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Sample records for 13c-labelled arable soils

  1. Enhancing Phospholipid Fatty Acid Profiling of Soil Bacterial Communities via Substrate- Specific 13C-labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evershed, R. P.; Maxfield, P. J.; Bingham, E. M.; Dildar, N.; Brennand, E. L.; Hornibrook, E.

    2008-12-01

    A range of culture-independent methods, has recently emerged to study environmental microorganisms in situ[1]. One such method is phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, wherein these ubiquitous membrane lipids provide a powerful tool for the study of unculturable soil microorganisms. PLFA analyses have been used to investigate the impacts of a wide range of environmental factors on the soil microbial community. An acknowledged shortcoming of the PLFAs approach is the lack the chemotaxonoic specificity, which restricts the ability of the method to probe the activities of specific functional groups of the microbial community selectively. However, the selectivity of PLFAs analyses can be enhanced by incubating soils with 13C- labelled substrates followed by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry to reveal the specific PLFAs incorporating the 13C-label. The application of this approach will be demonstrated through our recent work on methanotrophic bacteria in soils. We applied this approach initially to mineral soils[2] and then extended chemotaxonomic assessments by using a combination of 13C-labelled PLFAs and hopanoids [3]. We have used this approach to explore the properties of high affinity methanotrophs in a range of environments, investigating the relationship between methane oxidation rates and the nature and magnitude of the methanotrophic community for the first time[4,5] More recently we extended the technique using a novel time series 13C-labelling of PLFAs[6] to estimate the rate and progression of 13C- label incorporation and turnover of methanotrophic populations. This modified approach has been used to investigate the impacts of various environmental variables, e.g. soil type, vegetation cover and land use, on the methanotrophic biomass[7.8]. The unique nature of the 13CH4 as a gaseous substate/carbon source means that can be readily introduced into soils via a specific subset of the soil microbial biomass, thereby offering many

  2. Microbial metabolism in soil at low temperatures: Mechanisms unraveled by position-specific 13C labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bore, Ezekiel

    2016-04-01

    Microbial transformation of organic substances in soil is the most important process of the C cycle. Most of the current studies base their information about transformation of organic substances on incubation studies under laboratory conditions and thus, we have a profound knowledge on SOM transformations at ambient temperatures. However, metabolic pathway activities at low temperature are not well understood, despite the fact that the processes are relevant for many soils globally and seasonally. To analyze microbial metabolism at low soil temperatures, isotopomeres of position-specifically 13C labeled glucose were incubated at three temperature; 5, -5 -20 oC. Soils were sampled after 1, 3 and 10 days and additionally after 30 days for samples at -20 °C. The 13C from individual molecule position was quantifed in respired CO2, bulk soil, extractable organic C and extractable microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) and cell membranes of microbial communities classified by 13C phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. 13CO2 released showed a dominance of the flux from C-1 position at 5 °C. Consequently, at 5 °C, pentose phosphate pathway activity is a dominant metabolic pathway of glucose metabolization. In contrast to -5 °C and -20 oC, metabolic behaviors completely switched towards a preferential respiration of the glucose C-4 position. With decreasing temperature, microorganism strongly shifted towards metabolization of glucose via glycolysis which indicates a switch to cellular maintenance. High recoveries of 13C in extractable microbial biomass at -5 °C indicates optimal growth condition for the microorganisms. PLFA analysis showed high incorporation of 13C into Gram negative bacteria at 5 °C but decreased with temperature. Gram positive bacteria out-competed Gram negatives with decreasing temperature. This study revealed a remarkable microbial activity at temperatures below 0 °C, differing significantly from that at ambient

  3. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in Soils - revealed using 13C-labelled methane tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riekie, G. J.; Baggs, E. M.; Killham, K. S.; Smith, J. U.

    2008-12-01

    In marine sediments, anaerobic methane oxidation is a significant biogeochemical process limiting methane flux from ocean to atmosphere. To date, evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation in terrestrial environments has proved elusive, and its significance is uncertain. In this study, an isotope dilution method specifically designed to detect the process of anaerobic methane oxidation in methanogenic wetland soils is applied. Methane emissions of soils from three contrasting permanently waterlogged sites in Scotland are investigated in strictly anoxic microcosms to which 13C- labelled methane is added, and changes in the concentration and 12C/13C isotope ratios of methane and carbon dioxide are subsequently measured and used to calculate separate the separate components of the methane flux. The method used takes into account the 13C-methane associated with methanogenesis, and the amount of methane dissolved in the soil. The calculations make no prior assumptions about the kinetics of methane production or oxidation. The results indicate that methane oxidation can take place in anoxic soil environments. The clearest evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation is provided by soils from a minerotrophic fen site (pH 6.0) in Bin Forest underlain by ultra-basic and serpentine till. In the fresh soil anoxic microcosms, net consumption methane was observed, and the amount of headspace 13C-CO2 increased at a greater rate than the 12+13C-CO2, further proof of methane oxidation. A net increase in methane was measured in microcosms of soil from Murder Moss, an alkaline site, pH 6.5, with a strong calcareous influence. However, the 13C-CH4 data provided evidence of methane oxidation, both in the disappearance of C- CH4 and appearance of smaller quantities of 13C-CO2. The least alkaline (pH 5.5) microcosms, of Gateside Farm soil - a granitic till - exhibited net methanogenesis and the changes in 13C-CH4 and 13C-CO2 here followed the pattern expected if no methane is consumed

  4. Changes in microbial structure and functional communities at different soil depths during 13C labelled root litter degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanaullah, Muhammad; Baumann, Karen; Chabbi, Abad; Dignac, Marie-France; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Rumpel, Cornelia

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter turnover depends on substrate quality and microbial activity in soil but little is known about how addition of freshly added organic material modifies the diversity of soil microbial communities with in a soil profile. We took advantage of a decomposition experiment, which was carried out at different soil depths under field conditions and sampled litterbags with 13C-labelled wheat roots, incubated in subsoil horizons at 30, 60 and 90 cm depth for up to 36 months. The effect of root litter addition on microbial community structure, diversity and activity was studied by determining total microbial biomass, PLFA signatures, molecular tools (DNA genotyping and pyrosequencing of 16S and 18S rDNAs) and extracellular enzyme activities. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was also carried out to determine the differences in microbial community structure. We found that with the addition of root litter, total microbial biomass as well as microbial community composition and structure changed at different soil depths and change was significantly higher at top 30cm soil layer. Moreover, in the topsoil, population of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria increased with root litter addition over time, while subsoil horizons were relatively dominated by fungal community. Extra-cellular enzyme activities confirmed relatively higher fungal community at subsoil horizons compared with surface soil layer with bacteria dominant microbial population. Bacterial-ARISA profiling illustrated that the addition of root litter enhanced the abundance of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, at all three soil depths. These bacteria correspond to copiotrophic attributes, which can preferentially consume of labile soil organic C pools. While disappearance of oligotrophic Acidobacteria confirmed the shifting of microbial communities due to the addition of readily available substrate. We concluded that root litter mixing altered microbial community

  5. Using 13C-labeled benzene and Raman gas spectroscopy to investigate respiration and biodegradation kinetics following soil contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, Tobias; Popp, Juergen; Frosch, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination with benzene can cause serious environmental damages. However, many soil microorganisms are capable to adapt and known to strongly control the fate of organic contamination. Cavity enhanced Raman gas spectroscopy (CERS) was applied to investigate the short-term response of indigenous soil bacteria to a sudden surface contamination with benzene regarding the temporal variations of gas products and their exchange rates with the adjacent atmosphere. 13C-labeled benzene was spiked on a silty-loamy soil column (sampled from Hainich National Park, Germany) in order to track and separate the changes in heterotrophic soil respiration - involving 12CO2 and O2 - from the microbial process of benzene degradation, which ultimately forms 13CO2.1 The respiratory quotient (RQ) of 0.98 decreased significantly after the spiking and increased again within 33 hours to a value of 0.72. This coincided with maximum 13CO2 concentration rates (0.63 μ mol m-2 s-1), indicating highest benzene degradation at 33 hours after the spiking event. The diffusion of benzene in the headspace and the biodegradation into 13CO2 were simultaneously monitored and 12 days after the benzene spiking no measurable degradation was detected anymore.1 The RQ finally returned to a value of 0.96 demonstrating the reestablished aerobic respiration. In summary, this study shows the potential of combining Raman gas spectroscopy and stable isotopes to follow soil microbial biodegradation dynamics while simultaneously monitoring the underlying respiration behavior. Support by the Collaborative Research Center 1076 Aqua Diva is kindly acknowledged. We thank Beate Michalzik for soil analysis and discussion. 1. T. Jochum, B. Michalzik, A. Bachmann, J. Popp and T. Frosch, Analyst, 2015, 140, 3143-3149.

  6. Carbon Metabolism of Soil microorganisms at Low Temperatures: Position-Specific 13C Labeled Glucose Reveals the Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, C.; Bore, E. K.; Halicki, S.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Dippold, M.

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic pathway activities at low temperature are not well understood, despite the fact that the processes are relevant for many soils globally and seasonally. To analyze soil metabolism at low temperature, isotopomeres of position-specifically 13C labeled glucose were applied at three temperature levels; +5, -5 -20 oC. In additon, one sterilization treatment with sodium azide at +5 oC was also performed. Soils were incubated for 1, 3 and 10 days while soil samples at -20 oC were additionally sampled after 30 days. The 13C from individual molecule position in respired CO2 was quantifed. Incorporation of 13C in bulk soil, extractable microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) and cell membranes of different microbial communities classified by 13C phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) was carried out. Our 13CO2 data showed a dominance of C-1 respiration at +5 °C for treatments with and without sodium azide, but total respiration for sodium azide inhibited treatments increased by 14%. In contrast, at -5 and -20 oC metabolic behavior showed intermingling of preferential respiration of the glucose C-4 and C-1 positions. Therefore, at +5 °C, pentose phosphate pathway activity is a dominant metabolic pathway used by microorganisms to metabolize glucose. The respiration increase due to NaN3 inhibition was attributed to endoenzymes released from dead organisms that are stabilized at the soil matrix and have access to suitable substrate and co-factors to permit their funtions. Our PLFA analysis showed that incorporation of glucose 13C was higher in Gram negative bacteria than other microbial groups as they are most competitive for LMWOS. Only a limited amount of microbial groups maintained their glucose utilizing activity at -5 and -20 °C and they strongly shifted towards a metabolization of glucose via both glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways indicating both growth and cellular maintenance. This study revealed a remarkable microbial acitivity

  7. Combining position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis: first steps towards soil fluxomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics is one of the most important challenges in soil science. Transformation of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) is a key step in biogeochemical cycles because 1) all high molecular substances pass this stage during their decomposition and 2) only LMWOS will be taken up by microorganisms. Previous studies on LMWOS were focused on determining net fluxes through the LMWOS pool, but they rarely identified transformations. As LMWOS are the preferred C and energy source for microorganisms, the transformations of LMWOS are dominated by biochemical pathways of the soil microorganisms. Thus, understanding fluxes and transformations in soils requires a detailed knowledge on the biochemical pathways and its controlling factors. Tracing C fate in soil by isotopes became on of the most applied and promising biogeochemistry tools. Up to now, studies on LMWOS were nearly exclusively based on uniformly labeled organic substances i.e. all C atoms in the molecules were labeled with 13C or 14C. However, this classical approach did not allow the differentiation between use of intact initial substances in any process, or whether they were transformed to metabolites. The novel tool of position-specific labeling enables to trace molecule atoms separately and thus to determine the cleavage of molecules - a prerequisite for metabolic tracing. Position-specific labeling of LMWOS and quantification of 13CO2 and 13C in bulk soil enabled following the basic metabolic pathways of soil microorganisms. However, only the combination of position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis of microbial biomarkers and metabolites allowed 1) tracing specific anabolic pathways in diverse microbial communities in soils and 2) identification of specific pathways of individual functional microbial groups. So, these are the prerequisites for soil fluxomics. Our studies combining position-specific labeled glucose with amino

  8. Utilization of low molecular weight organics by soil microorganisms: combination of 13C-labelling with PLFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna; Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Microbial metabolisation is the main transformation pathway of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), but detailed knowledge concerning the fate of LMWOS in soils is strongly limited. Considering that various LMWOS classes enter biochemical cycles at different steps, we hypothesise that the percentage of their LMWOS-Carbon (C) used for microbial biomass (MB) production and consequently medium-term stabilisation in soil is different. We traced the three main groups of LMWOS: amino acids, sugars and carboxylic acids, by uniformly labelled 13C-alanine, -glutamate, -glucose, -ribose, -acetate and -palmitate. Incorporation of 13C from these LMWOS into MB (fumigation-extraction method) and into phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) (Bligh-Dyer extraction, purification and GC-C-IRMS measurement) was investigated under field conditions 3 d and 10 d after LMWOS application. The activity of microbial utilization of LMWOS for cell membrane construction was estimated by replacement of PLFA-C with 13C. Decomposition of LMWOS-C comprised 20-65% of the total label, whereas incorporation of 13C into MB amounted to 20-50% of initially applied 13C on day three and was reduced to 5-30% on day 10. Incorporation of 13C-labelled LMWOS into MB followed the trend sugars > carboxylic acids > amino acids. Differences in microbial utilisation between LMWOS were observed mainly at day 10. Thus, instead of initial rapid uptake, further metabolism within microbial cells accounts for the individual fate of C from different LMWOS in soils. Incorporation of 13C from each LMWOS into each PLFA occurred, which reflects the ubiquitous ability of all functional microbial groups for LMWOS utilization. The preferential incorporation of palmitate can be attributed to its role as a direct precursor for many fatty acids (FAs) and PLFA formation. Higher incorporation of alanine and glucose compared to glutamate, ribose and acetate reflect the preferential use of glycolysis-derived substances in the FAs

  9. Priming effect of (13)C-labelled wheat straw in no-tillage soil under drying and wetting cycles in the Loess Plateau of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enke; Wang, Jianbo; Zhang, Yanqing; Angers, Denis A; Yan, Changrong; Oweis, Theib; He, Wenqing; Liu, Qin; Chen, Baoqing

    2015-09-08

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of drying and wetting (DW) cycles on soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralisation and on the priming effect (PE) induced by the addition of (13)C-labelled wheat straw to long-term no-tillage (NT) and conventional-tillage (CT) soils. We observed that the SOC mineralisation rate in rewetted soils was greater than that in soils that were kept at constant water content. The proportion of CO2 derived from the straw declined dramatically during the first 10 days. The priming direction was first positive, and then became slightly negative. The PE was higher under DW cycles than under constant water content. There was no significant effect of the tillage system on the SOC mineralisation rate or PE. The data indicate that the DW cycles had a significant effect on the SOC mineralisation rate and on the PE, demonstrating a positive combined effect between wheat straw and moisture fluctuations. Further research is needed to study the role of microbial communities and C pools in affecting the SOC mineralisation response to DW cycles.

  10. Priming effect of 13C-labelled wheat straw in no-tillage soil under drying and wetting cycles in the Loess Plateau of China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Enke; Wang, Jianbo; Zhang, Yanqing; Angers, Denis A.; Yan, Changrong; Oweis, Theib; He, Wenqing; Liu, Qin; Chen, Baoqing

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of drying and wetting (DW) cycles on soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralisation and on the priming effect (PE) induced by the addition of 13C-labelled wheat straw to long-term no-tillage (NT) and conventional-tillage (CT) soils. We observed that the SOC mineralisation rate in rewetted soils was greater than that in soils that were kept at constant water content. The proportion of CO2 derived from the straw declined dramatically during the first 10 days. The priming direction was first positive, and then became slightly negative. The PE was higher under DW cycles than under constant water content. There was no significant effect of the tillage system on the SOC mineralisation rate or PE. The data indicate that the DW cycles had a significant effect on the SOC mineralisation rate and on the PE, demonstrating a positive combined effect between wheat straw and moisture fluctuations. Further research is needed to study the role of microbial communities and C pools in affecting the SOC mineralisation response to DW cycles. PMID:26345303

  11. A method for (13)C-labeling of metabolic carbohydrates within French bean leaves (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) for decomposition studies in soils.

    PubMed

    Girardin, Cyril; Rasse, Daniel P; Biron, Philippe; Ghashghaie, Jaleh; Chenu, Claire

    2009-06-01

    The molecular composition of plant residues is suspected to largely govern the fate of their constitutive carbon (C) in soils. Labile compounds, such as metabolic carbohydrates, are affected differently from recalcitrant and structural compounds by soil-C stabilisation mechanisms. Producing (13)C-enriched plant residues with specifically labeled fractions would help us to investigate the fate in soils of the constitutive C of these compounds. The objective of the present research was to test (13)C pulse chase labeling as a method for specifically enriching the metabolic carbohydrate components of plant residues, i.e. soluble sugars and starch. Bean plants were exposed to a (13)CO(2)-enriched atmosphere for 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 21 h. The major soluble sugars were then determined on water-soluble extracts, and starch on HCl-hydrolysable extracts. The results show a quick differential labeling between water-soluble and water-insoluble compounds. For both groups, (13)C-labeling increased linearly with time. The difference in delta(13)C signature between water-soluble and insoluble fractions was 7 per thousand after 0.5 h and 70 per thousand after 21 h. However, this clear isotopic contrast masked a substantial labeling variability within each fraction. By contrast, metabolic carbohydrates on the one hand (i.e. soluble sugars + starch) and other fractions (essentially cell wall components) on the other hand displayed quite homogeneous signatures within fractions, and a significant difference in labeling between fractions: delta(13)C = 414 +/- 3.7 per thousand and 56 +/- 5.5 per thousand, respectively. Thus, the technique generates labeled plant residues displaying contrasting (13)C-isotopic signatures between metabolic carbohydrates and other compounds, with homogenous signatures within each group. Metabolic carbohydrates being labile compounds, our findings suggest that the technique is particularly appropriate for investigating the effect of compound lability on the long

  12. Incorporation of 13C labelled root-shoot residues in soil in the presence of Lumbricus terrestris: An isotopic and molecular approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Alix; Alexis, Marie; Nguyen Tu, Thanh Tu; Anquetil, Christelle; Vaury, Véronique; Derenne, Sylvie; Quenea, Katell

    2016-04-01

    Litter from plant biomass deposited on soil surface can either be mineralized; releasing CO2 to the atmosphere, or transferred into the soil as organic compounds. Both pathways depend on biotic factors such as litter characteristics and the of soil organism activity. During the last decades, many studies have focused on the origin of organic matter, with a particular attention to the fate of root and shoot litter. It is generally admitted that roots decompose at a slower rate than shoots, resulting in a higher carbon sequestration in soil for compounds originating from roots. Earthworms play a central role in litter decomposition and carbon cycling, ingesting both organic and mineral compounds which are mixed, complexed and dejected in the form of casts at the soil surface or along earthworm burrows. The simultaneous impact of earthworms and root-shoot on soil carbon cycling is still poorly understood. This study aimed at (1) defining the rate of incorporation of root and shoot litter with or without earthworms and (2) characterizing the molecular composition of soil organic matter upon litter decomposition, after one year of experimentation. A mesocosm experiment was set up to follow the incorporation of 13C labelled Ryegrass root and shoot litter in the soil, in the presence of anecic earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris). Soil samples were collected at 0-20 and 40-60 cm, as well as surface casts, at the beginning and after 1, 2, 4, 8, 24 and 54 weeks of experiment. Organic carbon content and δ13C values were determined for all the samples with Elemental Analysis - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry. Lipid-free soil and cast samples after 54 weeks of incubation were analyzed with Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Pyrolysis products were grouped into six classes: polysaccharides, lignin derived compounds, phenols, N-compounds, aliphatic compounds and sterols. Each pyrolysis product was quantified thanks to its peak area, relative to the total area of the

  13. Molecular Investigation of the Short-term Sequestration of Natural Abundance 13C -labelled Cow Dung in the Surface Horizons of a Temperate Grassland Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungait, J.; Bol, R.; Evershed, R. P.

    2004-12-01

    An adequate understanding of the carbon (C) sequestration potential of grasslands requires that the quantity and residence times of C inputs be measured. Herbivore dung is largely comprised of plant cell wall material, a significant source of stable C in intensively grazed temperate grassland ecosystems that contributes to the soil carbon budget. Our work uses compound-specific isotope analysis to identify the pattern of input of dung-derived compounds from natural abundance 13C/-labelled cow dung into the surface horizons of a temperate grassland soil over one year. C4 dung (δ 13C \\-12.6 ‰ ) from maize fed cows was applied to a temperate grassland surface (δ 13C \\-29.95 ‰ ) at IGER-North Wyke (Devon, UK), and dung remains and soil cores beneath the treatments collected at ŧ = 7, 14, 28, 56, 112, 224 and 372 days. Bulk dung carbon present in the 0\\-1 cm and 1\\-5 cm surface horizons of a grassland soil over one year was estimated using Δ 13C between C4 dung and C3 dung, after Bol {\\et al.} (2000). The major biochemical components of dung were quantified using proximate forage fibre analyses, after Goering and Van Soest (1970) and identified using `wet' chemical and GC-MS methods. Plant cell wall polysaccharides and lignin were found to account for up to 67 {%} of dung dry matter. Hydrolysed polysaccharides were prepared as alditol acetates for analyses (after Docherty {\\et al.}, 2001), and a novel application of an off-line pyrolysis method applied to measure lignin-derived phenolic compounds (after Poole & van Bergen, 2002). This paper focuses on major events in the incorporation of dung carbon, estimated using natural abundance 13C&-slash;labelling technique. This revealed a major bulk input of dung carbon after a period of significant rainfall with a consequent decline in bulk soil δ 13C values until the end of the experiment (Dungait {\\et al.}, submitted). Findings will be presented revealing contribution of plant cell wall polysaccharides and

  14. Investigation of the degradation of 13C-labeled fungal biomass in soil - fate of carbon in a soil bioreactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Michael; Fester, Thomas; Miltner, Anja; Kaestner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Nutrient balances and degradation processes in boreal forests are mainly influenced by interactions of plant roots and ectomycorrhizal fungi. Plants benefit from nitrogen compounds provided by their symbiotic interaction partner. In return ectomycorrhiza are provided by large amounts of carbon from the plants which is used for the synthesis of hyphal networks in soil and for metabolic activity for nutrient uptake. Therefore, ectomycorrhizal fungi play a major role in ecosystems of boreal forests and are consequently an important sink for carbon by building large amount of mycelia. Recently, it has been shown that microbial biomass residues contribute significantly to soil organic matter formation. This suggests that also residues of ectomycorrhizal fungi may be an important source for soil organic matter formation in forest soils where these fungi are abundant. However, the fate of ectomycorrhizal biomass residues in soils is unknown. We therefore investigated the fate of ectomycorrhizal biomass in soil in a soil bioreactor system to quantify the contribution of this material to soil organic matter formation. As a model organism, we selected Laccaria bicolor, which was labelled by growing the fungus on 13C glucose. The stable isotope-labeled biomass was then homogenized and incubated in a podzol from a typical forest site in Central Germany. The fate of the labeled biomass was traced by analyzing the amount of 13C mineralized and the amount remaining in the soil. The fungal biomass carbon was mineralized rather rapidly during the first 50 days. Then the mineralization rate slowed down, but mineralization continued until the end of the experiment, when approximately 40% of the 13C was mineralized and 60% remained in soil. In addition, we analyzed biomolecules such as fatty acids to trace the incorporation of the L. bicolor-derived biomass carbon into other microorganisms and to identify potential primary consumers of fungal biomass. By these analyses, we found a

  15. Investigation of the degradation of 13C-labeled fungal biomass in soil - fate of carbon in a soil bioreactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Michael; Fester, Thomas; Miltner, Anja; Kästner, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Nutrient balances and degradation processes in boreal forests are mainly influenced by interactions of plant roots and ectomycorrhizal fungi. Plants benefit from nitrogen compounds provided by their symbiotic interaction partner. In return ectomycorrhiza are provided by large amounts of carbon from the plants which is used for the synthesis of hyphal networks in soil and for metabolic activity for nutrient uptake. Therefore ectomycorrhizal fungi play a major role in ecosystems of boreal forests and are consequently an important sink for carbon by building large amounts of mycelia. Recently, it has been shown that microbial biomass residues contribute significantly to soil organic matter formation. This suggests that also residues of ectomycorrhizal fungi may be an important source for soil organic matter formation in forest soils where these fungi are abundant. However, the fate of ectomycorrhizal biomass residues in soils is unknown. We therefore investigated the fate of ectomycorrhizal biomass in soil in a bioreactor system to quantify the contribution of this material to soil organic matter formation. As a model organism, we selected Laccaria bicolor, which was labelled by growing the fungus on 13C glucose. The stable isotope-labeled biomass was then homogenized and incubated in a podzol from a typical forest site in Central Germany. The fate of the labeled biomass was traced by analyzing the amount of 13C mineralized and the amount remaining in the soil. The fungal biomass carbon was mineralized rather rapidly during the first 25 days. Then the mineralization rate slowed down, but mineralization continued until the end of the experiment, when approximately 40% of the 13C was mineralized and 60% remained in soil. In addition, we analyzed biomolecules such as fatty acids to trace the incorporation of the L. bicolor-derived biomass carbon into other microorganisms and to identify potential primary consumers of fungal biomass. By these analyses, we found a

  16. Spatial and temporal distribution of 13C labelled plant residues in soil aggregates and Lumbricus terrestris surface casts: A combination of Transmission Electron Microscopy and Nanoscale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Alix; Remusat, Laurent; Watteau, Françoise; Derenne, Sylvie; Quenea, Katell

    2016-04-01

    Earthworms play a central role in litter decomposition, soil structuration and carbon cycling. They ingest both organic and mineral compounds which are mixed, complexed with mucus and dejected in form of casts at the soil surface and along burrows. Bulk isotopic or biochemical technics have often been used to study the incorporation of litter in soil and casts, but they could not reflect the complex interaction between soil, plant and microorganisms at the microscale. However, the heterogeneous distribution of organic carbon in soil structures induces contrasted microbial activity areas. Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), which is a high spatial resolution method providing elemental and isotopic maps of organic and mineral materials, has recently been applied in soil science (Herrmann et al., 2007; Vogel et al., 2014). The combination of Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has proven its potential to investigate labelled residues incorporation in earthworm casts (Vidal et al., 2016). In line of this work, we studied the spatial and temporal distribution of plant residues in soil aggregates and earthworm surface casts. This study aimed to (1) identify the decomposition states of labelled plant residues incorporated at different time steps, in casts and soil, (2) identify the microorganisms implied in this decomposition (3) relate the organic matter states of decomposition with their 13C signature. A one year mesocosm experiment was set up to follow the incorporation of 13C labelled Ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) litter in a soil in the presence of anecic earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris). Soil and surface cast samples were collected after 8 and 54 weeks, embedded in epoxy resin and cut into ultra-thin sections. Soil was fractionated and all and analyzed with TEM and NanoSIMS, obtaining secondary ion images of 12C, 16O, 12C14N, 13C14N and 28Si. The δ13C maps were obtained using the 13C14

  17. Experimental design principles for isotopically instationary 13C labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Nöh, Katharina; Wiechert, Wolfgang

    2006-06-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is a well-established tool in Metabolic Engineering that found numerous applications in recent years. However, one strong limitation of the current method is the requirement of an-at least approximate-isotopic stationary state at sampling time. This requirement leads to a principle lower limit for the duration of a 13C labeling experiment. A new methodological development is based on repeated sampling during the instationary transient of the 13C labeling dynamics. The statistical and computational treatment of such instationary experiments is a completely new terrain. The computational effort is very high because large differential equations have to be solved and, moreover, the intracellular pool sizes play a significant role. For this reason, the present contribution works out principles and strategies for the experimental design of instationary experiments based on a simple example network. Hereby, the potential of isotopically instationary experiments is investigated in detail. Various statistical results on instationary flux identifiability are presented and possible pitfalls of experimental design are discussed. Finally, a framework for almost optimal experimental design of isotopically instationary experiments is proposed which provides a practical guideline for the analysis of large-scale networks.

  18. Assessment of cadmium (Cd) concentration in arable soil in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuying; Chen, Dongmei; Zhong, Taiyang; Zhang, Xiaomin; Cheng, Min; Li, Xinhui

    2015-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) concentration in arable soil has drawn broad public attention due to its direct effect on Cd concentration in food. However, there have been few studies of surveying Cd accumulation on the national scale in China. This paper collected 486 studies of Cd concentrations in Chinese arable soil. The results showed that the average Cd concentration was 0.27 mg/kg, higher than its background value, indicating that Cd had been introduced into arable soil by human activity. The Cd concentrations in areas of mining and smelting, urban areas, and areas irrigated by wastewater were obviously higher than that in remote areas. Spatially, Cd concentrations were lower in the north than those in the south, and many hotspots existed throughout China due to mining and smelting activities. Most Cd in the arable soil were accumulated from external sources in all investigated provinces except Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region.

  19. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra.

  20. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra. PMID:24771296

  1. Overexpression of a homogeneous oligosaccharide with 13C labeling by genetically engineered yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Sayoko; Chiba, Yasunori; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Kato, Koichi

    2011-08-01

    This report describes a novel method for overexpression of (13)C-labeled oligosaccharides using genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, in which a homogeneous high-mannose-type oligosaccharide accumulates because of deletions of genes encoding three enzymes involved in the processing pathway of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides in the Golgi complex. Using uniformly (13)C-labeled glucose as the sole carbon source in the culture medium of these engineered yeast cells, high yields of the isotopically labeled Man(8)GlcNAc(2) oligosaccharide could be successfully harvested from glycoprotein extracts of the cells. Furthermore, (13)C labeling at selected positions of the sugar residues in the oligosaccharide could be achieved using a site-specific (13)C-enriched glucose as the metabolic precursor, facilitating NMR spectral assignments. The (13)C-labeling method presented provides the technical basis for NMR analyses of structures, dynamics, and interactions of larger, branched oligosaccharides.

  2. Spatial Distribution of Fungal Communities in an Arable Soil.

    PubMed

    Moll, Julia; Hoppe, Björn; König, Stephan; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Krüger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Fungi are prominent drivers of ecological processes in soils, so that fungal communities across different soil ecosystems have been well investigated. However, for arable soils taxonomically resolved fine-scale studies including vertical itemization of fungal communities are still missing. Here, we combined a cloning/Sanger sequencing approach of the ITS/LSU region as marker for general fungi and of the partial SSU region for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to characterize the microbiome in different maize soil habitats. Four compartments were analyzed over two annual cycles 2009 and 2010: a) ploughed soil in 0-10 cm, b) rooted soil in 40-50 cm, c) root-free soil in 60-70 cm soil depth and d) maize roots. Ascomycota was the most dominant phylum across all compartments. Fungal communities including yeasts and AMF differed strongly between compartments. Inter alia, Tetracladium, the overall largest MOTU (molecular operational taxonomic unit), occurred in all compartments, whereas Trichosporon dominated all soil compartments. Sequences belonging to unclassified Helotiales were forming the most abundant MOTUs exclusively present in roots. This study gives new insights on spatial distribution of fungi and helps to link fungal communities to specific ecological properties such as varying resources, which characterize particular niches of the heterogeneous soil environment. PMID:26840453

  3. Spatial Distribution of Fungal Communities in an Arable Soil

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Julia; Hoppe, Björn; König, Stephan; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Krüger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Fungi are prominent drivers of ecological processes in soils, so that fungal communities across different soil ecosystems have been well investigated. However, for arable soils taxonomically resolved fine-scale studies including vertical itemization of fungal communities are still missing. Here, we combined a cloning/Sanger sequencing approach of the ITS/LSU region as marker for general fungi and of the partial SSU region for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to characterize the microbiome in different maize soil habitats. Four compartments were analyzed over two annual cycles 2009 and 2010: a) ploughed soil in 0–10 cm, b) rooted soil in 40–50 cm, c) root-free soil in 60–70 cm soil depth and d) maize roots. Ascomycota was the most dominant phylum across all compartments. Fungal communities including yeasts and AMF differed strongly between compartments. Inter alia, Tetracladium, the overall largest MOTU (molecular operational taxonomic unit), occurred in all compartments, whereas Trichosporon dominated all soil compartments. Sequences belonging to unclassified Helotiales were forming the most abundant MOTUs exclusively present in roots. This study gives new insights on spatial distribution of fungi and helps to link fungal communities to specific ecological properties such as varying resources, which characterize particular niches of the heterogeneous soil environment. PMID:26840453

  4. Spatial Distribution of Fungal Communities in an Arable Soil.

    PubMed

    Moll, Julia; Hoppe, Björn; König, Stephan; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Krüger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Fungi are prominent drivers of ecological processes in soils, so that fungal communities across different soil ecosystems have been well investigated. However, for arable soils taxonomically resolved fine-scale studies including vertical itemization of fungal communities are still missing. Here, we combined a cloning/Sanger sequencing approach of the ITS/LSU region as marker for general fungi and of the partial SSU region for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to characterize the microbiome in different maize soil habitats. Four compartments were analyzed over two annual cycles 2009 and 2010: a) ploughed soil in 0-10 cm, b) rooted soil in 40-50 cm, c) root-free soil in 60-70 cm soil depth and d) maize roots. Ascomycota was the most dominant phylum across all compartments. Fungal communities including yeasts and AMF differed strongly between compartments. Inter alia, Tetracladium, the overall largest MOTU (molecular operational taxonomic unit), occurred in all compartments, whereas Trichosporon dominated all soil compartments. Sequences belonging to unclassified Helotiales were forming the most abundant MOTUs exclusively present in roots. This study gives new insights on spatial distribution of fungi and helps to link fungal communities to specific ecological properties such as varying resources, which characterize particular niches of the heterogeneous soil environment.

  5. Kinetic isotope effects significantly influence intracellular metabolite 13C labeling patterns and flux determination

    PubMed Central

    Wasylenko, Thomas M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous mathematical modeling of carbon-labeling experiments allows estimation of fluxes through the pathways of central carbon metabolism, yielding powerful information for basic scientific studies as well as for a wide range of applications. However, the mathematical models that have been developed for flux determination from 13C labeling data have commonly neglected the influence of kinetic isotope effects on the distribution of 13C label in intracellular metabolites, as these effects have often been assumed to be inconsequential. We have used measurements of the 13C isotope effects on the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme from the literature to model isotopic fractionation at the pyruvate node and quantify the modeling errors expected to result from the assumption that isotope effects are negligible. We show that under some conditions kinetic isotope effects have a significant impact on the 13C labeling patterns of intracellular metabolites, and the errors associated with neglecting isotope effects in 13C-metabolic flux analysis models can be comparable in size to measurement errors associated with GC–MS. Thus, kinetic isotope effects must be considered in any rigorous assessment of errors in 13C labeling data, goodness-of-fit between model and data, confidence intervals of estimated metabolic fluxes, and statistical significance of differences between estimated metabolic flux distributions. PMID:23828762

  6. A Method to Constrain Genome-Scale Models with 13C Labeling Data

    PubMed Central

    García Martín, Héctor; Kumar, Vinay Satish; Weaver, Daniel; Ghosh, Amit; Chubukov, Victor; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    Current limitations in quantitatively predicting biological behavior hinder our efforts to engineer biological systems to produce biofuels and other desired chemicals. Here, we present a new method for calculating metabolic fluxes, key targets in metabolic engineering, that incorporates data from 13C labeling experiments and genome-scale models. The data from 13C labeling experiments provide strong flux constraints that eliminate the need to assume an evolutionary optimization principle such as the growth rate optimization assumption used in Flux Balance Analysis (FBA). This effective constraining is achieved by making the simple but biologically relevant assumption that flux flows from core to peripheral metabolism and does not flow back. The new method is significantly more robust than FBA with respect to errors in genome-scale model reconstruction. Furthermore, it can provide a comprehensive picture of metabolite balancing and predictions for unmeasured extracellular fluxes as constrained by 13C labeling data. A comparison shows that the results of this new method are similar to those found through 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C MFA) for central carbon metabolism but, additionally, it provides flux estimates for peripheral metabolism. The extra validation gained by matching 48 relative labeling measurements is used to identify where and why several existing COnstraint Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) flux prediction algorithms fail. We demonstrate how to use this knowledge to refine these methods and improve their predictive capabilities. This method provides a reliable base upon which to improve the design of biological systems. PMID:26379153

  7. Phosphorus Containing Water Dispersible Nanoparticles in Arable Soil.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoqian; Bol, Roland; Nischwitz, Volker; Siebers, Nina; Willbold, Sabine; Vereecken, Harry; Amelung, Wulf; Klumpp, Erwin

    2015-11-01

    Due to the limited solubility of phosphorus (P) in soil, understanding its binding in fine colloids is vital to better forecast P dynamics and losses in agricultural systems. We hypothesized that water-dispersible P is present as nanoparticles and that iron (Fe) plays a crucial role for P binding to these nanoparticles. To test this, we isolated water-dispersible fine colloids (WDFC) from an arable topsoil (Haplic Luvisol, Germany) and assessed colloidal P forms after asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled with ultraviolet and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, with and without removal of amorphous and crystalline Fe oxides using oxalate and dithionite, respectively. We found that fine colloidal P was present in two dominant sizes: (i) in associations of organic matter and amorphous Fe (Al) oxides in nanoparticles <20 nm, and (ii) in aggregates of fine clay, organic matter and Fe oxides (more crystalline Fe oxides) with a mean diameter of 170 to 225 nm. Solution P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra indicated that the organically bound P predominantly comprised orthophosphate-monoesters. Approximately 65% of P in the WDFC was liberated after the removal of Fe oxides (especially amorphous Fe oxides). The remaining P was bound to larger-sized WDFC particles and Fe bearing phyllosilicate minerals. Intriguingly, the removal of Fe by dithionite resulted in a disaggregation of the nanoparticles, evident in higher portions of organically bound P in the <20 nm nanoparticle fraction, and a widening of size distribution pattern in larger-sized WDFC fraction. We conclude that the crystalline Fe oxides contributed to soil P sequestration by (i) acting as cementing agents contributing to soil fine colloid aggregation, and (ii) binding not only inorganic but also organic P in larger soil WDFC particles.

  8. Spatial patterns of soil organic carbon stocks in Estonian arable soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suuster, Elsa; Astover, Alar; Kõlli, Raimo; Roostalu, Hugo; Reintam, Endla; Penu, Priit

    2010-05-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) determines ecosystem functions, influencing soil fertility, soil physical, chemical and biological properties and crop productivity. Therefore the spatial pattern of SOC stocks and its appropriate management is important at various scales. Due to climate change and the contribution of carbon store in the soils, the national estimates of soil carbon stocks should be determined. Estonian soils have been well studied and mapped at a scale 1:10,000. Previous studies have estimated SOC stocks based on combinations of large groups of Estonian soils and the mean values of the soil profile database, but were not embedded into the geo-referenced databases. These studies have estimated SOC stocks of Estonian arable soils 122.3 Tg. Despite of available soil maps and databases, this information is still very poorly used for spatial soil modelling. The aim of current study is to assess and model spatial pattern of SOC stocks of arable soils on a pilot area Tartu County (area 3089 sq km). Estonian digital soil map and soil monitoring databases are providing a good opportunity to assess SOC stocks at various scales. The qualitative nature of the initial data from a soil map prohibits any straightforward use in modelling. Thus we have used several databases to construct models and linkages between soil properties that can be integrated into soil map. First step was to reorganize the soil map database (44,046 mapping units) so it can be used as an input to modelling. Arable areas were distinguished by a field layer of Agricultural Registers and Information Board, which provides precise information of current land use as it is the basis of paying CAP subsidies. The estimates of SOC content were found by using the arable land evaluation database of Tartu from the Estonian Land Board (comprising 950 sq km and 31,226 fields), where each soil type was assessed separately and average SOC content grouped by texture was derived. SOC content of epipedon varies in

  9. Enhancement of late successional plants on ex-arable land by soil inoculations.

    PubMed

    Carbajo, Vanesa; den Braber, Bowy; van der Putten, Wim H; De Deyn, Gerlinde B

    2011-01-01

    Restoration of species-rich grasslands on ex-arable land can help the conservation of biodiversity but faces three big challenges: absence of target plant propagules, high residual soil fertility and restoration of soil communities. Seed additions and top soil removal can solve some of these constraints, but restoring beneficial biotic soil conditions remains a challenge. Here we test the hypotheses that inoculation of soil from late secondary succession grasslands in arable receptor soil enhances performance of late successional plants, especially after top soil removal but pending on the added dose. To test this we grew mixtures of late successional plants in arable top (organic) soil or in underlying mineral soil mixed with donor soil in small or large proportions. Donor soils were collected from different grasslands that had been under restoration for 5 to 41 years, or from semi-natural grassland that has not been used intensively. Donor soil addition, especially when collected from older restoration sites, increased plant community biomass without altering its evenness. In contrast, addition of soil from semi-natural grassland promoted plant community evenness, and hence its diversity, but reduced community biomass. Effects of donor soil additions were stronger in mineral than in organic soil and larger with bigger proportions added. The variation in plant community composition was explained best by the abundances of nematodes, ergosterol concentration and soil pH. We show that in controlled conditions inoculation of soil from secondary succession grassland into ex-arable land can strongly promote target plant species, and that the role of soil biota in promoting target plant species is greatest when added after top soil removal. Together our results point out that transplantation of later secondary succession soil can promote grassland restoration on ex-arable land.

  10. Biochar decelerates soil organic nitrogen cycling but stimulates soil nitrification in a temperate arable field trial.

    PubMed

    Prommer, Judith; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Trojan, Daniela; Offre, Pierre; Urich, Tim; Schleper, Christa; Sassmann, Stefan; Kitzler, Barbara; Soja, Gerhard; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca Clare

    2014-01-01

    Biochar production and subsequent soil incorporation could provide carbon farming solutions to global climate change and escalating food demand. There is evidence that biochar amendment causes fundamental changes in soil nutrient cycles, often resulting in marked increases in crop production, particularly in acidic and in infertile soils with low soil organic matter contents, although comparable outcomes in temperate soils are variable. We offer insight into the mechanisms underlying these findings by focusing attention on the soil nitrogen (N) cycle, specifically on hitherto unmeasured processes of organic N cycling in arable soils. We here investigated the impacts of biochar addition on soil organic and inorganic N pools and on gross transformation rates of both pools in a biochar field trial on arable land (Chernozem) in Traismauer, Lower Austria. We found that biochar increased total soil organic carbon but decreased the extractable organic C pool and soil nitrate. While gross rates of organic N transformation processes were reduced by 50-80%, gross N mineralization of organic N was not affected. In contrast, biochar promoted soil ammonia-oxidizer populations (bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers) and accelerated gross nitrification rates more than two-fold. Our findings indicate a de-coupling of the soil organic and inorganic N cycles, with a build-up of organic N, and deceleration of inorganic N release from this pool. The results therefore suggest that addition of inorganic fertilizer-N in combination with biochar could compensate for the reduction in organic N mineralization, with plants and microbes drawing on fertilizer-N for growth, in turn fuelling the belowground build-up of organic N. We conclude that combined addition of biochar with fertilizer-N may increase soil organic N in turn enhancing soil carbon sequestration and thereby could play a fundamental role in future soil management strategies. PMID:24497947

  11. Biochar Decelerates Soil Organic Nitrogen Cycling but Stimulates Soil Nitrification in a Temperate Arable Field Trial

    PubMed Central

    Prommer, Judith; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Trojan, Daniela; Offre, Pierre; Urich, Tim; Schleper, Christa; Sassmann, Stefan; Kitzler, Barbara; Soja, Gerhard; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca Clare

    2014-01-01

    Biochar production and subsequent soil incorporation could provide carbon farming solutions to global climate change and escalating food demand. There is evidence that biochar amendment causes fundamental changes in soil nutrient cycles, often resulting in marked increases in crop production, particularly in acidic and in infertile soils with low soil organic matter contents, although comparable outcomes in temperate soils are variable. We offer insight into the mechanisms underlying these findings by focusing attention on the soil nitrogen (N) cycle, specifically on hitherto unmeasured processes of organic N cycling in arable soils. We here investigated the impacts of biochar addition on soil organic and inorganic N pools and on gross transformation rates of both pools in a biochar field trial on arable land (Chernozem) in Traismauer, Lower Austria. We found that biochar increased total soil organic carbon but decreased the extractable organic C pool and soil nitrate. While gross rates of organic N transformation processes were reduced by 50–80%, gross N mineralization of organic N was not affected. In contrast, biochar promoted soil ammonia-oxidizer populations (bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers) and accelerated gross nitrification rates more than two-fold. Our findings indicate a de-coupling of the soil organic and inorganic N cycles, with a build-up of organic N, and deceleration of inorganic N release from this pool. The results therefore suggest that addition of inorganic fertilizer-N in combination with biochar could compensate for the reduction in organic N mineralization, with plants and microbes drawing on fertilizer-N for growth, in turn fuelling the belowground build-up of organic N. We conclude that combined addition of biochar with fertilizer-N may increase soil organic N in turn enhancing soil carbon sequestration and thereby could play a fundamental role in future soil management strategies. PMID:24497947

  12. Dynamics of organic carbon stock of Estonian arable and grassland peat soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauer, Karin; Tammik, Kerttu; Penu, Priit

    2016-04-01

    Peat soils represent globally a major reserve of soil organic carbon (SOC). Estimation of changes in SOC stocks is important for understanding soil carbon sequestration and dynamics of greenhouse gas emissions. The aim of this study was to estimate the SOC stock of Estonian agricultural peat soils and SOC stock change depending on land use type (arable land and long-term grasslands (over 5 years)). The soils were classified as Histosols according to WRB classification. Generally the arable land was used for growing cereals, oilseed rape, legumes and used as ley in crop rotation. The main technique of soil cultivation was ploughing. During 2002-2015 the soil samples of 0-20 cm soil layer (one average soil sample per 1-5 ha) were collected. The SOC content was measured by NIRS method. The SOC stock was calculated by assuming that soil mean bulk density is 0.3 g cm-3. The SOC stock change in arable land was estimated during 3-13 years (N=91) and in grassland 4-13 year (N=163). The average SOC content of peat soils varied from 150.6 to 549.0 mg g-1. The initial SOC stock of arable land was 271.3 t ha-1 and of grassland 269.3 t ha-1. The SOC stock declined in arable peat soils faster (-2.57 t ha-1 y-1) compared to the changes in grassland peat soils (-0.67 t ha-1 y-1). According to the length of the study period the SOC stock change per year varied from -5.14 to 6.64 t ha-1 y-1 in grasslands and from -14.78 to 0.83 t ha-1 y-1 in arable land, although there was no clear relationship between the SOC stock change and the length of the study period. More detailed information about the properties of agricultural land and land use history is needed to analyse the causes of the SOC stock changes in agricultural peat soils. However, from the current research we can conclude that the SOC stock of arable and grassland peat soils is declining during the cultivation. These decreases are important to specify when considering the role of peat soils in atmospheric greenhouse gas

  13. Measuring and modeling C flux rates through the central metabolic pathways in microbial communities using position-specific 13C-labeled tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, P.; van Groenigen, K.; Hagerty, S.; Salpas, E.; Fairbanks, D. E.; Hungate, B. A.; KOCH, G. W.; Schwartz, E.

    2012-12-01

    The production of energy and metabolic precursors occurs in well-known processes such as glycolysis and Krebs cycle. We use position-specific 13C-labeled metabolic tracers, combined with models of microbial metabolic organization, to analyze the response of microbial community energy production, biosynthesis, and C use efficiency (CUE) in soils, decomposing litter, and aquatic communities. The method consists of adding position-specific 13C -labeled metabolic tracers to parallel soil incubations, in this case 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose. The measurement of CO2 released from the labeled tracers is used to calculate the C flux rates through the various metabolic pathways. A simplified metabolic model consisting of 23 reactions is solved using results of the metabolic tracer experiments and assumptions of microbial precursor demand. This new method enables direct estimation of fundamental aspects of microbial energy production, CUE, and soil organic matter formation in relatively undisturbed microbial communities. We will present results showing the range of metabolic patterns observed in these communities and discuss results from testing metabolic models.

  14. Synthesis and applications of selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Shen, L.X.; Lewis, H.; Cai, Z.; Tinoci, I. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    Spectral overlap is a substantial problem in NMR studies of RNA molecules >30 nucleotides. To overcome this difficulty, we synthesized selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs and adapted several isotope-edited two- and three-dimensional NMR experiments originally developed for protein studies. We optimized protocols for synthesis of multi-gram quantities of CTP, UTp, ATP, and GTP using a combination of synthetic organic and enzymatic methods. Uracil is prepared in 40 to 50% yield from {sup 13}C-cyanide in two steps. Using acetyl- tribenzoyl-ribose and standard chemistry uracil is then attached to the sugar (90% yield). The tribenzoyl-uridine intermediate is converted into uridine or cytidine quantitatively, depending on the deblocking protocol. Labeled purines are synthesized using simple pyrimidine precursors and reacting with {sup 13}C-formic acid (80% yield). Purine nucleosides are then synthesized using uridine phosphorylase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase. The nucleosides were converted to NMPs by treatment with POC1{sub 3} in triethylphosphate. We converted NMPs to NTPs by standard enzymatic methods. Selectively labeled RNAs were synthesized by run-off transcription using {sup 13}C-labeled NTPs. Several different strategies help solve over-lap problems in larger RNAs. Isotope-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments such as {omega}1-1/2 X-filtered NOESY simplify NMR spectra by dividing the normal NOESY spectrum into two subspectra-one involving NOEs from protons bound to {sup 12}C and one from protons bound to {sup 13}C. For example, we labeled A and U residues of a 34-nucleotide pseudoknot, and the {sup 12}C subspectrum of the 1/2 X-filtered NOESY contained NOEs only from G and C residues (along with adenine 2H); the {sup 13}C subspectrum contained NOEs only from A and U residues. Each subspectrum has less overlap than the NOESY of an unlabeled sample; the editing strategy allows each resonance to be identified by residue type (A, C, G, or U).

  15. Belowground carbon allocation in a temperate beech forest: new insight into carbon residence time using whole tree 13C labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Ngao, J.; Plain, C.; Longdoz, B.; Granier, A.

    2011-12-01

    Belowground carbon allocation is an important component of forest carbon budget, affecting tree growth (competition between aboveground and belowground carbon sinks), acquisition of belowground resources (nutrients and water) that are often limiting forest ecosystems and soil carbon sequestration. Total belowground carbon flow can be estimated using a mass-balance approach as cumulative soil CO2 efflux minus the carbon input from aboveground litter plus the changes in the C stored in roots, in the forest floor, and in the soil, and further compared to gross annual production. While this approach is useful for understanding the whole ecosystem carbon budget, uncertainties remain about the contribution of the different belowground pools of carbon to ecosystem respiration and carbon sequestration. New insights into transfer rate and residence time of carbon in belowground compartments can be gained from in situ whole-crown 13C labelling experiments. We combined both approaches in a young temperate beech forest in north-eastern France where ecosystem carbon fluxes are recorded since a decade. Carbon allocated belowground represented less than 40% of gross primary production in this young beech forest. Autotrophic respiration assessed by comparing soil CO2 efflux measured on normal and on root exclusion plots, accounted for 60% of the total belowground carbon flow. This indicated a rather short mean residence time of carbon allocated belowground in the soil compartments. The recovery of 13C in soil CO2 efflux after pulse-labelling entire crowns of tree with 13CO2 at several occasions during the growing season was observed a few couple of hours after the labelling. That indicates a rapid transfer of 13C belowground with a maximum occurring within 2 to 4 days after labelling. Label was recovered at the same time in the respiration and in the biomass of both fine roots and soil microbes. Allocation of recently assimilated carbon to soil microbial respiration was greater in

  16. Sparse (13)C labelling for solid-state NMR studies of P. pastoris expressed eukaryotic seven-transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Chang; Fan, Ying; Munro, Rachel A; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S; Wang, Shenlin

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel sparse (13)C labelling approach for methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris expression system, towards solid-state NMR studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins. The labelling scheme was achieved by co-utilizing natural abundance methanol and specifically (13)C labelled glycerol as carbon sources in the expression medium. This strategy improves the spectral resolution by 1.5 fold, displays site-specific labelling patterns, and has advantages for collecting long-range distance restraints for structure determination of large eukaryotic membrane proteins by solid-state NMR.

  17. Isolation and identification of Aspergillus section fumigati strains from arable soil in Korea.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Beom; Kim, Dae-Ho; Park, In-Cheol; Samson, Robert A; Shin, Hyeon-Dong

    2010-03-01

    63 strains of Aspergillus section Fumigati were isolated from 17 samples of arable soil in a central province of Korea. Based on the results of genotypic and phenotypic analyses, they were identified as Aspergillus fumigatus, A. lentulus, Neosartorya coreana, N. fennelliae, N. fischeri, N. glabra, N. hiratsukae, N. laciniosa, N. pseudofischeri, N. quadricincta, N. spinosa and N. udagawae. Among these, N. fennelliae, N. hiratsukae, N. quadricincta, and N. udagawae had not been previously recorded in Korea. The diversity of Aspergillus section Fumigati species from arable soil in Korea is also addressed.

  18. Uniformly 13C-labeled algal protein used to determine amino acid essentiality in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Berthold, H K; Hachey, D L; Reeds, P J; Thomas, O P; Hoeksema, S; Klein, P D

    1991-01-01

    The edible alga Spirulina platensis was uniformly labeled with 13C by growth in an atmosphere of pure 13CO2. The labeled biomass was then incorporated into the diet of a laying hen for 27 days. The isotopic enrichment of individual amino acids in egg white and yolk proteins, as well as in various tissues of the hen at the end of the feeding period, was analyzed by negative chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The amino acids of successive eggs showed one of two exclusive enrichment patterns: complete preservation of the intact carbon skeleton or extensive degradation and resynthesis. The same observation was made in tissue proteins. These patterns were cleanly divided according to known nutritional amino acid essentiality/nonessentiality but revealed differences in labeling among the nonessential amino acids: most notable was that proline accretion was derived entirely from the diet. Feeding uniformly 13C-labeled algal protein and recovering and analyzing de novo-synthesized protein provides a useful method to examine amino acid metabolism and determine conditional amino acid essentially in vivo. Images PMID:11607211

  19. Timing and magnitude of C partitioning through a young loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) stand using 13C labeling and shade treatments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Warren, Jeffrey M.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Garten, Jr., Charles T.; Norby, Richard J.; Childs, Joanne; Brice, Deanne Jane; Evans, R. M.; Gu, Lianhong; Thornton, Peter E.; Weston, David J.

    2011-12-30

    The dynamics of rapid changes in carbon (C) partitioning within forest ecosystems are not well understood, which limits improvement of mechanistic models of C cycling. Our objective was to inform model processes by describing relationships between C partitioning and accessible environmental or physiological measurements, with a special emphasis on short-term C flux through a forest ecosystem. We exposed eight 7-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) trees to air enriched with 13CO2 and then implemented adjacent light shade (LS) and heavy shade (HS) treatments in order to manipulate C uptake and flux. The impacts of shading on photosynthesis, plant water potential,more » sap flow, basal area growth, root growth, and soil CO2 efflux rate (CER) were assessed for each tree over a three-week period. The progression of the 13C label was concurrently tracked from the atmosphere through foliage, phloem, roots, and surface soil CO2 efflux. The HS treatment significantly reduced C uptake, sap flow, stem growth and fine root standing crop, and resulted in greater residual soil water content to 1 m depth. Sap flow was strongly correlated with CER on the previous day, but not the current day, with no apparent treatment effect on the relationship. Although there were apparent reductions in new C flux belowground, the heavy shade treatment did not noticeably reduce the magnitude of belowground autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration based on surface soil CO2 efflux rate (CER), which was overwhelmingly driven by soil temperature and moisture. The 13C label was immediately detected in foliage on label day (half-life = 0.5 d), progressed through phloem by day 2 (half-life = 4.7 d), roots by day 2-4, and subsequently was evident as respiratory release from soil which peaked between days 3-6. The δ13C of soil CO2 efflux was strongly correlated with phloem 13C on the previous day, or two days earlier. While the 13C label was readily tracked through the ecosystem, the fate of root

  20. Heavy metals relationship in arable and greenhouse soils of SE Spain using a geostatistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Carlos; Joaquin Ramos-Miras, Jose; Rodríguez Martín, Jose Antonio; Boluda, Rafael; Roca, Núria; Bech, Jaume

    2013-04-01

    This study compares heavy metals contents and the main edaphic parameters in greenhouse soils from the W Almería region one of the most productive agricultural systems in Europe, with agricultural soils (arable soils) in western Andalusia, SW Spain. Heavy metals input in agricultural soils mainly occur through pesticides and phytosanitary control products. The hazardousness of the studied elements (Cr, Ni, Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd) is particularly relevant in soils used for intensive greenhouse farming where such agricultural practices, which centre on maximising production, end up with products that finally enter the human food chain directly. Here we explore a total of 199 greenhouse soils and 142 arable soils, representing two scales of variation in this Mediterranean area. Despite their similar edaphic characteristics, the main differences between arable soils and greenhouse soils lie in nutrients contents (P and K) and in certain heavy metals (Cd, Pb and Zn), which reflect widespread use of pesticides in greenhouse farming. One of the most toxic metals is Cd given its mobility, whose concentrations triple in greenhouse soils, although it does not exceed the limits set by Spanish legislation. We conclude that despite anthropic heavy metals input, the association patterns of these elements were similar on the two spatial variability scales. Cd, Pb and Zn contents, and partly those of Cu, are related with agricultural practices. On the short spatial scale, grouping these heavy metals shows very high contents in greenhouse soils in the central northern area of the W Almería region. On the other hand, the associations of Cr and Ni suggest a lithogenic influence combined with a pedogenic effect on spatial maps. This natural origin input becomes more marked on the long spatial scale (arable soils) where the main Cr and Ni contents are found in the vicinity of the Gádor Mountain Range.

  1. Remediation of degraded arable steppe soils in Moldova using vetch as green manure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmeier, M.; Lungu, M.; Hübner, R.; Cerbari, V.

    2015-01-01

    In the Republic of Moldova, non-sustainable arable farming led to severe degradation and erosion of fertile steppe soils (Chernozems). As a result, the Chernozems lost about 40% of their initial amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC). Aim of this study was to remediate degraded arable soils and promote carbon sequestration by implementation of cover cropping and green manuring in Moldova. Thereby, the suitability of the legume hairy vetch (Vicia sativa) as cover crop under the dry, continental climate of Moldova was examined. At two experimental sites, the effect of cover cropping on chemical and physical soil properties as well as on yields of subsequent main crops was determined. The results showed a significant increase of SOC after incorporation of hairy vetch due to a high above- and belowground biomass production that was related with a high input of carbon and nitrogen. A calculation of SOC stocks based on equivalent soil masses revealed a sequestration of around 3 t C ha-1 yr-1 as a result of hairy vetch cover cropping. The buildup of SOC was associated with an improvement of the soil structure as indicated by a distinct decrease of bulk density and a relative increase of macroaggregates at the expense of microaggregates and clods. As a result, yields of subsequent main crops increased by around 20%. Our results indicated that hairy vetch is a promising cover crop to remediate degraded steppe soils, control soil erosion and sequestrate substantial amounts of atmospheric C in arable soils of Moldova.

  2. Follow the Carbon: Laboratory Studies of 13C-Labeled Early Earth Haze Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. K.; Day, D. A.; Mojzsis, S. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    While the Sun was still young and faint before the rise of molecular oxygen 2.4 Ga, early Earth might have been kept warm by an atmosphere containing the greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide in abundances greater than what is found on Earth today. It has been suggested that an atmosphere containing approximately 1000 ppmv methane and carbon dioxide could provided the needed greenhouse warming for liquid water to exist at the surface. Laboratory and modeling studies suggest that an atmosphere containing methane and carbon dioxide could lead to the formation of significant amounts of organic haze due to photochemical reactions initiated by Lyman-α (121.6 nm) excitation. Chemical mechanisms proposed to explain the chemistry rely on methane as the source of carbon in these hazes and treat carbon dioxide as a source of oxygen only. In the present work, we use isotopically labelled precursor gases to examine the source of carbon in photochemical haze formed in a CH4/CO2/N2 atmosphere. We generate haze analogs in the laboratory by far-UV irradiation of analog atmospheres containing permutations of 1,000 ppmv unlabeled and 13C-labeled methane and carbon. Products in the particle phase were analyzed by both unit mass resolution and high-resolution (m/Δm=5,000) aerosol mass spectrometry. Results indicate that carbon from carbon dioxide accounts for 20% (×5%) of the total carbon contained in the hazes. These results have implications for the geochemical interpretations of inclusions found in Archaean rocks on Earth, and for the astrobiological potential of other planetary atmospheres.

  3. Remediation of degraded arable steppe soils in Moldova using vetch as green manure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmeier, M.; Lungu, M.; Hübner, R.; Cerbari, V.

    2015-05-01

    In the Republic of Moldova, non-sustainable arable farming led to severe degradation and erosion of fertile steppe soils (Chernozems). As a result, the Chernozems lost about 40% of their initial amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC). The aim of this study was to remediate degraded arable soils and promote carbon sequestration by implementation of cover cropping and green manuring in Moldova. Thereby, the suitability of the legume hairy vetch (Vicia sativa) as cover crop under the dry continental climate of Moldova was examined. At two experimental sites, the effect of cover cropping on chemical and physical soil properties as well as on yields of subsequent main crops was determined. The results showed a significant increase of SOC after incorporation of hairy vetch mainly due to increases of aggregate-occluded and mineral-associated OC. This was related to a high above- and belowground biomass production of hairy vetch associated with a high input of carbon and nitrogen into arable soils. A calculation of SOC stocks based on equivalent soil masses revealed a sequestration of around 3 t C ha-1yr-1 as a result of hairy vetch cover cropping. The buildup of SOC was associated with an improvement of the soil structure as indicated by a distinct decrease of bulk density and a relative increase of macroaggregates at the expense of microaggregates and clods. As a result, yields of subsequent main crops increased by around 20%. Our results indicated that hairy vetch is a promising cover crop to remediate degraded steppe soils, control soil erosion and sequester substantial amounts of atmospheric C in arable soils of Moldova.

  4. Roots rather than shoot residues drive soil arthropod communities of arable fields.

    PubMed

    Scheunemann, Nicole; Digel, Christoph; Scheu, Stefan; Butenschoen, Olaf

    2015-12-01

    Soil food webs are driven by plant-derived carbon (C) entering the soil belowground as rhizodeposits or aboveground via leaf litter, with recent research pointing to a higher importance of the former for driving forest soil food webs. Using natural abundance stable isotopes of wheat (C3 plant) and maize (C4 plant), we followed and quantified the incorporation of shoot residue- and root-derived maize C into the soil animal food web of an arable field for 1 year, thereby disentangling the importance of shoot residue- versus root-derived resources for arable soil food webs. On average, shoot residue-derived resources only contributed less than 12% to soil arthropod body C, while incorporation of root-derived resources averaged 26% after 2 months of maize crop and increased to 32% after 1 year. However, incorporation of root-derived maize C did not consistently increase with time: rather, it increased, decreased or remained constant depending on species. Further, preference of shoot residue- or root-derived resources was also species-specific with about half the species incorporating mainly root-derived C, while only a few species preferentially incorporated shoot residue-derived C, and about 40% incorporated both shoot residue- as well as root-derived C. The results highlight the predominant importance of root-derived resources for arable soil food webs and suggest that shoot residues only form an additional resource of minor importance. Variation in the use of plant-derived C between soil arthropod species suggests that the flux of C through soil food webs of arable systems can only be disentangled by adopting a species-specific approach.

  5. Erodibility of arable soils in Georgia during the period of storm runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogichaishvili, G. P.

    2012-02-01

    The erodibility of arable soils in Georgia varies from 1.0 to 2.9 t/ha per unit of the rainfall erosivity index. The well-structured brown forest and yellow-brown soils with a high humus content are the most resistant to erosion. The soils in the dry areas of Georgia (gray-cinnamon and cinnamon soils) are the most susceptible to erosion. The first map of the soil erodibility was composed that illustrates the spatial distribution pattern of this parameter in the Georgia territory.

  6. Monitoring electron donor metabolism under variable electron acceptor conditions using 13C-labeled lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Three sets of flow-through columns constructed with aquifer sediment from Hanford (WA) were used to study reduction of Cr(VI) to poorly soluble Cr(III) under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing/fermentative, and iron-reducing conditions with lactate as the electron donor. In order to understand the relationship between electron donors and biomarkers, and to determine the differences in carbon isotope fractionation resulting from different microbial metabolic processes, we monitored the variation in carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in total organic carbon (TOC), and in lactate, acetate and propionate. The greatest enrichment in 13C in columns was observed under denitrifying conditions. The δ13C of DIC increased by ~1750 to ~2000‰ fifteen days after supplementation of natural abundance lactate with a 13C-labeled lactate tracer (for an influent δ13C of ~2250‰ for the lactate) indicating almost complete oxidation of the electron donor. The denitrifying columns were among the most active columns and had the highest cell counts and the denitrification rate was highly correlated with Cr(VI) reduction rate. δ13C values of DIC ranged from ~540 to ~1170‰ for iron-reducing conditions. The lower enrichment in iron columns was related to the lower biological activity observed with lower yields of RNA and cell numbers in the column effluents. The carbon isotope shift in the sulfate-reducing ~198 to ~1960‰ for sulfate-reducing conditions reflecting the lower levels of the lactate in these columns. Additionally, in two of the sulfate columns, almost complete fermentation of the lactate occurred, producing acetate and propionate with the labeled carbon signature, but relatively smaller amounts of inorganic carbon. For all electron-accepting conditions, TOC yielded similar δ13C values as lactate stock solutions. Differences in C use efficiency, metabolic rate or metabolic pathway contributed to the differing TOC δ13C to DIC δ13C ratios between treatments

  7. Assessment of arsenic (As) occurrence in arable soil and its related health risk in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuying; Zhong, Taiyang; Chen, Dongmei; Cheng, Min; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaomin; Li, Xinhui

    2016-06-01

    Arsenic (As) is a major global environmental pollutant due to its high toxicity on human and animal health. This study collected 427 relevant papers to study As concentrations in Chinese arable soil and evaluate the health risk of exposure to As for humans. Results showed that the average of As concentration was 9.46 mg/kg in Chinese arable soil. Soil As concentrations in Hunan Province and Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region posed high carcinogenic and non-cancer risks on human health through diet, Yunnan, Guizhou, Guangdong, and Xinjiang provinces had relative high health risks, while As concentrations in the other provinces posed low health risks on humans. The physical factors controlled the spatial pattern of health risk on a provincial scale, but the As-related human activities introduced high health risk on people, particularly the agricultural activities such as sewage irrigation and fertilizer application should be given more attention due to its large area. PMID:26209282

  8. Microbial response to increasing temperatures during winter in arable soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, Stefan; Potthoff, Martin; Joergensen, Rainer Georg

    2014-05-01

    Climate scenarios predict increasing temperatures and higher precipitation rates in late fall to early spring, both holding the potential to modify carbon and nutrient dynamics in soils by altering snow pack thickness and soil frost events. When soils are frozen, a small amount of unfrozen water allows microorganisms to remain active at temperatures down to -10 °C. We carried out a field experiment on the microbial use of maize straw. We compared soils of two different clay contents and used latitude as a proxy for climate. Microcosms with sieved soil were mixed with chopped maize leaf straw (C/N 17) at a rate of 1 mg C g-1 dry soil, un-amended microcosms served as control. Results indicated that C-mineralization rates were independent from clay content. However, the microbial use of maize derived nitrogen was only increased in the soil with 13% clay compared to 33% clay in the other soil. Microbial responses to climate changes can be expected to be very specific due to characteristics of the soil and/or the location.

  9. Economical synthesis of 13C-labeled opiates, cocaine derivatives and selected urinary metabolites by derivatization of the natural products.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, Huiling; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2015-01-01

    The illegal use of opiates and cocaine is a challenge world-wide, but some derivatives are also valuable pharmaceuticals. Reference samples of the active ingredients and their metabolites are needed both for controlling administration in the clinic and to detect drugs of abuse. Especially, (13)C-labeled compounds are useful for identification and quantification purposes by mass spectroscopic techniques, potentially increasing accuracy by minimizing ion alteration/suppression effects. Thus, the synthesis of [acetyl-(13)C4]heroin, [acetyl-(13)C4-methyl-(13)C]heroin, [acetyl-(13)C2-methyl-(13)C]6-acetylmorphine, [N-methyl-(13)C-O-metyl-(13)C]codeine and phenyl-(13)C6-labeled derivatives of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine and cocaethylene was undertaken to provide such reference materials. The synthetic work has focused on identifying (13)C atom-efficient routes towards these derivatives. Therefore, the (13)C-labeled opiates and cocaine derivatives were made from the corresponding natural products.

  10. Use of 13C-Labeled Substrates to Determine Relative Methane Production Rates in Hypersaline Microbial Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, C. A.; Bebout, B.; Chanton, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rates and pathways of methane production were determined from photosynthetic soft microbial mats and gypsum-encrusted endoevaporites collected in hypersaline environments from California, Mexico and Chile, as well as an organic-rich mud from a pond in the El Tatio volcanic fields, Chile. Samples (mud, homogenized soft mats and endoevaporites) were incubated anaerobically with deoxygenated site water, and the increase in methane concentration through time in the headspaces of the incubation vials was used to determine methane production rates. To ascertain the substrates used by the methanogens, 13C-labeled methylamines, methanol, dimethylsulfide, acetate or bicarbonate were added to the incubations (one substrate per vial) and the stable isotopic composition of the resulting methane was measured. The vials amended with 13C-labeled methylamines produced the most 13C-enriched methane, generally followed by the 13C-labeled methanol-amended vials. The stable isotope data and the methane production rates were used to determine first order rate constants for each of the substrates at each of the sites. Estimates of individual substrate use revealed that the methylamines produced 55 to 92% of the methane generated, while methanol was responsible for another 8 to 40%.

  11. The fate of (13)C-labelled and non-labelled inulin predisposed to large bowel fermentation in rats.

    PubMed

    Butts, Christine A; Paturi, Gunaranjan; Tavendale, Michael H; Hedderley, Duncan; Stoklosinski, Halina M; Herath, Thanuja D; Rosendale, Douglas; Roy, Nicole C; Monro, John A; Ansell, Juliet

    2016-04-01

    The fate of stable-isotope (13)C labelled and non-labelled inulin catabolism by the gut microbiota was assessed in a healthy rat model. Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly assigned to diets containing either cellulose or inulin, and were fed these diets for 3 days. On day (d) 4, rats allocated to the inulin diet received (13)C-labelled inulin. The rats were then fed the respective non-labelled diets (cellulose or inulin) until sampling (d4, d5, d6, d7, d10 and d11). Post feeding of (13)C-labelled substrate, breath analysis showed that (13)C-inulin cleared from the host within a period of 36 hours. Faecal (13)C demonstrated the clearance of inulin from gut with a (13)C excess reaching maximum at 24 hours (d5) and then declining gradually. There were greater variations in caecal organic acid concentrations from d4 to d6, with higher concentrations of acetic, butyric and propionic acids observed in the rats fed inulin compared to those fed cellulose. Inulin influenced caecal microbial glycosidase activity, increased colon crypt depth, and decreased the faecal output and polysaccharide content compared to the cellulose diet. In summary, the presence of inulin in the diet positively influenced large bowel microbial fermentation.

  12. Geochemical background values for trace elements in arable soils developed from sedimentary rocks of glacial origin.

    PubMed

    Czarnowska, K; Gworek, B

    1990-12-01

    The total content of trace elements was examined in some arable soils developed from boulder loam and silt formations of the Middle Poland and Baltic glaciations (62 profiles). Mean element concentrations calculated on the basis of chemical and statistical analyses were as follows: Mn = 322; Zn = 36; Cr = 30; Ni = 12.7; Pb = 10.3; Cu = 8.8; Co = 4.7; and Cd = 0.27 in mg kg(-1) of soil dry weight. The authors propose to accept these figures as the geochemical background values for soils derived from sedimentary rocks of glacial origin.

  13. In situ spatial patterns of soil bacterial populations, mapped at multiple scales, in an arable soil.

    PubMed

    Nunan, N; Wu, K; Young, I M; Crawford, J W; Ritz, K

    2002-11-01

    Very little is known about the spatial organization of soil microbes across scales that are relevant both to microbial function and to field-based processes. The spatial distributions of microbes and microbially mediated activity have a high intrinsic variability. This can present problems when trying to quantify the effects of disturbance, management practices, or climate change on soil microbial systems and attendant function. A spatial sampling regime was implemented in an arable field. Cores of undisturbed soil were sampled from a 3 x 3 x 0.9 m volume of soil (topsoil and subsoil) and a biological thin section, in which the in situ distribution of bacteria could be quantified, prepared from each core. Geostatistical analysis was used to quantify the nature of spatial structure from micrometers to meters and spatial point pattern analysis to test for deviations from complete spatial randomness of mapped bacteria. Spatial structure in the topsoil was only found at the microscale (micrometers), whereas evidence for nested scales of spatial structure was found in the subsoil (at the microscale, and at the centimeter to meter scale). Geostatistical ranges of spatial structure at the micro scale were greater in the topsoil and tended to decrease with depth in the subsoil. Evidence for spatial aggregation in bacteria was stronger in the topsoil and also decreased with depth in the subsoil, though extremely high degrees of aggregation were found at very short distances in the deep subsoil. The data suggest that factors that regulate the distribution of bacteria in the subsoil operate at two scales, in contrast to one scale in the topsoil, and that bacterial patches are larger and more prevalent in the topsoil.

