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Sample records for 13c-nmr chemical shifts

  1. Chemical shift changes and line narrowing in 13C NMR spectra of hydrocarbon clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Kida, Masato; Sakagami, Hirotoshi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Nagao, Jiro

    2013-05-23

    The solid-state (13)C NMR spectra of various guest hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, propane, adamantane) in clathrate hydrates were measured to elucidate the local structural environments around hydrocarbon molecules isolated in guest-host frameworks of clathrate hydrates. The results show that, depending on the cage environment, the trends in the (13)C chemical shift and line width change as a function of temperature. Shielding around the carbons of the guest normal alkanes in looser cage environments tends to decrease with increasing temperature, whereas shielding in tighter cage environments tends to increase continuously with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the (13)C NMR line widths suggest, because of the reorientation of the guest alkanes, that the local structures in structure II are more averaged than those in structure I. The differences between structures I and II tend to be very large in the lower temperature range examined in this study. The (13)C NMR spectra of adamantane guest molecules in structure H hydrate show that the local structures around adamantane guests trapped in structure H hydrate cages are averaged at the same level as in the α phase of solid adamantane. PMID:23607335

  2. DFT study of zigzag (n, 0) single-walled carbon nanotubes: (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Teobald; Stachów, Michal; Stobiński, Leszek; Kaminský, Jakub

    2016-06-01

    (13)C NMR chemical shifts of selected finite-size models of pristine zigzag single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a diameter of ∼0.4-0.8nm and length up to 2.2nm were studied theoretically. Results for finite SWCNTs models containing 1, 4 and 10 adjacent bamboo-type units were compared with data obtained for infinite tubes in order to estimate the reliability of small finite models in predicting magnetic properties of real-size nanotubes and to assess their tube-length dependence. SWCNTs were fully optimized using unrestricted density functional theory (DFT-UB3LYP/6-31G*). Cyclacenes, as the shortest models of open-ended zigzag SWCNTs, with systematically varying diameter were calculated as well. GIAO NMR calculations on the SWCNT and cyclacene models were performed using the BHandH density functional combined with relatively small STO-3Gmag basis set, developed by Leszczyński and coworkers for accurate description of magnetic properties. Regular changes of carbon (13)C chemical shifts along the tube axis of real size (6, 0) and (9, 0) zigzag carbon nanotubes were shown. The (13)C NMR shifts according to increasing diameter calculated for zigzag (n, 0, n=5-10) cyclacenes followed the trends observed for zigzag (n, 0) SWCNTs. The results for 4-units long SWCNTs match reasonably well with the data obtained for infinite zigzag (n, 0) SWCNTs, especially to those with bigger diameter (n=8-15). The presence of rim hydrogens obviously affects theoretical (13)C chemical shieldings and shifts in cyclacenes and thus cyclacenes can provide only approximate estimation of (13)C NMR parameters of real-size SWCNTs. The NMR properties predicted for the longest 10-units long models of SWCNTs reliably correspond to results obtained for infinite nanotubes. They were thus able to accurately predict also recently reported experimental chemical shift of chiral (6, 5) SWCNT. PMID:27155813

  3. Using Neural Networks for 13C NMR Chemical Shift Prediction-Comparison with Traditional Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiler, Jens; Maier, Walter; Will, Martin; Meusinger, Reinhard

    2002-08-01

    Interpretation of 13C chemical shifts is essential for structure elucidation of organic molecules by NMR. In this article, we present an improved neural network approach and compare its performance to that of commonly used approaches. Specifically, our recently proposed neural network ( J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 2000, 40, 1169-1176) is improved by introducing an extended hybrid numerical description of the carbon atom environment, resulting in a standard deviation (std. dev.) of 2.4 ppm for an independent test data set of ˜42,500 carbons. Thus, this neural network allows fast and accurate 13C NMR chemical shift prediction without the necessity of access to molecule or fragment databases. For an unbiased test dataset containing 100 organic structures the accuracy of the improved neural network was compared to that of a prediction method based on the HOSE code ( hierarchically ordered spherical description of environment) using S PECI NFO. The results show the neural network predictions to be of quality (std. dev.=2.7 ppm) comparable to that of the HOSE code prediction (std. dev.=2.6 ppm). Further we compare the neural network predictions to those of a wide variety of other 13C chemical shift prediction tools including incremental methods (C HEMD RAW, S PECT OOL), quantum chemical calculation (G AUSSIAN, C OSMOS), and HOSE code fragment-based prediction (S PECI NFO, ACD/CNMR, P REDICTI T NMR) for the 47 13C-NMR shifts of Taxol, a natural product including many structural features of organic substances. The smallest standard deviations were achieved here with the neural network (1.3 ppm) and S PECI NFO (1.0 ppm).

  4. Quantitative analysis of deuterium using the isotopic effect on quaternary (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Tamim A; Yepuri, Nageshwar Rao; Holden, Peter J; James, Michael

    2016-07-13

    Quantitative analysis of specifically deuterated compounds can be achieved by a number of conventional methods, such as mass spectroscopy, or by quantifying the residual (1)H NMR signals compared to signals from internal standards. However, site specific quantification using these methods becomes challenging when dealing with non-specifically or randomly deuterated compounds that are produced by metal catalyzed hydrothermal reactions in D2O, one of the most convenient deuteration methods. In this study, deuterium-induced NMR isotope shifts of quaternary (13)C resonances neighboring deuterated sites have been utilized to quantify the degree of isotope labeling of molecular sites in non-specifically deuterated molecules. By probing (13)C NMR signals while decoupling both proton and deuterium nuclei, it is possible to resolve (13)C resonances of the different isotopologues based on the isotopic shifts and the degree of deuteration of the carbon atoms. We demonstrate that in different isotopologues, the same quaternary carbon, neighboring partially deuterated carbon atoms, are affected to an equal extent by relaxation. Decoupling both nuclei ((1)H, (2)H) resolves closely separated quaternary (13)C signals of the different isotopologues, and allows their accurate integration and quantification under short relaxation delays (D1 = 1 s) and hence fast accumulative spectral acquisition. We have performed a number of approaches to quantify the deuterium content at different specific sites to demonstrate a convenient and generic analysis method for use in randomly deuterated molecules, or in cases of specifically deuterated molecules where back-exchange processes may take place during work up. PMID:27237841

  5. Experimental link between the /sup 13/C NMR chemical shift of carbonyl carbons and the energy shifts observed in the n. -->. 3s optical transition of cyclic ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, T.J.; Baer, T.

    1988-09-14

    The n ..-->.. 3s transition energies of cold methylcyclopentanones and -cyclohexanones, as well as those of some branched-chain and bicyclic ketones, have been measured with 2 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The energy shifts of the n ..-->.. 3s transition origins are found to correlate in a linear fashion with reported /sup 13/C NMR chemical shifts of the carbonyl carbon atoms. Several possible explanations for the experimental connection to NMR are discussed including consideration of both the paramagnetic and diamagnetic shielding contributions to the total chemical shift. 31 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  6. 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shift Assignments and Conformational Analysis for the Two Diastereomers of the Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase Inhibitor Brodifacoum

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, John R.; Cho, Herman M.

    2009-10-01

    Proton and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments and 1H-1H scalar couplings for the two diastereomers of the vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) inhibitor brodifacoum have been determined from acetone solutions containing both diastereomers. Data were obtained from homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra acquired at 1H frequencies of 750 and 900 MHz over a 268-303 K temperature range. Conformations inferred from scalar coupling and 1-D NOE measurements exhibit large differences between the diastereomers. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  7. 13C NMR chemical shift correlations in application of “tool of increasing electron demand” to stable long-lived carbocations: Comprehensive evaluation*

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Berrier, Arthur L.; Prakash, G. K. Surya

    1981-01-01

    The reliability of 13C NMR chemical shift correlations in the application of the “tool of increasing electron demand” to stable long-lived carbocationic systems is demonstrated by a comprehensive analysis of 22 stable aryl-substituted carbocationic systems. The observation of slopes of less than unity in such chemical shift correlations for several cationic systems has been attributed to additional charge delocalizing mechanisms present in the system (such as homoallylic, cyclopropyl, and π conjugations). The onset of nonclassical σ-delocalization in 2-aryl-2-norbornyl cations with electron withdrawing-substituents previously observed was further verified by using σC+ substituent constants. Difficulties in relating the CαNMR shifts in different carbocationic systems are also discussed. PMID:16593000

  8. DFT-GIAO 1H and 13C NMR prediction of chemical shifts for the configurational assignment of 6beta-hydroxyhyoscyamine diastereoisomers.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Marcelo A; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2009-07-01

    (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift calculations using the density functional theory-gauge including/invariant atomic orbitals (DFT-GIAO) approximation at the B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) level of theory have been used to assign both natural diastereoisomers of 6beta-hydroxyhyoscyamine. The theoretical chemical shifts of the (1)H and (13)C atoms in both isomers were calculated using a previously determined conformational distribution, and the theoretical and experimental values were cross-compared. For protons, the obtained average absolute differences and root mean square (rms) errors for each comparison showed that the experimental chemical shifts of dextrorotatory and levorotatory 6beta-hydroxyhyoscyamines correlated well with the theoretical values calculated for the (3R,6R,2'S) and (3S,6S,2'S) configurations, respectively, whereas for (13)C atoms the calculations were unable to differentiate between isomers. The nature of the relatively large chemical shift differences observed in nuclei that share similar chemical environments between isomers was asserted from the same calculations. It is shown that the anisotropic effect of the phenyl group in the tropic ester moiety, positioned under the tropane ring, has a larger shielding effect over one ring side than over the other one. PMID:19373852

  9. Halogen effect on structure and 13C NMR chemical shift of 3,6-disubstituted-N-alkyl carbazoles.

    PubMed

    Radula-Janik, Klaudia; Kupka, Teobald; Ejsmont, Krzysztof; Daszkiewicz, Zdzislaw; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2013-10-01

    Structures of selected 3,6-dihalogeno-N-alkyl carbazole derivatives were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) level of theory, and their (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) isotropic shieldings were predicted using density functional theory (DFT). The model compounds contained 9H, N-methyl and N-ethyl derivatives. The relativistic effect of Br and I atoms on nuclear shieldings was modeled using the spin-orbit zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) method. Significant heavy atom shielding effects for the carbon atom directly bonded with Br and I were observed (~-10 and ~-30 ppm while the other carbon shifts were practically unaffected). The decreasing electronegativity of the halogen substituent (F, Cl, Br, and I) was reflected in both nonrelativistic and relativistic NMR results as decreased values of chemical shifts of carbon atoms attached to halogen (C3 and C6) leading to a strong sensitivity to halogen atom type at 3 and 6 positions of the carbazole ring. The predicted NMR data correctly reproduce the available experimental data for unsubstituted N-alkylcarbazoles. PMID:23922027

  10. E-2-Benzylidenebenzocycloalkanones. IV. Studies on transmission of substituent effects on 13C NMR chemical shifts of E-2-(X-benzylidene)-1-tetralones, and -benzosuberones. Comparison with the 13C NMR data of chalcones and E-2-(X-benzylidene)-1-indanones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perjési, Pál; Linnanto, Juha; Kolehmainen, Erkki; Ősz, Erzsébet; Virtanen, Elina

    2005-04-01

    Single substituent parameter (SSP) and dual substituent parameter (DSP) analyses were applied to study the transmission of substituent effects on selected 13C NMR chemical shifts of the cyclic chalcone analogues, E-2-(4'-X-benzylidene)-1-tetralones ( 2) and E-2-(4'-X-benzylidene)-1-benzosuberones ( 3). In order to study how the geometry of the cyclic chalcone analogues affects the transmission of substituent effects similar investigations with the respective chalcones ( 4) were also performed. The results obtained earlier with the five-membered analogue E-2-(4'-X-benzylidene)-1-indanones ( 1) were also involved in the comparisons. Geometry optimization of the unsubstituted 1a, 2a, 3a and 4a as well as the substituted 2 and 3 was performed by ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Both SSP and DSP analyses reflected that resonance effects contribute more to the chemical shift of C-α (C2), while inductive effects primarily affect that of C-β (C10) of the enone moiety of all the four series. This latter effect, however, is far not as pronounced as that of the former one. It was found that DSP analysis data ( ρF and ρR values) of transmission of substituent effects on the δC2 data can serve as a measure of choice to study the conformation (planarity) of the investigated enones in the four series.

  11. Structural determination of complex natural products by quantum mechanical calculations of (13)C NMR chemical shifts: development of a parameterized protocol for terpenes.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Ribeiro, Daniel Joras; de Amorim, Mauro Barbosa

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important tools for determining the structures of organic molecules. Despite the advances made in this technique, revisions of erroneously established structures for natural products are still commonly published in the literature. In this context, the prediction of chemical shifts through ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) calculations has become a very powerful tool for assisting with the structural determination of complex organic molecules. In this work, we present the development of a protocol for (13)C chemical shift calculations of terpenes, a class of natural products that are widely distributed among plant species and are very important due to their biological and pharmacological activities. This protocol consists of GIAO-DFT calculations of chemical shifts and the application of a parameterized scaling factor in order to ensure accurate structural determination of this class of natural products. The application of this protocol to a set of five terpenes yielded accurate calculated chemical shifts, showing that this is a very attractive tool for the calculation of complex organic structures such as terpenes. PMID:27424297

  12. Probing structural patterns of ion association and solvation in mixtures of imidazolium ionic liquids with acetonitrile by means of relative (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Marekha, Bogdan A; Kalugin, Oleg N; Bria, Marc; Idrissi, Abdenacer

    2015-09-21

    Mixtures of ionic liquids (ILs) with polar aprotic solvents in different combinations and under different conditions (concentration, temperature etc.) are used widely in electrochemistry. However, little is known about the key intermolecular interactions in such mixtures depending on the nature of the constituents and mixture composition. In order to systematically address the intermolecular interactions, the chemical shift variation of (1)H and (13)C nuclei has been followed in mixtures of imidazolium ILs 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BmimBF4), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BmimPF6), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (BmimTfO) and 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BmimTFSI) with molecular solvent acetonitrile (AN) over the entire composition range at 300 K. The concept of relative chemical shift variation is proposed to assess the observed effects on a unified and unbiased scale. We have found that hydrogen bonds between the imidazolium ring hydrogen atoms and electronegative atoms of anions are stronger in BmimBF4 and BmimTfO ILs than those in BmimTFSI and BmimPF6. Hydrogen atom at position 2 of the imidazolium ring is substantially more sensitive to interionic hydrogen bonding than those at positions 4-5 in the case of BmimTfO and BmimTFSI ILs. These hydrogen bonds are disrupted upon dilution in AN due to ion dissociation which is more pronounced at high dilutions. Specific solvation interactions between AN molecules and IL cations are poorly manifested. PMID:26278514

  13. Quantifying the chemical composition of soil organic carbon with solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, J. A.; Sanderman, J.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) to biological decomposition and mineralisation to CO2 is defined at least partially by its chemical composition. Highly aromatic charcoal-like SOC components are more stable to biological decomposition than other forms of carbon including cellulose. Solid-state 13C NMR has gained wide acceptance as a method capable of defining SOC chemical composition and mathematical fitting processes have been developed to estimate biochemical composition. Obtaining accurate estimates depends on an ability to quantitatively detect all carbon present in a sample. Often little attention has been paid to defining the proportion of organic carbon present in a soil that is observable in solid-state 13C NMR analyses of soil samples. However, if such data is to be used to inform carbon cycling studies, it is critical that quantitative assessments of SOC observability be undertaken. For example, it is now well established that a significant discrimination exists against the detection of the low proton content polyaromatic structures typical of charcoal using cross polarisation 13C NMR analyses. Such discrimination does not exist where direct polarisation analyses are completed. In this study, the chemical composition of SOC as defined by cross polarisation and direct polarisation13C NMR analyses will be compared for Australian soils collected from under a diverse range of agricultural managements and climatic conditions. Results indicate that where significant charcoal C contents exist, it is highly under-represented in the acquired CP spectra. For some soils, a discrimination against alkyl carbon was also evident. The ability to derive correction factors to compensate for such discriminations will be assessed and presented.

  14. Benchmarks for the 13C NMR chemical shielding tensors in peptides in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernek, Jiří; Pawlak, Tomasz; Potrzebowski, Marek J.

    2012-02-01

    The benchmark set is proposed, which comprises 126 principal elements of chemical shielding tensors, and the respective isotropic chemical shielding values, of all 42 13C nuclei in crystalline Tyr-D-Ala-Phe and Tyr-Ala-Phe tripeptides with known, but highly dissimilar structures. These data are obtained by both the NMR measurements and the density functional theory in the pseudopotential plane-wave scheme. Using the CASTEP program, several computational strategies are employed, for which the level of agreement between calculations and experiment is established. This set is mainly intended for the validation of methods capable of predicting the 13C NMR parameters in solid-state systems.

  15. Determination of the tautomeric equilibria of pyridoyl benzoyl β-diketones in the liquid and solid state through the use of deuterium isotope effects on (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Borisov, Eugeny V; Lindon, John C

    2015-02-01

    The tautomeric equilibria for 2-pyridoyl-, 3-pyridoyl-, and 4-pyridoyl-benzoyl methane have been investigated using deuterium isotope effects on (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts both in the liquid and the solid state. Equilibria are established both in the liquid and the solid state. In addition, in the solution state the 2-bond and 3-bond J((1)H-(13)C) coupling constants have been used to confirm the equilibrium positions. The isotope effects due to deuteriation at the OH position are shown to be superior to chemical shift in determination of equilibrium positions of these almost symmetrical -pyridoyl-benzoyl methanes. The assignments of the NMR spectra are supported by calculations of the chemical shifts at the DFT level. The equilibrium positions are shown to be different in the liquid and the solid state. In the liquid state the 4-pyridoyl derivative is at the B-form (C-1 is OH), whereas the 2-and 3-pyridoyl derivatives are in the A-form. In the solid state all three compounds are on the B-form. The 4-pyridoyl derivative shows unusual deuterium isotope effects in the solid, which are ascribed to a change of the crystal structure of the deuteriated compound. PMID:24070650

  16. GlyNest and CASPER: two independent approaches to estimate 1H and 13C NMR shifts of glycans available through a common web-interface.

    PubMed

    Loss, Alexander; Stenutz, Roland; Schwarzer, Eberhard; von der Lieth, Claus-W

    2006-07-01

    GlyNest and CASPER (www.casper.organ.su.se/casper/) are two independent services aiming to predict (1)H- and (13)C-NMR chemical shifts of glycans. GlyNest estimates chemical shifts of glycans based on a spherical environment encoding scheme for each atom. CASPER is an increment rule-based approach which uses chemical shifts of the free reducing monosaccharides which are altered according to attached residues of an oligo- or polysaccharide sequence. Both services, which are located on separate, distributed, servers are now available through a common interface of the GLYCOSCIENCES.de portal (www.glycosciences.de). The predictive ability of both techniques was evaluated for a test set of 155 (13)C and 181 (1)H spectra of assigned glycan structures. The standard deviations between experimental and estimated shifts ((1)H; 0.081/0.102; (13)C 0.763/0.794; GlyNest/CASPER) are comparable for both methods and significantly better than procedures where stereochemistry is not encoded. The predictive ability of both approaches is in most cases sufficiently precise to be used for an automatic assignment of NMR-spectra. Since both procedures work efficiently and require computation times in the millisecond range on standard computers, they are well suited for the assignment of NMR spectra in high-throughput glycomics projects. The service is available at www.glycosciences.de/sweetdb/start.php?action=form_shift_estimation. PMID:16845109

  17. Primidone - An antiepileptic drug - characterisation by quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR and UV-Visible) investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Subramanian, S.; Mohan, S.

    2013-05-01

    The solid phase FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of primidone were recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The vibrational spectra were analysed and the observed fundamentals were assigned and analysed. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the theoretical scaled vibrational wavenumbers determined by DFT methods. The Raman intensities were also determined with B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surface of the molecule were constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of primidone has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded and the chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated.

  18. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) investigations of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride an active metabolite in tramadol - An analgesic drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2014-03-01

    O-desmethyltramadol is one of the main metabolites of tramadol widely used clinically and has analgesic activity. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of O-desmethyl tramadol hydrochloride are recorded in the solid phase in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. Theoretical studies have been performed as its hydrochloride salt. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-31G** and cc-pVDZ basis sets. The optimised bond length and bond angles are correlated with the X-ray data. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the scaled vibrational frequencies determined by DFT methods. The IR and Raman intensities are determined with B3LYP method using cc-pVDZ and 6-31G(d,p) basic sets. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/cc-pVDZ method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule have been anlysed.

  19. Density functional investigation of intermolecular effects on {sup 13}C NMR chemical-shielding tensors modeled with molecular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Sean T.; Dybowski, Cecil; Iuliucci, Robbie J.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2014-10-28

    A quantum-chemical method for modeling solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance chemical-shift tensors by calculations on large symmetry-adapted clusters of molecules is demonstrated. Four hundred sixty five principal components of the {sup 13}C chemical-shielding tensors of 24 organic materials are analyzed. The comparison of calculations on isolated molecules with molecules in clusters demonstrates that intermolecular effects can be successfully modeled using a cluster that represents a local portion of the lattice structure, without the need to use periodic-boundary conditions (PBCs). The accuracy of calculations which model the solid state using a cluster rivals the accuracy of calculations which model the solid state using PBCs, provided the cluster preserves the symmetry properties of the crystalline space group. The size and symmetry conditions that the model cluster must satisfy to obtain significant agreement with experimental chemical-shift values are discussed. The symmetry constraints described in the paper provide a systematic approach for incorporating intermolecular effects into chemical-shielding calculations performed at a level of theory that is more advanced than the generalized gradient approximation. Specifically, NMR parameters are calculated using the hybrid exchange-correlation functional B3PW91, which is not available in periodic codes. Calculations on structures of four molecules refined with density plane waves yield chemical-shielding values that are essentially in agreement with calculations on clusters where only the hydrogen sites are optimized and are used to provide insight into the inherent sensitivity of chemical shielding to lattice structure, including the role of rovibrational effects.

  20. Soil organic degradation: bridging the gap between Rock-Eval pyrolysis and chemical characterization (CPMAS 13C NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Remy; Sebag, David; Verrecchia, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Being a source of mineral nutrients, organic matter contributes to soil chemical fertility and acts on soil physical fertility through its role in soil structure. Soil organic matter (SOM) is a key component of soils. Despite the paramount importance of SOM, information on its chemistry and behaviour in soils is incomplete. Numerous methods are used to characterize and monitor OM dynamics in soils using different approaches (Kogel-Knabner, 2000). Two of the main approaches are evaluated and compared in this study. Rock-Eval pyrolysis (RE pyrolysis) provides a description of a SOM's general evolution using its thermal resistance. The second tool (13C CPMAS NMR) aims to give precise and accurate chemical information on OM characterization. The RE pyrolysis technique was designed for petroleum exploration (Lafargue et al., 1998) and because of its simplicity, it has been applied to a variety of other materials such as soils or Recent sediments (Disnar et al., 2000; Sebag, 2006). Recently, RE pyrolysis became a conventional tool to study OM dynamics in soils. In RE pyrolysis, a peak deconvolution is applied to the pyrolysis signal in order to get four main components related to major classes of organic constituents. These components differ in origin and resistance to pyrolysis: labile biological constituents (F1), resistant biological constituents (F2), immature non-biotic constituents (F3) and a mature refractory fraction (F4) (Sebag, 2006; Coppard, 2006). Main advantages of the technique are its repeatability, and rapidity to provide an overview of OM properties and stocks. However, do the four major classes used in the literature reflect a pertinent chemical counterpart? To answer this question, we used 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in the solid state (13C CPMAS NMR) to collect direct information on structural and conformational characteristics of OM. NMR resonances were assigned to chemical structures according to five dominant forms: alkyl C, O

  1. Soil organic degradation: bridging the gap between Rock-Eval pyrolysis and chemical characterization (CPMAS 13C NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Remy; Sebag, David; Verrecchia, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Being a source of mineral nutrients, organic matter contributes to soil chemical fertility and acts on soil physical fertility through its role in soil structure. Soil organic matter (SOM) is a key component of soils. Despite the paramount importance of SOM, information on its chemistry and behaviour in soils is incomplete. Numerous methods are used to characterize and monitor OM dynamics in soils using different approaches (Kogel-Knabner, 2000). Two of the main approaches are evaluated and compared in this study. Rock-Eval pyrolysis (RE pyrolysis) provides a description of a SOM's general evolution using its thermal resistance. The second tool (13C CPMAS NMR) aims to give precise and accurate chemical information on OM characterization. The RE pyrolysis technique was designed for petroleum exploration (Lafargue et al., 1998) and because of its simplicity, it has been applied to a variety of other materials such as soils or Recent sediments (Disnar et al., 2000; Sebag, 2006). Recently, RE pyrolysis became a conventional tool to study OM dynamics in soils. In RE pyrolysis, a peak deconvolution is applied to the pyrolysis signal in order to get four main components related to major classes of organic constituents. These components differ in origin and resistance to pyrolysis: labile biological constituents (F1), resistant biological constituents (F2), immature non-biotic constituents (F3) and a mature refractory fraction (F4) (Sebag, 2006; Coppard, 2006). Main advantages of the technique are its repeatability, and rapidity to provide an overview of OM properties and stocks. However, do the four major classes used in the literature reflect a pertinent chemical counterpart? To answer this question, we used 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in the solid state (13C CPMAS NMR) to collect direct information on structural and conformational characteristics of OM. NMR resonances were assigned to chemical structures according to five dominant forms: alkyl C, O

  2. Monomeric and dimeric structures analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid with experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR, UV) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Kose, Etem; Atac, Ahmet; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Kurt, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid (3,5-DFPBA, C6H3F2B(OH)2) were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques. FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-10 cm-1) in the solid phase and 1H and 13C NMR spectra in DMSO solution were recorded. The UV spectra that dissolved in ethanol and water were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm for each solution. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule have been obtained for possible three conformers from DFT (B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Hydrogen-bonded dimer of title molecule, optimized by counterpoise correction, was also studied B3LYP at the 6-311++G(d,p) level and the effects of molecular association through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding have been discussed. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. The effects due to the substitutions of boric acid group and halogen were investigated. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), nonlinear optical properties (NLO) and thermodynamic features were performed.

  3. Z and E rotamers of N-formyl-1-bromo-4-hydroxy-3-methoxymorphinan-6-one and their interconversion as studied by 1H/13C NMR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    PubMed Central

    Sulima, Agnieszka; Cheng, Kejun; Jacobson, Arthur E.; Rice, Kenner C.; Gawrisch, Klaus; Lee, Yong-Sok

    2012-01-01

    N-Formyl-1-bromo-4-hydroxy-3-methoxymorphinan-6-one (2), an important intermediate in the NIH Opiate Total Synthesis, presumably exists as a mixture of two rotamers (Z and E) in both CHCl3 and DMSO at room temperature due to the hindered rotation of its N-C18 bond in the amide moiety. By comparing the experimental 1H and 13C chemical shifts of a single rotamer and the mixture of 2 in CDCl3 with the calculated chemical shifts of the geometry optimized Z and E rotamers utilizing density functional theory, the crystalline rotamer of 2 was characterized as having the E configuration. The energy barrier between the two rotamers was also determined with the temperature dependence of 1H and 13C NMR coalescence experiments, and then compared with that from the reaction path for the interconversion of the two rotamers calculated at the level of B3LYP/6-31G*. Detailed geometry of the ground state and the transition states of both rotamers are given and discussed. PMID:23233124

  4. Quantitation of metabolic compartmentation in hyperammonemic brain by natural abundance 13C-NMR detection of 13C-15N coupling patterns and isotopic shifts.

    PubMed

    Lapidot, A; Gopher, A

    1997-02-01

    In the present study, the removal of cerebral ammonia by glutamine synthetase (GS) and by reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate by glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of an amino donor group, was determined in hyperammonemic rabbit brains. The 15N enrichments of brain metabolite alpha-amino and amide positions of glutamine, glutamate, and alanine were determined by the indirect detection of 15N-labeled compounds of the 13C-15N spin coupling patterns of natural abundance 13C-NMR spectra. The 13C-NMR spectra of brain extracts were obtained from rabbits infused with 15NH4Cl with or without intraperitoneal infusion of the GS inhibitor, L-methionine DL-sulfoximine, in a reasonable acquisition time period. When 15NH4Cl was infused, [5-15N]glutamine and [2-15N]glutamine concentrations reached 5.2 mumol/100 mg protein and 3.6 mumol/100 mg protein, respectively, which indicates the relatively high activity of reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate in the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. The low concentration of [2-15N]glutamate, which is about 30% of that of [2-15N]glutamine obtained in this study, suggests that very little glutamine serves as a precursor of neuronal glutamate. When GS was inhibited by L-methionine DL-sulfoximine, a flux of 15NH4+ via the residual activity of GS was accompanied by an apparent increase of [2-15N]glutamate and [15N]alanine concentrations (2.9 mumol/100 mg protein and 1.8 mumol/100 mg protein, respectively). These findings and those obtained from 13C-13C isotopomer analysis (Lapidot and Gopher, 1994b) suggest that astrocytic 2-oxoglutarate is partially utilized (together with an amino group donor) as a precursor for neuronal glutamate in the hyperammonemic brain when GS is inhibited. This process can partly replace GS activity in metabolizing ammonia in the hyperammonemic rabbit brain. PMID:9057821

  5. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) investigations of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Anitha, R.; Devi, L.; Mohan, S.; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic epoxides are causative factors for mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of polycyclic arenes. The 1,2- or 2,3-epoxy compounds are widely used to a considerable extent in the textile, plastics, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, detergent and photochemical industries. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane are recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-311++G** and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The IR and Raman intensities are determined. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of the compounds has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecules have been analysed.

  6. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) investigations of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride an active metabolite in tramadol--an analgesic drug.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, V; Santhanam, R; Marchewka, M K; Mohan, S

    2014-03-25

    O-desmethyltramadol is one of the main metabolites of tramadol widely used clinically and has analgesic activity. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of O-desmethyl tramadol hydrochloride are recorded in the solid phase in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. Theoretical studies have been performed as its hydrochloride salt. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-31G(**) and cc-pVDZ basis sets. The optimised bond length and bond angles are correlated with the X-ray data. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the scaled vibrational frequencies determined by DFT methods. The IR and Raman intensities are determined with B3LYP method using cc-pVDZ and 6-31G(d,p) basic sets. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/cc-pVDZ method to display electrostatic potential (electron+nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule have been anlysed. PMID:24316546

  7. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, (1)H, (13)C NMR) investigations of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, V; Anitha, R; Devi, L; Mohan, S; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-01-25

    Aromatic epoxides are causative factors for mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of polycyclic arenes. The 1,2- or 2,3-epoxy compounds are widely used to a considerable extent in the textile, plastics, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, detergent and photochemical industries. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane are recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-311++G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The IR and Raman intensities are determined. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron+nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of the compounds has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the molecules have been analysed. PMID:25062058

  8. /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR coordination-induced shifts in a series of tris(/alpha/-diimine)ruthenium(II) complexes containing pyridine, pyrazine, and thiazole moieties

    SciTech Connect

    Orellana, G.; Ibarra, C.A.; Santoro, J.

    1988-03-23

    /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR chemical shifts of a series of ruthenium(II) tris chelates containing the heterocyclic ligands 2,2/prime/-bipyridine, 2-(2-pyridyl)thiazole, 2-(2-pyrazyl)thiazole, and 2,2/prime/-bithiazole are reported and compared to those of the corresponding free ligands. Calculated coordination-induced shifts (CIS, /delta//sub complexed/ - /delta//sub free/) range from +0.41 to /minus/1.00 ppM for /sup 1/H and from +5.8 to /minus/3.7 ppM for /sup 13/C nuclei. These values are discussed on the basis of the various effects (charge perturbation and field interactions) that arise upon chelation: electronic /sigma/-donation to the metallic center via the nitrogen lone pair, d-/pi/* back-donation to the ligand, van der Waals interactions, and magnetic anisotropy of the spectator ligands. Semiquantitative values of each effect at the different positions have been proposed, taking theoretical calculations of steric and anisotropic contributions as the starting point. Shielding van der Waals interaction between proximate atoms influences only the H(3/prime/) CIS of six-membered moieties, but to a very low extent (<0.15 ppM). Magnetic anisotropy of proximate ring currents practically determines the CIS of the /alpha/ positions for all the complexed ligands examined (upfield shifts from /minus/0.8 to /minus/1.0 ppm), has a lower influence on external /beta/ positions (< 0.2 ppM), and is negligible for /gamma/-protons. /sigma/-donation deshields all the positions, its contribution increasing as protons separate from the coordinated nitrogen atom (up to 0.4 ppM). /Pi/-back-bonding is a weaker effect (< 0.2 ppM upfield contribution) that operates mainly on the /gamma/ position of the pyridine and /alpha/ and /beta/ positions of the pyrazine rings. 36 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Structure of pyridine and quinoline vinyl ethers according to data from /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectra and quantum-chemical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Afonin, A.V.; Voronov, V.K.; Andriankov, M.A.; Danovich, D.K.

    1987-08-10

    A systematic investigation of the structure of the vinyl ethers of heterocyclic compounds has not been undertaken. The present work was devoted to investigation of the stereochemical and electronic structure of the vinyl ethers of pyridine and quinoline. The PMR spectra of the samples were recorded for 5% solutions in deuterochloroform on a Tesla BS-497 spectrometer at 100 MHz. The /sup 13/C NMR spectra were recorded on a Tesla BS-567A spectrometer at 25.1 MHz in deuterochloroform with the samples at concentrations of 30%. The internal standard was HMDS. The vinyl ethers of pyridine and quinoline exist preferentially in the nonplanar S-trans conformation. In the vinyl esters of pyridine and quinoline the p-..pi.. conjugation is concurrent in nature and depends on the position of the vinyloxy group in the heterocycle.

  10. Characterisation of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of methylcitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Hanna; Martyniuk, Tomasz

    2007-06-01

    Methylcitric acid (MCA) was synthesised in Reformatsky reaction (2 RS, 3 RS stereoisomers) and in the nucleophilic addition (2 RS, 3 SR stereoisomers). The stereoselectivity of these reactions was analysed. 1H and 13C NMR spectra of diastereoisomers of methylcitric acid were recorded and interpreted. The values of 1H chemical shifts and 1H- 1H coupling constants were analysed. Proton-decoupled high-resolution 13C NMR spectra of MCA diastereoisomers were measured in a series of dilute water solutions of various acidities. These data may provide a basis for unequivocal determination of the presence of MCA in the urine samples of patients' suffering from propionic acidemia, methylmalonic aciduria, or holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency. NMR spectroscopy enables determination of MCA diastereoisomers in body fluids and can be a complementary and useful diagnostic tool.

  11. Solid state 13C NMR characterisation study on fourth generation Ziegler-Natta catalysts.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Harri; Liitiä, Tiina; Virkkunen, Ville; Leinonen, Timo; Helaja, Tuulamari; Denifl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this study, solid state (13)C NMR spectroscopy was utilised to characterize and identify the metal-ester coordination in active fourth generation (phthalate) Ziegler-Natta catalysts. It is known that different donors affect the active species in ZN catalysts. However, there is still limited data available of detailed molecular information how the donors and the active species are interplaying. One of the main goals of this work was to get better insight into the interactions of donor and active species. Based on the anisotropy tensor values (δ(11), δ(22), δ(33)) from low magic-angle spinning (MAS) (13)C NMR spectra in combination with chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) calculations (δ(aniso) and η), both the coordinative metal (Mg/Ti) and the symmetry of this interaction between metal and the internal donor in the active catalyst (MgCl(2)/TiCl(4)/electron donor) system could be identified. PMID:22425229

  12. 13C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The many advantages of 13C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, 13C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semi-automated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE datasets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures. PMID:25932900

  13. Chemical and nanometer-scale structure of kerogen and its change during thermal maturation investigated by advanced solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, J.; Fang, X.; Lan, Y.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Xu, L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used advanced and quantitative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate structural changes in a series of type II kerogen samples from the New Albany Shale across a range of maturity (vitrinite reflectance R0 from 0.29% to 1.27%). Specific functional groups such as CH3, CH2, alkyl CH, aromatic CH, aromatic C-O, and other nonprotonated aromatics, as well as "oil prone" and "gas prone" carbons, have been quantified by 13C NMR; atomic H/C and O/C ratios calculated from the NMR data agree with elemental analysis. Relationships between NMR structural parameters and vitrinite reflectance, a proxy for thermal maturity, were evaluated. The aromatic cluster size is probed in terms of the fraction of aromatic carbons that are protonated (???30%) and the average distance of aromatic C from the nearest protons in long-range H-C dephasing, both of which do not increase much with maturation, in spite of a great increase in aromaticity. The aromatic clusters in the most mature sample consist of ???30 carbons, and of ???20 carbons in the least mature samples. Proof of many links between alkyl chains and aromatic rings is provided by short-range and long-range 1H-13C correlation NMR. The alkyl segments provide most H in the samples; even at a carbon aromaticity of 83%, the fraction of aromatic H is only 38%. While aromaticity increases with thermal maturity, most other NMR structural parameters, including the aromatic C-O fractions, decrease. Aromaticity is confirmed as an excellent NMR structural parameter for assessing thermal maturity. In this series of samples, thermal maturation mostly increases aromaticity by reducing the length of the alkyl chains attached to the aromatic cores, not by pronounced growth of the size of the fused aromatic ring clusters. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. (13)C NMR Studies, Molecular Order, and Mesophase Properties of Thiophene Mesogens.

    PubMed

    Veeraprakash, B; Lobo, Nitin P; Narasimhaswamy, T

    2015-12-01

    Three-ring mesogens with a core comprising thiophene linked to one phenyl ring directly and to the other via flexible ester are synthesized with terminal alkoxy chains to probe the mesophase properties and find the molecular order. The phenyl thiophene link in the core offers a comparison of the mesophase features with the molecular shape of the mesogen. The synthesized mesogens display enantiotropic polymesomorphism and accordingly nematic, smectic A, smectic C and smectic B mesophases are perceived depending upon the terminal chain length. For some of the homologues, monotropic higher order smectic phases such as smectic F and crystal E are also witnessed. The existence of polymesomorphism are originally observed by HOPM and DSC and further confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction studies. For the C8 homologue, high resolution solid state (13)C NMR spectroscopy is employed to find the molecular structure in the liquid crystalline phase and using the 2D SLF technique, the (13)C-(1)H dipolar couplings are extracted to calculate the order parameter. By comparing the ratio of local order of thiophene as well as phenyl rings, we establish the bent-core shape of the mesogen. Importantly, for assigning the carbon chemical shifts of the core unit of aligned C8 mesogen, the (13)C NMR measured in mesophase of the synthetic intermediate is employed. Thus, the proposed approach addresses the key step in the spectral assignment of target mesogens with the use of (13)C NMR data of mesomorphic intermediate. PMID:26551439

  15. Identification of natural metabolites in mixture: a pattern recognition strategy based on (13)C NMR.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Jane; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc; Purson, Sylvain; Hamzaoui, Mahmoud; Borie, Nicolas; Reynaud, Romain; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2014-03-18

    Because of their highly complex metabolite profile, the chemical characterization of bioactive natural extracts usually requires time-consuming multistep purification procedures to achieve the structural elucidation of pure individual metabolites. The aim of the present work was to develop a dereplication strategy for the identification of natural metabolites directly within mixtures. Exploiting the polarity range of metabolites, the principle was to rapidly fractionate a multigram quantity of a crude extract by centrifugal partition extraction (CPE). The obtained fractions of simplified chemical composition were subsequently analyzed by (13)C NMR. After automatic collection and alignment of (13)C signals across spectra, hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) was performed for pattern recognition. As a result, strong correlations between (13)C signals of a single structure within the mixtures of the fraction series were visualized as chemical shift clusters. Each cluster was finally assigned to a molecular structure with the help of a locally built (13)C NMR chemical shift database. The proof of principle of this strategy was achieved on a simple model mixture of commercially available plant secondary metabolites and then applied to a bark extract of the African tree Anogeissus leiocarpus Guill. & Perr. (Combretaceae). Starting from 5 g of this genuine extract, the fraction series was generated by CPE in only 95 min. (13)C NMR analyses of all fractions followed by pattern recognition of (13)C chemical shifts resulted in the unambiguous identification of seven major compounds, namely, sericoside, trachelosperogenin E, ellagic acid, an epimer mixture of (+)-gallocatechin and (-)-epigallocatechin, 3,3'-di-O-methylellagic acid 4'-O-xylopyranoside, and 3,4,3'-tri-O-methylflavellagic acid 4'-O-glucopyranoside. PMID:24555703

  16. Spectroscopic separation of (13) C NMR spectra of complex isomeric mixtures by the CSSF-TOCSY-INEPT experiment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Moreno, Aitor; Fieber, Wolfgang; Brauchli, Robert; Sommer, Horst

    2015-04-01

    Isomeric mixtures from synthetic or natural origins can pose fundamental challenges for their chromatographic separation and spectroscopic identification. A novel 1D selective NMR experiment, chemical shift selective filter (CSSF)-TOCSY-INEPT, is presented that allows the extraction of (13) C NMR subspectra of discrete isomers in complex mixtures without physical separation. This is achieved via CSS excitation of proton signals in the (1) H NMR mixture spectrum, propagation of the selectivity by polarization transfer within coupled (1) H spins, and subsequent relaying of the magnetization from (1) H to (13) C by direct INEPT transfer to generate (13) C NMR subspectra. Simple consolidation of the subspectra yields (13) C NMR spectra for individual isomers. Alternatively, CSSF-INEPT with heteronuclear long-range transfer can correlate the isolated networks of coupled spins and therefore facilitate the reconstruction of the (13) C NMR spectra for isomers containing multiple spin systems. A proof-of-principle validation of the CSSF-TOCSY-INEPT experiment is demonstrated on three mixtures with different spectral and structural complexities. The results show that CSSF-TOCSY-INEPT is a versatile, powerful tool for deconvoluting isomeric mixtures within the NMR tube with unprecedented resolution and offers unique, unambiguous spectral information for structure elucidation. PMID:25616134

  17. Trace level detection of compounds related to the chemical weapons convention by 1H-detected 13C NMR spectroscopy executed with a sensitivity-enhanced, cryogenic probehead.

    PubMed

    Cullinan, David B; Hondrogiannis, George; Henderson, Terry J

    2008-04-15

    Two-dimensional 1H-13C HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum correlation) and fast-HMQC (heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation) pulse sequences were implemented using a sensitivity-enhanced, cryogenic probehead for detecting compounds relevant to the Chemical Weapons Convention present in complex mixtures. The resulting methods demonstrated exceptional sensitivity for detecting the analytes at trace level concentrations. 1H-13C correlations of target analytes at < or = 25 microg/mL were easily detected in a sample where the 1H solvent signal was approximately 58,000-fold more intense than the analyte 1H signals. The problem of overlapping signals typically observed in conventional 1H spectroscopy was essentially eliminated, while 1H and 13C chemical shift information could be derived quickly and simultaneously from the resulting spectra. The fast-HMQC pulse sequences generated magnitude mode spectra suitable for detailed analysis in approximately 4.5 h and can be used in experiments to efficiently screen a large number of samples. The HSQC pulse sequences, on the other hand, required roughly twice the data acquisition time to produce suitable spectra. These spectra, however, were phase-sensitive, contained considerably more resolution in both dimensions, and proved to be superior for detecting analyte 1H-13C correlations. Furthermore, a HSQC spectrum collected with a multiplicity-edited pulse sequence provided additional structural information valuable for identifying target analytes. The HSQC pulse sequences are ideal for collecting high-quality data sets with overnight acquisitions and logically follow the use of fast-HMQC pulse sequences to rapidly screen samples for potential target analytes. Use of the pulse sequences considerably improves the performance of NMR spectroscopy as a complimentary technique for the screening, identification, and validation of chemical warfare agents and other small-molecule analytes present in complex mixtures and environmental

  18. DFT study of molecular structures and 13C NMR parameters of two fluorinated biphenyls and their η6-tricarbonylchromium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryff-Keller, Adam; Szczeciński, Przemysław

    2015-07-01

    The molecular structures of 2,2‧-difluoro-6,6‧-dimethylbiphenyl, 4,5-difluoro-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene and of their η6-tricarbonylchromium complexes have been discussed in the light of the results of molecular energy calculations. Also the isotropic magnetic shielding constants and carbon-fluorine spin-spin coupling constants for these objects have been calculated and compared with the experimental values of 13C NMR chemical shifts and J constants. The calculational methods used were: DFT/BHandH/6-311++G(2d,p) and/or DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p). It has been confirmed that experimental 13C NMR chemical shifts for η6-arene tricarbonylchromium complexes can be satisfactorily predicted using both methods, although the method exploiting BHandH functional is not able to reproduce the 13C NMR chemical shifts of Cr(CO)3 carbon atoms. On the other hand, this method provides the J(13C, 19F) values which are close to the experimental ones.

  19. Chemical composition of organic matter in a deep soil changed with a positive priming effect due to glucose addition as investigated by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fresh organic carbon becomes more accessible to subsoil following losses of surface soil or deep incorporation of crop residues, which can cause the priming effect and influence the quality and quantity of soil organic C (SOC) in subsoil. Chemical compositions of SOC in subsoil (1.0-1.2 m) without ...

  20. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Bulk chemical characterization using solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, Ronald; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Hedges, John I.

    1990-07-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of mangrove ( Rhizophora mangle) leaves during decomposition in tropical estuarine waters were characterized using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and elemental (CHNO) analysis. Carbohydrates were the most abundant components of the leaves accounting for about 50 wt% of senescent tissues. Tannins were estimated to account for about 20 wt% of leaf tissues, and lipid components, cutin, and possibly other aliphatic biopolymers in leaf cuticles accounted for about 15 wt%. Carbohydrates were generally less resistant to decomposition than the other constituents and decreased in relative concentration during decomposition. Tannins were of intermediate resistance to decomposition and remained in fairly constant proportion during decomposition. Paraffinic components were very resistant to decomposition and increased in relative concentration as decomposition progressed. Lignin was a minor component of all leaf tissues. Standard methods for the colorimetric determination of tannins (Folin-Dennis reagent) and the gravimetric determination of lignin (Klason lignin) were highly inaccurate when applied to mangrove leaves. The N content of the leaves was particularly dynamic with values ranging from 1.27 wt% in green leaves to 0.65 wt% in senescent yellow leaves attached to trees. During decomposition in the water the N content initially decreased to 0.51 wt% due to leaching, but values steadily increased thereafter to 1.07 wt% in the most degraded leaf samples. The absolute mass of N in the leaves increased during decomposition indicating that N immobilization was occurring as decomposition progressed.

  1. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Bulk chemical characterization using solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benner, R.; Hatcher, P.G.; Hedges, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) leaves during decomposition in tropical estuarine waters were characterized using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and elemental (CHNO) analysis. Carbohydrates were the most abundant components of the leaves accounting for about 50 wt% of senescent tissues. Tannins were estimated to account for about 20 wt% of leaf tissues, and lipid components, cutin, and possibly other aliphatic biopolymers in leaf cuticles accounted for about 15 wt%. Carbohydrates were generally less resistant to decomposition than the other constituents and decreased in relative concentration during decomposition. Tannins were of intermediate resistance to decomposition and remained in fairly constant proportion during decomposition. Paraffinic components were very resistant to decomposition and increased in relative concentration as decomposition progressed. Lignin was a minor component of all leaf tissues. Standard methods for the colorimetric determination of tannins (Folin-Dennis reagent) and the gravimetric determination of lignin (Klason lignin) were highly inaccurate when applied to mangrove leaves. The N content of the leaves was particularly dynamic with values ranging from 1.27 wt% in green leaves to 0.65 wt% in senescent yellow leaves attached to trees. During decomposition in the water the N content initially decreased to 0.51 wt% due to leaching, but values steadily increased thereafter to 1.07 wt% in the most degraded leaf samples. The absolute mass of N in the leaves increased during decomposition indicating that N immobilization was occurring as decomposition progressed. ?? 1990.

  2. Synthesis, spectral analysis (FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and UV-visible) and quantum chemical studies on molecular geometry, NBO, NLO, chemical reactivity and thermodynamic properties of novel 2-amino-4-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-5-oxo-6-phenyl-5,6-dihydro-4H-pyrano[3,2-c]quinoline-3-carbonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatma, Shaheen; Bishnoi, Abha; Verma, Anil Kumar

    2015-09-01

    In the present study novel 2-amino-4-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-5-oxo-6-phenyl-5,6-dihydro-4H-pyrano[3,2-c]quinoline-3-carbonitrile was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-visible spectroscopy and mass spectral analysis. The chemical calculations were done by DFT level of theory using Becke3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) and Coulomb Attenuating Method (CAM-B3LYP)/6-31G(d,p) basis set. 1H, 13C chemical shifts and vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and good correlation with the experimental data has been accomplished. UV-Visible spectrum of the molecule was recorded in the region 200-500 nm and the electronic properties and composition were obtained using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) method. Hyperconjugative interactions were studied with the help of natural bond orbital analysis. Electric dipole moment, polarizability and first static hyperpolarizability values have been calculated. The results show that the title compound possesses nonlinear optical behavior with non-zero values. The thermodynamic properties of the compound were calculated at different temperatures. The local reactivity descriptors show that C(7) is most reactive site for nucleophilic attack.

  3. A study of the molecular conformations and the vibrational, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the anticancer drug tamoxifen and triphenylethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Khan, Ibrahim

    2016-08-01

    The structural stability and the vibrational spectra of the anticancer drug tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were investigated by the DFT B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) calculations. Tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were predicted to exist predominantly as non-planar structures. The vibrational frequencies and the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the low energy structures of tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were computed at the DFT B3LYP level of theory. Complete vibrational assignments were provided by combined theoretical and experimental data of tamoxifen and triphenylethylene. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of both molecules were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the two molecules. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for tamoxifen is 0.29 and 4.72 ppm, whereas for triphenylethylene, it is 0.16 and 2.70 ppm, respectively.

  4. Ab initio/GIAO-CCSD(T) (13)C NMR study of the rearrangement and dynamic aspects of rapidly equilibrating tertiary carbocations, C6H13(+) and C7H15(+).

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Prakash, G K Surya; Rasul, Golam

    2016-01-01

    The rearrangement pathways of the equilibrating tertiary carbocations, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butyl cation (C6H13(+), 1), 2,3,3-trimethyl-2-butyl cation (C7H15(+), 5) and 2,3-dimethyl-2-pentyl cation (C7H15(+), 8 and 9) were investigated using the ab initio/GIAO-CCSD(T) (13)C NMR method. Comparing the calculated and experimental (13)C NMR chemical shifts of a series of carbocations indicates that excellent prediction of δ(13)C could be achieved through scaling. In the case of symmetrical equilibrating cations (1 and 5) the Wagner-Meerwein 1,2-hydride and 1,2-methide shifts, respectively, produce the same structure. This indicates that the overall (13)C NMR chemical shifts are conserved and independent of temperature. However, in the case of unsymmetrical equilibrating cations (8 and 9) the Wagner-Meerwein shift produces different tertiary structures, which have slightly different thermodynamic stabilities and, thus, different spectra. At the MP4(SDTQ)/cc-pVTZ//MP2/cc-pVTZ + ZPE level structure 8 is only 90 calories/mol more stable than structure 9. Based on computed (13)C NMR chemical shift calculations, mole fractions of these isomers were determined by assuming the observed chemical shifts are due to the weighted average of the chemical shifts of the static ions. PMID:26192716

  5. 13C NMR of methane in an AlPO4-11 molecular sieve: Exchange effects and shielding anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskela, Tuomas; Ylihautala, Mika; Jokisaari, Jukka; Vaara, Juha

    1998-12-01

    13C NMR spectra of 13CH4 in an AlPO4-11 molecular sieve reveal exchange effects between adsorbed and nonadsorbed methane gas. An application of pulsed field gradients is introduced to decrease nonadsorbed and exchanging gas signals in order to extract the chemical shift anisotropy line shape of the adsorbed gas. The resulting 13C shielding anisotropy of methane is compared to existing value for methane in related SAPO-11 material. Less anisotropic shielding is observed in AlPO4-11, most likely due to the lack of charge-compensating cations.

  6. Molecular structure, spectral investigation (1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Visible, FT-IR, FT-Raman), NBO, intramolecular hydrogen bonding, chemical reactivity and first hyperpolarizability analysis of formononetin [7-hydroxy-3(4-methoxyphenyl)chromone]: A quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Mishra, Rashmi; Kumar, Sudhir; Dev, Kapil; Tandon, Poonam; Maurya, Rakesh

    2015-03-01

    Formononetin [7-hydroxy-3(4-methoxyphenyl)chromone or 4‧-methoxy daidzein] is a soy isoflavonoid that is found abundantly in traditional Chinese medicine Astragalus mongholicus (Bunge) and Trifolium pretense L. (red clover), and in an Indian medicinal plant, Butea (B.) monosperma. Crude extract of B.monosperma is used for rapid healing of fracture in Indian traditional medicine. In this study, a combined theoretical and experimental approach is used to study the properties of formononetin. The optimized geometry was calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p) as a large basis set. The FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra were recorded in the solid phase, and interpreted in terms of potential energy distribution (PED) analysis. Density functional theory (DFT) is applied to explore the nonlinear optical properties of the molecule. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and observed data for the electronic absorption, IR and Raman spectra. The solvent effects have been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory in combination with the integral equation formalism polarized continuum model, and the results are in good agreement with observed measurements. The double well potential energy curve of the molecule about the respective bonds, have been plotted, as obtained from DFT/6-31G basis set. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of formononetin. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap of possible conformers has been calculated for comparing their chemical activity. Chemical reactivity has been measured by reactivity descriptors and molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEP). The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by the Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Furthermore, the role of CHsbnd O intramolecular hydrogen bond in the stability of molecule is investigated on the basis of the results of topological properties of AIM theory and NBO analysis. The calculated first hyperpolarizability shows

  7. Complexation of oxygen ligands with dimeric rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetate in chloroform: 1H, 13C NMR and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głaszczka, Rafał; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2013-03-01

    The complexation of dimeric rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetylate with 25 ligands containing oxygen atoms: alcohols, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and esters in chloroform solution have been investigated by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. Investigated ligands form 1:1 adducts in our experimental conditions, with stability constants in the order of several hundred mol-1. The exchange of ligands in solution is fast on the NMR spectroscopic timescale. The decrease of longitudinal relaxation times T1 in ligands in the presence of rhodium salt has been tested as the means of determination of the complexation site in ligands. The influence of complexation on chemical shifts in ligands was evaluated by a parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δadd - δlig). These parameters were positive (>0 ppm) and did not exceed 1 ppm for 1H NMR; and varied from ca. -5 to +15 ppm in the case of 13C NMR. The calculation by DFT methods using the B3LYP functional (structure optimization, electronic energy) and B3PW91 functional (shielding), and combinations of the (6-31G(2d), 6-311G++(2d,p), and LANL2DZ basis sets, followed by scaling procedures reproduced satisfactorily 1H and 13C chemical shifts and, with some limitations, allowed to estimate Δδ parameters.

  8. Phase behavior and 13C NMR spectroscopic analysis of the mixed methane + ethane + propane hydrates in mesoporous silica gels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungmin; Cha, Inuk; Seo, Yongwon

    2010-11-25

    In this study, the phase behavior and quantitative determination of hydrate composition and cage occupancy for the mixed CH(4) + C(2)H(6) + C(3)H(8) hydrates were closely investigated through the experimental measurement of three-phase hydrate (H)-water-rich liquid (L(W))-vapor (V) equilibria and (13)C NMR spectra. To examine the effect of pore size and salinity, we measured hydrate phase equilibria for the quaternary CH(4) (90%) + C(2)H(6) (7%) + C(3)H(8) (3%) + water mixtures in silica gel pores of nominal diameters of 6.0, 15.0, and 30.0 nm and for the quinary CH(4) (90%) + C(2)H(6) (7%) + C(3)H(8) (3%) + NaCl + water mixtures of two different NaCl concentrations (3 and 10 wt %) in silica gel pores of a nominal 30.0 nm diameter. The value of hydrate-water interfacial tension for the CH(4) (90%) + C(2)H(6) (7%) + C(3)H(8) (3%) hydrate was found to be 47 ± 4 mJ/m(2) from the relation of the dissociation temperature depression with the pore size of silica gels at a given pressure. At a specified temperature, three-phase H-L(W)-V equilibrium curves of pore hydrates were shifted to higher pressure regions depending on pore sizes and NaCl concentrations. From the cage-dependent (13)C NMR chemical shifts of enclathrated guest molecules, the mixed CH(4) (90%) + C(2)H(6) (7%) + C(3)H(8) (3%) gas hydrate was confirmed to be structure II. The cage occupancies of each guest molecule and the hydration number of the mixed gas hydrates were also estimated from the (13)C NMR spectra. PMID:20964277

  9. A novel approach to the rapid assignment of (13)C NMR spectra of major components of vegetable oils such as avocado, mango kernel and macadamia nut oils.

    PubMed

    Retief, Liezel; McKenzie, Jean M; Koch, Klaus R

    2009-09-01

    Assignment of (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of major fatty acid components of South African produced vegetable oils was attempted using a method in which the vegetable oil was spiked with a standard triacylglycerol. This proved to be inadequate and therefore a new rapid and potentially generic graphical linear correlation method is proposed for assignment of the (13)C NMR spectra of major fatty acid components of apricot kernel, avocado pear, grapeseed, macadamia nut, mango kernel and marula vegetable oils. In this graphical correlation method, chemical shifts of fatty acids present in a known standard triacylglycerol is plotted against the corresponding chemical shifts of fatty acids present in the vegetable oils. This new approach (under carefully defined conditions and concentrations) was found especially useful for spectrally crowded regions where significant peak overlap occurs and was validated with the well-known (13)C NMR spectrum of olive oil which has been extensively reported in the literature. In this way, a full assignment of the (13)C{1H} NMR spectra of the vegetable oils, as well as tripalmitolein was readily achieved and the resonances belonging to the palmitoleic acid component of the triacylglycerols in the case of macadamia nut and avocado pear oil resonances were also assigned for the first time in the (13)C NMR spectra of these oils. PMID:19544589

  10. Systematic comparison of sets of (13)C NMR spectra that are potentially identical. Confirmation of the configuration of a cuticular hydrocarbon from the cane beetle Antitrogus parvulus.

    PubMed

    Basar, Norazah; Damodaran, Krishnan; Liu, Hao; Morris, Gareth A; Sirat, Hasnah M; Thomas, Eric J; Curran, Dennis P

    2014-08-15

    A systematic process is introduced to compare (13)C NMR spectra of two (or more) candidate samples of known structure to a natural product sample of unknown structure. The process is designed for the case where the spectra involved can reasonably be expected to be very similar, perhaps even identical. It is first validated by using published (13)C NMR data sets for the natural product 4,6,8,10,16,18-hexamethyldocosane. Then the stereoselective total syntheses of two candidate isomers of the related 4,6,8,10,16-pentamethyldocosane natural product are described, and the process is applied to confidently assign the configuration of the natural product as (4S,6R,8R,10S,16S). This is accomplished even though the chemical shift differences between this isomer and its (16R)-epimer are only ±5-10 ppb (±0.005-0.01 ppm). PMID:25019530

  11. Systematic Comparison of Sets of 13C NMR Spectra That Are Potentially Identical. Confirmation of the Configuration of a Cuticular Hydrocarbon from the Cane Beetle Antitrogus parvulus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A systematic process is introduced to compare 13C NMR spectra of two (or more) candidate samples of known structure to a natural product sample of unknown structure. The process is designed for the case where the spectra involved can reasonably be expected to be very similar, perhaps even identical. It is first validated by using published 13C NMR data sets for the natural product 4,6,8,10,16,18-hexamethyldocosane. Then the stereoselective total syntheses of two candidate isomers of the related 4,6,8,10,16-pentamethyldocosane natural product are described, and the process is applied to confidently assign the configuration of the natural product as (4S,6R,8R,10S,16S). This is accomplished even though the chemical shift differences between this isomer and its (16R)-epimer are only ±5–10 ppb (±0.005–0.01 ppm). PMID:25019530

  12. Characterisation of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of N-acetylaspartylglutamate and its detection in urine from patients with Canavan disease.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Hanna; Gradowska, Wanda

    2003-03-10

    1H and 13C NMR spectra of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) have been recorded and interpreted. The values of the 1H chemical shifts and 1H-(1)H coupling constants at different pH were obtained by iterative computer fitting of 1-D 1H NMR spectra. This provided information on the solution conformation of the investigated molecule. Proton-decoupled high resolution 13C NMR spectra of NAAG have been measured in a series of dilute water solution of various acidity. These data have provided a basis for unequivocal determination of the presence of NAAG in the urine sample of a patient suffering from Canavan disease. NMR spectroscopy provides a possibility of detecting NAAG in body fluids. PMID:12615232

  13. Development of LC-13C NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, H. C.; Wang, J. S.; Glass, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    This study involves the development of C-13 nuclear resonance as an on-line detector for liquid chromatography (LC-C-13 NMR) for the chemical characterization of aviation fuels. The initial focus of this study was the development of a high sensitivity flow C-13 NMR probe. Since C-13 NMR sensitivity is of paramount concern, considerable effort during the first year was directed at new NMR probe designs. In particular, various toroid coil designs were examined. In addition, corresponding shim coils for correcting the main magnetic field (B sub 0) homogeneity were examined. Based on these initial probe design studies, an LC-C-13 NMR probe was built and flow C-13 NMR data was obtained for a limited number of samples.

  14. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  15. A 13C-NMR study of azacryptand complexes.

    PubMed

    Wild, Aljoscha A C; Fennell, Kevin; Morgan, Grace G; Hewage, Chandralal M; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2014-09-28

    An azacryptand has been solubilised in aqueous media containing 50% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide. (13)C-NMR has been used to determine how the azacryptand is affected by zinc binding at pH 10. Using (13)C-NMR and (13)C-enriched bicarbonate we have been able to observe the formation of 4 different carbamate derivatives of the azacryptand at pH 10. The azacryptand was shown to solubilise zinc or cadmium at alkaline pHs. Two moles of zinc are bound per mole of azacryptand and this complex binds 1 mole of carbonate. By replacing the zinc with cadmium-113 we have shown that the (13)C-NMR signal of the (13)C-enriched carbon of the bound carbonate is split into two triplets at 2.2 °C. This shows that two cadmium complexes are formed and in each of these complexes the carbonate group is bound by two magnetically equivalent metal ions. It also demonstrates that these cadmium complexes are not in fast exchange. From temperature studies we show that in the zinc complexes both complexes are in fast exchange with each other but are in slow exchange with free bicarbonate. HOESY is used to determine the position of the carbonate carbon in the complex. The solution and crystal structures of the zinc-carbonate-azacryptand complexes are compared. PMID:25091182

  16. Interactions of D-cellobiose with selected chloride salts: A 13C NMR and FT-IR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasekara, Ananda S.; Wiredu, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The interactions of cellulose model compound D-cellobiose with chloride salts of Zn2 +, Ca2 +, Li+, Sn2 +, La3 +, Mg2 +, K+ and NH4+ were evaluated by measuring the 13C NMR chemical shift changes (Δδ) of the disaccharide due to the addition of salts in D2O. The KCl and NH4Cl showed similar Δδ changes due to interactions only with the Cl- anion. Whereas other chloride salts showed interactions with both cation and anion. Among these salts the total interactions are in the order: Zn2 + > Sn2 + > Li+ > Ca2 + ~ La3 + > Mg2 +. The FT-IR spectra of D-cellobiose-chloride salt 1:2 mixtures also indicate that KCl and NH4Cl interacts similarly with D-cellobiose in the solid state.

  17. 13C NMR spectroscopy applications to brain energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Valette, Julien; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2013-01-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the method of choice for studying brain metabolism. Indeed, the most convincing data obtained to decipher metabolic exchanges between neurons and astrocytes have been obtained using this technique, thus illustrating its power. It may be difficult for non-specialists, however, to grasp thefull implication of data presented in articles written by spectroscopists. The aim of the review is, therefore, to provide a fundamental understanding of this topic to facilitate the non-specialists in their reading of this literature. In the first part of this review, we present the metabolic fate of 13C-labeled substrates in the brain in a detailed way, including an overview of some general neurochemical principles. We also address and compare the various spectroscopic strategies that can be used to study brain metabolism. Then, we provide an overview of the 13C NMR experiments performed to analyze both intracellular and intercellular metabolic fluxes. More particularly, the role of lactate as a potential energy substrate for neurons is discussed in the light of 13C NMR data. Finally, new perspectives and applications offered by 13C hyperpolarization are described. PMID:24367329

  18. Low-temperature solid-state /sup 13/C NMR studies of the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.O.; Palings, I.; Copie, V.; Raleigh, D.P.; Courtin, J.; Pardoen, J.A.; Lugtenburg, J.; Mathies, R.A.; Griffin, R.G.

    1987-03-24

    Magic angle sample spinning (MASS) /sup 13/C NMR spectra have been obtained of bovine rhodopsin regenerated with retinal prosthetic groups isotopically enriched with /sup 13/C at C-5 and C-14. In order to observe the /sup 13/C retinal chromophore resonances, it was necessary to employ low temperatures (-15 ..-->.. -35/sup 0/C) to restrict rotational diffusion of the protein. The isotropic chemical shift and principal values of the chemical shift tensor of the /sup 13/C-5 label indicate that the retinal chromophore is in the twisted 6-s-cis conformation in rhodopsin, in contrast to the planar 6-s-trans confirmation found in bacteriorhodopsin. The /sup 13/C-14 isotropic shift and shift tensor principal values show that the Schiff base C=N bond is anti. Furthermore, the /sup 13/C-14 chemical shift (121.2 ppm) is within the range of values (120-123 ppm) exhibited by protonated (C=N anti) Schiff base model compounds, indicating that the C=N linkage is protonated. The results are discussed with regard to the mechanism of wavelength regulation in rhodopsin.

  19. Metabolic engineering applications of in vivo sup 31 P and sup 13 C NMR studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks, J.V.

    1989-01-01

    With intent to quantify NMR measurements as much as possible, analysis techniques of the in vivo {sup 31}P NMR spectrum are developed. A systematic procedure is formulated for estimating the relative intracellular concentrations of the sugar phosphates in S. cerevisiae from the {sup 31}P NMR spectrum. In addition, in vivo correlation of inorganic phosphate chemical shift with the chemical shifts of 3-phosphoglycerate, {beta}-fructose 1,6-diphosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, and glucose 6-phosphate are determined. Also, a method was developed for elucidation of the cytoplasmic and vacuolar components of inorganic phosphate in the {sup 31}P NMR spectrum of S. cerevisiae. An in vivo correlation relating the inorganic phosphate chemical shift of the vacuole with the chemical shift of the resonance for pyrophosphate and the terminal phosphate of polyphosphate (PP{sub 1}) is established. Transient measurements provided by {sup 31}P NMR are applied to reg1 mutant and standard strains. {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C NMR measurements are used to analyze the performance of recombinant strains in which the glucose phosphorylation step had been altered.

