Parella, Teodor

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of the HOmodecoupled Band-Selective (HOBS) technique in the conventional Inversion-Recovery and CPMG-based PROJECT experiments is described. The achievement of fully homodecoupled signals allows the distinction of overlapped 1H resonances with small chemical shift differences. It is shown that the corresponding T1 and T2 relaxation times can be individually measured from the resulting singlet lines using conventional exponential curve-fitting methods.

  12. In vivo relaxation time measurements on a murine tumor model--prolongation of T1 after photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y H; Hawk, R M; Ramaprasad, S

    1995-01-01

    RIF tumors implanted on mice feet were investigated for changes in relaxation times (T1 and T2) after photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photodynamic therapy was performed using Photofrin II as the photosensitizer and laser light at 630 nm. A home-built proton solenoid coil in the balanced configuration was used to accommodate the tumors, and the relaxation times were measured before, immediately after, and up to several hours after therapy. Several control experiments were performed untreated tumors, tumors treated with Photofrin II alone, or tumors treated with laser light alone. Significant increases in T1s of water protons were observed after PDT treatment. In all experiments, 31P spectra were recorded before and after the therapy to study the tumor status and to confirm the onset of PDT. These studies show significant prolongation of T1s after the PDT treatment. The spin-spin relaxation measurements, on the other hand, did not show such prolongation in T2 values after PDT treatment. PMID:7739367

  13. T1 Relaxation Rate (R1) Indicates Nonlinear Mn Accumulation in Brain Tissue of Welders With Low-Level Exposure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Young; Flynn, Michael R; Du, Guangwei; Lewis, Mechelle M; Fry, Rebecca; Herring, Amy H; Van Buren, Eric; Van Buren, Scott; Smeester, Lisa; Kong, Lan; Yang, Qing; Mailman, Richard B; Huang, Xuemei

    2015-08-01

    Although the essential element manganese (Mn) is neurotoxic at high doses, the effects of lower exposure are unclear. MRI T1-weighted (TIW) imaging has been used to estimate brain Mn exposure via the pallidal index (PI), defined as the T1W intensity ratio in the globus pallidus (GP) versus frontal white matter (FWM). PI may not, however, be sensitive to Mn in GP because Mn also may accumulate in FWM. This study explored: (1) whether T1 relaxation rate (R1) could quantify brain Mn accumulation more sensitively; and (2) the dose-response relationship between estimated Mn exposure and T1 relaxation rate (R1). Thirty-five active welders and 30 controls were studied. Occupational questionnaires were used to estimate hours welding in the past 90 days (HrsW) and lifetime measures of Mn exposure. T1W imaging and T1-measurement were utilized to generate PI and R1 values in brain regions of interest (ROIs). PI did not show a significant association with any measure of Mn and/or welding-related exposure. Conversely, in several ROIs, R1 showed a nonlinear relationship to HrsW, with R1 signal increasing only after a critical exposure was reached. The GP had the greatest rate of Mn accumulation. Welders with higher exposure showed significantly higher R1 compared either with controls or with welders with lower exposure. Our data are additional evidence that Mn accumulation can be assessed more sensitively by R1 than by PI. Moreover, the nonlinear relationship between welding exposure and Mn brain accumulation should be considered in future studies and policies. PMID:25953701

  14. T1 Relaxation Rate (R1) Indicates Nonlinear Mn Accumulation in Brain Tissue of Welders With Low-Level Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Flynn, Michael R.; Du, Guangwei; Lewis, Mechelle M.; Fry, Rebecca; Herring, Amy H.; Van Buren, Eric; Van Buren, Scott; Smeester, Lisa; Kong, Lan; Yang, Qing; Mailman, Richard B.; Huang, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    Although the essential element manganese (Mn) is neurotoxic at high doses, the effects of lower exposure are unclear. MRI T1-weighted (TIW) imaging has been used to estimate brain Mn exposure via the pallidal index (PI), defined as the T1W intensity ratio in the globus pallidus (GP) versus frontal white matter (FWM). PI may not, however, be sensitive to Mn in GP because Mn also may accumulate in FWM. This study explored: (1) whether T1 relaxation rate (R1) could quantify brain Mn accumulation more sensitively; and (2) the dose-response relationship between estimated Mn exposure and T1 relaxation rate (R1). Thirty-five active welders and 30 controls were studied. Occupational questionnaires were used to estimate hours welding in the past 90 days (HrsW) and lifetime measures of Mn exposure. T1W imaging and T1-measurement were utilized to generate PI and R1 values in brain regions of interest (ROIs). PI did not show a significant association with any measure of Mn and/or welding-related exposure. Conversely, in several ROIs, R1 showed a nonlinear relationship to HrsW, with R1 signal increasing only after a critical exposure was reached. The GP had the greatest rate of Mn accumulation. Welders with higher exposure showed significantly higher R1 compared either with controls or with welders with lower exposure. Our data are additional evidence that Mn accumulation can be assessed more sensitively by R1 than by PI. Moreover, the nonlinear relationship between welding exposure and Mn brain accumulation should be considered in future studies and policies. PMID:25953701

  15. {sup 13}C spin-lattice relaxation and molecular dynamics of C{sub 60} in 1,2-dichlorobenzene-d{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, X.; Fisher, L.A.; Rodriguez, A.A.

    1996-03-14

    We have measured the {sup 13}C spin-lattice relaxation rate of C{sub 60} in 1,2-dichlorobenzene-d{sub 4} and have found that the spin rotation (SR) mechanism contributes significantly to the overall relaxation process. The magnitude of SR was found to be smaller than in the solid phase but consistent with quantities projected for C{sub 60} in toluene-d{sub 8}. These observations indicate that solvent effects play a critical role in determining the magnitude of the spin rotation contribution. Reorientational correlation times were also obtained experimentally and show that C{sub 60} is undergoing rapid rotational motion in this solvent. The activation energy for this mode of motion was found to be 7.71 kJ/mol. Several theoretical models were employed in an attempt at characterizing the rotational behavior of the title molecule. Of these theories, the Gierer-Wirtz model proved superior in duplicating our experimental findings. The close agreement suggests that 1,2-dichlorobenzene-d{sub 4} provides a discrete environment rather than a continuous one. Our study further indicates that C{sub 60} reorients in the `slip` limit where solute-solvent interactions are at a minimum. 21 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Transport and imaging of brute-force (13)C hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Smith, Bryce A; Mattingly, Mark; Goloshevsky, Artem G; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate transport of hyperpolarized frozen 1-(13)C pyruvic acid from its site of production to a nearby facility, where a time series of (13)C images was acquired from the aqueous dissolution product. Transportability is tied to the hyperpolarization (HP) method we employ, which omits radical electron species used in other approaches that would otherwise relax away the HP before reaching the imaging center. In particular, we attained (13)C HP by 'brute-force', i.e., using only low temperature and high-field (e.g., T<∼2K and B∼14T) to pre-polarize protons to a large Boltzmann value (∼0.4% (1)H polarization). After polarizing the neat, frozen sample, ejection quickly (<1s) passed it through a low field (B<100G) to establish the (1)H pre-polarization spin temperature on (13)C via the process known as low-field thermal mixing (yielding ∼0.1% (13)C polarization). By avoiding polarization agents (a.k.a. relaxation agents) that are needed to hyperpolarize by the competing method of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP), the (13)C relaxation time was sufficient to transport the sample for ∼10min before finally dissolving in warm water and obtaining a (13)C image of the hyperpolarized, dilute, aqueous product (∼0.01% (13)C polarization, a >100-fold gain over thermal signals in the 1T scanner). An annealing step, prior to polarizing the sample, was also key for increasing T1∼30-fold during transport. In that time, HP was maintained using only modest cryogenics and field (T∼60K and B=1.3T), for T1((13)C) near 5min. Much greater time and distance (with much smaller losses) may be covered using more-complete annealing and only slight improvements on transport conditions (e.g., yielding T1∼5h at 30K, 2T), whereas even intercity transfer is possible (T1>20h) at reasonable conditions of 6K and 2T. Finally, it is possible to increase the overall enhancement near d-DNP levels (i.e., 10(2)-fold more) by polarizing below 100mK, where nanoparticle

  17. Transport and imaging of brute-force 13C hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Smith, Bryce A.; Mattingly, Mark; Goloshevsky, Artem G.; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate transport of hyperpolarized frozen 1-13C pyruvic acid from its site of production to a nearby facility, where a time series of 13C images was acquired from the aqueous dissolution product. Transportability is tied to the hyperpolarization (HP) method we employ, which omits radical electron species used in other approaches that would otherwise relax away the HP before reaching the imaging center. In particular, we attained 13C HP by 'brute-force', i.e., using only low temperature and high-field (e.g., T < ∼2 K and B ∼ 14 T) to pre-polarize protons to a large Boltzmann value (∼0.4% 1H polarization). After polarizing the neat, frozen sample, ejection quickly (<1 s) passed it through a low field (B < 100 G) to establish the 1H pre-polarization spin temperature on 13C via the process known as low-field thermal mixing (yielding ∼0.1% 13C polarization). By avoiding polarization agents (a.k.a. relaxation agents) that are needed to hyperpolarize by the competing method of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP), the 13C relaxation time was sufficient to transport the sample for ∼10 min before finally dissolving in warm water and obtaining a 13C image of the hyperpolarized, dilute, aqueous product (∼0.01% 13C polarization, a >100-fold gain over thermal signals in the 1 T scanner). An annealing step, prior to polarizing the sample, was also key for increasing T1 ∼ 30-fold during transport. In that time, HP was maintained using only modest cryogenics and field (T ∼ 60 K and B = 1.3 T), for T1(13C) near 5 min. Much greater time and distance (with much smaller losses) may be covered using more-complete annealing and only slight improvements on transport conditions (e.g., yielding T1 ∼ 5 h at 30 K, 2 T), whereas even intercity transfer is possible (T1 > 20 h) at reasonable conditions of 6 K and 2 T. Finally, it is possible to increase the overall enhancement near d-DNP levels (i.e., 102-fold more) by polarizing below 100 mK, where

  18. Microwave Amplitude Modulation Technique to Measure Spin-Lattice (T 1) and Spin-Spin (T 2) Relaxation Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sushil K.

    The measurement of very short spin-lattice, or longitudinal, relaxation (SLR) times (i.e., 10-10 < T 1 < 10-6 s) is of great importance today for the study of relaxation processes. Recent case studies include, for example, glasses doped with paramagnetic ions (Vergnoux et al., 1996; Zinsou et al., 1996), amorphous Si (dangling bonds) and copper-chromium-tin spinel (Cr3+) (Misra, 1998), and polymer resins doped with rare-earth ions (Pescia et al., 1999a; Pescia et al. 1999b). The ability to measure such fast SLR data on amorphous Si and copper-chromium-tin spinel led to an understanding of the role of exchange interaction in affecting spin-lattice relaxation, while the data on polymer resins doped with rare-earth ions provided evidence of spin-fracton relaxation (Pescia et al., 1999a, b). But such fast SLR times are not measurable by the most commonly used techniques of saturation- and inversion-recovery (Poole, 1982; Alger, 1968), which only measure spin-lattice relaxation times longer than 10-6 s. A summary of relevant experimental data is presented in Table 1.

  19. Comparison of T1 relaxation times of the neurochemical profile in rat brain at 9.4 tesla and 14.1 tesla.

    PubMed

    Cudalbu, Cristina; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Xin, Lijing; Gruetter, Rolf

    2009-10-01

    Knowledge of T(1) relaxation times can be important for accurate relative and absolute quantification of brain metabolites, for sensitivity optimizations, for characterizing molecular dynamics, and for studying changes induced by various pathological conditions. (1)H T(1) relaxation times of a series of brain metabolites, including J-coupled ones, were determined using a progressive saturation (PS) technique that was validated with an adiabatic inversion-recovery (IR) method. The (1)H T(1) relaxation times of 16 functional groups of the neurochemical profile were measured at 14.1T and 9.4T. Overall, the T(1) relaxation times found at 14.1T were, within the experimental error, identical to those at 9.4T. The T(1)s of some coupled spin resonances of the neurochemical profile were measured for the first time (e.g., those of gamma-aminobutyrate [GABA], aspartate [Asp], alanine [Ala], phosphoethanolamine [PE], glutathione [GSH], N-acetylaspartylglutamate [NAAG], and glutamine [Gln]). Our results suggest that T(1) does not increase substantially beyond 9.4T. Furthermore, the similarity of T(1) among the metabolites (approximately 1.5 s) suggests that T(1) relaxation time corrections for metabolite quantification are likely to be similar when using rapid pulsing conditions. We therefore conclude that the putative T(1) increase of metabolites has a minimal impact on sensitivity when increasing B(0) beyond 9.4T. PMID:19645007

  20. Redoxable heteronanocrystals functioning magnetic relaxation switch for activatable T1 and T2 dual-mode magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong-Hoon; Son, Hye-Young; Kim, Ga-Yun; Park, Kwangyeol; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2016-09-01

    T1/T2 dual-mode magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents (DMCAs) have gained much attention because of their ability to improve accuracy by providing two pieces of complementary information with one instrument. However, most of these agents are "always ON" systems that emit MR contrast regardless of their interaction with target cells or biomarkers, which may result in poor target-to-background ratios. Herein, we introduce a rationally designed magnetic relaxation switch (MGRS) for an activatable T1/T2 dual MR imaging system. Redox-responsive heteronanocrystals, consisting of a superparamagnetic Fe3O4 core and a paramagnetic Mn3O4 shell, are synthesized through seed-mediated growth and subsequently surface-modified with polysorbate 80. The Mn3O4 shell acts as both a protector of Fe3O4 in aqueous environments to attenuate T2 relaxation and as a redoxable switch that can be activated in intracellular reducing environments by glutathione. This simultaneously generates large amounts of magnetically decoupled Mn(2+) ions and allows Fe3O4 to interact with the water protons. This smart nanoplatform shows an appropriate hydrodynamic size for the EPR effect (10-100 nm) and demonstrates biocompatibility. Efficient transitions of OFF/ON dual contrast effects are observed by in vitro imaging and MR relaxivity measurements. The ability to use these materials as DMCAs is demonstrated via effective passive tumor targeting for T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging in tumor-bearing mice. PMID:27281684

  1. A (Fluoroalkyl)Guanidine Modulates the Relaxivity of a Phosphonate-Containing T 1-Shortening Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinping; Dawsey, Anna C; Siriwardena-Mahanama, Buddhima N; Allen, Matthew J; Williams, Travis J

    2014-12-01

    Responsive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, those that change their relaxivity according to environmental stimuli, have promise as next generation imaging probes in medicine. While several of these are known based on covalent modification of the contrast agents, fewer are known based on controlling non-covalent interactions. We demonstrate here accentuated relaxivity of a T 1-shortening contrast agent, Gd-DOTP(5-) based on non-covalent, hydrogen bonding of Gd-DOTP(5-) with a novel fluorous amphiphile. By contrast to the phosphonate-containing Gd-DOTP(5-) system, the relaxivity of the analogous clinically approved contrast agent, Gd-DOTA(-) is unaffected by the same fluorous amphiphile under similar conditions. Mechanistic studies show that placing the fluorous amphiphile in proximity of the gadolinium center in Gd-DOTP(5-) caused an increase in τ m (bound-water residence lifetime or the inverse of water exchange rate, τ m = 1/k ex) and an increase in τ R (rotational correlation time), with τ R being the factor driving enhanced relaxivity. Further, these effects were not observed when Gd-DOTA(-) was treated with the same fluorous amphiphile. Thus, Gd-DOTP(5-) and Gd-DOTA(-) respond to the fluorous amphiphile differently, presumably because the former binds to the amphiphile with higher affinity. (DOTP = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraphosphonic acid; DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid). PMID:25431503

  2. Enhancement of T1 and T2 relaxation by paramagnetic silica-coated nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gerion, D; Herberg, J; Gjersing, E; Ramon, E; Maxwell, R; Gray, J W; Budinger, T F; Chen, F F

    2006-08-28

    We present the first comprehensive investigation on water-soluble nanoparticles embedded into a paramagnetic shell and their properties as an MRI contrast agent. The nanoprobes are constructed with an inorganic core embedded into an ultra-thin silica shell covalently linked to chelated Gd{sup 3+} paramagnetic ions that act as an MRI contrast agent. The chelator contains the molecule DOTA and the inorganic core contains a fluorescent CdSe/ZnS qdots in Au nanoparticles. Optical properties of the cores (fluorescence emission or plasmon position) are not affected by the neither the silica shell nor the presence of the chelated paramagnetic ions. The resulting complex is a MRI/fluorescence probe with a diameter of 8 to 15 nm. This probe is highly soluble in high ionic strength buffers at pH ranging from {approx}4 to 11. In MRI experiments at clinical field strengths of 60 MHz, the QDs probes posses spin-lattice (T{sub 1}) and a spin-spin (T{sub 2}) relaxivities of 1018.6 +/- 19.4 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} and 2438.1 +/- 46.3 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} respectively for probes having {approx}8 nm. This increase in relaxivity has been correlated to the number of paramagnetic ions covalently linked to the silica shell, ranging from approximately 45 to over 320. We found that each bound chelated paramagnetic species contributes by over 23 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} to the total T{sub 1} and by over 54 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} to the total T{sub 2} relaxivity respectively. The contrast power is modulated by the number of paramagnetic moieties linked to the silica shell and is only limited by the number of chelated paramagnetic species that can be packed on the surface. So far, the sensitivity of our probes is in the 100 nM range for 8-10 nm particles and reaches 10 nM for particles with approximately 15-18 nm in diameter. The sensitivities values in solutions are equivalent of those obtained with small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of 7 nm diameter clustered into a 100 nm polymeric

  3. Superparamagnetic behaviour and T 1, T 2 relaxivity of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjura Hoque, S.; Srivastava, C.; Venkatesha, N.; Kumar, P. S. Anil; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2013-05-01

    In the present study, ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation followed by calcinations at 473 and 673 K for 4 h. Particle sizes obtained were 4 and 6 nm for the calcination temperatures of 473 and 673 K, respectively. To study the origin of system's low temperature spin dynamic behaviour, temperature dependence of susceptibility ? was investigated as a function of particle size and frequency. Slight increase in the grain size from 4 nm at 473 K to 6 nm at 673 K has led to a peak shift of temperature dependence of susceptibility measured at a constant frequency of 400 Hz. Temperature dependence of ? at different frequencies also resulted in peak shift. Relaxation time dependence of peak temperature obeys a power law, which provides the fitting parameters within the range of superparamagnetic nature of the particles. Further, dependence of relaxation time and peak temperature obeys Vogel-Fulcher law rather than Néel-Brown equation demonstrating that the particles follow the behaviour of superparamagnetism of slightly interacting system. Spin-lattice, T 1 and spin-spin, T 2 relaxivity of proton of the water molecule in the presence of chitosan-coated superparamagnetic ZnFe2O4 nanoparticle yields the values of 0.002 and 0.360 s-1 per ppm.

  4. A (Fluoroalkyl)Guanidine Modulates the Relaxivity of a Phosphonate-Containing T1-Shortening Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinping; Dawsey, Anna C.; Siriwardena-Mahanama, Buddhima N.; Allen, Matthew J.; Williams, Travis J.

    2014-01-01

    Responsive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, those that change their relaxivity according to environmental stimuli, have promise as next generation imaging probes in medicine. While several of these are known based on covalent modification of the contrast agents, fewer are known based on controlling non-covalent interactions. We demonstrate here accentuated relaxivity of a T1-shortening contrast agent, Gd-DOTP5− based on non-covalent, hydrogen bonding of Gd-DOTP5− with a novel fluorous amphiphile. By contrast to the phosphonate-containing Gd-DOTP5− system, the relaxivity of the analogous clinically approved contrast agent, Gd-DOTA− is unaffected by the same fluorous amphiphile under similar conditions. Mechanistic studies show that placing the fluorous amphiphile in proximity of the gadolinium center in Gd-DOTP5− caused an increase in τm (bound-water residence lifetime or the inverse of water exchange rate, τm = 1/kex) and an increase in τR (rotational correlation time), with τR being the factor driving enhanced relaxivity. Further, these effects were not observed when Gd-DOTA− was treated with the same fluorous amphiphile. Thus, Gd-DOTP5− and Gd-DOTA− respond to the fluorous amphiphile differently, presumably because the former binds to the amphiphile with higher affinity. (DOTP = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraphosphonic acid; DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid). PMID:25431503

  5. (31)P-MRS of healthy human brain: ATP synthesis, metabolite concentrations, pH, and T1 relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jimin; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2015-11-01

    The conventional method for measuring brain ATP synthesis is (31)P saturation transfer (ST), a technique typically dependent on prolonged pre-saturation with γ-ATP. In this study, ATP synthesis rate in resting human brain is evaluated using EBIT (exchange kinetics by band inversion transfer), a technique based on slow recovery of γ-ATP magnetization in the absence of B1 field following co-inversion of PCr and ATP resonances with a short adiabatic pulse. The unidirectional rate constant for the Pi → γ-ATP reaction is 0.21 ± 0.04 s(-1) and the ATP synthesis rate is 9.9 ± 2.1 mmol min(-1)  kg(-1) in human brain (n = 12 subjects), consistent with the results by ST. Therefore, EBIT could be a useful alternative to ST in studying brain energy metabolism in normal physiology and under pathological conditions. In addition to ATP synthesis, all detectable (31)P signals are analyzed to determine the brain concentration of phosphorus metabolites, including UDPG at around 10 ppm, a previously reported resonance in liver tissues and now confirmed in human brain. Inversion recovery measurements indicate that UDPG, like its diphosphate analogue NAD, has apparent T1 shorter than that of monophosphates (Pi, PMEs, and PDEs) but longer than that of triphosphate ATP, highlighting the significance of the (31)P-(31)P dipolar mechanism in T1 relaxation of polyphosphates. Another interesting finding is the observation of approximately 40% shorter T1 for intracellular Pi relative to extracellular Pi, attributed to the modulation by the intracellular phosphoryl exchange reaction Pi ↔ γ-ATP. The sufficiently separated intra- and extracellular Pi signals also permit the distinction of pH between intra- and extracellular environments (pH 7.0 versus pH 7.4). In summary, quantitative (31)P MRS in combination with ATP synthesis, pH, and T1 relaxation measurements may offer a promising tool to detect biochemical alterations at early stages of brain dysfunctions and diseases

  6. Theoretical reason for the lack of influence of 1H-14N cross-relaxation on the water proton T 1 NMRD profile in slow tumbling proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westlund, P.-O.

    2012-09-01

    For immobilized protein the water proton T 1-NMRD profile displays three enhanced relaxation peaks (QP). For slow tumbling proteins these relaxation peaks are not experimentally observed. However, the theoretically determined QP effect on the amide proton T 1-NMRD profile displays a distorted Lorentzian dispersion profile. The question arises as to whether there is also a distortion of the water-proton T 1-NMRD profile due to QP. The model of Sunde and Halle [J. Magn. Reson. 203, 257 (2010)] predicts a decreasing QP relaxation contribution and, with the aid of a model for tumbling proteins [P.-O. Westlund, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys, 12, 3136 (2010)], it is shown that the QP effect is absent in water-proton T 1-NMRD profiles for slow tumbling proteins with τR < 1 µs, τI.

  7. Theory of NMR 1 /T1 relaxation in a quantum spin nematic in an applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerald, Andrew; Shannon, Nic

    2016-05-01

    There is now strong theoretical evidence that a wide range of frustrated magnets should support quantum spin-nematic order in an applied magnetic field. Nonetheless, the fact that spin-nematic order does not break time-reversal symmetry makes it very difficult to detect in experiment. In this article, we continue the theme begun in Phys. Rev. B 88, 184430 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.184430, of exploring how spin-nematic order reveals itself in the spectrum of spin excitations. Building on an earlier analysis of inelastic neutron scattering [Phys. Rev. B 91, 174402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.174402], we show how the NMR 1 /T1 relaxation rate could be used to identify a spin-nematic state in an applied magnetic field. We emphasize the characteristic universal features of 1 /T1 using a symmetry-based description of the spin-nematic order parameter and its fluctuations. Turning to the specific case of spin-1/2 frustrated ferromagnets, we show that the signal from competing spin-wave excitations can be suppressed through a judicious choice of nuclear site and field direction. As a worked example, we show how 31P NMR in the square lattice frustrated ferromagnet BaCdVO (PO4)2 is sensitive to spin-nematic order.

  8. A triarylmethyl spin label for long-range distance measurement at physiological temperatures using T1 relaxation enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongyu; Bridges, Michael D.; López, Carlos J.; Rogozhnikova, Olga Yu.; Trukhin, Dmitry V.; Brooks, Evan K.; Tormyshev, Victor; Halpern, Howard J.; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2016-08-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has become an important tool for measuring distances in proteins on the order of a few nm. For this purpose pairs of spin labels, most commonly nitroxides, are site-selectively introduced into the protein. Recent efforts to develop new spin labels are focused on tailoring the intrinsic properties of the label to either extend the upper limit of measurable distances at physiological temperature, or to provide a unique spectral lineshape so that selective pairwise distances can be measured in a protein or complex containing multiple spin label species. Triarylmethyl (TAM) radicals are the foundation for a new class of spin labels that promise to provide both capabilities. Here we report a new methanethiosulfonate derivative of a TAM radical that reacts rapidly and selectively with an engineered cysteine residue to generate a TAM containing side chain (TAM1) in high yield. With a TAM1 residue and Cu2+ bound to an engineered Cu2+ binding site, enhanced T1 relaxation of TAM should enable measurement of interspin distances up to 50 Å at physiological temperature. To achieve favorable TAM1-labeled protein concentrations without aggregation, proteins are tethered to a solid support either site-selectively using an unnatural amino acid or via native lysine residues. The methodology is general and readily extendable to complex systems, including membrane proteins.

  9. Osmotic and aging effects in caviar oocytes throughout water and lipid changes assessed by 1H NMR T1 and T2 relaxation and MRI.

    PubMed

    Gussoni, Maristella; Greco, Fulvia; Vezzoli, Alessandra; Paleari, Maria Antonietta; Moretti, Vittorio Maria; Lanza, Barbara; Zetta, Lucia

    2007-01-01

    By combining NMR relaxation spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging techniques, unsalted (us) and salted (s) caviar (Acipenser transmontanus) oocytes were characterized over a storage period of up to 90 days. The aging and the salting effects on the two major cell constituents, water and lipids, were separately assessed. T1 and T2 decays were interpreted by assuming a two-site exchange model. At Day 0, two water compartments that were not in fast exchange were identified by the T1 relaxation measurements on the us oocytes. In the s samples, T1 decay was monoexponential. During the time of storage, an increment of the free water amount was found for the us oocytes, ascribed to an increased metabolism. T1 and T2 of the s oocytes shortened as a consequence of the osmotic stress produced by salting. Selective images showed the presence of water endowed with different regional mobility that severely changed during the storage. Lipid T1 relaxation decays collected on us and s samples were found to be biexponential, and the T1 values lengthened during storage. In us and s oocytes, the increased lipid mobility with the storage was ascribed to lipolysis. Selective images of us samples showed lipids that were confined to the cytoplasm for up to 60 days of storage. PMID:17222723

  10. The Frequency-Dependence of the NMR Longitudinal Relaxation Rate, T(1)(-1), of Water in Cysts of the Brine Shrimp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Thomas F.

    The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, T(,1)(' -1), of water is independent of the Larmor frequency, (omega)/2(pi), in the normal rf range. However, T(,1)('-1) of intracellular water in biological systems, which accounts for as much as 80% of the cell mass, is frequency-dependent. This indicates that the NMR properties of water in the cellular environment are influenced by long-correlation time processes due to the interaction of water with proteins and other macromolecular constituents of the cell. In this research, the relaxation rate T(,1)(' -1) of water in the Artemia (brine shrimp) cyst is examined as a function of: (1) the proton NMR Larmor frequency for .01 <= (omega)/2(pi) <= 500 MHz, (2) different cyst hydration levels from 0.12 to 1.25 grams water/gram dry solid, (3) temperatures of 22C and 5C. The frequency-dependence of T(,1)('-1) is interpreted in terms of a two-phase exchange model. One water phase is similar to pure water and contributes a small constant relaxation rate. The second phase is water closely associated with the surfaces of large molecules and termed "hydration water". A polymer-dynamics relaxation mechanism, which treats fluctuations of long-chain molecules in aqueous solution, has been proposed by Rorschach and Hazlewood to explain the relaxation in this second water phase. In one limit, this mechanism predicts a frequency-dependent relaxation rate proportional to (omega)('- 1/2). This particular dependence has previously been observed in other NMR studies on biological systems and is also observed in this study for Artemia cysts between 10 and 500 MHz. At lower Larmor frequencies, below 1 MHz, the relaxation rates of water in brine shrimp cysts are influenced by additional relexation mechanisms; translational diffusion of hydration water is one possibility.

  11. The guest ordering and dynamics in urea inclusion compounds studied by solid-state 1H and 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaorong; Müller, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Urea inclusion compounds with different guest species were studied by 13C CP MAS and 1H MAS NMR spectroscopy. It is possible to arrange the asymmetric guest species in three different ways: head-head, head-tail and tail-tail. 13C CP MAS NMR studies indicate that the preference arrangement is determined by the interaction strength of the end functional groups. 13C relaxation experiments are used to study the dynamic properties of urea inclusion compounds. 13C relaxation studies on urea inclusion compounds with n-alkane or decanoic acid show that the 13C T1 and 13C T1ρ values exhibit the position dependence towards the center of the chain, indicating internal chain mobility. The analysis of variable-temperature 13C T1ρ experiments on urea inclusion compounds with hexadecane and pentadecane, for the first time, suggests that chain fluctuations and lateral motion of n-alkane guests may contribute to the 13C T1ρ relaxation.

  12. Dependencies of multi-component T 2 and T 1 ρ relaxation on the anisotropy of collagen fibrils in bovine nasal cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nian; Xia, Yang

    2011-09-01

    Both NMR spectroscopy and MRI were used to investigate the dependencies of multi-component T2 and T1ρ relaxation on the anisotropy of bovine nasal cartilage (BNC). The non-negative least square (NNLS) method and the multi-exponential fitting method were used to analyze all experimental data. When the collagen fibrils in nasal cartilage were oriented at the magic angle (55°) to the magnetic field B 0, both T2 and T1ρ were single component, regardless of the spin-lock field strength or the echo spacing time in the pulse sequences. When the collagen fibrils in nasal cartilage were oriented at 0° to B 0, both T2 and T1ρ at a spin-lock field of 500 Hz had two components. When the spin-lock field was increased to 1000 Hz or higher, T1ρ relaxation in nasal cartilage became a single component, even when the specimen orientation was 0°. These results demonstrate that the specimen orientation must be considered for any multi-component analysis, even for nasal cartilage that is commonly considered homogenously structured. Since the rapidly and slowly relaxing components can be attributed to different portions of the water population in tissue, the ability to resolve different relaxation components could be used to quantitatively examine individual molecular components in connective tissues.

  13. Initial evaluation of hepatic T1 relaxation time as an imaging marker of liver disease associated with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD).

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Erokwu, Bernadette O; DeSantis, David A; Croniger, Colleen M; Schur, Rebecca M; Lu, Lan; Mariappuram, Jose; Dell, Katherine M; Flask, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a potentially lethal multi-organ disease affecting both the kidneys and the liver. Unfortunately, there are currently no non-invasive methods to monitor liver disease progression in ARPKD patients, limiting the study of potential therapeutic interventions. Herein, we perform an initial investigation of T1 relaxation time as a potential imaging biomarker to quantitatively assess the two primary pathologic hallmarks of ARPKD liver disease: biliary dilatation and periportal fibrosis in the PCK rat model of ARPKD. T1 relaxation time results were obtained for five PCK rats at 3 months of age using a Look-Locker acquisition on a Bruker BioSpec 7.0 T MRI scanner. Six three-month-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were also scanned as controls. All animals were euthanized after the three-month scans for histological and biochemical assessments of bile duct dilatation and hepatic fibrosis for comparison. PCK rats exhibited significantly increased liver T1 values (mean ± standard deviation = 935 ± 39 ms) compared with age-matched SD control rats (847 ± 26 ms, p = 0.01). One PCK rat exhibited severe cholangitis (mean T1  = 1413 ms), which occurs periodically in ARPKD patients. The observed increase in the in vivo liver T1 relaxation time correlated significantly with three histological and biochemical indicators of biliary dilatation and fibrosis: bile duct area percent (R = 0.85, p = 0.002), periportal fibrosis area percent (R = 0.82, p = 0.004), and hydroxyproline content (R = 0.76, p = 0.01). These results suggest that hepatic T1 relaxation time may provide a sensitive and non-invasive imaging biomarker to monitor ARPKD liver disease. PMID:26608869

  14. Comparison of T1ρ and T2* Relaxation Mapping in Patients with Different Grades of Disc Degeneration at 3T MR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinjuan; Yang, Li; Gao, Fei; Yuan, Zhenguo; Lin, Xiangtao; Yao, Bin; Chen, Weibo; Chan, Queenie; Wang, Guangbin

    2015-01-01

    Background T1ρ and T2* relaxation times are capable of providing information about early biochemical changes in intervertebral disk degeneration (IVDD). The purpose of this study was to assess and compare T1ρ and T2* mapping in IVDD with reference to Pfirrmann grade. Material/Methods Lumbar sagittal T2-weighted, T1ρ and T2* relaxation MRI were performed at 3.0T in 42 subjects covering discs L1–L2 to L5–S1. All the discs were morphologically assessed according to the Pfirrmann grade. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn over the T1ρ and T2*mappings, including nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF). Wilcoxon signed rank test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Spearman rank correlation were performed. Results The difference in T1ρ and T2* values between NP and AF were highly significant (P<0.001). The trends of decreasing T1ρ and T2* values of both NP and AF with increasing Pfirrmann grades was significant (P<0.01), particularly between Pfirrmann grade II and III (P<0.001), whereas T2* mapping was additionally able to detect changes in the AF between Pfirrmann grade I and II (P<0.05). Pfirrmann grades were inversely significantly correlated with both T1ρ and T2* values in the NP (r=–0.69, P<0.001; r=−0.56, P<0.001) and AF (r=−0.45, P<0.001; r=−0.26, P<0.001). Conclusions The process of IVDD can be detected by T1ρ and T2* mapping, particularly at early stage, and both methodologies displayed roughly comparable performance. PMID:26141783

  15. Effect of manganese on human placental spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Angtuaco, T.L.; Mattison, D.R.; Thomford, P.J.; Jordan, J.

    1986-01-01

    Human placentas were obtained immediately following delivery and incubated with manganese chloride (MnCl/sub 2/) in concentrations ranging from 0.002 to 2.0 mM. Proton density, T1 and T2 were measured at times ranging from 5-200 minutes. There was rapid uptake of manganese by the placenta producing a dose-dependent decrease in placental T1 and T2. The major effect of manganese uptake was shortening of T1 suggesting that the contrast between placenta and myometrium will be enhanced predominantly for T1-dependent imaging pulse sequences.

  16. Spatial analysis of magnetic resonance T1ρ and T2 relaxation times improves classification between subjects with and without osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Stahl, Robert; Blumenkrantz, Gabrielle; Romero, Adan; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have shown that functional analysis of knee cartilage based on magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation times is a valuable tool in the understanding of osteoarthritis (OA). In this work, the regional spatial distribution of knee cartilage T1ρ and T2 relaxation times based on texture and laminar analyses was studied to investigate if they provide additional insight compared to global mean values in the study of OA. Methods: Knee cartilage of 36 subjects, 19 healthy controls and 17 with mild OA, was divided into 16 compartments. T1ρ and T2 relaxation times were studied with first order statistics, eight texture parameters with four different orientations using gray-level co-occurrence matrices and by subdividing each compartment into two different layers: Deep and superficial. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to evaluate the potential of each technique to correctly classify the populations. Results: Although the deep and superficial cartilage layers had in general significantly different T1ρ and T2 relaxation times, they performed similarly in terms of subject discrimination. The subdivision of lateral and medial femoral compartments into weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing regions did not improve discrimination. Also it was found that the most sensitive region was the patella and that T1ρ discriminated better than T2. The most important finding was that with respect to global mean values, laminar and texture analyses improved subject discrimination. Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that spatially assessing MR images of the knee cartilage relaxation times using laminar and texture analyses could lead to better and probably earlier identification of cartilage matrix abnormalities in subjects with OA. PMID:19810478

  17. Effects of Unloading on Knee Articular Cartilage T1rho and T2 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Relaxation Times: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    SOUZA, RICHARD B.; BAUM, THOMAS; WU, SAMUEL; FEELEY, BRIAN T.; KADEL, NANCY; LI, XIAOJUAN; LINK, THOMAS M.; MAJUMDAR, SHARMILA

    2013-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Case series. BACKGROUND It has been shown in rodent and canine models that cartilage composition is significantly altered in response to long-term unloading. To date, however, no in vivo human studies have investigated this topic. The objective of this case series was to determine the influence of unloading and reloading on T1rho and T2 relaxation times of articular cartilage in healthy young joints. CASE DESCRIPTION Ten patients who required 6 to 8 weeks of non–weight bearing (NWB) for injuries affecting the distal lower extremity participated in the study. Quantitative T1rho and T2 imaging of the ipsilateral knee joint was performed at 3 time points: (1) prior to surgery (baseline), (2) immediately after a period of NWB (post-NWB), and (3) after 4 weeks of full weight bearing (post-FWB). Cartilage regions of interest were segmented and overlaid on T1rho and T2 relaxation time maps for quantification. Descriptive statistics are provided for all changes. OUTCOMES Increases of 5% to 10% in T1rho times of all femoral and tibial compartments were noted post-NWB. All values returned to near-baseline levels post-FWB. Increases in medial tibia T2 times were noted post-NWB and remained elevated post-FWB. The load-bearing regions showed the most significant changes in response to unloading, with increases of up to 12%. DISCUSSION The observation of a transient shift in relaxation times confirms that cartilage composition is subject to alterations based on loading conditions. These changes appear to be mostly related to proteoglycan content and more localized to the load-bearing regions. However, following 4 weeks of full weight bearing, relaxation times of nearly all regions had returned to baseline levels, demonstrating reversibility in compositional fluctuations. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Therapy, level 4. PMID:22402583

  18. Normal variation of magnetic resonance T1 relaxation times in the human population at 1.5 T using ShMOLLI

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantitative T1-mapping is rapidly becoming a clinical tool in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) to objectively distinguish normal from diseased myocardium. The usefulness of any quantitative technique to identify disease lies in its ability to detect significant differences from an established range of normal values. We aimed to assess the variability of myocardial T1 relaxation times in the normal human population estimated with recently proposed Shortened Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery (ShMOLLI) T1 mapping technique. Methods A large cohort of healthy volunteers (n = 342, 50% females, age 11–69 years) from 3 clinical centres across two countries underwent CMR at 1.5T. Each examination provided a single average myocardial ShMOLLI T1 estimate using manually drawn myocardial contours on typically 3 short axis slices (average 3.4 ± 1.4), taking care not to include any blood pool in the myocardial contours. We established the normal reference range of myocardial and blood T1 values, and assessed the effect of potential confounding factors, including artefacts, partial volume, repeated measurements, age, gender, body size, hematocrit and heart rate. Results Native myocardial ShMOLLI T1 was 962 ± 25 ms. We identify the partial volume as primary source of potential error in the analysis of respective T1 maps and use 1 pixel erosion to represent “midwall myocardial” T1, resulting in a 0.9% decrease to 953 ± 23 ms. Midwall myocardial ShMOLLI T1 was reproducible with an intra-individual, intra- and inter-scanner variability of ≤2%. The principle biological parameter influencing myocardial ShMOLLI T1 was the female gender, with female T1 longer by 24 ms up to the age of 45 years, after which there was no significant difference from males. After correction for age and gender dependencies, heart rate was the only other physiologic factor with a small effect on myocardial ShMOLLI T1 (6ms/10bpm). Left and right ventricular

  19. Ligand protons in a frozen solution of copper histidine relax via a T1e-driven three-spin mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, S.; Epel, B.; Vega, S.; Goldfarb, D.

    2007-10-01

    Davies electron-nuclear double resonance spectra can exhibit strong asymmetries for long mixing times, short repetition times, and large thermal polarizations. These asymmetries can be used to determine nuclear relaxation rates in paramagnetic systems. Measurements of frozen solutions of copper(L-histidine)2 reveal a strong field dependence of the relaxation rates of the protons in the histidine ligand, increasing from low (g‖) to high (g⊥) field. It is shown that this can be attributed to a concentration-dependent T1e-driven relaxation process involving strongly mixed states of three spins: the histidine proton, the Cu(II) electron spin of the same complex, and another distant electron spin with a resonance frequency differing from the spectrometer frequency approximately by the proton Larmor frequency. The protons relax more efficiently in the g⊥ region, since the number of distant electrons able to participate in this relaxation mechanism is higher than in the g‖ region. Analytical expressions for the associated nuclear polarization decay rate Teen-1 are developed and Monte Carlo simulations are carried out, reproducing both the field and the concentration dependences of the nuclear relaxation.

  20. AQUEOUS RELAXATION REAGENTS IN NITROGEN-15 NMR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electron-nuclear relaxation times T(1)supe's for 15N and 13C in natural abundance are measured for a series of amines in aqueous solution using Gd(III) complexes of a series of polyaminocarboxylate ligands as paramagnetic relaxation reagents (PARRs). The PARRs are classified by t...

  1. Tuning the relaxation rates of dual-mode T1/T2 nanoparticle contrast agents: a study into the ideal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keasberry, Natasha A.; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Wood, Christopher; Stasiuk, Graeme. J.; Gallo, Juan; Long, Nicholas. J.

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent imaging modality. However the low sensitivity of the technique poses a challenge to achieving an accurate image of function at the molecular level. To overcome this, contrast agents are used; typically gadolinium based agents for T1 weighted imaging, or iron oxide based agents for T2 imaging. Traditionally, only one imaging mode is used per diagnosis although several physiological situations are known to interfere with the signal induced by the contrast agents in each individual imaging mode acquisition. Recently, the combination of both T1 and T2 imaging capabilities into a single platform has emerged as a tool to reduce uncertainties in MR image analysis. To date, contradicting reports on the effect on the contrast of the coupling of a T1 and T2 agent have hampered the application of these specialised probes. Herein, we present a systematic experimental study on a range of gadolinium-labelled magnetite nanoparticles envisioned to bring some light into the mechanism of interaction between T1 and T2 components, and advance towards the design of efficient (dual) T1 and T2 MRI probes. Unexpected behaviours observed in some of the constructs will be discussed. In this study, we demonstrate that the relaxivity of such multimodal probes can be rationally tuned to obtain unmatched potentials in MR imaging, exemplified by preparation of the magnetite-based nanoparticle with the highest T2 relaxivity described to date.Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent imaging modality. However the low sensitivity of the technique poses a challenge to achieving an accurate image of function at the molecular level. To overcome this, contrast agents are used; typically gadolinium based agents for T1 weighted imaging, or iron oxide based agents for T2 imaging. Traditionally, only one imaging mode is used per diagnosis although several physiological situations are known to interfere with the signal induced by the contrast agents in

  2. Impact of Ho(3+)-doping on (13)C dynamic nuclear polarization using trityl OX063 free radical.

    PubMed

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Martins, André; Fidelino, Leila; Khemtong, Chalermchai; Song, Likai; Sherry, A Dean; Lumata, Lloyd

    2016-08-21

    We have investigated the effects of Ho-DOTA doping on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of [1-(13)C] sodium acetate using trityl OX063 free radical at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. Our results indicate that addition of 2 mM Ho-DOTA on 3 M [1-(13)C] sodium acetate sample in 1 : 1 v/v glycerol : water with 15 mM trityl OX063 improves the DNP-enhanced (13)C solid-state nuclear polarization by a factor of around 2.7-fold. Similar to the Gd(3+) doping effect on (13)C DNP, the locations of the positive and negative (13)C maximum polarization peaks in the (13)C microwave DNP sweep are shifted towards each other with the addition of Ho-DOTA on the DNP sample. W-band electron spin resonance (ESR) studies have revealed that while the shape and linewidth of the trityl OX063 ESR spectrum was not affected by Ho(3+)-doping, the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of trityl OX063 was prominently reduced at cryogenic temperatures. The reduction of trityl OX063 electron T1 by Ho-doping is linked to the (13)C DNP improvement in light of the thermodynamic picture of DNP. Moreover, the presence of Ho-DOTA in the dissolution liquid at room temperature has negligible reduction effect on liquid-state (13)C T1, in contrast to Gd(3+)-doping which drastically reduces the (13)C T1. The results here suggest that Ho(3+)-doping is advantageous over Gd(3+) in terms of preservation of hyperpolarized state-an important aspect to consider for in vitro and in vivo NMR or imaging (MRI) experiments where a considerable preparation time is needed to administer the hyperpolarized (13)C liquid. PMID:27424954

  3. Robust hyperpolarized (13)C metabolic imaging with selective non-excitation of pyruvate (SNEP).

    PubMed

    Chen, Way Cherng; Teo, Xing Qi; Lee, Man Ying; Radda, George K; Lee, Philip

    2015-08-01

    In vivo metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate provides localized biochemical information and is particularly useful in detecting early disease changes, as well as monitoring disease progression and treatment response. However, a major limitation of hyperpolarized magnetization is its unrecoverable decay, due not only to T1 relaxation but also to radio-frequency (RF) excitation. RF excitation schemes used in metabolic imaging must therefore be able to utilize available hyperpolarized magnetization efficiently and robustly for the optimal detection of substrate and metabolite activities. In this work, a novel RF excitation scheme called selective non-excitation of pyruvate (SNEP) is presented. This excitation scheme involves the use of a spectral selective RF pulse to specifically exclude the excitation of [1-(13)C]pyruvate, while uniformly exciting the key metabolites of interest (namely [1-(13)C]lactate and [1-(13)C]alanine) and [1-(13)C]pyruvate-hydrate. By eliminating the loss of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate magnetization due to RF excitation, the signal from downstream metabolite pools is increased together with enhanced dynamic range. Simulation results, together with phantom measurements and in vivo experiments, demonstrated the improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the extension of the lifetime of the [1-(13)C]lactate and [1-(13)C]alanine pools when compared with conventional non-spectral selective (NS) excitation. SNEP has also been shown to perform comparably well with multi-band (MB) excitation, yet SNEP possesses distinct advantages, including ease of implementation, less stringent demands on gradient performance, increased robustness to frequency drifts and B0 inhomogeneity as well as easier quantification involving the use of [1-(13)C]pyruvate-hydrate as a proxy for the actual [1-(13)C] pyruvate signal. SNEP is therefore a promising alternative for robust hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate metabolic imaging with high

  4. 13C solid-state NMR analysis of heterogeneous structure of beeswax in native state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2005-12-01

    I investigated the molecular structure of natural wax from Japanese bees (Apis cerana japonica) in its native state (neither purified nor recrystallized) by 13C and 1H solid-state NMR. Two strong 13C peaks at 32.9 and 34.0 ppm were attributed to signals from internal-chain methylene carbons [int-(CH2)] in two types of crystal form. The peak at 32.9 ppm was assigned to an orthorhombic crystal form, and that at 34.0 ppm was assigned to a triclinic or monoclinic form. In both crystalline regions, bi-exponential decay of 13C spin-lattice relaxation [T1(C)] for the crystalline peaks due to chain diffusion was observed. 1H spin-lattice relaxation [T1(H)] values for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the crystalline and amorphous regions were identical; this was interpreted as being due to averaging of the T1(H) relaxation rates via spin diffusion. In contrast, although the T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) decay curves for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the amorphous and orthorhombic forms were almost identical, those of the triclinic or monoclinic forms were different. This unhomogeneous character of T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) was interpreted as resulting from differences in the molecular composition of each crystal form. Moreover, two components with long and short 1H spin-spin relaxation [T2(H)] values, arising from the mobile and rigid phases, respectively, were observed at above about -30 °C.

  5. High-field 1H T1 and T2 NMR relaxation time measurements of H2O in homeopathic preparations of quartz, sulfur, and copper sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Martin; Skrabal, Peter; Bangerter, Felix; Heusser, Peter; Thurneysen, André; Wolf, Ursula

    2009-09-01

    Quantitative meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials investigating the specific therapeutic efficacy of homeopathic remedies yielded statistically significant differences compared to placebo. Since the remedies used contained mostly only very low concentrations of pharmacologically active compounds, these effects cannot be accounted for within the framework of current pharmacology. Theories to explain clinical effects of homeopathic remedies are partially based upon changes in diluent structure. To investigate the latter, we measured for the first time high-field (600/500 MHz) 1H T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of H2O in homeopathic preparations with concurrent contamination control by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Homeopathic preparations of quartz (10 c-30 c, n = 21, corresponding to iterative dilutions of 100-10-100-30), sulfur (13 x-30 x, n = 18, 10-13-10-30), and copper sulfate (11 c-30 c, n = 20, 100-11-100-30) were compared to n = 10 independent controls each (analogously agitated dilution medium) in randomized and blinded experiments. In none of the samples, the concentration of any element analyzed by ICP-MS exceeded 10 ppb. In the first measurement series (600 MHz), there was a significant increase in T1 for all samples as a function of time, and there were no significant differences between homeopathic potencies and controls. In the second measurement series (500 MHz) 1 year after preparation, we observed statistically significant increased T1 relaxation times for homeopathic sulfur preparations compared to controls. Fifteen out of 18 correlations between sample triplicates were higher for controls than for homeopathic preparations. No conclusive explanation for these phenomena can be given at present. Possible hypotheses involve differential leaching from the measurement vessel walls or a change in water molecule dynamics, i.e., in rotational correlation time and/or diffusion. Homeopathic preparations

  6. Silica-F127 nanohybrid-encapsulated manganese oxide nanoparticles for optimized T1 magnetic resonance relaxivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei Hsu, Benedict You; Wang, Miao; Zhang, Yu; Vijayaragavan, Vimalan; Wong, Siew Yee; Yuang-Chi Chang, Alex; Bhakoo, Kishore Kumar; Li, Xu; Wang, John

    2013-12-01

    To properly engineer MnO nanoparticles (MONPs) of high r1 relaxivity, a nanohybrid coating consisting of silica and F127 (PEO106PPO70PEO106) is designed to encapsulate MONPs. Achieved by an interfacial templating scheme, the nanohybrid encapsulating layer is highly permeable and hydrophilic to allow for an optimal access of water molecules to the encapsulated manganese oxide core. Hence, the efficacy of MONPs as MRI contrast agents is significantly improved, as demonstrated by an enhancement of the MR signal measured with a pre-clinical 7.0 T MRI scanner. The nanohybrid encapsulation strategy also confers high colloidal stability to the hydrophobic MONPs by the surface decoration of PEO chains and a small overall diameter (<100 nm) of the PEO-SiO2 nanohybrid-encapsulated MONPs (PEOMSNs). The PEOMSNs are not susceptible to Mn-ion leaching, and their biocompatibility is affirmed by a low toxicity profile. Moreover, these hybrid nanocapsules exhibit a nano-rattle structure, which would favor the facile loading of various therapeutic reagents for theranostic applications.To properly engineer MnO nanoparticles (MONPs) of high r1 relaxivity, a nanohybrid coating consisting of silica and F127 (PEO106PPO70PEO106) is designed to encapsulate MONPs. Achieved by an interfacial templating scheme, the nanohybrid encapsulating layer is highly permeable and hydrophilic to allow for an optimal access of water molecules to the encapsulated manganese oxide core. Hence, the efficacy of MONPs as MRI contrast agents is significantly improved, as demonstrated by an enhancement of the MR signal measured with a pre-clinical 7.0 T MRI scanner. The nanohybrid encapsulation strategy also confers high colloidal stability to the hydrophobic MONPs by the surface decoration of PEO chains and a small overall diameter (<100 nm) of the PEO-SiO2 nanohybrid-encapsulated MONPs (PEOMSNs). The PEOMSNs are not susceptible to Mn-ion leaching, and their biocompatibility is affirmed by a low toxicity profile

  7. Phase transition in triglycine sulfate crystals by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance in the rotating frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Jeong, Se-Young

    2013-09-01

    The ferroelectric phase transition in triglycine sulfate ((NH2CH2COOH)3·H2SO4, TGS)) crystals, occurring at TC of 322 K, was studied using 1H and 13C CP/MAS NMR. From the spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame, T1ρ, of 1H and 13C, we found that the slopes of the T1ρ versus temperature curve changed near TC. In addition, the change of intensities for the protons and carbons NMR signals in the ferroelectric and the paraelectric phases led to the noticeable changes in the environments of proton and carbon in the carboxyl groups. The carboxyl ordering was the dominant factor driving the phase transition. Our study of the 1H and 13C spectra showed that the ferroelectric phase transition of TGS is of the order-disorder type due to ordering of the carboxyl groups.

  8. In vivo 13 carbon metabolic imaging at 3T with hyperpolarized 13C-1-pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Kohler, S J; Yen, Y; Wolber, J; Chen, A P; Albers, M J; Bok, R; Zhang, V; Tropp, J; Nelson, S; Vigneron, D B; Kurhanewicz, J; Hurd, R E

    2007-07-01

    We present for the first time dynamic spectra and spectroscopic images acquired in normal rats at 3T following the injection of (13)C-1-pyruvate that was hyperpolarized by the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) method. Spectroscopic sampling was optimized for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and for spectral resolution of (13)C-1-pyruvate and its metabolic products (13)C-1-alanine, (13)C-1-lactate, and (13)C-bicarbonate. Dynamic spectra in rats were collected with a temporal resolution of 3 s from a 90-mm axial slab using a dual (1)H-(13)C quadrature birdcage coil to observe the combined effects of metabolism, flow, and T(1) relaxation. In separate experiments, spectroscopic imaging data were obtained during a 17-s acquisition of a 20-mm axial slice centered on the rat kidney region to provide information on the spatial distribution of the metabolites. Conversion of pyruvate to lactate, alanine, and bicarbonate occurred within a minute of injection. Alanine was observed primarily in skeletal muscle and liver, while pyruvate, lactate, and bicarbonate concentrations were relatively high in the vasculature and kidneys. In contrast to earlier work at 1.5 T, bicarbonate was routinely observed in skeletal muscle as well as the kidney and vasculature. PMID:17659629

  9. T1 ρ MRI contrast in the human brain: Modulation of the longitudinal rotating frame relaxation shutter-speed during an adiabatic RF pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaeli, Shalom; Sorce, Dennis J.; Springer, Charles S.; Ugurbil, Kamil; Garwood, Michael

    2006-07-01

    Longitudinal relaxation in the rotating frame (T1ρ) is the dominant mechanism during a train of adiabatic full passage (AFP) RF pulses with no interpulse intervals, placed prior to an excitation pulse. Asymptotic apparent time constants (T1ρ ‧) were measured for human occipital lobe 1H2O at 4 T using brief imaging readouts following such pulse trains. Two members of the hyperbolic secant (HSn) AFP pulse family (n = 1 or 4; i.e., arising from different amplitude- and frequency-modulation functions) were used. These produced two different non-monoexponential signal decays during the pulse trains. Thus, there are differing contrasts in asymptotic T1ρ ‧ maps derived from these data. This behavior is quite different than that of 1H2O signals from an aqueous protein solution of roughly the same macromolecular volume fraction as tissue. The ROI-averaged decays from the two acquisitions can be simultaneously accommodated by a two-site-exchange model for an equilibrium isochronous process whose exchange condition is modulated during the pulse. The model employs a two-spin description of dipolar interaction fluctuations in each site. The intrinsic site R1ρ (≡T1ρ-1) value is sensitive to fluctuations at the effective Larmor frequency (ωeff) in the rotating frame, and this is modulated differently during the two types of AFP pulses. Agreement with the data is quite good for site orientation correlation time constants characteristic of macromolecule-interacting water (site A) and bulk-like water (site B). Since R1ρA is significantly modulated while R1ρB is not, the intrinsic relaxographic shutter-speed for the process (≡|R1ρA - R1ρB|), and thus the exchange condition, is modulated. However, the mean residence time (67 ms) and intrinsic population fraction (0.2) values found for site A are each rather larger than might be expected, suggesting a disproportionate role for the water molecules known to be "buried" within the large and concentrated macromolecules of

  10. 13C-NMR spectra and contact time experiment for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The T(CP) and T(1p) time constants for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids were determined to be short with T(CP) values ranging from 0.14 ms to 0.53 ms and T(1p) values ranging from 3.3 ms to 5.9 ms. T(CP) or T(1p) time constants at a contact time of 1 ms are favorable for quantification of 13C-NMR spectra. Because of the short T(CP) values, correction factors for signal intensity for various regions of the 13C-NMR spectra would be necessary at contact times greater than 1.1 ms or less than 0.9 ms. T(CP) and T(1p) values have a limited non-homogeneity within Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids. A pulse delay or repeat time of 700 ms is more than adequate for quantification of these 13C-NMR spectra. Paramagnetic effects in these humic substances are precluded due to low inorganic ash contents, low contents of Fe, Mn, and Co, and low organic free-radical contents. The observed T(CP) values suggest that all the carbon types in Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids are fully cross-polarized before significant proton relaxation occurs. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern fulvic acid is similar to most aquatic fulvic acids as it is predominantly aliphatic, low in aromaticity (fa1 = 24), low in phenolic content, high in carboxyl content, and has no resolution of a methoxyl peak. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern humic acid is also similar to most other aquatic humic acids in that it is also predominantly aliphatic, high in aromaticity (fa1 = 38), moderate in phenolic content, moderate in carboxyl content, and has a clear resolution of a methoxyl carbon region. After the consideration of the necessary 13C-NMR experimental conditions, these spectra are considered to be quantitative. With careful consideration of the previously determined 13C-NMR experimental conditions, quantitative spectra can be obtained for humic substances in the future from the HUMEX site. Possible changes in humic substances due to acidification should be determined from 13C-NMR data.