  14. Survival of free-living Acholeplasma in aerated pig manure slurry revealed by 13C-labeled bacterial biomass probing

    PubMed Central

    Hanajima, Dai; Aoyagi, Tomo; Hori, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on microbial community succession and/or predominant taxa during the composting process; however, the ecophysiological roles of microorganisms are not well understood because microbial community structures are highly diverse and dynamic. Bacteria are the most important contributors to the organic-waste decomposition process, while decayed bacterial cells can serve as readily digested substrates for other microbial populations. In this study, we investigated the active bacterial species responsible for the assimilation of dead bacterial cells and their components in aerated pig manure slurry by using 13C-labeled bacterial biomass probing. After 3 days of forced aeration, 13C-labeled and unlabeled dead Escherichia coli cell suspensions were added to the slurry. The suspensions contained 13C-labeled and unlabeled bacterial cell components, possibly including the cell wall and membrane, as well as intracellular materials. RNA extracted from each slurry sample 2 h after addition of E. coli suspension was density-resolved by isopycnic centrifugation and analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, followed by cloning and sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. In the heavy isotopically labeled RNA fraction, the predominant 13C-assimilating population was identified as belonging to the genus Acholeplasma, which was not detected in control heavy RNA. Acholeplasma spp. have limited biosynthetic capabilities and possess a wide variety of transporters, resulting in their metabolic dependence on external carbon and energy sources. The prevalence of Acholeplasma spp. was further confirmed in aerated pig manure slurry from four different pig farms by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes; their relative abundance was ∼4.4%. Free-living Acholeplasma spp. had a competitive advantage for utilizing dead bacterial cells and their components more rapidly relative to other microbial populations, thus allowing the survival and prevalence

  15. Biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone. 1. Identification of biosynthetic precursors using /sup 13/C labeling and NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.R.; Hanners, J.L.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1988-09-28

    The biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in the methylotropic bacterium methylobacterium AM1 has been investigated using /sup 13/C-labelling of the products and NMR spectroscopy. The data indicated that the quinoline portion of PQQ is formed by a novel condensation of N-1, C-2, -3, and -4 of glutamate with a symmetrical six-carbon ring derived from the shikimate pathway. It is postulated that tyrosine is the shikimate-derived percursor, since pyrrole could be formed by the internal cyclization of the amino acid backbone. 18 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Fast pyrolysis of 13C-labeled cellobioses: gaining insights into the mechanisms of fast pyrolysis of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Degenstein, John C; Murria, Priya; Easton, Mckay; Sheng, Huaming; Hurt, Matt; Dow, Alex R; Gao, Jinshan; Nash, John J; Agrawal, Rakesh; Delgass, W Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2015-02-01

    A fast-pyrolysis probe/tandem mass spectrometer combination was utilized to determine the initial fast-pyrolysis products for four different selectively (13)C-labeled cellobiose molecules. Several products are shown to result entirely from fragmentation of the reducing end of cellobiose, leaving the nonreducing end intact in these products. These findings are in disagreement with mechanisms proposed previously. Quantum chemical calculations were used to identify feasible low-energy pathways for several products. These results provide insights into the mechanisms of fast pyrolysis of cellulose.

  17. Ascomycota Members Dominate Fungal Communities during Straw Residue Decomposition in Arable Soil

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Anzhou; Zhuang, Xuliang; Wu, Junmei; Cui, Mengmeng; Lv, Di; Liu, Chunzhao; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the development of fungal community composition in arable soil during the degradation of straw residue. We explored the short-term responses of the fungal community over 28 days of decomposition in soil using culture-independent polymerase chain reaction in combination with a clone library and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Fungal cellobiohydrolase I (cbhI) genes in the soil were also characterized, and their diversity suggested the existence of a different cellulose decomposer. The DGGE profiles based on fungal internal transcribed spacer analysis showed different successions of fungal populations during residue decomposition. Members of Lecythophora and Sordariales were dominant in the early succession, while Hypocrea and Engyodontium were better adapted in the late succession. The succession of fungal communities might be related to changes of residue quality during decomposition. Collectively, sequences assigned to Ascomycota members were dominant at different stages of the fungal succession during decomposition, revealing that they were key drivers responsible for residue degradation in the arable soil tested. PMID:23840414

  18. Economical synthesis of 13C-labeled opiates, cocaine derivatives and selected urinary metabolites by derivatization of the natural products.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, Huiling; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2015-01-01

    The illegal use of opiates and cocaine is a challenge world-wide, but some derivatives are also valuable pharmaceuticals. Reference samples of the active ingredients and their metabolites are needed both for controlling administration in the clinic and to detect drugs of abuse. Especially, (13)C-labeled compounds are useful for identification and quantification purposes by mass spectroscopic techniques, potentially increasing accuracy by minimizing ion alteration/suppression effects. Thus, the synthesis of [acetyl-(13)C4]heroin, [acetyl-(13)C4-methyl-(13)C]heroin, [acetyl-(13)C2-methyl-(13)C]6-acetylmorphine, [N-methyl-(13)C-O-metyl-(13)C]codeine and phenyl-(13)C6-labeled derivatives of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine and cocaethylene was undertaken to provide such reference materials. The synthetic work has focused on identifying (13)C atom-efficient routes towards these derivatives. Therefore, the (13)C-labeled opiates and cocaine derivatives were made from the corresponding natural products. PMID:25816077

  19. Reliable Identification of Cross-Linked Products in Protein Interaction Studies by 13C-Labeled p-Benzoylphenylalanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettelkau, Jens; Ihling, Christian H.; Frohberg, Petra; van Werven, Lars; Jahn, Olaf; Sinz, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    We describe the use of the 13C-labeled artificial amino acid p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (Bpa) to improve the reliability of cross-linked product identification. Our strategy is exemplified for two protein-peptide complexes. These studies indicate that in many cases the identification of a cross-link without additional stable isotope labeling would result in an ambiguous assignment of cross-linked products. The use of a 13C-labeled photoreactive amino acid is considered to be preferred over the use of deuterated cross-linkers as retention time shifts in reversed phase chromatography can be ruled out. The observation of characteristic fragment ions additionally increases the reliability of cross-linked product assignment. Bpa possesses a broad reactivity towards different amino acids and the derived distance information allows mapping of spatially close amino acids and thus provides more solid structural information of proteins and protein complexes compared to the longer deuterated amine-reactive cross-linkers, which are commonly used for protein 3D-structure analysis and protein-protein interaction studies.

  20. Ecotoxicological Impact of the Bioherbicide Leptospermone on the Microbial Community of Two Arable Soils.

    PubMed

    Romdhane, Sana; Devers-Lamrani, Marion; Barthelmebs, Lise; Calvayrac, Christophe; Bertrand, Cédric; Cooper, Jean-François; Dayan, Franck E; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    The ecotoxicological impact of leptospermone, a β-triketone bioherbicide, on the bacterial community of two arable soils was investigated. Soil microcosms were exposed to 0 × (control), 1 × or 10 × recommended dose of leptospermone. The β-triketone was moderately adsorbed to both soils (i.e.,: K fa ~ 1.2 and K oc ~ 140 mL g(-1)). Its dissipation was lower in sterilized than in unsterilized soils suggesting that it was mainly influenced by biotic factors. Within 45 days, leptospermone disappeared almost entirely from one of the two soils (i.e., DT50 < 10 days), while 25% remained in the other. The composition of the microbial community assessed by qPCR targeting 11 microbial groups was found to be significantly modified in soil microcosms exposed to leptospermone. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons showed a shift in the bacterial community structure and a significant impact of leptospermone on the diversity of the soil bacterial community. Changes in the composition, and in the α- and β-diversity of microbial community were transient in the soil able to fully dissipate the leptospermone, but were persistent in the soil where β-triketone remained. To conclude the bacterial community of the two soils was sensitive to leptospermone and its resilience was observed only when leptospermone was fully dissipated.

  1. Ecotoxicological Impact of the Bioherbicide Leptospermone on the Microbial Community of Two Arable Soils

    PubMed Central

    Romdhane, Sana; Devers-Lamrani, Marion; Barthelmebs, Lise; Calvayrac, Christophe; Bertrand, Cédric; Cooper, Jean-François; Dayan, Franck E.; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    The ecotoxicological impact of leptospermone, a β-triketone bioherbicide, on the bacterial community of two arable soils was investigated. Soil microcosms were exposed to 0 × (control), 1 × or 10 × recommended dose of leptospermone. The β-triketone was moderately adsorbed to both soils (i.e.,: Kfa ~ 1.2 and Koc ~ 140 mL g−1). Its dissipation was lower in sterilized than in unsterilized soils suggesting that it was mainly influenced by biotic factors. Within 45 days, leptospermone disappeared almost entirely from one of the two soils (i.e., DT50 < 10 days), while 25% remained in the other. The composition of the microbial community assessed by qPCR targeting 11 microbial groups was found to be significantly modified in soil microcosms exposed to leptospermone. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons showed a shift in the bacterial community structure and a significant impact of leptospermone on the diversity of the soil bacterial community. Changes in the composition, and in the α- and β-diversity of microbial community were transient in the soil able to fully dissipate the leptospermone, but were persistent in the soil where β-triketone remained. To conclude the bacterial community of the two soils was sensitive to leptospermone and its resilience was observed only when leptospermone was fully dissipated. PMID:27252691

  2. Ecotoxicological Impact of the Bioherbicide Leptospermone on the Microbial Community of Two Arable Soils.

    PubMed

    Romdhane, Sana; Devers-Lamrani, Marion; Barthelmebs, Lise; Calvayrac, Christophe; Bertrand, Cédric; Cooper, Jean-François; Dayan, Franck E; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    The ecotoxicological impact of leptospermone, a β-triketone bioherbicide, on the bacterial community of two arable soils was investigated. Soil microcosms were exposed to 0 × (control), 1 × or 10 × recommended dose of leptospermone. The β-triketone was moderately adsorbed to both soils (i.e.,: K fa ~ 1.2 and K oc ~ 140 mL g(-1)). Its dissipation was lower in sterilized than in unsterilized soils suggesting that it was mainly influenced by biotic factors. Within 45 days, leptospermone disappeared almost entirely from one of the two soils (i.e., DT50 < 10 days), while 25% remained in the other. The composition of the microbial community assessed by qPCR targeting 11 microbial groups was found to be significantly modified in soil microcosms exposed to leptospermone. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons showed a shift in the bacterial community structure and a significant impact of leptospermone on the diversity of the soil bacterial community. Changes in the composition, and in the α- and β-diversity of microbial community were transient in the soil able to fully dissipate the leptospermone, but were persistent in the soil where β-triketone remained. To conclude the bacterial community of the two soils was sensitive to leptospermone and its resilience was observed only when leptospermone was fully dissipated. PMID:27252691

  3. The occurrence of heavy metals in irrigated and non-irrigated arable soils, NW Albania.

    PubMed

    Kasa, Elian; Felix-Henningsen, Peter; Duering, Rolf-Alexander; Gjoka, Fran

    2014-06-01

    The study analysed the content of heavy metals in surface soil and sediment samples from the Bregu i Matit Plain in NW Albania in relation to irrigation in order to evaluate the soil pollution and the potential risk to human health. Evaluation of soil pollution was performed using the enrichment factor and geo-accumulation index. Contents of cadmium, chromium and nickel of irrigated soils were significantly higher than those of non-irrigated soil, while contents of lead (in three of the irrigated locations), zinc and arsenic (in one of the irrigated locations) were significantly lower. Correlation analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the primary source of the first three metals was irrigation, and the last three metals were originated from other anthropic sources, like the use of chemicals, etc. Enrichment factor (E f) calculation showed that irrigated soils were most enriched in cadmium, chromium, copper and nickel. Index of geo-accumulation (I geo) revealed that arable soils of Bregu i Matit are unpolluted to moderately polluted with cadmium, chromium, copper and zinc and moderately to strongly polluted with nickel and arsenic. The presence of heavy metals in the studied soils indicates a potential risk of transfer of these elements in the food chain. Therefore, further studies on the speciation of heavy metals in the studied soils in order to evaluate their mobility are needed. PMID:24519635

  4. The occurrence of heavy metals in irrigated and non-irrigated arable soils, NW Albania.

    PubMed

    Kasa, Elian; Felix-Henningsen, Peter; Duering, Rolf-Alexander; Gjoka, Fran

    2014-06-01

    The study analysed the content of heavy metals in surface soil and sediment samples from the Bregu i Matit Plain in NW Albania in relation to irrigation in order to evaluate the soil pollution and the potential risk to human health. Evaluation of soil pollution was performed using the enrichment factor and geo-accumulation index. Contents of cadmium, chromium and nickel of irrigated soils were significantly higher than those of non-irrigated soil, while contents of lead (in three of the irrigated locations), zinc and arsenic (in one of the irrigated locations) were significantly lower. Correlation analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the primary source of the first three metals was irrigation, and the last three metals were originated from other anthropic sources, like the use of chemicals, etc. Enrichment factor (E f) calculation showed that irrigated soils were most enriched in cadmium, chromium, copper and nickel. Index of geo-accumulation (I geo) revealed that arable soils of Bregu i Matit are unpolluted to moderately polluted with cadmium, chromium, copper and zinc and moderately to strongly polluted with nickel and arsenic. The presence of heavy metals in the studied soils indicates a potential risk of transfer of these elements in the food chain. Therefore, further studies on the speciation of heavy metals in the studied soils in order to evaluate their mobility are needed.

  5. VARIABLE RATE APPLICATION OF SOIL HERBICIDES IN ARABLE CROPS: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE.

    PubMed

    Heijting, S; Kempenaar, C

    2014-01-01

    Soil herbicides are applied around crop emergence and kill germinating weeds in the surface layer of the soil. These herbicides play an important role in the chemical management of weeds in major arable crops. From an environmental point of view there is a clear need for smarter application of these chemicals. This paper presents research done in The Netherlands on Variable Rate Application (VRA) of soil herbicides by taking into account spatial variation of the soil. Herbicides adsorbed to soil parameters such as clay or organic matter are not available for herbicidal activity. Decision Support Rules (DSR) describe the relation between the soil parameter and herbicide dosage needed for effectively controlling weeds. Research methods such as greenhouse trials, models and on farm research to develop DSR are discussed and results are presented. Another important ingredient for VRA of soil herbicides is an accurate soil map of the field. Sampling and subsequent interpolation is costly. Soil scans measuring a proxy that is subsequently translated into soil properties such as clay fraction and soil organic matter content offer a quicker way to achieve such maps but validation is needed. DSR is applied to the soil map to get the variable dosage map. The farmer combines this map with the routing, spray volume and spray boom width in the Farm Management Information System (FMIS), resulting in a task file. This task file can subsequently be read by the board computer resulting in a VRA spray map. Reduction in soil herbicide depends on the DSR, the spatial variation and pattern of the soil, the spatial configuration of the routing and the technical advances of the spray equipment. Recently, within the framework the Programma Precisie Landbouw, first steps were made to test and implement this in practice. Currently, theory and practice of VRA of soil herbicides is developed within the research program IJKakker in close cooperation with pioneering farmers in The Netherlands

  6. VARIABLE RATE APPLICATION OF SOIL HERBICIDES IN ARABLE CROPS: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE.

    PubMed

    Heijting, S; Kempenaar, C

    2014-01-01

    Soil herbicides are applied around crop emergence and kill germinating weeds in the surface layer of the soil. These herbicides play an important role in the chemical management of weeds in major arable crops. From an environmental point of view there is a clear need for smarter application of these chemicals. This paper presents research done in The Netherlands on Variable Rate Application (VRA) of soil herbicides by taking into account spatial variation of the soil. Herbicides adsorbed to soil parameters such as clay or organic matter are not available for herbicidal activity. Decision Support Rules (DSR) describe the relation between the soil parameter and herbicide dosage needed for effectively controlling weeds. Research methods such as greenhouse trials, models and on farm research to develop DSR are discussed and results are presented. Another important ingredient for VRA of soil herbicides is an accurate soil map of the field. Sampling and subsequent interpolation is costly. Soil scans measuring a proxy that is subsequently translated into soil properties such as clay fraction and soil organic matter content offer a quicker way to achieve such maps but validation is needed. DSR is applied to the soil map to get the variable dosage map. The farmer combines this map with the routing, spray volume and spray boom width in the Farm Management Information System (FMIS), resulting in a task file. This task file can subsequently be read by the board computer resulting in a VRA spray map. Reduction in soil herbicide depends on the DSR, the spatial variation and pattern of the soil, the spatial configuration of the routing and the technical advances of the spray equipment. Recently, within the framework the Programma Precisie Landbouw, first steps were made to test and implement this in practice. Currently, theory and practice of VRA of soil herbicides is developed within the research program IJKakker in close cooperation with pioneering farmers in The Netherlands.

  7. Phosphorus in surface runoff from calcareous arable soils of the semiarid Western United States.

    PubMed

    Turner, Benjamin L; Kay, Mary A; Westermann, Dale T

    2004-01-01

    Management strategies that minimize P transfer from agricultural land to water bodies are based on relationships between P concentrations in soil and runoff. This study evaluated such relationships for surface runoff generated by simulated sprinkler irrigation onto calcareous arable soils of the semiarid western United States. Irrigation was applied at 70 mm h(-1) to plots on four soils containing a wide range of extractable P concentrations. Two irrigation events were conducted on each plot, first onto dry soil and then after 24 h onto wet soil. Particulate P (>0.45 microm) was the dominant fraction in surface runoff from all soils and was strongly correlated with suspended sediment concentration. For individual soil types, filterable reactive P (<0.45 microm) concentrations were strongly correlated with all soil-test P methods, including environmental tests involving extraction with water (1:10 and 1:200 soil to solution ratio), 0.01 M CaCl(2), and iron strips. However, only the Olsen-P agronomic soil-test procedure gave models that were not significantly different among soils. Soil chemical differences, including lower CaCO(3) and water-extractable Ca, higher water-extractable Fe, and higher pH, appeared to account for differences in filterable reactive P concentrations in runoff from soils with similar extractable P concentrations. It may therefore be possible to use a single agronomic test to predict filterable reactive P concentrations in surface runoff from calcareous soils, but inherent dangers exist in assuming a consistent response, even for one soil within a single field. PMID:15356242

  8. Pollution of Flooded Arable Soils with Heavy Metals and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs).

    PubMed

    Ciesielczuk, Tomasz; Kusza, Grzegorz; Poluszyńska, Joanna; Kochanowska, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Soils that are exposed to floodwaters because of shallow groundwater and periodical wetlands are, to a large extent, exposed to contamination by organic and inorganic compounds. These are mainly compounds that have drifted along with the inflow of heavily laden floodwater and are produced within the soil profile by the anaerobic transformation of organic matter. Heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds are absorbed by the soil of the floodwaters, and moving in the soil profile, they pose a threat to groundwater. What is more, after a flood, they may be absorbed by the crops. This paper focuses on the effects of Odra River (Poland) floods, heavy metals, and PAHs on soil and the possibilities of the migration of these pollutants into the soil profile. In the tested sludge samples of floodwater and soil, there were no abnormal concentrations of heavy metals, but the flooding time positively affected the amount listed in the test samples. Concentrations of PAHs increased, but they also exceeded the standards for arable soils in the case of single compounds.

  9. Pollution of Flooded Arable Soils with Heavy Metals and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs).

    PubMed

    Ciesielczuk, Tomasz; Kusza, Grzegorz; Poluszyńska, Joanna; Kochanowska, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Soils that are exposed to floodwaters because of shallow groundwater and periodical wetlands are, to a large extent, exposed to contamination by organic and inorganic compounds. These are mainly compounds that have drifted along with the inflow of heavily laden floodwater and are produced within the soil profile by the anaerobic transformation of organic matter. Heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds are absorbed by the soil of the floodwaters, and moving in the soil profile, they pose a threat to groundwater. What is more, after a flood, they may be absorbed by the crops. This paper focuses on the effects of Odra River (Poland) floods, heavy metals, and PAHs on soil and the possibilities of the migration of these pollutants into the soil profile. In the tested sludge samples of floodwater and soil, there were no abnormal concentrations of heavy metals, but the flooding time positively affected the amount listed in the test samples. Concentrations of PAHs increased, but they also exceeded the standards for arable soils in the case of single compounds. PMID:25253915

  10. The biosynthetic pathway of curcuminoid in turmeric (Curcuma longa) as revealed by 13C-labeled precursors.

    PubMed

    Kita, Tomoko; Imai, Shinsuke; Sawada, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Seto, Haruo

    2008-07-01

    In order to investigate the biosynthesis of curcuminoid in rhizomes of turmeric (Curcuma longa), we established an in vitro culture system of turmeric plants for feeding (13)C-labeled precursors. Analyses of labeled desmethoxycurcumin (DMC), an unsymmetrical curcuminoid, by (13)C-NMR, revealed that one molecule of acetic acid or malonic acid and two molecules of phenylalanine or phenylpropanoids, but not tyrosine, were incorporated into DMC. The incorporation efficiencies of the same precursors into DMC and curcumin were similar, and were in the order malonic acid > acetic acid, and cinnamic acid > p-coumaric acid > ferulic acid. These results suggest the possibility that the pathway to curcuminoids utilized two cinnamoyl CoAs and one malonyl CoA, and that hydroxy- and methoxy-functional groups on the aromatic rings were introduced after the formation of the curcuminoid skeleton.

  11. Enzymatic 13C Labeling and Multidimensional NMR Analysis of Miltiradiene Synthesized by Bifunctional Diterpene Cyclase in Selaginella moellendorffii*

    PubMed Central

    Sugai, Yoshinori; Ueno, Yohei; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Oogami, Shingo; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Natsume, Masahiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Diterpenes show diverse chemical structures and various physiological roles. The diversity of diterpene is primarily established by diterpene cyclases that catalyze a cyclization reaction to form the carbon skeleton of cyclic diterpene. Diterpene cyclases are divided into two types, monofunctional and bifunctional cyclases. Bifunctional diterpene cyclases (BDTCs) are involved in hormone and defense compound biosyntheses in bryophytes and gymnosperms, respectively. The BDTCs catalyze the successive two-step type-B (protonation-initiated cyclization) and type-A (ionization-initiated cyclization) reactions of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). We found that the genome of a lycophyte, Selaginella moellendorffii, contains six BDTC genes with the majority being uncharacterized. The cDNA from S. moellendorffii encoding a BDTC-like enzyme, miltiradiene synthase (SmMDS), was cloned. The recombinant SmMDS converted GGDP to a diterpene hydrocarbon product with a molecular mass of 272 Da. Mutation in the type-B active motif of SmMDS abolished the cyclase activity, whereas (+)-copalyl diphosphate, the reaction intermediate from the conversion of GGDP to the hydrocarbon product, rescued the cyclase activity of the mutant to form a diterpene hydrocarbon. Another mutant lacking type-A activity accumulated copalyl diphosphate as the reaction intermediate. When the diterpene hydrocarbon was enzymatically synthesized from [U-13C6]mevalonate, all carbons were labeled with 13C stable isotope (>99%). The fully 13C-labeled product was subjected to 13C-13C COSY NMR spectroscopic analyses. The direct carbon-carbon connectivities observed in the multidimensional NMR spectra demonstrated that the hydrocarbon product by SmMDS is miltiradiene, a putative biosynthetic precursor of tanshinone identified from the Chinese medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza. Hence, SmMDS functions as a bifunctional miltiradiene synthase in S. moellendorffii. In this study, we demonstrate that one-dimensional and

  12. 13C-labeled oligosaccharides in breastfed infants' urine: individual-, structure- and time-dependent differences in the excretion.

    PubMed

    Dotz, Viktoria; Rudloff, Silvia; Blank, Dennis; Lochnit, Günter; Geyer, Rudolf; Kunz, Clemens

    2014-02-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) have been paid much attention due to their beneficial effects observed in vitro, e.g., prebiotic, anti-infective and anti-inflammatory properties. However, in vivo investigations with regard to HMO metabolism and functions are rare. The few data available indicate that HMOs are absorbed to a low extent and excreted via urine without noteworthy modifications, whereas the major proportion reaches infant's colon undigested. Via intrinsic (13)C-labeling of HMOs during their biosynthesis in the mammary gland of 10 lactating women, we were able to follow the fate of (13)C-labeled oligosaccharides (OSs) from their secretion in milk to the excretion in the urine of their breastfed infants. To a certain extent, we could therefore discriminate between original HMOs and non-labeled OSs derived from degradation of HMOs or endogenous glycoconjugates. By means of our novel, rapid, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based approach, we found a homogeneous time pattern of isotopomer enrichment in milk among all subjects and between single OS species. In contrast, the time curves from infants' urine varied strongly between individuals and OS species, though the overall MALDI-TOF MS profile resembled those of the mothers' milk. Our data suggest that neutral HMOs might be processed and/or utilized differentially after or upon absorption from the gut, as deduced from their structure-dependent variation in the extent of tracer enrichment and in the retention times in infant's organism. This sheds new light on the role of HMOs within infant's body, beyond the intestine and its microbiota alone.

  13. 13C labelling reveals different contributions of photoassimilates from infructescences for fruiting in two temperate forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Hoch, G; Keel, S G

    2006-09-01

    The pathways of currently fixed carbon in fruit bearing branchlets were investigated in two temperate forest tree species (CARPINUS BETULUS and FAGUS SYLVATICA), which differ in texture of their vegetative infructescence tissues (leaf-like in CARPINUS vs. woody in FAGUS). During late spring, (13)C pulse-labelling was conducted on girdled, defoliated, girdled plus defoliated and untreated fruiting branchlets of mature trees IN SITU, to assess changes in C relations in response to the introduced C source-sink imbalances. At harvest in early August, 75 - 100 % of the recovered (13)C label was bound to infructescences (either fruits or vegetative infructescence tissue), revealing them as the prime C sinks for current photoassimilates. Leaves on girdled branchlets were not stronger labelled than on ungirdled ones in both species, indicating no upregulation of the leaves' photosynthetic capacity in response to the prevention of phloemic transport, which was also supported by measurements of light saturated photosynthesis. In contrast, (13)C labels tended to be higher after complete defoliation in the vegetative infructescence tissues of CARPINUS, suggesting enhanced net photosynthesis of green infructescence parts as compensation for the loss of regular leaves. The total labelling-derived (13)C content of whole infructescences was very similar between foliated and defoliated CARPINUS branchlets. Cupulae of FAGUS, on the other hand, remained almost unlabelled on defoliated branchlets, indicating the photosynthetic inactivity of this woody infructescence tissue. Consequently, CARPINUS still produced relatively high fruit masses on girdled plus defoliated branchlets, while in FAGUS fruit development ceased almost completely at this most severe treatment. Our results highlight that green vegetative infructescence tissue assimilates substantial amounts of C and can partly substitute regular leaves as C sources for successful fruit development. PMID:16883486

  14. Potential carbon sequestration of European arable soils estimated by modelling a comprehensive set of management practices.

    PubMed

    Lugato, Emanuele; Bampa, Francesca; Panagos, Panos; Montanarella, Luca; Jones, Arwyn

    2014-11-01

    Bottom-up estimates from long-term field experiments and modelling are the most commonly used approaches to estimate the carbon (C) sequestration potential of the agricultural sector. However, when data are required at European level, important margins of uncertainty still exist due to the representativeness of local data at large scale or different assumptions and information utilized for running models. In this context, a pan-European (EU + Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Albania, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Norway) simulation platform with high spatial resolution and harmonized data sets was developed to provide consistent scenarios in support of possible carbon sequestration policies. Using the CENTURY agroecosystem model, six alternative management practices (AMP) scenarios were assessed as alternatives to the business as usual situation (BAU). These consisted of the conversion of arable land to grassland (and vice versa), straw incorporation, reduced tillage, straw incorporation combined with reduced tillage, ley cropping system and cover crops. The conversion into grassland showed the highest soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration rates, ranging between 0.4 and 0.8 t C ha(-1)  yr(-1) , while the opposite extreme scenario (100% of grassland conversion into arable) gave cumulated losses of up to 2 Gt of C by 2100. Among the other practices, ley cropping systems and cover crops gave better performances than straw incorporation and reduced tillage. The allocation of 12 to 28% of the European arable land to different AMP combinations resulted in a potential SOC sequestration of 101-336 Mt CO2 eq. by 2020 and 549-2141 Mt CO2 eq. by 2100. Modelled carbon sequestration rates compared with values from an ad hoc meta-analysis confirmed the robustness of these estimates.

  15. Assessment of sampling and analytical uncertainty of trace element contents in arable field soils.

    PubMed

    Buczko, Uwe; Kuchenbuch, Rolf O; Ubelhör, Walter; Nätscher, Ludwig

    2012-07-01

    Assessment of trace element contents in soils is required in Germany (and other countries) before sewage sludge application on arable soils. The reliability of measured element contents is affected by measurement uncertainty, which consists of components due to (1) sampling, (2) laboratory repeatability (intra-lab) and (3) reproducibility (between-lab). A complete characterization of average trace element contents in field soils should encompass the uncertainty of all these components. The objectives of this study were to elucidate the magnitude and relative proportions of uncertainty components for the metals As, B, Cd, Co, Cr, Mo, Ni, Pb, Tl and Zn in three arable fields of different field-scale heterogeneity, based on a collaborative trial (CT) (standardized procedure) and two sampling proficiency tests (PT) (individual sampling procedure). To obtain reference values and estimates of field-scale heterogeneity, a detailed reference sampling was conducted. Components of uncertainty (sampling person, sampling repetition, laboratory) were estimated by variance component analysis, whereas reproducibility uncertainty was estimated using results from numerous laboratory proficiency tests. Sampling uncertainty in general increased with field-scale heterogeneity; however, total uncertainty was mostly dominated by (total) laboratory uncertainty. Reproducibility analytical uncertainty was on average by a factor of about 3 higher than repeatability uncertainty. Therefore, analysis within one single laboratory and, for heterogeneous fields, a reduction of sampling uncertainty (for instance by larger numbers of sample increments and/or a denser coverage of the field area) would be most effective to reduce total uncertainty. On the other hand, when only intra-laboratory analytical uncertainty was considered, total sampling uncertainty on average prevailed over analytical uncertainty by a factor of 2. Both sampling and laboratory repeatability uncertainty were highly variable

  16. Restoration of species-rich grasslands on ex-arable land: seed addition outweighs soil fertility reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kardol, Paul

    2008-01-01

    A common practice in biodiversity conservation is restoration of former species-rich grassland on ex-arable land. Major constraints for grassland restoration are high soil fertility and limited dispersal ability of plant species to target sites. Usually, studies focus on soil fertility or on methods to introduce plant seeds. However, the question is whether soil fertility reduction is always necessary for getting plant species established on target sites. In a three-year field experiment with ex-arable soil with intensive farming history, we tested single and combined effects of soil fertility reduction and sowing mid-successional plant species on plant community development and soil biological properties. A controlled microcosm study was performed to test short-term effects of soil fertility reduction measures on biomass production of mid-successional species. Soil fertility was manipulated by adding carbon (wood or straw) to incorporate plant-available nutrients into organic matter, or by removing nutrients through top soil removal (TSR). The sown species established successfully and their establishment was independent of carbon amendments. TSR reduced plant biomass, and effectively suppressed arable weeds, however, created a desert-like environment, inhibiting the effectiveness of sowing mid-successional plant species. Adding straw or wood resulted in short-term reduction of plant biomass, suggesting a temporal decrease in plant-available nutrients by microbial immobilisation. Straw and wood addition had little effects on soil biological properties, whereas TSR profoundly reduced numbers of bacteria, fungal biomass and nematode abundance. In conclusion, in ex-arable soils, on a short term sowing is more effective for grassland restoration than strategies aiming at soil fertility reduction.

  17. Thallium in French agrosystems--I. Thallium contents in arable soils.

    PubMed

    Tremel, A; Masson, P; Sterckeman, T; Baize, D; Mench, M

    1997-01-01

    The thallium (Tl) content of the upper horizons of 244 French soils was determined as the first step towards the creation of a reference data bank for total Tl content of arable soils. Forty soil samples were collected in the vicinity of potential anthropogenic sources of Tl, but the remainder came from rural areas. The distribution of Tl concentrations in soils was characterized by a median value of 0.29 mg Tl kg(-1) and a 90th percentile value of 1.54 mg Tl kg(-1). Very high pedogeochemical contents were found (up to 55 mg Tl kg(-1)) but none could be attributed to obvious anthropogenic pollution. Areas of very high Tl concentration belong to an epihercynian transgression zone with a contact between a sedimentary basin and a crystalline massif. This contact is associated with stratified mineralizations (Zn, Pb, F, Sb, Ba, Tl and pyrites). High Tl concentrations were common in limestone, marl or granite derived soils, and the Tl in limestones or marls is probably concentrated in the sulfides contained in these rocks because Tl has a high affinity to S. In granites, Tl may be in the micas and feldspars because Tl+ can replace K+ in these minerals. Silty or clay-silty soils showed the highest concentrations. These granulometric fractions contain the majority of the minerals, which are supposed to be the major hosts of Tl in soils, i.e. clay minerals, oxides and micas. Tl in the soils was positively correlated with Ba, V, Pb, Fe, Ni, Cd, Zn, Co, As and especially Mn. A significant proportion of Tl may be in the Mn oxides: in oxidizing conditions, Tl(III) could enter the Mn oxides by sorption, or Tl(I) could replace K(I) in the oxide. PMID:15093443

  18. Thallium in French agrosystems--I. Thallium contents in arable soils.

    PubMed

    Tremel, A; Masson, P; Sterckeman, T; Baize, D; Mench, M

    1997-01-01

    The thallium (Tl) content of the upper horizons of 244 French soils was determined as the first step towards the creation of a reference data bank for total Tl content of arable soils. Forty soil samples were collected in the vicinity of potential anthropogenic sources of Tl, but the remainder came from rural areas. The distribution of Tl concentrations in soils was characterized by a median value of 0.29 mg Tl kg(-1) and a 90th percentile value of 1.54 mg Tl kg(-1). Very high pedogeochemical contents were found (up to 55 mg Tl kg(-1)) but none could be attributed to obvious anthropogenic pollution. Areas of very high Tl concentration belong to an epihercynian transgression zone with a contact between a sedimentary basin and a crystalline massif. This contact is associated with stratified mineralizations (Zn, Pb, F, Sb, Ba, Tl and pyrites). High Tl concentrations were common in limestone, marl or granite derived soils, and the Tl in limestones or marls is probably concentrated in the sulfides contained in these rocks because Tl has a high affinity to S. In granites, Tl may be in the micas and feldspars because Tl+ can replace K+ in these minerals. Silty or clay-silty soils showed the highest concentrations. These granulometric fractions contain the majority of the minerals, which are supposed to be the major hosts of Tl in soils, i.e. clay minerals, oxides and micas. Tl in the soils was positively correlated with Ba, V, Pb, Fe, Ni, Cd, Zn, Co, As and especially Mn. A significant proportion of Tl may be in the Mn oxides: in oxidizing conditions, Tl(III) could enter the Mn oxides by sorption, or Tl(I) could replace K(I) in the oxide.

  19. Production of Hydrolysable Tannin-Like Structures During the Microbial Demethylation of lignin: An Assessment Using13C-Labeled Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide Thermochemolysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, T.; Blanchette, R.; Nierop, K.; Gamblin, D.

    2003-12-01

    Phenolic compounds in soils are important mediators of microbial activity, metal mobility, soil redox, and soil organic matter building processes. Direct tannin input and the microbial decomposition of lignin in litter and soil are important contributors to this pool of phenols. The ability to accurately assess the relative differences in lignin decay (which are initiated by demethylation and side chain oxidation) among synapyl, coniferyl, and p-coumaryl components of detrital lignin requires the ability to determine microbial demethylation within the complex soil residues. Differentiating between hydrolysable tannins and contributions from advanced lignin decay can be problematic for many of the most common molecular techniques such as alkaline CuO oxidation, pyrolysis GC, and tetramethylammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis because of either the masking effects of derivatizing agents, oxidative damage to ortho-phenols or low volatility of lignin monomers. In this study we investigate lignin demethylation and polyhydroxyl-aromatic production in BC and C horizons of sandy forest soils dominated by oak, the A horizon from a red spruce forest, and controlled microbial inoculation studies of woody tissue using in-line 13C-labeled tetramethylammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis. Both white-rot and brown-rot decay resulted in syringyl demethylation, with the latter exhibiting more aggressive demethylation chemistry, while coniferyl monomer demethylation was essentially restricted to brown-rot decay. In a typical brown-rot sequence demethylation of syringyl components occurs more rapidly than coniferyl units within the same tissue and lower molecular weight fragments are likewise more demethylated than lignin monomers containing the full glycerol side chain. Demethylation of both methoxyl groups in the syringyl monomer is evident in soil horizons as well as laboratory inoculations. The latter may suggest demethylation after lignin depolymerization. Low molecular weight

  20. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Arable Soils of Europe: a Multi-Decadal Analysis Using the Biogeochemical Model LandscapeDNDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C.; Haas, E.; Kiese, R.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2012-12-01

    Arable soils are considered to be strong terrestrial sources of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. European countries have a long history of intensive fertilizer use, which leads to substantial gaseous and aquatic nitrogen losses. Biogeochemical models like LandscapeDNDC were designed to simulate relevant processes and pools of the carbon and nitrogen cycle and their environmental controls. We present direct and indirect N2O emission estimates for arable soils of Europe as calculated by the new LandscapeDNDC model and based on the NitroEurope database. Emissions were calculated for 21,467 spatial units and daily climate data (1971-2000). Five model runs were conduced to capture variability of arable management practices. The mean N2O emission for arable soils of Europe was 2.2 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (307,239 t N yr-1 for the entire area of 1,394,442 km2). Using the IPCC guidelines for national greenhouse gas inventories, indirect emission of N2O from simulated nitrate leaching was derived. Using this simple approach, another 0.4 kg N ha-1 yr-1 were estimated to enter the troposphere (15.2% of the total N2O emission). According to our model runs, total N2O emissions from arable soils in Europe gradually increased until the early 80s, before declining back to the previous levels while N application remained high (fig.1). Regional climatic conditions, soil properties and management also strongly affect N2O emissions (see fig.2). Furthermore, intra-annual variability can be observed (not shown). The results illustrate the advantage of using mechanistic models when assessing N2O emission characteristics versus conventional up-scaling techniques.

  1. 3D HCCH 3-TOCSY for Resonance Assignment of Methyl-Containing Side Chains in 13C-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrín, Dušan; Uhrínová, Stanislava; Leadbeater, Claire; Nairn, Jacqueline; Price, Nicholas C.; Barlow, Paul N.

    2000-02-01

    Two 3D experiments, (H)CCH3-TOCSY and H(C)CH3-TOCSY, are proposed for resonance assignment of methyl-containing amino acid side chains. After the initial proton-carbon INEPT step, during which either carbon or proton chemical shift labeling is achieved (t1), the magnetization is spread along the amino acid side chains by a carbon spin lock. The chemical shifts of methyl carbons are labeled (t2) during the following constant time interval. Finally the magnetization is transferred, in a reversed INEPT step, to methyl protons for detection (t3). The proposed experiments are characterized by high digital resolution in the methyl carbon dimension (t2max = 28.6 ms), optimum sensitivity due to the use of proton decoupling during the long constant time interval, and an optional removal of CH2, or CH2 and CH, resonances from the F2F3 planes. The building blocks used in these experiments can be implemented in a range of heteronuclear experiments focusing on methyl resonances in proteins. The techniques are illustrated using a 15N, 13C-labeled E93D mutant of Schizosacharomyces pombe phosphoglycerate mutase (23.7 kDa).

  2. Effective Estimation of Dynamic Metabolic Fluxes Using 13C Labeling and Piecewise Affine Approximation: From Theory to Practical Applicability

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Robin; Wahl, S. Aljoscha

    2015-01-01

    The design of microbial production processes relies on rational choices for metabolic engineering of the production host and the process conditions. These require a systematic and quantitative understanding of cellular regulation. Therefore, a novel method for dynamic flux identification using quantitative metabolomics and 13C labeling to identify piecewise-affine (PWA) flux functions has been described recently. Obtaining flux estimates nevertheless still required frequent manual reinitalization to obtain a good reproduction of the experimental data and, moreover, did not optimize on all observables simultaneously (metabolites and isotopomer concentrations). In our contribution we focus on measures to achieve faster and robust dynamic flux estimation which leads to a high dimensional parameter estimation problem. Specifically, we address the following challenges within the PWA problem formulation: (1) Fast selection of sufficient domains for the PWA flux functions, (2) Control of over-fitting in the concentration space using shape-prescriptive modeling and (3) robust and efficient implementation of the parameter estimation using the hybrid implicit filtering algorithm. With the improvements we significantly speed up the convergence by efficiently exploiting that the optimization problem is partly linear. This allows application to larger-scale metabolic networks and demonstrates that the proposed approach is not purely theoretical, but also applicable in practice. PMID:26690237

  3. Determination of sup 13 C labeling pattern of citric acid cycle intermediates by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Di Donato, L.; Montgomery, J.A.; Des Rosiers, C.; David, F.; Garneau, M.; Brunengraber, H. )

    1990-02-26

    Investigations of the regulation of the citric acid cycle require determination of labeling patterns of cycle intermediates. These were assayed to date, using infusion of: (i) ({sup 14}C)tracer followed by chemical degradation of intermediates and (ii) ({sup 13}C)tracer followed by NMR analysis of intermediates. The authors developed a strategy to analyze by GC-MS the ({sup 13}C) labeling pattern of {mu}mole samples of citrate (CIT), isocitrate (ICIT), 2-ketoglutarate (2-KG), glutamate (GLU) and glutamine (GLN). These are enzymatically or chemically converted to 2-KG, ICIT, 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) and 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-OHG). GC-MS analyses of TMS or TBDMS derivatives of these compounds yield the enrichment of each carbon. The authors confirmed the identity of each fragment using the spectra of (1-{sup 13}C), (5-{sup 13}C), (2,3,3,4,4-{sup 2}H{sub 5})glutamate and (1-{sup 13}C), (1,4-{sup 13}C)GABA.

  4. Determination of nonylphenol ethoxylates and octylphenol ethoxylates in environmental samples using 13C-labeled surrogate compounds.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yasuko; Ito, Azusa; Murakami, Masashi; Murakami, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Hideharu; Takeda, Kikuo; Suzuki, Shigeru; Hori, Masahiro

    2007-10-01

    Alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEOs) have been widely used as nonionic surfactants in a variety of industrial and commercial products. Typical compounds are nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPEOs) and octylphenol polyethoxylates (OPEOs), which serve as precursors to nonylphenol (NP) and octylphenol (OP), respectively. NP and 4-t-OP are known to have endocrine disrupting effects on fish (medaka, Oryzias latipes), so it is important to know the concentrations of APEOs in the environment. Because the analytical characteristics of these compounds depend on the length of the ethoxy chain, it is necessary to use appropriate compounds as internal standards or surrogates. We synthesized two 13C-labeled surrogate compounds and used these compounds as internal standards to determine NPEOs and OPEOs by high-performance liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry. Method detection limits were 0.015 microg/L for NP (2)EO to 0.037 microg/L for NP(12)EO, and 0.011 microg/L for OP(3,6)EO to 0.024 microg/L for OP (4)EO. NPEO concentrations in water from a sewage treatment plant were less than 0.05-0.52 microg/L for final effluent and 1.2-15 microg/L for influent. OPEO concentrations were less than 0.05-0.15 microg/L for the final effluent and less than 0.05-1.1 microg/L for influent. PMID:17972761

  5. Metabolic network analysis of Bacillus clausii on minimal and semirich medium using (13)C-labeled glucose.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Torben; Christensen, Bjarke; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-04-01

    Using (13)C-labeled glucose fed to the facultative alkalophilic Bacillus clausii producing the alkaline serine protease Savinase, the intracellular fluxes were quantified in continuous cultivation and in batch cultivation on a minimal medium. The flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was found to increase with increasing specific growth rate but at a much lower level than previously reported for Bacillus subtilis. Two futile cycles in the pyruvate metabolism were included in the metabolic network. A substantial flux in the futile cycle involving malic enzyme was estimated, whereas only a very small or zero flux through PEP carboxykinase was estimated, indicating that the latter enzyme was not active during growth on glucose. The uptake of the amino acids in a semirich medium containing 15 of the 20 amino acids normally present in proteins was estimated using fully labeled glucose in batch cultivations. It was found that leucine, isoleucine, and phenylalanine were taken up from the medium and not synthesized de novo from glucose. In contrast, serine and threonine were completely synthesized from other metabolites and not taken up from the medium. Valine, proline, and lysine were partly taken up from the medium and partly synthesized from glucose. The metabolic network analysis was extended to include analysis of growth on the semirich medium containing amino acids, and the metabolic flux distribution on this medium was estimated and compared with growth on minimal medium. PMID:12009795

  6. Earthworm impact on the global warming potential of a no-tillage arable soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, M.; Hurme, T.; Mikola, J.; Regina, K.; Nuutinen, V.

    2015-04-01

    We studied the effect of the deep-burrowing earthworm Lumbricus terrestris on the greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes and global warming potential (GWP) of arable no-till soil using both field measurements and a controlled 15 week laboratory experiment. In the field, the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were on average 43 and 32% higher in areas occupied by L. terrestris (the presence judged by the surface midden) than in adjacent, unoccupied areas (with no midden). The fluxes of methane (CH4) were variable and had no consistent difference between the midden and non-midden areas. Removing the midden did not affect soil N2O and CO2 emissions. The laboratory results were consistent with the field observations in that the emissions of N2O and CO2 were on average 27 and 13% higher in mesocosms with than without L. terrestris. Higher emissions of N2O were most likely due to the higher content of mineral nitrogen and soil moisture under the middens, whereas L. terrestris respiration fully explained the observed increase in CO2 emissions. The activity of L. terrestris increased the GWP of field and laboratory soil by 50 and 18%, but only 6 and 2% of this increase was due to the enhanced N2O emission. Our results suggest that high N2O emissions commonly observed in no-tillage soils can partly be explained by the abundance of L. terrestris under no-till management and that L. terrestris can markedly regulate the climatic effects of different cultivation practises.

  7. Soil organic carbon accumulation in afforested/abandoned arable fields in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Han; Cheng, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    Afforestation or abandonment of arable fields has been proposed as a way to increase terrestrial carbon storage and mitigate anthropogenic carbon emissions. When the arable fields are afforested or abandoned, the accumulation in soil organic carbon (SOC) is a key pool to sequestrate carbon. However, high uncertainties still exist in the tropics and subtropics because of fast SOC turnover rates and variable land use managements in these areas. In this study, a total of eleven sites with afforested/abandoned age over 15 years and elevation ranging from 16 to 2,056 m were investigated. We examined the increments of SOC by comparing with the adjacent tilled (e.g. croplands) and non-tilled (e.g. tea plantation or orchards) fields in two sampling layers, 0 - 10 and 10 - 20 cm in depth. In addition, density fractionation of SOC was also conducted in order to differentiate SOC into light fraction, intra-aggregate fraction, and heavy fraction to gain more information about the mechanism of SOC sequestration. Our results indicated that the increments of SOC concentration and stock varied with elevation, land use management, and soil depth. For the sites with elevation below 500 m, the SOC concentration and stock in the abandoned fields were 14.3 ± 0.9 mg C g-1 and 14.6 ± 4.6 Mg C ha-1 higher than the adjacent tilled fields, and 10.2 ± 6.3 mg C g-1and 6.4 ± 6.2 Mg C ha-1 higher than the adjacent non-tilled fields for surface 0-10 cm. For the sites with elevation above 500 m, the SOC concentration in the abandoned arable fields were 22.8 ± 12.8 mg C g-1 higher than the adjacent tilled fields, but the SOC stock might not be different due to high stone content in abandoned field. Moreover, the SOC concentration and stock in abandoned field were not different or even less than non-tilled fields where organic amendments were frequently applied. The increments of SOC for 10-20 cm soils were less evident than those for surface 0-10 cm soils, and the differences were only

  8. Soil organic carbon accumulation in afforested/abandoned arable fields in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Han; Cheng, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    Afforestation or abandonment of arable fields has been proposed as a way to increase terrestrial carbon storage and mitigate anthropogenic carbon emissions. When the arable fields are afforested or abandoned, the accumulation in soil organic carbon (SOC) is a key pool to sequestrate carbon. However, high uncertainties still exist in the tropics and subtropics because of fast SOC turnover rates and variable land use managements in these areas. In this study, a total of eleven sites with afforested/abandoned age over 15 years and elevation ranging from 16 to 2,056 m were investigated. We examined the increments of SOC by comparing with the adjacent tilled (e.g. croplands) and non-tilled (e.g. tea plantation or orchards) fields in two sampling layers, 0 - 10 and 10 - 20 cm in depth. In addition, density fractionation of SOC was also conducted in order to differentiate SOC into light fraction, intra-aggregate fraction, and heavy fraction to gain more information about the mechanism of SOC sequestration. Our results indicated that the increments of SOC concentration and stock varied with elevation, land use management, and soil depth. For the sites with elevation below 500 m, the SOC concentration and stock in the abandoned fields were 14.3 ± 0.9 mg C g‑1 and 14.6 ± 4.6 Mg C ha‑1 higher than the adjacent tilled fields, and 10.2 ± 6.3 mg C g‑1and 6.4 ± 6.2 Mg C ha‑1 higher than the adjacent non-tilled fields for surface 0-10 cm. For the sites with elevation above 500 m, the SOC concentration in the abandoned arable fields were 22.8 ± 12.8 mg C g‑1 higher than the adjacent tilled fields, but the SOC stock might not be different due to high stone content in abandoned field. Moreover, the SOC concentration and stock in abandoned field were not different or even less than non-tilled fields where organic amendments were frequently applied. The increments of SOC for 10-20 cm soils were less evident than those for surface 0-10 cm soils, and the differences were

  9. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments. PMID:27074782

  10. A 13C labelling study on carbon fluxes in Arctic plankton communities under elevated CO2 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kluijver, A.; Soetaert, K.; Czerny, J.; Schulz, K. G.; Boxhammer, T.; Riebesell, U.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of CO2 on carbon fluxes (production, consumption, and export) in Arctic plankton communities was investigated during the 2010 EPOCA (European project on Ocean Acidification) mesocosm study off Ny Ålesund, Svalbard. 13C labelled bicarbonate was added to nine mesocosms with a range in pCO2 (185 to 1420 μatm) to follow the transfer of carbon from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into phytoplankton, bacterial and zooplankton consumers, and export. A nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus model amended with 13C dynamics was constructed and fitted to the data to quantify uptake rates and carbon fluxes in the plankton community. The plankton community structure was characteristic for a post-bloom situation and retention food web and showed high bacterial production (∼31% of primary production), high abundance of mixotrophic phytoplankton, low mesozooplankton grazing (∼6% of primary production) and low export (∼7% of primary production). Zooplankton grazing and export of detritus were sensitive to CO2: grazing decreased and export increased with increasing pCO2. Nutrient addition halfway through the experiment increased the export, but not the production rates. Although mixotrophs showed initially higher production rates with increasing CO2, the overall production of POC (particulate organic carbon) after nutrient addition decreased with increasing CO2. Interestingly, and contrary to the low nutrient situation, much more material settled down in the sediment traps at low CO2. The observed CO2 related effects potentially alter future organic carbon flows and export, with possible consequences for the efficiency of the biological pump.

  11. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments.

  12. Future rainfall patterns will reduce arthropod abundance in model arable agroecosystems with different soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaller, Johann; Simmer, Laura; Tabi Tataw, James; Formayer, Herbert; Hösch, Johannes; Baumgarten, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Climate change scenarios for eastern Austria predict a seasonal shift in precipitation patterns with fewer but heavier rainfall events and longer drought periods during the growing season and more precipitation during winter. This is expected to alter arthropods living in natural and agricultural ecosystems with consequences for several ecosystem functions and services. In order to better understand the effects of future rainfall patterns on aboveground arthropods inhabiting an agroecosystem, we conducted an experiment where we simulated rainfall patterns in model arable systems with three different soil types. Experiments were conducted in winter wheat cultivated in a lysimeter facility near Vienna, Austria, where three different soil types (calcaric phaeozem, calcic chernozem and gleyic phaeozem) were subjected to long-term current vs. predicted rainfall patterns according to regionalized climate change projections for 2071-2100. Aboveground arthropods were assessed by suction sampling in April, May and June 2012. We found significant differences in mean total arthropod abundances between the sampling dates with 20 ± 2 m-2, 90 ± 20 m-2 and 289 ± 54 m-2 in April, May and June, respectively. Across all three sampling dates, future rainfall patterns significantly reduced the abundance of Araneae (-43%), Auchenorrhyncha (-39%), Coleoptera (-48%), Carabidae (-41%), Chrysomelidae (-64%), Collembola (-58%), Diptera (-75%) and Neuroptera (-73%). Generally, different soil types had no effect on the abundance of arthropods. The diversity of arthropod communities was unaffected by rainfall patterns or soil types. Correlation analyses of arthropod abundances with crop biomass, weed density and abundance suggest that rainfall effects indirectly affected arthropods via changes on crops and weeds. In conclusion, these results show that future rainfall patterns will have detrimental effects on the abundance of a variety of aboveground arthropods in winter wheat with potential

  13. Stabilization of glucose-C in microbial cell membranes (PLFA) and cell walls (amino sugars) evaluated by 13C-labelling in a field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Glaser, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Microorganisms control carbon (C) cycle and strongly contribute to formation of soil organic matter. Strong differences in the turnover of microbial groups and cellular compounds complicate the assessment of their contribution to microbial food webs and C sequestration in soil in situ. The uptake and incorporation of 13C labeled glucose by microbial groups were traced during 50 days after the labeling under field conditions. 13C was analysed: i) in the cytosolic pool by chloroform fumigation extraction, ii) in cell membranes by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), iii) in cell walls by amino sugars, and iv) remaining in bulk soil. This allowed tracing C in microbial groups as well as cellular compounds. Mean residence times (MRT) of C in PLFA and the cytosol were 47 and 150 days, respectively. Such long cytosol MRT depends on its heterogeneous composition, which includes high and low molecular weight organics. Amino sugars were mainly originated from microbial residues and thus, observation periods higher than 1 year are required for estimation of their MRT. Relative 13C incorporation (13C portion in total pool C) was the highest for PLFAs (~1.5% at day 3), whereas 13C content of the cytosol and amino sugars was one and two orders of magnitude less, respectively. Relative 13C incorporation into amino sugars of living microorganisms showed only 0.57% on day 3. Therefore, the turnover of cell membrane components is two times faster than that of cell walls, even in living microorganisms. Both PLFAs and amino sugars showed that glucose C was preferentially used by bacteria. 13C incorporation into bacterial cell walls and membranes decreased with time, but increased or remained constant for fungi, reflecting faster turnover of bacteria than fungi. Consequently, bacteria contribute more to the decomposition of low molecular weight organics, whereas fungi consume bacterial products or necromass and contribute more to long-term C stabilisation. Thus, tracing of 13C in cellular

  14. Structural properties of dissolved organic carbon in deep soil horizons of an arable and temporarily grassland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavaud, A.; Chabbi, A.; Croue, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    It is commonly accepted that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the bio-available fraction of the largest amount of soil organic matter (SOM), even if it does represent only a very small proportion. Because most of the studies on DOC dynamics were mainly restricted to forest soils, studies on the factors governing the dynamics of DOC in deep soil horizons (>1 m) in arable system are still very little limited. The objective of this work is to better define the proportion of DOC in deep soil horizons and indicate their main characteristics and structural properties. The study was conducted on the long term observatory for environmental research- biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity Lusignan site). DOC collected using lysimeters plates inserted to a depth of 105 cm was fractionated into 3 fractions using the two column array of XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins. The HPO (hydrophobic) fraction (i.e. humic substances) isolated from the XAD-8 resin, the TPH (Transphilic) fraction from the XAD-4 resin and the HPI (hydrophilic) fraction which corresponds to the DOC that does not adsorbed onto the two resins under the acid condition used (pH 2). DOM adsorbed onto the resins is recovered with a 75%/25% acetonitrile/water mixture and lyophilized. Depend on the amount of material; the chemical composition of DOC was performed using UV254 nm, fluorescence EEM, NMR and HPSEC/UV/COD. The results show that the concentration and structural properties of DOC in deep soil horizon were similar to those of groundwater (low SUVA (1.2 m-1.L.mg C-1), structures composed mainly of low molecular weight). Because of the relatively recent establishment of the treatment, the monitoring of the dynamics of the DOC concentrations did not show significant differences between arable and grassland. However, the temporal dynamic shows a slight increase in the DOC content regardless of the of land use. DOC concentrations between winter and the middle of spring tend to double going from 1 to 2.5 mg / L and then

  15. A compilation and meta-analysis of rainfall simulation data on arable soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiener, P.; Seibert, S. P.; Auerswald, K.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryRainfall simulations are a useful and important tool in studying infiltration, surface runoff generation, soil erosion and nutrient as well as agro-chemical transport from arable land. Such simulations are time-consuming and costly and hence are usually only carried out under a limited variation of settings necessary to answer specific research questions. Therefore, it is difficult to use rainfall simulation data for hypothesis testing in a more general sense or to parameterize hydrological or erosion models applicable under a wider range of environmental conditions. To overcome these restrictions and to set-up a broader basis for following up studies, we analyzed, harmonized and filled gaps of a large set of existing rainfall simulations carried out by five different research groups in Germany. This covered 726 rainfall simulations (24,384 runoff measurements) carried out on 209 plots under a wide range of conditions for which 4 rain properties, 5 plot properties, 20 soil properties, 5 land use properties and 2 runoff properties were compiled. These data were quality controlled and made available for public use ( Seibert et al., 2011). The most important deficiencies were smoothed runoff measurements, missing time to ponding data, different soil descriptions including frequent gaps in stone content, inconsistent moisture measurements and sometimes rather rough measurements of surface cover. The calculation of the geometric mean particle diameter, time since tillage and the application of different site specific procedures supported harmonization and helped to overcome several of these deficiencies. A satisfying gap filling procedure was developed for time to ponding. The most important inconsistencies that could not be removed were different depths of moisture measurement. Hence, there is a need to define a set of basic variables that always should be measured and documented with defined standards to enable comparison between different studies, to assess

  16. Response of rhizosphere microbial community structure and diversity to heavy metal co-pollution in arable soil.

    PubMed

    Deng, Linjing; Zeng, Guangming; Fan, Changzheng; Lu, Lunhui; Chen, Xunfeng; Chen, Ming; Wu, Haipeng; He, Xiaoxiao; He, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Due to the emerging environmental issues related to heavy metals, concern about the soil quality of farming lands near manufacturing district is increasing. Investigating the function of soil microorganisms exposed to long-term heavy metal contamination is meaningful and important for agricultural soil utilization. This article studied the potential influence of several heavy metals on microbial biomass, activity, abundance, and community composition in arable soil near industrial estate in Zhuzhou, Hunan province, China. The results showed that soil organic contents (SOC) were significantly positive correlated with heavy metals, whereas dehydrogenase activity (DHA) was greatly depressed by the heavy metal stress. Negative correlation was found between heavy metals and basal soil respiration (BSR), and no correlation was found between heavy metals and microbial biomass content (MBC). The quantitative PCR (QPCR) and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis could suggest that heavy metal pollution has significantly decreased abundance of bacteria and fungi and also changed their community structure. The results could contribute to evaluate heavy metal pollution level in soil. By combining different environmental parameters, it would promote the better understanding of heavy metal effect on the size, structure, and activity of microbial community in arable soil.

  17. Atmospheric CO2 level affects plants' carbon use efficiency: insights from a 13C labeling experiment on sunflower stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaoying; Schäufele, Rudi; Schnyder, Hans

    2015-04-01

    The increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration has been shown to stimulate plant photosynthesis and (to a lesser extent) growth, thereby acting as a possible sink for the additional atmospheric CO2. However, this effect is dependent on the efficiency with which plants convert atmospheric carbon into biomass carbon, since a considerable proportion of assimilated carbon is returned to the atmosphere via plant respiration. As a core parameter for carbon cycling, carbon use efficiency of plants (CUE, the ratio of net primary production to gross primary production) quantifies the proportion of assimilated carbon that is incorporated into plant biomass. CUE has rarely been assessed based on measurements of complete carbon balance, due to methodological difficulties in measuring respiration rate of plants in light. Moreover, foliar respiration is known to be inhibited in light, thus foliar respiration rate is generally lower in light than in dark. However, this phenomenon, termed as inhibition of respiration in light (IRL), has rarely been assessed at the stand-scale and been incorporated into the calculation of CUE. Therefore, how CUE responses to atmospheric CO2 levels is still not clear. We studied CUE of sunflower stands grown at sub-ambient CO2 level (200 μmol mol-1) and elevated CO2 level (1000 μmol mol-1) using mesocosm-scale gas exchange facilities which enabled continuous measurements of 13CO2/12CO2 exchange. Appling steady-state 13C labeling, fluxes of respiration and photosynthesis in light were separated, and tracer kinetic in respiration was analyzed. This study provides the first data on CUE at a mesocosm-level including respiration in light in different CO2 environments. We found that CUE of sunflower was lower at an elevated CO2 level than at a sub-ambient CO2 level; and the ignorance of IRL lead to erroneous estimations of CUE. Variation in CUE at atmospheric CO2 levels was attributed to several mechanisms. In this study, CO2 enrichment i) affected the

  18. A 13C labelling study on carbon fluxes in Arctic plankton communities under elevated CO2 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kluijver, A.; Soetaert, K.; Czerny, J.; Schulz, K. G.; Boxhammer, T.; Riebesell, U.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of CO2 on carbon fluxes in Arctic plankton communities was investigated during the 2010 EPOCA mesocosm study in Ny Ålesund, Svalbard. Nine mesocosms were set up with initial pCO2 levels ranging from 185 to 1420 μatm for 5 weeks. 13C labelled bicarbonate was added at the start of the experiment to follow the transfer of carbon from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into phytoplankton, bacteria, total particulate organic carbon (POC), zooplankton, and settling particles. Polar lipid derived fatty acids (PLFA) were used to trace carbon dynamics of phytoplankton and bacteria and allowed distinction of two groups of phytoplankton: phyto I (autotrophs) and phyto II (mixotrophs). Nutrients were added on day 13. A nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus model amended with 13C dynamics was constructed and fitted to the data to quantify uptake rates and carbon fluxes in the plankton community during the phase prior to nutrient addition (phase 1, days 0-12). During the first 12 days, a phytoplankton bloom developed that was characterized by high growth rates (0.87 days-1) for phyto I and lower growth rates (0.18 days-1) for phyto II. A large part of the carbon fixed by phytoplankton (~31%) was transferred to bacteria, while mesozooplankton grazed only ~6% of the production. After 6 days, the bloom collapsed and part of the organic matter subsequently settled into the sediment traps. The sedimentation losses of detritus in phase 1 were low (0.008 days-1) and overall export was only ~7% of production. Zooplankton grazing and detritus sinking losses prior to nutrient addition were sensitive to CO2: grazing decreased with increasing CO2, while sinking increased. Phytoplankton production increased again after nutrient addition on day 13. Although phyto II showed initially higher growth rates with increasing CO2 (days 14-22), the overall production of POC after nutrient addition (phase 2, days 14-29) decreased with increasing CO2. Significant sedimentation occurred

  19. Soil pH effect on phosphate induced cadmium precipitation in Arable soil.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang Oh; Owens, Vance N; Kim, Yong Gyun; Lee, Sang Mong; Park, Hyean Cheal; Kim, Keun Ki; Son, Hong Joo; Suh, Jeong Min; Kim, Pil Joo

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine soil pH conditions that allow cadmium (Cd) to precipitate as Cd minerals in phosphate (P) amended soil. Cadmium immobilization could be attributed primarily to Cd adsorption due to increase in pH and negative charge. Soil pH might not affect Cd precipitation as Cd3(PO4)2 by direct reaction of Cd and P in the studied soil, even when soil pH increased up to 9.0. However, Cd might precipitate as CdCO3 with increasing pH up to 9.0 in P untreated soil and up to 8.0 in P treated soil depending on CO2 level.

  20. The level of selenium and some other trace elements in different Libyan arable soils using instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    El-Ghawi, U M; Al-Fakhri, S M; Al-Sadeq, A A; Bejey, M M; Doubali, K K

    2007-10-01

    Elemental analysis of soils from two different arable regions in Libya was carried out to measure the level of many trace elements. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used for the determination of 10 elements, viz., (Ba, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Sc, Se, Th, and Zn), using their long-lived radionuclides. The accuracy of the measurements has been evaluated by analyzing two IAEA soil reference materials: IAEA Soil-7 and IAEA leak sediment SL-1; precision has been estimated by triplicate analysis of the sample and that of the reference material. Irradiations were carried out at the Tajura Research Center reactor, at 5-MW power level. It is clear that in the Libyan soil selenium concentration is somewhat lower than in other countries. The results show that trace metal concentrations in Libyan clay surface soil are higher than the sandy soil.

  1. [Study on Contents and Budgets of Cu, Zn and Cd in an Arable Soil Using AAS].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Jiang, Chun-ming; Ma, Qiang; Zhou, Hua; Xu, Yong-gang; Yu, Wan-tai

    2015-12-01

    Based on a long-term experiment in Shenyang Experimental Station, the effect of manure application on the contents and budgets of Cu, Zn and Cd in the arable soil was studied. The experiment included four treatments: no mature addition (CK), mature addition 10 t · ha⁻¹ year⁻¹(M1), 25 t · ha⁻¹ year⁻¹ (M2), and 50 t · ha⁻¹ year⁻¹(M3). The result showed that Cu, Zn and Cd in soil were accumulated with manure application and prolongation of experiment, and the accumulative magnitude increased with increasing of manure application. The average annual growth rates of the heavy metals in the four treatments (CK, M1, M2, M3) were 2.83%, 6.56%, 7.54%, 8.96%; 0.03%, 3.44%, 4.53%, 6.64% and 1.51%, 8.01%, 10. 27%, 16. 08% for Cu, Zn and Cd, respectively. After six years of the experiment, the content of Cd in the M3 treatment was quite close to the threshold of Chinese Soil Quality Standard Grade III (1 mg · kg⁻¹, GB15618-1995). After 12 years of the experiment, the contents of Cu in the mature-amended treatments fell in the Chinese Soil Quality Standard Grade III, which should be paid more attention. Although the heavy metals in soil were gradually accumulated, the Cu, Zn and Cd levels in crop grain were still below the National Food Contamination Standards (GB2762-2005; GB13106-91; GB15199-94), indicating the contents of heavy metals in crop produced from contaminated soil might not exceed the corresponding standards. The contents of Cu, Zn and Cd in the straw were much greater than those in the grain. The removal of heavy metal by crop was in the order of M3 > M2 > M1 > CK. The average amounts of Cu, Zn and Cd annually removed from the soil in the four treatments (CK, M1, M2 and M3) were 35.68, 47.80, 63.65, 69.64; 249.14, 375.22, 375.16, 444.44, and 0.83, 1.39, 1.64, 1.66 g · ha⁻¹, respectively. The contents of heavy metals in organic manure varied in different years: the contents of Cu and Zn increased year by year, while Cd presented a

  2. Responses of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and bacterial taxa to (fluoro)quinolones-containing manure in arable soil.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wenguang; Sun, Yongxue; Ding, Xueyao; Zhang, Yiming; Zhong, Xiaoxia; Liang, Wenfei; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fate of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and the disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by (fluoro)quinolones (FQNs)-containing manure in arable soil. Representative FQNs (enrofloxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and norfloxacin (NOR)), PMQR genes (qepA, oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) and bacterial communities in untreated soil, +manure and +manure+FQNs groups were analyzed using culture independent methods. The significantly higher abundance of oqxA, oqxB and aac(6')-Ib-cr, and significantly higher abundance of qnrS in +manure group than those in untreated soil disappeared at day 30 and day 60, respectively. All PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) dissipated 1.5-1.7 times faster in +manure group than those in +manure+FQNs group. The disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by FQNs-containing manure was also found. The results indicated that significant effects of PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib and qnrS) on arable soils introduced by manure disappeared 2 month after manure application. FQNs introduced by manure slowed down the dissipation of PMQR genes. The presence of high FQNs provided a selective advantage for species affiliated to the phylum including Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes while suppressing Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria.

  3. The impact of management and climate on soil nitric oxide fluxes from arable land in the Southern Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medinets, Sergiy; Gasche, Rainer; Skiba, Ute; Medinets, Volodymyr; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    NO fluxes from soils are a significant source for tropospheric NOx, though global and regional estimates of the soil source strength are constrained by the paucity of measurements. In a continuous 18 month effort (2012-2014) soil NO fluxes from an intensively managed arable site in the black soil region of the Southern Ukraine (Odessa region) were measured using an automated dynamic chamber system. Measurements revealed three periods of peak NO emissions (fertigation, re-wetting of soils, and to a lower extend during winter), with a pulse emission peak during soil re-wetting in summer of 88.4 μg N m-2 h-1. The mean annual NO flux was 5.1 ± 8.9 μg N m-2 h-1 and total annual NO emissions were 0.44 ± 0.78 kg N ha-1 yr-1. The fertilizer induced emission factor for NO was 0.63% under beetroot. The combined effect of soil temperature, soil moisture and soil DIN (NH4+ and NO3-) concentrations were identified as drivers of the temporal and spatial variability of soil NO fluxes. This work shows that long-term measurements are needed for estimating annual fluxes and the importance of soils as a source for tropospheric NOx as the contribution of different seasons and crop growing periods to the annual budget differed markedly.

  4. Structural properties of dissolved organic carbon in deep horizons of an arable soil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavaud, A.; Croué, Jp; Berwick, L.; Steffens, M.; Chabbi, A.

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this work is to quantity the DOC that percolates in deep horizons of an arable soil, and to characterize the structural properties of the main fractions. The study was conducted on the long term observatory for environmental research- biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity Lusignan site-France. DOC collected using lysimeter plates inserted to a depth of 105 cm was fractionated into 3 fractions using the two column array of XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins. The HPO (hydrophobic) fraction (i.e. humic substances) isolated from the XAD-8 resin, the TPH (Transphilic) fraction from the XAD-4 resin and the HPI (hydrophilic) fraction which corresponds to the DOC that does not adsorbed onto the two resins under the acid condition used (pH 2). DOM adsorbed onto the resins is recovered with a 75%/25% acetonitrile/water mixture and lyophilized. The hydrophilic fraction is purified according the protocol proposed by Aiken and Leenheer (1993). The isolated fractions were subjected to several characterization tools: UV/Vis, fluorescence EEM, HPSEC/UV/DOC, 13C NMR, 14C dating, FT-IR, pyrolysis, thermochemolysis and MSSV GC/MS. The DOC content ranged from 1 to 2.5 mg / L between winter and the middle of spring and then to 4-5 mg / L in summer time. For all isolated fractions HPSEC analyses indicated the predominance of low molecular structures with a low aromatic character. Fluorescence EEM confirmed the non-humic character of the DOM. 13C-NMR spectra showed that the aromatic character decreased from HPO to TPH, and HPI character. Molecular size follows the same trend. HPI DOM was found to be strongly enriched in carboxyl groups. The 14C concentration of the HPO fraction corresponds to an apparent calibrated age around AD 1500. For the same fraction isolated from the 0 - 30 cm horizon, the measured 14C concentration 131.9 pMC corresponds to that in the atmosphere around AD 1978. Significant input of terpenoid derived organic matter was confirmed in the HPO fraction of DOC

  5. Lateral Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Spherical Magnetic Particles within Soil Catenas of the Arable Watershed (Tver Region, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshovskii, Timur; Zhidkin, Andrei; Gennadiev, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are very dangerous substances because of their carcinogenic properties. It is important to know the features of PAHs transport and accumulation in soils, especially on agricultural lands. Unfortunately this scientific problem is studied not enough. It is known that predominantly PAHs in soils are sorbed on solid phase particles [2], so redistribution of PAHs should be carried out with transport of soil solid phase matter. For the purpose of assessment of connections between PAHs and soil solid phase transport the lateral distribution of PAHs and spherical magnetic particles (SMP) as tracers of soil solid phase migration has been compared. SMP is the component of fly ash which is used last two decades for quantitative assessment of soil erosion [1]. Studies were conducted in small watershed of south-taiga zone in European part of Russia in Tver region. The watershed has 53 ha, steep slopes, less 50, convex and convexo-concave shapes with ridges and runnels. The watershed lands were plowed up for the last 350-400 years until 1995 year. Predominant soils are Umbric Albeluvisols. Soil samples were selected at four soil catenas (30 points with average distance about 70 meters). Two catenas were on opposite slopes near the road, and other two catenas were located on the opposite slopes (250-400 m from the road). It is revealed that average concentration of PAHs in studied soils are 105 ng/g, and varies from 11 to 770 ng/g, with coefficient of variation 143%. Lateral distribution of PAHs and SMP differs within different catenas, because of various factors influence on PAHs concentrations: 1) amounts of PAHs income, depending on the distance from the source; 2) homogenization of PAHs concentrations within arable layer because of mixing the soil matter due to plowing; 3) vertical transport of PAHs in subarable layers is also connected with plowing and bioturbation; 4) rates of decomposition of PAHs in arable layer, depending on

  6. Lack of 13C-label incorporation suggests low turnover rates of thaumarchaeal intact polar tetraether lipids in sediments from the Iceland Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengger, S. K.; Lipsewers, Y. A.; de Haas, H.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schouten, S.

