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Sample records for 13c-nmr chemical shifts

  1. Density functional theory study of (13)C NMR chemical shift of chlorinated compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Songqing; Zhou, Wenfeng; Gao, Haixiang; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-02-01

    The use of the standard density functional theory (DFT) leads to an overestimation of the paramagnetic contribution and underestimation of the shielding constants, especially for chlorinated carbon nuclei. For that reason, the predictions of chlorinated compounds often yield too high chemical shift values. In this study, the WC04 functional is shown to be capable of reducing the overestimation of the chemical shift of Cl-bonded carbons in standard DFT functionals and to show a good performance in the prediction of (13)C NMR chemical shifts of chlorinated organic compounds. The capability is attributed to the minimization of the contributions that intensively increase the chemical shift in the WC04. Extensive computations and analyses were performed to search for the optimal procedure for WC04. The B3LYP and mPW1PW91 standard functionals were also used to evaluate the performance. Through detailed comparisons between the basis set effects and the solvent effects on the results, the gas-phase GIAO/WC04/6-311+G(2d,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) was found to be specifically suitable for the prediction of (13)C NMR chemical shifts of chlorides in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated carbons. Further tests with eight molecules in the probe set sufficiently confirmed that WC04 was undoubtedly effective for accurately predicting (13) C NMR chemical shifts of chlorinated organic compounds.

  2. A predictive tool for assessing (13)C NMR chemical shifts of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Burns, Darcy C; Ellis, David A; March, Raymond E

    2007-10-01

    Herein are presented the (1)H and (13)C NMR data for seven monohydroxyflavones (3-, 5-, 6-, 7-, 2'-, 3'-, and 4'-hydroxyflavone), five dihydroxyflavones (3,2'-, 3,3'-, 3,4'-, 3,6-, 2',3'-dihydroxyflavone), a trihydroxyflavone (apigenin; 5,7,4'-trihydroxyflavone), a tetrahydroxyflavone (luteolin; 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), and three glycosylated hydroxyflavones (orientin; luteolin-6C-beta-D-glucoside, homoorientin; luteolin-8C-beta-D-glucoside, vitexin; apigenin-8C-beta-D-glucoside). When these NMR spectra are compared, it is possible to assess the impact of flavone modification and to elucidate detailed structural and electronic information for these flavonoids. A simple predictive tool for assigning flavonoid (13)C chemical shifts, which is based on the cumulative differences between the monohydroxyflavones and flavone (13)C chemical shifts, is demonstrated. The tool can be used to accurately predict (13)C flavonoid chemical shifts and it is expected to be useful for rapid assessment of flavonoid (13)C NMR spectra and for assigning substitution patterns in newly isolated flavonoids.

  3. Density Functional Studies of the 13C NMR Chemical Shifts in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Eva; Autschbach, Jochen

    2007-12-01

    Density functional theory has been used to compute the electronic structure and 13C NMR chemical shifts of finite (9,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) capped with fullerene hemispheres and with hydrogen atoms. The chemical shifts and HOMO-LUMO gaps were found to be dependent upon the mode of capping. The shifts of semiconducting and metallic tubes were estimated as being around 130 ppm and 141 ppm, respectively. Periodic boundary calculations on infinite zigzag (n,0) SWNTs with 7⩽n⩽17 were performed. These entities can be characterized by a family index, λ = mod(n,3), and the chemical shifts can be fitted well by a function inversely proportional to the diameter of the tube and proportional to a constant which depends on the nanotube family. Direct comparison of the molecular and periodic approaches can be made if benzene is used as the internal reference. Such a comparison indicates that capping may have a strong effect on the computed properties. Calculations on infinite zigzag (7⩽n⩽10) amine functionalized SWNTs have been performed. The functional group may react with a C-C bond which is parallel or diagonal to the tube axis and both sites have been considered. The shifts of the carbons directly attached to the group are sensitive to the bond which has been functionalized and may therefore be used to discriminate between the two products. Functionalization induces a significant line broadening of the NMR signals but it does not dramatically change the average shift of the unfunctionalized SWNT carbons.

  4. DFT calculations of 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    del Rosal, I; Maron, L; Poteau, R; Jolibois, F

    2008-08-14

    Transition metal hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential use as catalysts for hydrogenation. Among other available techniques, structural properties in transition metal (TM) complexes are often probed by NMR spectroscopy. In this paper we will show that it is possible to establish a viable methodological strategy in the context of density functional theory, that allows the determination of 1H NMR chemical shifts of hydride ligands attached to transition metal atoms in mononuclear systems and clusters with good accuracy with respect to experiment. 13C chemical shifts have also been considered in some cases. We have studied mononuclear ruthenium complexes such as Ru(L)(H)(dppm)2 with L = H or Cl, cationic complex [Ru(H)(H2O)(dppm)2]+ and Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2, in which hydride ligands are characterized by a negative 1H NMR chemical shift. For these complexes all calculations are in relatively good agreement compared to experimental data with errors not exceeding 20% except for the hydrogen atom in Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2. For this last complex, the relative error increases to 30%, probably owing to the necessity to take into account dynamical effects of phenyl groups. Carbonyl ligands are often encountered in coordination chemistry. Specific issues arise when calculating 1H or 13C NMR chemical shifts in TM carbonyl complexes. Indeed, while errors of 10 to 20% with respect to experiment are often considered good in the framework of density functional theory, this difference in the case of mononuclear carbonyl complexes culminates to 80%: results obtained with all-electron calculations are overall in very satisfactory agreement with experiment, the error in this case does not exceed 11% contrary to effective core potentials (ECPs) calculations which yield errors always larger than 20%. We conclude that for carbonyl groups the use of ECPs is not recommended, although their use could save time for very large systems, for

  5. Origin of the conformational modulation of the 13C NMR chemical shift of methoxy groups in aromatic natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Toušek, Jaromír; Straka, Michal; Sklenář, Vladimír; Marek, Radek

    2013-01-24

    The interpretation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters is essential to understanding experimental observations at the molecular and supramolecular levels and to designing new and more efficient molecular probes. In many aromatic natural compounds, unusual (13)C NMR chemical shifts have been reported for out-of-plane methoxy groups bonded to the aromatic ring (~62 ppm as compared to the typical value of ~56 ppm for an aromatic methoxy group). Here, we analyzed this phenomenon for a series of aromatic natural compounds using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. First, we checked the methodology used to optimize the structure and calculate the NMR chemical shifts in aromatic compounds. The conformational effects of the methoxy group on the (13)C NMR chemical shift then were interpreted by the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Natural Chemical Shift (NCS) approaches, and by excitation analysis of the chemical shifts, breaking down the total nuclear shielding tensor into the contributions from the different occupied orbitals and their magnetic interactions with virtual orbitals. We discovered that the atypical (13)C NMR chemical shifts observed are not directly related to a different conjugation of the lone pair of electrons of the methoxy oxygen with the aromatic ring, as has been suggested. Our analysis indicates that rotation of the methoxy group induces changes in the virtual molecular orbital space, which, in turn, correlate with the predominant part of the contribution of the paramagnetic deshielding connected with the magnetic interactions of the BD(CMet-H)→BD*(CMet-OMet) orbitals, resulting in the experimentally observed deshielding of the (13)C NMR resonance of the out-of-plane methoxy group.

  6. Quantitative analysis of deuterium using the isotopic effect on quaternary (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Tamim A; Yepuri, Nageshwar Rao; Holden, Peter J; James, Michael

    2016-07-13

    Quantitative analysis of specifically deuterated compounds can be achieved by a number of conventional methods, such as mass spectroscopy, or by quantifying the residual (1)H NMR signals compared to signals from internal standards. However, site specific quantification using these methods becomes challenging when dealing with non-specifically or randomly deuterated compounds that are produced by metal catalyzed hydrothermal reactions in D2O, one of the most convenient deuteration methods. In this study, deuterium-induced NMR isotope shifts of quaternary (13)C resonances neighboring deuterated sites have been utilized to quantify the degree of isotope labeling of molecular sites in non-specifically deuterated molecules. By probing (13)C NMR signals while decoupling both proton and deuterium nuclei, it is possible to resolve (13)C resonances of the different isotopologues based on the isotopic shifts and the degree of deuteration of the carbon atoms. We demonstrate that in different isotopologues, the same quaternary carbon, neighboring partially deuterated carbon atoms, are affected to an equal extent by relaxation. Decoupling both nuclei ((1)H, (2)H) resolves closely separated quaternary (13)C signals of the different isotopologues, and allows their accurate integration and quantification under short relaxation delays (D1 = 1 s) and hence fast accumulative spectral acquisition. We have performed a number of approaches to quantify the deuterium content at different specific sites to demonstrate a convenient and generic analysis method for use in randomly deuterated molecules, or in cases of specifically deuterated molecules where back-exchange processes may take place during work up.

  7. Experimental and theoretical study of substituent effect on 13C NMR chemical shifts of 5-arylidene-2,4-thiazolidinediones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rančić, Milica P.; Trišović, Nemanja P.; Milčić, Miloš K.; Ajaj, Ismail A.; Marinković, Aleksandar D.

    2013-10-01

    The electronic structure of 5-arylidene-2,4-thiazolidinediones has been studied by using experimental and theoretical methodology. The theoretical calculations of the investigated 5-arylidene-2,4-thiazolidinediones have been performed by the use of quantum chemical methods. The calculated 13C NMR chemical shifts and NBO atomic charges provide an insight into the influence of such a structure on the transmission of electronic substituent effects. Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) have been further applied to their 13C NMR chemical shifts. The correlation analyses for the substituent-induced chemical shifts (SCS) have been performed with σ using SSP (single substituent parameter), field (σF) and resonance (σR) parameters using DSP (dual substituent parameter), as well as the Yukawa-Tsuno model. The presented correlations account satisfactorily for the polar and resonance substituent effects operative at Cβ, and C7 carbons, while reverse substituent effect was found for Cα. The comparison of correlation results for the investigated molecules with those obtained for seven structurally related styrene series has indicated that specific cross-interaction of phenyl substituent and groups attached at Cβ carbon causes increased sensitivity of SCS Cβ to the resonance effect with increasing of electron-accepting capabilities of the group present at Cβ.

  8. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments of spiro-cycloalkylidenehomo- and methanofullerenes by the DFT-GIAO method.

    PubMed

    Khalilov, L M; Tulyabaev, A R; Yanybin, V M; Tuktarov, A R

    2011-06-01

    The (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of spiro-cycloalkylidene[60]fullerenes were assigned using experimental NMR data and the Density Functional Theory (DFT)-Gauge Independence Of Atomic Orbitals method (GAIO) calculation method in the Perdew Burke Ernzerhof (PBE)/3z approach. The calculated values of the (13)C NMR chemical shifts adequately reproduce the experimental values at this quantum chemistry approach. Similar assignments will be helpful for (13)C NMR spectral analysis of homo- and methano[60]fullerene derivatives for structure elucidation and to determine the influence of fullerene frames on substituents and the influence of substituents on fullerene cores.

  9. (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of methacrylate molecules associated with DMPC and/or DPPC liposomes.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Seiichiro; Ishihara, Mariko; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2005-01-01

    In the light of recent developments, changes in (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of methacrylate molecule associated with DMPC (L-alpha dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) or DPPC (L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine) liposomes as a model for mimic native lipid bilayers were studied at 30, 37, and 52 degrees C. The chemical shifts of 3Ha, 3C, and 4C resonances in methacrylates (see Fig. 2) were greatly shifted higher field, suggesting the methacrylate molecule-lipid bilayer interaction. Comparison of the findings with methyl methacrylate (MMA), ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA), and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) revealed that the interaction of dimethacrylates (EDMA, TEGDMA) was greater than monomethacrylate, MMA. Their interaction with DMPC liposomes was also judged by a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), indicating that the interaction was characterized by decreasing the enthalpy, entropy, and transition co-operativity. The evidence of the upfield NMR-shifts for methacrylate molecules was also judged by the descriptors such as the reactivity (HOMO-LUMO energy) and the electrostatic function (partial charges) between methacrylate molecules and DPPC, calculated by a PM 3 semiempirical MO method. The upfield NMR shifts were considerably well interpreted from the descriptors. NMR screening technique in methacrylates to phospholipid targets would be highly valuable in biomaterial developments. Figure 2 Changes in (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of methacrylate molecule associated with DMPC or DPPC liposomes. DMPC liposomes/MMA (1:1, molar ratio) and DMPC/TEGDMA (1:1) liposomes were measured at 30 degrees C. In DPPC liposome system, the rippled gel phase was measured at 30 degrees C, whereas the liquid crystalline phase for MMA and for both EDMA and TEGDMA were measured at 52 degrees C and 37 degrees C, respectively.

  10. 13C NMR chemical shifts of the triclinic and monoclinic crystal forms of valinomycin.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tsunenori; McGeorge, Gary; Orendt, Anita M; Grant, David M

    2004-07-01

    Two different crystalline polymorphs of valinomycin, the triclinic and monoclinic forms, have been studied by high resolution, solid state (13)C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy. Although the two polymorphs of the crystal are remarkably similar, there are distinct differences in the isotropic chemical shifts between the two spectra. For the triclinic form, the carbon chemical shift tensor components for the alpha carbons adjacent to oxygen in the lactic acid and hydroxyisovaleric acid residues and the ester carbonyls of the valine residue were obtained using the FIREMAT experiment. From the measured components, it was found that the behavior of the isotropic chemical shift, delta(iso), for valine residue ester carbonyl carbons is predominately influenced by the intermediate component, delta(22). Additionally it was found that the smallest shift component, delta(33), for the L -lactic acid ( L -Lac) and D -alpha-hydroxyisovaleric acid ( D -Hyi) C(alpha)-O carbon was significantly displaced depending upon the nature of individual amino acid residues, and it is the delta(33) component that governs the behavior of delta(iso) in these alpha carbons.

  11. Regression formulas for density functional theory calculated 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in toluene-d8.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, Ivan A; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2011-11-10

    This study aimed at investigating the performance of a series of basis sets, density functional theory (DFT) functionals, and the IEF-PCM solvation model in the accurate calculation of (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts in toluene-d(8). We demonstrated that, on a test set of 37 organic species with various functional moieties, linear scaling significantly improved the calculated shifts and was necessary to obtain more accurate results. Inclusion of a solvation model produced larger deviations from the experimental data as compared to the gas-phase calculations. Moreover, we did not find any evidence that very large basis sets were necessary to reproduce the experimental NMR data. Ultimately, we recommend the use of the BMK functional. For the (1)H shifts the use of the 6-311G(d) basis set gave linearly scaled mean unsigned (MU) and root-mean-square (rms) errors of 0.15 ppm and 0.21 ppm, respectively. For the calculation of the (13)C chemical shifts the 6-31G(d) basis set produced MUE of 1.82 ppm and RMSE of 3.29 ppm.

  12. 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shift Assignments and Conformational Analysis for the Two Diastereomers of the Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase Inhibitor Brodifacoum

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, John R.; Cho, Herman M.

    2009-10-01

    Proton and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments and 1H-1H scalar couplings for the two diastereomers of the vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) inhibitor brodifacoum have been determined from acetone solutions containing both diastereomers. Data were obtained from homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra acquired at 1H frequencies of 750 and 900 MHz over a 268-303 K temperature range. Conformations inferred from scalar coupling and 1-D NOE measurements exhibit large differences between the diastereomers. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  13. Geometries and tautomerism of OHN hydrogen bonds in aprotic solution probed by H/D isotope effects on (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, Peter M; Guo, Jing; Koeppe, Benjamin; Golubev, Nikolai S; Denisov, Gleb S; Smirnov, Sergei N; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-10-14

    The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of 17 OHN hydrogen-bonded complexes formed by CH(3)(13)COOH(D) with 14 substituted pyridines, 2 amines, and N-methylimidazole have been measured in the temperature region between 110 and 150 K using CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl mixture as solvent. The slow proton and hydrogen bond exchange regime was reached, and the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group were measured. In combination with the analysis of the corresponding (1)H chemical shifts, it was possible to distinguish between OHN hydrogen bonds exhibiting a single proton position and those exhibiting a fast proton tautomerism between molecular and zwitterionic forms. Using H-bond correlations, we relate the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group with the OHN hydrogen bond geometries.

  14. Quantum-chemical analysis of paramagnetic 13C NMR shifts of iron-bound cyanide ions in heme-protein environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaki, Daisuke; Hada, Masahiko

    2012-12-01

    Paramagnetic 13C NMR chemical shifts of iron-bound cyanide ions located in biological environments such as heme-proteins are significantly sensitive to the environments. These chemical shifts are due to negative spin density at 13C induced by the open-shell iron center. In order to examine the environments effects on the electronic states around heme parts, ab initio calculations were performed for model systems of heme-proteins. The proximal residues in proteinparts of cytochrome c, hemoglobin, myoglobin and horseradish peroxidase were included in the model systems with the common active site (cyanide imidazole porphyrinato iron(III)) to take account of the environments effects. The calculated paramagnetic shifts of model systems reproduce the experimental trend of corresponding heme-proteins. It is found that the effects of proximal residues on the electronic states of the heme-parts are significant for these hemeproteins. In this abstract we focused on the calculations and analysis of cytochrome c.

  15. Hydrogen bond geometries and proton tautomerism of homoconjugated anions of carboxylic acids studied via H/D isotope effects on 13C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Tolstoy, Peter M; Koeppe, Benjamin; Golubev, Nikolai S; Denisov, Gleb S; Smirnov, Sergei N; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2012-11-26

    Ten formally symmetric anionic OHO hydrogen bonded complexes, modeling Asp/Glu amino acid side chain interactions in nonaqueous environment (CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl solution, 200-110 K) have been studied by (1)H, (2)H, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, i.e. intermolecularly H-bonded homoconjugated anions of acetic, chloroacetic, dichloroacetic, trifluoroacetic, trimethylacetic, and isobutyric acids, and intramolecularly H-bonded hydrogen succinate, hydrogen rac-dimethylsuccinate, hydrogen maleate, and hydrogen phthalate. In particular, primary H/D isotope effects on the hydrogen bond proton signals as well as secondary H/D isotope effects on the (13)C signals of the carboxylic groups are reported and analyzed. We demonstrate that in most of the studied systems there is a degenerate proton tautomerism between O-H···O(-) and O(-)···H-O structures which is fast in the NMR time scale. The stronger is the proton donating ability of the acid, the shorter and more symmetric are the H-bonds in each tautomer of the homoconjugate. For the maleate and phthalate anions exhibiting intramolecular hydrogen bonds, evidence for symmetric single well potentials is obtained. We propose a correlation between H/D isotope effects on carboxylic carbon chemical shifts and the proton transfer coordinate, q(1) = ½(r(OH) - r(HO)), which allows us to estimate the desired OHO hydrogen bond geometries from the observed (13)C NMR parameters, taking into account the degenerate proton tautomerism.

  16. Unraveling the 13C NMR chemical shifts in single-walled carbon nanotubes: dependence on diameter and electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Irurzun, Veronica M; Gjersing, Erica L; Holt, Josh M; Larsen, Brian A; Resasco, Daniel E; Blackburn, Jeffrey L

    2012-03-14

    The atomic specificity afforded by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy could enable detailed mechanistic information about single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) functionalization as well as the noncovalent molecular interactions that dictate ground-state charge transfer and separation by electronic structure and diameter. However, to date, the polydispersity present in as-synthesized SWCNT populations has obscured the dependence of the SWCNT (13)C chemical shift on intrinsic parameters such as diameter and electronic structure, meaning that no information is gleaned for specific SWCNTs with unique chiral indices. In this article, we utilize a combination of (13)C labeling and density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) to produce an array of (13)C-labeled SWCNT populations with varying diameter, electronic structure, and chiral angle. We find that the SWCNT isotropic (13)C chemical shift decreases systematically with increasing diameter for semiconducting SWCNTs, in agreement with recent theoretical predictions that have heretofore gone unaddressed. Furthermore, we find that the (13)C chemical shifts for small diameter metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs differ significantly, and that the full-width of the isotropic peak for metallic SWCNTs is much larger than that of semiconducting nanotubes, irrespective of diameter.

  17. Calculation of the {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift of ether linkages in lignin derived geopolymers: Constraints on the preservation of lignin primary structure with diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, G.D.; Saghi-Szabo, G.

    1999-01-01

    Methodology for the calculation of {sup 13}C NMR shielding on molecular organic fragments, representative of monomers in a type 3 kerogen, is presented. Geometry optimization of each molecular fragment was carried out using Density Functional Theory employing the generalized gradient approximation. NMR shieldings were calculated using the Individual Gauge for Localized orbital Method. Convincing agreement was obtained between calculated and experimentally derived isotropic chemical shielding values over a broad frequency range. Shielding calculations employing the localized orbitals/local origin method resulted in nearly identical results. NMR chemical shift static powder patterns also exhibit excellent agreement with experimental values. These quantum mechanical calculations were applied to determine the extent of lignin primary structure preservation with diagenesis. Specifically, the calculations were used to assess whether inhomogeneous spectral broadening due to both functional group variation and local configurational variability may inhibit the detection of otherwise significant quantities of alkyl-aryl ethers in lignin derived geopolymers. Determination of the chemical-shielding tensor principle axis values reveals a strong correlation between anisotropy and asymmetry with local configuration effects such as dihedral rotation, phenyl group rotation, and bond angle variation. These results indicate that a range of 9 ppm in the isotropic chemical shift can be ascribed to local configuration. Consequently, an upper limit of 5% alkyl-aryl-linkages may go undetected using NMR spectroscopy on lignin-derived geopolymers at the liginite-sub-bituminous transition. It is concluded that the primary structure of lignin does not persist in kerogens even at relatively low thermal maturities.

  18. Calculation of the 13C NMR chemical shift of ether linkages in lignin derived geopolymers: . Constraints on the preservation of lignin primary structure with diagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G. D.; Sághi-Szabó, G.