  20. A 13C NMR study of the adsorbed states of CO on Rh dispersed on Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, T. M.; Yates, J. T.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1980-07-01

    The results of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been analyzed with respect to previous infrared studies of CO adsorbed on Rh dispersed on Al2O3 to quantify the site distribution and to describe the adsorbed state. The 13C NMR spectra account for all the 13CO adsorbed on a 2.2% Rh on Al2O3 substrate. Although the spectra from the different adsorbed states of CO overlap, the line shapes may be separated into two components based on differences in the 13C spin-lattice relaxation times. These two components have been assigned to the 13CO dicarbonyl formed on single Rh atoms and to 13CO adsorbed on Rh rafts. The component attributed to the CO adsorbed on the raft sites is further separated into linear and bridged CO state contributions based on chemical shift information, yielding a quantitative distribution of the three adsorbed states of CO on Rh. The 13CO distribution is used to estimate the molar integrated intensities of the infrared spectrum of 13CO on Rh at high coverage and to determine the degree of dispersion of Rh on the Al2O3. The 13C NMR line shapes of CO adsorbed on Rh are different from the powder pattern of Rh2Cl2(CO)4. It is suggested that the line shape of the dicarbonyl surface species is narrowed to a Lorentzian curve by reorientation at the site and the line shape of CO on the Rh rafts is modulated by exchange between sites on a single raft. The 13C relaxation time distribution provides further evidence for the existence of isolated Rh atoms on the Al2O3 surface.

  1. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  2. Molecular structure, vibrational and 13C NMR spectra of two ent-kaurenes spirolactone type diterpenoids rabdosinate and rabdosin B: A combined experimental and density functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Xueliang

    2015-01-01

    The title compounds, rabdosinate and rabdosin B, were isolated from the leaves of Isodon japonica, and characterized by IR-NMR spectroscopy. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies and gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO-13C) chemical shift values of the title compounds have been calculated by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. In addition, obtained results were related to the linear regression of experimental 13C NMR chemical shifts values. The integral equation formalism polarized continuum model (IEFPCM) was used in treating chloroform solvation effects on optimized structural parameters and 13C chemical shifts. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), HOMO-LUMO analysis were performed by the B3LYP method.

  3. Molecular structure, vibrational and 13C NMR spectra of two ent-kaurenes spirolactone type diterpenoids rabdosinate and rabdosin B: a combined experimental and density functional methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Xueliang

    2015-01-25

    The title compounds, rabdosinate and rabdosin B, were isolated from the leaves of Isodon japonica, and characterized by IR-NMR spectroscopy. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies and gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO-13C) chemical shift values of the title compounds have been calculated by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. In addition, obtained results were related to the linear regression of experimental 13C NMR chemical shifts values. The integral equation formalism polarized continuum model (IEFPCM) was used in treating chloroform solvation effects on optimized structural parameters and 13C chemical shifts. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), HOMO-LUMO analysis were performed by the B3LYP method. PMID:25123947

  4. The conformational stability, solvation and the assignments of the experimental infrared, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2015-05-01

    The structure, vibrational and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine were investigated by the B3LYP/6-311G∗∗ calculations. The molecule was predicted to have the non-planar cis (NCCN ∼ 0°) structures being about 2-6 kcal/mol lower in energy than the corresponding trans (NCCN ∼ 180°) forms. The calculated NCCN (9.6°) and CNCC (-132.2°) torsional angles were in a good qualitative agreement with the reported X-ray angles (3.1 and 13.0°, -102.67 and -77.9°, respectively, for H-bonded dimers). The Gibbs energy of solution of lidocaine in formamide, water, dimethylsulfoxide, acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol and chloroform solutions was estimated at the B3LYP level. The predicted affinity of lidocaine toward the alcohols, acetonitrile and chloroform solutions was in excellent agreement with the reported experimental solubility of the drug in organic solvents. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of lidocaine in only one conformation at room temperature. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of lidocaine were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the drug. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for lidocaine is 0.47 and 8.26 ppm, respectively.

  5. A study of the experimental and theoretical infrared, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the biochemicals valeric and valproic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2014-10-01

    The structural stability, vibrational, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of valeric and valproic acids were investigated by the B3LYP calculations with the 6-311G** basis set. Valeric acid is predicted to exist predominantly in the planar cis form (80% abundance). Valproic acid is predicted to have an equilibrium mixture of 68% gauche-1 and 32% gauche-2 structures at 298.15 K. The spectral feature of the Osbnd H stretching mode in the infrared spectra of both acids suggests the presence of strong H-bonding in the condensed phase of valeric acid and weak H-bonding in the case of valproic acid. The harmonic and anharmonic vibrational wavenumbers were computed at the B3LYP level of theory and tentative vibrational assignments were provided on the basis of combined theoretical and experimental infrared and Raman data of the molecules. Not all of the calculated anharmonic wavenumbers showed a consistent trend with the observed wavenumbers. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of both acids were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the two acids. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for valeric acid is 1.8 and 3.8 ppm, whereas for valproic acid, it is 1.4 and 4.5 ppm, respectively.

  6. Fullerene C70 characterization by 13C NMR and the importance of the solvent and dynamics in spectral simulations.

    PubMed

    Kaminský, Jakub; Buděšínský, Miloš; Taubert, Stefan; Bouř, Petr; Straka, Michal

    2013-06-21

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy combined with theoretical calculations is an important tool for fullerene identification. However, the accuracy of available theoretical methods is often not adequate. Therefore, in this work, different computational aspects needed to simulate realistically chemical shifts in the C70 molecule are investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The importance of the functional choice, basis set, solvent, and molecular motions was assessed. The solvent was simulated using the implicit conductor-like polarized continuum model. The molecular motions were included via anharmonic corrections and averaging of snapshots obtained from classical and first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Comparison to experiment revealed that density functional calculations typically overestimate the (13)C NMR chemical shifts. Hybrid functionals, such as BHandH and BHandHLYP, and long-range corrected functionals, such as wB97xd and CAM-B3LYP, give the best results. While the solvent has a minor effect (chemical shift changes by ~1 ppm), the vibrational and dynamical effects are surprisingly large, causing changes up to 9 ppm. Consideration of the latter was also necessary to explain the observed temperature dependence. While the dynamical corrections for MD performed in vacuum were overestimated, inclusion of the solvent in simulations provided more realistic results. The study thus points out the importance of an appropriate solvent model and a complex approach to the modelling, balancing the static, dynamic and environmental factors. PMID:23653057

  7. Experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR) and computational (density functional theory) studies on 3-bromophenylboronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, M.; Kose, E.; Atac, A.; Sas, E. B.; Asiri, A. M.; Kurt, M.

    2014-11-01

    Structurally, boronic acids are trivalent boron-containing organic compounds that possess one alkyl substituent (i.e., C-Br bond) and two hydroxyl groups to fill the remaining valences on the boron atom. We studied 3-bromophenylboronic acid (3BrPBA); a derivative of boronic acid. This study includes the experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR, UV-Vis) techniques and theoretical (DFT-density functional theory) calculations. The experimental data are recorded, FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-10 cm-1) in the solid phase. 1H and 13C NMR spectra are recorded in DMSO solution. UV-Vis spectrum is recorded in the range of 200-400 nm for each solution (in ethanol and water). The theoretical calculations are computed DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The optimum geometry is also obtained from inside for possible four conformers using according to position of hydrogen atoms after the scan coordinate of these structures. The fundamental vibrations are assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and parallel quantum solutions (PQS) program. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts are racked on by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is used to find HOMO and LUMO energies, excitation energies, oscillator strengths. The density of state of the studied molecule is investigated as total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and overlap population density of state (OPDOS or COOP) diagrams have been presented. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPs) and thermodynamic properties are performed. At the end of this work, the results are ensured beneficial for the literature contribution.

  8. Benzenium ion chemistry on solid metal halide superacids: in situ {sup 13}C NMR experiments and theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Barich, D.H.; Torres, P.D.; Haw, J.F.

    1997-01-15

    The benzenium, toluenium, and ethylbenzenium ions were synthesized on aluminium bromide by coadsorption of the precursors with either HBr or alkyl bromide. Principal components of the {sup 13}C chemical shift tensors for the ring carbons of these species were measured from magic angle spinning spectra. The benzenium ion was static at 77 K but underwent both proton scrambling and anisotropic rotation at 298 K as well as oligomerization at higher loadings. The para form of the toluenium ion was the dominant isomer at 77 K, but a temperature-dependent equilibrium between the para and ortho isomers was observed at 273 K. The energy calculations at MP4(fc,sdq)/ 6-311+G{sup *}//MP2/6-311+G{sup *} with thermal corrections resulted in good agreement between calculated and measured proton affinities for benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene. For toluenium ion, the energies of the ortho and meta isomers were 1.2 and 5.4 kcal/mol, respectively, above the para isomer, consistent with the temperature-dependent {sup 13}C NMR spectra in the solid state. {sup 13}C chemical shift tensors calculated at the GIAO-MP2/tzp/dz//MP2/ 6-311+G{sup *} and GIAO-MP2/tzp/dz//B3LYP/6-311+G{sup *} levels of theory were in very close agreement with each other and generally in satisfactory agreement with experimental principal components. 64 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Degradation of mangrove tissues by arboreal termites (Nasutitermes acajutlae) and their role in the mangrove C cycle (Puerto Rico): Chemical characterization and organic matter provenance using bulk δ13C, C/N, alkaline CuO oxidation-GC/MS, and solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vane, Christopher H.; Kim, Alexander W.; Moss-Hayes, Vicky; Snape, Colin E.; Diaz, Miguel Castro; Khan, Nicole S.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Horton, Benjamin P.

    2013-08-01

    Arboreal termites are wood decaying organisms that play an important role in the first stages of C cycling in mangrove systems. The chemical composition of Rhizophora mangle, Avicennia germinans, and Laguncularia racemosa leaf, stem, and pneumatophore tissues as well as associated sediments was compared to that of nests of the termite Nasutitermes acajutlae. Nests gave δ13C values of -26.1 to -27.2‰ (±0.1) and C/N of 43.3 (±2.0) to 98.6 (±16.2) which were similar to all stem and pneumatophores but distinct from mangrove leaves or sediments. Organic matter processed by termites yielded lignin phenol concentrations (Λ, lambda) that were 2-4 times higher than stem or pneumatophores and 10-20 times higher than that of leaves or sediments, suggesting that the nests were more resistant to biodegradation than the mangrove vegetation source. 13C NMR revealed that polysaccharide content of mangrove tissues (50-69% C) was higher than that of the nests (46-51% C). Conversely, lignin accounted for 16.2-19.6% C of nest material, a threefold increase relative to living mangrove tissues; a similar increase in aromatic methoxyl content was also observed in the nests. Lipids (aliphatic and paraffinic moieties) were also important but rather variable chemical components of all three mangrove species, representing between 13.5 and 28.3% of the C content. Termite nests contained 3.14 Mg C ha-1 which represents approximately 2% of above ground C storage in mangroves, a value that is likely to increase upon burial due to their refractory chemical composition.

  10. Conformational changes of alamethicin induced by solvent and temperature. A 13C-NMR and circular-dichroism study.

    PubMed

    Jung, G; Dubischar, N

    1975-06-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) have been used for studies on the conformation of alamethicin. The 13C NMR spectrum is assigned with the aid of signals of synthetic partial sequences and selective proton decoupling. The solvent and temperature-dependence of the 13C NMR spectra, T1 measurements and the use of lanthanide-shift reagents allow the differentiation between the amino acids belonging to a rigid alpha-helical portion of the alamethicin sequence and those belonging to a more flexible part. The 13C NMR results are in agreement with results obtained from extended solvent and temperature-dependent CD studies which indicate a highly stabilized nonpolar and intrachenar alpha-helical part. The concentration-dependence of the CD spectrum of alamethicin in a nematic phase revealed aggregation phenomena which might simulate those observed in natural and synthetic membranes. After dissolving alamethicin in aqueous alcohol there is a time-dependence of the ellipticity of the Cotton effects showing a sort of memory effect on the mode of dissolution. Four different conformations can be characterized by CD spectra depending on the solvent and concentration. A model illustrating the dynamic conformations and aggregation phenomena within a membrane is proposed. PMID:1175592

  11. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  12. Toward dynamic isotopomer analysis in the rat brain in vivo: automatic quantitation of 13C NMR spectra using LCModel.

    PubMed

    Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Oz, Gülin; Provencher, Stephen; Gruetter, Rolf

    2003-01-01

    The LCModel method was adapted to analyze localized in vivo (13)C NMR spectra obtained from the rat brain in vivo at 9.4 T. Prior knowledge of chemical-shifts, J-coupling constants and J-evolution was included in the analysis. Up to 50 different isotopomer signals corresponding to 10 metabolites were quantified simultaneously in 400 microl volumes in the rat brain in vivo during infusion of [1,6-(13)C(2)]glucose. The analysis remained accurate even at low signal-to-noise ratio of the order of 3:1. The relative distribution of isotopomers in glutamate, glutamine and aspartate determined in vivo in 22 min was in excellent agreement with that measured in brain extracts. Quantitation of time series of (13)C spectra yielded time courses of total (13)C label incorporation into up to 16 carbon positions, as well as time courses of individual isotopomer signals, with a temporal resolution as low as 5 min (dynamic isotopomer analysis). The possibility of measuring in vivo a wealth of information that was hitherto accessible only in extracts is likely to expand the scope of metabolic studies in the intact brain. PMID:14679502

  13. 1H and 13C NMR spectral study of some 3,5-bis[(E)-thienylmethylene]piperidin-4-ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswari, K.; Pandiarajan, K.

    2011-03-01

    1H and 13C NMR spectra have been recorded for 3,5-bis[(E)-thienylmethylene]piperidin-4-one ( 1a), 3',3″-dimethyl-3,5-bis[(E)-thienylmethylene]piperidin-4-one ( 1b), 5',5″-dibromo-3,5-bis[(E)-thienylmethylene]piperidin-4-one ( 1c), their 1-methyl derivatives 2a- c and 3,5-bis[(E)-thienylmethylene]-2r,6c-diphenylpiperidin-4-one ( 3a). For selected compounds 2D spectra have been recorded. The spectral data are used to study the configuration and conformation of these molecules. The chemical shifts are discussed in light of steric, electronic and magnetic anisotropic effects. The magnetic anisotropic effects of thiophene ring and phenyl group are noteworthy. 1H- 1H COSY spectrum of 2b suggests that long-range 1H- 1H coupling, up to seven bonds, is possible in it. HMBC spectrum of 2b displays the magnetic nonequivalence of C-2 and C-6 and protons at these carbons.

  14. Ionization of isocitrate bound to pig hear NADP/sup +/-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase: /sup 13/C NMR study of substrate binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.S.; Colman, R.F.

    1987-06-16

    Isocitrate and ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate have been synthesized with carbon-13 enrichment at specific positions. The /sup 13/C NMR spectra of these derivatives were measured as a function of pH. The magnitudes of the changes in chemical shifts with pH for free isocitrate and the magnesium-isocitrate complex suggest that the primary site of ionization at the ..beta..-carboxyl. In the presence of the enzyme NADP/sup +/-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase and the activating metal magnesium, the carbon-13 resonances of all three carboxyls remain constant from pH 5.5 to pH 7.5. Thus, the carboxyls remain in the ionized form in the enzyme-isocitrate complex. The ..cap alpha..-hydroxyl carbon resonance could not be located in the enzyme-isocitrate complex, suggesting immobilization of this group. Magnesium produces a 2 ppm downfield shift of the ..beta..-carboxyl but does not change the resonances of the ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-carboxyls. This result is consistent with metal activation of both the dehydrogenation and decarboxylation reactions. The /sup 13/C NMR spectrum of ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate remains unchanged in the presence of isocitrate dehydrogenase, implying the absence of alterations in geometry in the enzyme-bound form. Formation of the quaternary complex with Mg/sup 2 +/ and NADPH leads to loss of the ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate resonances and the appearance of new resonances characteristic of ..cap alpha..-hydroxyglutarate. In addition, a broad peak ascribed to the enol form of ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate is observed. The substantial change in the shift of the ..beta..-carboxyl of isocitrate and the lack of significant shifts in the other carboxyls of isocitrate or ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate suggest that interaction of the ..beta..-carboxyl with the enzyme contributes to the tighter binding of isocitrate and may be significant for the oxidative decarboxylation function of isocitrate dehydrogenase.

  15. Molecular interactions of a model bile salt and porcine bile with (1,3:1,4)-β-glucans and arabinoxylans probed by (13)C NMR and SAXS.

    PubMed

    Gunness, Purnima; Flanagan, Bernadine M; Mata, Jitendra P; Gilbert, Elliot P; Gidley, Michael J

    2016-04-15

    Two main classes of interaction between soluble dietary fibres (SDFs), such as (1,3:1,4)-β-D-glucan (βG) and arabinoxylan (AX) and bile salt (BS) or diluted porcine bile, were identified by (13)C NMR and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Small chemical shift differences of BS NMR resonances were consistent with effective local concentration or dilution of BS micelles mostly by βG, suggesting dynamic interactions; whilst the reduced line widths/intensities observed were mostly caused by wheat AX and the highest molecular size and concentrations of βG. SAXS showed evidence of changes in βG but not AX in the presence of BS micelles, at >13 nm length scale consistent with molecular level interactions. Thus intermolecular interactions between SDF and BS depend on both SDF source and its molecular weight and may occur alone or in combination. PMID:26617003

  16. 13C-NMR study of labeled vinyl groups in paramagnetic myoglobin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sankar, S S; La Mar, G N; Smith, K M; Fujinari, E M

    1987-04-01

    The 13C-NMR spectra of high-spin met-aquo myoglobin, spin-equilibrium met-azido myoglobin, low-spin met-cyano myoglobin, deoxy myoglobin and carbonmonoxy myoglobin from sperm whale reconstituted with hemin 13C enriched at both vinyl alpha or beta positions have been recorded. In all cases the labeled vinyl 13C signals are clearly resolved and useful spectra could be obtained within approx. 15 minutes. The decoupling of multiplet structure due to attached proton(s) has led to the specific assignment of vinyl 13C alpha signals in all paramagnetic derivatives and the 13C beta signals in met-cyano myoglobin. In all other cases, the collapse of the proton multiplet structure as a function of 1H decoupling frequency has located, but not assigned, the attached 1H resonance positions which are obscured by the intense diamagnetic envelope in the 1H-NMR spectrum. The resulting vinyl 13C hyperfine shifts follow Curie behavior, and the patterns closely resemble those in the appropriate model complexes in the same oxidation/spin/ligation state, except that the protein exhibits more in-plane asymmetry. The hyperfine shift patterns are indicative of dominant pi contact shifts for all ferric complexes. Deoxy myoglobin vinyl 13C and 1H contact shifts provide little evidence for pi bonding. PMID:3828362

  17. Solid-state 13C NMR analysis of Lower Cretaceous Baganuur (Mongolia) lignite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdenetsogt, B.; Lee, I.; Lee, S.; Ko, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The transformation of plant matter into peat and coal has two steps, called the biochemical and geochemical stages of coalification. Biochemical coalification begins with the accumulation of dead vegetable matter and ends at the rank of subbituminous coal. The rank of Baganuur lignite ranges from lignite to subbituminous coal. It is transition between biochemical and physico-chemical coalification stages. The changes of chemical structure of coal during the transition between above mentioned two stages were studied by solid state CP/MAS 13C NMR. The most predominant alteration is the disappearance of the resonances from oxygenated aliphatic carbons (63 ppm), protonated aromatic carbons (114 ppm), oxygen-substituted aromatic carbons (144 ppm) and carbonyl carbons (195 ppm). In addition, the intensity of resonances from methoxyl carbons (56 ppm) and oxygenated aliphatic carbons (72 ppm) decreased. While the intensities of resonance from aliphatic (30 ppm), protonated aromatic (125 ppm) and carboxyl carbon (174 ppm) increased or remained almost constant. The relative percent of O-substituted aromatic carbons decreased by ~25% mainly due to the intensity loss of the peak at 144 ppm, indicating removal of O-containing functional groups substituted to aromatic carbons. It is consistent with the decreased relative percent (~75%) of the peak at 114 ppm from protonated aromatic carbons nearby oxygen-substituted aromatic carbons. In addition, the resonance from 125 ppm was shifted to 128 ppm and its relative area increased by ~20%, indicating replacement of O-substituent of aromatic rings by hydrogen or carbon. Protonated aromatic carbons at least two bond away from an oxygen-substituted aromatic carbons give a resonance at 125 ppm and carbon-substituted aromatic carbons give a resonance at 130-132 ppm. With the increase relative percent of C-substituted aromatic carbons, their resonance were overlapped with protonated aromatic carbons and shifted to higher ppm. A decreasing

  18. Stable isotope-enhanced two- and three-dimensional diffusion ordered 13C-NMR spectroscopy (SIE-DOSY 13C-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable Isotope-Enhanced Diffusion Ordered (SIE-DOSY) 13C-NMR has been applied to 13C-enriched carbohydrates and has been used to determine diffusion coefficients for pentose and hexose monosaccharides, a disaccharide and a trisaccharide. These 2D spectra were obtained with as little as 8 min of acq...

  19. In Situ 13C NMR at Elevated-Pressures and -Temperatures Investigating the Conversion of CO2 to Magnesium and Calcium Carbonate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surface, J. A.; Conradi, M. S.; Skemer, P. A.; Hayes, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We have constructed specialized NMR hardware to conduct in situ elevated-pressure, elevated-temperature 13C NMR studies of unmixed heterogeneous mixtures of solids, liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. Specifically, our aim is to monitor CO2 uptake in both ultramafic rocks and in more porous geological materials to understand the mechanisms of chemisorption as a function of temperature, pressure and pH. In this in situ NMR probe, we are able to simulate processes at geologically relevant fluid pressures and temperatures, monitoring the kinetics of CO2 conversion to carbonates. The in situ NMR experiments consist of heterogeneous mixtures of rock, salty brine solution, and moderate pressure CO2 gas at elevated temperatures. The purpose of studying these reactions is to determine efficacy of carbonate formation in various geological reservoirs. Via 13C NMR, we have spectroscopically characterized and quantified the conversion of CO2 to magnesium carbonate and calcium carbonate minerals. When CO2 reacts with the calcium or magnesium in a mineral or rock sample, the 13C chemical shift, linewidth, lineshape, and relaxation times change dramatically. This change can be monitored in situ and provide instantaneous and continuous characterization that maps the chemistry that is taking place. For example, on the pathway to MgCO3 formation, there are a number of phases of Mg(OH)x(H2O)y(CO3)z that are apparent via NMR spectroscopy. We will demonstrate that NMR can be used for quantitative characterization of multiple metastable mineral phases in pure forms and in mixtures. Results are confirmed via powder XRD and Raman spectroscopy of aquo- hydro- carbonato- magnesium species and calcium carbonate species. We also have monitored the 13C spectroscopy to analyze the phase of CO2 (liquid, supercritical, or gas) and its conversion into other forms, such as bicarbonate and carbonate species, providing a "window" into the in situ pH of the reacting system. Reference: 'In Situ

  20. Four-Component Relativistic DFT Calculations of (13)C Chemical Shifts of Halogenated Natural Substances.

    PubMed

    Casella, Girolamo; Bagno, Alessandro; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Saielli, Giacomo

    2015-12-14

    We have calculated the (13)C NMR chemical shifts of a large ensemble of halogenated organic molecules (81 molecules for a total of 250 experimental (13)C NMR data at four different levels of theory), ranging from small rigid organic compounds, used to benchmark the performance of various levels of theory, to natural substances of marine origin with conformational degrees of freedom. Carbon atoms bonded to heavy halogen atoms, particularly bromine and iodine, are known to be rather challenging when it comes to the prediction of their chemical shifts by quantum methods, due to relativistic effects. In this paper, we have applied the state-of-the-art four-component relativistic density functional theory for the prediction of such NMR properties and compared the performance with two-component and nonrelativistic methods. Our results highlight the necessity to include relativistic corrections within a four-component description for the most accurate prediction of the NMR properties of halogenated organic substances. PMID:26541625

  1. 13C-NMR spectra and contact time experiment for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The T(CP) and T(1p) time constants for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids were determined to be short with T(CP) values ranging from 0.14 ms to 0.53 ms and T(1p) values ranging from 3.3 ms to 5.9 ms. T(CP) or T(1p) time constants at a contact time of 1 ms are favorable for quantification of 13C-NMR spectra. Because of the short T(CP) values, correction factors for signal intensity for various regions of the 13C-NMR spectra would be necessary at contact times greater than 1.1 ms or less than 0.9 ms. T(CP) and T(1p) values have a limited non-homogeneity within Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids. A pulse delay or repeat time of 700 ms is more than adequate for quantification of these 13C-NMR spectra. Paramagnetic effects in these humic substances are precluded due to low inorganic ash contents, low contents of Fe, Mn, and Co, and low organic free-radical contents. The observed T(CP) values suggest that all the carbon types in Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids are fully cross-polarized before significant proton relaxation occurs. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern fulvic acid is similar to most aquatic fulvic acids as it is predominantly aliphatic, low in aromaticity (fa1 = 24), low in phenolic content, high in carboxyl content, and has no resolution of a methoxyl peak. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern humic acid is also similar to most other aquatic humic acids in that it is also predominantly aliphatic, high in aromaticity (fa1 = 38), moderate in phenolic content, moderate in carboxyl content, and has a clear resolution of a methoxyl carbon region. After the consideration of the necessary 13C-NMR experimental conditions, these spectra are considered to be quantitative. With careful consideration of the previously determined 13C-NMR experimental conditions, quantitative spectra can be obtained for humic substances in the future from the HUMEX site. Possible changes in humic substances due to acidification should be determined from 13C-NMR data.

  2. Biosynthesis of the antibiotic maduramicin. Origin of the carbon and oxygen atoms as well as the 13C NMR assignments.

    PubMed

    Tsou, H; Rajan, S; Fiala, R; Mowery, P C; Bullock, M W; Borders, D B; James, J C; Martin, J H; Morton, G O

    1984-12-01

    The biosynthesis of maduramicin alpha and beta in a culture of Actinomadura yumaensis has been studied using 13C, 14C and 18O labeled precursors. The alpha component of this recently discovered polyether antibiotic, containing forty-seven carbon atoms in a seven-ring system, is derived from eight acetate, seven propionate and four methionine molecules. The beta component which is missing one methoxy group incorporates three methionine methyl groups. The carbohydrate moiety was enriched by methionine, but not significantly by acetate or propionate. Studies of the incorporation of 13C labeled precursors permit the 13C NMR assignment of maduramicin. The origin of oxygen atoms of maduramicin has been examined by feeding [1-13C, 18O2]acetate and [1-13C, 18O2]propionate separately in the fermentation culture and the resulting doubly labeled maduramicin samples were analyzed by the isotopic shifts in the 13C NMR spectra. These results are consistent with the initial formation of a triene, which is converted to maduramicin by cyclization of the triepoxide. PMID:6526733

  3. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  4. Evolution of organic matter during composting of different organic wastes assessed by CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Caricasole, P.; Provenzano, M.R.; Senesi, N.

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, the evolution of organic matter (OM) during composting of different mixtures of various organic wastes was assessed by means of chemical analyses and CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy measured during composting. The trends of temperatures and C/N ratios supported the correct evolution of the processes. The CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectra of all composting substrates indicated a reduction in carbohydrates and an increase in aromatic, phenolic, carboxylic and carbonylic C which suggested a preference by microorganisms for easily degradable C molecules. The presence of hardly degradable pine needles in one of the substrates accounted for the lowest increase in alkyl C and the lowest reduction in carbohydrates and carboxyl C as opposite to another substrate characterized by the presence of a highly degradable material such as spent yeast from beer production, which showed the highest increase of the alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio. The highest increase of COOH deriving by the oxidative degradation of cellulose was shown by a substrate composed by about 50% of plant residues. The smallest increases in alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio and in polysaccharides were associated to the degradation of proteins and lipids which are major components of sewage sludge. Results obtained were related to the different composition of fresh organic substrates and provided evidence of different OM evolution patterns as a function of the initial substrate composition.

  5. Investigating brain metabolism at high fields using localized 13C NMR spectroscopy without 1H decoupling.

    PubMed

    Deelchand, Dinesh Kumar; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2006-02-01

    Most in vivo 13C NMR spectroscopy studies in the brain have been performed using 1H decoupling during acquisition. Decoupling imposes significant constraints on the experimental setup (particularly for human studies at high magnetic field) in order to stay within safety limits for power deposition. We show here that incorporation of the 13C label from 13C-labeled glucose into brain amino acids can be monitored accurately using localized 13C NMR spectroscopy without the application of 1H decoupling. Using LCModel quantification with prior knowledge of one-bond and multiple-bond J(CH) coupling constants, the uncertainty on metabolites concentrations was only 35% to 91% higher (depending on the carbon resonance of interest) in undecoupled spectra compared to decoupled spectra in the rat brain at 9.4 Tesla. Although less sensitive, 13C NMR without decoupling dramatically reduces experimental constraints on coil setup and pulse sequence design required to keep power deposition within safety guidelines. This opens the prospect of safely measuring 13C NMR spectra in humans at varied brain locations (not only the occipital lobe) and at very high magnetic fields above 4 Tesla. PMID:16345037

  6. Stable isotope-enhanced two- and three-dimensional diffusion ordered 13C NMR spectroscopy (SIE-DOSY 13C NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermillion, Karl; Price, Neil P. J.

    2009-06-01

    The feasibility of obtaining high quality homonuclear or heteronuclear diffusion-ordered 13C NMR data is shown to be greatly improved by using 13C isotopically-enriched samples. Stable isotope-enhanced diffusion ordered (SIE-DOSY) 13C NMR has been applied to 13C-enriched carbohydrates, and has been used to determine diffusion coefficients for pentose and hexose monosaccharides, and a disaccharide and trisaccharide. These 2D spectra were obtained with as little as 8 min of acquisition time. Fully resolved 3D DOSY-HMQC NMR spectra of [U- 13C]xylose, [U- 13C]glucose, and [1- 13C gal]lactose were obtained in 5 h. Sample derivatization with [ carbonyl- 13C]acetate (peracetylation) extends the usefulness of the technique to included non-labeled sugars; the 13C-carbonyl - carbohydrate ring proton 1H- 13C correlations also provide additional structural information, as shown for the 3-D DOSY-HMQC analysis of a mixture of maltotriose and lactose per-[ carbonyl- 13C]acetates.

  7. Comparisons of lipid dynamics and packing in fully interdigitated monoarachidoylphosphatidylcholine and non-interdigitated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers: cross polarization/magic angle spinning 13C-NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, W G; Chi, L M

    1990-07-24

    13C-NMR spectra have been obtained at 50.3 MHz for monoarachidoylphosphatidylcholine (MAPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) dispersions from 25 degrees C to 55 degrees C and for DPPC polycrystals at 25 degrees C using the cross polarization/magic angle spinning technique. Differential scanning calorimetric studies on DPPC and MAPC dispersions show comparable lipid phase transitions with transition temperatures at 41 degrees C and 45 degrees C, respectively, and thus enable the comparison of thermal, structural and dynamic differences between these two systems at corresponding temperatures. Conformational-dependent 13C chemical shift studies on DPPC dispersions demonstrate not only the coexistence of the tilted gel (L beta') and liquid-crystalline (L alpha) phases in the rippled gel (P beta') phase, but also the presence of an intermediate third microscopic phase as evidenced by three resolvable peaks for omega - 1 methylene carbon signals at the temperature interval between Tp and Tm. By comparing chemical shifts of MAPC in the hydrocarbon chain region with those of DPPC at similar reduced temperatures, it can be concluded that the packings are perturbed markedly in the middle segment of the fatty acyl chain during the lamellar to micellar transition. However, terminal methylene and methyl groups of interdigitated MAPC lamellae were found to be more ordered than those of non-interdigitated DPPC bilayers in the gel state. Interestingly, the terminal methyl groups of MAPC in the micelles remain to be relatively ordered; in fact, they are more ordered than the corresponding acyl chain end of DPPC in the liquid-crystalline state. Analysis of data obtained from rotating frame proton spin-lattice relaxation measurements shows a highly mobile phosphocholine headgroup, a rigid carbonyl group and an ordered hydrocarbon chain for lamellar MAPC in the interdigitated state. Furthermore, results suggest that free rotations of the glycerol C2-C3 bond within MAPC

  8. 1H- and 13C-NMR investigation of redox-state-dependent and temperature-dependent conformation changes in horse cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Turner, D L; Williams, R J

    1993-02-01

    The redox-state dependent changes in chemical shift, which have been measured for almost 100 CHn groups in the 13C-NMR spectra of horse cytochrome c [Santos, H., and Turner, D. L. (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 206, 721-728], have been used to investigate the nature of the redox-related change in conformation. Apart from the haem and its axial ligands, the shifts are found to be dominated by the electron-nuclear dipolar coupling in the oxidised form, as was the case in 1H-NMR studies. These pseudocontact shifts are well described by using an empirically determined magnetic susceptibility tensor in conjunction with atomic coordinates for the horse cytochrome c. The groups which fit least well are located in the vicinity of Trp59. Comparison between 1H and 13C shifts and their temperature dependence shows that the differences from expectation based on a single structure for both oxidation states are caused largely by changes in the diamagnetic contribution to the chemical shifts. Since these are different for 1H and 13C resonances they indicate, independently from crystal structure data, some redox-related movement of the protein under the haem. The significance of these results for understanding electron transfer pathways is discussed. Finally, the temperature dependence of the pseudocontact shifts in the range 30-50 degrees C is shown to be anomalous. Approximately half of the anomalous effect may be attributed to Zeeman mixing of the electronic wavefunctions with a spin-orbit coupling constant lambda = 241 cm-1, while the other half is attributed to thermal expansion of the protein. PMID:8382154

  9. Quantum-chemical analyses of aromaticity, UV spectra, and NMR chemical shifts in plumbacyclopentadienylidenes stabilized by Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Toshiaki; Abe, Minori; Saito, Masaichi; Hada, Masahiko

    2014-04-30

    We carried out a series of zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA)-density functional theory (DFT) and ZORA-time-dependent (TD)-DFT calculations for molecular geometries, NMR chemical shifts, nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS), and electronic transition energies of plumbacyclopentadienylidenes stabilized by several Lewis bases, (Ph)2 ((t) BuMe2 Si)2 C4 PbL1 L2 (L1, L2 = tetrahydrofuran, Pyridine, N-heterocyclic carbene), and their model molecules. We mainly discussed the Lewis-base effect on the aromaticity of these complexes. The NICS was used to examine the aromaticity. The NICS values showed that the aromaticity of these complexes increases when the donation from the Lewis bases to Pb becomes large. This trend seems to be reasonable when the 4n-Huckel rule is applied to the fractional π-electron number. The calculated (13)C- and (207)Pb-NMR chemical shifts and the calculated UV transition energies reasonably reproduced the experimental trends. We found a specific relationship between the (13)C-NMR chemical shifts and the transition energies. As we expected, the relativistic effect was essential to reproduce a trend not only in the (207)Pb-NMR chemical shifts and J[Pb-C] but also in the (13)C-NMR chemical shifts of carbons adjacent to the lead atom. PMID:24643814

  10. Combined analysis by GC (RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR of the supercritical fluid extract of Abies alba twigs.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Emilie; Marongiu, Bruno; Castola, Vincent; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Casanova, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    Two samples (leaves and twigs) of Abies alba Miller from Corsica were extracted using supercritical CO2 and their chemical compositions were compared with those of the essential oils obtained from the same batch of plant material. In total 45 components were identified using combined analysis by GC (RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR. It was observed that the contents of monoterpenes (mainly represented by limonene, alpha-pinene and camphene) were significantly lower in the supercritical fluid extract (SFE) than in the essential oil (EO). Conversely, the proportions of sesquiterpenes were much higher in CO2 extracts than in essential oils (around 30% vs 4%). Cis-abienol, a diterpene alcohol, was identified only in SFE, and the proportions of this constituent (7.5% and 17.3%) were determined using quantitative 13C NMR since it was under estimated using the standard conditions of GC. PMID:21299139

  11. Conformational transitions and fibrillation mechanism of human calcitonin as studied by high-resolution solid-state 13C NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Kamihira, M.; Naito, A.; Tuzi, S.; Nosaka, A. Y.; Saitô, H.

    2000-01-01

    Conformational transitions of human calcitonin (hCT) during fibril formation in the acidic and neutral conditions were investigated by high-resolution solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. In aqueous acetic acid solution (pH 3.3), a local alpha-helical form is present around Gly10 whereas a random coil form is dominant as viewed from Phe22, Ala26, and Ala31 in the monomer form on the basis of the 13C chemical shifts. On the other hand, a local beta-sheet form as viewed from Gly10 and Phe22, and both beta-sheet and random coil as viewed from Ala26 and Ala31 were detected in the fibril at pH 3.3. The results indicate that conformational transitions from alpha-helix to beta-sheet, and from random coil to beta-sheet forms occurred in the central and C-terminus regions, respectively, during the fibril formation. The increased 13C resonance intensities of fibrils after a certain delay time suggests that the fibrillation can be explained by a two-step reaction mechanism in which the first step is a homogeneous association to form a nucleus, and the second step is an autocatalytic heterogeneous fibrillation. In contrast to the fibril at pH 3.3, the fibril at pH 7.5 formed a local beta-sheet conformation at the central region and exhibited a random coil at the C-terminus region. Not only a hydrophobic interaction among the amphiphilic alpha-helices, but also an electrostatic interaction between charged side chains can play an important role for the fibril formation at pH 7.5 and 3.3 acting as electrostatically favorable and unfavorable interactions, respectively. These results suggest that hCT fibrils are formed by stacking antiparallel beta-sheets at pH 7.5 and a mixture of antiparallel and parallel beta-sheets at pH 3.3. PMID:10850796

  12. Measuring Level Alignment at the Metal–Molecule Interface by In Situ Electrochemical 13C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zelakiewicz, Brian S.; Allison, Thomas C.; Tong, Yu ye J.

    2015-03-16

    A new technique to measure energy-level alignment at a metal–molecule interface between the Fermi level of the metal and the frontier orbitals of the molecule is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The method, which combines the electrochemistry of organo-ligand-stabilized Au nanoparticles with 13C NMR spectroscopy (i.e. in situ electrochemical NMR), enables measuring both occupied and unoccupied states.

  13. In vivo 13C NMR metabolite profiling: potential for understanding and assessing conifer seed quality.

    PubMed

    Terskikh, Victor V; Feurtado, J Allan; Borchardt, Shane; Giblin, Michael; Abrams, Suzanne R; Kermode, Allison R

    2005-08-01

    High-resolution 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy was used to profile a range of primary and secondary metabolites in vivo in intact whole seeds of eight different conifer species native to North America, including six of the Pinaceae family and two of the Cupressaceae family. In vivo 13C NMR provided information on the total seed oil content and fatty acid composition of the major storage lipids in a non-destructive manner. In addition, a number of monoterpenes were identified in the 13C NMR spectra of conifer seeds containing oleoresin; these compounds showed marked variability in individual seeds of Pacific silver fir within the same seed lot. In imbibed conifer seeds, the 13C NMR spectra showed the presence of considerable amounts of dissolved sucrose presumed to play a protective role in the desiccation-tolerance of seeds. The free amino acids arginine and asparagine, generated as a result of storage protein mobilization, were detected in vivo during seed germination and early seedling growth. The potential for NMR to profile metabolites in a non-destructive manner in single conifer seeds and seed populations is discussed. It is a powerful tool to evaluate seed quality because of its ability to assess reserve accumulation during seed development or at seed maturity; it can also be used to monitor reserve mobilization, which is critical for seedling emergence. PMID:15996983

  14. Hydrogen bonding induced distortion of CO3 units and kinetic stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate: results from 2D (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Kaseman, Derrick C; Colas, Bruno; Jacob, Dorrit E; Clark, Simon M

    2016-07-27

    Systematic correlation in alkaline-earth carbonate compounds between the deviation of the CO3 units from the perfect D3h symmetry and their (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters is established. The (13)C NMR CSA parameters of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) are measured using two-dimensional (13)C phase adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) NMR spectroscopy and are analyzed on the basis of this correlation. The results indicate a distortion of the CO3 units in ACC in the form of an in-plane displacement of the C atom away from the centroid of the O3 triangle, resulting from hydrogen bonding with the surrounding H2O molecules, without significant out-of-plane displacement. Similar distortion for all C atoms in the structure of ACC suggests a uniform spatial disposition of H2O molecules around the CO3 units forming a hydrogen-bonded amorphous network. This amorphous network is stabilized against crystallization by steric frustration, while additives such as Mg presumably provide further stabilization by increasing the energy of dehydration. PMID:27276013

  15. Quantification of brain glycogen concentration and turnover through localized 13C NMR of both the C1 and C6 resonances.

    PubMed

    van Heeswijk, Ruud B; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Xin, Lijing; Gruetter, Rolf

    2010-04-01

    We have recently shown that at isotopic steady state (13)C NMR can provide a direct measurement of glycogen concentration changes, but that the turnover of glycogen was not accessible with this protocol. The aim of the present study was to design, implement and apply a novel dual-tracer infusion protocol to simultaneously measure glycogen concentration and turnover. After reaching isotopic steady state for glycogen C1 using [1-(13)C] glucose administration, [1,6-(13)C(2)] glucose was infused such that isotopic steady state was maintained at the C1 position, but the C6 position reflected (13)C label incorporation. To overcome the large chemical shift displacement error between the C1 and C6 resonances of glycogen, we implemented 2D gradient based localization using the Fourier series window approach, in conjunction with time-domain analysis of the resulting FIDs using jMRUI. The glycogen concentration of 5.1 +/- 1.6 mM measured from the C1 position was in excellent agreement with concomitant biochemical determinations. Glycogen turnover measured from the rate of label incorporation into the C6 position of glycogen in the alpha-chloralose anesthetized rat was 0.7 micromol/g/h. PMID:20186693

  16. Solid-state and solution /sup 13/C NMR in the conformational analysis of methadone-hydrochloride and related narcotic analgesics

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, S.C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Solid state and solution /sup 13/C NMR have been used to study the conformations of the racemic mixtures and single enantiomers of methadone hydrochloride, alpha and beta methadol hydrochloride, and alpha and beta acetylmethadol hydrochloride. The NMR spectra acquired for the compounds as solids, and in polar and nonpolar solvents are compared, in order to determine the conformation of the molecules in solution. To determine the reliability of assigning solution conformations by comparing solution and solid state chemical shift data, three bond coupling constants measured in solution are compared with those calculated from X-ray data. The conformations of the racemic mixture and plus enantiomer of methadone hydrochloride have been shown to be very similar in the solid state, where minor differences in conformation can be seen by comparing NMR spectra obtained for the solids. Also shown is that the molecules of methadone hydrochloride have conformations in polar and in nonpolar solvents which are very similar to the conformation of the molecules in the solid state.

  17. The 'Nuts and Bolts' of 13C NMR Spectroscopy at Elevated-Pressures and -Temperatures for Monitoring In Situ CO2 Conversion to Metal Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. K.; Surface, J. A.; Skemer, P. A.; Conradi, M. S.; Hayes, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We will present details of newly-constructed specialized NMR designed to conduct in situ elevated-pressure, elevated-temperature 13C NMR studies on unmixed slurries of minerals in the presence of CO2 or other gases. This static probe is capable of achieving 300 bar, 300C conditions, and it is designed to spectroscopically examine 13C signals in mixtures of solids, liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. Ultimately, our aim is to monitor CO2 uptake in both ultramafic rocks and in more porous geological materials to understand the mechanisms of chemisorption as a function of temperature, pressure and pH. We will give details of the hardware setup, and we will show a variety of static in situ NMR, as well as ex situ 'magic-angle spinning' NMR to show the analyses that are possible of minerals in pure form and in mixtures. In addition, specific NMR pulse sequences, techniques, and modeling will be described in detail. In this in situ NMR probe, we are able to simulate processes at geologically relevant fluid pressures and temperatures, monitoring the kinetics of CO2 conversion to carbonates. The in situ NMR experiments consist of heterogeneous mixtures of rock, salty brine solution, and moderate pressure CO2 gas at elevated temperatures. The purpose of studying these reactions is to determine conditions that affect the efficacy of carbonate formation in various targeted geological reservoirs (i.e., peroditite, or others). Via 13C NMR, we have spectroscopically characterized and quantified the conversion of CO2 to magnesium carbonate and calcium carbonate minerals, including metastable intermediates (such as hydromagnesite, or dypingite in the case of magnesium carbonate species, or vaterite in the case of calcium carbonate species). Such species are distinguishable from a combination of the 13C isotropic chemical shift, the static 13C lineshape, and changes in spin-lattice (T1) relaxation times. We will demonstrate that NMR can be used for quantitative

  18. The binding of metal ions and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor by 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Sakamoto, Yuko; Ishii, Tomoko; Ohmoto, Taichi

    1991-06-01

    Enalaprilat (MK-422, 1- [ N- [1 (S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]- L-alanyl]- L-proline (1)) and Lisinopril (MK521, N- N- [ (s)-l-carboxy-3- phenylpropyl]- L-lysyl- L-proline, (2)) exhibit the capacity to act as a chelate, unidentate or bridge towards metal ions in aqueous solution, as determined by 13C NMR. By adding metal ions, in the series of Zn 2+, Ni 2+, Pb 2+, Pd 2+ and Cd 2+, the active site of the ACE inhibitor was well defined. MK-521 was more influenced by nuclei that were distant from the active site than MK-422.

  19. Application of 13C NMR spectroscopy to paratope mapping for larger antigen-Fab complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Kato, K; Yamato, S; Igarashi, T; Matsunaga, C; Ohtsuka, H; Higuchi, A; Nomura, N; Noguchi, H; Arata, Y

    1994-06-13

    For the purpose of engineering the antibody combining site, mapping residues that are involved in antigen binding provide us with valuable information. By use of 13C NMR spectroscopy with selectively 13C-labeled Fv fragments, we have established a general strategy to identify the residues that are perturbed upon binding of small antigen (hapten) molecules [(1990) Biochemistry 30, 6604-6610]. In the present paper, we demonstrate that this strategy can be extended to molecular structural analyses of the complexes of an Fab fragment and a larger antigen molecule such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A with a molecular mass of 67 kDa. PMID:8013642

  20. Methylation patterns of aquatic humic substances determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Steelink, C.; Wershaw, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectroscopy is used to examine the hydroxyl group functionality of a series of humic and fulvic acids from different aquatic environments. Samples first are methylated with 13C-labeled diazomethane. The NMR spectra of the diazomethylated samples allow one to distinguish between methyl esters of carboxylic acids, methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls, and methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls adjacent to two substituents. Samples are then permethylated with 13C-labeled methyl iodide/NaH. 13C NMR spectra of permethylated samples show that a significant fraction of the hydroxyl groups is not methylated with diazomethane alone. In these spectra methyl ethers of carbohydrate and aliphatic hydroxyls overlap with methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls. Side reactions of the methyltion procedure including carbon methylation in the CH3I/NaH procedure, are also examined. Humic and fulvic acids from bog, swamp, groundwater, and lake waters showssome differences in their distribution of hydroxyl groups, mainly in the concentrations of phenolic hydroxyls, which may be attributed to their different biogeochemical origins. ?? 1987.

  1. In vivo 31P and multilabel 13C NMR measurements for evaluation of plant metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Rijhwani, S K; Ho, C H; Shanks, J V

    1999-01-01

    Reliable measurements of intracellular metabolites are useful for effective plant metabolic engineering. This study explored the application of in situ 31P and 13C NMR spectroscopy for long-term measurements of intracellular pH and concentrations of several metabolites in glycolysis, glucan synthesis, and central carbon metabolic pathways in plant tissues. An NMR perfusion reactor system was designed to allow Catharanthus roseus hairy root cultures to grow for 3-6 weeks, during which time NMR spectroscopy was performed. Constant cytoplasmic pH (7.40+/-0.06), observed during the entire experiment, indicated adequate oxygenation. 13C NMR spectroscopy was performed on hairy root cultures grown in solutions containing 1-13C-, 2-13C-, and 3-13C-labeled glucose in separate experiments and the flow of label was monitored. Activities of pentose phosphate pathways, nonphotosynthetic CO2 fixation, and glucan synthesis pathways were evident from the experimental results. Scrambling of label in glucans also indicated recycling of triose phosphate and their subsequent conversion to hexose phosphates. PMID:10935751

  2. Characterisation of coke from FCC catalysts by solid state {sup 13}C NMR and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, J.M.; McGhee, B.; Snape, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    Coke has been concentrated by demineralisation from deactivated FCC catalysts from both refinery operations with actual feeds and MAT tests using n-hexadecane to facilitate detailed characterisation by solid state {sup 13}C NMR and mass spectrometry. All the catalysts investigated contained about 1% w/w carbon. As for solid fuels, the use of a low-field spectrometer for solid state {sup 13}C NMR in conjunction with the single pulse excitation (SPE or Bloch decay) technique has enabled quantitative carbon skeletal parameters to be obtained for the cokes. Internal standard measurements demonstrated that most of the carbon was observed by SPE and, therefore, NMR-invisible graphitic layers are not thought to be major structural features of the cokes. Differences in feedstock composition were reflected in the structure of the refinery cokes with the aromatic nuclei from a residue feed (5% Conradson carbon) corresponding to 15-20 peri-condensed aromatic rings and being more highly condensed than those from a hydrotreated vacuum gas oil. Mass spectrometry (EI, CI and FIMS) has confirmed that the refinery cokes are highly condensed, but those obtained from n-hexadecane in the MAT tests displayed significant aliphatic character.

  3. Solid-state (13)C NMR and synchrotron SAXS/WAXS studies of uniaxially-oriented polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Afeworki, Mobae; Brant, Pat; Lustiger, Arnold; Norman, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We report solid-state (13)C NMR and synchrotron wide-and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments (WAXS, SAXS) on metallocene linear low density polyethylene films (e.g., Exceed™ 1018 mLLDPE; nominally 1MI, 0.918 density ethylene-hexene metallocene copolymer) as a function of uniaxial draw ratio, λ. Combined, these experiments provide an unambiguous, quantitative molecular view of the orientation of both the crystalline and amorphous phases in the samples as a function of draw. Together with previously reported differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), gas transport measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), optical birefringence, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) as well as other characterization techniques, this study of the state of orientation in both phases provides insight concerning the development of unusually high barrier properties of the most oriented samples (λ=10). In this work, static (non-spinning) solid-state NMR measurements indicate that in the drawn Exceed(TM) films both the crystalline and amorphous regions are highly oriented. In particular, chemical shift data show the amorphous phase is comprised increasingly of so-called "taut tie chains" (or tie chains under any state of tautness) in the mLLDPE with increasing draw ratio - the resonance lines associated with the amorphous phase shift to where the crystalline peaks are observed. In the sample with highest total draw (λ=10), virtually all of the chains in the non-crystalline region have responded and aligned in the machine (draw) direction. Both monoclinic and orthorhombic crystalline peaks are observed in high-resolution, solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR measurements of the oriented PE films. The orientation is comparable to that obtained for ultra-high molecular weight HDPE fibers described as "ultra-oriented" in the literature. Furthermore, the presence of a monoclinic peak in cold-drawn samples suggests that there is an appreciable internal stress associated

  4. Calculation of the 13C NMR shieldings of the C0 2 complexes of aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    1995-04-01

    13C NMR shieldings have been calculated using the random-phase-approximation, localized-orbital local-origins version of ab initio coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory for CO 2 and and for several complexes formed by the reaction of CO 2 with molecular models for aluminosilicate glasses, H 3TOT'H3 3-n, T,T' = Si,Al. Two isomeric forms of the CO 2-aluminosilicate complexes have been considered: (1) "CO 2-like" complexes, in which the CO 2 group is bound through carbon to a bridging oxygen and (2) "CO 3-like" complexes, in which two oxygens of a central CO 3 group form bridging bonds to the two TH 3 groups. The CO 2-like isomer of CO 2-H 3SiOSiH 3 is quite weakly bonded and its 13C isotropic NMR shielding is almost identical to that in free CO 2. As Si is progressively replaced by Al in the - H terminated aluminosilicate model, the CO 2-like isomers show increasing distortion from the free CO 2 geometry and their 13C NMR shieldings decrease uniformly. The calculated 13C shielding value for H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 is only about 6 ppm larger than that calculated for point charge stabilized CO 3-2. However, for a geometry of H 3SiO(CO 2) AlH 3-1, in which the bridging oxygen to C bond length has been artificially increased to that found in the - OH terminated cluster (OH) 3SiO(CO 2)Al(OH) 3-1, the calculated 13C shielding is almost identical to that for free CO 2. The CO 3-like isomers of the CO 2-aluminosili-cate complexes show carbonate like geometries and 13C NMR shieldings about 4-9 ppm larger than those of carbonate for all T,T' pairs. For the Si,Si tetrahedral atom pair the CO 2-like isomer is more stable energetically, while for the Si,Al and Al,Al cases the CO 3-like isomer is more stable. Addition of Na + ions to the CO 3-2 or H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 complexes reduces the 13C NMR shieldings by about 10 ppm. Complexation with either Na + or CO 2 also reduces the 29Si NMR shieldings of the aluminosilicate models, while the changes in 27Al shielding with Na + or CO 2

  5. A 13C-NMR study of the role of Asn-155 in stabilizing the oxyanion of a subtilisin tetrahedral adduct.

    PubMed

    O'connell, T P; Day, R M; Torchilin, E V; Bachovchin, W W; Malthouse, J G

    1997-09-15

    By removing one of the hydrogen-bond donors in the oxyanion hole of subtilisin BPN, we have been able to determine how it affects the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme and the pKa of the oxyanion formed in a choloromethane inhibitor derivative. Variant 8397 of subtilisin BPN contains five mutations which enhance its stability. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to prepare the N155A mutant of this variant. The catalytic efficiencies of wild-type and variant 8397 are similar, but replacing Asn-155 with alanine reduces catalytic efficiency approx. 300-fold. All three forms of subtilisin were alkylated using benzyloxycarbonylglycylglycyl[2-13C]phenylalanylchloromethane++ + and examined by 13C-NMR. A single signal due to the 13C-enriched carbon was detected in all the derivatives and it was assigned to the hemiketal carbon of a tetrahedral adduct formed between the hydroxy group of Ser-221 and the inhibitor. This signal had chemical shifts in the range 98.3-103.6 p.p.m., depending on the pH. The titration shift of 4.7-4.8 p.p.m. was assigned to oxyanion formation. The oxyanion pKa values in the wild-type and 8397 variants were 6.92 and 7.00 respectively. In the N155A mutant of the 8397 variant the oxyanion pKa increased to 8.09. We explain why such a small increase is observed and we conclude that it is the interaction between the oxyanion and the imidazolium cation of the active-site histidine that is the main factor responsible for lowering the oxyanion pKa. PMID:9307038

  6. A 13C-NMR study of the role of Asn-155 in stabilizing the oxyanion of a subtilisin tetrahedral adduct.

    PubMed Central

    O'connell, T P; Day, R M; Torchilin, E V; Bachovchin, W W; Malthouse, J G

    1997-01-01

    By removing one of the hydrogen-bond donors in the oxyanion hole of subtilisin BPN, we have been able to determine how it affects the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme and the pKa of the oxyanion formed in a choloromethane inhibitor derivative. Variant 8397 of subtilisin BPN contains five mutations which enhance its stability. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to prepare the N155A mutant of this variant. The catalytic efficiencies of wild-type and variant 8397 are similar, but replacing Asn-155 with alanine reduces catalytic efficiency approx. 300-fold. All three forms of subtilisin were alkylated using benzyloxycarbonylglycylglycyl[2-13C]phenylalanylchloromethane++ + and examined by 13C-NMR. A single signal due to the 13C-enriched carbon was detected in all the derivatives and it was assigned to the hemiketal carbon of a tetrahedral adduct formed between the hydroxy group of Ser-221 and the inhibitor. This signal had chemical shifts in the range 98.3-103.6 p.p.m., depending on the pH. The titration shift of 4.7-4.8 p.p.m. was assigned to oxyanion formation. The oxyanion pKa values in the wild-type and 8397 variants were 6.92 and 7.00 respectively. In the N155A mutant of the 8397 variant the oxyanion pKa increased to 8.09. We explain why such a small increase is observed and we conclude that it is the interaction between the oxyanion and the imidazolium cation of the active-site histidine that is the main factor responsible for lowering the oxyanion pKa. PMID:9307038

  7. Kinetics and {sup 13}C NMR study of oxygen incorporation into PVC- and pitch-derived materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gisele F. Altoe; Jair C.C. Freitas; Alfredo G. Cunha; Francisco G. Emmerich; Mark E. Smith

    2009-03-15

    The kinetics of oxygen incorporation into a PVC-derived material with pitch-like characteristics was studied by isothermal thermogravimetric analysis at temperatures ranging from 200 to 270{sup o}C. Activation energy, E{sub a}, pre-exponential factor, A, and rate constants, kT, were obtained from the weight-gain curves recorded during reactions of the material with molecular oxygen, which were analyzed following a kinetic first-order model. The numerical values obtained were E{sub a} = 100.5 kJ/mol and A = 1.6 x 1010 h{sup -1}. The extent of the oxidation at a fixed temperature was monitored by elemental analysis, and the chemical changes in the materials were followed by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR. The study was next extended to the chars obtained from three coal tar pitches with different softening points (55, 85, and 110{sup o}C). Comparisons were then established between the determined kinetic parameters and the chemical/structural aspects and compositions of each analyzed material. 23 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs,

  8. A 13C-NMR study of exopolysaccharide synthesis in Rhizobium meliloti Su47 strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernier, P.; Portais, J.-C.; Besson, I.; Courtois, J.; Courtois, B.; Barbotin, J.-N.

    1998-02-01

    Metabolic pathways implied in the synthesis of succinoglycan produced by the Su47 strain of R. meliloti were evaluated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy after incubation with [1{-}13C] or [2{-}13C] glucose. The biosynthesis of this polymer by R. meliloti from glucose occurred by a direct polymerisation of the introduced glucose and by the pentose phosphate pathway. Les voies métaboliques impliquées dans la synthèse du succinoglycane produit par la souche Su47 de R. meliloti ont été évaluées par la spectroscopie de RMN du carbone 13 après incubation des cellules avec du [1{-}13C] ou [2{-}13C] glucose. La biosynthèse de ce polymère à partir du glucose se produit par polymérisation directe du glucose et par la voie des pentoses phosphate.

  9. 13C NMR spectroscopy of the insoluble carbon of carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Frye, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectra have been obtained of the insoluble carbon residues resulting from HF-digestion of three carbonaceous chondrites, Orgueil (C1), Murchison (CM2), and Allende (CV3). Spectra obtained using the cross polarization magic-angle spinning technique show two major features attributable respectively to carbon in aliphatic/olefinic structures. The spectrum obtained from the Allende sample was weak, presumably as a consequence of its low hydrogen content. Single pulse excitation spectra, which do not depend on 1H-13C polarization transfer for signal enhancement were also obtained. These spectra, which may be more representative of the total carbon in the meteorite samples, indicate a greater content of carbon in aromatic/olefinic structures. These results suggest that extensive polycyclic aromatic sheets are important structural features of the insoluble carbon of all three meteorites. The Orgueil and Murchison materials contain additional hydrogenated aromatic/olefinic and aliphatic groups.

  10. (1) H and (13) C NMR data on natural and synthetic capsaicinoids.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Calvario, Víctor; Garduño-Ramírez, María Luisa; León-Rivera, Ismael; Rios, María Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Capsaicinoids are the compounds responsible for the pungency of chili peppers. These substances have attracted the attention of many research groups in recent decades because of their antinociceptive, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-obesity properties, among others. There are nearly 160 capsaicinoids reported in the literature. Approximately 25 of them are natural products, while the rest are synthetic or semi-synthetic products. A large amount of NMR data for the capsaicinoids is dispersed throughout literature. Therefore, there is a need to organize all this NMR data in a systematic and orderly way. This review summarizes the (1) H and (13) C NMR data on 159 natural and synthetic capsaicinoids, with a brief discussion of some typical and relevant aspects of these NMR data. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26626418

  11. 13C-NMR study of acetate assimilation in Thermoproteus neutrophilus.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, S; Paalme, T; Vilu, R; Fuchs, G

    1989-12-22

    Acetate assimilation into amino acids and the functioning of central biosynthetic pathways in the extremely thermophilic anaerobic archaebacterium Thermoproteus neutrophilus was investigated using 13C NMR as the method for determination of the labelling patterns. Acetate was assimilated via reductive carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to pyruvate and pyruvate conversion to phosphoenolpyruvate which was further carboxylated to oxaloacetate. 2-Oxoglutarate was mainly formed via citrate. However, the labelling patterns of glutamic acid and alanine were in agreement with the concurrent synthesis of about 15% 2-oxoglutarate and 5% pyruvate through the reductive citric acid cycle. A scrambling phenomenon occurring in aspartate and all amino acids derived through oxaloacetate was observed. The labelling patterns of amino acids were in agreement with their standard biosynthetic pathways, with two remarkable exceptions: isoleucine was synthesized via the citramalate pathway and lysine was synthesized via the 2-aminoadipate pathway which has previously been reported only in eukaryotic microorganisms. PMID:2514097

  12. Quantitative solid-state 13C NMR with signal enhancement by multiple cross polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    A simple new method is presented that yields quantitative solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) 13C NMR spectra of organic materials with good signal-to-noise ratios. It achieves long (>10 ms) cross polarization (CP) from 1H without significant magnetization losses due to relaxation and with a moderate duty cycle of the radio-frequency irradiation, by multiple 1-ms CP periods alternating with 1H spin-lattice relaxation periods that repolarize the protons. The new method incorporates previous techniques that yield less distorted CP/MAS spectra, such as a linear variation (“ramp”) of the radio-frequency field strength, and it overcomes their main limitation, which is T1ρ relaxation of the spin-locked 1H magnetization. The ramp of the radio-frequency field strength and the asymptotic limit of cross polarization makes the spectral intensity quite insensitive to the exact field strengths used. The new multiCP pulse sequence is a “drop-in” replacement for previous CP methods and produces no additional data-processing burden. Compared to the only reliable quantitative 13C NMR method for unlabeled solids previously available, namely direct-polarization NMR, the measuring time is reduced by more than a factor of 50, enabling higher-throughput quantitative NMR studies. The new multiCP technique is validated with 14-kHz MAS on amino-acid derivatives, plant matter, a highly aromatic humic acid, and carbon materials made by low-temperature pyrolysis.

  13. A {sup 13}C NMR study of the condensation chemistry of acetone and acetaldehyde adsorbed at the Bronsted acid sites in H-ZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Biaglow, A.I.; Sepa, J.; Gorte, R.J.