  11. Feasibility for mapping cartilage t1 relaxation times in the distal metacarpus3/metatarsus3 of thoroughbred racehorses using delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC): normal cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Ann; Kirberger, Robert M; Velleman, Mark; Dahlberg, Leif E; Fletcher, Lizelle; Lammentausta, Eveliina

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the metacarpo/metatarsophalangeal joints is one of the major causes of poor performance in horses. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) may be a useful technique for noninvasively quantifying articular cartilage damage in horses. The purpose of this study was to describe dGEMRIC characteristics of the distal metacarpus3/metatarsus3 (Mc3/Mt3) articular cartilage in 20 cadaver specimens collected from normal Thoroughbred horses. For each specimen, T1 relaxation time was measured from scans acquired precontrast and at 30, 60, 120, and 180 min post intraarticular injection of Gd-DTPA(2-) (dGEMRIC series). For each scan, T1 relaxation times were calculated using five regions of interest (sites 1-5) in the cartilage. For all sites, a significant decrease in T1 relaxation times occurred between precontrast scans and 30, 60, 120, and 180 min scans of the dGEMRIC series (P < 0.0001). A significant increase in T1 relaxation times occurred between 60 and 180 min and between 120 and 180 min post Gd injection for all sites. For sites 1-4, a significant increase in T1 relaxation time occurred between 30 and 180 min postinjection (P < 0.05). Sites 1-5 differed significantly among one another for all times (P < 0.0001). Findings from this cadaver study indicated that dGEMRIC using intraarticular Gd-DTPA(2-) is a feasible technique for measuring and mapping changes in T1 relaxation times in equine metacarpo/metatarsophalangeal joint cartilage. Optimal times for postcontrast scans were 60-120 min. Future studies are needed to determine whether these findings are reproducible in live horses. PMID:23551282

  12. Molecular orientational dynamics in C70S48: Investigation by 13C MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grell, A.-S.; Talyzin, A.; Pirotte, P.; Masin, F.

    2001-11-01

    At room temperature the MAS 13C NMR spectrum of C70S48 is identical to that of pure C70 above 323 K, except that the 13C line is shifted by 1.7 ppm compared to that of pure C70. From these results, we deduce that our system is mainly of the van der Waals type. A simulation of the low speed MAS spectrum shows that C70 molecules in C70S48 undergo a uniaxial rotation as in pure C70. This new result contradicts what had been previously published. The chemical shift of the 13C line does not vary with temperature, however the rotation of C70 slows down as the temperature is decreased and stops at ca. 150 K. Moreover the 13C spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, can be described by a single correlation time that follows an Arrhenius law with a 900 K activation energy. By NMR no phase transition is observed at 245 K contrary to dielectric relaxation measurements.

  13. Low-field thermal mixing in [1-(13)C] pyruvic acid for brute-force hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Peat, David T; Hirsch, Matthew L; Gadian, David G; Horsewill, Anthony J; Owers-Bradley, John R; Kempf, James G

    2016-07-28

    We detail the process of low-field thermal mixing (LFTM) between (1)H and (13)C nuclei in neat [1-(13)C] pyruvic acid at cryogenic temperatures (4-15 K). Using fast-field-cycling NMR, (1)H nuclei in the molecule were polarized at modest high field (2 T) and then equilibrated with (13)C nuclei by fast cycling (∼300-400 ms) to a low field (0-300 G) that activates thermal mixing. The (13)C NMR spectrum was recorded after fast cycling back to 2 T. The (13)C signal derives from (1)H polarization via LFTM, in which the polarized ('cold') proton bath contacts the unpolarised ('hot') (13)C bath at a field so low that Zeeman and dipolar interactions are similar-sized and fluctuations in the latter drive (1)H-(13)C equilibration. By varying mixing time (tmix) and field (Bmix), we determined field-dependent rates of polarization transfer (1/τ) and decay (1/T1m) during mixing. This defines conditions for effective mixing, as utilized in 'brute-force' hyperpolarization of low-γ nuclei like (13)C using Boltzmann polarization from nearby protons. For neat pyruvic acid, near-optimum mixing occurs for tmix∼ 100-300 ms and Bmix∼ 30-60 G. Three forms of frozen neat pyruvic acid were tested: two glassy samples, (one well-deoxygenated, the other O2-exposed) and one sample pre-treated by annealing (also well-deoxygenated). Both annealing and the presence of O2 are known to dramatically alter high-field longitudinal relaxation (T1) of (1)H and (13)C (up to 10(2)-10(3)-fold effects). Here, we found smaller, but still critical factors of ∼(2-5)× on both τ and T1m. Annealed, well-deoxygenated samples exhibit the longest time constants, e.g., τ∼ 30-70 ms and T1m∼ 1-20 s, each growing vs. Bmix. Mixing 'turns off' for Bmix > ∼100 G. That T1m≫τ is consistent with earlier success with polarization transfer from (1)H to (13)C by LFTM. PMID:27362505

  14. THE EFFECTS OF PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION REAGENTS ON 15N SPIN RELAXATION AND THE USE OF GD(DPM)3 AS A NITROGEN-15 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPIN LABEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electron-nuclear relaxation times (T(1) sup e's) for (15)N and (13)C in natural abundance are measured for a series of amines of a wide range of pK(a)s using four paramagnetic relaxation reagents that are soluable in organic solutions. Cr(acac)3 and Cr(dpm)3 are seen to affect th...

  15. Quantitative Determination of Methylcyclohexanone Mixtures Using 13C NMR Spectroscopy: A Project for an Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Joseph W.; Silveira, Augustine, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The percentage composition of mixtures of four methylcyclohexanones was determined using 13C NMR spectroscopy as a quantitative analytical method. The data were acquired using standard broadband proton decoupling and inverse-gated decoupling, the latter done both with and without the paramagnetic relaxation reagent chromium(III) acetylacetonate [Cr(acac)3]. The standard broadband decoupled spectrum resulted in percentages far from the actual values owing to the varying nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1's) of the various carbon atoms. These effects were eliminated in the inverse-gated experiments, and the results were very close to the actual percentages. Before examining the mixtures, the students studied a pure sample of 2-methylcyclohexanone. They assigned the 13C spectrum and determined the T1 of the carbonyl group both with and without Cr(acac)3 using the inversion-recovery method. Then a five-times-T1 delay was inserted between pulses in all subsequent inverse-gated decoupling experiments. This project provides students with valuable experience with modern NMR techniques. These include COrrelated SpectroscopY (COSY), Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer (DEPT) spectroscopy, HETeronuclear CORrelated (HETCOR) spectroscopy, T1 determination, standard broadband versus inverse-gated decoupling, and the addition of a paramagnetic relaxation reagent to dramatically shorten both the T

  16. Oligomerization and conformation change in solutions of calf lens gamma II-crystallin. Results from 1/T1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, S H; Beaulieu, C F; Brown, R D; Spiller, M

    1990-01-01

    From analyses of the magnetic field dependence of 1/T1 (nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion [NMRD] profiles) of water protons in solutions of highly purified calf lens gamma II-crystallin, we find that monomers form oligomers at relatively low concentrations, which increase in size with increasing concentration and decreasing temperature. At approximately 16% by volume and -4 degrees C, the mean oligomeric molecular weight is approximately 120-fold greater than the monomeric value of 20 kD. Below this concentration, there is no indication of any substantive change in conformation of the monomeric subunits. At higher concentrations, the tertiary structure of the monomer appears to reconfigure rather abruptly, but reversibly, as evidenced by the appearance of spectra-like 14N peaks in the NMRD profiles. The magnitudes of these peaks, known to arise from cross-relaxation of water protons through access to amide (NH) moieties of the protein backbone, indicate that the high concentration conformation is not compact, but open and extended in a manner that allows enhanced interaction with solvent. The data are analogous to those found for homogenates of calf and chicken lens (Beaulieu, C. F., J. I. Clark, R. D. Brown III, M. Spiller, and S. H. Koenig. 1988. Magn. Reson. Med. 8:47-57; Beaulieu, C. F., R. D. Brown III, J. I. Clark, M. Spiller, and S. H. Koenig. 1989. Magn. Reson. Med. 10:62-72). This unusually large dependence of oligomeric size and conformation on concentration in the physiological range is suggested as the mechanism by which osmotic equilibrium is maintained, at minimal metabolic expense, in the presence of large gradients of protein concentration in the lens in vivo (cf Vérétout and Tardieu, 1989. Eur. Biophys. J. 17:61-68). Finally, the results of the NMRD data provide a ready explanation of the low temperature phase transition, and "cold-cataract" separation of phases, observed in gamma II-crystallin solutions; we suggest that the phases that

  17. Purity analysis of hydrogen cyanide, cyanogen chloride and phosgene by quantitative (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Terry J; Cullinan, David B

    2007-11-01

    Hydrogen cyanide, cyanogen chloride and phosgene are produced in tremendously large quantities today by the chemical industry. The compounds are also particularly attractive to foreign states and terrorists seeking an inexpensive mass-destruction capability. Along with contemporary warfare agents, therefore, the US Army evaluates protective equipment used by warfighters and domestic emergency responders against the compounds, and requires their certification at > or = 95 carbon atom % before use. We have investigated the (13)C spin-lattice relaxation behavior of the compounds to develop a quantitative NMR method for characterizing chemical lots supplied to the Army. Behavior was assessed at 75 and 126 MHz for temperatures between 5 and 15 degrees C to hold the compounds in their liquid states, dramatically improving detection sensitivity. T(1) values for cyanogen chloride and phosgene were somewhat comparable, ranging between 20 and 31 s. Hydrogen cyanide values were significantly shorter at 10-18 s, most likely because of a (1)H--(13)C dipolar contribution to relaxation not possible for the other compounds. The T(1) measurements were used to derive relaxation delays for collecting the quantitative (13)C data sets. At 126 MHz, only a single data acquisition with a cryogenic probehead gave a signal-to-noise ratio exceeding that necessary for certifying the compounds at > or = 95 carbon atom % and 99% confidence. Data acquired at 75 MHz with a conventional probehead, however, required > or = 5 acquisitions to reach this certifying signal-to-noise ratio for phosgene, and >/= 12 acquisitions were required for the other compounds under these same conditions. In terms of accuracy and execution time, the NMR method rivals typical chromatographic methods. PMID:17924355

  18. 1H NMR relaxation in urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Bacher, Alfred D.; Dybowski, C.

    2007-11-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times T1 were measured for urea as a function of temperature. An activation energy of 46.3 ± 4.7 kJ/mol was extracted and compared with the range of 38-65 kJ/mol previously reported in the literature as measured by different magnetic resonance techniques. In addition, proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame T1 ρ were measured as a function of temperature. These measurements provide acquisition conditions for the 13C and 15N CP/MAS spectra of pure urea in the crystalline phase.

  19. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  20. Strategy for Enhancement of (13)C-Photo-CIDNP NMR Spectra by Exploiting Fractional (13)C-Labeling of Tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Joshi, Monika; Illarionov, Boris; Kacprzak, Sylwia; Lukaschek, Michail; Kothe, Gerd; Budisa, Nediljko; Fischer, Markus; Bacher, Adelbert; Weber, Stefan

    2015-10-29

    The photo-CIDNP effect has proven to be useful to strongly enhance NMR signals of photochemically active proteins simply by irradiation with light. The evolving characteristic patterns of enhanced absorptive and emissive NMR lines can be exploited to elucidate the photochemistry and photophysics of light-driven protein reactions. In particular, by the assignment of (13)C NMR resonances, redox-active amino acids may be identified and thereby electron-transfer pathways unraveled, in favorable cases, even with (13)C at natural abundance. If signal enhancement is weak, uniform (13)C isotope labeling is traditionally applied to increase the signal strength of protein (13)C NMR. However, this typically leads to cross relaxation, which transfers light-induced nuclear-spin polarization to adjacent (13)C nuclei, thereby preventing an unambiguous analysis of the photo-CIDNP effect. In this contribution, two isotope labeling strategies are presented; one leads to specific but ubiquitous (13)C labeling in tryptophan, and the other is based on fractional isotope labeling affording sets of isotopologs with low probability of next-neighbor isotope accumulation within individual tryptophan molecules. Consequently, cross relaxation is largely avoided while the signal enhancement by (13)C enrichment is preserved. This results in significantly simplified polarization patterns that are easier to analyze with respect to the generation of light-generated nuclear-spin polarization. PMID:26244593

  1. Modified Jeener solid-echo pulse sequences for the measurement of the proton dipolar spin-lattice relaxation time (T1D) of tissue solid-like macromolecular components.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Schleich, T

    1994-11-01

    Modified Jeener solid-echo pulse sequences are proposed for the measurement of the proton dipolar spin-lattice relaxation time, T1D, of motionally restricted (solid-like) components in the presence of mobile molecular species, such as encountered in biological tissue. A phase-cycled composite-pulse sequence was used for detection of the dipolar signal and cancellation of the Zeeman signal. A homospoil gradient pulse was added to the Jeener echo pulse sequence to enhance dephasing of the transverse magnetization components of mobile species, thereby aiding in elimination of the Zeeman signal during dipolar signal acquisition. A modified Jeener echo sequence incorporating water suppression is also proposed as a means to further depress the Zeeman signal arising from mobile components. The modified Jeener echo sequences were successfully used for the measurement of proton T1D values of solid 2,6-dimethylphenol and Sephadex gels of differing degrees of cross linking and hydration. PMID:7531583

  2. Biocompatible Nanoparticles of KGd(H2O)2[Fe(CN)6]·H2O with Extremely High T1-Weighted Relaxivity Owing to Two Water Molecules Directly Bound to the Gd(III) Center

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A simple one-step method for preparing biocompatible nanoparticles of gadolinium ferrocyanide coordination polymer KGd(H2O)2[Fe(CN)6]·H2O is reported. The crystal structure of this coordination polymer is determined by X-ray powder diffraction using the bulk materials. The stability, cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, and MR phantom and cellular imaging studies suggest that this coordination-polymer structural platform offers a unique opportunity for developing the next generation of T1-weighted contrast agents with high relaxivity as cellular MR probes for biological receptors or markers. Such high-relaxivity MR probes may hold potential in the study of molecular events and may be used for in vivo MR imaging in biomedical research and clinical applications. PMID:25238130

  3. Identification of Li-Ion Battery SEI Compounds through (7)Li and (13)C Solid-State MAS NMR Spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huff, Laura A; Tavassol, Hadi; Esbenshade, Jennifer L; Xing, Wenting; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-13

    Solid-state (7)Li and (13)C MAS NMR spectra of cycled graphitic Li-ion anodes demonstrate SEI compound formation upon lithiation that is followed by changes in the SEI upon delithiation. Solid-state (13)C DPMAS NMR shows changes in peaks associated with organic solvent compounds (ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate, EC/DMC) upon electrochemical cycling due to the formation of and subsequent changes in the SEI compounds. Solid-state (13)C NMR spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time measurements of lithiated Li-ion anodes and reference poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) powders, along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry results, indicate that large-molecular-weight polymers are formed in the SEI layers of the discharged anodes. MALDI-TOF MS and NMR spectroscopy results additionally indicate that delithiated anodes exhibit a larger number of SEI products than is found in lithiated anodes. PMID:26653886

  4. Correlation between 1H FID and T1rho components in heterogeneous polymer systems: an application to SBS.

    PubMed

    Ferrini, V; Forte, C; Geppi, M; Pizzanelli, S; Veracini, C A

    2005-06-01

    Wideline 1H FID and relaxation measurements of a relatively simple motionally heterogeneous system, the triblock copolymer styrene-butadiene-styrene, have been performed in a temperature range between the polystyrene and polybutadiene glass transition temperatures. The two FID and the two spin lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame (T1rho) components found at each temperature have been correlated by means of a two-dimensional approach. It is shown that this approach allows dynamic information, not accessible simply by interpreting proton T1 and T1rho data, to be revealed. In the case examined, the correlation found could be confirmed by high-resolution 1H T1rho-selective 13C Cross Polarization experiments. PMID:15799878

  5. Intermolecular protein interactions in solutions of calf lens alpha-crystallin. Results from 1/T1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, S H; Brown, R D; Spiller, M; Chakrabarti, B; Pande, A

    1992-01-01

    From analyses of the magnetic field dependence of 1/T1 (NMRD profiles) of water protons in solutions of calf lens alpha-crystallin at several concentrations, we find two regimes of solute behavior in both cortical and nuclear preparations. Below approximately 15% vol/vol protein concentration, the solute molecules appear as compact globular proteins of approximately 1,350 (cortical) and approximately 1,700 (nuclear) kD. At higher concentrations, the effective solute particle size increases, reversibly, as evidenced by the appearance of spectra-like 14N peaks in the NMRD profiles and a change in the field and temperature dependence of 1/T1. At these higher concentrations, the profiles are very similar to those of calf gamma II-crystallin, a crystallin that undergoes an analogous transition near approximately 15% protein (Koenig, S. H., C.F. Beaulieu, R. D. Brown III, and M. Spiller, 1990. Biophys. J. 57:461-469). By comparison with recent analyses of NMRD results for solutions of immobilized proteins as models for the transition from protein solutions to tissue (Koenig, S. H., and R. D. Brown III. 1991. Prog. NMR Spectr. 22:487-567), we argue that alpha-crystallin solute behaves as aggregates approximately greater than 50,000 kD as protein concentration is progressively increased above 15%. Finally, the concentration dependence of the NMRD profiles of alpha- and gamma II-crystallin can readily explain recent osmotic pressure data, in particular the intersection of the respective pressure curves at approximately 23% vol/vol (Vérétout, F., and A. Tardieu. 1989. Eur. Biophys. J. 17:61-68). Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 7 PMID:1504248

  6. Modification of local electronic state by BEDT-STF doping to κ -(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N (CN ) 2]Br salt studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Ihara, Y.; Kawamoto, A.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of site-selective 13C NMR spectroscopy on an organic superconductor κ -(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N (CN ) 2]Br (κ -Br) doped with BEDT-STF molecules. We reveal microscopically the modulation of the local electronic state caused by the BEDT-STF doping from the 13C NMR measurement on two types of samples, which are 13C enriched κ -Br doped with naturally abundant BEDT-STF molecules, and natural κ -Br doped with 13C enriched BEDT-STF molecules. The results of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 measured both in the normal and superconducting state suggest that the potential disorder at the BEDT-STF sites scatters antiferromagnetic interaction and superconducting Cooper pairs.

  7. Dose dependence and temporal evolution of the T1 relaxation time and MRI contrast in the rat brain after subcutaneous injection of manganese chloride.

    PubMed

    Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Sotak, Christopher H

    2012-12-01

    Divalent manganese ion (Mn(2+)) is a widely used T(1) contrast agent in manganese-enhanced MRI studies to visualize functional neural tracts and anatomy in the brain in vivo. In animal studies, Mn(2+) is administered at a dose that will maximize the contrast, while minimizing its toxic effects. In rodents, systemic administration of Mn(2+) via intravenous injection has been shown to create unique MRI contrast in the brain at a maximum dose of 175 mg kg(-1). However, intravenous administration of Mn(2+) results in faster bioelimination of excess Mn(2+) from the plasma due to a steep concentration gradient between plasma and bile. By contrast, following subcutaneous injection (LD(50) value = 320 mg kg(-1)), Mn(2+) is released slowly into the bloodstream, thus avoiding immediate hepatic elimination resulting in prolonged accumulation of Mn(2+) in the brain via the choroid plexus than that obtained via intravenous administration. The goal of this study was to investigate MRI dose response of Mn(2+) in rat brain following subcutaneous administration of Mn(2+). Dose dependence and temporal dynamics of Mn(2+) after subcutaneous injection can prove useful for longitudinal in vivo studies that require brain enhancement to persist for a long period of time to visualize neuroarchitecture like in neurodegenerative disease studies. PMID:22294279

  8. Influence of 13C isotopic labeling location of 13C DNP of acetate using TEMPO free radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Lumata, Lloyd

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) via the dissolution method enhances the liquid-state magnetic resonance (NMR or MRI) signals of insensitive nuclear spins by at least 10,000-fold. The basis for all these signal enhancements at room temperature is the polarization transfer from the electrons to nuclear spins at cryogenic temperature and high magnetic field. In this work, we have studied the influence of the location of 13C isotopic labeling on the DNP of sodium acetate at 3.35 T and 1.4 K using a wide ESR linewidth free radical 4-oxo-TEMPO. The carbonyl [1-13C]acetate spins produced a polarization level that is almost twice that of the methyl [2-13C]acetate spins. On the other hand, the polarization of the methyl 13C spins doubled to reach the level of [1-13C]acetate when the methyl group was deuterated. Meanwhile, the solid-state nuclear relaxation of these samples are the same and do not correlate with the polarization levels. These behavior implies that the nuclear relaxation for these samples is dominated by the contribution from the free radicals and the polarization levels can be explained by a thermodynamic picture of DNP.

  9. Quantitative solid-state 13C NMR with signal enhancement by multiple cross polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    A simple new method is presented that yields quantitative solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) 13C NMR spectra of organic materials with good signal-to-noise ratios. It achieves long (>10 ms) cross polarization (CP) from 1H without significant magnetization losses due to relaxation and with a moderate duty cycle of the radio-frequency irradiation, by multiple 1-ms CP periods alternating with 1H spin-lattice relaxation periods that repolarize the protons. The new method incorporates previous techniques that yield less distorted CP/MAS spectra, such as a linear variation (“ramp”) of the radio-frequency field strength, and it overcomes their main limitation, which is T1ρ relaxation of the spin-locked 1H magnetization. The ramp of the radio-frequency field strength and the asymptotic limit of cross polarization makes the spectral intensity quite insensitive to the exact field strengths used. The new multiCP pulse sequence is a “drop-in” replacement for previous CP methods and produces no additional data-processing burden. Compared to the only reliable quantitative 13C NMR method for unlabeled solids previously available, namely direct-polarization NMR, the measuring time is reduced by more than a factor of 50, enabling higher-throughput quantitative NMR studies. The new multiCP technique is validated with 14-kHz MAS on amino-acid derivatives, plant matter, a highly aromatic humic acid, and carbon materials made by low-temperature pyrolysis.

  10. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  11. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions. PMID:27187211

  12. Complexation of oxygen ligands with dimeric rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetate in chloroform: 1H, 13C NMR and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głaszczka, Rafał; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2013-03-01

    The complexation of dimeric rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetylate with 25 ligands containing oxygen atoms: alcohols, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and esters in chloroform solution have been investigated by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. Investigated ligands form 1:1 adducts in our experimental conditions, with stability constants in the order of several hundred mol-1. The exchange of ligands in solution is fast on the NMR spectroscopic timescale. The decrease of longitudinal relaxation times T1 in ligands in the presence of rhodium salt has been tested as the means of determination of the complexation site in ligands. The influence of complexation on chemical shifts in ligands was evaluated by a parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δadd - δlig). These parameters were positive (>0 ppm) and did not exceed 1 ppm for 1H NMR; and varied from ca. -5 to +15 ppm in the case of 13C NMR. The calculation by DFT methods using the B3LYP functional (structure optimization, electronic energy) and B3PW91 functional (shielding), and combinations of the (6-31G(2d), 6-311G++(2d,p), and LANL2DZ basis sets, followed by scaling procedures reproduced satisfactorily 1H and 13C chemical shifts and, with some limitations, allowed to estimate Δδ parameters.

  13. 13C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The many advantages of 13C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, 13C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semi-automated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE datasets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures. PMID:25932900

  14. Advanced CPMAS-13C NMR techniques for molecular characterization of size-separated fractions from a soil humic acid.

    PubMed

    Conte, Pellegrino; Spaccini, Riccardo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2006-09-01

    A humic acid extracted from a volcanic soil was subjected to preparative high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) to reduce its molecular complexity and eleven different size fractions were obtained. Cross-polarization magic-angle spinning 13C NMR (CPMAS 13C NMR) analysis performed with variable contact-time (VCT) pulse sequences showed that the largest molecular-size fractions contained aromatic, alkyl, and carbohydrate-like components. The carbohydrate-like content and the alkyl chain length seemed to decrease with decreasing molecular size. Progressive reduction of aromatic carbon atoms was also observed with decreasing molecular size of the separated fractions. Mathematical treatment of the results from VCT experiments enabled cross polarization (T (CH)) and proton spin-lattice relaxation (T(1rho)(H)) times to be related to structural differences among the size fractions. The conformational distribution indicated that the eleven size fractions could be allocated to two main groups. The first group, with larger nominal molecular sizes, was characterized by molecular domains with slower local molecular motion. The second group of size fractions, with smaller nominal molecular sizes, was characterized by a larger number of molecular domains with faster local molecular motion. The T (CH) and (T(1rho)(H)) values suggested that either condensed or strongly associated aromatic systems were predominant in the size fractions with the largest apparent molecular dimensions. PMID:16896626

  15. Dynamic aspects of extracellular loop region as a proton release pathway of bacteriorhodopsin studied by relaxation time measurements by solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Izuru; Ohmine, Masato; Tanabe, Junko; Tuzi, Satoru; Saitô, Hazime; Naito, Akira

    2007-12-01

    Local dynamics of interhelical loops in bacteriorhodopsin (bR), the extracellular BC, DE and FG, and cytoplasmic AB and CD loops, and helix B were determined on the basis of a variety of relaxation parameters for the resolved 13C and 15N signals of [1-13C]Tyr-, [15N]Pro- and [1-13C]Val-, [15N]Pro-labeled bR. Rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) filter experiments were used to assign [1-13C]Val-, [15N]Pro signals to the specific residues in bR. The previous assignments of [1-13C]Val-labeled peaks, 172.9 or 171.1 ppm, to Val69 were revised: the assignment of peak, 172.1 ppm, to Val69 was made in view of the additional information of conformation-dependent 15N chemical shifts of Pro bonded to Val in the presence of 13C-15N correlation, although no assignment of peak is feasible for 13C nuclei not bonded to Pro. 13C or 15N spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), spin-spin relaxation times under the condition of CP-MAS (T2), and cross relaxation times (TCH and TNH) for 13C and 15N nuclei and carbon or nitrogen-resolved, 1H spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating flame (1H T1 rho) for the assigned signals were measured in [1-13C]Val-, [15N]Pro-bR. It turned out that V69-P70 in the BC loop in the extracellular side has a rigid beta-sheet in spite of longer loop and possesses large amplitude motions as revealed from 13C and 15N conformation-dependent chemical shifts and T1, T2, 1H T1 rho and cross relaxation times. In addition, breakage of the beta-sheet structure in the BC loop was seen in bacterio-opsin (bO) in the absence of retinal. PMID:18036552

  16. New guidelines for δ13C measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Gehre, Matthias; Groning, Manfred; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Toman, Blaza; Verkouteren, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Consistency of δ13C measurements can be improved 39−47% by anchoring the δ13C scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in 13C/12C. It is recommended thatδ13C values of both organic and inorganic materials be measured and expressed relative to VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on a scale normalized by assigning consensus values of −46.6‰ to L-SVEC lithium carbonate and +1.95‰ to NBS 19 calcium carbonate. Uncertainties of other reference material values on this scale are improved by factors up to two or more, and the values of some have been notably shifted:  the δ13C of NBS 22 oil is −30.03%.

  17. /sup 13/C spin diffusion of adamantane

    SciTech Connect

    Bronniman, C.E.; Szeverenyi, N.M.; Maciel, G.E.

    1983-10-15

    Two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy of natural abundance /sup 13/C--/sup 13/C spin diffusion in solid adamantane illustrates the influence that /sup 13/C--/sup 1/H dipole--dipole coupling exerts on /sup 13/C spin diffusion by determining spectral overlap in the /sup 13/C system. 2D /sup 13/C spectra were obtained for several values of mixing time tau/sub m/ and compared with spectra calculated in the limit of nearest-neighbor coupling. Good agreement is obtained for short tau/sub m/, during which the equilibration of neighboring spins dominates. For longer tau/sub m/, slower spin diffusion that is not acounted for by the simple model is seen; after nearest-neighbor spins equilibrate, communication over larger distances produces further mixing. It is possible to modify spin diffusion rates by altering experimental conditions, e.g., magic-angle spinning, low-power /sup 1/H decoupling, or spin locking /sup 13/C in the rotating frame during tau/sub m/.

  18. In vivo13C spectroscopy in the rat brain using hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjańska, Małgorzata; Iltis, Isabelle; Shestov, Alexander A.; Deelchand, Dinesh K.; Nelson, Christopher; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2010-10-01

    The low sensitivity of 13C spectroscopy can be enhanced using dynamic nuclear polarization. Detection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and its metabolic products has been reported in kidney, liver, and muscle. In this work, the feasibility of measuring 13C signals of hyperpolarized 13C metabolic products in the rat brain in vivo following the injection of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and [2- 13C]pyruvate is investigated. Injection of [2- 13C]pyruvate led to the detection of [2- 13C]lactate, but no other downstream metabolites such as TCA cycle intermediates were detected. Injection of [1- 13C]pyruvate enabled the detection of both [1- 13C]lactate and [ 13C]bicarbonate. A metabolic model was used to fit the hyperpolarized 13C time courses obtained during infusion of [1- 13C]pyruvate and to determine the values of VPDH and VLDH.

  19. A study of structure and dynamics of poly(aspartic acid) sodium/poly(vinyl alcohol) blends by 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Ando, I.

    1999-09-01

    Solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR measurements have been carried out on poly(aspartic acid) sodium (PAANa)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) blends over a wide range of temperatures. From these experimental results, it is found that the main-chain conformations of PAANa in PAANa/PVA blends take the α-helix form over a wide range of blend ratios, and, in contrast, the conformation and dynamics of the side chains of PAANa are strongly influenced by the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group of the side chains and the hydroxyl group of PVA. The behavior of the proton spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame ( T1 ρ(H)) and the laboratory frame ( T1(H)) indicates that when the blend ratio of PAANa and PVA is 1:1, they are miscible.

  20. Analysing Groundwater Using the 13C Isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Sadek

    The stable isotope of the carbon atom (13C) give information about the type of the mineralisation of the groundwater existing during the water seepage and about the recharge conditions of the groundwater. The concentration of the CO2(aq.) dissolved during the infiltration of the water through the soil's layers has an effect on the mineralisation of this water. The type of the photosynthesis's cycle (C-3 or C-4 carbon cycle) can have a very important role to determine the conditions (closed or open system) of the mineralisation of groundwater. The isotope 13C of the dissolved CO2 in water give us a certain information about the origin and the area of pollution of water. The proportion of the biogenic carbon and its percentage in the mineralisation of groundwater is determined by using the isotope 13C.

  1. States of 13C with abnormal radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demyanova, A. S.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Danilov, A. N.; Goncharov, S. A.; Belyaeva, T. L.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Burtebaev, N.; Trzaska, W.; Heikkinen, P.; Tyurin, G. P.; Janseitov, D.; Gurov, Yu. B.

    2016-05-01

    Differential cross-sections of the elastic and inelastic 13C + α scattering were measured at E(α) = 90 MeV. The root mean-square radii() of 13C nucleus in the states: 8.86 (1/2-), 3.09 (1/2+) and 9.90 (3/2-) MeV were determined by the Modified diffraction model (MDM). The radii of the first two levels are enhanced compared to that of the ground state of 13C, confirming the suggestion that the 8.86 MeV state is an analogue of the Hoyle state in 12C and the 3.09 MeV state has a neutron halo. Some indications to the abnormally small size of the 9.90 MeV state were obtained.

  2. Tumbling motions of NH2(CH3)2 ions in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 studied using 1H MAS NMR and 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Choi, Jae Hun; Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-12-01

    The structure and the phase transition temperatures of [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 were determined using X-ray diffraction and DSC, respectively. The temperature dependence of chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation time T1ρ in the rotating frame were measured for the 1H and 13C nuclei in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4. From these results, it was observed that the structural change by chemical shifts does not occur with temperature. However, T1ρ for 1H and 13C in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 showed a minimum, and it is apparent that both T1ρ values are governed by the same tumbling motions. The activation energies of tumbling motions for 1H and 13C are nearly the same owing to the connection between CH3 and NH2 ions in the [NH2(CH3)2]+ group.

  3. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin–epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time 13C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio

    2015-01-01

    Summary The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  4. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin-epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time (13)C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization.

    PubMed

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio; Mele, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  5. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c] And [2h3, 13c]Methyl Aryl Sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-03-30

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2,.sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to the labeled compounds of [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide and [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide.

  6. The mobility of chondroitin sulfate in articular and artificial cartilage characterized by 13C magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, Holger A; Schibur, Stephanie; Magalhães, Alvicler; de Azevedo, Eduardo R; Bonagamba, Tito J; Pascui, Ovidiu; Schulz, Ronny; Reichert, Detlef; Huster, Daniel

    2010-06-01

    We have studied the molecular dynamics of one of the major macromolecules in articular cartilage, chondroitin sulfate. Applying (13)C high-resolution magic-angle spinning NMR techniques, the NMR signals of all rigid macromolecules in cartilage can be suppressed, allowing the exclusive detection of the highly mobile chondroitin sulfate. The technique is also used to detect the chondroitin sulfate in artificial tissue-engineered cartilage. The tissue-engineered material that is based on matrix producing chondrocytes cultured in a collagen gel should provide properties as close as possible to those of the natural cartilage. Nuclear relaxation times of the chondroitin sulfate were determined for both tissues. Although T(1) relaxation times are rather similar, the T(2) relaxation in tissue-engineered cartilage is significantly shorter. This suggests that the motions of chondroitin sulfate in natural and artificial cartilage are different. The nuclear relaxation times of chondroitin sulfate in natural and tissue-engineered cartilage were modeled using a broad distribution function for the motional correlation times. Although the description of the microscopic molecular dynamics of the chondroitin sulfate in natural and artificial cartilage required the identical broad distribution functions for the correlation times of motion, significant differences in the correlation times of motion that are extracted from the model indicate that the artificial tissue does not fully meet the standards of the natural ideal. This could also be confirmed by macroscopic biomechanical elasticity measurements. Nevertheless, these results suggest that NMR is a useful tool for the investigation of the quality of artificially engineered tissue. PMID:20091673

  7. Accurate determinations of one-bond 13C-13C couplings in 13C-labeled carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azurmendi, Hugo F.; Freedberg, Darón I.

    2013-03-01

    Carbon plays a central role in the molecular architecture of carbohydrates, yet the availability of accurate methods for 1DCC determination has not been sufficiently explored, despite the importance that such data could play in structural studies of oligo- and polysaccharides. Existing methods require fitting intensity ratios of cross- to diagonal-peaks as a function of the constant-time (CT) in CT-COSY experiments, while other methods utilize measurement of peak separation. The former strategies suffer from complications due to peak overlap, primarily in regions close to the diagonal, while the latter strategies are negatively impacted by the common occurrence of strong coupling in sugars, which requires a reliable assessment of their influence in the context of RDC determination. We detail a 13C-13C CT-COSY method that combines a variation in the CT processed with diagonal filtering to yield 1JCC and RDCs. The strategy, which relies solely on cross-peak intensity modulation, is inspired in the cross-peak nulling method used for JHH determinations, but adapted and extended to applications where, like in sugars, large one-bond 13C-13C couplings coexist with relatively small long-range couplings. Because diagonal peaks are not utilized, overlap problems are greatly alleviated. Thus, one-bond couplings can be determined from different cross-peaks as either active or passive coupling. This results in increased accuracy when more than one determination is available, and in more opportunities to measure a specific coupling in the presence of severe overlap. In addition, we evaluate the influence of strong couplings on the determination of RDCs by computer simulations. We show that individual scalar couplings are notably affected by the presence of strong couplings but, at least for the simple cases studied, the obtained RDC values for use in structural calculations were not, because the errors introduced by strong couplings for the isotropic and oriented phases are very

  8. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  9. Effects of spin-lock field direction on the quantitative measurement of spin-lattice relaxation time constant in the rotating frame (T1ρ) in a clinical MRI system

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether the direction of spin-lock field, either parallel or antiparallel to the rotating magnetization, has any effect on the spin-lock MRI signal and further on the quantitative measurement of T1ρ, in a clinical 3 T MRI system. Methods: The effects of inverted spin-lock field direction were investigated by acquiring a series of spin-lock MRI signals for an American College of Radiology MRI phantom, while the spin-lock field direction was switched between the parallel and antiparallel directions. The acquisition was performed for different spin-locking methods (i.e., for the single- and dual-field spin-locking methods) and for different levels of clinically feasible spin-lock field strength, ranging from 100 to 500 Hz, while the spin-lock duration was varied in the range from 0 to 100 ms. Results: When the spin-lock field was inverted into the antiparallel direction, the rate of MRI signal decay was altered and the T1ρ value, when compared to the value for the parallel field, was clearly different. Different degrees of such direction-dependency were observed for different spin-lock field strengths. In addition, the dependency was much smaller when the parallel and the antiparallel fields are mixed together in the dual-field method. Conclusions: The spin-lock field direction could impact the MRI signal and further the T1ρ measurement in a clinical MRI system.

  10. High resolution (13)C MRI with hyperpolarized urea: in vivo T(2) mapping and (15)N labeling effects.

    PubMed

    Reed, Galen D; von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert; Koelsch, Bertram L; Van Criekinge, Mark; Smith, Kenneth J; Hong Shang; Larson, Peder E Z; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-02-01

    (13)C steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging and effective spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping were performed using hyperpolarized [(13)C] urea and [(13) C,(15)N2] urea injected intravenously in rats. (15)N labeling gave large T2 increases both in solution and in vivo due to the elimination of a strong scalar relaxation pathway. The T2 increase was pronounced in the kidney, with [(13) C,(15) N2] urea giving T2 values of 6.3±1.3 s in the cortex and medulla, and 11±2 s in the renal pelvis. The measured T2 in the aorta was 1.3±0.3 s. [(13)C] urea showed shortened T2 values in the kidney of 0.23±0.03 s compared to 0.28±0.03 s measured in the aorta. The enhanced T2 of [(13)C,(15)N2] urea was utilized to generate large signal enhancement by SSFP acquisitions with flip angles approaching the fully refocused regime. Projection images at 0.94 mm in-plane resolution were acquired with both urea isotopes, with [(13)C,(15) N2] urea giving a greater than four-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio over [(13)C] urea. PMID:24235273

  11. Directly detected 55Mn MRI: Application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized 13C MRI development

    PubMed Central

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D.; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 (55Mn) MRI using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized 13C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the 55Mn and 13C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective “13C” MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, 55Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical 13C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large 13C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d= 8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7M) was scanned rapidly by 55Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for 13C, using a balanced SSFP acquisition. The requisite penetration of RF magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for 55Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image SNR of ~60 at 0.5cm3 spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP 13C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  12. Towards hyperpolarized 13C-succinate imaging of brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Pratip; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Perman, William H.; Harris, Kent C.; Lin, Alexander P.; Norton, Valerie A.; Tan, Chou T.; Ross, Brian D.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2007-05-01

    We describe a novel 13C enriched precursor molecule, sodium 1- 13C acetylenedicarboxylate, which after hydrogenation by PASADENA (Parahydrogen and Synthesis Allows Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment) under controlled experimental conditions, becomes hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate. Fast in vivo 3D FIESTA MR imaging demonstrated that, following carotid arterial injection, the hyperpolarized 13C-succinate appeared in the head and cerebral circulation of normal and tumor-bearing rats. At this time, no in vivo hyperpolarized signal has been localized to normal brain or brain tumor. On the other hand, ex vivo samples of brain harvested from rats bearing a 9L brain tumor, 1 h or more following in vivo carotid injection of hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate, contained significant concentrations of the injected substrate, 13C sodium succinate, together with 13C maleate and succinate metabolites 1- 13C-glutamate, 5- 13C-glutamate, 1- 13C-glutamine and 5- 13C-glutamine. The 13C substrates and products were below the limits of NMR detection in ex vivo samples of normal brain consistent with an intact blood-brain barrier. These ex vivo results indicate that hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate may become a useful tool for rapid in vivo identification of brain tumors, providing novel biomarkers in 13C MR spectral-spatial images.

  13. Synthesis Of 2h- And 13c-Substituted Dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  14. Synthesis of 2H- and 13C-substituted dithanes

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [2-.sup.13 C]dithiane wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to one or two deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to labeled compounds, e.g., [.sup.2 H.sub.1-2, .sup.13 C]methanol (arylthio)-, acetates wherein the .sup.13 C atom is directly bonded to exactly one or two deuterium atoms.

  15. Dipolar-coupling-mediated total correlation spectroscopy in solid-state 13C NMR: Selection of individual 13C- 13C dipolar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spano, Justin; Wi, Sungsool

    2010-06-01

    Herein is described a useful approach in solid-state NMR, for selecting homonuclear 13C- 13C spin pairs in a multiple- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupled spin system. This method builds upon the zero-quantum (ZQ) dipolar recoupling method introduced by Levitt and coworkers (Marin-Montesinos et al., 2006 [30]) by extending the originally introduced one-dimensional (1D) experiment into a two-dimensional (2D) method with selective irradiation scheme, while moving the 13C- 13C mixing scheme from the transverse to the longitudinal mode, together with a dramatic improvement in the proton decoupling efficiency. Selective spin-pair recoupling experiments incorporating Gaussian and cosine-modulated Gaussian pulses for inverting specific spins were performed, demonstrating the ability to detect informative, simplified/individualized, long-range 13C- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupling interactions more accurately by removing less informative, stronger, short-range 13C- 13C interactions from 2D correlation spectra. The capability of this new approach was demonstrated experimentally on uniformly 13C-labeled Glutamine and a tripeptide sample, GAL.

  16. New pulse sequences for T1- and T1/T2-contrast enhancing in NMR imaging.

    PubMed

    Andreev, N K; Hakimov, A M; Idiyatullin, D S

    1998-10-01

    Improved pulse sequences DIFN (abbreviation of the words: DIFferentiation by N pulses), 90 degrees - tau1 - 180 degrees tau1 - . . . 180 degrees - tau1 with optimised time intervals tau1- for T1 measurement and contrast enhancing in NMR imaging are presented. The pulse sequences DIFN have a better sensitivity to T1 than the well-known pulse sequence SR. In contrast to the IR pulse sequence, the information given by the DIFN pulse sequence is more reliable, because the NMR signal does not change its sign. For a given time interval tau0 < or = (0.1 - 0.3) T(1) the DIFN pulse sequences serve as T1-filters. They pass the signal components with relatively short T1 < T(1) and suppress the components with relatively long T1 < T(1). The effects of the radiofrequency field inhomogeneity and inaccurate adjusting of pulse lengths are also considered. It is also proposed in this work to use the joint T1T2-contrast in NMR imaging obtained as a result of applying the DIFN pulse sequences in combination with the well-known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence. The region of interest, where the contrast should be especially enhanced, is specified by the two times at which measurements are performed, which allow the amplitudes of pixels to reach some defined levels by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation. PMID:9814781

  17. In vivo dynamic turnover of cerebral 13C isotopomers from [U- 13C]glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su; Shen, Jun

    2006-10-01

    An INEPT-based 13C MRS method and a cost-effective and widely available 11.7 Tesla 89-mm bore vertical magnet were used to detect dynamic 13C isotopomer turnover from intravenously infused [U- 13C]glucose in a 211 μL voxel located in the adult rat brain. The INEPT-based 1H → 13C polarization transfer method is mostly adiabatic and therefore minimizes signal loss due to B 1 inhomogeneity of the surface coils used. High quality and reproducible data were acquired as a result of combined use of outer volume suppression, ISIS, and the single-shot three-dimensional localization scheme built in the INEPT pulse sequence. Isotopomer patterns of both glutamate C4 at 34.00 ppm and glutamine C4 at 31.38 ppm are dominated first by a doublet originated from labeling at C4 and C5 but not at C3 (with 1JC4C5 = 51 Hz) and then by a quartet originated from labeling at C3, C4, and C5 (with 1JC3C4 = 35 Hz). A lag in the transition of glutamine C4 pattern from doublet-dominance to quartet dominance as compared to glutamate C4 was observed, which provides an independent verification of the precursor-product relationship between neuronal glutamate and glial glutamine and a significant intercompartmental cerebral glutamate-glutamine cycle between neurons and glial cells.

  18. Calculation of total meal d13C from individual food d13C.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variations in the isotopic signature of carbon in biological samples can be used to distinguish dietary patterns and monitor shifts in metabolism. But for these variations to have meaning, the isotopic signature of the diet must be known. We sought to determine if knowledge of the 13C isotopic abund...

  19. Solid-State 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Cellulose in the Cell Walls of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, R. H.; Davies, L. M.; Harris, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance was used to characterize the molecular ordering of cellulose in a cell-wall preparation containing mostly primary walls obtained from the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. Proton and 13C spin relaxation time constants showed that the cellulose was in a crystalline rather than a paracrystalline state or amorphous state. Cellulose chains were distributed between the interiors (40%) and surfaces (60%) of crystallites, which is consistent with crystallite cross-sectional dimensions of about 3 nm. Digital resolution enhancement revealed signals indicative of triclinic and monoclinic crystalline forms of cellulose mixed in similar proportions. Of the five nuclear spin relaxation processes used, proton rotating-frame relaxation provided the clearest distinction between cellulose and other cell-wall components for purposes of editing solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. PMID:12226303

  20. The cluster and single-particle states in 13C (α,α)13C reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynbayev, N. A.; Nurmukhanbetova, A. K.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Rogachev, G. V.; Golovkov, M. S.; Koloberdin, M.; Ivanov, I.; Nauruzbayev, D. K.; Berdibek, Sh S.; Rakhymzhanov, A. M.; Tribble, R. E.

    2016-06-01

    The excitation functions of elastic scattering of 13C on alpha particle have been measured using the thick-target inverse kinematic method at the heavy ion DC-60 cyclotron. The helium gas was used as a target and also as a degrader to stop the beam. New data (including 180°degree) of the resonances close to the threshold in 17O have been obtained.

  1. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-07

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  2. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2015-01-09

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  3. CARBON-13 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE. 13C CHEMICAL SHIFTS AND 13C-199HG COUPLING CONSTANTS FOR SOME ORGANOMERCURY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The (13)C shieldings and (13)C-(199)Hg coupling constants of fourteen phenyl- and seven alkyl- and alkenyl-mercury compounds have been obtained. Substituent effects on the (13)C shieldings are similar to those in nonmercurated phenyl compounds, with a similar relationship between...

  4. Directly detected (55)Mn MRI: application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized (13)C MRI development.

    PubMed

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-12-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 ((55)Mn) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized (13)C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the (55)Mn and (13)C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective "(13)C" MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, (55)Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical (13)C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large (13)C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d=8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7 M) was scanned rapidly by (55)Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for (13)C, using a balanced steady state free precession acquisition. The requisite penetration of radiofrequency magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for (55)Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image signal-to-noise ratio of ~60 at 0.5 cm(3) spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP (13)C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  5. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H-13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H-13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H-13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H-13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr-Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr-Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C-13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils.

  6. Investigation of the spin-lattice relaxation of 13CO and 13CO2 adsorbed in the metal-organic frameworks Cu3(btc)2 and Cu3-xZnx(btc)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul-E-Noor, Farhana; Michel, Dieter; Krautscheid, Harald; Haase, Jürgen; Bertmer, Marko

    2013-07-01

    The 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time of 13CO and 13CO2 molecules adsorbed in the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) Cu2.97Zn0.03(btc)2 and Cu3(btc)2 is investigated over a wide range of temperatures at resonance frequencies of 75.468 and 188.62 MHz. In all cases a mono-exponential relaxation is observed, and the 13C spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) reveal minima within the temperature range of the measurements and both frequencies. This allows us to carry out a more detailed analysis of the 13C spin relaxation data and to consider the influence due to the spectral functions of the thermal motion. In a model-free discussion of the temperature dependence of the ratios T1 (T)/T1,min we observe a motional mechanism that can be described by a single correlation time. In relation to the discussion of the relaxation mechanisms this can be understood in terms of dominating translational motion with mean jump distance being larger than the minimum distances between neighboring adsorption sites in the MOFs. A more detailed discussion of the jump-like motion observed here might be carried out on the basis of self-diffusion coefficients. From the present spin relaxation measurements activation energies for the local motion of the adsorbed molecules in the MOFs can be estimated to be 3.3 kJ/mol and 2.2 kJ/mol, for CO and CO2 molecules, respectively. Finally, our findings are compared with our recent results derived from the 13C line shape analysis.

  7. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c]M [2h2m 13c], And [2h3,, 13c] Methyl Aryl Sulfones And Sulfoxides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2004-07-20

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfones and [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfoxides, wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfone or sulfoxide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing methyl aryl sulfones and methyl aryl sulfoxides.

  8. Improvement of the inverse-gated-decoupling sequence for a faster quantitative analysis of various samples by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Baguet, Evelyne

    2006-05-01

    The inverse-gated-decoupling sequence enables quantitative 1H decoupled 13C spectra to be obtained. We modified this sequence so as to obtain the same result in less time for molecules containing carbons with various relaxation properties. For that, we determined the optimal 13C longitudinal-magnetization initial value for a faster relaxation while 1H decoupler is stopped. This value can be calculated precisely via the nuclear Overhauser effects, the longitudinal relaxation times, together with the determination of the relaxation rate constants of carbons while 1H are out of equilibrium. A supplementary delay of 1H decoupling and/or a series of selective pulses applied at the beginning of the recovery delay allow an acceleration of 13C longitudinal relaxation. We applied this method to the molecule of vanillin. The simultaneous quantification of all carbons was carried out with a recovery delay divided by two compared to the usual sequence.

  9. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cardiac metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seeholzer, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques for following the metabolic fate of compounds specifically labeled with /sup 13/C. The goals of the present study are: (1) to develop reliable quantitative procedures for measuring the /sup 13/C enrichment of specific carbon sites in compounds enriched by the metabolism of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates in rat heart, and (2) to use these quantitative measurements of fractional /sup 13/C enrichment within the context of a mathematical flux model describing the carbon flow through the TCA cycle and ancillary pathways, as a means for obtaining unknown flux parameters. Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with various combinations of glucose, acetate, pyruvate, and propionate to achieve steady state flux conditions, followed by perfusion with the same substrates labeled with /sup 13/C in specific carbon sites. The hearts were frozen at different times after addition of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates and neutralized perchloric acid extracts were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The fractional /sup 13/C enrichment (F.E.) of individual carbon sites in different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for saturation and nuclear Overhauser effects. These F.E. measurements by /sup 13/C NMR were validated by the analysis of /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H scalar coupling patterns observed in /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the extracted metabolites. The results obtained from perfusion of hearts glucose plus either (2-/sup 13/C) acetate or (3-/sup 13/C) pyruvate are similar to those obtained by previous investigators using /sup 14/C-labeled substrates.

  10. Distortion-free {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy in coal: {sup 1}H rotating-frame dynamic nuclear polarization and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    A {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization (CP) experiment is described in which the {sup 1}H magnetization, used in CP, is obtained via dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in the proton rotating frame (RF DNP). This experiment can be carried out in coal and other solids containing unpaired electrons. In this so-called RF DNP-CP experiment, interplay effects between the {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C polarization-transfer times and the {sup 1}H rotating-frame relaxation time are avoided; thus {sup 13}C spectral distortions due to these effects are prevented. Moreover, multiple-contact RF DNP-CP experiments are possible, and these experiments reduce the measuring time of a {sup 13}C spectrum. An application of the RF DNP-CP technique in a low-volatile bituminous coal is given. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Direct Monitoring of γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase Activity In Vivo Using a Hyperpolarized (13) C-Labeled Molecular Probe.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Tatsuya; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Nonaka, Hiroshi; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Can, Emine; Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Takado, Yuhei; Comment, Arnaud; Sando, Shinsuke

    2016-08-26

    The γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) enzyme plays a central role in glutathione homeostasis. Direct detection of GGT activity could provide critical information for the diagnosis of several pathologies. We propose a new molecular probe, γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly, for monitoring GGT activity in vivo by hyperpolarized (HP) (13) C magnetic resonance (MR). The properties of γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly are suitable for in vivo HP (13) C metabolic analysis since the chemical shift between γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly and its metabolic product, [1-(13) C]Gly, is large (4.3 ppm) and the T1 of both compounds is relatively long (30 s and 45 s, respectively, in H2 O at 9.4 T). We also demonstrate that γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly is highly sensitive to in vivo modulation of GGT activity induced by the inhibitor acivicin. PMID:27483206

  12. Non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux ratio analysis.

    PubMed

    Hörl, Manuel; Schnidder, Julian; Sauer, Uwe; Zamboni, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) has become a key method for metabolic engineering and systems biology. In the most common methodology, fluxes are calculated by global isotopomer balancing and iterative fitting to stationary (13)C-labeling data. This approach requires a closed carbon balance, long-lasting metabolic steady state, and the detection of (13)C-patterns in a large number of metabolites. These restrictions mostly reduced the application of (13)C-MFA to the central carbon metabolism of well-studied model organisms grown in minimal media with a single carbon source. Here we introduce non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux ratio analysis as a novel method for (13)C-MFA to allow estimating local, relative fluxes from ultra-short (13)C-labeling experiments and without the need for global isotopomer balancing. The approach relies on the acquisition of non-stationary (13)C-labeling data exclusively for metabolites in the proximity of a node of converging fluxes and a local parameter estimation with a system of ordinary differential equations. We developed a generalized workflow that takes into account reaction types and the availability of mass spectrometric data on molecular ions or fragments for data processing, modeling, parameter and error estimation. We demonstrated the approach by analyzing three key nodes of converging fluxes in central metabolism of Bacillus subtilis. We obtained flux estimates that are in agreement with published results obtained from steady state experiments, but reduced the duration of the necessary (13)C-labeling experiment to less than a minute. These results show that our strategy enables to formally estimate relative pathway fluxes on extremely short time scale, neglecting cellular carbon balancing. Hence this approach paves the road to targeted (13)C-MFA in dynamic systems with multiple carbon sources and towards rich media. PMID:23860906

  13. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H–13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H–13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H–13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H–13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr–Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr–Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C–13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils. PMID:22743540

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization of carbonyl and methyl 13C spins in acetate using trityl OX063

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Lumata, Lloyd

    2015-03-01

    Hyperpolarization via dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a physics technique that amplifies the magnetic resonance signals by several thousand-fold for biomedical NMR spectroscopy and imaging (MRI). Herein we have investigated the effect of carbon-13 isotopic location on the DNP of acetate (one of the biomolecules commonly used for hyperpolarization) at 3.35 T and 1.4 K using a narrow ESR linewidth free radical trityl OX063. We have found that the carbonyl 13C spins yielded about twice the polarization produced in methyl 13C spins. Deuteration of the methyl group, beneficial in the liquid-state, did not produce an improvement in the polarization level at cryogenic conditions. Concurrently, the solid-state nuclear relaxation of these samples correlate with the polarization levels achieved. These results suggest that the location of the 13C isotopic labeling in acetate has a direct impact on the solid-state polarization achieved and is mainly governed by the nuclear relaxation leakage factor.