    1999-01-01

    Methodology for the calculation of 13C NMR shieldings on molecular organic fragments, representative of monomers in a type III kerogen, is presented. Geometry optimization of each molecular fragment was carried out using Density Functional Theory employing the generalized gradient approximation. NMR shieldings were calculated using the Individual Gauge for Localized Orbital Method. Convincing agreement was obtained between calculated and experimentally derived isotropic chemical shielding values over a broad frequency range. Shielding calculations employing the localized orbitals/local origin method resulted in nearly identical results. NMR chemical shift static powder patterns also exhibit excellent agreement with experimental values. These quantum mechanical calculations were applied to determine the extent of lignin primary structure preservation with diagenesis. Specifically, the calculations were used to assess whether inhomogeneous spectral broadening due to both functional group variation and local configurational variability may inhibit the detection of otherwise significant quantities of alkyl-aryl ethers in lignin derived geopolymers. Determination of the chemical-shielding tensor principle axis values reveals a strong correlation between anisotropy and asymmetry with local configuration effects such as dihedral rotation, phenyl group rotation, and bond angle variation. These results indicate that a range of 9 ppm in the isotropic chemical shift can be ascribed to local configuration. Consequently, an upper limit of 5% alkyl-aryl-linkages may go undetected using NMR spectroscopy on lignin-derived geopolymers at the liginite-sub-bituminous transition. It is concluded that the primary structure of lignin does not persist in kerogens even at relatively low thermal maturities.

  19. Complete (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift assignments of mono-, di-, and trisaccharides as basis for NMR chemical shift predictions of polysaccharides using the computer program casper.

    PubMed

    Roslund, Mattias U; Säwén, Elin; Landström, Jens; Rönnols, Jerk; Jonsson, K Hanna M; Lundborg, Magnus; Svensson, Mona V; Widmalm, Göran

    2011-08-16

    The computer program casper uses (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data of mono- to trisaccharides for the prediction of chemical shifts of oligo- and polysaccharides. In order to improve the quality of these predictions the (1)H and (13)C, as well as (31)P when applicable, NMR chemical shifts of 30 mono-, di-, and trisaccharides were assigned. The reducing sugars gave two distinct sets of NMR resonances due to the α- and β-anomeric forms. In total 35 (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data sets were obtained from the oligosaccharides. One- and two-dimensional NMR experiments were used for the chemical shift assignments and special techniques were employed in some cases such as 2D (1)H,(13)C-HSQC Hadamard Transform methodology which was acquired approximately 45 times faster than a regular t(1) incremented (1)H,(13)C-HSQC experiment and a 1D (1)H,(1)H-CSSF-TOCSY experiment which was able to distinguish spin-systems in which the target protons were only 3.3Hz apart. The (1)H NMR chemical shifts were subsequently refined using total line-shape analysis with the PERCH NMR software. The acquired NMR data were then utilized in the casper program (http://www.casper.organ.su.se/casper/) for NMR chemical shift predictions of the O-antigen polysaccharides from Klebsiella O5, Shigella flexneri serotype X, and Salmonella arizonae O62. The data were compared to experimental data of the polysaccharides from the two former strains and the lipopolysaccharide of the latter strain showing excellent agreement between predicted and experimental (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

  20. A combined DFT - NMR study of cyclic 1,2-diones and methyl ethers of their enols: The power and limitations of the method based on theoretical predictions of 13C NMR chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubicki, Dominik; Gryff-Keller, Adam; Szczeciński, Przemysław

    2012-08-01

    A series of cyclic 1,2-diones and methyl ethers of their enols were investigated by a combined 13C NMR/computational DFT method to establish their preferred solution structures. The optimum molecular geometries and magnetic shielding constants of carbon nuclei were calculated with GIAO DFT [PBE1PBE/6-311++G(2d,p) PCM] method for the investigated molecules allowing for enolization and dynamic conformational equilibriums occurring in the solutions. These compounds served simultaneously as model compounds for testing the effectiveness and limitations of the exploited method of investigating molecular structures based on comparison of the theoretically calculated magnetic shielding constants and experimental 13C NMR chemical shifts. Generally, a very good agreement between experimental and theoretical data was obtained for the investigated group of compounds, which proved the applied level of theory and used methodology to be adequate and should ensure a high accuracy of the 13C NMR chemical shift predictions. Some divergences between the experiment and theory could be interpreted as the results of insufficiencies of the molecular modelling and the effects of neglecting vibrational/librational molecular motions. Furthermore, we report herein an observation of an unexpected 1H NMR spectral pattern for 2,3-dimethoxycyclodeca-1,3-diene (diether of cyclodecadione dienol), which was interpreted to be caused by the slow (in NMR time scale) enantiomerization of this molecule which preferentially assumes a chiral conformation.

  1. Probing structural patterns of ion association and solvation in mixtures of imidazolium ionic liquids with acetonitrile by means of relative (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Marekha, Bogdan A; Kalugin, Oleg N; Bria, Marc; Idrissi, Abdenacer

    2015-09-21

    Mixtures of ionic liquids (ILs) with polar aprotic solvents in different combinations and under different conditions (concentration, temperature etc.) are used widely in electrochemistry. However, little is known about the key intermolecular interactions in such mixtures depending on the nature of the constituents and mixture composition. In order to systematically address the intermolecular interactions, the chemical shift variation of (1)H and (13)C nuclei has been followed in mixtures of imidazolium ILs 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BmimBF4), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BmimPF6), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (BmimTfO) and 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BmimTFSI) with molecular solvent acetonitrile (AN) over the entire composition range at 300 K. The concept of relative chemical shift variation is proposed to assess the observed effects on a unified and unbiased scale. We have found that hydrogen bonds between the imidazolium ring hydrogen atoms and electronegative atoms of anions are stronger in BmimBF4 and BmimTfO ILs than those in BmimTFSI and BmimPF6. Hydrogen atom at position 2 of the imidazolium ring is substantially more sensitive to interionic hydrogen bonding than those at positions 4-5 in the case of BmimTfO and BmimTFSI ILs. These hydrogen bonds are disrupted upon dilution in AN due to ion dissociation which is more pronounced at high dilutions. Specific solvation interactions between AN molecules and IL cations are poorly manifested.

  2. Quantifying the chemical composition of soil organic carbon with solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, J. A.; Sanderman, J.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) to biological decomposition and mineralisation to CO2 is defined at least partially by its chemical composition. Highly aromatic charcoal-like SOC components are more stable to biological decomposition than other forms of carbon including cellulose. Solid-state 13C NMR has gained wide acceptance as a method capable of defining SOC chemical composition and mathematical fitting processes have been developed to estimate biochemical composition. Obtaining accurate estimates depends on an ability to quantitatively detect all carbon present in a sample. Often little attention has been paid to defining the proportion of organic carbon present in a soil that is observable in solid-state 13C NMR analyses of soil samples. However, if such data is to be used to inform carbon cycling studies, it is critical that quantitative assessments of SOC observability be undertaken. For example, it is now well established that a significant discrimination exists against the detection of the low proton content polyaromatic structures typical of charcoal using cross polarisation 13C NMR analyses. Such discrimination does not exist where direct polarisation analyses are completed. In this study, the chemical composition of SOC as defined by cross polarisation and direct polarisation13C NMR analyses will be compared for Australian soils collected from under a diverse range of agricultural managements and climatic conditions. Results indicate that where significant charcoal C contents exist, it is highly under-represented in the acquired CP spectra. For some soils, a discrimination against alkyl carbon was also evident. The ability to derive correction factors to compensate for such discriminations will be assessed and presented.

  3. 1H, 13C NMR spectral and single crystal structural studies of toxaphene congeners. Quantum chemical calculations for preferred conformers of 2,5- endo,6- exo,8,9,9,10,10-octachloro-2-bornene and their DFT/GIAO 13C chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laihia, K.; Valkonen, A.; Kolehmainen, E.; Suontamo, R.; Nissinen, M.; Nikiforov, V.; Selivanov, S.

    2005-11-01

    The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for six toxaphene congeners: 2- exo,3- endo,6- exo,8,9,10-hexachloro- ( 1), 2- exo,3- endo,5- exo,9,9,10,10-heptachloro- ( 2), 2- exo,3- endo,6- exo,8,9,10,10-heptachloro- ( 3), 2- exo,3- endo,5- exo,6- endo,8,9,10-heptachloro- ( 4), 2- exo,3- endo,5- exo,6- endo,8,9,9,10-octachlorobornane ( 5) and 2,5- endo,6- exo,8,9,9,10,10-octachloro-2-bornene ( 6) are reported. Their chemical shift assignments have been obtained by means of Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) Double Quantum Filtered (DQF) 1H, 1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY), PFG 1H, 13C Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Coherence (HMQC) and PFG 1H, 13C Heteronuclear Multiple Bond Correlation (HMBC) experiments. A single crystal X-ray structural analysis was made for compounds 1, 3, 4 and 6. The prevalences of two octachlorobornene rotamers ( 6 a, 6 b) were elucidated by ab initio MO method and single point DFT/GIAO calculations for 13C chemical shifts. Theoretical calculations proved that the single crystal structure of 6 corresponds its most stable conformer in solution.

  4. Computational Study of (13)C NMR Chemical Shift Anisotropy Patterns in C20H10 and [C20H10](4-). Insights into Their Variation upon Planarization and Formation of Concentric Aromatic Species in the Smaller Isolated-Pentagon Structural Motif.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Castro, Alvaro; Caimanque-Aguilar, Wilson; Morales-Verdejo, Cesar

    2017-04-06

    Corannulene, C20H10, exhibits a concave surface in the ground state that is able to experience a bowl-to-bowl inversion through a planar conformation. Such a structure is the smaller example resembling an isolated-pentagon motif, as a relevant fragment in fullerene chemistry. Here, we explored the differences between bowl and planar conformations involving both energetic and (13)C NMR properties, for the neutral and tetraanionic species by using density functional theory (DFT) methods. This allows us to understand the variation of the chemical environment at the carbon atoms upon planarization of this representive motif. Our results reveal that the variation of the chemical shift comes about from the variation of different main components of the shielding tensor, according to the relative position of the carbon atoms in the structure (i.e., rim, hub, and protonated), which is more relevant for both hub and protonated sites, in contrast to the rim carbon remaining almost unshifted. Interestingly, the planar transition state exhibits a more favorable bonding situation than the bowl-shaped conformation; however, the higher strain is enough to overcome this extra stabilization. Upon reduction to the tetraanionic counterpart (C20H10(4-)), a lesser strain in the planar conformation is observed, decreasing the inversion barrier. In addition, the formation of the concentric aromatic ring systems in C20H10(4-), results in a more axially symmetric chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor for the hub carbons, accounting in a local manner, for the concentric aromatic behavior in such structure in contrast to the neutral parent. These observations can be useful to evaluate the aromatic behavior of teh isolated-pentagon rule (IPR) motif in fullerene cages.

  5. Chemical composition of Ivorian Artabotrys insignis leaf oil. Combined analysis including (13)C NMR, to quantify germacrene A and β-elemene.

    PubMed

    Gooré, Stéphane G; Ouattara, Zana A; Yapi, Thierry A; Békro, Yves-Alain; Tomi, Pierre; Paoli, Mathieu; Tomi, Félix

    2017-02-20

    The chemical composition of leaf essential oil from Artabotrys insignis Engler & Diels collected from Cote d'Ivoire was determined by GC(FID), GC-MS and (13)C NMR. The main compounds were β-elemene (66.8%) and germacrene A (17.1%). The true content of germacrene A/β-elemene was obtained by combining GC(FID) and (13)C NMR data.

  6. Characterization of Chemical Weapons Convention Schedule 3 Compounds by Quantitative 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Stokes-Einstein equation for a rigid isotropic rotor: r = 3 7 3 kT In the equation, q is viscosity (0.224 mPa s at 5 ’C), extrapolated from the reported... viscosities for hydrogen cyanide at 0 and 25 oC,31 r is the radius of the hydrogen cyanide molecule, calculated from its 1.064 x 10-8 cm C-H distance...Lammers, G.; Janssen, L.P.B.; Beenackers, A.A.C.M. Quantitative Analysis of Chemically Modified Starches by ’H-NMR Spectroscopy. Starch /Staerke 1995; 47

  7. Aqueous-phase quantitative NMR determination of amino acid enantiomer ratio by 13C-NMR using chiral neodymium shift reagent.

    PubMed

    Florini, Nicola; Faglioni, Francesco; Zucchi, Claudia; Caglioti, Luciano; Pályi, Gyula

    2010-05-01

    A neodymium-(S)-PDTA (PDTA = N,N,N',N'-tetrakis[(hydroxycarbonyl)methyl]-1,2-diaminopropane) complex was found exceptionally useful in the quantitative determination of enantiomer ratios of water-soluble natural amino acids by (13)C-NMR. The method is demonstrated on mixtures of L- and D-enantiomers of various amino acids. The interactions of the chiral shift reagent with the amino acid molecules were rationalized by molecular orbital calculations.

  8. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) investigations of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride an active metabolite in tramadol - An analgesic drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2014-03-01

    O-desmethyltramadol is one of the main metabolites of tramadol widely used clinically and has analgesic activity. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of O-desmethyl tramadol hydrochloride are recorded in the solid phase in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. Theoretical studies have been performed as its hydrochloride salt. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-31G** and cc-pVDZ basis sets. The optimised bond length and bond angles are correlated with the X-ray data. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the scaled vibrational frequencies determined by DFT methods. The IR and Raman intensities are determined with B3LYP method using cc-pVDZ and 6-31G(d,p) basic sets. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/cc-pVDZ method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule have been anlysed.

  9. Giant spin-orbit effects on (1)H and (13)C NMR shifts for uranium(vi) complexes revisited: role of the exchange-correlation response kernel, bonding analyses, and new predictions.

    PubMed

    Greif, Anja H; Hrobárik, Peter; Autschbach, Jochen; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-11-09

    Previous relativistic quantum-chemical predictions of unusually large (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts for ligand atoms directly bonded to a diamagnetic uranium(vi) center (P. Hrobárik, V. Hrobáriková, A. H. Greif and M. Kaupp, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed., 2012, 51, 10884) have been revisited by two- and four-component relativistic density functional methods. In particular, the effect of the exchange-correlation response kernel, which had been missing in the previously used two-component version of the Amsterdam Density Functional program, has been examined. Kernel contributions are large for cases with large spin-orbit (SO) contributions to the NMR shifts and may amount to up to ∼30% of the total shifts, which means more than a 50 ppm difference for the metal-bonded carbon shifts in some extreme cases. Previous calculations with a PBE-40HF functional had provided overall reasonable predictions, due to cancellation of errors between the missing kernel contributions and the enhanced exact-exchange (EXX) admixture of 40%. In the presence of an exchange-correlation kernel, functionals with lower EXX admixtures give already good agreement with experiments, and the PBE0 functional provides reasonable predictive quality. Most importantly, the revised approach still predicts unprecedented giant (1)H NMR shifts between +30 ppm and more than +200 ppm for uranium(vi) hydride species. We also predict uranium-bonded (13)C NMR shifts for some synthetically known organometallic U(vi) complexes, for which no corresponding signals have been detected to date. In several cases, the experimental lack of these signals may be attributed to unexpected spectral regions in which some of the (13)C NMR shifts can appear, sometimes beyond the usual measurement area. An extremely large uranium-bonded (13)C shift above 550 ppm, near the upper end of the diamagnetic (13)C shift range, is predicted for a known pincer carbene complex. Bonding analyses allow in particular the magnitude of the SO

  10. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance data of lanosterol derivatives—Profiling the steric topology of the steroid skeleton via substituent effects on its 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Jerry Ray; Gao, Hongwu

    2009-12-01

    The 13C NMR spectra of over 24 tetracyclic triterpenoid derivatives have been structurally analyzed. The 13C NMR chemical shifts allow one to probe the steric topology of the rigid steroid skeleton and inductive effects of its substituents. Use of deuterium labeling in chemical shift assignment and B-ring aromatic terpenoids are also featured.

  11. Complete assignment of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of cis and trans isonucleoside derivatives of purine with a tetrahydropyran ring.

    PubMed

    Besada, Pedro; Costas, Tamara; Terán, Carmen

    2010-06-01

    (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of cis and trans isonucleoside analogues of purine in which the furanose moiety is substituted by a tetrahydropyran ring were completely assigned using one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments that include NOE, DEPT, COSY and HSQC. The significant (1)H and (13)C NMR signals differentiating between the cis and trans stereoisomers were compared.

  12. Soil organic degradation: bridging the gap between Rock-Eval pyrolysis and chemical characterization (CPMAS 13C NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Remy; Sebag, David; Verrecchia, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Being a source of mineral nutrients, organic matter contributes to soil chemical fertility and acts on soil physical fertility through its role in soil structure. Soil organic matter (SOM) is a key component of soils. Despite the paramount importance of SOM, information on its chemistry and behaviour in soils is incomplete. Numerous methods are used to characterize and monitor OM dynamics in soils using different approaches (Kogel-Knabner, 2000). Two of the main approaches are evaluated and compared in this study. Rock-Eval pyrolysis (RE pyrolysis) provides a description of a SOM's general evolution using its thermal resistance. The second tool (13C CPMAS NMR) aims to give precise and accurate chemical information on OM characterization. The RE pyrolysis technique was designed for petroleum exploration (Lafargue et al., 1998) and because of its simplicity, it has been applied to a variety of other materials such as soils or Recent sediments (Disnar et al., 2000; Sebag, 2006). Recently, RE pyrolysis became a conventional tool to study OM dynamics in soils. In RE pyrolysis, a peak deconvolution is applied to the pyrolysis signal in order to get four main components related to major classes of organic constituents. These components differ in origin and resistance to pyrolysis: labile biological constituents (F1), resistant biological constituents (F2), immature non-biotic constituents (F3) and a mature refractory fraction (F4) (Sebag, 2006; Coppard, 2006). Main advantages of the technique are its repeatability, and rapidity to provide an overview of OM properties and stocks. However, do the four major classes used in the literature reflect a pertinent chemical counterpart? To answer this question, we used 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in the solid state (13C CPMAS NMR) to collect direct information on structural and conformational characteristics of OM. NMR resonances were assigned to chemical structures according to five dominant forms: alkyl C, O

  13. Monomeric and dimeric structures analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid with experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR, UV) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Kose, Etem; Atac, Ahmet; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Kurt, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 3,5-difluorophenylboronic acid (3,5-DFPBA, C6H3F2B(OH)2) were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques. FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-10 cm-1) in the solid phase and 1H and 13C NMR spectra in DMSO solution were recorded. The UV spectra that dissolved in ethanol and water were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm for each solution. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule have been obtained for possible three conformers from DFT (B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Hydrogen-bonded dimer of title molecule, optimized by counterpoise correction, was also studied B3LYP at the 6-311++G(d,p) level and the effects of molecular association through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding have been discussed. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. The effects due to the substitutions of boric acid group and halogen were investigated. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), nonlinear optical properties (NLO) and thermodynamic features were performed.

  14. Chemical composition of the essential oil from Corsican Mentha aquatica--combined analysis by GC(RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sutour, Sylvain; Tomi, Félix; Bradesi, Pascale; Casanova, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    The essential oil (EO) of M. aquatica L. growing wild in Corsica was isolated by dry vapor distillation and submitted to combined analysis by column chromatography over silica gel, GC(RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The composition was dominated byoxygenated monoterpenes and characterized by the occurrence of menthofuran (50.7%) as the major component. In parallel, seven laboratory-distilled oil samples isolated from individual plants collected in Corsica were analyzed by GC(RI) and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Onlyquantitative differences were observed between the samples. Beside the usual terpenes, various p-menthane lactones (mintlactone, isomintlactone, hydroxymintlactone, menthofurolactone and epimenthofurolactone) have been identified in all the oil samples.

  15. 13C NMR of Nephila clavipes major ampullate silk gland.

    PubMed

    Hijirida, D H; Do, K G; Michal, C; Wong, S; Zax, D; Jelinski, L W

    1996-12-01

    The major ampullate glands of the spider Nephila clavipes contain approximately 0.2 microliter each of a highly concentrated (approximately 50%) solution of silk fibroin. Therefore, the reservoir of silk in these glands presents an ideal opportunity to observe prefolded conformations of a protein in its native state. To this end, the structure and conformation of major ampullate gland silk fibroin within the glands of the spider N. clavipes were examined by 13C NMR spectroscopy. These results were compared to those from silk protein first drawn from the spinneret and then denatured. The 13C NMR chemical shifts, along with infrared and circular dichroism data, suggest that the silk fibroin in the glands exists in dynamically averaged helical conformations. Furthermore, there is no evidence of proline residues in U-(13)C-D-glucose-labeled silk. This transient prefolded "molten fibril" state may correspond to the silk I form found in Bombyx mori silk. There is no evidence of the final beta-sheet structure in the ampullate gland silk fibroin before final silk processing. However, the conformation of silk in the glands appears to be in a highly metastable state, as plasticization with water produces the beta-sheet structure. Therefore, the ducts connecting the ampullate glands to the spinnerets play a larger role in silk processing than previously thought.

  16. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for seven arylnaphthalide lignans from Justicia procumbens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meihua; Wu, Jun; Cheng, Fan; Zhou, Yuan

    2006-07-01

    Three new arylnaphthalide lignans named 6'-hydroxy justicidin A (1), 6'-hydroxy justicidin B (2) and 6'-hydroxy justicidin C (3) have been isolated from the whole plant of Justicia procumbens, together with four known ones, neojusticin A (4), chinensinaphthol methyl ester (5), isodiphyllin (6) and taiwanin C (7). The complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for the new lignans and the 13C NMR chemical shifts for the known lignans were obtained for the first time by means of 2D NMR techniques, including HSQC and HMBC.

  17. Composition and chemical variability of the leaf oil from Corsican Juniperus thurifera. Integrated analysis by GC(RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Ottavioli, Josephine; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange

    2010-12-01

    The composition of 16 samples of leaf oil from Corsican Juniperus thurifera was investigated by integrated techniques, GC, GC-MS and 13C NMR. K-means partitioning and PCA analysis of the data allowed the definition of a main group (14 samples) dominated by limonene (mean = 52.2%, SD = 6.4) and alpha-pinene (mean = 7.2%, SD = 3.8). Limonene and beta-elemol (up to 19.7%) were identified as the major components of two atypic samples.