    1995-02-01

    Several bimolecular, acid-catalyzed condensation reactions of acetone and acetaldehyde have been examined in H-ZSM-5, along with the adsorption complexes formed by the products, using {sup 13}C NMR. For acetone, the hydrogen-bonded adsorption complex is stable at room temperature and coverages below one molecule per Broensted acid site. Reaction to mesityl oxide occurs only at higher coverages or temperatures, which are necessary to induce site exchange. The adsorption complex exhibits reaction chemistry analogous to that observed in solution phase, forming adsorption complexes of chloroacetone upon exposure to Cl{sub 2} and of imines upon exposure to NH{sub 3} or dimethylamine. The reactions of acetaldehyde to crotonaldehyde and imines are similar, although they occur at a faster rate due to the higher mobility of this molecule. The adsorption complexes formed by acetone, acetaldehyde, and their condensation products can all be described as rigid, hydrogen-bonded complexes at low coverages. Complexes formed from imines and enamines exhibit isotropic chemical shifts nearly identical to those observed in magic acids, indicating that proton transfer is nearly complete for these molecules. The extent of proton transfer for the remaining molecules varies with the proton affinity of the molecule, ranging from close to complete proton transfer for mesityl oxide and crotonaldehyde to almost complete absence of proton transfer for the chloroacetones. The differences and similarities between these reactions in the zeolite and in solution phase are discussed, along with the implications for understanding the primary processes responsible for these reactions in zeolites. 34 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  14. In situ measurement of magnesium carbonate formation from CO2 using static high-pressure and -temperature 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Surface, J Andrew; Skemer, Philip; Hayes, Sophia E; Conradi, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    We explore a new in situ NMR spectroscopy method that possesses the ability to monitor the chemical evolution of supercritical CO(2) in relevant conditions for geological CO(2) sequestration. As a model, we use the fast reaction of the mineral brucite, Mg(OH)(2), with supercritical CO(2) (88 bar) in aqueous conditions at 80 °C. The in situ conversion of CO(2) into metastable and stable carbonates is observed throughout the reaction. After more than 58 h of reaction, the sample was depressurized and analyzed using in situ Raman spectroscopy, where the laser was focused on the undisturbed products through the glass reaction tube. Postreaction, ex situ analysis was performed on the extracted and dried products using Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and magic-angle spinning (1)H-decoupled (13)C NMR. These separate methods of analysis confirmed a spatial dependence of products, possibly caused by a gradient of reactant availability, pH, and/or a reaction mechanism that involves first forming hydroxy-hydrated (basic, hydrated) carbonates that convert to the end-product, anhydrous magnesite. This carbonation reaction illustrates the importance of static (unmixed) reaction systems at sequestration-like conditions. PMID:22676479

  15. (13)C NMR-based metabolomics for the classification of green coffee beans according to variety and origin.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Furihata, Kazuo; Koda, Masanori; Hu, Fangyu; Kato, Rieko; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2012-10-10

    (13)C NMR-based metabolomics was demonstrated as a useful tool for distinguishing the species and origins of green coffee bean samples of arabica and robusta from six different geographic regions. By the application of information on (13)C signal assignment, significantly different levels of 14 metabolites of green coffee beans were identified in the classifications, including sucrose, caffeine, chlorogenic acids, choline, amino acids, organic acids, and trigonelline, as captured by multivariate analytical models. These studies demonstrate that the species and geographical origin can be quickly discriminated by evaluating the major metabolites of green coffee beans quantitatively using (13)C NMR-based metabolite profiling. PMID:22989016

  16. Performance evaluation of quantitative adiabatic (13)C NMR pulse sequences for site-specific isotopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Thibaudeau, Christophe; Remaud, Gérald; Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge

    2010-07-01

    (2)H/(1)H and (13)C/(12)C site-specific isotope ratios determined by NMR spectroscopy may be used to discriminate pharmaceutically active ingredients based on the synthetic process used in production. Extending the Site-specific Natural Isotope Fractionation NMR (SNIF-NMR) method to (13)C is highly beneficial for complex organic molecules when measurements of (2)H/(1)H ratios lead to poorly defined molecular fingerprints. The current NMR methodology to determine (13)C/(12)C site-specific isotope ratios suffers from poor sensitivity and long experimental times. In this work, several NMR pulse sequences based on polarization transfer were evaluated and optimized to measure precise quantitative (13)C NMR spectra within a short time. Adiabatic 180 degrees (1)H and (13)C pulses were incorporated into distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT) and refocused insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer (INEPT) to minimize the influence of 180 degrees pulse imperfections and of off-resonance effects on the precision of the measured (13)C peak areas. The adiabatic DEPT sequence was applied to draw up a precise site-specific (13)C isotope profile of ibuprofen. A modified heteronuclear cross-polarization (HCP) experiment featuring (1)H and (13)C spin-locks with adiabatic 180 degrees pulses is also introduced. This sequence enables efficient magnetization transfer across a wide (13)C frequency range although not enough for an application in quantitative (13)C isotopic analysis. PMID:20527737

  17. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  18. (13)C-NMR-Based Metabolomic Profiling of Typical Asian Soy Sauces.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ghulam Mustafa; Yuan, Bin; Hussain, Abdullah Ijaz; Wang, Jie; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili

    2016-01-01

    It has been a strong consumer interest to choose high quality food products with clear information about their origin and composition. In the present study, a total of 22 Asian soy sauce samples have been analyzed in terms of (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Spectral data were analyzed by multivariate statistical methods in order to find out the important metabolites causing the discrimination among typical soy sauces from different Asian regions. It was found that significantly higher concentrations of glutamate in Chinese red cooking (CR) soy sauce may be the result of the manual addition of monosodium glutamate (MSG) in the final soy sauce product. Whereas lower concentrations of amino acids, like leucine, isoleucine and valine, observed in CR indicate the different fermentation period used in production of CR soy sauce, on the other hand, the concentration of some fermentation cycle metabolites, such as acetate and sucrose, can be divided into two groups. The concentrations of these fermentation cycle metabolites were lower in CR and Singapore Kikkoman (SK), whereas much higher in Japanese shoyu (JS) and Taiwan (China) light (TL), which depict the influence of climatic conditions. Therefore, the results of our study directly indicate the influences of traditional ways of fermentation, climatic conditions and the selection of raw materials and can be helpful for consumers to choose their desired soy sauce products, as well as for researchers in further authentication studies about soy sauce. PMID:27598115

  19. Dynamic 13C NMR analysis of oxidative metabolism in the in vivo canine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, P M; Rath, D P; Abduljalil, A M; O'Donnell, J M; Jiang, Z; Zhang, H; Hamlin, R L

    1993-12-15

    Oxidative metabolism in the in vivo canine myocardium was studied noninvasively using 13C-enriched acetate and non-steady state 13C NMR techniques. Under low workload conditions, the myocardium oxidized the infused [2-13C]acetate and incorporated the labeled carbon into the glutamate pool as expected. This conclusion stems from the rapid enrichment of the C-2, C-3, and C-4 carbons of glutamic acid both under in vivo conditions and in extracts. Surprisingly, [2-13C]acetate uptake was not observed at high workloads as reflected by an absence of glutamate pool enrichment at these rate pressure products. Rather, the myocardium selected its substrate from an endogenous pool. Since free acetate can directly cross the inner mitochondrial membrane and be converted to acetyl-CoA through acetyl-CoA synthetase, these results support workload-dependent regulation of substrate access to the mitochondrial CoASH pool. As such, we advance the hypothesis that the selection of substrate for condensation with CoASH and subsequent oxidation in the tricarboxylic acid cycle is regulated kinetically through the Km values of the appropriate condensation enzymes and through the absolute levels of free CoASH in the mitochondria. PMID:8253751

  20. Determination of Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Time Using (Super 13)C NMR: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasyna, Zbigniew L.; Jurkiewicz, Antoni

    2004-01-01

    An experiment designed for the physical chemistry laboratory where (super 13)C NMR is applied to determine the spin-lattice relaxation time for carbon atoms in n-hexanol is proposed. It is concluded that students learn the principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy as well as dynamic NMR experiments.

  1. State-of-the-Art Direct 13C and Indirect 1H-[13C] NMR Spectroscopy In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Robin A.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy in combination with 13C-labeled substrate infusion is a powerful technique to measure a large number of metabolic fluxes non-invasively in vivo. It has been used to quantify glycogen synthesis rates, establish quantitative relationships between energy metabolism and neurotransmission and evaluate the importance of different substrates. All measurements can, in principle, be performed through direct 13C NMR detection or via indirect 1H-[13C] NMR detection of the protons attached to 13C nuclei. The choice for detection scheme and pulse sequence depends on the magnetic field strength, whereas substrate selection depends on the metabolic pathways that are studied. 13C NMR spectroscopy remains a challenging technique that requires several non-standard hardware modifications, infusion of 13C-labeled substrates and sophisticated processing and metabolic modeling. Here the various aspects of direct 13C and indirect 1H-[13C] NMR are reviewed with the aim of providing a practical guide. PMID:21919099

  2. Complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of standard neo-iota-carrabiose oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Jouanneau, Diane; Boulenguer, Patrick; Mazoyer, Jacques; Helbert, William

    2010-02-26

    Standard Eucheuma denticulatum iota-carrageenan was degraded with the Alteromonas fortis iota-carrageenase. The most abundant products, the neo-iota-carratetraose and neo-iota-carrahexaose were purified by permeation gel chromatography, and their corresponding (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were fully assigned. PMID:20038459

  3. Structure and dynamics of homoleptic beryllocenes: a solid-state 9Be and 13C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Macdonald, Charles L B; Schurko, Robert W

    2004-11-19

    The correlation between anisotropic 9Be NMR (quadrupolar and chemical shielding) interactions and the structure and dynamics in [Cp2Be], [Cp2*Be], and [(C5Me4H)2Be] is examined by solid-state 9Be NMR spectroscopy, as well as by ab initio and hybrid density functional theory calculations. The 9Be quadrupole coupling constants in the three compounds correspond well to the relative degrees of spherical ground-state electronic symmetry of the environment about beryllium. Theoretical computations of NMR interaction tensors are in excellent agreement with experimental values and aid in understanding the origins of NMR interaction tensors and their correlation to molecular symmetry. Variable-temperature (VT) 9Be and 13C NMR experiments reveal a highly fluxional structure in the condensed phase of [Cp2Be]. In particular, the pathway by which the Cp rings of [Cp2Be] 'invert' coordination modes is examined in detail using hybrid density functional theory in order to inspect variations of the 9Be NMR interaction tensors. The activation energy for the 'inversion' process is found to be 36.9 kJ mol(-1) from chemical exchange analysis of 13C VT CP/MAS NMR spectra. The low-temperature (ca. -100 degrees C) X-ray crystal structures of all three compounds have been collected and refined, and are in agreement with previously reported structures. In addition, the structure of the same Cp2Be crystal was determined at 20 degrees C and displays features consistent with increased intramolecular motion, supporting observations by 9Be VT NMR spectroscopy. PMID:15484199

  4. Spectrally edited 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR spectra without diagonal ridge for characterizing 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Anderson, Jason M.; Shanks, Brent H.; Fang, Xiaowen; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Two robust combinations of spectral editing techniques with 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR have been developed for characterizing the aromatic components of 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials. One method (exchange with protonated and nonprotonated spectral editing, EXPANSE) selects cross peaks of protonated and nearby nonprotonated carbons, while the other technique, dipolar-dephased double-quantum/single-quantum (DQ/SQ) NMR, selects signals of bonded nonprotonated carbons. Both spectra are free of a diagonal ridge, which has many advantages: Cross peaks on the diagonal or of small intensity can be detected, and residual spinning sidebands or truncation artifacts associated with the diagonal ridge are avoided. In the DQ/SQ experiment, dipolar dephasing of the double-quantum coherence removes protonated-carbon signals; this approach also eliminates the need for high-power proton decoupling. The initial magnetization is generated with minimal fluctuation by combining direct polarization, cross polarization, and equilibration by 13C spin diffusion. The dipolar dephased DQ/SQ spectrum shows signals from all linkages between aromatic rings, including a distinctive peak from polycondensed aromatics. In EXPANSE NMR, signals of protonated carbons are selected in the first spectral dimension by short cross polarization combined with dipolar dephasing difference. This removes ambiguities of peak assignment to overlapping signals of nonprotonated and protonated aromatic carbons, e.g. near 125 ppm. Spin diffusion is enhanced by dipolar-assisted rotational resonance. Before detection, Csbnd H dipolar dephasing by gated decoupling is applied, which selects signals of nonprotonated carbons. Thus, only cross peaks due to magnetization originating from protonated C and ending on nearby nonprotonated C are retained. Combined with the chemical shifts deduced from the cross-peak position, this double spectral editing defines the bonding environment of aromatic, COO, and Cdbnd O carbons

  5. 1H and 13C NMR spectra, structure and physicochemical features of phenyl acridine-9-carboxylates and 10-methyl-9-(phenoxycarbonyl)acridinium trifluoromethanesulphonates--alkyl substituted in the phenyl fragment.

    PubMed

    Krzymiński, K; Malecha, P; Zadykowicz, B; Wróblewska, A; Błażejowski, J

    2011-01-01

    The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of twelve phenyl acridine-9-carboxylates--alkyl-substituted in the phenyl fragment--and their 10-methyl-9-(phenoxycarbonyl)acridinium salts dissolved in CD3CN, CD3OD, CDCl3 and DMSO-d6 were recorded in order to examine the influence of the structure of these compounds and the properties of the solvents on chemical shifts and 1H-(1)H coupling constants. Experimental data were compared with 1H and 13C chemical shifts predicted at the GIAO/DFT level of theory for DFT(B3LYP)/6-31G** optimised geometries of molecules, as well as with values of 1H chemical shifts and 1H-(1)H coupling constants, estimated using ACD/HNMR database software to ensure that the assignment was correct. To investigate the relations between chemical shifts and selected structural or physicochemical characteristics of the target compounds, the values of several of these parameters were determined at the DFT or HF levels of theory. The HOMO and LUMO energies obtained at the HF level yielded the ionisation potentials and electron affinities of molecules. The DFT method provided atomic partial charges, dipole moments, LCAO coefficients of pz LUMO of selected C atoms, and angles reflecting characteristic structural features of the compounds. It was found that the experimentally determined 1H and 13C chemical shifts of certain atoms relate to the predicted dipole moments, the angles between the acridine and phenyl moieties, and the LCAO coefficients of the pz LUMO of the C atoms believed to participate in the initial step of the oxidation of the target compounds. The spectral and physicochemical characteristics of the target compounds were investigated in the context of their chemiluminogenic ability. PMID:21134782

  6. Neuroprotective effects of caffeine in MPTP model of Parkinson's disease: A (13)C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Bagga, Puneet; Chugani, Anup N; Patel, Anant B

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons with an accompanying neuroinflammation leading to loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia. Caffeine, a well-known A2A receptor antagonist is reported to slow down the neuroinflammation caused by activated microglia and reduce the extracellular glutamate in the brain. In this study, we have evaluated the neuroprotective effect of caffeine in the MPTP model of PD by monitoring the region specific cerebral energy metabolism. Adult C57BL6 mice were treated with caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min prior to MPTP (25 mg/kg, i.p.) administration for 8 days. The paw grip strength of mice was assessed in order to evaluate the motor function after various treatments. For metabolic studies, mice were infused with [1,6-(13)C2]glucose, and (13)C labeling of amino acids was monitored using ex vivo(1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy. The paw grip strength was found to be reduced following the MPTP treatment. The caffeine pretreatment showed significant protection against the reduction of paw grip strength in MPTP treated mice. The levels of GABA and myo-inositol were found to be elevated in the striatum of MPTP treated mice. The (13)C labeling of GluC4, GABAC2 and GlnC4 from [1,6-(13)C2]glucose was decreased in the cerebral cortex, striatum, olfactory bulb, thalamus and cerebellum suggesting impaired glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal activity and neurotransmission of the MPTP treated mice. Most interestingly, the pretreatment of caffeine maintained the (13)C labeling of amino acids to the control values in cortical, olfactory bulb and cerebellum regions while it partially retained in striatal and thalamic regions in MPTP treated mice. The pretreatment of caffeine provides a partial neuro-protection against severe striatal degeneration in the MPTP model of PD. PMID:26626997

  7. Properties of sesame oil by detailed 1H and 13C NMR assignments before and after ozonation and their correlation with iodine value, peroxide value, and viscosity measurements.

    PubMed

    Sega, Alessandro; Zanardi, Iacopo; Chiasserini, Luisa; Gabbrielli, Alessandro; Bocci, Velio; Travagli, Valter

    2010-02-01

    Gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated triglyceride substrates leading to ozonated derivatives with a wide potential applications, ranging from the petrochemical to the pharmaceutical industry. To date, an ultimate understanding of the ozone reactivity during sesame oil ozonation process as well as detailed (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments are lacking. A practical advantage of NMR is that a single NMR sample measurement can explain many issues, while similar analysis by traditional methods may require several independent and time-consuming measurements. Moreover, significant relationships among NMR spectra and both conventional chemical analysis and viscosity measurements have been found. Eventually, NMR could play an important role for quality attributes of ozonated oil derivatives. PMID:19900426

  8. Application of ChemDraw NMR Tool: Correlation of Program-Generated (Super 13)C Chemical Shifts and pK[subscript a] Values of Para-Substituted Benzoic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hongyi Wang

    2005-01-01

    A study uses the ChemDraw nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) tool to process 15 para-substituted benzoic acids and generate (super 13)C NMR chemical shifts of C1 through C5. The data were plotted against their pK[subscript a] value and a fairly good linear fit was found for pK[subscript a] versus delta[subscript c1].

  9. 13C-NMR study of the inhibition of delta-chymotrypsin by a tripeptide-glyoxal inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Djurdjevic-Pahl, Aleksandra; Hewage, Chandralal; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2002-01-01

    A new inhibitor, Z-Ala-Pro-Phe-glyoxal (where Z is benzyloxycarbonyl),has been synthesized and shown to be a competitive inhibitor of delta-chymotrypsin, with a K(i) of 25+/-8 nM at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. Z-Ala-Pro-[1-(13)C]Phe-glyoxal and Z-Ala-Pro-[2-(13)C]Phe-glyoxal have been synthesized, and (13)C-NMR has been used to determine how they interact with delta-chymotrypsin. Using Z-Ala-Pro-[2-(13)C]Phe-glyoxal we have detected a signal at 100.7 p.p.m. which we assign to the tetrahedral adduct formed between the hydroxy group of Ser-195 and the (13)C-enriched keto-carbon of the inhibitor. This signal is in a pH-dependent slow exchange with a signal at 107.6 p.p.m. which depends on a pK(a) of approximately 4.5, which we assign to oxyanion formation. Thus we are the first to detect an oxyanion pK(a) in a reversible chymotrypsin-inhibitor complex. A smaller titration shift of 100.7 p.p.m. to 103.9 p.p.m. with a pK(a) of approximately 5.3 is also detected due to a rapid exchange process. This pK(a) is also detected with the Z-Ala-Pro-[1-(13)C]Phe-glyoxal inhibitor and gives a larger titration shift of 91.4 p.p.m. to 97.3 p.p.m., which we assign to the ionization of the hydrated aldehyde hydroxy groups of the enzyme-bound inhibitor. Protonation of the oxyanion in the oxyanion hole decreases the binding efficiency of the inhibitor. From this decrease in binding efficiency we estimate that oxyanion binding in the oxyanion hole reduces the oxyanion pK(a) by 1.3 pK(a) units. We calculate that the pK(a)s of the oxyanions of the hemiketal and hydrated aldehyde moieties of the glyoxal inhibitor are both lowered by 6.4-6.9 pK(a) units on binding to chymotrypsin. Therefore we conclude that oxyanion binding in the oxyanion hole has only a minor role in decreasing the oxyanion pK(a). We also investigate how the inhibitor breaks down at alkaline pH, and how it breaks down at neutral pH in the presence of chymotrypsin. PMID:11853541

  10. Phosphorus-31, sup 15 N, and sup 13 C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, S.; Leo, G.C.; Sammons, R.D.; Sikorski, J.A. )

    1989-05-02

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph}) of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by {sup 31}P, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts ({delta}) for each of the three nuclei. By {sup 31}P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The {sup 13}C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The {sup 15}N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the {sup 31}P {delta} and the C-P-O bond angle, and the {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N {delta} values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield {sup 31}P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P {sup 31}P {delta} vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the E{sup S3P} binary complex, while the E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph} complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle.

  11. Application of Spectroscopic Techniques (FT-IR, 13C NMR) to the analysis of humic substances in volcanic soils along an environmental gradient (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Rodriguez, Antonio; María Armas Herrera, Cecilia; González Pérez, José Antonio; González-Vila, Francisco Javier; Arbelo Rodríguez, Carmen Dolores; Mora Hernández, Juan Luis; Polvillo Polo, Oliva

    2010-05-01

    Andosols and andic soils are considered as efficient C-sinks in terms of C sequestration. These soils are usually developed from volcanic materials, and are characterized by a predominance of short-range ordered minerals like allophanes, imogolite and other Fe and Al oxyhydroxides. Such materials occur commonly associated with organic compounds, thus generating highly stable organo-mineral complexes and leading to the accumulation of a high amount of organic carbon. Spectroscopic methods like FT-IR and 13C NMR are suitable for the analysis of the chemical structure of soil humic substances, and allow identifying distinct functional groups and protein, lipids, lignin, carbohydrate-derived fragments. In this work we study the structural features of four soils developed on Pleistocene basaltic lavae in Tenerife (Canary Island, Spain), distributed along an altitudinal climatic gradient. The soil sequence comprises soils with different degree of geochemical evolution and andic character, including a mineral ‘Hypersalic Solonchak' (Tabaibal de Rasca), a slightly vitric ‘Luvic Phaeozem' (Los Frailes), a degraded and shallow ‘Endoleptic, fulvic, silandic Andosol' (Siete Lomas), and a well-developed and deep ‘Fulvic, silandic, Andosol' (Ravelo). Samples of the raw soil and humic and fulvic acids isolated from the surface horizons were analyzed. The results show a low content of organic carbon in the mineral soil, the inherited humin predominating, and a very high content of humic and fulvic acids in Andosols. The FT-IR and 13C NMR spectra of the raw soil samples show a low resolution, related to interferences from mineral complexes signals, particularly in soils with lower organic carbon content. 13C NMR shows a predominance of O-alkyl carbon (derived of carbohydrates) in andic soils, whereas O-alkyl and aromatic fractions are most evident in the mineral soil. The humic acids spectra are characterized by a dominance of alkyl and aromatic fractions with a high degree

  12. Characterization of the humic substances isolated from postfire soils of scotch pine forest in Togljatty city, Samara region by the 13C-NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimova, Ekaterina; Abakumov, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    Postpyrogenic soil dynamics is an informative tool for studying of soil elementary processes in extreme temperature conditions and for predicting of short time environmental changes in conditions of catastrophic landscape changes. Soil organic matter (SOM) system evolution is the most rapid process of postpyrogenic soil development. In this relation the evaluation of humus accumulation rates and humification trend were conducted with use of the classical chemical and modern spectroscopy methods. Soil restoration after spontaneous forest fires near Togljatty city (Samara region, Russia) was abandoned in 2010, and further monitoring over the next four years was organized to evaluate the speed of biogenic processes and humus accumulation dynamics. Three key soil plots were studied for estimating SOM quality changes under the forest fire effect: surface forest fire, crown forest fire and control. Total carbon and nitrogen content as well as Cha/Cfa ratios (content of humic acids/ content of fulvic acids), were estimated to assess the dynamics of soil restoration. Humic acid powders were extracted and analyzed by elemental composition and 13C-NMR spectroscopy to assess changes in humic substance structure and composition. The data obtained indicate that burning of a forest floor and sod (humic) horizon led to humus losses and decreases in total carbon stocks. As a result of the fires, the content of humic acids in the pyrogenic horizon increased, leading alterations of humus type. Greater increases in the degree of organic matter humification were observed for surface fires than crown fires. It was shown that the humus molecular composition was substantially affected by the wildfires. The data show an increase in aromaticity, a loss of oxygen-containing groups and dehydrogenation of humic acids. Humic acids in the soils of the control plots and after wildfires were significantly different, especially in the ratios of hydrogen, oxygen and carbon. The increase in the

  13. Accurate quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy: repeatability over time of site-specific 13C isotope ratio determination.

    PubMed

    Caytan, Elsa; Botosoa, Eliot P; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S

    2007-11-01

    The stability over time (repeatability) for the determination of site-specific 13C/12C ratios at natural abundance by quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy has been tested on three probes: enriched bilabeled [1,2-13C2]ethanol; ethanol at natural abundance; and vanillin at natural abundance. It is shown in all three cases that the standard deviation for a series of measurements taken every 2-3 months over periods between 9 and 13 months is equal to or smaller than the standard deviation calculated from 5-10 replicate measurements made on a single sample. The precision which can be achieved using the present analytical 13C NMR protocol is higher than the prerequisite value of 1-2 per thousand for the determination of site-specific 13C/12C ratios at natural abundance (13C-SNIF-NMR). Hence, this technique permits the discrimination of very small variations in 13C/12C ratios between carbon positions, as found in biogenic natural products. This observed stability over time in 13C NMR spectroscopy indicates that further improvements in precision will depend primarily on improved signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:17900175

  14. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: [sup 13]C-NMR analysis of CONSOL THF-soluble residual materials from the Wilsonville coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Solum, M.S.; Pugmire, R.J. )

    1992-11-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using CP/MAS [sup 13]C-NMR spectroscopy for the chemical structural examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. A set of twelve carbon skeletal-structure parameters and eight molecular structural descriptors were derived from the NMR data. The technique was used previously to determine these parameters for coal and char, and in the construction of a coal pyrolysis model. The method was applied successfully to the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble portion of eleven 850[degrees]F[sup +] distillation resids and one 850[degrees]F[sup +] distillation resid which contained ash and insoluble organic material (IOM). The results of this study demonstrate that this analytical method can provide data for construction of a model of direct coal liquefaction. Its further development and use is justified based on these results.

  15. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: {sup 13}C-NMR analysis of CONSOL THF-soluble residual materials from the Wilsonville coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Solum, M.S.; Pugmire, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using CP/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy for the chemical structural examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. A set of twelve carbon skeletal-structure parameters and eight molecular structural descriptors were derived from the NMR data. The technique was used previously to determine these parameters for coal and char, and in the construction of a coal pyrolysis model. The method was applied successfully to the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble portion of eleven 850{degrees}F{sup +} distillation resids and one 850{degrees}F{sup +} distillation resid which contained ash and insoluble organic material (IOM). The results of this study demonstrate that this analytical method can provide data for construction of a model of direct coal liquefaction. Its further development and use is justified based on these results.

  16. Luminescence dynamics and {sup 13}C NMR characteristics of dinuclear complexes exhibiting coupled lanthanide(III) cation pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, K.D.; Bailey-Folkes, S.A.; Kahwa, I.A.

    1992-08-20

    Luminescence and cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) {sup 13}C NMR properties of lanthanide dinuclear macrocyclic complexes of a compartmental Schiff base chelate (1) derived from the condensation of 2,6-diformyl-p-cresol and 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanediamine are reported. The Schiff base chromophore in 1 is a strong light absorber and an efficient sensitizer for intense Tb{sup 3+}({sup 5}D{sub 4}) and Eu{sup 3+}({sup 5}D{sub 0})(T < 110 K ) emission which does not exhibit self-quenching effects. Emission from Tb{sup 3+} is sensitized by the ligand singlet state; in striking contrast, Eu{sup 3+} emission is sensitized by the triplet state and reveals an unusual nonradiative quenching process at T > 110 K with a thermal barrier of {approx} 2300 cm{sup {minus}1}. Weak emission is observed from Dy{sup 3+}({sup 4}F{sub 9/2}), Sm{sup 3+}({sup 4}G{sub 5/2}), and Pr{sup 3+}({sup 1}D{sub 2}) diluted in Gd{sup 3+} (i.e., from Gd{sup 3+}-Ln{sup 3+} heteropairs, Ln = Pr, Sm, Dy). Intramolecular metal-metal (Ln-Ln = 4 {Angstrom}) interactions account for the greatly quenched emission from Sm{sup 3+}-Sm{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+}-Dy{sup 3+} homopairs compared to Gd{sup 3+}-Ln heteropairs (Ln = Sm, Dy). Gd{sup 3+}-Ln{sup 3+} emission lifetimes at 77 K are 1610 (Tb{sup 3+}), 890 (Eu{sup 3+}), 14 (Dy{sup 3+}) and {approx} 13 {mu}s (Sm{sup 3+}). Nonradiative relaxation processes at 77 K in dilute Ln{sup 3+}:Gd{sub 2}1(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, being temperature independent for Sm{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} but temperature dependent for Tb{sup 3+}, follow the energy gap law with {alpha} {approx} - 10{sup {minus}3} cm and B {approx} 2 x 10{sup 8} s{sup {minus}1}. CP-MAS data show paramagnetic broadening of {sup 13}C resonances which increases with the magnetic moment of Ln{sup 3+}. Surprisingly, no significant shifts in resonance positions corresponding to the changing nature of paramagnetic Ln{sup 3+} ions are observed. 43 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Cucurbitacins from Cayaponia racemosa: isolation and total assignment of 1H and 13C NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Davina C; Assunção, João Carlos C; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Lemos, Telma L G; Monte, Francisco J Q

    2007-05-01

    Two new cucurbitane-type triterpenoids, 2beta,3beta,16alpha,20(R),25-pentahydroxy-9-methyl-19-norlanost-5-en-7,22-dione and 2beta,3beta,16alpha,20(R),25-pentahydroxy-9-methyl-19-norlanost-5-en-7,11,22-trione, were isolated from fruits of Cayaponia racemosa. The total (1)H and (13)C chemical shift assignment of these two closely related compounds is described, making use of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques. PMID:17372957

  18. 13C NMR spectral characterization of epimeric rotenone and some related tetrahydrobenzopyranofurobenzopyranones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.; Abidi, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    The 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectra of epimers of rotenone and four 12a-hydroxy-analogues were examined to determine the stereochemical effect of the B/C ring fusion involving the 6a- and 12a-carbon centers. Chemical shift differences between the epimeric carbon resonances of cis- and trans-6a,12a-compounds were notably larger than those of diastereoisomers derived from the same B/C ring junction stereochemistry. Results of the spectral analysis have been useful for the quantification of mixtures of epimers and for the measurement of rates of epimerization and oxygenation.

  19. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV absorption, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical (in B3LYP/6-311++G** level) studies on alkali metal salts of caffeic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, Renata

    The effect of some metals on the electronic system of benzoic and nicotinic acids has recently been investigated by IR, Raman and UV spectroscopy [1-3]. Benzoic and nicotinic acids are regarded model systems representing a wide group of aromatic ligands which are incorporated into enzymes. In this work the FT-IR (in solid state and in solution), FT-Raman, UV absorption and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) and its salts with lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium were registered, assigned and analyzed. The effect of alkali metals on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. Studies of differences in the number and position of bands from the IR, Raman, UV absorption spectra and chemical shifts from NMR spectra allowed to conclude on the distribution of electronic charge in the molecules, the delocalization energy of π electrons and the reactivity of ligands in metal complexes. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G** basis set. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments for the optimized structures of caffeic acid and lithium, sodium, potassium caffeinates were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris.

  20. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV absorption, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical (in B3LYP/6-311++G** level) studies on alkali metal salts of caffeic acid.

    PubMed

    Świsłocka, Renata

    2013-01-01

    The effect of some metals on the electronic system of benzoic and nicotinic acids has recently been investigated by IR, Raman and UV spectroscopy [1-3]. Benzoic and nicotinic acids are regarded model systems representing a wide group of aromatic ligands which are incorporated into enzymes. In this work the FT-IR (in solid state and in solution), FT-Raman, UV absorption and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) and its salts with lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium were registered, assigned and analyzed. The effect of alkali metals on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. Studies of differences in the number and position of bands from the IR, Raman, UV absorption spectra and chemical shifts from NMR spectra allowed to conclude on the distribution of electronic charge in the molecules, the delocalization energy of π electrons and the reactivity of ligands in metal complexes. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G** basis set. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments for the optimized structures of caffeic acid and lithium, sodium, potassium caffeinates were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris. PMID:22369898

  1. Changes in the compound classes of dissolved organic matter along an estuarine transect: A study using FTIR and 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulla, Hussain A. N.; Minor, Elizabeth C.; Dias, Robert F.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2010-07-01

    In this work, we use Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 13C NMR) data to quantify the changes of major chemical compound classes (carboxylic acid, amide, ester, aliphatic, aromatic and carbohydrate) in high molecular weight (HMW, >1 kDa) dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated along a transect through the Elizabeth River/Chesapeake Bay system to the coastal Atlantic Ocean off Virginia, USA. Results show that carboxylic acids and aromatic compounds are lost along the transect, while HMW DOC becomes enriched in carbohydrate moieties that could have a mid-transect source, perhaps the intensive red tide bloom ( Choclodinium polykrikoides) which occurred during our sampling period. Taking the second derivative of the FTIR spectra resolved three pools of de-protonated carboxylic acids at our Dismal Swamp site (used to represent terrestrial organic matter in this area): one carboxylic acid pool, complexed with iron, seems to be lost between the Dismal Swamp and river sites; the second appears biogeochemically active throughout the riverine transect, disappearing in the coastal ocean sample; the third seems refractory, with the potential to be transported to and to accumulate within the open ocean. Five-member ring esters (γ-lactones) were the major ester form in the Dismal Swamp; aliphatic and acetate esters were the dominant esters in the estuary/marine DOM. No amide groups were detectable in Dismal Swamp DOM; secondary amides were present at the estuarine/marine sites. Coupling FTIR with 13C NMR provides new insights into the biogeochemical roles of carboxylic acid, amide and ester compounds in aquatic ecosystems.

  2. Improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme for (1)H and (13)C NMR Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kapaev, Roman R; Toukach, Philip V

    2015-07-21

    The improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme has been developed for the simulation of (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra of oligo- and polysaccharides and their derivatives, including those containing noncarbohydrate constituents found in natural glycans. Besides adding the (1)H NMR calculations, we improved the accuracy and performance of prediction and optimized the mathematical model of the precision estimation. This new approach outperformed other methods of chemical shift simulation, including database-driven, neural net-based, and purely empirical methods and quantum-mechanical calculations at high theory levels. It can process structures with rarely occurring and noncarbohydrate constituents unsupported by the other methods. The algorithm is transparent to users and allows tracking used reference NMR data to original publications. It was implemented in the Glycan-Optimized Dual Empirical Spectrum Simulation (GODESS) web service, which is freely available at the platform of the Carbohydrate Structure Database (CSDB) project ( http://csdb.glycoscience.ru). PMID:26087011

  3. Carbon-13 chemical-shift tensors in indigo: A two-dimensional NMR-ROCSA and DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Sean T; Dybowski, Cecil

    2015-11-01

    The principal components of the (13)C NMR chemical-shift tensors for the eight unique carbon sites of crystalline indigo have been measured using the ROCSA pulse sequence. The chemical shifts have been assigned unambiguously to their respective nuclear sites through comparison of the experimental data to the results of density-functional calculations employing a refined X-ray diffraction structure. These measurements expand the database of measured aromatic (13)C chemical-shift tensors to the indole ring. Magnetic shielding calculations for hypoxanthine and adenosine are also reported. Comparisons of calculations that include the effect of the crystalline lattice with calculations that model indigo as an isolated molecule give an estimate of the intermolecular contribution to the magnetic shielding. PMID:26344134

  4. Carbon-13 chemical-shift tensors in indigo: A two-dimensional NMR-ROCSA and DFT Study

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Sean T.; Dybowski, Cecil

    2016-01-01

    The principal components of the 13C NMR chemical-shift tensors for the eight unique carbon sites of crystalline indigo have been measured using the ROCSA pulse sequence. The chemical shifts have been assigned unambiguously to their respective nuclear sites through comparison of the experimental data to the results of density-functional calculations employing a refined X-ray diffraction structure. These measurements expand the database of measured aromatic 13C chemical-shift tensors to the indole ring. Magnetic shielding calculations for hypoxanthine and adenosine are also reported. Comparisons of calculations that include the effect of the crystalline lattice with calculations that model indigo as an isolated molecule give an estimate of the intermolecular contribution to the magnetic shielding. PMID:26344134

  5. Compositional differences among Chinese soy sauce types studied by (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ghulam Mustafa; Wang, Xiaohua; Bin Yuan; Wang, Jie; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili

    2016-09-01

    Soy sauce a well known seasoning all over the world, especially in Asia, is available in global market in a wide range of types based on its purpose and the processing methods. Its composition varies with respect to the fermentation processes and addition of additives, preservatives and flavor enhancers. A comprehensive (1)H NMR based study regarding the metabonomic variations of soy sauce to differentiate among different types of soy sauce available on the global market has been limited due to the complexity of the mixture. In present study, (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis like principle component analysis (PCA), and orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was applied to investigate metabonomic variations among different types of soy sauce, namely super light, super dark, red cooking and mushroom soy sauce. The main additives in soy sauce like glutamate, sucrose and glucose were easily distinguished and quantified using (13)C NMR spectroscopy which were otherwise difficult to be assigned and quantified due to serious signal overlaps in (1)H NMR spectra. The significantly higher concentration of sucrose in dark, red cooking and mushroom flavored soy sauce can directly be linked to the addition of caramel in soy sauce. Similarly, significantly higher level of glutamate in super light as compared to super dark and mushroom flavored soy sauce may come from the addition of monosodium glutamate. The study highlights the potentiality of (13)C NMR based metabonomics coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis in differentiating between the types of soy sauce on the basis of level of additives, raw materials and fermentation procedures. PMID:27343582

  6. Use of solid-state 13C NMR in structural studies of humic acids and humin from Holocene sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; VanderHart, D.L.; Earl, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    13C NMR spectra of solid humic substances in Holocene sediments have been obtained using cross polarization with magic-angle sample spinning techniques. The results demonstrate that this technique holds great promise for structural characterizations of complex macromolecular substances such as humin and humic acids. Quantifiable distinctions can be made between structural features of aquatic and terrestrial humic substances. The aliphatic carbons of the humic substances are dominant components suggestive of input from lipid-like materials. An interesting resemblance is also noted between terrestrial humic acid and humin spectra. ?? 1980.

  7. Prediction of hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts from RNA using database mining and support vector regression.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joshua D; Summers, Michael F; Johnson, Bruce A

    2015-09-01

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) contains NMR chemical shift depositions for over 200 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the (1)H NMR and (13)C chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of 187 of these RNAs. Software was developed that downloads BMRB datasets and corresponding PDB structure files, and then generates residue-specific attributes based on the calculated secondary structure. Attributes represent properties present in each sequential stretch of five adjacent residues and include variables such as nucleotide type, base-pair presence and type, and tetraloop types. Attributes and (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the central nucleotide are then used as input to train a predictive model using support vector regression. These models can then be used to predict shifts for new sequences. The new software tools, available as stand-alone scripts or integrated into the NMR visualization and analysis program NMRViewJ, should facilitate NMR assignment and/or validation of RNA (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts. In addition, our findings enabled the re-calibration a ring-current shift model using published NMR chemical shifts and high-resolution X-ray structural data as guides. PMID:26141454

  8. Effect of organic matter application on CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectra of humic acids from a brown soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.

    2009-04-01

    The humified SOM or humic substances (HS) composed of humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA) and humin (HM) represent the most microbially recalcitrant and stable reservoir of organic carbon in soil (Piccolo et al., 2004). OM applications can influence the amount and structural characteristics of HS(Dou et al., 2008). During the past few decades, there has been much research on HS, but their chemical structure is still not fully understood (Dong, 2006).CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectroscopy was considered as an effective method to study structures of HS without dissolving problem compared with liquid 13C-NMR (Conte et al., 1997; Dou et al., 2008). It can directly measure the carbon framework and reflect the nature of HS transformation after OM application (Spaccini et al., 2000). For that reason, this method was applied in this study. The objective of this paper was to clarify the effect of long term OM application on the changes of structural characteristics in HAs, which provided new information for improving soil fertility by OM application. The experiment was carried out on a brown soil (Paleudalf in USDA Soil Taxonomy) at Shenyang Agricultural University, Liaoning province, China (N41°48'-E123°25'). The experiment included 3 treatments: zero-treatment (CKbr), and two pig manure (PM) treatments (O1 and O2) at the rates of 0.9 t ha-1 and 1.8 t ha-1 of organic carbon, respectively. The samples of the HA fraction were extracted, separated and purified according to the method described by Dou et al. (1991). Elemental composition, Differential thermal analysis (DTA), -lgK value, FT-IR and CP-MAS- 13C-NMR of HAs were performed. Effects on the contents of orgaic carbon and its composition. The contents of TOC were from 8.77 g kg-1 to 12.25 g kg-1. The relative contents in TOC for WSS, HA, and FA were 6.87%, 14.2% and 19.8%. Comparing the CKbr, the contents of WSS, HA and FA for O1 and O2 increased, but relative contents of WSS and FA decreased. The content of the HA increased after

  9. Molecular structure of crude beeswax studied by solid-state 13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2004-01-01

    13C Solid-state NMR experiments were performed to investigate the structure of beeswax in the native state (crude beeswax) for the first time. From quantitative direct polarization 13C MAS NMR spectrum, it was found that the fraction of internal-chain methylene (int-(CH2)) component compared to other components of crude beeswax was over 95%. The line shape of the int-(CH2) carbon resonance region was comprehensively analyzed in terms of NMR chemical shift. The 13C broad peak component covering from 31 to 35ppm corresponds to int-(CH2) carbons with trans conformation in crystalline domains, whereas the sharp signal at 30.3 ppm corresponds to gauche conformation in the non-crystalline domain. From peak deconvolution of the aliphatic region, it was found that over 85% of the int-(CH2) has a crystal structure and several kinds of molecular packing for int-(CH2), at least three, exist in the crystalline domain. Abbreviation: NMR nuclear magnetic resonance int-(CH2) internal-chain methylene CP cross-polarization MAS magic angle spinning PMID:15861244

  10. A procedure to validate and correct the 13C chemical shift calibration of RNA datasets.

    PubMed

    Aeschbacher, Thomas; Schubert, Mario; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-02-01

    Chemical shifts reflect the structural environment of a certain nucleus and can be used to extract structural and dynamic information. Proper calibration is indispensable to extract such information from chemical shifts. Whereas a variety of procedures exist to verify the chemical shift calibration for proteins, no such procedure is available for RNAs to date. We present here a procedure to analyze and correct the calibration of (13)C NMR data of RNAs. Our procedure uses five (13)C chemical shifts as a reference, each of them found in a narrow shift range in most datasets deposited in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank. In 49 datasets we could evaluate the (13)C calibration and detect errors or inconsistencies in RNA (13)C chemical shifts based on these chemical shift reference values. More than half of the datasets (27 out of those 49) were found to be improperly referenced or contained inconsistencies. This large inconsistency rate possibly explains that no clear structure-(13)C chemical shift relationship has emerged for RNA so far. We were able to recalibrate or correct 17 datasets resulting in 39 usable (13)C datasets. 6 new datasets from our lab were used to verify our method increasing the database to 45 usable datasets. We can now search for structure-chemical shift relationships with this improved list of (13)C chemical shift data. This is demonstrated by a clear relationship between ribose (13)C shifts and the sugar pucker, which can be used to predict a C2'- or C3'-endo conformation of the ribose with high accuracy. The improved quality of the chemical shift data allows statistical analysis with the potential to facilitate assignment procedures, and the extraction of restraints for structure calculations of RNA. PMID:22252483

  11. Advanced CPMAS-13C NMR techniques for molecular characterization of size-separated fractions from a soil humic acid.

    PubMed

    Conte, Pellegrino; Spaccini, Riccardo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2006-09-01

    A humic acid extracted from a volcanic soil was subjected to preparative high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) to reduce its molecular complexity and eleven different size fractions were obtained. Cross-polarization magic-angle spinning 13C NMR (CPMAS 13C NMR) analysis performed with variable contact-time (VCT) pulse sequences showed that the largest molecular-size fractions contained aromatic, alkyl, and carbohydrate-like components. The carbohydrate-like content and the alkyl chain length seemed to decrease with decreasing molecular size. Progressive reduction of aromatic carbon atoms was also observed with decreasing molecular size of the separated fractions. Mathematical treatment of the results from VCT experiments enabled cross polarization (T (CH)) and proton spin-lattice relaxation (T(1rho)(H)) times to be related to structural differences among the size fractions. The conformational distribution indicated that the eleven size fractions could be allocated to two main groups. The first group, with larger nominal molecular sizes, was characterized by molecular domains with slower local molecular motion. The second group of size fractions, with smaller nominal molecular sizes, was characterized by a larger number of molecular domains with faster local molecular motion. The T (CH) and (T(1rho)(H)) values suggested that either condensed or strongly associated aromatic systems were predominant in the size fractions with the largest apparent molecular dimensions. PMID:16896626

  12. (13)C NMR characterization of triacylglycerols of Moringa oleifera seed oil: an "oleic-vaccenic acid" oil.

    PubMed

    Vlahov, Giovanna; Chepkwony, Paul Kiprono; Ndalut, Paul K

    2002-02-27

    The composition of acyl chains and their positions in the triacylglycerols of the oil extracted from seeds of Moringa oleifera were studied by (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The unsaturated chains of M. oleifera seed oil were found to comprise only mono-unsaturated fatty acids and, in particular, two omega-9 mono-unsaturated acids, (cis-9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) and cis-11-eicosenoic acids) and one omega-7 mono-unsaturated acid (cis-11-octadecenoic acid (vaccenic acid)). The mono-unsaturated fatty acids were detected as separated resonances in the spectral regions where the carbonyl and olefinic carbons resonate according to the 1,3- and 2-positions on the glycerol backbone. The unambiguous detection of vaccenic acid was also achieved through the resonance of the omega-3 carbon. The (13)C NMR methodology enabled the simultaneous detection of oleate, vaccenate, and eicosenoate chains according to their positions on the glycerol backbone (1,3- and 2-positions) through the carboxyl, olefinic, and methylene envelope carbons of the triacylglycerol acyl chains. PMID:11853466

  13. Method for determining molar concentrations of metabolites in complex solutions from two-dimensional 1H-13C NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ian A; Schommer, Seth C; Hodis, Brendan; Robb, Kate A; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M; Sussman, Michael R; Markley, John L

    2007-12-15

    One-dimensional (1D) (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used extensively for high-throughput analysis of metabolites in biological fluids and tissue extracts. Typically, such spectra are treated as multivariate statistical objects rather than as collections of quantifiable metabolites. We report here a two-dimensional (2D) (1)H-(13)C NMR strategy (fast metabolite quantification, FMQ, by NMR) for identifying and quantifying the approximately 40 most abundant metabolites in biological samples. To validate this technique, we prepared mixtures of synthetic compounds and extracts from Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Medicago sativa. We show that accurate (technical error 2.7%) molar concentrations can be determined in 12 min using our quantitative 2D (1)H-(13)C NMR strategy. In contrast, traditional 1D (1)H NMR analysis resulted in 16.2% technical error under nearly ideal conditions. We propose FMQ by NMR as a practical alternative to 1D (1)H NMR for metabolomics studies in which 50-mg (extract dry weight) samples can be obtained. PMID:17985927

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  15. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-06-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ, ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1-40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1-40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16-21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1-40 fibrils in 4 h or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples.

  16. Effect of organic matter application on CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectra of humic acids from a brown soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.

    2009-04-01

    The humified SOM or humic substances (HS) composed of humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA) and humin (HM) represent the most microbially recalcitrant and stable reservoir of organic carbon in soil (Piccolo et al., 2004). OM applications can influence the amount and structural characteristics of HS(Dou et al., 2008). During the past few decades, there has been much research on HS, but their chemical structure is still not fully understood (Dong, 2006).CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectroscopy was considered as an effective method to study structures of HS without dissolving problem compared with liquid 13C-NMR (Conte et al., 1997; Dou et al., 2008). It can directly measure the carbon framework and reflect the nature of HS transformation after OM application (Spaccini et al., 2000). For that reason, this method was applied in this study. The objective of this paper was to clarify the effect of long term OM application on the changes of structural characteristics in HAs, which provided new information for improving soil fertility by OM application. The experiment was carried out on a brown soil (Paleudalf in USDA Soil Taxonomy) at Shenyang Agricultural University, Liaoning province, China (N41°48'-E123°25'). The experiment included 3 treatments: zero-treatment (CKbr), and two pig manure (PM) treatments (O1 and O2) at the rates of 0.9 t ha-1 and 1.8 t ha-1 of organic carbon, respectively. The samples of the HA fraction were extracted, separated and purified according to the method described by Dou et al. (1991). Elemental composition, Differential thermal analysis (DTA), -lgK value, FT-IR and CP-MAS- 13C-NMR of HAs were performed. Effects on the contents of orgaic carbon and its composition. The contents of TOC were from 8.77 g kg-1 to 12.25 g kg-1. The relative contents in TOC for WSS, HA, and FA were 6.87%, 14.2% and 19.8%. Comparing the CKbr, the contents of WSS, HA and FA for O1 and O2 increased, but relative contents of WSS and FA decreased. The content of the HA increased after

  17. Deuterium-induced isotope effects on the 13C chemical shifts of α-D-glucose pentaacetate.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Hernández, Nury; Álvarez-Cisneros, Celina; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2013-03-01

    1,2,3,4,6-Penta-O-acetyl-α-D-glucopyranose and the corresponding [1-(2)H], [2-(2)H], [3-(2)H], [4-(2)H], [5-(2)H], and [6,6-(2)H(2)]-labeled compounds were prepared for measuring deuterium/hydrogen-induced effects on (13)C chemical shift (n)Δ (DHIECS) values. A conformational analysis of the nondeuterated compound was achieved using density functional theory (DFT) molecular models that allowed calculation of several structural properties as well as Boltzmann-averaged (13)C NMR chemical shifts by using the gauge-including atomic orbital method. It was found that the DFT-calculated C-H bond lengths correlate with (1)Δ DHIECS. PMID:23315885

  18. Metabolic pathway of Propionibacterium growing with oxygen: enzymes, 13C NMR analysis, and its application for vitamin B12 production with periodic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ye, K; Shijo, M; Miyano, K; Shimizu, K

    1999-01-01

    The metabolic pathway of Propionibacterium grown under an aerobic condition is still not clear so far. In this work, cell growth, organic acid formation, vitamin B12 synthesis, and enzyme activities were determined in different aerobic cultivation systems. It was found that the propionate, which is accumulated during anaerobic cultivation, was completely decomposed when the cultivation was shifted to an aerobic condition. Moreover, pyruvate was formed in accordance with the decomposition of the propionate. Besides, more acetate was produced and a large amount of malate was formed during the aerobic cultivation. Such phenomena could be repeatedly observed in a periodic cultivation in which the dissolved oxygen concentration was alternatively controlled at 0 or 1 ppm. Enzyme analysis indicates that the regulation of organic acid formation depends on which molecule, i.e., oxygen or fumarate, serves as an electron acceptor in the respiratory chain reactions. No tricarboxylic acid cycle was found to exist in this species grown under an aerobic condition. It is evident that the randomizing pathway worked in a reversed direction in the presence of oxygen, through which the propionate is oxidized to pyruvate. The 13C NMR spectral analysis confirmed this observation. PMID:10194395

  19. Soil Organic Matter Characterization by 13C-NMR and Thermal Analysis in Deep Tropical Soil Profiles from the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, A. F.; Hockaday, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forest soils store large quantities of carbon (C) as soil organic matter (SOM), a substantial proportion of which is stored deep (> 30 cm) in the soil profile. Characterization of tropical SOM remains difficult, in part due to the analytical challenges associated high iron and low C concentrations. In this study, we combined solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with analytical thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry, DSC; evolved CO2 gas analysis, CO2-EGA) to explore patterns in SOM composition in deep soil profiles from two contrasting soil types at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO) in northeast Puerto Rico. Prior to 13C NMR, soils were repeatedly demineralized with hydrofluoric acid (HF) to remove paramagnetic compounds and concentrate organic matter. Given the scant information on tropical subsoil OM, we also sought to evaluate the effect of HF acid treatments on tropical subsoil SOM. HF treatments effectively enriched sample C and removed paramagnetic compounds, allowing us to obtain high-quality NMR spectra for low-C subsoils. C:N ratios before and after HF treatment were nearly identical (mean = 16.6 ± 0.8), suggesting that the SOM pool was not substantially fractionated, though C recoveries were low and variable. Thermal analyses confirmed the loss of a substantial fraction of the soil mineral matrix, however, retention of several endothermic regions in post-HF Inceptisol soils indicated that not all minerals were completely solubilized. In addition, important differences in the DSC and CO2-EGA thermograms were observed in comparing samples before versus after HF treatments. These results suggest that the organo-mineral associations were substantially altered, though it is not immediately clear the degree to which alterations in chemical composition versus binding association have changed. In addition to these qualitative changes, quantitative interpretations of 13C-NMR results from low-C and high

  20. Brominated Compounds from Marine Sponges of the Genus Aplysina and a Compilation of Their 13C NMR Spectral Data

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Narlize Silva; Montes, Ricardo Carneiro; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; da Cunha, Emidio V. L.; de Athayde-Filho, Petronio Filgueiras; Rodrigues, Luis Cezar; da Silva Dias, Celidarque; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria

    2011-01-01

    Aplysina is the best representative genus of the family Aplysinidae. Halogenated substances are its main class of metabolites. These substances contribute greatly to the chemotaxonomy and characterization of the sponges belonging to this genus. Due to their pharmacological activities, these alkaloids are of special interest. The chemistry of halogenated substances and of the alkaloids has long been extensively studied in terrestrial organisms, while the number of marine organisms studied has just started to increase in the last decades. This review describes 101 halogenated substances from 14 species of Aplysina from different parts of the world. These substances can be divided into the following classes: bromotyramines (A), cavernicolins (B), hydroverongiaquinols (C), bromotyrosineketals (D), bromotyrosine lactone derivatives (E), oxazolidones (F), spiroisoxazolines (G), verongiabenzenoids (H), verongiaquinols (I), and dibromocyclohexadienes (J). A compilation of their 13C NMR data is also part of the review. For this purpose 138 references were consulted. PMID:22163189

  1. Brominated compounds from marine sponges of the genus Aplysina and a compilation of their 13C NMR spectral data.

    PubMed

    Lira, Narlize Silva; Montes, Ricardo Carneiro; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; da Cunha, Emidio V L; de Athayde-Filho, Petronio Filgueiras; Rodrigues, Luis Cezar; da Silva Dias, Celidarque; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria

    2011-01-01

    Aplysina is the best representative genus of the family Aplysinidae. Halogenated substances are its main class of metabolites. These substances contribute greatly to the chemotaxonomy and characterization of the sponges belonging to this genus. Due to their pharmacological activities, these alkaloids are of special interest. The chemistry of halogenated substances and of the alkaloids has long been extensively studied in terrestrial organisms, while the number of marine organisms studied has just started to increase in the last decades. This review describes 101 halogenated substances from 14 species of Aplysina from different parts of the world. These substances can be divided into the following classes: bromotyramines (A), cavernicolins (B), hydroverongiaquinols (C), bromotyrosineketals (D), bromotyrosine lactone derivatives (E), oxazolidones (F), spiroisoxazolines (G), verongiabenzenoids (H), verongiaquinols (I), and dibromocyclohexadienes (J). A compilation of their (13)C NMR data is also part of the review. For this purpose 138 references were consulted. PMID:22163189

  2. Rotary resonance recoupling of 13C- 1H dipolar interactions in magic angle spinning 13C NMR of dynamic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchin, Simon J.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Aliev, Abil E.; Apperley, David C.

    2000-06-01

    Rotary resonance recoupling of heteronuclear 13C- 1H dipolar interactions in magic angle spinning solid state 13C NMR spectra (recorded under conditions of 1H decoupling at frequency ν1 and magic angle spinning at frequency νr) has been studied for three examples of molecular solids (adamantane, ferrocene and hexamethylbenzene) in which substantial molecular motion is known to occur. It is shown that when rotary resonance conditions are satisfied (i.e. ν1/νr= n, for n=1 or 2), the recoupling can lead to motionally averaged Pake-like powder patterns from which information on 13C- 1H internuclear distances and/or molecular motion can be derived.

  3. Local structure and molecular motions in imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal as studied by 2H and 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, M.; Chizuwa, M.; Umiyama, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Miyatou, T.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T.; Tansho, M.; Shimizu, T.

    2015-04-01

    The local structure and molecular motion of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal were investigated using solid-state 2H and 13C NMR. The imidazolium ion undergoes isotropic rotation, which is correlated with a defect in the crystal, as observed by 2H NMR broadline spectra above 263 K. A 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in the regular site was observed from 2H NMR quadrupole Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra. The Grotthuss mechanism was accompanied by a 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in regular sites. Moreover, the proton transfer associated with the imidazolium ion of the defective crystal is important for proton conductivity of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal.

  4. Bonded Cumomer Analysis of Human Melanoma Metabolism Monitored by 13C NMR Spectroscopy of Perfused Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Shestov, Alexander A; Mancuso, Anthony; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Guo, Lili; Nelson, David S; Roman, Jeffrey C; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Leeper, Dennis B; Blair, Ian A; Glickson, Jerry D

    2016-03-01

    A network model for the determination of tumor metabolic fluxes from (13)C NMR kinetic isotopomer data has been developed and validated with perfused human DB-1 melanoma cells carrying the BRAF V600E mutation, which promotes oxidative metabolism. The model generated in the bonded cumomer formalism describes key pathways of tumor intermediary metabolism and yields dynamic curves for positional isotopic enrichment and spin-spin multiplets. Cells attached to microcarrier beads were perfused with 26 mm [1,6-(13)C2]glucose under normoxic conditions at 37 °C and monitored by (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Excellent agreement between model-predicted and experimentally measured values of the rates of oxygen and glucose consumption, lactate production, and glutamate pool size validated the model. ATP production by glycolytic and oxidative metabolism were compared under hyperglycemic normoxic conditions; 51% of the energy came from oxidative phosphorylation and 49% came from glycolysis. Even though the rate of glutamine uptake was ∼ 50% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux, the rate of ATP production from glutamine was essentially zero (no glutaminolysis). De novo fatty acid production was ∼ 6% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux was 3.6% of glycolysis, and three non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway exchange fluxes were calculated. Mass spectrometry was then used to compare fluxes through various pathways under hyperglycemic (26 mm) and euglycemic (5 mm) conditions. Under euglycemic conditions glutamine uptake doubled, but ATP production from glutamine did not significantly change. A new parameter measuring the Warburg effect (the ratio of lactate production flux to pyruvate influx through the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier) was calculated to be 21, close to upper limit of oxidative metabolism. PMID:26703469

  5. /sup 13/C NMR study of effects of fasting and diabetes on the metabolism of pyruvate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and of the utilization of pyruvate and ethanol in lipogenesis in perfused rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.M.

    1987-01-27

    /sup 13/C NMR has been used to study the competition of pyruvate dehydrogenase with pyruvate carboxylase for entry of pyruvate into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic and normal donor rats. The relative proportion of pyruvate entering the TCA cycle by these two routes was estimated from the /sup 13/C enrichments at the individual carbons of glutamate when (3-/sup 13/C)alanine was the only exogenous substrate present. In this way, the proportion of pyruvate entering by the pyruvate dehydrogenase route relative to the pyruvate carboxylase route was determined to be 1:1.2 +/- 0.1 in liver from fed controls, 1:7.7 +/- 2 in liver from 24-fasted controls, and 1:2.6 +/- 0.3 in diabetic liver. Pursuant to this observation that conversion of pyruvate to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) was greatest in perfused liver from fed controls, the incorporation of /sup 13/C label into fatty acids was monitored in this liver preparation. With the exception of the repeating methylene carbons, fatty acyl carbons labeled by (1-/sup 13/C)acetyl-CoA (from (2-/sup 13/C)pyruvate) gave rise to resonances distinguishable on the basis of chemical shift from those observed when label was introduced by (3-/sup 13/C)alanine plus (2-/sup 13/C)ethanol, which are converted to (2-/sup 13/C)acetyl-CoA. Thus, measurement of /sup 13/C enrichment at several specific sites in the fatty acyl chains in time-resolved spectra of perfused liver offers a novel way of monitoring the kinetics of the biosynthesis of fatty acids. In addition to obtaining the rate of lipogenesis, it was possible to distinguish the contributions of chain elongation from those of the de novo synthesis pathway and to estimate the average chain length of the /sup 13/C-labeled fatty acids produced.

  6. Characterizing biomass fast pyrolysis oils by 13C-NMR and chemometric analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several biomass fast pyrolysis oils were characterized by 13C and DEPT NMR analysis to determine chemical functional group compositions as related to their energy content. Pyrolysis oils were produced from a variety of feedstocks including energy crops, woods, animal wastes and oil seed presscakes,...

  7. Hydrolysis of Functional Monomers in a Single-bottle Self-etching Primer—Correlation of 13C NMR and TEM Findings

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, N.; Tay, F. R.; Fujita, K.; Pashley, D. H.; Ikemura, K.; Hiraishi, N.; King, N. M.

    2008-01-01

    Self-etching primers/adhesives that combine acidic methacrylate monomers with water in a single bottle are hydrolytically unstable and require refrigeration to extend their shelf-lives. This study tested the null hypothesis that one year of intermittent refrigeration of a 4-MET-containing simplified self-etching primer does not result in hydrolytic changes that are identifiable by transmission electron microscopy and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Human dentin was bonded with UniFil Bond immediately after being unpacked, or after one year of intermittent refrigeration at 4°C. Fresh and aged primers were analyzed by NMR for chemical changes. Ultrastructural observations indicated that there was an augmentation in etching capacity of the aged adhesive that was not accompanied by resin infiltration or effective polymerization. New NMR peaks detected from the aged ethanol-based primer confirmed that degradation occurred initially via esterification with ethanol, followed by hydrolysis of both ester groups in the 4-MET. Hydrolysis of functional methacrylate monomers occurs despite intermittent refrigeration. PMID:16632754

  8. 13C-NMR Assessment of the Pattern of Organic Matter Transformation during Domestic Wastewater Treatment by Autothermal Aerobic Digestion (ATAD)

    PubMed Central

    Piterina, Anna V.; Barlett, John; Pembroke, J. Tony

    2009-01-01

    The pattern of biodegradation and the chemical changes occurring in the macromolecular fraction of domestic sludge during autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) was monitored and characterised via solid-state 13C-NMR CP-MAS. Major indexes such as aromaticity, hydrophobicity and alkyl/O-alkyl ratios calculated for the ATAD processed biosolids were compared by means of these values to corresponding indexes reported for sludges of different origin such as manures, soil organic matter and certain types of compost. Given that this is the first time that these techniques have been applied to ATAD sludge, the data indicates that long-chain aliphatics are easily utilized by the microbial populations as substrates for metabolic activities at all stages of aerobic digestion and serve as a key substrate for the temperature increase, which in turn results in sludge sterilization. The ATAD biosolids following treatment had a prevalence of O-alkyl domains, a low aromaticity index (10.4%) and an alkyl/O-alkyl ratio of 0.48 while the hydrophobicity index of the sludge decreased from 1.12 to 0.62 during the treatment. These results have important implications for the evolution of new ATAD modalities particularly in relation to dewatering and the future use of ATAD processed biosolids as a fertilizer, particularly with respect to hydrological impacts on the soil behaviour. PMID:19742161

  9. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR observation of lactate kinetics in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Mo; Josan, Sonal; Mayer, Dirk; Hurd, Ralph E; Chung, Youngran; Bendahan, David; Spielman, Daniel M; Jue, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The production of glycolytic end products, such as lactate, usually evokes a cellular shift from aerobic to anaerobic ATP generation and O2 insufficiency. In the classical view, muscle lactate must be exported to the liver for clearance. However, lactate also forms under well-oxygenated conditions, and this has led investigators to postulate lactate shuttling from non-oxidative to oxidative muscle fiber, where it can serve as a precursor. Indeed, the intracellular lactate shuttle and the glycogen shunt hypotheses expand the vision to include a dynamic mobilization and utilization of lactate during a muscle contraction cycle. Testing the tenability of these provocative ideas during a rapid contraction cycle has posed a technical challenge. The present study reports the use of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]lactate and [2-(13)C]pyruvate in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR experiments to measure the rapid pyruvate and lactate kinetics in rat muscle. With a 3 s temporal resolution, (13)C DNP NMR detects both [1-(13)C]lactate and [2-(13)C]pyruvate kinetics in muscle. Infusion of dichloroacetate stimulates pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and shifts the kinetics toward oxidative metabolism. Bicarbonate formation from [1-(13)C]lactate increases sharply and acetyl-l-carnitine, acetoacetate and glutamate levels also rise. Such a quick mobilization of pyruvate and lactate toward oxidative metabolism supports the postulated role of lactate in the glycogen shunt and the intracellular lactate shuttle models. The study thus introduces an innovative DNP approach to measure metabolite transients, which will help delineate the cellular and physiological role of lactate and glycolytic end products. PMID:26347554

  10. Analysis of Hydroperoxides in Solid Polyethylene by MAS (13)C NMR and EPR

    SciTech Connect

    ASSINK,ROGER A.; CELINA,MATHIAS C.; DUNBAR,TIMOTHY D.; ALAM,TODD M.; CLOUGH,ROGER LEE; GILLEN,KENNETH T.

    1999-11-19

    {sup 13}C-enriched polyethylene was subjected to {gamma}-irradiation in the presence of air at 25 and 80 C for total doses ranging from 71 to 355 kGy. Significant quantities of hydroperoxides were detected in the 25 C irradiated sample by {sup 13}C magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. This method of detection was performed on the solid polymer and required no chemical derivatization or addition of solvent. The chemical stability and subsequent products of the hydroperoxide species were studied by annealing the irradiated samples in air at temperatures ranging from 22 to 110 C. A time-temperature superposition analysis provided an activation energy of 108 kJ/mol for the hydroperoxide decomposition process. The primary products of hydroperoxide decomposition were ketones and secondary alcohols with lesser amounts of acids and esters. EPR measurements suggest that the reactive hydroperoxide species reside in the amorphous phase of polyethylene, consistent with degradation occurring in the amorphous phase.

  11. Topotecan dynamics, tautomerism and reactivity--1H/13C NMR and ESI MS study.

    PubMed

    Hyz, Karolina; Kawecki, Robert; Bednarek, Elzbieta; Bocian, Wojciech; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech

    2010-08-01

    Topotecan (TPT) is in clinical use as an antitumor agent, hycamtin. Because of this, it requires both biologically and chemically useful information to be available. TPT acts by binding to the covalent complex formed by nicked DNA and topoisomerase I. This has a poisonous effect since inserted into the single-strand nick and TPT inhibits its religation. We used NMR to trace TPT dynamics, tautomerism and solvolysis products in various solvents and conditions. Chemical stability was assessed in methanol and DMSO as compared to water, and the regioselectivity of the N- and O-methylation was studied using various alkylating agents. The reaction products of quaternization of the nitrogen atom and methylation of the oxygen atom were characterized by means of ESI MS, (1)H/(13)C-HMBC and -HSQCAD NMR. We have focused on the NMR characterization of TPT with an anticipation that its aggregation, tumbling properties and the intramolecular dipolar interactions will be a common feature for other compounds described in this article. These features can also be useful in tracing the interactions of this class of topoisomerase I (TopoI) poisons with DNA. Moreover, the results explained shed light on the recently disclosed problem of lack of stability of TPT in the heart tissue homogenate samples using the analytical assays developed for this class of compounds carried out in the presence of methanol. PMID:20623719

  12. Solid-state 13C NMR study of cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Marumo, Kazuhiro; Kang, Sungmin; Deguchi, Kenzo; Nakai, Toshihito; Shimizu, Tadashi; Watanabe, Junji

    2013-12-19

    We investigated the structural behavior of cholesteric liquid crystals of 4-(hexyloxy)-4'-cyanobiphenyl (6OCB) in an 11.7 T magnetic field by solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance. Five 6OCB cholesteric liquid crystal systems were prepared with 4-methoxyphenyl 3,4-O-isopropylidene-2,6-bis-O-(4-methylbenzoyl)-β-d-galactopyranoside (CR), in which 6OCB was doped with 0.51, 1.00, 2.34, 5.60, and 6.47 mol % CR, giving products with helical twisting powers (HTPs) of 0.28, 0.54, 1.27, 3.05, and 3.52 μm(-1), respectively. Analyses of the alignment-induced shifts showed that the liquid crystals directors in pure 6OCB and 6OCB doped with 0.51 and 1.00 mol % CR become aligned with the 11.7 T magnetic field direction. However, 6OCB doped with 2.34, 5.60, and 6.47 mol % CR retained their cholesteric structures when the magnetic field was applied. The critical HTP value for resisting realignment by magnetic field was estimated to be approximately 1.27 μm(-1). A biaxiality of the phase was partially considered during spectral simulations, although the molecular shape of 6OCB can be defined as cylinderical when it is rotating rapidly. Our current understanding is that the order parameters in the cholesteric structures are not uniform; i.e., the molecular directors already aligned almost perpendicular to the magnetic field are significantly perturbed by the external field. PMID:24188010

  13. Purity analysis of hydrogen cyanide, cyanogen chloride and phosgene by quantitative (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Terry J; Cullinan, David B

    2007-11-01

    Hydrogen cyanide, cyanogen chloride and phosgene are produced in tremendously large quantities today by the chemical industry. The compounds are also particularly attractive to foreign states and terrorists seeking an inexpensive mass-destruction capability. Along with contemporary warfare agents, therefore, the US Army evaluates protective equipment used by warfighters and domestic emergency responders against the compounds, and requires their certification at > or = 95 carbon atom % before use. We have investigated the (13)C spin-lattice relaxation behavior of the compounds to develop a quantitative NMR method for characterizing chemical lots supplied to the Army. Behavior was assessed at 75 and 126 MHz for temperatures between 5 and 15 degrees C to hold the compounds in their liquid states, dramatically improving detection sensitivity. T(1) values for cyanogen chloride and phosgene were somewhat comparable, ranging between 20 and 31 s. Hydrogen cyanide values were significantly shorter at 10-18 s, most likely because of a (1)H--(13)C dipolar contribution to relaxation not possible for the other compounds. The T(1) measurements were used to derive relaxation delays for collecting the quantitative (13)C data sets. At 126 MHz, only a single data acquisition with a cryogenic probehead gave a signal-to-noise ratio exceeding that necessary for certifying the compounds at > or = 95 carbon atom % and 99% confidence. Data acquired at 75 MHz with a conventional probehead, however, required > or = 5 acquisitions to reach this certifying signal-to-noise ratio for phosgene, and >/= 12 acquisitions were required for the other compounds under these same conditions. In terms of accuracy and execution time, the NMR method rivals typical chromatographic methods. PMID:17924355

  14. 1H and 13C NMR study of substituted 3-OH pyridines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kowalewski, D. G.; De Los Santos, C.