    2013-08-01

    Thaumarchaeota are amongst the most abundant microorganisms in aquatic environments, however, their metabolism in marine sediments is still debated. Labeling studies in marine sediments have previously been undertaken, but focused on complex organic carbon substrates which Thaumarchaeota have not yet been shown to take up. In this study, we investigated the activity of Thaumarchaeota in sediments by supplying different 13C-labeled substrates which have previously been shown to be incorporated into archaeal cells in water incubations and/or enrichment cultures. We determined the incorporation of 13C-label from bicarbonate, pyruvate, glucose and amino acids into thaumarchaeal intact polar lipid-glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (IPL-GDGTs) during 4-6 day incubations of marine sediment cores from three different sites on the Iceland Shelf. Thaumarchaeal intact polar lipids were detected at all stations and concentrations remained constant or decreased slightly upon incubation. No 13C incorporation in any IPL-GDGT was observed at stations 2 (clay-rich sediment) and 3 (organic-rich sediment). In bacterial/eukaryotic IPL-derived fatty acids at station 3, contrastingly, a large uptake of 13C label (up to +80‰) was found. 13C was also respired during the experiment as shown by a substantial increase in the 13C content of the dissolved inorganic carbon. In IPL-GDGTs recovered from the sandy sediments at station 1, however, some enrichment in 13C (1-4‰) was detected after incubation with bicarbonate and pyruvate. The low incorporation rates suggest a low activity of Thaumarchaeota in marine sediments and/or a low turnover rate of thaumarchaeal IPL-GDGTs due to their low degradation rates. Cell numbers and activity of sedimentary Thaumarchaeota based on IPL-GDGT measurements may thus have previously been overestimated.

  7. Lack of 13C-label incorporation suggests low turnover rates of thaumarchaeal intact polar tetraether lipids in sediments from the Iceland shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengger, S. K.; Lipsewers, Y. A.; de Haas, H.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schouten, S.

    2014-01-01

    Thaumarchaeota are amongst the most abundant microorganisms in aquatic environments, however, their metabolism in marine sediments is still debated. Labeling studies in marine sediments have previously been undertaken, but focused on complex organic carbon substrates which Thaumarchaeota have not yet been shown to take up. In this study, we investigated the activity of Thaumarchaeota in sediments by supplying different 13C-labeled substrates which have previously been shown to be incorporated into archaeal cells in water incubations and/or enrichment cultures. We determined the incorporation of 13C-label from bicarbonate, pyruvate, glucose and amino acids into thaumarchaeal intact polar lipid-glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (IPL-GDGTs) during 4-6 day incubations of marine sediment cores from three sites on the Iceland shelf. Thaumarchaeal intact polar lipids, in particular crenarchaeol, were detected at all stations and concentrations remained constant or decreased slightly upon incubation. No 13C incorporation in any IPL-GDGT was observed at stations 2 (clay-rich sediment) and 3 (organic-rich sediment). In bacterial/eukaryotic IPL-derived fatty acids at station 3, contrastingly, a large uptake of 13C label (up to + 80‰ ) was found. 13C was also respired during the experiment as shown by a substantial increase in the 13C content of the dissolved inorganic carbon. In IPL-GDGTs recovered from the sandy sediments at station 1, however, some enrichment in δ13C (1-4‰ ) was detected after incubation with bicarbonate and pyruvate. The low incorporation rates suggest a low activity of Thaumarchaeota in marine sediments and/or a low turnover rate of thaumarchaeal IPL-GDGTs due to their low degradation rates. Cell numbers and activity of sedimentary Thaumarchaeota based on IPL-GDGT measurements may thus have previously been overestimated.

  8. Soil organic matter composition along a slope in an erosion-affected arable landscape in North East Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbrock, Ruth, H.; Gerke, Horst, H.; Deumlich, Detlef

    2016-04-01

    In hummocky landscapes, soil erosion is forming truncated profiles at steep slope positions and colluvial soils in topographic depressions thereby affecting soil organic carbon (SOC) storage. However, the knowledge on the spatial distribution and composition of differently stable organic matter (OM) fractions in arable landscapes is still limited. Here, amount and composition of OM from top- and subsoil horizons at eroded, colluvic, and non -eroded slope positions were compared. The horizons were from a Luvisol at plateau (LV), an eroded Luvisol (eLV) at mid slope (6%slope gradient), a calcaric Regosol (caRG) at steep slope (13%), and a colluvic Regosol (coRG) at hollow position. Water soluble (OM-W) and pyrophosphate soluble (OM-PY) fractions were extracted sequentially. Soil samples, OM fractions, and extraction residues were analyzed with transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The soluble fractions were 3% of SOC for OM-W and 15% of SOC for OM-PY. For topsoil samples, extract ion rates were independent of slope position. The highest intensities of both, C-H (alkyl groups) and C=O (carboxyl groups) absorption band, were found in FTIR spectra of OM-PY from top and subsoil horizons at the steep slope position (caRG). The C-H/C=O ratio in OM-PY decreased with increasing contents of oxalate soluble Fe and Al oxides from steep slope (0.25 for caRG-Ap) towards plateau, and hollow position (0.09 for coRG-Ap) except for the Bt -horizons. This relation is reflecting that the down slope-deposited Ap material, which is higher in poorly crystalline Fe an d Al oxides, consists of relatively stable OM. This OM is enriched in C=O groups that are known for their interaction with soil minerals. These OM-mineral interactions may help explaining C storage in arable soil landscapes.

  9. A method to assess ecosystem services developed from soil attributes with stakeholders and data of four arable farms.

    PubMed

    Rutgers, M; van Wijnen, H J; Schouten, A J; Mulder, C; Kuiten, A M P; Brussaard, L; Breure, A M

    2012-01-15

    Ecosystem-service indicators and related accounting units are crucial for the development of decision frameworks for sustainable land management systems. With a management concept using ecosystem services, land-use expectations can be linked to quantifiable soil features in a defendable and transparent way. A method to define a set of site-specific ecosystem services and indication system for quantification was set-up and run. First, we interviewed a wide group of land users profiting from ecosystem services of the soil at four arable farms in the polder Hoeksche Waard (S-SE of Rotterdam, the Netherlands). Subsequently, site-specific ecosystem services were defined and weighted according to land use expectations at different spatial and temporal scales. Second, a practical set of indicators was taken from 'Best Professional Judgment' and used to quantify the performance of the ecosystem services for these four farms. The indicators were derived from biotic and abiotic soil parameters. The performance of ecosystem services was related to a reference situation (MEP: maximum ecological potential) with the same land use and soil type combination (i.e., arable fields on silt loam) taken from the database of our national soil survey. In many cases, the performance of ecosystem services was relatively poor if compared to MEP. However, the performances of natural attenuation and/or climate-related services were better. In addition, the different management of these farms (i.e. conventional, intensive and organic farming) was reflected in the performance of the ecosystem services of their soils. Third, land management measures to improve the targeted ecosystem services were incorporated in the outlined method, but not worked out with illustrative field data in this study. Together with concordant data, we show opportunities for a quantification of ecosystem services to improve land-users' awareness and to assess management sustainability.

  10. Changes in soil water balance following afforestation of former arable soils in Denmark as evaluated using the DAISY model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Osvaldo; Hansen, Søren; Abrahamsen, Per; Hansen, Karin; Gundersen, Per

    2013-03-01

    SummaryLand use change alters water and element cycles, but the changes in these cycles after conversion, for example, from cropland to forest are not fully described in hydrological and nutrient transport models, which usually describe either cropland or forest stands. In the European Union future afforestation is likely to occur on abandoned cropland, and evaluation of the future impacts of this land use change will require projections with models that include combined cropland-forest modules. This study used the agro-based DAISY model (Version 4.93) to investigate changes in the soil water balance over four decades following afforestation of a homogeneous area of former arable land on a sandy loam in Denmark. Hydrological data collected during nine hydrological years (April 2001-March 2010) were used to test the DAISY model. Monthly data on soil water content at 0-90 cm used for calibration were available from April 2001 to December 2002 for six monoculture stands of oak (age 8, 22 and 31 years) and Norway spruce (age 4, 13 and 32 years). Model performance was evaluated by considering uncertainties in model inputs using the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) procedure. The GLUE estimates obtained (uncertainty bands 5% and 95%) agreed satisfactorily with measured monthly soil water content during the calibration period (April 2001-December 2002). Similarly, in the oldest oak stand, long-term monitoring observations and predictions of monthly water content were in satisfactory agreement during the period January 2003-March 2010). Sensitivity analysis showed that the DAISY model was most sensitive to the potential evapotranspiration factor and soil hydraulic parameters included in the Campbell model. Simulation results during nine hydrological years showed that 16-25% of incoming precipitation led to water recharge in the spruce stands, while the corresponding range for oak stands was 25-27%. A 35-year DAISY simulation revealed that Norway spruce

  11. Influence of long-term land use (arable and forest) and soil mineralogy on organic carbon stocks as well as composition and stability of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M.; Ellerbrock, R. H.; Wulf, M.; Dultz, S.; Hierath, C.; Sommer, M.

    2009-04-01

    The function of soils to sequester organic carbon (OC) and their related potential to mitigate the greenhouse effect is strongly affected by land use and soil mineralogy. This study is aimed to clarify long-term impacts of arable and forest land use as well as soil mineralogy on topsoil soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks as well as soil organic matter (SOM) composition and stability. Topsoil samples were taken from deciduous forest and adjacent arable sites (within Germany) that are continuously used for more than 100 years. The soils are different in genesis (Albic and Haplic Luvisol (AL, HL), Colluvic and Haplic Regosol (CR, HR), Haplic and Vertic Cambisol (HC, VC), Haplic Stagnosol (HSt)). First, particulate and water soluble organic matter were separated from the topsoil samples (Ap and Ah horizons). From the remaining solid extraction residues the Na-pyrophosphate soluble organic matter fractions (OM(PY)) were extracted, analysed for its OC content (OC(PY)) and characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and 14C analyses. The SOC stocks calculated for 0-40 cm depth are in general larger for the forest as compared to the adjacent arable soils (except VC). The largest difference between forest and arable topsoils was detected for the HR site (5.9 kg m-2) and seemed to be caused by a two times larger stock of exchangeable Ca of the forest topsoil. For the arable topsoils multiple regression analyses indicate a strong influence of clay, oxalate soluble Al and pyrophosphate soluble Mg on the content of OC(PY) weighted with its C=O content. Such relation is not found for the forest topsoils. Further, a positive relation between Δ14C values of OM(PY) and the following independent variables: (i) specific mineral surface area, (ii) relative C=O group content in OM(PY) and (iii) soil pH is found for the arable topsoils (pH 6.7 - 7.5) suggesting an increase in OM(PY) stability with increasing interactions between OM(PY) and soil mineral surfaces via cation bridging. A similar

  12. Sequential backbone assignment of uniformly 13C-labeled RNAs by a two-dimensional P(CC)H-TOCSY triple resonance NMR experiment.

    PubMed

    Wijmenga, S S; Heus, H A; Leeuw, H A; Hoppe, H; van der Graaf, M; Hilbers, C W

    1995-01-01

    A new 1H-13C-31P triple resonance experiment is described which allows unambiguous sequential backbone assignment in 13C-labeled oligonucleotides via through-bond coherence transfer from 31P via 13C to 1H. The approach employs INEPT to transfer coherence from 31P to 13C and homonuclear TOCSY to transfer the 13C coherence through the ribose ring, followed by 13C to 1H J-cross-polarisation. The efficiencies of the various possible transfer pathways are discussed. The most efficient route involves transfer of 31Pi coherence via C4'i and C4'i-1, because of the relatively large JPC4' couplings involved. Via the homonuclear and heteronuclear mixing periods, the C4'i and C4'i-1 coherences are subsequently transferred to, amongst others, H1'i and H1'i-1, respectively, leading to a 2D 1H-31P spectrum which allows a sequential assignment in the 31P-1H1' region of the spectrum, i.e. in the region where the proton resonances overlap least. The experiment is demonstrated on a 13C-labeled RNA hairpin with the sequence 5'(GGGC-CAAA-GCCU)3'.

  13. Expression, purification, and mass spectrometric analysis of 15N, 13C-labeled RGD-hirudin, expressed in Pichia pastoris, for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yinong; Zhang, Yanling; Wu, Yi; Wang, Jue; Liu, Xingang; Dai, Linsen; Wang, Longsheng; Yu, Min; Mo, Wei

    2012-01-01

    A novel recombinant hirudin, RGD-hirudin, inhibits the activity of thrombin and the aggregation of platelets. Here, we successfully expressed (15)N, (13)C-labeled RGD-hirudin in Pichia pastoris in a fermenter. The protein was subsequently purified to yield sufficient quantities for structural and functional studies. The purified protein was characterized by HPLC and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. Analysis revealed that the protein was pure and uniformly labeled with (15)N and (13)C. A bioassay showed that the anti-thrombin activity and the anti-platelet aggregation ability of the labeled protein were the same as those of unlabeled RGD-hirudin. Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy has been used to determine almost complete backbone (15)N, (13)C and (1)H resonance assignments of the r-RGD-Hirudin. The (15)N-(1)H HSQC spectrum of uniformly (15)N, (13)C-labeled RGD-hirudin allowed successful assignment of the signals. Examples of the quality of the data are provided for the (15)N-(l)H correlation spectrum, and by selected planes of the CBCA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and HNCO experiments. These results provide a basis for further studies on the structure-function relationship of RGD-hirudin with thrombin and platelets. PMID:22879918

  14. In vivo, large-scale preparation of uniformly (15)N- and site-specifically (13)C-labeled homogeneous, recombinant RNA for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Le, My T; Brown, Rachel E; Simon, Anne E; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of how ribonucleic acid (RNA) structures fold to form intricate, three-dimensional structures has provided fundamental insights into understanding the biological functions of RNA. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a particularly useful high-resolution technique to investigate the dynamic structure of RNA. Effective study of RNA by NMR requires enrichment with isotopes of (13)C or (15)N or both. Here, we present a method to produce milligram quantities of uniformly (15)N- and site-specifically (13)C-labeled RNAs using wild-type K12 and mutant tktA Escherichia coli in combination with a tRNA-scaffold approach. The method includes a double selection protocol to obtain an E. coli clone with consistently high expression of the recombinant tRNA-scaffold. We also present protocols for the purification of the tRNA-scaffold from a total cellular RNA extract and the excision of the RNA of interest from the tRNA-scaffold using DNAzymes. Finally, we showcase NMR applications to demonstrate the benefit of using in vivo site-specifically (13)C-labeled RNA. PMID:26577743

  15. Effect of the natural reforestation of an arable land on the organic matter composition in soddy-podzolic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhova, A. A.; Makarov, M. I.; Morgun, E. G.; Ryzhova, I. M.

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of the organic matter composition in soddy-podzolic soils during the natural reforestation of an arable land in the southern taiga zone have been discussed. It has been shown that the contents of the total and labile carbon in the old plow horizon increase with the age of the fallow in the chronosequence of soils established in the Parfen'evo district of Kostroma oblast. The parameters characterizing the labile soil organic matter include the contents of the carbon extractable by mild chemical extractants (distilled water, 0.1 M K2SO4 solution, 0.1 M neutral Na4P2O7 solution), the microbial biomass, and the light fraction. The granulo-densimetric fractionation has shown that the contents of carbon in the light and organomineral fractions of the soil vary in the course of the postagrogenic succession. The content of the clay-fraction carbon increases and its portion in the total carbon of the soil decreases at the transition from the plowland to the forest. The reforestation of agrosoddy-podzolic soils enhances the physical protection of the soil organic matter due to the increase in the portion of microaggregate carbon.

  16. Effect of almond shell biochar addition on the hydro-physical properties of an arable Central Valley soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, V.; Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar is composed of any carbonaceous matter pyrolyzed under low oxygen exposure. Its use as a soil amendment to address soil infertility has been accelerated by studies reporting positive effects of enhanced nutrient retention, cation exchange capacity, microbial activity, and vegetative growth over time. Biochar has also been considered as a carbon sequestration method because of its reported environmental persistence. While the aforementioned effects are positive benefits of biochar's use, its impact on soil physical properties and water flow are equally important in maintaining soil fertility. This study aims to show how soil physical and hydraulic properties change over time with biochar addition. To address these aims, we conducted a 9 week microcosm incubation experiment with local arable loamy sand soils amended with biochar. Biochar was created from locally collected almond shells and differs by pyrolysis temperatures (350°C, 700°C) and size (<250 μm, 1-2mm). Additionally, biochar was applied to soil at a low (10 t/ha) or high (60 t/ha) rates. Changes in soil water flow properties were analyzed by infiltration or pressure cell experiments immediately after creating our soil-biochar mixtures. These experiments were repeated during and after the incubation period to observe if and how flow is altered over time. Following incubation and hydraulic experiments, a water drop penetration time (WDPT) test was conducted to observe any alterations in surface hydrophobicity. Changes in soil physical properties were analyzed by determining content of water stable aggregates remaining after wet sieving. This series of experiments is expected to provide a greater understanding on the impact biochar addition on soil physical and hydraulic properties. Furthermore, it provides insight into whether or not converting local agricultural waste into biochar for soil use will be beneficial, especially in agricultural systems undergoing climate stress.

  17. Effect of Phosphate Addition on Cadmium Precipitation and Adsorption in Contaminated Arable Soil with a Low Concentration of Cadmium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Un; Owens, Vance N; Kim, Yong Gyun; Lee, Sang Mong; Park, Hyean Cheal; Kim, Keun Ki; Son, Hong Joo; Hong, Chang Oh

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the phosphorus (P) level required to induce cadmium (Cd) precipitation in a contaminated arable soil with low concentrations of Cd and (2) the primary mechanism of Cd immobilization at different P levels. Phosphorus was added at levels of 0 800, 1600, and 16,000 mg P kg(-1) to a soil containing 5.57 mg Cd kg(-1). The concentration of 1 M NH4OAc extractable Cd decreased significantly with P levels up to 1600 mg kg(-1) due to an increase in soil pH and negative charge of soil (p<0.001). A further decrease in 1 M NH4OAc extractable Cd concentration was noted when P was increased to 16,000 mg P kg(-1) and may have been the result of Cd precipitation. This study suggest that adding P at high levels may help in the formation of geochemically stable Cd minerals in soil containing low levels of this heavy metal.

  18. Effects of a copper-tolerant grass (Agrostis capillaris) on the ecosystem of a copper-contaminated arable soil

    SciTech Connect

    Boon, G.T.; Bouwman, L.A.; Bloem, J.; Roemkens, P.F.A.M.

    1998-10-01

    To test how a dysfunctioning ecosystem of a severely metal-polluted soil responds to renewed plant growth, a pot experiment was conducted with soil from an experimental arable field with pH and copper gradients imposed 13 years ago. In this experiment, four pH/copper combinations from this field were either planted with a pH- and copper-resistant grass cultivar or remained fallow. During a 10-week period, the dynamics of the microbial activity and of the abundances of bacteria, protozoa. and nematodes were measured, as were the dynamics of several chemical soil parameters. After 13 years of copper, which had resulted in severely reduced crop growth, no effects were observed on bacterial numbers, respiration, or protozoan numbers, but bacterial growth was strongly reduced in the low pH plots, and even more so in low pH plots enriched with copper. Of the organisms, only nematodes were negatively affected under conditions of high copper load at low pH. In these plots, numbers belonging to all feeding categories were strongly reduced. Planting of a copper-tolerant grass variety, Agrostis capillaris L. var. Parys Mountain, resulted within 10 weeks in faster bacterial growth and more protozoa and bacterivorous nematodes in comparison with fallow controls; these effects were markedly strongest in the acidic, copper-enriched soils. During incubation, fungivorous nematodes increased in all treatments, in fallow and in planted pots and in the pots with high-copper, low-pH soil. The results of this experiment suggest that introduction of plant growth is one of the major causes of increased biological activity in acidic contaminated soils. Planting such soils with metal-tolerant plant species can reestablish the necessary food base to support soil organism growth, and this can lead to numerous positive effects, reversing the loss of soil functions due to the high copper levels under acidic conditions.

  19. Direct uptake of organically derived carbon by grass roots and allocation in leaves and phytoliths: 13C labeling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, Anne; Balesdent, Jérôme; Cazevieille, Patrick; Chevassus-Rosset, Claire; Signoret, Patrick; Mazur, Jean-Charles; Harutyunyan, Araks; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Miche, Hélène; Santos, Guaciara M.

    2016-03-01

    In the rhizosphere, the uptake of low-molecular-weight carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) by plant roots has been well documented. While organic N uptake relative to total uptake is important, organic C uptake is supposed to be low relative to the plant's C budget. Recently, radiocarbon analyses demonstrated that a fraction of C from the soil was occluded in amorphous silica micrometric particles that precipitate in plant cells (phytoliths). Here, we investigated whether and to what extent organically derived C absorbed by grass roots can feed the C occluded in phytoliths. For this purpose we added 13C- and 15N-labeled amino acids (AAs) to the silicon-rich hydroponic solution of the grass Festuca arundinacea. The experiment was designed to prevent C leakage from the labeled nutritive solution to the chamber atmosphere. After 14 days of growth, the 13C and 15N enrichments (13C excess and 15N excess) in the roots, stems and leaves as well as phytoliths were measured relative to a control experiment in which no labeled AAs were added. Additionally, the 13C excess was measured at the molecular level, in AAs extracted from roots and stems and leaves. The net uptake of labeled AA-derived 13C reached 4.5 % of the total AA 13C supply. The amount of AA-derived 13C fixed in the plant was minor but not nil (0.28 and 0.10 % of total C in roots and stems/leaves, respectively). Phenylalanine and methionine that were supplied in high amounts to the nutritive solution were more 13C-enriched than other AAs in the plant. This strongly suggested that part of AA-derived 13C was absorbed and translocated into the plant in its original AA form. In phytoliths, AA-derived 13C was detected. Its concentration was on the same order of magnitude as in bulk stems and leaves (0.15 % of the phytolith C). This finding strengthens the body of evidences showing that part of organic compounds occluded in phytoliths can be fed by C entering the plant through the roots. Although this experiment was done in

  20. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively (13)C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  1. Use of 13C Labeled Carbon Tetrachloride to Demonstrate the Transformation to Carbon Dioxide under Anaerobic Conditions in a Continuous Flow Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprini, L.; Azizian, M.

    2012-12-01

    The demonstration of transformation of chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CAHs) in the subsurface is a challenge, especially when the products are carbon dioxide (CO2) and chloride ion. The groundwater contaminant carbon tetrachloride (CT) is of particular interest since a broad range of transformation products can be potentially formed under anaerobic conditions. The ability to demonstrate the transformation of CT to CO2 as a non toxic endproduct, is also of great interest. Results will be presented from a continuous flow column study where 13C labeled CT was used to demonstrate its transformation to CO2. The column was packed with a quartz sand and bioaugmented the Evanite Culture (EV) that is capable of transforming tetrachloroethene (PCE) to ethene. The column was continously fed a synthetic groundwater that was amended with PCE (0.10 mM) and either formate (1.5 mM) or lactate (1.1 mM), which ferments to produce hydrogen (H2) as the ultimate electron donor. Earlier CT transformation studies with the column, in the absence of sulfate reduction, and with formate added as a donor found CT (0.015 mM) was over 98% transformed with about 20% converted to chloroform (CF) (0.003 mM) and with a transient detection of chloromethane (CM). Methane and carbon disulfide, as potential products, were not detected. Neither CT nor CF inhibited the reductive dehalogenation of PCE to ethene. A series of transient studies conducted after these initial CT transformation tests, but in the absence of CT, showed formate remained an effective substrate for maintaining sulfate reduction and PCE transformation. Lactate, which was effectively fermented prior to CT addition, was not effectively fermented, with propionate accumulating as a fermentation product. When lactate was added, PCE was mainly transformed to cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and VC, and sulfate reduction did not occur. In order to restore effective lactate fermentation the column was then bioaugmented with an EV culture that

  2. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively 13C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  3. An intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH experiment for the assignment of main-chain resonances in 15N, 13C labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Mäntylahti, Sampo; Tossavainen, Helena; Hellman, Maarit; Permi, Perttu

    2009-11-01

    An improved pulse sequence, intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH, is described for establishing solely (13)C'(i), (15)N(i), (1)HN(i) connectivities in uniformly 15N/13C-labeled proteins. In comparison to the "out-and-back" style intra-HN(CA)CO experiment, the new pulse sequence offers at least two-fold higher experimental resolution in the (13)C' dimension and on average 1.6 times higher sensitivity especially for residues in alpha-helices. Performance of the new experiment was tested on a small globular protein ubiquitin and an intrinsically unfolded 110-residue cancer/testis antigen CT16/PAGE5. Use of intraresidual i(HCA)CO(CA)NH experiment in combination with the established HNCO experiment was crucial for the assignment of highly disordered CT16. PMID:19768387

  4. Quantitation of a spin polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effect (SPINOE) between a hyperpolarized 13C-labeled cell metabolite and water protons

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Rius, Irene; Bohndiek, Sarah E; Kettunen, Mikko I; Larkin, Timothy J; Basharat, Meer; Seeley, Colm; Brindle, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The spin polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effect (SPINOE) describes the enhancement of spin polarization of solvent nuclei by the hyperpolarized spins of a solute. In this communication we demonstrate that SPINOEs can be observed between [1,4-13C2]fumarate, hyperpolarized using the dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization technique, and solvent water protons. We derive a theoretical expression for the expected enhancement and demonstrate that this fits well with experimental measurements. Although the magnitude of the effect is relatively small (around 2% measured here), the SPINOE increases at lower field strengths, so that at clinically relevant magnetic fields (1.5–3 T) it may be possible to track the passage through the circulation of a bolus containing a hyperpolarized 13C-labeled substrate through the increase in solvent water 1H signal. © 2014 The Authors. Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd. PMID:24523064

  5. Effects of agricultural tillage practise on green house gas balance of an arable soil in a long term field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munch, Jean Charles; Schilling, Rolf; Ruth, Bernhard; Fuss, Roland

    2010-05-01

    Soils are an important part of the global carbon cycle. A large proportion of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is released from soils, though carbon sequestration occurs. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions of soils are also believed to contribute significantly to the green house effect as well as the stratospheric ozone depletion. An important source of N2O emissions is denitrification of nitrate from nitrogen fertilized soils. Although it is desirable to minimize these emissions while maintaining high crop yields it is still poorly understood how green house gas emissions may be steered by agricultural management practise, i.e. tillage and fertilization systems . In an ongoing long term field experiment at the research farm Scheyern, Bavaria, a arable field with one homogenous soil formation was transformed into plots in a randomized design 14 years ago. Since then, they are managed using conventional tillage (CT) and no tillage (NT) as well as low and high fertilization. A conventional crop rotation is maintained on the field. Starting 2007, CO2 and N2O emissions were monitored continuously for 2.5 years. Furthermore water content, temperature and redox potential were measured in-situ as they are major factors on microbial activity and denitrification. Soil was sampled from the Ap horizons of the plots about twice a month and extracts from these soil samples were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ammonium, nitrate/nitrite, and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). According to the results soil density and hydrology are clearly affected by tillage practise. DOC is more affected by tillage while concentration of nitrogen species is controlled mainly by fertilization. There are distinct differences in redox potential between CT and NT plots with CT plots having more anaerobic periods. CO2 and N2O emissions exhibit a clear seasonal pattern and are affected by both tillage system and fertilization

  6. 13C-labeled gluconate tracing as a direct and accurate method for determining the pentose phosphate pathway split ratio in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Kleijn, Roelco J; van Winden, Wouter A; Ras, Cor; van Gulik, Walter M; Schipper, Dick; Heijnen, Joseph J

    2006-07-01

    In this study we developed a new method for accurately determining the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) split ratio, an important metabolic parameter in the primary metabolism of a cell. This method is based on simultaneous feeding of unlabeled glucose and trace amounts of [U-13C]gluconate, followed by measurement of the mass isotopomers of the intracellular metabolites surrounding the 6-phosphogluconate node. The gluconate tracer method was used with a penicillin G-producing chemostat culture of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. For comparison, a 13C-labeling-based metabolic flux analysis (MFA) was performed for glycolysis and the PPP of P. chrysogenum. For the first time mass isotopomer measurements of 13C-labeled primary metabolites are reported for P. chrysogenum and used for a 13C-based MFA. Estimation of the PPP split ratio of P. chrysogenum at a growth rate of 0.02 h(-1) yielded comparable values for the gluconate tracer method and the 13C-based MFA method, 51.8% and 51.1%, respectively. A sensitivity analysis of the estimated PPP split ratios showed that the 95% confidence interval was almost threefold smaller for the gluconate tracer method than for the 13C-based MFA method (40.0 to 63.5% and 46.0 to 56.5%, respectively). From these results we concluded that the gluconate tracer method permits accurate determination of the PPP split ratio but provides no information about the remaining cellular metabolism, while the 13C-based MFA method permits estimation of multiple fluxes but provides a less accurate estimate of the PPP split ratio.

  7. A hypersaline microbial mat from the Pacific Atoll Kiritimati: insights into composition and carbon fixation using biomarker analyses and a 13C-labeling approach.

    PubMed

    Bühring, S I; Smittenberg, R H; Sachse, D; Lipp, J S; Golubic, S; Sachs, J P; Hinrichs, K-U; Summons, R E

    2009-06-01

    Modern microbial mats are widely recognized as useful analogs for the study of biogeochemical processes relevant to paleoenvironmental reconstruction in the Precambrian. We combined microscopic observations and investigations of biomarker composition to investigate community structure and function in the upper layers of a thick phototrophic microbial mat system from a hypersaline lake on Kiritimati (Christmas Island) in the Northern Line Islands, Republic of Kiribati. In particular, an exploratory incubation experiment with (13)C-labeled bicarbonate was conducted to pinpoint biomarkers from organisms actively fixing carbon. A high relative abundance of the cyanobacterial taxa Aphanocapsa and Aphanothece was revealed by microscopic observation, and cyanobacterial fatty acids and hydrocarbons showed (13)C-uptake in the labeling experiment. Microscopic observations also revealed purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) in the deeper layers. A cyclic C(19:0) fatty acid and farnesol were attributed to this group that was also actively fixing carbon. Background isotopic values indicate Calvin-Benson cycle-based autotrophy for cycC(19:0) and farnesol-producing PSBs. Biomarkers from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the top layer of the mat and their (13)C-uptake patterns indicated a close coupling between SRBs and cyanobacteria. Archaeol, possibly from methanogens, was detected in all layers and was especially abundant near the surface where it contained substantial amounts of (13)C-label. Intact glycosidic tetraether lipids detected in the deepest layer indicated other archaea. Large amounts of ornithine and betaine bearing intact polar lipids could be an indicator of a phosphate-limited ecosystem, where organisms that are able to substitute these for phospholipids may have a competitive advantage.

  8. A hypersaline microbial mat from the Pacific Atoll Kiritimati: insights into composition and carbon fixation using biomarker analyses and a 13C-labeling approach.

    PubMed

    Bühring, S I; Smittenberg, R H; Sachse, D; Lipp, J S; Golubic, S; Sachs, J P; Hinrichs, K-U; Summons, R E

    2009-06-01

    Modern microbial mats are widely recognized as useful analogs for the study of biogeochemical processes relevant to paleoenvironmental reconstruction in the Precambrian. We combined microscopic observations and investigations of biomarker composition to investigate community structure and function in the upper layers of a thick phototrophic microbial mat system from a hypersaline lake on Kiritimati (Christmas Island) in the Northern Line Islands, Republic of Kiribati. In particular, an exploratory incubation experiment with (13)C-labeled bicarbonate was conducted to pinpoint biomarkers from organisms actively fixing carbon. A high relative abundance of the cyanobacterial taxa Aphanocapsa and Aphanothece was revealed by microscopic observation, and cyanobacterial fatty acids and hydrocarbons showed (13)C-uptake in the labeling experiment. Microscopic observations also revealed purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) in the deeper layers. A cyclic C(19:0) fatty acid and farnesol were attributed to this group that was also actively fixing carbon. Background isotopic values indicate Calvin-Benson cycle-based autotrophy for cycC(19:0) and farnesol-producing PSBs. Biomarkers from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the top layer of the mat and their (13)C-uptake patterns indicated a close coupling between SRBs and cyanobacteria. Archaeol, possibly from methanogens, was detected in all layers and was especially abundant near the surface where it contained substantial amounts of (13)C-label. Intact glycosidic tetraether lipids detected in the deepest layer indicated other archaea. Large amounts of ornithine and betaine bearing intact polar lipids could be an indicator of a phosphate-limited ecosystem, where organisms that are able to substitute these for phospholipids may have a competitive advantage. PMID:19476506

  9. Direct uptake of organic carbon by grass roots and allocation in leaves and phytoliths: 13C labeling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, A.; Balesdent, J.; Cazevieille, P.; Chevassus-Rosset, C.; Signoret, P.; Mazur, J.-C.; Harutyunyan, A.; Doelsch, E.; Basile-Doelsch, I.; Miche, H.; Santos, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the rhizosphere, the uptake of low molecular weight carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) by plant roots has been well documented. While organic N uptake relatively to total uptake is important, organic C uptake is supposed to be low relatively to the plant's C budget. Recently, radiocarbon analyses demonstrated that a fraction of C from the soil was occluded in amorphous silica micrometric particles that precipitate in plant cells (phytoliths). Here, we investigated whether and in which extent organic C absorbed by grass roots, under the form of either intact amino acids (AAs) or microbial metabolites, can feed the organic C occluded in phytoliths. For this purpose we added 13C- and 15N-labeled AAs to the silicon-rich hydroponic solution of the grass Festuca arundinacea. The experiment was designed to prevent C leakage from the labeled nutritive solution to the chamber atmosphere. After 14 days of growth, the 13C and 15N enrichments (13C-excess and 15N-excess) in the roots, stems and leaves, and phytoliths, as well as the 13C-excess in AAs extracted from roots and stems and leaves, were quantified relatively to a control experiment in which no labelled AAs were added. The net uptake of 13C derived from the labeled AAs supplied to the nutritive solution (AA-13C) by Festuca arundinacea represented 4.5 % of the total AA-13C supply. AA-13C fixed in the plant represented only 0.13 % of total C. However, the experimental conditions may have underestimated the extent of the process under natural and field conditions. Previous studies showed that 15N and 13C can be absorbed by the roots in several organic and inorganic forms. In the present experiment, the fact that phenylalanine and methionine, that were supplied in high amount to the nutritive solution, were more 13C-enriched than other AAs in the roots and stems and leaves strongly suggested that part of AA-13C was absorbed and translocated in its original AA form. The concentration of AA-13C represented only 0.15 % of the

  10. Combining a coupled FTIR-EGA system and in situ DRIFTS for studying soil organic matter in arable soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demyan, M. S.; Rasche, F.; Schütt, M.; Smirnova, N.; Schulz, E.; Cadisch, G.

    2013-05-01

    An optimized spectroscopic method combining quantitative evolved gas analysis via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-EGA) in combination with a qualitative in situ thermal reaction monitoring via diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (in situT DRIFTS) is being proposed to rapidly characterize soil organic matter (SOM) to study its dynamics and stability. A thermal reaction chamber coupled with an infrared gas cell was used to study the pattern of thermal evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to relate evolved gas (i.e., CO2) to different qualities of SOM. Soil samples were taken from three different arable sites in Germany: (i) the Static Fertilization Experiment, Bad Lauchstädt (Chernozem), from treatments of farmyard manure (FYM), mineral fertilizer (NPK), their combination (FYM + NPK) and control without fertilizer inputs; (ii) Kraichgau; and (iii) Swabian Alb (Cambisols) areas, Southwest Germany. The two latter soils were further fractionated into particulate organic matter (POM), sand and stable aggregates (Sa + A), silt and clay (Si + C), and NaOCl oxidized Si + C (rSOC) to gain OM of different inferred stabilities; respiration was measured from fresh soil samples incubated at 20 °C and 50% water holding capacity for 490 days. A variable long path length gas cell was used to record the mid-infrared absorbance intensity of CO2 (2400 to 2200 cm-1) being evolved during soil heating from 25 to 700 °C with a heating rate of 68 °C min-1 and holding time of 10 min at 700 °C. Separately, the heating chamber was placed in a diffuse reflectance chamber (DRIFTS) for measuring the mid-infrared absorbance of the soil sample during heating. Thermal stability of the bulk soils and fractions was measured via the temperature of maximum CO2 evolution (CO2max). Results indicated that the FYM + NPK and FYM treatments of the Chernozem soils had a lower CO2max as compared to both NPK and CON treatments. On average, CO2max of the Chernozem

  11. Impact of earthworm Lumbricus terrestris living sites on the greenhouse gas balance of no-till arable soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, M.; Hurme, T.; Mikola, J.; Regina, K.; Nuutinen, V.

    2015-09-01

    We studied the effect of the deep-burrowing earthworm Lumbricus terrestris on the greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes and global warming potential (GWP) of arable no-till soil using both field measurements and a controlled 15-week laboratory experiment. In the field, the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were on average 43 and 32 % higher in areas occupied by L. terrestris (the presence judged by the surface midden) than in adjacent, unoccupied areas (with no midden). The fluxes of methane (CH4) were variable and had no consistent difference between the midden and non-midden areas. Removing the midden did not affect soil N2O and CO2 emissions. The laboratory results were consistent with the field observations in that the emissions of N2O and CO2 were on average 27 and 13 % higher in mesocosms with than without L. terrestris. Higher emissions of N2O were most likely due to the higher content of mineral nitrogen and soil moisture under the middens, whereas L. terrestris respiration fully explained the observed increase in CO2 emissions in the laboratory. In the field, the significantly elevated macrofaunal densities in the vicinity of middens likely contributed to the higher emissions from areas occupied by L. terrestris. The activity of L. terrestris increased the GWP of field and laboratory soil by 50 and 18 %, but only 6 and 2 % of this increase was due to the enhanced N2O emission. Our results suggest that high N2O emissions commonly observed in no-till soils can partly be explained by the abundance of L. terrestris under no-till management and that L. terrestris can markedly regulate the climatic effects of different cultivation practises.

  12. Evidence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in a contaminated aquifer by combined application of in situ and laboratory microcosms using (13)C-labelled target compounds.

    PubMed

    Bahr, Arne; Fischer, Anko; Vogt, Carsten; Bombach, Petra

    2015-02-01

    The number of approaches to evaluate the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) within contaminated aquifers is limited. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of a novel method based on the combination of in situ and laboratory microcosms using (13)C-labelled PAHs as tracer compounds. The biodegradation of four PAHs (naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, and acenaphthene) was investigated in an oxic aquifer at the site of a former gas plant. In situ biodegradation of naphthalene and fluorene was demonstrated using in situ microcosms (BACTRAP(®)s). BACTRAP(®)s amended with either [(13)C6]-naphthalene or [(13)C5/(13)C6]-fluorene (50:50) were incubated for a period of over two months in two groundwater wells located at the contaminant source and plume fringe, respectively. Amino acids extracted from BACTRAP(®)-grown cells showed significant (13)C-enrichments with (13)C-fractions of up to 30.4% for naphthalene and 3.8% for fluorene, thus providing evidence for the in situ biodegradation and assimilation of those PAHs at the field site. To quantify the mineralisation of PAHs, laboratory microcosms were set up with BACTRAP(®)-grown cells and groundwater. Naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, or acenaphthene were added as (13)C-labelled substrates. (13)C-enrichment of the produced CO2 revealed mineralisation of between 5.9% and 19.7% for fluorene, between 11.1% and 35.1% for acenaphthene, between 14.2% and 33.1% for phenanthrene, and up to 37.0% for naphthalene over a period of 62 days. Observed PAH mineralisation rates ranged between 17 μg L(-1) d(-1) and 1639 μg L(-1) d(-1). The novel approach combining in situ and laboratory microcosms allowed a comprehensive evaluation of PAH biodegradation at the investigated field site, revealing the method's potential for the assessment of PAH degradation within contaminated aquifers.

  13. Spatial variability of specific surface area of arable soils in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, S.; Sokolowska, Z.; Usowicz, B.

    2012-04-01

    Evaluation of soil spatial variability is an important issue in agrophysics and in environmental research. Knowledge of spatial variability of physico-chemical properties enables a better understanding of several processes that take place in soils. In particular, it is well known that mineralogical, organic, as well as particle-size compositions of soils vary in a wide range. Specific surface area of soils is one of the most significant characteristics of soils. It can be not only related to the type of soil, mainly to the content of clay, but also largely determines several physical and chemical properties of soils and is often used as a controlling factor in numerous biological processes. Knowledge of the specific surface area is necessary in calculating certain basic soil characteristics, such as the dielectric permeability of soil, water retention curve, water transport in the soil, cation exchange capacity and pesticide adsorption. The aim of the present study is two-fold. First, we carry out recognition of soil total specific surface area patterns in the territory of Poland and perform the investigation of features of its spatial variability. Next, semivariograms and fractal analysis are used to characterize and compare the spatial variability of soil specific surface area in two soil horizons (A and B). Specific surface area of about 1000 samples was determined by analyzing water vapor adsorption isotherms via the BET method. The collected data of the values of specific surface area of mineral soil representatives for the territory of Poland were then used to describe its spatial variability by employing geostatistical techniques and fractal theory. Using the data calculated for some selected points within the entire territory and along selected directions, the values of semivariance were determined. The slope of the regression line of the log-log plot of semi-variance versus the distance was used to estimate the fractal dimension, D. Specific surface area

  14. Speciation and distribution of P associated with Fe and Al oxides in aggregate-sized fraction of an arable soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Bol, R.; Willbold, S.; Vereecken, H.; Klumpp, E.

    2015-07-01

    To maximize crop productivity fertilizer P is generally applied to arable soils, a significant proportion of which becomes stabilized by mineral components and in part subsequently becomes unavailable to plants. However, little is known about the relative contributions of the different organic and inorganic P bound to Fe/Al oxides in the smaller soil particles. The alkaline (NaOH-Na2EDTA) extraction with solution 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy is considered as a reliable method for extracting and quantifying organic P and (some) inorganic P. However, any so-called residual P after the alkaline extraction has remained unidentified. Therefore, in the present study, the amorphous (a) and crystalline (c) Fe/Al oxide minerals and related P in soil aggregate-sized fractions (> 20, 2-20, 0.45-2 and < 0.45 μm) were specifically extracted by oxalate (a-Fe/Al oxides) and dithionite (DCB, both a- and c-Fe/Al oxides). These soil aggregate-sized fractions with and without the oxalate and DCB pre-treatments were then sequentially extracted by alkaline extraction prior to solution 31P-NMR spectroscopy. This was done to quantify the various chemical P forms which were associated with a- and c-Fe/Al oxides both in alkaline extraction and in the residual P of different soil aggregate-sized fractions. The results showed that overall P contents increased with decreasing size of the soil aggregate-sized fractions. However, the relative distribution and speciation of varying P forms were found to be independent of soil aggregate-size. The majority of alkaline extractable P was in the a-Fe/Al oxide fraction (42-47 % of total P), most of which was orthophosphate (36-41 % of total P). Furthermore, still significant amounts of particularly monoester P were bound to the oxides. Intriguingly, however, Fe/Al oxides were not the main bonding sites for pyrophosphate. Residual P contained similar amounts of total P associated with both a- (10-13 % of total P) and c

  15. Speciation and distribution of P associated with Fe and Al oxides in aggregate-sized fraction of an arable soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Bol, R.; Willbold, S.; Vereecken, H.; Klumpp, E.

    2015-11-01

    To maximize crop productivity fertilizer P is generally applied to arable soils, a significant proportion of which becomes stabilized by mineral components and in part subsequently becomes unavailable to plants. However, little is known about the relative contributions of the different organic and inorganic P bound to Fe/Al oxides in the smaller soil particles. Alkaline (NaOH-Na2EDTA) extraction with solution 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy is considered a reliable method for extracting and quantifying organic P and (some) inorganic P. However, any so-called residual P after the alkaline extraction has remained unidentified. Therefore, in the present study, the amorphous (a) and crystalline (c) Fe/Al oxide minerals and related P in soil aggregate-sized fractions (> 20, 2-20, 0.45-2 and < 0.45 μm) were specifically extracted by oxalate (a-Fe/Al oxides) and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB, both a- and c-Fe/Al oxides). These soil aggregate-sized fractions with and without the oxalate and DCB pre-treatments were then sequentially extracted by alkaline extraction prior to solution 31P-NMR spectroscopy. This was done to quantify the P associated with a- and c-Fe/Al oxides in both alkaline extraction and the residual P of different soil aggregate-sized fractions. The results showed that overall P contents increased with decreasing size of the soil aggregate-sized fractions. However, the relative distribution and speciation of varying P forms were found to be independent of soil aggregate-size. The majority of alkaline-extractable P was in the a-Fe/Al oxide fraction (42-47 % of total P), most of which was ortho-phosphate (36-41 % of total P). Furthermore, still significant amounts of particularly monoester P were bound to these oxides. Intriguingly, however, Fe/Al oxides were not the main bonding sites for pyrophosphate. Residual P contained similar amounts of total P associated with both a- (11-15 % of total P) and c-Fe oxides (7-13 % of total P

  16. Soil types will alter the response of arable agroecosystems to future rainfall patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaller, J. G.; Schwarz, T.; Hall, R.; Ziss, E.; von Hohberg und Buchwald, C.; Hösch, J.; Baumgarten, A.

    2012-04-01

    Regional climate change scenarios for eastern Austria (pannonian region) predict fewer but heavier rains during the vegetation period without substantial changes in the total annual amount of rainfall. While many studies investigated the effects of rainfall patterns on ecosystem properties, very little is known on how different soil types might alter ecosystem responses. In order to test this, we conducted an experiment at the AGES lysimeter station using 18 3 m2 lysimeters where we simultaneously manipulated rainfall patterns according to regional climate scenarios (current vs. prognosticated rain) on the three main soil types of the region (sandy calcaric phaeozem, gleyic phaeozem and calcic chernozem). Lysimeters were cultivated according to good farming practice using crop varieties and crop rotations typically for the region. Here, we present results of the response of field peas (Pisum sativum) on important agricultural parameters. Lysimeters under progn. rain showed lower crop cover than under curr. rain while soil types had no effect. Total aboveground biomass production (comprising crops plus weeds) was significantly lower under progn. rain; sandy calcaric phaeozem showed the lowest plant biomass. Pea yields under progn. rain were substantially lower than under curr. rain; again, yields under sandy soils were lower than under the other two soil types. Root growth was significantly higher in progn. rain than in curr. rain; there was a trend towards less root growth in the gleyic soils. Mycorrhization of roots was not influenced by soil types, however under progn. rain colonization rates were lower than under curr. rain. Weed establishment and growth was increased under progn. rain in gleyic soils but decreased in the other soil types. Weed biomass was not affected by rainfall, however sandy soils had less weed biomass than the other soil types. Abundance of the insect pest pea moth (Cydia nigricana) was almost twice as high under progn. rain than under curr

  17. Modelling soil borne fungal pathogens of arable crops under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manici, L. M.; Bregaglio, S.; Fumagalli, D.; Donatelli, M.

    2014-12-01

    Soil-borne fungal plant pathogens, agents of crown and root rot, are seldom considered in studies on climate change and agriculture due both to the complexity of the soil system and to the incomplete knowledge of their response to environmental drivers. A controlled chamber set of experiments was carried out to quantify the response of six soil-borne fungi to temperature, and a species-generic model to simulate their response was developed. The model was linked to a soil temperature model inclusive of components able to simulate soil water content also as resulting from crop water uptake. Pathogen relative growth was simulated over Europe using the IPCC A1B emission scenario derived from the Hadley-CM3 global climate model. Climate scenarios of soil temperature in 2020 and 2030 were compared to the baseline centred in the year 2000. The general trend of the response of soil-borne pathogens shows increasing growth in the coldest areas of Europe; however, a larger rate of increase is shown from 2020 to 2030 compared to that of 2000 to 2020. Projections of pathogens of winter cereals indicate a marked increase of growth rate in the soils of northern European and Baltic states. Fungal pathogens of spring sowing crops show unchanged conditions for their growth in soils of the Mediterranean countries, whereas an increase of suitable conditions was estimated for the areals of central Europe which represent the coldest limit areas where the host crops are currently grown. Differences across fungal species are shown, indicating that crop-specific analyses should be ran.

  18. Determination of the Orientation and Dynamics of Ergosterol in Model Membranes Using Uniform 13C Labeling and Dynamically Averaged 13C Chemical Shift Anisotropies as Experimental Restraints

    PubMed Central

    Soubias, O.; Jolibois, F.; Massou, S.; Milon, A.; Réat, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new strategy was established to determine the average orientation and dynamics of ergosterol in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. It is based on the analysis of chemical shift anisotropies (CSAs) averaged by the molecular dynamics. Static 13C CSA tensors were computed by quantum chemistry, using the gauge-including atomic-orbital approach within Hartree-Fock theory. Uniformly 13C-labeled ergosterol was purified from Pichia pastoris cells grown on labeled methanol. After reconstitution into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipids, the complete 1H and 13C assignment of ergosterol's resonances was performed using a combination of magic-angle spinning two-dimensional experiments. Dynamically averaged CSAs were determined by standard side-band intensity analysis for isolated 13C resonances (C3 and ethylenic carbons) and by off-magic-angle spinning experiments for other carbons. A set of 18 constraints was thus obtained, from which the sterol's molecular order parameter and average orientation could be precisely defined. The validity of using computed CSAs in this strategy was verified on cholesterol model systems. This new method allowed us to quantify ergosterol's dynamics at three molar ratios: 16 mol % (Ld phase), 30 mol % (Lo phase), and 23 mol % (mixed phases). Contrary to cholesterol, ergosterol's molecular diffusion axis makes an important angle (14°) with the inertial axis of the rigid four-ring system. PMID:15923221

  19. Characterization of uniformly and atom-specifically 13C-labeled heparin and heparan sulfate polysaccharide precursors using 13C NMR spectroscopy and ESI mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao K. N.; Tran, Vy M.; Victor, Xylophone V.; Skalicky, Jack J.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2010-01-01

    The biological actions of heparin and heparan sulfate, two structurally related glycosaminoglycans, depend on the organization of the complex heparanome. Due to the structural complexity of the heparanome, the sequence of variably sulfonated uronic acid and glucosamine residues is usually characterized by the analysis of smaller oligosaccharide and disaccharide fragments. Even characterization of smaller heparin/heparan sulfate oligosaccharide or disaccharide fragments using simple 1D 1H NMR spectroscopy is often complicated by the extensive signal overlap. 13C NMR signals, on the other hand, overlap less and therefore, 13C NMR spectroscopy can greatly facilitate the structural elucidation of the complex heparanome and provide finer insights into the structural basis for biological functions. This is the first report of the preparation of anomeric carbon-specific 13C-labeled heparin/heparan sulfate precursors from the Escherichia coli K5 strain. Uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled precursors were also produced and characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis of enzymatically fragmented disaccharides revealed that anomeric carbon-specific labeling efforts resulted in a minor loss/scrambling of 13C in the precursor backbone, whereas uniform labeling efforts resulted in greater than 95% 13C isotope enrichment in the precursor backbone. These labeled precursors provided high-resolution NMR signals with great sensitivity and set the stage for studying the heparanome–proteome interactions. PMID:20832774

  20. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of (13)C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our (13)C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the (13)C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the (13)C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in (13)C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  1. Evaluation of biodegradability of phenol and bisphenol A during mesophilic and thermophilic municipal solid waste anaerobic digestion using 13C-labeled contaminants.

    PubMed

    Limam, Intissar; Mezni, Mohamed; Guenne, Angéline; Madigou, Céline; Driss, Mohamed Ridha; Bouchez, Théodore; Mazéas, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the isotopic tracing using (13)C-labeled phenol and bisphenol A was used to study their biodegradation during anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste. Microcosms were incubated anaerobically at 35 °C (mesophilic conditions) and 55 °C (thermophilic conditions) without steering. A continuous follow-up of the production of biogas (CH(4) and CO(2)), was carried out during 130 d until the establishment of stable methanogenesis. Then (13)C(12)-BPA, and (13)C(6)-phenol were injected in microcosms and the follow-up of their degradation was performed simultaneously by gas chromatography isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Moreover, Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((13)C-NMR) Spectroscopy is used in the identification of metabolites. This study proves that the mineralization of phenol to CO(2) and CH(4) occurs during anaerobic digestion both in mesophilic and thermophilic conditions with similar kinetics. In mesophilic condition phenol degradation occurs through the benzoic acid pathway. In thermophilic condition it was not possible to identify the complete metabolic pathway as only acetate was identified as metabolite. Our results suggest that mineralization of phenol under thermophilic condition is instantaneous explaining why metabolites are not observed as they do not accumulate. No biodegradation of BPA was observed.

  2. Impacts of proline on the central metabolism of an industrial erythromycin-producing strain Saccharopolyspora erythraea via (13)C labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Huang, Mingzhi; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-08-10

    Saccharopolyspora erythraea E3 is an important industrial strain for erythromycin production and knowledge on its metabolism is limited. In the present work, (13)C labeling experiments were conducted to characterize the metabolism of S. erythraea E3. We found that S. erythraea E3 was difficult to grow on minimal medium with glucose as sole carbon source and the addition of proline remarkably improved the cell growth. The activity of EMP pathway was very low and ED pathway was alternatively the main glucose utilization pathway. The addition of proline resulted in remarkable changes in the fluxes of central metabolism. The fluxes in PP pathway, in TCA cycle and in ED pathway were 90% higher, 64% and 31% lower on Glc/Pro than on Glc, respectively. The maintenance energy on Glc/Pro was 58.4% lower than that on Glc. The energy charge was lower on Glc than on Glc/Pro, indicating that the cells on Glc suffered from energy burden. This study elucidates the impacts of proline on the central metabolism of S. erythraea and deepens the understanding of its metabolism. PMID:27215341

  3. Impacts of proline on the central metabolism of an industrial erythromycin-producing strain Saccharopolyspora erythraea via (13)C labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Huang, Mingzhi; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-08-10

    Saccharopolyspora erythraea E3 is an important industrial strain for erythromycin production and knowledge on its metabolism is limited. In the present work, (13)C labeling experiments were conducted to characterize the metabolism of S. erythraea E3. We found that S. erythraea E3 was difficult to grow on minimal medium with glucose as sole carbon source and the addition of proline remarkably improved the cell growth. The activity of EMP pathway was very low and ED pathway was alternatively the main glucose utilization pathway. The addition of proline resulted in remarkable changes in the fluxes of central metabolism. The fluxes in PP pathway, in TCA cycle and in ED pathway were 90% higher, 64% and 31% lower on Glc/Pro than on Glc, respectively. The maintenance energy on Glc/Pro was 58.4% lower than that on Glc. The energy charge was lower on Glc than on Glc/Pro, indicating that the cells on Glc suffered from energy burden. This study elucidates the impacts of proline on the central metabolism of S. erythraea and deepens the understanding of its metabolism.

  4. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of 13C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our 13C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the 13C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the 13C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in 13C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  5. Incorporation of {sup 13}C-labeled intermediates into developing lignin revealed by analytical pyrolysis and CuO oxidation in combination with IRM-GC-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Eglinton, T.I.; Goni, M.A.; Boon, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    Tissue samples from Ginkgo shoots (Ginkgo biloba L.) and Rice grass (Oryzasitiva sp.) incubated in the presence of {sup 13}C-labeled substrates such as coniferin (postulated to be biosynthetic intermediates in lignin biosynthesis) were studied using thermal and chemical dissociation methods in combination with molecular-level isotopic measurements. The aim of the study was (1) to investigate dissociation mechanisms, and (2) to examine and quantify the proportions of labeled material incorporated within each sample. Isotopic analysis of specific dissociation products revealed the presence of the label in its original positions, and only within lignin-derived (phenolic) products. Moreover, the distribution and isotopic composition of the dissociation products strongly suggest an origin from newly-formed lignin. These results clearly indicate that there is no {open_quotes}scrambling{close_quotes} of carbon atoms as a result of the dissociation process, thereby lending support to this analytical approach. In addition, the data provide confidence in the selective labeling approach for elucidation of the structure and biosynthesis of lignin.

  6. Modeling greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient transport in managed arable soils with a fully coupled hydrology-biogeochemical modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Edwin; Klatt, Steffen; Kiese, Ralf; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kraft, Philipp; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    The use of mineral nitrogen fertilizer sustains the global food production and therefore the livelihood of human kind. The rise in world population will put pressure on the global agricultural system to increase its productivity leading most likely to an intensification of mineral nitrogen fertilizer use. The fate of excess nitrogen and its distribution within landscapes is manifold. Process knowledge on the site scale has rapidly grown in recent years and models have been developed to simulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in managed ecosystems on the site scale. Despite first regional studies, the carbon and nitrogen cycling on the landscape or catchment scale is not fully understood. In this study we present a newly developed modelling approach by coupling the fully distributed hydrology model CMF (catchment modelling framework) to the process based regional ecosystem model LandscapeDNDC for the investigation of hydrological processes and carbon and nitrogen transport and cycling, with a focus on nutrient displacement and resulting greenhouse gas emissions in various virtual landscapes / catchment to demonstrate the capabilities of the modelling system. The modelling system was applied to simulate water and nutrient transport at the at the Yanting Agro-ecological Experimental Station of Purple Soil, Sichuan province, China. The catchment hosts cypress forests on the outer regions, arable fields on the sloping croplands cultivated with wheat-maize rotations and paddy rice fields in the lowland. The catchment consists of 300 polygons vertically stratified into 10 soil layers. Ecosystem states (soil water content and nutrients) and fluxes (evapotranspiration) are exchanged between the models at high temporal scales (hourly to daily) forming a 3-dimensional model application. The water flux and nutrients transport in the soil is modelled using a 3D Richards/Darcy approach for subsurface fluxes with a kinematic wave approach for surface water runoff and the

  7. Soil organic carbon dynamics under long-term fertilizations in arable land of northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. J.; Wang, X. J.; Xu, M. G.; Huang, S. M.; Liu, H.; Peng, C.

    2010-02-01

    Soil carbon sequestration is a complex process influenced by agricultural practices, climate and soil conditions. This paper reports a study of long-term fertilization impacts on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamic from six long-term experiments. The experiment sites are located from warm-temperate zone with a double-cropping system of corn (Zea mays L.) - wheat (Triticum Aestivium L.) rotation, to mild-temperate zones with mono-cropping systems of continuous corn, or a three-year rotation of corn-wheat-wheat. Mineral fertilizer applications result in an increasing trend in SOC except in the arid and semi-arid areas with the mono-cropping systems. Additional manure application is important to maintain SOC level in the arid and semi-arid areas. Carbon conversion rate is significant lower in the warm-temperate zone with double cropping system (6.8%-7.7%) than that in the mild-temperate areas with mono-cropping systems (15.8%-31.0%). The conversion rate is significantly correlated with annual precipitation and active accumulative temperature, i.e., higher conversion rate under lower precipitation and/or temperature conditions. Moreover, soil high in clay content has higher conversion rate than soils low in clay content. Soil carbon sequestration rate ranges from 0.07 to 1.461 t ha-1 year-1 in the upland of northern China. There is significantly linear correlation between soil carbon sequestration and carbon input at most sites, indicating that these soils are not carbon-saturated thus have potential to migrate more CO2 from atmosphere.

  8. Spatio-temporal distribution and emergence of beetles in arable fields in relation to soil moisture.

    PubMed

    Holland, J M; Thomas, C F G; Birkett, T; Southway, S

    2007-02-01

    Predatory beetles contribute to the control of crop pests and are an important food resource for farmland birds. Many of these beetle species overwinter as larvae within agricultural soils, however, their spatio-temporal emergence patterns are poorly understood, even though such knowledge can assist with their management for biocontrol. Soil moisture is considered to be a key factor influencing oviposition site selection and larval survival. The time, density and spatial pattern of Carabidae and Staphylidae emergence was therefore measured across two fields and compared to soil moisture levels in the previous winter and adult distribution in the previous July. The mean density of Carabidae and Staphylidae that emerged between April and harvest within each field was 157 and 86 m-2, indicating that soils are an important over-wintering habitat for beneficial invertebrates and should be managed sympathetically if numbers are to be increased. Of the species that were sufficiently numerous to allow their spatial pattern to be analysed, all showed a heterogeneous emergence pattern, although patches with high emergence were stable over the sampling period. The distribution of eight species was influenced by soil moisture levels in the previous winter and eight species, although not the same, were spatially associated with the distribution of adults in the previous summer suggesting that the females selected oviposition areas with the appropriate soil wetness.

  9. Daily dynamics of cellulase activity in arable soils depending on management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrent'eva, E. V.; Semenov, A. M.; Zelenev, V. V.; Chzhun, Yu.; Semenova, E. V.; Semenov, V. M.; Namsaraev, B. B.; van Bruggen, A. H. C.

    2009-08-01

    The daily dynamics of cellulase activity was studied during 27 days by the cellophane membrane method on soils managed using the conventional high-input farming system (application of mineral fertilizers and pesticides) and the biological conservation farming system (application of organic fertilizers alone) in a microfield experiment. The regular oscillatory dynamics of the cellulase activity were revealed and confirmed by the harmonic (Fourier) analysis. The oscillatory dynamics of the cellulase activity had a self-oscillatory nature and was not directly caused by the disturbing impacts of both the uncontrolled (natural) changes in the temperature and moisture (rainfall) and the controlled ones (the application of different fertilizers). The disturbing impacts affected the oscillation amplitude of the cellulase activity but not the frequency (periods) of the oscillations. The periodic oscillations of the cellulase activity were more significant in the soil under the high-input management compared to the soil under the biological farming system.

  10. [COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE USE OF 13C-LABELED MIXED TRIGLYCERIDE AND 13C-STARCH BREATH TESTS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PANCREATITIS AFTER CHOLECYSTECTOMY].

    PubMed

    Sirchak, Ye S

    2015-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive study of 96 patients after cholecystectomy are provided. The higher sensitivity and informativeness of the 13C-labeled mixed triglyceride breath .test compared with 13C-starch breath test for determining functional pancreatic insufficiency in patients after cholecystectomy in early stages of its formation was set. PMID:27491156

  11. Carbon dynamics with prolonged arable cropping soils in the Dano district (Southwest Burkina-Faso)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hounkpatin, Ozias; Welp, Gerhard; Amelung, Wulf

    2016-04-01

    The conversion of natural ecosystems into agricultural land affects the atmospheric CO2 concentration whose increase contributes to global warming. In the low activity clay soils (LAC) of the tropics, farming is largely dependent on the level of soil organic carbon (SOC) for sustainable crop production. In this study, we investigated the changes in SOC in Plinthosols along a cultivation chronosequence in the Dano district (Southwest Burkina-Faso). The chronosequence consisted of undisturbed savannah (Y0) and 11 agricultural fields with short and long histories of cultivation ranging from 1-year-old cropland to 29-year-old cropland (Y29). About 14 soil profiles were described and soil composite samples were taken per horizon. Particulate organic matter (POM) was fractionated according to particle size: fraction 2000 - 250 μm (POM1), 250 μm - 53 μm (POM2), 53 μm - 20 μm (POM3), and < 20 μm (nonPOM). Our results revealed that the extent of change in SOC stock varied with depth and the age of the cropland. The impact of cultivation was greater in the top 10 cm with a decrease in SOC stock of 21 t C/ha after 29 years of cropping indicating that about 60% of the initial stock in the native vegetation had been released. The SOC content and stock in the different POM fractions followed the following pattern: non POM > POM1 > POM3 > POM2 carbon no matter the duration of land use. However, SOC losses occurred not only in the labile C pools but also in the stabile nonPOM fraction with increasing duration of agricultural land use. Compared to the initial carbon content in the Y0 field, about 59% of carbon content loss occurred in the POM1 (> 250 μm), 53% in the POM2 (250 - 53 μm), 52 % in the POM3 (53 - 20 μm) and 47% in the nonPOM fraction (< 20 μm) after 11 years of cultivation while 79 % occurred in the POM1 C, 75% in the POM2C, 78 % in the POM3 C and 67% in the nonPOM C after 29 years of cultivation. Though most carbon was found as nonPOM, indicating that organo

  12. Impact of manure-related DOM on sulfonamide transport in arable soils.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören; Arenz-Leufen, Martina Gesine; Jacques, Diederik; Lichtner, Peter; Engelhardt, Irina

    2016-09-01

    Field application of livestock manure introduces colloids and veterinary antibiotics, e.g. sulfonamides (SAs), into farmland. The presence of manure colloids may potentially intensify the SAs-pollution to soils and groundwater by colloid-facilitated transport. Transport of three SAs, sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfamethoxypyridazine (SMPD), and sulfamoxole (SMOX), was investigated in saturated soil columns with and without manure colloids from sows and farrows, weaners, and fattening pigs. Experimental results showed that colloid-facilitated transport of SMOX was significant in the presence of manure colloids from fattening pigs with low C/N ratio, high SUVA280nm and protein C, while manure colloids from sows and farrows and weaners had little effect on SMOX transport. In contrast, only retardation was observed for SDZ and SMPD when manure colloids were present. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of colloids and SAs were replicated well by a newly developed numerical model that considers colloid-filtration theory, competitive kinetic sorption, and co-transport processes. Model results demonstrate that mobile colloids act as carriers for SMOX, while immobile colloids block SMOX from sorbing onto the soil. The low affinity of SMOX to sorb on immobile colloids prevents aggregation and also promotes SMOX's colloid-facilitated transport. Conversely, the high affinity of SDZ and SMPD to sorb on all types of immobile colloids retarded their transport. Thus, manure properties play a fundamental role in increasing the leaching risk of hydrophobic sulfonamides. PMID:27450276

  13. Impact of manure-related DOM on sulfonamide transport in arable soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dan; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören; Arenz-Leufen, Martina Gesine; Jacques, Diederik; Lichtner, Peter; Engelhardt, Irina

    2016-09-01

    Field application of livestock manure introduces colloids and veterinary antibiotics, e.g. sulfonamides (SAs), into farmland. The presence of manure colloids may potentially intensify the SAs-pollution to soils and groundwater by colloid-facilitated transport. Transport of three SAs, sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfamethoxypyridazine (SMPD), and sulfamoxole (SMOX), was investigated in saturated soil columns with and without manure colloids from sows and farrows, weaners, and fattening pigs. Experimental results showed that colloid-facilitated transport of SMOX was significant in the presence of manure colloids from fattening pigs with low C/N ratio, high SUVA280 nm and protein C, while manure colloids from sows and farrows and weaners had little effect on SMOX transport. In contrast, only retardation was observed for SDZ and SMPD when manure colloids were present. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of colloids and SAs were replicated well by a newly developed numerical model that considers colloid-filtration theory, competitive kinetic sorption, and co-transport processes. Model results demonstrate that mobile colloids act as carriers for SMOX, while immobile colloids block SMOX from sorbing onto the soil. The low affinity of SMOX to sorb on immobile colloids prevents aggregation and also promotes SMOX's colloid-facilitated transport. Conversely, the high affinity of SDZ and SMPD to sorb on all types of immobile colloids retarded their transport. Thus, manure properties play a fundamental role in increasing the leaching risk of hydrophobic sulfonamides.

  14. Synthesis of /sup 13/C-labeled standards for use in coal liquefaction studies. II. Dissolving metal reactions applied to naphthalenes and indoles: effect of sonication

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    High yield syntheses of /sup 13/C-labeled standards for later use in coal liquefaction studies are described. An alternate route for the synthesis of 1-cyclohexanone-1-/sup 13/C is discussed. Naphthalene and 2,3-dimethylnaphthalene were reduced with metal-amine solutions. The effect of sonication on product distribution was investigated. The effect of different amine solvent and different metals also was studied. A series of indoles were reduced with lithium and ethylenediamine to study the effect of sonication. To aid identification of some reduction products, independent syntheses were conducted. Naphthalenol-1-/sup 13/C, phenol-1-/sup 13/C, 1-indanone-1-/sup 13/C, 3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone-2-/sup 13/C, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline-2-/sup 13/C and carbazole-9a-/sup 13/C were synthesized in good yield. The carbonation of 1,5-pentanedimagnesium bromide was shown to be a viable alternative route for the synthesis of 1-cyclohexanone-1-/sup 13/C. Sonication was found to be an efficient agitation method for the reductive dimerization or the reductive amination of naphthalene and 2,3-dimethylnaphthalene. The product distribution was found to be dependent on the selection of the amine solvent. Sodium was shown to be a better reagent for reductive dimerization than potassium, lithium, calcium, or magnesium. The synthesis of 6,6',7,7'-tetramethyl-,1'-binaphthyl, 6,6',7,7'-tetramethyl-1,2'-binaphthyl, 6,6',7,7'-tetramethyl-2,2'-binaphthyl and some of their hydro-derivatives are described. The reduction of indoles with lithium-ethylenediamine was found to be influenced by sonication which significant increased the yield of the 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-derivative. N-Substituted indoles were shown to undergo reductive cleavage with lithium-ethylenediamine while being treated with ultrasound.

  15. Studies on organic and in-organic biostimulants in bioremediation of diesel-contaminated arable soil.

    PubMed

    Nwankwegu, Amechi S; Orji, Michael U; Onwosi, Chukwudi O

    2016-11-01

    In this study, use of inorganic fertilizer (N.P.K) was compared with organic manure (compost) in the bioremediation of diesel-polluted agricultural soil over a two-month period. Renewal by enhanced natural attenuation was used as control. The results revealed that total petroleum hydrocarbon removal from polluted soil was 71.40 ± 5.60% and 93.31 ± 3.60% for N.P.K and compost amended options, respectively. The control (natural attenuation) had 57.90 ± 3.98% of total petroleum hydrocarbon removed. Experimental data fitted second order kinetic model adequately for compost amended option. The fertilizer amended option was found to be 1.04 times slower (k2 = 4.00 ± 1.40 × 10(-7)gmg(-1)d(-1), half-life = 28.15 d) than compost amended option (k2 = 1.39 ± 0.54 × 10(-5) gmg(-1)d(-1), half-life = 8.10 d) but 1.21 times (20.6%) faster than the control (k2 = 2.57 ± 0.16 × 10(-7) gmg(-1)d(-1), half-life = 43.81 d). The hydrocarbon utilizers isolated from the diesel contaminated soil were: Bacillus nealsoni, Micrococcus luteus, Aspergillus awamori, and Fusarium proliferatum. The phytotoxicity test showed that germination indices for natural attenuation (control), fertilizer (NPK) and compost amended options were 34%, 56%, and 89%, respectively. PMID:27494315

  16. Studies on organic and in-organic biostimulants in bioremediation of diesel-contaminated arable soil.

    PubMed

    Nwankwegu, Amechi S; Orji, Michael U; Onwosi, Chukwudi O

    2016-11-01

    In this study, use of inorganic fertilizer (N.P.K) was compared with organic manure (compost) in the bioremediation of diesel-polluted agricultural soil over a two-month period. Renewal by enhanced natural attenuation was used as control. The results revealed that total petroleum hydrocarbon removal from polluted soil was 71.40 ± 5.60% and 93.31 ± 3.60% for N.P.K and compost amended options, respectively. The control (natural attenuation) had 57.90 ± 3.98% of total petroleum hydrocarbon removed. Experimental data fitted second order kinetic model adequately for compost amended option. The fertilizer amended option was found to be 1.04 times slower (k2 = 4.00 ± 1.40 × 10(-7)gmg(-1)d(-1), half-life = 28.15 d) than compost amended option (k2 = 1.39 ± 0.54 × 10(-5) gmg(-1)d(-1), half-life = 8.10 d) but 1.21 times (20.6%) faster than the control (k2 = 2.57 ± 0.16 × 10(-7) gmg(-1)d(-1), half-life = 43.81 d). The hydrocarbon utilizers isolated from the diesel contaminated soil were: Bacillus nealsoni, Micrococcus luteus, Aspergillus awamori, and Fusarium proliferatum. The phytotoxicity test showed that germination indices for natural attenuation (control), fertilizer (NPK) and compost amended options were 34%, 56%, and 89%, respectively.

  17. Manipulation of temperature and precipitation alter CO2 and N2O fluxes from an arable soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poll, Christian; Marhan, Sven; Kandeler, Ellen

    2010-05-01

    Carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems provides a feedback mechanism to climate change by releasing or sequestering additional atmospheric CO2. However, the response of terrestrial carbon cycling to the interactive effects of a changing temperature and precipitation regime is still unclear. A field experiment was established in summer 2008 to manipulate soil temperature and precipitation on an arable field. The plots are covered by roofs, which are closed with a UV-transparent greenhouse film during summer. Roof control plots (without roof) were additionally established to account for the impact of the roof on the micro-environmental conditions (only Ambient precipitation). Each treatment is replicated four times. Soil temperature is increased by 2.5°C in 4 cm depth using heating cables, which are placed on the surface. Temperature probes in 4 cm depth are connected to a datalogger, which controls the electricity supply of the heating system. Each ambient and elevated temperature plot has a size of 4 x 1 m² and is divided into 4 subplots according to the following precipitation manipulation treatments: a) ambient, b) precipitation amount decreased by 25% during summer and increased by 25% during winter, c) drought periods increased by 50% during summer, d) combination of b and c. Each subplot is surrounded by a PVC barrier to a depth of 0.5 m to avoid lateral water movement between subplots and the surrounding soil. The experimental plots were planted with spring wheat (Triticum aestivum) in 2009. Plants were harvested in August and aboveground biomass was determined. We measured the CO2 and N2O fluxes weekly using the closed chamber method. After mid of October, the closure time was increased from 30 to 60 min to account for low gas fluxes. First results indicate that the manipulation of climatic factors (soil temperature, precipitation) induced short-term effects one year after start of the field experiment. Aboveground wheat biomass was increased by elevated

  18. Vertical distribution of soil organic carbon originated from a prior peatland in Greece and impacts on the landscape, after conversion to arable land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayrotis, Theodore; Charoulis, A.; Vavoulidou, E.; Tziouvalekas, M.