  15. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  16. Partial-wave analysis for elastic p{sup 13}C scattering at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2012-03-15

    A standard partial-wave analysis was performed on the basis of known measurements of differential cross sections for elastic p{sup 13}C scattering at energies in the range 250-750 keV. This analysis revealed that, in the energy range being considered, it is sufficient to take into account the {sup 3}S{sub 1} wave alone. A potential for the triplet {sup 3}S{sub 1}-wave state of the p{sup 13}C system in the region of the J{sup p}T = 1{sup -1} resonance at 0.55 MeV was constructed on the basis of the phase shifts obtained from the aforementioned partial-wave analysis.

  17. Distinct fungal and bacterial δ13C signatures can drive the increase in soil δ13C with depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Lukas; Laganièrea, Jérôme; Edwards, Kate A.; Billings, Sharon A.; Morrill, Penny L.; Van Biesen, Geert; Ziegler, Susan E.

    2015-04-01

    Soil microbial biomass is a key precursor of soil organic carbon (SOC), and the enrichment in 13C during SOC diagenesis has been purported to be driven by increasing proportions of microbially derived SOC. Yet, little is known about how the δ13C of soil microbial biomass - and by extension the δ13C of microbial inputs to SOC - vary in space, time, or with the composition of the microbial community. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) can be analyzed to measure the variation of the natural abundance δ13C values of both individual groups of microorganisms and the microbial community as a whole. Here, we show how variations of δ13CPLFA within the soil profile provides insight into C fluxes in undisturbed soils and demonstrate that distinct δ13C of fungal and bacterial biomass and their relative abundance can drive the increase of bulk δ13CSOC with depth. We studied the variation in natural abundance δ13C signatures of PLFA in podzolic soil profiles from mesic boreal forests in Atlantic Canada. Samples from the organic horizons (L,F,H) and the mineral (B; top 10 cm) horizons were analyzed for δ13C values of PLFA specific to fungi, G+ bacteria, or G- bacteria as proxies for the δ13C of the biomass of these groups, and for δ13C values of PLFA produced by a wide range of microorganisms (e.g. 16:0) as a proxy for the δ13C value of microbial biomass as a whole. Results were compared to fungi:bacteria ratios (F:B) and bulk δ13CSOC values. The δ13C values of group-specific PLFA were driven by differences among source organisms, with fungal PLFA consistently depleted (2.1 to 6.4‰) relative to and G+ and G- bacterial PLFA in the same sample. All group-specific PLFA, however, exhibited nearly constant δ13C values throughout the soil profile, apparently unaffected by the over 2.8‰ increase in δ13CSOC with depth from the L to B horizons. This indicates that bulk SOC poorly represents the substrates actually consumed by soil microorganisms in situ. Instead, our

  18. Ultrashort TE T1ρ magic angle imaging.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda; Znamirowski, Richard; Bydder, Graeme M; Chung, Christine B

    2013-03-01

    An ultrashort TE T(1)ρ sequence was used to measure T(1) ρ of the goat posterior cruciate ligament (n = 1) and human Achilles tendon specimens (n = 6) at a series of angles relative to the B(0) field and spin-lock field strengths to investigate the contribution of dipole-dipole interaction to T(1relaxation. Preliminary results showed a significant magic angle effect. T(1)ρ of the posterior cruciate ligament increased from 6.9 ± 1.3 ms at 0° to 36 ± 5 ms at 55° and then gradually reduced to 12 ± 3 ms at 90°. Mean T(1)ρ of the Achilles tendon increased from 5.5 ± 2.2 ms at 0° to 40 ± 5 ms at 55°. T(1)ρ dispersion study showed a significant T(1)ρ increase from 2.3 ± 0.9 ms to 11 ± 3 ms at 0° as the spin-lock field strength increased from 150 Hz to 1 kHz, and from 30 ± 3 ms to 42 ± 4 ms at 55° as the spin-lock field strength increased from 100 to 500 Hz. These results suggest that dipolar interaction is the dominant T(1relaxation mechanism in tendons and ligaments. PMID:22539354

  19. Accurate quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy: repeatability over time of site-specific 13C isotope ratio determination.

    PubMed

    Caytan, Elsa; Botosoa, Eliot P; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S

    2007-11-01

    The stability over time (repeatability) for the determination of site-specific 13C/12C ratios at natural abundance by quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy has been tested on three probes: enriched bilabeled [1,2-13C2]ethanol; ethanol at natural abundance; and vanillin at natural abundance. It is shown in all three cases that the standard deviation for a series of measurements taken every 2-3 months over periods between 9 and 13 months is equal to or smaller than the standard deviation calculated from 5-10 replicate measurements made on a single sample. The precision which can be achieved using the present analytical 13C NMR protocol is higher than the prerequisite value of 1-2 per thousand for the determination of site-specific 13C/12C ratios at natural abundance (13C-SNIF-NMR). Hence, this technique permits the discrimination of very small variations in 13C/12C ratios between carbon positions, as found in biogenic natural products. This observed stability over time in 13C NMR spectroscopy indicates that further improvements in precision will depend primarily on improved signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:17900175

  20. State-of-the-Art Direct 13C and Indirect 1H-[13C] NMR Spectroscopy In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Robin A.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy in combination with 13C-labeled substrate infusion is a powerful technique to measure a large number of metabolic fluxes non-invasively in vivo. It has been used to quantify glycogen synthesis rates, establish quantitative relationships between energy metabolism and neurotransmission and evaluate the importance of different substrates. All measurements can, in principle, be performed through direct 13C NMR detection or via indirect 1H-[13C] NMR detection of the protons attached to 13C nuclei. The choice for detection scheme and pulse sequence depends on the magnetic field strength, whereas substrate selection depends on the metabolic pathways that are studied. 13C NMR spectroscopy remains a challenging technique that requires several non-standard hardware modifications, infusion of 13C-labeled substrates and sophisticated processing and metabolic modeling. Here the various aspects of direct 13C and indirect 1H-[13C] NMR are reviewed with the aim of providing a practical guide. PMID:21919099

  1. Quantitative analysis of deuterium using the isotopic effect on quaternary (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Tamim A; Yepuri, Nageshwar Rao; Holden, Peter J; James, Michael

    2016-07-13

    Quantitative analysis of specifically deuterated compounds can be achieved by a number of conventional methods, such as mass spectroscopy, or by quantifying the residual (1)H NMR signals compared to signals from internal standards. However, site specific quantification using these methods becomes challenging when dealing with non-specifically or randomly deuterated compounds that are produced by metal catalyzed hydrothermal reactions in D2O, one of the most convenient deuteration methods. In this study, deuterium-induced NMR isotope shifts of quaternary (13)C resonances neighboring deuterated sites have been utilized to quantify the degree of isotope labeling of molecular sites in non-specifically deuterated molecules. By probing (13)C NMR signals while decoupling both proton and deuterium nuclei, it is possible to resolve (13)C resonances of the different isotopologues based on the isotopic shifts and the degree of deuteration of the carbon atoms. We demonstrate that in different isotopologues, the same quaternary carbon, neighboring partially deuterated carbon atoms, are affected to an equal extent by relaxation. Decoupling both nuclei ((1)H, (2)H) resolves closely separated quaternary (13)C signals of the different isotopologues, and allows their accurate integration and quantification under short relaxation delays (D1 = 1 s) and hence fast accumulative spectral acquisition. We have performed a number of approaches to quantify the deuterium content at different specific sites to demonstrate a convenient and generic analysis method for use in randomly deuterated molecules, or in cases of specifically deuterated molecules where back-exchange processes may take place during work up. PMID:27237841

  2. Sensitivity-enhanced IPAP experiments for measuring one-bond 13C '- 13C α and 13C α- 1H α residual dipolar couplings in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Keyang; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2004-04-01

    Sensitivity-enhanced 2D IPAP experiments using the accordion principle for measuring one-bond 13C '- 13C α and 1H α- 13C α dipolar couplings in proteins are presented. The resolution of the resulting spectra is identical to that of the decoupled HSQC spectra and the sensitivity of the corresponding 1D acquisitions are only slightly lower than those obtained with 3D HNCO and 3D HN(COCA)HA pulse sequences due to an additional delay 2 Δ. For cases of limited resolution in the 2D 15N- 1H N HSQC spectrum the current pulse sequences can easily be modified into 3D versions by introducing a poorly digitized third dimension, if so desired. The experiments described here are a valuable addition to the suites available for determination of residual dipolar couplings in biological systems.

  3. Quality assurance of PASADENA hyperpolarization for 13C biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Harris, Kent C.; Perman, William H.; Tran, Thao T.; Bhattacharya, Pratip

    2009-01-01

    Object Define MR quality assurance procedures for maximal PASADENA hyperpolarization of a biological 13C molecular imaging reagent. Materials and methods An automated PASADENA polarizer and a parahydrogen generator were installed. 13C enriched hydroxyethyl acrylate, 1-13C, 2,3,3-d3 (HEA), was converted to hyperpolarized hydroxyethyl propionate, 1-13C, 2,3,3-d3 (HEP) and fumaric acid, 1-13C, 2,3-d2 (FUM) to hyperpolarized succinic acid, 1-13C, 2,3-d2 (SUC), by reaction with parahydrogen and norbornadiene rhodium catalyst. Incremental optimization of successive steps in PASADENA was implemented. MR spectra and in vivo images of hyperpolarized 13C imaging agents were acquired at 1.5 and 4.7 T. Results Application of quality assurance (QA) criteria resulted in incremental optimization of the individual steps in PASADENA implementation. Optimal hyperpolarization of HEP of P = 20% was achieved by calibration of the NMR unit of the polarizer (B0 field strength ± 0.002 mT). Mean hyperpolarization of SUC, P = [15.3 ± 1.9]% (N = 16) in D2O, and P = [12.8 ± 3.1]% (N = 12) in H2O, was achieved every 5–8 min (range 13–20%). An in vivo 13C succinate image of a rat was produced. Conclusion PASADENA spin hyperpolarization of SUC to 15.3% in average was demonstrated (37,400 fold signal enhancement at 4.7 T). The biological fate of 13C succinate, a normally occurring cellular intermediate, might be monitored with enhanced sensitivity. PMID:19067009

  4. Study of Urban environmental quality through Isotopes δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Sosa, E.; Mastachi-Loza, C.; Becerril-Piña, R.; Ramos-Salinas, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    Usually, trees with similar pH values on their bark develop epiphytes of similar species, the acidity to be a factor for growth. The aim of the study was evaluate the air quality through isotope δ13C in order to define the levels of environmental quality in the city of Queretaro, Mexico. In this work were collected at least 4 epiphytes positioned in trees of the species Prosopis Laevigata at 25 sites of Queretaro City. The samples were analyzed for trace elements with an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP). The collecting took place during dry period, in May and early rain June 2011 period, and on four sectors to identify the spatial distribution of pollution, using isotopic analysis of concentration of δ 13C. According with the results there are significant differences among the species in each of the sampled areas. The 5 February Avenue presented greater diversity and richness of δ13C, followed by those who were surveyed in the proximity of the UAQ and finally in the middle-east area. An average value of δ13C-17.92%, followed by those surveyed in the vicinity of the UAQ that correspond to sector I and II with an concentration of δ13C-17.55% and δ13C-17.22%, and finally the samples collected in trees scattered in the East-Sector II and IV with a value of δ13C-17.02% and δ13C-15.62%, respectively. Also were observed differences between the dry and wet period. It is likely that these results of δ 13C in moist period reflect the drag of the isotopes due to rain events that could mark a trend in the dilution of this element, however there is a trend in terms of abundance and composition of finding more impact in those species sampled in dry period, in May and early June 2011.

  5. Cardiac magnetic resonance T1 mapping of left atrial myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Beinart, Roy; Khurram, Irfan M.; Liu, Songtao; Yarmohammadi, Hirad; Halperin, Henry R.; Bluemke, David A.; Gai, Neville; van der Geest, Rob J.; Lima, Joao A.C.; Calkins, Hugh; Zimmerman, Stefan L.; Nazarian, Saman

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) T1 mapping is an emerging tool for objective quantification of myocardial fibrosis. OBJECTIVES To (a) establish the feasibility of left atrial (LA) T1 measurements, (b) determine the range of LA T1 values in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) vs healthy volunteers, and (c) validate T1 mapping vs LA intracardiac electrogram voltage amplitude measures. METHODS CMR imaging at 1.5 T was performed in 51 consecutive patients before AF ablation and in 16 healthy volunteers. T1 measurements were obtained from the posterior LA myocardium by using the modified Look-Locker inversion-recovery sequence. Given the established association of reduced electrogram amplitude with fibrosis, intracardiac point-by-point bipolar LA voltage measures were recorded for the validation of T1 measurements. RESULTS The median LA T1 relaxation time was shorter in patients with AF (387 [interquartile range 364–428] ms) compared to healthy volunteers (459 [interquartile range 418–532] ms; P < .001) and was shorter in patients with AF with prior ablation compared to patients without prior ablation (P = .035). In a generalized estimating equations model, adjusting for data clusters per participant, age, rhythm during CMR, prior ablation, AF type, hypertension, and diabetes, each 100-ms increase in T1 relaxation time was associated with 0.1 mV increase in intracardiac bipolar LA voltage (P = .025). CONCLUSIONS Measurement of the LA myocardium T1 relaxation time is feasible and strongly associated with invasive voltage measures. This methodology may improve the quantification of fibrotic changes in thin-walled myocardial tissues. PMID:23643513

  6. IRMS detection of testosterone manipulated with 13C labeled standards in human urine by removing the labeled 13C.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingzhu; Yang, Rui; Yang, Wenning; Liu, Xin; Xing, Yanyi; Xu, Youxuan

    2014-12-10

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is applied to confirm testosterone (T) abuse by determining the carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C value). However, (13)C labeled standards can be used to control the δ(13)C value and produce manipulated T which cannot be detected by the current method. A method was explored to remove the (13)C labeled atom at C-3 from the molecule of androsterone (Andro), the metabolite of T in urine, to produce the resultant (A-nor-5α-androstane-2,17-dione, ANAD). The difference in δ(13)C values between Andro and ANAD (Δδ(13)CAndro-ANAD, ‰) would change significantly in case manipulated T is abused. Twenty-one volunteers administered T manipulated with different (13)C labeled standards. The collected urine samples were analyzed with the established method, and the maximum value of Δδ(13)CAndro-ANAD post ingestion ranged from 3.0‰ to 8.8‰. Based on the population reference, the cut-off value of Δδ(13)CAndro-ANAD for positive result was suggested as 1.2‰. The developed method could be used to detect T manipulated with 3-(13)C labeled standards. PMID:25441891

  7. Detection of inflammatory cell function using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy of hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine

    PubMed Central

    Najac, Chloé; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Kohanbash, Gary; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Okada, Hideho; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are highly prevalent inflammatory cells that play a key role in tumor development and are considered therapeutic targets. MDSCs promote tumor growth by blocking T-cell-mediated anti-tumoral immune response through depletion of arginine that is essential for T-cell proliferation. To deplete arginine, MDSCs express high levels of arginase, which catalyzes the breakdown of arginine into urea and ornithine. Here, we developed a new hyperpolarized 13C probe, [6-13C]-arginine, to image arginase activity. We show that [6-13C]-arginine can be hyperpolarized, and hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production from [6-13C]-arginine is linearly correlated with arginase concentration in vitro. Furthermore we show that we can detect a statistically significant increase in hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production in MDSCs when compared to control bone marrow cells. This increase was associated with an increase in intracellular arginase concentration detected using a spectrophotometric assay. Hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine could therefore serve to image tumoral MDSC function and more broadly M2-like macrophages. PMID:27507680

  8. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  9. Anomalous 13C enrichment in modern marine organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Claypool, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Marine organic carbon is heavier isotopically (13C enriched) than most land-plant or terrestrial organic C1. Accordingly, ??13C values of organic C in modern marine sediments are routinely interpreted in terms of the relative proportions of marine and terrestrial sources of the preserved organic matter2,3. When independent geochemical techniques are used to evaluate the source of organic matter in Cretaceous or older rocks, those rocks containing mostly marine organic C are found typically to have lighter (more-negative) ??13C values than rocks containing mostly terrestrial organic C. Here we conclude that marine photosynthesis in mid-Cretaceous and earlier oceans generally resulted in a greater fractionation of C isotopes and produced organic C having lighter ??13C values. Modern marine photosynthesis may be occurring under unusual geological conditions (higher oceanic primary production rates, lower PCO2) that limit dissolved CO2 availability and minimize carbon isotope fractionation4. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  10. Field measurements of del13C in ecosystem respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Asperen, Hella; Sabbatini, Simone; Nicolini, Giacomo; Warneke, Thorsten; Papale, Dario; Notholt, Justus

    2014-05-01

    Stable carbon isotope del13C-measurements are extensively used to study ecological and biogeochemical processes in ecosystems. Above terrestrial ecosystems, atmospheric del13C can vary largely due to photosynthetic fractionation. Photosynthetic processes prefer the uptake of the lighter isotope 12C (in CO2), thereby enriching the atmosphere in 13C and depleting the ecosystem carbon. At night, when ecosystem respiratory fluxes are dominant, 13C-depleted CO2 is respired and thereby depletes the atmospheric del13C-content. Different ecosystems and different parts of one ecosystem (type of plant, leaves, and roots) fractionate and respire with a different del13C-ratio signature. By determining the del13C-signature of ecosystem respiration in temporal and spatial scale, an analysis can be made of the composition of respiratory sources of the ecosystem. A field study at a dry cropland after harvest (province of Viterbo, Lazio, Italy) was performed in the summer of 2013. A FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer) was set up to continuously measure CO2-, CH4-, N2O-, CO- and del13C-concentrations. The FTIR was connected to 2 different flux measurements systems: a Flux Gradient system (sampling every half hour at 1.3m and 4.2m) and 2 flux chambers (measured every hour), providing a continuous data set of the biosphere-atmosphere gas fluxes and of the gas concentrations at different heights. Keeling plot intercept values of respiratory CO2, measured by the Flux Gradient system at night, were determined to be between -25‰ and -20‰. Keeling plot intercept values of respiratory CO2, measured by the flux chamber system, varied between -24‰ and -29‰, and showed a clear diurnal pattern, suggesting different (dominant) respiratory processes between day and night.

  11. Abundance anomaly of the 13C species of CCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, N.; Saruwatari, O.; Sakai, T.; Takano, S.; Yamamoto, S.

    2010-03-01

    Aims: We have observed the N = 1-0 lines of CCH and its 13C isotopic species toward a cold dark cloud, TMC-1 and a star-forming region, L1527, to investigate the 13C abundances and formation pathways of CCH. Methods: The observations have been carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Results: We have successfully detected the lines of 13CCH and C13CH toward the both sources and found a significant intensity difference between the two 13C isotopic species. The [C13CH] /[13CCH] abundance ratios are 1.6 ± 0.4 (3σ) and 1.6 ± 0.1 (3σ) for TMC-1 and L1527, respectively. The abundance difference between C13CH and 13CCH means that the two carbon atoms of CCH are not equivalent in the formation pathway. On the other hand, the [CCH]/[C13CH] and [CCH]/[13CCH] ratios are evaluated to be larger than 170 and 250 toward TMC-1, and to be larger than 80 and 135 toward L1527, respectively. Therefore, both of the 13C species are significantly diluted in comparison with the interstellar 12C/13C ratio of 60. The dilution is discussed in terms of a behavior of 13C in molecular clouds.

  12. Uncertainty estimations for quantitative in vivo MRI T1 mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polders, Daniel L.; Leemans, Alexander; Luijten, Peter R.; Hoogduin, Hans

    2012-11-01

    Mapping the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) of brain tissue is of great interest for both clinical research and MRI sequence development. For an unambiguous interpretation of in vivo variations in T1 images, it is important to understand the degree of variability that is associated with the quantitative T1 parameter. This paper presents a general framework for estimating the uncertainty in quantitative T1 mapping by combining a slice-shifted multi-slice inversion recovery EPI technique with the statistical wild-bootstrap approach. Both simulations and experimental analyses were performed to validate this novel approach and to evaluate the estimated T1 uncertainty in several brain regions across four healthy volunteers. By estimating the T1 uncertainty, it is shown that the variation in T1 within anatomic regions for similar tissue types is larger than the uncertainty in the measurement. This indicates that heterogeneity of the inspected tissue and/or partial volume effects can be the main determinants for the observed variability in the estimated T1 values. The proposed approach to estimate T1 and its uncertainty without the need for repeated measurements may also prove to be useful for calculating effect sizes that are deemed significant when comparing group differences.

  13. Uncertainty estimations for quantitative in vivo MRI T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Polders, Daniel L; Leemans, Alexander; Luijten, Peter R; Hoogduin, Hans

    2012-11-01

    Mapping the longitudinal relaxation time (T(1)) of brain tissue is of great interest for both clinical research and MRI sequence development. For an unambiguous interpretation of in vivo variations in T(1) images, it is important to understand the degree of variability that is associated with the quantitative T(1) parameter. This paper presents a general framework for estimating the uncertainty in quantitative T(1) mapping by combining a slice-shifted multi-slice inversion recovery EPI technique with the statistical wild-bootstrap approach. Both simulations and experimental analyses were performed to validate this novel approach and to evaluate the estimated T(1) uncertainty in several brain regions across four healthy volunteers. By estimating the T(1) uncertainty, it is shown that the variation in T(1) within anatomic regions for similar tissue types is larger than the uncertainty in the measurement. This indicates that heterogeneity of the inspected tissue and/or partial volume effects can be the main determinants for the observed variability in the estimated T(1) values. The proposed approach to estimate T(1) and its uncertainty without the need for repeated measurements may also prove to be useful for calculating effect sizes that are deemed significant when comparing group differences. PMID:23041796

  14. ^13C Solid NMR Study of Devulcanization and Revulcanization of SBR Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, J.; Levin, V.; Isayev, A.; von Meerwall, E.

    1996-03-01

    As part of a larger effort in support of recycling of rubber-based composites, we have used ^13C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy and relaxation to study molecular and segmental mobilities in styrene-butadiene random copolymers before and after sulfur crosslinking, after subsequent devulcanization using a thermal ultrasound technique, and following revulcanization. Tracking the cis-trans ratio indicates that overall network crosslink density increases during each of these steps, including devulcanization, which produces mesoscale network aggregates and substantial amounts of sol. This observation is confirmed by the transverse (T_2) relaxation times, which show that molecular/segmental mobilities monotonically decrease in the same sequence. Analysis of these effects requires the invocation of alterations in sulfur crosslinking, i.e. density, distribution, and functionality, including extensive cyclization. Measurements of the glass transition temperatures in melt, network, sol , and revulcanizate are in accord with this picture.

  15. Assignment of 1H and 13C hyperfine-shifted resonances for tuna ferricytochrome c.

    PubMed Central

    Sukits, S F; Satterlee, J D

    1996-01-01

    Tuna ferricytochrome c has been used to demonstrate the potential for completely assigning 1H and 13C strongly hyperfine-shifted resonances in metalloprotein paramagnetic centers. This was done by implementation of standard two-dimensional NMR experiments adapted to take advantage of the enhanced relaxation rates of strongly hyperfine-shifted nuclei. The results show that complete proton assignments of the heme and axial ligands can be achieved, and that assignments of several strongly shifted protons from amino acids located close to the heme can also be made. Virtually all proton-bearing heme 13C resonances have been located, and additional 13C resonances from heme vicinity amino acids are also identified. These results represent an improvement over previous proton resonance assignment efforts that were predicated on the knowledge of specific assignments in the diamagnetic protein and relied on magnetization transfer experiments in heterogeneous solutions composed of mixtures of diamagnetic ferrocytochrome c and paramagnetic ferricytochrome c. Even with that more complicated procedure, complete heme proton assignments for ferricytochrome c have never been demonstrated by a single laboratory. The results presented here were achieved using a more generally applicable strategy with a solution of the uniformly oxidized protein, thereby eliminating the requirement of fast electron self-exchange, which is a condition that is frequently not met. PMID:8913622

  16. Transmembrane Exchange of Hyperpolarized 13C-Urea in Human Erythrocytes: Subminute Timescale Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Guilhem; Puckeridge, Max; Liangfeng, Guo; Tan, Yee Ling; Jacob, Chacko; Garland, Marc; Kuchel, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    The rate of exchange of urea across the membranes of human erythrocytes (red blood cells) was quantified on the 1-s to 2-min timescale. 13C-urea was hyperpolarized and subjected to rapid dissolution and the previously reported (partial) resolution of 13C NMR resonances from the molecules inside and outside red blood cells in suspensions was observed. This enabled a stopped-flow type of experiment to measure the (initially) zero-trans transport of urea with sequential single-pulse 13C NMR spectra, every second for up to ∼2 min. Data were analyzed using Bayesian reasoning and a Markov chain Monte Carlo method with a set of simultaneous nonlinear differential equations that described nuclear magnetic relaxation combined with transmembrane exchange. Our results contribute to quantitative understanding of urea-exchange kinetics in the whole body; and the methodological approach is likely to be applicable to other cellular systems and tissues in vivo. PMID:24209840

  17. A 13C-NMR study of azacryptand complexes.

    PubMed

    Wild, Aljoscha A C; Fennell, Kevin; Morgan, Grace G; Hewage, Chandralal M; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2014-09-28

    An azacryptand has been solubilised in aqueous media containing 50% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide. (13)C-NMR has been used to determine how the azacryptand is affected by zinc binding at pH 10. Using (13)C-NMR and (13)C-enriched bicarbonate we have been able to observe the formation of 4 different carbamate derivatives of the azacryptand at pH 10. The azacryptand was shown to solubilise zinc or cadmium at alkaline pHs. Two moles of zinc are bound per mole of azacryptand and this complex binds 1 mole of carbonate. By replacing the zinc with cadmium-113 we have shown that the (13)C-NMR signal of the (13)C-enriched carbon of the bound carbonate is split into two triplets at 2.2 °C. This shows that two cadmium complexes are formed and in each of these complexes the carbonate group is bound by two magnetically equivalent metal ions. It also demonstrates that these cadmium complexes are not in fast exchange. From temperature studies we show that in the zinc complexes both complexes are in fast exchange with each other but are in slow exchange with free bicarbonate. HOESY is used to determine the position of the carbonate carbon in the complex. The solution and crystal structures of the zinc-carbonate-azacryptand complexes are compared. PMID:25091182

  18. Synthesis and applications of {sup 13}C glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Stocking, E.; Khalsa, O.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-12-01

    Due in part to the use of labeled glycerol for the {sup 13}C enrichment of biomolecules, we are currently developing new synthetic routes to various isotopomers of glycerol. Judging from our experience, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment and/or have poor overall yields (12 to 15%). Furthermore, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability is limited by the level of demand. We are presently developing a short de novo synthesis of glycerol from carbon dioxide ({approximately}53% overall yield for four steps) and are examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific {sup 13}C-labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from labeled methanol and carbon dioxide. One application of {sup 13}C glycerol we have examined is enzymatic conversion of glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25 to 50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). We are also pursuing the chemical conversion of {sup 13}C-labeled DHA to DHAP. We are especially interested in {sup 13}C-labeled DHAP because we are investigating its use as a chemo-enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids.

  19. A scientific workflow framework for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Dalman, Tolga; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2016-08-20

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) with (13)C labeling data is a high-precision technique to quantify intracellular reaction rates (fluxes). One of the major challenges of (13)C MFA is the interactivity of the computational workflow according to which the fluxes are determined from the input data (metabolic network model, labeling data, and physiological rates). Here, the workflow assembly is inevitably determined by the scientist who has to consider interacting biological, experimental, and computational aspects. Decision-making is context dependent and requires expertise, rendering an automated evaluation process hardly possible. Here, we present a scientific workflow framework (SWF) for creating, executing, and controlling on demand (13)C MFA workflows. (13)C MFA-specific tools and libraries, such as the high-performance simulation toolbox 13CFLUX2, are wrapped as web services and thereby integrated into a service-oriented architecture. Besides workflow steering, the SWF features transparent provenance collection and enables full flexibility for ad hoc scripting solutions. To handle compute-intensive tasks, cloud computing is supported. We demonstrate how the challenges posed by (13)C MFA workflows can be solved with our approach on the basis of two proof-of-concept use cases. PMID:26721184

  20. 13C NMR spectroscopy applications to brain energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Valette, Julien; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2013-01-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the method of choice for studying brain metabolism. Indeed, the most convincing data obtained to decipher metabolic exchanges between neurons and astrocytes have been obtained using this technique, thus illustrating its power. It may be difficult for non-specialists, however, to grasp thefull implication of data presented in articles written by spectroscopists. The aim of the review is, therefore, to provide a fundamental understanding of this topic to facilitate the non-specialists in their reading of this literature. In the first part of this review, we present the metabolic fate of 13C-labeled substrates in the brain in a detailed way, including an overview of some general neurochemical principles. We also address and compare the various spectroscopic strategies that can be used to study brain metabolism. Then, we provide an overview of the 13C NMR experiments performed to analyze both intracellular and intercellular metabolic fluxes. More particularly, the role of lactate as a potential energy substrate for neurons is discussed in the light of 13C NMR data. Finally, new perspectives and applications offered by 13C hyperpolarization are described. PMID:24367329

  1. The 'Nuts and Bolts' of 13C NMR Spectroscopy at Elevated-Pressures and -Temperatures for Monitoring In Situ CO2 Conversion to Metal Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. K.; Surface, J. A.; Skemer, P. A.; Conradi, M. S.; Hayes, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We will present details of newly-constructed specialized NMR designed to conduct in situ elevated-pressure, elevated-temperature 13C NMR studies on unmixed slurries of minerals in the presence of CO2 or other gases. This static probe is capable of achieving 300 bar, 300C conditions, and it is designed to spectroscopically examine 13C signals in mixtures of solids, liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. Ultimately, our aim is to monitor CO2 uptake in both ultramafic rocks and in more porous geological materials to understand the mechanisms of chemisorption as a function of temperature, pressure and pH. We will give details of the hardware setup, and we will show a variety of static in situ NMR, as well as ex situ 'magic-angle spinning' NMR to show the analyses that are possible of minerals in pure form and in mixtures. In addition, specific NMR pulse sequences, techniques, and modeling will be described in detail. In this in situ NMR probe, we are able to simulate processes at geologically relevant fluid pressures and temperatures, monitoring the kinetics of CO2 conversion to carbonates. The in situ NMR experiments consist of heterogeneous mixtures of rock, salty brine solution, and moderate pressure CO2 gas at elevated temperatures. The purpose of studying these reactions is to determine conditions that affect the efficacy of carbonate formation in various targeted geological reservoirs (i.e., peroditite, or others). Via 13C NMR, we have spectroscopically characterized and quantified the conversion of CO2 to magnesium carbonate and calcium carbonate minerals, including metastable intermediates (such as hydromagnesite, or dypingite in the case of magnesium carbonate species, or vaterite in the case of calcium carbonate species). Such species are distinguishable from a combination of the 13C isotropic chemical shift, the static 13C lineshape, and changes in spin-lattice (T1) relaxation times. We will demonstrate that NMR can be used for quantitative

  2. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  3. Inclusion of 13C and D in protonated acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Roueff, Evelyne; Lee, Timothy J.

    2016-04-01

    The rovibrational spectrum of cyclic, protonated acetylene has been established. The improvement in modern telescopes coupled with the different branching ratios in reaction models welcomes study of 13C-substitution for C2H3+. Quartic force fields (QFFs) have been previously utilized to predict the antisymmetric HCCH stretch in standard c-C2H3+ to within 0.1 cm-1 of experiment and are employed here to generate rovibrational insights for the 13C isotopologues. The zero-point energies are also given for the cyclic and 'Y'-shaped isomers for both 13C and D substitutions. Vibrational intensities and the dipole moments are provided in order to characterize more fully this simple cation.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Hyperpolarized 13C Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Jeremy W.

    Hyperpolarized 13C substrates offer the potential to non-invasively image metabolism and enzymatic activity. However, hyperpolarization introduces a number of difficulties, and imaging is hampered by non-equilibrium magnetization and the need for spectral encoding. There is therefore a need for fast and RF efficient spectral imaging techniques. This work presents a number of new methods that can be used to improve polarization, increase RF efficiency and improve modeling accuracy in hyperpolarized 13C experiments. In particular, a novel encoding and reconstruction algorithm is presented that can generate spatially and spectrally resolved images with a single RF excitation and echo time. This reconstruction framework increases data acquisition efficiency, enabling accelerated acquisition speed, preserved polarization, and/or improved temporal or spatial resolution. Overall, the methods enumerated in this dissertation have the potential to improve modeling accuracy and to mitigate the conventional tradeoffs between SNR, spatial resolution, and temporal resolution that govern image quality in hyperpolarized 13C experiments.

  5. Study of molecular interactions with 13C DNP-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, Mathilde H.; Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Baumann, Herbert; Petersen, Bent O.; Karlsson, Magnus; Duus, Jens Ø.; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan H.

    2010-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is an established, versatile technique for the detection of molecular interactions, even when these interactions are weak. Signal enhancement by several orders of magnitude through dynamic nuclear polarization alleviates several practical limitations of NMR-based interaction studies. This enhanced non-equilibrium polarization contributes sensitivity for the detection of molecular interactions in a single NMR transient. We show that direct 13C NMR ligand binding studies at natural isotopic abundance of 13C gets feasible in this way. Resultant screens are easy to interpret and can be performed at 13C concentrations below μM. In addition to such ligand-detected studies of molecular interaction, ligand binding can be assessed and quantified with enzymatic assays that employ hyperpolarized substrates at varying enzyme inhibitor concentrations. The physical labeling of nuclear spins by hyperpolarization thus provides the opportunity to devise fast novel in vitro experiments with low material requirement and without the need for synthetic modifications of target or ligands.

  6. A 13C{31P} REDOR NMR Investigation of the Role of Glutamic Acid Residues in Statherin-Hydroxyapatite Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ndao, Moise; Ash, Jason T.; Breen, Nicholas F.; Goobes, Gil; Stayton, Patrick S.; Drobny, Gary P.

    2011-01-01

    The side chain carboxyl groups of acidic proteins found in the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) of mineralized tissues play a key role in promoting or inhibiting the growth of minerals such as hydroxyapatite (HAP), the principal mineral component of bone and teeth. Among the acidic proteins found in the saliva is statherin, a 43-residue tyrosine-rich peptide that is a potent lubricant in the salivary pellicle and an inhibitor of both HAP crystal nucleation and growth. Three acidic amino acids – D1, E4, and E5 – are located in the N-terminal 15 amino acid segment, with a fourth amino acid, E26, located outside the N-terminus. We have utilized 13C{31P} REDOR NMR to analyze the role played by acidic amino acids in the binding mechanism of statherin to the HAP surface by measuring the distance between the δ-carboxyl 13C spins of the three glutamic acid side chains of statherin (residues E4, E5, E26) and 31P spins of the phosphate groups at the HAP surface. 13C{31P} REDOR studies of glutamic-5-13C acid incorporated at positions E4 and E26 indicate a 13C–31P distance of more than 6.5 Å between the side chain carboxyl 13C spin of E4 and the closest 31P in the HAP surface. In contrast, the carboxyl 13C spin at E5 has a much shorter 13C–31P internuclear distance of 4.25±0.09 Å, indicating that the carboxyl group of this side chain interacts directly with the surface. 13C T1ρ and slow-spinning MAS studies indicate that the motions of the side chains of E4 and E5 are more restricted than that of E26. Together, these results provide further insight into the molecular interactions of statherin with HAP surfaces. PMID:19678690

  7. T1-mapping in the heart: accuracy and precision

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The longitudinal relaxation time constant (T1) of the myocardium is altered in various disease states due to increased water content or other changes to the local molecular environment. Changes in both native T1 and T1 following administration of gadolinium (Gd) based contrast agents are considered important biomarkers and multiple methods have been suggested for quantifying myocardial T1 in vivo. Characterization of the native T1 of myocardial tissue may be used to detect and assess various cardiomyopathies while measurement of T1 with extracellular Gd based contrast agents provides additional information about the extracellular volume (ECV) fraction. The latter is particularly valuable for more diffuse diseases that are more challenging to detect using conventional late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Both T1 and ECV measures have been shown to have important prognostic significance. T1-mapping has the potential to detect and quantify diffuse fibrosis at an early stage provided that the measurements have adequate reproducibility. Inversion recovery methods such as MOLLI have excellent precision and are highly reproducible when using tightly controlled protocols. The MOLLI method is widely available and is relatively mature. The accuracy of inversion recovery techniques is affected significantly by magnetization transfer (MT). Despite this, the estimate of apparent T1 using inversion recovery is a sensitive measure, which has been demonstrated to be a useful tool in characterizing tissue and discriminating disease. Saturation recovery methods have the potential to provide a more accurate measurement of T1 that is less sensitive to MT as well as other factors. Saturation recovery techniques are, however, noisier and somewhat more artifact prone and have not demonstrated the same level of reproducibility at this point in time. This review article focuses on the technical aspects of key T1-mapping methods and imaging protocols and describes their limitations including

  8. Measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy in [(13)C,(15)N] uniformly enriched proteins using CSA amplification.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Ge, Yuwei; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Mali; Li, Conggang; Gan, Zhehong

    2015-11-01

    Extended chemical shift anisotropy amplification (xCSA) is applied for measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) of uniformly labeled proteins under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The amplification sequence consists of a sequence of π-pulses that repetitively interrupt MAS averaging of the CSA interaction. The timing of the pulses is designed to generate amplified spinning sideband manifolds which can be fitted to extract CSA parameters. The (13)C/(13)C homonuclear dipolar interactions are not affected by the π-pulses due to the bilinear nature of the spin operators and are averaged by MAS in the xCSA experiment. These features make the constant evolution-time experiment suitable for measuring CSA of uniformly labeled samples. The incorporation of xCSA with multi-dimensional (13)C/(15)N correlation is demonstrated with a GB1 protein sample as a model system for measuring (13)C/(15)N CSA of all backbone (15)NH, (13)CA and (13)CO sites. PMID:26404770

  9. Measuring doubly 13C-substituted ethane by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clog, M.; Ling, C.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is present in non-negligible amounts in most natural gas reservoirs and is used to produce ethylene for petrochemical industries. It is one of the by-products of lipid metabolism and is the arguably simplest molecule that can manifest multiple 13C substitutions. There are several plausible controls on the relative abundances of 13C2H6 in natural gases: thermodynamically controlled homogeneous isotope exchange reactions analogous to those behind carbonate clumped isotope thermometry; inheritance from larger biomolecules that under thermal degradation to produce natural gas; mixing of natural gases that differ markedly in bulk isotopic composition; or combinations of these and/or other, less expected fractionations. There is little basis for predicting which of these will dominate in natural samples. Here, we focus on an analytical techniques that will provide the avenue for exploring these phenomena. The method is based on high-resolution gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometry, using the Thermo 253-Ultra (a new prototype mass spectrometer). This instrument achieves the mass resolution (M/Δ M) up to 27,000, permitting separation of the isobaric interferences of potential contaminants and isotopologues of an analtye or its fragments which share a cardinal mass. We present techniques to analyze several isotopologues of molecular and fragment ions of C2H6. The critical isobaric separations for our purposes include: discrimination of 13C2H6 from 13C12CDH5 at mass 32 and separation of the 13CH3 fragment from 12CH4 at mass 16, both requiring at least a mass resolution of 20000 to make an adequate measurement. Other obvious interferences are either cleanly separated (e.g., O2, O) or accounted for by peak-stripping (CH3OH on mass 32 and NH2 on mass 16). We focus on a set of measurements which constrain: the doubly-substituted isotopologue, 13C2H6, and the 13CH3/12CH3 ratio of the methyl fragment, which constrains the bulk δ 13C. Similar methods can be

  10. Rotary resonance recoupling of 13C- 1H dipolar interactions in magic angle spinning 13C NMR of dynamic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchin, Simon J.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Aliev, Abil E.; Apperley, David C.

    2000-06-01

    Rotary resonance recoupling of heteronuclear 13C- 1H dipolar interactions in magic angle spinning solid state 13C NMR spectra (recorded under conditions of 1H decoupling at frequency ν1 and magic angle spinning at frequency νr) has been studied for three examples of molecular solids (adamantane, ferrocene and hexamethylbenzene) in which substantial molecular motion is known to occur. It is shown that when rotary resonance conditions are satisfied (i.e. ν1/νr= n, for n=1 or 2), the recoupling can lead to motionally averaged Pake-like powder patterns from which information on 13C- 1H internuclear distances and/or molecular motion can be derived.

  11. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation spectroscopy with magic angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Rosay, Melanie; Weis, Volker; Kreischer, Kenneth E; Temkin, Richard J; Griffin, Robert G

    2002-04-01

    The sensitivity of solid-state NMR experiments can be enhanced with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a technique that transfers the high Boltzmann polarization of unpaired electrons to nuclei. Signal enhancements of up to 23 have been obtained for magic angle spinning (MAS) experiments at 5 T and 85-90 K using a custom-designed high-power gyrotron. The extended stability of MAS/DNP experiments at low temperature is demonstrated with (1)H-driven (13)C spin-diffusion experiments on the amino acid proline. These (13)C-(13)C chemical shift correlation spectra are the first two-dimensional MAS/DNP experiments performed at high field (>1.4 T). PMID:11916398

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain tumors: measurement of T1: work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, T.; Inouye, T.; Suzuki, H.; Machida, T.; Iio, M.

    1984-01-01

    Longitudinal relaxation times (T1) of 20 brain tumors were calculated in vivo using a whole-body magnetic resonance unit with a 0.15-T resistive magnet. Images employing standard inversion recovery pulse sequences with different intervals between the 180)2) pulse and selective excitation pulses were compared on every point of the 256 x 256 pixel matrix. Tumor, white matter, and gray matter were sampled from each patient from the computed T1 image for T1 measurement. Astrocytomas, neurinomas, and metastatic tumors showed longer T1 values than did meningiomas. Lipomas had the shortest T1s. It is concluded that it is difficult to predict histological types of brain tumors by the measurement of T1 alone because of the wide variation in relaxation times, but measurement of T1 can be helpful in differentiating brain tumors when additional information about the patient's condition is known.

  13. Spectral editing for in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yun; Shen, Jun

    2012-01-01

    In vivo detection of carboxylic/amide carbons is a promising technique for studying cerebral metabolism and neurotransmission due to the very low RF power required for proton decoupling. In the carboxylic/amide region, however, there is severe spectral overlap between acetate C1 and glutamate C5, complicating studies that use acetate as an astroglia-specific substrate. There are no known in vivo MRS techniques that can spectrally resolve acetate C1 and glutamate C5 singlets. In this study, we propose to spectrally separate acetate C1 and glutamate C5 by a two-step J-editing technique after introducing homonuclear 13C- 13C scalar coupling between carboxylic/amide carbons and aliphatic carbons. By infusing [1,2- 13C 2]acetate instead of [1- 13C]acetate the acetate doublet can be spectrally edited because of the large separation between acetate C2 and glutamate C4 in the aliphatic region. This technique can be applied to studying acetate transport and metabolism in brain in the carboxylic/amide region without spectral interference.

  14. Synthesis of 2-deoxy-(6-/sup 13/C)glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.E.; Unkefer, C.J.; Ehler, D.S.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have prepared 2-deoxy-D-(6-/sup 13/C)glucose which will be used to test the stability of 2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate in brain tissue. They chose to label 2-deoxy-D-glucose at C-6 because of the large chemical shift difference between C-6 in the free sugar and C-6 in the 6-phosphate analog. Their synthetic scheme is similar to that used for the synthesis of D-(6-/sup 13/C)glucose which involves the removal of C-6 from D-glucose followed by its replacement with /sup 13/C. They first prepare the methyl ..cap alpha..-furanoside using trifluoroacetic acid in methanol. This product is then treated with periodate which cleaves only between C-5 and C-6 to form a hydrated aldehyde which is reacted directly with K/sup 13/CN to form a mixture of nitriles. The enriched nitriles are reduced with hydrogen to a mixture of 6-aldehydo sugars using a 5% Pd on carbon catalyst. These sugars are reduced with NaBH/sub 4/ to a mixture of labeled methyl furanosides. Acid hydrolysis followed by chromatography yields 2-deoxy-D-(6-/sup 13/C)glucose in an overall yield of 10% from K/sup 13/CN.

  15. Does the Shuram δ13C excursion record Ediacaran oxygenation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, J. M.; Maloof, A. C.; Schoene, B.; Higgins, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The most negative carbon isotope excursion in Earth history is found in carbonate rocks of the Ediacaran Period (635-542 Ma). Known colloquially as the the 'Shuram' excursion, workers have long noted its tantalizing, broad concordance with the rise of abundant macro-scale fossils in the rock record, variously interpreted as animals, giant protists, macro-algae and lichen, and known as the 'Ediacaran Biota.' Thus, the Shuram excursion has been interpreted by many in the context of a dramatically changing redox state of the Ediacaran oceans - e.g., a result of methane cycling in a low O2 atmosphere, the final destruction of a large pool of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and the step-wise oxidation of the Ediacaran oceans. More recently, diagenetic interpretations of the Shuram excursion - e.g. sedimentary in-growth of very δ13C depleted authigenic carbonates, meteoric alteration of Ediacaran carbonates, late-stage burial diagenesis - have challenged the various Ediacaran redox models. A rigorous geologic context is required to discriminate between these explanatory models, and determine whether the Shuram excursion can be used to evaluate terminal Neoproterozoic oxygenation. Here, we present chemo-stratigraphic data (δ13C, δ18O, δ44/42Ca and redox sensitive trace element abundances) from 12 measured sections of the Ediacaran-aged Wonoka Formation (Fm.) of South Australia that require a syn-depositional age for the extraordinary range of δ13C values (-12 to +4‰) observed in the formation. In some locations, the Wonoka Fm. is ~700 meters (m) of mixed shelf limestones and siliclastics that record the full 16 ‰ δ13C excursion in a remarkably consistent fashion across 100s of square kilometers of basin area. Fabric-altering diagenesis, where present, occurs at the sub-meter vertical scale, only results in sub-permil offsets in δ13C and cannot be used to explain the full δ13C excursion. In other places, the Wonoka Fm. is host to deep (1 km

  16. Molecular Level Insights on Collagen-Polyphenols Interaction Using Spin-Relaxation and Saturation Transfer Difference NMR.

    PubMed

    Reddy, R Ravikanth; Phani Kumar, Bandaru V N; Shanmugam, Ganesh; Madhan, Balaraman; Mandal, Asit B

    2015-11-01

    Interaction of small molecules with collagen has far reaching consequences in biological and industrial processes. The interaction between collagen and selected polyphenols, viz., gallic acid (GA), pyrogallol (PG), catechin (CA), and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), has been investigated by various solution NMR measurements, viz., (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts (δH and δC), (1)H nonselective spin-lattice relaxation times (T1NS) and selective spin-lattice relaxation times (T1SEL), as well as spin-spin relaxation times (T2). Furthermore, we have employed saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR method to monitor the site of GA, CA, PG, and EGCG which are in close proximity to collagen. It is found that -COOH group of GA provides an important contribution for the interaction of GA with collagen, as evidenced from (13)C analysis, while PG, which is devoid of -COOH group in comparison to GA, does not show any significant interaction with collagen. STD NMR data indicates that the resonances of A-ring (H2', H5' and H6') and C-ring (H6 and H8) protons of CA, and A-ring (H2' and H6'), C-ring (H6 and H8), and D-ring (H2″and H6″) protons of EGCG persist in the spectra, demonstrating that these protons are in spatial proximity to collagen, which is further validated by independent proton spin-relaxation measurement and analysis. The selective (1)H T1 measurements of polyphenols in the presence of protein at various concentrations have enabled us to determine their binding affinities with collagen. EGCG exhibits high binding affinity with collagen followed by CA, GA, and PG. Further, NMR results propose that presence of gallic acid moiety in a small molecule increases its affinity with collagen. Our experimental findings provide molecular insights on the binding of collagen and plant polyphenols. PMID:26447653

  17. Optical hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in nanodiamond ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical nuclear polarization holds the key for orders of magnitude enhancements of nuclear magnetic resonance signals which, in turn, would enable a wide range of novel applications in biomedical sciences. However, current implementations of DNP require cryogenic temperatures and long times for achieving high polarization. Here we propose and analyze in detail protocols that can achieve rapid hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in randomly oriented ensembles of nanodiamonds at room temperature. Our protocols exploit a combination of optical polarization of electron spins in nitrogen-vacancy centers and the transfer of this polarization to 13C nuclei by means of microwave control to overcome the severe challenges that are posed by the random orientation of the nanodiamonds and their nitrogen-vacancy centers. Specifically, these random orientations result in exceedingly large energy variations of the electron spin levels that render the polarization and coherent control of the nitrogen-vacancy center electron spins as well as the control of their coherent interaction with the surrounding 13C nuclear spins highly inefficient. We address these challenges by a combination of an off-resonant microwave double resonance scheme in conjunction with a realization of the integrated solid effect which, together with adiabatic rotations of external magnetic fields or rotations of nanodiamonds, leads to a protocol that achieves high levels of hyperpolarization of the entire nuclear-spin bath in a randomly oriented ensemble of nanodiamonds even at room temperature. This hyperpolarization together with the long nuclear-spin polarization lifetimes in nanodiamonds and the relatively high density of 13C nuclei has the potential to result in a major signal enhancement in 13C nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and suggests functionalized and hyperpolarized nanodiamonds as a unique probe for molecular imaging both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Synthesis of [1-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [2-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [3-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid] and combinations thereof

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2009-09-01

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, of the formulae ##STR00001## wherein C* is each independently selected from the group consisting of .sup.13C and .sup.12C with the proviso that at least one C* is .sup.13C, each hydrogen of the methylene group can independently be either hydrogen or deuterium, the methyl group includes either zero or three deuterium atoms, Q is from the group of sulfide, sulfinyl, and sulfone, Z is an aryl group from the group of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently from the group of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group from the group of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently from the group of a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, and an alkoxy group, and the methyl group can include either zero or three deuterium atoms.

  19. Synthesis of [1-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [2-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid], [3-.sup.13C]pyruvic acid] and combinations thereof

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A. , Unkefer; Clifford J. , Alvarez; Marc A.

    2012-06-12

    The present invention is directed to the labeled compounds, ##STR00001## wherein C* is each either .sup.13C and .sup.12C where at least one C* is .sup.13C, each hydrogen of the methylene group is hydrogen or deuterium, the methyl group includes either zero or three deuterium atoms, Q is sulfide, sulfinyl, or sulfone, Z is an aryl group such as 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, or a phenyl group ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently either hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group such as NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently either a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, and an alkoxy group, and the methyl group can include either zero or three deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to the labeled compounds ##STR00003##

  20. Systematic R -matrix analysis of the 13C(p ,γ )14N capture reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Suprita; deBoer, Richard; Mukherjee, Avijit; Roy, Subinit

    2015-04-01

    Background: The proton capture reaction 13C(p ,γ )14N is an important reaction in the CNO cycle during hydrogen burning in stars with mass greater than the mass of the Sun. It also occurs in astrophysical sites such as red giant stars: the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. The low energy astrophysical S factor of this reaction is dominated by a resonance state at an excitation energy of around 8.06 MeV (Jπ=1-,T =1 ) in 14N. The other significant contributions come from the low energy tail of the broad resonance with Jπ=0-,T =1 at an excitation of 8.78 MeV and the direct capture process. Purpose: Measurements of the low energy astrophysical S factor of the radiative capture reaction 13C(p ,γ )14N reported extrapolated values of S (0 ) that differ by about 30 % . Subsequent R -matrix analysis and potential model calculations also yielded significantly different values for S (0 ) . The present work intends to look into the discrepancy through a detailed R -matrix analysis with emphasis on the associated uncertainties. Method: A systematic reanalysis of the available decay data following the capture to the Jπ=1-,T =1 resonance state of 14N around 8.06 MeV excitation had been performed within the framework of the R -matrix method. A simultaneous analysis of the 13C(p ,p0 ) data, measured over a similar energy range, was carried out with the capture data. The data for the ground state decay of the broad resonance state (Jπ=0-,T =1 ) around 8.78 MeV excitations was included as well. The external capture model along with the background poles to simulate the internal capture contribution were used to estimate the direct capture contribution. The asymptotic normalization constants (ANCs) for all states were extracted from the capture data. The multichannel, multilevel R -matrix code azure2 was used for the calculation. Results: The values of the astrophysical S factor at zero relative energy, resulting from the present analysis, are found to be consistent within the

  1. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA.

    PubMed

    Mroue, Kamal H; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H; Morris, Michael D; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA=Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the (1)H T1 values were calculated from data collected by (1)H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the (1)H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the (13)C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from (13)C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using (1)H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. PMID:24881032

  2. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans.

  3. Acceleration of Natural-Abundance Solid-State MAS NMR Measurements on Bone by Paramagnetic Relaxation from Gadolinium-DTPA

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. PMID:24881032

  4. Single voxel localization for dynamic hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Albert P.; Cunningham, Charles H.

    2015-09-01

    The PRESS technique has been widely used to achieve voxel localization for in vivo1H MRS acquisitions. However, for dynamic hyperpolarized 13C MRS experiments, the transition bands of the refocusing pulses may saturate the pre-polarized substrate spins flowing into the voxel. This limitation may be overcome by designing refocusing pulses that do not perturb the resonance of the hyperpolarized substrate, but selectively refocuses the spins of the metabolic products. In this study, a PRESS pulse sequence incorporating spectral-spatial refocusing pulses that have a stop band ('notch') at the substrate resonance is tested in vivo using hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. Higher metabolite SNR was observed in experiments using the spectral-spatial refocusing pulses as compared to conventional refocusing pulses.