    1990-04-01

    nJHH, nJCH and δ 13C values have been measured for a series of X substituted 3-hydroxypyridines (X = 2-NH 2, 2-NO 2, 5-Cl, 6-CH 3, 2-Cl, 2-Br, 2-I). The results show that the additivity of δ 13C provides a valuable criterion to differentiate the phenolic from the zwitterion structure. This conclusion is based on the fact that in the first case, for 2-NH 2-, 2-NO 2-, 5-Cl- and 6-CH 3-3-hydroxypyridines, there is agreement between the experimental and the additivity δ 13C values, while in the three halogen derivatives (2-Cl-, 2-Br- and 2-I-3-hydroxypyridines) the δ exp—addC3 values of -4.95, -7.25 and 9.05 are probably due to the negative charge present on the three position of the zwitterion. Since the additivity of 1JCH values holds in all substances examined (unlike the case of the 2-pyridone derivatives) it is not possible to use that criterion to differentiate between the phenolic and dipolar structures. The above conclusions are in agreement with IR, p K, NQR, RX, kinetics experiments and quantum chemical calculations of other authors.

  15. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for 13C NMR relaxation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of 15N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to 13C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and 13C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly 13C -labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  16. The Influence of Plant Litter on Soil Water Repellency: Insight from 13C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cesarano, Gaspare; Incerti, Guido; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR, i.e. reduced affinity for water owing to the presence of organic hydrophobic coatings on soil particles) has relevant hydrological implications because low rates of infiltration enhance water runoff, and untargeted diffusion of fertilizers and pesticides. Previous studies investigated the occurrence of SWR in ecosystems with different vegetation cover but did not clarify its relationships with litter biochemical quality. Here, we investigated the capability of different plant litter types to induce SWR by using fresh and decomposed leaf materials from 12 species, to amend a model sandy soil over a year-long microcosm experiment. Water repellency, measured by the Molarity of an Ethanol Droplet (MED) test, was tested for the effects of litter species and age, and compared with litter quality assessed by 13C-CPMAS NMR in solid state and elemental chemical parameters. All litter types were highly water repellent, with MED values of 18% or higher. In contrast, when litter was incorporated into the soil, only undecomposed materials induced SWR, but with a large variability of onset and peak dynamics among litter types. Surprisingly, SWR induced by litter addition was unrelated to the aliphatic fraction of litter. In contrast, lignin-poor but labile C-rich litter, as defined by O-alkyl C and N-alkyl and methoxyl C of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectral regions, respectively, induced a stronger SWR. This study suggests that biochemical quality of plant litter is a major controlling factor of SWR and, by defining litter quality with 13C-CPMAS NMR, our results provide a significant novel contribution towards a full understanding of the relationships between plant litter biochemistry and SWR. PMID:27022916

  17. The Influence of Plant Litter on Soil Water Repellency: Insight from 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cesarano, Gaspare; Incerti, Guido; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR, i.e. reduced affinity for water owing to the presence of organic hydrophobic coatings on soil particles) has relevant hydrological implications because low rates of infiltration enhance water runoff, and untargeted diffusion of fertilizers and pesticides. Previous studies investigated the occurrence of SWR in ecosystems with different vegetation cover but did not clarify its relationships with litter biochemical quality. Here, we investigated the capability of different plant litter types to induce SWR by using fresh and decomposed leaf materials from 12 species, to amend a model sandy soil over a year-long microcosm experiment. Water repellency, measured by the Molarity of an Ethanol Droplet (MED) test, was tested for the effects of litter species and age, and compared with litter quality assessed by 13C-CPMAS NMR in solid state and elemental chemical parameters. All litter types were highly water repellent, with MED values of 18% or higher. In contrast, when litter was incorporated into the soil, only undecomposed materials induced SWR, but with a large variability of onset and peak dynamics among litter types. Surprisingly, SWR induced by litter addition was unrelated to the aliphatic fraction of litter. In contrast, lignin-poor but labile C-rich litter, as defined by O-alkyl C and N-alkyl and methoxyl C of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectral regions, respectively, induced a stronger SWR. This study suggests that biochemical quality of plant litter is a major controlling factor of SWR and, by defining litter quality with 13C-CPMAS NMR, our results provide a significant novel contribution towards a full understanding of the relationships between plant litter biochemistry and SWR. PMID:27022916

  18. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for (13)C NMR relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of (15)N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to (13)C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and (13)C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly (13)C-labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions. PMID:27003380

  19. Solvation chemical shifts of perylenic antenna molecules from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Nergiz; Mareš, Jiří; Sundholm, Dage; Vaara, Juha

    2014-10-28

    Solvation-induced shifts in molecular properties can be realistically simulated by employing a dynamic model with explicit solvent molecules. In this work, (13)C NMR chemical shifts of various candidate antenna molecules for dye-sensitised solar cells have been studied by using density-functional theory calculations both in vacuo and by employing a dynamic solvation model. The solvent effects were investigated using instantaneous molecular dynamics snapshots containing the antenna molecule and surrounding acetonitrile solvent molecules. Such calculations take into account the main mechanisms of solvation-induced chemical shifts. We have analysed the contributions to the solvent shift due to the solvent susceptibility anisotropy, changes in the density of the virtual orbital space and the accessibility of the excited states to the pronouncedly local magnetic hyperfine operator. We present Lorentzian-broadened chemical shift stick spectra in which a comparison of the in vacuo and dynamic-solvation model results is graphically illustrated. The results show that the solvent-accessible atoms at the perimeter of the solute are influenced by the virtual states of the solvent molecules, which are visible to the hyperfine operators of the perimeter nuclei. This enables efficient coupling of the ground state of the solute to the magnetically allowed excited states, resulting in a positive chemical shift contribution of the perimeter nuclei. As a result of solvation, the chemical shift signals of perimeter nuclei are found to be displaced towards larger chemical shift values, whereas the nuclei of the inner region of the solute molecules show the opposite trend. The solvent susceptibility anisotropy is found to cause a small and practically constant contribution. PMID:25222796

  20. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and elemental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, S.M.; Chen, C.R.; Xu, Z.H.; Nelson, P.N.; Boyd, S.E.; Meszaros, I.; Chan, K.Y.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state {sup 13}C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  1. Quantitative Determination of Methylcyclohexanone Mixtures Using 13C NMR Spectroscopy: A Project for an Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Joseph W.; Silveira, Augustine, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The percentage composition of mixtures of four methylcyclohexanones was determined using 13C NMR spectroscopy as a quantitative analytical method. The data were acquired using standard broadband proton decoupling and inverse-gated decoupling, the latter done both with and without the paramagnetic relaxation reagent chromium(III) acetylacetonate [Cr(acac)3]. The standard broadband decoupled spectrum resulted in percentages far from the actual values owing to the varying nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1's) of the various carbon atoms. These effects were eliminated in the inverse-gated experiments, and the results were very close to the actual percentages. Before examining the mixtures, the students studied a pure sample of 2-methylcyclohexanone. They assigned the 13C spectrum and determined the T1 of the carbonyl group both with and without Cr(acac)3 using the inversion-recovery method. Then a five-times-T1 delay was inserted between pulses in all subsequent inverse-gated decoupling experiments. This project provides students with valuable experience with modern NMR techniques. These include COrrelated SpectroscopY (COSY), Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer (DEPT) spectroscopy, HETeronuclear CORrelated (HETCOR) spectroscopy, T1 determination, standard broadband versus inverse-gated decoupling, and the addition of a paramagnetic relaxation reagent to dramatically shorten both the T

  2. 1H and 13C NMR signal assignment of cucurbitacin derivatives from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrader and Ecballium elaterium L. (Cucurbitaceae).

    PubMed

    Seger, Christoph; Sturm, Sonja; Mair, Maria-Elisabeth; Ellmerer, Ernst P; Stuppner, Hermann

    2005-06-01

    2D NMR-derived 1H and 13C NMR signal assignments of six structurally closely related cucurbitacin derivatives are presented. The investigated 2-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylcucurbitacins I, J, K, and L were obtained from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrader whereas the aglyca cucurbitacin E and I were isolated from Ecballium elaterium L. PMID:15772995

  3. A Discovery-Based Hydrochlorination of Carvone Utilizing a Guided-Inquiry Approach to Determine the Product Structure from [superscript 13]C NMR Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelter, Michael W.; Walker, Natalie M.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment describes a discovery-based method for the regio- and stereoselective hydrochlorination of carvone, appropriate for a 3-h second-semester organic chemistry laboratory. The product is identified through interpretation of the [superscript 13]C NMR and DEPT spectra are obtained on an Anasazi EFT-60 at 15 MHz as neat samples. A…

  4. /sup 31/P NMR saturation-transfer and /sup 13/C NMR kinetic studies of glycolytic regulation during anaerobic and aerobic glycolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell-Burk, S.L.; den Hollander, J.A.; Alger, J.R.; Shulman, R.G.

    1987-11-17

    /sup 31/P NMR saturation-transfer techniques have been employed in glucose-gown derepressed yeast to determine unidirectional fluxes in the upper part of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. The experiments were performed during anaerobic and aerobic glycolysis by saturating the ATP/sub ..gamma../ resonances and monitoring changes in the phosphomonoester signals from glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. These experiments were supplemented with /sup 13/C NMR measurements of glucose utilization rates and /sup 13/C NMR label distribution studies. Combined with data obtained previously from radioisotope measurement, these /sup 31/P and /sup 13/C NMR kinetic studies allowed estimation of the net glycolytic flow in addition to relative flows through phosphofructokinase (PFK) and Fru-1,6-P/sub 2/ase during anaerobic and aerobic glycolysis. The /sup 31/P NMR saturation-transfer results are consistent with previous results obtained from measurements of metabolite levels, radioisotope data, and /sup 13/C NMR studies, providing additional support for in vivo measurement of the flows during glycolysis.

  5. Discovering [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR Spectroscopy in the General Chemistry Laboratory through a Sequence of Guided-Inquiry Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Justice, David; Brauer, Shari; Landis, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This sequence of three guided-inquiry labs is designed for a second-semester general chemistry course and challenges students to discover basic theoretical principles associated with [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR spectroscopy. Students learn to identify and explain basic concepts of magnetic resonance and vibrational…

  6. Stereoregularity of poly (lactic acid) and their model compounds as studied by NMR and quantum chemical calculations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to understand the origin of the tacticity splitting in the NMR spectrum of poly(lactic acid), monomer model compound and dimer model compounds (both isotactic and syndiotactic) were synthesized and their 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts observed. Two energetically stable conformations were o...

  7. Chemical shift driven geometry optimization.

    PubMed

    Witter, Raiker; Priess, Wolfram; Sternberg, Ulrich

    2002-01-30

    A new method for refinement of 3D molecular structures by geometry optimization is presented. Prerequisites are a force field and a very fast procedure for the calculation of chemical shifts in every step of optimization. To the energy, provided by the force field (COSMOS force field), a pseudoenergy, depending on the difference between experimental and calculated chemical shifts, is added. In addition to the energy gradients, pseudoforces are computed. This requires the derivatives of the chemical shifts with respect to the coordinates. The pseudoforces are analytically derived from the integral expressions of the bond polarization theory. Single chemical shift values attributed to corresponding atoms are considered for structural correction. As a first example, this method is applied for proton position refinement of the D-mannitol X-ray structure. A crystal structure refinement with 13C chemical shift pseudoforces is carried out. PMID:11924742

  8. Area per Lipid and Cholesterol Interactions in Membranes from Separated Local-Field 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leftin, Avigdor; Molugu, Trivikram R.; Job, Constantin; Beyer, Klaus; Brown, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of lipid membranes using NMR spectroscopy generally require isotopic labeling, often precluding structural studies of complex lipid systems. Solid-state 13C magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy at natural isotopic abundance gives site-specific structural information that can aid in the characterization of complex biomembranes. Using the separated local-field experiment DROSS, we resolved 13C-1H residual dipolar couplings that were interpreted with a statistical mean-torque model. Liquid-disordered and liquid-ordered phases were characterized according to membrane thickness and average cross-sectional area per lipid. Knowledge of such structural parameters is vital for molecular dynamics simulations, and provides information about the balance of forces in membrane lipid bilayers. Experiments were conducted with both phosphatidylcholine (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)) and egg-yolk sphingomyelin (EYSM) lipids, and allowed us to extract segmental order parameters from the 13C-1H residual dipolar couplings. Order parameters were used to calculate membrane structural quantities, including the area per lipid and bilayer thickness. Relative to POPC, EYSM is more ordered in the ld phase and experiences less structural perturbation upon adding 50% cholesterol to form the lo phase. The loss of configurational entropy is smaller for EYSM than for POPC, thus favoring its interaction with cholesterol in raftlike lipid systems. Our studies show that solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy is applicable to investigations of complex lipids and makes it possible to obtain structural parameters for biomembrane systems where isotope labeling may be prohibitive. PMID:25418296

  9. Characterization of cerebral glutamine uptake from blood in the mouse brain: implications for metabolic modeling of 13C NMR data

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, Puneet; Behar, Kevin L; Mason, Graeme F; De Feyter, Henk M; Rothman, Douglas L; Patel, Anant B

    2014-01-01

    13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of rodent and human brain using [1-13C]/[1,6-13C2]glucose as labeled substrate have consistently found a lower enrichment (∼25% to 30%) of glutamine-C4 compared with glutamate-C4 at isotopic steady state. The source of this isotope dilution has not been established experimentally but may potentially arise either from blood/brain exchange of glutamine or from metabolism of unlabeled substrates in astrocytes, where glutamine synthesis occurs. In this study, the contribution of the former was evaluated ex vivo using 1H-[13C]-NMR spectroscopy together with intravenous infusion of [U-13C5]glutamine for 3, 15, 30, and 60 minutes in mice. 13C labeling of brain glutamine was found to be saturated at plasma glutamine levels >1.0 mmol/L. Fitting a blood–astrocyte–neuron metabolic model to the 13C enrichment time courses of glutamate and glutamine yielded the value of glutamine influx, VGln(in), 0.036±0.002 μmol/g per minute for plasma glutamine of 1.8 mmol/L. For physiologic plasma glutamine level (∼0.6 mmol/L), VGln(in) would be ∼0.010 μmol/g per minute, which corresponds to ∼6% of the glutamine synthesis rate and rises to ∼11% for saturating blood glutamine concentrations. Thus, glutamine influx from blood contributes at most ∼20% to the dilution of astroglial glutamine-C4 consistently seen in metabolic studies using [1-13C]glucose. PMID:25074745

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance, vibrational spectroscopic studies, physico-chemical properties and computational calculations on (nitrophenyl) octahydroquinolindiones by DFT method.

    PubMed

    Pasha, M A; Siddekha, Aisha; Mishra, Soni; Azzam, Sadeq Hamood Saleh; Umapathy, S

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, 2'-nitrophenyloctahydroquinolinedione and its 3'-nitrophenyl isomer were synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift values of the synthesized compounds in the ground state have been calculated by using the density functional theory (DFT) method with the 6-311++G (d,p) basis set and compared with the experimental data. The complete vibrational assignments of wave numbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution using GAR2PED programme. Isotropic chemical shifts for (1)H and (13)C NMR were calculated using gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The experimental vibrational frequencies, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift values were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. On the basis of vibrational analysis, molecular electrostatic potential and the standard thermodynamic functions have been investigated. PMID:25440584

  11. Mechanism of formation of humus coatings on mineral surfaces 3. Composition of adsorbed organic acids from compost leachate on alumina by solid-state 13C NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Llaguno, E.C.; Leenheer, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The adsorption of compost leachate DOC on alumina is used as a model for elucidation of the mechanism of formation of natural organic coatings on hydrous metal oxide surfaces in soils and sediments. Compost leachate DOC is composed mainly of organic acid molecules. The solid-state 13C NMR spectra of these organic acids indicate that they are very similar in composition to aquatic humic substances. Changes in the solid-state 13C NMR spectra of compost leachate DOC fractions adsorbed on alumina indicate that the DOC molecules are most likely adsorbed on metal oxide surfaces through a combination of polar and hydrophobic interaction mechanisms. This combination of polar and hydrophobic mechanism leads to the formation of bilayer coatings of the leachate molecules on the oxide surfaces.

  12. Interaction between a recombinant prion protein and organo-mineral complexes as evidenced by CPMAS 13C-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, F.; Scotti, R.; Gianfreda, L.; Conte, P.; Rao, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    Prion proteins (PrP) are the main responsible for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE). The TSE etiological agent is a misfolded form of the normal cellular prion protein. The amyloidal aggregates accumulated in the brain of infected animals and mainly composed of PrPSc exhibit resistance to protease attack and many conventional inactivating procedures. The prion protein diseases cause an environmental issue because the environment and in particular the soil compartment can be contaminated and then become a potential reservoir and diffuser of TSEs infectivity as a consequence of (i) accidental dispersion from storage plants of meat and bone meal, (ii) incorporation of contaminated material in fertilizers, (iii) possible natural contamination of pasture soils by grazing herds, and (v) burial of carcasses. The environmental problem can be even more relevant because very low amounts of PrPSc are able to propagate the disease. Several studies evidenced that infectious prion protein remains active in soils for years. Contaminated soils result, thus, a possible critical route of TSE transmission in wild animals. Soil can also protect prion protein toward degradation processes due to the presence of humic substances and inorganic components such as clays. Mineral and organic colloids and the more common association between clay minerals and humic substances can contribute to the adsorption/entrapment of molecules and macromolecules. The polymerization of organic monomeric humic precursors occurring in soil in the presence of oxidative enzymes or manganese and iron oxides, is considered one of the most important processes contributing to the formation of humic substances. The process is very fast and produces a population of polymeric products of different molecular structures, sizes, shapes and complexity. Other molecules and possibly biomacromolecules such as proteins may be involved. The aim of the present work was to study by CPMAS 13C-NMR the interactions

  13. [FTIR and 13C NMR Analysis of Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) in the Treatment Process of Tannery Wastewater].

    PubMed

    Fan, Chun-hui; Zhang, Ying-chao; Tang, Ze-heng; Wang, Jia-hong

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, the wastewater quantity discharged yearly from tannery industry is around 0. 2 billion t in China. The contaminants of tannery wastewater include macromolecular organic matters, such as grease, fur scraps and collagen, and the alkaline wastewater appears to be of high content of salt and COD. The quality of tannery wastewater is monitored strictly among all kinds of industry wastewater. In the treatment process of tannery wastewater, the quality of inlet and outlet water is generally analyzed. In fact, the transformation behavior of contaminants should be additionally checked to optimize the treatment conditions. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is commonly existed in water-bodies and helpful to understand the physicochemical characteristics, while the related work should be further studied on tannery wastewater. The approaches of elemental analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis (TG), Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) were used to reveal the characteristics of DOM in the treatment process of tannery wastewater. The results showed the carbon content of DOM samples increased gradually, atomic ratios of H/C increased firstly and then decreased, indicating the organic matters were decomposed into chain structures firstly, finally forming the component hard to degraded. The pyrolysis process of DOM mainly proceeded in the regions of 110~530 °C (aliphatic compound, protein, etc. ) and 530~800 °C (aromatic ring, single bond of C-C, etc. ). The functional groups of DOM included -OH, -NH2, C=O and so on, and the aromatic substances were detected, shown from FTIR figures, in the later period of the reaction, caused by the metabolism effect of micro-organism. The content of alkoxy-C increased to the maximum in the second biochemical pond, and the minimum content of aromatic-C appeared in the second biochemical pond, suggesting the transformation behavior of carbon functional groups. The investigation on DOM in tannery

  14. 13C NMR Metabolomic Evaluation of Immediate and Delayed Mild Hypothermia in Cerebrocortical Slices After Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Segal, Mark; Kelly, Mark J.S.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Kim, Myungwon; James, Thomas L.; Litt, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Background Mild brain hypothermia (32°C–34°C) after human neonatal asphyxia improves neurodevelopmental outcomes. Astrocytes but not neurons have pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and an acetate uptake transporter. 13C NMR spectroscopy of rodent brain extracts after administering [1-13C]glucose and [1,2-13C]acetate can distinguish metabolic differences between glia and neurons, and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) entry via pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and PC. Methods Neonatal rat cerebrocortical slices receiving a 13C-acetate/glucose mixture underwent a 45-min asphyxia simulation via oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) followed by 6 h of recovery. Protocols in three groups of N = 3 experiments were identical except for temperature management. The three temperature groups were: normothermia (37°C), hypothermia (32°C for 3.75 h beginning at OGD start), and delayed hypothermia (32°C for 3.75 h, beginning 15 min after OGD start). Multivariate analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance metabolite quantifications included principal component analyses and the L1-Penalized Regularized Regression algorithm known as the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO). Results The most significant metabolite difference (p < 0.0056) was [2-13C]glutamine’s higher final/control ratio for the Hypothermia group (1.75 ± 0.12) compared to ratios for the Delayed (1.12 ± 0.12) and Normothermia group (0.94 ± 0.06), implying a higher PC/PDH ratio for glutamine formation. LASSO found the most important metabolites associated with adenosine triphosphate preservation: [3,4-13C]glutamate—produced via PDH entry, [2-13C]taurine--an important osmolyte, and phosphocreatine. Final principal component analyses scores plots suggested separate cluster formation for the hypothermia group, but with insufficient data for statistical significance. Conclusions Starting mild hypothermia simultaneously with OGD, compared with delayed starting or no hypothermia, has higher PC throughput

  15. Detailed 1H and 13C NMR structural assignment and relative stereochemistry determination for three new and one known semi-synthetic sesquiterpene lactones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, Daiane Cristina; Heleno, Vladimir Constantino Gomes; Soares, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Lopes, João Luis Callegari; Constantino, Mauricio Gomes

    2012-01-01

    In this work is described a complete 1H and 13C NMR analysis for a group of four sesquiterpene lactones, three previously unknown. The unequivocal assignments were achieved by 1H NMR, 13C{ 1H} NMR, J-resolved, gCOSY, gHMQC, gHMBC and NOESY experiments and no ambiguities were left behind. All hydrogen coupling constants were measured, clarifying all hydrogen signals multiplicities.

  16. Effects of insulin on perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic and untreated rats: /sup 13/C NMR assay of pyruvate kinase flux

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.M.

    1987-01-27

    The effects of insulin in vitro on perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic rats and their untreated littermates during gluconeogenesis from either (3-/sup 13/C)alanine + ethanol or (2-/sup 13/C)pyruvate + NH/sub 4/Cl + ethanol were studied by /sup 13/C NMR. A /sup 13/C NMR determination of the rate of pyruvate kinase flux under steady-state conditions of active gluconeogenesis was developed; this assay includes a check on the reuse of recycled pyruvate. The preparations studied provided gradations of pyruvate kinase flux within the confines of the assay's requirement of active gluconeogenesis. By this determination, the rate of pyruvate kinase flux was 0.74 +/- 0.04 of the gluconeogenic rate in liver from 24-h-fasted controls; in liver from 12-h fasted controls, relative pyruvate kinase flux increased to 1.0 +/- 0.2. In diabetic liver, this flux was undetectable by the authors NMR method. Insulin's hepatic influence in vitro was greatest in the streptozotocin model of type 1 diabetes: upon treatment of diabetic liver with 7 nM insulin in vitro, a partial reversal of many of the differences noted between diabetic and control liver was demonstrated by /sup 13/C NMR. A major effect of insulin in vitro upon diabetic liver was the induction of a large increase in the rate of pyruvate kinase flux, bringing relative and absolute fluxes up to the levels measured in 24-h-fasted controls. By way of comparison, the effects of ischemia on diabetic liver were studied by /sup 13/C NMR to test whether changes in allosteric effectors under these conditions could also increase pyruvate kinase flux. A large increase in this activity was demonstrated in ischemic diabetic liver.

  17. Variable temperature 1H and 13C NMR study of restricted rotation in N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)acetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, R. Alan; Smith, Melanja H.; Wilson, Heather S.

    2016-06-01

    N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)acetamide shows restricted rotation about the amide bond in both 1H and 13C NMR spectra rendering the two hydroxyethyl groups non-equivalent. A variable temperature study in CD3SOCD3 allowed estimation of the free energy barrier to rotation as 75.6 ± 0.2 kJ mol-1. Previously published data in CDCl3 appears to be erroneous.

  18. /sup 13/C and /sup 17/O NMR and IR spectroscopic study of a series of carbonyl(4-substituted pyridine)(meso-tetraphenylporphinato)iron(II) complexes. Correlations between NMR chemical shifts and IR stretching frequencies of the carbonyl ligand and Taft parameters of the pyridine substituent

    SciTech Connect

    Box, J.W.; Gray, G.M.

    1987-08-26

    The results of a /sup 13/C and /sup 17/O NMR and IR spectroscopic study of a series of carbonyl(4 substituted pyridine)(meso-tetraphenylporphinato)iron(II) (Fe(TPP)(CO)(py-4-X)) complexes are presented. Good to excellent linear correlations between the /sup 13/ and /sup 17/O NMR chemical shifts and the IR stretching frequencies of the carbonyl ligand are observed as the pyridine substituent is varied. Good to excellent linear correlations are also observed between these NMR chemical shifts and IR stretching frequencies and the NMR chemical shifts and IR stretching force constants for the trans carbonyls of a series of cis-Mo(CO)/sub 4/(py-4-X)/sub 2/ complexes as the pyridine substituent is varied. The relationship between the donor ability of the pyridine ligands and the /sup 13/C and /sup 17/O NMR chemical shifts and the IR stretching frequencies of the carbonyl ligands in the Fe(TPP)(CO)(py-4-X) complexes has been quantitated by fitting the spectroscopic data to the single and the dual Taft substituent parameters of the pyridine substituent. Good to excellent correlations are observed. The upfield shift in the /sup 13/C NMR resonance of the carbonyl ligand as the electron-donor ability of the pyridine increases is unique. This has been rationalized by using the Buchner and Schenk description of metal carbonyl /sup 13/C NMR chemical shifts. 49 references, 3 figures, 6 tables.

  19. Subtle Chemical Shifts Explain the NMR Fingerprints of Oligomeric Proanthocyanidins with High Dentin Biomodification Potency.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joo-Won; Phansalkar, Rasika S; Lankin, David C; Bisson, Jonathan; McAlpine, James B; Leme, Ariene A; Vidal, Cristina M P; Ramirez, Benjamin; Niemitz, Matthias; Bedran-Russo, Ana; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2015-08-01

    The ability of certain oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPACs) to enhance the biomechanical properties of dentin involves collagen cross-linking of the 1.3-4.5 nm wide space via protein-polyphenol interactions. A systematic interdisciplinary search for the bioactive principles of pine bark has yielded the trimeric PAC, ent-epicatechin-(4β→8)-epicatechin-(2β→O→7,4β→8)-catechin (3), representing the hitherto most potent single chemical entity capable of enhancing dentin stiffness. Building the case from two congeneric PAC dimers, a detailed structural analysis decoded the stereochemistry, spatial arrangement, and chemical properties of three dentin biomodifiers. Quantum-mechanics-driven (1)H iterative full spin analysis (QM-HiFSA) of NMR spectra distinguished previously unrecognized details such as higher order J coupling and provided valuable information about 3D structure. Detection and quantification of H/D-exchange effects by QM-HiFSA identified C-8 and C-6 as (re)active sites, explain preferences in biosynthetic linkage, and suggest their involvement in dentin cross-linking activity. Mapping of these molecular properties underscored the significance of high δ precision in both (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Occurring at low- to subppb levels, these newly characterized chemical shift differences in ppb are small but diagnostic measures of dynamic processes inherent to the OPAC pharmacophores and can help augment our understanding of nanometer-scale intermolecular interactions in biomodified dentin macromolecules. PMID:26214362

  20. A [sup 13]C NMR study of ethylene adsorbed on reduced and oxygen-covered Ag surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Plischke, J.K.; Benesi, A.J.; Vannice, M.A. )

    1992-11-01

    [sup 13]C-enriched ethylene was adsorbed on both clean and oxygen-covered Ag particles dispersed on [eta]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Irreversibly adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4] on O-covered Ag exhibited an upfield shift of [minus]20 ppm relative to gas-phase C[sub 2]H[sub 4], whereas a narrower line and smaller shift of [minus]5 ppm occurred for C[sub 2]H[sub 4] reversibly adsorbed on reduced Ag. In addition to the resonance at 103 ppm for irreversibly adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4], CP/MAS NMR spectra also gave resonances at 179, 170, 164, 159, and 19 ppm for the O-covered Ag sample. The CP/MAS spectrum for Ag acetate powder clearly identified the 179- and 19-ppm peaks as those associated with the carboxyl and methyl carbons of the acetate anion, and the peaks at 159, 164, and 170 ppm were assigned to oxalate, formate, and carbonate (or possibly acetic anhydride) species, respectively, based on previous studies. When heated to 473 K the adsorbed C[sub 2]H[sub 4] disappeared and only acetate and oxalate groups were observed, and continued heating to 573 K removed almost all resonances. No C[sub 2]H[sub 4]O was unambiguously detected, thus with this unpromoted Ag catalyst utilizing a high-surface-area alumina the observable surface species appeared to be those associated with complete combustion, with acetate and oxalate predominating during reaction. These results directly confirm the presence of an Ag acetate species which has been proposed previously to be an intermediate in complete combustion, and the presence of the other three species support earlier tentative assignments based on IR and TPR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts at 61, 28, and 13 ppm were indicative of alkoxy species formed on Bronsted-acid sites on the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] surface. 58 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Stereochemistry of Complex Marine Natural Products by Quantum Mechanical Calculations of NMR Chemical Shifts: Solvent and Conformational Effects on Okadaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Humberto J.; Crespín, Guillermo D.; Santiago-Benítez, Adrián J.; Gavín, José A.; Norte, Manuel; Fernández, José J.; Hernández Daranas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Marine organisms are an increasingly important source of novel metabolites, some of which have already inspired or become new drugs. In addition, many of these molecules show a high degree of novelty from a structural and/or pharmacological point of view. Structure determination is generally achieved by the use of a variety of spectroscopic methods, among which NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) plays a major role and determination of the stereochemical relationships within every new molecule is generally the most challenging part in structural determination. In this communication, we have chosen okadaic acid as a model compound to perform a computational chemistry study to predict 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts. The effect of two different solvents and conformation on the ability of DFT (density functional theory) calculations to predict the correct stereoisomer has been studied. PMID:24402177

  2. Determination of [{sup 13}C]pyrene sequestration in sediment microcosms using flash pyrolysis--GC--MS and {sup 13}C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, E.A.; Bortiatynski, J.M.; Hardy, K.S.; Kovach, E.M.; Van Heemst, J.D.H.; Hatcher, P.G.; Richman, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the use of a {sup 13}C-labeled pollutant probe, [{sup 13}C]pyrene, and the application of flash pyrolysis--GC--MS and CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR provided analytical capabilities to study pyrene interactions with soluble and insoluble compartments of sedimentary organic matter (S{sub D}OM) during whole sediments incubations in aerated microcosms. Surface sediments were collected from a site of previous hydrocarbon contamination in New Orleans, LA. Over a period of 60 days, humic acid and humin fractions of S{sub D}OM accumulated increasing amounts of pyrene that were resistant to exhaustive extraction with organic solvents. The sequestered pyrene was evident in CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectra of humin fractions. The amount of sequestered pyrene in humic materials was quantified by flash pyrolysis--GC--MS, a technique that destroys the three-dimensional structure of macromolecular S{sub D}OM. Noncovalent binding of pyrene to humic materials in S{sub D}OM was greater in sediments incubated with biological activity than biocide-treated sediments. The combined analytical approaches demonstrate that the sequestered pyrene, or bound residue, is noncovalently associated with S{sub D}OM and has not undergone structural alteration. Implications of these data are discussed in reference to S{sub D}OM diagenesis and long-term availability of bound pollutant residues in sediments.

  3. Land use Effects on Storage, Stability and Structure of Organic Carbon in Soil Density Fractions Revealed by 13C Natural Abundance and CPMAS 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flessa, H.; Helfrich, M.; John, B.; Yamashita, T.; Ludwig, B.

    2004-12-01

    The type of land use and soil cultivation are important factors controlling organic carbon storage (SOC) in soils and they can also influence the relative importance, the structure, and the stability of different SOC pools. The objectives of our study were: i) to quantify the SOC stocks in different density fractions (mineral-associated soil organic matter > 2 g cm-3 (Mineral-SOM), free particulate organic matter < 1.6 g cm-3 (free POM), light occluded particulate organic matter < 1.6 g cm-3 (occluded POM<1.6) and dense occluded particulate organic matter 1.6 to 2.0 g cm-3 (occluded POM1.6-2.0)) of silty soils under different land use (spruce forest, grassland, maize, wheat), ii) to determine the structure of these SOC fractions by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy, and iii) to analyse the stability of these SOC fractions in the maize soil on the basis of the stable isotope composition of SOC. The SOC concentration in the A horizon increased in the order wheat (12.7 g kg-1) < maize (13.0 g kg-1) < grassland (24.5 g kg-1) < spruce (40.5 g kg-1). The major part (86-91%) of the SOC was associated with the heavy mineral fraction at the grassland, maize and wheat site. In the A horizon of the spruce soil, the particulate organic matter accounted for 52% of the total SOC content. The chemical structure of the soil organic matter (SOM) was influenced by litter quality, the intensity of litter decomposition and the related production and storage of microbially-derived substances. SOM of the acid forest soil was characterized by large amounts of POM with a high content of spruce litter-derived alkyl C. In the biologically more active grassland and maize soil, litter-derived POM was decomposed more rapidly and SOC stocks were dominated by mineral-associated SOM which contained greater proportions of aryl and carbonyl C. The cultivation of the grassland soil induced enhanced mineralization of POM and in particular of mineral-associated SOM. The faster SOC turnover was associated

  4. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ((13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 (13)C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited "hand-picked" data sets, we show that ~94% of the (13)C NMR data and almost all (15)N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6% of the (13)C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. -2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided

  5. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations (13C–13C, 15N–13C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 13C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited “hand-picked” data sets, we show that ~94 % of the 13C NMR data and almost all 15N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6 % of the 13C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. −2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided command

  6. Effect of Oxygen Concentration on Viability and Metabolism in a Fluidized-Bed Bioartificial Liver Using 31P and 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Rex E.; Gamcsik, Michael P.; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Pediaditakis, Peter; Tikunov, Andrey P.; Young, Gregory B.; Lee, Haakil; Watkins, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    Many oxygen mass-transfer modeling studies have been performed for various bioartificial liver (BAL) encapsulation types; yet, to our knowledge, there is no experimental study that directly and noninvasively measures viability and metabolism as a function of time and oxygen concentration. We report the effect of oxygen concentration on viability and metabolism in a fluidized-bed NMR-compatible BAL using in vivo 31P and 13C NMR spectroscopy, respectively, by monitoring nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) and 13C-labeled nutrient metabolites, respectively. Fluidized-bed bioreactors eliminate the potential channeling that occurs with packed-bed bioreactors and serve as an ideal experimental model for homogeneous oxygen distribution. Hepatocytes were electrostatically encapsulated in alginate (avg. diameter, 500 μm; 3.5×107 cells/mL) and perfused at 3 mL/min in a 9-cm (inner diameter) cylindrical glass NMR tube. Four oxygen treatments were tested and validated by an in-line oxygen electrode: (1) 95:5 oxygen:carbon dioxide (carbogen), (2) 75:20:5 nitrogen:oxygen:carbon dioxide, (3) 60:35:5 nitrogen:oxygen:carbon dioxide, and (4) 45:50:5 nitrogen:oxygen:carbon dioxide. With 20% oxygen, β-NTP steadily decreased until it was no longer detected at 11 h. The 35%, 50%, and 95% oxygen treatments resulted in steady β-NTP levels throughout the 28-h experimental period. For the 50% and 95% oxygen treatment, a 13C NMR time course (∼5 h) revealed 2-13C-glycine and 2-13C-glucose to be incorporated into [2-13C-glycyl]glutathione (GSH) and 2-13C-lactate, respectively, with 95% having a lower rate of lactate formation. 31P and 13C NMR spectroscopy is a noninvasive method for determining viability and metabolic rates. Modifying tissue-engineered devices to be NMR compatible is a relatively easy and inexpensive process depending on the bioreactor shape. PMID:22835003

  7. New organic single crystal of (benzylthio)acetic acid: Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic (ATR-FTIR, 1H and 13C NMR) and thermal characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sienkiewicz-Gromiuk, Justyna; Tarasiuk, Bogdan; Mazur, Liliana

    2016-04-01

    (Benzylthio)acetic acid (Hbta) was synthesized with 78% yield from benzyl chloride and thiourea as substrates. Well-shaped crystals of Hbta were grown by slow solvent evaporation technique from pure methanol. The compound was investigated by single-crystal X-ray and powder diffraction techniques and was also characterized by other analytical methods, like ATR-FTIR, 1H and 13C NMR and TG/DSC. The acid molecule adopts bent conformation in the solid state. The crystal structure of Hbta is stabilized by numerous intermolecular interactions, including O-H···O, C-H···O, C-H···S and C-H···π contacts. Thermal decomposition of the obtained material takes place above 150 °C.

  8. Delineation of conformational and structural features of the amikacin-Cu(II) complex in water solution by 13C-NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Maccotta, Antonella; Valensin, Gianni; Marini, Domenico; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Manetti, Cesare; Delfini, Maurizio

    1998-12-01

    The copper (II) complex of amikacin in water solution at pH 5.5 was investigated by 13C-NMR. The temperature dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rates was measured and fast exchange conditions were shown to apply. The motional correlation time of the complex was approximated by the pseudo-isotropic rotational correlation time of free amikacin in water solution ( τc=0.17 ns at 300 K). Formation of a pseudo-tetrahedral 1:1 complex was demonstrated by relaxation rates analysis and also by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Two amino nitrogens of amikacin, together with the amide nitrogen and the hydroxyl in the hydroxyl-aminopropyl carbonyl side chain, were assigned as the copper-binding sites and a model of the complex was built by using copper-carbon distances obtained by NMR analysis as input parameters.

  9. FT-IR, 1H, 13C NMR, ESI-MS and semiempirical investigation of the structures of Monensin phenyl urethane complexes with the sodium cation.

    PubMed

    Huczyński, Adam

    2013-06-01

    In this paper three forms of phenyl urethane of Monensin i.e. its acid form (H-MU) and its 1:1 complex with NaClO4 (H-MU-Na) and its sodium salt (Na-MU) were obtained and their structures were studied by FT-IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, ESI MS and PM5 methods. The FT-IR data of Na-MU complexes demonstrate that the C=O urethane group is not engaged in the complexation of the sodium cation. However spectroscopic studies of H-MU-Na complex show that the structure in which this C=O urethane groups participate in the complexation is also present, but it is in the minority. The PM5 semiempirical calculations allow visualisation of all structures and determination of the hydrogen bond parameters. PMID:23578536

  10. Solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy of adduction products of 2,5-hexanedione with ribonuclease, albumin, and rat neurofilament protein.

    PubMed

    Yan, B; DeCaprio, A P; Zhu, M; Bank, S

    1996-10-21

    The Paal-Knorr condensation reaction between the gamma-diketone 2,5-hexanedione (2,5-HD) and epsilon-amine moieties of proteins of various molecular weight, including ribonuclease (RNase), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and rat neurofilament (NF), has been investigated by solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy. These proteins all reacted with 2,5-HD with the formation of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole (2,5-DMP) derivatives. The size and complexity of the protein affected the rate of formation of 2,5-DMP derivatives. Using the selective reducing reagent NaCNBH3, the Paal-Knorr reaction intermediates were trapped by conversion into amines, which were identified by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The secondary autoxidation reaction following the formation of 2,5-DMP derivatives was also studied by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. PMID:8950225

  11. Molecular organization in the native state of woody tissue: Studies of tertiary structure using the Raman microprobe Solid State [sup 13]C NMR and biomimetic tertiary aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Atalla, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    A number of new approaches to the study of native wood tissue complementary to our earlier Raman spectroscopy including solid state [sup 13]C NMR and X-ray diffractometry. A wide variety of native cellulosic tissues were examined which led to the generation of biomimetic tertiary aggregates which simulate states of aggregation characteristic of cell walls. We have also explored charge transport characteristics of lignified tissue. Our Raman spectroscopic studies have advanced our understanding of key spectral features and confirmed the variability of the patterns of orientation of lignin reported earlier. A major effort was dedicated to assessing the contributions of electronic factors such as conjugation and the resonance Raman effect to enhancement of the spectra features associated with lignin. We have now established a solid foundation for spectral mapping of different regions in cell walls.

  12. Comparison among Different Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Farming Systems: Activity of Intestinal and Hepatic Enzymes and 13C-NMR Analysis of Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Coco, Laura Del; Papadia, Paride; Pascali, Sandra A. De; Bressani, Giorgia; Storelli, Carlo; Zonno, Vincenzo; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2009-01-01

    In order to evaluate differences in general health and nutritional values of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), the effects of semi-intensive, land-based tanks and sea-cages intensive rearing systems were investigated, and results compared with captured wild fish. The physiological state was determined by measuring the activity of three different intestinal digestive enzymes: alkaline phosphatase (ALP), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and maltase; and the activity of the hepatic ALP. Also, the hepatic content in protein, cholesterol, and lipid were assessed. 13C-NMR analysis for qualitative and quantitative characterization of the lipid fraction extracted from fish muscles for semi-intensive and land based tanks intensive systems was performed. The lipid fraction composition showed small but significant differences in the monounsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio, with the semi-intensive characterized by higher monounsaturated and lower saturated fatty acid content with respect to land based tanks intensive rearing system. PMID:22253985

  13. Determination of fructose metabolic pathways in normal and fructose-intolerant children: A sup 13 C NMR study using (U- sup 13 C)fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Gopher, A.; Lapidot, A. ); Vaisman, N. ); Mandel, H. )

    1990-07-01

    An inborn deficiency in the ability of aldolase B to split fructose 1-phosphate is found in humans with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). A stable isotope procedure to elucidate the mechanism of conversion of fructose to glucose in normal children and in HFI children has been developed. A constant infusion of D-(U-{sup 13}C)fructose was given nasogastrically to control and to HFI children. Hepatic fructose conversion to glucose was estimated by examination of {sup 13}C NMR spectra of plasma glucose. Significantly lower values ({approx}3-fold) for fructose conversion to glucose were obtained for the HFI patients as compared to the controls. A quantitative determination of the metabolic pathways of fructose conversion to glucose was derived from {sup 13}C NMR measurement of plasma ({sup 13}C)glucose isotopomer populations. The finding of isotopomer populations of three adjacent {sup 13}C atoms at glucose C-4 ({sup 13}C{sub 3}-{sup 13}C{sub 4}-{sup 13}C{sub 5}) suggests that there is a direct pathway from fructose, by-passing fructose-1-phosphate aldolase, to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The metabolism of fructose by fructose-1-phosphate aldolase activity accounts for only {approx}50% of the total amount of hepatic fructose conversion to glucose. In view of the marked decline by 67% in synthesis of glucose from fructose in HFI subjects found in this study, the extent of ({sup 13}C)glucose formation from a trace amount of (U-{sup 13}C)fructose infused into the patient can be used as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic test for inherent faulty fructose metabolism.

  14. Dynamic 13C NMR analysis of pyruvate and lactate oxidation in the in vivo canine myocardium: evidence of reduced utilization with increased work.

    PubMed

    Rath, D P; Zhu, H; Tong, X; Jiang, Z; Hamlin, R L; Robitaille, P M

    1997-12-01

    In this work, substrate selection was monitored in the left ventricle of the canine myocardium by following pyruvate and lactate oxidation under in vivo conditions at basal and elevated workloads. These studies were conducted in the open chest model using dynamic 13C NMR techniques in the presence and absence of dichloroacetic acid (DCA), a well-known activator of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). Following the infusion of (3-(13)C) pyruvate or (3-(13)C) lactate into the left anterior descending artery, highly variable 13C enrichments of glutamate, alanine, aspartate, and citrate were noted under low (RPP < 14,500 mmHg/min), intermediate (RPP = 15,000-25,000 mmHg/min), and high (RPP > 25,500 mmHg/min) rate pressure products (RPP). At low workloads, the myocardium typically oxidized the infused (3-(13)C) pyruvate or (3-(13)C) lactate and incorporated the labeled carbon into the glutamate pool as expected. However, in a few notable instances (n = 3), 13C-enriched pyruvate and lactate were unable to label the glutamate pool under in vivo conditions even at the lowest RPPs, indicating a lack of selection for these substrates by the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Nonetheless, the levels of glutamate C4 enrichment observed at low workloads could usually be enhanced by infusion of DCA. Importantly, 13C NMR extract analysis revealed that (3-(13)C) pyruvate or (3-(13)C) lactate labeling of the glutamate pool was reduced (< 20%) at high workloads in spite of increased DCA concentrations. PMID:9402190

  15. Metabolic pathways for ketone body production. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of rat liver in vivo using /sup 13/C-multilabeled fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl-Wostl, C.; Seelig, J.

    1986-11-04

    The hormonal regulation of ketogenesis in the liver of living rat has been studied noninvasively with /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance. The spatial selection for the liver was better than 90%, with extrahepatic adipose tissue contribution only a very small amount of signal. The metabolic activities of the liver were investigated by infusion of /sup 13/C-labeled butyrate in the jugular vein of the anesthetized rat. The rate of butyrate infusion was chosen to be close to the maximum oxidative capacity of the rat liver, and the /sup 13/C signal intensities were enhanced by using doubly labeled (1,3-/sup 13/C)butyrate as a substrate. Different /sup 13/C NMR spectra and hence different metabolites were observed depending on the hormonal state of the animal. The /sup 13/C NMR studies demonstrate that even when rate of acetyl-CoA production are high, the disposal of this compound is not identical in fasted and diabetic animals. This supports previous suggestions that the redox state of the mitochondrion represents the most important factor in regulation. For a given metabolic state of the animal, different signal intensities were obtained depending on whether butyrate was labeled at C-1, C-3, or C-1,3. From the ratios of incorporation of /sup 13/C label into the carbons of 3-hydroxybutyrate, it could be estimated that a large fraction of butyrate evaded ..beta..-oxidation to acetyl-CoA but was converted directly to acetoacetyl-CoA. /sup 13/C-labeled glucose could be detected in vivo in the liver of diabetic rats.

  16. A Short History of Three Chemical Shifts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    A short history of chemical shifts in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and Mossbauer spectroscopy, which are useful for chemical studies, is described. The term chemical shift is shown to have originated in the mistaken assumption that nuclei of a given element would all undergo resonance at the…

  17. Characterization of aging in organic materials on atomic-, meso- and macro-length scales by {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, R.A.; Jamison, G.M.; Alam, T.M.; Gillen, K.T.

    1997-10-01

    A fundamental understanding of aging in an organic material requires that one understand how aging affects the chemical structure of a material, and how these chemical changes are related to the material`s macroscopic properties. This level of understanding is usually achieved by examining the material on a variety of length scales ranging from atomic to meso-scale to macroscopic. The authors are developing and applying several {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiments to characterize the aging process of organic materials over a broad range of length scales. Examples of studies which range from atomic to macroscopic will be presented.

  18. Combined analysis of the essential oil of Chenopodium ambrosioides by GC, GC-MS and 13C-NMR spectroscopy: quantitative determination of ascaridole, a heat-sensitive compound.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Jean-François; Tomi, Félix; Bernardini, Antoine-François; Casanova, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A commercial sample of the essential oil of Chenopodium ambrosioides L. from Madagascar was analysed by GC, GC-MS and 13C-NMR. By GC analysis, the major constituents were found to be ascaridole (1) (41.8%), isoascaridole (2) (18.1%), p-cymene (16.2%), alpha-terpinene (9.7%) and limonene (3.8%). However, ascaridole undergoes a partial thermal isomerisation to 2 and hence the amount of 1 is under-estimated by GC analysis. The actual contents of 1 and 2 (55.3 and 4.6%, respectively) were obtained following combined analysis of the sample by GC and 13C-NMR. Several hydroxy- and polyhydroxy-menthanes were identified by 13C-NMR. PMID:15508830

  19. Paramagnetic 1H and 13C NMR studies on cobalt-substituted human carbonic anhydrase I carboxymethylated at active site histidine-200: molecular basis for the changes in catalytic properties induced by the modification.

    PubMed

    Khalifah, R G; Rogers, J I; Harmon, P; Morely, P J; Carroll, S B

    1984-07-01

    Using bromo[1-13C]acetate to modify N tau of His-200 of human carbonic anhydrase isozyme I leads to the introduction of a useful 13C NMR probe into the active site. To complement our previous diamagnetic NMR studies with this probe, we have now succeeded in directly observing the paramagnetically perturbed resonance of the carboxylate in the cobalt-substituted modified enzyme above pH 8. In the pH range 8-10, the resonance undergoes a pH-dependent slow-exchange process, with the more alkaline form having a much smaller pseudocontact shift and a narrower line width. Below pH 8, the resonance apparently undergoes a very large paramagnetic downfield shift that was estimated by extrapolation. An ionization of approximate pK of 6 appears to control this process. Paramagnetic spin-relaxation studies on the resonance under conditions where it was directly observed yielded distance measurements between the carboxylate carbon and the active site cobalt ion. In inhibitor complexes, this distance was in the range of 5-7 A. In the absence of inhibitors, the distance was approximately 3.0-3.2 A at pH 7.9, consistent with the coordination of the carboxylate to the metal. However, at pH 10, the distance was increased to 4.8 A. These distance determinations were aided by relaxation measurements of a paramagnetically shifted proton resonance at 60-65 ppm downfield assigned by others to a proton of a ligand histidine of metal and confirmed by us to be 5.2 +/- 0.1 A from the metal. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the observed changes in catalytic properties that accompany the carboxymethylation. PMID:6432037

  20. Solid-state 13C NMR studies of a large fossil gymnosperm from the Yallourn Open Cut, Latrobe Valley, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    A series of samples taken from the cross section of a 3-m-diameter fossilized gymnospermous log (Araucariaceae) in the Yallourn Seam of the Australian brown coals was examined by solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate chemical changes related to the combined processes of peatification and coalification. The results show that cellulosic materials were degraded and lost on the periphery of the log, however, the degree of such degradation in the central core is substantially less. The lignin is uniformly altered by coalification reactions to a macromolecular substance displaying decreased aryl ether linkages but significantly greater amounts of carbon linkages compared to modern lignin. Changes in the methoxyl carbon contents of lignin in cross section reveal demethylation reactions, but these do not appear to be related to degree of carbon linking. Both the degredation of cellulosic materials and demethylation of lignin appear to be early diagenetic processes occurring during peatification independently of the coalification reactions. ?? 1989.

  1. Solid-state 13C NMR studies of dissolved organic matter in pore waters from different depositional environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in pore waters from sediments of a number of different depositional environments was isolated by ultrafiltration using membranes with a nominal molecular weight cutoff of 500. This > 500 molecular weight DOM represents 70-98% of the total DOM in these pore waters. We determined the gross chemical structure of this material using both solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Our results show that the DOM in these pore waters appears to exist as two major types: one type dominated by carbohydrates and paraffinic structures and the second dominated by paraffinic and aromatic structures. We suggest that the dominance of one or the other structural type of DOM in the pore water depends on the relative oxidizing/reducing nature of the sediments as well as the source of the detrital organic matter. Under dominantly anaerobic conditions carbohydrates in the sediments are degraded by bacteria and accumulate in the pore water as DOM. However, little or no degradation of lignin occurs under these conditions. In contrast, sediments thought to be predominantly aerobic in character have DOM with diminished carbohydrate and enhanced aromatic character. The aromatic structures in the DOM from these sediments are thought to arise from the degradation of lignin. The large amounts of paraffinic structures in both types of DOM may be due to the degradation of unidentified paraffinic materials in algal or bacterial remains. ?? 1987.

  2. Characterization of pyrogenic organic matter by 2-dimenstional HETeronucleus CORelation solid-state 13C NMR (HETCOR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    technique was used for monitoring the chemical changes occurring during charring of biomass derived from model compounds, fire-affected and unaffected NOM. The 2D 13C HETCOR NMR spectrum of the fire- unaffected soils revealed that most of the carboxyl C occurs as ester or amide. Aside from cross peaks typically seen in spectra of NOM, the spectrum of the respective fire-affected counterpart shows additional signals assignable to PyOM.

  3. Mathematical analysis of isotope labeling in the citric acid cycle with applications to 13C NMR studies in perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Chance, E M; Seeholzer, S H; Kobayashi, K; Williamson, J R

    1983-11-25

    Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with 5 mM glucose and either 5 mM acetate or 1 mM pyruvate to achieve steady state conditions, followed by replacement of the acetate with 90% enriched [2-13C]acetate or pyruvate with 90% enriched [3-13C]pyruvate. The hearts were frozen different times after addition of 13C-substrate and neutralized perchloric acid extracts from three pooled hearts per time point were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled 13C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The 13C fractional enrichment of individual carbons of different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for nuclear Overhauser enhancement and saturation effects. A mathematical flux model of the citric acid cycle and ancillary transamination reactions was constructed with the FACSIMILE program, and used to solve unknown flux parameters with constant pool sizes by nonlinear least squares analysis of the approximately 200 simultaneous differential equations required to describe the reactions. With [2-13C] acetate as substrate, resonances and line splittings due to 13C-13C spin coupling of the C-2, C-3, and C-4 carbons of glutamate were well resolved. The half-times to reach maximum 13C enrichment were 2.6 min for glutamate C-4 and 8 min for glutamate C-2 and C-3. From these data, a well determined citric acid cycle flux of 8.3 mumol/g dry weight X min was calculated for an observed oxygen consumption of 31 mumol/g dry weight X min. With [3-13C]pyruvate as substrate, resonances of aspartate C-2 and C-3 and of alanine C-3 were well resolved in addition to those of glutamate C-2, C-3, and C-4. Nonlinear least squares fitting of these data to the model gave nonrandomly distributed residuals for the 13C fractional enrichments of glutamate C-4, suggesting an incomplete model, but a well determined cycle flux of 11.9 mumol/g dry weight X min for an oxygen uptake of 35 mumol/g dry weight X min. Our studies demonstrate the practicality of 13C NMR

  4. Stability and biodegradability of humic substances from Arctic soils of Western Siberia: insights from 13C-NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejarque, E.; Abakumov, E.

    2015-11-01

    Arctic soils contain large amounts of organic matter which, globally, exceed the amount of carbon stored in vegetation biomass and in the atmosphere. Recent studies emphasize the potential sensitivity for this soil organic matter (SOM) to be mineralised when faced with increasing ambient temperatures. In order to better refine the predictions about the response of SOM to climate warming, there is a need to increase the spatial coverage of empirical data on SOM quantity and quality in the Arctic area. This study provides, for the first time, a characterisation of SOM from the Gydan Peninsula in the Yamal Region, Western Siberia, Russia. On the one hand, soil humic acids and their humification state were characterised by measuring the elemental composition and diversity of functional groups using solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Also, the total mineralisable carbon was measured. Our results show that there is a uniformity of SOM characteristics throughout the studied region, as well as within soil profiles. Such in-depth homogeneity, together with a predominance of aliphatic carbon structures, suggests the accumulation in soil of raw and slightly decomposed organic matter. Moreover, results on total mineralisable carbon suggest a high lability of these compounds. The mineralisation rate was found to be independent of SOM quality, and to be mainly explained solely by the total carbon content. Overall, our results provide further evidence on the fundamental role that the soils of Western Siberia may have on regulating the global carbon balance when faced with increasing ambient temperatures.

  5. Construction and 13C NMR signal-amplification efficiency of a dynamic nuclear polarizer at 6.4 T and 1.4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Taylor, David; McDonald, George; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a rapidly emerging technique in biomedical and metabolic imaging since it amplifies the liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and imaging (MRI) signals by >10,000-fold. Originally used in nuclear scattering experiments, DNP works by creating a non-Boltzmann nuclear spin distribution by transferring the high electron (γ = 28,000 MHz/T) thermal polarization to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation of the sample at high magnetic field and low temperature. A dissolution device is used to rapidly dissolve the frozen sample and consequently produces an injectable ``hyperpolarized'' liquid at physiologically-tolerable temperature. Here we report the construction and performance evaluation of a dissolution DNP hyperpolarizer at 6.4 T and 1.4 K using a continuous-flow cryostat. The solid and liquid-state 13C NMR signal enhancement levels of 13C acetate samples doped with trityl OX063 and 4-oxo-TEMPO free radicals will be discussed and compared with the results from the 3.35 T commercial hyperpolarizer. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  6. Determination of Oxidative Glucose Metabolism in vivo in the Young Rat Brain using Localized Direct-detected 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ennis, Kathleen; Deelchand, Dinesh Kumar; Tkac, Ivan; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Rao, Raghavendra

    2011-01-01

    Determination of oxidative metabolism in the brain using in vivo 13C NMR spectroscopy (13C MRS) typically requires repeated blood sampling throughout the study to measure blood glucose concentration and fractional enrichment (input function). However, drawing blood from small animals, such as young rats, placed deep inside the magnet is technically difficult due to their small total blood volume. In the present study, a custom-built animal holder enabled temporary removal of the animal from the magnet for blood collection, followed by accurate repositioning in the exact presampling position without degradation of B0 shimming. 13C label incorporation into glutamate C4 and C3 positions during a 120 min [1,6-13C2] glucose infusion was determined in 28-day-old rats (n = 4) under α-chloralose sedation using localized, direct-detected in vivo 13C MRS at 9.4T. The tricarboxylic acid cycle activity rate (VTCA) determined using a one-compartment metabolic modeling was 0.67 ± 0.13 µmol/g/min, a value comparable to previous ex vivo studies. This methodology opens the avenue for in vivo measurements of brain metabolic rates using 13C MRS in small animals. PMID:21660589

  7. Reversal of metabolic deficits by lipoic acid in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: a 13C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Sancheti, Harsh; Kanamori, Keiko; Patil, Ishan; Díaz Brinton, Roberta; Ross, Brian D; Cadenas, Enrique

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an age-related neurodegenerative disease characterized by deterioration of cognition and loss of memory. Several clinical studies have shown Alzheimer's disease to be associated with disturbances in glucose metabolism and the subsequent tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle-related metabolites like glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA). These metabolites have been viewed as biomarkers by (a) assisting early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and (b) evaluating the efficacy of a treatment regimen. In this study, 13-month-old triple transgenic mice (a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD)) were given intravenous infusion of [1-(13)C]glucose followed by an ex vivo (13)C NMR to determine the concentrations of (13)C-labeled isotopomers of Glu, Gln, aspartate (Asp), GABA, myo-inositol, and NAA. Total ((12)C+(13)C) Glu, Gln, and Asp were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography to calculate enrichment. Furthermore, we examined the effects of lipoic acid in modulating these metabolites, based on its previously established insulin mimetic effects. Total (13)C labeling and percent enrichment decreased by ∼50% in the 3xTg-AD mice. This hypometabolism was partially or completely restored by lipoic acid feeding. The ability of lipoic acid to restore glucose metabolism and subsequent TCA cycle-related metabolites further substantiates its role in overcoming the hypometabolic state inherent in early stages of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24220168

  8. Slow magic-angle rotation 13C NMR studies of solid phosphonium iodides. The interplay of dipolar, shielding, and indirect coupling tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robin K.; Packer, Kenneth J.; Thayer, Ann M.

    High-resolution 13C NMR spectra were recorded for solid [Me 2Ph 2P] +I - and [Me 3PhP] +I - using high-power decoupling, cross-polarization, and magic-angle rotation. Spectra of the ipso carbon, obtained with the nonquaternary suppression (dipolar dephasing) pulse sequence, show an unequal distribution intensity of spinning sidebands for the two peaks split by the isotropic coupling constant 1JPC. This effect is traced to the joint influence of (P, C) dipolar coupling and 13C shielding anisotropy. The existence of scalar coupling enables magic-angle rotation to distinguish the two subspectra which are present. Analysis of the sideband patterns yields values of the NMR parameters. Under certain assumptions, including that the axis of greatest shielding is perpendicular to the PC bond, it is shown that 1JPC is positive. In contrast to traditional methods of determining signs, this conclusion does not rely on knowledge of signs of other coupling constants.

  9. Changes in dynamics of SRE-RNA on binding to the VTS1p-SAM domain studied by 13C NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Oberstrass, Florian C; Allain, Frédéric H-T; Ravindranathan, Sapna

    2008-09-10

    RNA recognition by proteins is often accompanied by significant changes in RNA dynamics in addition to conformational changes. However, there are very few studies which characterize the changes in molecular motions in RNA on protein binding. We present a quantitative (13)C NMR relaxation study of the changes in RNA dynamics in the pico-nanosecond time scale and micro-millisecond time scale resulting from interaction of the stem-loop SRE-RNA with the VTS1p-SAM domain. (13)C relaxation rates of the protonated carbons of the nucleotide base and anomeric carbons have been analyzed by employing the model-free formalism, for a fully (13)C/(15)N-labeled sample of the SRE-RNA in the free and protein-bound forms. In the free RNA, the nature of molecular motions are found to be distinctly different in the stem and the loop region. On binding to the protein, the nature of motions becomes more homogeneous throughout the RNA, with many residues showing increased flexibility at the aromatic carbon sites, while the anomeric carbon sites become more rigid. Surprisingly, we also observe indications of a slow collective motion of the RNA in the binding pocket of the protein. The observation of increased motions on binding is interesting in the context of growing evidence that binding does not always lead to motional restrictions and the resulting entropy gain could favor the free energy of association. PMID:18698768

  10. Stability and biodegradability of organic matter from Arctic soils of Western Siberia: Insights from 13C-NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejarque, Elisabet; Abakumov, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    Arctic soils contain large amounts of organic matter which, globally, exceed the amount of carbon stored in vegetation biomass and in the atmosphere. Recent studies emphasize the potential sensitivity for this soil organic matter (SOM) to be mineralised when faced with increasing ambient temperatures. In order to better refine the predictions about the response of SOM to climate warming, there is a need to increase the spatial coverage of empirical data on SOM quantity and quality in the Arctic area. This study provides, for the first time, a characterisation of SOM from the Gydan Peninsula in the Yamal Region, Western Siberia, Russia. On the one hand, soil humic acids and their humification state were characterised by measuring the elemental composition and diversity of functional groups using solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Also, the total mineralisable carbon was measured. Our results show that there is a predominance of aliphatic carbon structures, with a distribution of functional groups that has a minimal variation both regionally and within soil depth. Such vertical homogeneity and low level of aromaticity reflects the accumulation in soil of lowly decomposed organic matter due to cold temperatures. Mineralisation rates were found to be independent of SOM quality, and to be mainly explained solely by the total carbon content. Overall, our results provide further evidence on the sensitivity that the soils of Western Siberia may have to increasing ambient temperatures and highlight the important role that this region can play in the global carbon balance under the effects of climate warming.

  11. Early estrogen-induced metabolic changes and their inhibition by actinomycin D and cycloheximide in human breast cancer cells: sup 31 P and sup 13 C NMR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Neeman, M.; Degani, H. )

    1989-07-01

    Metabolic changes following estrogen stimulation and the inhibition of these changes in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide were monitored continuously in perfused human breast cancer T47D clone 11 cells with {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C NMR techniques. The experiments were performed by estrogen rescue of tamoxifen-treated cells. Immediately after perfusion with estrogen-containing medium, a continuous enhancement in the rates of glucose consumption, lactate production by glycolysis, and glutamate synthesis by the Krebs cycle occurred with a persistent 2-fold increase at 4 hr. Pretreatment with either actinomycin D or cycloheximide, at concentrations known to inhibit mRNA and protein synthesis, respectively, and simultaneous treatment with estrogen and each inhibitor prevented the estrogen-induced changes in glucose metabolism. This suggested that the observed estrogen stimulation required synthesis of mRNA and protein. These inhibitors also modulated several metabolic activities that were not related to estrogen stimulation. The observed changes in the in vivo kinetics of glucose metabolism may provide a means for the early detection of the response of human breast cancer cells to estrogen versus tamoxifen treatment.

  12. Synthesis, spectral analysis, structural elucidation and quantum chemical studies of (E)-methyl-4-[(2-phenylhydrazono)methyl]benzoate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Zarife Sibel; Şenöz, Hülya; Tezcan, Habibe; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2015-05-01

    The title compound, (E)-methyl-4-[(2-phenylhydrazono)methyl]benzoate, (I), (C15H14N2O2), has been synthesized by condensation reaction of methyl-4-formylbenzoate and phenylhydrazine. The compound has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Vis spectroscopies and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. Optimized molecular structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts have been investigated by B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method using density functional theory (DFT). Global chemical reactivity descriptors, natural population analysis (NPA), thermodynamic and non-linear optical (NLO) properties have also been studied. The energetic behavior of the compound has been examined in solvent media using the integral equation formalism polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM).