    2010-05-01

    The vertical distribution and the status of soil organic carbon (Corg.) in 66 surface and subsurface soil samples were investigated. These soils originated mainly from organic deposits of Philippoi (northern Greece) have been classified as Histosols and belong to the suborder of Saprists. The present study consisted of an area of 10,371 ha where about 90% of the soils are organic. The main crops are maize (Zea mays L.), sugar beets (Beta vulgaris L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).The surface horizons consist mainly of well-humified organic materials mixed with mineral soil particles. Usually, they have moderate or insufficient drainage regime and conditions become favorable for microbial growth. Microbes decompose and transform the soil organic compounds into mineral forms, which are then available as nutrients for the crop. The organic matter was derived primarily from Cyperaceae (Cladium mariscus, various Carex species, etc.) and from decomposed residues of arable crops. The dominant features of these soils are the high content of organic matter and the obvious stratification of soil horizons. In contrast, most arable soils in Greece are characterized by low organic matter content. The stratification differentiates the physical and chemical properties and the groundwater table even during dry summers lies at depths,150 cm beneath surface. The Corg. content was high and varied greatly among the examined samples. In the surface layers ranged between 3.57 and 336.50 g kg2 (mean 199.26 g kg2) and between 22.10 and 401.10 g kg2 in the subsurface horizons (mean 258.89 g kg2). It can be argued that surface layers are drier and part of soil organic matter was seriously affected by the process of oxidation. At drier sites, soil subsidence was appeared as a consequence of soil organic matter oxidation. Increased contents were found in the northern part of the

  19. Health risks of thallium in contaminated arable soils and food crops irrigated with wastewater from a sulfuric acid plant in western Guangdong province, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunlin; Chen, Yongheng; Liu, Juan; Wang, Jin; Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Yongbo; Liu, Yimin

    2013-04-01

    Thallium (Tl) contamination in soils poses a significant threat to human health due to the high toxicity of Tl and its ready assimilation by crops. Consumption of food crops contaminated with Tl is a major food chain route for human exposure. The health risks of Tl in contaminated food crops irrigated with wastewater from a sulfuric acid factory were investigated in this paper. Results indicate that long-term Tl-containing wastewater irrigation resulted in Tl contamination of arable soils and crops. The pollution load index values indicated that the arable soils were moderately enriched with Tl. Tl was highly accumulated in the crops. The content of Tl in the edible plant portions of crops ranged from 1.2 mg/kg to 104.8 mg/kg, exceeding the recommended permissible limits for food crops. The daily intake of metals (DIM) values of Tl for both adults and children via the consumption of the food crops except soya beans were higher than the reference oral dose (RfD) limit recommend by the United States environmental protection agency (US-EPA). Health risk index (HRI) values were generally higher than 1, indicating that health risks associated with Tl exposure are significant and assumed to be dangerous to the health of local villagers. Therefore, much attention should be paid to avoid consumption of these Tl-contaminated crops that can cause great potential risks. PMID:23321363

  20. Health risks of thallium in contaminated arable soils and food crops irrigated with wastewater from a sulfuric acid plant in western Guangdong province, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunlin; Chen, Yongheng; Liu, Juan; Wang, Jin; Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Yongbo; Liu, Yimin

    2013-04-01

    Thallium (Tl) contamination in soils poses a significant threat to human health due to the high toxicity of Tl and its ready assimilation by crops. Consumption of food crops contaminated with Tl is a major food chain route for human exposure. The health risks of Tl in contaminated food crops irrigated with wastewater from a sulfuric acid factory were investigated in this paper. Results indicate that long-term Tl-containing wastewater irrigation resulted in Tl contamination of arable soils and crops. The pollution load index values indicated that the arable soils were moderately enriched with Tl. Tl was highly accumulated in the crops. The content of Tl in the edible plant portions of crops ranged from 1.2 mg/kg to 104.8 mg/kg, exceeding the recommended permissible limits for food crops. The daily intake of metals (DIM) values of Tl for both adults and children via the consumption of the food crops except soya beans were higher than the reference oral dose (RfD) limit recommend by the United States environmental protection agency (US-EPA). Health risk index (HRI) values were generally higher than 1, indicating that health risks associated with Tl exposure are significant and assumed to be dangerous to the health of local villagers. Therefore, much attention should be paid to avoid consumption of these Tl-contaminated crops that can cause great potential risks.

  1. Combining a coupled FTIR-EGA system and in situ DRIFTS for studying soil organic matter in arable soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demyan, M. S.; Rasche, F.; Schütt, M.; Smirnova, N.; Schulz, E.; Cadisch, G.

    2012-11-01

    An optimized spectroscopic method combining quantitative evolved gas analysis via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-EGA) and qualitative in situ thermal reaction monitoring via diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (in situT DRIFTS) is being proposed to rapidly characterize soil organic matter (SOM) to study its dynamics and stability. A thermal reaction chamber coupled with an infrared gas cell was used to study the pattern of thermal evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to relate evolved gas to different qualities of soil organic matter (SOM). Soil samples were from three different sites, i.e. (i) the Static Fertilization Experiment, Bad Lauchstädt (Chernozem) from treatments of farmyard manure (FYM), mineral fertilizer (NPK), combination (FYM + NPK) and control without fertilizer inputs, and cropped soils from the (ii) Kraichgau and (iii) Swabian Alb (Cambisols) areas, Southwest Germany. Soils from Kraichgau and Swabian Alb were further fractionated into particulate organic matter (POM), sand and stable aggregates (Sa + A), silt and clay (Si + C), and NaOCl oxidized Si + C (rSOC) to gain OM of different inferred stabilities. Fresh soil samples from the Kraichgau and Swabian Alb were incubated at 20 °C and 50% water holding capacity for 490 days in order to measure soil respiration under controlled conditions. A variable long path length gas cell was used to record the mid-infrared absorbance intensity of carbon dioxide (2400 to 2200 cm-1) being evolved during soil heating from 25 to 700 °C with a heating rate of 68 °C min-1 during an initial ramping time of 10 min and holding time of 10 min. Separately the heating chamber was placed in a diffuse reflectance chamber (DRIFTS) for measuring the mid-infrared absorption of the soil sample during heating. Thermal stability of the bulk soils and fractions was measured via the temperature of maximum CO2 (2400 to 2200 cm-1 evolution (CO2). Results indicated that the FYM + NPK

  2. National monitoring study in Denmark finds increased and critical levels of copper and zinc in arable soils fertilized with pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Jensen, John; Larsen, Martin Mørk; Bak, Jesper

    2016-07-01

    The increasing consumption of copper and zinc in modern farming is linked to their documented benefit as growth promoting agents and usefulness for controlling diarrhoea. Copper and zinc are inert and non-degradable in the slurry and the environment and thereby introducing new challenges and concern. Therefore, a follow-up to pervious national soil monitoring programs on heavy metals was initiated in 2014 with special focus on the historical trends in soil concentrations of copper and zinc in Danish arable soils. Hereby it is possible to analyse trends for a 28 year period. Data shows that: 1) Amendment of soils with pig slurry has led to a significant increase in soil concentrations of copper and zinc, especially in the latest monitoring period from 1998 to 2014; 2) Predicted no-effect concentrations for soil dwelling species published by the European Union is exceeded for zinc in 45% of all soil samples, with the highest proportion on sandy soils; 3) The current use of zinc and copper in pig production may lead to leaching of metals, especially zinc, from fields fertilized with pig slurry in concentrations that may pose a risk to aquatic species.

  3. Ecological impacts of arable intensification in Europe.

    PubMed

    Stoate, C; Boatman, N D; Borralho, R J; Carvalho, C R; de Snoo, G R; Eden, P

    2001-12-01

    Although arable landscapes have a long history, environmental problems have accelerated in recent decades. The effects of these changes are usually externalized, being greater for society as a whole than for the farms on which they operate, and incentives to correct them are therefore largely lacking. Arable landscapes are valued by society beyond the farming community, but increased mechanization and farm size, simplification of crop rotations, and loss of non-crop features, have led to a reduction in landscape diversity. Low intensity arable systems have evolved a characteristic and diverse fauna and flora, but development of high input, simplified arable systems has been associated with a decline in biodiversity. Arable intensification has resulted in loss of non-crop habitats and simplification of plant and animal communities within crops, with consequent disruption to food chains and declines in many farmland species. Abandonment of arable management has also led to the replacement of such wildlife with more common and widespread species. Soils have deteriorated as a result of erosion, compaction, loss of organic matter and contamination with pesticides, and in some areas, heavy metals. Impacts on water are closely related to those on soils as nutrient and pesticide pollution of water results from surface runoff and subsurface flow, often associated with soil particles, which themselves have economic and ecological impacts. Nitrates and some pesticides also enter groundwater following leaching from arable land. Greatest impacts are associated with simplified, high input arable systems. Intensification of arable farming has been associated with pollution of air by pesticides, NO2 and CO2, while the loss of soil organic matter has reduced the system's capacity for carbon sequestration. International trade contributes to global climate change through long distance transport of arable inputs and products. The EU Rural Development Regulation (1257/99) provides an

  4. Assessing microbial utilization of free versus sorbed Alanine by using position-specific 13C labeling and 13C-PLFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, Jennifer; Apostel, Carolin; Spielvogel, Sandra; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Dippold, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Microbial utilization is a key transformation process of soil organic matter (SOM). Sorption of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces blocks or delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil science, combined with 13C-phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, to assess microbial utilization of sorbed and non-sorbed Alanine in soil. Alanine has various functional groups enabling different sorption mechanisms via its positive charge (e.g. to clay minerals by cation exchange), as well as via its negative charge (e.g. to iron oxides by ligand exchange). To assess changes in the transformation pathways caused by sorption, we added uniformly and position-specifically 13C and 14C labeled Alanine to the Ap of a loamy Luvisol in a short-term (10 days) incubation experiment. To allow for sorption of the tracer solution to an aliquot of this soil, microbial activity was minimized in this subsample by sterilizing the soil by γ-radiation. After shaking, the remaining solutions were filtered and the non-sorbed Alanine was removed with Millipore water and then added to non-sterilized soil. For the free Alanine treatment, solutions with Alanine of similar amount and isotopic composition were prepared, added to the soil and incubated as well. The respired CO2 was trapped in NaOH and its 14C-activity was determined at increasing times intervals. Microbial utilization of Alanine's individual C positions was evaluated in distinct microbial groups classified by 13C-PLFA analysis. Sorption to soil minerals delayed respiration to CO2 and reduced initial respiration rate by 80%. Irrespective of sorption, the highest amount was respired from the carboxylic position (C-1), whereas the amino-bound (C-2) and the methylic position (C-3) were preferentially incorporated into PLFA of microorganisms due to the

  5. Carbon sequestration and estimated carbon credit values as measured using 13C labelling and analysis by means of an optical breath test analyser.

    PubMed

    Hood, R C; Khan, M; Haque, A; Khadir, M; Bonetto, J P; Syamsul, R; Mayr, L; Heiling, M

    2004-05-01

    Recent developments in optical systems (isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry) for breath testing have provided a robust, low-cost option for undertaking (13)C analysis. Although these systems were initially developed for breath testing for Helicobacter pylori, they have an enormous potential as a soil science research tool. The relatively low cost of the equipment, US$15,000-25,000, is within the research budgets of most institutes or universities. The simplicity of the mechanisms and optical nature mean that the equipment requires relatively low maintenance and minimal training. Thus methods were developed to prepare soil and plant materials for analysis using the breath test analyser. Results that compare conventional mass spectrometric methods with the breath test analyser will be presented. In combination with simple (13)C-plant-labeling techniques it is possible to devise methods for estimating carbon sequestration under different agronomic management practices within a short time frame. This enables assessment of the carbon credit value of a particular agronomic practice, which can in turn be used by policy makers for decision-making purposes. For global understanding of the effect of agricultural practices on the carbon cycle, data are required from a range of cropping systems and agro-ecological zones. The method and the approach described will enable collection of hard data within a reasonable time.

  6. Heavy metals and health risk assessment of arable soils and food crops around Pb-Zn mining localities in Enyigba, southeastern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obiora, Smart C.; Chukwu, Anthony; Davies, Theophilus C.

    2016-04-01

    This study determined the heavy metals concentration in arable soils and associated food crops around the Pb-Zn mines in Enyigba, Nigeria, and metal transfer factors were calculated. Air-dried samples of the soils and food crops were analyzed for 8 known nutritional and toxic heavy metals by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) method. Eighty seven percent of all the 20 sampled soils contain Pb in excess of the maximum allowable concentration (MAC) set by Canadian Environmental Quality Guideline (CCME) and European Union (EU) Standard, while Zn in thirty-one percent of the samples exceeded the CCME for MAC of 200 mg/kg. All the food crops, with the exception of yam tuber, contain Pb which exceeded the 0.43 mg/kg and 0.3 mg/kg MAC standards of EU and WHO/FAO respectively, with the leafy vegetables accumulating more Pb than the tubers. The metal transfer factors in the tubers and the leafy vegetables were in the order: Mo > Cu > Zn > Mn > As > Cd > Cr > Ni > Pb and Cd > Cu > Zn > Mn > Mo > As > Ni > Pb > Cr, respectively. Risk assessment studies revealed no health risk in surrounding populations for most of the heavy metals. However, Pb had a high health risk index (HRI) of 1.1 and 1.3, in adults and children, respectively for cassava tuber; Pb had HRI > 1 in lemon grass while Mn also had HRI > 1 in all the leafy vegetables for both adult and children. This high level of HRI for Pb and Mn is an indication that consumers of the food crops contaminated by these metals are at risk of health problems such as Alzheimers' disease and Manganism, associated with excessive intake of these metals. Further systematic monitoring of heavy metal fluxes in cultivable soils around the area of these mines is recommended.

  7. Effects of long-term differential fertilization on eukaryotic microbial communities in an arable soil: a multiple barcoding approach.

    PubMed

    Lentendu, Guillaume; Wubet, Tesfaye; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Wilhelm, Christian; Buscot, François; Schlegel, Martin

    2014-07-01

    To understand the fine-scale effects of changes in nutrient availability on eukaryotic soil microorganisms communities, a multiple barcoding approach was used to analyse soil samples from four different treatments in a long-term fertilization experiment. We performed PCR amplification on soil DNA with primer pairs specifically targeting the 18S rRNA genes of all eukaryotes and three protist groups (Cercozoa, Chrysophyceae-Synurophyceae and Kinetoplastida) as well as the ITS gene of fungi and the 23S plastid rRNA gene of photoautotrophic microorganisms. Amplicons were pyrosequenced, and a total of 88,706 quality filtered reads were clustered into 1232 operational taxonomic units (OTU) across the six data sets. Comparisons of the taxonomic coverage achieved based on overlapping assignment of OTUs revealed that half of the eukaryotic taxa identified were missed by the universal eukaryotic barcoding marker. There were only little differences in OTU richness observed between organic- (farmyard manure), mineral- and nonfertilized soils. However, the community compositions appeared to be strongly structured by organic fertilization in all data sets other than that generated using the universal eukaryotic 18S rRNA gene primers, whereas mineral fertilization had only a minor effect. In addition, a co-occurrence based network analysis revealed complex potential interaction patterns between OTUs from different trophic levels, for example between fungivorous flagellates and fungi. Our results demonstrate that changes in pH, moisture and organic nutrients availability caused shifts in the composition of eukaryotic microbial communities at multiple trophic levels.

  8. Effect of Conversion from Natural Grassland to Arable Land on Soil Carbon Reserve in the Argentinean Rolling Pampas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriulo, A. E.; Irizar, A. B.; Mary, B.; Wilson, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    The evaluation of the effect of land use change on accumulation of soil organic carbon (SOC) requires reliable data obtained from georeferenced sites with land use history records. The purpose of this study was to evaluate long term changes in the reserves of SOC in a typical Argiudol of the Pergamino series after the introduction of agriculture. Measures of soil organic carbon concentration and bulk density of Ap and A12 horizons were carried out in three sites of the Pergamino County (N of Buenos Aires province): a reference field with untilled pristine soil (33° 57' S; 60° 34' W), a field with 31 years (1980-2011) of agriculture (31Y) located next to the former, and a third field (33° 46' S; 60° 37' W) with 80 years (1910/1990) of agriculture (80Y). 31Y has been under continuous soybean cultivation with conventional tillage (CT) that consists of moldboard plow or double disk harrowing. At 80K the cultivation sequence was: 44 years of corn + 9 years of flax + 2 years of wheat + 17 years of wheat/soybean double cropping + 1 year of lentil; mostly under CT, some years under chisel plow during the 70's and a few years under zero tillage in soybean after wheat sown with conventional tillage during the 80's. Before the introduction of mechanical harvesting (1947) crop residues were burnt as well as the wheat stubble during the conventional double cropping period (1970-1980). Soil texture (23±1% clay, with predominance of illite) and field slopes (<0.5%) were similar in the three sites. Nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization rates were minimal due to the low crop response. The results are expressed in Mg ha-1 for an A soil horizon mass of 2500 Mg ha-1. The introduction of agriculture decreased SOC stock: 31Y varied from 68.3 to 40.1 Mg ha-1 (41.3% loss) and 80Y from 68.3 to 47.2 Mg ha-1 (30% loss). The SOC loss was the result of the mineralization of a large amount labile SOC present in the pristine soil and low annual additions of carbon issued from crop residue

  9. Metabolic flux analysis of recombinant Pichia pastoris growing on different glycerol/methanol mixtures by iterative fitting of NMR-derived (13)C-labelling data from proteinogenic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Jordà, Joel; de Jesus, Sérgio S; Peltier, Solenne; Ferrer, Pau; Albiol, Joan

    2014-01-25

    The yeast Pichia pastoris has emerged as one of the most promising yeast cell factories for the production of heterologous proteins. The readily available genetic tools and the ease of high-cell density cultivations using methanol or glycerol/methanol mixtures are among the key factors for this development. Previous studies have shown that the use of mixed feeds of glycerol and methanol seem to alleviate the metabolic burden derived from protein production, allowing for higher specific and volumetric process productivities. However, initial studies of glycerol/methanol co-metabolism in P. pastoris by classical metabolic flux analyses using (13)C-derived Metabolic Flux Ratio (METAFoR) constraints were hampered by the reduced labelling information obtained when using C3:C1 substrate mixtures in relation to the conventional C6 substrate, that is, glucose. In this study, carbon flux distributions through the central metabolic pathways in glycerol/methanol co-assimilation conditions have been further characterised using biosynthetically directed fractional (13)C labelling. In particular, metabolic flux distributions were obtained under 3 different glycerol/methanol ratios and growth rates by iterative fitting of NMR-derived (13)C-labelling data from proteinogenic amino acids using the software tool (13)CFlux2. Specifically, cells were grown aerobically in chemostat cultures fed with 80:20, 60:40 and 40:60 (w:w) glycerol/methanol mixtures at two dilutions rates (0.05 hour(-1) and 0.16 hour(-1)), allowing to obtain additional data (biomass composition and extracellular fluxes) to complement pre-existing datasets. The performed (13)C-MFA reveals a significant redistribution of carbon fluxes in the central carbon metabolism as a result of the shift in the dilution rate, while the ratio of carbon sources has a lower impact on carbon flux distribution in cells growing at the same dilution rate. At low growth rate, the percentage of methanol directly dissimilated to CO2 ranges

  10. Biomimetic oxidative treatment of spruce wood studied by pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectrometry coupled with multivariate analysis and 13C-labeled tetramethylammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis: implications for fungal degradation of wood.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Valdeir; Qian, Yuhui; Kelley, Stephen S; Milagres, Adriane M F; Filley, Timothy R; Jellison, Jody; Goodell, Barry

    2009-11-01

    In this work, pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectrometry analysis coupled with principal components analysis and (13)C-labeled tetramethylammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis were used to study lignin oxidation, depolymerization, and demethylation of spruce wood treated by biomimetic oxidative systems. Neat Fenton and chelator-mediated Fenton reaction (CMFR) systems as well as cellulosic enzyme treatments were used to mimic the nonenzymatic process involved in wood brown-rot biodegradation. The results suggest that compared with enzymatic processes, Fenton-based treatment more readily opens the structure of the lignocellulosic matrix, freeing cellulose fibrils from the matrix. The results demonstrate that, under the current treatment conditions, Fenton and CMFR treatment cause limited demethoxylation of lignin in the insoluble wood residue. However, analysis of a water-extractable fraction revealed considerable soluble lignin residue structures that had undergone side chain oxidation as well as demethoxylation upon CMFR treatment. This research has implications for our understanding of nonenzymatic degradation of wood and the diffusion of CMFR agents in the wood cell wall during fungal degradation processes.

  11. Uniform {sup 15}N- and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeling of proteins in mammalian cells and solution structure of the amino terminal fragment of u-PA

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.P.; Petros, A.M.; Meadows, R.P.; Mazar, A.P.; Nettesheim, D.G.; Pederson, T.M.; Fesik, S.W.

    1994-12-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) is a 54-kDa glycoprotein that catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, a broad-specificity protease responsible for the degradation of fibrin clots and extracellular matrix components. The u-PA protein consists of three individual modules: a growth factor domain (GFD), a kringle, and a serine protease domain. The amino terminal fragment (ATF) includes the GFD-responsible for u-PA binding to its receptor-and the kringle domains. This protein was expressed and uniformly {sup 15}N-and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled in mammalian cells by methods that will be described. In addition, we present the three-dimensional structure of ATF that was derived from 1299 NOE-derived distance restraints along with the {phi} angle and hydrogen bonding restraints. Although the individual domains in the structures were highly converged, the two domains are structurally independent. The overall structures of the individual domains are very similar to the structures of homologous proteins. However, important structural differences between the growth factor domain of u-PA and other homologous proteins were observed in the region that has been implicated in binding the urokinase receptor. These results may explain, in part, why other growth factors show no appreciable affinity for the urokinase receptor.

  12. Investigations of enzymatic alterations of 2,4-dichlorophenol using {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance in combination with site-specific {sup 13}C-labeling: Understanding the environmental fate of this pollutant

    SciTech Connect

    Nanny, M.A.; Bortiatynski, J.M.; Tien, M.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1996-11-01

    The biodegradation of {sup 13}C-labeled 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP labeled at the C-2 and C-6 positions), in the presence and absence of natural organic matter (NOM), by the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, was examined using {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Using this method permitted the chemistry occurring at or near the labeled site to be followed. The formation of alkyl ethers and alkene ethers was observed. No aromatic by-products were detected, indicating that aromatic compounds are quickly degraded. Examining the reaction with time shows the exponential removal of 2,4-DCP and the consequential formation of labeled by-products, whose concentration reaches a maximum just before all 2,4-DCP is consumed. After this, the by-products degrade exponentially. The presence of NOM causes 2,4-DCP to be removed from the aqueous phase more quickly than in its absence and also causes the by-products to reach their maximum concentration much earlier. Degradation of the by-products occurs at a much greater rate in the presence of NOM. One hypothesis for this behavior is that the NOM interacts with 2,4-DCP and its by-products, allowing them to be incorporated into the fungal biomass. {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fungal biomass after NaOH extraction show the presence of alkanes and a small amount of 2,4-DCP.

  13. Do cover crops enhance N₂O, CO₂ or CH₄ emissions from soil in Mediterranean arable systems?

    PubMed

    Sanz-Cobena, A; García-Marco, S; Quemada, M; Gabriel, J L; Almendros, P; Vallejo, A

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of planting three cover crops (CCs) (barley, Hordeum vulgare L.; vetch, Vicia villosa L.; rape, Brassica napus L.) on the direct emission of N₂O, CO₂ and CH₄ in the intercrop period and the impact of incorporating these CCs on the emission of greenhouse gas (GHG) from the forthcoming irrigated maize (Zea mays L.) crop. Vetch and barley were the CCs with the highest N₂O and CO₂ losses (75 and 47% increase compared with the control, respectively) in the fallow period. In all cases, fluxes of N₂O were increased through N fertilization and the incorporation of barley and rape residues (40 and 17% increase, respectively). The combination of a high C:N ratio with the addition of an external source of mineral N increased the fluxes of N₂O compared with -Ba and -Rp. The direct emissions of N₂O were lower than expected for a fertilized crop (0.10% emission factor, EF) compared with other studies and the IPCC EF. These results are believed to be associated with a decreased NO₃(-) pool due to highly denitrifying conditions and increased drainage. The fluxes of CO₂ were in the range of other fertilized crops (i.e., 1118.71-1736.52 kg CO₂-Cha(-1)). The incorporation of CC residues enhanced soil respiration in the range of 21-28% for barley and rape although no significant differences between treatments were detected. Negative CH₄ fluxes were measured and displayed an overall sink effect for all incorporated CC (mean values of -0.12 and -0.10 kg CH₄-Cha(-1) for plots with and without incorporated CCs, respectively). PMID:23906854

  14. Do cover crops enhance N₂O, CO₂ or CH₄ emissions from soil in Mediterranean arable systems?

    PubMed

    Sanz-Cobena, A; García-Marco, S; Quemada, M; Gabriel, J L; Almendros, P; Vallejo, A

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of planting three cover crops (CCs) (barley, Hordeum vulgare L.; vetch, Vicia villosa L.; rape, Brassica napus L.) on the direct emission of N₂O, CO₂ and CH₄ in the intercrop period and the impact of incorporating these CCs on the emission of greenhouse gas (GHG) from the forthcoming irrigated maize (Zea mays L.) crop. Vetch and barley were the CCs with the highest N₂O and CO₂ losses (75 and 47% increase compared with the control, respectively) in the fallow period. In all cases, fluxes of N₂O were increased through N fertilization and the incorporation of barley and rape residues (40 and 17% increase, respectively). The combination of a high C:N ratio with the addition of an external source of mineral N increased the fluxes of N₂O compared with -Ba and -Rp. The direct emissions of N₂O were lower than expected for a fertilized crop (0.10% emission factor, EF) compared with other studies and the IPCC EF. These results are believed to be associated with a decreased NO₃(-) pool due to highly denitrifying conditions and increased drainage. The fluxes of CO₂ were in the range of other fertilized crops (i.e., 1118.71-1736.52 kg CO₂-Cha(-1)). The incorporation of CC residues enhanced soil respiration in the range of 21-28% for barley and rape although no significant differences between treatments were detected. Negative CH₄ fluxes were measured and displayed an overall sink effect for all incorporated CC (mean values of -0.12 and -0.10 kg CH₄-Cha(-1) for plots with and without incorporated CCs, respectively).

  15. Modeling the effects of different N fertilizer rates on N2O emissions and nitrate leaching from arable soils in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Berger, S.; Tenhunen, J. D.; Gebauer, G.; Kiese, R.

    2012-12-01

    Process-based biogeochemical models can be used to predict the impact of various agricultural management practices on plant nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen losses to the environment such as greenhouse gas emissions and nitrate leaching by analyzing the interactions between management practices, primary drivers such as climate, soil properties, crop types, etc., and biogeochemical reactions. In this study we applied the Landscape-DNDC model, which combines and uniforms functions of the agricultural-DNDC and the Forest-DNDC for simulation of C and N turnover, GHG emissions, nitrate leaching, and plant growth for a Korean arable field cultivated with radish (Raphanus sativus L.). The annual average temperature is app. 8.5°C and the annual precipitation is app. 1,500 mm. According to farmers practice the study field received a basal fertilizer application of app. 200 kg N ha-1 before setting up four fertilizer treatments i.e. additionally 50, 150, 250 and 350 kg N ha-1. All N treatment plots were tilled a week after application of specific N fertilizer in order to make row and interrow. Just before radish seeding rows were covered with black plastic mulch which was removed after harvest. In spite the widespread usage of black mulch in Korea or even Asia; so far biogeochemical models do not consider impacts of mulch on soil environmental conditions and soil biogeochemistry. Based on field measurements we adjusted input information and used only half of the annual precipitation and the maximum temperature for simulation of row conditions, whereas the actual weather data were used for the interrow simulations. Simulated N2O emissions agreed well with measurements; however peak emissions after fertilization were slightly underestimated in row and interrow. Annual N2O emissions of the fertilizer treatments increased with increasing fertilization rates from around 1.5 to 3 kg N ha-1 in the row and lower emissions of app. 1.5 kg N ha-1 (for all N treatments) in the

  16. Significant alteration of soil bacterial communities and organic carbon decomposition by different long-term fertilization management conditions of extremely low-productivity arable soil in South China.

    PubMed

    Xun, Weibing; Zhao, Jun; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Guishan; Ran, Wei; Wang, Boren; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2016-06-01

    Different fertilization managements of red soil, a kind of Ferralic Cambisol, strongly affected the soil properties and associated microbial communities. The association of the soil microbial community and functionality with long-term fertilization management in the unique low-productivity red soil ecosystem is important for both soil microbial ecology and agricultural production. Here, 454 pyrosequencing analysis of 16S recombinant ribonucleic acid genes and GeoChip4-NimbleGen-based functional gene analysis were used to study the soil bacterial community composition and functional genes involved in soil organic carbon degradation. Long-term nitrogen-containing chemical fertilization-induced soil acidification and fertility decline and significantly altered the soil bacterial community, whereas long-term organic fertilization and fallow management improved the soil quality and maintained the bacterial diversity. Short-term quicklime remediation of the acidified soils did not change the bacterial communities. Organic fertilization and fallow management supported eutrophic ecosystems, in which copiotrophic taxa increased in relative abundance and have a higher intensity of labile-C-degrading genes. However, long-term nitrogen-containing chemical fertilization treatments supported oligotrophic ecosystems, in which oligotrophic taxa increased in relative abundance and have a higher intensity of recalcitrant-C-degrading genes but a lower intensity of labile-C-degrading genes. Quicklime application increased the relative abundance of copiotrophic taxa and crop production, although these effects were utterly inadequate. This study provides insights into the interaction of soil bacterial communities, soil functionality and long-term fertilization management in the red soil ecosystem; these insights are important for improving the fertility of unique low-productivity red soil.

  17. hNCOcanH pulse sequence and a robust protocol for rapid and unambiguous assignment of backbone ((1)H(N), (15)N and (13)C') resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulse sequence named as hNCOcanH has been described to aid rapid sequential assignment of backbone resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins. The experiment has been derived by a simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147]; t2 evolution is used to frequency label (13)C' rather than (15)N (similar trick has also been used in the design of hNCAnH pulse sequence from hNcaNH [Frueh et al., JACS, 131 (2009) 12880-12881]). The modification results in a spectrum equivalent to HNCO, but in addition to inter-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi , Ci-1), the spectrum also contains additional intra-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi-1 , Ci-1) in the direct proton dimension which has maximum resolution. This is the main strength of the experiment and thus, even a small difference in amide (1) H chemical shifts (5-6 Hz) can be used for establishing a sequential connectivity. This experiment in combination with the HNN experiment described previously [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] leads to a more robust assignment protocol for backbone resonances ((1) H(N) , (15)N) than could be derived from the combination of HNN and HN(C)N experiments [Bhavesh et al., Biochemistry, 40 (2001) 14727-14735]. Further, this new protocol enables assignment of (13)C' resonances as well. We believe that the experiment and the protocol presented here will be of immense value for structural-and functional-proteomics research by NMR. Performance of this experiment has been demonstrated using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin.

  18. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  19. Production process monitoring by serial mapping of microbial carbon flux distributions using a novel Sensor Reactor approach: II--(13)C-labeling-based metabolic flux analysis and L-lysine production.

    PubMed

    Drysch, A; El Massaoudi, M; Mack, C; Takors, R; de Graaf, A A; Sahm, H

    2003-04-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is intensively used for the industrial large-scale (fed-) batch production of amino acids, especially glutamate and lysine. However, metabolic flux analyses based on 13C-labeling experiments of this organism have hitherto been restricted to small-scale batch conditions and carbon-limited chemostat cultures, and are therefore of questionable relevance for industrial fermentations. To lever flux analysis to the industrial level, a novel Sensor Reactor approach was developed (El Massaoudi et al., Metab. Eng., submitted), in which a 300-L production reactor and a 1-L Sensor Reactor are run in parallel master/slave modus, thus enabling 13C-based metabolic flux analysis to generate a series of flux maps that document large-scale fermentation courses in detail. We describe the successful combination of this technology with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, metabolite balancing methods and a mathematical description of 13C-isotope labelings resulting in a powerful tool for quantitative pathway analysis during a batch fermentation. As a first application, 13C-based metabolic flux analysis was performed on exponentially growing, lysine-producing C. glutamicum MH20-22B during three phases of a pilot-scale batch fermentation. By studying the growth, (co-) substrate consumption and (by-) product formation, the similarity of the fermentations in production and Sensor Reactor was verified. Applying a generally applicable mathematical model, which included metabolite and carbon labeling balances for the analysis of proteinogenic amino acid 13C-isotopomer labeling data, the in vivo metabolic flux distribution was investigated during subsequent phases of exponential growth. It was shown for the first time that the in vivo reverse C(4)-decarboxylation flux at the anaplerotic node in C. glutamicum significantly decreased (70%) in parallel with threefold increased lysine formation during the investigated subsequent phases of exponential growth.

  20. hNCOcanH pulse sequence and a robust protocol for rapid and unambiguous assignment of backbone ((1)H(N), (15)N and (13)C') resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulse sequence named as hNCOcanH has been described to aid rapid sequential assignment of backbone resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins. The experiment has been derived by a simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147]; t2 evolution is used to frequency label (13)C' rather than (15)N (similar trick has also been used in the design of hNCAnH pulse sequence from hNcaNH [Frueh et al., JACS, 131 (2009) 12880-12881]). The modification results in a spectrum equivalent to HNCO, but in addition to inter-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi , Ci-1), the spectrum also contains additional intra-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi-1 , Ci-1) in the direct proton dimension which has maximum resolution. This is the main strength of the experiment and thus, even a small difference in amide (1) H chemical shifts (5-6 Hz) can be used for establishing a sequential connectivity. This experiment in combination with the HNN experiment described previously [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] leads to a more robust assignment protocol for backbone resonances ((1) H(N) , (15)N) than could be derived from the combination of HNN and HN(C)N experiments [Bhavesh et al., Biochemistry, 40 (2001) 14727-14735]. Further, this new protocol enables assignment of (13)C' resonances as well. We believe that the experiment and the protocol presented here will be of immense value for structural-and functional-proteomics research by NMR. Performance of this experiment has been demonstrated using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin. PMID:21818779

  1. Effectiveness Of Miraba an Indigenous Soil and Water Conservation Measures On Reducing Runoff And Soil Loss In Arable Land Of Western Usambara Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msita, H. B.; Kimaro, D. N.; Mtakwa, P. W.; Msanya, B. M.; Dondyene, S.; Poesen, J.; Deckers, J.

    2012-04-01

    Soil erosion by water is rampant mainly in mountainous areas of Tanzania leading to environmental hazards, low land productivity, low income and increased poverty. Despite the severity of the soil erosion problem, there is not much quantitative data on the erosion effects and effectiveness of indigenous soil and water conservation (SWC) measures. The consequence is that indigenous knowledge in SWC planning is ignored. The on-farm field experiment was conducted for three years in Migambo village, Lushoto district in Tanzania, to determine the effectiveness of improved Miraba (IM) an indigenous soil erosion control measure on reducing runoff and soil loss. Management practices were tested viz: control that is without any soil conservation measure (C), Miraba alone (M), Miraba with farmyard manure and mulching (MFM) replicated three times in CRD setting. Maize (Zea mays) and beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) were used as test crops, due to their importance as food crops and the high erosion rates on fields with these crops. The crops were planted in rotation, maize and beans in short and long rains respectively. Gerlach troughs and runoff plots were used to evaluate the physical effectiveness. Results show significant effects of IM against control on crop yields, soil loss, surface runoff and moisture retention. MFM is the most effective measure in reducing soil and water losses followed by MF and M. The results further showed that these management practices can be implemented to reduce soil erosion and nutrient losses in the study area and areas with similar ecological setting. To facilitate adoption of these practices further research works is recommended for identifying economically feasible indigenous SWC measures under different biophysical and socio-economic conditions.

  2. Changes in the agrochemical properties of major arable soils in the south of the Far East of Russia under the impact of their long-term agricultural use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdukovskii, M. L.; Golov, V. I.; Kovshik, I. G.

    2016-10-01

    Agrochemical properties of meadow-brown (Gleyic Cambisols (Clayic, Aric)) and meadow-chernozemic (Luvic Gleyic Chernic Phaeozems (Loamic, Aric, Pachic)) soils under the impact of long-term application of mineral and organic fertilizers were studied. The investigations were performed at the agrochemical experimental stations of the Primorskii region and Amur oblast founded in 1941 and 1962, respectively. It was shown that the long-term crop cultivation without fertilizers or with great rates of mineral fertilizers and lime resulted in the soil dehumification, a rise in the soil acidity, and a decrease of the content of exchangeable bases. These processes were slowed down by the application of organic fertilizers. Agrochemical parameters of meadow-chernozemic and floodplain meadow (Fluvic Phaeozems (Loamic, Aric, Oxyaquic)) soils of Amur oblast (Russia) and the Heilongjiang border province (China) were compared.

  3. Modeling greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, N2O, CH4) from managed arable soils with a fully coupled hydrology-biogeochemical modeling system simulating water and nutrient transport and associated carbon and nitrogen cycling at catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klatt, Steffen; Haas, Edwin; Kraus, David; Kiese, Ralf; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kraft, Philipp; Plesca, Ina; Breuer, Lutz; Zhu, Bo; Zhou, Minghua; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Xunhua; Wlotzka, Martin; Heuveline, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    The use of mineral nitrogen fertilizer sustains the global food production and therefore the livelihood of human kind. The rise in world population will put pressure on the global agricultural system to increase its productivity leading most likely to an intensification of mineral nitrogen fertilizer use. The fate of excess nitrogen and its distribution within landscapes is manifold. Process knowledge on the site scale has rapidly grown in recent years and models have been developed to simulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in managed ecosystems on the site scale. Despite first regional studies, the carbon and nitrogen cycling on the landscape or catchment scale is not fully understood. In this study we present a newly developed modelling approach by coupling the fully distributed hydrology model CMF (catchment modelling framework) to the process based regional ecosystem model LandscapeDNDC for the investigation of hydrological processes and carbon and nitrogen transport and cycling, with a focus on nutrient displacement and resulting greenhouse gas emissions in a small catchment at the Yanting Agro-ecological Experimental Station of Purple Soil, Sichuan province, China. The catchment hosts cypress forests on the outer regions, arable fields on the sloping croplands cultivated with wheat-maize rotations and paddy rice fields in the lowland. The catchment consists of 300 polygons vertically stratified into 10 soil layers. Ecosystem states (soil water content and nutrients) and fluxes (evapotranspiration) are exchanged between the models at high temporal scales (hourly to daily) forming a 3-dimensional model application. The water flux and nutrients transport in the soil is modelled using a 3D Richards/Darcy approach for subsurface fluxes with a kinematic wave approach for surface water runoff and the evapotranspiration is based on Penman-Monteith. Biogeochemical processes are modelled by LandscapeDNDC, including soil microclimate, plant growth and biomass allocation

  4. Responses of bacterial communities in arable soils in a rice-wheat cropping system to different fertilizer regimes and sampling times.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Ni, Tian; Li, Yong; Xiong, Wu; Ran, Wei; Shen, Biao; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2014-01-01

    Soil physicochemical properties, soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structures in a rice-wheat cropping system subjected to different fertilizer regimes were investigated in two seasons (June and October). All fertilizer regimes increased the soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen. Both fertilizer regime and time had a significant effect on soil physicochemical properties and bacterial community structure. The combined application of inorganic fertilizer and manure organic-inorganic fertilizer significantly enhanced the bacterial diversity in both seasons. The bacterial communities across all samples were dominated by Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi at the phylum level. Permutational multivariate analysis confirmed that both fertilizer treatment and season were significant factors in the variation of the composition of the bacterial community. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on Bray-Curtis distances further revealed that bacterial communities were separated primarily by season. The effect of fertilizer treatment is significant (P = 0.005) and accounts for 7.43% of the total variation in bacterial community. Soil nutrients (e.g., available K, total N, total P and organic matter) rather than pH showed significant correlation with the majority of abundant taxa. In conclusion, both fertilizer treatment and seasonal changes affect soil properties, microbial biomass and bacterial community structure. The application of NPK plus manure organic-inorganic fertilizer may be a sound fertilizer practice for sustainable food production. PMID:24465530

  5. Responses of bacterial communities in arable soils in a rice-wheat cropping system to different fertilizer regimes and sampling times.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Ni, Tian; Li, Yong; Xiong, Wu; Ran, Wei; Shen, Biao; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2014-01-01

    Soil physicochemical properties, soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structures in a rice-wheat cropping system subjected to different fertilizer regimes were investigated in two seasons (June and October). All fertilizer regimes increased the soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen. Both fertilizer regime and time had a significant effect on soil physicochemical properties and bacterial community structure. The combined application of inorganic fertilizer and manure organic-inorganic fertilizer significantly enhanced the bacterial diversity in both seasons. The bacterial communities across all samples were dominated by Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi at the phylum level. Permutational multivariate analysis confirmed that both fertilizer treatment and season were significant factors in the variation of the composition of the bacterial community. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on Bray-Curtis distances further revealed that bacterial communities were separated primarily by season. The effect of fertilizer treatment is significant (P = 0.005) and accounts for 7.43% of the total variation in bacterial community. Soil nutrients (e.g., available K, total N, total P and organic matter) rather than pH showed significant correlation with the majority of abundant taxa. In conclusion, both fertilizer treatment and seasonal changes affect soil properties, microbial biomass and bacterial community structure. The application of NPK plus manure organic-inorganic fertilizer may be a sound fertilizer practice for sustainable food production.

  6. Heavy metal contamination of arable soil and corn plant in the vicinity of a zinc smelting factory and stabilization by liming.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang Oh; Gutierrez, Jessie; Yun, Sung Wook; Lee, Yong Bok; Yu, Chan; Kim, Pil Joo

    2009-02-01

    The heavy metal contamination in soils and cultivated corn plants affected by zinc smelting activities in the vicinity of a zinc smelting factory in Korea was studied. Soils and corn plants were sampled at the harvesting stage and analyzed for cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) concentration, as well as Cd and Zn fraction and other chemical properties of soils. Cd and Zn were highly accumulated in the surface soils (0-20 cm), at levels higher than the Korean warning criteria (Cd, 1.5; Zn, 300 mg kg(-1)), with corresponding mean values of 1.7 and 407 mg kg(-1), respectively, but these metals decreased significantly with increasing soil depth and distance from the factory, implying that contaminants may come from the factory through aerosol dynamics (Hong et al., Kor J Environ Agr 26(3):204-209, 2007a; Environ Contam Toxicol 52:496-502, 2007b) and not from geological sources. The leaf part had higher Cd and Zn concentrations, with values of 9.5 and 1733 mg kg(-1), compared to the stem (1.6 and 547 mg kg(-1)) and grain (0.18 and 61 mg kg(-1)) parts, respectively. Cd and Zn were higher in the oxidizable fraction, at 38.5% and 46.9% of the total Cd (2.6 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (407 mg kg(-1)), but the exchangeable + acidic fraction of Cd and Zn as the bioavailable phases was low, 0.2 and 50 mg kg(-1), respectively. To study the reduction of plant Cd and Zn uptake by liming, radish (Raphanus sativa L.) was cultivated in one representative field among the sites investigated, and Ca(OH)(2) was applied at rates of 0, 2, 4, and 8 mg ha(-1). Plant Cd and Zn concentrations and NH(4)OAc extractable Cd and Zn concentrations of soil decreased significantly with increasing Ca(OH)(2) rate, since it markedly increases the cation exchange capacity of soil induced by increased pH. As a result, liming in this kind of soil could be an effective countermeasure in reducing the phytoextractability of Cd and Zn.

  7. Heavy metal contamination of arable soil and corn plant in the vicinity of a zinc smelting factory and stabilization by liming.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang Oh; Gutierrez, Jessie; Yun, Sung Wook; Lee, Yong Bok; Yu, Chan; Kim, Pil Joo

    2009-02-01

    The heavy metal contamination in soils and cultivated corn plants affected by zinc smelting activities in the vicinity of a zinc smelting factory in Korea was studied. Soils and corn plants were sampled at the harvesting stage and analyzed for cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) concentration, as well as Cd and Zn fraction and other chemical properties of soils. Cd and Zn were highly accumulated in the surface soils (0-20 cm), at levels higher than the Korean warning criteria (Cd, 1.5; Zn, 300 mg kg(-1)), with corresponding mean values of 1.7 and 407 mg kg(-1), respectively, but these metals decreased significantly with increasing soil depth and distance from the factory, implying that contaminants may come from the factory through aerosol dynamics (Hong et al., Kor J Environ Agr 26(3):204-209, 2007a; Environ Contam Toxicol 52:496-502, 2007b) and not from geological sources. The leaf part had higher Cd and Zn concentrations, with values of 9.5 and 1733 mg kg(-1), compared to the stem (1.6 and 547 mg kg(-1)) and grain (0.18 and 61 mg kg(-1)) parts, respectively. Cd and Zn were higher in the oxidizable fraction, at 38.5% and 46.9% of the total Cd (2.6 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (407 mg kg(-1)), but the exchangeable + acidic fraction of Cd and Zn as the bioavailable phases was low, 0.2 and 50 mg kg(-1), respectively. To study the reduction of plant Cd and Zn uptake by liming, radish (Raphanus sativa L.) was cultivated in one representative field among the sites investigated, and Ca(OH)(2) was applied at rates of 0, 2, 4, and 8 mg ha(-1). Plant Cd and Zn concentrations and NH(4)OAc extractable Cd and Zn concentrations of soil decreased significantly with increasing Ca(OH)(2) rate, since it markedly increases the cation exchange capacity of soil induced by increased pH. As a result, liming in this kind of soil could be an effective countermeasure in reducing the phytoextractability of Cd and Zn. PMID:18704256

  8. Recycling vs. stabilisation of soil sugars - a long-term laboratory incubation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-06-01

    Independent of its chemical structure carbon (C) persists in soil for several decades, controlled by stabilisation and recycling. To disentangle the importance of the two factors on the turnover dynamics of soil sugars, an important compound of soil organic matter (SOM), a three year incubation experiment was conducted on a silty loam soil under different types of land use (arable land, grassland and forest) by adding 13C-labeled glucose. The compound specific isotope analysis of soil sugars was used to examine the dynamics of different sugars during incubation. Sugar dynamics were dominated by a pool of high mean residence times (MRT) indicating that recycling plays an important role for sugars. However, this was not substantially affected by soil C content. Six months after label addition the contribution of the label was much higher for microbial biomass than for CO2 production for all examined soils, corroborating that substrate recycling was very effective within the microbial biomass. Two different patterns of tracer dynamics could be identified for different sugars: while fucose (fuc) and mannose (man) showed highest label contribution at the beginning of the incubation with a subsequent slow decline, galactose (gal) and rhamnose (rha) were characterised by slow label incorporation with subsequently constant levels, which indicates that recycling is dominating the dynamics of these sugars. This may correspond to (a) different microbial growing strategies (r and K-strategist) or (b) location within or outside the cell membrane (lipopolysaccharides vs. exopolysaccharides) and thus be subject of different re-use within the microbial food web. Our results show how the microbial community recycles substrate very effectively and that high losses of substrate only occur during initial stages after substrate addition.

  9. Immobilising of Cd, Pb, and Zn contaminated arable soils close to a former Pb/Zn smelter: a field study in Austria over 5 years.

    PubMed

    Friesl-Hanl, W; Platzer, K; Horak, O; Gerzabek, M H

    2009-10-01

    Numerous smelter sites are surrounded by rural land. The entrance of non-essential metals such as lead or cadmium into the food chain is very likely as well as phytotoxicity effects of zinc. Finding a realistic solution for these large-scale contaminations was one aim of this study. Previous results from pot experiments showed a high potential for the reduction of metals entering the food chain via crops grown on smelter-contaminated soils from Arnoldstein, Austria, by the use of amendments for immobilisation. A further aim was to optimise a field experiment for overcoming the gap between pot and field experiments and to look for long-term efficiency of the treatments [lime (CA), red mud (RM), gravel sludge + red mud (GS + RM)]. Field experiment results were obtained for 5 years. Besides soil and soil pore water samples, the following harvests were yielded: spring barley (Hordeum distichon ssp. L.) (2004-2005), narrowleaf plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.) (2006-2007) and velvet grass (Holcus lanatus L.) (2007-2008). The long-term efficiency of GS + RM led us to conclude that their application seems to be a realistic and practical measure for extensively contaminated land, best in combination with metal excluding cultivars. PMID:19283493

  10. Role of climatic single events and pedohydraulic factors in the mobilization and the transport of mobile organic matter in an arable soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalwasser, Andreas; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Soils are the largest terrestrial pool for organic carbon. To improve our understanding of local and global carbon cycles, factors and conditions that effect release, redistribution and transport of organic carbon should be known. Besides dissolved organic substances, organic particles with sizes up to several micrometers are mobile in soils. The aims of this work are (i) to investigate the impact of external factors (climatic, anthropogenic) and pedohydraulic conditions on the mobilization of mobile organic matter (MOM) and (ii) to characterize the MOM with focus on the particulate fraction. We monitored spatially resolved water and carbon fluxes at an agricultural site (Luvisol) with wheat and maize cultivation. Climatic and pedohydraulic boundary conditions were measured continuously with a climate station and a soilhydraulic monitoring pit. The seepage water has been collected in two depths (plough horizon and subsoil) with sixteen tension lysimeters. The results from two years observation suggest that release of MOM in soil is mainly triggered by single events like heavy rain and snowmelt. The pedohydraulic data support that preferential flow along biopores plays a major role for the MOM release during these events, whereas the hydraulic gradient was not observed as an important factor for MOM release. Owing to preferential flow, less MOM were detected in the seepage water collected below the plough pan than in the deeper subsoiĺs seepage water at single events. Further, the translocation of dissolved and particulate organic substances depends on the cultivation type. With regard to probably increasing occurrence of extreme events as a consequence of the climatic change, the influence of MOM translocation should be considered in future balances of carbon cycling.

  11. Microbial carbon recycling - an underestimated process controlling soil carbon dynamics - Part 1: A long-term laboratory incubation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-10-01

    Independent of its chemical structure carbon (C) persists in soil for several decades, controlled by stabilization and recycling. To disentangle the importance of the two factors on the turnover dynamics of soil sugars, an important compound of soil organic matter (SOM), a 3-year incubation experiment was conducted on a silty loam soil under different types of land use (arable land, grassland and forest) by adding 13C-labelled glucose. The compound-specific isotope analysis of soil sugars was used to examine the dynamics of different sugars during incubation. Sugar dynamics were dominated by a pool of high mean residence times (MRT) indicating that recycling plays an important role for sugars. However, this was not substantially affected by soil C content. Six months after label addition the contribution of the label was much higher for microbial biomass than for CO2 production for all examined land use types, corroborating that substrate recycling was very effective within the microbial biomass. Two different patterns of tracer dynamics could be identified for different sugars: while fucose and mannose showed highest label contribution at the beginning of the incubation with a subsequent slow decline, galactose and rhamnose were characterized by slow label incorporation with subsequently constant levels, which indicates that recycling is dominating the dynamics of these sugars. This may correspond to (a) different microbial growing strategies (r and K-strategist) or (b) location within or outside the cell membrane (lipopolysaccharides vs. exopolysaccharides) and thus be subject of different re-use within the microbial food web. Our results show how the microbial community recycles substrate very effectively and that high losses of substrate only occur during initial stages after substrate addition. This study indicates that recycling is one of the major processes explaining the high MRT observed for many SOM fractions and thus is crucial for understanding the

  12. Adverse weather impacts on arable cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Damages due to extreme or adverse weather strongly depend on crop type, crop stage, soil conditions and management. The impact is largest during the sensitive periods of the farming calendar, and requires a modelling approach to capture the interactions between the crop, its environment and the occurrence of the meteorological event. The hypothesis is that extreme and adverse weather events can be quantified and subsequently incorporated in current crop models. Since crop development is driven by thermal time and photoperiod, a regional crop model was used to examine the likely frequency, magnitude and impacts of frost, drought, heat stress and waterlogging in relation to the cropping season and crop sensitive stages. Risk profiles and associated return levels were obtained by fitting generalized extreme value distributions to block maxima for air humidity, water balance and temperature variables. The risk profiles were subsequently confronted with yields and yield losses for the major arable crops in Belgium, notably winter wheat, winter barley, winter oilseed rape, sugar beet, potato and maize at the field (farm records) to regional scale (statistics). The average daily vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and reference evapotranspiration (ET0) during the growing season is significantly lower (p < 0.001) and has a higher variability before 1988 than after 1988. Distribution patterns of VPD and ET0 have relevant impacts on crop yields. The response to rising temperatures depends on the crop's capability to condition its microenvironment. Crops short of water close their stomata, lose their evaporative cooling potential and ultimately become susceptible to heat stress. Effects of heat stress therefore have to be combined with moisture availability such as the precipitation deficit or the soil water balance. Risks of combined heat and moisture deficit stress appear during the summer. These risks are subsequently related to crop damage. The methodology of defining

  13. Flash Flooding and 'Muddy Floods' on Arable Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, J.

    2012-04-01

    Flash flooding is often associated with upland, grazed catchments. It does, however, occur in lowland arable-dominated areas. In southern England, notable examples have occurred at Rottingdean (Brighton) in 1987, at Faringdon (Oxfordshire) in 1993 and at Breaky Bottom vineyard (near Brighton) in 1987 and 2000. All resulted in damage to nearby property. Runoff was largely from recently cultivated ground. The characteristics of such floods are: Rapid runoff from bare soil surfaces. Saturated excess overland flow is likely in the early parts of storms but high intensity rainfall on loamy soils results in crusting and Hortonian overland flow; High rates of erosion; Sediment transport to downvalley sites causing property damage ('muddy flooding'). Muddy floods are known from several areas of Europe e.g. Belgium, northern France, South Limburg (Netherlands) and Slovakia (Boardman et al 2006). In other areas they occur but have gone unreported or are classified under different terms. The necessary conditions for occurrence are areas of arable land which is bare at times of the year when there is a risk of storms. For muddy floods to cause damage (and hence be reported), vulnerable property must lie downstream from such areas of arable land. In some areas the incidence of muddy floods relates to autumn and early winter rainfall and winter cereal crops (e.g. southern England). In continental Europe, flooding is more common in summer and is associated with convectional storms and land uses including sugar beet, maize and potatoes. Predictions of increased numbers of high-intensity storms with future climate change, suggest that arable areas will continue to generate both flash floods and muddy floods.

  14. The 2D {31P} Spin-Echo-Difference Constant-Time [13C, 1H]-HMQC Experiment for Simultaneous Determination of 3JH3‧P and 3JC4‧P in 13C-Labeled Nucleic Acids and Their Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyperski, Thomas; Fernández, César; Ono, Akira; Wüthrich, Kurt; Kainosho, Masatsune

    1999-10-01

    A two-dimensional {31P} spin-echo-difference constant-time [13C, 1H]-HMQC experiment (2D {31P}-sedct-[13C, 1H]-HMQC) is introduced for measurements of 3JC4‧P and 3JH3‧P scalar couplings in large 13C-labeled nucleic acids and in DNA-protein complexes. This experiment makes use of the fact that 1H-13C multiple-quantum coherences in macromolecules relax more slowly than the corresponding 13C single-quantum coherences. 3JC4‧P and 3JH3‧P are related via Karplus-type functions with the phosphodiester torsion angles β and ɛ, respectively, and their experimental assessment therefore contributes to further improved quality of NMR solution structures. Data are presented for a uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled 14-base-pair DNA duplex, both free in solution and in a 17-kDa protein-DNA complex.

  15. The good, the bad or the ugly: Microbial biomass of biogas residues as a contributor to soil carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coban, H.; Miltner, A.; Kaestner, M.

    2013-12-01

    Loss of soil organic matter is a recent problem in soils all over the world. This can be related to enhanced mineralization of the soil organic matter due to land use change, which is a source of anthropogenic carbon dioxide increase. For example, the carbon input from plant residues is reduced because of the increased cultivation of bioenergy crops. In order to avoid soil degradation, application of biogas residues is a common practice in such areas. Biogas residues are side products of biogas production and contain microbial biomass. Application of these residues as soil additive influences the soil microorganisms as well as the carbon cycle. We study this effect by incubating 13C-labeled biogas residues in an arable soil from the Static Fertilization Experiment in Bad Lauchstaedt, Germany. Labeled residues were produced via labeling of active microbial biomass by addition of KH13CO3 to biogas reactors. High enrichment in the various phospholipid fatty acids proved the successful labeling of the biomass. The labeled biogas residues are being long-term incubated in the soil. During incubation, we monitor the fate of the carbon by analyzing the label in phospholipid fatty acids, amino acids as well as carbon dioxide. This allows us to trace the fate of the biogas residues-derived C in soil and to quantify the effect on the transformation of the natural soil organic matter (e.g. negative effects such as priming effects). Also, microbial community dynamics will be determined using molecular biology tools such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR). In order to prevent potentially negative effects, various additives such as charred biomaterials, clays and chopped bark will be tested to improve the carbon storage in soil. In conclusion, this study investigates the fate and impact of biogas residues used as a soil additive on the soil microbial community and amount of soil organic matter. It is aimed to understand and

  16. Denitrification 'hot spots' in soil following surface residue application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, Marianne; Morley, Nicholas J.; Hallett, Paul D.; Watson, Christine; Baggs, Elizabeth M.

    2015-04-01

    The availability of organic C is an important driver for the production and reduction of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) during denitrification. Denitrification as a response to plant residue amendments to soil surfaces has been extensively researched. However, the nature of hotspot sites of N2O production and reduction within the soil profile, especially in relation to the location of applied residues, is unknown. In a laboratory experiment we investigated the relationship between denitrifier N2O surface fluxes and N2O production and reduction sites. Probes which equilibrate with the soil gas phase by diffusion were developed to quantify denitrification products and product ratios at 1-2 cm, 4.5-5.5 cm or 8-9 cm from the surface. 13C labelled barley straw was incorporated at rates of 0, 2 and 4 t ha-1 into the top 3 cm of soil and subsequently amended with 14NH415NO3. In a three week experiment the soil gas phase at the three depths was analysed for 15N-N2O, 15N-N2, 13C-CO2 and O2 concentrations. Additionally, cores were destructively sampled for mineral 15N as well as microbial C and dissolved C in the respective depths. 15N-N2O and CO2 surface fluxes peaked one day after N application, with residue application resulting in significantly higher 15N-N2O emission rates compared to the non-amended control. The timing of the 15N-N2O surface flux on day 1 was related to maximum 15N-N2O concentrations of 36.6 μg 15N L-1 within the pore space at 5 cm depth. Three days after fertilizer application 15N-N2O pore space concentrations had significantly increased to 193 μg 15N L-1 at 9 cm depth indicating denitrifier activity at greater depth. Denitrification below the soil surface could be explained by increased microbial activity, oxygen depletion with increasing depth and progressive downwards diffusion of fertilizer NO3-. However, C availability appeared to only affect denitrification in the surface layer in which the residue was incorporated. Our results provide

  17. Optimization of Sample Points for Monitoring Arable Land Quality by Simulated Annealing while Considering Spatial Variations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junxiao; Wang, Xiaorui; Zhou, Shenglu; Wu, Shaohua; Zhu, Yan; Lu, Chunfeng

    2016-01-01

    With China’s rapid economic development, the reduction in arable land has emerged as one of the most prominent problems in the nation. The long-term dynamic monitoring of arable land quality is important for protecting arable land resources. An efficient practice is to select optimal sample points while obtaining accurate predictions. To this end, the selection of effective points from a dense set of soil sample points is an urgent problem. In this study, data were collected from Donghai County, Jiangsu Province, China. The number and layout of soil sample points are optimized by considering the spatial variations in soil properties and by using an improved simulated annealing (SA) algorithm. The conclusions are as follows: (1) Optimization results in the retention of more sample points in the moderate- and high-variation partitions of the study area; (2) The number of optimal sample points obtained with the improved SA algorithm is markedly reduced, while the accuracy of the predicted soil properties is improved by approximately 5% compared with the raw data; (3) With regard to the monitoring of arable land quality, a dense distribution of sample points is needed to monitor the granularity. PMID:27706051

  18. Modeling Central Carbon Metabolic Processes in Soil Microbial Communities: Comparing Measured With Modeled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, P.; Fairbanks, D.; Miller, E.; Salpas, E.; Hagerty, S.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating C cycling is hindered by our inability to directly observe and measure the biochemical processes of glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and TCA cycle in intact and complex microbial communities. Position-specific 13C labeled metabolic tracer probing is proposed as a new way to study microbial community energy production, biosynthesis, C use efficiency (the proportion of substrate incorporated into microbial biomass), and enables the quantification of C fluxes through the central C metabolic network processes (Dijkstra et al 2011a,b). We determined the 13CO2 production from U-13C, 1-13C, 2-13C, 3-13C, 4-13C, 5-13C, and 6-13C labeled glucose and 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate in parallel incubations in three soils along an elevation gradient. Qualitative and quantitative interpretation of the results indicate a high pentose phosphate pathway activity in soils. Agreement between modeled and measured CO2 production rates for the six C-atoms of 13C-labeled glucose indicate that the metabolic model used is appropriate for soil community processes, but that improvements can be made. These labeling and modeling techniques may improve our ability to analyze the biochemistry and (eco)physiology of intact microbial communities. Dijkstra, P., Blankinship, J.C., Selmants, P.C., Hart, S.C., Koch, G.W., Schwartz, E., Hungate, B.A., 2011a. Probing C flux patterns of soil microbial metabolic networks using parallel position-specific tracer labeling. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 43, 126-132. Dijkstra, P., Dalder, J.J., Selmants, P.C., Hart, S.C., Koch, G.W., Schwartz, E., Hungate, B.A., 2011b. Modeling soil metabolic processes using isotopologue pairs of position-specific 13C-labeled glucose and pyruvate. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 43, 1848-1857.

  19. Estimation of soil-to-plant transfer factors of radiocesium in 99 wild plant species grown in arable lands 1 year after the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Jun; Enomoto, Takashi; Yamada, Masao; Ono, Toshiro; Hanafusa, Tadashi; Nagamatsu, Tomohiro; Sonoda, Shoji; Yamamoto, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    One year after the deposition of radionuclides from the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant (A formal name is Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station) in March 2011, radiocesium (¹³⁴Cs, ¹³⁷Cs) concentrations ([Cs]) were comprehensively investigated in the wild plants of 99 species most of which were annual or summer green perennial herbs and started to grow from April 2012 at the heavily contaminated fields of paddy (three study sites) and upland (one study site) in Fukushima Prefecture. The survey was conducted three times (April, July and October) in the year. In each site, soils (soil cores of 5-cm depth) and plants (aerial shoots) were collected for determination of [Cs] on a dry weight basis, and then the transfer factor (TF) of radiocesium from soil to plant ([Cs]plant/[Cs]soil) was estimated in each species. The [Cs] values of both soils and plants largely varied. However, some species exhibited relatively high TF values (more than 0.4) (e.g., Athyrium yokoscense, Dryopteris tokyoensis, and Cyperus brevifolius), while others exhibited almost negligible values (less than 0.01) (e.g., Salix miyabeana, Humulus scandens, and Elymus tsukushiensis). In addition, judging from the 11 species grown in both paddy and upland fields, TF values were generally higher in the paddy fields. The estimation of phytoextraction efficiency of soil radiocesium by weed communities in the paddy fields suggests that the weed community is not a practical candidate for phytoremediation technique.

  20. Estimation of soil-to-plant transfer factors of radiocesium in 99 wild plant species grown in arable lands 1 year after the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Jun; Enomoto, Takashi; Yamada, Masao; Ono, Toshiro; Hanafusa, Tadashi; Nagamatsu, Tomohiro; Sonoda, Shoji; Yamamoto, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    One year after the deposition of radionuclides from the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant (A formal name is Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station) in March 2011, radiocesium (¹³⁴Cs, ¹³⁷Cs) concentrations ([Cs]) were comprehensively investigated in the wild plants of 99 species most of which were annual or summer green perennial herbs and started to grow from April 2012 at the heavily contaminated fields of paddy (three study sites) and upland (one study site) in Fukushima Prefecture. The survey was conducted three times (April, July and October) in the year. In each site, soils (soil cores of 5-cm depth) and plants (aerial shoots) were collected for determination of [Cs] on a dry weight basis, and then the transfer factor (TF) of radiocesium from soil to plant ([Cs]plant/[Cs]soil) was estimated in each species. The [Cs] values of both soils and plants largely varied. However, some species exhibited relatively high TF values (more than 0.4) (e.g., Athyrium yokoscense, Dryopteris tokyoensis, and Cyperus brevifolius), while others exhibited almost negligible values (less than 0.01) (e.g., Salix miyabeana, Humulus scandens, and Elymus tsukushiensis). In addition, judging from the 11 species grown in both paddy and upland fields, TF values were generally higher in the paddy fields. The estimation of phytoextraction efficiency of soil radiocesium by weed communities in the paddy fields suggests that the weed community is not a practical candidate for phytoremediation technique. PMID:24346655

  1. Interactive effects of litter quality and soil mineralogy on temperate forest soil carbon response to temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, C.; Horwath, W.; Southard, R.

    2007-12-01

    Temperate forest soil organic carbon (C) represents a significant pool of terrestrial C that may be released to the atmosphere as CO2 with predicted climate change. To address feedbacks between climate change and terrestrial C turnover, we quantified forest soil C response to litter quality and temperature change as a function of soil parent material. We collected soils from three conifer forest-types dominated by ponderosa pine (PP), white fir (WF), and red fir (RF) from each of three parent materials, granite (GR), basalt (BS), and andesite (AN) in the Sierra Nevada of California. AN soils were dominated by short-range-order (SRO) minerals, GR soils by crystalline minerals, and BS soils by a mix of crystalline and SRO minerals. Field soils were incubated in the laboratory at their mean annual soil temperature (MAST), with addition of native 13C-labeled litter. Further, we incubated WF and RF soils at PP MAST with 13C-labeled PP litter; and RF soils at WF MAST with 13C-labeled WF litter to simulate a migration of MAST and vegetation type up-elevation in response to predicted climate warming. Results indicated that total CO2 and percent of CO2 derived from soil C varied significantly across forest-types, following the pattern of GR>BS>AN. Regression analyses indicated significant control of C mineralization and soil C priming by litter quality and SRO minerals. Addition of litter derived water-soluble compounds enabled priming of recalcitrant soil C in soils with high SRO mineral content, whereas water-soluble litter components did little to promote priming of extant soil C in soils of low SRO mineral content. Results further indicated a 10-300% increase in WF and RF forest-type soil C mineralization under climate change conditions that varied substantially between parent materials. Soils derived from andesite exhibited minimal change; whereas granite and basalt derived soils lost large amounts of soil C under climate change conditions. This study corroborates the

  2. Mathematical modeling of water fluxes in arable chernozems under different land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangel'skaya, T. A.; Khokhlova, O. S.; Myakshina, T. N.

    2016-07-01

    The hydrologic regimes of arable chernozems were simulated for two plots located within a watershed. For the last fifty years continuous corn monoculture was practiced in one plot, and permanent bare fallow was practiced in the other plot. Carbonates are detected from a depth of 140-160 cm under corn and from 70-80 cm under bare fallow. The objective of the simulation study was to test the validity of the hypothesis that the shallower depth to carbonates under bare fallow is related to carbonate rise due to changes in the hydrologic regime of bare soil compared to soil under vegetation. Mathematical modeling using the HYDRUS-1D software and the FAO56 method confirmed that the hydrologic regimes of arable chernozems within the two plots are different. The soil water content under bare fallow is generally higher than that under corn. The downward soil water fluxes for the two plots are comparable. The upward soil water fluxes under bare fallow significantly exceed those under corn and affect a thicker soil layer. The changes in the hydrologic regimes of chernozems under bare fallow favor the upward movement of carbonates through both the direct transfer by upward water fluxes and the diffusion of ions.

  3. County-scale temporal-spatial distribution and variability tendency of heavy metals in arable soils influenced by policy adjustment during the last decade: a case study of Changxing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Zhi, Yuyou; Shi, Jiachun; Zeng, Lingzao; Wu, Laosheng

    2015-11-01

    The widespread "pertinacious illness" for environmental management soil contamination by toxic metals has inevitably led to announcement of gradual adjustment for the local government to curb the notorious pollution. An extensive survey was conducted in Changxing County, Zhejiang Province, to investigate the contents of cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As), lead (Pb), and copper (Cu) and characterize the spatial-temporal change pattern to elucidate the current state and performance of policy adjustment. Geostatistic methods were applied in the mapping and characterizing processes to assess the concentrations of heavy metals at unsampled sites. Enrichment factor analysis indicated obvious Cd and As enrichment in the west and northwest of the county. Ordinary kriging interpolation combined with semivariogram revealed that the four heavy metals possessed distinct spatial distribution patterns. However, the distribution patterns for the elevated Cd and Pb concentrations exhibited a similar geographic drift, corresponding primarily to industrial distribution. Compared with the investigation findings in 2003, the results indicated an uptrend of Cd and As and downtrend of Cu, while Pb was a mixture of increase and decrease. However, strengthened actions aimed at restraining heavy metal contamination are still needed to establish a mechanism to secure residents' health and livelihood.

  4. Statistical analysis and modelling of surface runoff from arable fields in central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiener, P.; Auerswald, K.; Winter, F.; Disse, M.

    2013-10-01

    Surface runoff generation on arable fields is an important driver of flooding, on-site and off-site damages by erosion, and of nutrient and agrochemical transport. In general, three different processes generate surface runoff (Hortonian runoff, saturation excess runoff, and return of subsurface flow). Despite the developments in our understanding of these processes it remains difficult to predict which processes govern runoff generation during the course of an event or throughout the year, when soil and vegetation on arable land are passing many states. We analysed the results from 317 rainfall simulations on 209 soils from different landscapes with a resolution of 14 286 runoff measurements to determine temporal and spatial differences in variables governing surface runoff, and to derive and test a statistical model of surface runoff generation independent from an a priori selection of modelled process types. Measured runoff was related to 20 time-invariant soil properties, three variable soil properties, four rain properties, three land use properties and many derived variables describing interactions and curvilinear behaviour. In an iterative multiple regression procedure, six of these properties/variables best described initial abstraction and the hydrograph. To estimate initial abstraction, the percentages of stone cover above 10% and of sand content in the bulk soil were needed, while the hydrograph could be predicted best from rain depth exceeding initial abstraction, rainfall intensity, soil organic carbon content, and time since last tillage. Combining the multiple regressions to estimate initial abstraction and surface runoff allowed modelling of event-specific hydrographs without an a priori assumption of the underlying process. The statistical model described the measured data well and performed equally well during validation. In both cases, the model explained 71 and 58% of variability in accumulated runoff volume and instantaneous runoff rate (RSME: 5

  5. Process-oriented Simulation of Runoff Generation on Arable Fields Using a Physically Based Hydrological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, F.; Disse, M.

    2011-12-01

    In Germany, aside from technical flood protection and forecasting, modern flood protection strategies include distributed flood control measures. On arable fields these measures comprise of increasing infiltration ability due to different tillage practices such as conservational tillage or no-tillage. Tillage practices have a significant effect on the runoff generation process. Bare soils are prone to forming soil crusts during extreme rainfall events especially on Loessial soils that are abundant in Central European landscapes, and soil crusts promote surface runoff and erosion. Due to the impact of raindrops, the topsoil aggregates are broken and form a layer of a few millimeters to centimeters with very low hydraulic conductivity. One way to describe this process is by using a modified Horton infiltration equation. WaSiM-ETH is a physically based hydrological modeling system developed by SCHULLA (1997) to analyze the spatial and temporal distributed flow processes in complex catchments. In order to investigate the effect of soil crusts on runoff generation on arable fields, WaSiM-ETH was extended by adding a silting module which is able to simulate the process of soil crust formation. It has been shown that sprinkler experiments could be simulated more efficiently with the model extension than with the simulation of runoff generation according to the Mualem-van-Genuchten parameterization. This effect is extended to a lower mesoscale agricultural catchment for a number of different high intensity storm events. Finally, scenario setups show the potential of surface water retention for different tillage practices. Literature: SCHULLA, J. (1997): Hydrologische Modellierung von Flussgebieten zur Abschätzung der Folgen von Klimaänderungen, Dissertation, ETH Zürich, 161. S. (in German) http://www.unibw.de/ifw/WWR-en/forschung-en/einflussbewirtschaftung-en?set_language=en

  6. Managing Bioenergy Production on Arable Field Margins for Multiple Ecosystem Services: Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarini, Andrea; Serra, Paolo; Amaducci, Stefano; Trevisan, Marco; Puglisi, Edoardo

    2013-04-01

    Growing crops for bioenergy is increasingly viewed as conflicting with food production. However, energy use continues to rise and food production requires fuel inputs, which have increased with intensification. The debate should shift from "food or fuel" to the more challenging target: how the increasing demand for food and energy can be met in the future, particularly when water and land availability will be limited. As for food crops, also for bioenergy crops it is questioned whether it is preferable to manage cultivation to enhance ecosystem services ("land sharing" strategy) or to grow crops with lower ecosystem services but higher yield, thereby requiring less land to meet bioenergy demand ("land sparing" strategy). Energy crop production systems differ greatly in the supply of ecosystem services. The use of perennial biomass (e.g. Switchgrass, Mischantus, Giant reed) for energy production is considered a promising way to reduce net carbon emissions and mitigate climate change. In addition, regulating and supporting ecosystem services could be provided when specific management of bioenergy crops is implemented. The idea of HEDGE-BIOMASS* project is to convert the arable field margins to bioenergy crop production fostering a win-win strategy at landscape level. Main objective of the project is to improve land management to generate environmental benefits and increase farmer income. The various options available in literature for an improved field boundary management are presented. The positive/unknown/negative effects of growing perennial bioenergy crops on field margins will be discussed relatively to the following soil-related ecosystem services: (I) biodiversity conservation and enhancement, (II) soil nutrient cycling, (III) climate regulation (reduction of GHG emissions and soil carbon sequestration/stabilization, (IV) water regulation (filtering and buffering), (V) erosion regulation, (VI) pollination and pest regulation. From the analysis of available

  7. Stable isotope probing of rRNA and DNA reveals a dynamic methylotroph community and trophic interactions with fungi and protozoa in oxic rice field soil.