  5. Single voxel localization for dynamic hyperpolarized (13)C MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Albert P; Cunningham, Charles H

    2015-09-01

    The PRESS technique has been widely used to achieve voxel localization for in vivo(1)H MRS acquisitions. However, for dynamic hyperpolarized (13)C MRS experiments, the transition bands of the refocusing pulses may saturate the pre-polarized substrate spins flowing into the voxel. This limitation may be overcome by designing refocusing pulses that do not perturb the resonance of the hyperpolarized substrate, but selectively refocuses the spins of the metabolic products. In this study, a PRESS pulse sequence incorporating spectral-spatial refocusing pulses that have a stop band ('notch') at the substrate resonance is tested in vivo using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. Higher metabolite SNR was observed in experiments using the spectral-spatial refocusing pulses as compared to conventional refocusing pulses. PMID:26232365

  6. Interlobe communication in 13C-methionine-labeled human transferrin.

    PubMed

    Beatty, E J; Cox, M C; Frenkiel, T A; Tam, B M; Mason, A B; MacGillivray, R T; Sadler, P J; Woodworth, R C

    1996-06-18

    [1H, 13C] NMR investigations of metal-induced conformational changes in the blood serum protein transferrin (80 kDa) are reported. These are thought to play an important role in the recognition of this protein by its cellular receptors. [1H, 13C] NMR resonance assignments are presented for all nine methionine 13CH3 groups of recombinant deglycosylated human transferrin on the basis of studies of recombinant N-lobe (40 kDa, five Met residues), NOESY-relayed [1H, 13C] HMQC spectra, and structural considerations. The first specific assignments for C-lobe resonances of transferrin are presented. Using methionine 13CH3 resonances as probes, it is shown that, with oxalate as the synergistic anion, Ga3+ binds preferentially to the C-lobe and subsequently to the N-lobe. The NMR shifts of Met464, which is in the Trp460-centered hydrophobic patch of helix 5 in the C-lobe in contact with the anion and metal binding site, show that Ga3+ binding causes movement of side chains within this helix, as is also the case in the N-lobe. The C-lobe residue Met382, which contacts the N-lobe hinge region, is perturbed when Ga3+ binds to the N-lobe, indicative of interlobe communication, a feature which may control the recognition of fully-metallated transferrin by its receptor. These results demonstrate that selective 13C labeling is a powerful method for probing the structure and dynamics of high-molecular-mass proteins. PMID:8672464

  7. In Vivo Natural-Abundance 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Living Ectomycorrhizal Fungi 1

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Francis; Canet, Daniel; Marchal, Jean-Pierre; Brondeau, Jean

    1984-01-01

    Natural-abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to study intact mycelia of the ectomycorrhizal fungi Cenococcum graniforme (Ascomycetes) and Hebeloma crustuliniforme (Basidiomycetes). A number of sharp resonances are observed in living fungi. These signals primarily arise from fatty acyl chains and carbohydrate nuclei. The spectra are interpreted in terms of relative concentrations of the major fatty acids present in the fungal triglycerides. The small line width of fatty acids (mainly oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acids) resonances and spin-lattice relaxation time are indicative of fast rotational reorientations and are consequently thought to arise from fatty acyl chains in fat droplets. We were able to locate the site of lipids accumulation within mycelia using light microscopy and histological staining. Many lipid droplets were observed in mycelia of both species. These results suggest that fatty acids droplets could be involved in carbon storage and metabolism from ectomycorrhizal fungi. PMID:16663561

  8. The effect of sample hydration on 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Wilson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fulvic acids, two of which have been well studied by a number of other groups (Armadale and Suwannee river fulvic acids) have been examined by high resolution solid-state 13C-NMR techniques to delineate the effect of absorbed water. Two main effects of absorbed water were observed: (1) changes in spin lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame and cross polarization times and (2) total loss of signal so that some fulvic acid is effectively in solution. These results suggest that discrepancies in the literature concerning observed relative signal intensities from different structural groups are due to absorbed water and emphasize the necessity for proper precautionary drying before spectroscopic analysis. ?? 1991.

  9. 13c Measurements On Air of Small Ice Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyer, M.; Leuenberger, M.

    We have developed a new method for 13C analysis for very small air amounts of less than 0.5 cc STP, corresponding to less than 10 gram of ice. It is based on the needle-crasher technique, which we routinely use for CO2 concentration measurements by infrared laser absorption. The extracted air is slowly expanded into a large volume through a water trap held at ­100°C. This sampled air is then carried by a high helium flux through a modified Precon system of Thermo-Finnigan to separate CO2 from the air and to inject the pure CO2 gas in a low helium stream via an open split device to a Delta Plus XL mass spectrometer. The overall precision based on replicates of standard air is significantly better than 0.1 for a single analysis and is further improved by a triplicate measurement of the same sample through a specially designed gas splitter. We have used this new method for investigations on polar ice cores. The 13C measurements are important for climate reconstructions, e.g. to reconstruct the evolution and its variability in the terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks and to identify natural variations in the marine carbon cycle. During the industrialization atmospheric 13C decreased by about -2, mainly due to the anthropogenic release of biogenic CO2 by fossil fuel burning. Reconstructions of carbon and oxygen cycles of Joos at al. [1999] using a double deconvolution method show that between 1930 and 1950 the net terrestrial release is changing to a net terrestrial uptake of CO2. A highly resolved 13C dataset of this time window would replenish the documentation of this behaviour. Further, it would be interesting to compare such data with O2/N2 measurements, known as an other partitioning tool for carbon sources and sinks. At the EGS 2002 we will present a highly resolved 13C record from Antarctic ice covering this time period.

  10. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra of 13C methylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Smirnov, I. A.; Alekseev, E. A.; Halfen, D. T.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Methylamine (CH3NH2) is a light molecule of astrophysical interest, which has an intensive rotational spectrum that extends in the submillimeter wave range and far beyond, even at temperatures characteristic for the interstellar medium. It is likely for 13C isotopologue of methylamine to be identified in astronomical surveys, but there is no information available for the 13CH3NH2 millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra. Aims: In this context, to provide reliable predictions of 13CH3NH2 spectrum in millimeter and submillimeter wave ranges, we have studied rotational spectra of the 13C methylamine isotopologue in the frequency range from 48 to 945 GHz. Methods: The spectrum of 13C methylamine was recorded using conventional absorption spectrometers. The analysis of the rotational spectrum of 13C methylamine in the ground vibrational state was performed on the basis of the group-theoretical high-barrier tunneling Hamiltonian that was developed for methylamine. The available multiple observations of the parent methylamine species toward Sgr B2(N) at 1, 2, and 3 mm using the Submillimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory were used to make a search for interstellar 13CH3NH2. Results: In the recorded spectra, we have assigned 2721 rotational transitions that belong to the ground vibrational state of the 13CH3NH2. These measurements were fitted to the Hamiltonian model that uses 75 parameters to achieve an overall weighted rms deviation of 0.73. On the basis of these spectroscopic results, predictions of transition frequencies in the frequency range up to 950 GHz with J ≤ 50 and Ka ≤ 20 are presented. The search for interstellar 13C methylamine in available observational data was not successful and therefore only an upper limit of 6.5 × 1014 cm-2 can be derived for the column density of 13CH3NH2 toward Sgr B2(N), assuming the same source size, temperature, linewidth, and systemic velocity as for parent methylamine isotopic

  11. An online solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to study the presence of thyronamines in plasma and tissue and their putative conversion from 13C6-thyroxine.

    PubMed

    Ackermans, M T; Klieverik, L P; Ringeling, P; Endert, E; Kalsbeek, A; Fliers, E

    2010-09-01

    Thyronamines are exciting new players at the crossroads of thyroidology and metabolism. Here, we report the development of a method to measure 3-iodothyronamine (T(1)AM) and thyronamine (T(0)AM) in plasma and tissue samples. The detection limit of the method was 0.25 nmol/l in plasma and 0.30 pmol/g in tissue both for T(1)AM and for T(0)AM. Using this method, we were able to demonstrate T(1)AM and T(0)AM in plasma and liver from rats treated with synthetic thyronamines. Although we demonstrated the in vivo conversion of (13)C(6)-thyroxine ((13)C(6)-T(4)) to (13)C(6)-3,5,3'-triiodothyronine, we did not detect (13)C(6)-T(1)AM in plasma or brain samples of rats treated with (13)C(6)-T(4). Surprisingly, our method did not detect any endogenous T(1)AM or T(0)AM in plasma from vehicle-treated rats, nor in human plasma or thyroid tissue. Although we are cautious to draw general conclusions from these negative findings and in spite of the fact that insufficient sensitivity of the method related to extractability and stability of T(0)AM cannot be completely excluded at this point, our findings raise questions on the biosynthetic pathways and concentrations of endogenous T(1)AM and T(0)AM. PMID:20603264

  12. Conformational changes of alamethicin induced by solvent and temperature. A 13C-NMR and circular-dichroism study.

    PubMed

    Jung, G; Dubischar, N

    1975-06-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) have been used for studies on the conformation of alamethicin. The 13C NMR spectrum is assigned with the aid of signals of synthetic partial sequences and selective proton decoupling. The solvent and temperature-dependence of the 13C NMR spectra, T1 measurements and the use of lanthanide-shift reagents allow the differentiation between the amino acids belonging to a rigid alpha-helical portion of the alamethicin sequence and those belonging to a more flexible part. The 13C NMR results are in agreement with results obtained from extended solvent and temperature-dependent CD studies which indicate a highly stabilized nonpolar and intrachenar alpha-helical part. The concentration-dependence of the CD spectrum of alamethicin in a nematic phase revealed aggregation phenomena which might simulate those observed in natural and synthetic membranes. After dissolving alamethicin in aqueous alcohol there is a time-dependence of the ellipticity of the Cotton effects showing a sort of memory effect on the mode of dissolution. Four different conformations can be characterized by CD spectra depending on the solvent and concentration. A model illustrating the dynamic conformations and aggregation phenomena within a membrane is proposed. PMID:1175592

  13. Observation of 1H-13C and 1H-1H proximities in a paramagnetic solid by NMR at high magnetic field under ultra-fast MAS.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenhui; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Zhou, Lei; Shen, Ming; Pourpoint, Frédérique; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The assignment of NMR signals in paramagnetic solids is often challenging since: (i) the large paramagnetic shifts often mask the diamagnetic shifts specific to the local chemical environment, and (ii) the hyperfine interactions with unpaired electrons broaden the NMR spectra and decrease the coherence lifetime, thus reducing the efficiency of usual homo- and hetero-nuclear NMR correlation experiments. Here we show that the assignment of (1)H and (13)C signals in isotopically unmodified paramagnetic compounds with moderate hyperfine interactions can be facilitated by the use of two two-dimensional (2D) experiments: (i) (1)H-(13)C correlations with (1)H detection and (ii) (1)H-(1)H double-quantum↔single-quantum correlations. These methods are experimentally demonstrated on isotopically unmodified copper (II) complex of l-alanine at high magnetic field (18.8 T) and ultra-fast Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) frequency of 62.5 kHz. Compared to (13)C detection, we show that (1)H detection leads to a 3-fold enhancement in sensitivity for (1)H-(13)C 2D correlation experiments. By combining (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(1)H 2D correlation experiments with the analysis of (13)C longitudinal relaxation times, we have been able to assign the (1)H and (13)C signals of each l-alanine ligand. PMID:25557861

  14. /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C spin-spin coupling constants in structural investigations. II. Conformational structure of vinyl ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Krivdin, L.B.; Shcherbakov, V.V.; Bzhezovskii, V.M.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1986-10-10

    The /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C spin-spin coupling constants between the carbon nuclei of the vinyl group were measured for a series of vinyl ethers. It was established that the unshared electron pairs of the oxygen atom can make a substantial stereospecific contribution to the direct /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C constants of the adjacent nuclei. The observed effect was used to establish the conformational structure of the compounds.

  15. Sodium and T1ρ MRI for molecular and diagnostic imaging of articular cartilage†

    PubMed Central

    Borthakur, Arijitt; Mellon, Eric; Niyogi, Sampreet; Witschey, Walter; Kneeland, J. Bruce; Reddy, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    In this article, both sodium magnetic resonance (MR) and T1ρ relaxation mapping aimed at measuring molecular changes in cartilage for the diagnostic imaging of osteoarthritis are reviewed. First, an introduction to structure of cartilage, its degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA) and an outline of diagnostic imaging methods in quantifying molecular changes and early diagnostic aspects of cartilage degeneration are described. The sodium MRI section begins with a brief overview of the theory of sodium NMR of biological tissues and is followed by a section on multiple quantum filters that can be used to quantify both bi-exponential relaxation and residual quadrupolar interaction. Specifically, (i) the rationale behind the use of sodium MRI in quantifying proteoglycan (PG) changes, (ii) validation studies using biochemical assays, (iii) studies on human OA specimens, (iv) results on animal models and (v) clinical imaging protocols are reviewed. Results demonstrating the feasibility of quantifying PG in OA patients and comparison with that in healthy subjects are also presented. The section concludes with the discussion of advantages and potential issues with sodium MRI and the impact of new technological advancements (e.g. ultra-high field scanners and parallel imaging methods). In the theory section on T1ρ, a brief description of (i) principles of measuring T1ρ relaxation, (ii) pulse sequences for computing T1ρ relaxation maps, (iii) issues regarding radio frequency power deposition, (iv) mechanisms that contribute to T1ρ in biological tissues and (v) effects of exchange and dipolar interaction on T1ρ dispersion are discussed. Correlation of T1ρ relaxation rate with macromolecular content and biomechanical properties in cartilage specimens subjected to trypsin and cytokine-induced glycosaminoglycan depletion and validation against biochemical assay and histopathology are presented. Experimental T1ρ data from osteoarthritic specimens, animal models, healthy human

  16. T1ρ magnetic resonance: basic physics principles and applications in knee and intervertebral disc imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Chen, Weitian; Ahuja, Anil; Yuan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    T1ρ relaxation time provides a new contrast mechanism that differs from T1- and T2-weighted contrast, and is useful to study low-frequency motional processes and chemical exchange in biological tissues. T1ρ imaging can be performed in the forms of T1ρ-weighted image, T1ρ mapping and T1ρ dispersion. T1ρ imaging, particularly at low spin-lock frequency, is sensitive to B0 and B1 inhomogeneity. Various composite spin-lock pulses have been proposed to alleviate the influence of field inhomogeneity so as to reduce the banding-like spin-lock artifacts. T1ρ imaging could be specific absorption rate (SAR) intensive and time consuming. Efforts to address these issues and speed-up data acquisition are being explored to facilitate wider clinical applications. This paper reviews the T1ρ imaging’s basic physic principles, as well as its application for cartilage imaging and intervertebral disc imaging. Compared to more established T2 relaxation time, it has been shown that T1ρ provides more sensitive detection of proteoglycan (PG) loss at early stages of cartilage degeneration. T1ρ has also been shown to provide more sensitive evaluation of annulus fibrosis (AF) degeneration of the discs. PMID:26807369

  17. Galactose oxidation using (13)C in healthy and galactosemic children.

    PubMed

    Resende-Campanholi, D R; Porta, G; Ferrioli, E; Pfrimer, K; Ciampo, L A Del; Junior, J S Camelo

    2015-03-01

    Galactosemia is an inborn error of galactose metabolism that occurs mainly as the outcome of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) deficiency. The ability to assess galactose oxidation following administration of a galactose-labeled isotope (1-(13)C-galactose) allows the determination of galactose metabolism in a practical manner. We aimed to assess the level of galactose oxidation in both healthy and galactosemic Brazilian children. Twenty-one healthy children and seven children with galactosemia ranging from 1 to 7 years of age were studied. A breath test was used to quantitate (13)CO2 enrichment in exhaled air before and at 30, 60, and 120 min after the oral administration of 7 mg/kg of an aqueous solution of 1-(13)C-galactose to all children. The molar ratios of (13)CO2 and (12)CO2 were quantified by the mass/charge ratio (m/z) of stable isotopes in each air sample by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. In sick children, the cumulative percentage of (13)C from labeled galactose (CUMPCD) in the exhaled air ranged from 0.03% at 30 min to 1.67% at 120 min. In contrast, healthy subjects showed a much broader range in CUMPCD, with values from 0.4% at 30 min to 5.58% at 120 min. The study found a significant difference in galactose oxidation between children with and without galactosemia, demonstrating that the breath test is useful in discriminating children with GALT deficiencies. PMID:25608239

  18. The 13C nuclear magnetic resonance in graphite intercalation compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Resing, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of graphite intercalation compounds were calculated. For acceptor types, the shifts come mainly from the paramagnetic (Ramsey) intra-atomic terms. They are related to the gross features of the two-dimensional band structures. The calculated anisotropy is about -140 ppm and is independent of the finer details such as charge transfer. For donor types, the carbon 2p pi orbitals are spin-polarized because of mixing with metal conduction electrons, thus there is an additional dipolar contribution which may be correlated with the electronic specific heat. The general agreement with experimental data is satisfactory.

  19. S-Factor of radiative р 13C capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2012-06-01

    The possibility of description of experimental data on the astrophysical S-factor of radiative р 13C capture within the framework of the potential cluster model with forbidden states is analyzed at energies in the range 0.03-0.8 MeV. It is demonstrated that the behavior of the astrophysical S-factor can be explained based on the Е1-transition to the bound 3 P 1 state of the 14N nucleus in the р 13С channel from the 3 S 1 wave of р 13С scattering at resonant energy of 0.55 MeV (l.s.).

  20. Absolute partial decay-branch measurements in 13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheldon, C.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Kokalova, Tz.; Malcolm, J. D.; Ziman, V. A.; Faestermann, Th.; Wirth, H.-F.; Hertenberger, R.; Lutter, R.

    2012-10-01

    The 9Be(6Li,d)13C* reaction at a beam energy of 42 MeV has been investigated using a large-acceptance silicon-strip detector array and the high-resolution Q3D magnetic spectrograph. The Q3D facilitated the unambiguous determination of the reaction channel via identification of the deuteron ejectile, thereby providing the spectrum of excited states in 13C in the range from 10.7 to 15.0 MeV. The silicon array was used to detect and identify the 13C recoil-breakup products with efficiencies of up to 49%. The results obtained for the absolute partial branching ratios represent the first complete measurements for states in this energy region and allow the extraction of reduced widths. The quantities measured for Γn0/Γtot and Γn1/Γtot are 0.91±0.11 and ≤0.13 (10.753 MeV), 0.51±0.04 and 0.51±0.04 (10.818 MeV), 0.68±0.03 and 0.42±0.02 (10.996 MeV), 0.49±0.08 and 0.71±0.11 (11.848 MeV), and 0.49±0.08 and 0.53±0.08 (12.130 MeV), respectively. For the two observed higher-lying energy levels, Γα0/Γtot and Γn1/Γtot have been measured as 0.54±0.02 and 0.45±0.02 (13.760 MeV) and 0.94±0.03 and 0.13±0.02 (14.582 MeV), respectively. The consequences for the proposed molecular structures in 13C are explored following the extraction of reduced widths.

  1. Design of a sup 13 C (1H) RF probe for monitoring the in vivo metabolism of (1- sup 13 C)glucose in primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, B.E.; Sacks, W.; Bigler, R.E.; Hennessy, M.J.; Sacks, S.; Fleischer, A.; Zanzonico, P.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of an RF probe suitable for obtaining proton-decoupled {sup 13}C spectra from a subhuman primate brain is described. Two orthogonal saddle coils, one tuned to the resonant frequency of {sup 13}C and the other to the resonant frequency of 1H, were used to monitor the in vivo metabolism of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose in rhesus monkey brain at 2.1 T. Difference spectra showed the appearance of {sup 13}C-enriched glutamate and glutamine 30 to 40 min after a bolus injection of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose.

  2. Enhanced NMR relaxation of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids and the magnitude of the carbon hyperfine coupling in single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kiss, A; Pályi, A; Ihara, Y; Wzietek, P; Simon, P; Alloul, H; Zólyomi, V; Koltai, J; Kürti, J; Dóra, B; Simon, F

    2011-10-28

    Recent transport measurements [Churchill et al. Nature Phys. 5, 321 (2009)] found a surprisingly large, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than usual (13)C hyperfine coupling (HFC) in (13)C enriched single-wall carbon nanotubes. We formulate the theory of the nuclear relaxation time in the framework of the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory to enable the determination of the HFC from recent data by Ihara et al. [Europhys. Lett. 90, 17,004 (2010)]. Though we find that 1/T(1) is orders of magnitude enhanced with respect to a Fermi-liquid behavior, the HFC has its usual, small value. Then, we reexamine the theoretical description used to extract the HFC from transport experiments and show that similar features could be obtained with HFC-independent system parameters. PMID:22107670

  3. Measuring changes in substrate utilization in the myocardium in response to fasting using hyperpolarized [1-13C]butyrate and [1-13C]pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaansen, Jessica A. M.; Merritt, Matthew E.; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is often associated with a shift in substrate preference for ATP production. Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has the unique ability to detect real-time metabolic changes in vivo due to its high sensitivity and specificity. Here a protocol using HP [1-13C]pyruvate and [1-13C]butyrate is used to measure carbohydrate versus fatty acid metabolism in vivo. Metabolic changes in fed and fasted Sprague Dawley rats (n = 36) were studied at 9.4 T after tail vein injections. Pyruvate and butyrate competed for acetyl-CoA production, as evidenced by significant changes in [13C]bicarbonate (−48%), [1-13C]acetylcarnitine (+113%), and [5-13C]glutamate (−63%), following fasting. Butyrate uptake was unaffected by fasting, as indicated by [1-13C]butyrylcarnitine. Mitochondrial pseudoketogenesis facilitated the labeling of the ketone bodies [1-13C]acetoacetate and [1-13C]β-hydroxybutyryate, without evidence of true ketogenesis. HP [1-13C]acetoacetate was increased in fasting (250%) but decreased during pyruvate co-injection (−82%). Combining HP 13C technology and co-administration of separate imaging agents enables noninvasive and simultaneous monitoring of both fatty acid and carbohydrate oxidation. This protocol illustrates a novel method for assessing metabolic flux through different enzymatic pathways simultaneously and enables mechanistic studies of the changing myocardial energetics often associated with disease. PMID:27150735

  4. Measuring changes in substrate utilization in the myocardium in response to fasting using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]butyrate and [1-(13)C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Merritt, Matthew E; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is often associated with a shift in substrate preference for ATP production. Hyperpolarized (HP) (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has the unique ability to detect real-time metabolic changes in vivo due to its high sensitivity and specificity. Here a protocol using HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate and [1-(13)C]butyrate is used to measure carbohydrate versus fatty acid metabolism in vivo. Metabolic changes in fed and fasted Sprague Dawley rats (n = 36) were studied at 9.4 T after tail vein injections. Pyruvate and butyrate competed for acetyl-CoA production, as evidenced by significant changes in [(13)C]bicarbonate (-48%), [1-(13)C]acetylcarnitine (+113%), and [5-(13)C]glutamate (-63%), following fasting. Butyrate uptake was unaffected by fasting, as indicated by [1-(13)C]butyrylcarnitine. Mitochondrial pseudoketogenesis facilitated the labeling of the ketone bodies [1-(13)C]acetoacetate and [1-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyryate, without evidence of true ketogenesis. HP [1-(13)C]acetoacetate was increased in fasting (250%) but decreased during pyruvate co-injection (-82%). Combining HP (13)C technology and co-administration of separate imaging agents enables noninvasive and simultaneous monitoring of both fatty acid and carbohydrate oxidation. This protocol illustrates a novel method for assessing metabolic flux through different enzymatic pathways simultaneously and enables mechanistic studies of the changing myocardial energetics often associated with disease. PMID:27150735

  5. Stable isotope-enhanced two- and three-dimensional diffusion ordered 13C NMR spectroscopy (SIE-DOSY 13C NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermillion, Karl; Price, Neil P. J.

    2009-06-01

    The feasibility of obtaining high quality homonuclear or heteronuclear diffusion-ordered 13C NMR data is shown to be greatly improved by using 13C isotopically-enriched samples. Stable isotope-enhanced diffusion ordered (SIE-DOSY) 13C NMR has been applied to 13C-enriched carbohydrates, and has been used to determine diffusion coefficients for pentose and hexose monosaccharides, and a disaccharide and trisaccharide. These 2D spectra were obtained with as little as 8 min of acquisition time. Fully resolved 3D DOSY-HMQC NMR spectra of [U- 13C]xylose, [U- 13C]glucose, and [1- 13C gal]lactose were obtained in 5 h. Sample derivatization with [ carbonyl- 13C]acetate (peracetylation) extends the usefulness of the technique to included non-labeled sugars; the 13C-carbonyl - carbohydrate ring proton 1H- 13C correlations also provide additional structural information, as shown for the 3-D DOSY-HMQC analysis of a mixture of maltotriose and lactose per-[ carbonyl- 13C]acetates.

  6. Hepatic gluconeogenesis influences (13)C enrichment in lactate in human brain tumors during metabolism of [1,2-(13)C]acetate.

    PubMed

    Pichumani, Kumar; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Kovacs, Zoltan; Ratnakar, James; Mickey, Bruce; Malloy, Craig R; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Bachoo, Robert M; Maher, Elizabeth A

    2016-07-01

    (13)C-enriched compounds are readily metabolized in human malignancies. Fragments of the tumor, acquired by biopsy or surgical resection, may be acid-extracted and (13)C NMR spectroscopy of metabolites such as glutamate, glutamine, 2-hydroxyglutarate, lactate and others provide a rich source of information about tumor metabolism in situ. Recently we observed (13)C-(13)C spin-spin coupling in (13)C NMR spectra of lactate in brain tumors removed from patients who were infused with [1,2-(13)C]acetate prior to the surgery. We found, in four patients, that infusion of (13)C-enriched acetate was associated with synthesis of (13)C-enriched glucose, detectable in plasma. (13)C labeled glucose derived from [1,2-(13)C]acetate metabolism in the liver and the brain pyruvate recycling in the tumor together lead to the production of the (13)C labeled lactate pool in the brain tumor. Their combined contribution to acetate metabolism in the brain tumors was less than 4.0%, significantly lower than the direct oxidation of acetate in the citric acid cycle in tumors. PMID:27020407

  7. A 13C NMR study of the adsorbed states of CO on Rh dispersed on Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, T. M.; Yates, J. T.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1980-07-01

    The results of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been analyzed with respect to previous infrared studies of CO adsorbed on Rh dispersed on Al2O3 to quantify the site distribution and to describe the adsorbed state. The 13C NMR spectra account for all the 13CO adsorbed on a 2.2% Rh on Al2O3 substrate. Although the spectra from the different adsorbed states of CO overlap, the line shapes may be separated into two components based on differences in the 13C spin-lattice relaxation times. These two components have been assigned to the 13CO dicarbonyl formed on single Rh atoms and to 13CO adsorbed on Rh rafts. The component attributed to the CO adsorbed on the raft sites is further separated into linear and bridged CO state contributions based on chemical shift information, yielding a quantitative distribution of the three adsorbed states of CO on Rh. The 13CO distribution is used to estimate the molar integrated intensities of the infrared spectrum of 13CO on Rh at high coverage and to determine the degree of dispersion of Rh on the Al2O3. The 13C NMR line shapes of CO adsorbed on Rh are different from the powder pattern of Rh2Cl2(CO)4. It is suggested that the line shape of the dicarbonyl surface species is narrowed to a Lorentzian curve by reorientation at the site and the line shape of CO on the Rh rafts is modulated by exchange between sites on a single raft. The 13C relaxation time distribution provides further evidence for the existence of isolated Rh atoms on the Al2O3 surface.

  8. Can T1-rho MRI detect acetabular cartilage degeneration in femoroacetabular impingement?: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rakhra, K S; Lattanzio, P-J; Cárdenas-Blanco, A; Cameron, I G; Beaulé, P E

    2012-09-01

    Advanced MRI cartilage imaging such as T(1)-rho (T1ρ) for the diagnosis of early cartilage degradation prior to morpholgic radiological changes may provide prognostic information in the management of joint disease. This study aimed first to determine the normal T1ρ profile of cartilage within the hip, and secondly to identify any differences in T1ρ profile between the normal and symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) hip. Ten patients with cam-type FAI (seven male and three female, mean age 35.9 years (28 to 48)) and ten control patients (four male and six female, mean age 30.6 years (22 to 35)) underwent 1.5T T1ρ MRI of a single hip. Mean T1ρ relaxation times for full thickness and each of the three equal cartilage thickness layers were calculated and compared between the groups. The mean T1ρ relaxation times for full cartilage thickness of control and FAI hips were similar (37.17 ms (SD 9.95) and 36.71 ms (SD 6.72), respectively). The control group demonstrated a T1ρ value trend, increasing from deep to superficial cartilage layers, with the middle third having significantly greater T1ρ relaxation values than the deepest third (p = 0.008). The FAI group demonstrated loss of this trend. The deepest third in the FAI group demonstrated greater T1ρ relaxation values than controls (p = 0.028). These results suggest that 1.5T T1ρ MRI can detect acetabular hyaline cartilage changes in patients with FAI. PMID:22933489

  9. Hyperpolarized (129)Xe T (1) in oxygenated and deoxygenated blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.; Kacher, D. F.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Jolesz, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    The viability of the new technique of hyperpolarized (129)Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) for imaging organs other than the lungs depends on whether the spin-lattice relaxation time, T(1), of (129)Xe is sufficiently long in the blood. In previous experiments by the authors, the T(1) was found to be strongly dependent upon the oxygenation of the blood, with T(1) increasing from about 3 s in deoxygenated samples to about 10 s in oxygenated samples. Contrarily, Tseng et al. (J. Magn. Reson. 1997; 126: 79-86) reported extremely long T(1) values deduced from an indirect experiment in which hyperpolarized (129)Xe was used to create a 'blood-foam'. They found that oxygenation decreased T(1). Pivotal to their experiment is the continual and rapid exchange of hyperpolarized (129)Xe between the gas phase (within blood-foam bubbles) and the dissolved phase (in the skin of the bubbles); this necessitated a complicated analysis to extract the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood. In the present study, the experimental design minimizes gas exchange after the initial bolus of hyperpolarized (129)Xe has been bubbled through the sample. This study confirms that oxygenation increases the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood, from about 4 s in freshly drawn venous blood, to about 13 s in blood oxygenated to arterial levels, and also shifts the red blood cell resonance to higher frequency. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Abbreviations used BOLD blood oxygen level dependent NOE nuclear overhouses effect PO(2) oxygen partial pressure RBC red blood cells RF radio frequency SNR signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. The 4051 Å Comet Band of 13C3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, M. A.; Zhao, D.; Linnartz, H.; Ubachs, W.

    2014-02-01

    The tricarbon C3 molecule has been detected in a number of translucent interstellar clouds via its $A^1\\Piu-X^1\\Sigmag+$ (000-000) electronic `comet' band around 4051 Å. So far, it is the largest molecule unambiguously identified in the diffuse interstellar medium. In this work, rotationally resolved laboratory spectra are presented for the corresponding transition of the 13C3 isotopologue. The spectra are recorded in direct absorption using cavity ring-down spectroscopy in combination with a supersonic plasma jet. A rotational analysis yields accurate spectroscopic parameters. In contrast to 12C3, no significant perturbations are found for (e- or f-parity) levels up to J' = 18 in the A 1Π upper electronic state.

  11. Σ production from targets of ^4He and ^13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrien, R. E.

    1996-10-01

    One of the abiding issues in hypernuclear research has been the question of the formation of nuclear bound states incorporating the Σ-hyperon. The recent increases in beam intensity at the Brookhaven AGS have enabled us to obtain a high statistics study on the production of Σ-hyperons on a ^4He target. Earlier research using stopped kaons at KEK indicated the presence of structure in the (K^-,π^-) reaction, and led to the postulate of a Σ bound state. That structure has now been definitely confirmed in the in-flight kaon experiment at the LESB2 beam line and Moby-Dick spectrometer. An improved measurement of the binding energy of the presumed state will be reported, together with a production cross section. In addition, both (K^-,π^-) and (K^-,π^+) reactions on ^13C have been studied and will be compared to similar measurements on ^9Be.

  12. Multiscale computational modeling of (13)C DNP in liquids.

    PubMed

    Küçük, Sami Emre; Sezer, Deniz

    2016-04-14

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enables the substantial enhancement of the NMR signal intensity in liquids. While proton DNP is dominated by the dipolar interaction between the electron and nuclear spins, the Fermi contact (scalar) interaction is equally important for heavier nuclei. The impossibility to predict the magnitude and field dependence of the scalar contribution hampers the application of high-field DNP to nuclei other than (1)H. We demonstrate that molecular dynamics (MD) simulations followed by density functional calculations of the Fermi contacts along the MD trajectory lead to quantitative agreement with the DNP coupling factors of the methyl and carbonyl carbons of acetone in water at 0.35 T. Thus, the accurate calculation of scalar-dominated DNP enhancement at a desired magnetic field is demonstrated for the first time. For liquid chloroform at fields above 9 T, our methodology predicts direct (13)C DNP enhancements that are two orders of magnitude larger than those of (1)H. PMID:27001446

  13. In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR Investigation of Supercritical CO2 Incorporation in Smectite-Natural Organic Matter Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Hoyt, David W.; Burton, Sarah D.; Ferguson, Brennan O.; Varga, Tamas; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.

    2014-01-29

    This paper presents an in situ NMR study of clay-natural organic polymer systems (a hectoritehumic acid [HA] composite) under CO2 storage reservoir conditions (90 bars CO2 pressure, 50°C). The 13C and 23Na NMR data show that supercritical CO2 interacts more strongly with the composite than with the base clay and does not react to form other C-containing species over several days at elevated CO2. With and without organic matter, the data suggest that CO2 enters the interlayer space of Na-hectorite equilibrated at 43% relative humidity. The presence of supercritical CO2 also leads to increased 23Na signal intensity, reduced line width at half height, increased basal width, more rapid 23Na T1 relaxation rates, and a shift to more positive resonance frequencies. Larger changes are observed for the hectorite-HA composite than for the base clay. In light of recently reported MD simulations of other polymer-Na-smectite composites, we interpret the observed changes as an increase in the rate of Na+ site hopping in the presence of supercritical CO2, the presence of potential new Na+ sorption sites when the humic acid is present, and perhaps an accompanying increase in the number of Na+ ions actively involved in site hopping. The results suggest that the presence of organic material either in clay interlayers or on external particle surfaces can significantly affect the behavior of supercritical CO2 and the mobility of metal ions in reservoir rocks.

  14. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra of 13C-glycolaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haykal, I.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) is the simplest sugar and an important intermediate in the path toward forming more complex biologically relevant molecules. Astronomical surveys of interstellar molecules, such as those available with the very sensitive ALMA telescope, require preliminary laboratory investigations of the microwave and submillimeter-wave spectra of molecular species including new isotopologs - to identify these in the interstellar media. Aims: To achieve the detection of the 13C isotopologs of glycolaldehyde in the interstellar medium, their rotational spectra in the millimeter and submillimeter-wave regions were studied. Methods: The spectra of 13CH2OHCHO and CH2OH13CHO were recorded in the 150-945 GHz spectral range in the laboratory using a solid-state submillimeter-wave spectrometer in Lille. The observed line frequencies were measured with an accuracy of 30 kHz up to 700 GHz and of 50 kHz above 700 GHz. We analyzed the spectra with a standard Watson Hamiltonian. Results: About 10 000 new lines were identified for each isotopolog. The spectroscopic parameters were determined for the ground- and the three lowest vibrational states up to 945 and 630 GHz. Previous microwave assignments of 13CH2OHCHO were not confirmed. Conclusions: The provided line-lists and sets of molecular parameters meet the needs for a first astrophysical search of 13C-glycolaldehydes. Full Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A96

  15. 13C breath tests in infections and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kurpad, Anura V; Ajami, Alfred; Young, Vernon R

    2002-09-01

    Stable isotope labeled compounds are widely used as diagnostic probes in medicine. These diagnostic stable isotope probes are now being expanded in their scope, to provide precise indications of the presence or absence of etiologically significant change in metabolism due to a specific disease. This concept exploits a labeled tracer probe that is a specifically designed substrate of a "gateway" enzyme in a discrete metabolic pathway, whose turnover can be measured by monitoring unidirectional precursor product mass flow. An example of such a probe is the 13C-urea breath test, where labeled urea is given to patients with H. pylori infection. Another example of this kind of probe is used to study the tripeptide glutathione (glu-cys-gly, GSH), which is the most abundant cellular thiol, and protects cells from the toxic effects of reactive oxygen species. Within the gamma glutamyl cycle, 5-oxoproline (L-pyroglutamic acid) is a metabolite generated during GSH catabolism, and is metabolized to glutamic acid by 5-oxoprolinase. This enzyme can also utilize the substrate L-2-oxothiazolidone-4-carboxylate (OTC), to generate intracellular cysteine, which is beneficial to the cell. Thus, labeled (13C) OTC would, under enzymatic attack yield cysteine and 13CO2, and can thus track the state and capacity of glutathione metabolism. Similarly, stable isotope labeled probes can be used to track the activity of the rate of homocysteine clearance, lymphocyte CD26, and liver CYP (cytochrome P450) enzyme activity. In the future, these applications should be able to titrate, in vivo, the characteristics of various specific enzyme systems in the body and their response to stress or infection as well as to treatment regimes. PMID:12362798

  16. The First in Vivo Observation of 13C- 15N Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2001-12-01

    [5-13C,15N]Glutamine, with 1J(13C-15N) of 16 Hz, was observed in vivo in the brain of spontaneously breathing rats by 13C MRS at 4.7 T. The brain [5-13C]glutamine peak consisted of the doublet from [5-13C,15N]glutamine and the center [5-13C,14N]glutamine peak, resulting in an apparent triplet with a separation of 8 Hz. The time course of formation of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine was monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 20-35 min. This [5-13C,15N]glutamine was formed by glial uptake of released neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate and its reaction with 15NH3 catalyzed by the glia-specific glutamine synthetase. The neurotransmitter glutamate C5 was selectively13C-enriched by intravenous [2,5-13C]glucose infusion to 13C-label whole-brain glutamate C5, followed by [12C]glucose infusion to chase 13C from the small and rapidly turning-over glial glutamate pool, leaving 13C mainly in the neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate pool, which is sequestered in vesicles until release. Hence, the observed [5-13C,15N]glutamine arises from a coupling between 13C of neuronal origin and 15N of glial origin. Measurement of the rate of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine formation provides a novel noninvasive method of studying the kinetics of neurotransmitter uptake into glia in vivo, a process that is crucial for protecting the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity.

  17. In vivo quantification of hyperoxic arterial blood water T1.

    PubMed

    Siero, Jeroen C W; Strother, Megan K; Faraco, Carlos C; Hoogduin, Hans; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Donahue, Manus J

    2015-11-01

    Normocapnic hyperoxic and hypercapnic hyperoxic gas challenges are increasingly being used in cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) and calibrated functional MRI experiments. The longitudinal arterial blood water relaxation time (T1a) change with hyperoxia will influence signal quantification through mechanisms relating to elevated partial pressure of plasma-dissolved O2 (pO2) and increased oxygen bound to hemoglobin in arteries (Ya) and veins (Yv). The dependence of T1a on Ya and Yv has been elegantly characterized ex vivo; however, the combined influence of pO2, Ya and Yv on T1a in vivo under normal ventilation has not been reported. Here, T1a is calculated during hyperoxia in vivo by a heuristic approach that evaluates T1 -dependent arterial spin labeling (ASL) signal changes to varying gas stimuli. Healthy volunteers (n = 14; age, 31.5 ± 7.2 years) were scanned using pseudo-continuous ASL in combination with room air (RA; 21% O2/79% N2), hypercapnic normoxic (HN; 5% CO2/21% O2/74% N2) and hypercapnic hyperoxic (HH; 5% CO2/95% O2) gas administration. HH T1a was calculated by requiring that the HN and HH cerebral blood flow (CBF) change be identical. The HH protocol was then repeated in patients (n = 10; age, 61.4 ± 13.3 years) with intracranial stenosis to assess whether an HH T1a decrease prohibited ASL from being performed in subjects with known delayed blood arrival times. Arterial blood T1a decreased from 1.65 s at baseline to 1.49 ± 0.07 s during HH. In patients, CBF values in the affected flow territory for the HH condition were increased relative to baseline CBF values and were within the physiological range (RA CBF = 36.6 ± 8.2 mL/100 g/min; HH CBF = 45.2 ± 13.9 mL/100 g/min). It can be concluded that hyperoxic (95% O2) 3-T arterial blood T1aHH = 1.49 ± 0.07 s relative to a normoxic T1a of 1.65 s. PMID:26419505

  18. Activation of the umami taste receptor (T1R1/T1R3) initiates the peristaltic reflex and pellet propulsion in the distal colon

    PubMed Central

    Kendig, Derek M.; Hurst, Norman R.; Bradley, Zachary L.; Mahavadi, Sunila; Kuemmerle, John F.; Lyall, Vijay; DeSimone, John; Murthy, Karnam S.

    2014-01-01

    Intraluminal nutrients in the gut affect the peristaltic reflex, although the mechanism is not well defined. Recent evidence supports the presence of taste receptors and their signaling components in enteroendocrine cells, although their function is unclear. This study aimed to determine if nutrients modify colonic motility through activation of taste receptors. Colonic sections were immunostained for the umami taste receptor T1R1/T1R3, which mediates the response to umami ligands, such as monosodium glutamate (MSG), in taste cells. Ascending contraction, descending relaxation, and calcitonin gene-related peptide release were measured in three-chamber flat-sheet preparations of rat colon in response to MSG alone or with inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP). Velocity of artificial fecal pellet propulsion was measured by video recording in guinea pig distal colon. T1R1/T1R3 receptors were present in enteroendocrine cells of colonic sections from human, rat, mouse, and guinea pig. MSG initiated ascending contraction and descending relaxation components of the peristaltic reflex and calcitonin gene-related peptide release in flat-sheet preparations. IMP augmented the MSG-induced effects, suggesting activation of T1R1/T1R3 receptors. In T1R1−/− mice, mucosal stroking, but not MSG, elicited a peristaltic reflex. Intraluminal perfusion of MSG enhanced the velocity of artificial fecal pellet propulsion, which was also augmented by IMP. Propulsion was also increased by l-cysteine, but not l-tryptophan, supporting a role of T1R1/T1R3 receptors. We conclude that T1R1/T1R3 activation by luminal MSG or l-cysteine elicits a peristaltic reflex and CGRP release and increases the velocity of pellet propulsion in distal colon. This mechanism may explain how nutrients regulate colonic propulsion. PMID:25324508

  19. Activation of the umami taste receptor (T1R1/T1R3) initiates the peristaltic reflex and pellet propulsion in the distal colon.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Derek M; Hurst, Norman R; Bradley, Zachary L; Mahavadi, Sunila; Kuemmerle, John F; Lyall, Vijay; DeSimone, John; Murthy, Karnam S; Grider, John R

    2014-12-01

    Intraluminal nutrients in the gut affect the peristaltic reflex, although the mechanism is not well defined. Recent evidence supports the presence of taste receptors and their signaling components in enteroendocrine cells, although their function is unclear. This study aimed to determine if nutrients modify colonic motility through activation of taste receptors. Colonic sections were immunostained for the umami taste receptor T1R1/T1R3, which mediates the response to umami ligands, such as monosodium glutamate (MSG), in taste cells. Ascending contraction, descending relaxation, and calcitonin gene-related peptide release were measured in three-chamber flat-sheet preparations of rat colon in response to MSG alone or with inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP). Velocity of artificial fecal pellet propulsion was measured by video recording in guinea pig distal colon. T1R1/T1R3 receptors were present in enteroendocrine cells of colonic sections from human, rat, mouse, and guinea pig. MSG initiated ascending contraction and descending relaxation components of the peristaltic reflex and calcitonin gene-related peptide release in flat-sheet preparations. IMP augmented the MSG-induced effects, suggesting activation of T1R1/T1R3 receptors. In T1R1(-/-) mice, mucosal stroking, but not MSG, elicited a peristaltic reflex. Intraluminal perfusion of MSG enhanced the velocity of artificial fecal pellet propulsion, which was also augmented by IMP. Propulsion was also increased by l-cysteine, but not l-tryptophan, supporting a role of T1R1/T1R3 receptors. We conclude that T1R1/T1R3 activation by luminal MSG or l-cysteine elicits a peristaltic reflex and CGRP release and increases the velocity of pellet propulsion in distal colon. This mechanism may explain how nutrients regulate colonic propulsion. PMID:25324508

  20. [Treatment options of T1 glottic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Fan, Guokang

    2016-01-01

    T1 glottic carcinoma is part of early laryngeal carcinoma which involves the vocal cords, including anterior commissure or posterior commissure. We analyzed the treatment options of T1 glottic carcinoma by reviewing the related literatures about T1 glottic carcinoma treated by conservative surgery (open surgery and laser microsurgery), radiotherapy, robot surgery, photodynamic treatment. PMID:27192922

  1. Application of the Steady-State Variable Nutation Angle Method for Faster Determinations of Long T1s—An Approach Useful for the Design of Hyperpolarized MR Molecular Probes

    PubMed Central

    Jupin, Marc; Gamliel, Ayelet; Hovav, Yonatan; Sosna, Jacob; Gomori, J Moshe; Katz-Brull, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    In the dissolution-dynamic nuclear polarization technique, molecular probes with long T1s are preferred. 13C nuclei of small molecules with no directly bonded protons or sp3 13C nuclei with proton positions substituted by deuterons may fulfill this requirement. The T1 determination of such new molecular probes is crucial for the success of the hyperpolarized observation. Although the inversion-recovery approach remained by and large the standard for T1 measurements, we show here that the steady-state variable nutation angle approach is faster and may be better suited for the determination of relatively long T1s in thermal equilibrium. Specifically, the T1 of a new molecular probe, [uniformly labeled (UL)-13C6, UL-2H8]2-deoxy-d-glucose, is determined here and compared to that of [UL-13C6, UL-2H7]d-glucose. PMID:26560856

  2. Measurement of T1 of human arterial and venous blood at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Rane, S.; Gore, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for measuring cerebral perfusion require accurate longitudinal relaxation (T1) of blood, a MRI parameter that is field dependent. T1 of arterial and venous human blood was measured at 7T using three different sources – pathology laboratory, blood bank and in vivo. The T1 of venous blood was measured from sealed samples from a pathology lab and in vivo. Samples from a blood bank were oxygenated and mixed to obtain different physiological concentrations of hematocrit and oxygenation. T1 relaxation times were estimated using a three-point fit to a simple inversion recovery equation. At 37° C, the T1 of blood at arterial pO2was 2.29 ± 0.1 s and 2.07 ± 0.12 at venous pO2. The in vivo T1 of venous blood, in three subjects, was slightly longer at 2.45 ± 0.11s. T1 of arterial and venous blood at 7T was measured and found to be significantly different. The T1 values were longer in vivo than in vitro. While the exact cause for the discrepancy is unknown, the additives in the blood samples, degradation during experiment, oxygenation differences, and the non-stagnant nature of blood in vivo could be potential contributors to the lower values of T1 in the venous samples. PMID:23102945

  3. Conformation of gramicidin A channel in phospholipid vesicles: a 13C and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, S; Wallace, B A; Blout, E R; Morrow, J S; Veatch, W

    1979-01-01

    We have determined the conformation of the channel-forming polypeptide antibiotic gramicidin A in phosphatidylcholine vesicles by using 13C and 19F NMR spectroscopy. The models previously proposed for the conformation of the dimer channel differ in the surface localization of the NH2 and COOH termini. We have incorporated specific 13C and 19F nuclei at both the NH2, and COOH termini of gramicidin and have used 13C and 19F chemical shifts and spin lattice relaxation time measurements to determine the accessibility of these labels to three paramagnetic NMR probes--two in aqueous solution and one attached to the phosphatidylcholine fatty acid chain9 all of our results indicate that the COOH terminus of gramicidin in the channel is located near the surface of the membrane and the NH2 terminus is buried deep within the lipid bilayer. These findings strongly favor an NH2-terminal to NH2-terminal helical dimer as the major conformation for the gramicidin channel in phosphatidylcholine vesicles. PMID:92025

  4. Perturbative harmonic modulation of longitudinal electron-spin magnetization for short T1 determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takayuki

    2015-10-01

    Longitudinally detected T1 measurement scheme (LOD-T1) is studied in detail. In contrast to the original work on LOD-T1, using high power microwave pulses, this work deals with general and practically frequent cases in which perfect inversion of the electron-spin magnetization is not feasible due to the effect of relaxation during microwave pulses. Theoretical studies, numerical simulations, and experiments reveal a pair of separate contributions of the dynamics of the longitudinal magnetization to the LOD signal, namely, the periodic modulation and the relaxation contributions. The latter alone which is of interest can be extracted to give relaxation curves. In addition, it is shown that T1 information can be obtained even when the available microwave power is so low that the electron magnetization can only be perturbatively modulated, at the cost of reduced sensitivity. To overcome this, a modified pulse sequence is proposed. In this new method, the pulse excitations are repeated during half a period of the resonance of the longitudinal detection circuit. The method is called the perturbative harmonic modulation method for longitudinally detected T1 measurement (HM-LOD-T1). HM-LOD-T1 experiments are demonstrated in 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH).

  5. Assessing Myocardial Disease Using T1ρ MRI.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuchi; Liimatainen, Timo; Gorman, Robert C; Witschey, Walter R T

    2014-02-01

    There is great interest to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for non-invasive assessment of myocardial disease in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. Recently, there has been a renewed interest to use a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique utilizing spin locking radiofrequency (RF) pulses, called T1ρ MRI. The spin locking RF pulse creates sensitivity to some mechanisms of nuclear relaxation such as (1)H exchange between water and amide, amine and hydroxyl functional groups in molecules; consequently, there is the potential to non-invasively, and without exogenous contrast agents, obtain important molecular information from diseased myocardial tissue. The purpose of this article is to review and critically examine the recent published literature in the field related to T1ρ MRI of myocardial disease. PMID:24688628

  6. Assessing Myocardial Disease Using T1ρ MRI

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yuchi; Liimatainen, Timo; Gorman, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    There is great interest to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for non-invasive assessment of myocardial disease in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. Recently, there has been a renewed interest to use a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique utilizing spin locking radiofrequency (RF) pulses, called T1ρ MRI. The spin locking RF pulse creates sensitivity to some mechanisms of nuclear relaxation such as 1H exchange between water and amide, amine and hydroxyl functional groups in molecules; consequently, there is the potential to non-invasively, and without exogenous contrast agents, obtain important molecular information from diseased myocardial tissue. The purpose of this article is to review and critically examine the recent published literature in the field related to T1ρ MRI of myocardial disease. PMID:24688628

  7. Acute astrocyte activation in brain detected by MRI: new insights into T(1) hypointensity.

    PubMed

    Sibson, Nicola R; Lowe, John P; Blamire, Andrew M; Martin, Matthew J; Obrenovitch, Tiho P; Anthony, Daniel C

    2008-03-01

    Increases in the T(1) of brain tissue, which give rise to dark or hypointense areas on T(1)-weighted images using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are common to a number of neuropathologies including multiple sclerosis (MS) and ischaemia. However, the biologic significance of T(1) increases remains unclear. Using a multiparametric MRI approach and well-defined experimental models, we have experimentally induced increases in tissue T(1) to determine the underlying cellular basis of such changes. We have shown that a rapid acute increase in T(1) relaxation in the brain occurs in experimental models of both low-flow ischaemia induced by intrastriatal injection of endothelin-1 (ET-1), and excitotoxicity induced by intrastriatal injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). However, there appears to be no consistent correlation between increases in T(1) relaxation and changes in other MRI parameters (apparent diffusion coefficient, T(2) relaxation, or magnetisation transfer ratio of tissue water). Immunohistochemically, one common morphologic feature shared by the ET-1 and NMDA models is acute astrocyte activation, which was detectable within 2 h of intracerebral ET-1 injection. Pretreatment with an inhibitor of astrocyte activation, arundic acid, significantly reduced the spatial extent of the T(1) signal change induced by intrastriatal ET-1 injection. These findings suggest that an increase in T(1) relaxation may identify the acute development of reactive astrocytes within a central nervous system lesion. Early changes in T(1) may, therefore, provide insight into acute and reversible injury processes in neurologic patients, such as those observed before contrast enhancement in MS. PMID:17851455

  8. T2 can be greater than 2T1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevian, H. M.; Skinner, J. L.

    1989-08-01

    We consider a quantum-mechanical two-level system under the influence of both diagonal and off-diagonal stochastic perturbations, and focus on the decay times T1 and T2, which refer to the relaxation to equilibrium of the populations and relative phase of the two levels, respectively. From both theoretical and experimental viewpoints one traditionally expects that T2≤2T1. On the other hand, from a fourth-order cumulant expansion calculation of the asymptotic time dependence of the density matrix elements, Budimir and Skinner [J. Stat. Phys. 49, 1029 (1987)] showed that, in fact, in some instances T2>2T1. In this paper we solve the stochastic model numerically, which leads to the exact time dependence of the density matrix at all times. We find that the analytic prediction that T2>2T1 is not only correct, but also meaningful, in the sense that the density matrix elements decay exponentially after only a short transient time.

  9. Two Categories of 13C/12C Ratios for Higher Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bruce N.; Epstein, Samuel

    1971-01-01

    13C/12C ratios have been determined for plant tissue from 104 species representing 60 families. Higher plants fall into two categories, those with low δPDBI13C values (—24 to —34‰) and those with high δ 13C values (—6 to —19‰). Algae have δ 13C values of —12 to —23‰. Photosynthetic fractionation leading to such values is discussed. PMID:16657626

  10. Inelastic pion scattering by /sup 13/C at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions for inelastically scattered pions were obtained for several states in /sup 13/C at an incident energy of 65 MeV. The data include results from both ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ measurements. In addition, ..pi../sup -/ measurements were made at T/sub ..pi../ = 50 MeV at one angle to give a two point fixed-q excitation function. The data are compared to theory and the data of others. As might be expected, medium corrections are shown to be considerably more important at low energies than at resonance. This is true for inelastic transitions of multipolarity 0,2 and 3. Parameters derived from an analysis of elastic pion scattering and SCX data also provide an adequate description of the inelastic transitions. The charge asymmetry in the cross sections for the 9/2/sup +/ state that was seen at resonance persists at these energies. This result is consistent with an impulse approximation treatment of the spin-flip amplitude. This is true even though the incoming energy of the pions is far below the range where the validity of an impulse treatment is expected. 65 refs., 45 figs.