  13. Compartmentalized Cerebral Metabolism of [1,6-13C]Glucose Determined by in vivo 13C NMR Spectroscopy at 14.1 T

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, João M. N.; Lanz, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral metabolism is compartmentalized between neurons and glia. Although glial glycolysis is thought to largely sustain the energetic requirements of neurotransmission while oxidative metabolism takes place mainly in neurons, this hypothesis is matter of debate. The compartmentalization of cerebral metabolic fluxes can be determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy upon infusion of 13C-enriched compounds, especially glucose. Rats under light α-chloralose anesthesia were infused with [1,6-13C]glucose and 13C enrichment in the brain metabolites was measured by 13C NMR spectroscopy with high sensitivity and spectral resolution at 14.1 T. This allowed determining 13C enrichment curves of amino acid carbons with high reproducibility and to reliably estimate cerebral metabolic fluxes (mean error of 8%). We further found that TCA cycle intermediates are not required for flux determination in mathematical models of brain metabolism. Neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle rate (VTCA) and neurotransmission rate (VNT) were 0.45 ± 0.01 and 0.11 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min, respectively. Glial VTCA was found to be 38 ± 3% of total cerebral oxidative metabolism, accounting for more than half of neuronal oxidative metabolism. Furthermore, glial anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation rate (VPC) was 0.069 ± 0.004 μmol/g/min, i.e., 25 ± 1% of the glial TCA cycle rate. These results support a role of glial cells as active partners of neurons during synaptic transmission beyond glycolytic metabolism. PMID:21713114

  14. Solvent effect on pathways and mechanisms for D-fructose conversion to 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde: in situ 13C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Masaru; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2013-03-14

    Noncatalytic reactions of D-fructose were kinetically investigated in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), water, and methanol as a function of time at temperatures of 30-150 °C by applying in situ (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The products were quantitatively analyzed with distinction of isomeric species by taking advantage of site-selective (13)C labeling technique. In DMSO, D-fructose was converted first into 3,4-dihydroxy-2-dihydroxymethyl-5-hydroxymethyltetrahydrofuran having no double bond in the ring, subsequently into 4-hydroxy-5-hydroxymethyl-4,5-dihydrofuran-2-carbaldehyde having one double bond through dehydration, and finally into 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (5-HMF) having two double bonds. No other reaction pathways were involved, as shown from the carbon mass balance. In water, 5-HMF, the final product in DMSO, was generated with the precursors undetected and furthermore transformed predominantly into formic and levulinic acids and slightly into 1,2,4-benzenetriol accompanied by polymerization. D-glucose was also produced through the reversible transformation of the reactant D-fructose. In methanol, some kinds of anhydro-D-fructoses were generated instead of 5-HMF. The reaction pathways can thus be controlled by taking advantage of the solvent effect. The D-fructose conversion reactions are of the first order with respect to the concentration of D-fructose and proceed on the order of minutes in DMSO but on the order of hours in water and methanol. The rate constant was three orders of magnitude larger in DMSO than in water or methanol. PMID:23458365

  15. Solid state 13C NMR analysis of shales and coals from Laramide Basins. Final report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.; Jiao, Z.S.; Zhao, Hanqing; Surdam, R.C.

    1998-12-31

    This Western Research Institute (WRI) jointly sponsored research (JSR) project augmented and complemented research conducted by the University of Wyoming Institute For Energy Research for the Gas Research Institute. The project, {open_quotes}A New Innovative Exploitation Strategy for Gas Accumulations Within Pressure Compartments,{close_quotes} was a continuation of a project funded by the GRI Pressure Compartmentalization Program that began in 1990. That project, {open_quotes}Analysis of Pressure Chambers and Seals in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana,{close_quotes} characterized a new class of hydrocarbon traps, the discovery of which can provide an impetus to revitalize the domestic petroleum industry. In support of the UW Institute For Energy Research`s program on pressure compartmentalization, solid-state {sup 13}C NMR measurements were made on sets of shales and coals from different Laramide basins in North America. NMR measurements were made on samples taken from different formations and depths of burial in the Alberta, Bighorn, Denver, San Juan, Washakie, and Wind River basins. The carbon aromaticity determined by NMR was shown to increase with depth of burial and increased maturation. In general, the NMR data were in agreement with other maturational indicators, such as vitrinite reflectance, illite/smectite ratio, and production indices. NMR measurements were also obtained on residues from hydrous pyrolysis experiments on Almond and Lance Formation coals from the Washakie Basin. These data were used in conjunction with mass and elemental balance data to obtain information about the extent of carbon aromatization that occurs during artificial maturation. The data indicated that 41 and 50% of the original aliphatic carbon in the Almond and Lance coals, respectively, aromatized during hydrous pyrolysis.

  16. Detecting a new source for photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization in the LOV2 domain of phototropin by magnetic-field dependent (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kothe, Gerd; Lukaschek, Michail; Link, Gerhard; Kacprzak, Sylwia; Illarionov, Boris; Fischer, Markus; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Bacher, Adelbert; Weber, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Phototropin is a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) containing blue-light receptor, which regulates, governed by its two LOV domains, the phototropic response of higher plants. Upon photoexcitation, the FMN cofactor triplet state, (3)F, reacts with a nearby cysteine to form a covalent adduct. Cysteine-to-alanine mutants of LOV domains instead generate a flavin radical upon illumination. Here, we explore the formation of photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) in LOV2-C450A of Avena sativa phototropin and demonstrate that photo-CIDNP observed in solution (13)C NMR spectra can reliably be interpreted in terms of solid-state mechanisms including a novel triplet mechanism. To minimize cross-polarization, which transfers light-induced magnetization to adjacent (13)C nuclei, our experiments were performed on proteins reconstituted with specifically (13)C-labeled flavins. Two potential sources for photo-CIDNP can be identified: The photogenerated triplet state, (3)F, and the triplet radical pair (3)(F(-•)W(+•)), formed by electron abstraction of (3)F from tryptophan W491. To separate the two contributions, photo-CIDNP studies were performed at four different magnetic fields ranging from 4.7 to 11.8 T. Analysis revealed that, at fields <9 T, both (3)(F(-•)W(+•)) and (3)F contribute to photo-CIDNP, whereas at high magnetic fields, the calculated enhancement factors of (3)F agree favorably with their experimental counterparts. Thus, we have for the first time detected that a triplet state is the major source for photo-CIDNP in a photoactive protein. Since triplet states are frequently encountered upon photoexcitation of flavoproteins, the novel triplet mechanism opens up new means of studying electronic structures of the active cofactors in these proteins at atomic resolution. PMID:25207844

  17. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Meng, Wei; He, Zhongqi; Feng, Weiying; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P

    2016-02-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O-C-O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes. PMID:26624522

  18. Modification of local electronic state by BEDT-STF doping to κ -(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N (CN ) 2]Br salt studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Ihara, Y.; Kawamoto, A.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of site-selective 13C NMR spectroscopy on an organic superconductor κ -(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N (CN ) 2]Br (κ -Br) doped with BEDT-STF molecules. We reveal microscopically the modulation of the local electronic state caused by the BEDT-STF doping from the 13C NMR measurement on two types of samples, which are 13C enriched κ -Br doped with naturally abundant BEDT-STF molecules, and natural κ -Br doped with 13C enriched BEDT-STF molecules. The results of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 measured both in the normal and superconducting state suggest that the potential disorder at the BEDT-STF sites scatters antiferromagnetic interaction and superconducting Cooper pairs.

  19. Spectroscopic characterization of the 1-substituted 3,3-diphenyl-4-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)azetidin-2-ones: Application of 13C NMR, 1H- 13C COSY NMR and mass spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Girija S.; Pheko, Tshepo

    2008-08-01

    The article deals with spectroscopic characterization of azetidin-2-ones. The presence of substituents like hydroxyl, fluoro, methoxy and benzhydryl, etc., on the azetidin-2-one ring significantly affects the IR absorption and 13C NMR frequencies of the carbonyl group present in these compounds. The presence of an ester carbonyl group or too many methine protons in the molecule has been observed to limit the scope of IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy in unambiguous assignment of the structure. The application of 13C NMR, 2D NMR ( 1H- 13C COSY) and mass spectroscopy in characterization of complex azetidin-2-ones is discussed. An application of the latter two techniques is described in deciding unequivocally between an azetidin-2-one ring and chroman-2-one ring structure for the product obtained by treatment of the 1-substituted 3,3-diphenyl-4-[2'-( O-diphenylacyl)hydroxyphenyl]-2-azetidinones with ethanolic sodium hydroxide at room temperature.

  20. - and Cross-Polarization 13C NMR Evidence of Alterations in Molecular Composition of Humic Substances Following Afforestation with Eucalypt in Distinct Brazilian Biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, I. R.; Soares, E. M.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Novais, R.; Barros, N.; Fernandes, S.

    2010-12-01

    The effect of planting fast growing tree species on SOM quality in tropical regions has been overlooked. In the present study 13C-NMR approaches were used to evaluate the impact of eucalypt cultivation on humic and fulvic acids molecular composition. The results indicate that the replacement of native vegetation by eucalypt plantations increased the relative contribution of aliphatic groups in HA from soils previously under Atlantic Forest, Grassland, and the Cerrado (Curvelo site only). The same trend was observed for FA, except in the Curvelo site. A trend for degradation and smaller contribution of O-alkyl C (carbohydrates) in HA was observed in soils under eucalyptus in Atlantic Forest and Cerrado. For FA such decreases were seen in Cerrado and Grassland biomes after eucalypt planting. In the area cultivated with pasture in the Atlantic Forest biome and in the Grassland soil, the largest contributions of lignin-derived compounds were detected in HA. The HA from the Cerrado at the Curvelo site, where the woody vegetation is virtually devoid of grassy species, showed the lowest intensity of lignin signal then those from the Cerrado sensu stricto in Itacambira, where grass species are more abundant. At our study sites, charred material are most likely derived from burning of the native vegetation, as naturally occurs in the Cerrado region, or anthropogenic fires in the Grassland biome. Burning of harvest residues in eucalypt fields was also a common practice in the early rotations. The replacement of native vegetation by eucalypt plantations increases the relative contribution of nonpolar alkyl groups in HA from soils previously under Atlantic Forest, Grassland, and the Cerrado (Curvelo site only) biomes. There is evidence of substantial contribution of lignin-derived C to HA and FA, especially in sites planted with Brachiaria sp pastures. Eucalypt introduction decreases the relative contribution of carbohydrates in HA and FA. 13C DP/MAS NMR functional groups in

  1. Successful combination of computationally inexpensive GIAO 13C NMR calculations and artificial neural network pattern recognition: a new strategy for simple and rapid detection of structural misassignments.

    PubMed

    Sarotti, Ariel M

    2013-08-01

    GIAO NMR chemical shift calculations coupled with trained artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been shown to provide a powerful strategy for simple, rapid and reliable identification of structural misassignments of organic compounds using only one set of both computational and experimental data. The geometry optimization, usually the most time-consuming step in the overall procedure, was carried out using computationally inexpensive methods (MM+, AM1 or HF/3-21G) and the NMR shielding constants at the affordable mPW1PW91/6-31G(d) level of theory. As low quality NMR prediction is typically obtained with such protocols, the decision making was foreseen as a problem of pattern recognition. Thus, given a set of statistical parameters computed after correlation between experimental and calculated chemical shifts the classification was done using the knowledge derived from trained ANNs. The training process was carried out with a set of 200 molecules chosen to provide a wide array of chemical functionalities and molecular complexity, and the results were validated with a set of 26 natural products that had been incorrectly assigned along with their 26 revised structures. The high prediction effectiveness observed makes this method a suitable test for rapid identification of structural misassignments, preventing not only the publication of wrong structures but also avoiding the consequences of such a mistake. PMID:23779148

  2. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, Raman, NMR and UV-vis.) and quantum chemical investigations of (E)-3-[4-(pentyloxy)phenyl]-1-phenylprop-2-en-1-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Asghar; Gökce, Halil; Bahçeli, Semiha; Naseer, Muhammad Moazzam

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the molecular structure and vibrational and electronic transition spectra and 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift values (gas phase and in chloroform solvent), HOMO-LUMO analysis, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), thermodynamic properties and Mulliken atomic charges of (E)-3-[4-(pentyloxy)phenyl]-1-phenylprop-2-en-1-one molecule, C20H22O2, which has many biological activities have been calculated using the DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in the ground state. The obtained results indicate a good harmony among the calculated and the experimental FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis. (in methanol solvent) and 1H and 13C NMR (in chloroform-d solvent) spectra of the mentioned compound.

  3. NMR crystallography: the use of chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robin K.

    2004-10-01

    Measurements of chemical shifts obtained from magic-angle spinning NMR spectra (together with quantum mechanical computations of shielding) can provide valuable information on crystallography. Examples are given of the determination of crystallographic asymmetric units, of molecular symmetry in the solid-state environment, and of crystallographic space group assignment. Measurements of full tensor components for 199Hg have given additional coordination information. The nature of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in cortisone acetate polymorphs and solvates is obtained from chemical shift information, also involving measurement of the full tensor parameters. The resulting data have been used as restraints, built into the computation algorithm, in the analysis of powder diffraction patterns to give full crystal structures. A combination of quantum mechanical computation of shielding and measurement of proton chemical shifts (obtained by high-speed MAS) leads to the determination of the position of a proton in an intermolecular hydrogen bond. A recently-developed computer program specifically based on crystallographic repetition has been shown to give acceptable results. Moreover, NMR chemical shifts can distinguish between static and dynamic disorder in crystalline materials and can be used to determine modes and rates of molecular exchange motion.

  4. Stereospecificity of (1) H, (13) C and (15) N shielding constants in the isomers of methylglyoxal bisdimethylhydrazone: problem with configurational assignment based on (1) H chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Ushakov, Igor A; Keiko, Natalia A

    2012-07-01

    In the (13) C NMR spectra of methylglyoxal bisdimethylhydrazone, the (13) C-5 signal is shifted to higher frequencies, while the (13) C-6 signal is shifted to lower frequencies on going from the EE to ZE isomer following the trend found previously. Surprisingly, the (1) H-6 chemical shift and (1) J(C-6,H-6) coupling constant are noticeably larger in the ZE isomer than in the EE isomer, although the configuration around the -CH═N- bond does not change. This paradox can be rationalized by the C-H⋯N intramolecular hydrogen bond in the ZE isomer, which is found from the quantum-chemical calculations including Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis. This hydrogen bond results in the increase of δ((1) H-6) and (1) J(C-6,H-6) parameters. The effect of the C-H⋯N hydrogen bond on the (1) H shielding and one-bond (13) C-(1) H coupling complicates the configurational assignment of the considered compound because of these spectral parameters. The (1) H, (13) C and (15) N chemical shifts of the 2- and 8-(CH(3) )(2) N groups attached to the -C(CH(3) )═N- and -CH═N- moieties, respectively, reveal pronounced difference. The ab initio calculations show that the 8-(CH(3) )(2) N group conjugate effectively with the π-framework, and the 2-(CH(3) )(2) N group twisted out from the plane of the backbone and loses conjugation. As a result, the degree of charge transfer from the N-2- and N-8- nitrogen lone pairs to the π-framework varies, which affects the (1) H, (13) C and (15) N shieldings. PMID:22615146

  5. Dipolar-dephasing 13C NMR studies of decomposed wood and coalified xylem tissue: Evidence for chemical structural changes associated with defunctionalization of lignin structural units during coalification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    A series of decomposed and coalified gymnosperm woods was examined by conventional solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and by dipolar-dephasing NMR techniques. The results of these NMR studies for a histologically related series of samples provide clues as to the nature of codification reactions that lead to the defunctionalization of lignin-derived aromatic structures. These reactions sequentially involve the following: (1) loss of methoxyl carbons from guaiacyl structural units with replacement by hydroxyls and increased condensation; (2) loss of hydroxyls or aryl ethers with replacement by hydrogen as rank increases from lignin to high-volatile bituminous coal; (3) loss of alkyl groups with continued replacement by hydrogen. The dipolar-dephasing data show that the early stages of coalification in samples examined (lignin to lignite) involve a decreasing degree of protonation on aromatic rings and suggest that condensation is significant during coalification at this early stage. An increasing degree of protonation on aromatic rings is observed as the rank of the sample increases from lignite to anthracite.

  6. Accessible surface area from NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    Accessible surface area (ASA) is the surface area of an atom, amino acid or biomolecule that is exposed to solvent. The calculation of a molecule's ASA requires three-dimensional coordinate data and the use of a "rolling ball" algorithm to both define and calculate the ASA. For polymers such as proteins, the ASA for individual amino acids is closely related to the hydrophobicity of the amino acid as well as its local secondary and tertiary structure. For proteins, ASA is a structural descriptor that can often be as informative as secondary structure. Consequently there has been considerable effort over the past two decades to try to predict ASA from protein sequence data and to use ASA information (derived from chemical modification studies) as a structure constraint. Recently it has become evident that protein chemical shifts are also sensitive to ASA. Given the potential utility of ASA estimates as structural constraints for NMR we decided to explore this relationship further. Using machine learning techniques (specifically a boosted tree regression model) we developed an algorithm called "ShiftASA" that combines chemical-shift and sequence derived features to accurately estimate per-residue fractional ASA values of water-soluble proteins. This method showed a correlation coefficient between predicted and experimental values of 0.79 when evaluated on a set of 65 independent test proteins, which was an 8.2 % improvement over the next best performing (sequence-only) method. On a separate test set of 92 proteins, ShiftASA reported a mean correlation coefficient of 0.82, which was 12.3 % better than the next best performing method. ShiftASA is available as a web server ( http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com ) for submitting input queries for fractional ASA calculation. PMID:26078090

  7. Crystal structure and theoretical study of IR and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of cordatin, a natural product with antiulcerogenic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasil, Davi S. B.; Alves, Cláudio N.; Guilhon, Giselle M. S. P.; Muller, Adolfo H.; Secco, Ricardo De S.; Peris, Gabriel; Llusar, Rosa

    Cordatin is a furan diterpenoid with a clerodane skeleton isolated from Croton palanostigma Klotzsch (Euphorbiaceae). This natural product shows significant antiulcerogenic activity, similar to cimetidine (Tagamet®), a compound used for the treatment of peptic ulcers. The crystal structure of cordatin was obtained by X-ray diffraction and its geometrical parameters were compared with theoretical calculations at the B3LYP theory level. The IR and NMR (1H and 13C chemical shifts and coupling constants) spectra were obtained and compared with the theoretical calculations. The B3LYP theory level, with the 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis set, provided IR absorption values close to the experimental data. Moreover, theoretical NMR parameters obtained in both gas phase and chloroform solvent at the B3PW91/DGDZVP, B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p), and B3PW91/6-311+G(2d,p) levels showed good correlations with the experimental results.

  8. Ground-fire effects on the composition of dissolved and total organic matter in forest floor and soil solutions from Scots pine forests in Germany: new insights from solid state 13C NMR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näthe, Kerstin; Michalzik, Beate; Levia, Delphis; Steffens, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Fires represent an ecosystem disturbance and are recognized to seriously pertubate the nutrient budgets of forested ecosystems. While the effects of fires on chemical, biological, and physical soil properties have been intensively studied, especially in Mediterranean areas and North America, few investigations examined the effects of fire-induced alterations in the water-bound fluxes and the chemical composition of dissolved and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC, POC, DN, PN). The exclusion of the particulate organic matter fraction (0.45 μm < POM < 500 μm) potentially results in misleading inferences and budgeting gaps when studying the effects of fires on nutrient and energy fluxes. To our best knowledge, this is the first known study to present fire-induced changes on the composition of dissolved and total organic matter (DOM, TOM) in forest floor (FF) and soil solutions (A, B horizon) from Scots pine forests in Germany. In relation to control sites, we test the effects of low-severity fires on: (1) the composition of DOM and TOM in forest floor and soil solutions; and (2) the translocated amount of particulate in relation to DOC and DN into the subsoil. The project aims to uncover the mechanisms of water-bound organic matter transport along an ecosystem profile and its compositional changes following a fire disturbance. Forest floor and soil solutions were fortnightly sampled from March to December 2014 on fire-manipulated and control plots in a Scots pine forest in Central Germany. Shortly after the experimental duff fire in April 2014 pooled solutions samples were taken for solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy to characterize DOM (filtered solution < 0.8μm pore size) and TOM in unfiltered solutions. Independent from fire manipulation, the composition of TOM was generally less aromatic (aromaticity index [%] according to Hatcher et al., 1981) with values between 18 (FF) - 25% (B horizon) than the DOM fraction with 23 (FF) - 27% (B horizon). For DOM

  9. Conformational analysis, spectroscopic study (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR), molecular orbital energy and NLO properties of 5-iodosalicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaca, Caglar; Atac, Ahmet; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2015-02-01

    In this study, 5-iodosalicylic acid (5-ISA, C7H5IO3) is structurally characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR and UV spectroscopies. There are eight conformers, Cn, n = 1-8 for this molecule therefore the molecular geometry for these eight conformers in the ground state are calculated by using the ab-initio density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method approach with the aug-cc-pVDZ-PP basis set for iodine and the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set for the other elements. The computational results identified that the most stable conformer of 5-ISA is the C1 form. The vibrational spectra are calculated DFT method invoking the same basis sets and fundamental vibrations are assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method with PQS program. Total density of state (TDOS) and partial density of state (PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (COOP or OPDOS) diagrams analysis for C1 conformer were calculated using the same method. The energy and oscillator strength are calculated by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complement with the experimental findings. Besides, charge transfer occurring in the molecule between HOMO and LUMO energies, frontier energy gap, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) are calculated and presented. The NMR chemical shifts (1H and 13C) spectra are recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Mulliken atomic charges of the title molecule are also calculated, interpreted and compared with salicylic acid. The optimized bond lengths, bond angles and calculated NMR and UV, vibrational wavenumbers showed the best agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Calculation of Chemical Shift Anisotropy in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sishi; Case, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Individual peptide groups in proteins must exhibit some variation in the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) of their constituent atoms, but not much is known about the extent or origins of this dispersion. Direct spectroscopic measurement of CSA remains technically challenging, and theoretical methods can help to overcome these limitations by estimating shielding tensors for arbitrary structures. Here we use an automated fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (AF-QM/MM) approach to compute 15N, 13C′ and 1H chemical shift tensors for human ubiquitin and the GB1 and GB3 fragments of staphylococcal protein G. The average and range of variation of the anisotropies is in good agreement with experimental estimates from solid-state NMR, and the variation among residues is somewhat smaller than that estimated from solution-state measurements. Hydrogen-bond effects account for much of the variation, both between helix and sheet regions, and within elements of secondary structure, but other effects (including variations in torsion angles) may play a role as well. PMID:21866436

  11. Static and dynamic interaction between π and d electrons in organic superconductor β″-(BEDT-TTF)4[(H3O ) Fe (C2O4)3] .C6H5Br studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Y.; Futami, Y.; Kawamoto, A.; Matsui, K.; Goto, T.; Sasaki, T.; Benmansour, S.; Gómez-García, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of 13C NMR experiments in an organic superconductor with localized Fe spins β″-(BEDT-TTF) 4[(H3O ) Fe (C2O4)3] .C6H5Br . We reveal the antiferromagnetic coupling between Fe d spins and π spins, which creates an exchange field antiparallel to the external field direction at the π electrons. In addition to the static effects of Fe spins, we show from the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate measurement that the magnetic fluctuations generated by Fe spins are suppressed at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. These conditions are suitable to stabilize the field-induced superconductivity by the field compensation mechanism. After the suppression of Fe-spin dynamics by a magnetic field of 19 T, we observed the underlying π -electron contribution. We discuss a possible anomaly in the π -electron system.

  12. Synthesis and NMR Spectral Analysis of Amine Heterocycles: The Effect of Asymmetry on the [superscript 1]H and [superscript 13]C NMR Spectra of N,O-Acetals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saba, Shahrokh; Ciaccio, James A.; Espinal, Jennifer; Aman, Courtney E.

    2007-01-01

    The stereochemical investigation is conducted to give students the combined experience of chemical synthesis of amines and N-heterocycles and structural stereochemical analysis using NMR spectroscopy. Students are introduced to the concept of topicity-stereochemical relationships between ligands within a molecule by synthesizing N,O-acetals.

  13. Protein conformation and proton nuclear-magnetic-resonance chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Pardi, A; Wagner, G; Wüthrich, K

    1983-12-15

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the polypeptide backbone protons in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor from bovine organs and the inhibitors E and K from the venom of Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis have been analyzed. Using the corresponding shifts in model peptides, the chemical shifts observed in the proteins were decomposed into random-coil shifts and conformation-dependent shifts. Correlations between contributions to the latter term and the polypeptide conformation were investigated by using the crystal structure of the bovine inhibitor. In addition to the well-known ring-current effects, a correlation was found between chemical shifts of amide and C alpha protons and the length of the hydrogen bonds formed by these protons with nearby oxygen atoms as acceptor groups. There remain sizeable and as yet unexplained residual conformation shifts. Overall, the present treatment provides a satisfactory qualitative explanation for the outstandingly large shifts of backbone hydrogen atoms in these diamagnetic proteins. PMID:6198174

  14. Use of 13C NMR and ftir for elucidation of degradation pathways during natural litter decomposition and composting I. early stage leaf degradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Leenheer, J.A.; Kennedy, K.R.; Noyes, T.I.

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative degradation of plant tissue leads to the formation of natural dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and humus. Infrared (IR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry have been used to elucidate the chemical reactions of the early stages of degradation that give rise to DOC derived from litter and compost. The results of this study indicate that oxidation of the lignin components of plant tissue follows the sequence of O-demethylation, and hydroxylation followed by ring-fission, chain-shortening, and oxidative removal of substituents. Oxidative ring-fission leads to the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the cleaved ends of the rings and, in the process, transforms phenolic groups into aliphatic alcoholic groups. The carbohydrate components are broken down into aliphatic hydroxy acids and aliphatic alcohols.

  15. Solid-state 13C NMR study of the mobility of polysaccharides in the cell walls of two apple cultivars of different firmness.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jovyn K T; Zujovic, Zoran D; Smith, Bronwen G; Johnston, Jason W; Schröder, Roswitha; Melton, Laurence D

    2014-03-11

    Solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to compare differences in mobility of the cell wall polysaccharides of 'Scifresh' and 'Royal Gala' apples after 20 weeks of storage. The texture of 'Scifresh' apples was markedly firmer than that of 'Royal Gala' at the end of storage. In a novel approach Two Pulse Phase Modulation (TPPM) decoupling was combined with cross polarisation (CP) and single pulse excitation (SPE) experiments. The resulting high resolution solid-state SPE spectra, unprecedented for apple cell walls, allowed a detailed insight into the physical and chemical properties of very mobile polysaccharides such as the arabinan and galactan side chains of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I). NMR showed that the cellulose rigidity was the same in the two cultivars, while arabinans were more mobile than galactans in both. Unexpectedly, arabinans in 'Scifresh' cell walls were more mobile than those in 'Royal Gala' which was unforeseen considering the greater firmness of the 'Scifresh' cultivar. PMID:24423413

  16. Comment on the reference compound for chemical shift and Knight shift determination of (209)Bi nuclei.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Several groups exploring the (209)Bi NMR in solids, including usual insulators, metallic and magnetic materials and recently diamagnetic topological materials, use different standards (usually old and invalid) for chemical shift (Knight shift) determination, ignoring IUPAC recommendations. As a consequence the published shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 17,500 ppm). PMID:25534279

  17. Effect of organic carbon chemistry on sorption of atrazine and metsulfuron-methyl as determined by (13)C-NMR and IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban; Mandal, Abhishek; Manna, Suman; Singh, S B; Berns, Anne E; Singh, Neera

    2015-10-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) content is the major soil component affecting pesticide sorption. However, recent studies have highlighted the fact that it is not the total carbon content of the organic matter, but its chemical structure which have a profound effect on the pesticide's sorption. In the present study, sorption of atrazine and metsulfuron-methyl herbicides was studied in four SOM fractions viz. commercial humic acid, commercial lignin, as well as humic acid and humin extracted from a compost. Sorption data was fitted to the Freundlich adsorption equation. In general, the Freundlich slope (1/n) values for both the herbicides were <1. Except for atrazine sorption on commercial humic acid, metsulfuron-methyl was more sorbed. Desorption results suggested that atrazine was more desorbed than metsulfuron-methyl. Lignin, which showed least sorption of both the herbicides, showed minimum desorption. Sorption of atrazine was best positively correlated with the alkyl carbon (adjusted R (2) = 0.748) and carbonyl carbon (adjusted R (2) = 0.498) but, their effect was statistically nonsignificant (P = 0.05). Metsulfuron-methyl sorption showed best positive correlation with carbonyl carbon (adjusted R (2) = 0.960; P = 0.05) content. Sorption of both the herbicides showed negative correlation with O/N-alkyl carbon. Correlation of herbicide's sorption with alkyl and carbonyl carbon content of SOM fractions suggested their contribution towards herbicide sorption. But, sorption of metsulfuron-methyl, relatively more polar than atrazine, was mainly governed by the polar groups in SOM. IR spectra showed that H-bonds and charge-transfer bonds between SOM fraction and herbicides probably operated as mechanisms of adsorption. PMID:26353968

  18. 4D prediction of protein (1)H chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Lehtivarjo, Juuso; Hassinen, Tommi; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; Peräkylä, Mikael; Laatikainen, Reino

    2009-12-01

    A 4D approach for protein (1)H chemical shift prediction was explored. The 4th dimension is the molecular flexibility, mapped using molecular dynamics simulations. The chemical shifts were predicted with a principal component model based on atom coordinates from a database of 40 protein structures. When compared to the corresponding non-dynamic (3D) model, the 4th dimension improved prediction by 6-7%. The prediction method achieved RMS errors of 0.29 and 0.50 ppm for Halpha and HN shifts, respectively. However, for individual proteins the RMS errors were 0.17-0.34 and 0.34-0.65 ppm for the Halpha and HN shifts, respectively. X-ray structures gave better predictions than the corresponding NMR structures, indicating that chemical shifts contain invaluable information about local structures. The (1)H chemical shift prediction tool 4DSPOT is available from http://www.uku.fi/kemia/4dspot . PMID:19876601

  19. Relative Configuration of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By comparing calculated with experimental NMR chemical shifts, we were able to determine the relative configurations of three monoterpene diastereomers produced by the walkingstick Anisomorpha buprestoides. The combined RMSDs of both 1H and 13C quantum chemically calculated shifts were able to predi...

  20. An isotropic chemical shift-chemical shift anisotropic correlation experiment using discrete magic angle turning.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jesse A; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hoyt, David W; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H F

    2009-05-01

    An isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectroscopy is introduced that combines the advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) technologies. In this new approach, denoted DMAT for "discrete magic angle turning", the sample rotates clockwise followed by an anticlockwise rotation of exactly the same amount with each rotation less or equal than 360 degrees but greater than 240 degrees , with the rotation speed being constant only for times related to the evolution dimension. This back and forth rotation is repeated and synchronized with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. For any spin-interaction of rank-2 such as chemical shift anisotropy, isotropic magnetic susceptibility interaction, and residual homo-nuclear dipolar interaction in biological fluid samples, the projection along the isotropic dimension is a high resolution spectrum. Since a less than 360 degrees sample rotation is involved, the design potentially allows for in situ control over physical parameters such as pressure, flow conditions, feed compositions, and temperature so that true in situ NMR investigations can be carried out. PMID:19246221

  1. Probabilistic validation of protein NMR chemical shift assignments.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Hesam; Tonelli, Marco; Lee, Woonghee; Westler, William M; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Ulrich, Eldon L; Markley, John L

    2016-01-01

    Data validation plays an important role in ensuring the reliability and reproducibility of studies. NMR investigations of the functional properties, dynamics, chemical kinetics, and structures of proteins depend critically on the correctness of chemical shift assignments. We present a novel probabilistic method named ARECA for validating chemical shift assignments that relies on the nuclear Overhauser effect data . ARECA has been evaluated through its application to 26 case studies and has been shown to be complementary to, and usually more reliable than, approaches based on chemical shift databases. ARECA is available online at http://areca.nmrfam.wisc.edu/. PMID:26724815

  2. Structural effects in solvolytic reactions; carbon-13 NMR studies of carbocations†: Effect of increasing electron demand on the carbon-13 NMR shifts in substituted tert-cumyl and 1-aryl-1-cyclopentyl carbocations—correlation of the data by a new set of substituent constants, σC+*†

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Herbert C.; Kelly, David P.; Periasamy, Mariappan

    1980-01-01

    The cationic carbon substituent chemical shifts (ΔδC+) for nine representative meta-substituted tert-cumyl carbocations are correlated satisfactorily by the σm+ substituent constants (slope ρ+ = -18.18, correlation coefficient r = 0.990). However, the substituent chemical shifts (ΔδC+) for the corresponding para derivatives are not correlated by the σp+ substituent constants. The possibility of developing a set of substituent constants capable of correlating such 13C NMR shifts was examined. The slope of the line defined by the meta substituents (ρ+ = -18.18) was utilized to calculate σC+ constants for both meta and para substituents. The utility of these constants was then tested by their ability to correlate the 13C NMR shifts in the cations for a different system, the 1-aryl-1-cyclopentyl cations. Indeed, these σC+ values correlate very well with the ΔδC+ values, yielding ρC+ = -16.84, r = 0.999. PMID:16592926

  3. Theoretical and experimental NMR chemical shifts of norsanguinarine and norchelerythrine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toušek, Jaromír.; Dostál, Jiří; Marek, Radek

    2004-02-01

    Norchelerythrine and norsanguinarine, tertiary benzo[ c]phenanthridine alkaloids, were examined by gradient-selected 2D NMR spectroscopy and the later also by extensive theoretical calculations. 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts assignments of the title isoquinoline alkaloids based on NOE and multiple-bond chemical-shift correlation experiments (GSQMBC) are reported. Various methods were used for the NMR chemical shifts calculations. Molecular mechanics (MM3 forcefield), AM1 method and Ab initio methods were used for optimizing the geometry. Chemical shielding constants were computed by density functional theory, GIAO and IGLO approaches were used. Chemical shifts calculated by all methods display good qualitative agreement with experimentally determined values. The best overall agreement was achieved when geometry was optimized by RHF/6-31G** method and chemical shielding constants were calculated by B3LYP/6-311G** method, GIAO approach.

  4. 1H, 13C NMR, FT-IR, ESI MS and PM5 studies of a new 3,6,9-trioxadecylamide of monensin A and its complexes with Li +, Na + and K + cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łowicki, Daniel; Huczyński, Adam; Brzezinski, Bogumil; Bartl, Franz

    2011-03-01

    A new 3,6,9-trioxadecylamide of monensin A (M-AM4) has been synthesised and its ability to form complexes with Li +, Na + and K + cations has been studied by ESI mass spectrometry, 1H and 13C NMR, FT-IR spectroscopy and PM5 semiempirical method. The ESI MS data indicate that M-AM4 forms complexes with Li +, Na + and K + of exclusively 1:1 stoichiometry which are stable up to cv = 70 V. The formation of the M-AM4-Na + is strongly favoured. Above cv = 70 the fragmentation process is observed. The spectroscopic studies show that the structures of the M-AM4 and its complexes with the cations of 1:1 stoichiometry are stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonds in which the OH groups are always involved. The C dbnd O amide group is engaged in the complexation process of each cation. The M-AM4-K + complex can also assume a structure in which the C dbnd O amide group does not participate in the complexation but the complexes of such structure do not dominate.

  5. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H- and 13C-NMR), theoretical and microbiological study of trans o-coumaric acid and alkali metal o-coumarates.

    PubMed

    Kowczyk-Sadowy, Małgorzata; Świsłocka, Renata; Lewandowska, Hanna; Piekut, Jolanta; Lewandowski, Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    This work is a continuation of research on a correlation between the molecular structure and electronic charge distribution of phenolic compounds and their biological activity. The influence of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium cations on the electronic system of trans o-coumaric (2-hydroxy-cinnamic) acid was studied. We investigated the relationship between the molecular structure of the tested compounds and their antimicrobial activity. Complementary molecular spectroscopic techniques such as infrared (FT-IR), Raman (FT-Raman), ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H- and 13C-NMR) were applied. Structures of the molecules were optimized and their structural characteristics were calculated by the density functional theory (DFT) using the B3LYP method with 6-311++G** as a basis set. Geometric and magnetic aromaticity indices, atomic charges, dipole moments and energies were also calculated. Theoretical parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Correlations between certain vibrational bands and some metal parameters, such as electronegativity, ionization energy, atomic and ionic radius, were found. The microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris and Candida albicans. PMID:25689641

  6. Development and validation of a RP-HPLC method for stability-indicating assay of gemifloxacin mesylate including identification of related substances by LC-ESI-MS/MS, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Nageswara; Naidu, Ch Gangu; Prasad, K Guru; Narasimha, R

    2011-11-01

    A validated stability indicating RP-HPLC assay of gemifloxacin mesylate was developed by separating its related substances on an Inertsil-ODS3V-C18 (4.6 × 250 mm; 5 μm) column using 0.1% trifluoroaceticacid (pH 2.5) and methanol as a mobile phase in a gradient elution mode at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min at 27°C. The column effluents were monitored by a photodiode array detector set at 287 nm. The method was validated in terms of accuracy, precision and linearity as per ICH guidelines. Forced degradation of gemifloxacin (GFX) was carried out under acidic, basic, thermal, photolysis and peroxide conditions and the degradation products were separated and characterized by ESI-MS/MS, (1) H and (13) C NMR spectroscopy. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of bulk drugs and the recoveries of gemifloxacin and impurities were in the range of 97.60-102.90 and 96.99-102.10%, respectively. No previous reports were found in the literature on identification of degradation products of gemifloxacin. PMID:21370250

  7. Analysis of commercial proanthocyanidins. Part 4: solid state (13)C NMR as a tool for in situ analysis of proanthocyanidin tannins, in heartwood and bark of quebracho and acacia, and related species.

    PubMed

    Reid, David G; Bonnet, Susan L; Kemp, Gabre; van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2013-10-01

    (13)C NMR is an effective method of characterizing proanthocyanidin (PAC) tannins in quebracho (Schinopsis lorentzii) heartwood and black wattle (Acacia mearnsii) bark, before and after commercial extraction. The B-rings of the constituent flavan-3-ols, catechols (quebracho) or pyrogallols (wattle), are recognized in unprocessed source materials by "marker" signals at ca. 118 or 105ppm, respectively. NMR allows the minimum extraction efficiency to be calculated; ca. 30%, and ca. 80%, for quebracho heartwood and black wattle bark, respectively. NMR can also identify PAC tannin (predominantly robinetinidin), and compare tannin content, in bark from other acacia species; tannin content decreases in the order A. mearnsii, Acacia pycnantha (87% of A. mearnsii), Acacia dealbata and Acacia decurrens (each 74%) and Acacia karroo (30%). Heartwood from an underexploited PAC tannin source, Searsia lancea, taxonomically close to quebracho, shows abundant profisetinidin and catechin PACs. NMR offers the advantage of being applicable to source materials in their native state, and has potential applications in optimizing extraction processes, identification of tannin sources, and characterization of tannin content in cultivar yield improvement programmes. PMID:23838626

  8. Comparison of the Fc fragment from a human IgG1 and its CH2, pFc', and tFc' subfragments. A study using reductive methylation and sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Jentoft, J.E.; Rayford, R. )

    1989-04-18

    The Fc fragment of a human monoclonal IgG1 was compared with subfragments containing (a) the intact CH2 domain (CH2 fragment) or (b) the intact CH3 domain (pFc' and tFc' fragments). All fragments were reductively {sup 13}C-methylated and their resulting dimethyllysyl resonances characterized in 0.1 M KCl as a function of pH by {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. Seven resonances were characterized for the 18 lysine residues of the Fc fragment, eight for the 12 lysines of the CH2 fragment, and five each for the 9 lysines of the pFc' and the 6 lysines of the tFc' fragments, respectively. The multiplicity of resonances indicates that the lysine residues in each fragment exist in a variety of microenvironments and that the fragments are all highly structured. The correspondence between 6 of the 12 or 13 perturbed lysine residues in the Fc fragment and the smaller subfragments indicates that the conformation of the CH2 and CH3 domains is largely unchanged in the smaller fragments. However, in addition to three lysines at the CH2-CH3 domain interface, whose environments were known to be disrupted in the smaller fragments, three or four lysine residues have somewhat different properties in the Fc fragment and in the subfragments, indicating that some local perturbations are included in the domain structure in the subfragments.

  9. Prediction of Bioactive Compounds Using Computed NMR Chemical Shifts.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Rajamohanan, Pattuparambil Ramanpillai; Vyas, Renu

    2015-01-01

    NMR based chemical shifts are an important diagnostic parameter for structure elucidation as they capture rich information related to conformational, electronic and stereochemical arrangement of functional groups in a molecule which is responsible for its activity towards any biological target. The present work discusses the importance of computing NMR chemical shifts from molecular structures. The NMR chemical shift data (experimental or computed) was used to generate fingerprints in binary formats for mapping molecular fragments (as descriptors) and correlating with the bioactivity classes. For this study, chemical shift data derived binary fingerprints were computed for 149 classes and 4800 bioactive molecules. The sensitivity and selectivity of fingerprints in discriminating molecules belonging to different therapeutic categories was assessed using a LibSVM based classifier. An accuracy of 82% for proton and 94% for carbon NMR fingerprints were obtained for anti-psoriatic and anti-psychotic molecules demonstrating the effectiveness of this approach for virtual screening. PMID:26138568

  10. 93Nb NMR chemical shift scale for niobia systems.

    PubMed

    Lapina, Olga B; Khabibulin, Dzhalil F; Romanenko, Konstantin V; Gan, Zhehong; Zuev, Mikhail G; Krasil'nikov, Vladimir N; Fedorov, Vladimir E

    2005-09-01

    93Nb solid-state NMR spectra of a series of inorganic niobates with Nb in different oxygen coordination environments were measured. For all studied compounds the chemical shielding and quadrupole tensor parameters were determined using conventional and ultrahigh field NMR facilities, ultrahigh speed MAS, DQ STMAS, solid-echo and computer modeling. It has been demonstrated that the 93Nb isotropic chemical shift is sensitive to the coordination number of Nb sites. For the first time the 93Nb NMR chemical shift scale for NbOx polyhedra in solid materials has been proposed: for four-coordinated Nb sites, the isotropic shifts occur from -650 to -950 ppm; five-coordinated Nb sites have the isotropic shifts in the range of -900 to -980 ppm; for six-coordinated Nb sites the isotropic shifts vary from -900 to -1360 ppm; the shifts from -1200 to -1600 ppm are typical for seven-coordinated Nb sites; for eight-coordinated Nb sites the shifts are higher than -1400 ppm. The possible correlation between the value of the isotropic chemical shift and the ionic character of the NbOx-MOy polyhedra association has been suggested. The magnitude of the 93Nb quadrupole coupling constant depends on the local symmetry of Nb sites and may vary from hundreds of kHz to hundreds of MHz. PMID:16216475

  11. Chemical shift guided homology modeling of larger proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    We describe an alternate approach to protein structure determination that relies on experimental NMR chemical shifts, plus sparse NOEs if available. The newly introduced alignment method, POMONA, directly exploits the powerful bioinformatics algorithms previously developed for sequence-based homology modeling, but does not require significant sequence similarity. Protein templates, generated by POMONA, are subsequently used as input for chemical shift based Rosetta comparative modeling (CS-RosettaCM) to generate reliable full atom models. PMID:26053889

  12. Flexibility at a glycosidic linkage revealed by molecular dynamics, stochastic modeling, and (13)C NMR spin relaxation: conformational preferences of α-L-Rhap-α-(1 → 2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe in water and dimethyl sulfoxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Pendrill, Robert; Engström, Olof; Volpato, Andrea; Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Widmalm, Göran

    2016-01-28

    The monosaccharide L-rhamnose is common in bacterial polysaccharides and the disaccharide α-L-Rhap-α-(1 → 2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe represents a structural model for a part of Shigella flexneri O-antigen polysaccharides. Utilization of [1'-(13)C]-site-specific labeling in the anomeric position at the glycosidic linkage between the two sugar residues facilitated the determination of transglycosidic NMR (3)JCH and (3)JCC coupling constants. Based on these spin-spin couplings the major state and the conformational distribution could be determined with respect to the ψ torsion angle, which changed between water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as solvents, a finding mirrored by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with explicit solvent molecules. The (13)C NMR spin relaxation parameters T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOE of the probe were measured for the disaccharide in DMSO-d6 at two magnetic field strengths, with standard deviations ≤1%. The combination of MD simulation and a stochastic description based on the diffusive chain model resulted in excellent agreement between calculated and experimentally observed (13)C relaxation parameters, with an average error of <2%. The coupling between the global reorientation of the molecule and the local motion of the spin probe is deemed essential if reproduction of NMR relaxation parameters should succeed, since decoupling of the two modes of motion results in significantly worse agreement. Calculation of (13)C relaxation parameters based on the correlation functions obtained directly from the MD simulation of the solute molecule in DMSO as solvent showed satisfactory agreement with errors on the order of 10% or less. PMID:26741055

  13. Chemical shift of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Happer, W.

    2002-01-01

    We report NMR measurements of hyperpolarized xenon dissolved in liquid nitrogen. The dependence of the 129Xe frequency shift on liquid nitrogen temperature was measured along the nitrogen saturated vapor curve from 77 to 93 K. Plotted as a function of the liquid nitrogen density, the chemical shift of xenon is very well described by a simple proportionality relation, with a slope of 0.2135(15) ppm/amagat. The relationship between the chemical shift and the longitudinal spin relaxation is considered in terms of the spin-rotation interaction, and estimates of Xe relaxation time in liquid nitrogen are discussed.

  14. Counterion influence on chemical shifts in strychnine salts

    SciTech Connect

    Metaxas, Athena E.; Cort, John R.

    2013-05-01

    The highly toxic plant alkaloid strychnine is often isolated in the form of the anion salt of its protonated tertiary amine. Here we characterize the relative influence of different counterions on 1H and 13C chemical shifts in several strychnine salts in D2O, methanol-d4 (CD3OD) and chloroform-d (CDCl3) solvents. In organic solvents, but not in water, substantial variation in chemical shifts of protons near the tertiary amine was observed among different salts. These secondary shifts reveal differences in the way each anion influences electronic structure within the protonated amine. The distributions of secondary shifts allow salts to be easily distinguished from each other as well as from the free base form. The observed effects are much greater in organic solvents than in water. Slight concentration-dependence in chemical shifts of some protons near the amine was observed for two salts in CDCl3, but this effect is small compared to the influence of the counterion. Distinct chemical shifts in different salt forms of the same compound may be useful as chemical forensic signatures for source attribution and sample matching of alkaloids such as strychnine and possibly other organic acid and base salts.

  15. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data

    PubMed Central

    Bratholm, Lars A.; Christensen, Anders S.; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model, and a bias is introduced which might result in incorrect structures. In the inferential structure determination framework, both the unknown structure and the disagreement between experimental and back-calculated data are formulated as a joint probability distribution, thus utilizing the full information content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term, the simulations suggests that sampling both the structure and the uncertainties in chemical shift prediction leads more accurate structures compared to conventional methods using empirical determined weights. The Cauchy distribution, using either sampled uncertainties or predetermined weights, did, however, result in overall better convergence to the native fold, suggesting that both types of distribution might be useful in different aspects of the protein structure prediction. PMID:25825683

  16. Counterion influence on chemical shifts in strychnine salts.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Athena E; Cort, John R

    2013-05-01

    The highly toxic plant alkaloid strychnine is often isolated in the form of the anion salt of its protonated tertiary amine. Here, we characterize the relative influence of different counterions on (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts in several strychnine salts in D2O, methanol-d4 (CD3OD), and chloroform-d (CDCl3) solvents. In organic solvents but not in water, substantial variation in chemical shifts of protons near the tertiary amine was observed among different salts. These secondary shifts reveal differences in the way each anion influences electronic structure within the protonated amine. The distributions of secondary shifts allow salts to be easily distinguished from each other as well as from the free base form. Slight concentration dependence in chemical shifts of some protons near the amine was observed for two salts in CDCl3, but this effect is small compared with the influence of the counterion. Distinct chemical shifts in different salt forms of the same compound may be useful as chemical forensic signatures for source attribution and sample matching of alkaloids such as strychnine and possibly other organic acid and base salts. PMID:23495106

  17. Interpretation of chemical shifts and coupling constants in macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Case, D A

    2000-04-01

    Recent developments in NMR spectroscopy, along with advances in computational techniques, have produced new approaches to the interpretation of chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants in biomolecules. Quantum chemical studies of useful accuracy are now becoming more routine and are increasingly being used in conjunction with experimental studies to map out expected structural patterns for peptides and oligonucleotides. Topics of recent special interest include spin couplings across hydrogen bonds and patterns of chemical shift anisotropies, in both diamagnetic and paramagnetic proteins. PMID:10753812

  18. NMR analysis and chemical shift calculations of poly(lactic acid) dimer model compounds with different tacticities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, PLA dimer model compounds with different tacticities were synthesized and studied in detail by 1H and 13C NMR in three solvents, CDCl3/CCl4 (20/80 v/v), CDCl3 and DMSO-d6. All the peaks in the 1H and 13C NMR spectra were assigned with the help of two-dimensional NMR. Although the solve...

  19. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, (1)H, (13)C NMR and UV-vis) characterization and DFT studies of novel 8-((4-(methylthio)-2,5-diphenylfuran-3-yl)methoxy)quinoline.

    PubMed

    Diwaker; Chidan Kumar, C S; Kumar, Ashwani; Chandraju, Siddegowda

    2015-11-01

    In this study, computational calculations of a new quinoline derivative: 8-((4-(methylthio)-2,5-diphenylfuran-3-yl)methoxy)quinoline is carried out using ab initio methods. The geometry optimization as well as fundamental frequencies of the most stable configuration of the title compound is reported. A detailed study of Infrared spectrum, chemical shifts and electronic spectrum of the title compound is also presented. The Gauge-Invariant Atomic Orbital approach is used to calculate the proton and carbon chemical shifts of the title compound. The natural bond orbital analysis of the title compound is also reported in order to understand the stability of the molecule which arises from hyper conjugative interactions and charge delocalization. The theoretical electronic absorption spectrum is also reported using the time dependent density functional approach. The molecular structure along with vibrational frequencies as simulated for binding of iron with the title compound is also reported using ab initio methods. PMID:26079516

  20. Solid-state 13C NMR study of banana liquid crystals - 3: Alkyl-tail-group packing environments of an acute-angle bent-core molecule in the hexagonal columnar and cubic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosu, Hiromichi; Endo, Yumi; Kimura, Saori; Hashimoto, Tomoko; Harada, Motoi; Lee, Eun-Woo; Sone, Masato; Watanabe, Junji; Kang, Sungmin

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements were performed on the hexagonal columnar and cubic phases of an acute-angle banana-shaped molecule, N(1,7)-S30. In the hexagonal columnar phase, three peaks appear at the NMR chemical shifts assigned to the internal methylene carbons of alkyl tails, indicating that the two alkyl tails have different packing structures, and one of the tails has two different conformations within a single molecule. Combined cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning and pulse saturation transfer/magic-angle spinning measurements show that one of the alkyl chains is located inside and the other is located outside the columnar structure. In the cubic phase, pulse saturation transfer/magic-angle spinning measurement shows that only one peak appears at the NMR chemical shifts assigned to the internal methylene carbons of alkyl tails, indicating that both of the alkyl chains are located outside the cubic structure.

  1. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported. PMID:24746715

  2. {sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for carbonate ions in cement minerals and the use of {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR in studies of Portland cement including limestone additions

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Herfort, Duncan

    2013-10-15

    {sup 13}C isotropic chemical shifts and chemical shift anisotropy parameters have been determined for a number of inorganic carbonates relevant in cement chemistry from slow-speed {sup 13}C MAS or {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR spectra (9.4 T or 14.1 T) for {sup 13}C in natural abundance. The variation in the {sup 13}C chemical shift parameters is relatively small, raising some doubts that different carbonate species in Portland cement-based materials may not be sufficiently resolved in {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectra. However, it is shown that by combining {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR carbonate anions in anhydrous and hydrated phases can be distinguished, thereby providing valuable information about the reactivity of limestone in cement blends. This is illustrated for three cement pastes prepared from an ordinary Portland cement, including 0, 16, and 25 wt.% limestone, and following the hydration for up to one year. For these blends {sup 29}Si MAS NMR reveals that the limestone filler accelerates the hydration for alite and also results in a smaller fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated Al incorporated in the C-S-H phase. The latter result is more clearly observed in {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra of the cement–limestone blends and suggests that dissolved aluminate species in the cement–limestone blends readily react with carbonate ions from the limestone filler, forming calcium monocarboaluminate hydrate. -- Highlights: •{sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for inorganic carbonates from {sup 13}C MAS NMR. •Narrow {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift range (163–171 ppm) for inorganic carbonates. •Anhydrous and hydrated carbonate species by {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR. •Limestone accelerates the hydration for alite in Portland – limestone cements. •Limestone reduces the amount of aluminium incorporated in the C-S-H phase.

  3. Determination of Relative Configuration from Residual Chemical Shift Anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nilamoni; Schmidt, Manuel; Gil, Roberto R; Williamson, R Thomas; Martin, Gary E; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando; Griesinger, Christian; Liu, Yizhou

    2016-08-01

    Determination of relative configuration is frequently a rate-limiting step in the characterization of small organic molecules. Solution NMR-based nuclear Overhauser effect and scalar J-coupling constants can provide useful spatial information but often fail when stereocenters are separated by more than 4-5 Å. Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) can provide a means of assigning relative configuration without limits of distance between stereocenters. However, sensitivity limits their application. Chemical shift is the most readily measured NMR parameter, and partial molecular alignment can reveal the anisotropic component of the chemical shift tensor, manifested as residual chemical shift anisotropy (RCSA). Hence, (13)C RCSAs provide information on the relative orientations of specific structural moieties including nonprotonated carbons and can be used for stereochemical assignment. Herein, we present two robust and sensitive methods to accurately measure and apply (13)C RCSAs for stereochemical assignment. The complementary techniques are demonstrated with five molecules representing differing structural classes. PMID:27294984

  4. Protein Structure Refinement Using 13Cα Chemical Shift Tensors

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Oldfield, Eric; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2009-01-01

    We have obtained the 13Cα chemical shift tensors for each amino acid in the protein GB1. We then developed a CST force field and incorporated this into the Xplor-NIH structure determination program. GB1 structures obtained by using CST restraints had improved precision over those obtained in the absence of CST restraints, and were also more accurate. When combined with isotropic chemical shifts, distance and vector angle restraints, the root-mean squared error with respect to existing x-ray structures was better than ~1.0 Å. These results are of broad general interest since they show that chemical shift tensors can be used in protein structure refinement, improving both structural accuracy and precision, opening up the way to accurate de novo structure determination. PMID:19123862

  5. Solid state 13C-NMR, infrared, X-ray powder diffraction and differential thermal studies of the homologous series of some mono-valent metal (Li, Na, K, Ag) n-alkanoates: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter N.; Ellis, Henry A.; White, Nicole A. S.

    2015-06-01

    A comparative study of the molecular packing, lattice structures and phase behaviors of the homologous series of some mono-valent metal carboxylates (Li, Na, K and Ag) is carried out via solid state FT-infrared and 13C-NMR spectroscopes, X-rays powder diffraction, density measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing light microscopy and variable temperature infrared spectroscopy. It is proposed that, for lithium, sodium and potassium carboxylates, metal-carboxyl coordination is via asymmetric chelating bidentate bonding with extensive intermolecular interactions to form tetrahedral metal centers, irrespective of chain length. However, for silver n-alkanoates, carboxyl moieties are bound to silver ions via syn-syn type bridging bidentate coordination to form dimeric units held together by extensive head group inter-molecular interactions. Furthermore, the fully extended hydrocarbon chains which are crystallized in the all-trans conformation are tilted at ca. 30°, 27°, 15° and 31° with respect to a normal to the metal plane, for lithium, sodium, silver and potassium carboxylates, respectively. All compounds are packed as lamellar bilayer structures, however, lithium compounds are crystallized in a triclinic crystal system whilst silver, sodium and potassium n-alkanoates are all monoclinic with possible P1 bravais lattice. Odd-even alternation observed in various physical features is associated with different inter-planar spacing between closely packed layers in the bilayer which are not in the same plane; a phenomenon controlled by lattice packing symmetry requirements. All compounds, except silver carboxylates, show partially reversibly first order pre-melting transitions; the number of which increases with increasing chain length. These transitions are associated, for the most part, with lamellar collapse followed by increased gauche-trans isomerism in the methylene group assembly, irrespective of chain length. It is proposed that the absence of

  6. Quantum chemical calculations on the geometrical, conformational, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical parameters of 5-(2-Chloroethyl)-2,4-dichloro-6-methylpyrimidine.

    PubMed

    Gümüş, Hacer Pir; Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2014-08-14

    The optimized geometry, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts, conformational and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses, thermodynamic parameters, molecular surfaces, Mulliken, NBO and APT charges for 5-(2-Chloroethyl)-2,4-dichloro-6-methylpyrimidine [C7H7Cl3N2] were investigated by the ab initio HF and density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The calculated structural parameters (bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles) and (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts values are compared with experimental values of the investigated compound. The observed and the calculated values are found to be in good agreement. The energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) were calculated, and the obtained energies displayed that charge transfer occurs in 5-(2-Chloroethyl)-2,4-dichloro-6-methylpyrimidine compound. In addition, the linear polarizability (α) and the first order hyperpolarizability (β) values of the investigated compound have been computed by using HF and DFT methods. PMID:24732007

  7. Quantum chemical calculations on the geometrical, conformational, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical parameters of 5-(2-Chloroethyl)-2,4-dichloro-6-methylpyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümüş, Hacer Pir; Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2014-08-01

    The optimized geometry, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts, conformational and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses, thermodynamic parameters, molecular surfaces, Mulliken, NBO and APT charges for 5-(2-Chloroethyl)-2,4-dichloro-6-methylpyrimidine [C7H7Cl3N2] were investigated by the ab initio HF and density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The calculated structural parameters (bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles) and 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts values are compared with experimental values of the investigated compound. The observed and the calculated values are found to be in good agreement. The energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) were calculated, and the obtained energies displayed that charge transfer occurs in 5-(2-Chloroethyl)-2,4-dichloro-6-methylpyrimidine compound. In addition, the linear polarizability (α) and the first order hyperpolarizability (β) values of the investigated compound have been computed by using HF and DFT methods.

  8. Molecular dynamics averaging of Xe chemical shifts in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; Sears, Devin N.; Murad, Sohail

    2004-11-01

    The Xe nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift differences that afford the discrimination between various biological environments are of current interest for biosensor applications and medical diagnostic purposes. In many such environments the Xe signal appears close to that in water. We calculate average Xe chemical shifts (relative to the free Xe atom) in solution in eleven liquids: water, isobutane, perfluoro-isobutane, n-butane, n-pentane, neopentane, perfluoroneopentane, n-hexane, n-octane, n-perfluorooctane, and perfluorooctyl bromide. The latter is a liquid used for intravenous Xe delivery. We calculate quantum mechanically the Xe shielding response in Xe-molecule van der Waals complexes, from which calculations we develop Xe (atomic site) interpolating functions that reproduce the ab initio Xe shielding response in the complex. By assuming additivity, these Xe-site shielding functions can be used to calculate the shielding for any configuration of such molecules around Xe. The averaging over configurations is done via molecular dynamics (MD). The simulations were carried out using a MD technique that one of us had developed previously for the simulation of Henry's constants of gases dissolved in liquids. It is based on separating a gaseous compartment in the MD system from the solvent using a semipermeable membrane that is permeable only to the gas molecules. We reproduce the experimental trends in the Xe chemical shifts in n-alkanes with increasing number of carbons and the large chemical shift difference between Xe in water and in perfluorooctyl bromide. We also reproduce the trend for a given solvent of decreasing Xe chemical shift with increasing temperature. We predict chemical shift differences between Xe in alkanes vs their perfluoro counterparts.

  9. A new chalcone structure of (E)-1-(4-Bromophenyl)-3-(napthalen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one: Synthesis, structural characterizations, quantum chemical investigations and biological evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanigaimani, Kaliyaperumal; Arshad, Suhana; Khalib, Nuridayanti Che; Razak, Ibrahim Abdul; Arunagiri, C.; Subashini, A.; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza; Hashim, Nurul Shafiqah; Ooi, Kheng Leong

    2015-10-01

    The structure of (E)-1-(4-Bromophenyl)-3-(napthalen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (C19H13BrO) crystallized in the triclinic system of P-1 space group. The unit cell dimensions are: a = 5.8944 (9) Å, b = 7.8190 (12) Å, c = 16.320 (2) Å, α = 102.4364 (19)°, β = 95.943 (2)°, γ = 96.274 (2)° and Z = 2. The physical properties of this compound was determined by the spectroscopic methods (FTIR and 1H and 13C NMR). Quantum chemical investigations have been employed to investigate the structural and spectral properties. The molecular structure, vibrational assignments, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift values, non-linear optical (NLO) effect, HOMO-LUMO analysis and natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis were calculated using HF and DFT/B3LYP methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in the ground state. The results show that the theoretical calculation of the geometrical parameters, vibrational frequencies and chemical shifts are comparable with the experimental data. The crystal structure is influenced and stabilized by weak C-H⋯π interactions connecting the molecules into infinite supramolecular one dimensional ladder-like arrangement. Additionally, this compound is evaluated for their antibacterial activities against gram positive and gram negative strains using a micro dilution procedure and shows activities against a panel of microorganisms.

  10. NMR chemical shifts in periodic systems from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastiani, Daniel; Goward, Gillian; Schnell, Ingo; Parrinello, Michele

    2002-08-01

    A recently developed ab-initio method for the calculation of NMR chemical shifts and magnetic susceptibilities in systems under periodic boundary conditions is presented and applied to a hydrogen-bonded molecular crystal. The calculations can unambiguously assign the chemical shifts to individual atoms in experimental spectra, and can further serve for the validation of simulated atomic trajectories and geometries. Apart from the example presented, the method can be applied to crystalline and amorphous insulators, as well as to isolated molecules using a supercell technique. The results are in good agreement with experiment.

  11. SHIFTX2: significantly improved protein chemical shift prediction.

    PubMed

    Han, Beomsoo; Liu, Yifeng; Ginzinger, Simon W; Wishart, David S

    2011-05-01

    A new computer program, called SHIFTX2, is described which is capable of rapidly and accurately calculating diamagnetic (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts from protein coordinate data. Compared to its predecessor (SHIFTX) and to other existing protein chemical shift prediction programs, SHIFTX2 is substantially more accurate (up to 26% better by correlation coefficient with an RMS error that is up to 3.3× smaller) than the next best performing program. It also provides significantly more coverage (up to 10% more), is significantly faster (up to 8.5×) and capable of calculating a wider variety of backbone and side chain chemical shifts (up to 6×) than many other shift predictors. In particular, SHIFTX2 is able to attain correlation coefficients between experimentally observed and predicted backbone chemical shifts of 0.9800 ((15)N), 0.9959 ((13)Cα), 0.9992 ((13)Cβ), 0.9676 ((13)C'), 0.9714 ((1)HN), 0.9744 ((1)Hα) and RMS errors of 1.1169, 0.4412, 0.5163, 0.5330, 0.1711, and 0.1231 ppm, respectively. The correlation between SHIFTX2's predicted and observed side chain chemical shifts is 0.9787 ((13)C) and 0.9482 ((1)H) with RMS errors of 0.9754 and 0.1723 ppm, respectively. SHIFTX2 is able to achieve such a high level of accuracy by using a large, high quality database of training proteins (>190), by utilizing advanced machine learning techniques, by incorporating many more features (χ(2) and χ(3) angles, solvent accessibility, H-bond geometry, pH, temperature), and by combining sequence-based with structure-based chemical shift prediction techniques. With this substantial improvement in accuracy we believe that SHIFTX2 will open the door to many long-anticipated applications of chemical shift prediction to protein structure determination, refinement and validation. SHIFTX2 is available both as a standalone program and as a web server ( http://www.shiftx2.ca ). PMID:21448735

  12. The spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies of 3,4-difluoroaniline.

    PubMed

    Kose, Etem; Karabacak, Mehmet; Atac, Ahmet

    2015-05-15

    Spectroscopic and structural investigations of 3,4-difluoroaniline molecule are presented by using experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, (1)H and (13)C NMR, and UV-Vis) techniques and theoretical (DFT approach) calculations. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 3,4-difluoroaniline molecule are recorded in the region 4000-400cm(-1) and 3500-10cm(-1) in the liquid phase, respectively. The NMR chemical shifts ((1)H and (13)C) are recorded in chloroform-d solution. The UV absorption spectra of 3,4-difluoroaniline dissolved in ethanol and water are recorded in the range of 200-400nm. Experimental results are supported with the following theoretical calculations; the optimized geometry and vibrational (FT-IR and FT-Raman) spectra are carried out by DFT (B3LYP)/6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectra ((1)H and (13)C NMR) are obtained by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital method. Moreover, electronic characteristics, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, density of state diagrams, and molecular electrostatic potential surface are investigated. Nonlinear optical properties and thermodynamic features are also outlined theoretically. An excellent correlation of theoretical and experimental results provides a detailed description of the structural and physicochemical properties of the molecule. Thus, this work leads to a deep understanding of the characteristics of di-substituted aniline derivatives. PMID:25733254

  13. The spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies of 3,4-difluoroaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kose, Etem; Karabacak, Mehmet; Atac, Ahmet

    2015-05-01

    Spectroscopic and structural investigations of 3,4-difluoroaniline molecule are presented by using experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR, and UV-Vis) techniques and theoretical (DFT approach) calculations. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 3,4-difluoroaniline molecule are recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and 3500-10 cm-1 in the liquid phase, respectively. The NMR chemical shifts (1H and 13C) are recorded in chloroform-d solution. The UV absorption spectra of 3,4-difluoroaniline dissolved in ethanol and water are recorded in the range of 200-400 nm. Experimental results are supported with the following theoretical calculations; the optimized geometry and vibrational (FT-IR and FT-Raman) spectra are carried out by DFT (B3LYP)/6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (1H and 13C NMR) are obtained by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital method. Moreover, electronic characteristics, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, density of state diagrams, and molecular electrostatic potential surface are investigated. Nonlinear optical properties and thermodynamic features are also outlined theoretically. An excellent correlation of theoretical and experimental results provides a detailed description of the structural and physicochemical properties of the molecule. Thus, this work leads to a deep understanding of the characteristics of di-substituted aniline derivatives.

  14. Synthesis, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical and structure-activity relation studies of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, V; Devi, L; Subbalakshmi, R; Rani, T; Mohan, S

    2014-09-15

    The stable geometry of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone is optimised by DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(∗∗) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the optimised geometry have been determined. The effects of substituents (hydroxyl, methoxy and acetyl groups) on the benzene ring vibrational frequencies are analysed. The vibrational frequencies of the fundamental modes of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone have been precisely assigned and analysed and the theoretical results are compared with the experimental vibrations. 1H and 13C NMR isotropic chemical shifts are calculated and assignments made are compared with the experimental values. The energies of important MO's, the total electron density and electrostatic potential of the compound are determined. Various reactivity and selectivity descriptors such as chemical hardness, chemical potential, softness, electrophilicity, nucleophilicity and the appropriate local quantities are calculated. PMID:24792193

  15. Synthesis, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical and structure-activity relation studies of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Devi, L.; Subbalakshmi, R.; Rani, T.; Mohan, S.