    PubMed

    Lueders, Tillmann; Wagner, Bianca; Claus, Peter; Friedrich, Michael W

    2004-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) is a novel technique to characterize structure and in situ function of active microbial populations, which is based on the incorporation of 13C-labelled substrates into nucleic acids. Here, we have traced methylotrophic members of a rice field soil microbial community, which became active upon continuous addition of 13C-methanol (< 22 mM) as studied in microcosms. By combining rRNA- and DNA-based SIP, as well as domain-specific real-time PCR detection of templates in fractions of centrifugation gradients, we were able to detect 13C-labelled bacterial rRNA after 6 days of incubation. Fingerprinting and comparative sequence analysis of 'heavy' bacterial rRNA showed that mostly members of the Methylobacteriaceae and a novel clade within the Methylophilaceae formed part of the indigenous methylotrophic community. Over time, however, the Methylophilaceae were enriched. Unexpectedly, nucleic acids of eukaryotic origin were detected, mostly in intermediately 13C-labelled gradient fractions. These eukaryotes were identified as fungi mostly related to Fusarium and Aspergillus spp., and also Cercozoa, known as predatory soil flagellates. The detection of fungi and protozoa in 13C-enriched nucleic acid fractions suggests a possible involvement in either direct assimilation of label by the fungi, or a food web, i.e. that primary 13C-methanol consuming methylotrophs were decomposed by fungi and grazed by protozoa.

  8. Microbial utilization of rice straw and its derived biochar in a paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fuxia; Li, Yaying; Chapman, Stephen James; Khan, Sardar; Yao, Huaiying

    2016-07-15

    The application of straw and biochar to soil has received great attention because of their potential benefits such as fertility improvement and carbon (C) sequestration. The abiotic effects of these materials on C and nitrogen (N) cycling in the soil ecosystem have been previously investigated, however, the effects of straw or its derived biochar on the soil microbial community structure and function are not well understood. For this purpose, a short-term incubation experiment was conducted using (13)C-labeled rice straw and its derived biochar ((13)C-labeled biochar) to deepen our understanding about soil microbial community dynamics and function in C sequestration and greenhouse gas emission in the acidic paddy soil amended with these materials. Regarding microbial function, biochar and straw applications increased CO2 emission in the initial stage of incubation and reached the highest level (0.52 and 3.96mgCkg(-1)soilh(-1)) at 1d and 3d after incubation, respectively. Straw amendment significantly (p<0.01) increased respiration rate, total phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and (13)C-PLFA as compared to biochar amendment and the control. The amount and percent of Gram positive bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes were also significantly (p<0.05) higher in (13)C-labeled straw amended soil than the (13)C-labeled biochar amended soil. According to the (13)C data, 23 different PLFAs were derived from straw amended paddy soil, while only 17 PLFAs were derived from biochar amendments. The profile of (13)C-PLFAs derived from straw amendment was significantly (p<0.01) different from biochar amendment. The PLFAs18:1ω7c and cy17:0 (indicators of Gram negative bacteria) showed high relative abundances in the biochar amendment, while 10Me18:0, i17:0 and 18:2ω6,9c (indicators of actinomycetes, Gram positive bacteria and fungi, respectively) showed high relative abundance in the straw amendments. Our results suggest that the function, size and structure of the microbial

  9. Arsenic Content in Arable Land of the Ząbkowice District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszubkiewicz, Jarosław; Pora, Ewa; Kawałko, Dorota; Jezierski, Paweł

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the content of arsenic in soils used for agriculture in the Ząbkowicki district. The content of arsenic in collected soil samples ranged 1.1-569.5 mg·kg-1. The standard for arable lands of Group B has been exceeded in 24 out of 231 test points. The highest concentrations occurred in the Złoty Stok commune. This is due to the output of arsenic and gold in this area. Exceeding the standard also occurred in neighboring communes: Kamieniec Ząbkowicki and Ziębice. This is due to the blowing and washing pollutions form the source of contamination, the arsenic mines in the Złoty Stok commune.

  10. Characterization of grit in arable birds to improve pesticide risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Luttik, R; de Snoo, G R

    2004-03-01

    To describe the grit in bird gizzards, we examined the gizzard content of some 200 birds of varying size and diet (e.g., granivores and nongranivores). Grit use (frequency, size, amount, and shape) was characterized for 27 bird species that forage, at least part of the year, on arable land in the Netherlands. Three different groups could be recognized: the nongranivores with predominantly small "grit" particles (the result of inadvertent ingesting soil while foraging), the granivores with larger grit particles (the result of intentionally selecting soil particles), and the group in between (omnivores), which shows features of both other groups. Sample calculations made in this article show a probability of 3-277 in 1000 times for unintentionally consuming one granule. Therefore, attention should also be paid to nongranivorous birds when assessing the hazard or risk of the use of granular pesticide formulations. A risk assessment model is presented in the Appendix.

  11. Stable-Isotope Probing Identifies Uncultured Planctomycetes as Primary Degraders of a Complex Heteropolysaccharide in Soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Sharp, Christine E; Jones, Gareth M; Grasby, Stephen E; Brady, Allyson L; Dunfield, Peter F

    2015-07-01

    The exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by some bacteria are potential growth substrates for other bacteria in soil. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify aerobic soil bacteria that assimilated the cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus or the EPS produced by Beijerinckia indica. The latter is a heteropolysaccharide comprised primarily of l-guluronic acid, d-glucose, and d-glycero-d-mannoheptose. (13)C-labeled EPS and (13)C-labeled cellulose were purified from bacterial cultures grown on [(13)C]glucose. Two soils were incubated with these substrates, and bacteria actively assimilating them were identified via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes recovered from (13)C-labeled DNA. Cellulose C was assimilated primarily by soil bacteria closely related (93 to 100% 16S rRNA gene sequence identities) to known cellulose-degrading bacteria. However, B. indica EPS was assimilated primarily by bacteria with low identities (80 to 95%) to known species, particularly by different members of the phylum Planctomycetes. In one incubation, members of the Planctomycetes made up >60% of all reads in the labeled DNA and were only distantly related (<85% identity) to any described species. Although it is impossible with SIP to completely distinguish primary polysaccharide hydrolyzers from bacteria growing on produced oligo- or monosaccharides, the predominance of Planctomycetes suggested that they were primary degraders of EPS. Other bacteria assimilating B. indica EPS included members of the Verrucomicrobia, candidate division OD1, and the Armatimonadetes. The results indicate that some uncultured bacteria in soils may be adapted to using complex heteropolysaccharides for growth and suggest that the use of these substrates may provide a means for culturing new species. PMID:25934620

  12. Stable-Isotope Probing Identifies Uncultured Planctomycetes as Primary Degraders of a Complex Heteropolysaccharide in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Sharp, Christine E.; Jones, Gareth M.; Grasby, Stephen E.; Brady, Allyson L.

    2015-01-01

    The exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by some bacteria are potential growth substrates for other bacteria in soil. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify aerobic soil bacteria that assimilated the cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus or the EPS produced by Beijerinckia indica. The latter is a heteropolysaccharide comprised primarily of l-guluronic acid, d-glucose, and d-glycero-d-mannoheptose. 13C-labeled EPS and 13C-labeled cellulose were purified from bacterial cultures grown on [13C]glucose. Two soils were incubated with these substrates, and bacteria actively assimilating them were identified via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes recovered from 13C-labeled DNA. Cellulose C was assimilated primarily by soil bacteria closely related (93 to 100% 16S rRNA gene sequence identities) to known cellulose-degrading bacteria. However, B. indica EPS was assimilated primarily by bacteria with low identities (80 to 95%) to known species, particularly by different members of the phylum Planctomycetes. In one incubation, members of the Planctomycetes made up >60% of all reads in the labeled DNA and were only distantly related (<85% identity) to any described species. Although it is impossible with SIP to completely distinguish primary polysaccharide hydrolyzers from bacteria growing on produced oligo- or monosaccharides, the predominance of Planctomycetes suggested that they were primary degraders of EPS. Other bacteria assimilating B. indica EPS included members of the Verrucomicrobia, candidate division OD1, and the Armatimonadetes. The results indicate that some uncultured bacteria in soils may be adapted to using complex heteropolysaccharides for growth and suggest that the use of these substrates may provide a means for culturing new species. PMID:25934620

  13. Simulating the impacts of land use in northwest Europe on Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE): the role of arable ecosystems, grasslands and forest plantations in climate change mitigation.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Mohamed; Saunders, Matthew; Hastings, Astley; Williams, Mike; Smith, Pete; Osborne, Bruce; Lanigan, Gary; Jones, Mike B

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we compared measured and simulated Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) values from three wide spread ecosystems in the southeast of Ireland (forest, arable and grassland), and investigated the suitability of the DNDC (the DeNitrification-DeComposition) model to estimate present and future NEE. Although, the field-DNDC version overestimated NEE at temperatures >5 °C, forest-DNDC under-estimated NEE at temperatures >5 °C. The results suggest that the field/forest DNDC models can successfully estimate changes in seasonal and annual NEE from these ecosystems. Differences in NEE were found to be primarily land cover specific. The annual NEE was similar for the grassland and arable sites, but due to the contribution of exported carbon, the soil carbon increased at the grassland site and decreased at the arable site. The NEE of the forest site was an order of magnitude larger than that of the grassland or arable ecosystems, with large amounts of carbon stored in woody biomass and the soil. The average annual NEE, GPP and Reco values over the measurement period were -904, 2379 and 1475 g C m(-2) (forest plantations), -189, 906 and 715 g C m(-2) (arable systems) and -212, 1653 and 1444 g C m(-2) (grasslands), respectively. The average RMSE values were 3.8 g C m(-2) (forest plantations), 0.12 g C m(-2) (arable systems) and 0.21 g C m(-2) (grasslands). When these models were run with climate change scenarios to 2060, predictions show that all three ecosystems will continue to operate as carbon sinks. Further, climate change may decrease the carbon sink strength in the forest plantations by up to 50%. This study supports the use of the DNDC model as a valid tool to predict the consequences of climate change on NEE from different ecosystems.

  14. Simulating the impacts of land use in northwest Europe on Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE): the role of arable ecosystems, grasslands and forest plantations in climate change mitigation.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Mohamed; Saunders, Matthew; Hastings, Astley; Williams, Mike; Smith, Pete; Osborne, Bruce; Lanigan, Gary; Jones, Mike B

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we compared measured and simulated Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) values from three wide spread ecosystems in the southeast of Ireland (forest, arable and grassland), and investigated the suitability of the DNDC (the DeNitrification-DeComposition) model to estimate present and future NEE. Although, the field-DNDC version overestimated NEE at temperatures >5 °C, forest-DNDC under-estimated NEE at temperatures >5 °C. The results suggest that the field/forest DNDC models can successfully estimate changes in seasonal and annual NEE from these ecosystems. Differences in NEE were found to be primarily land cover specific. The annual NEE was similar for the grassland and arable sites, but due to the contribution of exported carbon, the soil carbon increased at the grassland site and decreased at the arable site. The NEE of the forest site was an order of magnitude larger than that of the grassland or arable ecosystems, with large amounts of carbon stored in woody biomass and the soil. The average annual NEE, GPP and Reco values over the measurement period were -904, 2379 and 1475 g C m(-2) (forest plantations), -189, 906 and 715 g C m(-2) (arable systems) and -212, 1653 and 1444 g C m(-2) (grasslands), respectively. The average RMSE values were 3.8 g C m(-2) (forest plantations), 0.12 g C m(-2) (arable systems) and 0.21 g C m(-2) (grasslands). When these models were run with climate change scenarios to 2060, predictions show that all three ecosystems will continue to operate as carbon sinks. Further, climate change may decrease the carbon sink strength in the forest plantations by up to 50%. This study supports the use of the DNDC model as a valid tool to predict the consequences of climate change on NEE from different ecosystems. PMID:23384575

  15. Peatlands under cultivation for arable crops; a new area estimate for Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donlan, Jennifer; Byrne, Ken

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands cover 20% of the Irish landscape and store between 53% and 61% of total soil carbon stocks. Eighty percent of these have been drained for peat cutting, afforestation and conversion to agricultural use. As a signatory to the United Nations framework Convention on Climate Change, Ireland is required to make an annual inventory of greenhouse gas emissions and sinks in the agricultural sector. While guidelines on the compilation of such inventories are provided by the IPCC 2006 Guidelines, reporting at higher Tiers requires the collection of national specific information including the accuracy of inventories. Total land area (including accuracy estimates) and national emission factors are lacking for agricultural activity on drained organic soils i.e. converted peatlands. Locations of organic (peat) soils under cultivation were identified using a map overlay analysis and existing geographic data on peat habitats and agricultural activities. The result was 3688 ha of land cultivated for arable crops overlaid areas classified as peatland. A design-based accuracy assessment and probability sampling method were chosen to assess the accuracy of the overlay. The focus of the analysis was on the accuracy of the peat data. The agricultural data was considered quite robust, so it was used to limit the area included in the assessment. Ground truthing was carried out at randomly chosen locations within areas mapped as 1) areas cultivated for arable crops and 2) peat habitats or a 100m buffer surrounding those areas. Sixty-nine sites were sampled and an error matrix was constructed comparing the map classification at the sample location to the samples taken there. The overall accuracy was 77%. There was a high producer's accuracy (84%) and a low user's accuracy (28%) for the peat category. Area estimate of peatlands under cultivation for arable crops was 1235 ± 784 ha. Future policies will require the identification of strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and

  16. 13C labelled cholesteryl octanoate breath test for assessing pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ventrucci, M; Cipolla, A; Ubalducci, G; Roda, A; Roda, E

    1998-01-01

    Background—A non-invasive test for assessment of fat digestion has been developed based on the intraluminal hydrolysis of cholesteryl-[1-13C]octanoate by pancreatic esterase. 
Aims—To determine the diagnostic performance of this breath test in the assessment of exocrine pancreatic function. 
Methods—The test was performed in 20 healthy controls, 22 patients with chronic pancreatic disease (CPD), four with biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), and 32 with non-pancreatic digestive diseases (NPD); results were compared with those of other tubeless tests (faecal chymotrypsin and fluorescein dilaurate test). 
Results—Hourly recoveries of 13CO2 were significantly lower in CPD when compared with healthy controls or NPD. In patients with CPD with mild to moderate insufficiency, the curve of 13CO2 recovery was similar to that of healthy controls, while in those with severe insufficiency it was flat. In three patients with CPD with severe steatorrhoea, a repeat test after pancreatic enzyme supplementation showed a significant rise in 13CO2 recovery. The four BPD patients had low and delayed 13CO2 recovery. Only eight of the 32 patients with NPD had abnormal breath test results. There was a significant correlation between the results of the breath test and those of faecal chymotrypsin, the fluorescein dilaurate test, and faecal fat measurements. For the diagnosis of pancreatic disease using the three hour cumulative 13CO2 recovery test, the sensitivity was 68.2% and specificity 75.0%; values were similar to those of the other two tubeless pancreatic function tests. In seven healthy controls, nine patients with CPD, and nine with NPD a second breath test was performed using Na-[1-13C]octanoate and a pancreatic function index was calculated as the ratio of 13C recovery obtained in the two tests: at three hours this index was abnormal in eight patients with CPD and in three with NPD. 
Conclusion—The cholesteryl-[1-13C]octanoate breath test can be useful for the diagnosis of fat malabsorption and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. 

 Keywords: cholesteryl octanoate breath test; exocrine pancreatic insufficiency; lipid malabsorption; stable isotopes PMID:9505890

  17. Absorption and distribution kinetics of the 13C-labeled tomato carotenoid phytoene in healthy adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoene is a tomato carotenoid which may contribute to the apparent health benefits of tomato consumption. While phytoene is a less prominent tomato carotenoid than lycopene, it is a major carotenoid in various human tissues. Phytoene distribution to plasma lipoproteins and tissues differs from lyc...

  18. Computational Platform for Flux Analysis Using 13C-Label Tracing- Phase I SBIR Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dien, Stephen J.

    2005-04-12

    Isotopic label tracing is a powerful experimental technique that can be combined with metabolic models to quantify metabolic fluxes in an organism under a particular set of growth conditions. In this work we constructed a genome-scale metabolic model of Methylobacterium extorquens, a facultative methylotroph with potential application in the production of useful chemicals from methanol. A series of labeling experiments were performed using 13C-methanol, and the resulting distribution of labeled carbon in the proteinogenic amino acids was determined by mass spectrometry. Algorithms were developed to analyze this data in context of the metabolic model, yielding flux distributions for wild-type and several engineered strains of M. extorquens. These fluxes were compared to those predicted by model simulation alone, and also integrated with microarray data to give an improved understanding of the metabolic physiology of this organism.

  19. Metabolic Flux Elucidation for Large-Scale Models Using 13C Labeled Isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Suthers, Patrick F.; Burgard, Anthony P.; Dasika, Madhukar S.; Nowroozi, Farnaz; Van Dien, Stephen; Keasling, Jay D.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2007-01-01

    A key consideration in metabolic engineering is the determination of fluxes of the metabolites within the cell. This determination provides an unambiguous description of metabolism before and/or after engineering interventions. Here, we present a computational framework that combines a constraint-based modeling framework with isotopic label tracing on a large-scale. When cells are fed a growth substrate with certain carbon positions labeled with 13C, the distribution of this label in the intracellular metabolites can be calculated based on the known biochemistry of the participating pathways. Most labeling studies focus on skeletal representations of central metabolism and ignore many flux routes that could contribute to the observed isotopic labeling patterns. In contrast, our approach investigates the importance of carrying out isotopic labeling studies using a more comprehensive reaction network consisting of 350 fluxes and 184 metabolites in Escherichia coli including global metabolite balances on cofactors such as ATP, NADH, and NADPH. The proposed procedure is demonstrated on an E. coli strain engineered to produce amorphadiene, a precursor to the anti-malarial drug artemisinin. The cells were grown in continuous culture on glucose containing 20% [U-13C]glucose; the measurements are made using GC-MS performed on 13 amino acids extracted from the cells. We identify flux distributions for which the calculated labeling patterns agree well with the measurements alluding to the accuracy of the network reconstruction. Furthermore, we explore the robustness of the flux calculations to variability in the experimental MS measurements, as well as highlight the key experimental measurements necessary for flux determination. Finally, we discuss the effect of reducing the model, as well as shed light onto the customization of the developed computational framework to other systems. PMID:17632026

  20. The Fate of Oral Glucosamine Traced by 13C Labeling in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, George R.; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Noyszewski, Elizabeth A.; Hall, Jeffery O.; Sharma, Akella V.; Callaway, D. Allen; Reddy, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Objective: It has remained ambiguous as to whether oral dosing of glucosamine (GlcN) would make its way to the joint and affect changes in the cartilage, particularly the integrity of cartilage and chondrocyte function. The objective of this study was to trace the fate of orally dosed GlcN and determine definitively if GlcN was incorporated into cartilage proteoglycans. Design: Two dogs were treated with 13C-GlcN-HCl by oral dosing (500 mg/dog/d for 2 weeks and 250 mg/dog/d for 3 weeks). Cartilage was harvested from the tibial plateau and femoral condyles along with tissue specimens from the liver, spleen, heart, kidney, skin, skeletal muscle, lung, and costal cartilage. Percentages of 13C and 13C-GlcN present in each tissue sample were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Results: In the case of dog 1 (2-week treatment), there was an increase of 2.3% of 13C present in the articular cartilage compared to the control and an increase of 1.6% of 13C in dog 2 compared to control. As to be expected, the highest percentage of 13C in the other tissues tested was found in the liver, and the remaining tissues had percentages of 13C less than that of articular cartilage. Conclusion: The results are definitive and for the first time provide conclusive evidence that orally given GlcN can make its way through the digestive tract and be used by chondrocytes in joint cartilage, thereby potentially having an effect on the available GlcN for proteoglycan biosynthesis. PMID:26069586

  1. Methanogenic capabilities of ANME-archaea deduced from (13) C-labelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Sebastian; Blumenberg, Martin; Michaelis, Walter; Siegert, Michael; Krüger, Martin; Seifert, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) are ubiquitous in marine sediments where sulfate dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) occurs. Despite considerable progress in the understanding of AOM, physiological details are still widely unresolved. We investigated two distinct microbial mat samples from the Black Sea that were dominated by either ANME-1 or ANME-2. The (13) C lipid stable isotope probing (SIP) method using labelled substances, namely methane, bicarbonate, acetate, and methanol, was applied, and the substrate-dependent methanogenic capabilities were tested. Our data provide strong evidence for a versatile physiology of both, ANME-1 and ANME-2. Considerable methane production rates (MPRs) from CO2 -reduction were observed, particularly from ANME-2 dominated samples and in the presence of methane, which supports the hypothesis of a co-occurrence of methanotrophy and methanogenesis in the AOM systems (AOM/MPR up to 2:1). The experiments also revealed strong methylotrophic capabilities through (13) C-assimilation from labelled methanol, which was independent of the presence of methane. Additionally, high MPRs from methanol were detected in both of the mat samples. As demonstrated by the (13) C-uptake into lipids, ANME-1 was found to thrive also under methane free conditions. Finally, C35 -isoprenoid hydrocarbons were identified as new lipid biomarkers for ANME-1, most likely functioning as a hydrogen sink during methanogenesis.

  2. Homonuclear dipolar recoupling techniques for structure determination in uniformly 13C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2009-11-01

    In solid-state NMR magic angle spinning is often used to remove line broadening associated with anisotropic interactions, such as chemical shift anisotropy and dipolar couplings. Dipolar recoupling refers to sequences of pulses designed to reintroduce dipolar interactions that are otherwise averaged by magic angle spinning. One of the key applications of homonuclear (and heteronuclear) dipolar recoupling is for the purpose of protein structure determination. Recoupling experiments, originally designed for applications in spin-pair labeled samples, have been revised in recent years for applications in samples with extensive or uniform incorporation of isotopic labels. In these samples multiple internuclear distances can in principle be probed simultaneously, but the dipolar truncation effects (i.e. attenuation of the effects of weak couplings by strong ones) circumvent such measurements. In this article we review some of the recent developments in homonuclear recoupling methods that allow overcoming this problem.

  3. Production and NMR signal optimization of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Amino acids are targeted nutrients for consumption by cancers to sustain their rapid growth and proliferation. 13C-enriched amino acids are important metabolic tracers for cancer diagnostics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Despite this diagnostic potential, 13C NMR of amino acids however is hampered by the inherently low NMR sensitivity of the 13C nuclei. In this work, we have employed a physics technique known as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance the NMR signals of 13C-enriched amino acids. DNP works by transferring the high polarization of electrons to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Using a fast dissolution method in which the frozen polarized samples are dissolved rapidly with superheated water, injectable solutions of 13C-amino acids with highly enhanced NMR signals (by at least 5,000-fold) were produced at room temperature. Factors that affect the NMR signal enhancement levels such as the choice of free radical polarizing agents and sample preparation will be discussed along with the thermal mixing physics model of DNP. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  4. [Profile distribution and storage of soil organic carbon in a black soil as affected by land use types].

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiang-xiang; Han, Xiao-zeng; Li, Lu-jun; Zou, Wen-xiu; Lu, Xin-chun; Qiao, Yun-fa

    2015-04-01

    Taking soils in a long-term experimental field over 29 years with different land uses types, including arable land, bare land, grassland and larch forest land as test materials, the distribution and storage of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the profile (0-200 cm) in typical black soil (Mollisol) region of China were investigated. The results showed that the most significant differences in SOC content occurred in the 0-10 cm surface soil layer among all soils with the order of grassland > arable land > larch forest land > bare land. SOC contents at 10-120 cm depth were lower in arable land as compared with the other land use types. Compared with arable land, grassland could improve SOC content obviously. SOC content down to a depth of 60 cm in grassland was significantly higher than that in arable land. The content of SOC at 0-10 cm in bare land was significantly lower than that in arable land. Although there were no significant differences in SOC content at 0-20 cm depth between larch forestland and arable land, the SOC contents at 20-140 cm depth were generally higher in larch forestland than that in arable land. In general, SOC content showed a significantly negative relationship with soil pH, bulk density, silt and clay content and an even stronger significantly positive relationship with soil total N content and sand content. The SOC storage in arable land at 0-200 cm depth was significantly lower than that in the other three land use types, which was 13.6%, 11.4% and 10.9% lower than in grassland, bare land and larch forest land, respectively. Therefore, the arable land of black soil has a great potential for sequestering C in soil and improving environmental quality.

  5. Autotrophic ammonia oxidation by soil thaumarchaea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Offre, Pierre R; He, Ji-Zheng; Verhamme, Daniel T; Nicol, Graeme W; Prosser, James I

    2010-10-01

    Nitrification plays a central role in the global nitrogen cycle and is responsible for significant losses of nitrogen fertilizer, atmospheric pollution by the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, and nitrate pollution of groundwaters. Ammonia oxidation, the first step in nitrification, was thought to be performed by autotrophic bacteria until the recent discovery of archaeal ammonia oxidizers. Autotrophic archaeal ammonia oxidizers have been cultivated from marine and thermal spring environments, but the relative importance of bacteria and archaea in soil nitrification is unclear and it is believed that soil archaeal ammonia oxidizers may use organic carbon, rather than growing autotrophically. In this soil microcosm study, stable isotope probing was used to demonstrate incorporation of (13)C-enriched carbon dioxide into the genomes of thaumarchaea possessing two functional genes: amoA, encoding a subunit of ammonia monooxygenase that catalyses the first step in ammonia oxidation; and hcd, a key gene in the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle, which has been found so far only in archaea. Nitrification was accompanied by increases in archaeal amoA gene abundance and changes in amoA gene diversity, but no change was observed in bacterial amoA genes. Archaeal, but not bacterial, amoA genes were also detected in (13)C-labeled DNA, demonstrating inorganic CO(2) fixation by archaeal, but not bacterial, ammonia oxidizers. Autotrophic archaeal ammonia oxidation was further supported by coordinate increases in amoA and hcd gene abundance in (13)C-labeled DNA. The results therefore provide direct evidence for a role for archaea in soil ammonia oxidation and demonstrate autotrophic growth of ammonia oxidizing archaea in soil.

  6. Identification of soil bacteria able to degrade phenanthrene bound to a hydrophobic sorbent in situ.

    PubMed

    Regonne, Raïssa Kom; Martin, Florence; Mbawala, Augustin; Ngassoum, Martin Benoît; Jouanneau, Yves

    2013-09-01

    Efficient bioremediation of PAH-contaminated sites is limited by the hydrophobic character and poor bioavailability of pollutants. In this study, stable isotope probing (SIP) was implemented to track bacteria that can degrade PAHs adsorbed on hydrophobic sorbents. Temperate and tropical soils were incubated with (13)C-labeled phenanthrene, supplied by spiking or coated onto membranes. Phenanthrene mineralization was faster in microcosms with PAH-coated membranes than in microcosms containing spiked soil. Upon incubation with temperate soil, phenanthrene degraders found in the biofilms that formed on coated membranes were mainly identified as Sphingomonadaceae and Actinobacteria. In the tropical soil, uncultured Rhodocyclaceae dominated degraders bound to membranes. Accordingly, ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase sequences recovered from this soil matched PAH-specific dioxygenase genes recently found in Rhodocyclaceae. Hence, our SIP approach allowed the detection of novel degraders, mostly uncultured, which differ from those detected after soil spiking, but might play a key role in the bioremediation of PAH-polluted soils.

  7. Distinct germination response of endangered and common arable weeds to reduced water potential.

    PubMed

    Rühl, A T; Eckstein, R L; Otte, A; Donath, T W

    2016-01-01

    Arable weeds are one of the most endangered species groups in Europe. Modern agriculture and intensive land-use management are the main causes of their dramatic decline. However, besides the changes in land use, climate change may further challenge the adaptability of arable weeds. Therefore, we investigated the response pattern of arable weeds to different water potential and temperature regimes during the phase of germination. We expected that endangered arable weeds would be more sensitive to differences in water availability and temperature than common arable weeds. To this end, we set up a climate chamber experiment where we exposed seeds of five familial pairs of common and endangered arable weed species to different temperatures (5/15, 10/20 °C) and water potentials (0.0 to -1.2 MPa). The results revealed a significant relationship between the reaction of arable weed species to water availability and their Red List status. The effects of reduced water availability on total germination, mean germination time and synchrony were significantly stronger in endangered than in common arable weeds. Therefore, global climate change may present a further threat to the survival of endangered arable weed species. PMID:25786499

  8. Distinct germination response of endangered and common arable weeds to reduced water potential.

    PubMed

    Rühl, A T; Eckstein, R L; Otte, A; Donath, T W

    2016-01-01

    Arable weeds are one of the most endangered species groups in Europe. Modern agriculture and intensive land-use management are the main causes of their dramatic decline. However, besides the changes in land use, climate change may further challenge the adaptability of arable weeds. Therefore, we investigated the response pattern of arable weeds to different water potential and temperature regimes during the phase of germination. We expected that endangered arable weeds would be more sensitive to differences in water availability and temperature than common arable weeds. To this end, we set up a climate chamber experiment where we exposed seeds of five familial pairs of common and endangered arable weed species to different temperatures (5/15, 10/20 °C) and water potentials (0.0 to -1.2 MPa). The results revealed a significant relationship between the reaction of arable weed species to water availability and their Red List status. The effects of reduced water availability on total germination, mean germination time and synchrony were significantly stronger in endangered than in common arable weeds. Therefore, global climate change may present a further threat to the survival of endangered arable weed species.

  9. Rapid Recovery of Cyanobacterial Pigments in Desiccated Biological Soil Crusts following Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Raeid M. M.; Polerecky, Lubos; Al-Habsi, Amal; Oetjen, Janina; Strous, Marc; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    We examined soil surface colour change to green and hydrotaxis following addition of water to biological soil crusts using pigment extraction, hyperspectral imaging, microsensors and 13C labeling experiments coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALD-TOF MS). The topsoil colour turned green in less than 5 minutes following water addition. The concentrations of chlorophyll a (Chl a), scytonemin and echinenon rapidly increased in the top <1 mm layer while in the deeper layer, their concentrations remained low. Hyperspectral imaging showed that, in both wet and dehydrated crusts, cyanobacteria formed a layer at a depth of 0.2–0.4 mm and this layer did not move upward after wetting. 13C labeling experiments and MALDI TOF analysis showed that Chl a was already present in the desiccated crusts and de novo synthesis of this molecule started only after 2 days of wetting due to growth of cyanobacteria. Microsensor measurements showed that photosynthetic activity increased concomitantly with the increase of Chl a, and reached a maximum net rate of 92 µmol m−2 h−1 approximately 2 hours after wetting. We conclude that the colour change of soil crusts to green upon water addition was not due to hydrotaxis but rather to the quick recovery and reassembly of pigments. Cyanobacteria in crusts can maintain their photosynthetic apparatus intact even under prolonged periods of desiccation with the ability to resume their photosynthetic activities within minutes after wetting. PMID:25375172

  10. Fate of brominated flame retardants and organochlorine pesticides in urban soil: volatility and degradation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Fiona; Kurt-Karakus, Perihan; Bidleman, Terry F

    2012-03-01

    As the uses of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) are being phased out in many countries, soils could become a secondary emission source to the atmosphere. It is also anticipated that the demand for alternative brominated flame retardants (BFRs) will grow, but little is known about their environmental fate in soils. In this study, the volatility and degradation of BFRs and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in soil was investigated. A low organic carbon (5.6%) urban soil was spiked with a suite of BFRs and OCPs, followed by incubation under laboratory condition for 360 days. These included BDE- 17, -28, -47, -99; α- and β-1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (TBECH), β-1,2,5,6-tetrabromocyclooctane (TBCO), and 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE), OCPs: α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH) and (13)C(6)-α-HCH, trans-chlordane (TC), and (13)C(10)-TC. The volatility of spiked chemicals was investigated using a fugacity meter to measure the soil-air partition coefficient (K(SA)). K(SA) of some spiked BFRs and OCPs increased from Day 10 to 60 or 90 and leveled off afterward. This suggests that the volatility of BFRs and OCPs decreases over time as the chemicals become more strongly bound to the soil. Degradation of alternative BFRs (α- and β-TBECH, β-TBCO, DPTE), BDE-17, and α-HCH ((13)C-labeled and nonlabeled) was evident in soils over 360 days, but no degradation was observed for the BDE-28, -47, -99, and TC ((13)C-labeled and nonlabeled). A method to separate the enantiomers of α-TBECH and β-TBCO was developed and their degradation, along with α-HCH ((13)C-labeled and nonlabeled) was enantioselective. This is the first study which reports the enantioselective degradation of chiral BFRs in soils. Discrepancies between the enantiomer fraction (EF) of chemicals extracted from the soil by dichloromethane (DCM) and air were found. It is suggested that DCM removes both the sequestered and loosely bound fractions of chemicals in soil, whereas

  11. Burkholderiales participating in pentachlorophenol biodegradation in iron-reducing paddy soil as identified by stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hui; Hu, Min; Li, Fangbai; Chen, Manjia; Lv, Yahui

    2015-07-01

    As the most prevalent preservative worldwide for many years, pentachlorophenol (PCP) has attracted much interest in the study of biodegradation in soil and aquatic ecosystems. However, the key microorganisms involved in anaerobic degradation are less well understood. Hence, we used DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) to identify the PCP-degrading microorganisms in iron-rich paddy soil under anaerobic conditions. (12)C- and (13)C-labeled PCP were almost completely degraded in 30 days under iron-reducing conditions. The results of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of 16S rRNA genes showed that 197 and 217 bp (HaeIII digests) restriction fragments (T-RFs) were enriched in heavy DNA fractions of (13)C-labeled samples, and the information from 16S rRNA gene clone libraries suggested that the microorganisms corresponding to these T-RF fragments, which increased in relative abundance during incubation, belonged to the order of Burkholderiales, in which 197 and 217 bp were classified as unclassified Burkholderiales and the genus Achromobacter, respectively. The results of the present study indicated that Burkholderiales-affiliated microorganisms were responsible for PCP degradation in anaerobic paddy soil and shed new light on in situ bioremediation in anaerobic PCP contaminated soil.

  12. Phylogenetically Distinct Phylotypes Modulate Nitrification in a Paddy Soil

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Wang, Baozhan

    2015-01-01

    Paddy fields represent a unique ecosystem in which regular flooding occurs, allowing for rice cultivation. However, the taxonomic identity of the microbial functional guilds that catalyze soil nitrification remains poorly understood. In this study, we provide molecular evidence for distinctly different phylotypes of nitrifying communities in a neutral paddy soil using high-throughput pyrosequencing and DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP). Following urea addition, the levels of soil nitrate increased significantly, accompanied by an increase in the abundance of the bacterial and archaeal amoA gene in microcosms subjected to SIP (SIP microcosms) during a 56-day incubation period. High-throughput fingerprints of the total 16S rRNA genes in SIP microcosms indicated that nitrification activity positively correlated with the abundance of Nitrosospira-like ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), soil group 1.1b-like ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and Nitrospira-like nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Pyrosequencing of 13C-labeled DNA further revealed that 13CO2 was assimilated by these functional groups to a much greater extent than by marine group 1.1a-associated AOA and Nitrobacter-like NOB. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that active AOB communities were closely affiliated with Nitrosospira sp. strain L115 and the Nitrosospira multiformis lineage and that the 13C-labeled AOA were related to phylogenetically distinct groups, including the moderately thermophilic “Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis,” uncultured fosmid 29i4, and acidophilic “Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra” lineages. These results suggest that a wide variety of microorganisms were involved in soil nitrification, implying physiological diversification of soil nitrifying communities that are constantly exposed to environmental fluctuations in paddy fields. PMID:25724959

  13. Can the application of biochar during arable and forestry plantation create an ongoing carbon sink and increase plant productivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. J.; Worrall, F.

    2009-04-01

    This study is based at the National Trust Wallington estate in Northumberland, NE England, an agricultural estate where land-management options are being considered in an attempt to enhance current land carbon stocks. The aim of this research is to identify if biochar (charcoal produced from biomass) can provide an opportunity to create a perpetual carbon sink as apposed to a transitionary sink associated with other land-use changes currently under consideration? The main issues under investigation are: can biochar be ploughed into arable soils to create a long term carbon sink? Can biochar be ploughed into organic rich forest soils to create a long term carbon sink? Will the application of biochar increase crop productivity, increasing photosynthesis and carbon sequestration further still? In order for the estate to become carbon neutral through biochar application alone it was calculated that 3312 Kg/ha/year of biochar would need to be applied to the current area of arable land. This however is based on the assumption that all of the biochar added is stable and will remain in the soil, and assumes that addition does not lead to increased CO2 emissions from the organic matter already present. This study presents the results of weekly soil respiration measurements currently being made on 24 lysimeters filled with arable and forestry soils and 4 levels of charcoal treatment. Levels of treatment were chosen to assess the impact of applying biochar on a yearly basis and any negative impacts which may result from very high eventual concentrations. The following levels of charcoal were applied: 0 Kg/hectare, 6250 Kg/hectare, 62500 Kg/hectare, 87 500 Kg/hectare. The lysimeters containing 0 Kg/ha act as a control, the lysimeters containing 6250 Kg/hectare allow assessment of the impacts of 2 years of addition, 62 500Kg/ha the impact of 18 years of addition, and 87 500kg/ha the impact of 26 years of addition. The study will also present the results of plant productivity

  14. Evaluation of mitigation strategies to reduce ammonia losses from slurry fertilisation on arable lands.

    PubMed

    Carozzi, M; Ferrara, R M; Rana, G; Acutis, M

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the best practices in reducing ammonia (NH3) losses from fertilised arable lands, six field trials were carried out in three different locations in northern Italy. NH3 emissions from cattle slurry were estimated considering the spreading techniques and the field incorporation procedures. The measurements were performed using long term exposure samplers associated to the determination of the atmospheric turbulence and the use of the backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) model WindTrax. The results obtained indicate that the NH3 emission process was exhausted in the first 24-48 h after slurry spreading. The slurry incorporation technique was able to reduce the NH3 losses with respect to the surface spreading, where a contextual incorporation led to reductions up to 87%. However, the best abatement strategy for NH3 losses from slurry applications has proved to be the direct injection into the soil, with a reduction of about 95% with respect to the surface spreading. The results obtained highlight the strong dependence of the volatilisation phenomenon by soil and weather conditions.

  15. An assessment of the predictors of the dynamics in arable production per capita index, arable production and permanent cropland and forest area based on structural equation models.

    PubMed

    Epule, Epule Terence; Bryant, Christopher Robin; Akkari, Cherine; Sarr, Mamadou Adama; Peng, Changhui

    2014-01-01

    This study sets out to verify the key predictors of the dynamics of the arable production per capita index, the arable production and permanent crop land and forest area at a national scale in Cameroon. To achieve this objective, data for twelve time series data variables spanning the period 1961-2000 were collected from Oxford University, the United Nations Development program, the World Bank, FAOSTAT and the World Resource Institute. The data were analysed using structural equation models (SEM) based on the two stage least square approach (2SLS). To optimize the results, variables that showed high correlations were dropped because they will not add any new information into the models. The results show that the arable production per capita index is impacted more by population while the influence of rainfall on the arable production per capita index is weak. Arable production and permanent cropland on its part has as the main predictor arable production per capita index. Forest area is seen to be more vulnerable to trade in forest products and logging than any other variable. The models presented in this study are quite reliable because the p and t values are consistent and overall, these results are consistent with previous studies.

  16. [Determination of trace organochlorine pesticides in soil using isotope dilution-high resolution gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenjun; Gao, Lirong; Gong, Aijun; Li, Cheng; Wang, Pu; Fu, Shan; Xiao, Ke; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Wenbin

    2010-05-01

    A method for the determination of trace organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in soil using isotope dilution and high resolution gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (ID-HRGC-HRMS) was developed. The sample was extracted by accelerated solvent extractor (ASE) and cleaned-up by a Florisil solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. The analytes were separated by HRGC on a DB-5MS column (30 mx 0.25 mm x 0.25 microm) and determined by HRMS. The identifications of OCPs were based on the retention time of 13C-labelled standard and the abundance ratio of the two exact mass-to-charge ratios. The quantitative analysis was performed using the ratios of the integrated areas of the 13C-labelled standards. This method has the recoveries ranging from 77.3% to 114.5% and the relative standard deviations (RSD) less than 10.81% (n=5). The limits of detection (LODs) of this method for all OCPs were lower than 0.04 pg/g. The results indicated that the method is rapid, selective and sensitive for precise determination requirements of organochlorine pesticides at trace level in soil.

  17. Microbial respiration activities correlated to sequentially separated, particulate and water-soluble organic matter fractions from arable and forest topsoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M.; Wirth, S.; Ellerbrock, R.; Sommer, M.

    2009-12-01

    Michael Kaiser1, Stephan Wirth2, Ruth H. Ellerbrock3, Michael Sommer3,4 1University of California Merced, Natural Science, 4225 N. Hospital Rd., Atwater, CA 95301 2,3 Leibniz-Center for Agricultural Research (ZALF) e. V. 2 Institute of Landscape Matter Dynamics 3 Institute of Soil Landscape Research Eberswalder Str. 84, D-15374 Muencheberg, Germany 4University of Potsdam, Institute of Geoecology, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany Microbial respiration activities correlated to sequentially separated, particulate and water-soluble organic matter fractions from arable and forest topsoils Microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) accounts for roughly half of CO2 evolution from vegetated soil surfaces and plays a crucial role in the ability of soil to mitigate the greenhouse effect. The separation and identification of labile (i.e., easily decomposable) organic matter (OM) fractions from bulk SOM is of particular importance for a mechanistic understanding of microbial decomposition processes and for predicting the response of SOM to changes in land use, management, and climate. This work aimed to reveal differences in the relevance of particulate as well as water-soluble organic matter (OM) fractions from topsoils to the easily biodegradable soil organic matter (SOM). We selected eight paired sites with quite different soil types (Udorthent, Paleudalf, Glossudalf, Aquept, Hapludalf, Aquert, Udert, Haplorthod) and soil properties (e.g., clay content: 28 to 564 g kg-1). For each of these sites, we took samples from adjacent arable and forest topsoils. Physically uncomplexed, macro-, and micro-aggregate-occluded organic particle, as well as water-soluble OM fractions were sequentially separated by a combination of electrostatic attraction, ultrasonic treatment, density separation, sieving, and water extraction. The easily biodegradable SOM of the topsoil samples was determined by measuring microbial respiration during a short-term incubation

  18. Phosphorus sources and losses in two arable catchments and implications for catchment management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, P. N. C.; Melland, A. R.; Mellander, P.-E.; Shortle, G.; Wall, D.; Jordan, P.

    2012-04-01

    Multi-scale catchment experiments allow assessment of the impact of policy measures on nutrient losses from agriculture and water quality and testing of conceptual models of nutrient loss. The potential for catchment-specific responses to be extrapolated to similar catchments country-wide can then help guide future policy measures to achieve water quality targets, such as those in the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD). This paper presents results from the Agricultural Catchments Programme; an integrated advisory/research programme working with stakeholders to assess the efficacy of Ireland's National Action Programme (NAP) of measures in meeting the targets of the Nitrates Directive and WFD. Results are presented for P sources and losses over two water years in two catchments (9.5 and 11.2 km2) with intensive arable agriculture but contrasting soil drainage and geology and resultant hydrologic and nutrient transfer pathways. Phosphorus source pressures were characterised in terms of field-scale soil P status and P balances. Phosphorus loss was characterised in terms of P concentration and loads monitored with high-resolution bank-side analysers. Despite having similar P soil status (18-19 % in excess of agronomic optimum), P losses were much greater from the catchment with more poorly drained soils (0.7 kg ha-1 yr-1) than from the catchment with more freely drained soils (0.2 kg ha-1 yr-1). This paper considers the factors controlling P loss in the two catchments (farm nutrient management, soils, topography and hydrology) to explain the differences between the two catchments and the spatio-temporal variability observed. Agricultural and non-agricultural point sources, in addition to diffuse agricultural sources, are considered. Although both catchments are subject to the same NAP measures, the outcomes, in terms of both P loads and concentrations, showed that inter-annual hydrological patterns and inter-catchment hydrological properties are critical. This

  19. Probing soil C metabolism in response to temperature: results from experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, P.; Dalder, J.; Blankinship, J.; Selmants, P. C.; Schwartz, E.; Koch, G. W.; Hart, S.; Hungate, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    C use efficiency (CUE) is one of the least understood aspects of soil C cycling, has a very large effect on soil respiration and C sequestration, and decreases with elevated temperature. CUE is directly related to substrate partitioning over energy production and biosynthesis. The production of energy and metabolic precursors occurs in well-known processes such as glycolysis and Krebs cycle. We have developed a new stable isotope approach using position-specific 13C-labeled metabolic tracers to measure these fundamental metabolic processes in intact soil communities (1). We use this new approach, combined with models of soil metabolic flux patterns, to analyze the response of microbial energy production, biosynthesis, and CUE to temperature. The method consists of adding small but precise amounts of position-specific 13C -labeled metabolic tracers to parallel soil incubations, in this case 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose. The measurement of CO2 released from the labeled tracers is used to calculate the C flux rates through various metabolic pathways. A simplified metabolic model consisting of 23 reactions is iteratively solved using results of the metabolic tracer experiments and information on microbial precursor demand under different temperatures. This new method enables direct study of fundamental aspects of microbial energy production, C use efficiency, and soil organic matter formation in response to temperature. (1) Dijkstra P, Blankinship JC, Selmants PC, Hart SC, Koch GW, Schwarz E and Hungate BA. Probing metabolic flux patterns of soil microbial communities using parallel position-specific tracer labeling. Soil Biology and Biochemistry (accepted)

  20. The Bio-accessibility of Synthetic Fe-Organo Complexes in Subsurface Soil with Elevated Temperature: a Proxy for the Vulnerability of Mineral Associated Carbon to Warming Rachel C. Porras, Peter S. Nico, and Margaret Torn Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, R. C.; Hicks Pries, C.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, subsurface soils (>30 cm) represent an important reservoir of soil organic carbon (SOC). However, the vulnerability of this deep SOC and, in particular mineral-associated SOC, to warming, and its potential to amplify the effects of climate change is highly uncertain. To gain insight into the bio-accessibility and temperature sensitivity of mineral-associated organic C, we conducted a series of incubations using soils collected from three depths (0-10, 50-60, and 80-90 cm) under coniferous forest. The soils are moderately acidic (mean pH=6.5) sandy, mixed, mesic Ultic Haploxeralfs. To understand how mechanisms controlling SOC bio-accessibilty or temperature sensitivity differ with depth and with the properties of Fe-organo complexes (i.e.,degree of crystallinity, amount of reactive surface area, or surface saturation), we used a 13C labeled glucose substrate to prepare synthetic Fe-organo complexes spanning a range of crystallinity and mineral surface saturation. The synthetic Fe-organo complexes were then added to soil from three depths. The soils containing the 13C labeled Fe-organo adduct were incubated at two temperatures (ambient and +4°C) and respired 13CO2 was measured and used to estimate flux rates. Differences in measured 13CO2 fluxes as a function of depth, surface loading, and mineral properties are discussed in terms of their implications for the temperature sensitivity of mineral protected organic carbon in subsurface soils.

  1. Reconciling Pesticide Reduction with Economic and Environmental Sustainability in Arable Farming

    PubMed Central

    Lechenet, Martin; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Boissinot, François; Petit, Marie-Sophie; Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas M.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing pesticide use is one of the high-priority targets in the quest for a sustainable agriculture. Until now, most studies dealing with pesticide use reduction have compared a limited number of experimental prototypes. Here we assessed the sustainability of 48 arable cropping systems from two major agricultural regions of France, including conventional, integrated and organic systems, with a wide range of pesticide use intensities and management (crop rotation, soil tillage, cultivars, fertilization, etc.). We assessed cropping system sustainability using a set of economic, environmental and social indicators. We failed to detect any positive correlation between pesticide use intensity and both productivity (when organic farms were excluded) and profitability. In addition, there was no relationship between pesticide use and workload. We found that crop rotation diversity was higher in cropping systems with low pesticide use, which would support the important role of crop rotation diversity in integrated and organic strategies. In comparison to conventional systems, integrated strategies showed a decrease in the use of both pesticides and nitrogen fertilizers, they consumed less energy and were frequently more energy efficient. Integrated systems therefore appeared as the best compromise in sustainability trade-offs. Our results could be used to re-design current cropping systems, by promoting diversified crop rotations and the combination of a wide range of available techniques contributing to pest management. PMID:24887494

  2. Reconciling pesticide reduction with economic and environmental sustainability in arable farming.

    PubMed

    Lechenet, Martin; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Boissinot, François; Petit, Marie-Sophie; Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas M

    2014-01-01

    Reducing pesticide use is one of the high-priority targets in the quest for a sustainable agriculture. Until now, most studies dealing with pesticide use reduction have compared a limited number of experimental prototypes. Here we assessed the sustainability of 48 arable cropping systems from two major agricultural regions of France, including conventional, integrated and organic systems, with a wide range of pesticide use intensities and management (crop rotation, soil tillage, cultivars, fertilization, etc.). We assessed cropping system sustainability using a set of economic, environmental and social indicators. We failed to detect any positive correlation between pesticide use intensity and both productivity (when organic farms were excluded) and profitability. In addition, there was no relationship between pesticide use and workload. We found that crop rotation diversity was higher in cropping systems with low pesticide use, which would support the important role of crop rotation diversity in integrated and organic strategies. In comparison to conventional systems, integrated strategies showed a decrease in the use of both pesticides and nitrogen fertilizers, they consumed less energy and were frequently more energy efficient. Integrated systems therefore appeared as the best compromise in sustainability trade-offs. Our results could be used to re-design current cropping systems, by promoting diversified crop rotations and the combination of a wide range of available techniques contributing to pest management.

  3. The arable ecosystem as battleground for emergence of new human pathogens

    PubMed Central

    van Overbeek, Leonard S.; van Doorn, Joop; Wichers, Jan H.; van Amerongen, Aart; van Roermund, Herman J. W.; Willemsen, Peter T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Disease incidences related to Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica infections by consumption of (fresh) vegetables, sprouts, and occasionally fruits made clear that these pathogens are not only transmitted to humans via the “classical” routes of meat, eggs, and dairy products, but also can be transmitted to humans via plants or products derived from plants. Nowadays, it is of major concern that these human pathogens, especially the ones belonging to the taxonomical family of Enterobacteriaceae, become adapted to environmental habitats without losing their virulence to humans. Adaptation to the plant environment would lead to longer persistence in plants, increasing their chances on transmission to humans via consumption of plant-derived food. One of the mechanisms of adaptation to the plant environment in human pathogens, proposed in this paper, is horizontal transfer of genes from different microbial communities present in the arable ecosystem, like the ones originating from soil, animal digestive track systems (manure), water and plants themselves. Genes that would confer better adaptation to the phytosphere might be genes involved in plant colonization, stress resistance and nutrient acquisition and utilization. Because human pathogenic enterics often were prone to genetic exchanges via phages and conjugative plasmids, it was postulated that these genetic elements may be hold key responsible for horizontal gene transfers between human pathogens and indigenous microbes in agroproduction systems. In analogy to zoonosis, we coin the term phytonosis for a human pathogen that is transmitted via plants and not exclusively via animals. PMID:24688484

  4. Reconciling pesticide reduction with economic and environmental sustainability in arable farming.

    PubMed

    Lechenet, Martin; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Boissinot, François; Petit, Marie-Sophie; Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas M

    2014-01-01

    Reducing pesticide use is one of the high-priority targets in the quest for a sustainable agriculture. Until now, most studies dealing with pesticide use reduction have compared a limited number of experimental prototypes. Here we assessed the sustainability of 48 arable cropping systems from two major agricultural regions of France, including conventional, integrated and organic systems, with a wide range of pesticide use intensities and management (crop rotation, soil tillage, cultivars, fertilization, etc.). We assessed cropping system sustainability using a set of economic, environmental and social indicators. We failed to detect any positive correlation between pesticide use intensity and both productivity (when organic farms were excluded) and profitability. In addition, there was no relationship between pesticide use and workload. We found that crop rotation diversity was higher in cropping systems with low pesticide use, which would support the important role of crop rotation diversity in integrated and organic strategies. In comparison to conventional systems, integrated strategies showed a decrease in the use of both pesticides and nitrogen fertilizers, they consumed less energy and were frequently more energy efficient. Integrated systems therefore appeared as the best compromise in sustainability trade-offs. Our results could be used to re-design current cropping systems, by promoting diversified crop rotations and the combination of a wide range of available techniques contributing to pest management. PMID:24887494

  5. Plant soil interactions alter carbon cycling in an upland grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Bruce C; Ostle, Nick J; McNamara, Niall P; Oakley, Simon; Whiteley, Andrew S; Bailey, Mark J; Griffiths, Robert I

    2013-01-01

    Soil carbon (C) storage is dependent upon the complex dynamics of fresh and native organic matter cycling, which are regulated by plant and soil-microbial activities. A fundamental challenge exists to link microbial biodiversity with plant-soil C cycling processes to elucidate the underlying mechanisms regulating soil carbon. To address this, we contrasted vegetated grassland soils with bare soils, which had been plant-free for 3 years, using stable isotope ((13)C) labeled substrate assays and molecular analyses of bacterial communities. Vegetated soils had higher C and N contents, biomass, and substrate-specific respiration rates. Conversely, following substrate addition unlabeled, native soil C cycling was accelerated in bare soil and retarded in vegetated soil; indicative of differential priming effects. Functional differences were reflected in bacterial biodiversity with Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria dominating vegetated and bare soils, respectively. Significant isotopic enrichment of soil RNA was found after substrate addition and rates varied according to substrate type. However, assimilation was independent of plant presence which, in contrast to large differences in (13)CO2 respiration rates, indicated greater substrate C use efficiency in bare, Acidobacteria-dominated soils. Stable isotope probing (SIP) revealed most community members had utilized substrates with little evidence for competitive outgrowth of sub-populations. Our findings support theories on how plant-mediated soil resource availability affects the turnover of different pools of soil carbon, and we further identify a potential role of soil microbial biodiversity. Specifically we conclude that emerging theories on the life histories of dominant soil taxa can be invoked to explain changes in soil carbon cycling linked to resource availability, and that there is a strong case for considering microbial biodiversity in future studies investigating the turnover of different pools of soil

  6. Plant soil interactions alter carbon cycling in an upland grassland soil

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Bruce C.; Ostle, Nick J.; McNamara, Niall P.; Oakley, Simon; Whiteley, Andrew S.; Bailey, Mark J.; Griffiths, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    Soil carbon (C) storage is dependent upon the complex dynamics of fresh and native organic matter cycling, which are regulated by plant and soil-microbial activities. A fundamental challenge exists to link microbial biodiversity with plant-soil C cycling processes to elucidate the underlying mechanisms regulating soil carbon. To address this, we contrasted vegetated grassland soils with bare soils, which had been plant-free for 3 years, using stable isotope (13C) labeled substrate assays and molecular analyses of bacterial communities. Vegetated soils had higher C and N contents, biomass, and substrate-specific respiration rates. Conversely, following substrate addition unlabeled, native soil C cycling was accelerated in bare soil and retarded in vegetated soil; indicative of differential priming effects. Functional differences were reflected in bacterial biodiversity with Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria dominating vegetated and bare soils, respectively. Significant isotopic enrichment of soil RNA was found after substrate addition and rates varied according to substrate type. However, assimilation was independent of plant presence which, in contrast to large differences in 13CO2 respiration rates, indicated greater substrate C use efficiency in bare, Acidobacteria-dominated soils. Stable isotope probing (SIP) revealed most community members had utilized substrates with little evidence for competitive outgrowth of sub-populations. Our findings support theories on how plant-mediated soil resource availability affects the turnover of different pools of soil carbon, and we further identify a potential role of soil microbial biodiversity. Specifically we conclude that emerging theories on the life histories of dominant soil taxa can be invoked to explain changes in soil carbon cycling linked to resource availability, and that there is a strong case for considering microbial biodiversity in future studies investigating the turnover of different pools of soil

  7. Effect of climate change in herbivorous livestock systems, including arable crops, in the French area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruget, F.; J; Moreau, -C.; Ferrand, M.; Poisson, S.; Gate, P.; Lacroix, B.; Lorgeou, J.; Cloppet, E.; Souverain, F.

    2009-09-01

    The effects of atmospheric changes on climate are assessed through GCM (General circulation model). We have used the results of one of these models, the ARPEGE model, developed by the CNRM (Météo-France) concerning two scenarios of economic, technical and socio-economic development. There are the A2 scenario, with little attention to GHG emissions leading to a high CO2 concentration in the atmosphere at the end of the century (800 ppm) and the B1 scenario, a moderate scenario where the CO2 concentration would be better controlled, allowing to reach only 550 ppm at the end of the century. Our study contains studies at 2 periods in the future, the near (2020-2049) and the distant (2070-2099) future, using a mean effect for each period, without any representation of the evolution inside each period. We have done three types of analyses using the present and future climate data : first, we analyzed the climatic data, with means, maps and multiple factor analysis second, we used a crop model for grass, alfalfa and arable crops third, we analyze the evolution of some agrometeorological criteria In the climate analysis, out of the known effects (higher temperature, lower precipitation), the most interesting part for the agriculture is the spatial distribution of the changes. We showed the spatial evolution of the 10 main climates defined using the MFA of spatial data : climates of the low mountains will go up and the part of the high mountain climate will be reduced, the area of the Mediterranean climate will be larger, and the Atlantic front will be dryer. Main crop model results concern phenology and yield of crops. As phenological results, all the harvests are put forward, as well for cut crops (grass and alfalfa) as for arable crops. As adaptation, the sowing dates of the spring crops (maize) can be put forward too. The direction of the variation of yields depends on the period of the future, on the scenario and mainly on the effect of CO2 concentration. Because of

  8. Impacts of Soil Warming and Plant Rhizosphere on Root Litter Decomposition at Different Soil Depths in a Mediterranuan Grassland Lysimeter Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Hicks Pries, C.; Castanha, C.; Curtis, J. B.; Porras, R. C.; Torn, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate understanding of soil carbon cycling is critical for predicting climate-ecosystem feedbacks. Decomposition of root litter and its transformation into soil organic matter (SOM) are critical processes of soil carbon cycling. We aim to study the impacts of soil warming and plant rhizosphere on the fate of 13C-labeled roots buried at two soil depths using a field lysimeter facility at Hopland, California. The lysimeters contain soil columns of 38-cm diameter and 48-cm depth (0-15 cm A-horizon, and 15-48 cm B-horizon, Laughlin soil series) sown with annual grasses dominated by Avena barbata. The experiment has three treatments (planted-ambient, planted-warming (+4°C), and unplanted-ambient). In February 2014, 13C-labeled A. fatua roots were added to two depths (8-12 and 38-42 cm). We measured root-derived 13C in respired CO2 collected at the soil surface and in leachate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) collected from the lysimeters during the growing season and in soil harvested in August 2014. We found (1) soil temperature at two depths (10- and 40-cm) have been elevated by 4±0.2°C in the warmed compared to the ambient lysimeters; (2) surface (10-cm) volumetric soil moisture followed this order (unplanted-ambient > planted-ambient > planted-warming), while subsurface (40-cm) soil moisture showed little variation among treatments; (3) ecosystem respiration was enhanced by soil warming during the early growing season (March 15th and April 5th) when soil moisture was not limiting (>20%), while it was suppressed by soil warming during the late growing season (May 7th) when soil moisture was limiting (<20%), and was not significantly different among treatments towards the end of growing season (May 20th); and (4) aboveground plant biomass increased 25% with soil warming. More data including 13C values of ecosystem respiration, DOC loss, and harvested soil samples, as well as soil nutrient supply rates, microbial biomass and community structure will be presented

  9. Microbial Diversity Indexes Can Explain Soil Carbon Dynamics as a Function of Carbon Source

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Pierre-Alain; Menasseri-Aubry, Safya; Sarr, Amadou; Lévêque, Jean; Mathieu, Olivier; Jolivet, Claudy; Leterme, Philippe; Viaud, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models do not explicitly represent the influence of soil microbial diversity on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics despite recent evidence of relationships between them. The objective of the present study was to statistically investigate relationships between bacterial and fungal diversity indexes (richness, evenness, Shannon index, inverse Simpson index) and decomposition of different pools of soil organic carbon by measuring dynamics of CO2 emissions under controlled conditions. To this end, 20 soils from two different land uses (cropland and grassland) were incubated with or without incorporation of 13C-labelled wheat-straw residue. 13C-labelling allowed us to study residue mineralisation, basal respiration and the priming effect independently. An innovative data-mining approach was applied, based on generalized additive models and a predictive criterion. Results showed that microbial diversity indexes can be good covariates to integrate in SOC dynamics models, depending on the C source and the processes considered (native soil organic carbon vs. fresh wheat residue). Specifically, microbial diversity indexes were good candidates to help explain mineralisation of native soil organic carbon, while priming effect processes seemed to be explained much more by microbial composition, and no microbial diversity indexes were found associated with residue mineralisation. Investigation of relationships between diversity and mineralisation showed that higher diversity, as measured by the microbial diversity indexes, seemed to be related to decreased CO2 emissions in the control soil. We suggest that this relationship can be explained by an increase in carbon yield assimilation as microbial diversity increases. Thus, the parameter for carbon yield assimilation in mathematical models could be calculated as a function of microbial diversity indexes. Nonetheless, given limitations of the methods used, these observations should be considered with caution and

  10. Microbial Diversity Indexes Can Explain Soil Carbon Dynamics as a Function of Carbon Source.

    PubMed

    Louis, Benjamin P; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Menasseri-Aubry, Safya; Sarr, Amadou; Lévêque, Jean; Mathieu, Olivier; Jolivet, Claudy; Leterme, Philippe; Viaud, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models do not explicitly represent the influence of soil microbial diversity on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics despite recent evidence of relationships between them. The objective of the present study was to statistically investigate relationships between bacterial and fungal diversity indexes (richness, evenness, Shannon index, inverse Simpson index) and decomposition of different pools of soil organic carbon by measuring dynamics of CO2 emissions under controlled conditions. To this end, 20 soils from two different land uses (cropland and grassland) were incubated with or without incorporation of 13C-labelled wheat-straw residue. 13C-labelling allowed us to study residue mineralisation, basal respiration and the priming effect independently. An innovative data-mining approach was applied, based on generalized additive models and a predictive criterion. Results showed that microbial diversity indexes can be good covariates to integrate in SOC dynamics models, depending on the C source and the processes considered (native soil organic carbon vs. fresh wheat residue). Specifically, microbial diversity indexes were good candidates to help explain mineralisation of native soil organic carbon, while priming effect processes seemed to be explained much more by microbial composition, and no microbial diversity indexes were found associated with residue mineralisation. Investigation of relationships between diversity and mineralisation showed that higher diversity, as measured by the microbial diversity indexes, seemed to be related to decreased CO2 emissions in the control soil. We suggest that this relationship can be explained by an increase in carbon yield assimilation as microbial diversity increases. Thus, the parameter for carbon yield assimilation in mathematical models could be calculated as a function of microbial diversity indexes. Nonetheless, given limitations of the methods used, these observations should be considered with caution and

  11. Microbial Diversity Indexes Can Explain Soil Carbon Dynamics as a Function of Carbon Source.

    PubMed

    Louis, Benjamin P; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Menasseri-Aubry, Safya; Sarr, Amadou; Lévêque, Jean; Mathieu, Olivier; Jolivet, Claudy; Leterme, Philippe; Viaud, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models do not explicitly represent the influence of soil microbial diversity on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics despite recent evidence of relationships between them. The objective of the present study was to statistically investigate relationships between bacterial and fungal diversity indexes (richness, evenness, Shannon index, inverse Simpson index) and decomposition of different pools of soil organic carbon by measuring dynamics of CO2 emissions under controlled conditions. To this end, 20 soils from two different land uses (cropland and grassland) were incubated with or without incorporation of 13C-labelled wheat-straw residue. 13C-labelling allowed us to study residue mineralisation, basal respiration and the priming effect independently. An innovative data-mining approach was applied, based on generalized additive models and a predictive criterion. Results showed that microbial diversity indexes can be good covariates to integrate in SOC dynamics models, depending on the C source and the processes considered (native soil organic carbon vs. fresh wheat residue). Specifically, microbial diversity indexes were good candidates to help explain mineralisation of native soil organic carbon, while priming effect processes seemed to be explained much more by microbial composition, and no microbial diversity indexes were found associated with residue mineralisation. Investigation of relationships between diversity and mineralisation showed that higher diversity, as measured by the microbial diversity indexes, seemed to be related to decreased CO2 emissions in the control soil. We suggest that this relationship can be explained by an increase in carbon yield assimilation as microbial diversity increases. Thus, the parameter for carbon yield assimilation in mathematical models could be calculated as a function of microbial diversity indexes. Nonetheless, given limitations of the methods used, these observations should be considered with caution and

  12. Glyphosate applications on arable fields considerably coincide with migrating amphibians.

    PubMed

    Berger, Gert; Graef, Frieder; Pfeffer, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Glyphosate usage is increasing worldwide and the application schemes of this herbicide are currently changing. Amphibians migrating through arable fields may be harmed by Glyphosate applied to field crops. We investigated the population-based temporal coincidence of four amphibian species with Glyphosate from 2006 to 2008. Depending on a) age- and species-specific main migration periods, b) crop species, c) Glyphosate application mode for crops, and d) the presumed DT50 value (12 days or 47 days) of Glyphosate, we calculated up to 100% coincidence with Glyphosate. The amphibians regularly co-occur with pre-sowing/pre-emerging Glyphosate applications to maize in spring and with stubble management prior to crop sowing in late summer and autumn. Siccation treatment in summer coincides only with early pond-leaving juveniles. We suggest in-depth investigations of both acute and long-term effects of Glyphosate applications on amphibian populations not only focussed on exposure during aquatic periods but also terrestrial life stages.

  13. Weed vegetation ecology of arable land in Salalah, Southern Oman

    PubMed Central

    El-Sheikh, Mohamed A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper applies multivariate statistical methods to a data set of weed relevés from arable fields in two different habitat types of coastal and mountainous escarpments in Southern Oman. The objectives were to test the effect of environmental gradients, crop plants and time on weed species composition, to rank the importance of these particular factors, and to describe the patterns of species composition and diversity associated with these factors. Through the application of TWINSPAN, DCA and CCA programs on data relating to 102 species recorded in 28 plots and farms distributed in the study area, six plant communities were identified: I- Dichanthium micranthum, II- Cynodon dactylon–D. micranthum, III- Convolvulus arvensis, IV- C. dactylon–Sonchus oleraceus, V- Amaranthus viridis and VI- Suaeda aegyptiaca–Achyranthes aspera. The ordination process (CCA) provided a sequence of plant communities and species diversity that correlated with some anthropogenic factors, physiographic variables and crop types. Therefore, length of time since farm construction, disturbance levels and altitude are the most important factors related to the occurrence of the species. The perennial species correlated with the more degraded mountain areas of new farm stands, whereas most of the annuals correlated with old lowland and less disturbed farms. PMID:23961246

  14. The effects of soil management on subsoil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Andrew; Coleman, Kevin; Jenkinson, David; Powlson, David; Poulton, Paul; Whitmore, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    Soil management has a clear effect on the organic matter (OM) content of soils in agricultural systems. For instance, grassland soils tend to have a greater OM content than arable soils due to the difference in the management of the surface vegetation between the two systems. Our knowledge of this is largely restricted to the topsoil however, as this is the part of the profile that is most obviously influenced by the inputs and losses of OM. How agricultural management at the surface affects OM contents in the subsoil is rarely considered, let alone understood. We present the state of our current knowledge of the effect of soil management on subsoil OM based on measurements made on soils from some of the established field experiments at Rothamsted Research, UK. We have examined subsoil OM data collected by us and other scientists at Rothamsted representing different timescales: long-term (Broadbalk wilderness and arable, Geescroft wilderness, and Park Grass: 130 years), medium-term (Highfield ley-arable: 40-60 years), and short-term (Highfield and Geescroft reversion: 2 years). Samples to depths of up to 96 cm in the profile were collected from the field experiments periodically between 1870 and 2009 and analysed for C and N. Both C and N increased in soils converted from arable to long-term woodland and grassland throughout the profile. The C:N ratio also increased in comparison to long-term arable soils which suggested either the preferential accumulation of C or the preferential decomposition of N at depth in grassland and woodland soils, or the converse at depth in the arable soils. Small increases in C and N in both long-term grassland and arable soils were also apparent. In the medium-term, differences in the pattern of soil C and N with depth were found, with homogenisation in the cultivated layer in arable and fallow soils and a more gradual decrease with depth in the grassland soil. In general, differences between soils subjected to different management

  15. Litter input decreased the response of soil organic matter decomposition to warming in two subtropical forest soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingkui; He, Tongxin; Liu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Interaction effect of temperature and litter input on SOM decomposition is poor understood, restricting accurate prediction of the dynamics and stocks of soil organic carbon under global warming. To address this knowledge gap, we conducted an incubation experiment by adding (13)C labeled leaf-litter into a coniferous forest (CF) soil and a broadleaved forest (BF) soil. In this experiment, response of the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of SOM decomposition to the increase in litter input was investigated. The temperature dependences of priming effect (PE) and soil microbial community were analyzed. The Q10 for CF soil significantly decreased from 2.41 in no-litter treatment to 2.05 in litter-added treatment and for BF soil from 2.14 to 1.82, suggesting that litter addition decreases the Q10. PE in the CF soil was 24.9% at 20 °C and 6.2% at 30 °C, and in the BF soil the PE was 8.8% at 20 °C and -7.0% at 30 °C, suggesting that PE decreases with increasing temperature. Relative PE was positively related to the concentrations of Gram-negative bacterial and fungal PLFAs. This study moves a step forward in understanding warming effect on forest carbon cycling by highlighting interaction effect of litter input and warming on soil carbon cycling. PMID:27644258

  16. Litter input decreased the response of soil organic matter decomposition to warming in two subtropical forest soils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingkui; He, Tongxin; Liu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Interaction effect of temperature and litter input on SOM decomposition is poor understood, restricting accurate prediction of the dynamics and stocks of soil organic carbon under global warming. To address this knowledge gap, we conducted an incubation experiment by adding 13C labeled leaf-litter into a coniferous forest (CF) soil and a broadleaved forest (BF) soil. In this experiment, response of the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of SOM decomposition to the increase in litter input was investigated. The temperature dependences of priming effect (PE) and soil microbial community were analyzed. The Q10 for CF soil significantly decreased from 2.41 in no-litter treatment to 2.05 in litter-added treatment and for BF soil from 2.14 to 1.82, suggesting that litter addition decreases the Q10. PE in the CF soil was 24.9% at 20 °C and 6.2% at 30 °C, and in the BF soil the PE was 8.8% at 20 °C and −7.0% at 30 °C, suggesting that PE decreases with increasing temperature. Relative PE was positively related to the concentrations of Gram-negative bacterial and fungal PLFAs. This study moves a step forward in understanding warming effect on forest carbon cycling by highlighting interaction effect of litter input and warming on soil carbon cycling. PMID:27644258

  17. Labile soil carbon inputs mediate the soil microbial community composition and plant residue decomposition rates

    SciTech Connect

    De Graaff, Marie-Anne; Classen, Aimee T; Castro Gonzalez, Hector F; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2010-01-01

    Root carbon (C) inputs may regulate decomposition rates in soil, and in this study we ask: how do labile C inputs regulate decomposition of plant residues, and soil microbial communities? In a 14 d laboratory incubation, we added C compounds often found in root exudates in seven different concentrations (0, 0.7, 1.4, 3.6, 7.2, 14.4 and 21.7 mg C g{sup -1} soil) to soils amended with and without {sup 13}C-labeled plant residue. We measured CO{sub 2} respiration and shifts in relative fungal and bacterial rRNA gene copy numbers using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Increased labile C input enhanced total C respiration, but only addition of C at low concentrations (0.7 mg C g{sup -1}) stimulated plant residue decomposition (+2%). Intermediate concentrations (1.4, 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) had no impact on plant residue decomposition, while greater concentrations of C (> 7.2 mg C g{sup -1}) reduced decomposition (-50%). Concurrently, high exudate concentrations (> 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) increased fungal and bacterial gene copy numbers, whereas low exudate concentrations (< 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) increased metabolic activity rather than gene copy numbers. These results underscore that labile soil C inputs can regulate decomposition of more recalcitrant soil C by controlling the activity and relative abundance of fungi and bacteria.

  18. [Physicochemical and biological factors affecting atmospheric methane oxidation in gray forest soils].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, I K; Semenov, V M; Kuznetsova, T V; Bykova, S A; Dulov, L E; Pardini, G; Gispert, M; Boeckx, P; Van Cleemput, O; Gal'chenko, V F

    2005-01-01

    The decline of methane oxidizing activities in gray forest soil upon its conversion into arable land was shown to be caused by major changes in biotic and physicochemical properties of soil. Using the method of immune serums, methane-oxidizing bacteria were detected in both forest and agricultural soils, but their populations differed significantly in both abundance and composition. In the forest soil, the number of methanotrophs was an order of magnitude higher than in arable soil, amounting to 3.5 x 10(8) and 0.24 x 10(8) cells/g soil, respectively. All methane-oxidizing bacteria identified in the forest soil belonged to the genus Methylocystis, and 94% of these were represented by a single species, M. parvus. The arable soil was dominated by type I methanotrophs (Methylobacter and Methylomonas, 67.6%), occurring along with bacteria of the genus Methylocystis. In addition, arable soil is characterized by a low content of microbial biomass, lower porosity and water permeability of soil aggregates, and the predominance of nitrogen mineralization processes over those of nitrogen immobilization. These factors can also contribute to lower rates of methane oxidation in arable soil as compared to forest soil.