  18. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, (1)H, (13)C NMR) investigations of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, V; Anitha, R; Devi, L; Mohan, S; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-01-25

    Aromatic epoxides are causative factors for mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of polycyclic arenes. The 1,2- or 2,3-epoxy compounds are widely used to a considerable extent in the textile, plastics, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, detergent and photochemical industries. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane are recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-311++G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The IR and Raman intensities are determined. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron+nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of the compounds has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the molecules have been analysed.

  19. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) investigations of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Anitha, R.; Devi, L.; Mohan, S.; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic epoxides are causative factors for mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of polycyclic arenes. The 1,2- or 2,3-epoxy compounds are widely used to a considerable extent in the textile, plastics, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, detergent and photochemical industries. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane are recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-311++G** and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The IR and Raman intensities are determined. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of the compounds has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecules have been analysed.

  20. (13)C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Clendinen, Chaevien S; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S

    2015-06-02

    The many advantages of (13)C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, (13)C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semiautomated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE data sets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures.

  1. Chemical and nanometer-scale structure of kerogen and its change during thermal maturation investigated by advanced solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, J.; Fang, X.; Lan, Y.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Xu, L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used advanced and quantitative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate structural changes in a series of type II kerogen samples from the New Albany Shale across a range of maturity (vitrinite reflectance R0 from 0.29% to 1.27%). Specific functional groups such as CH3, CH2, alkyl CH, aromatic CH, aromatic C-O, and other nonprotonated aromatics, as well as "oil prone" and "gas prone" carbons, have been quantified by 13C NMR; atomic H/C and O/C ratios calculated from the NMR data agree with elemental analysis. Relationships between NMR structural parameters and vitrinite reflectance, a proxy for thermal maturity, were evaluated. The aromatic cluster size is probed in terms of the fraction of aromatic carbons that are protonated (???30%) and the average distance of aromatic C from the nearest protons in long-range H-C dephasing, both of which do not increase much with maturation, in spite of a great increase in aromaticity. The aromatic clusters in the most mature sample consist of ???30 carbons, and of ???20 carbons in the least mature samples. Proof of many links between alkyl chains and aromatic rings is provided by short-range and long-range 1H-13C correlation NMR. The alkyl segments provide most H in the samples; even at a carbon aromaticity of 83%, the fraction of aromatic H is only 38%. While aromaticity increases with thermal maturity, most other NMR structural parameters, including the aromatic C-O fractions, decrease. Aromaticity is confirmed as an excellent NMR structural parameter for assessing thermal maturity. In this series of samples, thermal maturation mostly increases aromaticity by reducing the length of the alkyl chains attached to the aromatic cores, not by pronounced growth of the size of the fused aromatic ring clusters. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Computer-assisted structural analysis of regular glycopolymers on the basis of 13C NMR data.

    PubMed

    Toukach, F V; Shashkov, A S

    2001-09-28

    A computer-assisted approach to the prediction of the primary structures of regular glycopolymers is described. The analysis is based on comparing the calculated 13C NMR spectra of all the possible structures of the repeating unit (for the given monomeric composition) to an experimental 13C NMR spectrum. The spectra generation is based on the spectral database containing information on the 13C chemical shifts of monomers, di- and trimeric fragments. If the required data are missing from this database, the special database for average glycosylation effects is used. The analysis reveals those structures with the calculated 13C NMR spectrum most close to observed. The structures of repeating units of any topology containing up to six residues linked by glycosidic, amidic or phospho-diester bridges can be predicted. Unambiguous selection of the proper structure from the output list of possible structures may require additional experimental data. Testing the created program and databases on bacterial polysaccharides and their derivatives containing up to three non-sugar residues (alditols, amino acids, phosphate groups etc.) per repeating unit revealed the good convergence of prediction with independently obtained structural data.

  3. 13C NMR of tunnelling methyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detken, A.

    The dipolar interactions between the protons and the central 13C nucleus of a 13CH3 group are used to study rotational tunnelling and incoherent dynamics of such groups in molecular solids. Single-crystal 13C NMR spectra are derived for arbitrary values of the tunnel frequency upsilon t. Similarities to ESR and 2H NMR are pointed out. The method is applied to three different materials. In the hydroquinone/acetonitrile clathrate, the unique features in the 13C NMR spectra which arise from tunnelling with a tunnel frequency that is much larger than the dipolar coupling between the methyl protons and the 13C nucleus are demonstrated, and the effects of incoherent dynamics are studied. The broadening of the 13C resonances is related to the width of the quasi-elastic line in neutron scattering. Selective magnetization transfer experiments for studying slow incoherent dynamics are proposed. For the strongly hindered methyl groups of L-alanine, an upper limit for upsilon is derived from the 13C NMR spectrum. In aspirinTM (acetylsalicylic acid), incoherent reorientations dominate the spectra down to the lowest temperatures studied; their rate apparently increases with decreasing temperature below 25K.

  4. Chemical composition of organic matter in a deep soil changed with a positive priming effect due to glucose addition as investigated by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fresh organic carbon becomes more accessible to subsoil following losses of surface soil or deep incorporation of crop residues, which can cause the priming effect and influence the quality and quantity of soil organic C (SOC) in subsoil. Chemical compositions of SOC in subsoil (1.0-1.2 m) without ...

  5. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Bulk chemical characterization using solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benner, R.; Hatcher, P.G.; Hedges, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) leaves during decomposition in tropical estuarine waters were characterized using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and elemental (CHNO) analysis. Carbohydrates were the most abundant components of the leaves accounting for about 50 wt% of senescent tissues. Tannins were estimated to account for about 20 wt% of leaf tissues, and lipid components, cutin, and possibly other aliphatic biopolymers in leaf cuticles accounted for about 15 wt%. Carbohydrates were generally less resistant to decomposition than the other constituents and decreased in relative concentration during decomposition. Tannins were of intermediate resistance to decomposition and remained in fairly constant proportion during decomposition. Paraffinic components were very resistant to decomposition and increased in relative concentration as decomposition progressed. Lignin was a minor component of all leaf tissues. Standard methods for the colorimetric determination of tannins (Folin-Dennis reagent) and the gravimetric determination of lignin (Klason lignin) were highly inaccurate when applied to mangrove leaves. The N content of the leaves was particularly dynamic with values ranging from 1.27 wt% in green leaves to 0.65 wt% in senescent yellow leaves attached to trees. During decomposition in the water the N content initially decreased to 0.51 wt% due to leaching, but values steadily increased thereafter to 1.07 wt% in the most degraded leaf samples. The absolute mass of N in the leaves increased during decomposition indicating that N immobilization was occurring as decomposition progressed. ?? 1990.

  6. Near-silence of isothiocyanate carbon in (13)C NMR spectra: a case study of allyl isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Rainer; Hillebrand, Roman; Wycoff, Wei; Camasta, Cory; Gates, Kent S

    2015-05-01

    (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) were measured, and the exchange dynamics were studied to explain the near-silence of the ITC carbon in (13)C NMR spectra. The dihedral angles α = ∠(C1-C2-C3-N4) and β = ∠(C2-C3-N4-C5) describe the conformational dynamics (conformation change), and the bond angles γ = ∠(C3-N4-C5) and ε = ∠(N4-C5-S6) dominate the molecular dynamics (conformer flexibility). The conformation space of AITC contains three minima, Cs-M1 and enantiomers M2 and M2'; the exchange between conformers is very fast, and conformational effects on (13)C chemical shifts are small (νM1 - νM2 < 3 ppm). Isotropic chemical shifts, ICS(γ), were determined for sp, sp(x), and sp(2) N-hybridization, and the γ dependencies of δ(N4) and δ(C5) are very large (10-33 ppm). Atom-centered density matrix propagation trajectories show that every conformer can access a large region of the potential energy surface AITC(γ,ε,...) with 120° < γ < 180° and 155° < ε < 180°. Because the extreme broadening of the (13)C NMR signal of the ITC carbon is caused by the structural flexibility of every conformer of AITC, the analysis provides a general explanation for the near-silence of the ITC carbon in (13)C NMR spectra of organic isothiocyanates.

  7. A study of the molecular conformations and the vibrational, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the anticancer drug tamoxifen and triphenylethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Khan, Ibrahim

    2016-08-01

    The structural stability and the vibrational spectra of the anticancer drug tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were investigated by the DFT B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) calculations. Tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were predicted to exist predominantly as non-planar structures. The vibrational frequencies and the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the low energy structures of tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were computed at the DFT B3LYP level of theory. Complete vibrational assignments were provided by combined theoretical and experimental data of tamoxifen and triphenylethylene. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of both molecules were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the two molecules. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for tamoxifen is 0.29 and 4.72 ppm, whereas for triphenylethylene, it is 0.16 and 2.70 ppm, respectively.

  8. Ab initio/GIAO-CCSD(T) (13)C NMR study of the rearrangement and dynamic aspects of rapidly equilibrating tertiary carbocations, C6H13(+) and C7H15(+).

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Prakash, G K Surya; Rasul, Golam

    2016-01-05

    The rearrangement pathways of the equilibrating tertiary carbocations, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butyl cation (C6H13(+), 1), 2,3,3-trimethyl-2-butyl cation (C7H15(+), 5) and 2,3-dimethyl-2-pentyl cation (C7H15(+), 8 and 9) were investigated using the ab initio/GIAO-CCSD(T) (13)C NMR method. Comparing the calculated and experimental (13)C NMR chemical shifts of a series of carbocations indicates that excellent prediction of δ(13)C could be achieved through scaling. In the case of symmetrical equilibrating cations (1 and 5) the Wagner-Meerwein 1,2-hydride and 1,2-methide shifts, respectively, produce the same structure. This indicates that the overall (13)C NMR chemical shifts are conserved and independent of temperature. However, in the case of unsymmetrical equilibrating cations (8 and 9) the Wagner-Meerwein shift produces different tertiary structures, which have slightly different thermodynamic stabilities and, thus, different spectra. At the MP4(SDTQ)/cc-pVTZ//MP2/cc-pVTZ + ZPE level structure 8 is only 90 calories/mol more stable than structure 9. Based on computed (13)C NMR chemical shift calculations, mole fractions of these isomers were determined by assuming the observed chemical shifts are due to the weighted average of the chemical shifts of the static ions.

  9. Interactions of calcium nitrate with pyranosides in water: A 13C NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Kelei; Wang, Yaping; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Qian; Wang, Jianji

    2008-11-01

    The 13C NMR spectra of methyl α- and β- D-galactopyranosides, and methyl α- and β- D-glucopyranosides were recorded and show that the Δ( δC-4) values for methyl α- and β- D-galactopyranosides increase most rapidly, whereas those for methyl α- and β- D-glucopyranosides vary hardly with increasing molality of calcium nitrate. It can be concluded that ax-OH-4 interacts more strongly with Ca 2+ than eq-OH-4 group, namely, the Ca 2+ ion interaction with ax-OH-4 leads to a stronger deshielding of the C-4 atom. Compared with other C atoms, the chemical shifts of both C-1 and C-5 atoms in these two types of glycosides decrease relatively rapidly as molality of calcium nitrate increases, indicating that the nitrate ion attractions for these glycosides cause a relatively strong enhancing shielding effect of C-1 and C-5 atoms.

  10. Molecular structure, spectral investigation (1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Visible, FT-IR, FT-Raman), NBO, intramolecular hydrogen bonding, chemical reactivity and first hyperpolarizability analysis of formononetin [7-hydroxy-3(4-methoxyphenyl)chromone]: A quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Mishra, Rashmi; Kumar, Sudhir; Dev, Kapil; Tandon, Poonam; Maurya, Rakesh

    2015-03-01

    Formononetin [7-hydroxy-3(4-methoxyphenyl)chromone or 4‧-methoxy daidzein] is a soy isoflavonoid that is found abundantly in traditional Chinese medicine Astragalus mongholicus (Bunge) and Trifolium pretense L. (red clover), and in an Indian medicinal plant, Butea (B.) monosperma. Crude extract of B.monosperma is used for rapid healing of fracture in Indian traditional medicine. In this study, a combined theoretical and experimental approach is used to study the properties of formononetin. The optimized geometry was calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p) as a large basis set. The FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra were recorded in the solid phase, and interpreted in terms of potential energy distribution (PED) analysis. Density functional theory (DFT) is applied to explore the nonlinear optical properties of the molecule. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and observed data for the electronic absorption, IR and Raman spectra. The solvent effects have been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory in combination with the integral equation formalism polarized continuum model, and the results are in good agreement with observed measurements. The double well potential energy curve of the molecule about the respective bonds, have been plotted, as obtained from DFT/6-31G basis set. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of formononetin. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap of possible conformers has been calculated for comparing their chemical activity. Chemical reactivity has been measured by reactivity descriptors and molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEP). The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by the Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Furthermore, the role of CHsbnd O intramolecular hydrogen bond in the stability of molecule is investigated on the basis of the results of topological properties of AIM theory and NBO analysis. The calculated first hyperpolarizability shows

  11. Random isotopolog libraries for protein perturbation studies. 13C NMR studies on lumazine protein of Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Illarionov, Boris; Lee, Chan Yong; Bacher, Adelbert; Fischer, Markus; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2005-11-25

    [graph: see text] Lumazine proteins of luminescent bacteria are paralogs of riboflavin synthase which are devoid of catalytic activity but bind the riboflavin synthase substrate, 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine, with high affinity and are believed to serve as optical transponders for bioluminescence emission. Lumazine protein of Photobacterium leiognathi was expressed in a recombinant Escherichia coli host and was reconstituted with mixtures (random libraries) of 13C-labeled isotopologs of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine or riboflavin that had been prepared by biotransformation of [U-(13)C6]-, [1-(13)C1]-, [2-(13)C1]-, and [3-(13)C1]glucose. 13C NMR analysis of the protein/ligand complexes afforded the assignments of the 13C NMR chemical shifts for all carbon atoms of the protein-bound ligands by isotopolog abundance editing. The carbon atoms of the ribityl groups of both ligands studied were shifted up to 6 ppm upon binding to the protein. Chemical shift modulation of the side chain and chromophore carbon atoms due to protein/ligand interaction is discussed on the basis of the sequence similarity between lumazine protein and riboflavin synthase.

  12. A novel approach to the rapid assignment of (13)C NMR spectra of major components of vegetable oils such as avocado, mango kernel and macadamia nut oils.

    PubMed

    Retief, Liezel; McKenzie, Jean M; Koch, Klaus R

    2009-09-01

    Assignment of (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of major fatty acid components of South African produced vegetable oils was attempted using a method in which the vegetable oil was spiked with a standard triacylglycerol. This proved to be inadequate and therefore a new rapid and potentially generic graphical linear correlation method is proposed for assignment of the (13)C NMR spectra of major fatty acid components of apricot kernel, avocado pear, grapeseed, macadamia nut, mango kernel and marula vegetable oils. In this graphical correlation method, chemical shifts of fatty acids present in a known standard triacylglycerol is plotted against the corresponding chemical shifts of fatty acids present in the vegetable oils. This new approach (under carefully defined conditions and concentrations) was found especially useful for spectrally crowded regions where significant peak overlap occurs and was validated with the well-known (13)C NMR spectrum of olive oil which has been extensively reported in the literature. In this way, a full assignment of the (13)C{1H} NMR spectra of the vegetable oils, as well as tripalmitolein was readily achieved and the resonances belonging to the palmitoleic acid component of the triacylglycerols in the case of macadamia nut and avocado pear oil resonances were also assigned for the first time in the (13)C NMR spectra of these oils.

  13. Quantitative 13C NMR characterization of fast pyrolysis oils

    DOE PAGES

    Happs, Renee M.; Lisa, Kristina; Ferrell, III, Jack R.

    2016-10-20

    Quantitative 13C NMR analysis of model catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) oils following literature procedures showed poor agreement for aromatic hydrocarbons between NMR measured concentrations and actual composition. Furthermore, modifying integration regions based on DEPT analysis for aromatic carbons resulted in better agreement. Solvent effects were also investigated for hydrotreated CFP oil.

  14. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  15. Synthesis, XRD crystal structure, spectroscopic characterization (FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR), DFT studies, chemical reactivity and bond dissociation energy studies using molecular dynamics simulations and evaluation of antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of a novel chalcone derivative, (E)-1-(4-bromophenyl)-3-(4-iodophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainuri, D. Alwani; Arshad, Suhana; Khalib, N. Che; Razak, I. Abdul; Pillai, Renjith Raveendran; Sulaiman, S. Fariza; Hashim, N. Shafiqah; Ooi, K. Leong; Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J.; Panicker, C. Yohannan; Van Alsenoy, C.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the title compound named as (E)-1-(4-bromophenyl)-3-(4-iodophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one was synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system with P21/c space group with the unit cell parameters of a = 16.147 (2) Å, b = 14.270 (2) Å, c = 5.9058 (9) Å, β = 92.577 (3)° and Z = 4. The molecular geometry obtained from X-Ray structure determination was optimized by Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP/6-31G+(d, p)/Lanl2dz(f) method in the ground state. The IR spectrum was recorded and interpreted in details with the aid of Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and Potential Energy Distribution (PED) analysis. In order to investigate local reactivity properties of the title molecule, we have conducted DFT calculations of average local ionization energy surface and Fukui functions which were mapped to the electron density surface. In order to predict the open air stability and possible degradation properties, within DFT approach, we have also calculated bond dissociation energies. 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded and chemical shifts were calculated theoretically and compared with the experimental values. In addition, in vitro antimicrobial results show that the title compound has great potential of antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Micrococcus luteus bacteria and antifungal activity against Candida albicans in comparison to some reported chalcone derivatives. Antioxidant studies revealed the highest metal chelating activity of this compound.

  16. The molecular structure and vibrational, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of lidocaine hydrochloride monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Hassan M; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A

    2016-01-05

    The structure, vibrational and NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine hydrochloride monohydrate salt were investigated by B3LYP/6-311G(∗∗) calculations. The lidocaine·HCl·H2O salt is predicted to have the gauche structure as the predominant form at ambient temperature with NCCN and CNCC torsional angles of 110° and -123° as compared to 10° and -64°, respectively in the base lidocaine. The repulsive interaction between the two N-H bonds destabilized the gauche structure of lidocaine·HCl·H2O salt. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of the lidocaine salt in only one gauche conformation at room temperature. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of lidocaine·HCl·H2O were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the lidocaine salt. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts for lidocaine·HCl·H2O is 2.32 and 8.21ppm, respectively.

  17. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for two new angular furanocoumarin glycosides from Peucedanum praeruptorum.

    PubMed

    Chang, Haitao; Okada, Yoshihito; Okuyama, Toru; Tu, Pengfei

    2007-07-01

    Two novel angular-type furanocoumarin glycosides, peucedanoside A (1) and peucedanoside B (2), along with a known compound apterin (3), were isolated from the roots of Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn. Their chemical structures were determined by MS, NMR spectroscopy and chemical analysis. Complete assignments of the 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic data were achieved by 1D and 2D NMR experiments including DEPT, HSQC, HMBC and ROESY.

  18. (13)C-NMR Spectral Data of Alkaloids Isolated from Psychotria Species (Rubiaceae).

    PubMed

    Carvalho Junior, Almir Ribeiro de; Vieira, Ivo Jose Curcino; Carvalho, Mario Geraldo de; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; S Lima, Mary Anne; Ferreira, Rafaela Oliveira; José Maria, Edmilson; Oliveira, Daniela Barros de

    2017-01-11

    The genus Psychotria (Rubiaceae) comprises more than 2000 species, mainly found in tropical and subtropical forests. Several studies have been conducted concerning their chemical compositions, showing that this genus is a potential source of alkaloids. At least 70 indole alkaloids have been identified from this genus so far. This review aimed to compile (13)C-NMR data of alkaloids isolated from the genus Psychotria as well as describe the main spectral features of different skeletons.

  19. 13C NMR Metabolomics: Applications at Natural Abundance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    13C NMR has many advantages for a metabolomics study, including a large spectral dispersion, narrow singlets at natural abundance, and a direct measure of the backbone structures of metabolites. However, it has not had widespread use because of its relatively low sensitivity compounded by low natural abundance. Here we demonstrate the utility of high-quality 13C NMR spectra obtained using a custom 13C-optimized probe on metabolomic mixtures. A workflow was developed to use statistical correlations between replicate 1D 13C and 1H spectra, leading to composite spin systems that can be used to search publicly available databases for compound identification. This was developed using synthetic mixtures and then applied to two biological samples, Drosophila melanogaster extracts and mouse serum. Using the synthetic mixtures we were able to obtain useful 13C–13C statistical correlations from metabolites with as little as 60 nmol of material. The lower limit of 13C NMR detection under our experimental conditions is approximately 40 nmol, slightly lower than the requirement for statistical analysis. The 13C and 1H data together led to 15 matches in the database compared to just 7 using 1H alone, and the 13C correlated peak lists had far fewer false positives than the 1H generated lists. In addition, the 13C 1D data provided improved metabolite identification and separation of biologically distinct groups using multivariate statistical analysis in the D. melanogaster extracts and mouse serum. PMID:25140385

  20. (1)H-(13)C NMR-Based Profiling of Biotechnological Starch Utilization.

    PubMed

    Sundekilde, Ulrik K; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-10-04

    Starch is used in food- and nonfood applications as a renewable and degradable source of carbon and energy. Insight into the chemical detail of starch degradation remains challenging as the starch constituents amylose and amylopectin are homopolymers. We show that considerable molecular detail of starch fragmentation can be obtained from multivariate analysis of spectral features in optimized (1)H-(13)C NMR spectroscopy of starch fragments to identify relevant features that distinguish processes in starch utilization. As a case study, we compare the profiles of starch fragments in commercial beer samples. Spectroscopic profiles of homooligomeric starch fragments can be excellent indicators of process conditions. In addition, differences in the structure and composition of starch fragments have predictive value for downstream process output such as ethanol production from starch. Thus, high-resolution (1)H-(13)C NMR spectroscopic profiles of homooligomeric fragment mixtures in conjunction with chemometric methods provide a useful addition to the analytical chemistry toolbox of biotechnological starch utilization.