    2014-09-01

    The stable geometry of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone is optimised by DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G∗∗ and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the optimised geometry have been determined. The effects of substituents (hydroxyl, methoxy and acetyl groups) on the benzene ring vibrational frequencies are analysed. The vibrational frequencies of the fundamental modes of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone have been precisely assigned and analysed and the theoretical results are compared with the experimental vibrations. 1H and 13C NMR isotropic chemical shifts are calculated and assignments made are compared with the experimental values. The energies of important MO’s, the total electron density and electrostatic potential of the compound are determined. Various reactivity and selectivity descriptors such as chemical hardness, chemical potential, softness, electrophilicity, nucleophilicity and the appropriate local quantities are calculated.

  16. Calculations of NMR chemical shifts with APW-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskowski, Robert; Blaha, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present a full potential, all electron augmented plane wave (APW) implementation of first-principles calculations of NMR chemical shifts. In order to obtain the induced current we follow a perturbation approach [Pickard and Mauri, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.63.245101 63, 245101 (2001)] and extended the common APW + local orbital (LO) basis by several LOs at higher energies. The calculated all-electron current is represented in traditional APW manner as Fourier series in the interstitial region and with a spherical harmonics representation inside the nonoverlapping atomic spheres. The current is integrated using a “pseudocharge” technique. The implementation is validated by comparison of the computed chemical shifts with some “exact” results for spherical atoms and for a set of solids and molecules with available published data.

  17. Ab initio theory of NMR chemical shifts in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, S.G. |

    1997-12-31

    A new formalism for ab initio calculation of the orbital magnetic susceptibility and the NMR chemical shifts in solids and liquids is presented. The approach can be applied to periodic systems such as crystals, surfaces or polymers, and with a supercell technique, to nonperiodic systems such as amorphous materials, liquids, or solids with defects. The formalism is based on the density functional theory in the local density approximation and makes use of a generalized f-sum rule to eliminate the divergent terms that plagued previous theories. Calculations have been successfully carried out for the diamagnetic susceptibility of a number of insulators and for the NMR chemical shifts of a variety of systems including free molecules, ionic crystals, hydrogen-bonded materials and amorphous carbon.

  18. Chemical Shift Induced Phase Errors in Phase Contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Middione, Matthew J.; Ennis, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is subject to numerous sources of error, which decrease clinical confidence in the reported measures. This work outlines how stationary perivascular fat can impart a significant chemical shift induced PC-MRI measurement error using computational simulations, in vitro, and in vivo experiments. This chemical shift error does not subtract in phase difference processing, but can be minimized with proper parameter selection. The chemical shift induced phase errors largely depend on both the receiver bandwidth (BW) and the TE. Both theory and an in vivo comparison of the maximum difference in net forward flow between vessels with and without perivascular fat indicated that the effects of chemically shifted perivascular fat are minimized by the use of high BW (814 Hz/px) and an in-phase TE (HBW-TEIN). In healthy volunteers (N=10) HBW-TEIN significantly improves intrapatient net forward flow agreement compared to low BW (401 Hz/px) and a mid-phase TE as indicated by significantly decreased measurement biases and limits of agreement for the ascending aorta (1.8±0.5 mL vs. 6.4±2.8 mL, P=0.01), main pulmonary artery (2.0±0.9 mL vs. 11.9±5.8 mL, P=0.04), the left pulmonary artery (1.3±0.9 mL vs. 5.4±2.5 mL, P=0.003), and all vessels (1.7±0.8 mL vs. 7.2±4.4 mL, P=0.001). PMID:22488490

  19. Chemical-shift MRI of exogenous lipoid pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.E.; Choplin, R.H.; Chiles, C.

    1996-05-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia results from the aspiration or inhalation of fatty substances, such as mineral oil found in laxatives or nasal medications containing liquid paraffin. We present standard and lipid-sensitive (chemical-shift) MR findings in a patient with histologically confirmed lipoid pneumonia. The loss of signal intensity in an area of airspace disease on opposed-phase imaging was considered specific for the presence of lipid. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Synthesis and 1H and 13C NMR spectral study of some r(2),c(4)-bis(isopropylcarbonyl)-c(5)-hydroxy-t(5)-methyl-t(3)-substituted phenyl, cyclohexanones and their oximes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachander, R.; Sameera, S. A.; Mohan, R. T. Sabapathy

    2016-07-01

    All the synthesized compounds have been characterized by 1H, 13C, 2D NMR and mass spectral studies. The spectral data suggest that compounds 2, 3, 5 and 6 exist in chair conformation with axial orientation of the hydroxyl group and equatorial orientations of all the other substituent. Long-range coupling is observed between OH proton to H-6a proton should be in a W arrangement. Compounds 1 and 4 diamagnetic anisotropic effect of the furyl group is not pronounced and absence of long-rang coupling between OH proton to H-6a proton. The oximation effects were discussed to all synthesized compounds using 1H and 13C chemical shifts.

  1. Chemical shift referencing in MAS solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcombe, Corey R.; Zilm, Kurt W.

    2003-06-01

    Solid state 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra are typically referenced externally using a probe which does not incorporate a field frequency lock. Solution NMR shifts on the other hand are more often determined with respect to an internal reference and using a deuterium based field frequency lock. Further differences arise in solution NMR of proteins and nucleic acids where both 13C and 1H shifts are referenced by recording the frequency of the 1H resonance of DSS (sodium salt of 2,2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulphonic acid) instead of TMS (tetramethylsilane). In this note we investigate the difficulties in relating shifts measured relative to TMS and DSS by these various approaches in solution and solids NMR, and calibrate adamantane as an external 13C standard for solids NMR. We find that external chemical shift referencing of magic angle spinning spectra is typically quite reproducible and accurate, with better than ±0.03 ppm accuracy being straight forward to achieve. Solid state and liquid phase NMR shifts obtained by magic angle spinning with external referencing agree with those measured using typical solution NMR hardware with the sample tube aligned with the applied field as long as magnetic susceptibility corrections and solvent shifts are taken into account. The DSS and TMS reference scales for 13C and 1H are related accurately using MAS NMR. Large solvent shifts for the 13C resonance in TMS in either deuterochloroform or methanol are observed, being +0.71 ppm and -0.74 ppm from external TMS, respectively. The ratio of the 13C resonance frequencies for the two carbons in solid adamantane to the 1H resonance of TMS is reported.

  2. Chemical shift referencing in MAS solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Morcombe, Corey R; Zilm, Kurt W

    2003-06-01

    Solid state 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra are typically referenced externally using a probe which does not incorporate a field frequency lock. Solution NMR shifts on the other hand are more often determined with respect to an internal reference and using a deuterium based field frequency lock. Further differences arise in solution NMR of proteins and nucleic acids where both 13C and 1H shifts are referenced by recording the frequency of the 1H resonance of DSS (sodium salt of 2,2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulphonic acid) instead of TMS (tetramethylsilane). In this note we investigate the difficulties in relating shifts measured relative to TMS and DSS by these various approaches in solution and solids NMR, and calibrate adamantane as an external 13C standard for solids NMR. We find that external chemical shift referencing of magic angle spinning spectra is typically quite reproducible and accurate, with better than +/-0.03 ppm accuracy being straight forward to achieve. Solid state and liquid phase NMR shifts obtained by magic angle spinning with external referencing agree with those measured using typical solution NMR hardware with the sample tube aligned with the applied field as long as magnetic susceptibility corrections and solvent shifts are taken into account. The DSS and TMS reference scales for 13C and 1H are related accurately using MAS NMR. Large solvent shifts for the 13C resonance in TMS in either deuterochloroform or methanol are observed, being +0.71 ppm and -0.74 ppm from external TMS, respectively. The ratio of the 13C resonance frequencies for the two carbons in solid adamantane to the 1H resonance of TMS is reported. PMID:12810033

  3. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR) profiling and theoretical calculations of (2E)-2-[3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-1-phenylpropylidene]hydrazinecarboxamide: An anticonvulsant agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haress, Nadia G.; Govindarajan, Munusamy; AL-Wabli, Reem I.; Almutairi, Maha S.; Al-Alshaikh, Monirah A.; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.; Attia, Mohamed I.

    2016-08-01

    Vibrational characteristics of the anticonvulsant agent, (2E)-2-[3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-1-phenylpropylidene]hydrazinecarboxamide ((2E)-IPHC) have been investigated. The computational data are obtained by adopting ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and DFT/B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) methods. The most stable conformer is identified by a potential energy scan. The optimized geometrical parameters indicated that the overall symmetry of the most stable conformer is CS. Atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis is contained out and the chemical bondings between the atoms are as characterized. Mulliken atomic charges and simulated thermo-molecular (heat capacity and enthalpy) characteristics of the (2E)-IPHC molecule also have been analyzed. The magnitude of the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) of oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen atoms as well as phenyl and imidazole rings in the title molecule were investigated along with their contribution to the biological activity. The energy gap between HOMO and LUMO orbitals has been found to be 5.1334 eV in the gaseous phase. Excitation energies, oscillator strength and wavelengths were computed by the time-dependent density function theory (TD-DFT) approach. Predicted wavenumbers have been assigned and they are consistent with the experimental values. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the (2E)-IPHC molecule were computed by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and were compared with the experimental results.

  4. Chemical shifts of small heterogeneous Ar/Xe clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblad, A.; Rander, T.; Bradeanu, I.; Oehrwall, G.; Bjoerneholm, O.; Mucke, M.; Ulrich, V.; Lischke, T.; Hergenhahn, U.

    2011-03-15

    Heterogeneous rare-gas clusters produced by a coexpansion of an argon/xenon mixture have been studied using synchrotron-radiation-based photoelectron spectroscopy. Both valence and Xe 4d{sub 5/2} core-level photoelectron spectra were recorded for three different concentrations of the primary argon/xenon mixture and, for those mixtures, spectra were recorded at several different stagnation conditions. The studied size regime of the mixed clusters ranges from large, similar to those studied in an earlier paper [Phys. Rev. A 69, 031210(R) (2004)], to very small--as reflected in the cluster line shapes and chemical shifts. The chemical shifts obtained from a curve fitting procedure similar to that used in our earlier paper are discussed in terms of the mixed cluster structure which can be expected from equilibrium considerations and the Lennard-Jones parameters of the constituent atoms. Molecular dynamics simulations of the vertical polarization shifts allow more specific assignments of ''on-top'' sites and interfacial sites.

  5. Analysis of carbon forms in chemically-modified peat humic acids by partial least squares regression analysis of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendros, G.; Hernández, Z.; González-Vila, F. J.; Sanz, J.; De la Rosa, J. M.; Knicker, H.

    2012-04-01

    Classical structural studies on soil organic matter often show that the natural variability in C- and N forms in soil humic acids (HAs) is in many cases not enough to distinguish significant differences amongst HAs from different origin. In the present research contrasting C-distribution patterns are obtained when the HAs are modified in the laboratory through chemical treatments (derivatization reactions or methods focused to incorporation or removal of specific structural constituents). For instance, oxygen functionality can be modified by introducing or blocking the major functional groups (methylation, acetylation, oximation, nitration, sulphonation, etc). Other treatments lead to selective hydrolysis or drastic peroxydation of the HA carbon backbone. Apart from this, N-groups can be introduced in the HA structure by e.g., nitration, oximation, amidation or ammonification. A series of chemically-modified HA preparations were obtained from a sapric peat (Vivero peat, Northern Spain) and their 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (13C NMR) were obtained, showing the success of the above treatments which lead to contrasted NMR profiles. This set of 12 HA preparations was considered suitable material to assess the extent to which 13C NMR spectroscopy reflect the induced structural modifications, as well as to help the assignation of signals in conflicting chemical shift ranges. In order to improve the interpretation of the 13C NMR spectra, partial least squares regression (PLS) was used as a multivariate chemometric tool based on covariance. This is a convenient method in cases where the number of variables (spectral points in the 200-(-25) ppm spectral range with 1-ppm resolution) is high as regards the number of individuals (modified HAs), mainly when there is large redundancy in data sets of variables mutually correlated. The spectroscopic information in the spectral matrix is processed by successively examining independent variables from an external matrix of

  6. pH-responsive fluorescence chemical sensor constituted by conjugated polymers containing pyridine rings.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Naoya; Kaneko, Yuki; Sekiguchi, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Sugeno, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Poly(p-pyridinium phenylene ethynylene)s (PPyPE) functionalized with alternating donor-acceptor repeat units were synthesized by a Pd-catalyzed Sonogashira coupling reaction between diethynyl monomer and di-iodopyridine for use as a pH-responsive fluorescence chemical sensor. The synthesized PPyPE, containing pyridine units, was characterized by FT-IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopies. We investigated the relationship between changes of optical properties and protonation/deprotonation of PPyPE containing pyridine units in solution. Addition of HCl decreased and red-shifted the fluorescence intensity of the conjugated polymers that contained pyridine rings; fluorescence intensity of the polymers increased upon addition of NaOH solution. The synthesized PPyPE was found to be an effective and reusable chemical sensor for pH sensing. PMID:25828634

  7. Errors of fourier chemical-shift imaging and their corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyue; Bolinger, Lizann; Subramanian, V. Harihara; Leigh, John S.

    From a finite and discrete Fourier transform point of view, we discuss the sources of localization errors in Fourier chemical-shift imaging, and demonstrate them explicitly by computer simulations for simple cases. Errors arise from intravoxel dephasing and the intravoxel asymmetry. The spectral leakage due to intravoxel dephasing is roughly 6-8% from one voxel to one of its nearest neighbors. Neighbors further away are influenced less significantly. The loss of localization due to intravoxel asymmetry effect is also severe. Fortunately, these errors can be corrected under certain conditions. The method for correcting the errors by postprocessing the data is described.

  8. Assignment of Ferriheme Resonances for High- and Low-Spin Forms of Nitrophorin 3 by 1H and 13C NMR Spectroscopy and Comparison to Nitrophorin 2: Heme Pocket Structural Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Shokhireva, Tatiana Kh.; Berry, Robert E.; Zhang, Hongjun; Shokhirev, Nikolai V.; Walker, F. Ann

    2008-01-01

    Nitrophorin 3 (NP3) is the only one of the four major NO-binding heme proteins found in the saliva of the blood-sucking insect Rhodnius prolixus (also called the Kissing Bug) for which it has not been possible to obtain crystals of diffraction quality for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Thus we have used NMR spectroscopy, mainly of the hyperfine-shifted ferriheme substituent resonances, to learn about the similarities and differences in the heme pocket and the iron active site of NP3 as compared to NP2, which has previously been well-characterized by both X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. Only one residue in the heme pocket differs between the two, F27 of NP2 is Y27 for NP3; in both cases this residue is expected to interact strongly with the 2-vinyl side chain of the B heme rotational isomer or the 4-vinyl of the A heme rotational isomer. Both the high-spin (S = 5/2) aquo complex, NP3-H2O, and the low-spin (S = 1/2) N-methylimidazole (NMeIm) complex of NP3 have been studied. It is found that the chemical shifts of the protons of both forms are similar to those of the corresponding NP2 complexes, but with minor differences that indicate a slightly different angle for the proximal histidine (H57) ligand plane. The B heme rotational isomer is preferred by both NP3 and NP2 in both spin states, but to a greater extent when phenylalanine is present at position 27 (A:B = 1:8 for NP2, 1:6 for NP3-Y27F, 1:4 for NP3, and 1:3 for NP2-F27Y). Careful analysis of the 5Me and 8Me shifts of the A and B isomers of the two high-spin nitrophorins leads to the conclusion that the heme environment for the two isomers differs in some way that cannot be explained at the present time. The kinetics of deprotonation of the high-spin complexes of NP2 and NP3 are very different, with NP2 giving well-resolved high-spin aquo and “low-spin” hydroxo proton NMR spectra until close to the end of the titration, while NP3 exhibits broadened 1H NMR spectra indicative

  9. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  10. 13C NMR study of the generation of C2- and C3-deuterated lactic acid by tumoral pancreatic islet cells exposed to D-[1-13C]-, D-[2-13C]- and D-[6-13C]-glucose in 2H2O.

    PubMed

    Willem, R; Biesemans, M; Kayser, F; Malaisse, W J

    1994-03-01

    Tumoral pancreatic islet cells of the RIN5mF line were incubated for 120 min in media prepared in 2H2O and containing D-[1-13C]glucose, D-[2-13C]glucose, and D-[6-13C]glucose. The generation of C2- and C3-deuterated lactic acid was assessed by 13C NMR. The interpretation of experimental results suggests that a) the efficiency of deuteration on the C1 of D-fructose 6-phosphate does not exceed about 47% and 4% in the phosphoglucoisomerase and phosphomannoisomerase reactions, respectively; b) approximately 38% of the molecules of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate generated from D-glucose escape deuteration in the sequence of reactions catalyzed by triose phosphate isomerase and aldolase; and c) about 41% of the molecules of pyruvate generated by glycolysis are immediately converted to lactate, the remaining 59% of pyruvate molecules undergoing first a single or double back-and-forth interconversion with L-alanine. It is proposed that this methodological approach, based on high resolution 13C NMR spectroscopy, may provide novel information on the regulation of back-and-forth interconversion of glycolytic intermediates in intact cells as modulated, for instance, by enzyme-to-enzyme tunneling. PMID:8057796

  11. Synthesis, molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic transition, isometric chemical shift, polarizability and hyperpolarizability analysis of 3-(4-Methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile: A combined experimental and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiri, Abdullah Mohamed; Karabacak, Mehmet; Kurt, Mustafa; Alamry, Khalid A.

    2011-11-01

    This work presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel compound, 3-(4-Methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile (abbreviated as 3-(4MP)-2-(4-NP)-AN, C 16H 12N 2O 3). The spectroscopic properties of the compound were examined by FT-IR, UV-vis and NMR ( 1H and 13C) techniques. FT-IR spectrum in solid state was observed in the region 4000-400 cm -1. The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the compound which dissolved in chloroform was recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded in CDCl 3 solution. To determine lowest-energy molecular conformation of the title molecule, the selected torsion angle is varied every 10° and molecular energy profile is calculated from 0° to 360°. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) basis set. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first hyperpolarizability values were also computed using the same basis set. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The HOMO and LUMO analysis were used to elucidate information regarding charge transfer within the molecule. The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and scaled values were compared with experimental FT-IR spectrum. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental results and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. Isotropic chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Comparison of the calculated frequencies, NMR chemical shifts, absorption wavelengths with the experimental values revealed that DFT and TD-DFT method produce good results. The linear polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecule indicate that the title compound can be used as a good nonlinear optical material

  12. Synthesis, molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic transition, isometric chemical shift, polarizability and hyperpolarizability analysis of 3-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile: a combined experimental and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Asiri, Abdullah Mohamed; Karabacak, Mehmet; Kurt, Mustafa; Alamry, Khalid A

    2011-11-01

    This work presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel compound, 3-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-nitro-phenyl)-acrylonitrile (abbreviated as 3-(4MP)-2-(4-NP)-AN, C(16)H(12)N(2)O(3)). The spectroscopic properties of the compound were examined by FT-IR, UV-vis and NMR ((1)H and (13)C) techniques. FT-IR spectrum in solid state was observed in the region 4000-400 cm(-1). The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the compound which dissolved in chloroform was recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded in CDCl(3) solution. To determine lowest-energy molecular conformation of the title molecule, the selected torsion angle is varied every 10° and molecular energy profile is calculated from 0° to 360°. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) basis set. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first hyperpolarizability values were also computed using the same basis set. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The HOMO and LUMO analysis were used to elucidate information regarding charge transfer within the molecule. The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and scaled values were compared with experimental FT-IR spectrum. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental results and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. Isotropic chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Comparison of the calculated frequencies, NMR chemical shifts, absorption wavelengths with the experimental values revealed that DFT and TD-DFT method produce good results. The linear polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecule indicate that the title compound can be used as a good nonlinear

  13. Accurate calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts in polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Borràs, Magda; López, Xavier; Poblet, Josep M

    2015-04-14

    We search for the best density functional theory strategy for the determination of (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts, δ((31)P), in polyoxometalates. Among the variables governing the quality of the quantum modelling, we tackle herein the influence of the functional and the basis set. The spin-orbit and solvent effects were routinely included. To do so we analysed the family of structures α-[P2W18-xMxO62](n-) with M = Mo(VI), V(V) or Nb(V); [P2W17O62(M'R)](n-) with M' = Sn(IV), Ge(IV) and Ru(II) and [PW12-xMxO40](n-) with M = Pd(IV), Nb(V) and Ti(IV). The main results suggest that, to date, the best procedure for the accurate calculation of δ((31)P) in polyoxometalates is the combination of TZP/PBE//TZ2P/OPBE (for NMR//optimization step). The hybrid functionals (PBE0, B3LYP) tested herein were applied to the NMR step, besides being more CPU-consuming, do not outperform pure GGA functionals. Although previous studies on (183)W NMR suggested that the use of very large basis sets like QZ4P were needed for geometry optimization, the present results indicate that TZ2P suffices if the functional is optimal. Moreover, scaling corrections were applied to the results providing low mean absolute errors below 1 ppm for δ((31)P), which is a step forward in order to confirm or predict chemical shifts in polyoxometalates. Finally, via a simplified molecular model, we establish how the small variations in δ((31)P) arise from energy changes in the occupied and virtual orbitals of the PO4 group. PMID:25738630

  14. Protein Dielectric Constants Determined from NMR Chemical Shift Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Kukic, Predrag; Farrell, Damien; McIntosh, Lawrence P.; E., Bertrand García-Moreno; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Toleikis, Zigmantas; Teilum, Kaare; Nielsen, Jens Erik

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the connection between protein structure and function requires a quantitative understanding of electrostatic effects. Structure-based electrostatics calculations are essential for this purpose, but their use have been limited by a long-standing discussion on which value to use for the dielectric constants (εeff and εp) required in Coulombic models and Poisson-Boltzmann models. The currently used values for εeff and εp are essentially empirical parameters calibrated against thermodynamic properties that are indirect measurements of protein electric fields. We determine optimal values for εeff and εp by measuring protein electric fields in solution using direct detection of NMR chemical shift perturbations (CSPs). We measured CSPs in fourteen proteins to get a broad and general characterization of electric fields. Coulomb's law reproduces the measured CSPs optimally with a protein dielectric constant (εeff) from 3 to 13, with an optimal value across all proteins of 6.5. However, when the water-protein interface is treated with finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann calculations, the optimal protein dielectric constant (εp) rangedsfrom 2-5 with an optimum of 3. It is striking how similar this value is to the dielectric constant of 2-4 measured for protein powders, and how different it is from the εp of 6-20 used in models based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation when calculating thermodynamic parameters. Because the value of εp = 3 is obtained by analysis of NMR chemical shift perturbations instead of thermodynamic parameters such as pKa values, it is likely to describe only the electric field and thus represent a more general, intrinsic, and transferable εp common to most folded proteins. PMID:24124752

  15. Spectroscopic (vibrational, NMR and UV-vis.) and quantum chemical investigations on 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Ashgar; Gökce, Halil; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde compound as one of the derivatives of vanillin which is a well known flavoring agent, C14H20O3, has been investigated by experimentally and extensively utilizing density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. In this context, the optimized geometry, vibrational frequencies, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts, UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra, HOMO-LUMO analysis, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), thermodynamic parameters and atomic charges of 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde have been calculated. In addition, theoretically predicted IR, Raman and UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra of the mentioned molecule have been constructed. The results calculated were compared with the experimental data.

  16. Spectroscopic (vibrational, NMR and UV-vis.) and quantum chemical investigations on 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ashgar; Gökce, Halil; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde compound as one of the derivatives of vanillin which is a well known flavoring agent, C14H20O3, has been investigated by experimentally and extensively utilizing density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. In this context, the optimized geometry, vibrational frequencies, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts, UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra, HOMO-LUMO analysis, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), thermodynamic parameters and atomic charges of 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde have been calculated. In addition, theoretically predicted IR, Raman and UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra of the mentioned molecule have been constructed. The results calculated were compared with the experimental data. PMID:25736185

  17. Quantum chemical 13Cα chemical shift calculations for protein NMR structure determination, refinement, and validation

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.; Aramini, James M.; Rossi, Paolo; Kuzin, Alexandre; Su, Min; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    A recently determined set of 20 NMR-derived conformations of a 48-residue all-α-helical protein, (PDB ID code 2JVD), is validated here by comparing the observed 13Cα chemical shifts with those computed at the density functional level of theory. In addition, a recently introduced physics-based method, aimed at determining protein structures by using NOE-derived distance constraints together with observed and computed 13Cα chemical shifts, was applied to determine a new set of 10 conformations, (Set-bt), as a blind test for the same protein. A cross-validation of these two sets of conformations in terms of the agreement between computed and observed 13Cα chemical shifts, several stereochemical quality factors, and some NMR quality assessment scores reveals the good quality of both sets of structures. We also carried out an analysis of the agreement between the observed and computed 13Cα chemical shifts for a slightly longer construct of the protein solved by x-ray crystallography at 2.0-Å resolution (PDB ID code 3BHP) with an identical amino acid residue sequence to the 2JVD structure for the first 46 residues. Our results reveal that both of the NMR-derived sets, namely 2JVD and Set-bt, are somewhat better representations of the observed 13Cα chemical shifts in solution than the 3BHP crystal structure. In addition, the 13Cα-based validation analysis appears to be more sensitive to subtle structural differences across the three sets of structures than any other NMR quality-assessment scores used here, and, although it is computationally intensive, this analysis has potential value as a standard procedure to determine, refine, and validate protein structures. PMID:18787110

  18. A Simple and Fast Approach for Predicting 1H and 13C Chemical Shifts: Toward Chemical Shift-Guided Simulations of RNA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a simple and fast approach for predicting RNA chemical shifts from interatomic distances that performs with an accuracy similar to existing predictors and enables the first chemical shift-restrained simulations of RNA to be carried out. Our analysis demonstrates that the applied restraints can effectively guide conformational sampling toward regions of space that are more consistent with chemical shifts than the initial coordinates used for the simulations. As such, our approach should be widely applicable in mapping the conformational landscape of RNAs via chemical shift-guided molecular dynamics simulations. The simplicity and demonstrated sensitivity to three-dimensional structure should also allow our method to be used in chemical shift-based RNA structure prediction, validation, and refinement. PMID:25255209

  19. Automated determination of chemical functionalisation addition routes based on magnetic susceptibility and nucleus independent chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lier, G.; Ewels, C. P.; Geerlings, P.

    2008-07-01

    We present a modified version of our previously reported meta-code SACHA, for systematic analysis of chemical addition. The code automates the generation of structures, running of quantum chemical codes, and selection of preferential isomers based on chosen selection rules. While the selection rules for the previous version were based on the total system energy, predicting purely thermodynamic addition patterns, we examine here the possibility of using other system parameters, notably magnetic susceptibility as a descriptor of global aromaticity, and nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) as local aromaticity descriptor.

  20. Pitfalls of adrenal imaging with chemical shift MRI.

    PubMed

    Schieda, N; Al Dandan, O; Kielar, A Z; Flood, T A; McInnes, M D F; Siegelman, E S

    2014-11-01

    Chemical shift (CS) MRI of the adrenal glands exploits the different precessional frequencies of fat and water protons to differentiate the intracytoplasmic lipid-containing adrenal adenoma from other adrenal lesions. The purpose of this review is to illustrate both technical and interpretive pitfalls of adrenal imaging with CS MRI and emphasize the importance of adherence to strict technical specifications and errors that may occur when other imaging features and clinical factors are not incorporated into the diagnosis. When performed properly, the specificity of CS MRI for the diagnosis of adrenal adenoma is over 90%. Sampling the in-phase and opposed-phase echoes in the correct order and during the same breath-hold are essential requirements, and using the first echo pair is preferred, if possible. CS MRI characterizes more adrenal adenomas then unenhanced CT but may be non-diagnostic in a proportion of lipid-poor adenomas; CT washout studies may be able to diagnose these lipid-poor adenomas. Other primary and secondary adrenal tumours and supra-renal disease entities may contain lipid or gross fat and mimic adenoma or myelolipoma. Heterogeneity within an adrenal lesion that contains intracytoplasmic lipid could be due to myelolipoma, lipomatous metaplasia of adenoma, or collision tumour. Correlation with previous imaging, other imaging features, clinical history, and laboratory investigations can minimize interpretive errors. PMID:25062926

  1. Applications of Chemical Shift Imaging to Marine Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haakil; Tikunov, Andrey; Stoskopf, Michael K.; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    The successful applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in medicine are mostly due to the non-invasive and non-destructive nature of MRI techniques. Longitudinal studies of humans and animals are easily accomplished, taking advantage of the fact that MRI does not use harmful radiation that would be needed for plain film radiographic, computerized tomography (CT) or positron emission (PET) scans. Routine anatomic and functional studies using the strong signal from the most abundant magnetic nucleus, the proton, can also provide metabolic information when combined with in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). MRS can be performed using either protons or hetero-nuclei (meaning any magnetic nuclei other than protons or 1H) including carbon (13C) or phosphorus (31P). In vivo MR spectra can be obtained from single region of interest (ROI or voxel) or multiple ROIs simultaneously using the technique typically called chemical shift imaging (CSI). Here we report applications of CSI to marine samples and describe a technique to study in vivo glycine metabolism in oysters using 13C MRS 12 h after immersion in a sea water chamber dosed with [2-13C]-glycine. This is the first report of 13C CSI in a marine organism. PMID:20948912

  2. Chemical Constituents of Lecythispisonis (Lecythidaceae)--A New Saponin and Complete 1H and 13C Chemical Shift Assignments.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Rennê C; Matos, Carlos R R; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Mathias, Leda

    2015-06-01

    A novel triterpenoid saponin 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1' --> 3)-2α,19α-dihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid [3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1' --> 3)-arjunic acid, 1], ten known compounds [six triterpenoids: α-amyrin (2), β-amyrin (3), germanicol (4), lupeol (5), friedelin (6), friedelanol (7); four steroids--campesterol (8), stigmasterol (9), sitosterol (10), cholesterol (11)], and a long chain alcohol n-eicosan-1-ol (12) were identified in the bark of Lecythis pisonis. The structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy (1H and 13C-NMR, DEPTQ, 1H-1H-COSY, NOESY, HSQC and HMBC), low (CG-MS) and high resolution mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS), and infrared (IR) spectral data involving comparison with the literature. PMID:26197504

  3. Synthesis and x-ray structural characterization of binuclear iridium(I) and rhodium(I) hydroxypyridinate complexes. 1. Complete assignment of the /sup 1/H NMR spectra by two-dimensional and NOE techniques. The nature of inside and outside /sup 1/H chemical shift differences

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, G.S.; Mann, K.R.

    1988-09-21

    Six new d/sup 8/-d/sup 8/ complexes, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-hp))/sub 2/, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-mhp))/sub 2/, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-chp))/sub 2/, (Ir(COD)(..mu..-2hq))/sub 2/, (Rh(COD)(..mu..-hp))/sub 2/, and (Rh(COD)(..mu..-mhp))/sub 2/ (hp = 2-hydroxyphridinate, mhp = 6-methyl-2-hydroxypyridinate, chp = 6-chloro-2-hydroxypyridinate, 2hq = 2-hydroxyquinolate, COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene), were synthesized and characterized by /sup 1/H NMR, /sup 13/C NMR, and IR spectroscopy and FAB mass spectrometry. X-ray crystallographic analyses of the isostructural (M(COD)(..mu..-mhp))/sub 2/ (M = Ir and Rh) complexes confirmed the binuclear nature of the complexes. The complete assignment of the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of (Ir(COD)(..mu..-hp))/sub 2/ (and by analogy, the spectra of the other five complexes) was carried out with selective decoupling, nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE), and two-dimensional NMR techniques. The NOE observed between hp proton H5 and COD proton H15 allowed the precise assignment of all 12 COD resonances. Olefinic proton H12 (trans to N and outside) resonates downfield of olefinic proton H11 (trans to N and inside). Olefininc proton H15 (trans to O and outside) resonates upfield of olefinic proton H16 (trans to O and inside). The endo methylene protons resonate upfield of the exo methylene protons. The inside/outside chemical shift differences observed for these compounds are ascribed to steric and magnetic anisotropy effects. The crystallographic data are presented. The molecular structure of the complexes is discussed in detail. 39 references, 5 figures, 9 tables.

  4. Synthesis, X-ray crystallography, spectroscopic (FT-IR, 1H &13C NMR and UV), computational (DFT/B3LYP) and enzymes inhibitory studies of 7-hydroximinocholest-5-en-3-ol acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Faheem; Parveen, Mehtab; Alam, Mahboob; Azaz, Shaista; Malla, Ali Mohammed; Alam, Mohammad Jane; Lee, Dong-Ung; Ahmad, Shabbir

    2016-07-01

    The present study reports the synthesis of 7-Hydroximinocholest-5-en-3-ol acetate (syn. 3β-acetoxycholest-5-en-7-one oxime; in general, steroidal oxime). The identity of steroidal molecule was confirmed by NMR, FT-IR, MS, CHN microanalysis and X-ray crystallography. DFT calculations on the titled molecule have been performed. The molecular structure and spectra interpreted by Gaussian hybrid computational analysis theory (B3LYP) are found to be in good correlation with the experimental data obtained from the various spectrophotometric techniques. The vibrational bands appearing in the FTIR are assigned with great accuracy using harmonic frequencies along with intensities and animated modes. Molecular properties like HOMO-LUMO analysis, chemical reactivity descriptors, MEP mapping, dipole moment and natural atomic charges have been presented at the same level of theory. Moreover, the Hirshfeld analysis was carried out to ascertain the secondary interactions and associated 2D fingerprint plots. The percentages of various interactions are pictorialized by fingerprint plots of Hirshfeld surface. Steroidal oxime exhibited promising inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as compared to the reference drug, tacrine. Molecular docking was performed to introduce steroidal molecules into the X-ray crystal structures of acetylcholinesterase at the active site to find out the probable binding mode. The results of molecular docking admitted that steroidal oxime may exhibit enzyme inhibitor activity.

  5. Predicting (17)O NMR chemical shifts of polyoxometalates using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rupali; Zhang, Jie; Ohlin, C André

    2016-03-21

    We have investigated the computation of (17)O NMR chemical shifts of a wide range of polyoxometalates using density functional theory. The effects of basis sets and exchange-correlation functionals are explored, and whereas pure DFT functionals generally predict the chemical shifts of terminal oxygen sites quite well, hybrid functionals are required for the prediction of accurate chemical shifts in conjunction with linear regression. By using PBE0/def2-tzvp//PBE0/cc-pvtz(H-Ar), lanl2dz(K-) we have computed the chemical shifts of 37 polyoxometalates, corresponding to 209 (17)O NMR signals. We also show that at this level of theory the protonation-induced pH dependence of the chemical shift of the triprotic hexaniobate Lindqvist anion, [HxNb6O19]((8-x)), can be reproduced, which suggests that hypotheses regarding loci of protonation can be confidently tested. PMID:26925832

  6. The nature and origin of chemical shift for intracellular water nuclei in artemia cysts.

    PubMed

    Kasturi, S R; Hazlewood, C F; Yamanashi, W S; Dennis, L W

    1987-08-01

    We investigated the possible existence of chemical shift of water nuclei in Artemia cysts using high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The results conducted at 60, 200, and 500 MHz revealed an unusually large chemical shift for intracellular water protons. After correcting for bulk susceptibility effects, a residual downfield chemical shift of 0.11 ppm was observed in fully hydrated cysts. Similar results have been observed for the deuterium and (17)O nuclei.We have ruled out unusual intracellular pH, diamagnetic susceptibility of intracellular water, or interaction of water molecules with lipids, glycerol, and/or trehalose as possible origins of the residual chemical shift. We conclude that the residual chemical shift observed for water nuclei ((1)H, (2)H, and (17)O) is due to significant water-macromolecular interactions. PMID:19431702

  7. Ab Initio Calculation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors 1. Influence of Basis Set on the Calculation of 31P Chemical Shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.

    1998-09-01

    The influence of changes in the contracted Gaussian basis set used for ab initio calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phosphorous chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors was investigated. The isotropic chemical shitl and chemical shift anisotropy were found to converge with increasing complexity of the basis set at the Hartree-Fock @IF) level. The addition of d polarization function on the phosphorous nucIei was found to have a major impact of the calculated chemical shi~ but diminished with increasing number of polarization fimctions. At least 2 d polarization fimctions are required for accurate calculations of the isotropic phosphorous chemical shift. The introduction of density fictional theory (DFT) techniques through tie use of hybrid B3LYP methods for the calculation of the phosphorous chemical shift tensor resulted in a poorer estimation of the NMR values, even though DFT techniques result in improved energy and force constant calculations. The convergence of the W parametem with increasing basis set complexity was also observed for the DFT calculations, but produced results with consistent large deviations from experiment. The use of a HF 6-31 l++G(242p) basis set represents a good compromise between accuracy of the simulation and the complexity of the calculation for future ab initio calculations of 31P NMR parameters in larger complexes.

  8. Relativistically corrected nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts calculated with the normalized elimination of the small component using an effective potential-NMR chemical shifts of molybdenum and tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael; Cremer, Dieter

    2003-07-01

    A new method for relativistically corrected nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts is developed by combining the individual gauge for the localized orbital approach for density functional theory with the normalized elimination of a small component using an effective potential. The new method is used for the calculation of the NMR chemical shifts of 95Mo and 183W in various molybdenum and tungsten compounds. It is shown that quasirelativistic corrections lead to an average improvement of calculated NMR chemical shift values by 300 and 120 ppm in the case of 95Mo and 183W, respectively, which is mainly due to improvements in the paramagnetic contributions. The relationship between electronic structure of a molecule and the relativistic paramagnetic corrections is discussed. Relativistic effects for the diamagnetic part of the magnetic shielding caused by a relativistic contraction of the s,p orbitals in the core region concern only the shielding values, however, have little consequence for the shift values because of the large independence from electronic structure and a cancellation of these effects in the shift values. It is shown that the relativistic corrections can be improved by level shift operators and a B3LYP hybrid functional, for which Hartree-Fock exchange is reduced to 15%.

  9. Investigation of DOTA-Metal Chelation Effects on the Chemical Shift of (129) Xe.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Keunhong; Slack, Clancy C; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Dao, Phuong; Gomes, Muller D; Kennedy, Daniel J; Truxal, Ashley E; Sperling, Lindsay J; Francis, Matthew B; Wemmer, David E; Pines, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has shown that xenon chemical shifts in cryptophane-cage sensors are affected when tethered chelators bind to metals. Here, we explore the xenon shifts in response to a wide range of metal ions binding to diastereomeric forms of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) linked to cryptophane-A. The shifts induced by the binding of Ca(2+) , Cu(2+) , Ce(3+) , Zn(2+) , Cd(2+) , Ni(2+) , Co(2+) , Cr(2+) , Fe(3+) , and Hg(2+) are distinct. In addition, the different responses of the diastereomers for the same metal ion indicate that shifts are affected by partial folding with a correlation between the expected coordination number of the metal in the DOTA complex and the chemical shift of (129) Xe. These sensors may be used to detect and quantify many important metal ions, and a better understanding of the basis for the induced shifts could enhance future designs. PMID:26376768

  10. Generation of heteronuclear 13C 1H chemical-shift correlations using soft pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doddrell, David M.; Brooks, William; Field, James; Lynden-Bell, R. M.

    Two multipulse sequences are analyzed which can be used to generate heteronuclear 13C, 1H chemical-shift correlations without 2D NMR techniques. Both sequences utilize polarization-transfer techniques and generate the required chemical-shift correlation using a single soft proton pulse. The most useful technique is an extension of the DEPT method of polarization transfer since not only are the chemical-shift correlations generated in an easy to interpret form, but depending on the specific form of the pulse train used, the method can be employed to obtain information on the CH n group multiplicity. The methods are illustrated by applying them to generate 13C, 1H chemical-shift correlation spectra for menthol and cholesterol.

  11. An Improved Experiment to Illustrate the Effect of Electronegativity on Chemical Shift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boggess, Robert K.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a method for using nuclear magnetic resonance to observe the effect of electronegativity on the chemical shift of protons in similar compounds. Suggests the use of 1,3-dihalopropanes as samples. Includes sample questions. (MVL)

  12. Chemical shifts and coupling constants of C8H10N4O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, M.

    This document is part of Subvolume D3 `Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13: Heterocycles' of Volume 35 `Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Data' of Landolt-Börnstein Group III `Condensed Matter'

  13. An efficient amplification pulse sequence for measuring chemical shift anisotropy under fast magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong

    2011-12-01

    A two-dimensional experiment for measuring chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) under fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) is presented. The chemical shift anisotropy evolution is amplified by a sequence of π-pulses that repetitively interrupt MAS averaging. The amplification generates spinning sideband manifolds in the indirect dimension separated by the isotropic shift along the direct dimension. The basic unit of the pulse sequence is designed based on the magic-angle turning experiment and can be concatenated for larger amplification factors. PMID:21962909

  14. Magnetic couplings in the chemical shift of paramagnetic NMR.

    PubMed

    Vaara, Juha; Rouf, Syed Awais; Mareš, Jiří

    2015-10-13

    We apply the Kurland-McGarvey (J. Magn. Reson. 1970, 2, 286) theory for the NMR shielding of paramagnetic molecules, particularly its special case limited to the ground-state multiplet characterized by zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction of the form S·D·S. The correct formulation for this problem was recently presented by Soncini and Van den Heuvel (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 054113). With the effective electron spin quantum number S, the theory involves 2S+1 states, of which all but one are low-lying excited states, between which magnetic couplings take place by Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. We investigate these couplings as a function of temperature, focusing on both the high- and low-temperature behaviors. As has been seen in work by others, the full treatment of magnetic couplings is crucial for a realistic description of the temperature behavior of NMR shielding up to normal measurement temperatures. At high temperatures, depending on the magnitude of ZFS, the effect of magnetic couplings diminishes, and the Zeeman and hyperfine interactions become effectively averaged in the thermally occupied states of the multiplet. At still higher temperatures, the ZFS may be omitted altogether, and the shielding properties may be evaluated using a doublet-like formula, with all the 2S+1 states becoming effectively degenerate at the limit of vanishing magnetic field. We demonstrate these features using first-principles calculations of Ni(II), Co(II), Cr(II), and Cr(III) complexes, which have ZFS of different sizes and signs. A non-monotonic inverse temperature dependence of the hyperfine shift is predicted for axially symmetric integer-spin systems with a positive D parameter of ZFS. This is due to the magnetic coupling terms that are proportional to kT at low temperatures, canceling the Curie-type 1/kT prefactor of the hyperfine shielding in this case. PMID:26574272

  15. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  16. Chemical shift prediction for protein structure calculation and quality assessment using an optimally parameterized force field

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jakob T.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2011-01-01

    The exquisite sensitivity of chemical shifts as reporters of structural information, and the ability to measure them routinely and accurately, gives great import to formulations that elucidate the structure-chemical-shift relationship. Here we present a new and highly accurate, precise, and robust formulation for the prediction of NMR chemical shifts from protein structures. Our approach, shAIC (shift prediction guided by Akaikes Information Criterion), capitalizes on mathematical ideas and an information-theoretic principle, to represent the functional form of the relationship between structure and chemical shift as a parsimonious sum of smooth analytical potentials which optimally takes into account short-, medium-, and long-range parameters in a nuclei-specific manner to capture potential chemical shift perturbations caused by distant nuclei. shAIC outperforms the state-of-the-art methods that use analytical formulations. Moreover, for structures derived by NMR or structures with novel folds, shAIC delivers better overall results; even when it is compared to sophisticated machine learning approaches. shAIC provides for a computationally lightweight implementation that is unimpeded by molecular size, making it an ideal for use as a force field. PMID:22293396

  17. 1H NMR spectra part 31: 1H chemical shifts of amides in DMSO solvent.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The (1)H chemical shifts of 48 amides in DMSO solvent are assigned and presented. The solvent shifts Δδ (DMSO-CDCl3 ) are large (1-2 ppm) for the NH protons but smaller and negative (-0.1 to -0.2 ppm) for close range protons. A selection of the observed solvent shifts is compared with calculated shifts from the present model and from GIAO calculations. Those for the NH protons agree with both calculations, but other solvent shifts such as Δδ(CHO) are not well reproduced by the GIAO calculations. The (1)H chemical shifts of the amides in DMSO were analysed using a functional approach for near ( ≤ 3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy and steric effect of the amide group for more distant protons. The chemical shifts of the NH protons of acetanilide and benzamide vary linearly with the π density on the αN and βC atoms, respectively. The C=O anisotropy and steric effect are in general little changed from the values in CDCl3. The effects of substituents F, Cl, Me on the NH proton shifts are reproduced. The electric field coefficient for the protons in DMSO is 90% of that in CDCl3. There is no steric effect of the C=O oxygen on the NH proton in an NH…O=C hydrogen bond. The observed deshielding is due to the electric field effect. The calculated chemical shifts agree well with the observed shifts (RMS error of 0.106 ppm for the data set of 257 entries). PMID:24824670

  18. Method for evaluating chemical shifts of x-ray emission lines in molecules and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomachuk, Yuriy V.; Titov, Anatoly V.

    2013-12-01

    A method of evaluating chemical shifts of x-ray emission lines for period four and heavier elements is developed. This method is based on the relativistic pseudopotential model and one-center restoration approach [Int. J. Quantum Chem.IJQCB20020-760810.1002/qua.20418 104, 223 (2005)] to recover a proper electronic structure in heavy-atom cores after the pseudopotential simulation of chemical compounds. The approximations of instantaneous transition and frozen core are presently applied to derive an expression for chemical shift as a difference between mean values of certain effective operator. The method allows one to avoid evaluation of small quantities (chemical shifts ˜0.01-1 eV) as differences of very large values (transition energies ˜1-100 keV in various compounds). The results of our calculations of chemical shifts for the Kα1, Kα2, and L transitions of group-14 metal cations with respect to neutral atoms are presented. Calculations of Kα1-line chemical shifts for the Pb core transitions in PbO and PbF2 with respect to those in the Pb atom are also performed and discussed. The accuracy of approximations used is estimated and the quality of the calculations is analyzed.

  19. Rapid and accurate calculation of protein 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Neal, Stephen; Nip, Alex M; Zhang, Haiyan; Wishart, David S

    2003-07-01

    A computer program (SHIFTX) is described which rapidly and accurately calculates the diamagnetic 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts of both backbone and sidechain atoms in proteins. The program uses a hybrid predictive approach that employs pre-calculated, empirically derived chemical shift hypersurfaces in combination with classical or semi-classical equations (for ring current, electric field, hydrogen bond and solvent effects) to calculate 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts from atomic coordinates. The chemical shift hypersurfaces capture dihedral angle, sidechain orientation, secondary structure and nearest neighbor effects that cannot easily be translated to analytical formulae or predicted via classical means. The chemical shift hypersurfaces were generated using a database of IUPAC-referenced protein chemical shifts--RefDB (Zhang et al., 2003), and a corresponding set of high resolution (<2.1 A) X-ray structures. Data mining techniques were used to extract the largest pairwise contributors (from a list of approximately 20 derived geometric, sequential and structural parameters) to generate the necessary hypersurfaces. SHIFTX is rapid (<1 CPU second for a complete shift calculation of 100 residues) and accurate. Overall, the program was able to attain a correlation coefficient (r) between observed and calculated shifts of 0.911 (1Halpha), 0.980 (13Calpha), 0.996 (13Cbeta), 0.863 (13CO), 0.909 (15N), 0.741 (1HN), and 0.907 (sidechain 1H) with RMS errors of 0.23, 0.98, 1.10, 1.16, 2.43, 0.49, and 0.30 ppm, respectively on test data sets. We further show that the agreement between observed and SHIFTX calculated chemical shifts can be an extremely sensitive measure of the quality of protein structures. Our results suggest that if NMR-derived structures could be refined using heteronuclear chemical shifts calculated by SHIFTX, their precision could approach that of the highest resolution X-ray structures. SHIFTX is freely available as a web server at http

  20. NMRDSP: an accurate prediction of protein shape strings from NMR chemical shifts and sequence data.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wusong; Cong, Peisheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Lu, Longjian; Zhu, Zhongliang; Li, Tonghua

    2013-01-01

    Shape string is structural sequence and is an extremely important structure representation of protein backbone conformations. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts give a strong correlation with the local protein structure, and are exploited to predict protein structures in conjunction with computational approaches. Here we demonstrate a novel approach, NMRDSP, which can accurately predict the protein shape string based on nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts and structural profiles obtained from sequence data. The NMRDSP uses six chemical shifts (HA, H, N, CA, CB and C) and eight elements of structure profiles as features, a non-redundant set (1,003 entries) as the training set, and a conditional random field as a classification algorithm. For an independent testing set (203 entries), we achieved an accuracy of 75.8% for S8 (the eight states accuracy) and 87.8% for S3 (the three states accuracy). This is higher than only using chemical shifts or sequence data, and confirms that the chemical shift and the structure profile are significant features for shape string prediction and their combination prominently improves the accuracy of the predictor. We have constructed the NMRDSP web server and believe it could be employed to provide a solid platform to predict other protein structures and functions. The NMRDSP web server is freely available at http://cal.tongji.edu.cn/NMRDSP/index.jsp. PMID:24376713

  1. MP2 calculation of (77) Se NMR chemical shifts taking into account relativistic corrections.

    PubMed

    Rusakov, Yury Yu; Rusakova, Irina L; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-07-01

    The main factors affecting the accuracy and computational cost of the Second-order Möller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculation of (77) Se NMR chemical shifts (methods and basis sets, relativistic corrections, and solvent effects) are addressed with a special emphasis on relativistic effects. For the latter, paramagnetic contribution (390-466 ppm) dominates over diamagnetic term (192-198 ppm) resulting in a total shielding relativistic correction of about 230-260 ppm (some 15% of the total values of selenium absolute shielding constants). Diamagnetic term is practically constant, while paramagnetic contribution spans over 70-80 ppm. In the (77) Se NMR chemical shifts scale, relativistic corrections are about 20-30 ppm (some 5% of the total values of selenium chemical shifts). Solvent effects evaluated within the polarizable continuum solvation model are of the same order of magnitude as relativistic corrections (about 5%). For the practical calculations of (77) Se NMR chemical shifts of the medium-sized organoselenium compounds, the most efficient computational protocols employing relativistic Dyall's basis sets and taking into account relativistic and solvent corrections are suggested. The best result is characterized by a mean absolute error of 17 ppm for the span of (77) Se NMR chemical shifts reaching 2500 ppm resulting in a mean absolute percentage error of 0.7%. PMID:25998325

  2. NMRDSP: An Accurate Prediction of Protein Shape Strings from NMR Chemical Shifts and Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Wusong; Cong, Peisheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Lu, Longjian; Zhu, Zhongliang; Li, Tonghua

    2013-01-01

    Shape string is structural sequence and is an extremely important structure representation of protein backbone conformations. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts give a strong correlation with the local protein structure, and are exploited to predict protein structures in conjunction with computational approaches. Here we demonstrate a novel approach, NMRDSP, which can accurately predict the protein shape string based on nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts and structural profiles obtained from sequence data. The NMRDSP uses six chemical shifts (HA, H, N, CA, CB and C) and eight elements of structure profiles as features, a non-redundant set (1,003 entries) as the training set, and a conditional random field as a classification algorithm. For an independent testing set (203 entries), we achieved an accuracy of 75.8% for S8 (the eight states accuracy) and 87.8% for S3 (the three states accuracy). This is higher than only using chemical shifts or sequence data, and confirms that the chemical shift and the structure profile are significant features for shape string prediction and their combination prominently improves the accuracy of the predictor. We have constructed the NMRDSP web server and believe it could be employed to provide a solid platform to predict other protein structures and functions. The NMRDSP web server is freely available at http://cal.tongji.edu.cn/NMRDSP/index.jsp. PMID:24376713

  3. Benchmarking quantum mechanical calculations with experimental NMR chemical shifts of 2-HADNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuemin; Junk, Thomas; Liu, Yucheng; Tzeng, Nianfeng; Perkins, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In this study, both GIAO-DFT and GIAO-MP2 calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were benchmarked with experimental chemical shifts. The experimental chemical shifts were determined experimentally for carbon-13 (C-13) of seven carbon atoms for the TNT degradation product 2-hydroxylamino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2-HADNT). Quantum mechanics GIAO calculations were implemented using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) and other six hybrid DFT methods (Becke-1-Lee-Yang-Parr (B1LYP), Becke-half-and-half-Lee-Yang-Parr (BH and HLYP), Cohen-Handy-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (O3LYP), Coulomb-attenuating-B3LYP (CAM-B3LYP), modified-Perdew-Wang-91-Lee-Yang-Parr (mPW1LYP), and Xu-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (X3LYP)) which use the same correlation functional LYP. Calculation results showed that the GIAO-MP2 method gives the most accurate chemical shift values, and O3LYP method provides the best prediction of chemical shifts among the B3LYP and other five DFT methods. Three types of atomic partial charges, Mulliken (MK), electrostatic potential (ESP), and natural bond orbital (NBO), were also calculated using MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ method. A reasonable correlation was discovered between NBO partial charges and experimental chemical shifts of carbon-13 (C-13).

  4. NMR Hyperfine Shifts in Blue Copper Proteins: A Quantum Chemical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Oldfield, Eric

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of the first quantum chemical investigations of 1H NMR hyperfine shifts in the blue copper proteins (BCPs): amicyanin, azurin, pseudoazurin, plastocyanin, stellacyanin, and rusticyanin. We find that very large structural models that incorporate extensive hydrogen bond networks, as well as geometry optimization, are required to reproduce the experimental NMR hyperfine shift results, the best theory vs experiment predictions having R2 = 0.94, a slope = 1.01, and a SD = 40.5 ppm (or ~4.7% of the overall ~860 ppm shift range). We also find interesting correlations between the hyperfine shifts and the bond and ring critical point properties computed using atoms-in-molecules theory, in addition to finding that hyperfine shifts can be well-predicted by using an empirical model, based on the geometry-optimized structures, which in the future should be of use in structure refinement. PMID:18314973

  5. Modeling (15)N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure.

    PubMed

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-28

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence. PMID:27586953

  6. (77)Se chemical shift tensor of L-selenocystine: experimental NMR measurements and quantum chemical investigations of structural effects.

    PubMed

    Struppe, Jochem; Zhang, Yong; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-03-01

    The genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine and its dimeric form, selenocystine, are both utilized by nature. They are found in active sites of selenoproteins, enzymes that facilitate a diverse range of reactions, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and regulation of redox pathways. Due to selenocysteine and selenocystine's specialized biological roles, it is of interest to examine their (77)Se NMR properties and how those can in turn be employed to study biological systems. We report the solid-state (77)Se NMR measurements of the L-selenocystine chemical shift tensor, which provides the first experimental chemical shift tensor information on selenocysteine-containing systems. Quantum chemical calculations of L-selenocystine models were performed to help understand various structural effects on (77)Se L-selenocystine's chemical shift tensor. The effects of protonation state, protein environment, and substituent of selenium-bonded carbon on the isotropic chemical shift were found to be in a range of ca. 10-20 ppm. However, the conformational effect was found to be much larger, spanning ca. 600 ppm for the C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle range of -180° to +180°. Our calculations show that around the minimum energy structure with a C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle of ca. -90°, the energy costs to alter the dihedral angle in the range from -120° to -60° are within only 2.5 kcal/mol. This makes it possible to realize these conformations in a protein or crystal environment. (77)Se NMR was found to be a sensitive probe to such changes and has an isotropic chemical shift range of 272 ± 30 ppm for this energetically favorable conformation range. The energy-minimized structures exhibited calculated isotropic shifts that lay within 3-9% of those reported in previous solution NMR studies. The experimental solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shift is near the lower bound of this calculated range for these readily accessible conformations. These results suggest

  7. 77Se Chemical Shift Tensor of L-selenocystine: Experimental NMR Measurements and Quantum Chemical Investigations of Structural Effects

    PubMed Central

    Struppe, Jochem; Zhang, Yong; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    The genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine and its dimeric form, selenocystine, are both utilized by nature. They are found in active sites of selenoproteins, enzymes that facilitate a diverse range of reactions, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and regulation of redox pathways. Due to selenocysteine and selenocystine’s specialized biological roles, it is of interest to examine their 77Se NMR properties and how those can in turn be employed to study biological systems. We report the solid-state 77Se NMR measurements of the L-selenocystine chemical shift tensor, which provides the first experimental chemical shift tensor information of selenocysteine-containing systems. Quantum chemical calculations of L-selenocystine models were performed to help understand various structural effects on 77Se L-selenocystine’s chemical shift tensor. The effects of protonation state, protein environment, and substituent of selenium-bonded carbon on the isotropic chemical shift were found to be in a range of ca. 10–20 ppm. However, the conformational effect was found to be much larger, spanning ca. 600 ppm for the C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle range of −180° to +180°. Our calculations show that around the minimum energy structure with a C-Se-Se-C dihedral angle of ca. −90°, the energy costs to alter the dihedral angle in the range from −120° to −60° are within only 2.5 kcal/mol. This makes it possible to realize these conformations in a protein or crystal environment. 77Se NMR was found to be a sensitive probe to such changes and has an isotropic chemical shift range of 272±30 ppm for this energetically favorable conformation range. The energy-minimized structures exhibited calculated isotropic shifts that lay within 3–9% of those reported in previous solution NMR studies. The experimental solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shift is near the lower bound of this calculated range for these readily accessible conformations. These results

  8. Sequential nearest-neighbor effects on computed 13Cα chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate sequential nearest-neighbor effects on quantum-chemical calculations of 13Cα chemical shifts, we selected the structure of the nucleic acid binding (NAB) protein from the SARS coronavirus determined by NMR in solution (PDB id 2K87). NAB is a 116-residue α/β protein, which contains 9 prolines and has 50% of its residues located in loops and turns. Overall, the results presented here show that sizeable nearest-neighbor effects are seen only for residues preceding proline, where Pro introduces an overestimation, on average, of 1.73 ppm in the computed 13Cα chemical shifts. A new ensemble of 20 conformers representing the NMR structure of the NAB, which was calculated with an input containing backbone torsion angle constraints derived from the theoretical 13Cα chemical shifts as supplementary data to the NOE distance constraints, exhibits very similar topology and comparable agreement with the NOE constraints as the published NMR structure. However, the two structures differ in the patterns of differences between observed and computed 13Cα chemical shifts, Δca,i, for the individual residues along the sequence. This indicates that the Δca,i -values for the NAB protein are primarily a consequence of the limited sampling by the bundles of 20 conformers used, as in common practice, to represent the two NMR structures, rather than of local flaws in the structures. PMID:20644980

  9. Proton Magnetic Resonance and Human Thyroid Neoplasia III. Ex VivoChemical-Shift Microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, Allison; Künnecke, Basil; Dowd, Susan; Russell, Peter; Delbridge, Leigh; Mountford, Carolyn E.

    1996-03-01

    Magnetic-resonance chemical-shift microimaging, with a spatial resolution of 40 × 40 μm, is a modality which can detect alterations to cellular chemistry and hence markers of pathological processes in human tissueex vivo.This technique was used as a chemical microscope to assess follicular thyroid neoplasms, lesions which are unsatisfactorily investigated using standard histopathological techiques or water-based magnetic-resonance imaging. The chemical-shift images at the methyl frequency (0.9 ppm) identify chemical heterogeneity in follicular tumors which are histologically homogeneous. The observed changes to cellular chemistry, detectable in foci of approximately 100 cells or less, support the existence of a preinvasive state hitherto unidentified by current pathological techniques.

  10. [Study on the chemical components of Rabdosia excisa].

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Li, C; Yi, X

    1998-07-01

    Four kinds of components were extracted and separated from the stems and leaves of Rabdosia excisa. They had been identified as Kamebakaurin, Ursolic acid, Daucosterol and Liquiritin respectively by physical and chemical methods, as well as spectrum data. It was first time that Liquiritin was obtained from the Robdosia family, and its 13C-NMR data of Liquiritin had not been reported before. PMID:12569856

  11. Chemical and microscopic characterization of outer seed coats of fossil and extant water plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bergen, P. F.; Goñi, M.; Collinson, M. E.; Barrie, P. J.; Damsté, J. S. Sinninghe; De Leeuw, J. W.

    1994-09-01

    Sclerotic outer seed coat layers (testae) of three fossil and two extant water plant species were analyzed using scanning electron and light microscopy in addition to Curie-point pyrolysis, solid state 13C NMR, and CuO oxidation. Comparison between the chemical results from the fossil and extant samples reveals that the original resistant constituents in the sclerotic testae are native lignin-celluloses which are transformed to polyphenol macromolecules recognized in the fossil samples. The combination of microscopic and chemical data provides new insights regarding the early diagenetic processes by which lignin-cellulose-containing plant remains may have been transformed. In particular, the unaltered morphology in combination with major chemical modifications is used as the basis to postulate the timing and nature of lignin transformations. The combination of pyrolysis, solid state 13C NMR, and CuO oxidation is shown to be a powerful tool to characterize the chemical structure of testae of fossil and extant water plants.

  12. The Chemical Shift Baseline for High-Pressure NMR Spectra of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Frach, Roland; Kibies, Patrick; Böttcher, Saraphina; Pongratz, Tim; Strohfeldt, Steven; Kurrmann, Simon; Koehler, Joerg; Hofmann, Martin; Kremer, Werner; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert; Reiser, Oliver; Horinek, Dominik; Kast, Stefan M

    2016-07-18

    High-pressure (HP) NMR spectroscopy is an important method for detecting rare functional states of proteins by analyzing the pressure response of chemical shifts. However, for the analysis of the shifts it is mandatory to understand the origin of the observed pressure dependence. Here we present experimental HP NMR data on the (15) N-enriched peptide bond model, N-methylacetamide (NMA), in water, combined with quantum-chemical computations of the magnetic parameters using a pressure-sensitive solvation model. Theoretical analysis of NMA and the experimentally used internal reference standard 4,4-dimethyl-4-silapentane-1-sulfonic (DSS) reveal that a substantial part of observed shifts can be attributed to purely solvent-induced electronic polarization of the backbone. DSS is only marginally responsive to pressure changes and is therefore a reliable sensor for variations in the local magnetic field caused by pressure-induced changes of the magnetic susceptibility of the solvent. PMID:27282319

  13. Use of 13Cα Chemical-Shifts in Protein Structure Determination

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.; Ripoll, Daniel R.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    A physics-based method, aimed at determining protein structures by using NOE-derived distances together with observed and computed 13C chemical shifts, is proposed. The approach makes use of 13Cα chemical shifts, computed at the density functional level of theory, to obtain torsional constraints for all backbone and side-chain torsional angles without making a priori use of the occupancy of any region of the Ramachandran map by the amino acid residues. The torsional constraints are not fixed but are changed dynamically in each step of the procedure, following an iterative self-consistent approach intended to identify a set of conformations for which the computed 13Cα chemical shifts match the experimental ones. A test is carried out on a 76-amino acid all-α-helical protein, namely the B. Subtilis acyl carrier protein. It is shown that, starting from randomly generated conformations, the final protein models are more accurate than an existing NMR-derived structure model of this protein, in terms of both the agreement between predicted and observed 13Cα chemical shifts and some stereochemical quality indicators, and of similar accuracy as one of the protein models solved at a high level of resolution. The results provide evidence that this methodology can be used not only for structure determination but also for additional protein structure refinement of NMR-derived models deposited in the Protein Data Bank. PMID:17516673

  14. Chemical shifts in transition metal dithiocarbamates from infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, R.; Magee, R. J.; Liesegang, J.

    1982-11-01

    Measurements of the IR stretching frequencies of the NC and MS bonds in transition-metal (M) dithiocarbamates show significant correlation with measurement of core level XPS chemical shifts. This is believed to be the first demonstration of such a correlation for a series of solid-phase compounds.

  15. Computation of Chemical Shifts for Paramagnetic Molecules: A Laboratory Experiment for the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Benjamin P.; Simpson, Scott; Zurek, Eva; Autschbach, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    A computational experiment investigating the [superscript 1]H and [superscript 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of molecules with unpaired electrons has been developed and implemented. This experiment is appropriate for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory course in computational, physical, or inorganic chemistry. The…

  16. Compressed sensing for chemical shift-based water-fat separation.

    PubMed

    Doneva, Mariya; Börnert, Peter; Eggers, Holger; Mertins, Alfred; Pauly, John; Lustig, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Multi echo chemical shift-based water-fat separation methods allow for uniform fat suppression in the presence of main field inhomogeneities. However, these methods require additional scan time for chemical shift encoding. This work presents a method for water-fat separation from undersampled data (CS-WF), which combines compressed sensing and chemical shift-based water-fat separation. Undersampling was applied in the k-space and in the chemical shift encoding dimension to reduce the total scanning time. The method can reconstruct high quality water and fat images in 2D and 3D applications from undersampled data. As an extension, multipeak fat spectral models were incorporated into the CS-WF reconstruction to improve the water-fat separation quality. In 3D MRI, reduction factors of above three can be achieved, thus fully compensating the additional time needed in three-echo water-fat imaging. The method is demonstrated on knee and abdominal in vivo data. PMID:20859998

  17. Identify Beta-Hairpin Motifs with Quadratic Discriminant Algorithm Based on the Chemical Shifts

    PubMed Central

    YongE, Feng; GaoShan, Kou

    2015-01-01

    Successful prediction of the beta-hairpin motif will be helpful for understanding the of the fold recognition. Some algorithms have been proposed for the prediction of beta-hairpin motifs. However, the parameters used by these methods were primarily based on the amino acid sequences. Here, we proposed a novel model for predicting beta-hairpin structure based on the chemical shift. Firstly, we analyzed the statistical distribution of chemical shifts of six nuclei in not beta-hairpin and beta-hairpin motifs. Secondly, we used these chemical shifts as features combined with three algorithms to predict beta-hairpin structure. Finally, we achieved the best prediction, namely sensitivity of 92%, the specificity of 94% with 0.85 of Mathew’s correlation coefficient using quadratic discriminant analysis algorithm, which is clearly superior to the same method for the prediction of beta-hairpin structure from 20 amino acid compositions in the three-fold cross-validation. Our finding showed that the chemical shift is an effective parameter for beta-hairpin prediction, suggesting the quadratic discriminant analysis is a powerful algorithm for the prediction of beta-hairpin. PMID:26422468

  18. Automated assignment of NMR chemical shifts based on a known structure and 4D spectra.

    PubMed

    Trautwein, Matthias; Fredriksson, Kai; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    Apart from their central role during 3D structure determination of proteins the backbone chemical shift assignment is the basis for a number of applications, like chemical shift perturbation mapping and studies on the dynamics of proteins. This assignment is not a trivial task even if a 3D protein structure is known and needs almost as much effort as the assignment for structure prediction if performed manually. We present here a new algorithm based solely on 4D [(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC-NOESY-[(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC spectra which is able to assign a large percentage of chemical shifts (73-82 %) unambiguously, demonstrated with proteins up to a size of 250 residues. For the remaining residues, a small number of possible assignments is filtered out. This is done by comparing distances in the 3D structure to restraints obtained from the peak volumes in the 4D spectrum. Using dead-end elimination, assignments are removed in which at least one of the restraints is violated. Including additional information from chemical shift predictions, a complete unambiguous assignment was obtained for Ubiquitin and 95 % of the residues were correctly assigned in the 251 residue-long N-terminal domain of enzyme I. The program including source code is available at https://github.com/thomasexner/4Dassign . PMID:27484442

  19. A geometrical parametrization of C1'-C5' RNA ribose chemical shifts calculated by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suardíaz, Reynier; Sahakyan, Aleksandr B.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-07-01

    It has been recently shown that NMR chemical shifts can be used to determine the structures of proteins. In order to begin to extend this type of approach to nucleic acids, we present an equation that relates the structural parameters and the 13C chemical shifts of the ribose group. The parameters in the equation were determined by maximizing the agreement between the DFT-derived chemical shifts and those predicted through the equation for a database of ribose structures. Our results indicate that this type of approach represents a promising way of establishing quantitative and computationally efficient analytical relationships between chemical shifts and structural parameters in nucleic acids.