  11. PASADENA hyperpolarization of 13C biomolecules: equipment design and installation

    PubMed Central

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Harris, Kent C.; Perman, William H.; Robertson, Larry W.; Bhattacharya, Pratip

    2009-01-01

    Object The PASADENA method has achieved hyperpolarization of 16–20% (exceeding 40,000-fold signal enhancement at 4.7 T), in liquid samples of biological molecules relevant to in vivo MRI and MRS. However, there exists no commercial apparatus to perform this experiment conveniently and reproducibly on the routine basis necessary for translation of PASADENA to questions of biomedical importance. The present paper describes equipment designed for rapid production of six to eight liquid samples per hour with high reproducibility of hyperpolarization. Materials and methods Drawing on an earlier, but unpublished, prototype, we provide diagrams of a delivery circuit, a laminar-flow reaction chamber within a low field NMR contained in a compact, movable housing. Assembly instructions are provided from which a computer driven, semiautomated PASADENA polarizer can be constructed. Results Together with an available parahydrogen generator, the polarizer, which can be operated by a single investigator, completes one cycle of hyperpolarization each 52 s. Evidence of efficacy is presented. In contrast to competing, commercially available devices for dynamic nuclear polarization which characteristically require 90 min per cycle, PASADENA provides a low-cost alternative for high throughput. Conclusions This equipment is suited to investigators who have an established small animal NMR and wish to explore the potential of heteronuclear (13C and 15N) MRI, MRS, which harnesses the enormous sensitivity gain offered by hyperpolarization. PMID:19067008

  12. New optical analyzer for 13C-breath test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Dressler, Matthias; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus; Groninga, Hinrich

    2008-04-01

    Medical breath tests are well established diagnostic tools, predominantly for gastroenterological inspections, but also for many other examinations. Since the composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflect the physical condition of a patient, a breath analysis allows one to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that is based on photoacoustic spectroscopy and uses a DFB diode laser at 2.744 μm. The concentration ratio of the CO II isotopologues is determined by measuring the absorption on a 13CO II line in comparison to a 12CO II line. In the specially selected spectral range the lines have similar strengths, although the concentrations differ by a factor of 90. Therefore, the signals are well comparable. Due to an excellent signal-noise-ratio isotope variations of less than 1% can be resolved as required for the breath test.

  13. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  14. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  15. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  16. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  17. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  18. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  19. 13C, 2h NMR studies of structural and dynamical modifications of glucose-exposed porcine aortic elastin.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Moshe C; Bilici, Kübra; Morgan, Steven W; Wang, Yunjie; Zhang, Yanhang; Boutis, Gregory S

    2015-04-01

    Elastin, the principal component of the elastic fiber of the extracellular matrix, imparts to vertebrate tissues remarkable resilience and longevity. This work focuses on elucidating dynamical and structural modifications of porcine aortic elastin exposed to glucose by solid-state NMR spectroscopic and relaxation methodologies. Results from macroscopic stress-strain tests are also presented and indicate that glucose-treated elastin is mechanically stiffer than the same tissue without glucose treatment. These measurements show a large hysteresis in the stress-strain behavior of glucose-treated elastin-a well-known signature of viscoelasticity. Two-dimensional relaxation NMR methods were used to investigate the correlation time, distribution, and population of water in these samples. Differences are observed between the relative populations of water, whereas the measured correlation times of tumbling motion of water across the samples were similar. (13)C magic-angle-spinning NMR methods were applied to investigate structural and dynamical modifications after glucose treatment. Although some overall structure is preserved, the process of glucose exposure results in more heterogeneous structures and slower mobility. The correlation times of tumbling motion of the (13)C-(1)H internuclear vectors in the glucose-treated sample are larger than in untreated samples, pointing to their more rigid structure. The (13)C cross-polarization spectra reveal a notably increased α-helical character in the alanine motifs after glucose exposure. Results from molecular dynamics simulations are provided that add further insight into dynamical and structural changes of a short repeat, [VPGVG]5, an alanine pentamer, desmosine, and isodesmosine sites with and without glucose. The simulations point to changes in the entropic and energetic contributions in the retractive forces of VPGVG and AAAAA motifs. The most notable change is the increase of the energetic contribution in the retractive

  20. 13C, 2H NMR Studies of Structural and Dynamical Modifications of Glucose-Exposed Porcine Aortic Elastin

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Moshe C.; Bilici, Kübra; Morgan, Steven W.; Wang, Yunjie; Zhang, Yanhang; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Elastin, the principal component of the elastic fiber of the extracellular matrix, imparts to vertebrate tissues remarkable resilience and longevity. This work focuses on elucidating dynamical and structural modifications of porcine aortic elastin exposed to glucose by solid-state NMR spectroscopic and relaxation methodologies. Results from macroscopic stress-strain tests are also presented and indicate that glucose-treated elastin is mechanically stiffer than the same tissue without glucose treatment. These measurements show a large hysteresis in the stress-strain behavior of glucose-treated elastin—a well-known signature of viscoelasticity. Two-dimensional relaxation NMR methods were used to investigate the correlation time, distribution, and population of water in these samples. Differences are observed between the relative populations of water, whereas the measured correlation times of tumbling motion of water across the samples were similar. 13C magic-angle-spinning NMR methods were applied to investigate structural and dynamical modifications after glucose treatment. Although some overall structure is preserved, the process of glucose exposure results in more heterogeneous structures and slower mobility. The correlation times of tumbling motion of the 13C-1H internuclear vectors in the glucose-treated sample are larger than in untreated samples, pointing to their more rigid structure. The 13C cross-polarization spectra reveal a notably increased α-helical character in the alanine motifs after glucose exposure. Results from molecular dynamics simulations are provided that add further insight into dynamical and structural changes of a short repeat, [VPGVG]5, an alanine pentamer, desmosine, and isodesmosine sites with and without glucose. The simulations point to changes in the entropic and energetic contributions in the retractive forces of VPGVG and AAAAA motifs. The most notable change is the increase of the energetic contribution in the retractive force

  1. Stable isotope-enhanced two- and three-dimensional diffusion ordered 13C-NMR spectroscopy (SIE-DOSY 13C-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable Isotope-Enhanced Diffusion Ordered (SIE-DOSY) 13C-NMR has been applied to 13C-enriched carbohydrates and has been used to determine diffusion coefficients for pentose and hexose monosaccharides, a disaccharide and a trisaccharide. These 2D spectra were obtained with as little as 8 min of acq...

  2. Relaxed Intensity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    Relaxed intensity refers to a professional philosophy, demeanor, and way of life. It is the key to being an effective educational leader. To be successful one must be relaxed, which means managing stress efficiently, having fun, and enjoying work. Intensity allows one to get the job done and accomplish certain tasks or goals. Educational leaders…

  3. Determination of fructose metabolic pathways in normal and fructose-intolerant children: A sup 13 C NMR study using (U- sup 13 C)fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Gopher, A.; Lapidot, A. ); Vaisman, N. ); Mandel, H. )

    1990-07-01

    An inborn deficiency in the ability of aldolase B to split fructose 1-phosphate is found in humans with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). A stable isotope procedure to elucidate the mechanism of conversion of fructose to glucose in normal children and in HFI children has been developed. A constant infusion of D-(U-{sup 13}C)fructose was given nasogastrically to control and to HFI children. Hepatic fructose conversion to glucose was estimated by examination of {sup 13}C NMR spectra of plasma glucose. Significantly lower values ({approx}3-fold) for fructose conversion to glucose were obtained for the HFI patients as compared to the controls. A quantitative determination of the metabolic pathways of fructose conversion to glucose was derived from {sup 13}C NMR measurement of plasma ({sup 13}C)glucose isotopomer populations. The finding of isotopomer populations of three adjacent {sup 13}C atoms at glucose C-4 ({sup 13}C{sub 3}-{sup 13}C{sub 4}-{sup 13}C{sub 5}) suggests that there is a direct pathway from fructose, by-passing fructose-1-phosphate aldolase, to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The metabolism of fructose by fructose-1-phosphate aldolase activity accounts for only {approx}50% of the total amount of hepatic fructose conversion to glucose. In view of the marked decline by 67% in synthesis of glucose from fructose in HFI subjects found in this study, the extent of ({sup 13}C)glucose formation from a trace amount of (U-{sup 13}C)fructose infused into the patient can be used as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic test for inherent faulty fructose metabolism.

  4. Topological Constraints on Chain-Folding Structure of Semicrystalline Polymer as Studied by 13C-13C Double Quantum NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Youlee; Miyoshi, Toshikazu

    Chain-folding process is a prominent feature of long polymer chains during crystallization. Over the last half century, much effort has been paid to reveal the chain trajectory. Even though various chain-folding models as well as theories of crystallization at molecule levels have been proposed, they could be not reconciled due to the limited experimental evidences. Recent development of double quantum NMR with selective isotope labeling identified the chain-trajectory of 13C labeled isotactic poly(1-butene). The systematic experiments covered a wide range of parameters, i.e. kinetics, concentration, and molecular weight (Mw) . It was demonstrated that i) adjacent re-entry site was invariant as a function of crystallization temperature (Tc) , concentration, andMw, ii) long-range order of adjacent re-entry sequence is independence of kinetics at a given concentration while it decreased with increasing the polymer concentration at a given Tc due to the increased interruption between the chains, and iii) high Mw chains led to the multilayer folded structures in single crystals, but the melt state induced the identical short adjacent sequences of long and short polymer over a wide range of Tc due to the entanglements. The behaviors indicated that the topological restriction plays significant roles in the chain-folding process rather than the kinetics. The proposed framework to control the chain-folding structure presents a new perspective into the chain organization by either the intra- or inter-chain interaction. National Science Foundation Grants DMR-1105829 and 1408855.

  5. Geochemical Approach to Archaeal Ecology: δ13C of GDGTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtin, S.; Warren, C.; Pearson, A.; Pagani, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade and a half, glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) have increasingly been used to reconstruct environmental temperatures; proxies like TEX86 that correlate the relative abundance of these archaeal cell membrane lipids to sea surface temperature are omnipresent in paleoclimatology literature. While it has become common to make claims about past temperatures using GDGTs, our present understanding of the organisms that synthesize the compounds is still quite limited. The generally accepted theory states that microorganisms like the Thaumarchaeota modify the structure of membrane lipids to increase intermolecular interactions, strengthening the membrane at higher temperatures. Yet to date, culture experiments have been largely restricted to a single species, Nitrosopumilus maritimes, and recent studies on oceanic archaeal rRNA have revealed that these biomarkers are produced in diverse, heterogeneous, and site-specific communities. This brings up questions as to whether different subclasses of GDGTs, and all subsequent proxies, represent adaptation within a single organismal group or a shift in community composition. To investigate whether GDGTs with different chain structures, from the simple isoprenoidal GDGT-0 to Crenarchaeol with its many cyclopentane groups, are sourced from archaea with similar or disparate metabolic pathways—and if that information is inherited in GDGTs trapped in marine sediments—this study examines the stable carbon isotope values (δ13C) of GDGTs extracted from the uppermost meters of sediment in the Orca Basin, Gulf of Mexico, using spooling-wire microcombustion isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (SWiM-IRMS), tackling a fundamental assumption of the TEX86 proxy that influences the way we perceive the veracity of existing temperature records.

  6. Fluxomers: a new approach for 13C metabolic flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The ability to perform quantitative studies using isotope tracers and metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is critical for detecting pathway bottlenecks and elucidating network regulation in biological systems, especially those that have been engineered to alter their native metabolic capacities. Mathematically, MFA models are traditionally formulated using separate state variables for reaction fluxes and isotopomer abundances. Analysis of isotope labeling experiments using this set of variables results in a non-convex optimization problem that suffers from both implementation complexity and convergence problems. Results This article addresses the mathematical and computational formulation of 13C MFA models using a new set of variables referred to as fluxomers. These composite variables combine both fluxes and isotopomer abundances, which results in a simply-posed formulation and an improved error model that is insensitive to isotopomer measurement normalization. A powerful fluxomer iterative algorithm (FIA) is developed and applied to solve the MFA optimization problem. For moderate-sized networks, the algorithm is shown to outperform the commonly used 13CFLUX cumomer-based algorithm and the more recently introduced OpenFLUX software that relies upon an elementary metabolite unit (EMU) network decomposition, both in terms of convergence time and output variability. Conclusions Substantial improvements in convergence time and statistical quality of results can be achieved by applying fluxomer variables and the FIA algorithm to compute best-fit solutions to MFA models. We expect that the fluxomer formulation will provide a more suitable basis for future algorithms that analyze very large scale networks and design optimal isotope labeling experiments. PMID:21846358

  7. Sc3CH@C80: selective 13C enrichment of the central carbon atom†

    PubMed Central

    Junghans, Katrin; Rosenkranz, Marco; Popov, Alexey A.

    2016-01-01

    Sc3CH@C80 is synthesized and characterized by 1H, 13C, and 45Sc NMR. A large negative chemical shift of the proton, −11.73 ppm in the Ih and −8.79 ppm in the D5h C80 cage isomers, is found. 13C satellites in the 1H NMR spectrum enabled indirect determination of the 13C chemical shift for the central carbon at 173 ± 1 ppm. Intensity of the satellites allowed determination of the 13C content for the central carbon atom. This unique possibility is applied to analyze the cluster/cage 13C distribution in mechanistic studies employing either 13CH4 or 13C powder to enrich Sc3CH@C80 with 13C. PMID:27109443

  8. Sc3CH@C80: selective (13)C enrichment of the central carbon atom.

    PubMed

    Junghans, Katrin; Rosenkranz, Marco; Popov, Alexey A

    2016-05-01

    Sc3CH@C80 is synthesized and characterized by (1)H, (13)C, and (45)Sc NMR. A large negative chemical shift of the proton, -11.73 ppm in the Ih and -8.79 ppm in the D5h C80 cage isomers, is found. (13)C satellites in the (1)H NMR spectrum enabled indirect determination of the (13)C chemical shift for the central carbon at 173 ± 1 ppm. Intensity of the satellites allowed determination of the (13)C content for the central carbon atom. This unique possibility is applied to analyze the cluster/cage (13)C distribution in mechanistic studies employing either (13)CH4 or (13)C powder to enrich Sc3CH@C80 with (13)C. PMID:27109443

  9. Functional Lung MRI in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Comparison of T1 Mapping, Oxygen-Enhanced T1 Mapping and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Jobst, Bertram J.; Triphan, Simon M. F.; Sedlaczek, Oliver; Anjorin, Angela; Kauczor, Hans Ulrich; Biederer, Jürgen; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian; Wielpütz, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Monitoring of regional lung function in interventional COPD trials requires alternative endpoints beyond global parameters such as FEV1. T1 relaxation times of the lung might allow to draw conclusions on tissue composition, blood volume and oxygen fraction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of lung Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping for the assessment of COPD patients in comparison with contrast enhanced perfusion MRI. Materials and Methods 20 COPD patients (GOLD I-IV) underwent a coronal 2-dimensional inversion recovery snapshot flash sequence (8 slices/lung) at room air and during inhalation of pure oxygen, as well as dynamic contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion imaging. Regional distribution of T1 at room air (T1), oxygen-induced T1 shortening (ΔT1) and peak enhancement were rated by 2 chest radiologists in consensus using a semi-quantitative 3-point scale in a zone-based approach. Results Abnormal T1 and ΔT1 were highly prevalent in the patient cohort. T1 and ΔT1 correlated positively with perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.81 and r = 0.80; p&0.001), and with each other (r = 0.80; p<0.001). In GOLD stages I and II ΔT1 was normal in 16/29 lung zones with mildly abnormal perfusion (15/16 with abnormal T1). The extent of T1 (r = 0.45; p<0.05), ΔT1 (r = 0.52; p<0.05) and perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.52; p<0.05) showed a moderate correlation with GOLD stage. Conclusion Native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping correlated with lung perfusion deficits and severity of COPD. Under the assumption that T1 at room air correlates with the regional pulmonary blood pool and that oxygen-enhanced T1 reflects lung ventilation, both techniques in combination are principally suitable to characterize ventilation-perfusion imbalance. This appears valuable for the assessment of regional lung characteristics in COPD trials without administration of i.v. contrast. PMID:25822195

  10. Nonlinear Optical Investigations of Vibrational Relaxation in Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decola, Philip Lawrence

    Experimental studies of four-wave mixing have been used to obtain novel spectroscopic information in molecular crystals. This work can be separated into singly resonant and multiresonant investigations. One effort was to exploit the frequency and time domain capabilities of singly resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) to study vibrational dynamics in naphthalene and benzene single crystals at liquid Helium temperatures. To a large extent vibrational energy is chemical energy, so to understand the flow of vibrational energy in molecules and molecular aggregates can enhance our understanding of chemical reaction rates and pathways. Some of the salient results are: (1) the existence of motional narrowing in molecular crystals makes it possible for lifetime (T _1) broadening to dominate the linewidth of the vibrational transition even when the intrinsic disorder width is much larger than 1/T_1, (2) relaxation in molecular crystals can be surprisingly slow, ranging from subnanosecond to nanosecond, (3) substantial mode dependent contribution to relaxation from ^{13}C impurities in benzene, and (4) evidence of mode specific energy relaxation observed in a systematic study of benzene Raman active modes. The results obtained here are applied to the problems of understanding the contributions to residual low-temperature vibron linewidths and of developing simple mechanical intuitions to explain systematically the kinetic pathways for vibrational relaxation in molecular crystals. These results are discussed in light of the current theories of excitation dynamics in condensed phases. The other area of study was multiresonant nonlinear spectroscopic investigations of mixed organic crystals. The first multiresonant CARS and its Stokes analogue (CSRS) have been obtained in a mixed crystal of pentacene in benzoic acid allowing the simultaneous observation of ground and excited state Raman spectra. These spectra contain lines that are much sharper than expected

  11. Adult-onset hypothyroidism and the cerebral metabolism of (1,2-13C2) acetate as detected by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chapa, F; Künnecke, B; Calvo, R; Escobar del Rey, F; Morreale de Escobar, G; Cerdán, S

    1995-01-01

    The effects of adult-onset hypothyroidism on the metabolic compartmentation of the cerebral tricarboxylic acid cycle and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt have been investigated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Rats thyroidectomized as adults and age-matched controls were infused in the right jugular vein with unlabeled or (1,2-13C2) acetate solutions for 60 min. At the end of the infusion, the brains were frozen in situ and perchloric acid extracts were prepared and analyzed by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and reverse-phase HPLC. Thyroidectomized animals showed a decrease in the incorporation of 13C from (1,2-13C2) acetate in cerebral metabolites and an increase in the concentrations of unlabeled glutamate and GABA. Computer-assisted interpretation of the 13C multiplets observed for the carbons of glutamate, glutamine, and GABA indicated that adult-onset hypothyroidism produced 1) a decrease in the contribution of infused (1,2-13C2) acetate to the glial tricarboxylic acid cycle; 2) an increase in the contribution of unlabeled acetyl-CoA to the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle; and 3) impairments in the exchange of glutamate, glutamine, and GABA between the neuronal and glial compartments. Despite the fact that the adult brain has often been considered metabolically unresponsive to thyroid hormone status, present results show metabolic alterations in the neuronal and glial compartments that are reversible with substitution therapy. PMID:7828544

  12. Structural characterization of ion-vapor deposited hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings by solid state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jiao; Kato, Takahisa; Watanabe, Sadayuki; Hayashi, Hideo; Kawaguchi, Masahiro

    2014-01-07

    In the present study, unique structural heterogeneity was observed in ion-vapor deposited a-C:H coatings by performing {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CPMAS experiments on solid state nuclear magnetic resonance devices. Two distinct types of sp{sup 2} C clusters were discovered: one of them denoted as sp{sup 2} C′ in content of 3–12 at. % was non-protonated specifically localized in hydrogen-absent regions, while the other dominant one denoted as sp{sup 2} C″ was hydrogenated or at least proximate to proton spins. On basis of the notably analogous variation of sp{sup 2} C′ content and Raman parameters as function of substrate bias voltage in the whole range of 0.5 kV–3.5 kV, a model of nano-clustering configuration was proposed that the sp{sup 2} C′ clusters were embedded between sp{sup 2} C″ clusters and amorphous sp{sup 3} C matrix as trapped interfaces or boundaries where the sp{sup 2} carbon bonds were highly distorted. Continuous increase of bias voltage would promote the nano-clustering and re-ordering of dominant sp{sup 2} C″ clusters, thus results in a marked decrease of interspace and a change of the content of sp{sup 2} C′ clusters. Further investigation on the {sup 13}C magnetization recovery showed typical stretched-exponential approximation due to the prominent presence of paramagnetic centers, and the stretched power α varied within 0.6–0.9 from distinct types of sp{sup 2} C clusters. Differently, the magnetization recovery of {sup 1}H showed better bi-exponential approximation with long and short T{sub 1}(H) fluctuated within 40–60 ms and 0.1–0.3 ms approximately in content of 80% ± 5% and 20% ± 5%, respectively, varying with various bias voltages. Meanwhile, the interrupted {sup 13}C saturation recovery with an interval of short T{sub 1}(H) showed that most of quick-relaxing protons were localized in sp{sup 2} C″ clusters. Such a short T{sub 1}(H) was only possibly resulted from a relaxation mechanism

  13. Performance evaluation of quantitative adiabatic (13)C NMR pulse sequences for site-specific isotopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Thibaudeau, Christophe; Remaud, Gérald; Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge

    2010-07-01

    (2)H/(1)H and (13)C/(12)C site-specific isotope ratios determined by NMR spectroscopy may be used to discriminate pharmaceutically active ingredients based on the synthetic process used in production. Extending the Site-specific Natural Isotope Fractionation NMR (SNIF-NMR) method to (13)C is highly beneficial for complex organic molecules when measurements of (2)H/(1)H ratios lead to poorly defined molecular fingerprints. The current NMR methodology to determine (13)C/(12)C site-specific isotope ratios suffers from poor sensitivity and long experimental times. In this work, several NMR pulse sequences based on polarization transfer were evaluated and optimized to measure precise quantitative (13)C NMR spectra within a short time. Adiabatic 180 degrees (1)H and (13)C pulses were incorporated into distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT) and refocused insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer (INEPT) to minimize the influence of 180 degrees pulse imperfections and of off-resonance effects on the precision of the measured (13)C peak areas. The adiabatic DEPT sequence was applied to draw up a precise site-specific (13)C isotope profile of ibuprofen. A modified heteronuclear cross-polarization (HCP) experiment featuring (1)H and (13)C spin-locks with adiabatic 180 degrees pulses is also introduced. This sequence enables efficient magnetization transfer across a wide (13)C frequency range although not enough for an application in quantitative (13)C isotopic analysis. PMID:20527737

  14. Analysis of hyperpolarized dynamic 13C lactate imaging in a transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Janine M.; Chen, Albert P.; Zierhut, Matthew L.; Bok, Robert A.; Cunningham, Charles H.; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the application of an acquisition that selectively excites the [1-13C]lactate resonance and allows dynamic tracking of the conversion of 13C-lactate from hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate at a high spatial resolution. In order to characterize metabolic processes occurring in a mouse model of prostate cancer, 20 sequential 3D images of 13C-lactate were acquired 5 s apart using a pulse sequence that incorporated a spectral–spatial excitation pulse and a flyback echo-planar readout to track the time course of newly converted 13C-lactate after injection of prepolarized 13C-pyruvate. The maximum lactate signal (MLS), full-width half-maximum (FWHM), time to the peak 13C-lactate signal (TTP) and area under the dynamic curve were calculated from the dynamic images of 10 TRAMP mice and two wild-type controls. The regional variation in 13C-lactate associated with the injected pyruvate was demonstrated by the peak of the 13C-lactate signal occurring earlier in the kidney than in the tumor region. The intensity of the dynamic 13C-lactate curves also varied spatially within the tumor, illustrating the heterogeneity in metabolism that was most prominent in more advanced stages of disease development. The MLS was significantly higher in TRAMP mice that had advanced disease. PMID:19695815

  15. Thin film NMR T1 measurement by MRFM using cyclic adiabatic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sungmin; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Won, Soonho

    2014-03-01

    We obtained the NMR spectrum and the spin lattice relaxation time (T1) for thin film samples using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM). The samples were Alq3, which is widely used as an organic light emitting diode (OLED), thin films of 150 nm thick and a bulk crystal. T1 was measured by using the cyclic adiabatic inversion method at a fixed frequency of 297 MHz and at 12 K. To confirm the reliability of our measurement technique we compared the result with that obtained by conventional NMR method. T1 of thin film samples was measured and compared with that of the bulk sample. thin film, MRFM.

  16. 13C metabolic flux analysis at a genome-scale.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Saratram; Maranas, Costas D

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic models used in 13C metabolic flux analysis generally include a limited number of reactions primarily from central metabolism. They typically omit degradation pathways, complete cofactor balances, and atom transition contributions for reactions outside central metabolism. This study addresses the impact on prediction fidelity of scaling-up mapping models to a genome-scale. The core mapping model employed in this study accounts for (75 reactions and 65 metabolites) primarily from central metabolism. The genome-scale metabolic mapping model (GSMM) (697 reaction and 595 metabolites) is constructed using as a basis the iAF1260 model upon eliminating reactions guaranteed not to carry flux based on growth and fermentation data for a minimal glucose growth medium. Labeling data for 17 amino acid fragments obtained from cells fed with glucose labeled at the second carbon was used to obtain fluxes and ranges. Metabolic fluxes and confidence intervals are estimated, for both core and genome-scale mapping models, by minimizing the sum of square of differences between predicted and experimentally measured labeling patterns using the EMU decomposition algorithm. Overall, we find that both topology and estimated values of the metabolic fluxes remain largely consistent between core and GSM model. Stepping up to a genome-scale mapping model leads to wider flux inference ranges for 20 key reactions present in the core model. The glycolysis flux range doubles due to the possibility of active gluconeogenesis, the TCA flux range expanded by 80% due to the availability of a bypass through arginine consistent with labeling data, and the transhydrogenase reaction flux was essentially unresolved due to the presence of as many as five routes for the inter-conversion of NADPH to NADH afforded by the genome-scale model. By globally accounting for ATP demands in the GSMM model the unused ATP decreased drastically with the lower bound matching the maintenance ATP requirement. A non

  17. Metabolic pathways for ketone body production. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of rat liver in vivo using /sup 13/C-multilabeled fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl-Wostl, C.; Seelig, J.

    1986-11-04

    The hormonal regulation of ketogenesis in the liver of living rat has been studied noninvasively with /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance. The spatial selection for the liver was better than 90%, with extrahepatic adipose tissue contribution only a very small amount of signal. The metabolic activities of the liver were investigated by infusion of /sup 13/C-labeled butyrate in the jugular vein of the anesthetized rat. The rate of butyrate infusion was chosen to be close to the maximum oxidative capacity of the rat liver, and the /sup 13/C signal intensities were enhanced by using doubly labeled (1,3-/sup 13/C)butyrate as a substrate. Different /sup 13/C NMR spectra and hence different metabolites were observed depending on the hormonal state of the animal. The /sup 13/C NMR studies demonstrate that even when rate of acetyl-CoA production are high, the disposal of this compound is not identical in fasted and diabetic animals. This supports previous suggestions that the redox state of the mitochondrion represents the most important factor in regulation. For a given metabolic state of the animal, different signal intensities were obtained depending on whether butyrate was labeled at C-1, C-3, or C-1,3. From the ratios of incorporation of /sup 13/C label into the carbons of 3-hydroxybutyrate, it could be estimated that a large fraction of butyrate evaded ..beta..-oxidation to acetyl-CoA but was converted directly to acetoacetyl-CoA. /sup 13/C-labeled glucose could be detected in vivo in the liver of diabetic rats.

  18. Photosynthesis and sup 13 C/ sup 12 C ratios in Amazonian rain forests

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Merwe, N.J. ); Medina, E. )

    1989-05-01

    Measurements are reported of {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios for air CO{sub 2} at different heights in two Amazonian rain forests. CO{sub 2} emitted from the forest floor is severely depleted in {sup 13}C which produces isotopically light source air throughout the forest. Air {delta}{sup 13}C values vary very little with height above ground, but are about 5 to 6{per thousand} more negative than the open atmosphere. CO{sub 2} recycling under the canopy depletes all leaf {delta}{sup 13}C values by a like amount. Additional factors further deplete leaf {delta}{sup 13}C values by 4 to 5{per thousand} at ground level; this effect decreases with height to zero in the upper canopy, yielding a gradient in {delta}{sup 13}C values.

  19. Site-specific 13C content by quantitative isotopic 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry: a pilot inter-laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Chaintreau, Alain; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst; Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita; Yoshida, Naohiro; Pagelot, Alain; Moskau, Detlef; Moreno, Aitor; Schleucher, Jürgen; Reniero, Fabiano; Holland, Margaret; Guillou, Claude; Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S

    2013-07-25

    Isotopic (13)C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular (13)C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the (13)C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic (13)C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular (13)C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic (13)C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ (13)Ci profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ (13)Ci in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results. PMID:23845488

  20. Biosynthesis of highly enriched 13C-lycopene for human metabolic studies using repeated batch tomato cell culturing with 13C-glucose

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Nancy E.; Rogers, Randy B.; Lu, Chi-Hua; Conlon, Lauren E.; Lila, Mary Ann; Clinton, Steven K.; Erdman, John W.

    2013-01-01

    While putative disease-preventing lycopene metabolites are found in both tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) products and in their consumers, mammalian lycopene metabolism is poorly understood. Advances in tomato cell culturing techniques offer an economical tool for generation of highly-enriched 13C-lycopene for human bioavailability and metabolism studies. To enhance the 13C-enrichment and yields of labeled lycopene from the hp-1 tomato cell line, cultures were first grown in 13C-glucose media for three serial batches and produced increasing proportions of uniformly labeled lycopene (14.3 +/− 1.2 %, 39.6 +/− 0.5 %, and 48.9 +/− 1.5% with consistent yields (from 5.8 to 9 mg/L). An optimized 9-day-long 13C-loading and 18-day-long labeling strategy developed based on glucose utilization and lycopene yields, yielded 13C-lycopene with 93% 13C isotopic purity, and 55% of isotopomers were uniformly labeled. Furthermore, an optimized acetone and hexane extraction led to a four-fold increase in lycopene recovery from cultures compared to a standard extraction. PMID:23561155

  1. Coupling and higher-order effects in the {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C and {sup 13}C(p,d){sup 12}C reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Delaunay, F.; Nunes, F.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Tsang, M.B.

    2005-07-01

    Coupled-channel calculations are performed for the {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C and {sup 13}C(p,d){sup 12}C reactions between 7 and 60 MeV to study the effect of inelastic couplings in transfer reactions. The effect of treating transfer beyond Born approximation is also addressed. The coupling to the {sup 12}C 2{sup +} state is found to change the peak cross section by up to 15%. Effects beyond Born approximation lead to a significant renormalization of the cross sections, between 5% and 10% for deuteron energies above 10 MeV and larger than 10% for lower energies. We also performed calculations including the remnant term in the transfer operator, which has a small impact on the {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C(g.s.) and {sup 13}C(p,d){sup 12}C(g.s.) reactions (where g.s. indicates ground state). Above 30-MeV deuteron energy, the effect of the remnant term is larger than 10% for the {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C(1/2{sup +}, 3.09 MeV) reaction and is found to increase with decreasing neutron separation energy for the 3.09-MeV state of {sup 13}C. This is of importance for transfer reactions with weakly bound nuclei.

  2. Change in the Proton T1 of Fat and Water in Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Houchun H.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes observed changes in the proton T1 relaxation time of both water and lipid when they are in relatively homogeneous mixtures. Results obtained from vegetable oil–water emulsions, pork kidney and lard mixtures, and excised samples of white and brown adipose tissues are presented to demonstrate this change in T1 as a function of mixture fat fraction. As an initial proof of concept, a simpler acetone-water experiment was performed to take advantage of complete miscibility between acetone and water and both components’ single chemical shift peaks. Single-voxel MR spectroscopy was used to measure the T1 of predominant methylene spins in fat and the T1 of water spins in each setup. In the vegetable oil–water emulsions, the T1 of fat varied by as much as 3-fold when water was the dominant mixture component. The T1 of pure lard increased by 170 msec (+37%) when it was blended with lean kidney tissue in a 16% fatty mixture. The fat T1 of lipid-rich white adipose tissue was 312 msec. In contrast, the fat T1 of leaner brown adipose tissue (fat fraction 53%) was 460 msec. A change in the water T1 from that of pure water was also observed in the experiments. PMID:19918888

  3. Model-Based Acceleration of Look-Locker T1 Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Gia, Johannes; Wech, Tobias; Bley, Thorsten; Köstler, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the longitudinal relaxation time T1 has widespread applications in clinical MRI as it promises a quantitative comparison of tissue properties across subjects and scanners. Due to the long scan times of conventional methods, however, the use of quantitative MRI in clinical routine is still very limited. In this work, an acceleration of Inversion-Recovery Look-Locker (IR-LL) T1 mapping is presented. A model-based algorithm is used to iteratively enforce an exponential relaxation model to a highly undersampled radially acquired IR-LL dataset obtained after the application of a single global inversion pulse. Using the proposed technique, a T1 map of a single slice with 1.6mm in-plane resolution and 4mm slice thickness can be reconstructed from data acquired in only 6s. A time-consuming segmented IR experiment was used as gold standard for T1 mapping in this work. In the subsequent validation study, the model-based reconstruction of a single-inversion IR-LL dataset exhibited a T1 difference of less than 2.6% compared to the segmented IR-LL reference in a phantom consisting of vials with T1 values between 200ms and 3000ms. In vivo, the T1 difference was smaller than 5.5% in WM and GM of seven healthy volunteers. Additionally, the T1 values are comparable to standard literature values. Despite the high acceleration, all model-based reconstructions were of a visual quality comparable to fully sampled references. Finally, the reproducibility of the T1 mapping method was demonstrated in repeated acquisitions. In conclusion, the presented approach represents a promising way for fast and accurate T1 mapping using radial IR-LL acquisitions without the need of any segmentation. PMID:25860381

  4. Synthesis of isotopically labeled R- or S-[.sup.13C, .sup.2H] glycerols

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2008-01-22

    The present invention is directed to asymmetric chiral labeled glycerols including at least one chiral atom, from one to two .sup.13C atoms and from zero to four deuterium atoms bonded directly to a carbon atom, e.g., (2S) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol and (2R) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol, and to the use of such chiral glycerols in the preparation of labeled amino acids.

  5. A large metabolic carbon contribution to the δ 13C record in marine aragonitic bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, David P.; Lorrain, Anne; Meng, Li; Dehairs, Frank

    2007-06-01

    It is well known that the incorporation of isotopically light metabolic carbon (C M) significantly affects the stable carbon isotope (δ 13C) signal recorded in biogenic carbonates. This can obscure the record of δ 13C of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon (δ 13C DIC) potentially archived in the shell carbonate. To assess the C M contribution to Mercenaria mercenaria shells collected in North Carolina, USA, we sampled seawater δ 13C DIC, tissue, hemolymph and shell δ 13C. All shells showed an ontogenic decrease in shell δ 13C, with as much as a 4‰ decrease over the lifespan of the clam. There was no apparent ontogenic change in food source indicated by soft tissue δ 13C values, therefore a change in the respired δ 13C value cannot be the cause of this decrease. Hemolymph δ 13C, on the other hand, did exhibit a negative relationship with shell height indicating that respired CO 2 does influence the δ 13C value of internal fluids and that the amount of respired CO 2 is related to the size or age of the bivalve. The percent metabolic C incorporated into the shell (%C M) was significantly higher (up to 37%, with a range from 5% to 37%) than has been found in other bivalve shells, which usually contain less than 10%C M. Interestingly, the hemolymph did contain less than 10%C M, suggesting that complex fractionation might occur between hemolymph and calcifying fluids. Simple shell biometrics explained nearly 60% of the observed variability in %C M, however, this is not robust enough to predict %C M for fossil shells. Thus, the metabolic effect on shell δ 13C cannot easily be accounted for to allow reliable δ 13C DIC reconstructions. However, there does seem to be a common effect of size, as all sites had indistinguishable slopes between the %C M and shell height (+0.19% per mm of shell height).

  6. Measuring (13)C-(2)D dipolar couplings with a universal REDOR dephasing curve

    PubMed

    Gullion

    2000-09-01

    A (13)C-observe REDOR experiment is described which allows (13)C-(2)D dipolar couplings to be obtained by a universal dipolar dephasing curve. Previous (13)C-observe REDOR experiments on (13)C-(2)D spin pairs generally relied on numerical simulations to obtain the dipolar coupling. The REDOR experiment described in this article is based on a deuterium composite pulse, and the data analysis eliminates the need for numerical simulations and is the same as the traditional REDOR analysis performed on pairs of spin-12 nuclei. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10968975

  7. Open-Source Automated Parahydrogen Hyperpolarizer for Molecular Imaging Using (13)C Metabolic Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Aaron M; Shchepin, Roman V; Truong, Milton L; Wilkens, Ken; Pham, Wellington; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-08-16

    An open-source hyperpolarizer producing (13)C hyperpolarized contrast agents using parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) for biomedical and other applications is presented. This PHIP hyperpolarizer utilizes an Arduino microcontroller in conjunction with a readily modified graphical user interface written in the open-source processing software environment to completely control the PHIP hyperpolarization process including remotely triggering an NMR spectrometer for efficient production of payloads of hyperpolarized contrast agent and in situ quality assurance of the produced hyperpolarization. Key advantages of this hyperpolarizer include: (i) use of open-source software and hardware seamlessly allowing for replication and further improvement as well as readily customizable integration with other NMR spectrometers or MRI scanners (i.e., this is a multiplatform design), (ii) relatively low cost and robustness, and (iii) in situ detection capability and complete automation. The device performance is demonstrated by production of a dose (∼2-3 mL) of hyperpolarized (13)C-succinate with %P13C ∼ 28% and 30 mM concentration and (13)C-phospholactate at %P13C ∼ 15% and 25 mM concentration in aqueous medium. These contrast agents are used for ultrafast molecular imaging and spectroscopy at 4.7 and 0.0475 T. In particular, the conversion of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate to (13)C-lactate in vivo is used here to demonstrate the feasibility of ultrafast multislice (13)C MRI after tail vein injection of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate in mice. PMID:27478927

  8. Sub-second Proton Imaging of 13C Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents in Water

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Milton L.; Coffey, Aaron M.; Shchepin, Roman V.; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2014-01-01

    Indirect proton detection of 13C hyperpolarized contrast agents potentially enables greater sensitivity. Presented here is a study of sub-second projection imaging of hyperpolarized 13C contrast agent addressing the obstacle posed by water suppression for indirect detection in vivo. Sodium acetate phantoms were used to develop and test water suppression and sub-second imaging with frequency selective RF pulses using spectroscopic and imaging indirect proton detection. A 9.8 mM aqueous solution of 13C PHIP hyperpolarized 2-hydroxyethyl-13C-propionate-d2,3,3 (HEP),

    ~25% was used for demonstration of indirect proton sub-second imaging detection. Balanced 2D FSSFP (Fast Steady State Free Precession) allowed recording proton images with FOV = 64×64 mm2 and spatial resolution 2×2 mm2 with total acquisition time of less than 0.2 s. In thermally polarized sodium 1-13C-acetate, 13C to 1H polarization transfer efficiency of 45.1% of the theoretically predicted values was observed in imaging detection corresponding to an 11 fold of overall sensitivity improvement compared to direct 13C FSSFP imaging. 13C to 1H polarization transfer efficiency of 27% was observed in imaging detection corresponding to a 3.25 fold sensitivity improvement compared to direct 13C FSSFP imaging with hyperpolarized HEP. The range of potential applications and limitations of this sub-second and ultra-sensitive imaging approach are discussed. PMID:24753438

  9. Conditions to obtain precise and true measurements of the intramolecular 13C distribution in organic molecules by isotopic 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bayle, Kevin; Gilbert, Alexis; Julien, Maxime; Yamada, Keita; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Akoka, Serge; Yoshida, Naohiro; Remaud, Gérald S

    2014-10-10

    Intramolecular (13)C composition gives access to new information on the (bio) synthetic history of a given molecule. Isotopic (13)C NMR spectrometry provides a general tool for measuring the position-specific (13)C content. As an emerging technique, some aspects of its performance are not yet fully delineated. This paper reports on (i) the conditions required to obtain satisfactory trueness and precision for the determination of the internal (13)C distribution, and (ii) an approach to determining the "absolute" position-specific (13)C content. In relation to (i), a precision of <1% can be obtained whatever the molecule on any spectrometer, once quantitative conditions are met, in particular appropriate proton decoupling efficiency. This performance is a prerequisite to the measurement of isotope fractionation either on the transformed or residual compound when a chemical reaction or process is being studied. The study of the trueness has revealed that the response of the spectrometer depends on the (13)C frequency range of the studied molecule, i.e. the chemical shift range. The "absolute value" and, therefore, the trueness of the (13)C NMR measurements has been assessed on acetic acid and by comparison to the results obtained on the fragments from COOH and CH3 by isotopic mass spectrometry coupled to a pyrolysis device (GC-Py-irm-MS), this technique being the reference method for acetic acid. Of the two NMR spectrometers used in this work, one gave values that corresponded to those obtained by GC-Py-irm-MS (thus, the "true" value) while the other showed a bias, which was dependent to the range covered by the resonance frequencies of the molecule. Therefore, the former can be used directly for studying isotope affiliations, while the latter can only be used directly for comparative data, for example in authenticity studies, but can also be used to obtain the true values by applying appropriate correction factors. The present study assesses several key protocol

  10. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  11. Caffeine intake inverts the effect of adenosine on myocardial perfusion during stress as measured by T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Dirkjan; Prakken, Niek H; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; van Dijkman, Paul R M; van der Harst, Pim; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2016-10-01

    Caffeine intake before adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging may cause false negative findings. We hypothesized that the antagonistic effect of caffeine can be measured by T1 relaxation times in rest and adenosine stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), as T1 mapping techniques are sensitive to changes in myocardial blood volume. We prospectively analyzed 105 consecutive patients with adenosine stress perfusion CMR on a 1.5-T MRI system. Rest and stress T1 mapping was performed using Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery. T1 reactivity was defined as difference in T1rest and T1stress (∆T1). Fifteen patients drank coffee within 4 h of CMR (<4H caffeine group), and 10 patients had coffee the day before (>8H caffeine group). Comparison was made to patients without self-reported coffee intake: 50 with normal CMR (control group), 18 with myocardial ischemia, and 12 with myocardial infarction. The national review board approved the study; all patients gave written informed consent. The <4H caffeine group showed inverted ∆T1 of -7.8 % (T1rest 975 ± 42 ms, T1stress 898 ± 51 ms, p < 0.0005). The >8H caffeine group showed reduced T1 reactivity (1.8 %; T1rest 979 ms, T1stress 997 ms) compared to the controls (4.3 %; T1rest 977 ± 40 ms, T1stress 1018 ± 40 ms), p < 0.0005. Ischemic and infarcted myocardium showed minimal T1 reactivity (0.2 and 0.3 %, respectively). Caffeine intake inverts the adenosine effect during stress perfusion CMR as measured by T1 mapping. T1 reactivity can assess the adequacy of adenosine-induced stress in perfusion CMR. PMID:27473274

  12. Monitoring creatine and phosphocreatine by (13)C MR spectroscopic imaging during and after (13)C4 creatine loading: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Barbara H; Lassche, Saskia; Hopman, Maria T; Wevers, Ron A; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Heerschap, Arend

    2016-08-01

    Creatine (Cr) supplementation to enhance muscle performance shows variable responses among individuals and different muscles. Direct monitoring of the supplied Cr in muscles would address these differences. In this feasibility study, we introduce in vivo 3D (13)C MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of the leg with oral ingestion of (13)C4-creatine to observe simultaneously Cr and phosphocreatine (PCr) for assessing Cr uptake, turnover, and the ratio PCr over total Cr (TCr) in individual muscles. (13)C MRSI was performed of five muscles in the posterior thigh in seven subjects (two males and two females of ~20 years, one 82-year-old male, and two neuromuscular patients) with a (1)H/(13)C coil in a 3T MR system before, during and after intake of 15 % (13)C4-enriched Cr. Subjects ingested 20 g Cr/day for 4 days in four 5 g doses at equal time intervals. The PCr/TCr did not vary significantly during supplementation and was similar for all subjects and investigated muscles (average 0.71 ± 0.07), except for the adductor magnus (0.64 ± 0.03). The average Cr turnover rate, assessed in male muscles, was 2.1 ± 0.7 %/day. The linear uptake rates of Cr were variable between muscles, although not significantly different. This assessment was possible in all investigated muscles of young male volunteers, but less so in muscles of the other subjects due to lower signal-to-noise ratio. Improvements for future studies are discussed. In vivo (13)C MRSI after (13)C-Cr ingestion is demonstrated for longitudinal studies of Cr uptake, turnover, and PCr/TCr ratios of individual muscles in one exam. PMID:27401085

  13. Photobioreactor design for isotopic non-stationary 13C-metabolic flux analysis (INST 13C-MFA) under photoautotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Martzolff, Arnaud; Cahoreau, Edern; Cogne, Guillaume; Peyriga, Lindsay; Portais, Jean-Charles; Dechandol, Emmanuel; Le Grand, Fabienne; Massou, Stéphane; Gonçalves, Olivier; Pruvost, Jérémy; Legrand, Jack

    2012-12-01

    Adaptive metabolic behavior of photoautotrophic microorganisms toward genetic and environmental perturbations can be interpreted in a quantitative depiction of carbon flow through a biochemical reaction network using isotopic non-stationary (13) C-metabolic flux analysis (INST (13) C-MFA). To evaluate (13) C-metabolic flux maps for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an original experimental framework was designed allowing rapid, reliable collection of high-quality isotopomer data against time. It involved (i) a short-time (13) C labeling injection device based on mixing control in a torus-shaped photobioreactor with plug-flow hydrodynamics allowing a sudden step-change in the (13) C proportion in the substrate feed and (ii) a rapid sampling procedure using an automatic fast filtration method coupled to a manual rapid liquid nitrogen quenching step. (13) C-substrate labeling enrichment was controlled through the total dissolved inorganic carbon concentration in the pulsed solution. First results were obtained from steady-state continuous culture measurements allowing the characterization of the kinetics of label incorporation into light-limited growing cells cultivated in a photobioreactor operating at the maximal biomass productivity for an incident photon flux density of 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1). (13)C label incorporation was measured for 21 intracellular metabolites using IC-MS/MS in 58 samples collected across a labeling experiment duration of 7 min. The fastest labeling rate was observed for 2/3-phosphoglycerate with an apparent isotopic stationary state reached after 300 s. The labeling rate was consistent with the optimized mixing time of about 4.9 s inside the reactor and the shortest reliable sampling period assessed at 5 s. PMID:22688667

  14. A Large Metabolic Carbon Ccontribution to the δ13C Record in Marine Aragonitic Bivalve Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, D. P.; Lorrain, A.; Dehairs, F.

    2006-12-01

    The stable carbon isotopic signature archived in bivalve shells was originally thought to record the δ13C of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC). However, more recent studies have shown that the incorporation of isotopically light metabolic carbon (M) significantly affects the δ13C signal recorded in biogenic carbonates. To assess the M contribution to Mercenaria mercenaria shells collected in North Carolina, USA, we sampled seawater δ13C-DIC, tissue, hemolymph and shell δ13C. We found up to a 4‰ decrease through ontogeny in shell δ13C in a 23 year old individual. There was no correlation between shell height or age and tissue δ13C. Thus, the ontogenic decrease observed in the shell δ13C could not be attributed to changes in food sources as the animal ages leading to more negative metabolic CO2, since this would require a negative relationship between tissue δ13C and shell height. Hemolymph δ13C, on the other hand, did exhibit a negative relationship with height, but the δ13C values were more positive than expected, indicating that hemolymph may not be a good proxy of extrapallial fluid δ13C. Nevertheless, the hemolymph data indicate that respired CO2 does influence the δ13C of internal fluids and that the amount of respired CO2 is related to the age of the bivalve. The percent metabolic C incorporated into the shell (%M) was significantly higher (up to 37%) than has been found in other bivalve shells, which usually contain less than 10 %M. Attempts to use shell biometrics to predict %M could not explain more than ~60% of the observed variability. Moreover, there were large differences in the %M between different sites. Thus, the metabolic effect on shell δ13C cannot easily be accounted for to allow reliable δ13C-DIC reconstructions. However, there does seem to be a common effect of size, as all sites had indistinguishable slopes between the %M and shell height (+0.19% per mm of shell height).

  15. Cerebral abnormalities: use of calculated T1 and T2 magnetic resonance images for diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, C.M.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1984-01-01

    The potential clinical importance of T1 and T2 relaxation times in distinguishing normal and pathologic tissue with magnetic resonance (MR) is discussed and clinical examples of cerebral abnormalities are given. Five patients with cerebral infarction, 15 with multiple sclerosis, two with Wilson disease, and four with tumors were imaged. Hemorrhagic and ischemic cerebrovascular accidents were distinguished using the spin echo technique. In the patients with multiple sclerosis, lesions had prolonged T1 and T2 times, but the definition of plaque was limited by spatial resolution. No abnormalities in signal intensity were seen in the patient with Wilson disease who was no longer severly disabled; abnormal increased signal intensity in the basal ganglia was found in the second patient with Wilson disease. Four tumors produced abnormal T1 and T2 relaxation times but these values alone were not sufficient for tumor characterization.

  16. Preliminary studies of a canine 13C-aminopyrine demethylation blood test.

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, E M; Steiner, J M; Williams, D A; Klein, P D

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether a 13C-aminopyrine demethylation blood test is technically feasible in clinically healthy dogs, whether oral administration of 13C-aminopyrine causes a detectable increase in percent dose/min (PCD) of 13C administered as 13C-aminopyrine and recovered in gas extracted from blood, and whether gas extraction efficiency has an impact on PCD. A dose of 2 mg/kg body weight of 13C-aminopyrine dissolved in deionized water was administered orally to 6 clinically healthy dogs. Blood samples were taken from each dog 0, 30, 60, and 120 min after administration of the 13C-aminopyrine. Carbon dioxide was extracted from blood samples by addition of acid and analyzed by fractional mass spectrometry. None of the 6 dogs showed any side effects after 13C-aminopyrine administration. All 6 dogs showed a measurable increase of the PCD in gas samples extracted from blood samples at 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min after 13C-aminopyrine administration. Coefficients of variation between the triplicate samples were statistically significantly higher for the %CO2, a measure of extraction efficiency, than for PCD values (P < 0.0001). The 13C-aminopyrine demethylation blood test described here is technically feasible. Oral administration of 13C-aminopyrine did not lead to gross side effects in the 6 dogs. Clinically healthy dogs show a measurable increase of PCD in gas extracted from blood samples after oral administration of 13C-aminopyrine. Efficiency of CO2 extraction from blood samples does not have an impact on PCD determined from these blood samples. This test may prove useful to evaluate hepatic function in dogs. PMID:11227194

  17. Metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate through alternate pathways in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Jin, Eunsook S; Moreno, Karlos X; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Fidelino, Leila; Merritt, Matthew E; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-04-01

    The source of hyperpolarized (HP) [(13) C]bicarbonate in the liver during metabolism of HP [1-(13) C]pyruvate is uncertain and likely changes with physiology. Multiple processes including decarboxylation through pyruvate dehydrogenase or pyruvate carboxylase followed by subsequent decarboxylation via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (gluconeogenesis) could play a role. Here we tested which metabolic fate of pyruvate contributed to the appearance of HP [(13) C]bicarbonate during metabolism of HP [1-(13) C]pyruvate by the liver in rats after 21 h of fasting compared to rats with free access to food. The (13) C NMR of HP [(13) C]bicarbonate was observed in the liver of fed rats, but not in fasted rats where pyruvate carboxylation and gluconeogenesis was active. To further explore the relative fluxes through pyruvate carboxylase versus pyruvate dehydrogenase in the liver under typical conditions of hyperpolarization studies, separate parallel experiments were performed with rats given non-hyperpolarized [2,3-(13) C]pyruvate. (13) C NMR analysis of glutamate isolated from the liver of rats revealed that flux from injected pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase was dominant under fed conditions whereas flux through pyruvate carboxylase dominated under fasted conditions. The NMR signal of HP [(13) C]bicarbonate does not parallel pyruvate carboxylase activity followed by subsequent decarboxylation reaction leading to glucose production. In the liver of healthy well-fed rats, the appearance of HP [(13) C]bicarbonate exclusively reflects decarboxylation of HP [1-(13) C]pyruvate via pyruvate dehydrogenase. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26836042

  18. Effects of sampling method on foliar δ (13)C of Leymus chinensis at different scales.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjie; Li, Yan; Zhang, Lirong; Xu, Xingliang; Niu, Haishan

    2015-03-01

    Stable carbon isotope composition (δ (13)C) usually shows a negative relationship with precipitation at a large scale. We hypothesized that sampling method affects foliar δ (13)C and its response pattern to precipitation. We selected 11 sites along a precipitation gradient in Inner Mongolia and collected leaves of Leymus chinensis with five or six replications repeatedly in each site from 2009 to 2011. Additionally, we collected leaves of L. chinensis separately from two types of grassland (grazed and fenced) in 2011. Foliar δ (13)C values of all samples were measured. We compared the patterns that foliar δ (13)C to precipitation among different years or different sample sizes, the differences of foliar δ (13)C between grazed and fenced grassland. Whether actual annual precipitation (AAP) or mean annual precipitation (MAP), it was strongly correlated with foliar δ (13)C every year. Significant difference was found between the slopes of foliar δ (13)C to AAP and MAP every year, among the slopes of foliar δ (13)C to AAP from 2009 to 2011. The more samples used at each site the lower and convergent P-values of the linear regression test between foliar δ (13)C and precipitation. Furthermore, there was significant lower foliar δ (13)C value in presence of grazed type than fenced type grassland. These findings provide evidence that there is significant effect of sampling method to foliar δ (13)C and its response pattern to precipitation of L. chinensis. Our results have valuable implications in methodology for future field sampling studies. PMID:25798224

  19. The Nature of Carbonate and Organic δ13C Covariance Through Geological Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlert, A. M.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Significant evolutionary, climatic, and oceanographic events in Earth history are often accompanied by excursions in the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of marine carbonates and co-occurring sedimentary organic material. The observation of synchronous excursions in the δ13C values of marine carbonates and coeval organic matter is commonly thought to prove that the deposit has not been altered by diagenesis, and that the variations in the δ13C records are the result of a significant change in global carbon cycling. Furthermore, this model suggests that the covariance of carbonate and organic δ13C records is driven only by changes in the δ13C value of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the surface waters of the ocean. However, recent work suggests that there may be at least two alternate models for generating covariance between carbonate and organic δ13C values in the geologic record. One of the models invokes sea-level driven syndepositional mixing between isotopically distinct sources of carbonate and organic material to produce positive covariance between carbonate and organic δ13C values. The second model suggests that post-depositional alteration to the carbonate δ13C values during meteoric diagenesis, in concert with concurrent contributions of terrestrial organic material during subaerial exposure, can also produce co-occurring negative excursions with tightly covariant δ13C records. In contrast to earlier interpretations of covariant δ13C values, these models suggest that both syndepositional and post-depositional factors can significantly influence the relationship between carbonate and organic δ13C values in a variety of depositional environments. The implications for reconstructions of ancient global carbon cycle events will be explored within the context of these three models, and their relative importance throughout geologic time will be discussed.