  1. A Critical Evaluation of the Quality of Published (13)C NMR Data in Natural Product Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Robien, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy contributes very efficiently to the structure elucidation process in organic chemistry. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy allows direct insight into the skeleton of organic compounds and therefore plays a central role in the structural assignment of natural products. Despite this important contribution, there is no established and well-accepted workflow protocol utilized during the first steps of interpreting spectroscopic data and converting them into structural fragments and then combining them, by considering the given spectroscopic constraints, into a final proposal of structure. The so-called "combinatorial explosion" in the process of structure generation allows in many cases the generation of reasonable alternatives, which are usually ignored during manual interpretation of the measured data leading ultimately to a large number of structural revisions. Furthermore, even when the determined structure is correct, problems may exist such as assignment errors, ignoring chemical shift values, or assigning lines of impurities to the compound under consideration. An extremely large heterogeneity in the presentation of carbon NMR data can be observed, but, as a result of the efficiency and precision of spectrum prediction, the published data can be analyzed in substantial detail.This contribution presents a comprehensive analysis of frequently occurring errors with respect to (13)C NMR spectroscopic data and proposes a straightforward protocol to eliminate a high percentage of the most obvious errors. The procedure discussed can be integrated readily into the processes of submission and peer-reviewing of manuscripts.

  2. Synthesis and complete assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 6-substituted and 2,6-disubstituted pyridazin-3(2H)-ones.

    PubMed

    Besada, Pedro; Costas, Tamara; Vila, Noemi; Chessa, Carla; Terán, Carmen

    2011-07-01

    Several pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives were synthesized starting from alkyl furans using oxidation with singlet oxygen to give 4-methoxy or 4-hydroxybutenolides, key intermediates of the synthetic strategy followed. For all pyridazinones reported, a complete assignment of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra using one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic methods, which included NOE, DEPT, COSY, HSQC and HMBC experiments, was accomplished. Correlations between the chemical shifts of the heterocyclic ring atoms and substituents at N-2 and C-6 were analyzed.

  3. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  4. High Resolution Solid State 13C NMR Spectroscopy of Sporopollenins from Different Plant Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Guilford, William J.; Schneider, Diane M.; Labovitz, Jeffrey; Opella, Stanley J.

    1988-01-01

    The extremely chemically resistant component of the cell wall of spores, pollens, and some microorganisms, sporopollenin, is generally accepted to be derived from carotenoids or carotenoid esters. However, we report here that 13C NMR analyses of sporopollenin from several sources shows that this widely held view is incorrect, with one possible exception. Sporopollenin is not a unique substance but rather a series of related biopolymers derived from largely saturated precursors such as fatty acids. The biopolymers contain widely varying amounts of oxygen in the form of ether, hydroxyl, carboxylic acid, ester, and ketone groups. PMID:16665854

  5. The conformational stability, solvation and the assignments of the experimental infrared, Raman, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Hassan M; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A

    2015-05-05

    The structure, vibrational and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine were investigated by the B3LYP/6-311G(∗∗) calculations. The molecule was predicted to have the non-planar cis (NCCN∼0°) structures being about 2-6kcal/mol lower in energy than the corresponding trans (NCCN∼180°) forms. The calculated NCCN (9.6°) and CNCC (-132.2°) torsional angles were in a good qualitative agreement with the reported X-ray angles (3.1 and 13.0°, -102.67 and -77.9°, respectively, for H-bonded dimers). The Gibbs energy of solution of lidocaine in formamide, water, dimethylsulfoxide, acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol and chloroform solutions was estimated at the B3LYP level. The predicted affinity of lidocaine toward the alcohols, acetonitrile and chloroform solutions was in excellent agreement with the reported experimental solubility of the drug in organic solvents. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of lidocaine in only one conformation at room temperature. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of lidocaine were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the drug. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts for lidocaine is 0.47 and 8.26ppm, respectively.

  6. The conformational stability, solvation and the assignments of the experimental infrared, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2015-05-01

    The structure, vibrational and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine were investigated by the B3LYP/6-311G∗∗ calculations. The molecule was predicted to have the non-planar cis (NCCN ∼ 0°) structures being about 2-6 kcal/mol lower in energy than the corresponding trans (NCCN ∼ 180°) forms. The calculated NCCN (9.6°) and CNCC (-132.2°) torsional angles were in a good qualitative agreement with the reported X-ray angles (3.1 and 13.0°, -102.67 and -77.9°, respectively, for H-bonded dimers). The Gibbs energy of solution of lidocaine in formamide, water, dimethylsulfoxide, acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol and chloroform solutions was estimated at the B3LYP level. The predicted affinity of lidocaine toward the alcohols, acetonitrile and chloroform solutions was in excellent agreement with the reported experimental solubility of the drug in organic solvents. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of lidocaine in only one conformation at room temperature. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of lidocaine were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the drug. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for lidocaine is 0.47 and 8.26 ppm, respectively.

  7. Experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR) and computational (density functional theory) studies on 3-bromophenylboronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, M.; Kose, E.; Atac, A.; Sas, E. B.; Asiri, A. M.; Kurt, M.

    2014-11-01

    Structurally, boronic acids are trivalent boron-containing organic compounds that possess one alkyl substituent (i.e., C-Br bond) and two hydroxyl groups to fill the remaining valences on the boron atom. We studied 3-bromophenylboronic acid (3BrPBA); a derivative of boronic acid. This study includes the experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR, UV-Vis) techniques and theoretical (DFT-density functional theory) calculations. The experimental data are recorded, FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-10 cm-1) in the solid phase. 1H and 13C NMR spectra are recorded in DMSO solution. UV-Vis spectrum is recorded in the range of 200-400 nm for each solution (in ethanol and water). The theoretical calculations are computed DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The optimum geometry is also obtained from inside for possible four conformers using according to position of hydrogen atoms after the scan coordinate of these structures. The fundamental vibrations are assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and parallel quantum solutions (PQS) program. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts are racked on by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is used to find HOMO and LUMO energies, excitation energies, oscillator strengths. The density of state of the studied molecule is investigated as total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and overlap population density of state (OPDOS or COOP) diagrams have been presented. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPs) and thermodynamic properties are performed. At the end of this work, the results are ensured beneficial for the literature contribution.

  8. A new salen base 5-(phenylazo)-N-(2-amino pyridine) salicyliden Schiff base ligand: synthesis, experimental and density functional studies on its crystal structure, FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Saheb, Vahid

    2010-12-01

    A novel Schiff base ligand 5-(phenylazo)-N-(2-amino pyridine) salicyliden is prepared through the condensation of 5-(phenylazo) salicylaldehyde and 2-amino pyridine in methanol at room temperature. The orange crystalline precipitate is used for X-ray crystallography and measuring Fourier transform (FTIR), 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP, MPWB1K and B3PW91 levels of theory is used to optimize the geometry and calculate the FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra of the compound. The vibrational frequencies determined experimentally are compared with those obtained theoretically and a vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound is performed. We found that the MPWB1K method predicts low vibrational frequencies better than the commonly used B3LYP method. Although the B3PW91 method overestimates the 1H NMR chemical shifts, the values computed at the B3LYP level of theory are in accordance with experimental 1H NMR spectrum. However, both B3LYP and B3PW91 methods tend to overestimate 13C NMR chemical shifts. In addition, a few quantum descriptors of the molecule are calculated and conformational analysis is performed and the result was compared with crystallographic data.

  9. Tautomeric ratio and prototropic equilibrium constants of tenoxicam, a 1H and 13C NMR theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Moya-Hernández, Rosario; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto; Gutiérrez, Atilano; Gómez-Balderas, Rodolfo

    2011-11-24

    The determination of the micro-equilibrium prototropic constants is often a tough task when the tautomeric ratio favors one of the species or when the chemical exchange is not slow enough to allow the quantitative detection of the tautomeric species. There are just few experimental methods available to reveal the constants of the tautomeric micro-equilibriums; its applicability depends on the nature of the tautomeric system. A combination of experimental and quantum chemistry calculated (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts is presented here to estimate the population of the species participating in the tautomeric equilibriums of the tenoxicam, an important anti-inflammatory drug. A multivariate fitting of a fraction-mol-weighted contribution model, for the NMR chemical shifts of the species in solution, was used to find the populations of the tautomers of tenoxicam. To consider and evaluate the effect of the solvent polarity on the tautomers' populations, experimental determinations were carried out in DMSO-d(6), in an equimolar DMSO-H(2)O mixture of deuterated solvents and in D(2)O. Additionally, by employing HYPNMR, it has been possible to refine the acid-base macroscopic constants of tenoxicam.

  10. Benzenium ion chemistry on solid metal halide superacids: in situ {sup 13}C NMR experiments and theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Barich, D.H.; Torres, P.D.; Haw, J.F.

    1997-01-15

    The benzenium, toluenium, and ethylbenzenium ions were synthesized on aluminium bromide by coadsorption of the precursors with either HBr or alkyl bromide. Principal components of the {sup 13}C chemical shift tensors for the ring carbons of these species were measured from magic angle spinning spectra. The benzenium ion was static at 77 K but underwent both proton scrambling and anisotropic rotation at 298 K as well as oligomerization at higher loadings. The para form of the toluenium ion was the dominant isomer at 77 K, but a temperature-dependent equilibrium between the para and ortho isomers was observed at 273 K. The energy calculations at MP4(fc,sdq)/ 6-311+G{sup *}//MP2/6-311+G{sup *} with thermal corrections resulted in good agreement between calculated and measured proton affinities for benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene. For toluenium ion, the energies of the ortho and meta isomers were 1.2 and 5.4 kcal/mol, respectively, above the para isomer, consistent with the temperature-dependent {sup 13}C NMR spectra in the solid state. {sup 13}C chemical shift tensors calculated at the GIAO-MP2/tzp/dz//MP2/ 6-311+G{sup *} and GIAO-MP2/tzp/dz//B3LYP/6-311+G{sup *} levels of theory were in very close agreement with each other and generally in satisfactory agreement with experimental principal components. 64 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. 13C-NMR in Iodine and Potassium Intercalated C60 Solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniwa, Yutaka; Shibata, Takayuki; Mizoguchi, Kenji; Kume, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Koichi; Ikemoto, Isao; Suzuki, Shinzo; Achiba, Yoji

    1992-07-01

    Iodine intercalated C60, I2.29C60, was studied by 13C NMR above 160 K. A sharp NMR signal and a strong temperature-dependent spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, indicated a presence of C60 molecular rotation much higher than 10 kHz at least down to 160 K. No evidence of metallic characteristics was found in the NMR shift (143± 1 ppm) and the T1 (40± 5 sec at room temperature). In K3C60, metallic behavior, T1T˜constant, was observed at the carbon sites between 20 K and 100 K. Electronic density of states at the Fermi level, N(EF), in I2.29C60 was estimated to be smaller than 0.12 of that in K3C60, assuming a relationship between N(EF) and T1T for normal metals.

  12. Degradation of mangrove tissues by arboreal termites (Nasutitermes acajutlae) and their role in the mangrove C cycle (Puerto Rico): Chemical characterization and organic matter provenance using bulk δ13C, C/N, alkaline CuO oxidation-GC/MS, and solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vane, Christopher H.; Kim, Alexander W.; Moss-Hayes, Vicky; Snape, Colin E.; Diaz, Miguel Castro; Khan, Nicole S.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Horton, Benjamin P.

    2013-08-01

    Arboreal termites are wood decaying organisms that play an important role in the first stages of C cycling in mangrove systems. The chemical composition of Rhizophora mangle, Avicennia germinans, and Laguncularia racemosa leaf, stem, and pneumatophore tissues as well as associated sediments was compared to that of nests of the termite Nasutitermes acajutlae. Nests gave δ13C values of -26.1 to -27.2‰ (±0.1) and C/N of 43.3 (±2.0) to 98.6 (±16.2) which were similar to all stem and pneumatophores but distinct from mangrove leaves or sediments. Organic matter processed by termites yielded lignin phenol concentrations (Λ, lambda) that were 2-4 times higher than stem or pneumatophores and 10-20 times higher than that of leaves or sediments, suggesting that the nests were more resistant to biodegradation than the mangrove vegetation source. 13C NMR revealed that polysaccharide content of mangrove tissues (50-69% C) was higher than that of the nests (46-51% C). Conversely, lignin accounted for 16.2-19.6% C of nest material, a threefold increase relative to living mangrove tissues; a similar increase in aromatic methoxyl content was also observed in the nests. Lipids (aliphatic and paraffinic moieties) were also important but rather variable chemical components of all three mangrove species, representing between 13.5 and 28.3% of the C content. Termite nests contained 3.14 Mg C ha-1 which represents approximately 2% of above ground C storage in mangroves, a value that is likely to increase upon burial due to their refractory chemical composition.

  13. A new Schiff base compound N,N'-(2,2-dimetylpropane)-bis(dihydroxylacetophenone): synthesis, experimental and theoretical studies on its crystal structure, FTIR, UV-visible, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Saheb, Vahid; Sheikhshoaie, Iran

    2011-10-15

    The Schiff base compound, N,N'-(2,2-dimetylpropane)-bis(dihydroxylacetophenone) (NDHA) is synthesized through the condensation of 2-hydroxylacetophenone and 2,2-dimethyl 1,3-amino propane in methanol at ambient temperature. The yellow crystalline precipitate is used for X-ray single-crystal determination and measuring Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-visible, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. Electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP, PBEPBE and PW91PW91 levels of theory are performed to optimize the molecular geometry and to calculate the FTIR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra of the compound. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method is used to calculate the UV-visible spectrum of NDHA. Vibrational frequencies are determined experimentally and compared with those obtained theoretically. Vibrational assignments and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound are also performed. All theoretical methods can well reproduce the structure of the compound. The (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR chemical shifts calculated by all DFT methods are consistent with the experimental data. However, the NMR shielding tensors computed at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory are in better agreement with experimental (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. The electronic absorption spectrum calculated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level by using TD-DFT method is in accordance with the observed UV-visible spectrum of NDHA. In addition, some quantum descriptors of the molecule are calculated and conformational analysis is performed and the results were compared with the crystallographic data.

  14. Experimental 25Mg and 13C NMR and Computational Modeling Studies of Amorphous Mg-Ca Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, J. W.; Yazaydin, A. O.; Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Saharay, M.; Bowers, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of synthetic Mg-Ca amorphous carbonates (AMC-ACC) provides direct, element specific structural information about these complicated phases. The 13C, 25Mg, and 43Ca resonances are typically broad and span the chemical shift ranges of all the crystalline polymorphs in the Ca-Mg-CO3-H2O system. In a fashion similar to our previous analysis of 43Ca NMR results for ACC,1 here we integrate new experimental 13C and 25Mg spectra obtained at 20T for samples with Mg/(Ca+Mg) ratios from x=0 to x=1 with quantum chemical calculations of the NMR parameters of the crystalline phases using CASTEP calculations, simulations of the spectra using the SIMPSON software, and classical molecular dynamics calculations. XRD and 13C NMR results are in general agreement with the one-phase/two-phase model of ACC-AMC derived from thermochemical work by others.2 13C-NMR spectra of amorphous materials having intermediate compositions can not be completely fit by mechanical mixing of ACC and AMC end members—requiring a degree of Ca/Mg solid solution. Amorphous samples in two-phase region crystallize to assemblages of dolomite-like (x~0.5) and hydromagnesite-like (x~1) defective structures, but we also observe aragonite co-nucleation in the presence of excess water, indicative of a more complex evolution. While 43Ca NMR of X-ray amorphous materials shows featureless, symmetric, Gaussian line shapes, the large quadrupole moment of 25Mg gives rise to superposition of several quadrupolar line shapes representing different local structural environments. Singularities of static Mg spectra are best explained by local environments similar to nequehonite, hydromagnesite, and landsfordite. The spectra can not exclude minor contributions from anhydrous phases dolomite, huntite, and magnesite. Additional sites having very large quadrupolar coupling and/or site asymmetry are not explained by any known reference phases. CITATIONS (1) Singer, J. W.; Yazaydin, A. O

  15. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  16. Differential protonation and dynamic structure of doxylamine succinate in solution using 1H and 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Somashekar, B S; Nagana Gowda, G A; Ramesha, A R; Khetrapal, C L

    2004-07-01

    A protonation and dynamic structural study of doxylamine succinate, a 1:1 salt of succinic acid with dimethyl-[2-(1-phenyl-1-pyridin-2-yl-ethoxy)ethyl]amine, in solution using one- and two-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR experiments at variable temperature and concentration is presented. The two acidic protons of the salt doxylamine succinate are in 'intermediate' exchange at room temperature, as evidenced by the appearance of a broad signal. This signal evolves into two distinct signals below about -30 degrees C. A two-dimensional 1H-1H double quantum filtered correlation experiment carried out at -55 degrees C shows protonation of one of the acidic protons to the dimethylamine nitrogen. A two-dimensional rotating frame 1H-1H NOE experiment at the same temperature reveals that the other proton remains with the succinate moiety. Comparison of the 1H and 13C chemical shifts and the 13C T1 relaxation times of the salt with those of the free base further substantiate the findings.

  17. Molecular interactions of a model bile salt and porcine bile with (1,3:1,4)-β-glucans and arabinoxylans probed by (13)C NMR and SAXS.

    PubMed

    Gunness, Purnima; Flanagan, Bernadine M; Mata, Jitendra P; Gilbert, Elliot P; Gidley, Michael J

    2016-04-15

    Two main classes of interaction between soluble dietary fibres (SDFs), such as (1,3:1,4)-β-D-glucan (βG) and arabinoxylan (AX) and bile salt (BS) or diluted porcine bile, were identified by (13)C NMR and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Small chemical shift differences of BS NMR resonances were consistent with effective local concentration or dilution of BS micelles mostly by βG, suggesting dynamic interactions; whilst the reduced line widths/intensities observed were mostly caused by wheat AX and the highest molecular size and concentrations of βG. SAXS showed evidence of changes in βG but not AX in the presence of BS micelles, at >13 nm length scale consistent with molecular level interactions. Thus intermolecular interactions between SDF and BS depend on both SDF source and its molecular weight and may occur alone or in combination.

  18. Structural study of (±) ethyl 3-acyloxy-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3-carboxylates by 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias-Pérez, M. S.; Cosme, A.; Gálvez, E.; Morreale, A.; Sanz-Aparicio, J.; Fonseca, I.

    2006-05-01

    1H, 13C NMR spectroscopy and DFT/B3LYP calculations were applied to investigate the conformational preferences of the ethoxycarbonyl and acyloxy groups of some α-acyloxyesters derived from (±) ethyl 3-hydroxy-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3-carboxylate. The crystal structure of (±) ethyl 3-diphenylacetoxy-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3-carboxylate was determined by X-ray diffraction. To correlate between calculated conformations and the structure in solution, NMR chemical shifts calculations were also performed using the GIAO approach. It has been found that the lowest energetic conformer computed gives the greatest correspondance with experimental solution and solid state data.

  19. In Situ 13C NMR at Elevated-Pressures and -Temperatures Investigating the Conversion of CO2 to Magnesium and Calcium Carbonate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surface, J. A.; Conradi, M. S.; Skemer, P. A.; Hayes, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We have constructed specialized NMR hardware to conduct in situ elevated-pressure, elevated-temperature 13C NMR studies of unmixed heterogeneous mixtures of solids, liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. Specifically, our aim is to monitor CO2 uptake in both ultramafic rocks and in more porous geological materials to understand the mechanisms of chemisorption as a function of temperature, pressure and pH. In this in situ NMR probe, we are able to simulate processes at geologically relevant fluid pressures and temperatures, monitoring the kinetics of CO2 conversion to carbonates. The in situ NMR experiments consist of heterogeneous mixtures of rock, salty brine solution, and moderate pressure CO2 gas at elevated temperatures. The purpose of studying these reactions is to determine efficacy of carbonate formation in various geological reservoirs. Via 13C NMR, we have spectroscopically characterized and quantified the conversion of CO2 to magnesium carbonate and calcium carbonate minerals. When CO2 reacts with the calcium or magnesium in a mineral or rock sample, the 13C chemical shift, linewidth, lineshape, and relaxation times change dramatically. This change can be monitored in situ and provide instantaneous and continuous characterization that maps the chemistry that is taking place. For example, on the pathway to MgCO3 formation, there are a number of phases of Mg(OH)x(H2O)y(CO3)z that are apparent via NMR spectroscopy. We will demonstrate that NMR can be used for quantitative characterization of multiple metastable mineral phases in pure forms and in mixtures. Results are confirmed via powder XRD and Raman spectroscopy of aquo- hydro- carbonato- magnesium species and calcium carbonate species. We also have monitored the 13C spectroscopy to analyze the phase of CO2 (liquid, supercritical, or gas) and its conversion into other forms, such as bicarbonate and carbonate species, providing a "window" into the in situ pH of the reacting system. Reference: 'In Situ

  20. Conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to magnetically oriented lipid bilayers by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Naito, A; Nagao, T; Norisada, K; Mizuno, T; Tuzi, S; Saitô, H

    2000-01-01

    The conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer and the magnetic orientation in the lipid bilayer systems were investigated by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Using (31)P NMR, it was found that melittin-lipid bilayers form magnetically oriented elongated vesicles with the long axis parallel to the magnetic field above the liquid crystalline-gel phase transition temperature (T(m) = 24 degrees C). The conformation, orientation, and dynamics of melittin bound to the membrane were further determined by using this magnetically oriented lipid bilayer system. For this purpose, the (13)C NMR spectra of site-specifically (13)C-labeled melittin bound to the membrane in the static, fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and slow MAS conditions were measured. Subsequently, we analyzed the (13)C chemical shift tensors of carbonyl carbons in the peptide backbone under the conditions where they form an alpha-helix and reorient rapidly about the average helical axis. Finally, it was found that melittin adopts a transmembrane alpha-helix whose average axis is parallel to the bilayer normal. The kink angle between the N- and C-terminal helical rods of melittin in the lipid bilayer is approximately 140 degrees or approximately 160 degrees, which is larger than the value of 120 degrees determined by x-ray diffraction studies. Pore formation was clearly observed below the T(m) in the initial stage of lysis by microscope. This is considered to be caused by the association of melittin molecules in the lipid bilayer. PMID:10777736

  1. 13C NMR study of halogen bonding of haloarenes: measurements of solvent effects and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Rainer; Chen, Naijun; Wu, Hong; Knotts, Nathan; Kaupp, Martin

    2004-04-07

    Solvent effects on the NMR spectra of symmetrical (X = F (1), X = Cl (2), X = Br (3), X = I (4), X = NO2 (5), X = CN (6)) and unsymmetrical (X = I, Y = MeO (7), Y = PhO (8)) para-disubstituted acetophenone azines X-C6H4-CMe=N-N=CMe-C6H4-Y and of models X-C6H4-CMe=N-Z (X = I, Z = H (9), Z = NH2 (10)), 4-iodoacetophenone (11), and iodobenzene (12) were measured in CDCl(3), DMSO, THF, pyridine, and benzene to address one intramolecular and one intermolecular issue. Solvent effects on the (13)C NMR spectra are generally small, and this finding firmly establishes that the azine bridge indeed functions as a "conjugation stopper," an important design concept in our polar materials research. Since intermolecular halogen bonding of haloarenes do occur in polar organic crystalline materials, the NMR solution data pose the question as to whether the absence of solvent shifts indicates the absence of strong halogen bonding in solution. This question was studied by the theoretical analysis of the DMSO complexes of iodoarenes 4, 9-12, and of iodoacetylene. DFT and MP2 computations show iodine bonding, and characteristic structural and electronic features are described. The nonrelativistic complexation shifts and the change in the spin-orbit induced heavy atom effect of iodine compensate each other, and iodine bonding thus has no apparent effect on Ci in the iodoarenes. For iodides, complexation by DMSO occurs and may or may not manifest itself in the NMR spectra. The absence of complexation shifts in the NMR spectra of halides does not exclude the occurrence of halogen bonding in solution.