  20. Scalar Relativistic Computations and Localized Orbital Analyses of Nuclear Hyperfine Coupling and Paramagnetic NMR Chemical Shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, Fredy W.; Pritchard, Ben; Autschbach, Jochen

    2012-02-14

    A method is reported by which calculated hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) and paramagnetic NMR (pNMR) chemical shifts can be analyzed in a chemically intuitive way by decomposition into contributions from localized molecular orbitals (LMOs). A new module for density functional calculations with nonhybrid functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids, utilizing the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA), has been implemented in the parallel open-source NWChem quantum chemistry package. Benchmark results are reported for a test set of few-atom molecules with light and heavy elements. Finite nucleus effects on ¹⁹⁹Hg HFCCs are shown to be on the order of -11 to -15%. A proof of concept for the LMO analysis is provided for the metal and fluorine HFCCs of TiF₃ and NpF₆. Calculated pNMR chemical shifts are reported for the 2-methylphenyl-t-butylnitroxide radical and for five cyclopentadienyl (Cp) sandwich complexes with 3d metals. Nickelocene and vanadocene carbon pNMR shifts are analyzed in detail, demonstrating that the large carbon pNMR shifts calculated as +1540 for Ni (exptl.: +1514) and -443 for V (exptl.: -510) are caused by different spin-polarization mechanisms. For Ni, Cp to Ni π back-donation dominates the result, whereas for vanadocene, V to Cp σ donation with relaxation of the carbon 1s shells can be identified as the dominant mechanism.

  1. Protein structural information derived from NMR chemical shift with the neural network program TALOS-N.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    Chemical shifts are obtained at the first stage of any protein structural study by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts are known to be impacted by a wide range of structural factors, and the artificial neural network based TALOS-N program has been trained to extract backbone and side-chain torsion angles from (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C shifts. The program is quite robust and typically yields backbone torsion angles for more than 90 % of the residues and side-chain χ 1 rotamer information for about half of these, in addition to reliably predicting secondary structure. The use of TALOS-N is illustrated for the protein DinI, and torsion angles obtained by TALOS-N analysis from the measured chemical shifts of its backbone and (13)C(β) nuclei are compared to those seen in a prior, experimentally determined structure. The program is also particularly useful for generating torsion angle restraints, which then can be used during standard NMR protein structure calculations. PMID:25502373

  2. A sensitive, high resolution magic angle turning experiment for measuring chemical shift tensor principal values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderman, D. W.

    1998-12-01

    A sensitive, high-resolution 'FIREMAT' two-dimensional (2D) magic-angle-turning experiment is described that measures chemical shift tensor principal values in powdered solids. The spectra display spinning-sideband patterns separated by their isotropic shifts. The new method's sensitivity and high resolution in the isotropic-shift dimension result from combining the 5pi magic-angle-turning pulse sequence, an extension of the pseudo-2D sideband-suppression data rearrangement, and the TIGER protocol for processing 2D data. TPPM decoupling is used to enhance resolution. The method requires precise synchronization of the pulses and sampling to the rotor position. It is shown that the technique obtains 35 natural-abundance 13C tensors from erythromycin in 19 hours, and high quality naturalabundance 15N tensors from eight sites in potassium penicillin V in three days on a 400MHz spectrometer.

  3. NMR characterization of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose 2: Chemical shift assignment and conformation analysis of substituent groups.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroyuki; Oshima, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Hisaho; Shimizu, Yuuichi; Tajima, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    The chemical shifts of the substituent groups of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were assigned by examining a series of CMC samples with different degrees of substitution. Comparative analysis of the (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) spectra allowed the complete assignment of the substituent groups at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions of the seven substituted monomers comprising the CMC chains, namely, 2-mono-, 3-mono-, 6-mono-, 2,3-di-, 2,6-di-, 3,6-di-, and 2,3,6-tri-substituted anhydroglucose units (AGUs). In addition, the mole fractions of the monomers were determined by lineshape analysis of the carbonyl carbon resonances. The comparison between the chemical shifts of the substituents revealed strong interactions between 2- and 3-substituents in the same AGU, and showed that the steric hindrance by a substituent at the 2- or 3-position suppresses subsequent substitution at the adjacent position. PMID:27312635

  4. Assignment of protein backbone resonances using connectivity, torsion angles and 13Calpha chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Morris, Laura C; Valafar, Homayoun; Prestegard, James H

    2004-05-01

    A program is presented which will return the most probable sequence location for a short connected set of residues in a protein given just (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts (delta((13)C(alpha))) and data restricting the phi and psi backbone angles. Data taken from both the BioMagResBank and the Protein Data Bank were used to create a probability density function (PDF) using a multivariate normal distribution in delta((13)C(alpha)), phi, and psi space for each amino acid residue. Extracting and combining probabilities for particular amino acid residues in a short proposed sequence yields a score indicative of the correctness of the proposed assignment. The program is illustrated using several proteins for which structure and (13)C(alpha) chemical shift data are available. PMID:15017135

  5. Characterization of Tricoordinate Boron Chemical Shift Tensors: Definitive High-Field

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, David L.; Wasylishen, Roderick E.; Gee, Myrlene

    2001-01-01

    Despite the large known chemical shift (CS) range for boron and the large number of 11B NMR studies of glasses, no boron CS tensors have been characterized to date. We report the application of solid-state NMR techniques at moderate (9.4 T) and high (17.63 T) applied magnetic field strengths to the characterization of the boron CS tensors in trimesitylborane (BMes3) and triphenyl borate (B(OPh)3). The boron CS tensor of the former compound exhibits a remarkably large span,? 121 1 ppm, which encompasses the known range of isotropic chemical shifts for tricoordinate boron compounds. Conversely, the effect of the boron CS tensor on the 11B NMR spectra of B(OPh)3 is difficult to observe and quantify even at field strengths as high

  6. Prediction of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts for phosphines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Jianbo; Liu, Shuling; Zhang, Shengwan; Li, Shengshi Z.

    2007-07-01

    Quantitative relationships of the 31P NMR chemical shifts of the phosphorus atoms in 291 phosphines with the atomic ionicity index (INI) and stereoscopic effect parameters ( ɛα, ɛβ, ɛγ) were primarily investigated in this paper for modeling some fundamental quantitative structure-spectroscopy relationships (QSSR). The results indicated that the 31P NMR chemical shifts of phosphines can be described as the quantitative equation by multiple linear regression (MLR): δp (ppm) = -174.0197 - 2.6724 INI + 40.4755 ɛα + 15.1141 ɛβ - 3.1858 ɛγ, correlation coefficient R = 0.9479, root mean square error (rms) = 13.9, and cross-validated predictive correlation coefficient was found by using the leave-one-out procedure to be Q2 = 0.8919. Furthermore, through way of random sampling, the estimative stability and the predictive power of the proposed MLR model were examined by constructing data set randomly into both the internal training set and external test set of 261 and 30 compounds, respectively, and then the chemical shifts were estimated and predicted with the training correlation coefficient R = 0.9467 and rms = 13.4 and the external predicting correlation coefficient Qext = 0.9598 and rms = 10.8. A partial least square model was developed that produced R = 0.9466, Q = 0.9407 and Qext = 0.9599, respectively. Those good results provided a new, simple, accurate and efficient methodology for calculating 31P NMR chemical shifts of phosphines.

  7. Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways: Identifying Metabolic Pathways Directly from a Single 2D NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Pal, Debnath; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2015-12-15

    Identifying cellular processes in terms of metabolic pathways is one of the avowed goals of metabolomics studies. Currently, this is done after relevant metabolites are identified to allow their mapping onto specific pathways. This task is daunting due to the complex nature of cellular processes and the difficulty in establishing the identity of individual metabolites. We propose here a new method: ChemSMP (Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways), which facilitates rapid analysis by identifying the active metabolic pathways directly from chemical shifts obtained from a single two-dimensional (2D) [(13)C-(1)H] correlation NMR spectrum without the need for identification and assignment of individual metabolites. ChemSMP uses a novel indexing and scoring system comprised of a "uniqueness score" and a "coverage score". Our method is demonstrated on metabolic pathways data from the Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) and chemical shifts from the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Benchmarks show that ChemSMP has a positive prediction rate of >90% in the presence of decluttered data and can sustain the same at 60-70% even in the presence of noise, such as deletions of peaks and chemical shift deviations. The method tested on NMR data acquired for a mixture of 20 amino acids shows a success rate of 93% in correct recovery of pathways. When used on data obtained from the cell lysate of an unexplored oncogenic cell line, it revealed active metabolic pathways responsible for regulating energy homeostasis of cancer cells. Our unique tool is thus expected to significantly enhance analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data by reducing existing impediments. PMID:26556218

  8. Relativistic DFT Calculation of (119)Sn Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants in Tin Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bagno, Alessandro; Casella, Girolamo; Saielli, Giacomo

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear shielding and spin-spin coupling constants of (119)Sn in stannane, tetramethylstannane, methyltin halides Me4-nSnXn (X = Cl, Br, I; n = 1-3), tin halides, and some stannyl cations have been investigated computationally by DFT methods and Slater all-electron basis sets, including relativistic effects by means of the zeroth order regular approximation (ZORA) method up to spin-orbit coupling. Calculated (119)Sn chemical shifts generally correlate well with experimental values, except when several heavy halogen atoms, especially iodine, are bound to tin. In such cases, calculated chemical shifts are almost constant at the scalar (spin-free) ZORA level; only at the spin-orbit level is a good correlation, which holds for all compounds examined, attained. A remarkable "heavy-atom effect", analogous to that observed for analogous alkyl halides, is evident. The chemical shift of the putative stannyl cation (SnH3(+)) has also been examined, and it is concluded that the spectrum of the species obtained in superacids is inconsistent with a simple SnH3(+) structure; strong coordination to even weak nucleophiles such as FSO3H leads to a very satisfactory agreement. On the contrary, the calculated (119)Sn chemical shift of the trimesitylstannyl cation is in very good agreement with the experimental value. Coupling constants between (119)Sn and halogen nuclei are also well-modeled in general (taking into account the large uncertainties in the experimental values); relativistic spin-orbit effects are again quite evident. Couplings to (13)C and (1)H also fall, on the average, on the same correlation line, but individual values show a significant deviation from the expected unit slope. PMID:26626377

  9. 14N Chemical Shifts and Quadrupole Coupling Constants of Inorganic Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marburger, Simon P.; Fung, B. M.; Khitrin, A. K.

    2002-02-01

    The isotropic chemical shift and the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant for 14N were obtained for 14 inorganic nitrates by solid-state MAS NMR measurements at two different field strengths, 9.4 and 11.7 T. The compounds studied were polycrystalline powders of AgNO3, Al(NO3)3, Ba(NO3)2, Ca(NO3)2, CsNO3, KNO3, LiNO3, Mg(NO3)2, NaNO3, Pb(NO3)2, RbNO3, Sr(NO3)2, Th(NO3)4·4H2O, and UO2(NO3)2·3H2O. Even though the spectra show broadening due to 14N quadrupole interactions, linewidths of a few hundred hertz and a good signal-to-noise ratio were achieved. From the position of the central peaks at the two fields, the chemical shifts and the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants were calculated. The chemical shifts for all compounds studied range from 282 to 342 ppm with respect to NH4Cl. The nuclear quadrupole coupling constants range from 429 kHz for AgNO3 to 993 kHz for LiNO3. These data are compared with those available in the literature.

  10. Modeling proteins using a super-secondary structure library and NMR chemical shift information

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Vilas; Vallat, Brinda; Dybas, Joseph M.; Fiser, Andras

    2013-01-01

    Summary A remaining challenge in protein modeling is to predict structures for sequences that do not share recognizable sequence similarity to any experimentally solved structure. This challenge can be addressed by hybrid algorithms that utilize easily obtainable experimental data and carry a limited amount of indirect structural information. Based on earlier observations, the library of protein super-secondary structure motifs (Smotifs) saturated about a decade ago, and new folds discovered since then are novel combinations of existing Smotifs. This observation suggests that it should be possible to build any structure, of either a known or yet to be discovered fold, from a combination of existing Smotifs derived from already known structures. In the absence of any sequence similarity signal, limited experimental data can be used to relate the backbone conformations of Smotifs between target proteins and known experimental structures. Here we present a modeling algorithm that relies on an exhaustive Smotif library and on NMR chemical shift patterns without any input of primary sequence information. In a test of 102 proteins with unique folds, the algorithm delivered 90 homology model quality models, among them 24 high quality ones, and a topologically correct solution for almost all cases. Detailed analysis of the method’s performance suggests that further improvement can be achieved by improving sampling algorithms and developing more precise tools that predict dihedral angle preferences from chemical shift assignments. The current approach opens a venue to address the modeling of larger protein structures for which chemical shifts are available. PMID:23685209

  11. NMR study of some coumarins and furocoumarins methylated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, R.; Santana, L.; Uriarte, E.; Zagotto, G.

    1994-01-01

    The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of various methylcoumarins and methylfurocoumarins are reported. All signals were assigned and the influence on chemical shifts of methylation at various positions was determined.

  12. Measurement of proton chemical shifts in invisible states of slowly exchanging protein systems by chemical exchange saturation transfer.

    PubMed

    Bouvignies, Guillaume; Kay, Lewis E

    2012-12-13

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful technique for studies of transiently formed, sparsely populated (excited) conformational states of protein molecules in slow exchange with a dominant structure. The most popular form of the experiment, and the version originally developed, uses a weak (1)H radio frequency field to perturb longitudinal magnetization of one state with the effect transferred to magnetization in the second conformation via chemical exchange. A significant limitation of the method for protein applications emerges from (1)H magnetization transfer via dipolar relaxation (NOE effect) that can severely complicate analysis of the resulting CEST profile. This is particularly an issue since the (1)H chemical shifts of the excited state, critical for structural studies of these elusive conformers, become difficult to extract. Here we present a method for measurement of these shifts via CEST experiments in which the NOE effect is not an issue. The methodology is illustrated through applications to a pair of exchanging systems where the results are cross-validated. PMID:23194058

  13. Temperature dependence of contact and dipolar NMR chemical shifts in paramagnetic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bob; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-02-07

    Using a recently proposed equation for NMR nuclear magnetic shielding for molecules with unpaired electrons [A. Soncini and W. Van den Heuvel, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 021103 (2013)], equations for the temperature (T) dependent isotropic shielding for multiplets with an effective spin S equal to 1/2, 1, 3/2, 2, and 5/2 in terms of electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian parameters are derived and then expanded in powers of 1/T. One simplifying assumption used is that a matrix derived from the zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensor and the Zeeman coupling matrix (g-tensor) share the same principal axis system. The influence of the rhombic ZFS parameter E is only investigated for S = 1. Expressions for paramagnetic contact shielding (from the isotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) and pseudo-contact or dipolar shielding (from the anisotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) are considered separately. The leading order is always 1/T. A temperature dependence of the contact shielding as 1/T and of the dipolar shielding as 1/T{sup 2}, which is sometimes assumed in the assignment of paramagnetic chemical shifts, is shown to arise only if S ≥ 1 and zero-field splitting is appreciable, and only if the Zeeman coupling matrix is nearly isotropic (Δg = 0). In such situations, an assignment of contact versus dipolar shifts may be possible based only on linear and quadratic fits of measured variable-temperature chemical shifts versus 1/T. Numerical data are provided for nickelocene (S = 1). Even under the assumption of Δg = 0, a different leading order of contact and dipolar shifts in powers of 1/T is not obtained for S = 3/2. When Δg is not very small, dipolar and contact shifts both depend in leading order in 1/T in all cases, with sizable contributions in order 1/T{sup n} with n = 2 and higher.

  14. Blue-shifted and picosecond amplified UV emission from aqueous chemical grown ZnO microrods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Empizo, Melvin John F.; Yamanoi, Kohei; Santos-Putungan, Alexandra B.; Arita, Ren; Minami, Yuki; Luong, Mui Viet; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Estacio, Elmer S.; Somintac, Armando S.; Salvador, Arnel A.; Sarmago, Roland V.; Sarukura, Nobuhiko

    2015-10-01

    Room-temperature amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) has been observed from aqueous chemical grown zinc oxide (ZnO) microrods. The well-faceted microrods have only a single narrow ultraviolet (UV) emission at 390 nm (3.2 eV) with average lifetimes as fast as 85-100 ps. The characteristic ASE also exhibits blue-shifted peaks and shortened lifetimes. At present, the peak shifting and the lifetime shortening are attributed to the band filling and photo-induced screening effects and to the nonradiative relaxation process, respectively. Results indicate that the ZnO microrods have good structural and optical quality which leads to their suitable use for optoelectronic applications.

  15. On the bathochromic shift of the absorption by astaxanthin in crustacyanin: a quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbeej, Bo; Eriksson, Leif A.

    2003-06-01

    The structural origin of the bathochromic shift assumed by the electronic absorption spectrum of protein-bound astaxanthin, the carotenoid that upon binding to crustacyanin is responsible for the blue colouration of lobster shell, is investigated by means of quantum chemical methods. The calculations suggest that the bathochromic shift is largely due to one of the astaxanthin C4 keto groups being hydrogen-bonded to a histidine residue of the surrounding protein, and that the effect of this histidine is directly dependent on its protonation state. Out of the different methodologies (CIS, TD-DFT, and ZINDO/S) employed to calculate wavelengths of maximum absorption, the best agreement with experimental data is obtained using the semiempirical ZINDO/S method.

  16. Conformational, structural, vibrational, electronic and quantum chemical investigations of cis-2-methoxycinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Anitha, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and FT-Raman spectra of cis-2-methoxycinnamic acid have been measured in the range 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. Complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out using the observed FTIR and FT-Raman data. The geometry was optimised without any symmetry constrains using the DFT/B3LYP method utilising 6-311++G∗∗ and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The thermodynamic stability and chemical reactivity descriptors of the molecule have been determined. The exact environment of C and H of the molecule has been analysed by NMR spectroscopies through 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule. The energies of the frontier molecular orbitals have also been determined. Complete NBO analysis was also carried out to find out the intramolecular electronic interactions and their stabilisation energy. The vibrational frequencies which were determined experimentally are compared with those obtained theoretically from density functional theory (DFT) gradient calculations employing the B3LYP/6-311++G∗∗ and cc-pVTZ methods.

  17. Direct detection of spin chemical potential shift through spin filtering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Guoxing; Moodera, Jagadeesh

    2010-03-01

    Spin filtering (SF) effect is a unique way to generate highly spin-polarized tunnel currents from nonmagnetic electrodes. Magnetic tunnel junctions based on pure SF effect have been realized recently [1] as a clear demonstration of principle for the spin manipulation through SF effect. The next challenge is the readout of spin information. In this work, we present the direct detection of the spin chemical potential shift in an Al nano cluster sandwiched between two SF EuS tunnel barriers. The spin channels are split by depositing Al directly onto EuS, and the indirect exchange interaction between the Al conduction electrons and the localized Eu 4f electrons gives rise to an effective Zeeman splitting with the strength of a few mV. EuS on the readout side is isolated from the Al clusters with a natural Al2O3 barrier. In a vertical measurement geometry with no transport current, we directly detected the spin dependent voltage levels by aligning the detection SF barrier parallel or antiparallel to the first SF barrier, corresponding to the equilibrium up- and down-spin chemical potentials. A simple analysis treating the barriers as a set of resistors revealed that the observed voltage difference is the actual chemical potential shift modulated by the SF efficiency.[4pt] [1] G.X. Miao, M. Muller, J.S. Moodera,PRL102,076601(2009)

  18. Experimental and quantum chemical studies of a novel synthetic prenylated chalcone

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chalcones are ubiquitous natural compounds with a wide variety of reported biological activities, including antitumoral, antiviral and antimicrobial effects. Furthermore, chalcones are being studied for its potential use in organic electroluminescent devices; therefore the description of their spectroscopic properties is important to elucidate the structure of these molecules. One of the main techniques available for structure elucidation is the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR). Accordingly, the prediction of the NMR spectra in this kind of molecules is necessary to gather information about the influence of substituents on their spectra. Results A novel substituted chalcone has been synthetized. In order to identify the functional groups present in the new synthesized compound and confirm its chemical structure, experimental and theoretical 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectra were analyzed. The theoretical molecular structure and NMR spectra were calculated at both the Hartree-Fock and Density Functional (meta: TPSS; hybrid: B3LYP and PBE1PBE; hybrid meta GGA: M05-2X and M06-2X) levels of theory in combination with a 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The structural parameters showed that the best method for geometry optimization was DFT:M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p), whereas the calculated bond angles and bond distances match experimental values of similar chalcone derivatives. The NMR calculations were carried out using the Gauge-Independent Atomic Orbital (GIAO) formalism in a DFT:M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) optimized geometry. Conclusion Considering all HF and DFT methods with GIAO calculations, TPSS and PBE1PBE were the most accurate methods used for calculation of 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR chemical shifts, which was almost similar to the B3LYP functional, followed in order by HF, M05-2X and M06-2X methods. All calculations were done using the Gaussian 09 software package. Theoretical calculations can be used to predict and confirm the structure of substituted chalcones

  19. Performance of Density Functional Models to Reproduce Observed 13Cα Chemical Shifts of Proteins in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Jorge A.; Baldoni, Héctor A.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to test several density functional models (namely, OPBE, O3LYP, OPW91, BPW91, OB98, BPBE, B971, OLYP, PBE1PBE, and B3LYP) to determine their accuracy and speed for computing 13Cα chemical shifts in proteins. The test is applied to 10 NMR-derived conformations of the 76-residue α/β protein ubiquitin (protein data bank id 1D3Z). With each functional, the 13Cα shielding was computed for 760 amino acid residues by using a combination of approaches that includes, but is not limited to, treating each amino acid X in the sequence as a terminally blocked tripeptide with the sequence Ac-GXG-NMe in the conformation of the regularized experimental protein structure. As computation of the 13Cα chemical shifts, not their shielding, is the main goal of this work, a computation of the 13Cα shielding of the reference, namely, tetramethylsilane, is investigated here and an effective and a computed tetramethylsilane shielding value for each of the functionals is provided. Despite observed small differences among all functionals tested, the results indicate that four of them, namely, OPBE, OPW91, OB98, and OLYP, provide the most accurate functionals with which to reproduce observed 13Cα chemical shifts of proteins in solution, and are among the faster ones. This study also provides evidence for the applicability of these functionals to proteins of any size or class, and for the validation of our previous results and conclusions, obtained from calculations with the slower B3LYP functional. PMID:18780343

  20. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brian A; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D; Stafford, R Jason

    2009-03-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz-McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (< or equal 16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > or =5 for echo train lengths (ETLs) > or =4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and/or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with > or =4 echoes and for T2*(<1.0%) with > or =7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire < or =16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo

  1. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Brian A.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D.; Stafford, R. Jason

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz–McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (≤16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer–Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)≥5 for echo train lengths (ETLs)≥4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and∕or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with ≥4 echoes and for T2* (<1.0%) with ≥7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire ≤16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo and in vivo

  2. Can the current density map topology be extracted from the nucleus independent chemical shifts?

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Sofie; Acke, Guillaume; Havenith, Remco W A; Bultinck, Patrick

    2016-04-28

    Aromatic compounds are characterised by the presence of a ring current when in a magnetic field. As a consequence, current density maps are used to assess (the degree of) aromaticity of a compound. However, often a more discrete set of so-called Nucleus Independent Chemical Shift (NICS) values is used that is derived from the current density. It is shown here that there is no simple one-to-one relationship that allows reconstructing current density maps from only NICS-values. NICS values should therefore not be used as aromaticity indices without analysis of the ab initio computed current density map. PMID:26762574

  3. Calculation of NMR chemical shifts. 7. Gauge-invariant INDO method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, H.; Miura, K.; Hirai, A.

    A gauge-invariant INDO method based on the coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory is presented and applied to the calculation of 1H and 13C chemical shifts of hydrocarbons including ring compounds. Invariance of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic shieldings with respect to displacement of the coordinate origin is discussed. Comparison between calculated and experimental results exhibits fairly good agreement, provided that the INDO parameters of Ellis et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.94, 4069 (1972)) are used with the inclusion of all multicenter one-electron integrals.

  4. Three model space experiments on chemical reactions. [Gibbs adsorption, equilibrium shift and electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P.; Facemire, B.

    1977-01-01

    Three investigations conducted aboard Skylab IV and Apollo-Soyuz involved phenomena that are of interest to the biochemistry community. The formaldehyde clock reaction and the equilibrium shift reaction experiments conducted aboard Apollo Soyuz demonstrate the effect of low-g foams or air/liquid dispersions on reaction rate and chemical equilibrium. The electrodeposition reaction experiment conducted aboard Skylab IV demonstrate the effect of a low-g environment on an electrochemical displacement reaction. The implications of the three space experiments for various applications are considered.

  5. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Görling, Benjamin; Bräse, Stefan; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored. PMID:27598217

  6. Prediction of (19)F NMR Chemical Shifts in Labeled Proteins: Computational Protocol and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Urick, Andrew K; Pomerantz, William C K; Cramer, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis of ligand complexation in biomolecular systems is important in the design of new medicinal therapeutic agents; however, monitoring subtle structural changes in a protein's microenvironment is a challenging and complex problem. In this regard, the use of protein-based (19)F NMR for screening low-molecular-weight molecules (i.e., fragments) can be an especially powerful tool to aid in drug design. Resonance assignment of the protein's (19)F NMR spectrum is necessary for structural analysis. Here, a quantum chemical method has been developed as an initial approach to facilitate the assignment of a fluorinated protein's (19)F NMR spectrum. The epigenetic "reader" domain of protein Brd4 was taken as a case study to assess the strengths and limitations of the method. The overall modeling protocol predicts chemical shifts for residues in rigid proteins with good accuracy; proper accounting for explicit solvation of fluorinated residues by water is critical. PMID:27218275

  7. Correlation between 19F environment and isotropic chemical shift in barium and calcium fluoroaluminates.

    PubMed

    Body, M; Silly, G; Legein, C; Buzaré, J-Y

    2004-04-19

    High-speed MAS (19)F NMR spectra are recorded and reconstructed for 10 compounds from BaF(2)-AlF(3) and CaF(2)-AlF(3) binary systems which leads to the determination of 77 isotropic (19)F chemical shifts in various environments. A first attribution of NMR lines is performed for 8 compounds using a superposition model as initially proposed by B. Bureau et al. The phenomenological parameters of this model are then refined to improve the NMR line assignment. A satisfactory reliability is reached with a root-mean-square (RMS) deviation between calculated and measured values equal to 6 ppm. The refined parameters are then successfully tested on alpha-BaCaAlF(7) whose structure was recently determined. Finally, the isotropic chemical shift ranges are defined for shared, unshared, and "free" fluorine atoms encountered in the investigated binary systems. So, the fluorine surroundings can be deduced from the NMR line positions in compounds whose structure is unknown. Such an approach can also be applied to fluoride glasses. PMID:15074964

  8. High spectral specificity of local chemical components characterization with multichannel shift-excitation Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for its noninvasive and nondestructive characterization of local chemical structures. However, spectrally overlapping components prevent the specific identification of hyperfine molecular information of different substances, because of limitations in the spectral resolving power. The challenge is to find a way of preserving scattered photons and retrieving hidden/buried Raman signatures to take full advantage of its chemical specificity. Here, we demonstrate a multichannel acquisition framework based on shift-excitation and slit-modulation, followed by mathematical post-processing, which enables a significant improvement in the spectral specificity of Raman characterization. The present technique, termed shift-excitation blind super-resolution Raman spectroscopy (SEBSR), uses multiple degraded spectra to beat the dispersion-loss trade-off and facilitate high-resolution applications. It overcomes a fundamental problem that has previously plagued high-resolution Raman spectroscopy: fine spectral resolution requires large dispersion, which is accompanied by extreme optical loss. Applicability is demonstrated by the perfect recovery of fine structure of the C-Cl bending mode as well as the clear discrimination of different polymorphs of mannitol. Due to its enhanced discrimination capability, this method offers a feasible route at encouraging a broader range of applications in analytical chemistry, materials and biomedicine.

  9. Density-functional computation of ⁹³Nb NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Bühl, Michael; Wrackmeyer, Bernd

    2010-12-01

    93Nb chemical shifts of [NbX6](-) (X = Cl, F, CO), [NbXCl4](-) (X = O, S), Nb2(OMe)10, Cp*2Nb(κ2-BH4), (Cp*Nb)2(µ-B2H6)2, CpNb(CO)4, and Cp2NbH3 are computed at the GIAO (gauge-including atomic orbitals)-, BPW91- and B3LYP-, and CSGT (continuous set of gauge transformations)-CAM-B3LYP, -ωB97, and -ωB97X levels, using BP86-optimized or experimental (X-ray) geometries. Experimental chemical shifts are best reproduced at the GIAO-BPW91 level when δ(93Nb) values of inorganic complexes are referenced directly relative to [NbCl6](-) and those of organometallic species are first calculated relative to [Nb(CO)6](-). An inadvertent error in the reported δ(93Nb) values of cyclopentadiene borane complexes (H. Brunner et al., J. Organomet. Chem.1992, 436, 313) is corrected. Trends in the observed 93Nb NMR linewidths for anionic niobates [Nb(CO)5](3-), [Nb(CO)5H](2-), and [Nb(CO)5(NH3)](-) are rationalized in terms of computed electric field gradients at the metal. PMID:20552575

  10. High spectral specificity of local chemical components characterization with multichannel shift-excitation Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for its noninvasive and nondestructive characterization of local chemical structures. However, spectrally overlapping components prevent the specific identification of hyperfine molecular information of different substances, because of limitations in the spectral resolving power. The challenge is to find a way of preserving scattered photons and retrieving hidden/buried Raman signatures to take full advantage of its chemical specificity. Here, we demonstrate a multichannel acquisition framework based on shift-excitation and slit-modulation, followed by mathematical post-processing, which enables a significant improvement in the spectral specificity of Raman characterization. The present technique, termed shift-excitation blind super-resolution Raman spectroscopy (SEBSR), uses multiple degraded spectra to beat the dispersion-loss trade-off and facilitate high-resolution applications. It overcomes a fundamental problem that has previously plagued high-resolution Raman spectroscopy: fine spectral resolution requires large dispersion, which is accompanied by extreme optical loss. Applicability is demonstrated by the perfect recovery of fine structure of the C-Cl bending mode as well as the clear discrimination of different polymorphs of mannitol. Due to its enhanced discrimination capability, this method offers a feasible route at encouraging a broader range of applications in analytical chemistry, materials and biomedicine. PMID:26350355

  11. Solvation effects on chemical shifts by embedded cluster integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Frach, Roland; Kast, Stefan M

    2014-12-11

    The accurate computational prediction of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters like chemical shifts represents a challenge if the species studied is immersed in strongly polarizing environments such as water. Common approaches to treating a solvent in the form of, e.g., the polarizable continuum model (PCM) ignore strong directional interactions such as H-bonds to the solvent which can have substantial impact on magnetic shieldings. We here present a computational methodology that accounts for atomic-level solvent effects on NMR parameters by extending the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) integral equation theory to the prediction of chemical shifts of N-methylacetamide (NMA) in aqueous solution. We examine the influence of various so-called closure approximations of the underlying three-dimensional RISM theory as well as the impact of basis set size and different treatment of electrostatic solute-solvent interactions. We find considerable and systematic improvement over reference PCM and gas phase calculations. A smaller basis set in combination with a simple point charge model already yields good performance which can be further improved by employing exact electrostatic quantum-mechanical solute-solvent interaction energies. A larger basis set benefits more significantly from exact over point charge electrostatics, which can be related to differences of the solvent's charge distribution. PMID:25377116

  12. A general chemical shift decomposition method for hyperpolarized (13) C metabolite magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Xiong; Merritt, Matthew E; Sherry, Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized carbon-13 allows sequential steps of metabolism to be detected in vivo. Potential applications in cancer, brain, muscular, myocardial, and hepatic metabolism suggest that clinical applications could be readily developed. A primary concern in imaging hyperpolarized nuclei is the irreversible decay of the enhanced magnetization back to thermal equilibrium. Multiple methods for rapid imaging of hyperpolarized substrates and their products have been proposed with a multi-point Dixon method distinguishing itself as a robust protocol for imaging [1-(13) C]pyruvate. We describe here a generalized chemical shift decomposition method that incorporates a single-shot spiral imaging sequence plus a spectroscopic sequence to retain as much spin polarization as possible while allowing detection of metabolites that have a wide range of chemical shift values. The new method is demonstrated for hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate, [1-(13) C]acetoacetate, and [2-(13) C]dihydroxyacetone. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27060361

  13. Relativistic environmental effects in (29)Si NMR chemical shifts of halosilanes: light nucleus, heavy environment.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Sergey V; Rusakov, Yury Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-06-01

    Relativistic calculations of (29)Si NMR shielding constants (chemical shifts) in the series of halosilanes SiX(n)H(4-n) (X = F, Cl, Br and I) are performed within a full four-component relativistic Dirac's scheme using relativistic Dyall's basis sets. Three different theoretical levels are tested in the computation of (29)Si NMR chemical shifts in comparison with experiment: namely, four-component relativistic GIAO-DFT, four-component relativistic GIAO-RPA, and a hybrid scheme of a nonrelativistic GIAO-MP2 with taking into account relativistic corrections using the four-component relativistic GIAO-RPA. The DFT results give larger relativistic effects as compared to the RPA data which might be rationalized in terms of the manifestation of correlation effects taken into account at the DFT level and not accounted for at the uncorrelated RPA level. Taking into account solvent effects slightly improves agreement with experiment, however, being not a matter of principle. Generally, relativistic pure nonempirical wave function methods perform much better as compared to relativistic DFT methods when benchmarked to experiment. PMID:25946056

  14. Predicting Pt-195 NMR chemical shift using new relativistic all-electron basis set.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, D; Guerra, C Fonseca; de Oliveira, M A L; Ramalho, T C; Dos Santos, H F

    2016-10-01

    Predicting NMR properties is a valuable tool to assist the experimentalists in the characterization of molecular structure. For heavy metals, such as Pt-195, only a few computational protocols are available. In the present contribution, all-electron Gaussian basis sets, suitable to calculate the Pt-195 NMR chemical shift, are presented for Pt and all elements commonly found as Pt-ligands. The new basis sets identified as NMR-DKH were partially contracted as a triple-zeta doubly polarized scheme with all coefficients obtained from a Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) second-order scalar relativistic calculation. The Pt-195 chemical shift was predicted through empirical models fitted to reproduce experimental data for a set of 183 Pt(II) complexes which NMR sign ranges from -1000 to -6000 ppm. Furthermore, the models were validated using a new set of 75 Pt(II) complexes, not included in the descriptive set. The models were constructed using non-relativistic Hamiltonian at density functional theory (DFT-PBEPBE) level with NMR-DKH basis set for all atoms. For the best model, the mean absolute deviation (MAD) and the mean relative deviation (MRD) were 150 ppm and 6%, respectively, for the validation set (75 Pt-complexes) and 168 ppm (MAD) and 5% (MRD) for all 258 Pt(II) complexes. These results were comparable with relativistic DFT calculation, 200 ppm (MAD) and 6% (MRD). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27510431

  15. Qualitative study of substituent effects on NMR (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I; Bustamante, Manuel G; Pasqualini, Enrique E; Melo, Juan I; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2009-09-10

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-beta substituent effects on both (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and sigma-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds. PMID:19685922

  16. Qualitative Study of Substituent Effects on NMR 15N and 17O Chemical Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Rubén H.; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Bustamante, Manuel G.; Pasqualini, Enrique E.; Melo, Juan I.; Tormena, Cláudio F.

    2009-08-01

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-β substituent effects on both 15N and 17O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and σ-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds.

  17. Cuticular hydrocarbon divergence in the jewel wasp Nasonia: Evolutionary shifts in chemical communication channels?

    PubMed Central

    Buellesbach, Jan; Gadau, Jürgen; Beukeboom, Leo W.; Echinger, Felix; Raychoudhury, Rhitoban; Werren, John H.; Schmitt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The evolution and maintenance of intraspecific communication channels constitutes a key feature of chemical signaling and sexual communication. However, how divergent chemical communication channels evolve while maintaining their integrity for both sender and receiver is poorly understood. In the present study, we compare male and female cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles in the jewel wasp genus Nasonia, analyze their chemical divergence, and investigate their role as species-specific sexual signaling cues. Males and females of all four Nasonia species showed unique, non-overlapping CHC profiles unambiguously separating them. Surprisingly, male and female phylogenies based on the chemical distances between their CHC profiles differed dramatically, where only male CHC divergence parallels the molecular phylogeny of Nasonia. In particular, N. giraulti female CHC profiles were the most divergent from all other species and very different from its most closely related sibling species N. oneida. Furthermore, although our behavioural assays indicate that female CHC can generally be perceived as sexual cues attracting males in Nasonia, this function has apparently been lost in the highly divergent female N. giraulti CHC profiles. Curiously, N. giraulti males are still attracted to heterospecific, but not to conspecific female CHC profiles. We suggest that this striking discrepancy has been caused by an extensive evolutionary shift in female N. giraulti CHC profiles, which are no longer used as conspecific recognition cues. Our study constitutes the first report of an apparent abandonment of a sexual recognition cue that the receiver did not adapt to. PMID:24118588

  18. Molecular structure, spectroscopic characterization of (S)-2-Oxopyrrolidin-1-yl Butanamide and ab initio, DFT based quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, T.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2015-10-01

    The experimental and theoretical spectra of (S)-2-Oxopyrrolidin-1-yl Butanamide (S2OPB) were studied. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of S2OPB in the solid phase were recorded and analyzed in the range 4000-450 and 5000-50 cm-1 respectively. The structural and spectroscopic analyses of S2OPB were calculated using ab initio Hartree Fock (HF) and density functional theory calculations (B3PW91, B3LYP) with 6-31G(d,p) basis set. A complete vibrational interpretation has been made on the basis of the calculated Potential Energy Distribution (PED). The HF, B3LYP and B3PW91 methods based NMR calculation has been used to assign the 1H NMR and 13C NMR chemical shift of S2OPB. Comparative study on UV-Vis spectral analysis between the experimental and theoretical (B3PW91, B3LYP) methods and the global chemical parameters and local descriptor of reactivity through the Fukui function were performed. Finally the thermodynamic properties of S2OPB were calculated at different temperatures and the corresponding relations between the properties and temperature were also studied.

  19. Molecular structure, spectroscopic characterization of (S)-2-Oxopyrrolidin-1-yl Butanamide and ab initio, DFT based quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Ramya, T; Gunasekaran, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2015-10-01

    The experimental and theoretical spectra of (S)-2-Oxopyrrolidin-1-yl Butanamide (S2OPB) were studied. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of S2OPB in the solid phase were recorded and analyzed in the range 4000-450 and 5000-50 cm(-1) respectively. The structural and spectroscopic analyses of S2OPB were calculated using ab initio Hartree Fock (HF) and density functional theory calculations (B3PW91, B3LYP) with 6-31G(d,p) basis set. A complete vibrational interpretation has been made on the basis of the calculated Potential Energy Distribution (PED). The HF, B3LYP and B3PW91 methods based NMR calculation has been used to assign the (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR chemical shift of S2OPB. Comparative study on UV-Vis spectral analysis between the experimental and theoretical (B3PW91, B3LYP) methods and the global chemical parameters and local descriptor of reactivity through the Fukui function were performed. Finally the thermodynamic properties of S2OPB were calculated at different temperatures and the corresponding relations between the properties and temperature were also studied. PMID:25956325

  20. Water-fat imaging and general chemical shift imaging with spectrum modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Li

    Water-fat chemical shift imaging (CSI) has been an active research area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since the early 1980's. There are two main reasons for water- fat imaging. First, water-fat imaging can serve as a fat- suppression method. Removing the usually bright fatty signals not only extends the useful dynamic range of an image, but also allows better visualization of lesions or injected contrast, and removes chemical shift artifacts, which may contribute to improved diagnosis. Second, quantification of water and fat provides useful chemical information for characterizing tissues such as bone marrow, liver, and adrenal masses. A milestone in water- fat imaging is the Dixon method that can produce separate water and fat images with only two data acquisitions. In practice, however, the Dixon method is not always successful due to field inhomogeneity problems. In recent years, many variations of the Dixon method have been proposed to overcome the field inhomogeneity problem. In general, these methods can at best separate water and fat without identifying the two because the water and fat magnetization vectors are sampled symmetrically, only parallel and anti-parallel. Furthermore, these methods usually depend on two-dimensional phase unwrapping which itself is sensitive to noise and artifacts, and becomes unreliable when the images have disconnected tissues in the field-of-view (FOV). We will first introduce the basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chapter 1, and briefly review the existing water-fat imaging techniques in chapter 2. In chapter 3, we will introduce a new method for water-fat imaging. With three image acquisitions, a general direct phase encoding (DPE) of the chemical shift information is achieved, which allows an unambiguous determination of water and fat on a pixel by pixel basis. Details of specific implementations and noise performance will be discussed. Representative results

  1. Synthesis of diosgenin p-nitrobenzoate by Steglich method, its crystal structure and quantum chemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Arun; Bhatia, Akriti; Shukla, Dolly; Kumar, Abhinav; Sonker, Ravi; Prakash, Rohit; Bhatia, Gitika

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, a novel one pot synthetic route for the synthesis of diosgenin p-nitrobenzoate (2) is described from cheap, commercially available naturally occurring sapogenin-diosgenin. The molecular geometry, IR frequencies, Gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO), 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of compound 2 has been calculated in the ground state by using the Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional method (DFT/B3LYP) using 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The structure of diosgenin p-nitrobenzoate (2) has been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The compound crystallizes in monoclinic form having space group P21 with cell parameters a = 7.719(2) Å, b = 8.425(2) Å and c = 22.578(6) Å, α = 90.00, β = 98.46 and γ = 90.00. The oxygen atoms O5 and O4 of the nitro and carbonyl ester, respectively display weak intermolecular N1sbnd O5⋯H7' and C1'dbnd O4⋯H4' interactions having dimensions of 2.61 and 2.59 Å, respectively to form intricate 1D network. The study of the electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energy were performed using time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energy values indicate that charge transfer takes place within the molecule. The compound was screened for cytotoxicity and anti-adipogenic activity.

  2. Chemical potential shift in organic field-effect transistors identified by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamura, Naoka Kitada, Yuta; Honma, Itaru; Tsurumi, Junto; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun; Horiba, Koji; Oshima, Masaharu

    2015-06-22

    A chemical potential shift in an organic field effect transistor (OFET) during operation has been revealed by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy analysis performed using a three-dimensional nanoscale electron-spectroscopy chemical analysis system. OFETs were fabricated using ultrathin (3 ML or 12 nm) single-crystalline C10-DNBDT-NW films on SiO{sub 2} (200 nm)/Si substrates with a backgate electrode and top source/drain Au electrodes, and C 1s line profiles under biasing at the backgate and drain electrodes were measured. When applying −30 V to the backgate, there is C 1s core level shift of 0.1 eV; this shift can be attributed to a chemical potential shift corresponding to band bending by the field effect, resulting in p-type doping.

  3. Chemical potential shift in organic field-effect transistors identified by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamura, Naoka; Kitada, Yuta; Tsurumi, Junto; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Horiba, Koji; Honma, Itaru; Takeya, Jun; Oshima, Masaharu

    2015-06-01

    A chemical potential shift in an organic field effect transistor (OFET) during operation has been revealed by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy analysis performed using a three-dimensional nanoscale electron-spectroscopy chemical analysis system. OFETs were fabricated using ultrathin (3 ML or 12 nm) single-crystalline C10-DNBDT-NW films on SiO2 (200 nm)/Si substrates with a backgate electrode and top source/drain Au electrodes, and C 1s line profiles under biasing at the backgate and drain electrodes were measured. When applying -30 V to the backgate, there is C 1s core level shift of 0.1 eV; this shift can be attributed to a chemical potential shift corresponding to band bending by the field effect, resulting in p-type doping.

  4. 125Te NMR chemical-shift trends in PbTe–GeTe and PbTe–SnTe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Njegic, Bosiljka; Levin, Evgenii M.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-10-08

    Complex tellurides, such as doped PbTe, GeTe, and their alloys, are among the best thermoelectric materials. Knowledge of the change in 125Te NMR chemical shift due to bonding to dopant or “solute” atoms is useful for determination of phase composition, peak assignment, and analysis of local bonding. We have measured the 125Te NMR chemical shifts in PbTe-based alloys, Pb1-xGexTe and Pb1-xSnxTe, which have a rocksalt-like structure, and analyzed their trends. For low x, several peaks are resolved in the 22-kHz MAS 125Te NMR spectra. A simple linear trend in chemical shifts with the number of Pb neighbors is observed. No evidence of a proposed ferroelectric displacement of Ge atoms in a cubic PbTe matrix is detected at low Ge concentrations. The observed chemical shift trends are compared with the results of DFT calculations, which confirm the linear dependence on the composition of the first-neighbor shell. The data enable determination of the composition of various phases in multiphase telluride materials. They also provide estimates of the 125Te chemical shifts of GeTe and SnTe (+970 and +400±150 ppm, respectively, from PbTe), which are otherwise difficult to access due to Knight shifts of many hundreds of ppm in neat GeTe and SnTe.

  5. The chemical structure of highly aromatic humic acids in three volcanic ash soils as determined by dipolar dephasing NMR studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Schnitzer, M.; Vassallo, A.M.; Wilson, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Dipolar dephasing 13C NMR studies of three highly aromatic humic acids, one from a modern soil and two from paleosols, have permitted the determination of the degree of aromatic substitution. From these data and the normal solid-state 13C NMR data we have been able to develop a model for the average chemical structure of these humic acids that generally correlates well with permanganate oxidation data. The models depict these humic acids as benzene di- and tricarboxylic acids interconnected by biphenyl linkages. An increasing degree of substitution is observed with increasing geologic age. These structures may be characteristic of the resistant aromatic part of the "core" of humic substances that survives degradation. ?? 1989.

  6. Reassigning the Structures of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts Computed with Quantum Mechanics: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palazzo, Teresa A.; Truong, Tiana T.; Wong, Shirley M. T.; Mack, Emma T.; Lodewyk, Michael W.; Harrison, Jason G.; Gamage, R. Alan; Siegel, Justin B.; Kurth, Mark J.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    An applied computational chemistry laboratory exercise is described in which students use modern quantum chemical calculations of chemical shifts to assign the structure of a recently isolated natural product. A pre/post assessment was used to measure student learning gains and verify that students demonstrated proficiency of key learning…

  7. Experimental and theoretical study of the intramolecular C-H···N and C-H···S hydrogen bonding effects in the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the 2-(alkylsulfanyl)-5-amino-1-vinylpyrroles: a particular state of amine nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Albanov, Alexander I; Tarasova, Ol'ga A; Nedolya, Nina A

    2013-07-01

    In the (1)H NMR spectra of the 1-vinylpyrroles with amino- and alkylsulfanyl groups in 5 and 2 positions, an extraordinarily large difference between resonance positions of the HA and HB terminal methylene protons of the vinyl group is discovered. Also, the one-bond (1)J(C(β),H(B)) coupling constant is surprisingly greater than the (1)J(C(β),H(A)) coupling constant in pyrroles under investigation, while in all known cases, there was a reverse relationship between these coupling constants. These spectral anomalies are substantiated by quantum chemical calculations. The calculations show that the amine nitrogen lone pair is removed from the conjugation with the π-system of the pyrrole ring so that it is directed toward the HB hydrogen. These factors are favorable to the emergence of the intramolecular C-HB •••N hydrogen bonding in the s-cis(N) conformation. On the other hand, the spatial proximity of the sulfur to the HB hydrogen provides an opportunity of the intramolecular C-HB •••S hydrogen bonding in the s-cis(S) conformation. Presence of the hydrogen bond critical points as well as ring critical point for corresponding chelate ring revealed by a quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) approach confirms the existence of the weak intramolecular C-H•••N and C-H•••S hydrogen bonding. Therefore, an unusual high-frequency shift of the HB signal and the increase in the (1)J(C(β),H(B)) coupling constant can be explained by the effects of hydrogen bonding. PMID:23695830

  8. Rates and Mechanisms of Oil Shale Pyrolysis: A Chemical Structure Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Thomas; Pugmire, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Three pristine Utah Green River oil shale samples were obtained and used for analysis by the combined research groups at the University of Utah and Brigham Young University. Oil shale samples were first demineralized and the separated kerogen and extracted bitumen samples were then studied by a host of techniques including high resolution liquid-state carbon-13 NMR, solid-state magic angle sample spinning 13C NMR, GC/MS, FTIR, and pyrolysis. Bitumen was extracted from the shale using methanol/dichloromethane and analyzed using high resolution 13C NMR liquid state spectroscopy, showing carbon aromaticities of 7 to 11%. The three parent shales and the demineralized kerogens were each analyzed with solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. Carbon aromaticity of the kerogen was 23-24%, with 10-12 aromatic carbons per cluster. Crushed samples of Green River oil shale and its kerogen extract were pyrolyzed at heating rates from 1 to 10 K/min at pressures of 1 and 40 bar and temperatures up to 1000°C. The transient pyrolysis data were fit with a first-order model and a Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM). The demineralized kerogen was pyrolyzed at 10 K/min in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure at temperatures up to 525°C, and the pyrolysis products (light gas, tar, and char) were analyzed using 13C NMR, GC/MS, and FTIR. Details of the kerogen pyrolysis have been modeled by a modified version of the chemical percolation devolatilization (CPD) model that has been widely used to model coal combustion/pyrolysis. This refined CPD model has been successful in predicting the char, tar, and gas yields of the three shale samples during pyrolysis. This set of experiments and associated modeling represents the most sophisticated and complete analysis available for a given set of oil shale samples.

  9. Quantum Chemical Calculations of Amide-15N Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors for a Membrane-Bound Cytochrome b5

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable interest in determining amide-15N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors from biomolecules and understanding their variation for structural and dynamics studies using solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy and also by quantum chemical calculations. Due to the difficulties associated with the measurement of CSA tensors from membrane proteins, NMR-based structural studies heavily relied on the CSA tensors determined from model systems, typically single crystals of model peptides. In the present study, the principal components of backbone amide-15N CSA tensor have been determined using density functional theory for a 16.7-kDa membrane-bound paramagnetic heme containing protein, cytochrome b5 (cytb5). All the calculations were performed by taking residues within 5Å distance from the backbone amide-15N nucleus of interest. The calculated amide-15N CSA spans agree less well with our solution NMR data determined for an effective internuclear distance rN-H = 1.023 Å and a constant angle β = 18° that the least shielded component (δ11) makes with the N-H bond. The variation of amide-15N CSA span obtained using quantum chemical calculations is found to be smaller than that obtained from solution NMR measurements, whereas the trends of the variations are found to be in close agreement. We believe that the results reported in this study will be useful in studying the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins and heme-containing proteins, and also membrane-bound protein-protein complexes such as cytochromes-b5-P450. PMID:23268659

  10. XPS Chemical Shifts for CO Adsorbed on Ni(100):. a Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedocchi, L.; Rovida, G.; Russo, N.

    Starting from the observed chemical shift of C-1s and O-1s ionization potentials (IP), reported in the literature for the adsorption of CO on Ni(100), and correlated to the different CO adsorption sites at different coverages, we have carried out a theoretical investigation, using a first-principle density-functional method, to calculate ionization energies for adsorbed CO in the atop and bridge sites. In our approach, the Ni(100) surface was simulated with clusters of up to nine metal atoms of different geometry, in order to test the two adsorption sites. For each cluster, the CO adsorption geometry was optimized and the O-1s and C-1s ionizations were calculated. The main result was that the (O-1s-C-1s) difference was very well reproduced even with clusters of modest size, thus confirming the possibility to use this value as a structure-sensitive parameter.

  11. Sequential acquisition of multi-dimensional heteronuclear chemical shift correlation spectra with 1H detection

    PubMed Central

    Bellstedt, Peter; Ihle, Yvonne; Wiedemann, Christoph; Kirschstein, Anika; Herbst, Christian; Görlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2014-01-01

    RF pulse schemes for the simultaneous acquisition of heteronuclear multi-dimensional chemical shift correlation spectra, such as {HA(CA)NH & HA(CACO)NH}, {HA(CA)NH & H(N)CAHA} and {H(N)CAHA & H(CC)NH}, that are commonly employed in the study of moderately-sized protein molecules, have been implemented using dual sequential 1H acquisitions in the direct dimension. Such an approach is not only beneficial in terms of the reduction of experimental time as compared to data collection via two separate experiments but also facilitates the unambiguous sequential linking of the backbone amino acid residues. The potential of sequential 1H data acquisition procedure in the study of RNA is also demonstrated here. PMID:24671105

  12. Study of wavelength-shifting chemicals for use in large-scale water Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sweany, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dunmore, J; Felde, J; Svoboda, R; Tripathi, S M

    2011-09-21

    Cherenkov detectors employ various methods to maximize light collection at the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). These generally involve the use of highly reflective materials lining the interior of the detector, reflective materials around the PMTs, or wavelength-shifting sheets around the PMTs. Recently, the use of water-soluble wavelength-shifters has been explored to increase the measurable light yield of Cherenkov radiation in water. These wave-shifting chemicals are capable of absorbing light in the ultravoilet and re-emitting the light in a range detectable by PMTs. Using a 250 L water Cherenkov detector, we have characterized the increase in light yield from three compounds in water: 4-Methylumbelliferone, Carbostyril-124, and Amino-G Salt. We report the gain in PMT response at a concentration of 1 ppm as: 1.88 {+-} 0.02 for 4-Methylumbelliferone, stable to within 0.5% over 50 days, 1.37 {+-} 0.03 for Carbostyril-124, and 1.20 {+-} 0.02 for Amino-G Salt. The response of 4-Methylumbelliferone was modeled, resulting in a simulated gain within 9% of the experimental gain at 1 ppm concentration. Finally, we report an increase in neutron detection performance of a large-scale (3.5 kL) gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector at a 4-Methylumbelliferone concentration of 1 ppm.

  13. Experimental study of resolution of proton chemical shifts in solids: Combined multiple pulse NMR and magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.; Taylor, R.E.; Paff, A.J.; Gerstein, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of protons in rigid, randomly oriented solids have been measured using combined homonuclear dipolar decoupling (via multiple pulse techniques) and attenuation of chemical shift anisotropies (via magic-angle sample spinning). Under those conditions, isotropic proton chemical shifts were recorded for a variety of chemical species, with individual linewidths varying from about 55 to 110 Hz (1--2 ppm). Residual line broadening was due predominately to (i) magnetic-field instability and inhomogeneity, (ii) unresolved proton--proton spin couplings, (iii) chemical shift dispersion, (iv) residual dipolar broadening, and (v) lifetime broadening under the multiple pulse sequences used. The magnitudes of those effects and the current limits of resolution for this experiment in our spectrometer have been investigated. The compounds studied included organic solids (4, 4'-dimethylbenzophenone, 2, 6-dimethylbenzoic acid, and aspirin), polymers (polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate), and the vitrain portion of a bituminous coal.

  14. Subchondral bone and cartilage thickness from MRI: effects of chemical-shift artifact.

    PubMed

    McGibbon, Chris A; Bencardino, Jenny; Palmer, William E

    2003-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for visualizing and quantifying articular cartilage thickness. However, difficulties persist in MRI of subchondral bone using spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) and other gradient-echo sequences, primarily due to the effects of chemical-shift artifact. Fat suppression techniques are often used to reduce these artifacts, but they prevent measurement of bone thickness. In this report, we assess the magnitude of chemical-shift effects (phase-cancellation and misregistration artifacts) on subchondral bone and cartilage thickness measurements in human femoral heads using a variety of pulse sequence parameters. Phase-cancellation effects were quantified by comparing measurements from in-phase images (TE=13.5 ms) to out-of-phase images (TE=15.8 ms). We also tested the assumption of the optimal in-phase TE by comparing thickness measures at small variations on TE (13.0, 13.5 and 14.0 ms). Misregistration effects were quantified by comparing measurements from water+fat images (water-only+fat-only images) to the measurements from in-phase (TE=13.5) images. A correction algorithm was developed and applied to the in-phase measurements and then compared to measurements from water+fat images. We also compared thickness measurements at different image resolutions. Results showed that both phase-cancellation artifact and misregistration artifact were significant for bone thickness measurement, but not for cartilage thickness measurement. Using an in-phase TE and correction algorithm for misregistration artifact, the errors in bone thickness relative to water+fat images were non-significant. This information may be useful for developing pulse sequences for optimal imaging of both cartilage and subchondral bone. PMID:12695880

  15. Network of long-range concerted chemical shift displacements upon ligand binding to human angiogenin

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Donald; Narayanan, Chitra; Doucet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Molecular recognition models of both induced fit and conformational selection rely on coupled networks of flexible residues and/or structural rearrangements to promote protein function. While the atomic details of these motional events still remain elusive, members of the pancreatic ribonuclease superfamily were previously shown to depend on subtle conformational heterogeneity for optimal catalytic function. Human angiogenin, a structural homologue of bovine pancreatic RNase A, induces blood vessel formation and relies on a weak yet functionally mandatory ribonucleolytic activity to promote neovascularization. Here, we use the NMR chemical shift projection analysis (CHESPA) to clarify the mechanism of ligand binding in human angiogenin, further providing information on long-range intramolecular residue networks potentially involved in the function of this enzyme. We identify two main clusters of residue networks displaying correlated linear chemical shift trajectories upon binding of substrate fragments to the purine- and pyrimidine-specific subsites of the catalytic cleft. A large correlated residue network clusters in the region corresponding to the V1 domain, a site generally associated with the angiogenic response and structural stability of the enzyme. Another correlated network (residues 40–42) negatively affects the catalytic activity but also increases the angiogenic activity. 15N-CPMG relaxation dispersion experiments could not reveal the existence of millisecond timescale conformational exchange in this enzyme, a lack of flexibility supported by the very low-binding affinities and catalytic activity of angiogenin. Altogether, the current report potentially highlights the existence of long-range dynamic reorganization of the structure upon distinct subsite binding events in human angiogenin. PMID:25450558

  16. A simple graphical approach to predict local residue conformation using NMR chemical shifts and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Shaghaghi, Hoora; Ebrahimi, Hossein Pasha; Fathi, Fariba; Bahrami Panah, Niloufar; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Tafazzoli, Mohsen

    2016-05-30

    The dependency of amino acid chemical shifts on φ and ψ torsion angle is, independently, studied using a five-residue fragment of ubiquitin and ONIOM(DFT:HF) approach. The variation of absolute deviation of (13) C(α) chemical shifts relative to φ dihedral angle is specifically dependent on secondary structure of protein not on amino acid type and fragment sequence. This dependency is observed neither on any of (13) C(β) , and (1) H(α) chemical shifts nor on the variation of absolute deviation of (13) C(α) chemical shifts relative to ψ dihedral angle. The (13) C(α) absolute deviation chemical shifts (ADCC) plots are found as a suitable and simple tool to predict secondary structure of protein with no requirement of highly accurate calculations, priori knowledge of protein structure and structural refinement. Comparison of Full-DFT and ONIOM(DFT:HF) approaches illustrates that the trend of (13) C(α) ADCC plots are independent of computational method but not of basis set valence shell type. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26940760

  17. A strong 13C chemical shift signature provides the coordination mode of histidines in zinc-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Pierre; Schubert, Mario; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-06-01

    Zinc is the second most abundant metal ion incorporated in proteins, and is in many cases a crucial component of protein three-dimensional structures. Zinc ions are frequently coordinated by cysteine and histidine residues. Whereas cysteines bind to zinc via their unique S(γ) atom, histidines can coordinate zinc with two different coordination modes, either N(δ1) or N(ε2) is coordinating the zinc ion. The determination of this coordination mode is crucial for the accurate structure determination of a histidine-containing zinc-binding site by NMR. NMR chemical shifts contain a vast amount of information on local electronic and structural environments and surprisingly their utilization for the determination of the coordination mode of zinc-ligated histidines has been limited so far to (15)N nuclei. In the present report, we observed that the (13)C chemical shifts of aromatic carbons in zinc-ligated histidines represent a reliable signature of their coordination mode. Using a statistical analysis of (13)C chemical shifts, we show that (13)C(δ2) chemical shift is sensitive to the histidine coordination mode and that the chemical shift difference δ{(13)C(ε1)} - δ{(13)C(δ2)} provides a reference-independent marker of this coordination mode. The present approach allows the direct determination of the coordination mode of zinc-ligated histidines even with non-isotopically enriched protein samples and without any prior structural information. PMID:22528293

  18. Handling the influence of chemical shift in amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Basse, Kristoffer; Shankar, Ravi; Bjerring, Morten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Nielsen, Anders B

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of chemical shifts on amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The method is demonstrated using the Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRrAdiaTION mediated Cross-Polarization ((RESPIRATION)CP) experiment as an example. By going into the pulse sequence rf interaction frame and employing a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach, we describe how chemical shift offset and anisotropic chemical shift affect the efficiency of heteronuclear polarization transfer. In this description, it becomes transparent that the main attribute leading to non-ideal performance is a fictitious field along the rf field axis, which is generated from second-order cross terms arising mainly between chemical shift tensors and themselves. This insight is useful for the development of improved recoupling experiments. We discuss the validity of this approach and present quaternion calculations to determine the effective resonance conditions in a combined rf field and chemical shift offset interaction frame transformation. Based on this, we derive a broad-banded version of the (RESPIRATION)CP experiment. The new sequence is experimentally verified using SNNFGAILSS amyloid fibrils where simultaneous (15)N → (13)CO and (15)N → (13)Cα coherence transfer is demonstrated on high-field NMR instrumentation, requiring great offset stability. PMID:27608995

  19. DFT calculations of 15N NMR shielding constants, chemical shifts and complexation shifts in complexes of rhodium(II) tetraformate with some nitrogenous organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-03-01

    Benchmark calculations of 15N NMR shielding constants for a set of model complexes of rhodium(II) tetraformate with nine organic ligands using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods have been carried out. The calculations were performed by means of several methods: the non-relativistic, relativistic scalar ZORA, and spin-orbit ZORA approaches at the CGA-PBE/QZ4P theory level, and the GIAO NMR method using the B3PW91 functional with the 6-311++G(2d,p) basis set for C, H, N, O atoms and the Stuttgart basis set for the Rh atom. The geometry of compounds was optimised either by the same basis set as for the NMR calculations or applying the B3LYP functional with the 6-31G(2d) basis set for C, H, N, O atoms and LANL2DZ for the Rh atom. Computed 15N NMR shielding constants σ were compatible with experimental 15N chemical shifts δ of complexes exhibiting similar structure and fulfil the linear equation δ = aσ + b. The a and b parameters for all data sets have been estimated by means of linear regression analysis. In contrast to the correlation method giving "scaled" chemical shifts, the conversion of shielding constants to chemical shifts with respect to the reference shielding of CH3NO2 provided very inaccurate "raw" δ values. The application of the former to the calculation of complexation shifts Δδ (Δδ = δcompl - δlig) reproduced experimental values qualitatively or semi-quantitatively. The non-relativistic B3PW91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] theory level reproduced the NMR parameters as good as the more expensive relativistic CGA-PBE//QZ4P ZORA approaches.

  20. Quantum chemical studies on structural, vibrational, NBO and hyperpolarizability of N-(1,1-Dimethyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-3-amino-2-hydroxypropanesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuga Devi, T. S.; Sharmi kumar, J.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of N-(1,1-Dimethyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-3-amino-2-hydroxypropanesulfonic acid were recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using Hartee-Fock and density functional method (B3LYP) with the correlation consistent-polarized valence double zeta (cc-pVDZ) basis set. The most stable conformer was optimized and the structural and vibrational parameters were determined based on this. With the observed FTIR and FT-Raman data, a complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out. Thermodynamic properties and Mulliken charges were calculated using both Hartee-Fock and density functional method using the cc-pVDZ basis set and compared. The calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gap revealed that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using Gauge Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method and were compared with experimental results. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. The first order hyperpolarizability (β) and Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP) of the molecule was computed using DFT calculations. The electron density based local reactivity descriptor such as Fukui functions were calculated to explain the chemical reactivity site in the molecule.

  1. Combined experimental and quantum chemical studies on spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis, and NMR) and structural characteristics of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumru, Mustafa; Altun, Ahmet; Kocademir, Mustafa; Küçük, Vesile; Bardakçı, Tayyibe; Şaşmaz, İbrahim

    2016-12-01

    Comparative experimental and theoretical studies have been performed on the structure and spectral (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis and NMR) features of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde. Quantum chemical calculations have been carried out at Hartree-Fock and density functional B3LYP levels with the triple-zeta 6-311++G** basis set. Two stable conformers of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde arising from the orientation of the carboxaldehyde moiety have been located at the room temperature. The energetic separation of these conformers is as small as 2.5 kcal/mol with a low transition barrier (around 9 kcal/mol). Therefore, these conformers are expected to coexist at the room temperature. Several molecular characteristics of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde obtained through B3LYP and time-dependent B3LYP calculations, such as conformational stability, key geometry parameters, vibrational frequencies, IR and Raman intensities, UV-Vis vertical excitation energies and the corresponding oscillator strengths have been analyzed. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde were also investigated.