  20. Ionic Dynamics in [C4mim]NTf2 in the Glassy and Liquid States: Results from 13C and 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Endo, Takatsugu; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2014-12-26

    The ionic dynamics of the room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimdiazolium bis((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)amide ([C(4)mim]NTf(2)) is studied using (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy over a wide temperature range encompassing the glassy and liquid states. The temperature dependence of the (13)C spin-lattice relaxation time is analyzed with four different models to derive the rotational dynamics of the RTIL in the nano to picosecond range. It was found that the extended model-free approach bridges the data obtained from the BPP and DC models, and describes ion dynamics of the RTIL well. Three different motions are observed based on the approach: an overall ion rotation, a slow and a fast local rotational motion. The time scale of the slow local rotational motion, particularly of the imidazolium ring carbons, is strongly coupled to the time scale of the overall ion rotation, above the melting point. Below the melting point these two time scales show strong decoupling and the local rotation displays nanosecond dynamics in the glassy state. The analyses of the second moment (M(2)) of the (1)H and (13)C nuclides indicate that, in addition to the axial rotations of the two methyl groups (cation) and the CF(3) group (anion), all (13)C sites including the imidazolium ring carbon and CF(3) show evidence of mobility, even in the glassy state. PMID:25458921

  1. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique. PMID:16332107

  2. Refined Analysis of Brain Energy Metabolism Using In Vivo Dynamic Enrichment of 13C Multiplets

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani M., Masoumeh; Duarte, João M. N.; Kunz, Nicolas; Gruetter, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with the infusion of 13C-labeled precursors is a unique approach to study in vivo brain energy metabolism. Incorporating the maximum information available from in vivo localized 13C spectra is of importance to get broader knowledge on cerebral metabolic pathways. Metabolic rates can be quantitatively determined from the rate of 13C incorporation into amino acid neurotransmitters such as glutamate and glutamine using suitable mathematical models. The time course of multiplets arising from 13C-13C coupling between adjacent carbon atoms was expected to provide additional information for metabolic modeling leading to potential improvements in the estimation of metabolic parameters. The aim of the present study was to extend two-compartment neuronal/glial modeling to include dynamics of 13C isotopomers available from fine structure multiplets in 13C spectra of glutamate and glutamine measured in vivo in rats brain at 14.1 T, termed bonded cumomer approach. Incorporating the labeling time courses of 13C multiplets of glutamate and glutamine resulted in elevated precision of the estimated fluxes in rat brain as well as reduced correlations between them. PMID:26969691

  3. 13C MRS studies of neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Douglas L.; De Feyter, Henk M.; de Graaf, Robin A.; Mason, Graeme F.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years 13C MRS has been established as the only non invasive method for measuring glutamate neurotransmission and cell specific neuroenergetics. Although technically and experimentally challenging 13C MRS has already provided important new information on the relationship between neuroenergetics and neuronal function, energy cost of brain function, the high neuronal activity in the resting brain state, and how neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling are altered in neurological and psychiatric disease. In this paper the current state of 13C MRS as it is applied to study neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling in humans is reviewed. The focus is predominantly on recent findings in humans regarding metabolic pathways, applications to clinical research, and the technical status of the method. Results from in vivo 13C MRS studies in animals are discussed from the standpoint of validation of MRS measurements of neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling and where they have helped identify key questions to address in human research. Controversies concerning the relation of neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling and factors impacting accurate determination of fluxes through mathematical modeling are addressed. We further touch upon different 13C labeled substrates used to study brain metabolism, before reviewing a number of human brain diseases studied using 13C MRS. Future technological developments are discussed that will help to overcome limitations of 13C MRS with special attention on recent developments in hyperpolarized 13C MRS. PMID:21882281

  4. Amorphous Fe72Cr8P13C7 Powder with High Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kangjo; Hwang, Choll-Hong; Pak, Chang-Su; Ryeom, Yeong-Jo

    1982-07-01

    Amorphous Fe72Cr8P13C7 powder has been prepared by the spark erosion technique and its corrosion behavior investigated potentiodynamically. It is concluded that the powder prepared this way possesses a relatively high corrosion resistance, as does amorphous Fe72Cr8P13C7 ribbon prepared by rapid quenching.

  5. 13c-SUCROSE BREATH TEST TO DIFFERENTIATE CONGENITAL SUCRASE-ISOMALTASE DEFICIENCY FROM PANDISACCHARIDASE DEFICIENCY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A substrate-paired breath test using 13C-sucrose (S) and 13C-glucose (G) has been developed to assess congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency (CSID). The aim was to determine if CSID could be detected without duodenal enzyme assay. Methods: Two patients (1F:1M, aged 1 & 15 yrs) wi...

  6. Latitudinal Variation in δ13C derived from Terrestrial Plants during the Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strganac, C.; Jacobs, L. L.; Ferguson, K.; Macphee, R. D.; Fiorillo, A. R.; Hooker, J.; Nishida, Y.; Flemming, C.

    2010-12-01

    Modern plankton and terrestrial plants exhibit a gradient in δ13C with latitude. Although there are several reasons for δ13C variation in plants, modern latitudinal variation is correlated with environmental and climatic factors such as temperature. We present δ13C values derived from mid-Cretaceous terrestrial plant fossils in Texas at paleolatitude ~30 N and Australia at paleolatitude ~70 S that show an offset in δ13C values, suggesting a latitudinal gradient in δ13C in plants during the Cretaceous. This hypothesis was tested by new data from Antarctica at paleolatitude ~60 S and Alaska at paleolatitude ~70 N, and we compared these data to published carbon isotope records. The latitudinal variation in plant δ13C was on the order of 2‰ more negative at high latitudes, suggesting a shallower Cretaceous latitudinal gradient in plant δ13C than at present. The shallow gradient in plant δ13C during the Cretaceous correlates with a latitudinal temperature gradient that is also less than today.

  7. Natural (13) C distribution in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) and consequences for allocation pattern.

    PubMed

    Lamade, Emmanuelle; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Darlan, Nuzul Hijri; Rodrigues, Rosario Lobato; Fresneau, Chantal; Mauve, Caroline; Lamothe-Sibold, Marlène; Sketriené, Diana; Ghashghaie, Jaleh

    2016-01-01

    Oil palm has now become one of the most important crops, palm oil representing nearly 25% of global plant oil consumption. Many studies have thus addressed oil palm ecophysiology and photosynthesis-based models of carbon allocation have been used. However, there is a lack of experimental data on carbon fixation and redistribution within palm trees, and important C-sinks have not been fully characterized yet. Here, we carried out extensive measurement of natural (13) C-abundance (δ(13) C) in oil palm tissues, including fruits at different maturation stages. We find a (13) C-enrichment in heterotrophic organs compared to mature leaves, with roots being the most (13) C-enriched. The δ(13) C in fruits decreased during maturation, reflecting the accumulation in (13) C-depleted lipids. We further used observed δ(13) C values to compute plausible carbon fluxes using a steady-state model of (13) C-distribution including metabolic isotope effects ((12) v/(13) v). The results suggest that fruits represent a major respiratory loss (≈39% of total tree respiration) and that sink organs such as fruits are fed by sucrose from leaves. That is, glucose appears to be a quantitatively important compound in palm tissues, but computations indicate that it is involved in dynamic starch metabolism rather that C-exchange between organs. PMID:26228944

  8. Variation in woody plant delta(13)C along a topoedaphic gradient in a subtropical savanna parkland.

    PubMed

    Bai, Edith; Boutton, Thomas W; Liu, Feng; Wu, X Ben; Archer, Steven R

    2008-06-01

    delta(13)C values of C(3) plants are indicators of plant carbon-water relations that integrate plant responses to environmental conditions. However, few studies have quantified spatial variation in plant delta(13)C at the landscape scale. We determined variation in leaf delta(13)C, leaf nitrogen per leaf area (N(area)), and specific leaf area (SLA) in April and August 2005 for all individuals of three common woody species within a 308 x 12-m belt transect spanning an upland-lowland topoedaphic gradient in a subtropical savanna in southern Texas. Clay content, available soil moisture, and soil total N were all negatively correlated with elevation. The delta(13)C values of Prosopis glandulosa (deciduous N(2)-fixing tree legume), Condalia hookeri (evergreen shrub), and Zanthoxylum fagara (evergreen shrub) leaves increased 1-4 per thousand with decreasing elevation, with the delta(13)C value of P. glandulosa leaves being 1-3 per thousand higher than those of the two shrub species. Contrary to theory and results from previous studies, delta(13)C values were highest where soil water was most available, suggesting that some other variable was overriding or interacting with water availability. Leaf N(area) was positively correlated with leaf delta(13)C of all species (p < 0.01) and appeared to exert the strongest control over delta(13)C along this topoedaphic gradient. Since leaf N(area) is positively related to photosynthetic capacity, plants with high leaf N(area) are likely to have low p (I)/p (a) ratios and therefore higher delta(13)C values, assuming stomatal conductance is constant. Specific leaf area was not correlated significantly with leaf delta(13)C. Following a progressive growing season drought in July/August, leaf delta(13)C decreased. The lower delta(13)C in August may reflect the accumulation of (13)C-depleted epicuticular leaf wax. We suggest control of leaf delta(13)C along this topoedaphic gradient is mediated by leaf N(area) rather than by stomatal

  9. A 13C-NMR study of exopolysaccharide synthesis in Rhizobium meliloti Su47 strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernier, P.; Portais, J.-C.; Besson, I.; Courtois, J.; Courtois, B.; Barbotin, J.-N.

    1998-02-01

    Metabolic pathways implied in the synthesis of succinoglycan produced by the Su47 strain of R. meliloti were evaluated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy after incubation with [1{-}13C] or [2{-}13C] glucose. The biosynthesis of this polymer by R. meliloti from glucose occurred by a direct polymerisation of the introduced glucose and by the pentose phosphate pathway. Les voies métaboliques impliquées dans la synthèse du succinoglycane produit par la souche Su47 de R. meliloti ont été évaluées par la spectroscopie de RMN du carbone 13 après incubation des cellules avec du [1{-}13C] ou [2{-}13C] glucose. La biosynthèse de ce polymère à partir du glucose se produit par polymérisation directe du glucose et par la voie des pentoses phosphate.

  10. Fish Movement and Dietary History Derived from Otolith (delta)13C

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P K; Finlay, J C; Power, M E; Phillis, C C; Ramon, C E; Eaton, G F; Ingram, B L

    2005-09-08

    Habitat use and food web linkages are critical data for fish conservation and habitat restoration efforts, particularly for threatened salmonids species. Otolith microchemistry has been shown to be a powerful tool for reconstructing fish movement, but over small distances (kilometers), geology-derived differences in otolith chemistry are rare. Here, we demonstrate that otolith {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio (i.e. {delta}{sup 13}C) of anadromous steelhead trout can be used to distinguish residence in small streams from residence in larger streams and rivers. While previous research has shown that water dissolved inorganic carbon {delta}{sup 13}C is the primary source of carbon in otoliths, the downstream change in food {delta}{sup 13}C in this watershed appears to be the primary control on otolith {delta}{sup 13}C. As a result, this method can also be applied to the problem of reconstructing feeding history at a location.

  11. Fish movement and dietary history derived from otolith δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, P. K.; Finlay, J. C.; Power, M. E.; Phillis, C. C.; Ramon, C. E.; Eaton, G. F.; Ingram, B. L.

    2005-12-01

    Habitat use and food web linkages are critical data for fish conservation and habitat restoration efforts, particularly for threatened salmonids species. Otolith microchemistry has been shown to be a powerful tool for reconstructing fish movement, but over small distances (kilometers), geology-derived differences in otolith chemistry are rare. Here, we demonstrate that otolith 13C/12C ratio (i.e. δ13C) of anadromous steelhead trout can be used to distinguish residence in small streams from residence in larger streams and rivers. While previous research has shown that water dissolved inorganic carbon d13C is the primary source of carbon in otoliths, the downstream change in food δ13C in this watershed appears to be the primary control on otolith δ13C. As a result, this method can also be applied to the problem of reconstructing feeding history at a location.

  12. Evidence of 13C non-covalent isotope effects obtained by quantitative 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at natural abundance during normal phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Botosoa, Eliot P; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Rojas, Jose Manuel Moreno; Guillou, Claude; Remaud, Gérald S

    2009-10-16

    Quantitative isotopic (13)C NMR at natural abundance has been used to determine the site-by-site (13)C/(12)C ratios in vanillin and a number of related compounds eluted from silica gel chromatography columns under similar conditions. Head-to-tail isotope fractionation is observed in all compounds at the majority of carbon positions. Furthermore, the site-specific isotope deviations show signatures characteristic of the position and functionality of the substituents present. The observed effects are more complex than would be obtained by simply summing the individual effects. Such detail is hidden when only the global (13)C content is measured by mass spectrometry. In particular, carbon positions within the aromatic ring are found to show site-specific isotope fractionation between the solute and the stationary phase. These interactions, defined as non-covalent isotope effects, can be normal or inverse and vary with the substitution pattern present. PMID:19748628

  13. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-06-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ, ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1-40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1-40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16-21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1-40 fibrils in 4 h or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples.

  15. Compartmentalized Cerebral Metabolism of [1,6-13C]Glucose Determined by in vivo 13C NMR Spectroscopy at 14.1 T

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, João M. N.; Lanz, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral metabolism is compartmentalized between neurons and glia. Although glial glycolysis is thought to largely sustain the energetic requirements of neurotransmission while oxidative metabolism takes place mainly in neurons, this hypothesis is matter of debate. The compartmentalization of cerebral metabolic fluxes can be determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy upon infusion of 13C-enriched compounds, especially glucose. Rats under light α-chloralose anesthesia were infused with [1,6-13C]glucose and 13C enrichment in the brain metabolites was measured by 13C NMR spectroscopy with high sensitivity and spectral resolution at 14.1 T. This allowed determining 13C enrichment curves of amino acid carbons with high reproducibility and to reliably estimate cerebral metabolic fluxes (mean error of 8%). We further found that TCA cycle intermediates are not required for flux determination in mathematical models of brain metabolism. Neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle rate (VTCA) and neurotransmission rate (VNT) were 0.45 ± 0.01 and 0.11 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min, respectively. Glial VTCA was found to be 38 ± 3% of total cerebral oxidative metabolism, accounting for more than half of neuronal oxidative metabolism. Furthermore, glial anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation rate (VPC) was 0.069 ± 0.004 μmol/g/min, i.e., 25 ± 1% of the glial TCA cycle rate. These results support a role of glial cells as active partners of neurons during synaptic transmission beyond glycolytic metabolism. PMID:21713114

  16. Metabolism of parenterally administered fat emulsions in the rat: studies of fatty acid oxidation with 1-13C- and 8-13C-labelled triolein.

    PubMed

    Bäurle, W; Brösicke, H; Matthews, D E; Pogan, K; Fürst, P

    1998-04-01

    To reassess the hypothesis that fatty acid catabolism occurs to completion via beta-oxidation, male Sprague-Dawley rats receiving continuous total parenteral nutrition (TPN) including 43% energy as fat were infused with [1-(13)C]- or [8-(13)C]triolein. Expired CO2 was collected continuously for 4 h and its 13C:12C ratio determined by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Bicarbonate retention was also assessed over 4 h by infusion of NaH14CO3 and measurement of the expired 14CO2. A possible loss of label from [8-(13)C]oleic acid from the citric acid cycle via labelled acetyl-CoA without oxidation to CO2 was assessed by infusing further animals with acetate labelled with 14C either at C atoms 1 or 2 and determination of its conversion to expired 14CO2. At isotopic steady state, 63.2 (SE 1.6)% (n 8) of the infused [1-(14)C]acetate and 46.0 (SE 1.2)% (n 8) of [2-(14)C]acetate was recovered as expired 14CO2. After correction for bicarbonate retention and non-oxidative isotope loss, 37.3 (SE 1.2)% (n 20) of the [1-(13)C]triolein was found to have been oxidized, whereas 32.6 (SE 1.0)% (n 20) of the [8-(13)C]triolein was oxidized (P < or = 0.01). The lower oxidation of the C atom at position 8 of oleic acid than that at position 1 indicates incomplete oxidative breakdown of the fatty acid after entering beta-oxidation. PMID:9624230

  17. Effects of post-reactor functionalization on the phase behaviour of an ethylene-1-octene copolymer studied using solid-state high resolution 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Calucci, Lucia; Cicogna, Francesca; Forte, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    The effects of post-reactor functionalization with naphthoate-TEMPO on the structure and morphology of an ethylene-1-octene copolymer were investigated by means of solid-state NMR techniques and DSC measurements. Selective (13)C MAS experiments allowed the orthorhombic and the monoclinic crystalline phases and two amorphous phases with different degree of mobility to be detected and quantified. (13)C and (1)H relaxation time measurements and spin diffusion experiments gave insight into the polymer dynamics within the different phases, the crystalline domain dimensions, and the rate of chain diffusion between amorphous and crystalline phases. Comparison of the results obtained for the pristine copolymer and the functionalized samples clearly indicated that the functionalization procedure causes redistribution within the crystalline and the amorphous phases with no relevant change in the degree of crystallinity or in the crystalline domain average size, and slows down chain diffusion. PMID:23942957

  18. Continuous-flow 13C-filtered 1H NMR spectroscopy of ethanol metabolism in rat liver perfusate.

    PubMed

    Albert, K; Sudmeier, J L; Anwer, M S; Bachovchin, W W

    1989-09-01

    Using a 188.5-microliters continuous-flow dual probe 1H[13C] spin-echo difference spectra of rat liver perfusate were acquired. The conversion of [1-13C]ethanol to [1-13C]-acetaldehyde was readily monitored as a function of time. In combination with 1-1 water nonexcitation and WALTZ 13C decoupling, this method proved to be superior in sensitivity and selectivity to direct 1H or 13C detection. PMID:2779419

  19. Multidimensional solid-state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of pectic polysaccharides in uniformly 13C-labeled Arabidopsis primary cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2012-07-08

    Plant cell wall (CW) polysaccharides are responsible for the mechanical strength and growth of plant cells; however, the high-resolution structure and dynamics of the CW polysaccharides are still poorly understood because of the insoluble nature of these molecules. Here, we use 2D and 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to investigate the structural role of pectins in the plant CW. Intact and partially depectinated primary CWs of Arabidopsis thaliana were uniformly labeled with 13C and their NMR spectra were compared. Recent 13C resonance assignment of the major polysaccharides in Arabidopsis thaliana CWs allowed us to determine the effects of depectination on the intermolecular packing and dynamics of the remaining wall polysaccharides. 2D and 3D correlation spectra show the suppression of pectin signals, confirming partial pectin removal by chelating agents and sodium carbonate. Importantly, higher cross peaks are observed in 2D and 3D 13C spectra of the depectinated CW, suggesting higher rigidity and denser packing of the remaining wall polysaccharides compared with the intact CW. 13C spin–lattice relaxation times and 1H rotating-frame spin–lattice relaxation times indicate that the polysaccharides are more rigid on both the nanosecond and microsecond timescales in the depectinated CW. Taken together, these results indicate that pectic polysaccharides are highly dynamic and endow the polysaccharide network of the primary CW with mobility and flexibility, which may be important for pectin functions. This study demonstrates the capability of multidimensional SSNMR to determine the intermolecular interactions and dynamic structures of complex plant materials under near-native conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Simultaneous hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate MRI and 18F-FDG-PET in cancer (hyperPET): feasibility of a new imaging concept using a clinical PET/MRI scanner

    PubMed Central

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E; Henriksen, Sarah T; Johannesen, Helle H; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan; Vignaud, Alexandre; Hansen, Anders E; Børresen, Betina; Klausen, Thomas L; Wittekind, Anne-Mette N; Gillings, Nic; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Clemmensen, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of a new imaging concept - combined hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and 18F-FDG-PET imaging. This procedure was performed in a clinical PET/MRI scanner with a canine cancer patient. We have named this concept hyper PET. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate results in an increase of 13C-lactate, 13C-alanine and 13C-CO2 (13C-HCO3) resonance peaks relative to the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. Accordingly, with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and use of 13C-pyruvate it is now possible to directly study the Warburg Effect through the rate of conversion of 13C-pyruvate to 13C-lactate. In this study, we combined it with 18F-FDG-PET that studies uptake of glucose in the cells. A canine cancer patient with a histology verified local recurrence of a liposarcoma on the right forepaw was imaged using a combined PET/MR clinical scanner. PET was performed as a single-bed, 10 min acquisition, 107 min post injection of 310 MBq 18F-FDG. 13C-chemical shift imaging (CSI) was performed just after FDG-PET and 30 s post injection of 23 mL hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate. Peak heights of 13C-pyruvate and 13C-lactate were quantified using a general linear model. Anatomic 1H-MRI included axial and coronal T1 vibe, coronal T2-tse and axial T1-tse with fat saturation following gadolinium injection. In the tumor we found clearly increased 13C-lactate production, which also corresponded to high 18F-FDG uptake on PET. This is in agreement with the fact that glycolysis and production of lactate are increased in tumor cells compared to normal cells. Yet, most interestingly, also in the muscle of the forepaw of the dog high 18F-FDG uptake was observed. This was due to activity in these muscles prior to anesthesia, which was not accompanied by a similarly high 13C-lactate production. Accordingly, this clearly demonstrates how the Warburg Effect directly

  1. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Doubly 13C-substituted ethyl cyanide (Margules+,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margules, L.; Belloche, A.; Muller, H. S. P.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Garrod, R. T.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-04-01

    We identified more than 5000 rotational transitions, pertaining to more than 3500 different transition frequencies, in the laboratory for each of the three doubly 13C-substituted isotopomers. The quantum numbers reach J~115 and Ka~35, resulting in accurate spectroscopic parameters and accurate rest frequency calculations beyond 1000 GHz for strong to moderately weak transitions of either isotopomer. All three species are unambiguously detected in our ALMA data. The 12C/13C column density ratio of the isotopomers with one 13C atom to those with two 13C atoms is about 25. Ethyl cyanide is the second molecule after methyl cyanide for which isotopologues containing two 13C atoms have been securely detected in the interstellar medium. The model of our ethyl cyanide data suggests that we should be able to detect vibrational satellites of the main species up to at least v19=1 at 1130K and up to v13+v21=2 at 600K for the isotopologues with one 13C atom in our present ALMA data. Such satellites may be too weak to be identified unambiguously for isotopologues with two 13C atoms. (3 data files).

  3. Simultaneous imaging of 13C metabolism and 1H structure: technical considerations and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeremy W; Fain, Sean B; Niles, David J; Ludwig, Kai D; Johnson, Kevin M; Peterson, Eric T

    2015-05-01

    Real-time imaging of (13)C metabolism in vivo has been enabled by recent advances in hyperpolarization. As a result of the inherently low natural abundance of endogenous (13)C nuclei, hyperpolarized (13)C images lack structural information that could be used to aid in motion detection and anatomical registration. Motion before or during the (13)C acquisition can therefore result in artifacts and misregistration that may obscure measures of metabolism. In this work, we demonstrate a method to simultaneously image both (1)H and (13)C nuclei using a dual-nucleus spectral-spatial radiofrequency excitation and a fully coincident readout for rapid multinuclear spectroscopic imaging. With the appropriate multinuclear hardware, and the means to simultaneously excite and receive on both channels, this technique is straightforward to implement requiring little to no increase in scan time. Phantom and in vivo experiments were performed with both Cartesian and spiral trajectories to validate and illustrate the utility of simultaneous acquisitions. Motion compensation of dynamic metabolic measurements acquired during free breathing was demonstrated using motion tracking derived from (1)H data. Simultaneous multinuclear imaging provides structural (1)H and metabolic (13)C images that are correlated both spatially and temporally, and are therefore amenable to joint (1)H and (13)C analysis and correction of structure-function images. PMID:25810146

  4. 13C-NMR study of labeled vinyl groups in paramagnetic myoglobin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sankar, S S; La Mar, G N; Smith, K M; Fujinari, E M

    1987-04-01

    The 13C-NMR spectra of high-spin met-aquo myoglobin, spin-equilibrium met-azido myoglobin, low-spin met-cyano myoglobin, deoxy myoglobin and carbonmonoxy myoglobin from sperm whale reconstituted with hemin 13C enriched at both vinyl alpha or beta positions have been recorded. In all cases the labeled vinyl 13C signals are clearly resolved and useful spectra could be obtained within approx. 15 minutes. The decoupling of multiplet structure due to attached proton(s) has led to the specific assignment of vinyl 13C alpha signals in all paramagnetic derivatives and the 13C beta signals in met-cyano myoglobin. In all other cases, the collapse of the proton multiplet structure as a function of 1H decoupling frequency has located, but not assigned, the attached 1H resonance positions which are obscured by the intense diamagnetic envelope in the 1H-NMR spectrum. The resulting vinyl 13C hyperfine shifts follow Curie behavior, and the patterns closely resemble those in the appropriate model complexes in the same oxidation/spin/ligation state, except that the protein exhibits more in-plane asymmetry. The hyperfine shift patterns are indicative of dominant pi contact shifts for all ferric complexes. Deoxy myoglobin vinyl 13C and 1H contact shifts provide little evidence for pi bonding. PMID:3828362

  5. Dephosphorylation and biodistribution of 1-13C-phospholactate in vivo†

    PubMed Central

    Shchepin, Roman V.; Pham, Wellington; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a new approach for the delivery of a metabolic contrast agent for in vivo molecular imaging. The use of a phosphate-protecting group that facilitates parahydrogen-induced polarization of 1-13C-phospholactate potentially enables the in vivo administration of a hydrogenated hyperpolarized adduct. When injected, nonhyperpolarized 1-13C-phospholactate is retained in the vasculature during its metabolic conversion to 1-13C-lactate by blood phosphatases as demonstrated here using a mucin 1 mouse model of breast cancer and ex vivo high-resolution 13C NMR. This multisecond process is a suitable mechanism for the delivery of relatively short-lived 13C and potentially 15N hyperpolarized contrast agents using –OH phosphorylated small molecules, which is demonstrated here for the first time as an example of 1-13C-phospholactate. Through this approach, DL-1-13C-lactate is taken up by tissues and organs including the liver, kidneys, brain, heart, and tumors according to a timescale amenable to hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24995802

  6. Reduced Right Ventricular Native Myocardial T1 in Anderson-Fabry Disease: Comparison to Pulmonary Hypertension and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Joseph J.; Chow, Kelvin; Khan, Aneal; Michelakis, Evangelos; Paterson, Ian; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Thompson, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is characterized by progressive multiorgan accumulation of intracellular sphingolipids due to α-galactosidase A enzyme deficiency, resulting in progressive ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, arrhythmias, and death. Decreased native (non-contrast) left ventricular (LV) T1 (longitudinal relaxation time) with MRI discriminates AFD from healthy controls or other presentations of concentric hypertrophy, but the right ventricle (RV) has not been studied. The aims of the current study were to evaluate native RV T1 values in AFD, with a goal of better understanding the pathophysiology of RV involvement. Methods and Results Native T1 values were measured in the inferior RV wall (RVI), interventricular septum (IVS), and inferior LV (LVI) in patients with AFD, patients with pulmonary hypertension, who provided an alternative RV pathological process for comparison, and healthy controls. A minimum wall thickness of 4 mm was selected to minimize partial volume errors in tissue T1 analysis. T1 analysis was performed in 6 subjects with AFD, 6 subjects with PH, and 21 controls. Native T1 values were shorter (adjusted p<0.05 for all comparisons), independent of location, in subjects with AFD (RVI-T1 = 1096±49 ms, IVS-T1 = 1053±41 ms, LVI-T1 = 1072±44 ms) compared to both PH (RVI-T1 = 1239±41 ms, IVS-T1 = 1280±123 ms, LVI-T1 = 1274±57 ms) and HC (IVS-T1 = 1180±60 ms, LVI-T1 = 1183±45 ms). RVI measurements were not possible in controls due to insufficient wall thickness. Conclusion Native T1 values appear similarly reduced in the left and right ventricles of individuals with AFD and RV wall thickening, suggesting a common pathology. In contrast, individuals with PH and thickened RVs showed increased native T1 values in both ventricles, suggestive of fibrosis. PMID:27305064

  7. Toward using delta13C of ecosystem respiration to monitor canopy physiology in complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Pypker, T G; Hauck, M; Sulzman, E W; Unsworth, M H; Mix, A C; Kayler, Z; Conklin, D; Kennedy, A M; Barnard, H R; Phillips, C; Bond, B J

    2008-12-01

    In 2005 and 2006, air samples were collected at the base of a Douglas-fir watershed to monitor seasonal changes in the delta13CO2 of ecosystem respiration (delta13C(ER)). The goals of this study were to determine whether variations in delta13C(ER) correlated with environmental variables and could be used to predict expected variations in canopy-average stomatal conductance (Gs). Changes in delta13C(ER) correlated weakly with changes in vapor pressure deficit (VPD) measured 0 and 3-7 days earlier and significantly with soil matric potential (psi(m)) (P value <0.02) measured on the same day. Midday G (s) was estimated using sapflow measurements (heat-dissipation method) at four plots located at different elevations within the watershed. Values of midday Gs from 0 and 3-7 days earlier were correlated with delta13C(ER), with the 5-day lag being significant (P value <0.05). To examine direct relationships between delta13C(ER) and recent Gs, we used models relating isotope discrimination to stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity at the leaf level to estimate values of stomatal conductance ("Gs-I") that would be expected if respired CO2 were derived entirely from recent photosynthate. We compared these values with estimates of Gs using direct measurement of transpiration at multiple locations in the watershed. Considering that the approach based on isotopes considers only the effect of photosynthetic discrimination on delta13C(ER), the magnitude and range in the two values were surprisingly similar. We conclude that: (1) delta13C(ER) is sensitive to variations in weather, and (2) delta13C(ER) potentially could be used to directly monitor average, basin-wide variations in Gs in complex terrain if further research improves understanding of how delta13C(ER) is influenced by post-assimilation fractionation processes. PMID:18839214

  8. Clinical NOE 13C MRS for neuropsychiatric disorders of the frontal lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailasuta, Napapon; Robertson, Larry W.; Harris, Kent C.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Allen, Peter S.; Ross, Brian D.

    2008-12-01

    In this communication, a scheme is described whereby in vivo 13C MRS can safely be performed in the frontal lobe, a human brain region hitherto precluded on grounds of SAR, but important in being the seat of impaired cognitive function in many neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders. By combining two well known features of 13C NMR—the use of low power NOE and the focus on 13C carbon atoms which are only minimally coupled to protons, we are able to overcome the obstacle of SAR and develop means of monitoring the 13C fluxes of critically important metabolic pathways in frontal brain structures of normal volunteers and patients. Using a combination of low-power WALTZ decoupling, variants of random noise for nuclear overhauser effect enhancement it was possible to reduce power deposition to 20% of the advised maximum specific absorption rate (SAR). In model solutions 13C signal enhancement achieved with this scheme were comparable to that obtained with WALTZ-4. In human brain, the low power procedure effectively determined glutamine, glutamate and bicarbonate in the posterior parietal brain after [1- 13C] glucose infusion. The same 13C enriched metabolites were defined in frontal brain of human volunteers after administration of [1- 13C] acetate, a recognized probe of glial metabolism. Time courses of incorporation of 13C into cerebral glutamate, glutamine and bicarbonate were constructed. The results suggest efficacy for measurement of in vivo cerebral metabolic rates of the glutamate-glutamine and tricarboxylic acid cycles in 20 min MR scans in previously inaccessible brain regions in humans at 1.5T. We predict these will be clinically useful biomarkers in many human neuropsychiatric and genetic conditions.

  9. The interplay between the solid effect and the cross effect mechanisms in solid state 13C DNP at 95 GHz using trityl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debamalya; Shimon, Daphna; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2013-05-01

    The 13C solid state Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) mechanism using trityl radicals (OX63) as polarizers was investigated in the temperature range of 10-60 K. The solutions used were 6 M 13C urea in DMSO/H2O (50% v/v) with 15 mM and 30 mM OX63. The measurements were carried out at ˜3.5 T, which corresponds to Larmor frequencies of 95 GHz and 36 MHz for the OX63 and the 13C nuclei, respectively. Measurements of the 13C signal intensity as a function of the microwave (MW) irradiation frequency yielded 13C DNP spectra with temperature dependent lineshapes for both samples. The maximum enhancement for the 30 mM sample was reached at 40 K, while that of the 15 mM sample at 20-30 K. Furthermore, the lineshapes observed showed that both the cross effect (CE) and the solid effect (SE) DNP mechanisms are active in this temperature range and that their relative contribution is temperature dependent. Simulations of the spectra with the relative contributions of the CE and SE mechanisms as a fit parameter revealed that for both samples the CE contribution decreases with decreasing temperature while the SE contribution increases. In addition, for the 15 mM sample the contributions of the two mechanisms are comparable from 20 K to 60 K while for the 30 mM the CE dominates in this range, as expected from the higher concentration. The steep decrease of the CE contribution towards low temperatures is however unexpected. The temperature dependence of the OX63 longitudinal relaxation, DNP buildup times and 13C spin lattice relaxation times did not reveal any obvious correlation with the DNP temperature dependence. A similar behavior of the CE and SE mechanism was observed for 1H DNP with the nitroxide radical TEMPOL as a polarizer. This suggests that this effect is a general phenomenon involving a temperature dependent competition between the CE and SE mechanisms, the source of which is, however, still unknown.

  10. Determination of the Orientation and Dynamics of Ergosterol in Model Membranes Using Uniform 13C Labeling and Dynamically Averaged 13C Chemical Shift Anisotropies as Experimental Restraints

    PubMed Central

    Soubias, O.; Jolibois, F.; Massou, S.; Milon, A.; Réat, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new strategy was established to determine the average orientation and dynamics of ergosterol in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. It is based on the analysis of chemical shift anisotropies (CSAs) averaged by the molecular dynamics. Static 13C CSA tensors were computed by quantum chemistry, using the gauge-including atomic-orbital approach within Hartree-Fock theory. Uniformly 13C-labeled ergosterol was purified from Pichia pastoris cells grown on labeled methanol. After reconstitution into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipids, the complete 1H and 13C assignment of ergosterol's resonances was performed using a combination of magic-angle spinning two-dimensional experiments. Dynamically averaged CSAs were determined by standard side-band intensity analysis for isolated 13C resonances (C3 and ethylenic carbons) and by off-magic-angle spinning experiments for other carbons. A set of 18 constraints was thus obtained, from which the sterol's molecular order parameter and average orientation could be precisely defined. The validity of using computed CSAs in this strategy was verified on cholesterol model systems. This new method allowed us to quantify ergosterol's dynamics at three molar ratios: 16 mol % (Ld phase), 30 mol % (Lo phase), and 23 mol % (mixed phases). Contrary to cholesterol, ergosterol's molecular diffusion axis makes an important angle (14°) with the inertial axis of the rigid four-ring system. PMID:15923221

  11. Position-Specific Isotope Analysis of Xanthines: A (13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Method to Determine the (13)C Intramolecular Composition at Natural Abundance.

    PubMed

    Diomande, Didier G; Martineau, Estelle; Gilbert, Alexis; Nun, Pierrick; Murata, Ariaki; Yamada, Keita; Watanabe, Naoharu; Tea, Illa; Robins, Richard J; Yoshida, Naohiro; Remaud, Gérald S

    2015-07-01

    The natural xanthines caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline are of major commercial importance as flavor constituents in coffee, cocoa, tea, and a number of other beverages. However, their exploitation for authenticity, a requirement in these commodities that have a large origin-based price-range, by the standard method of isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry (irm-MS) is limited. We have now developed a methodology that overcomes this deficit that exploits the power of isotopic quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry combined with chemical modification of the xanthines to enable the determination of positional intramolecular (13)C/(12)C ratios (δ(13)Ci) with high precision. However, only caffeine is amenable to analysis: theobromine and theophylline present substantial difficulties due to their poor solubility. However, their N-methylation to caffeine makes spectral acquisition feasible. The method is confirmed as robust, with good repeatability of the δ(13)Ci values in caffeine appropriate for isotope fractionation measurements at natural abundance. It is shown that there is negligible isotope fractionation during the chemical N-methylation procedure. Thus, the method preserves the original positional δ(13)Ci values. The method has been applied to measure the position-specific variation of the (13)C/(12)C distribution in caffeine. Not only is a clear difference between caffeine isolated from different sources observed, but theobromine from cocoa is found to show a (13)C pattern distinct from that of caffeine. PMID:26067163

  12. Comprehensive signal assignment of 13C-labeled lignocellulose using multidimensional solution NMR and 13C chemical shift comparison with solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-09-17

    A multidimensional solution NMR method has been developed using various pulse programs including HCCH-COSY and (13)C-HSQC-NOESY for the structural characterization of commercially available (13)C labeled lignocellulose from potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), chicory (Cichorium intybus), and corn (Zea mays). This new method allowed for 119 of the signals in the (13)C-HSQC spectrum of lignocelluloses to be assigned and was successfully used to characterize the structures of lignocellulose samples from three plants in terms of their xylan and xyloglucan structures, which are the major hemicelluloses in angiosperm. Furthermore, this new method provided greater insight into fine structures of lignin by providing a high resolution to the aromatic signals of the β-aryl ether and resinol moieties, as well as the diastereomeric signals of the β-aryl ether. Finally, the (13)C chemical shifts assigned in this study were compared with those from solid-state NMR and indicated the presence of heterogeneous dynamics in the polysaccharides where rigid cellulose and mobile hemicelluloses moieties existed together. PMID:24010724

  13. Determination of [{sup 13}C]pyrene sequestration in sediment microcosms using flash pyrolysis--GC--MS and {sup 13}C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, E.A.; Bortiatynski, J.M.; Hardy, K.S.; Kovach, E.M.; Van Heemst, J.D.H.; Hatcher, P.G.; Richman, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the use of a {sup 13}C-labeled pollutant probe, [{sup 13}C]pyrene, and the application of flash pyrolysis--GC--MS and CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR provided analytical capabilities to study pyrene interactions with soluble and insoluble compartments of sedimentary organic matter (S{sub D}OM) during whole sediments incubations in aerated microcosms. Surface sediments were collected from a site of previous hydrocarbon contamination in New Orleans, LA. Over a period of 60 days, humic acid and humin fractions of S{sub D}OM accumulated increasing amounts of pyrene that were resistant to exhaustive extraction with organic solvents. The sequestered pyrene was evident in CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectra of humin fractions. The amount of sequestered pyrene in humic materials was quantified by flash pyrolysis--GC--MS, a technique that destroys the three-dimensional structure of macromolecular S{sub D}OM. Noncovalent binding of pyrene to humic materials in S{sub D}OM was greater in sediments incubated with biological activity than biocide-treated sediments. The combined analytical approaches demonstrate that the sequestered pyrene, or bound residue, is noncovalently associated with S{sub D}OM and has not undergone structural alteration. Implications of these data are discussed in reference to S{sub D}OM diagenesis and long-term availability of bound pollutant residues in sediments.

  14. A roadmap for interpreting 13C metabolite labeling patterns from cells

    PubMed Central

    Buescher, Joerg M.; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.; Boros, Laszlo G.; Burgess, Shawn C.; Brunengraber, Henri; Clish, Clary B.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Feron, Olivier; Frezza, Christian; Ghesquiere, Bart; Gottlieb, Eyal; Hiller, Karsten; Jones, Russell G.; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Kimmelman, Alec C.; Locasale, Jason W.; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Maddocks, Oliver D. K.; Malloy, Craig; Metallo, Christian M.; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Munger, Joshua; Nöh, Katharina; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Ralser, Markus; Sauer, Uwe; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; St-Pierre, Julie; Tennant, Daniel A.; Wittmann, Christoph; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Vazquez, Alexei; Vousden, Karen; Young, Jamey D.; Zamboni, Nicola; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Measuring intracellular metabolism has increasingly led to important insights in biomedical research. 13C tracer analysis, although less information-rich than quantitative 13C flux analysis that requires computational data integration, has been established as a time-efficient method to unravel relative pathway activities, qualitative changes in pathway contributions, and nutrient contributions. Here, we review selected key issues in interpreting 13C metabolite labeling patterns, with the goal of drawing accurate conclusions from steady state and dynamic stable isotopic tracer experiments. PMID:25731751

  15. High-field dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization of [1-(13)C]pyruvic acid.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Can, Emine; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H; Schwitter, Juerg; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-05-14

    [1-(13)C]pyruvate is the most widely used hyperpolarized metabolic magnetic resonance imaging agent. Using a custom-built 7.0 T polarizer operating at 1.0 K and trityl radical-doped [1-(13)C]pyruvic acid, unextrapolated solution-state (13)C polarization greater than 60% was measured after dissolution and rapid transfer to a spectrometer magnet, demonstrating the signal enhancement attainable using optimized hardware. Slower rates of polarization under these conditions can be largely overcome with higher radical concentrations. PMID:27093499

  16. 13C NMR spectroscopy of methane adsorbed in SAPO-11 molecular sieve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskela, Tuomas; Ylihautala, Mika; Vaara, Juha; Jokisaari, Jukka

    1996-10-01

    Static 13C and 13C-{ 1H} NMR spectra of carbon-13 enriched methane ( 13CH 4) adsorbed into SAPO-11 molecular sieve were recorded at variable temperatures. Moreover, the corresponding MAS NMR spectra were measured. These experiments reveal a temperature-dependent, anisotropic and asymmetric 13C nuclear shielding tensor. Ab initio model calculations of methane in the field of a positive point charge suggest that the deformation of the shielding tensor may be related to the interaction between the methane molecule and the charge-compensating protons. A comparison with existing Xe data is made.

  17. Synthesis of D-[U-{sup 13}C]Glucal, D-[U-{sup 13}C] Galactal, and L-[U-{sup 13}C]Fucose for NMR structure studies of oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.; Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III

    1996-12-31

    The role of carbohydrates is well recognized in a variety of important biological phenomena such as cell surface recognition. Recent advances in carbohydrate chemistry, including the development of solid phase synthesis methods, have helped to provide significant quantities of material by offering general protocols for synthesis of well-defined, pure material. However, the study of the solution structure of oligosaccharides by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been hampered by the lack of enriched {sup 13}C material. In an effort to help alleviate this situation, we have been interested in the construction of the title compounds from a single economical carbon source, D-[U-{sup 13}C]glucose. Details of the syntheses will be provided.

  18. Two new organic reference materials for δ13C and δ15N measurements and a new value for the δ13C of NBS 22 oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Geilmann, Heike; Brand, Willi A.; Bohlke, John Karl

    2003-01-01

    Analytical grade L-glutamic acid is chemically stable and has a C/N mole ratio of 5, which is close to that of many of natural biological materials, such as blood and animal tissue. Two L-glutamic acid reference materials with substantially different 13C and 15N abundances have been prepared for use as organic reference materials for C and N isotopic measurements. USGS40 is analytical grade L-glutamic acid and has a δ13C value of −26.24‰ relative to VPDB and a δ15N value of −4.52‰ relative to N2 in air. USGS41 was prepared by dissolving analytical grade L-glutamic acid with L-glutamic acid enriched in 13C and 15N. USGS41 has a δ13C value of +37.76‰ and a δ15N value of +47.57‰. The δ13C and δ15N values of both materials were measured against the international reference materials NBS 19 calcium carbonate (δ13C = +1.95‰), L-SVEC lithium carbonate (δ13C = −46.48‰), IAEA-N-1 ammonium sulfate (δ15N = 0.43‰), and USGS32 potassium nitrate (δ15N = 180‰) by on-line combustion continuous-flow and off-line dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Both USGS40 and USGS41 are isotopically homogeneous; reproducibility of δ13C is better than 0.13‰, and that of δ15N is better than 0.13‰ in 100-μg amounts. These two isotopic reference materials can be used for (i) calibrating local laboratory reference materials, and (ii) quantifying drift with time, mass-dependent fractionations, and isotope-ratio-scale contraction in the isotopic analysis of various biological materials. Isotopic results presented in this paper yield a δ13C value for NBS 22 oil of −29.91‰, in contrast to the commonly accepted value of −29.78‰ for which off-line blank corrections probably have not been quantified satisfactorily.

  19. Synthesis of [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methacrylic acid, [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methyl methacrylate and/or related compounds

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Marc A.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2008-01-22

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds of the formulae ##STR00001## wherein Q is selected from the group consisting of --S--, --S(.dbd.O)--, and --S(.dbd.O).sub.2--, Z is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group selected from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently selected from the group consisting of a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, an aryl, and an alkoxy group, and X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group, and a fully-deuterated C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group. The present invention is also directed to a process of preparing labeled compounds, e.g., process of preparing [.sup.13C]methacrylic acid by reacting a (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13CH.sub.2)-- aryl sulfone precursor with .sup.13CHI to form a (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13C(.sup.13CH.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfone intermediate, and, reacting the (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13C(.sup.13CH.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfone intermediate with sodium hydroxide, followed by acid to form [.sup.13C]methacrylic acid. The present invention is further directed to a process of preparing [.sup.2H.sub.8]methyl methacrylate by reacting a (HOOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate with CD.sub.3I to form a (.sup.2H.sub.3COOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate, and heating the(.sup.2H.sub.3COOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate at temperatures and for time sufficient to form [.sup.2H.sub.8]methyl methacrylate.

  20. Stable Carbon Isotopes (δ 13C) in Coral Skeletons: Experimental Approach and Applications for Paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottoli, A. G.

    2004-12-01

    Scleractinian corals obtain fixed carbon via photosynthesis by their endosymbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) and via hetertrophy (injestion of zooplankton, δ 13C ≈ -17 to -22‰ ). Carbon dioxide (CO2) used for photosynthesis is obtained from seawater (δ 13C ≈ 0%) or from respired CO2 within the coral host. The δ 13C of the carbon used in the formation of the underlying coral skeleton is fractionated as a result of both of these metabolic processes. Here I have pooled evidence from several field and tank experiments on the effect of photosynthesis and heterotrophy of coral skeletal δ 13C. In the experiments, decreases in light levels due to shading or depth resulted in a significant decrease in skeletal δ 13C in all species studied (Pavona gigantea, Pavona clavus, Porites compressa). Decreases in photosynthesis in bleached corals also resulted in a decrease in skeletal δ 13C compared to non-bleached corals growing under the same conditions and at the same location. Skeletal δ 13C also decreased at higher than normal light levels most likely due to photoinhibition. Thus, decreases in photosynthesis due to reduced light levels, due to bleaching-induced decreases in chlorophyll a concentrations, or due to photodamage-induced decreases in functional cholorphyll a, results in significant δ 13C decreases. Comprehensive interpretation of all of the data showed that changes in photosynthesis itself can drive the changes in δ 13C. In field experiments, the addition of natural concentrations of zooplankton to the diet resulted in decreases in skeletal δ 13C. Such a decrease was more pronounced with depth and in P. gigantea compared to P. clavus. In situ feeding experiments have since confirmed these findings. However under tank conditions with unaturally high feeding rates, enhanced nitrogen supply in the diet can disrupt the coral-algal symbiosis, stimlate zooxanthellae growth and photosynthesis, and cause an incrase in skeletal δ 13C. It is proposed that under

  1. T1- Thresholds in Black Holes Increase Clinical-Radiological Correlation in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Christian; Faizy, Tobias; Sedlacik, Jan; Holst, Brigitte; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Young, Kim Lea; Heesen, Christoph; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an established tool in diagnosing and evaluating disease activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). While clinical-radiological correlations are limited in general, hypointense T1 lesions (also known as Black Holes (BH)) have shown some promising results. The definition of BHs is very heterogeneous and depends on subjective visual evaluation. Objective We aimed to improve clinical-radiological correlations by defining BHs using T1 relaxation time (T1-RT) thresholds to achieve best possible correlation between BH lesion volume and clinical disability. Method 40 patients with mainly relapsing-remitting MS underwent MRI including 3-dimensional fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MPRAGE) before and after Gadolinium (GD) injection and double inversion-contrast magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MP2RAGE) sequences. BHs (BHvis) were marked by two raters on native T1-weighted (T1w)-MPRAGE, contrast-enhancing lesions (CE lesions) on T1w-MPRAGE after GD and FLAIR lesions (total-FLAIR lesions) were detected separately. BHvis and total-FLAIR lesion maps were registered to MP2RAGE images, and the mean T1-RT were calculated for all lesion ROIs. Mean T1 values of the cortex (CTX) were calculated for each patient. Subsequently, Spearman rank correlations between clinical scores (Expanded Disability Status Scale and Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite) and lesion volume were determined for different T1-RT thresholds. Results Significant differences in T1-RT were obtained between all different lesion types with highest T1 values in visually marked BHs (BHvis: 1453.3±213.4 ms, total-FLAIR lesions: 1394.33±187.38 ms, CTX: 1305.6±35.8 ms; p<0.05). Significant correlations between BHvis/total-FLAIR lesion volume and clinical disability were obtained for a wide range of T1-RT thresholds. The highest correlation for BHvis and total-FLAIR lesion masks were found at T1-RT>1500 ms

  2. Trimethylation Enhancement Using (13)C-Diazomethane ((13)C-TrEnDi): Increased Sensitivity and Selectivity of Phosphatidylethanolamine, Phosphatidylcholine, and Phosphatidylserine Lipids Derived from Complex Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Canez, Carlos R; Shields, Samuel W J; Bugno, Magdalena; Wasslen, Karl V; Weinert, Hillary P; Willmore, William G; Manthorpe, Jeffrey M; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2016-07-19

    Significant sensitivity enhancements in the tandem mass spectrometry-based analysis of complex mixtures of several phospholipid classes has been achieved via (13)C-TrEnDi. (13)C-TrEnDi-modified phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine (PS), and phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids extracted from HeLa cells demonstrated greater sensitivity via precursor ion scans (PISs) than their unmodified counterparts. Sphingomyelin (SM) species exhibited neither an increased nor decreased sensitivity following modification. The use of isotopically labeled diazomethane enabled the distinction of modified PE and modified PC species that would yield isobaric species with unlabeled diazomethane. (13)C-TrEnDi created a PE-exclusive PIS of m/z 202.1, two PS-exclusive PISs of m/z 148.1 and m/z 261.1, and a PIS of m/z 199.1 for PC species (observed at odd m/z values) and SM species (observed at even m/z values). The standardized average area increase after TrEnDi modification was 10.72-fold for PE species, 2.36-fold for PC, and 1.05-fold for SM species. The sensitivity increase of PS species was not quantifiable, as there were no unmodified PS species identified prior to derivatization. (13)C-TrEnDi allowed for the identification of 4 PE and 7 PS species as well as the identification and quantitation of an additional 4 PE and 4 PS species that were below the limit of detection (LoD) prior to modification. (13)C-TrEnDi also pushed 24 PE and 6 PC lipids over the limit of quantitation (LoQ) that prior to modification were above the LoD only. PMID:27275841

  3. Direct reconstruction of T1 from k-space using a radial saturation-recovery sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liyong; DiBella, Edward V. R.

    2011-03-01

    Contrast agent concentration ([CA]) must be known accurately to quantify dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging. Accurate concentrations can be obtained if the longitudinal relaxation rate constant T1 is known both pre- and post-contrast injection. Post-contrast signal intensity in the images is often saturated and an approximation to T1 can be difficult to obtain. One method that has been proposed for accurate T1 estimation effectively acquires multiple images with different effective saturation recovery times (eSRTs) and fits the images to the equation for T1 recovery to obtain T1 values. This was done with a radial saturation-recovery sequence for 2D imaging of myocardial perfusion with DCE MRI. This multi-SRT method assumes that the signal intensity is constant for different readouts in each image. Here this assumption is not necessary as a model-based reconstruction method is proposed that directly reconstructs an image of T1 values from k-space. The magnetization for each ray at each readout pulse is modeled in the reconstruction with Bloch equations. Computer simulations based on a 72 ray cardiac DCE MRI acquisition were used to test the method. The direct model-based reconstruction gave accurate T1 values and was slightly more accurate than the multi-SRT method that used three sub-images.

  4. NMR-based metabolomics and breath studies show lipid and protein catabolism during low dose chronic T1AM treatment

    PubMed Central

    Haviland, J. A.; Reiland, H.; Butz, D. E.; Tonelli, M.; Porter, W. P.; Zucchi, R.; Scanlan, T. S.; Chiellini, G.; Assadi-Porter, F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM), an analog of thyroid hormone, is a recently discovered fast-acting endogenous metabolite. High single dose treatments of T1AM have produced rapid short-term effects, including a reduction of body temperature, bradycardia, and hyperglycemia in mice. Design and Methods The present study monitored the effect of daily low doses of T1AM (10mg/Kg) for eight-days on weight loss and metabolism in spontaneously overweight mice. The experiments were repeated twice (n=4). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of plasma and real-time analysis of exhaled 13CO2 in breath by cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) were used to detect T1M-induced lipolysis. Results CRDS detected increased lipolysis in breath shortly after T1AM administration that was associated with a significant weight loss but independent of food consumption. NMR spectroscopy revealed alterations in key metabolites in serum: valine, glycine, and 3-hydroxybutyrate, suggesting that the subchronic effects of T1AM include both lipolysis and protein breakdown. After discontinuation of T1AM treatment, mice regained only 1.8% of the lost weight in the following two weeks, indicating lasting effects of T1AM on weight maintenance. Conclusions CRDS in combination with NMR and 13C-metabolic tracing constitute a powerful method of investigation in obesity studies for identifying in vivo biochemical pathway shifts and unanticipated debilitating side effects. PMID:23512955

  5. Temperature dependence of the phosphorescence and of the thermally activated delayed fluorescence of 12C70 and 13C70 in amorphous polymer matrices. Is a second triplet involved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmeira, Tiago; Fedorov, Alexander; Berberan-Santos, Mário N.

    2014-09-01

    The phosphorescence and thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) lifetimes of 12C70 and 13C70 in two different glassy hydrocarbon polymers, one aliphatic (cyclic polyolefin) and one aromatic (polystyrene), were measured between -200 and 100 ºC. The temperature dependence of the lifetimes is equally well described by a three-state mechanism (ground state, S0, and two excited states in thermal equilibrium, T1 and S1, the lifetime of T1 being temperature dependent) and by a four-state mechanism (ground state, S0, and three excited states in thermal equilibrium, T1, T2 and S1, all with temperature-independent lifetimes). The estimated S1-T1 and T2-T1 energy gaps (four-state mechanism) are in good agreement with spectroscopic measurements. These and the determined quantum yield of triplet formation, 0.997 ± 0.001, are found to be essentially independent of the polymer matrix and of the isotopic composition of the fullerene. On the other hand, the lifetimes of both T1 and T2 (four-state mechanism) are weakly dependent on the polymer matrix but strongly vary with the fullerene isotopic composition, nearly doubling when going from 12C70 to 13C70. A parameter useful for the characterization of TADF, the on-set temperature T0, is also introduced.

  6. 13C MR imaging of methionine-rich gliomas at 4.7T: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sasao, Akira; Hirai, Toshinori; Iriguchi, Norio; Nakamura, Hideo; Kudo, Mareina; Sasao, Ako; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    We explored the feasibility of using carbon-13 ((13)C) magnetic resonance imaging ((13)C-MRI) to depict (13)C-labeled methionine-enriched gliomas at 4.7 tesla. We transplanted 2 types of glioma cells separately to 2 subcutaneous tissue sites on the backs of mice weighing 15 to 20 g. After confirming tumor growth, we used (13)C-MRI and (1)H-MRI to scan 4 mice that had been administered (13)C-labeled methionine and 2 control mice. (13)C-MRI of all 4 transplanted mice administered with (13)C-labeled methionine revealed 2 areas of hyperintensity that corresponded to the tumor sites on (1)H-MR images, but no such areas were visualized in transplanted controls. Our data suggest that (13)C-MRI can show the accumulation of (13)C-labeled tracer by gliomas. PMID:21720117

  7. Separation of extra- and intracellular metabolites using hyperpolarized 13C diffusion weighted MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelsch, Bertram L.; Sriram, Renuka; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Leon Swisher, Christine; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Wang, Zhen J.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-09-01

    This work demonstrates the separation of extra- and intracellular components of glycolytic metabolites with diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using b-values of up to 15,000 s mm-2, a multi-exponential signal response was measured for hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate and lactate. By fitting the fast and slow asymptotes of these curves, their extra- and intracellular weighted diffusion coefficients were determined in cells perfused in a MR compatible bioreactor. In addition to measuring intracellular weighted diffusion, extra- and intracellular weighted hyperpolarized 13C metabolites pools are assessed in real-time, including their modulation with inhibition of monocarboxylate transporters. These studies demonstrate the ability to simultaneously assess membrane transport in addition to enzymatic activity with the use of diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C MR. This technique could be an indispensible tool to evaluate the impact of microenvironment on the presence, aggressiveness and metastatic potential of a variety of cancers.