  19. N2O emission and CH4 uptake in arable fields managed under conventional and reduced tillage cropping systems in northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Nobuhisa; Tsuruta, Haruo; Sawamoto, Takuji; Nishimura, Seiichi; Yagi, Kazuyuki

    2004-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and methane (CH4) uptake were measured in an experimental long-term tillage field (Andosol) in Hokkaido, northern Japan, to assess their contributions to net global warming, associated with arable crop production. From May 2001 to August 2002, the field was cultivated with winter wheat, adzuki bean, sugar beet, potato, and cabbage, where the total N applied was 110, 40, 150, 60, and 220 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Under conventional tillage (CT) cropping systems, basal N fertilization and plowing for residue incorporation had little effect on N2O fluxes, but vigorous N2O emission was observed when rotary harrowing was used for incorporating N-rich cabbage residues into soil in summer. Also, high N2O emissions occurred when there was heavy rainfall after a large amount of N fertilizer had been applied to sugar beet and also when there was thawing of frozen soil and snow in the winter wheat treatment. Despite the differing N2O flux patterns among the crops, the annual N2O emissions from each crop were positively correlated with the total N applied as fertilizer. Under CT systems, across all five crops, the mean N2O emission factor (the percent ratio of N2O-N emitted out of total N applied as fertilizer) was 0.36%. Under reduced tillage (RT) cropping systems, where crop residues were left on the ground over winter, large quantities of N2O were emitted from adzuki bean and sugar beet residues when the frozen soil and snow thawed. Therefore, total N2O emissions from adzuki bean and sugar beet cultivated under RT systems were much greater than under CT systems. The rates of CH4 uptake by arable soils were less sensitive to crop type, field management practices, and fertilizer application rates, but the rates were strongly influenced by long-term tillage management. For fallow, winter wheat, adzuki bean, and sugar beet treatments, the CH4 uptake rates in the CT soils (1.36 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1), which had a 20-year history of intensive plowing

  20. Short rotation coppice improve the phosphorus (P) supply of arable land through translocation of P from subsoil to topsoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, K.; Kaupenjohann, M.

    2011-12-01

    Even if the agricultural use of P will not increase during the next decades, the stock of phosphorous (P) in global mineral deposits is predicted to last for only less than 50 to 100 years. This will cause a much more severe problem than the shortage of fossil energy because P as an element essential to all life is not substitutable through any other material. Thus, efforts have to be made to close the P-cycle and it will in the near future be no more justifiable to disperse P or dump it at places where it cannot be recovered from. Additionally, new resources of P have to be explored to cover increasing P demand and to compensate for inevitable losses. Subsoil, which is hardly explored by arable crops may contain such P reserves. Deep rooting perennial plants like trees have access to these P resources and may be used to introduce subsoil P into the agricultural P cycle. Using literature data we followed the question to what extent the introduction of short rotation coppice of energy - Populus, Salix and Robinia into the agricultural crop rotation could support the P supply to annual food crops. Leaf litter of Populs, Salix and Robinia will transfer 3 to 13, 5 to 12 and 5 to 12 kg P and ha-1 a-1 to the soil surface, respectively. The large variation is mainly explained by site conditions (soil and climate). Assuming that 30 % of the nutrient requirement of the trees is assimilated from the subsoil, 1 to 5 kg of P ha-1 a-1 may be translocated to the topsoil. The knowledge about root content of P of the three tree species is very scarce. Based on information about other broadleaf trees, we consider that root litter may transfer amounts of P to the topsoil similar to leaf litter. Thus, in total the annual translocation of subsoil-P to the topsoil may range between 2 to 10 kg ha-1 in short rotation plantations. These amounts are far below the annual P removal from soils through food crops which may range from 20 to 40 kg P ha-1 a-1. Therefore subsoil P cannot replace P

  1. An econometric analysis of changes in arable land utilization using multinomial logit model in Pinggu district, Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yueqing; McNamara, Paul; Wu, Yanfang; Dong, Yue

    2013-10-15

    Arable land in China has been decreasing as a result of rapid population growth and economic development as well as urban expansion, especially in developed regions around cities where quality farmland quickly disappears. This paper analyzed changes in arable land utilization during 1993-2008 in the Pinggu district, Beijing, China, developed a multinomial logit (MNL) model to determine spatial driving factors influencing arable land-use change, and simulated arable land transition probabilities. Land-use maps, as well as social-economic and geographical data were used in the study. The results indicated that arable land decreased significantly between 1993 and 2008. Lost arable land shifted into orchard, forestland, settlement, and transportation land. Significant differences existed for arable land transitions among different landform areas. Slope, elevation, population density, urbanization rate, distance to settlements, and distance to roadways were strong drivers influencing arable land transition to other uses. The MNL model was proved effective for predicting transition probabilities in land use from arable land to other land-use types, thus can be used for scenario analysis to develop land-use policies and land-management measures in this metropolitan area.

  2. Fate of xylem-transported 11C- and 13C-labeled CO2 in leaves of poplar.

    PubMed

    Bloemen, Jasper; Bauweraerts, Ingvar; De Vos, Filip; Vanhove, Christian; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Boeckx, Pascal; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    In recent studies, assimilation of xylem-transported CO2 has gained considerable attention as a means of recycling respired CO2 in trees. However, we still lack a clear and detailed picture on the magnitude of xylem-transported CO2 assimilation, in particular within leaf tissues. To this end, detached poplar leaves (Populus × canadensis Moench 'Robusta') were allowed to take up a dissolved (13)CO2 label serving as a proxy of xylem-transported CO2 entering the leaf from the branch. The uptake rate of the (13)C was manipulated by altering the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) (0.84, 1.29 and 1.83 kPa). Highest tissue enrichments were observed under the highest VPD. Among tissues, highest enrichment was observed in the petiole and the veins, regardless of the VPD treatment. Analysis of non-labeled leaves showed that some (13)C diffused from the labeled leaves and was fixed in the mesophyll of the non-labeled leaves. However, (13)C leaf tissue enrichment analysis with elemental analysis coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry was limited in spatial resolution at the leaf tissue level. Therefore, (11)C-based CO2 labeling combined with positron autoradiography was used and showed a more detailed spatial distribution within a single tissue, in particular in secondary veins. Therefore, in addition to (13)C, (11) C-based autoradiography can be used to study the fate of xylem-transported CO2 at leaf level, allowing the acquisition of data at a yet unprecedented resolution.

  3. Reduced mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity has a strong effect on photorespiratory metabolism as revealed by 13C labelling

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Pernilla; Keech, Olivier; Stenlund, Hans; Gardeström, Per; Moritz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) catalyses the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate (OAA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Its activity is important for redox control of the mitochondrial matrix, through which it may participate in regulation of TCA cycle turnover. In Arabidopsis, there are two isoforms of mMDH. Here, we investigated to which extent the lack of the major isoform, mMDH1 accounting for about 60% of the activity, affected leaf metabolism. In air, rosettes of mmdh1 plants were only slightly smaller than wild type plants although the fresh weight was decreased by about 50%. In low CO2 the difference was much bigger, with mutant plants accumulating only 14% of fresh weight as compared to wild type. To investigate the metabolic background to the differences in growth, we developed a 13CO2 labelling method, using a custom-built chamber that enabled simultaneous treatment of sets of plants under controlled conditions. The metabolic profiles were analysed by gas- and liquid- chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate the metabolic adjustments between wild type and mmdh1. The genotypes responded similarly to high CO2 treatment both with respect to metabolite pools and 13C incorporation during a 2-h treatment. However, under low CO2 several metabolites differed between the two genotypes and, interestingly most of these were closely associated with photorespiration. We found that while the glycine/serine ratio increased, a concomitant altered glutamine/glutamate/α-ketoglutarate relation occurred. Taken together, our results indicate that adequate mMDH activity is essential to shuttle reductants out from the mitochondria to support the photorespiratory flux, and strengthen the idea that photorespiration is tightly intertwined with peripheral metabolic reactions. PMID:26889011

  4. Direct Monitoring of γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase Activity In Vivo Using a Hyperpolarized (13) C-Labeled Molecular Probe.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Tatsuya; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Nonaka, Hiroshi; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Can, Emine; Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Takado, Yuhei; Comment, Arnaud; Sando, Shinsuke

    2016-08-26

    The γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) enzyme plays a central role in glutathione homeostasis. Direct detection of GGT activity could provide critical information for the diagnosis of several pathologies. We propose a new molecular probe, γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly, for monitoring GGT activity in vivo by hyperpolarized (HP) (13) C magnetic resonance (MR). The properties of γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly are suitable for in vivo HP (13) C metabolic analysis since the chemical shift between γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly and its metabolic product, [1-(13) C]Gly, is large (4.3 ppm) and the T1 of both compounds is relatively long (30 s and 45 s, respectively, in H2 O at 9.4 T). We also demonstrate that γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly is highly sensitive to in vivo modulation of GGT activity induced by the inhibitor acivicin. PMID:27483206

  5. Spatially tracking 13C labeled substrate (bicarbonate) accumulation in microbial communities using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Doll, Charles G.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2014-08-25

    This is a manuscript we would like to submit for publication in Environmental Microbiology Reports. This manuscript contains a description of a laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry methodology developed at PNNL and applied to a microbial system at a PNNL project location – Hot Lake, Washington. I will submit a word document containing the entire manuscript with this Erica input request form.

  6. Bioconversion of (13)C-labeled microalgal phytosterols to cholesterol by the Northern Bay scallop, Argopecten irradians irradians.

    PubMed

    Giner, José-Luis; Zhao, Hui; Dixon, Mark S; Wikfors, Gary H

    2016-02-01

    Bivalve mollusks lack de novo cholesterol biosynthesis capabilities and therefore rely upon dietary sources of sterols for rapid growth. Microalgae that constitute the main source of nutrition for suspension-feeding bivalves contain a diverse array of phytosterols, in most cases lacking cholesterol. Rapid growth of bivalves on microalgal diets with no cholesterol implies that some phytosterols can satisfy the dietary requirement for cholesterol through metabolic conversion to cholesterol, but such metabolic pathways have not been rigorously demonstrated. In the present study, stable isotope-labeled phytosterols were used to supplement a unialgal diet of Rhodomonas sp. and their biological transformation to cholesterol within scallop tissues was determined using (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Scallops efficiently dealkylated ∆(5) C29 (24-ethyl) sterols to cholesterol, and the only C28 sterol that was dealkylated efficiently possessed the 24(28)-double bond. Non-metabolized dietary phytosterols accumulated in the soft tissues. Observed formation of ∆(5,7) sterols (provitamin D) from ∆(5) sterols may represent initiation of steroid hormone (possibly ecdysone) biosynthesis. These findings provide a key component necessary for formulation of nutritionally complete microalgal diets for hatchery production of seed for molluscan aquaculture.

  7. Quantification of peptide m/z distributions from 13C-labeled cultures with high resolution mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the introduction of orbital trap mass spectrometers molecular masses can be determined with great precision and accuracy. In addition, orbital trap spectrometers (Orbitraps) are sensitive and possess a linear dynamic range of multiple orders of magnitude. These qualities make the Orbitrap well-...

  8. Vitamin K absorption and kinetics in human subjects after consumption of 13C-labelled phylloquinone from kale.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Janet A; Kurilich, Anne C; Britz, Steven J; Baer, David J; Clevidence, Beverly A

    2010-09-01

    The absorption and plasma disappearance of vitamin K were investigated by uniformly labelling phylloquinone in kale with carbon-13, and by feeding the kale to study subjects. Seven healthy volunteers ingested a single 400 g serving of kale with 30 g vegetable oil. The kale provided 156 nmol of phylloquinone. Serial plasma samples were collected and analysed for the appearance of 13C-phylloquinone by HPLC-MS. Six of the subjects showed significant amounts of labelled phylloquinone in plasma, though one subject's plasma was not consistently enriched above the detection limit, and this subject's baseline plasma phylloquinone level was the lowest in the group. After ingestion of the labelled kale, plasma 13C-phylloquinone concentration increased rapidly to a peak between 6 and 10 h, and then rapidly decreased. Average peak plasma concentration for the six subjects with detectable 13C-phylloquinone was 2.1 nmol/l. Plasma concentration-time data were analysed by compartmental modelling. Modelling results demonstrated a mean (n 6) bioavailability of phylloquinone from kale to be 4.7%. Plasma and tissue half-times for phylloquinone were found to be 8.8 and 215 h, respectively.

  9. Assimilation of xylem-transported 13C-labelled CO2 in leaves and branches of sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.).

    PubMed

    McGuire, M A; Marshall, J D; Teskey, R O

    2009-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that CO(2) dissolved in xylem sap in tree stems can move upward in the transpiration stream. To determine the fate of this dissolved CO(2), the internal transport of respired CO(2) at high concentration from the bole of the tree was simulated by allowing detached young branches of sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.) to transpire water enriched with a known quantity of (13)CO(2) in sunlight. Simultaneously, leaf net photosynthesis and CO(2) efflux from woody tissue were measured. Branch and leaf tissues were subsequently analysed for (13)C content to determine the quantity of transported (13)CO(2) label that was fixed. Treatment branches assimilated an average of 35% (SE=2.4) of the (13)CO(2) label taken up in the treatment water. The majority was fixed in the woody tissue of the branches, with smaller amounts fixed in the leaves and petioles. Overall, the fixation of internally transported (13)CO(2) label by woody tissues averaged 6% of the assimilation of CO(2) from the atmosphere by the leaves. Woody tissue assimilation rates calculated from measurements of (13)C differed from rates calculated from measurements of CO(2) efflux in the lower branch but not in the upper branch. The results of this study showed unequivocally that CO(2) transported in xylem sap can be fixed in photosynthetic cells in the leaves and branches of sycamore trees and provided evidence that recycling of xylem-transported CO(2) may be an important means by which trees reduce the carbon cost of respiration.

  10. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  11. Monitoring CO[subscript 2] Fixation Using GC-MS Detection of a [superscript 13]C-Label

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Daniel G.; Bridgham, April; Reichert, Kara; Magers, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Much of our understanding of metabolic pathways has resulted from the use of chemical and isotopic labels. In this experiment, a heavy isotope of carbon, [superscript 13]C, is used to label the product of the well-known RuBisCO enzymatic reaction. This is a key reaction in photosynthesis that converts inorganic carbon to organic carbon; a process…

  12. Dynamics of maize carbon contribution to soil organic carbon in association with soil type and fertility level.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jiubo; Li, Hui; Li, Shuangyi; An, Tingting; Farmer, John; Fu, Shifeng; Wang, Jingkuan

    2015-01-01

    Soil type and fertility level influence straw carbon dynamics in the agroecosystems. However, there is a limited understanding of the dynamic processes of straw-derived and soil-derived carbon and the influence of the addition of straw carbon on soil-derived organic carbon in different soils associated with different fertility levels. In this study, we applied the in-situ carborundum tube method and 13C-labeled maize straw (with and without maize straw) at two cropland (Phaeozem and Luvisol soils) experimental sites in northeast China to quantify the dynamics of maize-derived and soil-derived carbon in soils associated with high and low fertility, and to examine how the addition of maize carbon influences soil-derived organic carbon and the interactions of soil type and fertility level with maize-derived and soil-derived carbon. We found that, on average, the contributions of maize-derived carbon to total organic carbon in maize-soil systems during the experimental period were differentiated among low fertility Luvisol (from 62.82% to 42.90), high fertility Luvisol (from 53.15% to 30.00%), low fertility Phaeozem (from 58.69% to 36.29%) and high fertility Phaeozem (from 41.06% to 16.60%). Furthermore, the addition of maize carbon significantly decreased the remaining soil-derived organic carbon in low and high fertility Luvisols and low fertility Phaeozem before two months. However, the increasing differences in soil-derived organic carbon between both soils with and without maize straw after two months suggested that maize-derived carbon was incorporated into soil-derived organic carbon, thereby potentially offsetting the loss of soil-derived organic carbon. These results suggested that Phaeozem and high fertility level soils would fix more maize carbon over time and thus were more beneficial for protecting soil-derived organic carbon from maize carbon decomposition.

  13. Dynamics of Maize Carbon Contribution to Soil Organic Carbon in Association with Soil Type and Fertility Level

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jiubo; Li, Hui; Li, Shuangyi; An, Tingting; Farmer, John; Fu, Shifeng; Wang, Jingkuan

    2015-01-01

    Soil type and fertility level influence straw carbon dynamics in the agroecosystems. However, there is a limited understanding of the dynamic processes of straw-derived and soil-derived carbon and the influence of the addition of straw carbon on soil-derived organic carbon in different soils associated with different fertility levels. In this study, we applied the in-situ carborundum tube method and 13C-labeled maize straw (with and without maize straw) at two cropland (Phaeozem and Luvisol soils) experimental sites in northeast China to quantify the dynamics of maize-derived and soil-derived carbon in soils associated with high and low fertility, and to examine how the addition of maize carbon influences soil-derived organic carbon and the interactions of soil type and fertility level with maize-derived and soil-derived carbon. We found that, on average, the contributions of maize-derived carbon to total organic carbon in maize-soil systems during the experimental period were differentiated among low fertility Luvisol (from 62.82% to 42.90), high fertility Luvisol (from 53.15% to 30.00%), low fertility Phaeozem (from 58.69% to 36.29%) and high fertility Phaeozem (from 41.06% to 16.60%). Furthermore, the addition of maize carbon significantly decreased the remaining soil-derived organic carbon in low and high fertility Luvisols and low fertility Phaeozem before two months. However, the increasing differences in soil-derived organic carbon between both soils with and without maize straw after two months suggested that maize-derived carbon was incorporated into soil-derived organic carbon, thereby potentially offsetting the loss of soil-derived organic carbon. These results suggested that Phaeozem and high fertility level soils would fix more maize carbon over time and thus were more beneficial for protecting soil-derived organic carbon from maize carbon decomposition. PMID:25774529

  14. Decadally cycling soil carbon is more sensitive to warming than faster-cycling soil carbon.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junjie; Zhu, Biao; Cheng, Weixin

    2015-12-01

    The response of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools to globally rising surface temperature crucially determines the feedback between climate change and the global carbon cycle. However, there is a lack of studies investigating the temperature sensitivity of decomposition for decadally cycling SOC which is the main component of total soil carbon stock and the most relevant to global change. We tackled this issue using two decadally (13) C-labeled soils and a much improved measuring system in a long-term incubation experiment. Results indicated that the temperature sensitivity of decomposition for decadally cycling SOC (>23 years in one soil and >55 years in the other soil) was significantly greater than that for faster-cycling SOC (<23 or 55 years) or for the entire SOC stock. Moreover, decadally cycling SOC contributed substantially (35-59%) to the total CO2 loss during the 360-day incubation. Overall, these results indicate that the decomposition of decadally cycling SOC is highly sensitive to temperature change, which will likely make this large SOC stock vulnerable to loss by global warming in the 21st century and beyond.

  15. Decadally cycling soil carbon is more sensitive to warming than faster-cycling soil carbon.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junjie; Zhu, Biao; Cheng, Weixin

    2015-12-01

    The response of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools to globally rising surface temperature crucially determines the feedback between climate change and the global carbon cycle. However, there is a lack of studies investigating the temperature sensitivity of decomposition for decadally cycling SOC which is the main component of total soil carbon stock and the most relevant to global change. We tackled this issue using two decadally (13) C-labeled soils and a much improved measuring system in a long-term incubation experiment. Results indicated that the temperature sensitivity of decomposition for decadally cycling SOC (>23 years in one soil and >55 years in the other soil) was significantly greater than that for faster-cycling SOC (<23 or 55 years) or for the entire SOC stock. Moreover, decadally cycling SOC contributed substantially (35-59%) to the total CO2 loss during the 360-day incubation. Overall, these results indicate that the decomposition of decadally cycling SOC is highly sensitive to temperature change, which will likely make this large SOC stock vulnerable to loss by global warming in the 21st century and beyond. PMID:26301625

  16. Interactions among roots, mycorrhizas and free-living microbial communities differentially impact soil carbon processes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moore, Jessica A. M.; Jiang, Jiang; Patterson, Courtney M.; Mayes, Melanie A.; Wang, Gangsheng; Classen, Aimée T.

    2015-10-20

    Plant roots, their associated microbial community and free-living soil microbes interact to regulate the movement of carbon from the soil to the atmosphere, one of the most important and least understood fluxes of terrestrial carbon. Our inadequate understanding of how plant-microbial interactions alter soil carbon decomposition may lead to poor model predictions of terrestrial carbon feedbacks to the atmosphere. Roots, mycorrhizal fungi and free-living soil microbes can alter soil carbon decomposition through exudation of carbon into soil. Exudates of simple carbon compounds can increase microbial activity because microbes are typically carbon limited. When both roots and mycorrhizal fungi are presentmore » in the soil, they may additively increase carbon decomposition. However, when mycorrhizas are isolated from roots, they may limit soil carbon decomposition by competing with free-living decomposers for resources. We manipulated the access of roots and mycorrhizal fungi to soil insitu in a temperate mixed deciduous forest. We added 13C-labelled substrate to trace metabolized carbon in respiration and measured carbon-degrading microbial extracellular enzyme activity and soil carbon pools. We used our data in a mechanistic soil carbon decomposition model to simulate and compare the effects of root and mycorrhizal fungal presence on soil carbon dynamics over longer time periods. Contrary to what we predicted, root and mycorrhizal biomass did not interact to additively increase microbial activity and soil carbon degradation. The metabolism of 13C-labelled starch was highest when root biomass was high and mycorrhizal biomass was low. These results suggest that mycorrhizas may negatively interact with the free-living microbial community to influence soil carbon dynamics, a hypothesis supported by our enzyme results. Our steady-state model simulations suggested that root presence increased mineral-associated and particulate organic carbon pools, while mycorrhizal

  17. Impact of heat and drought stress on arable crop production in Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, A.

    2012-06-01

    Modelling approaches are needed to accelerate understanding of adverse weather impacts on crop performances and yields. The aim was to elicit biometeorological conditions that affect Belgian arable crop yield, commensurate with the scale of climatic impacts. The regional crop model REGCROP (Gobin, 2010) enabled to examine changing weather patterns in relation to the crop season and crop sensitive stages of six arable crops: winter wheat, winter barley, winter rapeseed, potato, sugar beet and maize. The sum of vapour pressure deficit during the growing season is the single best predictor of arable yields, with R2 ranging from 0.55 for sugar beet to 0.76 for wheat. Drought and heat stress, in particular during the sensitive crop stages, occur at different times in the crop season and significantly differ between two climatic periods, 1947-1987 and 1988-2008. Though average yields have risen steadily between 1947 and 2008, there is no evidence that relative tolerance to stress has improved.

  18. Prediction of soil organic carbon concentration and soil bulk density of mineral soils for soil organic carbon stock estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putku, Elsa; Astover, Alar; Ritz, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Soil monitoring networks provide a powerful base for estimating and predicting nation's soil status in many aspects. The datasets of soil monitoring are often hierarchically structured demanding sophisticated data analyzing methods. The National Soil Monitoring of Estonia was based on a hierarchical data sampling scheme as each of the monitoring site was divided into four transects with 10 sampling points on each transect. We hypothesized that the hierarchical structure in Estonian Soil Monitoring network data requires a multi-level mixed model approach to achieve good prediction accuracy of soil properties. We used this database to predict soil bulk density and soil organic carbon concentration of mineral soils in arable land using different statistical methods: median approach, linear regression and mixed model; additionally, random forests for SOC concentration. We compared the prediction results and selected the model with the best prediction accuracy to estimate soil organic carbon stock. The mixed model approach achieved the best prediction accuracy in both soil organic carbon (RMSE 0.22%) and bulk density (RMSE 0.09 g cm-3) prediction. Other considered methods under- or overestimated higher and lower values of soil parameters. Thus, using these predictions we calculated the soil organic carbon stock of mineral arable soils and applied the model to a specific case of Tartu County in Estonia. Average estimated SOC stock of Tartu County is 54.8 t C ha-1 and total topsoil SOC stock 1.8 Tg in humus horizon.

  19. Stabilization of labile organic C along a chronosequence of soil development: mineralogical vs. biological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, J. W.; Waldrop, M. P.; Strawn, D.; Harden, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) represents an important reservoir for carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and other essential nutrients. Consequently, variation in SOM turnover rates regulates resource availability for soil microbial activity and plant growth. Long-term SOM stabilization generally involves restricted microbial access to SOM through a variety of processes including complexation with soil minerals. These organo-mineral interactions are influenced by mineral composition and texture, often related to soil age. Soil microorganisms also influence the stabilization of C inputs to the pedosphere through the production of refractory residues controlled in part by C allocation patterns during metabolism. In this study we examined, simultaneously, the contribution of these two C stabilizing mechanisms by ‘tracing’ the fate of two 13C-labeled substrates (glucose and p-hydroxybenzoic acid) along a 1600Kya chronosequence of soil development along the Cowlitz River in southwest Washington. Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between mineralogical and biological controls over C sequestration in soils. Mineralogical analyses were done using the selective dissolutions ammonium oxalate (AOD), and dithionite-citrate extraction (CBD). In this cool, humid environment, intermediate aged soils derived from the late Wisconsin Evans Creek drift (24ka) had the highest AOD extractable Al, Fe, and Si, indicating a higher concentration of poorly crystalline minerals relative to other terraces. Correspondingly, CBD extractable Fe increases with soil age, further supporting the idea that crystalline iron oxides are also more prevalent with weathering. Turnover of both 13C-labeled substrates was rapid (< 12.5 hrs) However, the proportion of substrate mineralized to CO2 varied among terraces. Mineralization to CO2 was significantly lower at 24ka than that for the other three age classes (0.25k, 220k, and 1,600k years bp), corresponding to higher recovery of 13C in bulk soil for this

  20. Correspondence of ectomycorrhizal diversity and colonisation of willows (Salix spp.) grown in short rotation coppice on arable sites and adjacent natural stands.

    PubMed

    Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna; Toljander, Ylva K; Baum, Christel; Fransson, Petra M A; Taylor, Andy F S; Weih, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) are mycorrhizal tree species sometimes cultivated as short rotation coppice (SRC) on arable sites for energy purposes; they are also among the earliest plants colonising primary successional sites in natural stands. The objective of this study was to analyse the degree of colonisation and diversity of ectomycorrhizal (EM) communities on willows grown as SRC in arable soils and their adjacent natural or naturalized stands. Arable sites usually lack ectomycorrhizal host plants before the establishment of SRC, and adjacent natural or naturalized willow stands were hypothesized to be a leading source of ectomycorrhizal inoculum for the SRC. Three test sites including SRC stands (Salix viminalis, Salix dasyclados, and Salix schwerinii) and adjacent natural or naturalized (Salix caprea, Salix fragilis, and Salix × mollissima) stands in central Sweden were investigated on EM colonisation and morphotypes, and the fungal partners of 36 of the total 49 EM fungi morphotypes were identified using molecular tools. The frequency of mycorrhizas in the natural/naturalized stands was higher (two sites) or lower (one site) than in the corresponding cultivated stands. Correspondence analysis revealed that some EM taxa (e.g. Agaricales) were mostly associated with cultivated willows, while others (e.g. Thelephorales) were mostly found in natural/naturalized stands. In conclusion, we found strong effects of sites and willow genotype on EM fungi formation, but poor correspondence between the EM fungi abundance and diversity in SRC and their adjacent natural/naturalized stands. The underlying mechanism might be selective promotion of some EM fungi species by more effective spore dispersal.

  1. Dynamics of the rhizosphere effect in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevdokimov, I. V.

    2013-06-01

    In a greenhouse experiment with continuous labeling of oat plants in a 13CO2 atmosphere, the ratios between different carbon and nitrogen pools in the rhizosphere and nonrhizosphere soil, i.e., the values of the rhizosphere factor R f , were determined. The mean values of the rhizosphere factor varied from 0.9 (the water-soluble nitrogen pool) to 4.6 (the pool of 13C-labeled dissolved organic carbon). We split the carbon and nitrogen pools into three groups depending on the mean R f value. Group I with high R f values (>2) included the most labile labeled organic carbon pools and the active component of the soil microbial biomass. Group II with the rhizosphere factor values 1 < R f < 2 included the more conservative pools of the total dissolved organic carbon and the microbial biomass in the soil. The only representative of group III ( R f < 1) was the water-soluble nitrogen pool. The dynamics of the rhizosphere factor had a maximum during the period of the rapid root growth rate (the tillering, booting, and earing stages) for most members of group I; a maximum during the period of the intensive root turnover (the milk ripeness and wax stages) was detected for the pools-representatives of group II. The dynamics of the rhizosphere factor for the soluble nitrogen had no prominent trends.

  2. Soil microbial response to photo-degraded C60 fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Berry, Timothy D; Clavijo, Andrea P; Zhao, Yingcan; Jafvert, Chad T; Turco, Ronald F; Filley, Timothy R

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that while unfunctionalized carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) exhibit very low decomposition rates in soils, even minor surface functionalization (e.g., as a result of photochemical weathering) may accelerate microbial decay. We present results from a C60 fullerene-soil incubation study designed to investigate the potential links between photochemical and microbial degradation of photo-irradiated C60. Irradiating aqueous (13)C-labeled C60 with solar-wavelength light resulted in a complex mixture of intermediate products with decreased aromaticity. Although addition of irradiated C60 to soil microcosms had little effect on net soil respiration, excess (13)C in the respired CO2 demonstrates that photo-irradiating C60 enhanced its degradation in soil, with ∼ 0.78% of 60 day photo-irradiated C60 mineralized. Community analysis by DGGE found that soil microbial community structure was altered and depended on the photo-treatment duration. These findings demonstrate how abiotic and biotic transformation processes can couple to influence degradation of CNMs in the natural environment.

  3. Soil Warming and Rhizosphere Effects on Root Litter Decomposition at Two Depths in a Mediterranean Grassland Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanha, C.; Zhu, B.; Hicks Pries, C.; Torn, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate understanding of soil processes is critical for predicting climate-ecosystem feedbacks. We investigated the effects of soil warming and plant rhizosphere on decomposition of 13C-labeled roots buried at two soil depths at the field lysimeter facilities at Hopland Research and Extension Center, CA. The lysimeters contain soil columns 38-cm in diameter and 48-cm deep (0-15 cm A-horizon and 15-48 cm B-horizon, Laughlin soil) sown with an annual grassland mix. The experimental design includes three treatments: heated, ambient, and unplanted. In February 2014 we added 13C-labeled Avena fatua roots to either 8-12 cm or 38-42 cm. We measured loss of 13C in CO2 from the soil surface and in leachate as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) over two growing seasons. At the end of each growing season we recovered the 13C remaining in the soil. In addition, we monitored plant productivity and soil temperature and moisture. The rates of both soil respiration and DOC losses were greatest in heated and least in unplanted plots, although respiration losses far outweighed leachate losses. Treatment affected timing of decomposition; added root litter was respired earlier in the ambient plots and later in the unplanted plots in both years. The litter addition stimulated native soil respiration in year 1 heated plots. The depth of the litter addition did not have an effect on soil respiration. However, after the first growing season, less added root litter remained in the A than in the B horizon (both in the visible root fraction and in the 2mm soil fraction), indicating lower overall decomposition rates at depth. These results, including 13C recovery following the 2nd growing season and soil microclimate variables, will be used to develop a mechanistic understanding of the impacts of soil warming, the rhizosphere, and soil depth on root decomposition and soil organic matter dynamics, and should improve our predictions of the feedbacks between climate change and carbon cycling

  4. Stabilization of microbial biomass in soils: Implications for SOM formation and xenobiotics degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltner, A.; Kindler, R.; Achtenhagen, J.; Nowak, K.; Girardi, C.; Kästner, M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role in soils. It is the carbon source and the habitat of many soil microorganisms, its quality and quantity thus affect soil microbial activity. Therefore, the amount and composition of SOM determines soil quality, but SOM formation and stabilization are not yet sufficiently understood. Recently, microbial biomass residues could be identified as a significant source of SOM. We incubated 13C-labelled bacterial cells for 224 days in an agricultural soil and traced the fate of the 13C label of bacterial biomass in soil by isotopic analysis. The data were combined to a mass balance, and the biomass residues were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A high percentage of the biomass-derived carbon (in particular from proteins) remained in soil, mainly in the non-living part of SOM, after extended incubation. The SEM micrographs only rarely showed intact cells. Instead, organic patchy fragments of 200-500 nm size were abundant. These fragments were associated with all stages of cell envelope decay and fragmentation, indicating specific disintegration processes of cell walls. Similar fragments developed on initially clean and sterile in situ microcosms during exposure in groundwater, thus providing clear evidence for their microbial origin. Microbial cell envelope fragments thus contribute significantly to SOM formation. A significant contribution of cell envelope fragments to SOM formation provides a simple explanation for the development of the small, nano-scale patchy organic materials observed in soil electron micrographs. It also suggests that microstructures of microbial cells and of small plant debris provide the molecular architecture of SOM attached to particle surfaces. This origin and macromolecular architecture of SOM is consistent with most observations on SOM, e.g. the abundance of microbial-derived biomarkers, the low C/N ratio, the water repellency and the stabilization of microbial biomass. The

  5. Comparison of energetic productivity in differently renaturalized arable land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazlauskaite-Jadzevice, Asta; Marcinkonis, Saulius; Baksiene, Eugenija

    2014-05-01

    Soil renaturalization or ecological recovery has been studied from local to global scales. On a global scale - it's one of the ways of carbon fixation, preservation of natural diversity, locally - renaturalization processes help to solve problems of damaged (eroded and polluted) and infertile soils areas. Efficient land use can improve soil structure and therefore be attractive as a renewable energy resource that can encourage thermal energy, fuel production and installation of new technologies. Soil renaturalization is very important not only in that it helps to decrease the impact on the environment, but it can produce higher energy value of biomass at a lower cost. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare different renaturalization methods through analyzing biomass yields and chemical composition (pine afforested, fallowing, manage grassland - Alfalfa and cropland) carried out during almost two decades (1995 - 2012). The four stationary experimental sites were set up in 1995 in Vilnius district, Lithuania. Common sandy soils prevail in the region, and the agronomic value of soil is very low. All sites were arranged in one row (the divided sides is 400 m2 each). Managed grassland and cropland areas were subdivided into fertilized and unfertilized subplots. The size of the subdivided plots was 200 m2 each. Gross productions (straw, grain, hay, pine biomass) was recalculated into total energy amount (in the calculationswere used K. Neringa and R. Siman equation) expressed in MJ and the site's productivity data compared. Gross productions total energy amount of pine afforestration was recalculated into trees volume using diameter (DBH), height and density of pines. Observed data suggest that the difference between fertilized and unfertilized plots in the cropland site was on average 1.62 times and made up an average of 20 339 MJ y-1 ha-1. The grassland site was characterized by higher productivity and a bigger difference of total energy between fertilized

  6. Potential net soil N mineralization and decomposition of glycine-13C in forest soils along an elevation gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this research was to better understand patterns of soil nitrogen (N) availability and soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition in forest soils across an elevation gradient (235-1670 m) in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Laboratory studies were used to determine the potential rate of net soil N mineralization and in situ studies of {sup 13}C-labelled glycine were used to infer differences in decomposition rates. Nitrogen stocks, surface soil (0-5 cm) N concentrations, and the pool of potentially mineralizable surface soil N tended to increase from low to high elevations. Rates of potential net soil N mineralization were not significantly correlated with elevation. Increasing soil N availability with elevation is primarily due to greater soil N stocks and lower substrate C-to-N ratios, rather than differences in potential net soil N mineralization rates. The loss rate of {sup 13}C from labelled soils (0-20 cm) was inversely related to study site elevation (r = -0.85; P < 0.05) and directly related to mean annual temperature (+0.86; P<0.05). The results indicated different patterns of potential net soil N mineralization and {sup 13}C loss along the elevation gradient. The different patterns can be explained within a framework of climate, substrate chemistry, and coupled soil C and N stocks. Although less SOM decomposition is indicated at cool, high-elevation sites, low substrate C-to-N ratios in these N-rich systems result in more N release (N mineralization) for each unit of C converted to CO{sub 2} by soil microorganisms.

  7. The capacity of soil particles for spontaneous formation of macroaggregates after a wetting-drying cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodov, V. A.

    2013-06-01

    The capacity of soil particles for spontaneous formation of aggregates >0.25 mm was studied in a laboratory experiment. The particles from soil aggregates (3-1 mm) (initially aggregated particles, APs) and initially free particles (FPs) of <0.25 mm in size were isolated from the soddy-podzolic and chernozemic soils under fallow and from the arable soddy-podzolic soil. The aggregates of 3-1 mm were ground and passed through a 0.25-mm sieve. Then, the aggregates and free particles were poured with water and dried, and the content of the formed aggregates and their water stability were determined; in the samples from the arable soddy-podzolic soil, the organic carbon content was also determined in the newly formed aggregates. The FPs from the untilled soils formed almost no aggregates. At the same time, the APs from these soils manifested the ability for the spontaneous formation of aggregates, including water-stable aggregates. In the arable soddy-podzolic soil, on the contrary, both FPs and APs demonstrated the capacity for spontaneous self-organization into aggregates. The water stability of the self-organized aggregates from the arable soil was similar regardless of their source (APs or FPs). It was supposed that the ability of the FPs from the arable soil to form macroaggregates reflects the mechanical degradation of the aggregates in the soil: tillage results in the degradation of the aggregates, and the particles capable of spontaneously aggregation temporarily fall in the fraction of <0.25 mm. The water-stable aggregates produced from the APs or FPs of the arable soil contained more organic carbon (1.89%) in comparison with the water-stable aggregates separated from the initial 3- to 1-mm aggregates of this soil (1.31%).

  8. Relationship between carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a subtropical soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qianru; Sun, Yue; Zhang, Xinyu; Xu, Xingliang; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    In most soils, more than 90% nitrogen is bonded with carbon in organic forms. This indicates that carbon mineralization should be closely coupled with nitrogen mineralization, showing a positive correlation between carbon and nitrogen mineralization. To test this hypothesis above, we conducted an incubation using a subtropical soil for 10 days at 15 °C and 25 °C. 13C-labeled glucose and 15N-labeled ammonium or nitrate was used to separate CO2 and mineral N released from mineralization of soil organic matter and added glucose or inorganic nitrogen. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and four exoenzymes (i.e. β-1,4- Glucosaminidase, chitinase, acid phosphatase, β-1,4-N- acetyl glucosamine glycosidase) were also analyzed to detect change in microbial activities during the incubation. Our results showed that CO2 release decreased with increasing nitrogen mineralization rates. Temperature did not change this relationship between carbon and nitrogen mineralization. Although some changes in PLFA and the four exoenzymes were observed, these changes did not contribute to changes in carbon and nitrogen mineralization. These findings indicates that carbon and nitrogen mineralization in soil are more complicated than as previously expected. Future investigation should focus on why carbon and nitrogen mineralization are coupled in a negative correlation not in a positive correlation in many soils for a better understanding of carbon and nitrogen transformation during their mineralization.

  9. Contents and composition of organic matter in subsurface soils affected by land use and soil mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbrock, Ruth H.; Kaiser, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Land use and mineralogy affect the ability of surface as well as subsurface soils to sequester organic carbon and their contribution to mitigate the greenhouse effect. This study aimed to investigate the long-term impact of land use (i.e., arable and forest) and soil mineralogy on contents and composition of soil organic matter (SOM) from subsurface soils. Seven soils different in mineralogy (Albic and Haplic Luvisol, Colluvic and Haplic Regosol, Haplic and Vertic Cambisol, Haplic Stagnosol) were selected within Germany. Soil samples were taken from forest and adjacent arable sites. First, particulate and water soluble organic matter were separated from the subsurface soil samples. From the remaining solid residues the OM(PY) fractions were separated, analyzed for its OC content (OCPY) and characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. For the arable subsurface soils multiple regression analyses indicate significant positive relationships between the soil organic carbon contents and the contents of i) exchangeable Ca and oxalate soluble Fe, and Alox contents. Further for the neutral arable subsurface soils the contents OCPY weighted by its C=O contents were found to be related to the contents of Ca indicating interactions between OM(PY) and Ca cations. For the forest subsurface soils (pH <5) the OCPY contents were positively related with the contents of Na-pyrophosphate soluble Fe and Al. For the acidic forest subsurface soils such findings indicate interactions between OM(PY) and Fe3+ and Al3+ cations. The effects of land use and soil mineralogy on contents and composition of SOM and OM(PY) will be discussed.

  10. Use of caesium-137 data to evaluate SHETRAN simulated long-term erosion patterns in arable lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi Banis, Y.; Bathurst, J. C.; Walling, D. E.

    2004-07-01

    The caesium-137 method of quantifying soil erosion is used to provide field data for validating the capability of the SHETRAN modelling system for predicting long-term (30-year) erosion rates and their spatial variability. Simulations were carried out for two arable farm sites (area 3-5 ha) in central England for which average annual erosion rates of 6.5 and 10.4 t ha-1 year-1 had already been determined using caesium-137 measurements. These rates were compared with a range of simulated values representing the uncertainty in model output derived from uncertainty in the evaluation of model parameters. A successful validation was achieved in that the simulation range contained the measured rate at both sites, whereas the spatial variability was reproduced excellently at one site and partially at the other. The results indicate that, as the caesium-137 technique measures the erosion caused by all the processes acting at a site, it is relevant to hydrologically based models such as SHETRAN only if erosion by wind, agricultural activities and other processes not represented in the model are insignificant. The results also indicate a need to reduce the uncertainty in model parameter evaluation. More generally, the caesium-137 technique is shown to provide field data that improve the severity of the validation procedure (accounting for internal as well as outlet conditions) and that add spatial variability to magnitude as a condition for identifying unrealistic parameter sets when seeking to reduce simulation uncertainty.

  11. Plant adaptation to acid soils: the molecular basis for crop aluminum resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity on acid soils is a significant limitation to crop production worldwide, as approximately 50% of the world’s potentially arable soils are acidic. Because acid soils are such an important constraint to agriculture, understanding the mechanisms and genes conferring resistance to ...

  12. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN PESTICIDE TRANSFORMATION RATE AND MICROBIAL RESPIRATION ACTIVITY IN SOIL OF DIFFERENT ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cecil sandy loam soils (ultisol) from forest (coniferous and deciduous), pasture, and arable ecosystems were sampled (0-10 cm) in the vicinity of Athens, GA, USA. Soil from each site was subdivided into three portions, consisting of untreated soil (control) as well as live and s...

  13. Soil Fungal:Bacterial Ratios Are Linked to Altered Carbon Cycling.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ashish A; Chowdhury, Somak; Schlager, Veronika; Oliver, Anna; Puissant, Jeremy; Vazquez, Perla G M; Jehmlich, Nico; von Bergen, Martin; Griffiths, Robert I; Gleixner, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Despite several lines of observational evidence, there is a lack of consensus on whether higher fungal:bacterial (F:B) ratios directly cause higher soil carbon (C) storage. We employed RNA sequencing, protein profiling and isotope tracer techniques to evaluate whether differing F:B ratios are associated with differences in C storage. A mesocosm (13)C labeled foliar litter decomposition experiment was performed in two soils that were similar in their physico-chemical properties but differed in microbial community structure, specifically their F:B ratio (determined by PLFA analyses, RNA sequencing and protein profiling; all three corroborating each other). Following litter addition, we observed a consistent increase in abundance of fungal phyla; and greater increases in the fungal dominated soil; implicating the role of fungi in litter decomposition. Litter derived (13)C in respired CO2 was consistently lower, and residual (13)C in bulk SOM was higher in high F:B soil demonstrating greater C storage potential in the F:B dominated soil. We conclude that in this soil system, the increased abundance of fungi in both soils and the altered C cycling patterns in the F:B dominated soils highlight the significant role of fungi in litter decomposition and indicate that F:B ratios are linked to higher C storage potential. PMID:27555839

  14. Soil Fungal:Bacterial Ratios Are Linked to Altered Carbon Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ashish A.; Chowdhury, Somak; Schlager, Veronika; Oliver, Anna; Puissant, Jeremy; Vazquez, Perla G. M.; Jehmlich, Nico; von Bergen, Martin; Griffiths, Robert I.; Gleixner, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Despite several lines of observational evidence, there is a lack of consensus on whether higher fungal:bacterial (F:B) ratios directly cause higher soil carbon (C) storage. We employed RNA sequencing, protein profiling and isotope tracer techniques to evaluate whether differing F:B ratios are associated with differences in C storage. A mesocosm 13C labeled foliar litter decomposition experiment was performed in two soils that were similar in their physico-chemical properties but differed in microbial community structure, specifically their F:B ratio (determined by PLFA analyses, RNA sequencing and protein profiling; all three corroborating each other). Following litter addition, we observed a consistent increase in abundance of fungal phyla; and greater increases in the fungal dominated soil; implicating the role of fungi in litter decomposition. Litter derived 13C in respired CO2 was consistently lower, and residual 13C in bulk SOM was higher in high F:B soil demonstrating greater C storage potential in the F:B dominated soil. We conclude that in this soil system, the increased abundance of fungi in both soils and the altered C cycling patterns in the F:B dominated soils highlight the significant role of fungi in litter decomposition and indicate that F:B ratios are linked to higher C storage potential. PMID:27555839

  15. Possible changes to arable crop yields by 2050.

    PubMed

    Jaggard, Keith W; Qi, Aiming; Ober, Eric S

    2010-09-27

    By 2050, the world population is likely to be 9.1 billion, the CO(2) concentration 550 ppm, the ozone concentration 60 ppb and the climate warmer by ca 2 degrees C. In these conditions, what contribution can increased crop yield make to feeding the world? CO(2) enrichment is likely to increase yields of most crops by approximately 13 per cent but leave yields of C4 crops unchanged. It will tend to reduce water consumption by all crops, but this effect will be approximately cancelled out by the effect of the increased temperature on evaporation rates. In many places increased temperature will provide opportunities to manipulate agronomy to improve crop performance. Ozone concentration increases will decrease yields by 5 per cent or more. Plant breeders will probably be able to increase yields considerably in the CO(2)-enriched environment of the future, and most weeds and airborne pests and diseases should remain controllable, so long as policy changes do not remove too many types of crop-protection chemicals. However, soil-borne pathogens are likely to be an increasing problem when warmer weather will increase their multiplication rates; control is likely to need a transgenic approach to breeding for resistance. There is a large gap between achievable yields and those delivered by farmers, even in the most efficient agricultural systems. A gap is inevitable, but there are large differences between farmers, even between those who have used the same resources. If this gap is closed and accompanied by improvements in potential yields then there is a good prospect that crop production will increase by approximately 50 per cent or more by 2050 without extra land. However, the demands for land to produce bio-energy have not been factored into these calculations. PMID:20713388

  16. Possible changes to arable crop yields by 2050

    PubMed Central

    Jaggard, Keith W.; Qi, Aiming; Ober, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    By 2050, the world population is likely to be 9.1 billion, the CO2 concentration 550 ppm, the ozone concentration 60 ppb and the climate warmer by ca 2°C. In these conditions, what contribution can increased crop yield make to feeding the world? CO2 enrichment is likely to increase yields of most crops by approximately 13 per cent but leave yields of C4 crops unchanged. It will tend to reduce water consumption by all crops, but this effect will be approximately cancelled out by the effect of the increased temperature on evaporation rates. In many places increased temperature will provide opportunities to manipulate agronomy to improve crop performance. Ozone concentration increases will decrease yields by 5 per cent or more. Plant breeders will probably be able to increase yields considerably in the CO2-enriched environment of the future, and most weeds and airborne pests and diseases should remain controllable, so long as policy changes do not remove too many types of crop-protection chemicals. However, soil-borne pathogens are likely to be an increasing problem when warmer weather will increase their multiplication rates; control is likely to need a transgenic approach to breeding for resistance. There is a large gap between achievable yields and those delivered by farmers, even in the most efficient agricultural systems. A gap is inevitable, but there are large differences between farmers, even between those who have used the same resources. If this gap is closed and accompanied by improvements in potential yields then there is a good prospect that crop production will increase by approximately 50 per cent or more by 2050 without extra land. However, the demands for land to produce bio-energy have not been factored into these calculations. PMID:20713388

  17. Effects of habitat age and plant species on predatory mites (Acari, Mesostigmata) in grassy arable fallows in Eastern Austria

    PubMed Central

    Wissuwa, Janet; Salamon, Jörg-Alfred; Frank, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Density, diversity and assemblage structure of Mesostigmata (cohorts Gamasina and Uropodina) were investigated in nine grassy arable fallows according to a factorial design with age class (2–3, 6–8, 12–15 years) and plant species (legume: Medicago sativa, herb: Taraxacum officinale, grass: Bromus sterilis) as factors. The response of Mesostigmata to habitat age and plant species was explored because this group belongs to the dominant acarine predators playing a crucial role in soil food webs and being important as biological control agents. To our knowledge, this combination of factors has never been studied before for Mesostigmata. A further rarely applied aspect of the present study is the micro-scale approach investigating the Mesostigmata assemblage of the soil associated with single plants. Four plots were randomly chosen at each fallow in May 2008. At each plot plant roots and the adjacent soil of five randomly selected plant individuals per plant species were dug out with steel cylinders for heat extraction of soil fauna and measurement of environmental parameters. In total, 83 mite taxa were identified, with 50 taxa being new to Austria. GLM analysis revealed a significant effect of plant species on mite density, with significantly more mites in B. sterilis than in T. officinale samples, and M. sativa samples being intermediate. This was in contrast to the assumption that the mite density is highest in M. sativa samples due to the propagation of plant quality effects to higher trophic levels. These results were probably caused by a higher amount of fine roots in grass samples leading to high densities of Collembola, which are preferred prey of predatory mites. Mite density did not significantly differ between the three age classes. A canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) showed that the mite assemblage exhibited a weak yet significant separation between plant species, and a highly significant separation between age classes. Accordingly

  18. Priming-induced Changes in Permafrost Soil Organic Matter Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegoraro, E.; Schuur, E.; Bracho, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Warming of tundra ecosystems due to climate change is predicted to thaw permafrost and increase plant biomass and litter input to soil. Additional input of easily decomposable carbon can alter microbial activity by providing a much needed energy source, thereby accelerating soil organic matter decomposition. This phenomenon, known as the priming effect, can increase CO2 flux from soil to the atmosphere. However, the extent to which this mechanism can decrease soil carbon stocks in the Arctic is unknown. This project assessed priming effects on permafrost soil collected from a moist acidic tundra site in Healy, Alaska. We hypothesized that priming would increase microbial activity by providing microbes with a fresh source of carbon, thereby increasing decomposition of old and slowly decomposing carbon. Soil from surface and deep layers were amended with multiple pulses of uniformly 13C labeled glucose and cellulose, and samples were incubated at 15° C to quantify whether labile substrate addition increased carbon mineralization. We quantified the proportion of old carbon mineralization by measuring 14CO2. Data shows that substrate addition resulted in higher respiration rates in amended soils; however, priming was only observed in deep layers, where 30% more soil-derived carbon was respired compared to control samples. This suggests that microbes in deep layers are limited in energy, and the addition of labile carbon increases native soil organic matter decomposition, especially in soil with greater fractions of slowly decomposing carbon. Priming in permafrost could exacerbate the effects of climate change by increasing mineralization rates of carbon accumulated over the long-term in deep layers. Therefore, quantifying priming effect in permafrost soils is imperative to understanding the dynamics of carbon turnover in a warmer world.

  19. [Characteristics of nutrient loss by runoff in sloping arable land of yellow-brown under different rainfall intensities].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Liu, De-Fu; Song, Lin-Xu; Cui, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Gei

    2013-06-01

    In order to investigate the loss characteristics of N and P through surface flow and interflow under different rainfall intensities, a field experiment was conducted on the sloping arable land covered by typical yellow-brown soils inXiangxi River watershed by artificial rainfall. The results showed that the discharge of surface flow, total runoff and sediment increased with the increase of rain intensity, while the interflow was negatively correlated with rain intensity under the same total rainfall. TN, DN and DP were all flushed at the very beginning in surface flow underdifferent rainfall intensities; TP fluctuated and kept consistent in surface flow without obvious downtrend. While TN, DN and DP in interflow kept relatively stable in the whole runoff process, TP was high at the early stage, then rapidly decreased with time and kept steady finally. P was directly influenced by rainfall intensity, its concentration in the runoff increased with the increase of the rainfall intensity, the average concentration of N and P both exceeded the threshold of eutrophication of freshwater. The higher the amount of P loss was, the higher the rain intensity. The change of N loss was the opposite. The contribution rate of TN loss carried by surface flow increased from 36.5% to 57.6% with the increase of rainfall intensity, but surface flow was the primary form of P loss which contributed above 90.0%. Thus, it is crucial to control interflow in order to reduce N loss. In addition, measures should be taken to effectively manage soil erosion to mitigate P loss. The proportion of dissolved nitrogen in surface flow elevated with the decrease of rainfall intensity, but in interflow, dissolved form was predominant. P was exported mainly in the form of particulate under different rainfall intensities and runoff conditions.

  20. The impact of pyrogenic C on soil functioning : a study using ancient killn soil as a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpel, Cornelia; Naisse, Christophe; Thi Ngo, Phuong; Davasse, Bernard; Girardin, Cyril; Chabbi, Abad

    2016-04-01

    The long-term effect of pyrogenic C on the physicochemical and biological functioning of soils is poorly understood. We used ancient killn soils as model systems in order to investigate soil properties after four centuries of pyrogenic C addition. In particular we were interested in the effect of the pyrogenic C amendment on the (micro-)biological functioning of the soil. We analysed for physicochemical properties, C mineralisation as well as C dynamics following input of 13C labelled charcoal and plant residues. Our results show compared to soil without any addition, that pyrogenic C amendment led in the long term to more rapid decomposition of the new materials. The decomposition rate was increased by about 17%. In contrast,a negative priming effect reduced soil organic carbon mineralization by about 30%. Soil physicochemical poperties, i.e. clay content, cation exchange and nutrient availability were durably improved in soil amended with pyrogenic C four centuries ago. These changes probably promoted higher microbial activity and thus intense mineralization when new plant litter was added. On the contrary, charcoal was degraded at a similar rate compared to soil without pyrogenic C amendment. Thus no specific adaptation of microorganism to charcoal degradation was observed even after several centuries. The negative priming effect induced by charcoal additiion can be due to a physical protection of the soluble carbon fraction at the surfaces of new charcoal. In contrast, the negative priming effect induced by plant residue input may be more likely due to a shift of substrate utilisation by microbial communities evolving in a nutrient-rich environment. Our results demonstrate that pyrogenic C addition modifies the carbon dynamic of soils in the long-term. We propose a conceptual model accounting for the alterations of soil functioning in the long term after pyrogenic C addition.

  1. Rice (Oryza sativa L) plantation affects the stability of biochar in paddy soil

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mengxiong; Feng, Qibo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Gielen, Gerty; Wu, Weixiang

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of rice straw into biochar for soil amendment appears to be a promising method to increase long-term carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The stability of biochar in paddy soil, which is the major determining factor of carbon sequestration effect, depends mainly on soil properties and plant functions. However, the influence of plants on biochar stability in paddy soil remains unclear. In this study, bulk and surface characteristics of the biochars incubated without rice plants were compared with those incubated with rice plants using a suite of analytical techniques. Results showed that although rice plants had no significant influence on the bulk characteristics and decomposition rates of the biochar, the surface oxidation of biochar particles was enhanced by rice plants. Using 13C labeling we observed that rice plants could significantly increase carbon incorporation from biochar into soil microbial biomass. About 0.047% of the carbon in biochar was incorporated into the rice plants during the whole rice growing cycle. These results inferred that root exudates and transportation of biochar particles into rice plants might decrease the stability of biochar in paddy soil. Impact of plants should be considered when predicting carbon sequestration potential of biochar in soil systems. PMID:25944542

  2. Rice (Oryza sativa L) plantation affects the stability of biochar in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengxiong; Feng, Qibo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Gielen, Gerty; Wu, Weixiang

    2015-05-05

    Conversion of rice straw into biochar for soil amendment appears to be a promising method to increase long-term carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The stability of biochar in paddy soil, which is the major determining factor of carbon sequestration effect, depends mainly on soil properties and plant functions. However, the influence of plants on biochar stability in paddy soil remains unclear. In this study, bulk and surface characteristics of the biochars incubated without rice plants were compared with those incubated with rice plants using a suite of analytical techniques. Results showed that although rice plants had no significant influence on the bulk characteristics and decomposition rates of the biochar, the surface oxidation of biochar particles was enhanced by rice plants. Using (13)C labeling we observed that rice plants could significantly increase carbon incorporation from biochar into soil microbial biomass. About 0.047% of the carbon in biochar was incorporated into the rice plants during the whole rice growing cycle. These results inferred that root exudates and transportation of biochar particles into rice plants might decrease the stability of biochar in paddy soil. Impact of plants should be considered when predicting carbon sequestration potential of biochar in soil systems.

  3. Rice (Oryza sativa L) plantation affects the stability of biochar in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengxiong; Feng, Qibo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Gielen, Gerty; Wu, Weixiang

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of rice straw into biochar for soil amendment appears to be a promising method to increase long-term carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The stability of biochar in paddy soil, which is the major determining factor of carbon sequestration effect, depends mainly on soil properties and plant functions. However, the influence of plants on biochar stability in paddy soil remains unclear. In this study, bulk and surface characteristics of the biochars incubated without rice plants were compared with those incubated with rice plants using a suite of analytical techniques. Results showed that although rice plants had no significant influence on the bulk characteristics and decomposition rates of the biochar, the surface oxidation of biochar particles was enhanced by rice plants. Using (13)C labeling we observed that rice plants could significantly increase carbon incorporation from biochar into soil microbial biomass. About 0.047% of the carbon in biochar was incorporated into the rice plants during the whole rice growing cycle. These results inferred that root exudates and transportation of biochar particles into rice plants might decrease the stability of biochar in paddy soil. Impact of plants should be considered when predicting carbon sequestration potential of biochar in soil systems. PMID:25944542

  4. Multisubstrate Isotope Labeling and Metagenomic Analysis of Active Soil Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Verastegui, Y.; Cheng, J.; Engel, K.; Kolczynski, D.; Mortimer, S.; Lavigne, J.; Montalibet, J.; Romantsov, T.; Hall, M.; McConkey, B. J.; Rose, D. R.; Tomashek, J. J.; Scott, B. R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soil microbial diversity represents the largest global reservoir of novel microorganisms and enzymes. In this study, we coupled functional metagenomics and DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) using multiple plant-derived carbon substrates and diverse soils to characterize active soil bacterial communities and their glycoside hydrolase genes, which have value for industrial applications. We incubated samples from three disparate Canadian soils (tundra, temperate rainforest, and agricultural) with five native carbon (12C) or stable-isotope-labeled (13C) carbohydrates (glucose, cellobiose, xylose, arabinose, and cellulose). Indicator species analysis revealed high specificity and fidelity for many uncultured and unclassified bacterial taxa in the heavy DNA for all soils and substrates. Among characterized taxa, Actinomycetales (Salinibacterium), Rhizobiales (Devosia), Rhodospirillales (Telmatospirillum), and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium and Asticcacaulis) were bacterial indicator species for the heavy substrates and soils tested. Both Actinomycetales and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium) were associated with metabolism of cellulose, and Alphaproteobacteria were associated with the metabolism of arabinose; members of the order Rhizobiales were strongly associated with the metabolism of xylose. Annotated metagenomic data suggested diverse glycoside hydrolase gene representation within the pooled heavy DNA. By screening 2,876 cloned fragments derived from the 13C-labeled DNA isolated from soils incubated with cellulose, we demonstrate the power of combining DNA-SIP, multiple-displacement amplification (MDA), and functional metagenomics by efficiently isolating multiple clones with activity on carboxymethyl cellulose and fluorogenic proxy substrates for carbohydrate-active enzymes. PMID:25028422

  5. Rice (Oryza sativa L) plantation affects the stability of biochar in paddy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengxiong; Feng, Qibo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Gielen, Gerty; Wu, Weixiang

    2015-05-01

    Conversion of rice straw into biochar for soil amendment appears to be a promising method to increase long-term carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The stability of biochar in paddy soil, which is the major determining factor of carbon sequestration effect, depends mainly on soil properties and plant functions. However, the influence of plants on biochar stability in paddy soil remains unclear. In this study, bulk and surface characteristics of the biochars incubated without rice plants were compared with those incubated with rice plants using a suite of analytical techniques. Results showed that although rice plants had no significant influence on the bulk characteristics and decomposition rates of the biochar, the surface oxidation of biochar particles was enhanced by rice plants. Using 13C labeling we observed that rice plants could significantly increase carbon incorporation from biochar into soil microbial biomass. About 0.047% of the carbon in biochar was incorporated into the rice plants during the whole rice growing cycle. These results inferred that root exudates and transportation of biochar particles into rice plants might decrease the stability of biochar in paddy soil. Impact of plants should be considered when predicting carbon sequestration potential of biochar in soil systems.

  6. Changes in the Bacterial Community Structure of Remediated Anthracene-Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Balbuena, Laura; Bello-López, Juan M.; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Rodríguez-Valentín, Analine; Luna-Guido, Marco L.; Dendooven, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Mixing soil or adding earthworms (Eisenia fetida (Savigny, 1826)) accelerated the removal of anthracene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, from a pasture and an arable soil, while a non-ionic surfactant (Surfynol® 485) inhibited the removal of the contaminant compared to the untreated soil. It was unclear if the treatments affected the soil bacterial community and consequently the removal of anthracene. Therefore, the bacterial community structure was monitored by means of 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in the pasture and arable soil mixed weekly, amended with Surfynol® 485, E. fetida or organic material that served as food for the earthworms for 56 days. In both soils, the removal of anthracene was in the order: mixing soil weekly (100%) > earthworms applied (92%) > organic material applied (77%) > untreated soil (57%) > surfactant applied (34%) after 56 days. There was no clear link between removal of anthracene from soil and changes in the bacterial community structure. On the one hand, application of earthworms removed most of the contaminant from the arable soil and had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of the Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and Gemmatimonadetes, and an increase in that of the Proteobacteria compared to the unamended soil. Mixing the soil weekly removed all anthracene from the arable soil, but had little or no effect on the bacterial community structure. On the other hand, application of the surfactant inhibited the removal of anthracene from the arable soil compared to the untreated soil, but had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of Cytophagia (Bacteroidetes), Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes and Planctomycetes and an increase in that of the Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes) and Proteobacteria. Additionally, the removal of anthracene was similar in the different treatments of both the arable and pasture soil, but the

  7. A First Look at the Turnover Dynamics of Low Molecular Weight Organic Carbon in Shallow and Deep Soils of Coastal Prairie Grassland Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcfarland, J. W.; Lawrence, C. R.; Haw, M.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    The functional importance of low molecular weight organic compounds (LMWOC) is in disproportion to their abundance within soil organic carbon (SOC) pools. They are critical in driving microbial metabolism, though microbial utilization of LMWOC is likely dependent on C chemistry. Studies of C turnover in soils tend to focus in shallower horizons despite that for many ecosystems a substantial fraction of SOC resides below 1 m. In this study, we examined the fate of two important components of soluble SOC, sugars and carboxylic acids, through a soil profile extending to 150 cm. Our objective was to evaluate the turnover of LMWOC under varying physical, biological, and chemical conditions through the soil column. Our study area is part of a soil chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. From the side wall of a soil pit we installed intact soil collars and injected 13C-labeled glucose (GLU), 13C-labeled oxalic acid (OA), or deionized water (control) into the A, B (argillic) , and B/C (mottled) horizons at depths of 25, 75, and 125 cm, respectively. We sampled soil gas for 13CO2 intensively at graduated sampling intervals (6 hours to 2 weeks). The entire experiment was also replicated in the laboratory. We measured dissolved organic C (DOC) and microbial biomass C (MBC), and calculated total recovery of 13C in atmospheric and soil pools. Measures of DOC indicated a significant priming effect in the deepest (mottled) horizon and an increase in MBC in the argillic and mottled horizons. In all instances residence time was significantly lower for GLU than OA and increased with depth for both substrates. Mass balance calculations from the laboratory component indicated stronger retention for GLU than OA for the upper soils; however, this trend reversed below the argillic horizon. We hypothesize the greater retention of OA in the deepest (mottled) soil horizon may result from enhanced organo-metal complexation (e.g., between OA and dissolved Fe or Al). This hypothesis is consistent

  8. Implementation of Best Management Practices in soil cultivation in North and Central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raschke, Isabell; Werner, Magdalena; Potthoff, Martin; Steinmann, Horst

    2014-05-01

    Soil conservation in arable farming still needs further develeopment. Best Management Practices in soil cultivation are techniques that maintain and improve soil conditions and minimise the risk of degradation. However, farmers are still reluctant in anticipating these practices. Identifying and overcoming barriers might help to improve acceptance of Best Management Practices. Based on a set of management practices, such as non-inversion tillage, catch crops and crop rotation, we studied farmers attitudes to these practices. Inquieries were carried out in arable regions of Germany to obtain data on farmers perception. Results are discussed in an European context within the Catch-C project.

  9. Nutrient losses by surface run-off following the application of organic manures to arable land. 2. Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Smith, K A; Jackson, D R; Withers, P J

    2001-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) surface run-off losses were studied following organic manure applications to land, utilising a purpose-built facility on a sloping site in Herefordshire under arable tillage. Different rates and timing of cattle slurry, farm yard manure (FYM) and inorganic nitrogen (N) and P fertiliser were compared, over a 4-year period (1993-97). N losses from the same studies are reported in a separate paper. The application of cattle FYM and, especially slurry, to the silty clay loam soil increased both particulate and soluble P loss in surface water flow. Losses via subsurface flow (30 cm interflow) were consistently much lower than via surface water movement and were generally unaffected by treatment. Increased application of slurry solids increased all forms of P loss via surface run-off; the results suggested that a threshold for greatly increased risk of P losses via this route, as for N, occurred at ca. 2.5-3.0 t/ha solids loading. This approximates to the 50 m3/ha application rate limit suggested for slurry within UK 'good agricultural practice'. The studies also provided circumstantial evidence of the sealing of the soil surface by slurry solids as the major mechanism by which polluting surface run-off may occur following slurry application on susceptible soils. Losses of total and soluble P, recorded for each of the 4 years of experiments, reached a maximum of only up to 2 kg/ha total P (TP), even after slurry applications initiating run-off. Whilst these losses are insignificant in agronomic terms, peak concentrations of P (up to 30,000 micrograms/l TP) in surface water during a run-off event, could be of considerable concern in sensitive catchments. Losses of slurry P via surface run-off could make a significant contribution to accelerated eutrophication on entry to enclosed waters, particularly when combined with high concentrations of NO3(-)-N. Restricting slurry application rates to those consistent with good agronomic practice, and within the

  10. Changes in herbivore control in arable fields by detrital subsidies depend on predator species and vary in space.

    PubMed

    von Berg, Karsten; Thies, Carsten; Tscharntke, Teja; Scheu, Stefan

    2010-08-01

    Prey from the decomposer subsystem may help sustain predator populations in arable fields. Adding organic residues to agricultural systems may therefore enhance pest control. We investigated whether resource addition (maize mulch) strengthens aboveground trophic cascades in winter wheat fields. Evaluating the flux of the maize-borne carbon into the food web after 9 months via stable isotope analysis allowed differentiating between prey in predator diets originating from the above- and belowground subsystems. Furthermore, we recorded aphid populations in predator-reduced and control plots of no-mulch and mulch addition treatments. All analyzed soil dwelling species incorporated maize-borne carbon. In contrast, only 2 out of 13 aboveground predator species incorporated maize carbon, suggesting that these 2 predators forage on prey from the above- and belowground systems. Supporting this conclusion, densities of these two predator species were increased in the mulch addition fields. Nitrogen isotope signatures suggested that these generalist predators in part fed on Collembola thereby benefiting indirectly from detrital resources. Increased density of these two predator species was associated by increased aphid control but the identity of predators responsible for aphid control varied in space. One of the three wheat fields studied even lacked aphid control despite of mulch-mediated increased density of generalist predators. The results suggest that detrital subsidies quickly enter belowground food webs but only a few aboveground predator species include prey out of the decomposer system into their diet. Variation in the identity of predator species benefiting from detrital resources between sites suggest that, depending on locality, different predator species are subsidised by prey out of the decomposer system and that these predators contribute to aphid control. Therefore, by engineering the decomposer subsystem via detrital subsidies, biological control by

  11. Modelling impacts of climate change on arable crop diseases: progress, challenges and applications.

    PubMed

    Newbery, Fay; Qi, Aiming; Fitt, Bruce Dl

    2016-08-01

    Combining climate change, crop growth and crop disease models to predict impacts of climate change on crop diseases can guide planning of climate change adaptation strategies to ensure future food security. This review summarises recent developments in modelling climate change impacts on crop diseases, emphasises some major challenges and highlights recent trends. The use of multi-model ensembles in climate change modelling and crop modelling is contributing towards measures of uncertainty in climate change impact projections but other aspects of uncertainty remain largely unexplored. Impact assessments are still concentrated on few crops and few diseases but are beginning to investigate arable crop disease dynamics at the landscape level.

  12. Prospects for arable farm uptake of Short Rotation Coppice willow and miscanthus in England.

    PubMed

    Glithero, Neryssa J; Wilson, Paul; Ramsden, Stephen J

    2013-07-01

    Biomass will play a role in the UK meeting EU targets on renewable energy use. Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) and miscanthus are potential biomass feedstocks; however, supply will rely on farmer willingness to grow these crops. Despite attractive crop establishment grants for dedicated energy crops (DECs) in the UK, uptake remains low. Drawing on results from an on-farm survey with 244 English arable farmers, 81.6% (87.7%) of farmers would not consider growing miscanthus (SRC), while respectively, 17.2% (11.9%) would consider growing and 1.2% (0.4%) were currently growing these crops. Farmer age, location, land ownership, farm type, farm size and farmer education level were not significant factors in determining acceptance of DECs. The main reasons cited for not growing DECs were impacts on land quality, lack of appropriate machinery, commitment of land for a long period of time, time to financial return and profitability. Reasons cited for willingness to grow DECs included land quality, ease of crop management, commitment of land for a long period of time, and profitability. Farmers cited a range of 'moral' (e.g. should not be using land for energy crops when there is a shortage of food), land quality, knowledge, profit and current farming practice comments as reasons for not growing DECs, while those willing to grow DECs cited interest in renewable energy, willingness to consider new crops, and low labour needs as rationale for their interest. Farm business objectives indicated that maximising profit and quality of life were most frequently cited as very important objectives. Previous research in the UK indicates that farmers in arable areas are unlikely to convert large areas of land to DECs, even where these farmers have an interest and willingness to grow them. Assuming that those farmers interested in growing DECs converted 9.29% (average percentage of arable land set-aside between 1996 and 2005) of their utilised agricultural area to these crops, 50,700

  13. Modelling impacts of climate change on arable crop diseases: progress, challenges and applications.

    PubMed

    Newbery, Fay; Qi, Aiming; Fitt, Bruce Dl

    2016-08-01

    Combining climate change, crop growth and crop disease models to predict impacts of climate change on crop diseases can guide planning of climate change adaptation strategies to ensure future food security. This review summarises recent developments in modelling climate change impacts on crop diseases, emphasises some major challenges and highlights recent trends. The use of multi-model ensembles in climate change modelling and crop modelling is contributing towards measures of uncertainty in climate change impact projections but other aspects of uncertainty remain largely unexplored. Impact assessments are still concentrated on few crops and few diseases but are beginning to investigate arable crop disease dynamics at the landscape level. PMID:27471781

  14. Advancements in the application of NanoSIMS and Raman microspectroscopy to investigate the activity of microbial cells in soils

    PubMed Central

    Eichorst, Stephanie A.; Strasser, Florian; Woyke, Tanja; Schintlmeister, Arno; Wagner, Michael; Woebken, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    The combined approach of incubating environmental samples with stable isotope-labeled substrates followed by single-cell analyses through high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) or Raman microspectroscopy provides insights into the in situ function of microorganisms. This approach has found limited application in soils presumably due to the dispersal of microbial cells in a large background of particles. We developed a pipeline for the efficient preparation of cell extracts from soils for subsequent single-cell methods by combining cell detachment with separation of cells and soil particles followed by cell concentration. The procedure was evaluated by examining its influence on cell recoveries and microbial community composition across two soils. This approach generated a cell fraction with considerably reduced soil particle load and of sufficient small size to allow single-cell analysis by NanoSIMS, as shown when detecting active N2-fixing and cellulose-responsive microorganisms via 15N2 and 13C-UL-cellulose incubations, respectively. The same procedure was also applicable for Raman microspectroscopic analyses of soil microorganisms, assessed via microcosm incubations with a 13C-labeled carbon source and deuterium oxide (D2O, a general activity marker). The described sample preparation procedure enables single-cell analysis of soil microorganisms using NanoSIMS and Raman microspectroscopy, but should also facilitate single-cell sorting and sequencing. PMID:26324854

  15. Advancements in the application of NanoSIMS and Raman microspectroscopy to investigate the activity of microbial cells in soils.