  2. 13C-NMR spectra and contact time experiment for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The T(CP) and T(1p) time constants for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids were determined to be short with T(CP) values ranging from 0.14 ms to 0.53 ms and T(1p) values ranging from 3.3 ms to 5.9 ms. T(CP) or T(1p) time constants at a contact time of 1 ms are favorable for quantification of 13C-NMR spectra. Because of the short T(CP) values, correction factors for signal intensity for various regions of the 13C-NMR spectra would be necessary at contact times greater than 1.1 ms or less than 0.9 ms. T(CP) and T(1p) values have a limited non-homogeneity within Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids. A pulse delay or repeat time of 700 ms is more than adequate for quantification of these 13C-NMR spectra. Paramagnetic effects in these humic substances are precluded due to low inorganic ash contents, low contents of Fe, Mn, and Co, and low organic free-radical contents. The observed T(CP) values suggest that all the carbon types in Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids are fully cross-polarized before significant proton relaxation occurs. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern fulvic acid is similar to most aquatic fulvic acids as it is predominantly aliphatic, low in aromaticity (fa1 = 24), low in phenolic content, high in carboxyl content, and has no resolution of a methoxyl peak. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern humic acid is also similar to most other aquatic humic acids in that it is also predominantly aliphatic, high in aromaticity (fa1 = 38), moderate in phenolic content, moderate in carboxyl content, and has a clear resolution of a methoxyl carbon region. After the consideration of the necessary 13C-NMR experimental conditions, these spectra are considered to be quantitative. With careful consideration of the previously determined 13C-NMR experimental conditions, quantitative spectra can be obtained for humic substances in the future from the HUMEX site. Possible changes in humic substances due to acidification should be determined from 13C-NMR data.

  3. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  4. Structure elucidation of the designer drug N-(1-amino-3,3-dimethyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-pyrazole-5-carboxamide and the relevance of predicted (13) C NMR shifts - a case study.

    PubMed

    Girreser, Ulrich; Rösner, Peter; Vasilev, Andrej

    2016-07-01

    The detailed structure elucidation process of the new cannabimimetic designer drug, N-(1-amino-3,3-dimethyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-pyrazole-5-carboxamide, with a highly substituted pyrazole skeleton, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic and mass spectrometric (MS) techniques is described. After a first analysis of the NMR spectra and comparison with 48 possible pyrazole and imidazole structures, a subset of six positional isomeric pyrazoles and six imidazoles remained conceivable. Four substituents of the heterocyclic skeleton were identified: a proton bound to a pyrazole ring carbon atom; a 5-fluoropentyl group; a 4-fluorophenyl substituent; and a carbamoyl group, which is N-substituted with a methyl residue carrying a tert.-butyl and a carbamoyl substituent. The 5-fluoropentyl residue is situated at the nitrogen ring atom. Additional NMR experiments like the (1) H,(13) C HMBC were performed, but due to the small number of signals based on long-range couplings, the comparison of predicted and observed (13) C chemical shifts became necessary. The open access Internet shift prediction programs NMRDB, NMRSHIFTDB2, and CSEARCH were employed for the prediction of (13) C shift values which allowed an efficient and unambiguous structure determination. For the identified N-(1-amino-3,3-dimethyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-pyrazole-5-carboxamide, the best agreement between predicted (13) C shifts and the observed chemical shifts and long-range couplings for the pyrazole ring carbon atoms, with a standard error of about 2 ppm, was found with each of the predictions. For the comparison of measured and predicted chemical shifts model compounds with simple substituents proved helpful. The identified compound is a homologue of AZ-037 which is offered by Internet suppliers. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Evolution of organic matter during composting of different organic wastes assessed by CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Caricasole, P.; Provenzano, M.R.; Senesi, N.

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, the evolution of organic matter (OM) during composting of different mixtures of various organic wastes was assessed by means of chemical analyses and CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy measured during composting. The trends of temperatures and C/N ratios supported the correct evolution of the processes. The CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR spectra of all composting substrates indicated a reduction in carbohydrates and an increase in aromatic, phenolic, carboxylic and carbonylic C which suggested a preference by microorganisms for easily degradable C molecules. The presence of hardly degradable pine needles in one of the substrates accounted for the lowest increase in alkyl C and the lowest reduction in carbohydrates and carboxyl C as opposite to another substrate characterized by the presence of a highly degradable material such as spent yeast from beer production, which showed the highest increase of the alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio. The highest increase of COOH deriving by the oxidative degradation of cellulose was shown by a substrate composed by about 50% of plant residues. The smallest increases in alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio and in polysaccharides were associated to the degradation of proteins and lipids which are major components of sewage sludge. Results obtained were related to the different composition of fresh organic substrates and provided evidence of different OM evolution patterns as a function of the initial substrate composition.

  6. Evolution of organic matter during composting of different organic wastes assessed by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Caricasole, P; Provenzano, M R; Hatcher, P G; Senesi, N

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the evolution of organic matter (OM) during composting of different mixtures of various organic wastes was assessed by means of chemical analyses and CPMAS (13)C NMR spectroscopy measured during composting. The trends of temperatures and C/N ratios supported the correct evolution of the processes. The CPMAS (13)C NMR spectra of all composting substrates indicated a reduction in carbohydrates and an increase in aromatic, phenolic, carboxylic and carbonylic C which suggested a preference by microorganisms for easily degradable C molecules. The presence of hardly degradable pine needles in one of the substrates accounted for the lowest increase in alkyl C and the lowest reduction in carbohydrates and carboxyl C as opposite to another substrate characterized by the presence of a highly degradable material such as spent yeast from beer production, which showed the highest increase of the alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio. The highest increase of COOH deriving by the oxidative degradation of cellulose was shown by a substrate composed by about 50% of plant residues. The smallest increases in alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio and in polysaccharides were associated to the degradation of proteins and lipids which are major components of sewage sludge. Results obtained were related to the different composition of fresh organic substrates and provided evidence of different OM evolution patterns as a function of the initial substrate composition.

  7. Enantiomeric differentiation of oxygenated p-menthane derivatives by 13C NMR using Yb(hfc)3.

    PubMed

    Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Blanc, Marie-Cécile; Vellutini, Muriel; Bradesi, Pascale; Casanova, Joseph; Tomi, Félix

    2008-12-01

    The (13)C NMR behaviour of 21 p-menthanic terpene bearing an oxygenated function (alcohol, ketone, acetate) was examined in the presence of a chiral lanthanide shift reagent (Yb(hfc)(3)). For each monocyclic compound, we measured the lanthanide-induced shift (LIS) on the signals of the carbons and the splitting of signals allowing the enantiomeric differentiation. Some general features were found about their LIS behaviour: experimental data establishing distinct patterns for carvomenthone-like compounds and menthone-like compounds. The enantiomeric splitting was observed for the majority of signals in the spectrum of each compound. In the case of alcohols and acetates, the influence of the relative stereochemistry (cis vs trans) of isopropyl(ene) and the binding function was discussed.

  8. Following Glycolysis Using 13C NMR: An Experiment Adaptable to Different Undergraduate Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mega, T. L.; Carlson, C. B.; Cleary, D. A.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a laboratory exercise where the glycolysis of [1-13C] glucose under anaerobic conditions was followed using 13C NMR spectroscopy. The exercise is described in terms of its suitability for a variety of different undergraduate levels, although the emphasis in this paper is on its use in a n advanced chemistry laboratory course. The kinetics of the loss of glucose and the production of ethanol were investigated and found not to fit simple first or second order kinetics. In addition, the relative reaction rates of the two anomeric forms of glucose were analyzed, and it was determined that the a anomeric form reacted faster than the β anomeric form. Using proton-coupled 13C NMR, some of the metabolites were identified including ethanol (major) and glycerol (minor). Reaction and spectroscopic details are included.

  9. Characterization of covalent protein conjugates using solid-state sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Garbow, J.R.; Fujiwara, Hideji; Sharp, C.R.; Logusch, E.W. )

    1991-07-23

    Cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CPMAS) {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy has been used to characterize covalent conjugates of alachlor, an {alpha}-chloroacetamide hapten, with glutathione (GSH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The solid-state NMR method demonstrates definitively the covalent nature of these conjugates and can also be used to characterize the sites of hapten attachment to proteins. Three different sites of alachlor binding are observed in the BSA system. Accurate quantitation of the amount of hapten covalently bound to GSH and BSA is reported. The solid-state {sup 13}C NMR technique can easily be generalized to study other small molecule/protein conjugates and can be used to assist the development and refinement of synthetic methods needed for the successful formation of such protein alkylation products.

  10. Detection of human muscle glycogen by natural abundance /sup 13/C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Avison, M.J.; Rothman, D.L.; Nadel, E.; Shulman, R.G.

    1988-03-01

    Natural abundance /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect signals from glycogen in the human gastrocnemius muscle. The reproducibility of the measurement was demonstrated, and the ability to detect dynamic changes was confirmed by measuring a decrease in muscle glycogen levels after exercise and its subsequent repletion. Single frequency gated /sup 1/H decoupling was used to obtain decoupled natural abundance /sup 13/C NMR spectra of the C-1 position of muscle glycogen.

  11. NMR characterization of cellulose acetate: chemical shift assignments, substituent effects, and chemical shift additivity.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Hisaho; Shimizu, Yuuichi

    2015-03-15

    A series of cellulose acetates (CA) with degrees of substitution (DS) ranging from 2.92-0.92 dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-d6 and cellulose dissolved in tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF)/DMSO-d6 were investigated by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR spectroscopic analysis allowed the determination of the (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the eight anhydroglucose units (AGUs) that contain CA: 2,3,6-tri-, 2,3-di-, 2,6-di-, 3,6-di-, 2-mono-, 3-mono-, 6-mono-, and unacetylated AGUs. A comparative analysis of the chemical shift data revealed the substituent effect of acetyl groups at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions on the (1)H and (13)C nuclei in the same AGU. In addition, chemical shift additivity could be applied to the (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts of CA because the chemical shifts of the diacetylated and triacetylated AGUs could be almost completely explained by the acetyl substituent effects at the 2-, 3-, and 6-positions.

  12. Isotopic 13C NMR spectrometry to assess counterfeiting of active pharmaceutical ingredients: site-specific 13C content of aspirin and paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Virginie; Mboula, Vanessa Maroga; Jouitteau, Catherine; Akoka, Serge; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S

    2009-10-15

    Isotope profiling is a well-established technique to obtain information about the chemical history of a given compound. However, the current methodology using IRMS can only determine the global (13)C content, leading to the loss of much valuable data. The development of quantitative isotopic (13)C NMR spectrometry at natural abundance enables the measurement of the (13)C content of each carbon within a molecule, thus giving simultaneous access to a number of isotopic parameters. When it is applied to active pharmaceutical ingredients, each manufactured batch can be characterized better than by IRMS. Here, quantitative isotopic (13)C NMR is shown to be a very promising and effective tool for assessing the counterfeiting of medicines, as exemplified by an analysis of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and paracetamol (acetaminophen) samples collected from pharmacies in different countries. It is proposed as an essential complement to (2)H NMR and IRMS.

  13. Combined analysis by GC (RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR of the supercritical fluid extract of Abies alba twigs.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Emilie; Marongiu, Bruno; Castola, Vincent; Piras, Alessandra; Porcedda, Silvia; Casanova, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    Two samples (leaves and twigs) of Abies alba Miller from Corsica were extracted using supercritical CO2 and their chemical compositions were compared with those of the essential oils obtained from the same batch of plant material. In total 45 components were identified using combined analysis by GC (RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR. It was observed that the contents of monoterpenes (mainly represented by limonene, alpha-pinene and camphene) were significantly lower in the supercritical fluid extract (SFE) than in the essential oil (EO). Conversely, the proportions of sesquiterpenes were much higher in CO2 extracts than in essential oils (around 30% vs 4%). Cis-abienol, a diterpene alcohol, was identified only in SFE, and the proportions of this constituent (7.5% and 17.3%) were determined using quantitative 13C NMR since it was under estimated using the standard conditions of GC.

  14. Quantification of taxanes in a leaf and twig extract from Taxus baccata L. using 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Mathieu; Bighelli, Ange; Castola, Vincent; Tomi, Félix; Casanova, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    In the course of our ongoing work on the chemical characterization of Taxus baccata L. growing wild in Corsica, we have developed and validated a method for direct quantification of taxane derivatives by (13)C NMR using 10-deacetylbaccatin III as reference compound and 1,6-hexanediol as internal standard. We have observed good accuracy (relative errors between 0.3% and 3.5%), linearity (R(2) = 0.999) and precision (reproducibility 8.5 mg ± 1.1%) of the measurements. The experimental procedure was applied to the quantification of six identified taxanes in a fraction of chromatography of a methanol extract of T. baccata leaves. This method can be applied to other compounds bearing the taxane skeleton.

  15. Solid-state and solution /sup 13/C NMR in the conformational analysis of methadone-hydrochloride and related narcotic analgesics

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, S.C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Solid state and solution /sup 13/C NMR have been used to study the conformations of the racemic mixtures and single enantiomers of methadone hydrochloride, alpha and beta methadol hydrochloride, and alpha and beta acetylmethadol hydrochloride. The NMR spectra acquired for the compounds as solids, and in polar and nonpolar solvents are compared, in order to determine the conformation of the molecules in solution. To determine the reliability of assigning solution conformations by comparing solution and solid state chemical shift data, three bond coupling constants measured in solution are compared with those calculated from X-ray data. The conformations of the racemic mixture and plus enantiomer of methadone hydrochloride have been shown to be very similar in the solid state, where minor differences in conformation can be seen by comparing NMR spectra obtained for the solids. Also shown is that the molecules of methadone hydrochloride have conformations in polar and in nonpolar solvents which are very similar to the conformation of the molecules in the solid state.

  16. The 'Nuts and Bolts' of 13C NMR Spectroscopy at Elevated-Pressures and -Temperatures for Monitoring In Situ CO2 Conversion to Metal Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. K.; Surface, J. A.; Skemer, P. A.; Conradi, M. S.; Hayes, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We will present details of newly-constructed specialized NMR designed to conduct in situ elevated-pressure, elevated-temperature 13C NMR studies on unmixed slurries of minerals in the presence of CO2 or other gases. This static probe is capable of achieving 300 bar, 300C conditions, and it is designed to spectroscopically examine 13C signals in mixtures of solids, liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. Ultimately, our aim is to monitor CO2 uptake in both ultramafic rocks and in more porous geological materials to understand the mechanisms of chemisorption as a function of temperature, pressure and pH. We will give details of the hardware setup, and we will show a variety of static in situ NMR, as well as ex situ 'magic-angle spinning' NMR to show the analyses that are possible of minerals in pure form and in mixtures. In addition, specific NMR pulse sequences, techniques, and modeling will be described in detail. In this in situ NMR probe, we are able to simulate processes at geologically relevant fluid pressures and temperatures, monitoring the kinetics of CO2 conversion to carbonates. The in situ NMR experiments consist of heterogeneous mixtures of rock, salty brine solution, and moderate pressure CO2 gas at elevated temperatures. The purpose of studying these reactions is to determine conditions that affect the efficacy of carbonate formation in various targeted geological reservoirs (i.e., peroditite, or others). Via 13C NMR, we have spectroscopically characterized and quantified the conversion of CO2 to magnesium carbonate and calcium carbonate minerals, including metastable intermediates (such as hydromagnesite, or dypingite in the case of magnesium carbonate species, or vaterite in the case of calcium carbonate species). Such species are distinguishable from a combination of the 13C isotropic chemical shift, the static 13C lineshape, and changes in spin-lattice (T1) relaxation times. We will demonstrate that NMR can be used for quantitative

  17. 13C NMR studies of the molecular dynamics of chlorpromazine in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Ishii, Tomoko; Kurokawa, Noriko; Aoki, Toshikazu; Ohshima, Shigeru

    1996-02-01

    The optimum structure, which is expected to lead to biological activity, of chlorpromazine hydrochloride salt (compound ( I)) in solution was determined on the basis of NMR data and molecular orbital calculations; compound ( I) favours a bent structure in which the side-chain tilts toward the chlorinated benzene ring. The molecular mobility of compound ( I) in CDCl 3 and D 2O was also examined on the basis of 13C NMR spin-lattice relaxation time ( T1). T1 depends on the magnetic field strength and the solvent. The dependence indicates that the molecular mobility of compound ( I) is larger in D 2O than in CDCl 3

  18. Conformational studies by 1H and 13C NMR of lisinopril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Ishi, Tomoko

    1993-10-01

    Lisinopril, N-N-[( s-1-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]- L-lysyl- L-proline) (MK-521), is an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme and a new drug for the treatment of hypertension. 1H and 13C NMR studies have shown that the s-cis equilibrium about the amide bond is strongly dependent on the configuration of the chiral centres. Vicinal coupling constants of stereochemical significance were obtained in deuterated solvent using NMR techniques. Comparison with values calculated for lisinopril using potential energy calculations and NMR show that lisinopril exists in preferred optimum conformation in solution.

  19. 1H and 13C NMR study on some substituted azolidine derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerioni, Giovanni; Cristiani, Franco; Devillanova, Francesco A.; Diaz, Angelo; Verani, Gaetano

    The 1H and 13C NMR spectra carried out on R overlineN·CH 2·CH 2·X·C O (where for R = H, X = NH, NMe, NEt, CH 2, S, O; for R = Me, X = NMe, CH 2; for R = Et, X = NEt) are reported. The comparison of these results with those obtained for the thionic and selonic isologues shows that sulphur and selenium have a greater deshielding effect on the ring than oxygen. The resonance of the carbons not involved in the π system have been correlated with the σ charges calculated by the DEL RE method.

  20. Conformational evaluation and detailed 1H and 13C NMR assignments of eremophilanolides.

    PubMed

    Burgueño-Tapia, Eleuterio; Hernández, Luis R; Reséndiz-Villalobos, Adriana Y; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2004-10-01

    Extensive application of 1D and 2D NMR methodology, combined with molecular modeling, allowed the complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of eremophilanolides from Senecio toluccanus. Comparison of the experimental 1H, 1H coupling constant values with those generated employing a generalized Karplus-type relationship, using dihedral angles extracted from MMX and DFT calculations, revealed that the epoxidized eremophilanolides 1 and 2 show conformational rigidity at room temperature, whereas molecules 3-6, containing an isolated double bond, are conformationally mobile.

  1. Methylation patterns of aquatic humic substances determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Steelink, C.; Wershaw, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectroscopy is used to examine the hydroxyl group functionality of a series of humic and fulvic acids from different aquatic environments. Samples first are methylated with 13C-labeled diazomethane. The NMR spectra of the diazomethylated samples allow one to distinguish between methyl esters of carboxylic acids, methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls, and methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls adjacent to two substituents. Samples are then permethylated with 13C-labeled methyl iodide/NaH. 13C NMR spectra of permethylated samples show that a significant fraction of the hydroxyl groups is not methylated with diazomethane alone. In these spectra methyl ethers of carbohydrate and aliphatic hydroxyls overlap with methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls. Side reactions of the methyltion procedure including carbon methylation in the CH3I/NaH procedure, are also examined. Humic and fulvic acids from bog, swamp, groundwater, and lake waters showssome differences in their distribution of hydroxyl groups, mainly in the concentrations of phenolic hydroxyls, which may be attributed to their different biogeochemical origins. ?? 1987.

  2. Characterisation of pitch fractions by quantitative solid state {sup 13}C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, J.M.; Dennison, P.R.; Maroto-Valer, M.M.

    1994-12-31

    Thermal and other pretreatments of pitch fractions are being widely investigated as a means to increase the extent of mesophase formation in relation to the production of high performance carbons. The structural changes that occur can be assessed using carbon skeletal parameters but, although solid state {sup 13}C NMR has been used for this purpose, the quantitative reliability of the technique has still to be established for pitch fractions. It was demonstrated previously that, as for coals, cross-polarisation (CP) can vastly underestimate quaternary aromatic carbon concentrations. A combination of a low magnetic field strength to avoid problems with spinning sidebands and the simple Bloch decay or single pulse excitation (SPE) technique is now generally recognised as offering the most satisfactory approach for obtaining quantitative {sup 13}C NMR results for coals and related materials. In this study, single pulse excitation (SPE) and associated relaxation measurements have been conducted at low field on coal-derived pitches and their toluene-insoluble (TI) fractions, together with a biomass-derived pitch and the results compared with those from CP.