  8. Fusion cross section of 12C+13C at sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N. T.; Tang, X. D.; Chen, H.; Chesneanu, D.; Straticiuc, M.; Trache, L.; Burducea, I.; Li, K. A.; Li, Y. J.; Ghita, D. G.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Gomoiu, C.

    2016-02-01

    In the recent work at Notre Dame, correlations between three carbon isotope fusion systems have been studied and it is found that the fusion cross sections of 12C+13Cand 13C+13C provide an upper limit on the fusion cross section of the astrophysically important 12C+12C reaction.The aim of this work is to continue such research by measuring the fusion cross section of the 12C+13C reaction to lower energies. In this experiment, the off-line activity measurement was performed in the ultra-low background laboratory 12C+13C and the fusion cross section for has been determined in the energy range of Ec.m. =2.5-6.8 MeV. Comparison between this work and several models is also presented.

  9. Strongly polarizing weakly coupled 13C nuclear spins with optically pumped nitrogen-vacancy center

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Bao; Yang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the polarization of nuclear spins surrounding the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has recently attracted widespread attention due to its various applications. Here we present an analytical formula that not only provides a clear physical picture for the recently observed polarization reversal of strongly coupled13C nuclei over a narrow range of magnetic field [H. J. Wang et al., Nat. Commun. 4, 1940 (2013)], but also demonstrates the possibility to strongly polarize weakly coupled13C nuclei. This allows sensitive magnetic field control of the 13C nuclear spin polarization for NMR applications and significant suppression of the 13C nuclear spin noise to prolong the NV spin coherence time. PMID:26521962

  10. 13C-DEPLETED MICROBIAL LIPIDS INDICATE SEASONAL METHANOTROPHIC ACTIVITY IN SHALLOW ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compound specific isotope analysis was combined with phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis to identify methanotrophic activity in members of the sedimentary microbial community in the Altamaha and Savannah River estuaries in Georgia. 13C-depleted PLFAs indicate methane utilizat...

  11. Separation of extra- and intracellular metabolites using hyperpolarized (13)C diffusion weighted MR.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Bertram L; Sriram, Renuka; Keshari, Kayvan R; Leon Swisher, Christine; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Vigneron, Daniel B; Wang, Zhen J; Larson, Peder E Z; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-09-01

    This work demonstrates the separation of extra- and intracellular components of glycolytic metabolites with diffusion weighted hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using b-values of up to 15,000smm(-2), a multi-exponential signal response was measured for hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate and lactate. By fitting the fast and slow asymptotes of these curves, their extra- and intracellular weighted diffusion coefficients were determined in cells perfused in a MR compatible bioreactor. In addition to measuring intracellular weighted diffusion, extra- and intracellular weighted hyperpolarized (13)C metabolites pools are assessed in real-time, including their modulation with inhibition of monocarboxylate transporters. These studies demonstrate the ability to simultaneously assess membrane transport in addition to enzymatic activity with the use of diffusion weighted hyperpolarized (13)C MR. This technique could be an indispensible tool to evaluate the impact of microenvironment on the presence, aggressiveness and metastatic potential of a variety of cancers. PMID:27434780

  12. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  13. Natural abundance measurements of 13C indicate increased deep soil carbon mineralization after forest disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diochon, Amanda; Kellman, Lisa

    2008-07-01

    Northern forest soils represent globally important stores of carbon (C), yet there is no consensus about how they are altered by the widespread practice of harvesting that dominates many forested landscapes. Here we present the first study to systematically investigate the utility of δ 13C and C content depth profiles to infer temporal changes in belowground carbon cycling processes following disturbance in a pure C3 ecosystem. We document carbon concentration and δ 13C depth profile enrichment trends consistent with a kinetic fractionation arising from soil organic carbon (SOC) humification across a northern forest chronosequence (1, 15, 45, 80 and 125+ yrs). Reduced soil C storage that coincided with observed soil profile δ 13C-enrichment patterns which intensified following clearcut harvesting, pointed to losses of SOC in the deeper (>20 cm) mineral soil. This study suggests the δ 13C approach may assist in identifying mechanisms responsible for soil C storage changes in disturbed C3 forest ecosystems.

  14. 2H-DNP-enhanced 2H–13C solid-state NMR correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Andreas, Loren B.; Smith, Albert A.

    2015-01-01

    Perdeuteration of biological macromolecules for magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy can yield high-resolution 2H–13C correlation spectra and the method is therefore of great interest for the structural biology community. Here we demonstrate that the combination of sample deuteration and dynamic nuclear polarization yields resolved 2H–13C correlation spectra with a signal enhancement of ε ≥ 700 compared to a spectrum recorded with microwaves off and otherwise identical conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first time that 2H-DNP has been employed to enhance MAS-NMR spectra of a biologically relevant system. The DNP process is studied using several polarizing agents and the technique is applied to obtain 2H–13C correlation spectra of U-[2H, 13C] proline. PMID:20458422

  15. Spectroscopic study and astronomical detection of doubly 13C-substituted ethyl cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Belloche, A.; Müller, H. S. P.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Garrod, R. T.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. We have performed a spectral line survey called Exploring Molecular Complexity with ALMA (EMoCA) toward Sagittarius B2(N) between 84.1 and 114.4 GHz with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in its Cycles 0 and 1. Line intensities of the main isotopic species of ethyl cyanide and its singly 13C-substituted isotopomers observed toward the hot molecular core Sagittarius B2(N2) suggest that the doubly 13C-substituted isotopomers should also be detectable. Aims: We want to determine the spectroscopic parameters of all three doubly 13C-substituted isotopologues of ethyl cyanide to search for them in our ALMA data. Methods: We investigated the laboratory rotational spectra of the three species between 150 GHz and 990 GHz. We searched for emission lines produced by these species in the ALMA spectrum of Sagittarius B2(N2). We modeled their emission and the emission of the 12C and singly 13C-substituted isotopologues assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Results: We identified more than 5000 rotational transitions, pertaining to more than 3500 different transition frequencies, in the laboratory for each of the three doubly 13C-substituted isotopomers. The quantum numbers reach J ≈ 115 and Ka ≈ 35, resulting in accurate spectroscopic parameters and accurate rest frequency calculations beyond 1000 GHz for strong to moderately weak transitions of either isotopomer. All three species are unambiguously detected in our ALMA data. The 12C/13C column density ratio of the isotopomers with one 13C atom to those with two 13C atoms is about 25. Conclusions: Ethyl cyanide is the second molecule after methyl cyanide for which isotopologues containing two 13C atoms have been securely detected in the interstellar medium. The model of our ethyl cyanide data suggests that we should be able to detect vibrational satellites of the main species up to at least ν19 = 1 at ~1130 K and up to ν13 + ν21 = 2 at ~600 K for the isotopologues with one 13C atom in

  16. Simultaneous DNP enhancements of (1)H and (13)C nuclei: theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Shimon, Daphna; Hovav, Yonatan; Kaminker, Ilia; Feintuch, Akiva; Goldfarb, Daniella; Vega, Shimon

    2015-05-01

    DNP on heteronuclear spin systems often results in interesting phenomena such as the polarization enhancement of one nucleus during MW irradiation at the "forbidden" transition frequencies of another nucleus or the polarization transfer between the nuclei without MW irradiation. In this work we discuss the spin dynamics in a four-spin model system of the form {ea-eb-((1)H,(13)C)}, with the Larmor frequencies ωa, ωb, ωH and ωC, by performing Liouville space simulations. This spin system exhibits the common (1)H solid effect (SE), (13)C cross effect (CE) and in addition high order CE-DNP enhancements. Here we show, in particular, the "proton shifted (13)C-CE" mechanism that results in (13)C polarization when the model system, at one of its (13)C-CE conditions, is excited by a MW field at the zero quantum or double quantum electron-proton transitions ωMW = ωa ± ωH and ωMW = ωb ± ωH. Furthermore, we introduce the "heteronuclear" CE mechanism that becomes efficient when the system is at one of its combined CE conditions |ωa - ωb| = |ωH ± ωC|. At these conditions, simulations of the four-spin system show polarization transfer processes between the nuclei, during and without MW irradiation, resembling the polarization exchange effects often discussed in the literature. To link the "microscopic" four-spin simulations to the experimental results we use DNP lineshape simulations based on "macroscopic" rate equations describing the electron and nuclear polarization dynamics in large spin systems. This approach is applied based on electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) measurements that show strong (1)H-SE features outside the EPR frequency range. Simulated ELDOR spectra combined with the indirect (13)C-CE (iCE) mechanism, result in additional "proton shifted (13)C-CE" features that are similar to the experimental ones. These features are also observed experimentally in (13)C-DNP spectra of a sample containing 15 mM of trityl in a glass forming solution of

  17. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times

    PubMed Central

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E.J.; Reilly, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as 13C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60 s for 13C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance 13C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance. PMID:26450570

  18. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E. J.; Reilly, David J.

    2015-10-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as 13C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60 s for 13C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance 13C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance.

  19. A procedure to validate and correct the 13C chemical shift calibration of RNA datasets.

    PubMed

    Aeschbacher, Thomas; Schubert, Mario; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-02-01

    Chemical shifts reflect the structural environment of a certain nucleus and can be used to extract structural and dynamic information. Proper calibration is indispensable to extract such information from chemical shifts. Whereas a variety of procedures exist to verify the chemical shift calibration for proteins, no such procedure is available for RNAs to date. We present here a procedure to analyze and correct the calibration of (13)C NMR data of RNAs. Our procedure uses five (13)C chemical shifts as a reference, each of them found in a narrow shift range in most datasets deposited in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank. In 49 datasets we could evaluate the (13)C calibration and detect errors or inconsistencies in RNA (13)C chemical shifts based on these chemical shift reference values. More than half of the datasets (27 out of those 49) were found to be improperly referenced or contained inconsistencies. This large inconsistency rate possibly explains that no clear structure-(13)C chemical shift relationship has emerged for RNA so far. We were able to recalibrate or correct 17 datasets resulting in 39 usable (13)C datasets. 6 new datasets from our lab were used to verify our method increasing the database to 45 usable datasets. We can now search for structure-chemical shift relationships with this improved list of (13)C chemical shift data. This is demonstrated by a clear relationship between ribose (13)C shifts and the sugar pucker, which can be used to predict a C2'- or C3'-endo conformation of the ribose with high accuracy. The improved quality of the chemical shift data allows statistical analysis with the potential to facilitate assignment procedures, and the extraction of restraints for structure calculations of RNA. PMID:22252483

  20. Parallel labeling experiments validate Clostridium acetobutylicum metabolic network model for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Au, Jennifer; Choi, Jungik; Jones, Shawn W; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we provide new insights into the metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 obtained using a systematic approach for quantifying fluxes based on parallel labeling experiments and (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA). Here, cells were grown in parallel cultures with [1-(13)C]glucose and [U-(13)C]glucose as tracers and (13)C-MFA was used to quantify intracellular metabolic fluxes. Several metabolic network models were compared: an initial model based on current knowledge, and extended network models that included additional reactions that improved the fits of experimental data. While the initial network model did not produce a statistically acceptable fit of (13)C-labeling data, an extended network model with five additional reactions was able to fit all data with 292 redundant measurements. The model was subsequently trimmed to produce a minimal network model of C. acetobutylicum for (13)C-MFA, which could still reproduce all of the experimental data. The flux results provided valuable new insights into the metabolism of C. acetobutylicum. First, we found that TCA cycle was effectively incomplete, as there was no measurable flux between α-ketoglutarate and succinyl-CoA, succinate and fumarate, and malate and oxaloacetate. Second, an active pathway was identified from pyruvate to fumarate via aspartate. Third, we found that isoleucine was produced exclusively through the citramalate synthase pathway in C. acetobutylicum and that CAC3174 was likely responsible for citramalate synthase activity. These model predictions were confirmed in several follow-up tracer experiments. The validated metabolic network model established in this study can be used in future investigations for unbiased (13)C-flux measurements in C. acetobutylicum. PMID:25183671

  1. (13)C-Breath testing in animals: theory, applications, and future directions.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D; Welch, Kenneth C

    2016-04-01

    The carbon isotope values in the exhaled breath of an animal mirror the carbon isotope values of the metabolic fuels being oxidized. The measurement of stable carbon isotopes in carbon dioxide is called (13)C-breath testing and offers a minimally invasive method to study substrate oxidation in vivo. (13)C-breath testing has been broadly used to study human exercise, nutrition, and pathologies since the 1970s. Owing to reduced use of radioactive isotopes and the increased convenience and affordability of (13)C-analyzers, the past decade has witnessed a sharp increase in the use of breath testing throughout comparative physiology-especially to answer questions about how and when animals oxidize particular nutrients. Here, we review the practical aspects of (13)C-breath testing and identify the strengths and weaknesses of different methodological approaches including the use of natural abundance versus artificially-enriched (13)C tracers. We critically compare the information that can be obtained using different experimental protocols such as diet-switching versus fuel-switching. We also discuss several factors that should be considered when designing breath testing experiments including extrinsic versus intrinsic (13)C-labelling and different approaches to model nutrient oxidation. We use case studies to highlight the myriad applications of (13)C-breath testing in basic and clinical human studies as well as comparative studies of fuel use, energetics, and carbon turnover in multiple vertebrate and invertebrate groups. Lastly, we call for increased and rigorous use of (13)C-breath testing to explore a variety of new research areas and potentially answer long standing questions related to thermobiology, locomotion, and nutrition. PMID:26660654

  2. The effect of chemical processing on the δ 13C value of plant tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Water, Peter K.

    2002-04-01

    The effect of standard processing techniques on the δ 13C value of plant tissue was tested using species representing the three photosynthetic pathways, including angiosperms and gymnosperms within the C 3 taxonomic division. The species include Cowania mexicana (C 3 angiosperm), Juniperus osteosperma (C 3 gymnosperm), Opuntia spp. (crassulacean acid metabolism [CAM] angiosperm), and Atriplex canescens (C 4 angiosperm). Each species is represented by 5 plants collected at two different sites, for a total of 10 samples. The samples were processed to whole plant tissue, holocellulose, α-cellulose, and nitrocellulose. An additional process was added with the discovery of residual Ca-oxalate crystals in holocellulose samples. Both C 3 species show δ 13C values becoming 13C enriched with increased processing. The CAM representative shows the opposite trend, with 13C depletion during the progression of treatments. The greatest range of values and most inconsistent trends occur in the C 4 representative. Removal of the Ca-oxalate fraction resulted in different mean weight percentages and δ 13C values among the species. Calculated δ 13C values of the Ca-oxalate crystals show depletion from the tissue values in the two C 3 species and enrichment in the C 4 and CAM representatives. The C. mexicana samples show the greatest change between the tissue and Ca-oxalates (7.3‰) but the least mean weight percentage (11%), whereas A. canescens shows the greatest overall change, with a -2.8‰ isotopic shift and over 48% mean weight percentage. Variability within the samples undergoing each treatment remained relatively unchanged even with increased cellulose purity. This paper provides estimates of isotopic offsets necessary to correct from one treatment to another. Significant differences in δ 13C among different treatments confirm the need to state the tissue fraction analyzed when reporting δ 13C results.

  3. Multi-year estimates of plant and ecosystem 13C discrimination at AmeriFlux sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, X.; Lai, C.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Bush, S.; Randerson, J. T.; Law, B. E.; Schauer, A. J.; Ehleringer, J.

    2011-12-01

    We estimated plant and ecosystem 13C discrimination continuously at 8 AmeriFlux sites (Howland Forest, Harvard Forest, Wind River Forest, Rannells Prairie, Freeman Ranch, Chestnut Ridge, Metolius, and Marys River fir) over 8 years (2002-2009). We used an observation-based approach from weekly measurements of eddy covariance CO2 fluxes and their 13C/12C ratios to estimate photosynthetic 13C discrimination (△A) and respiration (δ13CR) on seasonal and interannual time scales. The coordinated, systematic flask sampling across the AmeriFlux subnetwork were used for cross-site synthesis of monthly flux estimates [Dang et al. Combining tower mixing ratio and community model data to estimate regional-scale net ecosystem carbon exchange by boundary layer inversion over 4 flux towers in the U.S.A., Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, in press]. Here, we evaluated environmental factors that also influenced temporal variability in △A and δ13CR from daily to interannual time scales, comparing atmospheric 13C/12C measurements, leaf and needle organic matter, and tree ring cellulose. Across these major biomes that dominate the continent, we show differential ecophysiological responses to environmental stresses, among which water availability appeared to be a dominant factor. Our decadal measurement period provided robust estimates of atmospheric 13C discrimination by terrestrial ecosystems, but also suggest regions where enhanced monitoring efforts are required (e.g., 13C/12C emission from fire and urban metabolism; increased temporal resolution of 13C measurements in stress-sensitive ecosystems) to make atmospheric 13C/12C measurements an effective constraint for continental-scale assessments of the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  4. Investigating brain metabolism at high fields using localized 13C NMR spectroscopy without 1H decoupling.

    PubMed

    Deelchand, Dinesh Kumar; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2006-02-01

    Most in vivo 13C NMR spectroscopy studies in the brain have been performed using 1H decoupling during acquisition. Decoupling imposes significant constraints on the experimental setup (particularly for human studies at high magnetic field) in order to stay within safety limits for power deposition. We show here that incorporation of the 13C label from 13C-labeled glucose into brain amino acids can be monitored accurately using localized 13C NMR spectroscopy without the application of 1H decoupling. Using LCModel quantification with prior knowledge of one-bond and multiple-bond J(CH) coupling constants, the uncertainty on metabolites concentrations was only 35% to 91% higher (depending on the carbon resonance of interest) in undecoupled spectra compared to decoupled spectra in the rat brain at 9.4 Tesla. Although less sensitive, 13C NMR without decoupling dramatically reduces experimental constraints on coil setup and pulse sequence design required to keep power deposition within safety guidelines. This opens the prospect of safely measuring 13C NMR spectra in humans at varied brain locations (not only the occipital lobe) and at very high magnetic fields above 4 Tesla. PMID:16345037

  5. Extreme (13)C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite.

    PubMed

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C13C as light as -69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to -125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane. PMID:25948095

  6. Extreme 13C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E.; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C13C as light as −69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to −125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane. PMID:25948095

  7. Perfusion and diffusion sensitive 13C stimulated-echo MRSI for metabolic imaging of cancer.

    PubMed

    Larson, Peder E Z; Hurd, Ralph E; Kerr, Adam B; Pauly, John M; Bok, Robert A; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2013-06-01

    Metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]-pyruvate can rapidly probe tissue metabolic profiles in vivo and has been shown to provide cancer imaging biomarkers for tumor detection, progression, and response to therapy. This technique uses a bolus injection followed by imaging within 1-2 minutes. The observed metabolites include vascular components and their generation is also influenced by cellular transport. These factors complicate image interpretation, especially since [1-(13)C]lactate, a metabolic product that is a biomarker of cancer, is also produced by red blood cells. It would be valuable to understand the distribution of metabolites between the vasculature, interstitial space, and intracellular compartments. The purpose of this study was to better understand this compartmentalization by using a perfusion and diffusion-sensitive stimulated-echo acquisition mode (STEAM) MRSI acquisition method tailored to hyperpolarized substrates. Our results in mouse models showed that among metabolites, the injected substrate (13)C-pyruvate had the largest vascular fraction overall while (13)C-alanine had the smallest vascular fraction. We observed a larger vascular fraction of pyruvate and lactate in the kidneys and liver when compared to back muscle and prostate tumor tissue. Our data suggests that (13)C-lactate in prostate tumor tissue voxels was the most abundant labeled metabolite intracellularly. This was shown in STEAM images that highlighted abnormal cancer cell metabolism and suppressed vascular (13)C metabolite signals. PMID:23260391

  8. Development of a 13C-optimized 1.5-mm high temperature superconducting NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Vijaykumar; Hooker, Jerris W.; Withers, Richard S.; Nast, Robert E.; Brey, William W.; Edison, Arthur S.

    2013-10-01

    We report a 1.5-mm NMR probe based on high temperature superconductors operating at 14.1 T optimized for 13C detection. The probe has a total sample volume of about 35 microliters (μL) with an active volume of 20 μL and provides exceptional mass sensitivity for 13C detection. The probe also has excellent 1H sensitivity and employs a 2H lock; 15N irradiation capability can be added in the future. The coils are cooled to about 20 K using a standard Agilent cryogenic refrigeration system, and the sample temperature is regulated near room temperature. The coil design considerations are discussed in detail. This probe is ideal for directly detected 13C NMR experiments for natural products chemistry and metabolomics applications, for which 35 μL is an optimal sample volume. The outstanding 13C sensitivity of this probe allowed us to directly determine the 13C connectivity on 1.1 mg of natural abundance histidine using an INADEQUATE experiment. We demonstrated the utility of this probe for 13C-based metabolomics using a synthetic mixture of common natural abundance metabolites whose concentrations ranged from 1 to 5 mM (40-200 nmol).

  9. R-Matrix Analysis of the 13C(α,n)16O Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, Arthur; Rogachev, Grigory

    2015-10-01

    The 13C(α,n)16O reaction plays a crucial role in the main s-process occurring in low-mass thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars, which produces about half of all nuclei heavier than iron. However, direct measurements of this reaction cross section near the Gamow-peak energy are currently not possible due to very small reaction cross sections. Additionally, available cross-section data at higher energy have some inconsistencies, leading to significant uncertainties in low energy extrapolations. A global R-matrix fit was conducted, using all available data for the 13C(α,n)16O, 13C(α, α)13C, and 16O(n,n)16O reactions. Of particular importance was the inclusion of the fixed ANC for the 1 / 2 + state at 6 . 356 MeV in 17O, which was measured recently using the sub-Coulomb α-transfer reaction, as well as the new 13C+ α elastic-scattering data measured in the low-energy region 1 . 6 - 3 . 8 MeV. Important constraining information on various resonances was found, and the uncertainty for the astrophysical 13C(α,n)16O reaction rate was dramatically reduced. Much work on the analysis was done by A. K. Nurmukhanbetova from National Laboratory Astana in Astana, Kazakhstan.

  10. The paper trail of the 13C of atmospheric CO2 since the industrial revolution period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakir, Dan

    2011-07-01

    The 13C concentration in atmospheric CO2 has been declining over the past 150 years as large quantities of 13C-depleted CO2 from fossil fuel burning are added to the atmosphere. Deforestation and other land use changes have also contributed to the trend. Looking at the 13C variations in the atmosphere and in annual growth rings of trees allows us to estimate CO2 uptake by land plants and the ocean, and assess the response of plants to climate. Here I show that the effects of the declining 13C trend in atmospheric CO2 are recorded in the isotopic composition of paper used in the printing industry, which provides a well-organized archive and integrated material derived from trees' cellulose. 13C analyses of paper from two European and two American publications showed, on average, a - 1.65 ± 1.00‰ trend between 1880 and 2000, compared with - 1.45 and - 1.57‰ for air and tree-ring analyses, respectively. The greater decrease in plant-derived 13C in the paper we tested than in the air is consistent with predicted global-scale increases in plant intrinsic water-use efficiency over the 20th century. Distinct deviations from the atmospheric trend were observed in both European and American publications immediately following the World War II period.

  11. 13C-labelled microdialysis studies of cerebral metabolism in TBI patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Keri L.H.; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Gallagher, Clare N.; Grice, Peter; Howe, Duncan J.; Mason, Andrew; Timofeev, Ivan; Helmy, Adel; Murphy, Michael P.; Menon, David K.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Sutherland, Garnette R.; Pickard, John D.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Human brain chemistry is incompletely understood and better methodologies are needed. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes metabolic perturbations, one result of which includes increased brain lactate levels. Attention has largely focussed on glycolysis, whereby glucose is converted to pyruvate and lactate, and is proposed to act as an energy source by feeding into neurons’ tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, generating ATP. Also reportedly upregulated by TBI is the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) that does not generate ATP but produces various molecules that are putatively neuroprotective, antioxidant and reparative, in addition to lactate among the end products. We have developed a novel combination of 13C-labelled cerebral microdialysis both to deliver 13C-labelled substrates into brains of TBI patients and recover the 13C-labelled metabolites, with high-resolution 13C NMR analysis of the microdialysates. This methodology has enabled us to achieve the first direct demonstration in humans that the brain can utilise lactate via the TCA cycle. We are currently using this methodology to make the first direct comparison of glycolysis and the PPP in human brain. In this article, we consider the application of 13C-labelled cerebral microdialysis for studying brain energy metabolism in patients. We set this methodology within the context of metabolic pathways in the brain, and 13C research modalities addressing them. PMID:24361470

  12. Metabolism of [13C5]hydroxyproline in vitro and in vivo: implications for primary hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Juquan; Johnson, Lynnette C.; Knight, John; Callahan, Michael F.; Riedel, Travis J.; Holmes, Ross P.

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyproline (Hyp) metabolism is a key source of glyoxylate production in the body and may be a major contributor to excessive oxalate production in the primary hyperoxalurias where glyoxylate metabolism is impaired. Important gaps in our knowledge include identification of the tissues with the capacity to degrade Hyp and the development of model systems to study this metabolism and how to suppress it. The expression of mRNA for enzymes in the pathway was examined in 15 different human tissues. Expression of the complete pathway was identified in liver, kidney, pancreas, and small intestine. HepG2 cells also expressed these mRNAs and enzymes and were shown to metabolize Hyp in the culture medium to glycolate, glycine, and oxalate. [18O]- and [13C5]Hyp were synthesized and evaluated for their use with in vitro and in vivo models. [18O]Hyp was not suitable because of an apparent tautomerism of [18O]glyoxylate between enol and hydrated forms, which resulted in a loss of isotope. [13C5]Hyp, however, was metabolized to [13C2]glycolate, [13C2]glycine, and [13C2]oxalate in vitro in HepG2 cells and in vivo in mice infused with [13C5]Hyp. These model systems should be valuable tools for exploring various aspects of Hyp metabolism and will be useful in determining whether blocking Hyp catabolism is an effective therapy in the treatment of primary hyperoxaluria. PMID:22207577

  13. (13) C Breath Tests Are Feasible in Patients With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Devices.

    PubMed

    Bednarsch, Jan; Menk, Mario; Malinowski, Maciej; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Pratschke, Johann; Stockmann, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Temporary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been established as an essential part of therapy in patients with pulmonary or cardiac failure. As physiological gaseous exchange is artificially altered in this patient group, it is debatable whether a (13) C-breath test can be carried out. In this proof of technical feasibility report, we assess the viability of the (13) C-breath test LiMAx (maximum liver function capacity) in patients on ECMO therapy. All breath probes for the test device were obtained directly via the membrane oxygenator. Data of four patients receiving liver function assessment with the (13) C-breath test LiMAx while having ECMO therapy were analyzed. All results were compared with validated scenarios of the testing procedures. The LiMAx test could successfully be carried out in every case without changing ECMO settings. Clinical course of the patients ranging from multiorgan failure to no sign of liver insufficiency was in accordance with the results of the LiMAx liver function test. The (13) C-breath test is technically feasible in the context of ECMO. Further evaluation of (13) C-breath test in general would be worthwhile. The LiMAx test as a (13) C-breath test accessing liver function might be of particular predictive interest if patients with ECMO therapy develop multiorgan failure. PMID:26527580

  14. sup 13 C and sup 18 O isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates: I. Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Biological carbonates frequently precipitate out of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C equilibrium with ambient waters. Two patterns of isotopic disequilibrium are particularly common. Kinetic disequilibria, so designated because they apparently result from kinetic isotope effects during CO{sub 2} hydration and hydroxylation, involve simultaneous depletions of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C as large as 4{per thousand} and 10 to 15{per thousand}, respectively. Rapid skeletogenesis favors strong kinetic effects, and approximately linear correlations between skeletal {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C are common in carbonates showing mainly the kinetic pattern. Metabolic effects involve additional positive or negative modulation of skeletal {delta}{sup 13}C, reflecting changes in the {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic carbon, caused mainly by photosynthesis and respiration. Kinetic isotope disequilibria tend to be fairly consistent in rapidly growing parts of photosynthetic corals, and time dependent isotopic variations therefore reflect changes in environmental conditions. {delta}{sup 18}O variations from Galapagos corals yields meaningful clues regarding seawater temperature, while {delta}{sup 13}C variations reflect changes in photosynthesis, modulated by cloudiness.

  15. Development of a 13C-Optimized 1.5-mm High Temperature Superconducting NMR Probe

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Vijaykumar; Hooker, Jerris W.; Withers, Richard S.; Nast, Robert E.; Brey, William W.; Edison, Arthur S.

    2013-01-01

    We report a 1.5-mm NMR probe based on high temperature superconductors operating at 14.1 T optimized for 13C detection. The probe has a total sample volume of about 35 microliters (μL) with an active volume of 20 μL and provides exceptional mass sensitivity for 13C detection. The probe also has excellent 1H sensitivity and employs a 2H channel lock; 15N irradiation capability can be added in the future. The coils are cooled to about 20 K using a standard Agilent cryogenic refrigeration system, and the sample temperature is regulated near room temperature. The coil design considerations are discussed in detail. This probe is ideal for directly detected 13C NMR experiments for natural products chemistry and metabolomics applications, for which 35 μL is an optimal sample volume. The outstanding 13C sensitivity of this probe allowed us to directly determine the 13C connectivity on 1.1 mg of natural abundance histidine using an INADEQUATE experiment. We demonstrated the utility of this probe for 13C-based metabolomics using a synthetic mixture of common natural abundance metabolites whose concentrations ranged from 1 to 5 mM (40 to 200 nmol). PMID:23969086

  16. [2,4-13C2]-β-Hydroxybutyrate Metabolism in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jullie W.; de Graaf, Robin A.; Petersen, Kitt F.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Hetherington, Hoby P.; Rothman, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Infusions of [2,4-13C2]-β-hydroxybutyrate and 1H–13C polarization transfer spectroscopy were used in normal human subjects to detect the entry and metabolism of β-hydroxybutyrate in the brain. During the 2-hour infusion study, 13C label was detectable in the β-hydroxybutyrate resonance positions and in the amino acid pools of glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate. With a plasma concentration of 2.25 ± 0.24 mmol/L (four volunteers), the apparent tissue β-hydroxybutyrate concentration reached 0.18 ± 0.06 mmol/L during the last 20 minutes of the study. The relative fractional enrichment of 13C-4-glutamate labeling was 6.78 ± 1.71%, whereas 13C-4-glutamine was 5.68 ± 1.84%. Steady-state modeling of the 13C label distribution in glutamate and glutamine suggests that, under these conditions, the consumption of the β-hydroxybutyrate is predominantly neuronal, used at a rate of 0.032 ± 0.009 mmol · kg−1 · min−1, and accounts for 6.4 ± 1.6% of total acetyl coenzyme A oxidation. These results are consistent with minimal accumulation of cerebral ketones with rapid utilization, implying blood–brain barrier control of ketone oxidation in the nonfasted adult human brain. PMID:12142574

  17. [2,4-13 C2 ]-beta-Hydroxybutyrate metabolism in human brain.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jullie W; de Graaf, Robin A; Petersen, Kitt F; Shulman, Gerald I; Hetherington, Hoby P; Rothman, Douglas L

    2002-07-01

    Infusions of [2,4-13C2]-beta-hydroxybutyrate and 1H-13C polarization transfer spectroscopy were used in normal human subjects to detect the entry and metabolism of beta-hydroxybutyrate in the brain. During the 2-hour infusion study, 13C label was detectable in the beta-hydroxybutyrate resonance positions and in the amino acid pools of glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate. With a plasma concentration of 2.25 +/- 0.24 mmol/L (four volunteers), the apparent tissue beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration reached 0.18 +/- 0.06 mmol/L during the last 20 minutes of the study. The relative fractional enrichment of 13C-4-glutamate labeling was 6.78 +/- 1.71%, whereas 13C-4-glutamine was 5.68 +/- 1.84%. Steady-state modeling of the 13C label distribution in glutamate and glutamine suggests that, under these conditions, the consumption of the beta-hydroxybutyrate is predominantly neuronal, used at a rate of 0.032 +/- 0.009 mmol. kg-1. min-1, and accounts for 6.4 +/- 1.6% of total acetyl coenzyme A oxidation. These results are consistent with minimal accumulation of cerebral ketones with rapid utilization, implying blood-brain barrier control of ketone oxidation in the nonfasted adult human brain. PMID:12142574

  18. Distinct Human and Mouse Membrane Trafficking Systems for Sweet Taste Receptors T1r2 and T1r3

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system. PMID:25029362

  19. Delineation of conformational and structural features of the amikacin-Cu(II) complex in water solution by 13C-NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Maccotta, Antonella; Valensin, Gianni; Marini, Domenico; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Manetti, Cesare; Delfini, Maurizio

    1998-12-01

    The copper (II) complex of amikacin in water solution at pH 5.5 was investigated by 13C-NMR. The temperature dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rates was measured and fast exchange conditions were shown to apply. The motional correlation time of the complex was approximated by the pseudo-isotropic rotational correlation time of free amikacin in water solution ( τc=0.17 ns at 300 K). Formation of a pseudo-tetrahedral 1:1 complex was demonstrated by relaxation rates analysis and also by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Two amino nitrogens of amikacin, together with the amide nitrogen and the hydroxyl in the hydroxyl-aminopropyl carbonyl side chain, were assigned as the copper-binding sites and a model of the complex was built by using copper-carbon distances obtained by NMR analysis as input parameters.

  20. Migration and deposition of 13C in the full-tungsten ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakola, A.; Likonen, J.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Groth, M.; Koivuranta, S.; Krieger, K.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Makkonen, T.; Mayer, M.; Müller, H. W.; Neu, R.; Rohde, V.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-06-01

    The migration of carbon in low-density, low-confinement plasmas of ASDEX Upgrade was studied by injecting 13C into the main chamber of the torus at the end of the 2007 experimental campaign. A selection of standard tungsten-coated lower-divertor and main-chamber tiles as well as a complete set of lower-divertor tiles with an uncoated poloidal marker stripe were removed from one poloidal cross section and analysed using secondary ion mass spectrometry. The poloidal deposition profiles of 13C on both the tungsten-coated tiles and on the uncoated graphite areas of the marker tiles were measured and compared. For the W-coated lower-divertor tiles, 13C was deposited mainly on the high-field side tiles, while barely detectable amounts of 13C were observed on low-field side samples. In contrast, on the uncoated marker stripes the deposition was equally pronounced in the high-field and low-field side divertor. The marker-tile results are in agreement with those obtained from graphite tiles after the 2003 and 2005 13C experiments in ASDEX Upgrade. In the case of W-coated tiles, the 13C measurements were complemented by determining the total amount of deposited carbon (12C) on the tiles, which also shows strong deposition at the inner parts of the lower divertor. The estimated deposition of 13C on W at the divertor areas was less than 1.5% of the injected amount of 13C atoms. The 13C analyses of the main-chamber tiles and small silicon samples mounted in remote areas revealed significant deposition in the upper divertor, in upper parts of the heat shield, in the limiter region close to the injection valve, and below the roof baffle. Approximately 8% of the injected 13C is estimated to have accumulated in these regions. Possible reasons for the different deposition patterns on W and on graphite in different regions of the torus are discussed.

  1. The use of dynamic nuclear polarization 13C-pyruvate MRS in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam Espe; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Clemmensen, Andreas Ettrup; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an immense development of new targeted anti-cancer drugs. For practicing precision medicine, a sensitive method imaging for non-invasive, assessment of early treatment response and for assisting in developing new drugs is warranted. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a potent technique for non-invasive in vivo investigation of tissue chemistry and cellular metabolism. Hyperpolarization by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is capable of creating solutions of molecules with polarized nuclear spins in a range of biological molecules and has enabled the real-time investigation of in vivo metabolism. The development of this new method has been demonstrated to enhance the nuclear polarization more than 10,000-fold, thereby significantly increasing the sensitivity of the MRS with a spatial resolution to the millimeters and a temporal resolution at the subsecond range. Furthermore, the method enables measuring kinetics of conversion of substrates into cell metabolites and can be integrated with anatomical proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many nuclei and substrates have been hyperpolarized using the DNP method. Currently, the most widely used compound is 13C-pyruvate due to favoring technicalities. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate results in appearance of 13C-lactate, 13C-alanine and 13C-bicarbonate resonance peaks depending on the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. In cancer, the lactate level is increased due to increased glycolysis. The use of DNP enhanced 13C-pyruvate has in preclinical studies shown to be a sensitive method for detecting cancer and for assessment of early treatment response in a variety of cancers. Recently, a first-in-man 31-patient study was conducted with the primary objective to assess the safety of hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate in healthy subjects and prostate cancer patients. The study showed an elevated 13C-lactate/13C-pyruvate ratio in regions of biopsy

  2. Determination of glucan phosphorylation using heteronuclear 1H, 13C double and 1H, 13C, 31P triple-resonance NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Peter; Nitschke, Felix; Steup, Martin; Mallow, Keven; Specker, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of starch and glycogen are important for their physicochemical properties and also their physiological functions. It is therefore desirable to reliably determine the phosphorylation sites. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR-spectroscopy is in principle a straightforward analytical approach even for complex carbohydrate molecules. With heterogeneous samples from natural sources, however, the task becomes more difficult because a full assignment of the resonances of the carbohydrates is impossible to obtain. Here, we show that the combination of heteronuclear (1) H,(13) C and (1) H,(13) C,(31) P techniques and information derived from spectra of a set of reference compounds can lead to an unambiguous determination of the phosphorylation sites even in heterogeneous samples. PMID:23913630

  3. Native Magnetic Resonance T1-Mapping Identifies Diffuse Myocardial Injury in Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Aijuan; Chen, Zhe; Jia, Yumei; Yang, Ning; Feng, Xiaomeng; Liu, Jia; Xu, Yuan; Yang, Xinchun; Wang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Hypothyroidism (HT) is characterized by thyroid hormone deficiencies, which can lead to diffuse myocardial interstitium lesions in patients with HT. Myocardial longitudinal relaxation time (T1) mapping is a potential diagnostic tool for quantifying diffuse myocardial injury. This study aimed to assess the usefulness of T1 mapping in identifying myocardial involvement in HT, and determine the relationship between T1 values and myocardial function. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 30 untreated HT patients alongside 23 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. All subjects underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) with non-contrast (native) T1 mapping using a modified Look-Locker inversion-recovery (MOLLI) sequence to assess the native T1 values of myocardium and cardiac function. Results Native myocardial T1 values were significantly increased in HT patients, especially those with pericardial effusion (p < 0.05), compared with healthy controls. In addition, significantly reduced peak filling rate (PFR) and prolonged peak filling time (PFT) were obtained (p < 0.05) in HT patients compared with controls. Furthermore, stroke volume (SV) and cardiac index (CI) were significantly lower in HT patients than controls (all p < 0.05). Interestingly, native T1 values were negatively correlated with free triiodothyronine (FT3), PFR, SV and CI (all p < 0.05). Conclusion Diffuse myocardial injuries are common in HT patients, and increased T1 values are correlated with FT3 and cardiac function impairment. These findings indicate that T1 mapping might be useful in evaluating myocardial injuries in HT patients. PMID:26964099

  4. T2 can be greater than 2T1 even at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Brian B.; Skinner, James L.

    1991-03-01

    The relaxation of a nondegenerate two-level quantum system linearly and off-diagonally coupled to a thermal bath of quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillators is studied. The population and phase relaxation times, T1 and T2, are calculated to fourth order in the system/bath interaction. Focus is on a specific model of the bath spectral density that is both Ohmic (proportional to frequency at low frequency) and Lorentzian, and which has the property that, in the semiclassical or high-temperature limit, it reproduces the stochastic model studied previously by Budimir and Skinner [J. Stat. Phys. 49, 1029 (1987)]. For this fully quantum-mechanical model, it is found that under certain conditions the standard inequality, T2≤2T1, is violated, demonstrating that this unusual result, which was originally derived from the (infinite-temperature) stochastic model, is valid at finite temperature as well.

  5. On the use of phloem sap δ13C to estimate canopy carbon discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascher, Katherine; Máguas, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2010-05-01

    Although the carbon stable isotope composition (d13C) of bulk leaf material is a good integrative parameter of photosynthetic discrimination and can be used as a reliable ecological index of plant functioning; it is not a good tracer of short-term changes in photosynthetic discrimination. In contrast, d13C of phloem sap is potentially useful as an indicator of short-term changes in canopy photosynthetic discrimination. However, recent research indicates that d13C signatures may be substantially altered by metabolic processes downstream of initial leaf-level carbon fixation (e.g. post-photosynthetic fractionation). Accordingly, before phloem sap d13C can be used as a proxy for canopy level carbon discrimination an understanding of factors influencing the degree and magnitude of post-photosynthetic fractionation and how these vary between species is of paramount importance. In this study, we measured the d13C signature along the basipetal transport pathway in two co-occurring tree species in the field - an understory invasive exotic legume, Acacia longifolia, and a native pine, Pinus pinaster. We measured d13C of bulk leaf and leaf water soluble organic matter (WSOM), phloem sap sampled at two points along the plant axis and leaf and root dark respiration. In general, species differences in photosynthetic discrimination resulted in more enriched d13C values in the water-conserving P. pinaster relative to the water-spending A. longifolia. Post-photosynthetic fractionation led to differences in d13C of carbon pools along the plant axis with progressively more depleted d13C from the canopy to the trunk (~6.5 per mil depletion in A. longifolia and ~0.8per mil depletion in P. pinaster). Leaf and root respiration, d13C, were consistently enriched relative to putative substrates. We hypothesize that the pronounced enrichment of leaf respired CO2 relative to leaf WSOM may have left behind relatively depleted carbon to be loaded into the phloem resulting in d13C depletion

  6. Paleoclimate Reconstruction From the d13C Organic and d13C Carbonate Proxies in Triassic Paleosols and Sediments, Ischigualasto Basin Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. A.; Tabor, N. J.; Montañez, I. P.; Currie, B.; Shipman, T.

    2001-12-01

    Stable carbon isotopes of organic matter and paleosol carbonate from the Triassic Ischigualasto Formation, Argentina are used as a proxy of paleoatmospheric pCO2 and d13CO2. Carbon and Oxygen isotope values were determined for over 100 Triassic pedogenic carbonate nodules and associated organic matter. The d13C of carbonate ranges from -3.29 per mil to -10.56 per mil. The d13C of organic matter ranges from -21.07 per mil to -24.24 per mil. The Hydrogen and Oxygen indices and TOC values indicate that the best preserved organic matter samples yield the most negative d13C values. Reconstructed pCO2 levels were around 1000 ppm V in the early to mid- Triassic and increased to around 2000 ppm V later in the Triassic. This maximum is followed by a fall in pCO2 in the late Triassic. This previously undocumented rapid change in paleo-CO2 levels likely accompanied the evolution of mammal-like reptiles to true dinosaurs as well as rapid climate change.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of interaction of ligands with Streptococcus faecium dihydrofolate reductase labeled with (. gamma. -/sup 13/C)tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.E.; Groff, J.P.; Cocco, L.; Blakley, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase from Streptococcus faecium has been labeled with (..gamma..-/sup 13/C)tryptophan. We have determined changes occurring in the chemical shifts and line widths of the four resonances of the /sup 13/C NMR spectrum of the labeled enzyme, due to its interaction with various ligands. These include the coenzyme, NPDPH and related nucleotides, folate and its polyglutamate derivatives, and many inhibitors including methotrexate and trimethoprim. In addition, paramagnetic relaxation effects produced by a bound spin-labeled analogue of 2'-phosphoadenosine-5'-diphosphoribose on the tryptophan C/sup ..gamma../ carbons have been measured. Distances calculated from the relaxation data have been compared with corresponding distances in the crystallographic model of the NADPH-methotrexate ternary complex of Lactobacillus casei reductase. The paramagnetic relaxation data indicate that the two downfield resonances (1 and 2) correspond to tryptophans (W/sub A/ and W/sub B/) that are more remote from the catalytic site, and from the crystallographic model these are seen to be Trp-115 and Trp-160. The upfield resonances (3 and 4) that show broadening due to chemical exchange correspond to closer residues (W/sub C/ and W/sub D/), and these are identified with Trp-6 and Trp-22. However, the relaxation data do not permit specific assignments within the nearer and farther pairs. Although resonance 3, which is split due to chemical exchange, was formerly assigned to Trp-6, data obtained for the enzyme in the presence of various ligands are better interpreted if resonance 3 is assigned to Trp-22, which is located on a loop that joins elements of secondary structure and forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity.

  8. Aperitif effects on gastric emptying: a crossover study using continuous real-time 13C breath test (BreathID System).

    PubMed

    Inamori, M; Iida, H; Endo, H; Hosono, K; Akiyama, T; Yoneda, K; Fujita, K; Iwasaki, T; Takahashi, H; Yoneda, M; Goto, A; Abe, Y; Kobayashi, N; Kubota, K; Nakajima, A

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a correlation between aperitif and gastric emptying. Ten healthy male volunteers participated in this randomized, two-way crossover study. Under two conditions (after drinking an aperitif versus not), the (13)C breath test was performed for 4 h with a liquid meal (200 kcal/200 ml) containing 100 mg (13)C acetate. We used 50 ml of umeshu as the aperitif. This is a traditional Japanese plum liqueur, and contains 7 ml alcohol (14%). In the aperitif group, T(1/2), T(lag), and T(peak) were significantly delayed [T(1/2) (132: 113-174) versus (112: 92-134) (P = 0.0069); T(lag) (80: 63-94) versus (55: 47-85) (P = 0.0069); and T(peak) (81: 62-96) versus (54: 34-84) (P = 0.0069), (median: range, aperitif versus control, min)]. Gastric emptying was significantly delayed in the aperitif group as compared with the control group. This study revealed that even a small amount of alcohol such as an aperitif may contribute to delayed gastric emptying. PMID:18688714

  9. Factors determining δ13C and δ18O fractionation in aragonitic otoliths of marine fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorrold, Simon R.; Campana, Steven E.; Jones, Cynthia M.; Swart, Peter K.

    1997-07-01

    Fish otoliths are aragonitic accretions located within the inner ear of teleost fish. The acellular nature of otoliths, along with taxon-specific shapes, chronological growth increments, and abundance in the fossil record suggest that the stable isotope chemistry of these structures may be unique recorders of environmental conditions experienced by fish in both modern and ancient water masses. To assess the factors determining δ 13C and δ 18O fractionation in fish otoliths, we reared Atlantic croaker ( Micropogonias undulatus) larvae under controlled environmental conditions. Metabolic effects apparently generated large isotopic disequilibria in the δ 13C values of M. undulatus otoliths. We found evidence of a negative regression between δ 13C- carbonate-δ 13C water (δ 13C) and temperature: δ 13C = -1.78 - 0.18 T °C However, this relationship was aliased to a degree by a positive correlation between δ 13C and somatic growth and otolith precipitation rates. Oxygen isotopes were deposited close to equilibrium with the ambient water. The relationship between temperature and the 18O/ 16O fractionation factor (α) was determined empirically to be: 1000 ln α = 18.56(10 3T K -1) - 32.54 The fractionation factor was not affected by either otolith precipitation or fish growth rates. Reconstruction of water temperature histories should, therefore, be possible from the δ 18O values of M. undulatus otoliths with a precision of 1°C, providing the δ 18O of the ambient water can be estimated.

  10. Theoretical estimation of 13C-D clumped isotope effects in methyl of several organic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, Q.; Yin, X.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in mass spectrometry and tunable infrared laser direct absorption spectroscopy make it possible to measure 13C-D clumped isotope effects of methane. These techniques can be further applied to determine 13C-D clumped isotope effects of methyl fragments, therefore need accurate equilirbium Δi values to calibrate experimental measurements. In this study, we calculate temperature depandences of 13C-D clumped isotope signatures in methyl of several organic compounds including ethane, propane, acetic acid, etc. Our calculation are performed at CCSD/6-311+G(3df,3pd) by using Gaussian 03 program with no scale treament. Our results show that the Δi values of 13C-D clumping in methyl fragments of different organic compounds yield similar signals (~5.5‰ at 25˚C, slightly lower than Δi value of 13C-D clumping in methane). For testing the calculated accuracy, theoretical treaments beyond the harmonic level by including several higher-order corrections to the Bigeleisen-Mayer equation are used. Contributions from higher-order corrections (e.g., AnZPE, AnEXC, VrZPE, VrEXC, QmCorr and CenDist) are estimated to repire the ignorings of the Bigeleisen-Mayer equation (the anharmonic effects of vibration, vibration-rotation coupling, quantum mechanics and centrifugal distortion for rotation, etc.) for the calculation of partition function ratios. The results show that the higher-order corrections contribute ~0.05‰ at 25˚C, which is similar to the contribution for calculating 13C-D clumped isotope signature of methane. By comparing our calculated frequencies to the measured ones, the uncertainty of our calculation of Δi values 13C-D clumping in methyl fragments is considered to be within ~0.05‰ at room temperature.

  11. An overview of methods using 13C for improved compound identification in metabolomics and natural products

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Stupp, Gregory S.; Ajredini, Ramadan; Lee-McMullen, Brittany; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    Compound identification is a major bottleneck in metabolomics studies. In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations, resonance overlap often hinders unambiguous database matching or de novo compound identification. In liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), discriminating between biological signals and background artifacts and reliable determination of molecular formulae are not always straightforward. We have designed and implemented several NMR and LC-MS approaches that utilize 13C, either enriched or at natural abundance, in metabolomics applications. For LC-MS applications, we describe a technique called isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA), which utilizes samples that are isotopically labeled with 5% (test) and 95% (control) 13C. This labeling strategy leads to characteristic isotopic patterns that allow the differentiation of biological signals from artifacts and yield the exact number of carbons, significantly reducing possible molecular formulae. The relative abundance between the test and control samples for every IROA feature can be determined simply by integrating the peaks that arise from the 5 and 95% channels. For NMR applications, we describe two 13C-based approaches. For samples at natural abundance, we have developed a workflow to obtain 13C–13C and 13C–1H statistical correlations using 1D 13C and 1H NMR spectra. For samples that can be isotopically labeled, we describe another NMR approach to obtain direct 13C–13C spectroscopic correlations. These methods both provide extensive information about the carbon framework of compounds in the mixture for either database matching or de novo compound identification. We also discuss strategies in which 13C NMR can be used to identify unknown compounds from IROA experiments. By combining technologies with the same samples, we can identify important biomarkers and corresponding metabolites of interest. PMID:26379677

  12. The Fate of Oral Glucosamine Traced by 13C Labeling in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, George R.; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Noyszewski, Elizabeth A.; Hall, Jeffery O.; Sharma, Akella V.; Callaway, D. Allen; Reddy, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Objective: It has remained ambiguous as to whether oral dosing of glucosamine (GlcN) would make its way to the joint and affect changes in the cartilage, particularly the integrity of cartilage and chondrocyte function. The objective of this study was to trace the fate of orally dosed GlcN and determine definitively if GlcN was incorporated into cartilage proteoglycans. Design: Two dogs were treated with 13C-GlcN-HCl by oral dosing (500 mg/dog/d for 2 weeks and 250 mg/dog/d for 3 weeks). Cartilage was harvested from the tibial plateau and femoral condyles along with tissue specimens from the liver, spleen, heart, kidney, skin, skeletal muscle, lung, and costal cartilage. Percentages of 13C and 13C-GlcN present in each tissue sample were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Results: In the case of dog 1 (2-week treatment), there was an increase of 2.3% of 13C present in the articular cartilage compared to the control and an increase of 1.6% of 13C in dog 2 compared to control. As to be expected, the highest percentage of 13C in the other tissues tested was found in the liver, and the remaining tissues had percentages of 13C less than that of articular cartilage. Conclusion: The results are definitive and for the first time provide conclusive evidence that orally given GlcN can make its way through the digestive tract and be used by chondrocytes in joint cartilage, thereby potentially having an effect on the available GlcN for proteoglycan biosynthesis. PMID:26069586

  13. 13C-phenylalanine breath test detects altered phenylalanine kinetics in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Teraishi, T; Ozeki, Y; Hori, H; Sasayama, D; Chiba, S; Yamamoto, N; Tanaka, H; Iijima, Y; Matsuo, J; Kawamoto, Y; Kinoshita, Y; Hattori, K; Ota, M; Kajiwara, M; Terada, S; Higuchi, T; Kunugi, H

    2012-01-01

    Phenylalanine is an essential amino acid required for the synthesis of catecholamines including dopamine. Altered levels of phenylalanine and its metabolites in blood and cerebrospinal fluid have been reported in schizophrenia patients. This study attempted to examine for the first time whether phenylalanine kinetics is altered in schizophrenia using L-[1-(13)C]phenylalanine breath test ((13)C-PBT). The subjects were 20 chronically medicated schizophrenia patients (DSM-IV) and the same number of age- and sex-matched controls. (13)C-phenylalanine (99 atom% (13)C; 100 mg) was administered orally and the breath (13)CO(2) /(12)CO(2) ratio was monitored for 120 min. The possible effect of antipsychotic medication (risperidone (RPD) or haloperidol (HPD) treatment for 21 days) on (13)C-PBT was examined in rats. Body weight (BW), age and diagnostic status were significant predictors of the area under the curve of the time course of Δ(13)CO(2) (‰) and the cumulative recovery rate (CRR) at 120 min. A repeated measures analysis of covariance controlled for age and BW revealed that the patterns of CRR change over time differed between the patients and controls and that Δ(13)CO(2) was lower in the patients than in the controls at all sampling time points during the 120 min test, with an overall significant difference between the two groups. Chronic administration of RPD or HPD had no significant effect on (13)C-PBT indices in rats. Our results suggest that (13)C-PBT is a novel laboratory test that can detect altered phenylalanine kinetics in chronic schizophrenia patients. Animal experiments suggest that the observed changes are unlikely to be attributable to antipsychotic medication. PMID:22832963

  14. Asymmetry measurement for (13)C(charged pion,charged pion)(13)C* at T(pi) = 162 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kevin William

    1998-12-01

    Left-right asymmetry measurements ( AY) were obtained for charged pion scattering of incident kinetic energy 162 MeV from polarized 13C nuclei over an angular range of 30o to 90o. The experiment was performed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility with the Energetic PIon Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS). The 13C target was made up of frozen beads of toluene consisting of 93% 13C612CH8 cryogenically cooled to 0.45o K by a 3He evaporation refrigerator. Polarization was achieved with the dynamic nuclear polarization method using a 2.5 Tesla magnetic field, target material doping by the paramagnetic substance DTBN, and a polarization driving microwave field of frequency 70.060 GHz for parallel and 70.320 GHz anti-parallel alignment with the applied magnetic field. Average polarization of the 13Cl nuclei was ~17% and for the 1H nuclei was ~54% which was obtained after an initial polarization time period of about 30 minutes. AY measurements were calculated by separately obtaining the excitation yield spectra for the chosen target nuclei spin orientation of up or down with respect to [/bf k]inc×[/bf k]scat of the incident and scattered pion. The separate excitation spectra for up and down were used to derive the difference and polarization scaled sum in a channel-by- channel method to reduce effects of the spectrometer plus polarization magnet acceptance. These difference and sum spectra were statistically fitted to peak shapes calculated to account for the pion energy loss straggling. The ratio of the peak yield of the difference spectra to the sum spectra is Ay. Results of AY for the elastic scattering of π+ and πsp- from 1H are consistent with the values calculated by phase shift analysis. Measured AY for the elastic scattering from 13C are found to be in general small but to exhibit two maxima at approximately 51o and 88o CMS scattering angle of approximate values 0.26 (0.24) and 0.21 (0.41) for π+/ (/pi/sp-) scattering. AY values were also measured for states

  15. Quantitation of metabolic compartmentation in hyperammonemic brain by natural abundance 13C-NMR detection of 13C-15N coupling patterns and isotopic shifts.