    PubMed

    Eichorst, Stephanie A; Strasser, Florian; Woyke, Tanja; Schintlmeister, Arno; Wagner, Michael; Woebken, Dagmar

    2015-10-01

    The combined approach of incubating environmental samples with stable isotope-labeled substrates followed by single-cell analyses through high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) or Raman microspectroscopy provides insights into the in situ function of microorganisms. This approach has found limited application in soils presumably due to the dispersal of microbial cells in a large background of particles. We developed a pipeline for the efficient preparation of cell extracts from soils for subsequent single-cell methods by combining cell detachment with separation of cells and soil particles followed by cell concentration. The procedure was evaluated by examining its influence on cell recoveries and microbial community composition across two soils. This approach generated a cell fraction with considerably reduced soil particle load and of sufficient small size to allow single-cell analysis by NanoSIMS, as shown when detecting active N2-fixing and cellulose-responsive microorganisms via (15)N2 and (13)C-UL-cellulose incubations, respectively. The same procedure was also applicable for Raman microspectroscopic analyses of soil microorganisms, assessed via microcosm incubations with a (13)C-labeled carbon source and deuterium oxide (D2O, a general activity marker). The described sample preparation procedure enables single-cell analysis of soil microorganisms using NanoSIMS and Raman microspectroscopy, but should also facilitate single-cell sorting and sequencing.

  16. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in grassland soils used for cattle husbandry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannert, A.; Bogen, C.; Esperschütz, J.; Koubová, A.; Buegger, F.; Fischer, D.; Radl, V.; Fuß, R.; Chroňáková, A.; Elhottová, D.; Šimek, M.; Schloter, M.

    2012-10-01

    While the importance of anaerobic methane oxidation has been reported for marine ecosystems, the role of this process in soils is still questionable. Grasslands used as pastures for cattle overwintering show an increase in anaerobic soil micro-sites caused by animal treading and excrement deposition. Therefore, anaerobic potential methane oxidation activity of severely impacted soil from a cattle winter pasture was investigated in an incubation experiment under anaerobic conditions using 13C-labelled methane. We were able to detect a high microbial activity utilizing CH4 as nutrient source shown by the respiration of 13CO2. Measurements of possible terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic oxidation of methane were carried out. Soil sulfate concentrations were too low to explain the oxidation of the amount of methane added, but enough nitrate and iron(III) were detected. However, only nitrate was consumed during the experiment. 13C-PLFA analyses clearly showed the utilization of CH4 as nutrient source mainly by organisms harbouring 16:1ω7 PLFAs. These lipids were also found as most 13C-enriched fatty acids by Raghoebarsing et al. (2006) after addition of 13CH4 to an enrichment culture coupling denitrification of nitrate to anaerobic oxidation of methane. This might be an indication for anaerobic oxidation of methane by relatives of "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" in the investigated grassland soil under the conditions of the incubation experiment.

  17. Soil carbon sequestration by three perennial legume pastures is greater in deeper soil layers than in the surface soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X.-K.; Turner, N. C.; Song, L.; Gu, Y.-J.; Wang, T.-C.; Li, F.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays a vital role as both a sink for and source of atmospheric carbon. Revegetation of degraded arable land in China is expected to increase soil carbon sequestration, but the role of perennial legumes on soil carbon stocks in semiarid areas has not been quantified. In this study, we assessed the effect of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and two locally adapted forage legumes, bush clover (Lespedeza davurica S.) and milk vetch (Astragalus adsurgens Pall.) on the SOC concentration and SOC stock accumulated annually over a 2 m soil profile. The results showed that the concentration of SOC in the bare soil decreased slightly over the 7 years, while 7 years of legume growth substantially increased the concentration of SOC over the 0-2.0 m soil depth. Over the 7-year growth period the SOC stocks increased by 24.1, 19.9 and 14.6 Mg C ha-1 under the alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch stands, respectively, and decreased by 4.2 Mg C ha-1 in the bare soil. The sequestration of SOC in the 1-2 m depth of the soil accounted for 79, 68 and 74 % of the SOC sequestered in the 2 m deep soil profile under alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch, respectively. Conversion of arable land to perennial legume pasture resulted in a significant increase in SOC, particularly at soil depths below 1 m.

  18. Quality of fresh organic matter affects priming of soil organic matter and substrate utilization patterns of microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Boutton, Thomas W.; Xu, Wenhua; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2015-05-01

    Changes in biogeochemical cycles and the climate system due to human activities are expected to change the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs to soils. How changing quality of fresh organic matter (FOM) might influence the priming effect (PE) on soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is still under debate. Here we determined the PE induced by two 13C-labeled FOMs with contrasting nutritional quality (leaf vs. stalk of Zea mays L.). Soils from two different forest types yielded consistent results: soils amended with leaf tissue switched faster from negative PE to positive PE due to greater microbial growth compared to soils amended with stalks. However, after 16 d of incubation, soils amended with stalks had a higher PE than those amended with leaf. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) results suggested that microbial demand for carbon and other nutrients was one of the major determinants of the PE observed. Therefore, consideration of both microbial demands for nutrients and FOM supply simultaneously is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of PE. Our study provided evidence that changes in FOM quality could affect microbial utilization of substrate and PE on SOM mineralization, which may exacerbate global warming problems under future climate change.

  19. Quality of fresh organic matter affects priming of soil organic matter and substrate utilization patterns of microbes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Boutton, Thomas W; Xu, Wenhua; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Changes in biogeochemical cycles and the climate system due to human activities are expected to change the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs to soils. How changing quality of fresh organic matter (FOM) might influence the priming effect (PE) on soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is still under debate. Here we determined the PE induced by two (13)C-labeled FOMs with contrasting nutritional quality (leaf vs. stalk of Zea mays L.). Soils from two different forest types yielded consistent results: soils amended with leaf tissue switched faster from negative PE to positive PE due to greater microbial growth compared to soils amended with stalks. However, after 16 d of incubation, soils amended with stalks had a higher PE than those amended with leaf. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) results suggested that microbial demand for carbon and other nutrients was one of the major determinants of the PE observed. Therefore, consideration of both microbial demands for nutrients and FOM supply simultaneously is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of PE. Our study provided evidence that changes in FOM quality could affect microbial utilization of substrate and PE on SOM mineralization, which may exacerbate global warming problems under future climate change. PMID:25960162

  20. Quality of fresh organic matter affects priming of soil organic matter and substrate utilization patterns of microbes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Boutton, Thomas W; Xu, Wenhua; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Changes in biogeochemical cycles and the climate system due to human activities are expected to change the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs to soils. How changing quality of fresh organic matter (FOM) might influence the priming effect (PE) on soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is still under debate. Here we determined the PE induced by two (13)C-labeled FOMs with contrasting nutritional quality (leaf vs. stalk of Zea mays L.). Soils from two different forest types yielded consistent results: soils amended with leaf tissue switched faster from negative PE to positive PE due to greater microbial growth compared to soils amended with stalks. However, after 16 d of incubation, soils amended with stalks had a higher PE than those amended with leaf. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) results suggested that microbial demand for carbon and other nutrients was one of the major determinants of the PE observed. Therefore, consideration of both microbial demands for nutrients and FOM supply simultaneously is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of PE. Our study provided evidence that changes in FOM quality could affect microbial utilization of substrate and PE on SOM mineralization, which may exacerbate global warming problems under future climate change.

  1. Soil organic phosphorus in soils under different land use systems in northeast Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slazak, Anna; Freese, Dirk; Hüttl, Reinhard F.

    2010-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is commonly known as a major plant nutrient, which can act as a limiting factor for plant growth in many ecosystems, including different land use systems. Organic P (Po), transformations in soil are important in determining the overall biological availability of P and additionally Po depletion is caused by land cultivation. It is expected that changes of land use modifies the distribution of soil P among the various P-pools (Ptotal, Plabile, Po), where the Plabile forms are considered to be readily available to plants and Po plays an important role with P nutrition supply for plants. The aim of the study was to measure the different soil P pools under different land use systems. The study was carried out in northeast of Brandenburg in Germany. Different land use systems were studied: i) different in age pine-oak mixed forest stands, ii) silvopastoral land, iii) arable lands. Samples were taken from two mineral soil layers: 0-10 and 10-20 cm. Recently, a variety of analytical methods are available to determine specific Po compounds in soils. The different P forms in the soil were obtained by a sequential P fractionation by using acid and alkaline extractants, which mean that single samples were subjected to increasingly stronger extractants, consequently separating the soil P into fractions based on P solubility. The soil Ptotal for the forest stands ranged from 100 to 183 mg kg -1 whereas Po from 77 to 148 mg kg -1. The Po and Plabile in both soil layers increased significantly with increase of age-old oak trees. The most available-P fraction was Plabile predominate in the oldest pine-oak forest stand, accounting for 29% of soil Ptotal. For the silvopasture and arable study sites the Ptotal content was comparable. However, the highest value of Ptotal was measured in the 30 years old silvopastoral system with 685 mg kg-1 and 728 mg kg-1 at 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm depth, respectively than in arable lands. The results have shown that the 30 years old

  2. Plant roots alter microbial potential for mediation of soil organic carbon decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, M.; Shi, S.; Herman, D.; He, Z.; Zhou, J.

    2014-12-01

    Plant root regulation of soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition is a key controller of terrestrial C-cycling. Although many studies have tested possible mechanisms underlying plant "priming" of decomposition, few have investigated the microbial mediators of decomposition, which can be greatly influenced by plant activities. Here we examined effects of Avena fatua roots on decomposition of 13C-labeled root litter in a California grassland soil over two simulated growing-seasons. The presence of plant roots consistently suppressed rates of litter decomposition. Reduction of inorganic nitrogen (N) concentration in soil reduced but did not completely relieve this suppressive effect. The presence of plants significantly altered the abundance, composition and functional potential of microbial communities. Significantly higher signal intensities of genes capable of degrading low molecular weight organic compounds (e.g., glucose, formate and malate) were observed in microbial communities from planted soils, while microorganisms in unplanted soils had higher relative abundances of genes involved in degradation of some macromolecules (e.g., hemicellulose and lignin). Additionally, compared to unplanted soils, microbial communities from planted soils had higher signal intensities of proV and proW, suggesting microbial osmotic stress in planted soils. Possible mechanisms for the observed inhibition of decomposition are 1) microbes preferentially using simple substrates from root exudates and 2) soil drying by plant evapotranspiration impairing microbial activity. We propose a simple data-based model suggesting that the impacts of roots, the soil environment, and microbial community composition on decomposition processes result from impacts of these factors on the soil microbial functional gene potential.

  3. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in grassland soils used for cattle husbandry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannert, A.; Bogen, C.; Esperschütz, J.; Koubová, A.; Buegger, F.; Fischer, D.; Radl, V.; Fuß, R.; Chroňáková, A.; Elhottová, D.; Šimek, M.; Schloter, M.

    2012-04-01

    While the importance of anaerobic methane oxidation has been reported for marine ecosystems, the role of this process in soils is still questionable. Grasslands used as pastures for cattle-overwintering show an increase in anaerobic soil micro-sites caused by animal treading and excrement deposition. Therefore anaerobic potential methane oxidation activity of severely impacted soil from a cattle winter pasture was investigated in an incubation experiment under anaerobic conditions using 13C-labeled methane. We were able to detect a high microbial activity utilizing CH4 as nutrient source shown by the respiration of 13CO2. Measurements of possible terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic oxidation of methane were carried out. Soil sulfate concentrations were too low to explain the oxidation of the amount of methane added, but enough nitrate and iron(III) were detected. However, only nitrate was consumed during the experiment. 13C-PLFA analyses clearly showed the utilization of CH4 as nutrient source mainly by organisms harbouring 16:1ω7 PLFAs. These lipids were found in Gram-negative microorganisms and anaerobes. The fact that these lipids are also typical for type I methanotrophs, known as aerobic methane oxidizers, might indicate a link between aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation.

  4. Reintroduction of rare arable plants by seed transfer. What are the optimal sowing rates?

    PubMed

    Lang, Marion; Prestele, Julia; Fischer, Christina; Kollmann, Johannes; Albrecht, Harald

    2016-08-01

    During the past decades, agro-biodiversity has markedly declined and some species are close to extinction in large parts of Europe. Reintroduction of rare arable plant species in suitable habitats could counteract this negative trend. The study investigates optimal sowing rates of three endangered species (Legousia speculum-veneris (L.) Chaix, Consolida regalis Gray, and Lithospermum arvense L.), in terms of establishment success, seed production, and crop yield losses.A field experiment with partial additive design was performed in an organically managed winter rye stand with study species added in ten sowing rates of 5-10,000 seeds m(-2). They were sown as a single species or as a three-species mixture (pure vs. mixed sowing) and with vs. without removal of spontaneous weeds. Winter rye was sown at a fixed rate of 350 grains m(-2). Performance of the study species was assessed as plant establishment and seed production. Crop response was determined as grain yield.Plant numbers and seed production were significantly affected by the sowing rate, but not by sowing type (pure vs. mixed sowing of the three study species), and weed removal. All rare arable plant species established and reproduced at sowing rates >25 seeds m(-2), with best performance of L. speculum-veneris. Negative density effects occurred to some extent for plant establishment and more markedly for seed production.The impact of the three study species on crop yield followed sigmoidal functions. Depending on the species, a yield loss of 10% occurred at >100 seeds m(-2). Synthesis and applications: The study shows that reintroduction of rare arable plants by seed transfer is a suitable method to establish them on extensively managed fields, for example, in organic farms with low nutrient level and without mechanical weed control. Sowing rates of 100 seeds m(-2) for C. regalis and L. arvense, and 50 seeds m(-2) for L. speculum-veneris are recommended, to achieve successful establishment

  5. Input of easily available organic C and N stimulates microbial decomposition of soil organic matter in arctic permafrost soil.

    PubMed

    Wild, Birgit; Schnecker, Jörg; Alves, Ricardo J Eloy; Barsukov, Pavel; Bárta, Jiří; Capek, Petr; Gentsch, Norman; Gittel, Antje; Guggenberger, Georg; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Mikutta, Robert; Rusalimova, Olga; Santrůčková, Hana; Shibistova, Olga; Urich, Tim; Watzka, Margarete; Zrazhevskaya, Galina; Richter, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Rising temperatures in the Arctic can affect soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition directly and indirectly, by increasing plant primary production and thus the allocation of plant-derived organic compounds into the soil. Such compounds, for example root exudates or decaying fine roots, are easily available for microorganisms, and can alter the decomposition of older SOM ("priming effect"). We here report on a SOM priming experiment in the active layer of a permafrost soil from the central Siberian Arctic, comparing responses of organic topsoil, mineral subsoil, and cryoturbated subsoil material (i.e., poorly decomposed topsoil material subducted into the subsoil by freeze-thaw processes) to additions of (13)C-labeled glucose, cellulose, a mixture of amino acids, and protein (added at levels corresponding to approximately 1% of soil organic carbon). SOM decomposition in the topsoil was barely affected by higher availability of organic compounds, whereas SOM decomposition in both subsoil horizons responded strongly. In the mineral subsoil, SOM decomposition increased by a factor of two to three after any substrate addition (glucose, cellulose, amino acids, protein), suggesting that the microbial decomposer community was limited in energy to break down more complex components of SOM. In the cryoturbated horizon, SOM decomposition increased by a factor of two after addition of amino acids or protein, but was not significantly affected by glucose or cellulose, indicating nitrogen rather than energy limitation. Since the stimulation of SOM decomposition in cryoturbated material was not connected to microbial growth or to a change in microbial community composition, the additional nitrogen was likely invested in the production of extracellular enzymes required for SOM decomposition. Our findings provide a first mechanistic understanding of priming in permafrost soils and suggest that an increase in the availability of organic carbon or nitrogen, e.g., by increased plant

  6. Input of easily available organic C and N stimulates microbial decomposition of soil organic matter in arctic permafrost soil.

    PubMed

    Wild, Birgit; Schnecker, Jörg; Alves, Ricardo J Eloy; Barsukov, Pavel; Bárta, Jiří; Capek, Petr; Gentsch, Norman; Gittel, Antje; Guggenberger, Georg; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Mikutta, Robert; Rusalimova, Olga; Santrůčková, Hana; Shibistova, Olga; Urich, Tim; Watzka, Margarete; Zrazhevskaya, Galina; Richter, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Rising temperatures in the Arctic can affect soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition directly and indirectly, by increasing plant primary production and thus the allocation of plant-derived organic compounds into the soil. Such compounds, for example root exudates or decaying fine roots, are easily available for microorganisms, and can alter the decomposition of older SOM ("priming effect"). We here report on a SOM priming experiment in the active layer of a permafrost soil from the central Siberian Arctic, comparing responses of organic topsoil, mineral subsoil, and cryoturbated subsoil material (i.e., poorly decomposed topsoil material subducted into the subsoil by freeze-thaw processes) to additions of (13)C-labeled glucose, cellulose, a mixture of amino acids, and protein (added at levels corresponding to approximately 1% of soil organic carbon). SOM decomposition in the topsoil was barely affected by higher availability of organic compounds, whereas SOM decomposition in both subsoil horizons responded strongly. In the mineral subsoil, SOM decomposition increased by a factor of two to three after any substrate addition (glucose, cellulose, amino acids, protein), suggesting that the microbial decomposer community was limited in energy to break down more complex components of SOM. In the cryoturbated horizon, SOM decomposition increased by a factor of two after addition of amino acids or protein, but was not significantly affected by glucose or cellulose, indicating nitrogen rather than energy limitation. Since the stimulation of SOM decomposition in cryoturbated material was not connected to microbial growth or to a change in microbial community composition, the additional nitrogen was likely invested in the production of extracellular enzymes required for SOM decomposition. Our findings provide a first mechanistic understanding of priming in permafrost soils and suggest that an increase in the availability of organic carbon or nitrogen, e.g., by increased plant

  7. Input of easily available organic C and N stimulates microbial decomposition of soil organic matter in arctic permafrost soil

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Birgit; Schnecker, Jörg; Alves, Ricardo J. Eloy; Barsukov, Pavel; Bárta, Jiří; Čapek, Petr; Gentsch, Norman; Gittel, Antje; Guggenberger, Georg; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Mikutta, Robert; Rusalimova, Olga; Šantrůčková, Hana; Shibistova, Olga; Urich, Tim; Watzka, Margarete; Zrazhevskaya, Galina; Richter, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Rising temperatures in the Arctic can affect soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition directly and indirectly, by increasing plant primary production and thus the allocation of plant-derived organic compounds into the soil. Such compounds, for example root exudates or decaying fine roots, are easily available for microorganisms, and can alter the decomposition of older SOM (“priming effect”). We here report on a SOM priming experiment in the active layer of a permafrost soil from the central Siberian Arctic, comparing responses of organic topsoil, mineral subsoil, and cryoturbated subsoil material (i.e., poorly decomposed topsoil material subducted into the subsoil by freeze–thaw processes) to additions of 13C-labeled glucose, cellulose, a mixture of amino acids, and protein (added at levels corresponding to approximately 1% of soil organic carbon). SOM decomposition in the topsoil was barely affected by higher availability of organic compounds, whereas SOM decomposition in both subsoil horizons responded strongly. In the mineral subsoil, SOM decomposition increased by a factor of two to three after any substrate addition (glucose, cellulose, amino acids, protein), suggesting that the microbial decomposer community was limited in energy to break down more complex components of SOM. In the cryoturbated horizon, SOM decomposition increased by a factor of two after addition of amino acids or protein, but was not significantly affected by glucose or cellulose, indicating nitrogen rather than energy limitation. Since the stimulation of SOM decomposition in cryoturbated material was not connected to microbial growth or to a change in microbial community composition, the additional nitrogen was likely invested in the production of extracellular enzymes required for SOM decomposition. Our findings provide a first mechanistic understanding of priming in permafrost soils and suggest that an increase in the availability of organic carbon or nitrogen, e.g., by increased

  8. Partitioning in trees and soil (PiTS) - a experimental approach to improve knowledge of forest carbon dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Garten Jr, Charles T; Iversen, Colleen M; Norby, Richard J; Thornton, Peter E; Weston, David; Gu, Lianhong; Brice, Deanne Jane; Childs, Joanne; Evans, R

    2012-01-01

    Summary The dynamics of rapid changes in carbon (C) partitioning within forest ecosystems are not well understood, which limits improvement of mechanistic models of C cycling. Our objective was to inform model processes by describing relationships between C partitioning and accessible environmental or physiological measurements, with a special emphasis on belowground C flux. We exposed eight 7-year-old loblolly pine trees to air enriched with 13CO2 and then implemented adjacent light shade (LS) and heavy shade (HS) treatments in order to manipulate C uptake and flux. A soil pit was dug adjacent to the trees to provide greater access belowground. The impacts of shading on photosynthesis, plant water potential, sap flow, basal area growth, root growth, and soil C exchange rate (CER) were assessed for each tree over a three-week period. The progression of the 13C label was concurrently tracked from the atmosphere through foliage, phloem, roots, and soil CO2 efflux. The HS treatment significantly reduced C uptake, sap flow, stem growth and root standing crop, and resulted in greater residual soil water content to 1 m depth. Sap flow was strongly correlated with CER on the previous day, but not the current day, with no apparent treatment effect on the relationship. The 13C label was immediately detected in foliage on label day (half-life = 0.5 d), progressed through phloem by day 2 (half-life = 4.7 d), roots by day 2-4, and subsequently was evident as respiratory release from soil which peaked between days 3-6. The 13C of soil CO2 efflux was strongly correlated with phloem 13C on the previous day, or two days earlier. These data detail the timing and relative magnitude of C flux through a young pine stand in relation to environmental conditions. Refinement of belowground sampling will be necessary to adequately separate and quantify the flux of recently fixed C into roots, and fate of that new C as respiratory, mycorrhizal or exudative release, storage or partitioning

  9. Unearthing the ecology of soil microorganisms using a high resolution DNA-SIP approach to explore cellulose and xylose metabolism in soil

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pepe-Ranney, Charles; Campbell, Ashley N.; Koechli, Chantal N.; Berthrong, Sean; Buckley, Daniel H.

    2016-05-12

    We explored microbial contributions to decomposition using a sophisticated approach to DNA Stable Isotope Probing (SIP). Our experiment evaluated the dynamics and ecological characteristics of functionally defined microbial groups that metabolize labile and structural C in soils. We added to soil a complex amendment representing plant derived organic matter substituted with either 13C-xylose or 13C-cellulose to represent labile and structural C pools derived from abundant components of plant biomass. We found evidence for 13C-incorporation into DNA from 13C-xylose and 13C-cellulose in 49 and 63 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. The types of microorganisms that assimilated 13C in the 13C-xylose treatmentmore » changed over time being predominantly Firrnicutes at day 1 followed by Bacteroidetes at day 3 and then Actinobacteria at day 7. These 13C-labeling dynamics suggest labile C traveled through different trophic levels. In contrast, microorganisms generally metabolized cellulose-C after 14 days and did not change to the same extent in phylogenetic composition over time. Furthermore, microorganisms that metabolized cellulose-C belonged to poorly characterized but cosmopolitan soil lineages including Verrucomicrobia, Chlorotlexi, and Planctomycetes.« less

  10. Unearthing the Ecology of Soil Microorganisms Using a High Resolution DNA-SIP Approach to Explore Cellulose and Xylose Metabolism in Soil.

    PubMed

    Pepe-Ranney, Charles; Campbell, Ashley N; Koechli, Chantal N; Berthrong, Sean; Buckley, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    We explored microbial contributions to decomposition using a sophisticated approach to DNA Stable Isotope Probing (SIP). Our experiment evaluated the dynamics and ecological characteristics of functionally defined microbial groups that metabolize labile and structural C in soils. We added to soil a complex amendment representing plant derived organic matter substituted with either (13)C-xylose or (13)C-cellulose to represent labile and structural C pools derived from abundant components of plant biomass. We found evidence for (13)C-incorporation into DNA from (13)C-xylose and (13)C-cellulose in 49 and 63 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. The types of microorganisms that assimilated (13)C in the (13)C-xylose treatment changed over time being predominantly Firmicutes at day 1 followed by Bacteroidetes at day 3 and then Actinobacteria at day 7. These (13)C-labeling dynamics suggest labile C traveled through different trophic levels. In contrast, microorganisms generally metabolized cellulose-C after 14 days and did not change to the same extent in phylogenetic composition over time. Microorganisms that metabolized cellulose-C belonged to poorly characterized but cosmopolitan soil lineages including Verrucomicrobia, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes. PMID:27242725

  11. Unearthing the Ecology of Soil Microorganisms Using a High Resolution DNA-SIP Approach to Explore Cellulose and Xylose Metabolism in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Pepe-Ranney, Charles; Campbell, Ashley N.; Koechli, Chantal N.; Berthrong, Sean; Buckley, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    We explored microbial contributions to decomposition using a sophisticated approach to DNA Stable Isotope Probing (SIP). Our experiment evaluated the dynamics and ecological characteristics of functionally defined microbial groups that metabolize labile and structural C in soils. We added to soil a complex amendment representing plant derived organic matter substituted with either 13C-xylose or 13C-cellulose to represent labile and structural C pools derived from abundant components of plant biomass. We found evidence for 13C-incorporation into DNA from 13C-xylose and 13C-cellulose in 49 and 63 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. The types of microorganisms that assimilated 13C in the 13C-xylose treatment changed over time being predominantly Firmicutes at day 1 followed by Bacteroidetes at day 3 and then Actinobacteria at day 7. These 13C-labeling dynamics suggest labile C traveled through different trophic levels. In contrast, microorganisms generally metabolized cellulose-C after 14 days and did not change to the same extent in phylogenetic composition over time. Microorganisms that metabolized cellulose-C belonged to poorly characterized but cosmopolitan soil lineages including Verrucomicrobia, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes. PMID:27242725

  12. From microbial biomass compounds to non-living soil organic matter - Microbial biomass as a significant source for soil organic matter formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltner, A.; Kindler, R.; Hoffmann-Jäniche, C.; Schmidt-Brücken, B.; Kästner, M.

    2009-04-01

    Soil organic matter is one of the most important pools of the global carbon cycle. Recently, it has been suggested that microbial biomass is a significant source for the formation of refractory organic matter. We tested the relevance of this source by incubation of soil with 13C-labeled Escherichia coli cells. We traced the labeled carbon in fatty acids and amino acids, both in the microbial biomass and in the bulk soil. We also localized cells and their debris by scanning electron microscopy. Although we could not detect any living cells after 100 days, about 50% of the carbon remained in the soil after 224 days. The amount of label in the fatty acids indicated that microbial lipids were degraded faster than the bulk microbial biomass. Their labeling pattern showed that they were redistributed from E. coli to the microbial food web and from the living biomass to non-living soil organic matter. In contrast, the label in the total amino acids did not decrease significantly during incubation. Proteins are thus surprisingly stable in soil, but they also shifted from microbial biomass to non-living soil organic matter. The scanning electron micrographs showed only isolated intact microbial cells in our soil, but patches of organic material of unknown origin which are about 20 - 50 nm2 in size were quite abundant. Dying microbial cells therefore are a significant carbon source for the formation of refractory organic material, but the morphology of the cells changes during degradation, as cell structures cannot be found frequently in soils.

  13. Microbial respiration and natural attenuation of benzene contaminated soils investigated by cavity enhanced Raman multi-gas spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; Michalzik, Beate; Bachmann, Anne; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-05-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination with benzene can cause serious environmental damage. However, many soil microorganisms are capable to adapt and are known to strongly control the fate of organic contamination. Innovative cavity enhanced Raman multi-gas spectroscopy (CERS) was applied to investigate the short-term response of the soil micro-flora to sudden surface contamination with benzene regarding the temporal variations of gas products and their exchange rates with the adjacent atmosphere. (13)C-labeled benzene was spiked on a silty-loamy soil column in order to track and separate the changes in heterotrophic soil respiration - involving (12)CO2 and O2- from the natural attenuation process of benzene degradation to ultimately form (13)CO2. The respiratory quotient (RQ) decreased from a value 0.98 to 0.46 directly after the spiking and increased again within 33 hours to a value of 0.72. This coincided with the maximum (13)CO2 concentration rate (0.63 μmol m(-2) s(-1)), indicating the highest benzene degradation at 33 hours after the spiking event. The diffusion of benzene in the headspace and the biodegradation into (13)CO2 were simultaneously monitored and 12 days after the benzene spiking no measurable degradation was detected anymore. The RQ finally returned to a value of 0.96 demonstrating the reestablished aerobic respiration.

  14. Long-term ferrocyanide application via deicing salts promotes the establishment of Actinomycetales assimilating ferrocyanide-derived carbon in soil.

    PubMed

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Mansfeldt, Tim; Kublik, Susanne; Touliari, Evangelia; Buegger, Franz; Schloter, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Cyanides are highly toxic and produced by various microorganisms as defence strategy or to increase their competitiveness. As degradation is the most efficient way of detoxification, some microbes developed the capability to use cyanides as carbon and nitrogen source. However, it is not clear if this potential also helps to lower cyanide concentrations in roadside soils where deicing salt application leads to significant inputs of ferrocyanide. The question remains if biodegradation in soils can occur without previous photolysis. By conducting a microcosm experiment using soils with/without pre-exposition to road salts spiked with (13) C-labelled ferrocyanide, we were able to confirm biodegradation and in parallel to identify bacteria using ferrocyanide as C source via DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP), TRFLP fingerprinting and pyrosequencing. Bacteria assimilating (13) C were highly similar in the pre-exposed soils, belonging mostly to Actinomycetales (Kineosporia, Mycobacterium, Micromonosporaceae). In the soil without pre-exposition, bacteria belonging to Acidobacteria (Gp3, Gp4, Gp6), Gemmatimonadetes (Gemmatimonas) and Gammaproteobacteria (Thermomonas, Xanthomonadaceae) used ferrocyanide as C source but not the present Actinomycetales. This indicated that (i) various bacteria are able to assimilate ferrocyanide-derived C and (ii) long-term exposition to ferrocyanide applied with deicing salts leads to Actinomycetales outcompeting other microorganisms for the use of ferrocyanide as C source. PMID:27194597

  15. The Effect of Soil Warming on Decomposition of Biochar, Wood, and Bulk Soil Organic Carbon in Contrasting Temperate and Tropical Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torn, Margaret; Tas, Neslihan; Reichl, Ken; Castanha, Cristina; Fischer, Marc; Abiven, Samuel; Schmidt, Michael; Brodie, Eoin; Jansson, Janet

    2013-04-01

    Biochar and wood are known to decay at different rates in soil, but the longterm effect of char versus unaltered wood inputs on soil carbon dynamics may vary by soil ecosystem and by their sensitivity to warming. We conducted an incubation experiment to explore three questions: (1) How do decomposition rates of char and wood vary with soil type and depth? (2) How vulnerable to warming are these slowly decomposing inputs? And (3) Do char or wood additions increase loss of native soil organic carbon (priming)? Soils from a Mediterranean grassland (Hopland Experimental Research Station, California) and a moist tropical forest (Tabunoco Forest, Puerto Rico) were collected from two soil depths and incubated at ambient temperature (14°C, 20°C for Hopland and Tabonuco respectively) and ambient +6°C. We added 13C-labeled wood and char (made from the wood at 450oC) to the soils and quantified CO2 and 13CO2 fluxes with continuous online carbon isotope measurements using a Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer (Picarro, Inc) for one year. As expected, in all treatments the wood decomposed much (about 50 times) more quickly than did the char amendment. With few exceptions, amendments placed in the surface soil decomposed more quickly than those in deeper soil, and in forest soil faster than that placed in grassland soil, at the same temperature. The two substrates were not very temperature sensitive. Both had Q10 less than 2 and char decomposition in particular was relatively insensitive to warming. Finally, the addition of wood caused a significant increase of roughly 30% in decomposition losses of the native soil organic carbon in the grassland and slightly less in forest. Char had only a slight positive priming effect but had a significant effect on microbial community. These results show that conversion of wood inputs to char through wildfire or intentional management will alter not only the persistence of the carbon in soil but also its temperature response and effect on

  16. Root carbon decomposition and microbial biomass response at different soil depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpel, C.

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between root litter addition and soil organic matter (SOM) formation in top- versus subsoils is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate root litter decomposition and stabilisation in relation to microbial parameters in different soil depths. Our conceptual approach included incubation of 13C-labelled wheat roots at 30, 60 and 90 cm soil depth for 36 months under field conditions. Quantitative root carbon contribution to SOM was assessed, changes of bulk root chemistry studied by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy and lignin content and composition was assessed after CuO oxidation. Compound-specific isotope analysis allowed to assess the role of root lignin for soil C storage in the different soil depths. Microbial biomass and community structure was determined after DNA extraction. After three years of incubation, O-alkyl C most likely assigned to polysaccharides decreased in all soil depth compared to the initial root material. The degree of root litter decomposition assessed by the alkyl/O-alkyl ratio decreased with increasing soil depth, while aryl/O-alkyl ratio was highest at 60 cm depth. Root-derived lignin showed depth specific concentrations (30 < 90 < 60 cm). Its composition was soil depth independent suggesting that microbial communities in all three soil depths had similar degradation abilities. Microbial biomass C and fungi contribution increased after root litter addition. Their community structure changed after root litter addition and showed horizon specific dynamics. Our study shows that root litter addition can contribute to C storage in subsoils but did not influence C storage in topsoil. We conclude that specific conditions of single soil horizons have to be taken into account if root C dynamics are to be fully understood.

  17. Microbial carbon mineralization in tropical lowland and montane forest soils of Peru

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Jeanette; Ostle, Nicholas; McNamara, Niall P.; Nottingham, Andrew T.; Stott, Andrew W.; Bardgett, Richard D.; Salinas, Norma; Ccahuana, Adan J. Q.; Meir, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is affecting the amount and complexity of plant inputs to tropical forest soils. This is likely to influence the carbon (C) balance of these ecosystems by altering decomposition processes e.g., “positive priming effects” that accelerate soil organic matter mineralization. However, the mechanisms determining the magnitude of priming effects are poorly understood. We investigated potential mechanisms by adding 13C labeled substrates, as surrogates of plant inputs, to soils from an elevation gradient of tropical lowland and montane forests. We hypothesized that priming effects would increase with elevation due to increasing microbial nitrogen limitation, and that microbial community composition would strongly influence the magnitude of priming effects. Quantifying the sources of respired C (substrate or soil organic matter) in response to substrate addition revealed no consistent patterns in priming effects with elevation. Instead we found that substrate quality (complexity and nitrogen content) was the dominant factor controlling priming effects. For example a nitrogenous substrate induced a large increase in soil organic matter mineralization whilst a complex C substrate caused negligible change. Differences in the functional capacity of specific microbial groups, rather than microbial community composition per se, were responsible for these substrate-driven differences in priming effects. Our findings suggest that the microbial pathways by which plant inputs and soil organic matter are mineralized are determined primarily by the quality of plant inputs and the functional capacity of microbial taxa, rather than the abiotic properties of the soil. Changes in the complexity and stoichiometry of plant inputs to soil in response to climate change may therefore be important in regulating soil C dynamics in tropical forest soils. PMID:25566230

  18. Microbial carbon mineralization in tropical lowland and montane forest soils of Peru.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Jeanette; Ostle, Nicholas; McNamara, Niall P; Nottingham, Andrew T; Stott, Andrew W; Bardgett, Richard D; Salinas, Norma; Ccahuana, Adan J Q; Meir, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is affecting the amount and complexity of plant inputs to tropical forest soils. This is likely to influence the carbon (C) balance of these ecosystems by altering decomposition processes e.g., "positive priming effects" that accelerate soil organic matter mineralization. However, the mechanisms determining the magnitude of priming effects are poorly understood. We investigated potential mechanisms by adding (13)C labeled substrates, as surrogates of plant inputs, to soils from an elevation gradient of tropical lowland and montane forests. We hypothesized that priming effects would increase with elevation due to increasing microbial nitrogen limitation, and that microbial community composition would strongly influence the magnitude of priming effects. Quantifying the sources of respired C (substrate or soil organic matter) in response to substrate addition revealed no consistent patterns in priming effects with elevation. Instead we found that substrate quality (complexity and nitrogen content) was the dominant factor controlling priming effects. For example a nitrogenous substrate induced a large increase in soil organic matter mineralization whilst a complex C substrate caused negligible change. Differences in the functional capacity of specific microbial groups, rather than microbial community composition per se, were responsible for these substrate-driven differences in priming effects. Our findings suggest that the microbial pathways by which plant inputs and soil organic matter are mineralized are determined primarily by the quality of plant inputs and the functional capacity of microbial taxa, rather than the abiotic properties of the soil. Changes in the complexity and stoichiometry of plant inputs to soil in response to climate change may therefore be important in regulating soil C dynamics in tropical forest soils. PMID:25566230

  19. Distribution of selenium and cadmium in soil-rice system of selenium-rich area in Hainan, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dengfeng; Wei, Zhiyuan; Tang, Shumei; Qi, Zhiping

    2014-09-01

    Rice, which is the staple food in East Asia, is a source of Selenium (Se) and Cadmium (Cd). The distribution of Se and Cd in soil-rice system is significant to human nutrition and public health. This study is to explore the distribution of Se and Cd in arable land soils and their distribution in polished rice and stalks of Se-rich area. A total of 63 soil samples and 126 rice samples (63 groups of rice grains and stalk samples) were collected from West Hainan Island to determine Se and Cd concentrations. The results suggested the concentration of Se in soil was higher than average level in China, and Cd content was lower than the agricultural land-use threshold of China. The distribution of Se and Cd in arable land soil was primarily determined by diagenesis and mineralization. Se and Cd were more inclined to accumulate in stalks than rice grains, and the contents in polished rice were correlated with that in stalk. Acidification of arable land soil will threaten human nutrition and health for the bioaccumulation factor of Se in polished rice decreased significantly with the decrease of soil pH, while that of Cd in polished rice increased significantly. Therefore, application of lime or alkaline fertilizers in arable land soil of Se-rich area can promote the accumulation of Se in polished rice but reduced the intake of Cd in rice crops.

  20. Soil 13C Dynamics in Aggregates Across a Soil Profile Under an Established Miscanthus System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondini, M.; Groenigen, K. J.; Jones, M.

    2008-12-01

    Soils are the largest pool of terrestrial organic carbon (C), containing nearly three times the amount of C as the atmosphere. Environmental changes that affect soil C dynamics could slow down the rise in atmospheric CO2 and associated warming by promoting soil C storage. Our capacity to predict the consequences for global change therefore depends on a better understanding of the distribution and controls of soil organic C and how vegetation change may affect SOC distributions. One land cover change of particular interest involves the establishment of bio energy crop stands. The full mitigation potential of bio energy crops cannot be considered without taking into account their effect on soil C dynamics. Miscanthus, a perennial C4 grass from Eastern Asia, has recently received considerable interest as a bio-energy crop. For that reason, we analyzed the C content and the 13C signatures across the soil profile in a 14 year old Miscanthus system, established on former arable land. We combined SOM fractionation techniques by size and density, allowing us to investigate small shifts in soil C stores that would be significant in the long term, but that might not be detected by conventional methodologies. The 13C signal of the various SOM fractions allowed us to distinguish between Miscanthus-derived vs. native soil organic C. Soils under Miscanthus contained 796 g C/m2 in the 0-15 cm layer, and 1233g C/m2 in the 15- 30 cm layer. These values are significantly higher than soil C contents in the arable land. Macroaggregates under Miscanthus contain more than twice as much C compared to arable land, showing a decrease in soil C content with decreasing aggregate size. These differences are largely caused by soil C storage in the microaggregate within macroaggregates fraction. Under Miscanthus, this fraction contains 440 g C/m2 and 488 g C/m2 at 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm respectively, while under the arable land it has mean values of 174 g C/m2 and 353 g C/m2. Our data suggest a

  1. Nitrous oxide and nitrate concentration in under-drainage from arable fields subject to diffuse pollution mitigation measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama-Aziz, Zanist; Hiscock, Kevin; Adams, Christopher; Reid, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric nitrous oxide concentrations are increasing by 0.3% annually and a major source of this greenhouse gas is agriculture. Indirect emissions of nitrous oxide (e.g. from groundwater and surface water) account for about quarter of total nitrous oxide emissions. However, these indirect emissions are subject to uncertainty, mainly due to the range in reported emission factors. It's hypothesised in this study that cover cropping and implementing reduced (direct drill) cultivation in intensive arable systems will reduce dissolved nitrate concentration and subsequently indirect nitrous oxide emissions. To test the hypothesis, seven fields with a total area of 102 ha in the Wensum catchment in eastern England have been chosen for experimentation together with two fields (41 ha) under conventional cultivation (deep inversion ploughing) for comparison. Water samples from field under-drainage have been collected for nitrate and nitrous oxide measurement on a weekly basis from April 2013 for two years from both cultivation areas. A purge and trap preparation line connected to a Shimadzu GC-8A gas chromatograph fitted with an electron capture detector was used for dissolved nitrous oxide analysis. Results revealed that with an oilseed radish cover crop present, the mean concentration of nitrate, which is the predominant form of N, was significantly depleted from 13.9 mg N L-1 to 2.5 mg N L-1. However, slightly higher mean nitrous oxide concentrations under the cover crop of 2.61 μg N L-1 compared to bare fields of 2.23 μg N L-1 were observed. Different inversion intensity of soil tended to have no effect on nitrous oxide and nitrate concentrations. The predominant production mechanism for nitrous oxide was nitrification process and the significant reduction of nitrate was due to plant uptake rather than denitrification. It is concluded that although cover cropping might cause a slight increase of indirect nitrous oxide emission, it can be a highly effective

  2. Potential of temperate agricultural soils for carbon sequestration: A meta-analysis of land-use effects.

    PubMed

    Kämpf, Immo; Hölzel, Norbert; Störrle, Maria; Broll, Gabriele; Kiehl, Kathrin

    2016-10-01

    Restoring depleted soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks of arable land to remove carbon from the atmosphere and offset fossil fuel emissions is a promising strategy for the mitigation of climate change. In agroecosystems conservational tillage practices and the abandonment of formerly plowed fields (ex-arable land) are shown to have the highest potential to sequester SOC. Nevertheless reported sequestration rates vary and the effects of environmental site conditions remain poorly understood. Our results are based on a meta-analysis of 273 paired SOC estimates from 65 publications which included only mineral soils from the temperate zone. SOC stocks of ex-arable grasslands with an average of 14years since abandonment were 18% larger compared to the SOC of arable land. Likewise, SOC stocks of never-plowed grassland plots were 11% larger than the SOC stocks of abandoned fields. The average sequestration rate was 0.72t Cha(-1)yr(-1). Semi-arid and sub-humid climate as well as low initial SOC stocks positively affected proportional SOC gains suggesting that the recovery of carbon stocks is not limited by low primary production. Therefore, the northward shift of cultivation areas in the temperate zone will lead to the abandonment of soils with high SOC recovery potential. However, if native soils are opened up elsewhere to compensate for yield losses due to abandonment the surplus of SOC in ex-arable land can easily be overcompensated by cultivation losses. PMID:27232969

  3. Potential of temperate agricultural soils for carbon sequestration: A meta-analysis of land-use effects.

    PubMed

    Kämpf, Immo; Hölzel, Norbert; Störrle, Maria; Broll, Gabriele; Kiehl, Kathrin

    2016-10-01

    Restoring depleted soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks of arable land to remove carbon from the atmosphere and offset fossil fuel emissions is a promising strategy for the mitigation of climate change. In agroecosystems conservational tillage practices and the abandonment of formerly plowed fields (ex-arable land) are shown to have the highest potential to sequester SOC. Nevertheless reported sequestration rates vary and the effects of environmental site conditions remain poorly understood. Our results are based on a meta-analysis of 273 paired SOC estimates from 65 publications which included only mineral soils from the temperate zone. SOC stocks of ex-arable grasslands with an average of 14years since abandonment were 18% larger compared to the SOC of arable land. Likewise, SOC stocks of never-plowed grassland plots were 11% larger than the SOC stocks of abandoned fields. The average sequestration rate was 0.72t Cha(-1)yr(-1). Semi-arid and sub-humid climate as well as low initial SOC stocks positively affected proportional SOC gains suggesting that the recovery of carbon stocks is not limited by low primary production. Therefore, the northward shift of cultivation areas in the temperate zone will lead to the abandonment of soils with high SOC recovery potential. However, if native soils are opened up elsewhere to compensate for yield losses due to abandonment the surplus of SOC in ex-arable land can easily be overcompensated by cultivation losses.

  4. Different effects of plant-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) and urea on the priming of soil organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Qingyan; Wu, Lanfang; Ouyang, Zhu; Li, Binbin; Xu, Yanyan

    2016-03-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization is important for the regulation of the global climate and soil fertility. Decomposition of SOC may be significantly affected by the supply of plant-derived labile carbon (C). To investigate the impact of plant-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) and urea (N) additions on the decomposition of native SOC as well as to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of priming effects (PEs), a batch of incubation experiments was conducted for 250 days by application of (13)C-labeled plant-derived DOM and urea to soils. The direction of PE induced by the addition of DOM was different from the addition of N, i.e. it switched from negative to positive in DOM-amended soils, whereas in the N-treated soil it switched from positive to negative. Adding DOM alone was favorable for soil C sequestration (59 ± 5 mg C per kg soil), whereas adding N alone or together with DOM accelerated the decomposition of native SOC, causing net C losses (-62 ± 4 and -34 ± 31 mg C per kg soil, respectively). These findings indicate that N addition and its interaction with DOM are not favorable for soil C sequestration. Adding DOM alone increased the level of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), but it did not increase the level of soil mineral N. Changes in the ratio of microbial biomass carbon (MBC) to microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2) after the addition of DOM and N suggest that a possible shift in the microbial community composition may occur in the present study. Adding DOM with or without N increased the activities of β-glucosidase and urease. Changes in the direction and magnitude of PE were closely related to changes in soil C and N availability. Soil C and N availability might influence the PE through affecting the microbial biomass and extracellular enzyme activity as well as causing a possible shift in the microbial community composition.

  5. Direct incorporation of fatty acids into microbial phospholipids in soils: Position-specific labeling tells the story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dippold, Michaela A.; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-02-01

    Fatty acids have been used as plant and microbial biomarkers, and knowledge about their transformation pathways in soils and sediments is crucial for interpreting fatty acid signatures, especially because the formation, recycling and decomposition processes are concurrent. We analyzed the incorporation of free fatty acids into microbial fatty acids in soil by coupling position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific 13C analysis. Position-specifically and uniformly 13C labeled palmitate were applied in an agricultural Luvisol. Pathways of fatty acids were traced by analyzing microbial utilization of 13C from individual molecule positions of palmitate and their incorporation into phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). The fate of palmitate 13C in the soil was characterized by the main pathways of microbial fatty acid metabolism: Odd positions (C-1) were preferentially oxidized to CO2 in the citric acid cycle, whereas even positions (C-2) were preferentially incorporated into microbial biomass. This pattern is a result of palmitate cleavage to acetyl-CoA and its further use in the main pathways of C metabolism. We observed a direct, intact incorporation of more than 4% of the added palmitate into the PLFA of microbial cell membranes, indicating the important role of palmitate as direct precursor for microbial fatty acids. Palmitate 13C was incorporated into PLFA as intact alkyl chain, i.e. the C backbone of palmitate was not cleaved, but palmitate was incorporated either intact or modified (e.g. desaturated, elongated or branched) according to the fatty acid demand of the microbial community. These modifications of the incorporated palmitate increased with time. Future PLFA studies must therefore consider the recycling of existing plant and microbial-derived fatty acids. This study demonstrates the intact uptake and recycling of free fatty acids such as palmitate in soils, as well as the high turnover and transformation of cellular PLFA. Knowledge about the intact

  6. Strength and limits using 13C phospholipid fatty acid analysis in soil ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watzinger, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    This presentation on microbial phospholipid biomarkers, their isotope analysis and their ability to reveal soil functions summarizes experiences gained by the author for more than 10 years. The amount and composition of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) measured in environmental samples strongly depend on the methodology. To achieve comparable results the extraction, separation and methylation method must be kept constant. PLFAs patterns are sensitive to microbial community shifts even though the taxonomic resolution of PLFAs is low. The possibility to easily link lipid biomarkers with stable isotope techniques is identified as a major advantage when addressing soil functions. Measurement of PLFA isotopic ratios is sensitive and enables detecting isotopic fractionation. The difference between the carbon isotopic ratio of single PLFAs and their substrate (δ13C) can vary between -6 and +11‰. This difference derives from the fractionation during biosynthesis and from substrate inhomogeneity. Consequently, natural abundance studies are restricted to quantifying substrate uptake of the total microbial biomass. In contrast, artificial labelling enables quantifying carbon uptake into single PLFAs, but labelling success depends on homogeneous and undisturbed label application. Current developments in microbial ecology (e.g. 13C and 15N proteomics) and isotope techniques (online monitoring of CO2 isotope ratios) will likely improve soil functional interpretations in the future. 13C PLFA analysis will continue to contribute because it is affordable, sensitive and allows frequent sampling combined with the use of small amounts of 13C label.

  7. The source of microbial C has little impact on soil organic matter stabilisation in forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Heather M; Bird, Jeffrey A; Dane, Laura; Firestone, Mary K; Horwath, William R

    2012-11-01

    The source of microbial C is thought to impact its stability in soil due to variations in cellular biochemistry. It has been hypothesised that a fungal-dominated community stabilises more C than a bacterial-dominated community, in part due to chemical recalcitrance of their non-living biomass, particularly cell wall components and pigments. We compared the turnover of (13)C-labelled (99.9 atom %) temperate and tropical microbial isolates [i.e. fungi, Gram-positive bacteria (including actinobacteria) and Gram-negative bacteria] in temperate (California) and tropical (Puerto Rico) forest soils. While significant differences in (13)C recovery and mean residence times occurred among some microbial additions, similar turnover rates were observed, and in general, results do not support the view that microbial biochemistry affects soil C maintenance. Different effects by microbial necromass additions in California and Puerto Rico suggest that ecosystem-specific effects may be as important to microbial C stabilisation as its macromolecular composition and recalcitrance. PMID:22897121

  8. A methane-driven microbial food web in a wetland rice soil.

    PubMed

    Murase, Jun; Frenzel, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Methane oxidation is a key process controlling methane emission from anoxic habitats into the atmosphere. Methanotrophs, responsible for aerobic methane oxidation, do not only oxidize but also assimilate methane. Once assimilated, methane carbon may be utilized by other organisms. Here we report on a microbial food web in a rice field soil driven by methane. A thin layer of water-saturated rice field soil was incubated under opposing gradients of oxygen and (13)C-labelled methane. Bacterial and eukaryotic communities incorporating methane carbon were analysed by RNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and cloning showed that methanotrophs were the most prominent group of bacteria incorporating methane carbon. In addition, a few Myxobacteria-related sequences were obtained from the 'heavy' rRNA fraction. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting 18S rRNA detected various groups of protists in the 'heavy' rRNA fraction including naked amoeba (Lobosea and Heterolobosea), ciliates (Colpodea) and flagellates (Cercozoa). Incubation of soil under different methane concentrations in air resulted in the development of distinct protozoan communities. These results suggest that methane carbon is incorporated into non-methanotrophic pro- and microeukaryotes probably via grazing, and that methane oxidation is a shaping force of the microeukaryotic community depending on methane availability.

  9. [Effect of acid rain on mercury leaching from forest yellow soil in Jinyun Mountain].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wei, Shiqiang; Yang, Xuechun

    2004-09-01

    Forest yellow soil and arable yellow soil in Jinyun Mountain were collected to study the effect of simulated acid rain(adjusted to pH 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0) on the Hg leaching from soils by the methods of static extraction and dynamic leaching. The results showed that in forest yellow soils, surface accumulation of Hg occurred, and the accumulated Hg was easier to be leached out than that in arable yellow soil by acid rain. The amount of leached Hg was the largest at pH 4.0. To abate the risk of Hg pollution in water bodies by the Hg leaching from this forest soil, the Mountain should be closed, and timber-felling should be forbidden.

  10. Assessment of the diversity, and antagonism towards Rhizoctonia solani AG3, of Pseudomonas species in soil from different agricultural regimes.

    PubMed

    Garbeva, Paolina; Veen, Johannes Antonie; Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2004-01-01

    The genus Pseudomonas is one of the best-studied bacterial groups in soil, and includes numerous species of environmental interest. Pseudomonas species play key roles in soil, for instance in biological control of soil-borne plant pathogens and in bioremediation of pollutants. A polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis system that specifically describes the diversity of Pseudomonas spp. in soil was developed. On the basis of this molecular method as well as cultivation-based approaches, the diversity of Pseudomonas species in soil under different agricultural regimes (permanent grassland, arable land either under rotation or under monoculture of maize) was studied. Both types of approaches revealed differences in the composition of Pseudomonas populations between the treatments. Differences between the treatments were also found based on the frequency of isolation of Pseudomonas strains with antagonistic properties against the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG3. Higher relative numbers of isolates either with antagonistic activity toward this pathogen or with chitinolytic activity were obtained from permanent grassland or from the short-term arable land than from the arable land. The results obtained in this study strongly indicate that agricultural regimes influence the structure of Pseudomonas populations in soil, with specific antagonistic subpopulations being stimulated in grassland as compared to arable land.

  11. Indirect nitrous oxide emissions from surface water bodies in a lowland arable catchment: a significant contribution to agricultural greenhouse gas budgets?

    PubMed

    Outram, Faye N; Hiscock, Kevin M

    2012-08-01

    In the UK agriculture is by far the largest source of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions. Direct N(2)O emissions as a result of nitrogen (N) application to soils have been well documented in the UK, whereas indirect emissions produced in surface waters and groundwaters from leached N are much less understood with limited data to support IPCC emission factors. Indirect emissions were studied in surface waters in the Upper Thurne, a lowland drained arable catchment in eastern England. All surface waters were found to have dissolved N(2)O concentrations above that expected if in equilibrium with ambient concentrations, demonstrating all surface waters were acting as a source of N(2)O. The drainage channels represented 86% of the total indirect N(2)O flux, followed by wetland areas, 11%, and the river, 3%. The dense drainage network was found to have the highest dissolved N(2)O concentrations of all the water bodies studied with a combined N(2)O flux of 16 kg N(2)O-N per day in March 2007. Such indirect fluxes are comparable to direct fluxes per hectare and represent a significant proportion of the total N(2)O flux for this catchment. Separate emission factors were established for the three different surface water types within the same catchment, suggesting that the one emission factor used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) methodology for predicting all indirect N(2)O emissions is inappropriate.

  12. Influence of Litter Diversity on Dissolved Organic Matter Release and Soil Carbon Formation in a Mixed Beech Forest

    PubMed Central

    Scheibe, Andrea; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of leaf litter on below ground carbon export and soil carbon formation in order to understand how litter diversity affects carbon cycling in forest ecosystems. 13C labeled and unlabeled leaf litter of beech (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior), characterized by low and high decomposability, were used in a litter exchange experiment in the Hainich National Park (Thuringia, Germany). Litter was added in pure and mixed treatments with either beech or ash labeled with 13C. We collected soil water in 5 cm mineral soil depth below each treatment biweekly and determined dissolved organic carbon (DOC), δ13C values and anion contents. In addition, we measured carbon concentrations and δ13C values in the organic and mineral soil (collected in 1 cm increments) up to 5 cm soil depth at the end of the experiment. Litter-derived C contributes less than 1% to dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected in 5 cm mineral soil depth. Better decomposable ash litter released significantly more (0.50±0.17%) litter carbon than beech litter (0.17±0.07%). All soil layers held in total around 30% of litter-derived carbon, indicating the large retention potential of litter-derived C in the top soil. Interestingly, in mixed (ash and beech litter) treatments we did not find a higher contribution of better decomposable ash-derived carbon in DOM, O horizon or mineral soil. This suggest that the known selective decomposition of better decomposable litter by soil fauna has no or only minor effects on the release and formation of litter-derived DOM and soil organic matter. Overall our experiment showed that 1) litter-derived carbon is of low importance for dissolved organic carbon release and 2) litter of higher decomposability is faster decomposed, but litter diversity does not influence the carbon flow. PMID:25486628

  13. Influence of litter diversity on dissolved organic matter release and soil carbon formation in a mixed beech forest.

    PubMed

    Scheibe, Andrea; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of leaf litter on below ground carbon export and soil carbon formation in order to understand how litter diversity affects carbon cycling in forest ecosystems. 13C labeled and unlabeled leaf litter of beech (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior), characterized by low and high decomposability, were used in a litter exchange experiment in the Hainich National Park (Thuringia, Germany). Litter was added in pure and mixed treatments with either beech or ash labeled with 13C. We collected soil water in 5 cm mineral soil depth below each treatment biweekly and determined dissolved organic carbon (DOC), δ13C values and anion contents. In addition, we measured carbon concentrations and δ13C values in the organic and mineral soil (collected in 1 cm increments) up to 5 cm soil depth at the end of the experiment. Litter-derived C contributes less than 1% to dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected in 5 cm mineral soil depth. Better decomposable ash litter released significantly more (0.50±0.17%) litter carbon than beech litter (0.17±0.07%). All soil layers held in total around 30% of litter-derived carbon, indicating the large retention potential of litter-derived C in the top soil. Interestingly, in mixed (ash and beech litter) treatments we did not find a higher contribution of better decomposable ash-derived carbon in DOM, O horizon or mineral soil. This suggest that the known selective decomposition of better decomposable litter by soil fauna has no or only minor effects on the release and formation of litter-derived DOM and soil organic matter. Overall our experiment showed that 1) litter-derived carbon is of low importance for dissolved organic carbon release and 2) litter of higher decomposability is faster decomposed, but litter diversity does not influence the carbon flow.

  14. Pyrogenic and Fresh Organic Matter Effects on Soil Microbial Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, T.; Buckley, D. H.; Lehmann, J.

    2014-12-01

    Soils hold a globally important stock of carbon (C) and can act as both a C source and sink, depending on management and environmental conditions. Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) is produced naturally during fires, and contains relatively stable forms of C. Its intentional production has also been proposed as a mechanism for C management (in such cases PyOM is often referred to as "biochar"). However, the impact of natural or anthropogenic PyOM production on soils is complex and depends on many factors. In particular, PyOM additions to soils may have effects on plant growth and on native soil C cycling. The response of the soil microbial community to PyOM additions is likely key to understanding these interactions, but remains poorly characterized. We studied soil C dynamics and soil microbial communities in a field study with 350°C PyOM from 13C-labelled corn stover, a C3-derived soil, and C4 plants (sudangrass). PyOM additions only temporarily increased total soil CO2 fluxes, dramatically less than the increase associated with the addition of corn stover, which likely increased SOC losses. We used high-throughput sequencing of the 16S region on the MiSeq platform to characterize the initial, 12-day and 82-day soil bacterial communiities. We used three-part stable isotopic partitioning after two months to distinguish 334% higher root-derived CO2 fluxes in the plots with PyOM additions than those without, and 45% lower PyOM-C derived CO2 fluxes in the plots with plants present. The 84% increase in estimated cumulative soil CO2 emissions with stover additions was accompanied by a significant shift in the soil bacterial community on days 12 and 82, while the PyOM additions only resulted in significant changes to the overall community on day 82. We investigate which taxa are driving these community shifts, and how they may relate to the soil CO2 fluxes.

  15. Trophic links between functional groups of arable plants and beetles are stable at a national scale.

    PubMed

    Brooks, David R; Storkey, Jonathan; Clark, Suzanne J; Firbank, Les G; Petit, Sandrine; Woiwod, Ian P

    2012-01-01

    1. There is an urgent need to accurately model how environmental change affects the wide-scale functioning of ecosystems, but advances are hindered by a lack of knowledge of how trophic levels are linked across space. It is unclear which theoretical approach to take to improve modelling of such interactions, but evidence is gathering that linking species responses to their functional traits can increase understanding of ecosystem dynamics. Currently, there are no quantitative studies testing how this approach might improve models of multiple, trophically interacting species, at wide spatial scales. 2. Arable weeds play a foundational role in linking food webs, providing resources for many taxa, including carabid beetles that feed on their seeds and weed-associated invertebrate prey. Here, we model associations between weeds and carabids across farmland in Great Britain (GB), to test the hypothesis that wide-scale trophic links between these groups are structured by their species functional traits. 3. A network of c. 250 arable fields, covering four crops and most lowland areas of GB, was sampled for weed, carabid and invertebrate taxa over 3 years. Data sets of these groups were closely matched in time and space, and each contained numerous species with a range of eco-physiological traits. The consistency of trophic linkages between multiple taxa sharing functional traits was tested within multivariate and log-linear models. 4. Robust links were established between the functional traits of taxa and their trophic interactions. Autumn-germinating, small-seeded weeds were associated with smaller, spring-breeding carabids, more specialised in seed feeding, whereas spring-germinating, large-seeded weeds were associated with a range of larger, autumn-breeding omnivorous carabids. These relationships were strong and dynamic, being independent of changes in invertebrate food resources and consistent across sample dates, crops and regions of GB. 5. We conclude that, in at

  16. Anaerobic mineralization of indigenous organic matters and methanogenesis in tropical wetland soils

    SciTech Connect

    Miyajima, Toshihiro; Wada, Eitaro; Hanba, Yuko T.; Vijarnsorn, P.

    1997-09-01

    Tropical wetlands are one of the largest natural sources in the global methane budget due to high biological activities and the anaerobiosis in soil. We studied mineralization and gas production during the early stage of anaerobic decomposition of indigenous organic matters in soils of Narathiwat, southern Thailand, to clarify the significance of the substrate quality in controlling decomposition and methanogenesis in some different tropical wetland soils. The optimal temperature of decomposition was around 35{degrees}C, while methanogenesis did not proceed at 45{degrees}C. During the first 50 days of anaerobic incubation, 5 {approximately} 63% (carbon basis) of indigeneous plant leaves were mineralized. The mineralization rate was strongly and negatively correlated with the lignin and/or fiber contents, but not the C/N ratio, of the substrate plant materials. Difference in {delta}{sup 13}C between the substrate, indicating that H{sub 2} as opposed to acetate becomes a more important metabolic intermediate in the anaerobic food web when the decomposition rate is limited by substrate recalcitrance. Thus, the CH{sub 4} isotope signature may be used to evaluate the importance of new vs. old organic matter as CH{sub 4} isotope signature may be used to evaluate the importance of new vs. old organic matter as CH{sub 4} source in natural soils. The mineralization rate was higher, and the isotopic difference between the substrate and CH{sub 4} was smaller when plant materials were incubated with sulfate-contaminated soils than with native peat soils. The isotopic difference between the substrate and CH{sub 4} was significantly different between native peat soils. Results of a tracer experiment using {sup 13}C-labeled substrates indicated that these differences could be ascribed to difference in the mode of acetate metabolism between soils. 49 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Anaerobic mineralization of indigenous organic matters and methanogenesis in tropical wetland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyajima, Toshihiro; Wada, Eitaro; Hanba, Yuko T.; Vijarnsorn, Pisoot

    1997-09-01

    Tropical wetlands are one of the largest natural sources in the global methane budget due to high biological activities and the anaerobiosis in soil. We studied mineralization and gas production during the early stage of anaerobic decomposition of indigenous organic matters in soils of Narathiwat, southern Thailand, to clarify the significance of the substrate quality in controlling decomposition and methanogenesis in some different tropical wetland soils. The optimal temperature of decomposition was around 35°C, while methanogenesis did not proceed at 45°C. During the first 50 days of anaerobic incubation, 5 ˜ 63% (carbon basis) of indigenous plant leaves were mineralized. The mineralization rate was strongly and negatively correlated with the lignin and/or fiber contents, but not theC/N ratio, of the substrate plant materials. Difference in δ 13C between the substrate and the produced CH 4 was generally greater (more negative in CH 4) for more recalcitrant substrates, indicating that H 2 as opposed to acetate becomes a more important metabolic intermediate in the anaerobic food web when the decomposition rate is limited by substrate recalcitrance. Thus, the CH 4 isotope signature may be used to evaluate the importance of new vs. old organic matter as CH 4 source in natural soils. The mineralization rate was higher, and the isotopic difference between the substrate and CH 4 was smaller when plant materials were incubated with sulfate-contaminated soils than with native peat soils. The isotopic difference between the substrate and CH 4 was significantly different between native peat soils. Results of a tracer experiment using 13C-labeled substrates indicated that these differences could be ascribed to difference in the mode of acetate metabolism between soils.

  18. Active Ammonia Oxidizers in an Acidic Soil Are Phylogenetically Closely Related to Neutrophilic Archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baozhan; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Xue; Wang, Dongmei; He, Yuanqiu

    2014-01-01

    All cultivated ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the Nitrososphaera cluster (former soil group 1.1b) are neutrophilic. Molecular surveys also indicate the existence of Nitrososphaera-like phylotypes in acidic soil, but their ecological roles are poorly understood. In this study, we present molecular evidence for the chemolithoautotrophic growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in an acidic soil with pH 4.92 using DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP). Soil microcosm incubations demonstrated that nitrification was stimulated by urea fertilization and accompanied by a significant increase in the abundance of AOA rather than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Real-time PCR analysis of amoA genes as a function of the buoyant density of the DNA gradient following the ultracentrifugation of the total DNA extracted from SIP microcosms indicated a substantial growth of soil AOA during nitrification. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes in the “heavy” DNA fractions suggested that archaeal communities were labeled to a much greater extent than soil AOB. Acetylene inhibition further showed that 13CO2 assimilation by nitrifying communities depended solely on ammonia oxidation activity, suggesting a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle. Phylogenetic analysis of both 13C-labeled amoA and 16S rRNA genes revealed that most of the active AOA were phylogenetically closely related to the neutrophilic strains Nitrososphaera viennensis EN76 and JG1 within the Nitrososphaera cluster. Our results provide strong evidence for the adaptive growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in acidic soil, suggesting a greater metabolic versatility of soil AOA than previously appreciated. PMID:24375137

  19. The Role of Actinobacteria in Biochar Decomposition in a Mediterranean Grassland Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, E. L.; Lim, H.; Bill, M.; Castanha, C.; Conrad, M. E.; Schmidt, M. W.; Abiven, S.; Jansson, J. K.; Torn, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Biochar addition to soil has been proposed as an attractive approach for carbon sequestration, particularly in concert with bioenergy biomass production and conversion. Biochar, partially combusted organic material, is assumed to be recalcitrant in soil but studies show significant variation in residence times. The controls on biochar C stabilization are likely complex interactions among the substrate, microbial activities, and the soil chemical and physical environment. However, there is a lack of understanding regarding the impact of biochar on soil microbial populations, the organisms that may be responsible for its mineralization or the factors regulating the rate of biochar mineralization. In this study we amended a Mediterranean grassland soil (Ultic Haploxeralf) with biochar (dried chestnut pyrolized at 450°C for 5h) or non-pyrolized oak at ratios of either 1:9 or 1:2 relative to native organic carbon. Both wood and biochar resulted in a significant and dose dependent alteration of microbial community composition within 1 week relative to controls. The rate of change of microbial composition was slower for biochar than for non-pyrolized wood but in both cases Actinobacteria showed significant enrichment relative to controls. From the same grassland soils, we then isolated bacteria capable of subsisting on biochar as a sole C or N source, many of which were Actinobacteria. We selected one Streptomyces isolate and confirmed using 13C-labeled biochar that this strain was capable of biochar mineralization, and show that mineralization was accelerated in the presence of an additional carbon source. We also detected significant abiotic CO2 loss from biochar during incubations. This study demonstrates that some soil Actinobacteria can subsist on biochar as a sole C source, mineralizing it to CO2, our data also shows that priming of biochar decomposition can occur. Overall this highlights the important roles that microbial composition and resource availability may

  20. The role of ectomycorrhizae of Arolla pine in mediating soil priming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menyailo, Oleg; Matvienko, Anastasia; Cheng, Chih-Hsin

    2015-04-01

    Ectomycorhizae is playing a vital role in soil C cycle. However, the role is controversial. Mycorrhizae could be a major source of soil C promoting C sequestration. On the other hand, mycorrhizal fungi could compete with soil free-living microorganisms for resources, accelerating their decomposition of soil organic matter, therefore leading to soil C losses. We studied the contribution of ectomycorrhizae of Arolla pine, a popular tree species in Siberia, in soil priming, a short term changes in decomposition of soil organic matter after addition of glucose. We used in-growth mesh collars where mycorrhizal hyphae could or could not grow in. We applied 13C labeled glucose and measured evolution of CO2 thereafter, and determined 13C-CO2 using Picarro 2131 iCO2 analyzer. The CO2 produced from soil was enriched 13C only during the first 48 hours, thereafter the enrichment declined to the natural abundance level. The maximum δ13C-CO2 was observed during the first 20 min after glucose amendment. It is surprising that not more than 3% of applied C-glucose was recovered as C-CO2 suggesting extremely high C use efficiency (97%). The glucose addition caused CO2 flux to increase by 25-30% during the first two days, the amount of primed C-CO2 was 7 times higher than emitted from applied C. The presence of mycorrhizae shifted both CUE and the priming. Mycorrhizae apparently competed with heterotrophs reducing their CUE by factor of 2, and increasing the priming by factor of 1.5. Overall, mycorrhizae could amplify the priming effect increasing C losses. However, the most part of applied C was incorporated into microbial biomass, resulting at least at the short time scale in net C sequestration. Future studies should be directed to understanding of the long-term fate of C incorporated into microbial biomass.

  1. Active ammonia oxidizers in an acidic soil are phylogenetically closely related to neutrophilic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baozhan; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Xue; Wang, Dongmei; He, Yuanqiu; Jia, Zhongjun

    2014-03-01

    All cultivated ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the Nitrososphaera cluster (former soil group 1.1b) are neutrophilic. Molecular surveys also indicate the existence of Nitrososphaera-like phylotypes in acidic soil, but their ecological roles are poorly understood. In this study, we present molecular evidence for the chemolithoautotrophic growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in an acidic soil with pH 4.92 using DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP). Soil microcosm incubations demonstrated that nitrification was stimulated by urea fertilization and accompanied by a significant increase in the abundance of AOA rather than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Real-time PCR analysis of amoA genes as a function of the buoyant density of the DNA gradient following the ultracentrifugation of the total DNA extracted from SIP microcosms indicated a substantial growth of soil AOA during nitrification. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes in the "heavy" DNA fractions suggested that archaeal communities were labeled to a much greater extent than soil AOB. Acetylene inhibition further showed that (13)CO2 assimilation by nitrifying communities depended solely on ammonia oxidation activity, suggesting a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle. Phylogenetic analysis of both (13)C-labeled amoA and 16S rRNA genes revealed that most of the active AOA were phylogenetically closely related to the neutrophilic strains Nitrososphaera viennensis EN76 and JG1 within the Nitrososphaera cluster. Our results provide strong evidence for the adaptive growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in acidic soil, suggesting a greater metabolic versatility of soil AOA than previously appreciated.

  2. Norlittorine and norhyoscyamine identified as products of littorine and hyoscyamine metabolism by (13)C-labeling in Datura innoxia hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Al Balkhi, Mohamad Houssam; Schiltz, Séverine; Lesur, David; Lanoue, Arnaud; Wadouachi, Anne; Boitel-Conti, Michèle

    2012-02-01

    The presence of two compounds, norlittorine and norhyoscyamine, has been reported in leaves and roots of Datura innoxia; however their metabolic origin in the tropane alkaloid pathway has remained unknown. Precise knowledge of this pathway is a necessary pre-requisite to optimize the production of hyoscyamine and scopolamine in D. innoxia hairy root cultures. The exact structure of norlittorine and norhyoscyamine was confirmed by LC-MS/MS and NMR analyses. Isotopic labeling experiments, using [1-(13)C]-phenylalanine, [1'-(13)C]-littorine and [1'-(13)C]-hyoscyamine, combined with elicitor treatments, using methyl jasmonate, coronalon and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, were used to investigate the metabolic origin of the N-demethylated tropane alkaloids. The results suggest that norlittorine and norhyoscyamine are induced under stress conditions by conversion of littorine and hyoscyamine. We propose the N-demethylation of tropane alkaloids as a mechanism to detoxify cells in overproducing conditions.

  3. Analysis of 13C labeling enrichment in microbial culture applying metabolic tracer experiments using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Heinzle, Elmar; Yuan, Yongbo; Kumar, Sathish; Wittmann, Christoph; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Herrmann; Wehrung, Patrick; Adam, Pierre; Albrecht, Pierre

    2008-09-15

    The applicability of gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) for the quantification of 13C enrichment of proteinogenic amino acids in metabolic tracer experiments was evaluated. Measurement of the 13C enrichment of proteinogenic amino acids from cell hydrolyzates of Corynebacterium glutamicum growing on different mixtures containing between 0.5 and 10% [1-13C]glucose shows the significance of kinetic isotope effects in metabolic flux studies at low degree of labeling. We developed a method to calculate the 13C enrichment. The approach to correct for these effects in metabolic flux studies using delta13C measurement by GC-C-IRMS uses two parallel experiments applying substrate with natural abundance and 13C-enriched tracer substrate, respectively. The fractional enrichment obtained in natural substrate is subtracted from that of the enriched one. Tracer studies with C. glutamicum resulted in a statistically identical relative fractional enrichment of 13C in proteinogenic amino acids over the whole range of applied concentrations of [1-13C]glucose. The current findings indicate a great potential of GC-C-IRMS for labeling quantification in 13C metabolic flux analysis with low labeling degree of tracer substrate directly in larger scale bioreactors.