  3. Calculation of the 13C NMR shieldings of the C0 2 complexes of aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    1995-04-01

    13C NMR shieldings have been calculated using the random-phase-approximation, localized-orbital local-origins version of ab initio coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory for CO 2 and and for several complexes formed by the reaction of CO 2 with molecular models for aluminosilicate glasses, H 3TOT'H3 3-n, T,T' = Si,Al. Two isomeric forms of the CO 2-aluminosilicate complexes have been considered: (1) "CO 2-like" complexes, in which the CO 2 group is bound through carbon to a bridging oxygen and (2) "CO 3-like" complexes, in which two oxygens of a central CO 3 group form bridging bonds to the two TH 3 groups. The CO 2-like isomer of CO 2-H 3SiOSiH 3 is quite weakly bonded and its 13C isotropic NMR shielding is almost identical to that in free CO 2. As Si is progressively replaced by Al in the - H terminated aluminosilicate model, the CO 2-like isomers show increasing distortion from the free CO 2 geometry and their 13C NMR shieldings decrease uniformly. The calculated 13C shielding value for H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 is only about 6 ppm larger than that calculated for point charge stabilized CO 3-2. However, for a geometry of H 3SiO(CO 2) AlH 3-1, in which the bridging oxygen to C bond length has been artificially increased to that found in the - OH terminated cluster (OH) 3SiO(CO 2)Al(OH) 3-1, the calculated 13C shielding is almost identical to that for free CO 2. The CO 3-like isomers of the CO 2-aluminosili-cate complexes show carbonate like geometries and 13C NMR shieldings about 4-9 ppm larger than those of carbonate for all T,T' pairs. For the Si,Si tetrahedral atom pair the CO 2-like isomer is more stable energetically, while for the Si,Al and Al,Al cases the CO 3-like isomer is more stable. Addition of Na + ions to the CO 3-2 or H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 complexes reduces the 13C NMR shieldings by about 10 ppm. Complexation with either Na + or CO 2 also reduces the 29Si NMR shieldings of the aluminosilicate models, while the changes in 27Al shielding with Na + or CO 2

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance, vibrational spectroscopic studies, physico-chemical properties and computational calculations on (nitrophenyl) octahydroquinolindiones by DFT method.

    PubMed

    Pasha, M A; Siddekha, Aisha; Mishra, Soni; Azzam, Sadeq Hamood Saleh; Umapathy, S

    2015-02-05

    In the present study, 2'-nitrophenyloctahydroquinolinedione and its 3'-nitrophenyl isomer were synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift values of the synthesized compounds in the ground state have been calculated by using the density functional theory (DFT) method with the 6-311++G (d,p) basis set and compared with the experimental data. The complete vibrational assignments of wave numbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution using GAR2PED programme. Isotropic chemical shifts for (1)H and (13)C NMR were calculated using gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The experimental vibrational frequencies, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift values were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. On the basis of vibrational analysis, molecular electrostatic potential and the standard thermodynamic functions have been investigated.

  5. Solid-state sup 13 C NMR of the retinal chromophore in photointermediates of bacteriorhodopsin: Characterization of two forms of M

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.O.; Courtin, J.; van den Berg, E.; Winkel, C.; Lugtenburg, J.; Herzfeld, J.; Griffin, R.G. )

    1989-01-10

    Solid-state {sup 13}C NMR spectra of the M photocycle intermediate of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) have been obtained from purple membrane regenerated with retinal specifically {sup 13}C labeled at positions 5, 12, 13, 14, and 15. The M intermediate was trapped at {minus}40{degree}C and pH = 9.5-10.0 in either 100 mM NaCl (M (NaCl)) or 500 mM guanidine hydrochloride (M (Gdn-HCl)). The {sup 13}C-12 chemical shift at 125.8 ppm in M (NaCl) and 128.1 ppm in M (Gdn-HCl) indicates that the C{sub 13}{double bond}C{sub 14} double bond has a cis configuration, while the {sup 13}C-13 chemical shift at 146.7 ppm in M (NaCl) and 14.57 ppm in M (Gdn-HCl) demonstrates that the Schiff base in unprotonated. The principal values of the chemical shift tensor of the {sup 13}C-5 resonance in both M (NaCl) and M (Gdn-HCl) are consistent with a 6-s-trans structure and a negative protein charge localized near C-5 as was observed in dark adapted bR. The {approximately}5 ppm upfield shift of the {sup 13}C-5 M resonance relative to {sup 13}C-5 bR{sub 568} and bR{sub 548} is attributed to an unprotonated Schiff base in the M chromophore. Of particular interest in this study were the results obtained from {sup 13}C-14 M. In M (NaCl), a dramatic upfield shift was observed for the {sup 13}C-14 resonance relative to unprotonanted Schiff base model compounds. In contrast, in M (Gdn-HCl) the {sup 13}C-14 resonance was observed at 125.7 ppm. The different {sup 13}C-14 chemical shifts in these two M preparations may be explained by different C{double prime}N configurations of the retinal-lysine Schiff base linkage, namely, syn in NaCl and anti in guanidine hydrochloride.

  6. FT-IR, UV-vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectra and the equilibrium structure of organic dye molecule disperse red 1 acrylate: a combined experimental and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Mehmet; Coruh, Ali; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2011-12-01

    This study reports the characterization of disperse red 1 acrylate compound by spectral techniques and quantum chemical calculations. The spectroscopic properties were analyzed by FT-IR, UV-vis, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR techniques. FT-IR spectrum in solid state was recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1). The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the compound that dissolved in methanol was recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded in CDCl(3) solution. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP exchange correlation and the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and scaled values were compared with experimental FT-IR spectrum. A satisfactory consistency between the experimental and theoretical spectra was obtained and it shows that the hybrid DFT method is very useful in predicting accurate vibrational structure, especially for high-frequency region. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental results and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. Isotropic chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. A study on the electronic properties were performed by timedependent DFT (TD-DFT) and CIS(D) approach. To investigate non linear optical properties, the electric dipole moment μ, polarizability α, anisotropy of polarizability Δα and molecular first hyperpolarizability β were computed. The linear polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecule indicate that the compound can be a good candidate of nonlinear optical materials.

  7. A 13C-NMR study of exopolysaccharide synthesis in Rhizobium meliloti Su47 strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernier, P.; Portais, J.-C.; Besson, I.; Courtois, J.; Courtois, B.; Barbotin, J.-N.

    1998-02-01

    Metabolic pathways implied in the synthesis of succinoglycan produced by the Su47 strain of R. meliloti were evaluated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy after incubation with [1{-}13C] or [2{-}13C] glucose. The biosynthesis of this polymer by R. meliloti from glucose occurred by a direct polymerisation of the introduced glucose and by the pentose phosphate pathway. Les voies métaboliques impliquées dans la synthèse du succinoglycane produit par la souche Su47 de R. meliloti ont été évaluées par la spectroscopie de RMN du carbone 13 après incubation des cellules avec du [1{-}13C] ou [2{-}13C] glucose. La biosynthèse de ce polymère à partir du glucose se produit par polymérisation directe du glucose et par la voie des pentoses phosphate.

  8. /sup 13/C NMR studies of the molecular flexibility of antidepressants

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, S.L.; Andrews, P.R.; Craik, D.J.; Gale, D.J.

    1986-02-01

    The solution dynamics of a series of clinically potent antidepressants have been investigated by measuring /sup 13/C NMR relaxation parameters. Correlation times and internal motional rates were calculated from spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser effects for the protonated carbons in mianserin, imipramine-like antidepressants, and amitriptyline-like antidepressants. These data were interpreted in terms of overall molecular tumbling, internal rotations, and inherent flexibility of these structures. Of particular interest was the conformational variability of the tricyclic nucleus of the tricyclic antidepressants, where the data indicated a fivefold difference in mobility of the dimethylene bridge of imipramine-like antidepressants relative to amitriptyline-like compounds. The implications of such a difference in internal motions is discussed in relation to previous NMR studies and to the reported differences in pharmacological activity of these antidepressants.

  9. 13C NMR spectroscopy of the insoluble carbon of carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Frye, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectra have been obtained of the insoluble carbon residues resulting from HF-digestion of three carbonaceous chondrites, Orgueil (C1), Murchison (CM2), and Allende (CV3). Spectra obtained using the cross polarization magic-angle spinning technique show two major features attributable respectively to carbon in aliphatic/olefinic structures. The spectrum obtained from the Allende sample was weak, presumably as a consequence of its low hydrogen content. Single pulse excitation spectra, which do not depend on 1H-13C polarization transfer for signal enhancement were also obtained. These spectra, which may be more representative of the total carbon in the meteorite samples, indicate a greater content of carbon in aromatic/olefinic structures. These results suggest that extensive polycyclic aromatic sheets are important structural features of the insoluble carbon of all three meteorites. The Orgueil and Murchison materials contain additional hydrogenated aromatic/olefinic and aliphatic groups.

  10. (1) H and (13) C NMR data on natural and synthetic capsaicinoids.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Calvario, Víctor; Garduño-Ramírez, María Luisa; León-Rivera, Ismael; Rios, María Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Capsaicinoids are the compounds responsible for the pungency of chili peppers. These substances have attracted the attention of many research groups in recent decades because of their antinociceptive, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-obesity properties, among others. There are nearly 160 capsaicinoids reported in the literature. Approximately 25 of them are natural products, while the rest are synthetic or semi-synthetic products. A large amount of NMR data for the capsaicinoids is dispersed throughout literature. Therefore, there is a need to organize all this NMR data in a systematic and orderly way. This review summarizes the (1) H and (13) C NMR data on 159 natural and synthetic capsaicinoids, with a brief discussion of some typical and relevant aspects of these NMR data. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Site-specific protonation kinetics of acidic side chains in proteins determined by pH-dependent carboxyl (13)C NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Johan; Weininger, Ulrich; Khan, M Ashhar I; Linse, Sara; Akke, Mikael

    2015-03-04

    Proton-transfer dynamics plays a critical role in many biochemical processes, such as proton pumping across membranes and enzyme catalysis. The large majority of enzymes utilize acid-base catalysis and proton-transfer mechanisms, where the rates of proton transfer can be rate limiting for the overall reaction. However, measurement of proton-exchange kinetics for individual side-chain carboxyl groups in proteins has been achieved in only a handful of cases, which typically have involved comparative analysis of mutant proteins in the context of reaction network modeling. Here we describe an approach to determine site-specific protonation and deprotonation rate constants (kon and koff, respectively) of carboxyl side chains, based on (13)C NMR relaxation measurements as a function of pH. We validated the method using an extensively studied model system, the B1 domain of protein G, for which we measured rate constants koff in the range (0.1-3) × 10(6) s(-1) and kon in the range (0.6-300) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), which correspond to acid-base equilibrium dissociation constants (Ka) in excellent agreement with previous results determined by chemical shift titrations. Our results further reveal a linear free-energy relationship between log kon and pKa, which provides information on the free-energy landscape of the protonation reaction, showing that the variability among residues in these parameters arises primarily from the extent of charge stabilization of the deprotonated state by the protein environment. We find that side-chain carboxyls with extreme values of koff or kon are involved in hydrogen bonding, thus providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed stabilization of the protonated or deprotonated state.

  12. A {sup 13}C NMR study of the condensation chemistry of acetone and acetaldehyde adsorbed at the Bronsted acid sites in H-ZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Biaglow, A.I.; Sepa, J.; Gorte, R.J.

    1995-02-01

    Several bimolecular, acid-catalyzed condensation reactions of acetone and acetaldehyde have been examined in H-ZSM-5, along with the adsorption complexes formed by the products, using {sup 13}C NMR. For acetone, the hydrogen-bonded adsorption complex is stable at room temperature and coverages below one molecule per Broensted acid site. Reaction to mesityl oxide occurs only at higher coverages or temperatures, which are necessary to induce site exchange. The adsorption complex exhibits reaction chemistry analogous to that observed in solution phase, forming adsorption complexes of chloroacetone upon exposure to Cl{sub 2} and of imines upon exposure to NH{sub 3} or dimethylamine. The reactions of acetaldehyde to crotonaldehyde and imines are similar, although they occur at a faster rate due to the higher mobility of this molecule. The adsorption complexes formed by acetone, acetaldehyde, and their condensation products can all be described as rigid, hydrogen-bonded complexes at low coverages. Complexes formed from imines and enamines exhibit isotropic chemical shifts nearly identical to those observed in magic acids, indicating that proton transfer is nearly complete for these molecules. The extent of proton transfer for the remaining molecules varies with the proton affinity of the molecule, ranging from close to complete proton transfer for mesityl oxide and crotonaldehyde to almost complete absence of proton transfer for the chloroacetones. The differences and similarities between these reactions in the zeolite and in solution phase are discussed, along with the implications for understanding the primary processes responsible for these reactions in zeolites. 34 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  13. The influence of sulfur configuration in (1) H NMR chemical shifts of diasteromeric five-membered cyclic sulfites.

    PubMed

    Obregón-Mendoza, Marco A; Sánchez-Castellanos, Mariano; Cuevas, Gabriel; Gnecco, Dino; Cassani, Julia; Poveda-Jaramillo, Juan C; Reynolds, William F; Enríquez, Raúl G

    2017-03-01

    The effect of the stereochemistry of the sulfur atom on (1) H chemical shifts of the diasteromeric pair of cyclic sulfites of 4-[methoxy(4-nitrophenyl)methyl]-5-phenyl-1,3,2-dioxathiolan-2-oxide was investigated. The complete (1) H and (13) C NMR spectral assignment was achieved by the use of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR techniques in combination with X-ray data. A correlation of experimental data with theoretical calculations of chemical shift tensors using density functional theory and topological theory of atoms in molecules was made. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Solution behavior and complete sup 1 H and sup 13 C NMR assignments of the coenzyme B sub 12 derivative (5 prime -deoxyadenosyl)cobinamide using modern 2D NMR experiments, including 600-MHz sup 1 H NMR data

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, T.G.; Yohannes, P.G.; Marzilli, L.G. ); Hay, B.P.; Scott, J.R.; Finke, R.G. )

    1989-02-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) NMR methods have been used to assign completely the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra of the (5{prime}-deoxyadenosyl)cobinamide cation (AdoCbi{sup +}) in D{sub 2}O. Most of the {sup 1}H spectral assignments were made by using 2D homonuclear shift correlation spectroscopy (COSY), homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn spectroscopy (HOHAHA), absorption-mode (phase sensitive) 2D nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) spectroscopy, and spin-locked NOE spectroscopy (also called ROESY, for rotating-frame Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy). Most of the protonated carbon resonances were assigned by using {sup 1}H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) spectroscopy. The nonprotonated carbon resonances, as well as the remaining unassigned {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR signals, were assigned from long-range {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C connectivities determined from {sup 1}H-detected multiple-bond heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence spectroscopy (HMBC). Comparison of the {sup 13}C chemical shifts and {sup 1}H NOEs of AdoCbi{sup +} with those of coenzyme B{sup 12} ((5{prime}-deoxyadenosyl)cobalamin) and its benzimidazole-protonated, base-off form indicates that the electronic properties and structure of AdoCbi{sup +} are similar to that of coenzyme B{sup 12} in the protonated, base-off form. The {sup 13}C chemical shifts of most of the carbons of AdoCbi{sup +} do not vary significantly from those of base-off, benzimidazole-protonated coenzyme B{sup 12}, indicating that the electronic environment of the corrin ring is also similar in both compounds. However, significant differences in the chemical shifts of some of the corresponding carbons of the b, d, e, and f corrin side chains in AdoCbi{sup +} and in base-off, benzimidazole-protonated coenzyme B{sub 12} indicate that the positions of these side chains may be different in AdoCbi{sup +} compared to base-off coenzyme B{sup 12}.

  15. Characterization and Comparison of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oils from Pinewood, Rapeseed Cake, and Wheat Straw Using 13C NMR and Comprehensive GC × GC

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis bio-oils are feasible energy carriers and a potential source of chemicals. Detailed characterization of bio-oils is essential to further develop its potential use. In this study, quantitative 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) was used to characterize fast pyrolysis bio-oils originated from pinewood, wheat straw, and rapeseed cake. The combination of both techniques provided new information on the chemical composition of bio-oils for further upgrading. 13C NMR analysis indicated that pinewood-based bio-oil contained mostly methoxy/hydroxyl (≈30%) and carbohydrate (≈27%) carbons; wheat straw bio-oil showed to have high amount of alkyl (≈35%) and aromatic (≈30%) carbons, while rapeseed cake-based bio-oil had great portions of alkyl carbons (≈82%). More than 200 compounds were identified and quantified using GC × GC coupled to a flame ionization detector (FID) and a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Nonaromatics were the most abundant and comprised about 50% of the total mass of compounds identified and quantified via GC × GC. In addition, this analytical approach allowed the quantification of high value-added phenolic compounds, as well as of low molecular weight carboxylic acids and aldehydes, which exacerbate the unstable and corrosive character of the bio-oil. PMID:27668136

  16. Characterization and Comparison of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oils from Pinewood, Rapeseed Cake, and Wheat Straw Using (13)C NMR and Comprehensive GC × GC.

    PubMed

    Negahdar, Leila; Gonzalez-Quiroga, Arturo; Otyuskaya, Daria; Toraman, Hilal E; Liu, Li; Jastrzebski, Johann T B H; Van Geem, Kevin M; Marin, Guy B; Thybaut, Joris W; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-06

    Fast pyrolysis bio-oils are feasible energy carriers and a potential source of chemicals. Detailed characterization of bio-oils is essential to further develop its potential use. In this study, quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) was used to characterize fast pyrolysis bio-oils originated from pinewood, wheat straw, and rapeseed cake. The combination of both techniques provided new information on the chemical composition of bio-oils for further upgrading. (13)C NMR analysis indicated that pinewood-based bio-oil contained mostly methoxy/hydroxyl (≈30%) and carbohydrate (≈27%) carbons; wheat straw bio-oil showed to have high amount of alkyl (≈35%) and aromatic (≈30%) carbons, while rapeseed cake-based bio-oil had great portions of alkyl carbons (≈82%). More than 200 compounds were identified and quantified using GC × GC coupled to a flame ionization detector (FID) and a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Nonaromatics were the most abundant and comprised about 50% of the total mass of compounds identified and quantified via GC × GC. In addition, this analytical approach allowed the quantification of high value-added phenolic compounds, as well as of low molecular weight carboxylic acids and aldehydes, which exacerbate the unstable and corrosive character of the bio-oil.

  17. Identification and quantitative determination of lignans in Cedrus atlantica resins using 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Anne-Marie; Paoli, Mathieu; Castola, Vincent; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange

    2011-03-01

    Identification and quantitative determination of individual components of resin collected on the trunk of 28 Cedrus atlantica trees, grown in Corsica, has been carried out using 13C NMR spectroscopy. Eight resin acids bearing either the pimarane or abietane skeleton, two monoterpene hydrocarbons and four oxygenated neutral diterpenes have been identified, as well as three lignans, scarcely found in resins. Three groups could be distinguished within the 28 resin samples. The nine samples of Group I had their composition dominated by diterpene acids (33.7-45.8%), with abietic acid (6.2-18.7%) and isopimaric acid (5.1-12.6%) being the major components. The four samples of Group II contained resin acids (main components) and lignans in moderate amounts (up to 10.3%). Conversely, lignans (38.8-63.8%) were by far the major components of the 15 samples of Group III. Depending on the sample, the major component was pinoresinol (18.1-38.9%), lariciresinol (17.2-33.7%) or lariciresinol 9'-acetate (16.9-29.1%). Finally, due to the high biological interest in lignans, a rapid procedure, based on 1H NMR spectroscopy, was developed for quantification of lignans in resins of C. atlantica.

  18. (13)C-NMR-Based Metabolomic Profiling of Typical Asian Soy Sauces.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ghulam Mustafa; Yuan, Bin; Hussain, Abdullah Ijaz; Wang, Jie; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili

    2016-09-02

    It has been a strong consumer interest to choose high quality food products with clear information about their origin and composition. In the present study, a total of 22 Asian soy sauce samples have been analyzed in terms of (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Spectral data were analyzed by multivariate statistical methods in order to find out the important metabolites causing the discrimination among typical soy sauces from different Asian regions. It was found that significantly higher concentrations of glutamate in Chinese red cooking (CR) soy sauce may be the result of the manual addition of monosodium glutamate (MSG) in the final soy sauce product. Whereas lower concentrations of amino acids, like leucine, isoleucine and valine, observed in CR indicate the different fermentation period used in production of CR soy sauce, on the other hand, the concentration of some fermentation cycle metabolites, such as acetate and sucrose, can be divided into two groups. The concentrations of these fermentation cycle metabolites were lower in CR and Singapore Kikkoman (SK), whereas much higher in Japanese shoyu (JS) and Taiwan (China) light (TL), which depict the influence of climatic conditions. Therefore, the results of our study directly indicate the influences of traditional ways of fermentation, climatic conditions and the selection of raw materials and can be helpful for consumers to choose their desired soy sauce products, as well as for researchers in further authentication studies about soy sauce.

  19. 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR lipid profiles of human renal tissues.

    PubMed

    Tugnoli, V; Bottura, G; Fini, G; Reggiani, A; Tinti, A; Trinchero, A; Tosi, M R

    2003-01-01

    Lipids from human renal tissues are studied by means of (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. The total lipid fractions obtained from healthy kidneys, malignant renal cell carcinomas, and benign oncocytomas are characterized and analyzed to elucidate the main differences between the functional and neoplastic tissues. In all cases the lipid components are well identified. The healthy kidney is characterized by high amounts of triglycerides and the presence of cholesterol in its free form. On the contrary, renal cell carcinomas contain high amounts of cholesterol that are almost completely esterified as oleate, suggesting an intracellular localization of the cholesteryl esters synthesis. Cholesteryl esters are considered markers of renal cell carcinomas, thus supporting recent theories that these compounds play a leading role in cell proliferation. Oncocytomas are particularly rich in phosphatidylcholine and, analogous to the healthy kidney, are completely lacking in cholesteryl esters. Healthy kidneys and oncocytomas appear to have other similarities if compared with renal cell carcinomas: a very high fatty acyl/cholesterol ratio, the presence of dolichols, and a higher grade of unsaturation. The (13)C data suggest a new method for the direct evaluation of the saturated/unsaturated fatty acyl ratio.