    PubMed

    Lapidot, A; Gopher, A

    1997-02-01

    In the present study, the removal of cerebral ammonia by glutamine synthetase (GS) and by reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate by glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of an amino donor group, was determined in hyperammonemic rabbit brains. The 15N enrichments of brain metabolite alpha-amino and amide positions of glutamine, glutamate, and alanine were determined by the indirect detection of 15N-labeled compounds of the 13C-15N spin coupling patterns of natural abundance 13C-NMR spectra. The 13C-NMR spectra of brain extracts were obtained from rabbits infused with 15NH4Cl with or without intraperitoneal infusion of the GS inhibitor, L-methionine DL-sulfoximine, in a reasonable acquisition time period. When 15NH4Cl was infused, [5-15N]glutamine and [2-15N]glutamine concentrations reached 5.2 mumol/100 mg protein and 3.6 mumol/100 mg protein, respectively, which indicates the relatively high activity of reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate in the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. The low concentration of [2-15N]glutamate, which is about 30% of that of [2-15N]glutamine obtained in this study, suggests that very little glutamine serves as a precursor of neuronal glutamate. When GS was inhibited by L-methionine DL-sulfoximine, a flux of 15NH4+ via the residual activity of GS was accompanied by an apparent increase of [2-15N]glutamate and [15N]alanine concentrations (2.9 mumol/100 mg protein and 1.8 mumol/100 mg protein, respectively). These findings and those obtained from 13C-13C isotopomer analysis (Lapidot and Gopher, 1994b) suggest that astrocytic 2-oxoglutarate is partially utilized (together with an amino group donor) as a precursor for neuronal glutamate in the hyperammonemic brain when GS is inhibited. This process can partly replace GS activity in metabolizing ammonia in the hyperammonemic rabbit brain. PMID:9057821

  16. T1rho and T2rho MRI in the evaluation of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nestrasil, I; Michaeli, S; Liimatainen, T; Rydeen, C E; Kotz, C M; Nixon, J P; Hanson, T; Tuite, Paul J

    2010-06-01

    Prior work has shown that adiabatic T(1rho) and T(2rho) relaxation time constants may have sensitivity to cellular changes and the presence of iron, respectively, in Parkinson's disease (PD). Further understanding of these magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods and how they relate to measures of disease severity and progression in PD is needed. Using T(1rho) and T(2rho) on a 4T MRI scanner, we assessed the substantia nigra (SN) of nine non-demented moderately affected PD and ten gender- and age-matched control participants. When compared to controls, the SN of PD subjects had increased T(1rho) and reduced T(2rho). We also found a significant correlation between asymmetric motor features and asymmetry based on T(1rho). This study provides additional validation of T(1rho) and T(2rho) as a means to separate PD from control subjects, and T(1rho) may be a useful marker of asymmetry in PD. PMID:20058018

  17. T1ρ and T2ρ MRI in the evaluation of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Nestrasil, I.; Michaeli, S.; Liimatainen, T.; Rydeen, C. E.; Kotz, C. M.; Nixon, J. P.; Hanson, T.

    2011-01-01

    Prior work has shown that adiabatic T1ρ and T2ρ relaxation time constants may have sensitivity to cellular changes and the presence of iron, respectively, in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Further understanding of these magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods and how they relate to measures of disease severity and progression in PD is needed. Using T1ρand T2ρ on a 4T MRI scanner, we assessed the substantia nigra (SN) of nine non-demented moderately affected PD and ten gender- and age-matched control participants. When compared to controls, the SN of PD subjects had increased T1ρ and reduced T2ρ We also found a significant correlation between asymmetric motor features and asymmetry based on T1ρ. This study provides additional validation of T1ρ and T2ρ as a means to separate PD from control subjects, and T1ρ may be a useful marker of asymmetry in PD. PMID:20058018

  18. The in vivo relaxivity of MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuter, Borys

    1999-11-01

    Post-contrast clinical 1H Magnetic Resonance Images have to date been interpreted with little regard for possible variations in the in-vivo properties of injected magnetic pharmaceuticals (contrast agents), particularly in their relaxivity or ability to alter tissue relaxation rates, T2-1 and T 2-1, per unit concentration. The relaxivities of contrast agents have only rarely been measured in-vivo, measurements usually being performed on excised tissues and at magnetic field strengths lower than used in clinical practice. Some researchers have simply assumed that relaxivities determined in homogeneous tissue phantoms were applicable in-vivo. In this thesis, the relaxivities of two contrast agents, Gd-DTPA and Gd-EOB-DTPA, were measured in simple tissue phantoms and in the kidney and liver of intact, but sacrificed, Wistar rats using a clinical MR scanner with a magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. T1 and T2 were determined from sets of images acquired using a standard clinical spin-echo pulse sequence. The contrast agent concentration in tissue was assessed by radioassay of 153Gd-DTPA or 153Gd-EOB-DTPA, mixed with the normal compound prior to injection. Relaxivity was taken as the slope of a linear regression fit of relaxation rate against Gd concentration. The relaxivities of Gd-EOB-DTPA were similarly determined in normal and biliary- obstructed guinea pigs. Relaxivities in tissue differed significantly from values obtained in simple phantoms. Kidney T1 relaxivity was reduced for both compounds in normal animals. Three days or more of biliary obstruction produced further reductions in kidney T1 relaxivity of Gd-EOB-DTPA, providing strong evidence that disease affects contrast agent relaxivity. Kidney T2 relaxivity was much greater than T1 relaxivity and was also depressed by biliary obstruction. Liver T1 and T 2 relaxivites were increased above phantom values, but were not affected by the biliary obstruction. Water compartmentalisation, macromolecular binding, proton

  19. Depletion of 13C in Cretaceous marine organic matter: Source, diagenetic, or environmental sigal?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.; Arthur, M.A.; Claypool, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Geochemical studies of Cretaceous strata rich in organic carbon (OC) from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) sites and several land sections reveal several consistent relationships among amount of OC, hydrocarbon generating potential of kerogen (measured by pyrolysis as the hydrogen index, HI), and the isotopic composition of the OC. First, there is a positive correlation between HI and OC in strata that contain more than about 1% OC. Second, percent OC and HI often are negatively correlated with carbon isotopic composition (?? 13C) of kerogen. The relationship between HI and OC indicates that as the amount of organic matter increases, this organic matter tends to be more lipid rich reflecting the marine source of the organic matter. Cretaceous samples that contain predominantly marine organic matter tend to be isotopically lighter than those that contain predominantly terrestrial organic matter. Average ?? 13C values for organic matter from most Cretaceous sites are between -26 and -28???, and values heavier than about -25??? occur at very few sites. Most of the ?? 13C values of Miocene to Holocene OC-rich strata and modern marine plankton are between -16 to -23???. Values of ??13C of modern terrestrial organic matter are mostly between -23 and -33???. The depletion of terrestial OC in 13C relative to marine planktonic OC is the basis for numerous statements in the literature that isotopically light Cretaceous organic matter is of terrestrial origin, even though other organic geochemical and(or) optical indicators show that the organic matter is mainly of marine origin. A difference of about 5??? in ?? 13C between modern and Cretaceous OC-rich marine strata suggests either that Cretaceous marine planktonic organic matter had the same isotopic signature as modern marine plankton and that signature has been changed by diagenesis, or that OC derived from Cretaceous marine plankton was isotopically lighter by about 5??? relative to modern plankton OC. Diagenesis does

  20. Monitoring electron donor metabolism under variable electron acceptor conditions using 13C-labeled lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Three sets of flow-through columns constructed with aquifer sediment from Hanford (WA) were used to study reduction of Cr(VI) to poorly soluble Cr(III) under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing/fermentative, and iron-reducing conditions with lactate as the electron donor. In order to understand the relationship between electron donors and biomarkers, and to determine the differences in carbon isotope fractionation resulting from different microbial metabolic processes, we monitored the variation in carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in total organic carbon (TOC), and in lactate, acetate and propionate. The greatest enrichment in 13C in columns was observed under denitrifying conditions. The δ13C of DIC increased by ~1750 to ~2000‰ fifteen days after supplementation of natural abundance lactate with a 13C-labeled lactate tracer (for an influent δ13C of ~2250‰ for the lactate) indicating almost complete oxidation of the electron donor. The denitrifying columns were among the most active columns and had the highest cell counts and the denitrification rate was highly correlated with Cr(VI) reduction rate. δ13C values of DIC ranged from ~540 to ~1170‰ for iron-reducing conditions. The lower enrichment in iron columns was related to the lower biological activity observed with lower yields of RNA and cell numbers in the column effluents. The carbon isotope shift in the sulfate-reducing ~198 to ~1960‰ for sulfate-reducing conditions reflecting the lower levels of the lactate in these columns. Additionally, in two of the sulfate columns, almost complete fermentation of the lactate occurred, producing acetate and propionate with the labeled carbon signature, but relatively smaller amounts of inorganic carbon. For all electron-accepting conditions, TOC yielded similar δ13C values as lactate stock solutions. Differences in C use efficiency, metabolic rate or metabolic pathway contributed to the differing TOC δ13C to DIC δ13C ratios between treatments

  1. Novel Imaging Contrast Methods for Hyperpolarized 13 C Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen Durant

    Magnetic resonance imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled small molecules has emerged as an extremely powerful tool for the in vivo monitoring of perfusion and metabolism. This work presents methods for improved imaging, parameter mapping, and image contrast generation for in vivo hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Angiography using hyperpolarized urea was greatly improved with a highly T2-weighted acquisition in combination with 15N labeling of the urea amide groups. This is due to the fact that the T2 of [13C]urea is strongly limited by the scalar coupling to the neighboring quadrupolar 14N. The long in vivo T2 values of [13C, 15N2]urea were utilized for sub-millimeter projection angiography using a contrast agent that could be safely injected in concentrations of 10-100 mM while still tolerated in patients with renal insufficiency. This study also presented the first method for in vivo T2 mapping of hyperpolarized 13C compounds. The in vivo T2 of urea was short in the blood and long within the kidneys. This persistent signal component was isolated to the renal filtrate, thus enabling for the first time direct detection of an imaging contrast agent undergoing glomerular filtration. While highly T2-weighted acquisitions select for molecules with short rotational correlation times, high diffusion weighting selects for those with the long translational correlation times. A specialized spin-echo EPI sequence was developed in order to generate highly diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized 13C images on a clinical MRI system operating within clinical peak- RF and gradient amplitude constraints. Low power adiabatic spin echo pulses were developed in order to generate a sufficiently large refocused bandwidth while maintaining low nominal power. This diffusion weighted acquisition gave enhanced tumor contrast-to-noise ratio when imaging [1-13C]lactate after infusion of [1-13C]pyruvate. Finally, the first in-man hyperpolarized 13C MRI clinical trial is discussed.

  2. Multi-objective experimental design for (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouvin, Jeroen; Cajot, Simon; D'Huys, Pieter-Jan; Ampofo-Asiama, Jerry; Anné, Jozef; Van Impe, Jan; Geeraerd, Annemie; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2015-10-01

    (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis is an excellent technique to resolve fluxes in the central carbon metabolism but costs can be significant when using specialized tracers. This work presents a framework for cost-effective design of (13)C-tracer experiments, illustrated on two different networks. Linear and non-linear optimal input mixtures are computed for networks for Streptomyces lividans and a carcinoma cell line. If only glucose tracers are considered as labeled substrate for a carcinoma cell line or S. lividans, the best parameter estimation accuracy is obtained by mixtures containing high amounts of 1,2-(13)C2 glucose combined with uniformly labeled glucose. Experimental designs are evaluated based on a linear (D-criterion) and non-linear approach (S-criterion). Both approaches generate almost the same input mixture, however, the linear approach is favored due to its low computational effort. The high amount of 1,2-(13)C2 glucose in the optimal designs coincides with a high experimental cost, which is further enhanced when labeling is introduced in glutamine and aspartate tracers. Multi-objective optimization gives the possibility to assess experimental quality and cost at the same time and can reveal excellent compromise experiments. For example, the combination of 100% 1,2-(13)C2 glucose with 100% position one labeled glutamine and the combination of 100% 1,2-(13)C2 glucose with 100% uniformly labeled glutamine perform equally well for the carcinoma cell line, but the first mixture offers a decrease in cost of $ 120 per ml-scale cell culture experiment. We demonstrated the validity of a multi-objective linear approach to perform optimal experimental designs for the non-linear problem of (13)C-metabolic flux analysis. Tools and a workflow are provided to perform multi-objective design. The effortless calculation of the D-criterion can be exploited to perform high-throughput screening of possible (13)C-tracers, while the illustrated benefit of multi

  3. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in Soils - revealed using 13C-labelled methane tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riekie, G. J.; Baggs, E. M.; Killham, K. S.; Smith, J. U.

    2008-12-01

    In marine sediments, anaerobic methane oxidation is a significant biogeochemical process limiting methane flux from ocean to atmosphere. To date, evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation in terrestrial environments has proved elusive, and its significance is uncertain. In this study, an isotope dilution method specifically designed to detect the process of anaerobic methane oxidation in methanogenic wetland soils is applied. Methane emissions of soils from three contrasting permanently waterlogged sites in Scotland are investigated in strictly anoxic microcosms to which 13C- labelled methane is added, and changes in the concentration and 12C/13C isotope ratios of methane and carbon dioxide are subsequently measured and used to calculate separate the separate components of the methane flux. The method used takes into account the 13C-methane associated with methanogenesis, and the amount of methane dissolved in the soil. The calculations make no prior assumptions about the kinetics of methane production or oxidation. The results indicate that methane oxidation can take place in anoxic soil environments. The clearest evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation is provided by soils from a minerotrophic fen site (pH 6.0) in Bin Forest underlain by ultra-basic and serpentine till. In the fresh soil anoxic microcosms, net consumption methane was observed, and the amount of headspace 13C-CO2 increased at a greater rate than the 12+13C-CO2, further proof of methane oxidation. A net increase in methane was measured in microcosms of soil from Murder Moss, an alkaline site, pH 6.5, with a strong calcareous influence. However, the 13C-CH4 data provided evidence of methane oxidation, both in the disappearance of C- CH4 and appearance of smaller quantities of 13C-CO2. The least alkaline (pH 5.5) microcosms, of Gateside Farm soil - a granitic till - exhibited net methanogenesis and the changes in 13C-CH4 and 13C-CO2 here followed the pattern expected if no methane is consumed

  4. Evaluation of a [13C]-Dextromethorphan Breath Test to Assess CYP2D6 Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, J. Steven; Pearce, Robin E.; Gaedigk, Andrea; Modak, Anil; Rosen, David I.

    2016-01-01

    A [13C]-dextromethorphan ([13C]-DM) breath test was evaluated to assess its feasibility as a rapid, phenotyping assay for CYP2D6 activity. [13C]-DM (0.5 mg/kg) was administered orally with water or potassium bicarbonate-sodium bicarbonate to 30 adult Caucasian volunteers (n = 1 each): CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (2 null alleles; PM-0) and extensive metabolizers with 1 (EM-1) or 2 functional alleles (EM-2). CYP2D6 phenotype was determined by 13CO2 enrichment measured by infrared spectrometry (delta-over-baseline [DOB] value) in expired breath samples collected before and up to 240 minutes after [13C]-DM ingestion and by 4-hour urinary metabolite ratio. The PM-0 group was readily distinguishable from either EM group by both the breath test and urinary metabolite ratio. Using a single point determination of phenotype at 40 minutes and defining PMs as subjects with a DOB ≤ 0.5, the sensitivity of the method was 100%; specificity was 95% with 95% accuracy and resulted in the misclassification of 1 EM-1 individual as a PM. Modification of the initial protocol (timing of potassium bicarbonate-sodium bicarbonate administration relative to dose) yielded comparable results, but there was a tendency toward increased DOB values. Although further development is required, these studies suggest that the [13C]-DM breath test offers promise as a rapid, minimally invasive phenotyping assay for CYP2D6 activity. PMID:18728242

  5. Elucidation of intrinsic biosynthesis yields using 13C-based metabolism analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of 13C-based metabolism analysis for the assessment of intrinsic product yields — the actual carbon contribution from a single carbon substrate to the final product via a specific biosynthesis route — in the following four cases. First, undefined nutrients (such as yeast extract) in fermentation may contribute significantly to product synthesis, which can be quantified through an isotopic dilution method. Second, product and biomass synthesis may be dependent on the co-metabolism of multiple-carbon sources. 13C labeling experiments can track the fate of each carbon substrate in the cell metabolism and identify which substrate plays a main role in product synthesis. Third, 13C labeling can validate and quantify the contribution of the engineered pathway (versus the native pathway) to the product synthesis. Fourth, the loss of catabolic energy due to cell maintenance (energy used for functions other than production of new cell components) and low P/O ratio (Phosphate/Oxygen Ratio) significantly reduces product yields. Therefore, 13C-metabolic flux analysis is needed to assess the influence of suboptimal energy metabolism on microbial productivity, and determine how ATP/NAD(P)H are partitioned among various cellular functions. Since product yield is a major determining factor in the commercialization of a microbial cell factory, we foresee that 13C-isotopic labeling experiments, even without performing extensive flux calculations, can play a valuable role in the development and verification of microbial cell factories. PMID:24642094

  6. Production and NMR signal optimization of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Amino acids are targeted nutrients for consumption by cancers to sustain their rapid growth and proliferation. 13C-enriched amino acids are important metabolic tracers for cancer diagnostics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Despite this diagnostic potential, 13C NMR of amino acids however is hampered by the inherently low NMR sensitivity of the 13C nuclei. In this work, we have employed a physics technique known as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance the NMR signals of 13C-enriched amino acids. DNP works by transferring the high polarization of electrons to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Using a fast dissolution method in which the frozen polarized samples are dissolved rapidly with superheated water, injectable solutions of 13C-amino acids with highly enhanced NMR signals (by at least 5,000-fold) were produced at room temperature. Factors that affect the NMR signal enhancement levels such as the choice of free radical polarizing agents and sample preparation will be discussed along with the thermal mixing physics model of DNP. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  7. 13C NMR study of the generation of C2- and C3-deuterated lactic acid by tumoral pancreatic islet cells exposed to D-[1-13C]-, D-[2-13C]- and D-[6-13C]-glucose in 2H2O.

    PubMed

    Willem, R; Biesemans, M; Kayser, F; Malaisse, W J

    1994-03-01

    Tumoral pancreatic islet cells of the RIN5mF line were incubated for 120 min in media prepared in 2H2O and containing D-[1-13C]glucose, D-[2-13C]glucose, and D-[6-13C]glucose. The generation of C2- and C3-deuterated lactic acid was assessed by 13C NMR. The interpretation of experimental results suggests that a) the efficiency of deuteration on the C1 of D-fructose 6-phosphate does not exceed about 47% and 4% in the phosphoglucoisomerase and phosphomannoisomerase reactions, respectively; b) approximately 38% of the molecules of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate generated from D-glucose escape deuteration in the sequence of reactions catalyzed by triose phosphate isomerase and aldolase; and c) about 41% of the molecules of pyruvate generated by glycolysis are immediately converted to lactate, the remaining 59% of pyruvate molecules undergoing first a single or double back-and-forth interconversion with L-alanine. It is proposed that this methodological approach, based on high resolution 13C NMR spectroscopy, may provide novel information on the regulation of back-and-forth interconversion of glycolytic intermediates in intact cells as modulated, for instance, by enzyme-to-enzyme tunneling. PMID:8057796

  8. Online Compound-Specific δ13C and δD Determinations Using Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, N.; Hoffnagle, J.

    2012-04-01

    A unique laser spectroscopic approach for making online high-precision compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of both δ13C and δD of the CO2 and H2O organic combustion products is described. The system consists of a gas chromatograph (GC) for the separation of an organic mixture coupled to a novel micro-fabricated microreactor (MFMR) for the complete combustion of each organic compound into CO2 and H2O and the precise measurements of δ13C in the CO2 gas and δ2H in the H2O vapor from the well established infrared spectrum of both gases, using an isotopic CO2 Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer and an isotopic H2O vapor CRDS analyzer, respectively. Light hydrocarbons are used as our test compounds in this study. The analyses of CH4, C2H6 and C3H8 for δ13C and δ2H values resulted in precisions of SD(δ13C)<1‰ and SD(δ2H)<2‰, respectively. These results were further compared to the gold standard method using Dual Inlet IRMS (DI-IRMS) and showed excellent agreements in isotopic measurements. The preliminary results presented here pave the way for a single CRDS analyzer-based system that simultaneously measures δ13C and δD, is field-deployable, less costly and necessitates less operator expertise than IRMS-based systems.

  9. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  10. In vivo 31P and multilabel 13C NMR measurements for evaluation of plant metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Rijhwani, S K; Ho, C H; Shanks, J V

    1999-01-01

    Reliable measurements of intracellular metabolites are useful for effective plant metabolic engineering. This study explored the application of in situ 31P and 13C NMR spectroscopy for long-term measurements of intracellular pH and concentrations of several metabolites in glycolysis, glucan synthesis, and central carbon metabolic pathways in plant tissues. An NMR perfusion reactor system was designed to allow Catharanthus roseus hairy root cultures to grow for 3-6 weeks, during which time NMR spectroscopy was performed. Constant cytoplasmic pH (7.40+/-0.06), observed during the entire experiment, indicated adequate oxygenation. 13C NMR spectroscopy was performed on hairy root cultures grown in solutions containing 1-13C-, 2-13C-, and 3-13C-labeled glucose in separate experiments and the flow of label was monitored. Activities of pentose phosphate pathways, nonphotosynthetic CO2 fixation, and glucan synthesis pathways were evident from the experimental results. Scrambling of label in glucans also indicated recycling of triose phosphate and their subsequent conversion to hexose phosphates. PMID:10935751

  11. Continuous field measurements of delta(13)C-CO(2) and trace gases by FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mohn, Joachim; Zeeman, Matthias J; Werner, Roland A; Eugster, Werner; Emmenegger, Lukas

    2008-09-01

    Continuous analysis of the (13)C/(12)C ratio of atmospheric CO(2) (delta(13)C-CO(2)) is a powerful tool to quantify CO(2) flux strengths of the two major ecosystem processes assimilation and respiration. Traditional laboratory techniques such as isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in combination with flask sampling are subject to technical limitations that do not allow to fully characterising variations of atmospheric delta(13)C-CO(2) at all relevant timescales. In our study, we demonstrate the strength of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in combination with a PLS-based calibration strategy for online analysis of delta(13)C-CO(2) in ambient air. The ability of the instrument to measure delta(13)C-CO(2) was tested on a grassland field-site and compared with standard laboratory-based IRMS measurements made on field-collected flask samples. Both methods were in excellent agreement, with an average difference of 0.4 per thousand (n=81). Simultaneously, other important trace gases such as CO, N(2)O and CH(4) were analysed by FTIR spectroscopy. PMID:18763182

  12. A Method to Constrain Genome-Scale Models with 13C Labeling Data

    PubMed Central

    García Martín, Héctor; Kumar, Vinay Satish; Weaver, Daniel; Ghosh, Amit; Chubukov, Victor; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    Current limitations in quantitatively predicting biological behavior hinder our efforts to engineer biological systems to produce biofuels and other desired chemicals. Here, we present a new method for calculating metabolic fluxes, key targets in metabolic engineering, that incorporates data from 13C labeling experiments and genome-scale models. The data from 13C labeling experiments provide strong flux constraints that eliminate the need to assume an evolutionary optimization principle such as the growth rate optimization assumption used in Flux Balance Analysis (FBA). This effective constraining is achieved by making the simple but biologically relevant assumption that flux flows from core to peripheral metabolism and does not flow back. The new method is significantly more robust than FBA with respect to errors in genome-scale model reconstruction. Furthermore, it can provide a comprehensive picture of metabolite balancing and predictions for unmeasured extracellular fluxes as constrained by 13C labeling data. A comparison shows that the results of this new method are similar to those found through 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C MFA) for central carbon metabolism but, additionally, it provides flux estimates for peripheral metabolism. The extra validation gained by matching 48 relative labeling measurements is used to identify where and why several existing COnstraint Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) flux prediction algorithms fail. We demonstrate how to use this knowledge to refine these methods and improve their predictive capabilities. This method provides a reliable base upon which to improve the design of biological systems. PMID:26379153

  13. Synthesis of [13C6]-labelled phenethylamine derivatives for drug quantification in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, HuiLing; Berg, Thomas; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2014-05-15

    The availability of high-quality (13)C-labelled internal standards will improve accurate quantification of narcotics and drugs in biological samples. Thus, the synthesis of 10 [(13)C6]-labelled phenethylamine derivatives, namely amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine, 4-methoxyamphetamine, 4-methoxymethamphetamine, 3,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenethylamine, have been undertaken. [(13)C6]-Phenol proved to be an excellent starting material for making (13)C-labelled narcotic substances in the phenethylamine class, and a developed Stille-type coupling enabled an efficient synthesis of the 3,4-methylenedioxy and 4-methoxy derivatives. The pros and cons of alternative routes and transformations are also discussed. The [(13)C6]-labelled compounds are intended for use as internal standards in forensic analysis, health sciences and metabolomics studies by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:24634286

  14. A Peptide-Based Method for 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis in Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Amit; Nilmeier, Jerome; Weaver, Daniel; Adams, Paul D.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Petzold, Christopher J.; Martín, Héctor García

    2014-01-01

    The study of intracellular metabolic fluxes and inter-species metabolite exchange for microbial communities is of crucial importance to understand and predict their behaviour. The most authoritative method of measuring intracellular fluxes, 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C MFA), uses the labeling pattern obtained from metabolites (typically amino acids) during 13C labeling experiments to derive intracellular fluxes. However, these metabolite labeling patterns cannot easily be obtained for each of the members of the community. Here we propose a new type of 13C MFA that infers fluxes based on peptide labeling, instead of amino acid labeling. The advantage of this method resides in the fact that the peptide sequence can be used to identify the microbial species it originates from and, simultaneously, the peptide labeling can be used to infer intracellular metabolic fluxes. Peptide identity and labeling patterns can be obtained in a high-throughput manner from modern proteomics techniques. We show that, using this method, it is theoretically possible to recover intracellular metabolic fluxes in the same way as through the standard amino acid based 13C MFA, and quantify the amount of information lost as a consequence of using peptides instead of amino acids. We show that by using a relatively small number of peptides we can counter this information loss. We computationally tested this method with a well-characterized simple microbial community consisting of two species. PMID:25188426

  15. Global-mean marine δ13C and its uncertainty in a glacial state estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbie, Geoffrey; Peterson, Carlye D.; Lisiecki, Lorraine E.; Spero, Howard J.

    2015-10-01

    A paleo-data compilation with 492 δ13C and δ18O observations provides the opportunity to better sample the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and infer its global properties, such as the mean δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon. Here, the paleo-compilation is used to reconstruct a steady-state water-mass distribution for the LGM, that in turn is used to map the data onto a 3D global grid. A global-mean marine δ13C value and a self-consistent uncertainty estimate are derived using the framework of state estimation (i.e., combining a numerical model and observations). The LGM global-mean δ13C is estimated to be 0.14‰ ± 0.20‰ at the two standard error level, giving a glacial-to-modern change of 0.32‰ ± 0.20‰. The magnitude of the error bar is attributed to the uncertain glacial ocean circulation and the lack of observational constraints in the Pacific, Indian, and Southern Oceans. To halve the error bar, roughly four times more observations are needed, although strategic sampling may reduce this number. If dynamical constraints can be used to better characterize the LGM circulation, the error bar can also be reduced to 0.05 to 0.1‰, emphasizing that knowledge of the circulation is vital to accurately map δ13C in three dimensions.

  16. Hybrid Nanotrimers for Dual T1 and T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Development of multifunctional nanoparticle-based probes for dual T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could allow us to image and diagnose the tumors or other abnormalities in an exceptionally accurate and reliable manner. In this study, by fusing distinct nanocrystals via solid-state interfaces, we built hybrid heteronanostructures to combine both T1 and T2- weighted contrast agents together for MRI with high accuracy and reliability. The resultant hybrid heterotrimers showed high stability in physiological conditions and could induce both simultaneous positive and negative contrast enhancements in MR images. Small animal positron emission tomography imaging study revealed that the hybrid heterostructures displayed favorable biodistribution and were suitable for in vivo imaging. Their potential as dual contrast agents for T1 and T2-weighted MRI was further demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo imaging and relaxivity measurements. PMID:25283972

  17. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  18. HCN, a triple-resonance NMR technique for selective observation of histidine and tryptophan side chains in 13C/15N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, J L; Ash, E L; Günther, U L; Luo, X; Bullock, P A; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from 1H to 13C to 15N and reverse through direct spin couplings 1JCH and 1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay tau 3 were employed for determination of optimal tau 3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the 1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the 13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 12 1H and 13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 12 15N chemical shifts were determined. The 13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping 1H and 15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mM sample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited alpha-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited alpha-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole 1H and/or 15N nuclei. PMID:8995843

  19. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  20. The thermal desorption of CO2 from amine carbamate solutions for the 13C isotope enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dronca, S.; Varodi, C.; Gligan, M.; Stoia, V.; Baldea, A.; Hodor, I.

    2012-02-01

    The CO2 desorption from amine carbamate in non-aqueous solvents is of major importance for isotopic enrichment of 13C. A series of experiments were carried out in order to set up the conditions for the CO2 desorption. For this purpose, a laboratory- scale plant for 13C isotope separation by chemical exchange between CO2 and amine carbamate was designed and used. The decomposition of the carbamate solution was mostly produced in the desorber and completed in the boiler. Two different-length desorbers were used, at different temperatures and liquid flow rates of the amine-non-aqueous solvent solutions. The residual CO2 was determined by using volumetric and gaschromatographic methods. These results can be used for enrichment of 13C by chemical exchange between CO2 and amine carbamate in nonaqueous solvents.

  1. 4. 4-. mu. m cascade /sup 13/C /sup 16/O/sub 2/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.P.; Cornelison, D.; Buzcek, C.J.

    1984-01-15

    An in-cavity hot /sup 13/C /sup 16/O/sub 2/ cell is used to obtain a 4.4-..mu..m lasing from a cascade process in a sealed off /sup 13/C /sup 16/O/sub 2/ laser. The 4.4-..mu..m laser is tunable and operates on the P branch (near 4.44 ..mu..m) and the R branch (near 4.39 ..mu..m) of the ((10/sup 0/1)/sub I/--(10/sup 0/0)/sub I/) band of /sup 13/C /sup 16/O/sub 2/. The laser is mechanically Q switched producing peak powers in excess of 10 W with repetition rates greater than 500 Hz.

  2. Animal /sup 13/C//sup 12/C correlates with trophic level in pelagic food webs

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, G.H.; Mearns, A.J.; Young, D.R.; Olson, R.J.; Schafer, H.A.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1983-01-01

    Whatever the underlying cause(s), our observations further substantiate the existence of small but progressive increases in animal tissue /sup 13/C//sup 12/C with increasing trophic level. Such a relationship has significant implications for the use of stable carbon isotope natural abundance in animal tissues or remains, in order to interpret the tropic structure and food base of past as well as present-day animal communities. The delta/sup 13/C of the marine animal tissues analyzed ranged from -20.6 to -15.8%. The macro-fauna from the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean had higher isotope values than the net plankton collected from the same area. The average increases in delta/sup 13/C per trophic level were 0.73 and 1.38% for the California coastal waters and for the eastern tropical Pacific, respectively. These isotopic increases approximate closely those previously reported to occur within single trophic level steps.

  3. Measurements of 13C multiple-quantum coherences in amyloid fibrils under magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Chou, Fang-Chieh; Tsai, Tim W T; Cheng, Hsin-Mei; Chan, Jerry C C

    2012-06-21

    The excitation and detection of high-order multiple quantum coherences among (13)C nuclear spins are demonstrated in the samples of [1-(13)C]-L-alanine and (13)C labeled amyloid fibrils at a spinning frequency of 20 kHz. The technique is based on the double-quantum average Hamiltonian prepared by the DRAMA-XY4 pulse sequence. Empirically, we find that multiple supercycles are required to suppress the higher-order effects for real applications. Measurements for the fibril samples formed by the polypeptides of PrP(113-127) provide the first solid-state NMR evidence for the stacking of multiple β-sheet layers at the structural core of amyloid fibrils. PMID:22632418

  4. Magnetic susceptibility effects on 13C MAS NMR spectra of carbon materials and graphite.

    PubMed

    Freita, J C; Emmerich, F G; Cernicchiaro, G R; Sampaio, L C; Bonagamba, T J

    2001-01-01

    13C high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study carbon materials prepared through the thermal decomposition of four different organic precursors (rice hulls, endocarp of babassu coconut, peat, and PVC). For heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) above about 600 C, all materials presented 13C NMR spectra composed of a unique resonance line associated with carbon atoms in aromatic planes. With increasing HTT a continuous broadening of this resonance and a diamagnetic shift in its central frequency were verified for all samples. The evolution of the magnitude and anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of the heat-treated carbon samples with HTT explains well these findings. It is shown that these results are better understood when a comparison is made with the features of the 13C NMR spectrum of polycrystalline graphite, for which the magnetic susceptibility effect is also present and is much more pronounced. PMID:11529420

  5. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of URNdesign, a computationally redesigned RRM protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Neil; Dantas, Gautam; Varani, Gabriele

    2005-10-01

    Protein design represents one of the great challenges of computational structural biology. The ability to successfully design new proteins would allow us to generate new reagents and enzymes, while at the same time providing us with an understanding of the principles of protein stability. Here we report 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of a redesigned U1A protein, URNdesign. U1A has been studied extensively by our group and hence was chosen as a design target. For the assignments we sued 2D and 3D heteronuclearNMR experiments with uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled URNdesign. The assignments for the backbone NH, CO,Ca and Cb nuclei are 94%complete. Sidechain 1Hand13C, aromatic andQ/NNH2 resonances are essentially complete with guanidinium and K NH3 residues unassigned. BMRB deposit with accession number 6493

  6. *d13C composition of primary producers and role of detritus in a freshwater coastal ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keough, J.R.; Hagley, C.A.; Sierszen, M.

    1998-01-01

    Stable-isotope ratio signatures of primary producers in a coastal wetland and in adjacent offshore waters of western Lake Superior indicated that phytoplankton are the primary source of carbon for the grazing food web of this ecosystem. This study outlines the possible roles of other autotrophs in this regard. Isotopic signatures of macrophytes reflected their life-form-associated constraints on diffusion of inorganic carbon. Data indicated that differences between wetland and lake phytoplankton may be explained by the isotopic signatures of their dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) sources. Results of an in situ experiment showed that respiration associated with macrophyte decomposition is capable of enriching surrounding water with significant amounts of *d13C-depleted DIC and lowering the net *d13C ratio of DIC in water in low-turbulence situations. The *d13C ratio for wetland phytoplankton may be depleted relative to pelagic algae because the fixed carbon is derived from decomposing detritus.

  7. Relaxation times estimation in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselice, Fabio; Caivano, Rocchina; Cammarota, Aldo; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a very powerful techniques for soft tissue diagnosis. At the present, the clinical evaluation is mainly conducted exploiting the amplitude of the recorded MR image which, in some specific cases, is modified by using contrast enhancements. Nevertheless, spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times can play an important role in many pathology diagnosis, such as cancer, Alzheimer or Parkinson diseases. Different algorithms for relaxation time estimation have been proposed in literature. In particular, the two most adopted approaches are based on Least Squares (LS) and on Maximum Likelihood (ML) techniques. As the amplitude noise is not zero mean, the first one produces a biased estimator, while the ML is unbiased but at the cost of high computational effort. Recently the attention has been focused on the estimation in the complex, instead of the amplitude, domain. The advantage of working with real and imaginary decomposition of the available data is mainly the possibility of achieving higher quality estimations. Moreover, the zero mean complex noise makes the Least Square estimation unbiased, achieving low computational times. First results of complex domain relaxation times estimation on real datasets are presented. In particular, a patient with an occipital lesion has been imaged on a 3.0T scanner. Globally, the evaluation of relaxation times allow us to establish a more precise topography of biologically active foci, also with respect to contrast enhanced images.

  8. Identification of natural metabolites in mixture: a pattern recognition strategy based on (13)C NMR.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Jane; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc; Purson, Sylvain; Hamzaoui, Mahmoud; Borie, Nicolas; Reynaud, Romain; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2014-03-18

    Because of their highly complex metabolite profile, the chemical characterization of bioactive natural extracts usually requires time-consuming multistep purification procedures to achieve the structural elucidation of pure individual metabolites. The aim of the present work was to develop a dereplication strategy for the identification of natural metabolites directly within mixtures. Exploiting the polarity range of metabolites, the principle was to rapidly fractionate a multigram quantity of a crude extract by centrifugal partition extraction (CPE). The obtained fractions of simplified chemical composition were subsequently analyzed by (13)C NMR. After automatic collection and alignment of (13)C signals across spectra, hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) was performed for pattern recognition. As a result, strong correlations between (13)C signals of a single structure within the mixtures of the fraction series were visualized as chemical shift clusters. Each cluster was finally assigned to a molecular structure with the help of a locally built (13)C NMR chemical shift database. The proof of principle of this strategy was achieved on a simple model mixture of commercially available plant secondary metabolites and then applied to a bark extract of the African tree Anogeissus leiocarpus Guill. & Perr. (Combretaceae). Starting from 5 g of this genuine extract, the fraction series was generated by CPE in only 95 min. (13)C NMR analyses of all fractions followed by pattern recognition of (13)C chemical shifts resulted in the unambiguous identification of seven major compounds, namely, sericoside, trachelosperogenin E, ellagic acid, an epimer mixture of (+)-gallocatechin and (-)-epigallocatechin, 3,3'-di-O-methylellagic acid 4'-O-xylopyranoside, and 3,4,3'-tri-O-methylflavellagic acid 4'-O-glucopyranoside. PMID:24555703

  9. Intrashell δ13C SIMS measurements in the cultured planktic foraminifer Orbulina universa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, L.; Kozdon, R.; Valley, J. W.; Mora, C. I.; Spero, H. J.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we present experimental data from the planktic foraminifer Orbulina universa cultured in laboratory experiments. We demonstrate that the δ13C of calcite precipitated in 13C-labeled seawater for 24 h can be resolved and accurately measured using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). Specimens maintained at 20°C were transferred from ambient seawater (δ13CDIC = +1.3‰) into 13C-enriched seawater with δ13CDIC = +51.5‰ and elevated [Ba] for 24 h. Specimens were then transferred into ambient seawater with elevated [87Sr] for 6-9 h of calcification, followed by a transfer back into unlabeled ambient seawater until gametogenesis. This technique produced O. universa shells with calcite layers of distinct geochemical signatures. We quantify the spatial positions of trace element labels in the shells using laser ablation ICP-MS depth profiling. Using fragments from the same shells, we quantify intrashell δ13Ccalcite using SIMS with a 6 or 8 μm spot (×1.1‰ (2 SD)). Measured δ13Ccalcite values in ambient O. universa shell layers are within 2‰ of predicted δ13Ccalcite values. In 13C-labeled bands of calcite, 6 μm SIMS spot measurements are within 2‰ of predicted δ13Ccalcite values, whereas 8 μm SIMS spots yield values that are intermediate between predicted values for ambient and spiked calcite. The spatial agreement between trace element and carbon isotope data suggest that δ13C, Ba, and Sr tracers are incorporated synchronously into shell calcite, within the resolution of the two analytical techniques. These results demonstrate the ability of SIMS δ13C measurements to resolve 6 μm features in foraminifer shell calcite, and highlight the potential of this technique for addressing questions about foraminifer ecology, biomineralization, and paleoceanography.

  10. Habitat-specific differences in plasticity of foliar δ13C in temperate steppe grasses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Zhang, Lirong; Niu, Haishan; Sun, Yue; Xu, Xingliang

    2014-01-01

    A decrease in foliar δ13C with increasing precipitation is a common tendency in steppe plants. However, the rate of decrease has been reported to differ between different species or populations. We here hypothesized that plant populations in the same habitat of temperate steppes may not differ in foliar δ13C response patterns to precipitation, but could differ in the levels of plasticity of foliar δ13C across different habitats. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted controlled watering experiments in northeast China at five sites along a west–east transect at latitude 44°N, which show substantial interannual fluctuations and intra-annual changes in precipitation among them. In 2001, watering treatment (six levels, three replicates) was assigned to 18 plots at each site. The responses of foliar δ13C to precipitation (i.e., the sum of watering and rainfall) were determined in populations of several grass species that were common across all sites. Although similar linear regression slopes were observed for populations of different species growing at the same site, significantly different slopes were obtained for populations of the same species growing at different sites. Further, the slope of the line progressively decreased from Site I to Site V for all species in this study. These results suggest habitat-specific differences in plasticity of foliar δ13C in temperate steppe grasses. This indicates that species' δ13C response to precipitation is conservative at the same site due to their long-term acclimation, but the mechanism responsible behind this needs further investigations. PMID:25035804

  11. Variation of delta13C in Aegiceras corniculatum seedling induced by cadmium application.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lili; Yan, Chongling; Wu, Guirong; Guo, Xiaoyin; Ye, Binbin

    2008-08-01

    To test whether the values of delta13C in mangrove plants are affected by Cd application, the seedlings of Aegiceras corniculatum, a dominant mangrove species, were cultured in soil supplied with CdCl2 solution at the concentration of 0, 0.5, 2.5, 5, 20, 30 and 50 CdCl2 mg/kg wet soils. Plants were grown in 10 replicate pots with 5 propagules each. After 5 months of Cd exposure, three pots contained 15 seedlings with average shoot heights were selected for each treatment. Leaves and roots of seedling were sampled respectively and analyzed for delta(13)C. Growth traits (fresh weight, shoot height and root length), total chlorophyll content, and Cd concentrations in leaf, root and dry soil were determined. After 5 months of the seedling growth, the concentrations of Cd in dry soil were 0.47, 0.83, 2.77, 4.54, 18.89, 29.79 and 47.35 mg/kg respectively. The values of delta13C in roots and leaves were affected to some extent by Cd application. Although root delta(13)C showed more sensitive to Cd compared with leaves, the values of delta13C in roots were not significantly affected by Cd until Cd level higher than 29.78 mg/kg which was not expected to exist in natural environments. Minor variation in delta13C values observed in roots and leaves was likely due to limited Cd uptake by seedlings and subsequent lack of negative impacts on photosynthesis. PMID:18386175

  12. Neuroprotective effects of caffeine in MPTP model of Parkinson's disease: A (13)C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Bagga, Puneet; Chugani, Anup N; Patel, Anant B

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons with an accompanying neuroinflammation leading to loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia. Caffeine, a well-known A2A receptor antagonist is reported to slow down the neuroinflammation caused by activated microglia and reduce the extracellular glutamate in the brain. In this study, we have evaluated the neuroprotective effect of caffeine in the MPTP model of PD by monitoring the region specific cerebral energy metabolism. Adult C57BL6 mice were treated with caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min prior to MPTP (25 mg/kg, i.p.) administration for 8 days. The paw grip strength of mice was assessed in order to evaluate the motor function after various treatments. For metabolic studies, mice were infused with [1,6-(13)C2]glucose, and (13)C labeling of amino acids was monitored using ex vivo(1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy. The paw grip strength was found to be reduced following the MPTP treatment. The caffeine pretreatment showed significant protection against the reduction of paw grip strength in MPTP treated mice. The levels of GABA and myo-inositol were found to be elevated in the striatum of MPTP treated mice. The (13)C labeling of GluC4, GABAC2 and GlnC4 from [1,6-(13)C2]glucose was decreased in the cerebral cortex, striatum, olfactory bulb, thalamus and cerebellum suggesting impaired glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal activity and neurotransmission of the MPTP treated mice. Most interestingly, the pretreatment of caffeine maintained the (13)C labeling of amino acids to the control values in cortical, olfactory bulb and cerebellum regions while it partially retained in striatal and thalamic regions in MPTP treated mice. The pretreatment of caffeine provides a partial neuro-protection against severe striatal degeneration in the MPTP model of PD. PMID:26626997

  13. Analysis of mutational lesions of acetate metabolism in Neurospora crassa by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G H; Baxter, R L

    1987-01-01

    The adaptation of Neurospora crassa mycelium to growth on acetate as the sole carbon source was examined by using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. Extracts were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance at various times after transfer of the mycelium from medium containing sucrose to medium containing [2-13C]acetate as the sole carbon source. The label was initially seen to enter the alanine, glutamate, and glutamine pools, and after 6 h 13C-enriched trehalose was evident, indicating that gluconeogenesis was occurring. Analysis of the isotopomer ratios in the alanine and glutamate-glutamine pools indicated that substantial glyoxylate cycle activity became evident between 2 and 4 h after transfer. Immediately after transfer of the mycelium to acetate medium, the alanine pool increased to about four times its previous level, only a small fraction of which was enriched with 13C. The quantity of 13C-enriched alanine remained almost constant between 2 and 7.5 h after the transfer, whereas the overall alanine pool decreased to its original level. The selective catabolism of the unenriched alanine leads us to suggest that the alanine pool is partitioned into two compartments during adaptation. Two acetate-nonutilizing mutants were also studied by this technique. An acu-3 strain, deficient for isocitrate lyase (EC 4.1.3.1) activity, showed metabolic changes consistent with this lesion. An acp strain, previously thought to be deficient in an inducible acetate permease, took up [2-13C]acetate but showed no evidence of glyoxylate cycle activity despite synthesizing the necessary enzymes; the lesion was therefore reinterpreted. PMID:2947898

  14. The 13C/2H-glucose test for determination of small intestinal lactase activity.

    PubMed

    Vonk, R J; Stellaard, F; Priebe, M G; Koetse, H A; Hagedoorn, R E; De Bruijn, S; Elzinga, H; Lenoir-Wijnkoop, I; Antoine, J M

    2001-03-01

    To diagnose hypolactasia, determination of lactase enzyme activity in small intestinal biopsy material is considered to be the golden standard. Because of its strongly invasive character and the sampling problems, alternative methods have been looked for. We analysed the 13C-glucose response in serum after consumption of 25 g of naturally enriched 13C-lactose. As an internal standard, 0.5 g of 2H-glucose was added and the 2H-glucose response in serum was measured simultaneously. The studies were performed in healthy volunteers with a background of genetically determined lactase nonpersistence (n = 12; low lactase activity) and lactase persistence (n = 27; high lactase activity). The results were compared with those of the lactose hydrogen breath test, the lactose 13CO2 breath test and the previously described 13C-lactose digestion test. After consumption of 13C-lactose and 2H-glucose, the mean ratio 13C-glucose/2H-glucose concentration in serum at 45-75 min was 0.26 +/- 0.09 in the low lactase activity group and 0.93 +/- 0.17 in the high lactase activity group (P < 0.01). Threshold of the ratio between digesters and maldigesters was calculated as 0.46. Accuracy of the new test was superior to all other tests. We conclude that the 13C/2H-glucose test has the potential of determining the small intestinal lactase activity in vivo and of estimating the amount of lactose which is digested in the small intestine. PMID:11264650

  15. Liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry for 13C isotopic analysis in life science research.

    PubMed

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Fay, Laurent-Bernard; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2007-01-01

    Among the different disciplines covered by mass spectrometry, measurement of (13)C/(12)C isotopic ratio crosses a large section of disciplines from a tool revealing the origin of compounds to more recent approaches such as metabolomics and proteomics. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and molecular mass spectrometry (MS) are the two most mature techniques for (13)C isotopic analysis of compounds, respectively, for high and low-isotopic precision. For the sample introduction, the coupling of gas chromatography (GC) to either IRMS or MS is state of the art technique for targeted isotopic analysis of volatile analytes. However, liquid chromatography (LC) also needs to be considered as a tool for the sample introduction into IRMS or MS for (13)C isotopic analyses of non-volatile analytes at natural abundance as well as for (13)C-labeled compounds. This review presents the past and the current processes used to perform (13)C isotopic analysis in combination with LC. It gives particular attention to the combination of LC with IRMS which started in the 1990's with the moving wire transport, then subsequently moved to the chemical reaction interface (CRI) and was made commercially available in 2004 with the wet chemical oxidation interface (LC-IRMS). The LC-IRMS method development is also discussed in this review, including the possible approaches for increasing selectivity and efficiency, for example, using a 100% aqueous mobile phase for the LC separation. In addition, applications for measuring (13)C isotopic enrichments using atmospheric pressure LC-MS instruments with a quadrupole, a time-of-flight, and an ion trap analyzer are also discussed as well as a LC-ICPMS using a prototype instrument with two quadrupoles. PMID:17853432

  16. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR observation of lactate kinetics in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Mo; Josan, Sonal; Mayer, Dirk; Hurd, Ralph E; Chung, Youngran; Bendahan, David; Spielman, Daniel M; Jue, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The production of glycolytic end products, such as lactate, usually evokes a cellular shift from aerobic to anaerobic ATP generation and O2 insufficiency. In the classical view, muscle lactate must be exported to the liver for clearance. However, lactate also forms under well-oxygenated conditions, and this has led investigators to postulate lactate shuttling from non-oxidative to oxidative muscle fiber, where it can serve as a precursor. Indeed, the intracellular lactate shuttle and the glycogen shunt hypotheses expand the vision to include a dynamic mobilization and utilization of lactate during a muscle contraction cycle. Testing the tenability of these provocative ideas during a rapid contraction cycle has posed a technical challenge. The present study reports the use of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]lactate and [2-(13)C]pyruvate in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR experiments to measure the rapid pyruvate and lactate kinetics in rat muscle. With a 3 s temporal resolution, (13)C DNP NMR detects both [1-(13)C]lactate and [2-(13)C]pyruvate kinetics in muscle. Infusion of dichloroacetate stimulates pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and shifts the kinetics toward oxidative metabolism. Bicarbonate formation from [1-(13)C]lactate increases sharply and acetyl-l-carnitine, acetoacetate and glutamate levels also rise. Such a quick mobilization of pyruvate and lactate toward oxidative metabolism supports the postulated role of lactate in the glycogen shunt and the intracellular lactate shuttle models. The study thus introduces an innovative DNP approach to measure metabolite transients, which will help delineate the cellular and physiological role of lactate and glycolytic end products. PMID:26347554

  17. Kinetic modeling of hyperpolarized 13C 1-pyruvate metabolism in normal rats and TRAMP mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierhut, Matthew L.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Chen, Albert P.; Bok, Robert; Albers, Mark J.; Zhang, Vickie; Tropp, Jim; Park, Ilwoo; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Kurhanewicz, John; Hurd, Ralph E.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2010-01-01

    PurposeTo investigate metabolic exchange between 13C 1-pyruvate, 13C 1-lactate, and 13C 1-alanine in pre-clinical model systems using kinetic modeling of dynamic hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopic data and to examine the relationship between fitted parameters and dose-response. Materials and methodsDynamic 13C spectroscopy data were acquired in normal rats, wild type mice, and mice with transgenic prostate tumors (TRAMP) either within a single slice or using a one-dimensional echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (1D-EPSI) encoding technique. Rate constants were estimated by fitting a set of exponential equations to the dynamic data. Variations in fitted parameters were used to determine model robustness in 15 mm slices centered on normal rat kidneys. Parameter values were used to investigate differences in metabolism between and within TRAMP and wild type mice. ResultsThe kinetic model was shown here to be robust when fitting data from a rat given similar doses. In normal rats, Michaelis-Menten kinetics were able to describe the dose-response of the fitted exchange rate constants with a 13.65% and 16.75% scaled fitting error (SFE) for kpyr→lac and kpyr→ala, respectively. In TRAMP mice, kpyr→lac increased an average of 94% after up to 23 days of disease progression, whether the mice were untreated or treated with casodex. Parameters estimated from dynamic 13C 1D-EPSI data were able to differentiate anatomical structures within both wild type and TRAMP mice. ConclusionsThe metabolic parameters estimated using this approach may be useful for in vivo monitoring of tumor progression and treatment efficacy, as well as to distinguish between various tissues based on metabolic activity.

  18. Errors in quantitative T1rho imaging and the correction methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weitian

    2015-08-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time constant in rotating frame (T1rho) is useful for assessment of the properties of macromolecular environment inside tissue. Quantification of T1rho is found promising in various clinical applications. However, T1rho imaging is prone to image artifacts and quantification errors, which remains one of the greatest challenges to adopt this technique in routine clinical practice. The conventional continuous wave spin-lock is susceptible to B1 radiofrequency (RF) and B0 field inhomogeneity, which appears as banding artifacts in acquired images. A number of methods have been reported to modify T1rho prep RF pulse cluster to mitigate this effect. Adiabatic RF pulse can also be used for spin-lock with insensitivity to both B1 RF and B0 field inhomogeneity. Another source of quantification error in T1rho imaging is signal evolution during imaging data acquisition. Care is needed to affirm such error does not take place when specific pulse sequence is used for imaging data acquisition. Another source of T1rho quantification error is insufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which is common among various quantitative imaging approaches. Measurement of T1rho within an ROI can mitigate this issue, but at the cost of reduced resolution. Noise-corrected methods are reported to address this issue in pixel-wise quantification. For certain tissue type, T1rho quantification can be confounded by magic angle effect and the presence of multiple tissue components. Review of these confounding factors from inherent tissue properties is not included in this article. PMID:26435922

  19. Errors in quantitative T1rho imaging and the correction methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time constant in rotating frame (T1rho) is useful for assessment of the properties of macromolecular environment inside tissue. Quantification of T1rho is found promising in various clinical applications. However, T1rho imaging is prone to image artifacts and quantification errors, which remains one of the greatest challenges to adopt this technique in routine clinical practice. The conventional continuous wave spin-lock is susceptible to B1 radiofrequency (RF) and B0 field inhomogeneity, which appears as banding artifacts in acquired images. A number of methods have been reported to modify T1rho prep RF pulse cluster to mitigate this effect. Adiabatic RF pulse can also be used for spin-lock with insensitivity to both B1 RF and B0 field inhomogeneity. Another source of quantification error in T1rho imaging is signal evolution during imaging data acquisition. Care is needed to affirm such error does not take place when specific pulse sequence is used for imaging data acquisition. Another source of T1rho quantification error is insufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which is common among various quantitative imaging approaches. Measurement of T1rho within an ROI can mitigate this issue, but at the cost of reduced resolution. Noise-corrected methods are reported to address this issue in pixel-wise quantification. For certain tissue type, T1rho quant