  2. Fragment-based {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals: An alternative to planewave methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Joshua D.; Beran, Gregory J. O.; Monaco, Stephen; Schatschneider, Bohdan

    2015-09-14

    We assess the quality of fragment-based ab initio isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shift predictions for a collection of 25 molecular crystals with eight different density functionals. We explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, combined cluster/fragment, and the planewave gauge-including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) models relative to experiment. When electrostatic embedding is employed to capture many-body polarization effects, the simple and computationally inexpensive two-body fragment model predicts both isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shifts and the chemical shielding tensors as well as both cluster models and the GIPAW approach. Unlike the GIPAW approach, hybrid density functionals can be used readily in a fragment model, and all four hybrid functionals tested here (PBE0, B3LYP, B3PW91, and B97-2) predict chemical shifts in noticeably better agreement with experiment than the four generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals considered (PBE, OPBE, BLYP, and BP86). A set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided based on these benchmark calculations. Statistical cross-validation procedures are used to demonstrate the robustness of these fits.

  3. [Evaluation of the Effect of Adiabatic Pulse and B1 Shim to the Radio Frequency Homogeneity in Chemical Shift Imaging].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Chie; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Okawa, Kohei; Taguchi, Jyunichi; Hirota, Yoshifumi; Yanagiya, Yohei

    2016-04-01

    It is considered that the enhancement of chemical shift and the elevation of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) induced by high magnetic fields are useful for the evaluation of metabolism using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). However, the reduction of the localization in MRS seems to be caused by the decreased homogeneity of radio frequency (RF) pulses, especially in chemical shift imaging (CSI). To search the influence of B1 shim mode and the significance of adiabatic pulses, we have examined the changes of RF homogeneity using 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the water phantom and the metabolites phantom (containing acetate and lactate) in CSI. The RF homogeneity and chemical shift artifact were obviously improved using the adiabatic pulses. Improvement of the homogeneity of RF pulses was observed when B1 shim was used. These results suggest the usefulness of CSI using adiabatic pulses and B1 shim when small amount of metabolites of target is measured in MRS. PMID:27097994

  4. CAESURA: Measurement of slow molecular dynamics by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift anisotropy modulation amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Limin; Titman, Jeremy J.

    2006-08-01

    An alternative magic angle spinning (MAS) exchange NMR experiment based on chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) amplification is described. The CSA amplification experiment correlates a standard MAS spectrum in the ω2 dimension with a sideband pattern in ω1 in which the intensities are identical to those expected for a sample spinning at some fraction 1/N of the actual rate ωr. In common with 2D-PASS, the isotropic shift appears only in the ω2 dimension, and long acquisition times can be avoided without loss of resolution of different chemical sites. The new CSA amplification exchange experiment provides information about the time scale and geometry of molecular motions via their effect on the sideband intensities in a one-dimensional pattern. The one-dimensional patterns from different chemical sites are separated across two frequency dimensions according to the isotropic shifts.

  5. Study of molecular structure, vibrational, electronic and NMR spectra of oncocalyxone A using DFT and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhawani Datt; Srivastava, Anubha; Honorato, Sara Braga; Tandon, Poonam; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia Loiola; Fechine, Pierre Basílio Almeida; Ayala, Alejandro Pedro

    2013-09-01

    Oncocalyxone A (C17H18O5) is the major secondary metabolite isolated from ethanol extract from the heartwood of Auxemma oncocalyx Taub popularly known as “pau branco”. Oncocalyxone A (Onco A) has many pharmaceutical uses such as: antitumor, analgesic, antioxidant and causative of inhibition of platelet activation. We have performed the optimized geometry, total energy, conformational study, molecular electrostatic potential mapping, frontier orbital energy gap and vibrational frequencies of Onco A employing ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and/or charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. UV-vis spectrum of the compound was recorded in DMSO and MeOH solvent. The TD-DFT calculations have been performed to explore the influence of electronic absorption spectra in the gas phase, as well as in solution environment using IEF-PCM and 6-31G basis set. The 13C NMR chemical shifts have been calculated with the B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) basis set and compared with the experimental values. These methods have been used as tools for structural characterization of Onco A.

  6. Shifts in microbial and chemical patterns within the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba during a disease outbreak.

    PubMed

    Webster, Nicole S; Xavier, Joana R; Freckelton, Marnie; Motti, Cherie A; Cobb, Rose

    2008-12-01

    The microbial community composition in affected and unaffected portions of diseased sponges and healthy control sponges of Aplysina aerophoba was assessed to ascertain the role of microbes in the disease process. Sponge secondary metabolites were also examined to assess chemical shifts in response to infection. The microbial profile and aplysinimine levels in unaffected tissue near the lesions closely reflected those of healthy sponge tissue, indicating a highly localized disease process. DGGE detected multiple sequences that were exclusively present in diseased sponges. Most notably, a Deltaproteobacteria sequence with high homology to a coral black band disease strain was detected in all sponge lesions and was absent from all healthy and unaffected regions of diseased sponges. Other potential pathogens identified by DGGE include an environmental Cytophaga strain and a novel Epsilonproteobacteria strain with no known close relatives. The disease process also caused a major shift in prokaryote community structure at a very high taxonomic level. Using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, only the diseased sponges were found to contain sequences belonging to the Epsilonproteobacteria and Firmicutes, and there was a much greater number of Bacteroidetes sequences within the diseased sponges. In contrast, only the healthy sponges contained sequences corresponding to the cyanobacteria and 'OP1' candidate division, and the healthy sponges were dominated by Chloroflexi and Gammaproteobacteria sequences. Overall bacterial diversity was found to be considerably higher in diseased sponges than in healthy sponges. These results provide a platform for future cultivation-based experiments to isolate the putative pathogens from A. aerophoba and perform re-infection trials to define the disease aetiology. PMID:18783385

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants and chemical shifts in linear 199Hg compounds: A comparison of three relativistic computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Melo, Juan I.; Hemmingsen, Lars; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the importance of relativistic effects on NMR shielding constants and chemical shifts of linear HgL2 (L = Cl, Br, I, CH3) compounds using three different relativistic methods: the fully relativistic four-component approach and the two-component approximations, linear response elimination of small component (LR-ESC) and zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA). LR-ESC reproduces successfully the four-component results for the C shielding constant in Hg(CH3)2 within 6 ppm, but fails to reproduce the Hg shielding constants and chemical shifts. The latter is mainly due to an underestimation of the change in spin-orbit contribution. Even though ZORA underestimates the absolute Hg NMR shielding constants by ˜2100 ppm, the differences between Hg chemical shift values obtained using ZORA and the four-component approach without spin-density contribution to the exchange-correlation (XC) kernel are less than 60 ppm for all compounds using three different functionals, BP86, B3LYP, and PBE0. However, larger deviations (up to 366 ppm) occur for Hg chemical shifts in HgBr2 and HgI2 when ZORA results are compared with four-component calculations with non-collinear spin-density contribution to the XC kernel. For the ZORA calculations it is necessary to use large basis sets (QZ4P) and the TZ2P basis set may give errors of ˜500 ppm for the Hg chemical shifts, despite deceivingly good agreement with experimental data. A Gaussian nucleus model for the Coulomb potential reduces the Hg shielding constants by ˜100-500 ppm and the Hg chemical shifts by 1-143 ppm compared to the point nucleus model depending on the atomic number Z of the coordinating atom and the level of theory. The effect on the shielding constants of the lighter nuclei (C, Cl, Br, I) is, however, negligible.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants and chemical shifts in linear 199Hg compounds: a comparison of three relativistic computational methods.

    PubMed

    Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Melo, Juan I; Hemmingsen, Lars; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2011-07-28

    We investigate the importance of relativistic effects on NMR shielding constants and chemical shifts of linear HgL(2) (L = Cl, Br, I, CH(3)) compounds using three different relativistic methods: the fully relativistic four-component approach and the two-component approximations, linear response elimination of small component (LR-ESC) and zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA). LR-ESC reproduces successfully the four-component results for the C shielding constant in Hg(CH(3))(2) within 6 ppm, but fails to reproduce the Hg shielding constants and chemical shifts. The latter is mainly due to an underestimation of the change in spin-orbit contribution. Even though ZORA underestimates the absolute Hg NMR shielding constants by ∼2100 ppm, the differences between Hg chemical shift values obtained using ZORA and the four-component approach without spin-density contribution to the exchange-correlation (XC) kernel are less than 60 ppm for all compounds using three different functionals, BP86, B3LYP, and PBE0. However, larger deviations (up to 366 ppm) occur for Hg chemical shifts in HgBr(2) and HgI(2) when ZORA results are compared with four-component calculations with non-collinear spin-density contribution to the XC kernel. For the ZORA calculations it is necessary to use large basis sets (QZ4P) and the TZ2P basis set may give errors of ∼500 ppm for the Hg chemical shifts, despite deceivingly good agreement with experimental data. A Gaussian nucleus model for the Coulomb potential reduces the Hg shielding constants by ∼100-500 ppm and the Hg chemical shifts by 1-143 ppm compared to the point nucleus model depending on the atomic number Z of the coordinating atom and the level of theory. The effect on the shielding constants of the lighter nuclei (C, Cl, Br, I) is, however, negligible. PMID:21806118

  9. Multiparametric fat–water separation method for fast chemical-shift imaging guidance of thermal therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jonathan S.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Jackson, Edward F.; Hazle, John D.; Jason Stafford, R.; Taylor, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A k-means-based classification algorithm is investigated to assess suitability for rapidly separating and classifying fat/water spectral peaks from a fast chemical shift imaging technique for magnetic resonance temperature imaging. Algorithm testing is performed in simulated mathematical phantoms and agar gel phantoms containing mixed fat/water regions. Methods: Proton resonance frequencies (PRFs), apparent spin-spin relaxation (T2*) times, and T1-weighted (T1-W) amplitude values were calculated for each voxel using a single-peak autoregressive moving average (ARMA) signal model. These parameters were then used as criteria for k-means sorting, with the results used to determine PRF ranges of each chemical species cluster for further classification. To detect the presence of secondary chemical species, spectral parameters were recalculated when needed using a two-peak ARMA signal model during the subsequent classification steps. Mathematical phantom simulations involved the modulation of signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), maximum PRF shift (MPS) values, analysis window sizes, and frequency expansion factor sizes in order to characterize the algorithm performance across a variety of conditions. In agar, images were collected on a 1.5T clinical MR scanner using acquisition parameters close to simulation, and algorithm performance was assessed by comparing classification results to manually segmented maps of the fat/water regions. Results: Performance was characterized quantitatively using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), sensitivity, and specificity. The simulated mathematical phantom experiments demonstrated good fat/water separation depending on conditions, specifically high SNR, moderate MPS value, small analysis window size, and low but nonzero frequency expansion factor size. Physical phantom results demonstrated good identification for both water (0.997 ± 0.001, 0.999 ± 0.001, and 0.986 ± 0.001 for DSC, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively

  10. One-dimensional phosphorus-31 chemical shift imaging of human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rutter, A.; Hugenholtz, H.; Saunders, J.K.

    1995-06-01

    Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used noninvasively to determine characteristic spectral parameters for untreated human brain tumors as a prelude to its use in clinical diagnosis. The spectra, which reflect the relative amounts of phosphorus-containing compounds, and the pH within and surrounding the tumors, were obtained in vivo using the the localization technique of one-dimensional chemical shift imaging applied with a surface coil. Phosphorus-31 chemical shift imaging was performed successfully in vivo on 9 volunteers and 27 patients with untreated brain tumors, including 7 with astrocytoma, 4 with glioblastoma, 3 with meningioma, and 11 with metastases. This study provides spectra from within and surrounding the brain tumors, and allows accountability for the heterogeneity of brain tumors by the selection of the maximum data point for each parameter. The ratios of resonance areas, phosphodiesters over nucleoside triphosphate (NTP), and phosphomonoesters over NTP, were found to be higher in glioblastomas (2.55 {plus_minus} 0.22, 1.06 {plus_minus} 0.09) and astorcytomas (3.04 {plus_minus} 0.36, 1.28 {plus_minus} 0.36) than in normal brain (2.00 {plus_minus} 0.32, 0.79 {plus_minus}0.22). The ratios of areas due to inorganic phosphate and NTP, and phosphocreatine and NTP, also were higher in astrocytomas (1.16 {plus_minus} 0.40, 1.17 {plus_minus} 0.41) compared with glioblastomas (0.68 {plus_minus} 0.01, 0.88 {plus_minus} 0.19) and normal brain (0.61 {plus_minus}0.03, 0.77 {plus_minus} 0.03). The pH of brain tumors ranged from alkaline to neutral, with meningiomas consistently having alkaline pH. These data show that there are statistically significant differences in the magnetic resonance parameters of the affected brain hemispheres of patients with astrocytomas, glioblastomas, meningiomas, and normal brain tissue, and underline the need for a multisite clinical trial to establish clinical criteria for diagnosis. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Recoupling of chemical shift anisotropy by R-symmetry sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangjin; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2012-10-01

    13C and 15N chemical shift (CS) interaction is a sensitive probe of structure and dynamics in a wide variety of biological and inorganic systems, and in the recent years several magic angle spinning NMR approaches have emerged for residue-specific measurements of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors in uniformly and sparsely enriched proteins. All of the currently existing methods are applicable to slow and moderate magic angle spinning (MAS) regime, i.e., MAS frequencies below 20 kHz. With the advent of fast and ultrafast MAS probes capable of spinning frequencies of 40-100 kHz, and with the superior resolution and sensitivity attained at such high frequencies, development of CSA recoupling techniques working under such conditions is necessary. In this work, we present a family of R-symmetry based pulse sequences for recoupling of 13C/15N CSA interactions that work well in both natural abundance and isotopically enriched systems. We demonstrate that efficient recoupling of either first-rank (σ1) or second-rank (σ2) spatial components of CSA interaction is attained with appropriately chosen γ-encoded RNnv symmetry sequences. The advantage of these γ-encoded RNnv-symmetry based CSA (RNCSA) recoupling schemes is that they are suitable for CSA recoupling under a wide range of MAS frequencies, including fast MAS regime. Comprehensive analysis of the recoupling properties of these RNnv symmetry sequences reveals that the σ1-CSA recoupling symmetry sequences exhibit large scaling factors; however, the partial homonuclear dipolar Hamiltonian components are symmetry allowed, which makes this family of sequences suitable for CSA measurements in systems with weak homonuclear dipolar interactions. On the other hand, the γ-encoded symmetry sequences for σ2-CSA recoupling have smaller scaling factors but they efficiently suppress the homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Therefore, the latter family of sequences is applicable for measurements of CSA parameters in

  12. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M.; Exner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3–0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r2) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  13. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2014-12-16

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3-0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r(2)) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  14. (39)K NMR of solid potassium salts at 21 T: effect of quadrupolar and chemical shift tensors.

    PubMed

    Moudrakovski, Igor L; Ripmeester, John A

    2007-01-25

    39K Solid State NMR spectra (static and magic angle spinning (MAS)) on a set of potassium salts measured at 21.14 T show that the chemical shift range for K(+) ions in diamagnetic salts is well in excess of 100 ppm contrary to previous assumptions that it was quite small. Inequivalent potassium sites in crystals can be resolved through differences in chemical shifts, with chemically similar sites showing differences of over 10 ppm. The quadrupolar coupling constants obtained from MAS and solid echo experiments on powders cover the range from zero for potassium in cubic environments in halides to over 3 MHz for the highly asymmetric sites in K2CO3. Although the quadrupolar effects generally dominate the 39K spectra, in several instances, we have observed subtle but significant contributions of chemical shift anisotropy with values up to 45 ppm, a first such observation. Careful analysis of static and MAS spectra allows the observation of the various chemical shift and quadrupole coupling tensor components as well as their relative orientations, thereby demonstrating that high-field 39K NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has a substantial sensitivity to the local environment with parameters that will be of considerable value in materials characterization and electronic structure studies. PMID:17228903

  15. Parallel-plate RF resonator imaging of chemical shift resolved capillary flow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Balcom, Bruce J

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has been introduced to study flow in microchannels using pure phase spatial encoding with a microfabricated parallel-plate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe. The NMR probe and pure phase spatial encoding enhance the sensitivity and resolution of the measurement. In this paper, (1)H NMR spectra and images were acquired at 100 MHz. The B(1) magnetic field is homogeneous and the signal-to-noise ratio of 30 microl doped water for a single scan is 8x10(4). The high sensitivity of the probe enables velocity mapping of the fluids in the micro-channel with a spatial resolution of 13x13 microm. The parallel-plate probe with pure phase encoding permits the acquisition of NMR spectra; therefore, chemical shift resolved velocity mapping was also undertaken. Results are presented which show separate velocity maps for water and methanol flowing through a straight circular micro-channel. Finally, future performance of these techniques for the study of microfluidics is extrapolated and discussed. PMID:20444567

  16. Heterogeneous living donor hepatic fat distribution on MRI chemical shift imaging

    PubMed Central

    Choi, YoungRok; Lee, Jeong Min; Yi, Nam-Joon; Kim, Hyeyoung; Park, Min-Su; Hong, Geun; Yoo, Tae; Suh, Suk-Won; Lee, Hae Won; Lee, Kwang-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the heterogeneity of steatosis in living donor livers to determine its regional differences. Methods Between June 2011 and February 2012, 81 liver donors were selected. Fat fraction was estimated using magnetic resonance triple-echo chemical shifting gradient imaging in 13 different regions: segment 1 (S1), S2, S3, and each peripheral and deep region of S4, S5, S6, S7, and S8. Results There were differences (range, 3.2%-5.3%) in fat fractions between each peripheral and deep region of S4, S6, S7, and S8 (P < 0.001, P = 0.004, P < 0.001, and P = 0.006). Fat deposit amount in S1, S2, S3 and deep regions of S4-S8 were significantly different from one another (F [4.003, 58.032] = 8.684, P < 0.001), while there were no differences among the peripheral regions of S4-S8 (F [2.9, 5.3] = 1.3, P = 0.272) by repeated measure analysis of variance method. And regional differences of the amount of fat deposit in the whole liver increased as a peripheral fat fraction of S5 increased (R2 = 0.428, P < 0.001). Conclusion Multifocal fat measurements for the whole liver are needed because a small regional evaluation might not represent the remaining liver completely, especially in patients with severe hepatic steatosis. PMID:26131443

  17. Backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments of apolipophorin III from Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Crowhurst, Karin A; Horn, James V C; Weers, Paul M M

    2016-04-01

    Apolipophorin III, a 163 residue monomeric protein from the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella (abbreviated as apoLp-IIIGM), has roles in upregulating expression of antimicrobial proteins as well as binding and deforming bacterial membranes. Due to its similarity to vertebrate apolipoproteins there is interest in performing atomic resolution analysis of apoLp-IIIGM as part of an effort to better understand its mechanism of action in innate immunity. In the first step towards structural characterization of apoLp-IIIGM, 99 % of backbone and 88 % of side chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts were assigned. TALOS+ analysis of the backbone resonances has predicted that the protein is composed of five long helices, which is consistent with the reported structures of apolipophorins from other insect species. The next stage in the characterization of apoLp-III from G. mellonella will be to utilize these resonance assignments in solving the solution structure of this protein. PMID:26493308

  18. Analysis of the contributions of ring current and electric field effects to the chemical shifts of RNA bases.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-02-21

    Ring current and electric field effects can considerably influence NMR chemical shifts in biomolecules. Understanding such effects is particularly important for the development of accurate mappings between chemical shifts and the structures of nucleic acids. In this work, we first analyzed the Pople and the Haigh-Mallion models in terms of their ability to describe nitrogen base conjugated ring effects. We then created a database (DiBaseRNA) of three-dimensional arrangements of RNA base pairs from X-ray structures, calculated the corresponding chemical shifts via a hybrid density functional theory approach and used the results to parametrize the ring current and electric field effects in RNA bases. Next, we studied the coupling of the electric field and ring current effects for different inter-ring arrangements found in RNA bases using linear model fitting, with joint electric field and ring current, as well as only electric field and only ring current approximations. Taken together, our results provide a characterization of the interdependence of ring current and electric field geometric factors, which is shown to be especially important for the chemical shifts of non-hydrogen atoms in RNA bases. PMID:23398371

  19. Detection of methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring 13C chemical-shift changes: A quantum-chemical study

    PubMed Central

    Garay, Pablo G.; Martin, Osvaldo A.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins expand the diversity of the proteome by several orders of magnitude and have a profound effect on several biological processes. Their detection by experimental methods is not free of limitations such as the amount of sample needed or the use of destructive procedures to obtain the sample. Certainly, new approaches are needed and, therefore, we explore here the feasibility of using 13C chemical shifts of different nuclei to detect methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring the deviation of the 13C chemical shifts from the expected (mean) experimental value of the non-modified residue. As a proof-of-concept, we used 13C chemical shifts, computed at the DFT-level of theory, to test this hypothesis. Moreover, as a validation test of this approach, we compare our theoretical computations of the 13Cε chemical-shift values against existing experimental data, obtained from NMR spectroscopy, for methylated and acetylated lysine residues with good agreement within ∼1 ppm. Then, further use of this approach to select the most suitable 13C-nucleus, with which to determine other modifications commonly seen, such as methylation of arginine and glycosylation of serine, asparagine and threonine, shows encouraging results. PMID:27547559

  20. Detection of methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring (13)C chemical-shift changes: A quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Garay, Pablo G; Martin, Osvaldo A; Scheraga, Harold A; Vila, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins expand the diversity of the proteome by several orders of magnitude and have a profound effect on several biological processes. Their detection by experimental methods is not free of limitations such as the amount of sample needed or the use of destructive procedures to obtain the sample. Certainly, new approaches are needed and, therefore, we explore here the feasibility of using (13)C chemical shifts of different nuclei to detect methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring the deviation of the (13)C chemical shifts from the expected (mean) experimental value of the non-modified residue. As a proof-of-concept, we used (13)C chemical shifts, computed at the DFT-level of theory, to test this hypothesis. Moreover, as a validation test of this approach, we compare our theoretical computations of the (13)Cε chemical-shift values against existing experimental data, obtained from NMR spectroscopy, for methylated and acetylated lysine residues with good agreement within ∼1 ppm. Then, further use of this approach to select the most suitable (13)C-nucleus, with which to determine other modifications commonly seen, such as methylation of arginine and glycosylation of serine, asparagine and threonine, shows encouraging results. PMID:27547559

  1. Structure analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid with experimental (FT-IR, Raman, NMR and XRD) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Özgür; Dikmen, Gökhan

    2016-03-01

    Possible stable conformers, geometrical molecular structures, vibrational properties as well as band assignments, nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid (2F3MP5BA) were studied experimentally and theoretically using FT-IR, Raman, (CP/MAS) NMR and XRD spectroscopic methods. FT-IR and Raman spectra were evaluated in the region of 3500-400 cm-1, and 3200-400 cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometric structures, vibrational wavenumbers and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors were examined using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional theory method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. 1H, 13C, APT and HETCOR NMR experiments of title molecule were carried out in DMSO solution. 13C CP/MAS NMR measurement was done with 4 mm zirconium rotor and glycine was used as an external standard. Single crystal of 2F3MP5BA was also prepared for XRD measurements. Assignments of vibrational wavenumbers were also strengthened by calculating the total energy distribution (TED) values using scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method.

  2. Use of solid waste for chemical stabilization: Adsorption isotherms and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR study of hazardous organic compounds sorbed on coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.; Lane, D.C.; Rovani, J.F.; Cox, J.D.; Clark, J.A.; Miknis, F.P.

    1993-09-01

    Adsorption of hazardous organic compounds on the Dave Johnston plant fly ash is described. Fly ash from Dave Johnston and Laramie River power plants were characterized using elemental, x-ray, and {sup 29}Si NMR; the Dave Johnston (DJ) fly ash had higher quartz contents, while the Laramie River fly ash had more monomeric silicate anions. Adsorption data for hydroaromatics and chlorobenzenes indicate that the adsorption capacity of DJ coal fly ash is much less than that of activated carbon by a factor of >3000; but it is needed to confirm that solid-gas and solid-liquid equilibrium isotherms can indeed be compared. However, for pyridine, pentachlorophenol, naphthalene, and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, the DJ fly ash appears to adsorb these compounds nearly as well as activated carbon. {sup 13}C NMR was used to study the adsorption of hazardous org. cpds on coal fly ash; the nuclear spin relaxation times often were very long, resulting in long experimental times to obtain a spectrum. Using a jumbo probe, low concentrations of some hazardous org. cpds could be detected; for pentachlorophenol adsorbed onto fly ash, the chemical shift of the phenolic carbon was changed. Use of NMR to study the adsorption needs further study.

  3. Toward Relatively General and Accurate Quantum Chemical Predictions of Solid-State 17O NMR Chemical Shifts in Various Biologically Relevant Oxygen-containing Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Rorick, Amber; Michael, Matthew A.; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an important element in most biologically significant molecules and experimental solid-state 17O NMR studies have provided numerous useful structural probes to study these systems. However, computational predictions of solid-state 17O NMR chemical shift tensor properties are still challenging in many cases and in particular each of the prior computational work is basically limited to one type of oxygen-containing systems. This work provides the first systematic study of the effects of geometry refinement, method and basis sets for metal and non-metal elements in both geometry optimization and NMR property calculations of some biologically relevant oxygen-containing compounds with a good variety of XO bonding groups, X= H, C, N, P, and metal. The experimental range studied is of 1455 ppm, a major part of the reported 17O NMR chemical shifts in organic and organometallic compounds. A number of computational factors towards relatively general and accurate predictions of 17O NMR chemical shifts were studied to provide helpful and detailed suggestions for future work. For the studied various kinds of oxygen-containing compounds, the best computational approach results in a theory-versus-experiment correlation coefficient R2 of 0.9880 and mean absolute deviation of 13 ppm (1.9% of the experimental range) for isotropic NMR shifts and R2 of 0.9926 for all shift tensor properties. These results shall facilitate future computational studies of 17O NMR chemical shifts in many biologically relevant systems, and the high accuracy may also help refinement and determination of active-site structures of some oxygen-containing substrate bound proteins. PMID:26274812

  4. Temperature effects on chemical structure and motion in coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maciel, G.E.

    1996-09-30

    The objective of this project was to apply recently developed, state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to examine in situ changes in the chemical structure and molecular/macromolecular motion in coal as the temperature is increased above room temperature. Although alterations in the chemical structure of coal have been studied previously by {sup 13}C NMR, using quenched samples, the goal of this project was to examine these chemical structural changes, and changes in molecular/macromolecular mobility that may precede or accompany the chemical changes, at elevated temperatures, using modern {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR techniques, especially {sup 1}H dipolar-dephasing techniques and related experiments pioneered in the laboratory for examining pyridine-saturated coals. This project consisted of the following four primary segments and related efforts on matters relevant to the first four tasks. (1) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure and mobility as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (2) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure, mobility and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (3) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure/mobility as a function of temperature over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (4) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure, dynamics and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (5) Related matters relevant to the first four tasks: (a) {sup 1}H CRAMPS NMR characterization of oil shales and their kerogen concentrates; and (b) improved quantitation in {sup 13}C MAS characterization of coals.

  5. Female sea lamprey shift orientation toward a conspecific chemical cue to escape a sensory trap

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brant, Cory O.; Johnson, Nicholas; Li, Ke; Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    The sensory trap model of signal evolution hypothesizes that signalers adapt to exploit a cue used by the receiver in another context. Although exploitation of receiver biases can result in conflict between the sexes, deceptive signaling systems that are mutually beneficial drive the evolution of stable communication systems. However, female responses in the nonsexual and sexual contexts may become uncoupled if costs are associated with exhibiting a similar response to a trait in both contexts. Male sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) signal with a mating pheromone, 3-keto petromyzonol sulfate (3kPZS), which may be a match to a juvenile cue used by females during migration. Upstream movement of migratory lampreys is partially guided by 3kPZS, but females only move toward 3kPZS with proximal accuracy during spawning. Here, we use in-stream behavioral assays paired with gonad histology to document the transition of female preference for juvenile- and male-released 3kPZS that coincides with the functional shift of 3kPZS as a migratory cue to a mating pheromone. Females became increasingly biased toward the source of synthesized 3kPZS as their maturation progressed into the reproductive phase, at which point, a preference for juvenile odor (also containing 3kPZS naturally) ceased to exist. Uncoupling of female responses during migration and spawning makes the 3kPZS communication system a reliable means of synchronizing mate search. The present study offers a rare example of a transition in female responses to a chemical cue between nonsexual and sexual contexts, provides insights into the origins of stable communication signaling systems.

  6. Benchmark fragment-based (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Joshua D; Kudla, Ryan A; Day, Graeme M; Mueller, Leonard J; Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-08-21

    The performance of fragment-based ab initio(1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions is assessed against experimental NMR chemical shift data in four benchmark sets of molecular crystals. Employing a variety of commonly used density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP, TPSSh, OPBE, PBE, TPSS), we explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, and combined cluster/fragment models. The hybrid density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP and TPSSh) generally out-perform their generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based counterparts. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O isotropic chemical shifts can be predicted with root-mean-square errors of 0.3, 1.5, 4.2, and 9.8 ppm, respectively, using a computationally inexpensive electrostatically embedded two-body PBE0 fragment model. Oxygen chemical shieldings prove particularly sensitive to local many-body effects, and using a combined cluster/fragment model instead of the simple two-body fragment model decreases the root-mean-square errors to 7.6 ppm. These fragment-based model errors compare favorably with GIPAW PBE ones of 0.4, 2.2, 5.4, and 7.2 ppm for the same (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O test sets. Using these benchmark calculations, a set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided and their robustness assessed using statistical cross-validation. We demonstrate the utility of these approaches and the reported scaling parameters on applications to 9-tert-butyl anthracene, several histidine co-crystals, benzoic acid and the C-nitrosoarene SnCl2(CH3)2(NODMA)2. PMID:27431490

  7. X-Ray Photoelectron and Anger Electron Spectroscopic Studies of Chemical Shifts in Amorphous Ge-Se System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Tokihiro

    1983-09-01

    The chemical shifts of the Ge 3d, 3p3/2,1/2 and Se 3d, 3p3/2,1/2 photoelectron lines were measured for the amorphous Ge-Se system and those of the Ge photoelectron lines are corrected for Auger parameter shifts. According to the valence shell potential model, the ratio of the chemical shift in the amorphous Ge-Se system to that in stoichiometric GeSe2 can be approximated by the ratio of the Ge-Se bond number in the Ge-Se system to that in GeSe2. The chemical shift ratios evaluated from the experimental results reveal bond structures at non-stoichiometric compositions. In the excess-Ge range, GeSe is composed of atomic clusters of three-fold co-ordinated Ge and Se atoms, and Ge2Se3 contains atomic clusters of Se3Ge-GeSe3 units. In the excess-Se range, GeSe3 includes GeSe4 tetrahedral units, and Se-Se chains and/or Se8 rings.

  8. Selective syntheses of leuconolam, leuconoxine, and mersicarpine alkaloids from a common intermediate through regiocontrolled cyclizations by Staudinger reactions† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and procedures, compound characterization data, copies of 1H and 13C NMR spectra for new compounds. See DOI: 10.1039/c4qo00312h Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zining; Geng, Qian; Lv, Zhe; Pritchett, Beau P.; Baba, Katsuaki; Numajiri, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Selective syntheses of leuconolam, leuconoxine, and mersicarpine alkaloids bearing distinctive core structures were achieved through Staudinger reactions using a common intermediate. In the key cyclization step, water functioned like a switch to control which core structure to produce. The chemistry allowed for selective syntheses of the group of alkaloids from a simple intermediate through straightforward chemical operations. PMID:25717379

  9. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly 13C/15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D 13C–13C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of 13C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, 13C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS 13C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely used in

  10. Are nucleus-independent (NICS) and 1H NMR chemical shifts good indicators of aromaticity in π-stacked polyfluorenes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuna, Sílvia; Poater, Jordi; Bofill, Josep M.; Alemany, Pere; Solà, Miquel

    2006-09-01

    We have analyzed the change of local aromaticity in a series of polyfluorene compounds with the increase of the number of π-stacked layers. The local aromaticity of the aromatic and non-aromatic rings of polyfluorenes remains unchanged when going from one to four layers of π-stacked rings according to HOMA, PDI, and FLU aromaticity descriptors. On the contrary, experimental 1H NMR chemical shifts indicate a reduction of the aromaticity of π-stacked rings with the increase of the number of layers. Calculated NICS also show a change of aromaticity, but opposite to the tendency given by the 1H NMR chemical shifts. We show that this increase (decrease) of local aromaticity in superimposed aromatic rings indicated by NICS ( 1H NMR) is not real but the result of the coupling between the magnetic fields generated by the π-stacked rings.

  11. De novo structure generation using chemical shifts for proteins with high-sequence identity but different folds

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Bryan, Philip N; He, Yanan; Orban, John; Baker, David; Bax, Ad

    2010-01-01

    Proteins with high-sequence identity but very different folds present a special challenge to sequence-based protein structure prediction methods. In particular, a 56-residue three-helical bundle protein (GA95) and an α/β-fold protein (GB95), which share 95% sequence identity, were targets in the CASP-8 structure prediction contest. With only 12 out of 300 submitted server-CASP8 models for GA95 exhibiting the correct fold, this protein proved particularly challenging despite its small size. Here, we demonstrate that the information contained in NMR chemical shifts can readily be exploited by the CS-Rosetta structure prediction program and yields adequate convergence, even when input chemical shifts are limited to just amide 1HN and 15N or 1HN and 1Hα values. PMID:19998407

  12. Determination of nuclear distances and chemical-shift anisotropy from 1H MAS NMR sideband patterns of surface OH groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenzke, Dieter; Hunger, Michael; Pfeifer, Harry

    A procedure is described which allows a separate determination of the proton-aluminum distance and of the chemical-shift anisotropy for the bridging OH groups of crystalline molecular sieves from their 'H MAS NMR sideband patterns. For the bridging OH groups which point into the 6-rings of the framework (line "c"), the 1H- 27Al distance could be determined to be 0.237 ± 0.004 and 0.234 ± 0.004 nm for molecular sieves of type H-Y and SAPO-5, respectively. In contrast, for the bridging OH groups of the 12-rings (line "b"), the corresponding distances are equal and distinctly larger, 0.248 ± 0.004 nm. Within the limits of error, the values of the chemical-shift anisotropy are equal (about 19 ± 2 ppm) except for line b of SAPO-5, which exhibits a much smaller value of 14.5 ± 2 ppm.

  13. Computer programming for nucleic acid studies. II. Total chemical shifts calculation of all protons of double-stranded helices.

    PubMed

    Giessner-Prettre, C; Ribas Prado, F; Pullman, B; Kan, L; Kast, J R; Ts'o, P O

    1981-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program called SHIFTS is described. Through SHIFTS, one can calculate the NMR chemical shifts of the proton resonances of single and double-stranded nucleic acids of known sequences and of predetermined conformations. The program can handle RNA and DNA for an arbitrary sequence of a set of 4 out of the 6 base types A,U,G,C,I and T. Data files for the geometrical parameters are available for A-, A'-, B-, D- and S-conformations. The positions of all the atoms are calculated using a modified version of the SEQ program [1]. Then, based on this defined geometry three chemical shift effects exerted by the atoms of the neighboring nucleotides on the protons of each monomeric unit are calculated separately: the ring current shielding effect: the local atomic magnetic susceptibility effect (including both diamagnetic and paramagnetic terms); and the polarization or electric field effect. Results of the program are compared with experimental results for a gamma (ApApGpCpUpU) 2 helical duplex and with calculated results on this same helix based on model building of A'-form and B-form and on graphical procedure for evaluating the ring current effects. PMID:6274583

  14. Study on molecular structure, spectroscopic investigation (IR, Raman and NMR), vibrational assignments and HOMO-LUMO analysis of L-sodium folinate using DFT: a combined experimental and quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Linwei; Cai, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Zhixu; Geng, Yiding; Sun, Tiemin

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, an exhaustive conformational search of N-[4-[[(2-amino-5-formyl-(6S)-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-4-oxo-6-pteridinyl)methyl]amino]benzoyl]-L-glutamic acid disodium salt (L-SF) has been preformed. The optimized structure of the molecule, vibrational frequencies and NMR spectra studies have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with the 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. IR and FT-Raman spectra for L-SF have been recorded in the region of 400-4000 cm(-1) and 100-3500 cm(-1), respectively. 13C and 1H NMR spectra were recorded and 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated based on the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Finally all of the calculation results were applied to simulate IR, Raman, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectrum of the title compound which showed excellent agreement with observed spectrum. Furthermore, reliable vibrational assignments which have been made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) and characteristic vibratinonal absorption bands of the title compound in IR and Raman have been figured out. HOMO-LUMO energy and Mulliken atomic charges have been evaluated, either. PMID:24177877

  15. On reasons of 29Si NMR chemical shift/structure relations for silicon oxides, nitrides, and carbides: an individual-gauge-for-localized-orbitals study.

    PubMed

    Wolff, R; Jancke, H; Radeglia, R

    1997-12-01

    For alpha-quartz, monoclinic ZSM-5, alpha- and beta-Si3N4 and SiC-6H polytype, the silicon chemical shifts have been calculated using the IGLO (individual gauge for localized orbitals) method and models of different size in real crystal geometry. The result is a theoretical chemical shift scale, which is very similar to the corresponding experimental scale from 29Si MAS NMR experiments. It is shown that the assignment of isotropic silicon chemical shifts of crystallized solids based on theory is a method of practical applicability, also in cases where experimental methods or empirical relations fail. The two NMR spectral lines of alpha-Si3N4 are for the first time assigned to the crystallographic positions. The partition of the silicon chemical shifts into localized contributions from different parts of the model allows insight into the interactions around the resonance nucleus due to substituent and geometry variations leading to silicon chemical shifts. PMID:9477448

  16. Automated evaluation of chemical shift perturbation spectra: New approaches to quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand interaction NMR spectra

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chen; Unger, Stephen W.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Sattler, Michael; Szalma, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents new methods designed for quantitative analysis of chemical shift perturbation NMR spectra. The methods automatically trace the displacements of cross peaks between a perturbed test spectrum and the reference spectrum (or among a series of titration spectra), and measure the changes of chemical shifts, heights, and widths of the altered peaks. The methods are primary aimed at the 1H-15N HSQC spectra of relatively small proteins (<15 kDa) assuming fast exchange between free and ligand-bound states on the chemical shift time scale, or for comparing spectra of free and fully bound states in the slow exchange situation. Using the 1H-15N HSQC spectra from a titration experiment of the 74-residue Pex13p SH3 domain with a Pex14p peptide ligand (14 residues, Kd = ~ 40µM), we demonstrate the scope and limits of our automatic peak tracing (APET) algorithm for efficient scoring of high-throughput SAR by NMR type HSQC spectra, and progressive peak tracing (PROPET) algorithm for detailed analysis of ligand titration spectra. Simulated spectra with low signal-to-noise ratios (S/N ranged from 20 to 1) were used to demonstrate the reliability and reproducibility of the results when dealing with poor quality spectra. These algorithms have been implemented in a new software module, FELIX-Autoscreen, for streamlined processing, analysis and visualization of SAR by NMR and other high-throughput receptor/ligand interaction experiments. PMID:15243180

  17. Quantum chemical computational studies on 5-(4-bromophenylamino)-2-methylsulfanylmethyl-2H-1,2,3-triazol-4-carboxylic acid ethyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokatlı, Ahmet; Özen, Emrah; Ucun, Fatih; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2011-03-01

    The optimized molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, and gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) 1H and 13C NMR shift values of 5-(4-bromophenylamino)-2-methylsulfanylmethyl-2H-1,2,3-triazol-4-carboxylic acid ethyl ester have been calculated by using Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional method (DFT/B3LYP) with 6-31G(d), 6-31G(d,p) and LANL2DZ basis sets. The optimized molecular geometric parameters were presented and compared with the data obtained from X-ray diffraction. In order to fit the calculated harmonic wavenumbers to the experimentally observed ones, scaled quantum mechanics force field (SQM FF) methodology was proceeded. Correlation factors between the experimental and calculated 1H chemical shift values of the title compound in vacuum and in CHCl 3 solution by using the conductor-like screening continuum solvation model (COSMO) were reported. The calculated results showed that the optimized geometry well reproduces the crystal structure. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and chemical shifts are in very good agreement with the experimental data. In solvent media the energetic behavior of the title compound was also examined by using the B3LYP method with the 6-31G(d) basis set, applying the COSMO model. The obtained results indicated that the total energy of the title compound decreases with increasing polarity of the solvent. Furthermore, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), natural bond orbital (NBO) and frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) of the title compound were performed by the B3LYP/LANL2DZ method, and also thermodynamic parameters for the title compound were calculated at all the HF and B3LYP levels.

  18. Comparison of Multistandard and TMS-Standard Calculated NMR Shifts for Coniferyl Alcohol and Application of the Multistandard Method to Lignin Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Heath D; Mohamed, M. Nasser Ali; Kubicki, James D

    2011-03-10

    statistical errors, compared with experiment. The correlation with experiment for 1H NMR was generally inferior to the {sup 13}C NMR results for the dimers.

  19. Cellular thermal shift and clickable chemical probe assays for the determination of drug-target engagement in live cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua; Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Hett, Erik C; Salter, Shores; Aulabaugh, Ann; Kyne, Robert E; Pierce, Betsy; Jones, Lyn H

    2016-07-14

    Proof of drug-target engagement in physiologically-relevant contexts is a key pillar of successful therapeutic target validation. We developed two orthogonal technologies, the cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA) and a covalent chemical probe reporter approach (harnessing sulfonyl fluoride tyrosine labeling and subsequent click chemistry) to measure the occupancy of the mRNA-decapping scavenger enzyme DcpS by a small molecule inhibitor in live cells. Enzyme affinity determined using isothermal dose response fingerprinting (ITDRFCETSA) and the concentration required to occupy 50% of the enzyme (OC50) using the chemical probe reporter assay were very similar. In this case, the chemical probe method worked well due to the long offset kinetics of the reversible inhibitor (determined using a fluorescent dye-tagged probe). This work suggests that CETSA could become the first choice assay to determine in-cell target engagement due to its simplicity. PMID:27216142

  20. Sub-electron-volt chemical shifts and strong interference effects measured in the resonance x-ray scattering spectra of aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Agren, H.; Guo, J.; Skytt, P.; Wassdahl, N.; Nordgren, J.

    1995-11-01

    By exploring the monosubstituted benzene compound aniline, we demonstrate that resonance inelastic x-ray spectroscopy of chemically shifted species is {ital site} {ital selective}. Core-excited levels with distinct, super-electron-volt shifts can be resonantly excited and their x-ray emission spectra analyzed separately. Core-excited levels referring to sites with small, sub-electron-volt, chemical shifts give resonant x-ray spectra that interfere strongly. It is demonstrated that this interference, which is manifested in the one-step model, can be used to monitor chemical shifts in the sub-electron-volt energy region. We show that in the limit when these chemical shifts go to zero some salient symmetry-selective features of the benzene resonant x-ray emission spectrum are restored in the aniline spectra.

  1. Thalassiosira spp. community composition shifts in response to chemical and physical forcing in the northeast Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, P. Dreux; Whitney, LeAnn P.; Haddock, Traci L.; Menden-Deuer, Susanne; Roy, Eric G.; Wells, Mark L.; Jenkins, Bethany D.

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms are genetically diverse unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes that are key primary producers in the ocean. Many of the over 100 extant diatom species in the cosmopolitan genus Thalassiosira are difficult to distinguish in mixed populations using light microscopy. Here, we examine shifts in Thalassiosira spp. composition along a coastal to open ocean transect that encountered a 3-month-old Haida eddy in the northeast Pacific Ocean. To quantify shifts in Thalassiosira species composition, we developed a targeted automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) method to identify Thalassiosira spp. in environmental samples. As many specific fragment lengths are indicative of individual Thalassiosira spp., the ARISA method is a useful screening tool to identify changes in the relative abundance and distribution of specific species. The method also enabled us to assess changes in Thalassiosira community composition in response to chemical and physical forcing. Thalassiosira spp. community composition in the core of a 3-month-old Haida eddy remained largely (>80%) similar over a 2-week period, despite moving 24 km southwestward. Shifts in Thalassiosira species correlated with changes in dissolved iron (Fe) and temperature throughout the sampling period. Simultaneously tracking community composition and relative abundance of Thalassiosira species within the physical and chemical context they occurred allowed us to identify quantitative linkages between environmental conditions and community response. PMID:24065961

  2. Predicting paramagnetic 1H NMR chemical shifts and state-energy separations in spin-crossover host-guest systems.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Zarra, Salvatore; Carlson, Rebecca K; Bilbeisi, Rana A; Ronson, Tanya K; Nitschke, Jonathan R; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J

    2014-06-14

    The behaviour of metal-organic cages upon guest encapsulation can be difficult to elucidate in solution. Paramagnetic metal centres introduce additional dispersion of signals that is useful for characterisation of host-guest complexes in solution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, paramagnetic centres also complicate spectral assignment due to line broadening, signal integration error, and large changes in chemical shifts, which can be difficult to assign even for known compounds. Quantum chemical predictions can provide information that greatly facilitates the assignment of NMR signals and identification of species present. Here we explore how the prediction of paramagnetic NMR spectra may be used to gain insight into the spin crossover (SCO) properties of iron(II)-based metal organic coordination cages, specifically examining how the structure of the local metal coordination environment affects SCO. To represent the tetrahedral metal-organic cage, a model system is generated by considering an isolated metal-ion vertex: fac-ML3(2+) (M = Fe(II), Co(II); L = N-phenyl-2-pyridinaldimine). The sensitivity of the (1)H paramagnetic chemical shifts to local coordination environments is assessed and utilised to shed light on spin crossover behaviour in iron complexes. Our data indicate that expansion of the metal coordination sphere must precede any thermal SCO. An attempt to correlate experimental enthalpies of SCO with static properties of bound guests shows that no simple relationship exists, and that effects are likely due to nuanced dynamic response to encapsulation. PMID:24752730

  3. Pressure dependence of backbone chemical shifts in the model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    PubMed

    Erlach, Markus Beck; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Kremer, Werner; Munte, Claudia E; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-01

    For a better understanding of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detected pressure responses of folded as well as unstructured proteins the availability of data from well-defined model systems are indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of chemical shifts of the backbone atoms (1)H(α), (13)C(α) and (13)C' in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2 (Xxx one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of these nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 are dependent on the type of amino acid studied. The coefficients of a given nucleus show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure are also weakly correlated. PMID:27335085

  4. 13C and 15N—Chemical Shift Anisotropy of Ampicillin and Penicillin-V Studied by 2D-PASS and CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Lee, Young K.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1998-11-01

    The principal values of the chemical shift tensors of all13C and15N sites in two antibiotics, ampicillin and penicillin-V, were determined by 2-dimensionalphaseadjustedspinningsideband (2D-PASS) and conventional CP/MAS experiments. The13C and15N chemical shift anisotropies (CSA), and their confidence limits, were evaluated using a Mathematica program. The CSA values suggest a revised assignment of the 2-methyl13C sites in the case of ampicillin. We speculate on a relationship between the chemical shift principal values of many of the13C and15N sites and the β-lactam ring conformation.

  5. Influence of the chemical shift artifact on measurements of compact bone thickness in equine distal limb MR images.

    PubMed

    Dimock, Abigail N; Spriet, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the chemical shift artifact, resulting from misregistration or phase cancellation at the interface between compact and trabecular bone, on apparent bone thickness was quantified in six isolated equine limbs. Sagittal T1-weighted spin echo (SE) and in-phase three-dimensional spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) images were acquired twice with a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) unit, switching the frequency encoding direction between acquisitions. Out-of-phase SPGR images were also obtained. MR images with different frequency encoding directions were compared with each other and to radiographs made from corresponding 3-mm-bone sections. Compact bone thickness was significantly different when comparing images acquired with different frequency encoding directions for both SE and SPGR sequences. Significant differences were identified in the frequency but not the phase encoding direction when measurements of compact bone in MR images were compared with measurements obtained from thin section radiographs for the majority of surfaces studied (P < 0.05). Correction of MR measurements with the calculated chemical shift abolished these differences (P > 0.05). Measurements of compact bone from out-of-phase SPGR sequences were significantly different than from in-phase sequences (P < 0.001) with out-of-phase measurements greater than in-phase measurements by an average of 0.38mm. These results indicate that the chemical shift artifact results in errors in MR evaluation of compact bone thickness when measurements are performed in the frequency encoding direction or in out-of-phase images. For better accuracy, measurements should be performed parallel to the phase encoding direction and avoiding out-of-phase gradient echo sequences. PMID:20806873

  6. Chemical shift and zone-folding effects on the energy gaps of GaAs-AlAs (001) superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.B. Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 ); Cohen, M.L.; Louie, S.G. )

    1991-04-15

    The chemical shift and zone-folding effects obtained from quasiparticle calculations for ultrathin GaAs-AlAs superlattices are incorporated within a Kronig-Penny model for superlattices of the arbitrary lattice period. We determine that superlattices with lattice periods in the range of 3{times}3 to 9{times}9 have an {ital X}-derived pseudodirect gap. This result explains both the results from first-principles calculations for ultrathin superlattices and those from experiments for a broader lattice period.

  7. A multiple pulse zero crossing NMR technique, and its application to F-19 chemical shift measurements in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W.-K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple multiple-pulse 'zero crossing technique' for accurately determining the first moment of a solid-state NMR spectrum is introduced. This technique was applied to obtain the F-19 chemical shift versus pressure curves up to 5 kbar for single crystals of CaF2 (0.29 + or - 0.02 ppm/kbar) and BaF2 (0.62 + or - 0.05 ppm/kbar). Results at ambient temperature and pressure are also reported for a number of other fluorine compounds. Because of its high data rate, this technique is potentially several orders of magnitude more sensitive than similar CW methods.

  8. The Effect of Molecular Conformation on the Accuracy of Theoretical (1)H and (13)C Chemical Shifts Calculated by Ab Initio Methods for Metabolic Mixture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Shimbo, Yudai; Komatsu, Keiko; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-14

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analyzing metabolic mixtures. The information obtained from an NMR spectrum is in the form of physical parameters, such as chemical shifts, and construction of databases for many metabolites will be useful for data interpretation. To increase the accuracy of theoretical chemical shifts for development of a database for a variety of metabolites, the effects of sets of conformations (structural ensembles) and the levels of theory on computations of theoretical chemical shifts were systematically investigated for a set of 29 small molecules in the present study. For each of the 29 compounds, 101 structures were generated by classical molecular dynamics at 298.15 K, and then theoretical chemical shifts for 164 (1)H and 123 (13)C atoms were calculated by ab initio quantum chemical methods. Six levels of theory were used by pairing Hartree-Fock, B3LYP (density functional theory), or second order Møller-Plesset perturbation with 6-31G or aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The six average fluctuations in the (1)H chemical shift were ±0.63, ± 0.59, ± 0.70, ± 0.62, ± 0.75, and ±0.66 ppm for the structural ensembles, and the six average errors were ±0.34, ± 0.27, ± 0.32, ± 0.25, ± 0.32, and ±0.25 ppm. The results showed that chemical shift fluctuations with changes in the conformation because of molecular motion were larger than the differences between computed and experimental chemical shifts for all six levels of theory. In conclusion, selection of an appropriate structural ensemble should be performed before theoretical chemical shift calculations for development of an accurate database for a variety of metabolites. PMID:26963288

  9. A (13)C NMR analysis of the effects of electron radiation on graphite/polyetherimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1989-01-01

    Initial investigations have been made into the use of high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the characterization of radiation effects in graphite and Kevlar fibers, polymers, and the fiber/matrix interface in graphite/polyetherimide composites. Sample preparation techniques were refined. Essential equipment has been procured. A new NMR probe was constructed to increase the proton signal-to-noise ratio. Problem areas have been identified and plans developed to resolve them.

  10. Quantitative 13C NMR of whole and fractionated Iowa Mollisols for assessment of organic matter composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaowen; Chua, Teresita; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Thompson, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Both the concentrations and the stocks of soil organic carbon vary across the landscape. Do the amounts of recalcitrant components of soil organic matter (SOM) vary with landscape position? To address this question, we studied four Mollisols in central Iowa, two developed in till and two developed in loess. Two of the soils were well drained and two were poorly drained. We collected surface-horizon samples and studied organic matter in the particulate organic matter (POM) fraction, the clay fractions, and the whole, unfractionated samples. We treated the soil samples with 5 M HF at ambient temperature or at 60 °C for 30 min to concentrate the SOM. To assess the composition of the SOM, we used solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in particular, quantitative 13C DP/MAS (direct-polarization/magic-angle spinning), with and without recoupled dipolar dephasing. Spin counting by correlation of the integral NMR intensity with the C concentration by elemental analysis showed that NMR was ⩾85% quantitative for the majority of the samples studied. For untreated whole-soil samples with <2.5 wt.% C, which is considerably less than in most previous quantitative NMR analyses of SOM, useful spectra that reflected ⩾65% of all C were obtained. The NMR analyses allowed us to conclude (1) that the HF treatment (with or without heat) had low impact on the organic C composition in the samples, except for protonating carboxylate anions to carboxylic acids, (2) that most organic C was observable by NMR even in untreated soil materials, (3) that esters were likely to compose only a minor fraction of SOM in these Mollisols, and (4) that the aromatic components of SOM were enriched to ˜53% in the poorly drained soils, compared with ˜48% in the well drained soils; in plant tissue and particulate organic matter (POM) the aromaticities were ˜18% and ˜32%, respectively. Nonpolar, nonprotonated aromatic C, interpreted as a proxy for charcoal C, dominated the aromatic C in all soil samples, composing 69-78% of aromatic C and 27-36% of total organic C in the whole-soil and clay-fraction samples.

  11. Characterization of alkyl carbon in forest soils by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy and dipolar dephasing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kogel-Knabner, I.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Samples obtained from forest soils at different stages of decomposition were treated sequentially with chloroform/methanol (extraction of lipids), sulfuric acid (hydrolysis), and sodium chlorite (delignification) to enrich them in refractory alkyl carbon. As revealed by NMR spectroscopy, this treatment yielded residues with high contents of alkyl carbon. In the NMR spectra of residues obtained from litter samples, resonances for carbohydrates are also present, indicating that these carbohydrates are tightly bound to the alkyl carbon structures. During decomposition in the soils this resistant carbohydrate fraction is lost almost completely. In the litter samples the alkyl carbon shows a dipolar dephasing behavior indicative of two structural components, a rigid and a more mobile component. As depth and decomposition increase, only the rigid component is observed. This fact could be due to selective degradation of the mobile component or to changes in molecular mobility during decomposition, e.g., because of an increase in cross linking or contact with the mineral matter of the soil.

  12. Conformational analysis of enalapril (MK-421) in solution by 1H and 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Sakamoto, Yuko; Oonishi, Isao; Ohmoto, Taichi

    1990-10-01

    The conformations of enalapril (MK-421, (-)-( N-(( S)-1-ethoxycarbonyl-3-phenylpropyl)- L-alanyl- L-proline), in CD 3OD, were investigated in order to account for their biological activity as inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). The ratio of trans to cis conformation around the amide bond is 3:2. The preferred optimum structures of the trans and cis forms are postulated. With reference to the proline ring the N-type trans isomer was more prevalent than the S-Type trans isomer.

  13. /sup 15/N and /sup 13/C NMR determination of methionine metabolism in developing soybean cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, G.T. III; Garbow, J.R.; Schaefer, J.

    1987-03-01

    The metabolism of D- and L-methionine by immature cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max, L. cv Elf) grown in culture has been investigated using solid-state /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance. D-Methionine is taken up by the cotyledons and converted to an amide, most likely by N-malonylation. About 16% of the L-methionine taken up is incorporated intact into protein, and 25% remains as soluble methionine. Almost two-thirds of the L-methionine that enters the cotyledons is degraded. The largest percentage of this is used in transmethylation of the carboxyl groups of pectin. Methionine is not extensively converted to polyamines. The authors attribute the stimulation of growth of the cotyledons by exogenous methionine to the bypassing of a rate-limiting methyl-transfer step in the synthesis of methionine itself, and subsequently of pectins and proteins.

  14. 13C NMR relaxation in neutral and charged tetra- n-alkyl compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordes, B.; Coletta, F.; Ferrarini, A.; Gottardi, F.; Nordio, P. L.

    1998-05-01

    NMR T1 relaxation times have been measured for 13C nuclei in the alkyl chains of symmetric tetra- n-alkylstannanes dissolved in CDCl 3. The results are interpreted in terms of conformational transitions occurring in the aliphatic chains superimposed to rotational diffusion of the whole molecule. A comparison with analogous tetra- n-alkylammonium salts is performed. Differences are ascribed to changes in the overall rotational diffusion deriving from effects of charge upon formation of ion-pairs and larger aggregates.

  15. Plant Resources, (13)C-NMR Spectral Characteristic and Pharmacological Activities of Dammarane-Type Triterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jingya; Zheng, Chang; Qu, Lu; Liu, Yanxia; Han, Lifeng; Yu, Haiyang; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Dammarane-type triterpenoids (DTT) widely distribute in various medicinal plants. They have generated a great amount of interest in the field of new drug research and development. Generally, DTT are the main bioactive ingredients abundant in Araliaceae plants, such as Panax ginseng, P. japonicas, P. notoginseng, and P. quinquefolium. Aside from Araliaceae, DTT also distribute in other families, including Betulaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Meliaceae, Rhamnaceae, and Scrophulariaceae. Until now, about 136 species belonging to 46 families have been reported to contain DTT. In this article, the genus classifications of plant sources of the botanicals that contain DTT are reviewed, with particular focus on the NMR spectral features and pharmacological activities based on literature reports, which may be benefit for the development of new drugs or food additives. PMID:27529202

  16. Lactate involvement in neuron-glia metabolic interaction: (13)C-NMR spectroscopy contribution.

    PubMed

    Bouzier-Sore, A-K; Serres, S; Canioni, P; Merle, M

    2003-09-01

    Glucose is commonly admitted to be the main substrate for brain energy requirement. However, it has been recently proposed that lactate, generated from glucose via glycolysis, would be the oxidative substrate for neurons, particularly during neuronal activation, according to a mechanism called the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis (ANLSH). In that mechanism, glutamate released in the synaptic cleft during brain activation is taken up by astrocytes. This uptake, via the glutamate/Na(+) transporter, induces the entry of sodium, which is then excluded from the astrocytes via the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase. This exclusion consumes ATP, which stimulates glycolysis and thus lactate formation in astrocytes. This lactate is then transferred to neurons where it is utilized as oxidative substrate. This review tries to gather the recent evidences that support this hypothesis and presents the contribution of NMR to this matter. PMID:14652173

  17. 13C NMR spectroscopy of methane adsorbed in SAPO-11 molecular sieve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskela, Tuomas; Ylihautala, Mika; Vaara, Juha; Jokisaari, Jukka

    1996-10-01

    Static 13C and 13C-{ 1H} NMR spectra of carbon-13 enriched methane ( 13CH 4) adsorbed into SAPO-11 molecular sieve were recorded at variable temperatures. Moreover, the corresponding MAS NMR spectra were measured. These experiments reveal a temperature-dependent, anisotropic and asymmetric 13C nuclear shielding tensor. Ab initio model calculations of methane in the field of a positive point charge suggest that the deformation of the shielding tensor may be related to the interaction between the methane molecule and the charge-compensating protons. A comparison with existing Xe data is made.

  18. Vibrational, XRD and (13)C NMR studies of DL-phenylglycinium methanesulfonate crystal.

    PubMed

    Wołoszyn, Łukasz; Ilczyszyn, Marek; Ilczyszyn, Maria M; Haupa, Karolina

    2016-11-01

    A new crystal formed by DL-phenylglycine and methanesulfonic acid (PGLYMS) was obtained and studied by X-ray diffraction, IR and Raman spectroscopy, solid state NMR and DSC methods. Additionally, theoretical computations for the phenylglycine cation were carried out (DFT/B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ). Our results show that PGLYMS does not exhibit any phase transitions and crystallizes in the P21/c space group of monoclinic system (Z=4). Detailed analysis of its structure and its IR, Raman and NMR spectra is presented. PMID:27289350

  19. Recent applications of /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy to biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in conjunction with carbon-13 labelling, is a powerful new analytical technique for the study of metabolic pathways and structural components in intact organelles, cells, and tissues. The technique can provide, rapidly and non-destructively, unique information about: the architecture and dynamics of structural components; the nature of the intracellular environment; and metabolic pathways and relative fluxes of individual carbon atoms. With the aid of results recently obtained by us and those reported by a number of other laboratories, the problems and potentialities of the technique will be reviewed with emphasis on: the viscosities of intracellular fluids; the structure and dynamics of the components of membranes; and the primary and secondary metabolic pathways of carbon in microorganisms, plants, and mammalian cells in culture.

  20. Effect of pH, urea, peptide length, and neighboring amino acids on alanine alpha-proton random coil chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Elizabeth A; Holder, Jessica L; Maranda, Abby M; de Alwis, Adamberage R; Selkie, Ellen L; McKay, Sonya L

    2007-01-01

    Accurate random coil alpha-proton chemical shift values are essential for precise protein structure analysis using chemical shift index (CSI) calculations. The current study determines the chemical shift effects of pH, urea, peptide length and neighboring amino acids on the alpha-proton of Ala using model peptides of the general sequence GnXaaAYaaGn, where Xaa and Yaa are Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, His, Trp or Pro, and n = 1-3. Changes in pH (2-6), urea (0-1M), and peptide length (n = 1-3) had no effect on Ala alpha-proton chemical shifts. Denaturing concentrations of urea (8M) caused significant downfield shifts (0.10 +/- 0.01 ppm) relative to an external DSS reference. Neighboring aliphatic residues (Leu, Val) had no effect, whereas aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, His and Trp) and Pro caused significant shifts in the alanine alpha-proton, with the extent of the shifts dependent on the nature and position of the amino acid. Smaller aromatic residues (Phe, Tyr, His) caused larger shift effects when present in the C-terminal position (approximately 0.10 vs. 0.05 ppm N-terminal), and the larger aromatic tryptophan caused greater effects in the N-terminal position (0.15 ppm vs. 0.10 C-terminal). Proline affected both significant upfield (0.06 ppm, N-terminal) and downfield (0.25 ppm, C-terminal) chemical shifts. These new Ala correction factors detail the magnitude and range of variation in environmental chemical shift effects, in addition to providing insight into the molecular level interactions that govern protein folding. PMID:17054116

  1. 13C and 199Hg nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of alkenemercurinium ions: Effect of methyl substituents on 199Hg chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Garcia-Luna, Armando

    1980-01-01

    The long-lived ethylene, cyclohexene, and norbornenemercurinium ions prepared in superacidic, low-nucleophilic media have been studied by 13C and 199Hg NMR spectroscopy. The norbornenemercurinium ion shows temperature-dependent 13C and 199Hg NMR spectra, consistent with equilibration via rapid hydride and Wagner-Meerwin shifts. The 199Hg NMR shifts of a series of alkylmercury bromides were also obtained in order to elucidate the effect of methyl substituents on 199Hg NMR chemical shifts. PMID:16592870

  2. Ab initio and DFT study of 31P-NMR chemical shifts of sphingomyelin and dihydrosphingomyelin lipid molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimori, K.; Kawabe, H.; Nagao, H.; Nishikawa, K.

    One of the phospholipids, sphingomyelin (SM, N-acyl-sphingosine-1-phosphorylcholine) is the most abundant component of mammalian membranes in brain, nervous tissues, and human ocular lens. It plays an important role for apoptosis, aging, and signal transduction. Recently, Yappert and coworkers have shown that human lens sphingomyelin and its hydrogenated derivative, dihydrosphingomyelin (DHSM) are interacted with Ca2+ ions to develop human cataracts. Previously, we have investigated conformational differences between an isolated SM/DHSM molecule and Ca2+-coordinated form by using density functional theory (DFT) for geometry optimization and normal mode analysis. As a result, one of stable conformers of SMs has a hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl group and phosphate group, whereas another conformer has a hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl and phosphate amide group. In this study, 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) shielding constants of the obtained conformers are investigated by using ab initio and DFT with NMR-gauge invariant atomic orbitals (NMR-GIAO) calculations. The experimental 31P-NMR chemical shifts of SMs and DHSMs have significant small value around 0.1 ppm. We consider the relative conformational changes between SMs and DHSMs affect the slight deviations of 31P-NMR chemical shifts, and discuss intramolecular hydrogen bondings and the solvent effect in relation to NMR experimental reference.

  3. Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect

    Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

    2010-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

  4. Simultaneous phase unwrapping and removal of chemical shift (SPURS) using graph cuts: application in quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jianwu; Liu, Tian; Chen, Feng; Zhou, Dong; Dimov, Alexey; Raj, Ashish; Cheng, Qiang; Spincemaille, Pascal; Wang, Yi

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a magnetic resonance imaging technique that reveals tissue magnetic susceptibility. It relies on having a high quality field map, typically acquired with a relatively long echo spacing and long final TE. Applications of QSM outside the brain require the removal of fat contributions to the total signal phase. However, current water/fat separation methods applied on typical data acquired for QSM suffer from three issues: inadequacy when using large echo spacing, over-smoothing of the field maps and high computational cost. In this paper, the general phase wrap and chemical shift problem is formulated using a single species fitting and is solved using graph cuts with conditional jump moves. This method is referred as simultaneous phase unwrapping and removal of chemical shift (SPURS). The result from SPURS is then used as the initial guess for a voxel-wise iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetric and least-squares estimation (IDEAL). The estimated 3-D field maps are used to compute QSM in body regions outside of the brain, such as the liver. Experimental results show substantial improvements in field map estimation, water/fat separation and reconstructed QSM compared to two existing water/fat separation methods on 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance human data with long echo spacing and rapid field map variation. PMID:25312917

  5. Measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy in [(13)C,(15)N] uniformly enriched proteins using CSA amplification.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Ge, Yuwei; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Mali; Li, Conggang; Gan, Zhehong

    2015-11-01

    Extended chemical shift anisotropy amplification (xCSA) is applied for measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) of uniformly labeled proteins under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The amplification sequence consists of a sequence of π-pulses that repetitively interrupt MAS averaging of the CSA interaction. The timing of the pulses is designed to generate amplified spinning sideband manifolds which can be fitted to extract CSA parameters. The (13)C/(13)C homonuclear dipolar interactions are not affected by the π-pulses due to the bilinear nature of the spin operators and are averaged by MAS in the xCSA experiment. These features make the constant evolution-time experiment suitable for measuring CSA of uniformly labeled samples. The incorporation of xCSA with multi-dimensional (13)C/(15)N correlation is demonstrated with a GB1 protein sample as a model system for measuring (13)C/(15)N CSA of all backbone (15)NH, (13)CA and (13)CO sites. PMID:26404770

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Assisted Prediction of Secondary Structure for RNA: Incorporation of Direction-Dependent Chemical Shift Constraints

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of RNA structure is necessary to determine structure–function relationships and to facilitate design of potential therapeutics. RNA secondary structure pr