  20. Effect of glyphosate on plant cell metabolism. 31P and 13C NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Gout, E; Bligny, R; Genix, P; Tissut, M; Douce, R

    1992-01-01

    The effect of glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl glycine; the active ingredient of Roundup herbicide) on plant cells metabolism was analysed by 31P and 13C NMR using suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L) cells. Cells were compressed in the NMR tube and perfused with an original arrangement enabling a tight control of the circulating nutrient medium. Addition of 1 mM glyphosate to the nutrient medium triggered the accumulation of shikimate (20-30 mumol g-1 cell wet weight within 50 h) and shikimate 3-phosphate (1-1.5 mumol g-1 cell wet weight within 50 h). From in vivo spectra it was demonstrated that these two compounds were accumulated in the cytoplasm where their concentrations reached potentially lethal levels. On the other hand, glyphosate present in the cytoplasmic compartment was extensively metabolized to yield aminomethylphosphonic acid which also accumulated in the cytoplasm. Finally, the results presented in this paper indicate that although the cell growth was stopped by glyphosate the cell respiration rates and the level of energy metabolism intermediates remained unchanged.

  1. 1H and 13C NMR signal assignments of a novel Baeyer-Villiger originated diterpene lactone.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Henriete S; Takahashi, Jacqueline A; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie; Boaventura, Maria Amélia D

    2006-02-01

    A highly rearranged novel dilactone was the single product isolated from Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a norketone prepared from grandiflorenic acid, a natural kaurane diterpene. The complete 1H and 13C NMR assignment is presented for this novel compound that showed discrete in vitro antibacterial activity.

  2. 13C-NMR relation study of heparin-disaccharide interactions with tripeptides GRG and GKG.

    PubMed Central

    Mikhailov, D; Mayo, K H; Pervin, A; Linhardt, R J

    1996-01-01

    Heparin is a polydisperse sulphated copolymer consisting mostly of 1-->4 linked glucosamine and uronic acid residues, i.e. 2-deoxy-2-sulphamido-D-glucopyranose 6-sulphate and L-idopyranosyluronic acid 2-sulphate. 13C NMR has been used to study the interactions of heparinase-derived and purified heparin disaccharide with N- and C-terminally-blocked tripeptides GRG and GKG. Titration of the disaccharide with peptide indicates that GRG binds the disaccharide more strongly than does GKG, with interactions in either case being stronger at uronate ring positions. In the presence of GRG, a carboxylate pKa depression suggests electrostatic interactions between the arginine guanidinium group and the uronate carboxylate group. 13C relaxation data have been acquired for all disaccharide and peptide carbons in the presence and absence of GRG and GKG. 13C relaxation rates for the disaccharide are significantly faster in the presence of peptide, especially with GRG. Analysis of these relaxation data has been done in terms of molecular diffusion constants, D [symbol: see text] and D parallel, and an angle alpha between D parallel and a molecular frame defined by the moment of inertia tensor calculated for an internally rigid disaccharide. Disaccharide conformational space in these calculations has been sampled for both uronate half-chair forms (2H1 and 1H2) and over a range of glycosidic bond angles defined by motional order parameters and inter-residue nuclear Overhauser effects (+/- 30 degree from the average). In the absence of peptide, the ratio D [symbol: see text] /D parallel falls between 0.4 and 0.7; therefore molecular diffusion occurs preferentially about D parallel, which runs through both disaccharide rings. In the presence of peptide, D [symbol: see text] /D parallel is decreased, indicating that GRG is oriented along D parallel and proximal to the uronic acid ring. A model for this is shown. PMID:8615813

  3. Neuroprotective effects of caffeine in MPTP model of Parkinson's disease: A (13)C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Bagga, Puneet; Chugani, Anup N; Patel, Anant B

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons with an accompanying neuroinflammation leading to loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia. Caffeine, a well-known A2A receptor antagonist is reported to slow down the neuroinflammation caused by activated microglia and reduce the extracellular glutamate in the brain. In this study, we have evaluated the neuroprotective effect of caffeine in the MPTP model of PD by monitoring the region specific cerebral energy metabolism. Adult C57BL6 mice were treated with caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min prior to MPTP (25 mg/kg, i.p.) administration for 8 days. The paw grip strength of mice was assessed in order to evaluate the motor function after various treatments. For metabolic studies, mice were infused with [1,6-(13)C2]glucose, and (13)C labeling of amino acids was monitored using ex vivo(1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy. The paw grip strength was found to be reduced following the MPTP treatment. The caffeine pretreatment showed significant protection against the reduction of paw grip strength in MPTP treated mice. The levels of GABA and myo-inositol were found to be elevated in the striatum of MPTP treated mice. The (13)C labeling of GluC4, GABAC2 and GlnC4 from [1,6-(13)C2]glucose was decreased in the cerebral cortex, striatum, olfactory bulb, thalamus and cerebellum suggesting impaired glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal activity and neurotransmission of the MPTP treated mice. Most interestingly, the pretreatment of caffeine maintained the (13)C labeling of amino acids to the control values in cortical, olfactory bulb and cerebellum regions while it partially retained in striatal and thalamic regions in MPTP treated mice. The pretreatment of caffeine provides a partial neuro-protection against severe striatal degeneration in the MPTP model of PD.

  4. Acetate and bicarbonate assimilation and metabolite formation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a 13C-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Himanshu; Shukla, Manish R; Chary, Kandala V R; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2014-01-01

    Cellular metabolite analyses by (13)C-NMR showed that C. reinhardtii cells assimilate acetate at a faster rate in heterotrophy than in mixotrophy. While heterotrophic cells produced bicarbonate and CO2aq, mixotrophy cells produced bicarbonate alone as predominant metabolite. Experiments with singly (13)C-labelled acetate ((13)CH(3)-COOH or CH(3)-(13)COOH) supported that both the (13)C nuclei give rise to bicarbonate and CO2(aq). The observed metabolite(s) upon further incubation led to the production of starch and triacylglycerol (TAG) in mixotrophy, whereas in heterotrophy the TAG production was minimal with substantial accumulation of glycerol and starch. Prolonged incubation up to eight days, without the addition of fresh acetate, led to an increased TAG production at the expense of bicarbonate, akin to that of nitrogen-starvation. However, such TAG production was substantially high in mixotrophy as compared to that in heterotrophy. Addition of mitochondrial un-coupler blocked the formation of bicarbonate and CO2(aq) in heterotrophic cells, even though acetate uptake ensued. Addition of PSII-inhibitor to mixotrophic cells resulted in partial conversion of bicarbonate into CO2(aq), which were found to be in equilibrium. In an independent experiment, we have monitored assimilation of bicarbonate via photoautotrophy and found that the cells indeed produce starch and TAG at a much faster rate as compared to that in mixotrophy and heterotrophy. Further, we noticed that the accumulation of starch is relatively more as compared to TAG. Based on these observations, we suggest that acetate assimilation in C. reinhardtii does not directly lead to TAG formation but via bicarbonate/CO2(aq) pathways. Photoautotrophic mode is found to be the best growth condition for the production of starch and TAG and starch in C. reinhardtii.

  5. Properties of sesame oil by detailed 1H and 13C NMR assignments before and after ozonation and their correlation with iodine value, peroxide value, and viscosity measurements.

    PubMed

    Sega, Alessandro; Zanardi, Iacopo; Chiasserini, Luisa; Gabbrielli, Alessandro; Bocci, Velio; Travagli, Valter

    2010-02-01

    Gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated triglyceride substrates leading to ozonated derivatives with a wide potential applications, ranging from the petrochemical to the pharmaceutical industry. To date, an ultimate understanding of the ozone reactivity during sesame oil ozonation process as well as detailed (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments are lacking. A practical advantage of NMR is that a single NMR sample measurement can explain many issues, while similar analysis by traditional methods may require several independent and time-consuming measurements. Moreover, significant relationships among NMR spectra and both conventional chemical analysis and viscosity measurements have been found. Eventually, NMR could play an important role for quality attributes of ozonated oil derivatives.

  6. Structural determination of Zn and Cd-DTPA complexes: MS, infrared, (13)C NMR and theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vanézia L; Carvalho, Ruy; Freitas, Matheus P; Tormena, Cláudio F; Melo, Walclée C

    2007-12-31

    The joint application of MS, infrared and (13)C NMR techniques for the determination of metal-DTPA structures (metal=Zn and Cd; DTPA=diethylenetriaminepentacetic acid) is reported. Mass spectrometry allowed determining the 1:1 stoichiometry of the complexes, while infrared analysis suggested that both nitrogen and carboxyl groups are sites for complexation. The (13)C NMR spectrum for the cadmium-containing complex evidenced the existence of free and complexed carboxyl groups, due to a straight singlet at 179.0 ppm (free carboxylic (13)C) and to two broad singlets or a broad doublet at 178.3 ppm (complexed carboxylic (13)C, (2)J(Cd-C(=O))=45.2 Hz). A similar interpretation might be given for the zinc derivative and, with the aid of DFT calculations, structures for both complexes were then proposed.

  7. Diffusion and conformation of peptide-functionalized polyphenylene dendrimers studied by fluorescence correlation and 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koynov, K; Mihov, G; Mondeshki, M; Moon, C; Spiess, H W; Müllen, K; Butt, H-J; Floudas, G

    2007-05-01

    We report on the combined use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy to detect the size and type of peptide secondary structures in a series of poly-Z-L-lysine functionalized polyphenylene dendrimers bearing the fluorescent perylenediimide core in solution. In dilute solution, the size of the molecule as detected from FCS and 1H NMR diffusion measurements matches nicely. We show that FCS is a sensitive probe of the core size as well as of the change in the peptide secondary structure. However, FCS is less sensitive to functionality. A change in the peptide secondary conformation from beta-sheets to alpha-helices detected by 13C NMR spectroscopy gives rise to a steep increase in the hydrodynamic radii for number of residues n > or = 16. Nevertheless, helices are objects of low persistence.

  8. Solid-state 13C NMR and molecular modeling studies of acetyl aleuritolic acid obtained from Croton cajucara Benth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva San Gil, Rosane Aguiar; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; da Cunha Pinto, Angelo; do Espírito Santo Gomes, Fabiano; de Castro Dantas, Tereza Neuma; Maciel, Maria Aparecida Medeiros

    2008-08-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance ( 13C NMR) with magic-angle spinning (MAS) and with cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) spectra, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques were used to obtain structural data from a sample of acetyl aleuritolic acid (AAA) extracted from the stem bark of Croton cajucara Benth. (Euphorbiaceae) and recrystallized from acetone. Since solid-state 13C NMR results suggested the presence of more than one molecule in the unitary cell for the AAA, DSC analysis and molecular modeling calculations were used to access this possibility. The absence of phase transition peaks in the DSC spectra and the dimeric models of AAA simulated using the semi-empirical PM3 method are in agreement with that proposal.

  9. Complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for three new arylnaphthalene lignan from Justicia procumbens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guorui; Wu, Jun; Si, Jianyong; Wang, Junmei; Yang, Meihua

    2008-03-01

    Three new arylnaphthalene lignans, named neojusticin C (1), procumbenoside C (2) and procumbenoside D (3), have been isolated from the whole plant of Justicia procumbens, together with three known ones, justicidinoside B (4), justicidinoside C (5), and diphyllin-1-O-beta-D-apiofuranoside (6). The complete assignments of 1H and 13C NMR data for three new lignans were first obtained by means of 2D NMR techniques, including HSQC and HMBC.

  10. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR) profiling and computational studies on methyl 5-methoxy-1H-indole-2-carboxylate: A potential precursor to biologically active molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almutairi, Maha S.; Xavier, S.; Sathish, M.; Ghabbour, Hazem A.; Sebastian, S.; Periandy, S.; Al-Wabli, Reem I.; Attia, Mohamed I.

    2017-04-01

    Methyl 5-methoxy-1H-indole-2-carboxylate (MMIC) was prepared via esterification of commercially available 5-methoxyindole-2-carboxylic acid. The title molecule MMIC was characterised using FT-IR and FT-Raman in the ranges of 4000-500 and 4000-50 cm-1, respectively. The fundamental modes of the vibrations were assigned and the UV-visible spectrum of the MMIC molecule was recorded in the range of 200-400 nm to explore its electronic nature. The HOMO-LUMO energy distribution was calculated and the bonding and anti-bonding structures of the title molecule were studied and analysed using the natural bond orbital (NBO) approach. The reactivity of the MMIC molecule was also investigated and both the positive and negative centres of the molecule were identified using chemical descriptors and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) analysis. The chemical shifts of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra were noted and the magnetic field environment of the MMIC molecule are discussed. The non-linear optical (NLO) properties of the title molecule were studied based on its calculated values of polarisability and hyperpolarisability. All computations were obtained by DFT methods using the 6-311++G (d,p) basis set.

  11. Deuterium isotope effects in 13C NMR spectra of trans-azobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikić-Topić, Draz̆en; Novak, Predrag; Smrec̆ki, Vilko; Meić, Zlatko

    1997-06-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts have been determined in a series of deuteriated trans-azobenzene isotopomers. The longest effect observed is the one over ten bonds ( 10Δ) in 4- 2H-isotopomer at C-4' atom amounting to 3.3 ppb. The magnitude and the extent of isotope effects in trans-azobenzene are related to those observed in isoelectronic and conformationally similar trans-stilbene. The sign alternation pattern of the long-range isotope effects in trans-azobenzene parallels that in isoelectronic trans-stilbene, cis-stilbene and trans-N-benzylideneaniline.

  12. 13C NMR spectral characterization of epimeric rotenone and some related tetrahydrobenzopyranofurobenzopyranones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.; Abidi, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    The 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectra of epimers of rotenone and four 12a-hydroxy-analogues were examined to determine the stereochemical effect of the B/C ring fusion involving the 6a- and 12a-carbon centers. Chemical shift differences between the epimeric carbon resonances of cis- and trans-6a,12a-compounds were notably larger than those of diastereoisomers derived from the same B/C ring junction stereochemistry. Results of the spectral analysis have been useful for the quantification of mixtures of epimers and for the measurement of rates of epimerization and oxygenation.

  13. 13C-NMR spectroscopic evaluation of the citric acid cycle flux in conditions of high aspartate transaminase activity in glucose-perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Tran-Dinh, S; Hoerter, J A; Mateo, P; Gyppaz, F; Herve, M

    1998-12-01

    A new mathematical model, based on the observation of 13C-NMR spectra of two principal metabolites (glutamate and aspartate), was constructed to determine the citric acid cycle flux in the case of high aspartate transaminase activity leading to the formation of large amounts of labeled aspartate and glutamate. In this model, the labeling of glutamate and aspartate carbons by chemical and isotopic exchange with the citric acid cycle are considered to be interdependent. With [U-13C]Glc or [1,2-(13)C]acetate as a substrate, all glutamate and aspartate carbons can be labeled. The isotopic transformations of 32 glutamate isotopomers into 16 aspartate isotopomers or vice versa were studied using matrix operations; the results were compiled in two matrices. We showed how the flux constants of the citric acid cycle and the 13C-enrichment of acetyl-CoA can be deduced from 13C-NMR spectra of glutamate and/or aspartate. The citric acid cycle flux in beating Wistar rat hearts, aerobically perfused with [U-13C]glucose in the absence of insulin, was investigated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, aspartate instead of glutamate was found to be the most abundantly-labeled metabolite, indicating that aspartate transaminase (which catalyses the reversible reaction: (glutamate + oxaloacetate <--> 2-oxoglutarate + aspartate) is highly active in the absence of insulin. The amount of aspartate was about two times larger than glutamate. The quantities of glutamate (G0) or aspartate (A0) were approximately the same for all hearts and remained constant during perfusion: G0 = (0.74 +/- 0.03) micromol/g; A0 = (1.49 +/- 0.05) micromol/g. The flux constants, i.e., the fraction of glutamate and aspartate in exchange with the citric acid cycle, were about 1.45 min(-1) and 0.72 min(-1), respectively; the flux of this cycle is about (1.07 +/- 0.02) micromol min(-1) g(-1). Excellent agreement between the computed and experimental data was obtained, showing that: i) in the absence of insulin

  14. Characterization of the humic substances isolated from postfire soils of scotch pine forest in Togljatty city, Samara region by the 13C-NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimova, Ekaterina; Abakumov, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    Postpyrogenic soil dynamics is an informative tool for studying of soil elementary processes in extreme temperature conditions and for predicting of short time environmental changes in conditions of catastrophic landscape changes. Soil organic matter (SOM) system evolution is the most rapid process of postpyrogenic soil development. In this relation the evaluation of humus accumulation rates and humification trend were conducted with use of the classical chemical and modern spectroscopy methods. Soil restoration after spontaneous forest fires near Togljatty city (Samara region, Russia) was abandoned in 2010, and further monitoring over the next four years was organized to evaluate the speed of biogenic processes and humus accumulation dynamics. Three key soil plots were studied for estimating SOM quality changes under the forest fire effect: surface forest fire, crown forest fire and control. Total carbon and nitrogen content as well as Cha/Cfa ratios (content of humic acids/ content of fulvic acids), were estimated to assess the dynamics of soil restoration. Humic acid powders were extracted and analyzed by elemental composition and 13C-NMR spectroscopy to assess changes in humic substance structure and composition. The data obtained indicate that burning of a forest floor and sod (humic) horizon led to humus losses and decreases in total carbon stocks. As a result of the fires, the content of humic acids in the pyrogenic horizon increased, leading alterations of humus type. Greater increases in the degree of organic matter humification were observed for surface fires than crown fires. It was shown that the humus molecular composition was substantially affected by the wildfires. The data show an increase in aromaticity, a loss of oxygen-containing groups and dehydrogenation of humic acids. Humic acids in the soils of the control plots and after wildfires were significantly different, especially in the ratios of hydrogen, oxygen and carbon. The increase in the

  15. Application of Spectroscopic Techniques (FT-IR, 13C NMR) to the analysis of humic substances in volcanic soils along an environmental gradient (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Rodriguez, Antonio; María Armas Herrera, Cecilia; González Pérez, José Antonio; González-Vila, Francisco Javier; Arbelo Rodríguez, Carmen Dolores; Mora Hernández, Juan Luis; Polvillo Polo, Oliva

    2010-05-01

    Andosols and andic soils are considered as efficient C-sinks in terms of C sequestration. These soils are usually developed from volcanic materials, and are characterized by a predominance of short-range ordered minerals like allophanes, imogolite and other Fe and Al oxyhydroxides. Such materials occur commonly associated with organic compounds, thus generating highly stable organo-mineral complexes and leading to the accumulation of a high amount of organic carbon. Spectroscopic methods like FT-IR and 13C NMR are suitable for the analysis of the chemical structure of soil humic substances, and allow identifying distinct functional groups and protein, lipids, lignin, carbohydrate-derived fragments. In this work we study the structural features of four soils developed on Pleistocene basaltic lavae in Tenerife (Canary Island, Spain), distributed along an altitudinal climatic gradient. The soil sequence comprises soils with different degree of geochemical evolution and andic character, including a mineral ‘Hypersalic Solonchak' (Tabaibal de Rasca), a slightly vitric ‘Luvic Phaeozem' (Los Frailes), a degraded and shallow ‘Endoleptic, fulvic, silandic Andosol' (Siete Lomas), and a well-developed and deep ‘Fulvic, silandic, Andosol' (Ravelo). Samples of the raw soil and humic and fulvic acids isolated from the surface horizons were analyzed. The results show a low content of organic carbon in the mineral soil, the inherited humin predominating, and a very high content of humic and fulvic acids in Andosols. The FT-IR and 13C NMR spectra of the raw soil samples show a low resolution, related to interferences from mineral complexes signals, particularly in soils with lower organic carbon content. 13C NMR shows a predominance of O-alkyl carbon (derived of carbohydrates) in andic soils, whereas O-alkyl and aromatic fractions are most evident in the mineral soil. The humic acids spectra are characterized by a dominance of alkyl and aromatic fractions with a high degree

  16. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: [sup 13]C-NMR analysis of CONSOL THF-soluble residual materials from the Wilsonville coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Solum, M.S.; Pugmire, R.J. )

    1992-11-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using CP/MAS [sup 13]C-NMR spectroscopy for the chemical structural examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. A set of twelve carbon skeletal-structure parameters and eight molecular structural descriptors were derived from the NMR data. The technique was used previously to determine these parameters for coal and char, and in the construction of a coal pyrolysis model. The method was applied successfully to the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble portion of eleven 850[degrees]F[sup +] distillation resids and one 850[degrees]F[sup +] distillation resid which contained ash and insoluble organic material (IOM). The results of this study demonstrate that this analytical method can provide data for construction of a model of direct coal liquefaction. Its further development and use is justified based on these results.

  17. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: {sup 13}C-NMR analysis of CONSOL THF-soluble residual materials from the Wilsonville coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Solum, M.S.; Pugmire, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using CP/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy for the chemical structural examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. A set of twelve carbon skeletal-structure parameters and eight molecular structural descriptors were derived from the NMR data. The technique was used previously to determine these parameters for coal and char, and in the construction of a coal pyrolysis model. The method was applied successfully to the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble portion of eleven 850{degrees}F{sup +} distillation resids and one 850{degrees}F{sup +} distillation resid which contained ash and insoluble organic material (IOM). The results of this study demonstrate that this analytical method can provide data for construction of a model of direct coal liquefaction. Its further development and use is justified based on these results.

  18. Kinetic analysis of reactions of Si-based epoxy resins by near-infrared spectroscopy, 13C NMR and soft-hard modelling.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Mariano; Larrechi, Maria Soledad; Rius, F Xavier; Mercado, Luis Adolfo; Galià, Marina

    2007-02-05

    Soft- and hard-modelling strategy was applied to near-infrared spectroscopy data obtained from monitoring the reaction between glycidyloxydimethylphenyl silane, a silicon-based epoxy monomer, and aniline. On the basis of the pure soft-modelling approach and previous chemical knowledge, a kinetic model for the reaction was proposed. Then, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares optimization was carried out under a hard constraint, that compels the concentration profiles to fulfil the proposed kinetic model at each iteration of the optimization process. In this way, the concentration profiles of each species and the corresponding kinetic rate constants of the reaction, unpublished until now, were obtained. The results obtained were contrasted with 13C NMR. The joint interval test of slope and intercept for detecting bias was not significant (alpha=5%).