  4. Laccase-catalyzed reactions of 17β-estradiol in the presence of humic acid: Resolved by high-resolution mass spectrometry in combination with (13)C labeling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Luo, Qi; Gao, Yanzheng; Huang, Qingguo

    2016-02-01

    The widespread presence of estrogens in natural waters poses potential threats to the aquatic organisms and human health. It is known that estrogens undergo enzyme-catalyzed oxidative coupling (ECOC) reactions, which may impact their environmental fate and can be used in wastewater treatment to remove estrogens, but little information is available on how natural organic matter (NOM) may influence 17β-estradiol (E2) transformation in ECOC processes. A series of experiments were conducted to examine the transformation of E2 in aqueous solution containing humic acid (HA) as model NOM by laccase-mediated ECOC reactions. The impact of HA on the reaction behaviors and product distribution is systematically characterized. The presence of HA inhibited the extent of E2 self-coupling in laccase-mediated systems, while promoted cross-coupling between E2 and HA. Reconfiguration of humic molecules was also observed and characterized by changes in absorbance at 275 nm and the ratios between A250 nm/A365 nm. In particular, experiments were conducted with un-labeled E2 mixed with (13)C3-labeled E2 at a set ratio, with the products probed using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The high m/z accuracy of HRMS enabled the use of isotope ratio as a tracer to identify possible cross-coupling products between E2 and HA. Such a method combining HRMS and isotope labeling provides a novel means for identification of products in a reaction system involving NOM or other complex matrices. These findings provide a basis for optimization of ECOC reactions for estrogen removal, and also help to understand the environmental transformation of estrogens. PMID:26692517

  5. Determination of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (13C-labeled and unlabeled) in human plasma and urine by combined liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hart, David J; Finglas, Paul M; Wolfe, Caroline A; Mellon, Fred; Wright, Anthony J A; Southon, Susan

    2002-06-15

    The association of folates with the prevention of neural tube defects and reduced risk of other chronic diseases has stimulated interest in the development of techniques for the study of their bioavailability in humans. Stable isotope protocols differentiate between oral and/or intravenous test doses of folate and natural levels of folate already present in the body. An liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) procedure is described that has been validated for the determination of [13C]5-methyltetrahydropteroyl monoglutamic acid ([13C]5-CH3H4PteGlu) in plasma and urine, following oral dosing of volunteers with different labeled folates. Folate binding protein affinity columns were used for sample purification prior to LC/MS determination. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a Superspher 100RP18 (4 microm) column and mobile phase of 0.1 mol/L acetic acid (pH 3.3):acetonitrile (90:10; 250 microL/min). Selected ion monitoring was conducted on the [M-H](-) ion: m/z 458 and 459 for analyzing 5-CH3H4PteGlu; m/z 464 [M+6-H](-) to determine 5-CH3H4PteGlu derived from the label dose; m/z 444 for analysis of 2H4PteGlu internal standard, and m/z 446 and 478 to confirm that there was no direct absorption of unmetabolized compounds. Calibration was linear over the range 0-9 x 10(-9) mol/L; the limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 x 10(-9) and 0.55 x 10(-9) mol/L, respectively. The mean coefficient of variation of the ratios (m/z 463/458) was 7.4%. The method has potential applications for other key folates involved in one-carbon metabolism.

  6. (13)C-labeled biochemical probes for the study of cancer metabolism with dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Keshari, Kayvan R

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, advances in metabolic imaging have become dependable tools for the diagnosis and treatment assessment in cancer. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has recently emerged as a promising technology in hyperpolarized (HP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and has reached clinical relevance with the successful visualization of [1-(13)C] pyruvate as a molecular imaging probe in human prostate cancer. This review focuses on introducing representative compounds relevant to metabolism that are characteristic of cancer tissue: aerobic glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism, glutamine addiction and glutamine/glutamate metabolism, and the redox state and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate metabolism. In addition, a brief introduction of probes that can be used to trace necrosis, pH changes, and other pathways relevant to cancer is presented to demonstrate the potential that HP MRI has to revolutionize the use of molecular imaging for diagnosis and assessment of treatments in cancer.

  7. Analyses of the bifid shunt and carbohydrate metabolism in Bifidobacterium spp. using **13C-labeled substrates and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bifidobacteria are Gram-positive, anaerobic bacteria whose presence in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is widely considered as a positive influence on human health. This is especially true in the early development of the infant GIT. Analyses of the genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum sugges...

  8. Determination of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (13C-labeled and unlabeled) in human plasma and urine by combined liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hart, David J; Finglas, Paul M; Wolfe, Caroline A; Mellon, Fred; Wright, Anthony J A; Southon, Susan

    2002-06-15

    The association of folates with the prevention of neural tube defects and reduced risk of other chronic diseases has stimulated interest in the development of techniques for the study of their bioavailability in humans. Stable isotope protocols differentiate between oral and/or intravenous test doses of folate and natural levels of folate already present in the body. An liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) procedure is described that has been validated for the determination of [13C]5-methyltetrahydropteroyl monoglutamic acid ([13C]5-CH3H4PteGlu) in plasma and urine, following oral dosing of volunteers with different labeled folates. Folate binding protein affinity columns were used for sample purification prior to LC/MS determination. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a Superspher 100RP18 (4 microm) column and mobile phase of 0.1 mol/L acetic acid (pH 3.3):acetonitrile (90:10; 250 microL/min). Selected ion monitoring was conducted on the [M-H](-) ion: m/z 458 and 459 for analyzing 5-CH3H4PteGlu; m/z 464 [M+6-H](-) to determine 5-CH3H4PteGlu derived from the label dose; m/z 444 for analysis of 2H4PteGlu internal standard, and m/z 446 and 478 to confirm that there was no direct absorption of unmetabolized compounds. Calibration was linear over the range 0-9 x 10(-9) mol/L; the limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 x 10(-9) and 0.55 x 10(-9) mol/L, respectively. The mean coefficient of variation of the ratios (m/z 463/458) was 7.4%. The method has potential applications for other key folates involved in one-carbon metabolism. PMID:12054449

  9. Folate is absorbed across the human colon: evidence by using enteric-coated caplets containing 13C-labeled [6S]-5-formyltetrahydrofolate1, 2, 3, 4

    PubMed Central

    Lakoff, Alanna; Fazili, Zia; Aufreiter, Susanne; Pfeiffer, Christine M; Connolly, Bairbie; Gregory, Jesse F; Pencharz, Paul B; O’Connor, Deborah L

    2016-01-01

    Background Folate intakes that do not meet or greatly exceed requirements may be associated with negative health outcomes. A better understanding of contributors that influence the input side will help establish dietary guidance that ensures health benefits without associated risks. Colonic microbiota produce large quantities of folate, and [13C5]5-formyltetrahydrofolate infused during colonoscopy is absorbed. However, it is unclear if significant quantities of folate are absorbed in an intact microbiome. Objective We determined whether and how much of a physiologic dose of [13C5]5-formyltetrahydrofolate delivered in a pH-sensitive enteric caplet to an intact colonic microbiome is absorbed. Design Healthy adults ingested a specially designed pH-sensitive acrylic copolymer–coated barium sulfate caplet that contained 855 nmol (400 μg) [13C5]5-formyltetrahydrofolate. After a washout period ≥4 wk, subjects received an intravenous injection of the same compound (214 nmol). Serially collected blood samples before and after each test dose were analyzed by using a microbiological assay and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results Caplet disintegration in the colon was observed by fluoroscopic imaging for 6 subjects with a mean (±SD) complete disintegration time of 284 ± 155 min. The mean (±SEM) rate of appearance of [13C5]5-methyltetrahydrofolate in plasma was 0.33 ± 0.09 (caplet) and 5.8 ± 1.2 (intravenous) nmol/h. Likely because of the significant time in the colon, the mean apparent absorption across the colon was 46%. Conclusions Folate is absorbed across the colon in humans with an undisturbed microbiome. This finding and previous observations of the size of the colonic depot of folate and its potential for manipulation by diet (eg, dietary fiber, oligosaccharides, and probiotics) suggest that an individual’s dietary folate requirement may differ depending on the consumption of dietary constituents that affect the size and composition of their gastrointestinal microbiota. In addition, a systematic investigation of the role of colonic folate on gastrointestinal development and the prevention of colorectal cancer is warranted. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00941174. PMID:25332326

  10. Aromatic spectral editing techniques for magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of uniformly (13)C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan K; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Hong, Mei

    2015-11-01

    The four aromatic amino acids in proteins, namely histidine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, have strongly overlapping (13)C chemical shift ranges between 100 and 160ppm, and have so far been largely neglected in solid-state NMR determination of protein structures. Yet aromatic residues play important roles in biology through π-π and cation-π interactions. To better resolve and assign aromatic residues' (13)C signals in magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectra, we introduce two spectral editing techniques. The first method uses gated (1)H decoupling in a proton-driven spin-diffusion (PDSD) experiment to remove all protonated (13)C signals and retain only non-protonated carbon signals in the aromatic region of the (13)C spectra. The second technique uses chemical shift filters and (1)H-(13)C dipolar dephasing to selectively detect the Cα, Cβ and CO cross peaks of aromatic residues while suppressing the signals of all aliphatic residues. We demonstrate these two techniques on amino acids, a model peptide, and the microcrystalline protein GB1, and show that they significantly simplify the 2D NMR spectra and both reveal and permit the ready assignment of the aromatic residues' signals.

  11. Multidimensional solid-state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of pectic polysaccharides in uniformly 13C-labeled Arabidopsis primary cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2012-07-08

    Plant cell wall (CW) polysaccharides are responsible for the mechanical strength and growth of plant cells; however, the high-resolution structure and dynamics of the CW polysaccharides are still poorly understood because of the insoluble nature of these molecules. Here, we use 2D and 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to investigate the structural role of pectins in the plant CW. Intact and partially depectinated primary CWs of Arabidopsis thaliana were uniformly labeled with 13C and their NMR spectra were compared. Recent 13C resonance assignment of the major polysaccharides in Arabidopsis thaliana CWs allowed us to determine the effects of depectination on the intermolecular packing and dynamics of the remaining wall polysaccharides. 2D and 3D correlation spectra show the suppression of pectin signals, confirming partial pectin removal by chelating agents and sodium carbonate. Importantly, higher cross peaks are observed in 2D and 3D 13C spectra of the depectinated CW, suggesting higher rigidity and denser packing of the remaining wall polysaccharides compared with the intact CW. 13C spin–lattice relaxation times and 1H rotating-frame spin–lattice relaxation times indicate that the polysaccharides are more rigid on both the nanosecond and microsecond timescales in the depectinated CW. Taken together, these results indicate that pectic polysaccharides are highly dynamic and endow the polysaccharide network of the primary CW with mobility and flexibility, which may be important for pectin functions. This study demonstrates the capability of multidimensional SSNMR to determine the intermolecular interactions and dynamic structures of complex plant materials under near-native conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. {sup 13}C-enrichment at carbons 8 and 2 of uric acid after {sup 13}C-labeled folate dose in man

    SciTech Connect

    Baggott, Joseph E.; Gorman, Gregory S.; Morgan, Sarah L.; Tamura, Tsunenobu . E-mail: tamurat@uab.edu

    2007-09-21

    To evaluate folate-dependent carbon incorporation into the purine ring, we measured {sup 13}C-enrichment independently at C{sub 2} and C{sub 8} of urinary uric acid (the final catabolite of purines) in a healthy male after an independent oral dose of [6RS]-5-[{sup 13}C]-formyltetrahydrofolate ([6RS]-5-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate) or 10-H{sup 13}CO-7,8-dihydrofolate (10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate). The C{sub 2} position was {sup 13}C-enriched more than C{sub 8} after [6RS]-5-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate, and C{sub 2} was exclusively enriched after 10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate. The enrichment of C{sub 2} was greater from [6RS]-5-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate than 10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate using equimolar bioactive doses. Our data suggest that formyl C of [6RS]-10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate was not equally utilized by glycinamide ribotide transformylase (enriches C{sub 8}) and aminoimidazolecarboxamide ribotide (AICAR) transformylase (enriches C{sub 2}), and the formyl C of 10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate was exclusively used by AICAR transformylase. 10-HCO-H{sub 2}folate may function in vivo as the predominant substrate for AICAR transformylase in humans.

  13. Selective 13C labeling of nucleotides for large RNA NMR spectroscopy using an E. coli strain disabled in the TCA cycle

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Chandar S.; Sama, Jacob N.; Jackson, Melantha E.; Chen, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is an ideal organism to tailor-make labeled nucleotides for biophysical studies of RNA. Recently, we showed that adding labeled formate enhanced the isotopic enrichment at protonated carbon sites in nucleotides. In this paper, we show that growth of a mutant E. coli strain DL323 (lacking succinate and malate dehydrogenases) on 13C-2-glycerol and 13C-1,3-glycerol enables selective labeling at many useful sites for RNA NMR spectroscopy. For DL323 E. coli grown in 13C-2-glycerol without labeled formate, all the ribose carbon atoms are labeled except the C3′ and C5′ carbon positions. Consequently the C1′, C2′ and C4′ positions remain singlet. In addition, only the pyrimidine base C6 atoms are substantially labeled to ~96% whereas the C2 and C8 atoms of purine are labeled to ~5%. Supplementing the growth media with 13C-formate increases the labeling at C8 to ~88%, but not C2. Not unexpectedly, addition of exogenous formate is unnecessary for attaining the high enrichment levels of ~88% for the C2 and C8 purine positions in a 13C-1,3-glycerol based growth. Furthermore, the ribose ring is labeled in all but the C4′ carbon position, such that the C2′ and C3′ positions suffer from multiplet splitting but the C5′ position remains singlet and the C1′ position shows a small amount of residual C1′–C2′ coupling. As expected, all the protonated base atoms, except C6, are labeled to ~90%. In addition, labeling with 13C-1,3-glycerol affords an isolated methylene ribose with high enrichment at the C5′ position (~90%) that makes it particularly attractive for NMR applications involving CH2-TROSY modules without the need for decoupling the C4′ carbon. To simulate the tumbling of large RNA molecules, perdeuterated glycerol was added to a mixture of the four nucleotides, and the methylene TROSY experiment recorded at various temperatures. Even under conditions of slow tumbling, all the expected carbon correlations were observed, which indicates this approach of using nucleotides obtained from DL323 E. coli will be applicable to high molecular weight RNA systems. PMID:21057854

  14. Impact of Long-Term Irrigation with Treated Sewage on Soil Magnetic Susceptibility and Organic Matter Content in North China.

    PubMed

    Yang, P G; Yang, M; Mao, R Z; Byrne, J M

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed the effect on magnetic susceptibility and organic matter content of arable soil by irrigation with either treated sewage or groundwater. Results indicated that organic matter and magnetic susceptibility values in the soil irrigated with sewage were increased by 7.1 % and 13.5 %, respectively, compared to agricultural soil that irrigated with groundwater. Both the sewage and groundwater irrigated soils contained a significant fraction of ultrafine superpara magnetic grains, as indicated by high frequency dependent susceptibility (χfd > 6 %). The enhancement of soil magnetic properties was determined to be caused by anthropogenic sewage irrigation and agrochemical use by investigation of vertical soil profiles. Magnetic susceptibility parameters were shown to be significantly correlated with organic matter content (y = 0.0057x + 1.3439, R(2) = 0.09, p < 0.05). This work indicates that measurements of magnetic susceptibility may offer a rapid first step for identifying the potential pollution in arable soils. PMID:25985871

  15. Soil erosion survey using remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakab, Gergely; Kertész, Ádám; Madarász, Balázs; Pálinkás, Melinda; Tóth, Adrienn

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion is one of the most effective soil degradation processes reducing crop production on arable fields significantly. It also leads to serious environmental hazards such as eutrophication, mud and flesh floods. Beyond the processes there is an urgent need to survey and descript the current degree of erosion of arable lands in order to provide adequate land use techniques and mitigate the harmful effects. Surveying soil erosion is a very time consuming process since soil loss and deposition take place next to each other resulting a rather diverse erosion pattern even within a plot. Remote sensing is a possible way to determine the degree of soil erosion without special efforts taken in the field. The application of images can provide high resolution erosion maps of almost any type of arable fields. The method is based on the identification of the origin of the surface soil layer, i.e. whether it represents an originally deeper laying horizon (e.g. B horizon), or the parent material. A case study was carried out on a Cambisol formed on loess parent material. The soil and the parent rock have various reflectance spectra in the visible range, so this strip was used for the investigations. For map creation "training sites" were used in ArcMap environment. The obtained results suggest that the method is highly effective and useful, however, other properties like moisture content and plant cover can limit automated application. In this case new training sites are needed. The study was supported by the National Research, Development and Innovation Office (NKFIH),), project Nr. 108755 and the support is gratefully acknowledged here. G. Jakab was supported by the János Bolyai Fellowship.

  16. Identification of biomass utilizing bacteria in a carbon-depleted glacier forefield soil by the use of 13C DNA stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Zumsteg, Anita; Schmutz, Stefan; Frey, Beat

    2013-06-01

    As Alpine glaciers are retreating rapidly, bare soils with low organic C and N contents are becoming exposed. Carbon availability is a key factor regulating microbial diversity and ecosystem functioning in these soils. The aim of this study was to investigate how bacterial activity, community structure and composition are influenced by organic carbon availability. Bare soils were supplied with (13)C-labelled fungal (Penicillium sp.) and green algal (Chlorella sp.) biomass and the CO2 evolution and its δ(13)C signature were monitored up to 60 days. These organisms have previously been isolated near the glacier terminus. DNA stable isotope probing followed by T-RFLP profiling and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes was employed to identify consumers able to assimilate carbon from these biomass amendments. Higher respiration and higher bacterial activity indicated a more efficient utilization of algal cells than fungal cells. Flavobacterium sp. predominantly incorporated fungal-derived C, whereas the algal-derived C was mainly incorporated by Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria. This study emphasizes the important role of both fungal and algal biomass in increasing the carbon pool in recently deglaciated bare soils, as only 20% of the added C was respired as CO2, and the rest, we presume, remained in the soil.

  17. Estimating reduction of nitrogen leaching from arable land and the related costs.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Martin H; Kyllmar, Katarina; Jonasson, Lars; Johnsson, Holger

    2005-11-01

    The EU Water Framework Directive will require river-basin management plans in order to achieve good ecological status and find the most cost-efficient nitrogen (N) leaching abatement measures. Detailed scenario calculations based on modeling methods will be valuable in this regard. This paper describes the approach and an application with a coefficient method based on the simulation model SOILNDB for quantification of N leaching from arable land and for prediction of the effect of abatement scenarios for the Rönneå catchment (1900 km2) in southern Sweden. Cost calculations for the different measures were also performed. The results indicate that the individual measures-cover crop and spring plowing, late termination of ley and fallow, and spring application of manure-would only reduce N leaching by between 5% and 8%. If all measures were combined and winter crops replaced by their corresponding spring variants, a 21% reduction in N leaching would be possible. However, this would require total fulfillment of the suggested measures.

  18. Statistical models to evaluate invertebrate-plant trophic interactions in arable systems.

    PubMed

    Bohan, D A; Hawes, C; Haughton, A J; Denholm, I; Champion, G T; Perry, J N; Clark, S J

    2007-06-01

    Over the past 40 years there have been marked shifts in arable farmland management that are widely believed to have had a considerable impact on flowering plants and invertebrates and the small mammals and birds that rely upon them. It is not yet possible to predict the dynamics of plants and invertebrates either with past or future changes in farmland management. This study investigates whether a basic invertebrate classification, formed of broad trophic groups, can be used to describe interactions between invertebrates and their resource plants and evaluate management impacts for genetically modified, herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) and conventional herbicide management in both spring- and winter-sown oilseed rape. It is argued that the analyses validate trophic-based approaches for describing the dynamics of invertebrates in farmland and that linear models might be used to describe the changes in invertebrate trophic group abundance in farmland when driven by primary producer abundance or biomass and interactions between invertebrates themselves. The analyses indicate that invertebrate dynamics under GMHT management are not unique, but similar to conventional management occurring over different resource ranges, and that dynamics differed considerably between spring- and winter-sown oilseed rape. Thus, herbicide management was of much lower impact on trophic relationships than sowing date. Results indicate that invertebrate dynamics in oilseed rape are regulated by a combination of top-down and bottom-up trophic processes.

  19. Crop-noncrop spillover: arable fields affect trophic interactions on wild plants in surrounding habitats.

    PubMed

    Gladbach, David J; Holzschuh, Andrea; Scherber, Christoph; Thies, Carsten; Dormann, Carsten F; Tscharntke, Teja

    2011-06-01

    Ecosystem processes in agricultural landscapes are often triggered by resource availability in crop and noncrop habitats. We investigated how oilseed rape (OSR; Brassica napus, Brassicaceae) affects noncrop plants in managed systems and semi-natural habitat, using trophic interactions among wild mustard (Sinapis arvensis, Brassicaceae), rape pollen beetles (Meligethes aeneus, Nitidulidae) and their parasitoids (Tersilochus heterocerus, Ichneumonidae). We exposed wild mustard as phytometer plants in two cropland habitat types (wheat field, field margin) and three noncrop habitat types (fallow, grassland, wood margin) across eight landscapes along a gradient from simple to complex (quantified as % arable land). Both landscape and local factors affected the abundance of rape pollen beetles and parasitoids. Rape pollen beetle infestation and parasitism rates on these plants were lower in noncrop habitats and higher in wheat fields and field margins, whereas beetles and parasitoids responded differently to landscape scale parameters. We found the hypothesized spillover from OSR crop onto wild plants in surrounding habitats only for parasitoids, but not for pollen beetles. Parasitism rates were not related to landscape simplification, but benefited from increasing proportions of OSR. In contrast, rape pollen beetles benefited from simple landscape structures, presumably due to multi-annual population build-ups resulting from long-term OSR planting (as part of the crop rotation). In conclusion, we showed that spillover from cropland affects parasitism rates on related wild plants outside cropland, which has not been shown so far, but can be expected to be a widespread effect shaping noncrop food webs.

  20. Environmental and economic impacts of decision-making at an arable farm: an integrative modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Urban; Elmquist, Helena

    2005-06-01

    This study examines the dependency between physical and anthropogenic systems in arable farming. The dynamic simulation model, which has its methodological origins in the modeling traditions of environmental systems analysis and microsimulation, reproduces the mutual links between the physical flows (e.g. energy, materials, emissions, and products), the farmer as a decision-making agent, and structural conditions influencing the farm. In running the model, the intention is to answer the question: What are the impacts on profitability and the environment (i.e. greenhouse gas effects, eutrophication, acidification, and energy use) of variations in prices, subsidies, the farmer's environmental values, and the farmer's skill in making production allocation choices? The results of the model simulations indicate, for example, that in terms of economic performance, a farmer can choose between two relatively sustainable strategies--either to specialize in organic production (thereby benefiting from higher subsidies and output prices), or to focus on conventional cultivation and use of pesticides and fertilizers (thereby benefiting from large yields). Regarding environmental impacts, there was no clear-cut divide between organic and conventional farming due to difficulties in allocating the use of manure. This finding is essentially related to the choice of system boundary, which is thoroughly discussed in the paper. PMID:16092275

  1. Improving arable land heterogeneity information in available land cover products for land surface modelling using MERIS NDVI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabel, F.; Hank, T. B.; Mauser, W.

    2010-10-01

    Regionalization of physical land surface models requires the supply of detailed land cover information. Numerous global and regional land cover maps already exist but generally, they do not resolve arable land into different crop types. However, arable land comprises a huge variety of different crops with characteristic phenological behaviour, demonstrated in this paper with Leaf Area Index (LAI) measurements exemplarily for maize and winter wheat. This affects the mass and energy fluxes on the land surface and thus its hydrology. The objective of this study is the generation of a land cover map for central Europe based on CORINE Land Cover (CLC) 2000, merged with CORINE Switzerland, but distinguishing different crop types. Accordingly, an approach was developed, subdividing the land cover class arable land into the regionally most relevant subclasses for central Europe using multiseasonal MERIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data. The satellite data were used for the separation of spring and summer crops due to their different phenological behaviour. Subsequently, the generated phenological classes were subdivided following statistical data from EUROSTAT. This database was analysed concerning the acreage of different crop types. The impact of the improved land use/cover map on evapotranspiration was modelled exemplarily for the Upper Danube catchment with the hydrological model PROMET. Simulations based on the newly developed land cover approach showed a more detailed evapotranspiration pattern compared to model results using the traditional CLC map, which is ignorant of most arable subdivisions. Due to the improved temporal behaviour and spatial allocation of evapotranspiration processes in the new land cover approach, the simulated water balance more closely matches the measured gauge.

  2. Spatial Heterogeneity of Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Its Temporal Course on Arable Land: Combining Field Measurements, Remote Sensing and Simulation in a Comprehensive Data Analysis Approach (CDAA).

    PubMed

    Reichenau, Tim G; Korres, Wolfgang; Montzka, Carsten; Fiener, Peter; Wilken, Florian; Stadler, Anja; Waldhoff, Guido; Schneider, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The ratio of leaf area to ground area (leaf area index, LAI) is an important state variable in ecosystem studies since it influences fluxes of matter and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere. As a basis for generating temporally continuous and spatially distributed datasets of LAI, the current study contributes an analysis of its spatial variability and spatial structure. Soil-vegetation-atmosphere fluxes of water, carbon and energy are nonlinearly related to LAI. Therefore, its spatial heterogeneity, i.e., the combination of spatial variability and structure, has an effect on simulations of these fluxes. To assess LAI spatial heterogeneity, we apply a Comprehensive Data Analysis Approach that combines data from remote sensing (5 m resolution) and simulation (150 m resolution) with field measurements and a detailed land use map. Test area is the arable land in the fertile loess plain of the Rur catchment on the Germany-Belgium-Netherlands border. LAI from remote sensing and simulation compares well with field measurements. Based on the simulation results, we describe characteristic crop-specific temporal patterns of LAI spatial variability. By means of these patterns, we explain the complex multimodal frequency distributions of LAI in the remote sensing data. In the test area, variability between agricultural fields is higher than within fields. Therefore, spatial resolutions less than the 5 m of the remote sensing scenes are sufficient to infer LAI spatial variability. Frequency distributions from the simulation agree better with the multimodal distributions from remote sensing than normal distributions do. The spatial structure of LAI in the test area is dominated by a short distance referring to field sizes. Longer distances that refer to soil and weather can only be derived from remote sensing data. Therefore, simulations alone are not sufficient to characterize LAI spatial structure. It can be concluded that a comprehensive picture of LAI spatial

  3. Utilization of Soil C and N by Microbial Groups in the Presence of Living Roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, J.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M.

    2007-12-01

    The effects of living plant roots and N on belowground C dynamics were examined in a CA annual grassland soil (Haploxeralf) during a 2-y greenhouse study. The fate of 13C-labeled plant roots ( Avena barbata L.) and soil were followed under planted and unplanted conditions; and with and without N addition (20 kg N ha-1 season-1). The treatments were applied during 2 growing seasons and each growing season was followed by a dry, fallow period (~ 150-d long). Living roots increased the turnover rate and loss of belowground 13 C during and after 2 seasons compared with unplanted soils. After 2 seasons, planted soils had 21% less belowground 13C present than in unplanted soils. However, total soil C increased in planted soils by 4.6% compared to unplanted after 2 seasons. N additions decreased belowground 13C turnover during the first treatment season in both planted and unplanted soils, however no effect of N on soil C was observed thereafter. Planted soils had larger microbial biomass and the community structure differed compared with unplanted soils. Planted soils had higher proportions of gram (-) bacteria, while unplanted soils had higher proportions of gram (+) bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi. New root and exudate C supplied from living roots increased the turnover of microbial assimilated 13C compared with unplanted for all microbial groups. This greater turnover of belowground 13C was especially significant for gram (-) bacteria, which were stimulated in the planted soil. In contrast, the activity among microbial groups in unplanted soils was similar to that prior to the initiation of the treatments and soil wet-up. Our findings suggest that A. barbata roots increased soil C levels over time because root and exudate C inputs are significant, however that C increase will be moderated by an overall faster C mineralization rate of belowground C. Increased N deposition may slow soil C losses, however, they appear minor and temporary at the rates applied and for

  4. Isotopic evidence for condensed aromatics from non-pyrogenic sources in soils--implications for current methods for quantifying soil black carbon.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Bruno; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2008-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a complex continuum of partly charred organic matter predominantly consisting of condensed aromatic and graphitic moieties and it has high potential for long-term carbon sequestration in soils and sediments. There has been common agreement that BC is exclusively formed by incomplete combustion of organic matter, while non-pyrogenic sources are negligible. In this study, we investigated the stable carbon isotope signature of benzenepolycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) as molecular markers for BC to test if there is also a significant contribution of non-pyrogenic carbon to this fraction in soils. BPCAs were formed by hot nitric acid oxidation of different soils and analyzed by three different procedures: (i) elemental analysis - isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS) of bulk BPCAs and gas chromatography - combustion - isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) of (ii) BPCA trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives, and (iii) BPCA methyl derivatives. Best accuracy and precision of isotope measurements were obtained by EA-IRMS of bulk BPCAs although this method has a risk of contamination by non-BC-derived compounds. The accuracy and precision of GC-C-IRMS measurements were superior for methyl derivatives (+/-0.1 per thousand and 0.5 per thousand, respectively) to those for TMS derivatives (+3.5 per thousand and 2.2 per thousand, respectively). Comparison of BPCA delta(13)C values of soil samples prior to and after laboratory and field incubations with both positive and negative (13)C labels at natural and artificial abundances revealed that up to 25% of the isolated BC fraction in soils had been produced in situ, without fire or charring. Commonly applied methods to quantify BC exclusively formed by pyrogenic processes may thus be biased by a significant non-pyrogenic fraction. Further research is encouraged to better define isolated BC fractions and/or understand mechanisms for non-pyrogenic BC production in soils. PMID:18306211

  5. Integrating microbial diversity in soil carbon dynamic models parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Benjamin; Menasseri-Aubry, Safya; Leterme, Philippe; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Viaud, Valérie

    2015-04-01

    Faced with the numerous concerns about soil carbon dynamic, a large quantity of carbon dynamic models has been developed during the last century. These models are mainly in the form of deterministic compartment models with carbon fluxes between compartments represented by ordinary differential equations. Nowadays, lots of them consider the microbial biomass as a compartment of the soil organic matter (carbon quantity). But the amount of microbial carbon is rarely used in the differential equations of the models as a limiting factor. Additionally, microbial diversity and community composition are mostly missing, although last advances in soil microbial analytical methods during the two past decades have shown that these characteristics play also a significant role in soil carbon dynamic. As soil microorganisms are essential drivers of soil carbon dynamic, the question about explicitly integrating their role have become a key issue in soil carbon dynamic models development. Some interesting attempts can be found and are dominated by the incorporation of several compartments of different groups of microbial biomass in terms of functional traits and/or biogeochemical compositions to integrate microbial diversity. However, these models are basically heuristic models in the sense that they are used to test hypotheses through simulations. They have rarely been confronted to real data and thus cannot be used to predict realistic situations. The objective of this work was to empirically integrate microbial diversity in a simple model of carbon dynamic through statistical modelling of the model parameters. This work is based on available experimental results coming from a French National Research Agency program called DIMIMOS. Briefly, 13C-labelled wheat residue has been incorporated into soils with different pedological characteristics and land use history. Then, the soils have been incubated during 104 days and labelled and non-labelled CO2 fluxes have been measured at ten

  6. Use of field-based stable isotope probing to identify adapted populations and track carbon flow through a phenol-degrading soil microbial community.

    PubMed

    DeRito, Christopher M; Pumphrey, Graham M; Madsen, Eugene L

    2005-12-01

    The goal of this field study was to provide insight into three distinct populations of microorganisms involved in in situ metabolism of phenol. Our approach measured 13CO2 respired from [13C]phenol and stable isotope probing (SIP) of soil DNA at an agricultural field site. Traditionally, SIP-based investigations have been subject to the uncertainties posed by carbon cross-feeding. By altering our field-based, substrate-dosing methodologies, experiments were designed to look beyond primary degraders to detect trophically related populations in the food chain. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), it was shown that (13)C-labeled biomass, derived from primary phenol degraders in soil, was a suitable growth substrate for other members of the soil microbial community. Next, three dosing regimes were designed to examine active members of the microbial community involved in phenol metabolism in situ: (i) 1 dose of [13C]phenol, (ii) 11 daily doses of unlabeled phenol followed by 1 dose of [13C]phenol, and (iii) 12 daily doses of [13C]phenol. GC/MS analysis demonstrated that prior exposure to phenol boosted 13CO2 evolution by a factor of 10. Furthermore, imaging of 13C-treated soil using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) verified that individual bacteria incorporated 13C into their biomass. PCR amplification and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of 13C-labeled soil DNA from the 3 dosing regimes revealed three distinct clone libraries: (i) unenriched, primary phenol degraders were most diverse, consisting of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-proteobacteria and high-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria, (ii) enriched primary phenol degraders were dominated by members of the genera Kocuria and Staphylococcus, and (iii) trophically related (carbon cross-feeders) were dominated by members of the genus Pseudomonas. These data show that SIP has the potential to document population shifts caused by substrate preexposure and to follow the flow of carbon through terrestrial microbial

  7. Microbial degradation of the pharmaceutical ibuprofen and the herbicide 2,4-D in water and soil - use and limits of data obtained from aqueous systems for predicting their fate in soil.

    PubMed

    Girardi, Cristobal; Nowak, Karolina M; Carranza-Diaz, Otoniel; Lewkow, Benjamín; Miltner, Anja; Gehre, Matthias; Schäffer, Andreas; Kästner, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    The persistence of chemicals is a key parameter for their environmental risk assessment. Extrapolating their biodegradability potential in aqueous systems to soil systems would improve the environmental impact assessment. This study compares the fate of (14/13)C-labelled 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) and ibuprofen in OECD tests 301 (ready biodegradability in aqueous systems) and 307 (soil). 85% of 2,4-D and 68% of ibuprofen were mineralised in aqueous systems, indicating ready biodegradability, but only 57% and 45% in soil. Parent compounds and metabolites decreased to <2% of the spiked amounts in both systems. In soil, 36% of 2,4-D and 30% of ibuprofen were bound in non-extractable residues (NER). NER formation in the abiotic controls was half as high as in the biotic treatments. However, mineralisation, biodegradation and abiotic residue formation are competing processes. Assuming the same extent of abiotic NER formation in abiotic and biotic systems may therefore overestimate the abiotic contribution in the biotic systems. Mineralisation was described by a logistic model for the aquatic systems and by a two-pool first order degradation model for the soil systems. This agrees with the different abundance of microorganisms in the two systems, but precludes direct comparison of the fitted parameters. Nevertheless, the maximum mineralisable amounts determined by the models were similar in both systems, although the maximum mineralisation rate was about 3.5 times higher in the aqueous systems than in the soil system for both compounds; these parameters may thus be extrapolated from aqueous to soil systems. However, the maximum mineralisable amount is calculated by extrapolation to infinite times and includes intermediately formed biomass derived from the labelled carbon. The amount of labelled carbon within microbial biomass residues is higher in the soil system, resulting in lower degradation rates. Further evaluation of these relationships requires

  8. Rates and spatial variations of soil erosion in Europe: A study based on erosion plot data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdan, O.; Govers, G.; Le Bissonnais, Y.; Van Oost, K.; Poesen, J.; Saby, N.; Gobin, A.; Vacca, A.; Quinton, J.; Auerswald, K.; Klik, A.; Kwaad, F. J. P. M.; Raclot, D.; Ionita, I.; Rejman, J.; Rousseva, S.; Muxart, T.; Roxo, M. J.; Dostal, T.

    2010-10-01

    An extensive database of short to medium-term erosion rates as measured on erosion plots in Europe under natural rainfall was compiled from the literature. Statistical analysis confirmed the dominant influence of land use and cover on soil erosion rates. Sheet and rill erosion rates are highest on bare soil; vineyards show the second highest soil losses, followed by other arable lands (spring crops, orchards and winter crops). A land with a permanent vegetation cover (shrubs, grassland and forest) is characterised by soil losses which are generally more than an order of magnitude lower than those on arable land. Disturbance of permanent vegetation by fire leads to momentarily higher erosion rates but rates are still lower than those measured on arable land. We also noticed important regional differences in erosion rates. Erosion rates are generally much lower in the Mediterranean as compared to other areas in Europe; this is mainly attributed to the high soil stoniness in the Mediterranean. Measured erosion rates on arable and bare land were related to topography (slope steepness and length) and soil texture, while this was not the case for plots with a permanent land cover. We attribute this to a fundamental difference in runoff generation and sediment transfer according to land cover types. On the basis of these results we calculated mean sheet and rill erosion rates for the European area covered by the CORINE database: estimated rill and interrill erosion rates are ca. 1.2 t ha - 1 year - 1 for the whole CORINE area and ca. 3.6 t ha - 1 year - 1 for arable land. These estimates are much lower than some earlier estimates which were based on the erroneous extrapolation of small datasets. High erosion rates occur in areas dominated by vineyards, the hilly loess areas in West and Central Europe and the agricultural areas located in the piedmont areas of the major European mountain ranges.

  9. Chemical and physical defense of weed seeds in relation to soil seedbank persistence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Persistent soil seedbanks drive the long-term population dynamics of annual weeds of arable fields, yet most weed management tactics are targeted at the seedling stage. Development of effective strategies for weed seedbank management will depend upon better mechanistic understanding of the ecologica...

  10. Uninhibited methane biogeochemistry: A candid view of interactions among soil processes made possible by stable isotope and inert tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Fischer, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    Methane emission emerges as a highly variable property of ecosystems because the proximate controlling processes, methane production, consumption and transport, appear to vary considerably in both space and time. But the extent and importance of any co-correlation among these processes remains unclear. The idea of co-correlation is supported by a simplified model of methane fluxes that we have developed and by the frequently-observed relationship between net ecosystem productivity and methane emission. Yet the dominant approach toward problems in methane biogeochemistry remains focused on measuring or modeling each process individually and then assembling them into an understanding of the whole. This approach has arisen, in part, from our historic inability to measure methane production, consumption and transport simultaneously. Instead, one or more processes have been inhibited or excluded from consideration, leading to an incomplete picture of soil methane biogeochemistry. To overcome this limitation, we have used additions of 13C- labeled methane to simultaneously measure methane production and consumption in wetland soils. When coupled with additions of inert hydrologic and gas tracers (e.g., Br- and SF6), we have measured methane production, consumption and soil-atmosphere transport under field conditions with minimal disturbance. Our results reveal strong co-correlations among the processes that can be useful for building simpler, mechanistically-based models of ecosystem methane emissions.

  11. Assessment of vertical soil solid phase transport (pedoturbations) in different types of land use by magnetic tracer method (Belgorod region, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhidkin, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    New method of quantitative assessments of vertical soil solid phase transport (pedoturbations) is based on redistribution of spherical magnetic particles (SMP) in soil profiles. SMP - are fly ash components, which mainly produce during coal burning. The main sources of SMP on studied object were locomotives on the railroads, which used coal at the turn of the XIX century. SMP income into the soil only from the atmosphere, very stable for destructions, can be preserved in soils for centuries, and have the same size and weight as the soil matter. So SMP redistribution reflects soil solid phase transport. SMP used as tracers of soil erosion (Olson et.al., 2013), but for the first time applied for quantitative assessments of pedoturbations. In Belgorod region of Russia studied vertical distribution of SMP in soils in different types of land use: a) arable chernozem about 160-year plowing, b) arable chernozem 120-year plowing, c) dark-gray forest soil, which didn't plow at least last 150 years. All three sites are located nearby for the same physical-geography conditions. Distribution of SMP studied layer by layer (thickness of the layer 7 cm) from the top to 70 cm depth, in triplicate soil columns in every land use type (totally 90 soil samples). The period of SMP kept in studied soils is about 115 years. Revealed the different depth of SMP penetration (burial) in soil profiles for this period: 49 cm in the soil of 160-year arable land, 58 cm in the soil of 120-year arable land and 68 cm in the virgin forest soil. Different depth of SMP penetration is connected with different activity of pedoturbations, which differs according to the composition of soil flora and fauna, root activity, and animal mixing work. It is supposed that in the arable land single cropping can reduce the thickness of the active layer and as a result the zone of active pedoturbation depth. Based on SMP distribution counted rates of vertical soil solid phase transport, which are equaled: 31 t

  12. Effects of land use and mineral characteristics on the organic carbon content, and the amount and composition of Na-pyrophosphate soluble organic matter in subsurface soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbrock, R.; Kaiser, M.; Walter, K.; Sommer, M.

    2010-12-01

    Land use and mineral characteristics affect the balance of organic carbon in surface as well as in subsurface soils and related feedbacks on soil functions like their potential to mitigate the greenhouse effect. Actually, there are less information about the effects of land use as well as soil properties on the amount and composition of organic matter (OM) for subsurface soils as compared to surface soils. Here we aimed to analyze the long-term impact of arable and forest land use and soil mineral characteristics on subsurface soil organic carbon (SOC) contents, as well as on amount and composition of OM sequentially separated by Na-pyrophosphate solution (OM(PY)) from subsurface soil samples. Seven soils different in mineral characteristics were selected within Germany. Soil samples were taken from subsurface horizons of forest and adjacent arable sites continuously used >100 years. The OM(PY) fractions were analysed on their OC content (OCPY) and characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. A distinct influence of the long-term land use on the SOC contents could not be detected because only for four out of seven sites the forest subsurface soils showed larger SOC contents than the adjacent agricultural soils. A generally site independent enhanced OC sequestration in subsurface soils due to differences in land use cannot be expected in the long-term. Multiple regression analyses indicated for the arable subsurface soils significant positive relationships between the SOC contents and combined effects of the i) exchangeable Ca (Caex) and oxalate soluble Fe (Feox), and ii) the Caex and Alox contents. For the arable subsurface soils the increase of OCPY* (OCPY multiplied by the relative C=O content of OM(PY)) by increasing contents of Caex indicated that OM(PY) mainly interacts with Ca2+ cations. For the forest subsurface soils (pH <5), the OCPY contents were found to be related to the contents of Na-pyrophosphate soluble Fe and Al. The long-term arable and forest land use

  13. Ecological Intensification Through Pesticide Reduction: Weed Control, Weed Biodiversity and Sustainability in Arable Farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Gaba, Sabrina; Cordeau, Stéphane; Lechenet, Martin; Mézière, Delphine; Colbach, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the biodiversity components of agriculture, weeds are an interesting model for exploring management options relying on the principle of ecological intensification in arable farming. Weeds can cause severe crop yield losses, contribute to farmland functional biodiversity and are strongly associated with the generic issue of pesticide use. In this paper, we address the impacts of herbicide reduction following a causal framework starting with herbicide reduction and triggering changes in (i) the management options required to control weeds, (ii) the weed communities and functions they provide and (iii) the overall performance and sustainability of the implemented land management options. The three components of this framework were analysed in a multidisciplinary project that was conducted on 55 experimental and farmer's fields that included conventional, integrated and organic cropping systems. Our results indicate that the reduction of herbicide use is not antagonistic with crop production, provided that alternative practices are put into place. Herbicide reduction and associated land management modified the composition of in-field weed communities and thus the functions of weeds related to biodiversity and production. Through a long-term simulation of weed communities based on alternative (?) cropping systems, some specific management pathways were identified that delivered high biodiversity gains and limited the negative impacts of weeds on crop production. Finally, the multi-criteria assessment of the environmental, economic and societal sustainability of the 55 systems suggests that integrated weed management systems fared better than their conventional and organic counterparts. These outcomes suggest that sustainable management could possibly be achieved through changes in weed management, along a pathway starting with herbicide reduction.

  14. Ecological Intensification Through Pesticide Reduction: Weed Control, Weed Biodiversity and Sustainability in Arable Farming.

    PubMed

    Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Gaba, Sabrina; Cordeau, Stéphane; Lechenet, Martin; Mézière, Delphine; Colbach, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the biodiversity components of agriculture, weeds are an interesting model for exploring management options relying on the principle of ecological intensification in arable farming. Weeds can cause severe crop yield losses, contribute to farmland functional biodiversity and are strongly associated with the generic issue of pesticide use. In this paper, we address the impacts of herbicide reduction following a causal framework starting with herbicide reduction and triggering changes in (i) the management options required to control weeds, (ii) the weed communities and functions they provide and (iii) the overall performance and sustainability of the implemented land management options. The three components of this framework were analysed in a multidisciplinary project that was conducted on 55 experimental and farmer's fields that included conventional, integrated and organic cropping systems. Our results indicate that the reduction of herbicide use is not antagonistic with crop production, provided that alternative practices are put into place. Herbicide reduction and associated land management modified the composition of in-field weed communities and thus the functions of weeds related to biodiversity and production. Through a long-term simulation of weed communities based on alternative (?) cropping systems, some specific management pathways were identified that delivered high biodiversity gains and limited the negative impacts of weeds on crop production. Finally, the multi-criteria assessment of the environmental, economic and societal sustainability of the 55 systems suggests that integrated weed management systems fared better than their conventional and organic counterparts. These outcomes suggest that sustainable management could possibly be achieved through changes in weed management, along a pathway starting with herbicide reduction.

  15. Ecological Intensification Through Pesticide Reduction: Weed Control, Weed Biodiversity and Sustainability in Arable Farming.

    PubMed

    Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Gaba, Sabrina; Cordeau, Stéphane; Lechenet, Martin; Mézière, Delphine; Colbach, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the biodiversity components of agriculture, weeds are an interesting model for exploring management options relying on the principle of ecological intensification in arable farming. Weeds can cause severe crop yield losses, contribute to farmland functional biodiversity and are strongly associated with the generic issue of pesticide use. In this paper, we address the impacts of herbicide reduction following a causal framework starting with herbicide reduction and triggering changes in (i) the management options required to control weeds, (ii) the weed communities and functions they provide and (iii) the overall performance and sustainability of the implemented land management options. The three components of this framework were analysed in a multidisciplinary project that was conducted on 55 experimental and farmer's fields that included conventional, integrated and organic cropping systems. Our results indicate that the reduction of herbicide use is not antagonistic with crop production, provided that alternative practices are put into place. Herbicide reduction and associated land management modified the composition of in-field weed communities and thus the functions of weeds related to biodiversity and production. Through a long-term simulation of weed communities based on alternative (?) cropping systems, some specific management pathways were identified that delivered high biodiversity gains and limited the negative impacts of weeds on crop production. Finally, the multi-criteria assessment of the environmental, economic and societal sustainability of the 55 systems suggests that integrated weed management systems fared better than their conventional and organic counterparts. These outcomes suggest that sustainable management could possibly be achieved through changes in weed management, along a pathway starting with herbicide reduction. PMID:26071767

  16. Soil carbon sequestration by three perennial legume pastures is greater in deeper soil layers than in the surface soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X.-K.; Turner, N. C.; Song, L.; Gu, Y.-J.; Wang, T.-C.; Li, F.-M.

    2015-07-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays a vital role as both a sink for and source of atmospheric carbon. Revegetation of degraded arable land in China is expected to increase soil carbon sequestration, but the role of perennial legumes on soil carbon stocks in semiarid areas has not been quantified. In this study, we assessed the effect of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and two locally adapted forage legumes, bush clover (Lespedeza davurica S.) and milk vetch (Astragalus adsurgens Pall.) on the SOC concentration and SOC stock accumulated annually over a 2 m soil profile, and to estimate the long-term potential for SOC sequestration in the soil under the three forage legumes. The results showed that the concentration of SOC of the bare soil decreased slightly over the 7 years, while 7 years of legume growth substantially increased the concentration of SOC over the 0-2.0 m soil depth measured. Over the 7 year growth period the SOC stocks increased by 24.1, 19.9 and 14.6 Mg C ha-1 under the alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch stands, respectively, and decreased by 4.2 Mg C ha-1 under bare soil. The sequestration of SOC in the 1-2 m depth of soil accounted for 79, 68 and 74 % of SOC sequestered through the upper 2 m of soil under alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch, respectively. Conversion of arable land to perennial legume pasture resulted in a significant increase in SOC, particularly at soil depths below 1 m.

  17. Redistributed water by saprotrophic fungi triggers carbon mineralization in dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhr, Alexander; Borken, Werner; Matzner, Egbert

    2015-04-01

    Summer droughts are common in temperate forests and especially the upper soil horizons experience soil drought. Drought events can be accompanied by negative effects for forest ecosystems but many plants can reduce drought stress by hydraulic redistribution (HR). Similar processes were recently described for ectomycorrhizal networks but no information is available for mycelia networks of saprotrophic fungi. They strongly contribute to belowground nutrient cycling, C and N mineralization. We hypothesize that redistributed water by saprotrophic fungi triggers mineralization of organic matter in soils under drought conditions. The impact of HR by saprotrophic fungi on mineralization was determined using mesocosms comprising two chambers, separated by a 2 mm air gap to prevent bulk flow of water. After inoculation with fungal cultures and a growth phase, both chambers were desiccated. Subsequently, only chamber I was rewetted while chamber II was treated with 13C labelled plant material. CO2 samples were collected over 7 days after rewetting and analyzed for stable isotope ratio. In addition, enzymatic activity of chitinases and cellobiohydrolases in chamber II was determined after 7 days using the soil zymographie method with fluorogenic 4-Methylumbelliferyl-substrates. A negative control was provided by mesocosms in which hyphal connections between the chambers were severed before rewetting. Intact fungal connections between the chambers led to a strong increase in volumetric water content in chamber II after rewetting of chamber I and the CO2 had a higher enrichment in 13C than in the control mescosms with severed connections. Enrichment started 48 h after rewetting and continued for the rest of the experiment. This resulted in a more than two fold higher total carbon mineralization after 7 days in chamber II of mesocosms with intact hyphal connections. In addition, enzyme activities were also strongly increased compared to controls. In conclusion, mycelia networks

  18. Seasonal variation in functional properties of microbial communities in beech forest soil.

    PubMed

    Koranda, Marianne; Kaiser, Christina; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Kitzler, Barbara; Sessitsch, Angela; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    Substrate quality and the availability of nutrients are major factors controlling microbial decomposition processes in soils. Seasonal alteration in resource availability, which is driven by plants via belowground C allocation, nutrient uptake and litter fall, also exerts effects on soil microbial community composition. Here we investigate if seasonal and experimentally induced changes in microbial community composition lead to alterations in functional properties of microbial communities and thus microbial processes. Beech forest soils characterized by three distinct microbial communities (winter and summer community, and summer community from a tree girdling plot, in which belowground carbon allocation was interrupted) were incubated with different (13)C-labeled substrates with or without inorganic N supply and analyzed for substrate use and various microbial processes. Our results clearly demonstrate that the three investigated microbial communities differed in their functional response to addition of various substrates. The winter communities revealed a higher capacity for degradation of complex C substrates (cellulose, plant cell walls) than the summer communities, indicated by enhanced cellulase activities and reduced mineralization of soil organic matter. In contrast, utilization of labile C sources (glucose) was lower in winter than in summer, demonstrating that summer and winter community were adapted to the availability of different substrates. The saprotrophic community established in girdled plots exhibited a significantly higher utilization of complex C substrates than the more plant root associated community in control plots if additional nitrogen was provided. In this study we were able to demonstrate experimentally that variation in resource availability as well as seasonality in temperate forest soils cause a seasonal variation in functional properties of soil microorganisms, which is due to shifts in community structure and physiological

  19. Is the rhizosphere priming effect an important mechanism for nitrogen mineralisation in soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Conor; Baggs, Elizabeth; Morley, Nicholas; Wall, David; Paterson, Eric

    2015-04-01

    In soil, nitrogen is mobilised from soil organic matter (SOM) to pools more readily available to plants (mineralisation), mediated by the microbial biomass. Multiple mechanisms underpin this process, including the priming effect (PE) which is increasingly recognised as an important driver of N mineralisation. The PE is where microbes utilize labile carbon from roots (root exudates or senescing plant material) for energy and subsequently mineralise SOM for nutrients, inevitably mobilising nutrients from SOM to plant available pools. However, the mechanism and regulators underpinning PE's are virtually unknown. This work investigates the importance of priming for N mineralisation. We hypothesized that 1) addition of labile C would increase gross N mineralisation and plant N uptake, and that this is soil-specific; 2) the stoichiometry of primed and basal mineralisation fluxes would be different, indicative of these processes being functionally distinct; and 3) the presence of fertilizer nitrogen and grazing would reduce primed and basal mineralisation and reduce plant uptake of SOM derived N. To do this we coupled continuous steady-state 13C labelling and 15N isotope dilution to measure specific gross C and N fluxes from two contrasting soils. Addition of carbon increased gross C and N fluxes from SOM, but the effect was soil-specific. The C-to-N ratio of the flux from 'primed' SOM was much lower than that of the basal flux indicating that the release of labile carbon from plant roots functions as a nutrient acquisition response, increasing mineralisation of SOM. Addition of N fertiliser resulted in negative priming of SOM, but overall and in both soils, the plant accessed more SOM-derived N. Grazing and priming were closely coupled, with grazing increasing SOM priming. Our results demonstrate that priming effects are an integral component of N mineralisation and should be incorporated into nitrogen cycling models.

  20. The priming effect of soluble carbon inputs in organic and mineral soils from a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Xu, Wenhua; Hu, Guoqing; Dai, Weiwei; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2015-08-01

    The priming effect (PE) is one of the most important interactions between C input and output in soils. Here we aim to quantify patterns of PE in response to six addition rates of (13)C-labeled water-soluble C (WSC) and determine if these patterns are different between soil organic and mineral layers in a temperate forest. Isotope mass balance was used to distinguish WSC derived from SOC-derived CO2 respiration. The relative PE was 1.1-3.3 times stronger in the mineral layer than in the organic layer, indicating higher sensitivity of the mineral layer to WSC addition. However, the magnitude of cumulative PE was significantly higher in the organic layer than in the mineral layer due to higher SOC in the organic layer. With an increasing WSC addition rate, cumulative PE increased for both layers, but tended to level off when the addition rate was higher than 400 mg C kg(-1) soil. This saturation effect indicates that stimulation of soil C loss by exogenous substrate would not be as drastic as the increase of C input. In fact, we found that the mineral layer with an WSC addition rate of 160-800 mg C kg(-1) soil had net C storage although positive PE was observed. The addition of WSC basically caused net C loss in the organic layer due to the high magnitude of PE, pointing to the importance of the organic layer in C cycling of forest ecosystems. Our findings provide a fundamental understanding of PE on SOC mineralization of forest soils and warrant further in situ studies of PE in order to better understand C cycling under global climate change.

  1. Complementary effects of soil organism and plant propagule introductions in restoration of species-rich grassland communities.

    SciTech Connect

    Kardol, Paul; Bezemer, T Martijn; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2009-01-01

    A common practice in biodiversity conservation is restoration of former species-rich grassland on ex-arable land. Major constraints for grassland restoration are high soil fertility and limited dispersal ability of plant species to target sites. Usually, studies focus on soil fertility or on methods to introduce plant seeds. However, the question is whether soil fertility reduction is always necessary for getting plant species established on target sites. In a three-year field experiment with ex-arable soil with intensive farming history, we tested single and combined effects of soil fertility reduction and sowing mid-successional plant species on plant community development and soil biological properties. A controlled microcosm study was performed to test short-term effects of soil fertility reduction measures on biomass production of mid-successional species. Soil fertility was manipulated by adding carbon (wood or straw) to incorporate plant-available nutrients into organic matter, or by removing nutrients through top soil removal (TSR). The sown species established successfully and their establishment was independent of carbon amendments. TSR reduced plant biomass, and effectively suppressed arable weeds, however, created a desert-like environment, inhibiting the effectiveness of sowing mid-successional plant species. Adding straw or wood resulted in short-term reduction of plant biomass, suggesting a temporal decrease in plant-available nutrients by microbial immobilisation. Straw and wood addition had little effects on soil biological properties, whereas TSR profoundly reduced numbers of bacteria, fungal biomass and nematode abundance. In conclusion, in ex-arable soils, on a short term sowing is more effective for grassland restoration than strategies aiming at soil fertility reduction.

  2. Responses of soil microeukaryotic communities to short-term fumigation-incubation revealed by MiSeq amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Xu, Jianming; Feng, Youzhi; Wang, Juntao; Yu, Yongjie; Brookes, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    In soil microbiology, there is a “paradox” of soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization, which is that even though chloroform fumigation destroys majority of the soil microbial biomass, SOC mineralization continues at the same rate as in the non-fumigated soil during the incubation period. Soil microeukaryotes as important SOC decomposers, however, their community-level responses to chloroform fumigation are not well understood. Using the 18S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, we analyzed the composition, diversity, and C-metabolic functions of a grassland soil and an arable soil microeukaryotic community in response to fumigation followed by a 30-day incubation. The grassland and arable soil microeukaryotic communities were dominated by the fungal Ascomycota (80.5–93.1% of the fungal sequences), followed by the protistan Cercozoa and Apicomplexa. In the arable soil fungal community, the predominance of the class Sordariomycetes was replaced by the class Eurotiomycetes after fumigation at days 7 and 30 of the incubation. Fumigation changed the microeukaryotic α-diversity in the grassland soil at days 0 and 7, and β-diversity in the arable soil at days 7 and 30. Network analysis indicated that after fumigation fungi were important groups closely related to other taxa. Most phylotypes (especially Sordariomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Coccidia, and uncultured Chytridiomycota) were inhibited, and only a few were positively stimulated by fumigation. Despite the inhibited Sordariomycetes, the fumigated communities mainly consisted of Eurotiomycetes and Sordariomycetes (21.9 and 36.5% relative frequency, respectively), which are able to produce hydrolytic enzymes associated with SOC mineralization. Our study suggests that fumigation not only decreases biomass size, but modulates the composition and diversity of the soil microeukaryotic communities, which are capable of driving SOC mineralization by release of hydrolytic enzymes during short-term fumigation-incubation. PMID

  3. Assessment of Bacterial Communities and Predictive Functional Profiling in Soils Subjected to Short-Term Fumigation-Incubation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Luo, Yu; Xu, Jianming; Yu, Zhuyun; Zhang, Kaile; Brookes, Philip C

    2016-07-01

    Previous investigations observed that when soil was fumigated with ethanol-free CHCl3 for 24 h and then incubated under appropriate conditions, after the initial flush of CO2 was over, soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization continued at the same rate as in the non-fumigated soil. This indicates that, following fumigation, the much diminished microbial population still retained the same ability to mineralize SOC as the much larger non-fumigated population. We hypothesize that although fumigation drastically alters the soil bacterial community abundance, composition, and diversity, it has little influence on the bacterial C-metabolic functions. Here, we conducted a 30-day incubation experiment involving a grassland soil and an arable soil with and without CHCl3 fumigation. At days 0, 7, and 30 of the incubation, the bacterial abundances were determined by quantitative PCR, and the bacterial community composition and diversity were assessed via the 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. PICRUSt was used to predict the metagenome functional content from the sequence data. Fumigation considerably changed the composition and decreased the abundance and diversity of bacterial community at the end of incubation. At day 30, Firmicutes (mainly Bacilli) accounted for 70.9 and 94.6 % of the total sequences in the fumigated grassland and arable soil communities, respectively. The two fumigated soil communities exhibited large compositional and structural differences during incubation. The families Paenibacillaceae, Bacillaceae, and Symbiobacteriaceae dominated the bacterial community in the grassland soil, and Alicyclobacillaceae in the arable soil. Fumigation had little influence on the predicted abundances of KEGG orthologs (KOs) assigned to the metabolism of the main acid esters, saccharides, amino acids, and lipids in the grassland soil community. The saccharide-metabolizing KO abundances were decreased, but the acid ester- and fatty acid-metabolizing KO abundances were

  4. How cultivation alleviates soil water repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orfanus, Tomas; Dlapa, Pavel; Fodor, Nandor; Rajkai, Kalman

    2010-05-01

    Prolonged droughts are still more frequent and last longer in Central Europe. Under high temperature and low water content, the wettability of organic substances, which cover soil particles, decreases and the infiltration process can be retarded or even entirely prevented. This phenomenon (usually called the soil water repellency - SWR) is very common in sandy soils, especially under natural-state vegetation (forests, grasslands). The objective of this study was to examine to what extent the SWR can be alleviated by sandy soil cultivation. Two study sites in Pannonian basin were selected; Sekule in south-western Slovakia and Őrbottyán in northern Hungary. Both have sandy soils with similar textural composition and elementary structure. They differ only by land use. The first is an untreated meadow while the other has been cultivated for decades and contains small after-fertilization residual amount of carbonates. As the reference material, pure aeolian sand with no organic matter from the Sekule study site was taken, since no SWR has been detected there. Infiltration tests under small positive pressure and comparative infiltration tests with water and ethanol under small negative pressure were performed on the three materials, after several prolonged dry seasons. The results show that, water infiltration is considerably retarded in both sandy soils, which contain organic matter (meadow and arable) when compared to the reference material. In arable soil the effect was partially alleviated by cultivation. One evident reason is the presence of residual after-fertilization carbonates in this soil. Carbonates on the one side enlarged the hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface ratio and on the other increased pH, which causes enhanced dissociation of carboxylic groups and by this way also overall hydrophilicity of soil organic matter. This assumption was proved by laboratory experiments with the meadow soil from Sekule, when after calcite addition into the soil the

  5. Soil nitrogen status as a regulator of carbon substrate flows through microbial communities with elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Susan E.; Billings, Sharon A.

    2011-03-01

    To assess how microbial processing of organic C inputs to forest soils may be influenced by elevated CO2 and altered N dynamics, we followed the fate of 13C-labeled substrates in soils from the Duke Free Air Carbon Enrichment site where differences in soil N status have been imposed by 7 years of N amendments. Heterotrophic respiration and δ13C of respired CO2-C and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were measured to track activities of microbial groups and estimate a relative measure of substrate use efficiency (PLFA-based SUE). Results indicate an increased proportion of fungal and actinomycete activity in elevated CO2 soils, which varied with substrate. The negative effect of N on vanillin phenolic-C incorporation into actinomycete PLFA suggests legacies of fertilization can mitigate increased C flow into actinomycetes with elevated CO2. Further, the fourfold increase in PLFA-based SUE for vanillin phenolic-C in elevated CO2 soils that received N suggests future enhanced N limitation in elevated CO2 soils may promote enhanced respiratory loss relative to incorporation of some C-substrates into microbial biomass. These short-term incubations did not reveal greater loss of soil organic carbon via respiration or shifts in SUE with elevated CO2. However, observed relative increases in activity of actinomycetes and fungi with elevated CO2 and mitigation of this effect on actinomycetes with N amendments suggests that elevated CO2 and predicted N limitation may alter the fate of slow-turnover soil organic matter (SOM) in two competing ways. Investigations need to focus on how these microorganisms may increase slow-turnover substrate use while possibly enhancing the prevalence of microbial cell wall structures that can serve as precursors of stabilized SOM.

  6. Carbon losses from pyrolysed and original wood in a forest soil under natural and increased N deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrini, B.; Abiven, S.; Singh, N.; Bird, J.; Torn, M. S.; Schmidt, M. W. I.

    2014-09-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) plays an important role as a stable carbon (C) sink in the soils of terrestrial ecosystems. However, uncertainties remain about in situ turnover rates of fire-derived PyOM in soil, the main processes leading to PyOM-C and nitrogen (N) losses from the soil, and the role of N availability on PyOM cycling in soils. We measured PyOM and native soil organic carbon losses from the soil as carbon dioxide and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) using additions of highly 13C-labelled PyOM (2.03 atom %) and its precursor pinewood during 1 year in a temperate forest soil. The field experiment was carried out under ambient and increased mineral N deposition (+60 kg N-NH4NO3 ha-1 year-1). The results showed that after 1 year: (1) 0.5% of PyOM-C and 22% of wood-C were mineralized as CO2, leading to an estimated turnover time of 191 and 4 years, respectively; (2) the quantity of PyOM and wood lost as dissolved organic carbon was negligible (0.0004 ± 0.0003% and 0.022 ± 0.007% of applied-C, respectively); and (3) N additions decreased cumulative PyOM mineralization by 43%, but did not affect cumulative wood mineralization and did not affect the loss of DOC from PyOM or wood. We conclude that mineralization to CO2 was the main process leading to PyOM losses during the first year of mineralization in a forest soil, and that N addition can decrease PyOM-C cycling, while added N showed no effect on wood C cycling.

  7. Priming of soil organic matter decomposition in cryoturbated Arctic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A.; Wild, B.; Schnecker, J.; Rusalimova, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Arctic is subjected to particularly high rates of warming, with profound consequences for the carbon cycle: on the one hand plant productivity and C storage in plant biomass have been shown to increase strongly in many parts of the Arctic, on the other hand, increasing rates of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition have been reported. One of the possibilities that could reconcile these observations is, that increased plant growth may lead to increased root exudation rates, which are known to stimulate microbial turnover of organic matter under certain circumstances, in a process termed "priming" of SOM. Two mechanisms have been brought forward that may be responsible for priming: first, easily assimilable material exuded by plant roots may help microbes to overcome their energy limitation and second, this input of labile carbon could lead to a nitrogen limitation of the microbial community and lead to nitrogen mining, i.e. decomposition of N-rich SOM. We here report on an incubation study with arctic soil investigating potential priming of SOM decomposition in organic topsoil horizons, cryoturbated organic matter and subsoil mineral horizons of tundra soil from the Taymyr peninsula in Siberia. We used arctic soils, that are characterized by cryoturbation (mixing of soil layers due to freezing and thawing), for this study. Turbated cryosols store more than 580 Gt C globally, a significant proportion of which is stored in the cryoturbated organic matter. We hypothesized that an increased availability of labile compounds would increase SOM decomposition rates, and that this effect would be strongest in horizons with a low natural availability of labile C, i.e. in the mineral subsoil. We amended soils with 13C labelled glucose, cellulose, amino acids or proteins, and measured the mineralization of SOM C as well as microbial community composition and potential activities of extracellular enzymes. Our results demonstrate that topsoil organic, cryoturbated and

  8. Dynamics of carbon pools in post-agrogenic sandy soils of southern taiga of Russia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Until recently, a lot of arable lands were abandoned in many countries of the world and, especially, in Russia, where about half a million square kilometers of arable lands were abandoned in 1961-2007. The soils at these fallows undergo a process of natural restoration (or self-restoration) that changes the balance of soil organic matter (SOM) supply and mineralization. Results A soil chronosequence study, covering the ecosystems of 3, 20, 55, 100, and 170 years of self-restoration in southern taiga zone, shows that soil organic content of mineral horizons remains relatively stable during the self-restoration. This does not imply, however, that SOM pools remain steady. The C/N ratio of active SOM reached steady state after 55 years, and increased doubly (from 12.5 - 15.6 to 32.2-33.8). As to the C/N ratio of passive SOM, it has been continuously increasing (from 11.8-12.7 to 19.0-22.8) over the 170 years, and did not reach a steady condition. Conclusion The results of the study imply that soil recovery at the abandoned arable sandy lands of taiga is incredibly slow process. Not only soil morphological features of a former ploughing remained detectable but also the balance of soil organic matter input and mineralization remained unsteady after 170 years of self-restoration. PMID:20420668

  9. Impact of pyrogenic organic matter decomposition and induced priming effect on soil C budget.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrini, Bernardo; Abiven, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) results from the incomplete combustion of biomass and may contribute to constitute an important fraction of soil C in forest and agricultural soils, in the form of charcoal (produced by wildfires) or biochar (anthropogenic). Although many evidences exist on the long mean residence time of PyOM there is still a large uncertainty on PyOM loss processes and rate and on possible induced priming effect on non-PyOM. Therefore determining PyOM mineralization rate, loss processes and possible induced priming effect on soil organic matter decomposition are key issues to understand the impact of PyOM on the carbon (C) cycle. We investigated the impact of PyOM on soil C budget by combining results from three independent studies: (i) a field study to investigate PyOM mineralization rate and the relative importance of PyOM loss processes, (ii) a PyOM and soil incubation experiment to correlate C and N mineralization rates, (iii) a review of the priming effect induced by PyOM on soil organic C. We employed 13C labelled pinewood-derived PyOM for the field experiment and 13C labelled ryegrass-derived PyOM in the incubation experiment to trace PyOM losses. In the field experiment it was observed that: (i) Pyrolysis process reduced pinewood decomposition by a factor of 60, (ii) leaching and translocation of fresh PyOM along the soil profile were negligible compared to losses as CO2. In the incubation experiment we found that ryegrass induced a two phase priming effect on native soil organic matter, with a positive priming effect followed by a negative priming effect phase, we also found that ryegrass-derived PyOM decomposition was much slower than pinewood one. The different decomposition rate results probably from the different aromaticity of the two PyOM together with the different set-up of the two experiments. Both the incubation experiment and the meta-analysis revealed that PyOM may induce a two-phase priming effect on native soil organic matter

  10. The content of macro- and microelements and the phosphatase activity of soils under a varied plant cultivation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowiak, A.; Lemanowicz, J.; Kobierski, M.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the analyses of selected physicochemical properties and the activity of alkaline and acid phosphatase in the soils which differed in terms of plant cultivation technology. Profile sI represented arable land in the crop rotation with cereals dominating (medium intensive technology), without irrigation, while profile sII—represented arable land with vegetable crops cultivation (intensive technology), intensively fertilized and irrigated. The content of available phosphorus in the two soil profiles investigated ranged from 6.6 to 69.1 mg/kg. The highest contents of phosphorus available to plants were reported in the plough horizon of both soils, while the abundance of potassium and magnesium was highest in the illuvial horizon of both soils. The soil profiles investigated showed a significant variation in terms of the cultivation technologies applied. The contents of plant-available Cu and Zn in soil were low and they resulted in the inhibition of neither alkaline nor acid phosphatase. The intensive vegetable crops cultivation technology decreased the content of organic matter and increased the content of the nutrients in soil. Using the Ward method, it was found that relatively similar physicochemical and chemical properties were reported for the genetic horizons of both soil profiles, especially Ap horizon of the soil representing arable land with intensive cultivation of vegetable crops.

  11. Inferences about radionuclide mobility in soils based on the solid/liquid partition coefficients and soil properties.

    PubMed

    Sohlenius, Gustav; Saetre, Peter; Nordén, Sara; Grolander, Sara; Sheppard, Steve

    2013-05-01

    To assist transport modeling in assessments of the radiological impact of a geological repository for radioactive wastes, the mobility of various elements was studied in arable and wetland soils in the Forsmark region, Sweden. Pore water and total element contents were determined for five types of unconsolidated deposits (regolith), spanning a wide range of soil properties with respect to pH and organic matter content. Two soil depths were sampled to capture element mobility in regolith layers affected and unaffected by soil-forming processes. The solid/liquid partition coefficients (K d values) for most elements varied significantly among regolith types. For most elements, the observed variations in K d values could be explained by variations in soil properties. For many elements, mobility increased with decreasing soil pH. The results provide a significant addition of data on radionuclide retention in soils, taking account of soil properties and processes. PMID:23619799

  12. Phosphorus leaching in relation to soil type and soil phosphorus content.

    PubMed

    Djodjic, Faruk; Börling, Katarina; Bergström, Lars

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorus losses from arable soils contribute to eutrophication of freshwater systems. In addition to losses through surface runoff, leaching has lately gained increased attention as an important P transport pathway. Increased P levels in arable soils have highlighted the necessity of establishing a relationship between actual P leaching and soil P levels. In this study, we measured leaching of total phosphorus (TP) and dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) during three years in undisturbed soil columns of five soils. The soils were collected at sites, established between 1957 and 1966, included in a long-term Swedish fertility experiment with four P fertilization levels at each site. Total P losses varied between 0.03 and 1.09 kg ha(-1) yr(-1), but no general correlation could be found between P concentrations and soil test P (Olsen P and phosphorus content in ammonium lactate extract [P-AL]) or P sorption indices (single-point phosphorus sorption index [PSI] and P sorption saturation) of the topsoil. Instead, water transport mechanism through the soil and subsoil properties seemed to be more important for P leaching than soil test P value in the topsoil. In one soil, where preferential flow was the dominant water transport pathway, water and P bypassed the high sorption capacity of the subsoil, resulting in high losses. On the other hand, P leaching from some soils was low in spite of high P applications due to high P sorption capacity in the subsoil. Therefore, site-specific factors may serve as indicators for P leaching losses, but a single, general indicator for all soil types was not found in this study. PMID:15074820

  13. Degradation pathway and field-scale DT50 determination of Boscalid in a sandy Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Anneli S.; Weihermüller, Lutz; Tappe, Wolfgang; Mukherjee, Santanu; Spielvogel, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    The research on environmental fate of pesticides has received increasing attention within the last decades and the persistence of several compounds in soil matrices is well documented. However, the fate of the new fungicide Boscalid (introduced in 2003) is not yet completely investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze the environmental fate of Boscalid in a sandy soil. Three years after the second application on a cropland site in Kaldenkirchen, Germany, 65 undisturbed soil samples from the plough layer were derived. Boscalid residues were extracted using Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) and measured with UPLC-MS/MS. The Boscalid residues ranged between 0.12 and 0.53 μg kg-1with a field mean of 0.20 ± 0.09 μg kg-1. These results differed considerably from the predicted field concentration of 16.89 μg kg-1 (calculated from the application rate) and half-lives (DT50) of 104-182 days compared to 345 days reported in literature. Adjusting the extraction efficiency to 20% could not explain the large difference. Therefore, an incubation study with 14C-labeled Boscalid was conducted to measure the DT50 under controlled conditions. Here, the DT50 values were in the range of values stated in literature (297-337 days compared to 345 days) but still much larger than the DT50 based on the field-study values (104-182 days). Our results indicate that Boscalid dissipation under field conditions is much faster at agricultural sites with sandy soil type as expected from laboratory incubation experiments. Future experiments with Boscalid will be conducted in two different soils with different particle size. A laboratory experiment with uniformly 13C-labeled Boscalid will provide insight into the uptake and incorporation in microbial biomass.

  14. Relevance of nonfunctional linear polyacrylic acid for the biodegradation of superabsorbent polymer in soils.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mo; Wilske, Burkhard; Buegger, Franz; Esperschütz, Jürgen; Bach, Martin; Frede, Hans-Georg; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradability is a desired characteristic for synthetic soil amendments. Cross-linked polyacrylic acid (PAA) is a synthetic superabsorbent used to increase the water availability for plant growth in soils. About 4% within products of cross-linked PAA remains as linear polyacrylic acid (PAAlinear). PAAlinear has no superabsorbent function but may contribute to the apparent biodegradation of the overall product. This is the first study th