  19. Luminescence dynamics and {sup 13}C NMR characteristics of dinuclear complexes exhibiting coupled lanthanide(III) cation pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, K.D.; Bailey-Folkes, S.A.; Kahwa, I.A.

    1992-08-20

    Luminescence and cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) {sup 13}C NMR properties of lanthanide dinuclear macrocyclic complexes of a compartmental Schiff base chelate (1) derived from the condensation of 2,6-diformyl-p-cresol and 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanediamine are reported. The Schiff base chromophore in 1 is a strong light absorber and an efficient sensitizer for intense Tb{sup 3+}({sup 5}D{sub 4}) and Eu{sup 3+}({sup 5}D{sub 0})(T < 110 K ) emission which does not exhibit self-quenching effects. Emission from Tb{sup 3+} is sensitized by the ligand singlet state; in striking contrast, Eu{sup 3+} emission is sensitized by the triplet state and reveals an unusual nonradiative quenching process at T > 110 K with a thermal barrier of {approx} 2300 cm{sup {minus}1}. Weak emission is observed from Dy{sup 3+}({sup 4}F{sub 9/2}), Sm{sup 3+}({sup 4}G{sub 5/2}), and Pr{sup 3+}({sup 1}D{sub 2}) diluted in Gd{sup 3+} (i.e., from Gd{sup 3+}-Ln{sup 3+} heteropairs, Ln = Pr, Sm, Dy). Intramolecular metal-metal (Ln-Ln = 4 {Angstrom}) interactions account for the greatly quenched emission from Sm{sup 3+}-Sm{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+}-Dy{sup 3+} homopairs compared to Gd{sup 3+}-Ln heteropairs (Ln = Sm, Dy). Gd{sup 3+}-Ln{sup 3+} emission lifetimes at 77 K are 1610 (Tb{sup 3+}), 890 (Eu{sup 3+}), 14 (Dy{sup 3+}) and {approx} 13 {mu}s (Sm{sup 3+}). Nonradiative relaxation processes at 77 K in dilute Ln{sup 3+}:Gd{sub 2}1(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, being temperature independent for Sm{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} but temperature dependent for Tb{sup 3+}, follow the energy gap law with {alpha} {approx} - 10{sup {minus}3} cm and B {approx} 2 x 10{sup 8} s{sup {minus}1}. CP-MAS data show paramagnetic broadening of {sup 13}C resonances which increases with the magnetic moment of Ln{sup 3+}. Surprisingly, no significant shifts in resonance positions corresponding to the changing nature of paramagnetic Ln{sup 3+} ions are observed. 43 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Phosphorus-31, sup 15 N, and sup 13 C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, S.; Leo, G.C.; Sammons, R.D.; Sikorski, J.A. )

    1989-05-02

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph}) of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by {sup 31}P, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts ({delta}) for each of the three nuclei. By {sup 31}P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The {sup 13}C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The {sup 15}N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the {sup 31}P {delta} and the C-P-O bond angle, and the {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N {delta} values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield {sup 31}P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P {sup 31}P {delta} vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the E{sup S3P} binary complex, while the E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph} complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle.

  1. Application of ChemDraw NMR Tool: Correlation of Program-Generated (Super 13)C Chemical Shifts and pK[subscript a] Values of Para-Substituted Benzoic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hongyi Wang

    2005-01-01

    A study uses the ChemDraw nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) tool to process 15 para-substituted benzoic acids and generate (super 13)C NMR chemical shifts of C1 through C5. The data were plotted against their pK[subscript a] value and a fairly good linear fit was found for pK[subscript a] versus delta[subscript c1].

  2. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV absorption, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical (in B3LYP/6-311++G** level) studies on alkali metal salts of caffeic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, Renata

    The effect of some metals on the electronic system of benzoic and nicotinic acids has recently been investigated by IR, Raman and UV spectroscopy [1-3]. Benzoic and nicotinic acids are regarded model systems representing a wide group of aromatic ligands which are incorporated into enzymes. In this work the FT-IR (in solid state and in solution), FT-Raman, UV absorption and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) and its salts with lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium were registered, assigned and analyzed. The effect of alkali metals on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. Studies of differences in the number and position of bands from the IR, Raman, UV absorption spectra and chemical shifts from NMR spectra allowed to conclude on the distribution of electronic charge in the molecules, the delocalization energy of π electrons and the reactivity of ligands in metal complexes. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G** basis set. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments for the optimized structures of caffeic acid and lithium, sodium, potassium caffeinates were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris.

  3. Changes in the compound classes of dissolved organic matter along an estuarine transect: A study using FTIR and 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulla, Hussain A. N.; Minor, Elizabeth C.; Dias, Robert F.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2010-07-01

    In this work, we use Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 13C NMR) data to quantify the changes of major chemical compound classes (carboxylic acid, amide, ester, aliphatic, aromatic and carbohydrate) in high molecular weight (HMW, >1 kDa) dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated along a transect through the Elizabeth River/Chesapeake Bay system to the coastal Atlantic Ocean off Virginia, USA. Results show that carboxylic acids and aromatic compounds are lost along the transect, while HMW DOC becomes enriched in carbohydrate moieties that could have a mid-transect source, perhaps the intensive red tide bloom ( Choclodinium polykrikoides) which occurred during our sampling period. Taking the second derivative of the FTIR spectra resolved three pools of de-protonated carboxylic acids at our Dismal Swamp site (used to represent terrestrial organic matter in this area): one carboxylic acid pool, complexed with iron, seems to be lost between the Dismal Swamp and river sites; the second appears biogeochemically active throughout the riverine transect, disappearing in the coastal ocean sample; the third seems refractory, with the potential to be transported to and to accumulate within the open ocean. Five-member ring esters (γ-lactones) were the major ester form in the Dismal Swamp; aliphatic and acetate esters were the dominant esters in the estuary/marine DOM. No amide groups were detectable in Dismal Swamp DOM; secondary amides were present at the estuarine/marine sites. Coupling FTIR with 13C NMR provides new insights into the biogeochemical roles of carboxylic acid, amide and ester compounds in aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Compositional differences among Chinese soy sauce types studied by (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ghulam Mustafa; Wang, Xiaohua; Bin Yuan; Wang, Jie; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili

    2016-09-01

    Soy sauce a well known seasoning all over the world, especially in Asia, is available in global market in a wide range of types based on its purpose and the processing methods. Its composition varies with respect to the fermentation processes and addition of additives, preservatives and flavor enhancers. A comprehensive (1)H NMR based study regarding the metabonomic variations of soy sauce to differentiate among different types of soy sauce available on the global market has been limited due to the complexity of the mixture. In present study, (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis like principle component analysis (PCA), and orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was applied to investigate metabonomic variations among different types of soy sauce, namely super light, super dark, red cooking and mushroom soy sauce. The main additives in soy sauce like glutamate, sucrose and glucose were easily distinguished and quantified using (13)C NMR spectroscopy which were otherwise difficult to be assigned and quantified due to serious signal overlaps in (1)H NMR spectra. The significantly higher concentration of sucrose in dark, red cooking and mushroom flavored soy sauce can directly be linked to the addition of caramel in soy sauce. Similarly, significantly higher level of glutamate in super light as compared to super dark and mushroom flavored soy sauce may come from the addition of monosodium glutamate. The study highlights the potentiality of (13)C NMR based metabonomics coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis in differentiating between the types of soy sauce on the basis of level of additives, raw materials and fermentation procedures.

  5. Identification and quantitative determination of carbohydrates in ethanolic extracts of two conifers using 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Emilie; Castola, Vincent; Casanova, Joseph

    2008-04-07

    We developed a method for the direct identification and quantification of carbohydrates in raw vegetable extracts using (13)C NMR spectroscopy without any preliminary step of precipitation or reduction of the components. This method has been validated (accuracy, precision and response linearity) using pure compounds and artificial mixtures before being applied to authentic ethanolic extracts of pine needles, pine wood and pine cones and fir twigs. We determined that carbohydrates represented from 15% to 35% of the crude extracts in which pinitol was the principal constituent accompanied by arabinitol, mannitol, glucose and fructose.

  6. Triterpenes in the hexane extract of leaves of Olea europaea L.: analysis using 13C-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Emilie; Castola, Vincent; Casanova, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Two neutral triterpenes and a triterpene acid were identified and quantified directly, in the absence of any purification steps, in a precipitate obtained during the industrial extraction of the leaves of Olea europaea L. using 13C-NMR spectroscopy (spectrometer operating at 4.7 T equipped with a 10 mm probe). The method was optimised in order to reduce the duration of analysis with a routine NMR spectrometer. Together with long-chain linear compounds, erythrodiol, uvaol and oleanolic acid accounted for 27.3, 18.3 and 12.5% of the precipitate, respectively.

  7. Use of solid-state 13C NMR in structural studies of humic acids and humin from Holocene sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; VanderHart, D.L.; Earl, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    13C NMR spectra of solid humic substances in Holocene sediments have been obtained using cross polarization with magic-angle sample spinning techniques. The results demonstrate that this technique holds great promise for structural characterizations of complex macromolecular substances such as humin and humic acids. Quantifiable distinctions can be made between structural features of aquatic and terrestrial humic substances. The aliphatic carbons of the humic substances are dominant components suggestive of input from lipid-like materials. An interesting resemblance is also noted between terrestrial humic acid and humin spectra. ?? 1980.

  8. (1)H, (13)C NMR and X-ray crystallographic studies of highly polyhalogenated derivatives of costunolide lactone.

    PubMed

    Corona, D; Díaz, E; Nava, J L; Guzmán, A; Barrios, H; Fuentes, A; Hernandez-Plata, S A; Allard, J; Jankowski, C K

    2005-11-01

    The costunolide lactone, a sesquiterpene compound isolated from Zaluzania triiloba species, reacted with several dihalocarbene sources produced by trihaloform-NaOH under successive phase transfer reactions yielding mono-, bis- and tris-dihalocyclopropane adducts. The structures, as well as the configurational assignments of the different derivatives, were established by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and assisted by X-ray crystallographic and molecular modelling studies. The specific shielding of protons in the neighbourhood of different halogens on the cyclopropane moieties was correlated to the pseudocontact interactions.

  9. Investigations on computed 13C NMR one-dimensional non-refocused INEPT experiments for structural determinations in O-methylated glycosides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouységu, Laurent; Nobert, Philippe; Deffieux, Denis; De Jéso, Bernard; Lartigue, Jean-Claude; Pétraud, Michel; Ratier, Max

    1999-10-01

    A new one-dimensional 13C NMR approach for the determination of methoxyl substituents configuration in O-methylated glycosides is presented. Assignments are based on structural investigations by non-refocused INEPT experiments associated with numerical methods.

  10. Effect of organic matter application on CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectra of humic acids from a brown soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.

    2009-04-01

    The humified SOM or humic substances (HS) composed of humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA) and humin (HM) represent the most microbially recalcitrant and stable reservoir of organic carbon in soil (Piccolo et al., 2004). OM applications can influence the amount and structural characteristics of HS(Dou et al., 2008). During the past few decades, there has been much research on HS, but their chemical structure is still not fully understood (Dong, 2006).CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectroscopy was considered as an effective method to study structures of HS without dissolving problem compared with liquid 13C-NMR (Conte et al., 1997; Dou et al., 2008). It can directly measure the carbon framework and reflect the nature of HS transformation after OM application (Spaccini et al., 2000). For that reason, this method was applied in this study. The objective of this paper was to clarify the effect of long term OM application on the changes of structural characteristics in HAs, which provided new information for improving soil fertility by OM application. The experiment was carried out on a brown soil (Paleudalf in USDA Soil Taxonomy) at Shenyang Agricultural University, Liaoning province, China (N41°48'-E123°25'). The experiment included 3 treatments: zero-treatment (CKbr), and two pig manure (PM) treatments (O1 and O2) at the rates of 0.9 t ha-1 and 1.8 t ha-1 of organic carbon, respectively. The samples of the HA fraction were extracted, separated and purified according to the method described by Dou et al. (1991). Elemental composition, Differential thermal analysis (DTA), -lgK value, FT-IR and CP-MAS- 13C-NMR of HAs were performed. Effects on the contents of orgaic carbon and its composition. The contents of TOC were from 8.77 g kg-1 to 12.25 g kg-1. The relative contents in TOC for WSS, HA, and FA were 6.87%, 14.2% and 19.8%. Comparing the CKbr, the contents of WSS, HA and FA for O1 and O2 increased, but relative contents of WSS and FA decreased. The content of the HA increased after

  11. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  12. The retrogradation properties of glutinous rice and buckwheat starches as observed with FT-IR, 13C NMR and DSC.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xijun; Wang, Changjun; Zhang, Kunsheng; Li, Lin

    2014-03-01

    The experiment was conducted to study the retrogradation properties of glutinous rice and buckwheat starch with wavelengths of maximum absorbance, FT-IR, (13)C NMR, and DSC. The results show that the starches in retrograded glutinous rice starch and glutinous rice amylopectin could not form double helix. The IR results show that protein inhabits in glutinous rice and maize starches in a different way and appearance of C-H symmetric stretching vibration at 2852 cm(-1) in starch might be appearance of protein. Retrogradation untied the protein in glutinous amylopectin. Enthalpies of sweet potato and maize granules are higher than those of their retrograded starches. The (13)C NMR results show that retrogradation of those two starches leads to presence of β-anomers and retrogradation might decompose lipids in glutinous rice amylopectin into small molecules. Glutinous rice starch was more inclined to retrogradation than buckwheat starch. The DSC results show that the second peak temperatures for retrograded glutinous rice and buckwheat starches should be assigned to protein. The SEM results show that an obvious layer structure exists in retrograded glutinous rice amylopectin.

  13. Variability of cork from Portuguese Quercus suber studied by solid-state (13)C-NMR and FTIR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M H; Barros, A S; Pascoal Neto, C; Rutledge, D; Delgadillo, I; Gil, A M

    2001-01-01

    A new approach is presented for the study of the variability of Portuguese reproduction cork using solid-state (13)C-NMR spectroscopy and photoacoustic (PAS) FTIR (FTIR-PAS) spectroscopy combined with chemometrics. Cork samples were collected from 12 different geographical sites, and their (13)C-cross-polarization with magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) and FTIR spectra were registered. A large spectral variability among the cork samples was detected by principal component analysis and found to relate to the suberin and carbohydrate contents. This variability was independent of the sample geographical origin but significantly dependent on the cork quality, thus enabling the distinction of cork samples according to the latter property. The suberin content of the cork samples was predicted using multivariate regression models based on the (13)C-NMR and FTIR spectra of the samples as reported previously. Finally, the relationship between the variability of the (13)C-CP/MAS spectra with that of the FTIR-PAS spectra was studied by outer product analysis. This type of multivariate analysis enabled a clear correlation to be established between the peaks assigned to suberin and carbohydrate in the FTIR spectrum and those appearing in the (13)C-CP/MAS spectra.

  14. 1H, 13C NMR and DFT Study of Hydrogen Bonding in Imidazolium-based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Balevičius, Vytautas; Gdaniec, Zofia; Džiaugys, Lukas; Kuliešius, Feliksas; Maršalka, Arūnas

    2011-09-01

    The ionic liquid 1-decyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide [C10mim][Br], the neat material, and also dissolved (~0.01 mole fraction) in various dielectric media (acetonitrile, benzene, chloroform, dichloromethane, methanol, 2-butanol and H2O) was studied using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The most important interaction in this compound is considered to be the Br-...H-C2+ hydrogen bond, which is formed between the anions and cations. The obtained results show that dielectric medium influence mostly the behavior of the Br-...H-C2+ bridge proton. The changes observed in 1H and 13C NMR spectra of [C10mim][Br] with increasing solvents polarity and temperature can be explained applying the model of the lengthening of the H2...Br- bond with the accompanying thickening of the solvation shell of bromine anion and C2-H bond contraction. The short-range order effects related to the configuration of neighboring dipoles of solvent molecules are more important for the solvation ability of small anions than the bulk solvent field effect. However, the solvents, molecules of which tend to associate via hydrogen bonding, can significantly affect the dynamics of anions.

  15. Understanding NMR Chemical Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.

    1996-10-01

    The NMR chemical shift serves as a paradigm for molecular electronic properties. We consider the factors that determine the general magnitudes of the shifts, the state of the art in theoretical calculations, the nature of the shielding tensor, and the multidimensional shielding surface that describes the variation of the shielding with nuclear positions. We also examine the nature of the intermolecular shielding surface as a general example of a supermolecule property surface. The observed chemical shift in the zero-pressure limit is determined not only by the value of the shielding at the equilibrium geometry, but the dynamic average over the multidimensional shielding surface during rotation and vibration of the molecule. In the gas, solution, or adsorbed phase it is an average of the intermolecular shielding surface over all the configurations of the molecule with its neighbors. The temperature dependence of the chemical shift in the isolated molecule, the changes upon isotopic substitution, the changes with environment, are well characterized experimentally so that quantum mechanical descriptions of electronic structure and theories related to dynamics averaging of any electronic property can be subjected to stringent test.

  16. Brominated Compounds from Marine Sponges of the Genus Aplysina and a Compilation of Their 13C NMR Spectral Data

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Narlize Silva; Montes, Ricardo Carneiro; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; da Cunha, Emidio V. L.; de Athayde-Filho, Petronio Filgueiras; Rodrigues, Luis Cezar; da Silva Dias, Celidarque; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria

    2011-01-01

    Aplysina is the best representative genus of the family Aplysinidae. Halogenated substances are its main class of metabolites. These substances contribute greatly to the chemotaxonomy and characterization of the sponges belonging to this genus. Due to their pharmacological activities, these alkaloids are of special interest. The chemistry of halogenated substances and of the alkaloids has long been extensively studied in terrestrial organisms, while the number of marine organisms studied has just started to increase in the last decades. This review describes 101 halogenated substances from 14 species of Aplysina from different parts of the world. These substances can be divided into the following classes: bromotyramines (A), cavernicolins (B), hydroverongiaquinols (C), bromotyrosineketals (D), bromotyrosine lactone derivatives (E), oxazolidones (F), spiroisoxazolines (G), verongiabenzenoids (H), verongiaquinols (I), and dibromocyclohexadienes (J). A compilation of their 13C NMR data is also part of the review. For this purpose 138 references were consulted. PMID:22163189

  17. Conditions for 13C NMR Detection of 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Tissue Extracts from IDH-Mutated Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Pichumani, Kumar; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Ratnakar, James; Mickey, Bruce; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Bachoo, Robert M.; Malloy, Craig R.; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    13C NMR spectroscopy of extracts from patient tumor samples provides rich information about metabolism. However, in IDH-mutant gliomas 13C labeling is obscured in glutamate and glutamine by the oncometabolite, 2-hydroxyglutaric acid (2HG), prompting development of a simple method to resolve the metabolites. J-coupled multiplets in 2HG were similar to glutamate and glutamine and could be clearly resolved at pH 6. A cryogenically-cooled 13C probe but not J-resolved heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectroscopy significantly improved detection of 2HG. These methods enable the monitoring of 13C-13C spin-spin couplings in 2HG expressing IDH mutant gliomas. PMID:25908561

  18. Local structure and molecular motions in imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal as studied by 2H and 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, M.; Chizuwa, M.; Umiyama, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Miyatou, T.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T.; Tansho, M.; Shimizu, T.

    2015-04-01

    The local structure and molecular motion of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal were investigated using solid-state 2H and 13C NMR. The imidazolium ion undergoes isotropic rotation, which is correlated with a defect in the crystal, as observed by 2H NMR broadline spectra above 263 K. A 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in the regular site was observed from 2H NMR quadrupole Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra. The Grotthuss mechanism was accompanied by a 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in regular sites. Moreover, the proton transfer associated with the imidazolium ion of the defective crystal is important for proton conductivity of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal.

  19. Beta-alanine-hydrochloride (2:1) crystal: structure, 13C NMR and vibrational properties, protonation character.

    PubMed

    Godzisz, D; Ilczyszyn, M; Ciunik, Z

    2003-01-15

    The crystal structure of beta-alanine-hydrochloride (2:1) complex (2A-HCl) has been determined by X-ray diffraction method at 298 and 100 K as monoclinic, space group C2/c, Z=4. The crystal comprises chloride anions and protonated beta-alanine dimers: two beta-alanine zwitterions are joined by strong, symmetric (Ci) hydrogen bond with the O...O distance of 2.473 A at room temperature. Powder FT-IR and FT-Raman as well as solid state 13C NMR spectra provide insights into the solid structure of this complex, character of its hydrogen bonds and the beta-alanine protonation.

  20. Beta-alanine-oxalic acid (1:1) hemihydrate crystal: structure, 13C NMR and vibrational properties, protonation character.

    PubMed

    Godzisz, D; Ilczyszyn, M; Ilczyszyn, M M

    2003-03-01

    The crystal structure of beta-alanine-oxalic acid (1:1) hemihydrate complex has been reinvestigated by X-ray diffraction method at 293 K. Formation of monoclinic crystal system belonging to C2/c space group and consisting of semi-oxalate chains, diprotonated beta-alanine dimers and water molecules bonded to both these units is confirmed. New results are obtained for distances in the carboxylic groups and hydrogen bonds. These structural observations are used for protonation degree monitoring on the carboxylic oxygen atoms. They are in accordance with our vibrational study. The 13C NMR spectra provide insights into the solid structure of this complex, character of its hydrogen bonds and the beta-alanine protonation.

  1. Application of /sup 13/C NMR, fluorescence, and light-scattering techniques for structural studies of oil-in-water microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Tricot, Y.; Kiwi, J.; Niederberger, W.; Graetzel, M.

    1981-04-02

    The nature of the microdroplets present in oil-in-water microemulsions was examined by using the 4-component model system water-hexadecane-sodium hexadecyl sulfate-pentanol. Three compositions were selected corresponding to regions in the pahse diagram where the content of water, cosurfactant, and oil, respectively, approached the tolerable limit to yield clear isotropic solutions. In the water-side microemulsion, the radius of the droplets is 127A as determined from quasi-elastic light-scattering measurements. Fluorescence experiments showed that the core of the microspheres has a microviscosity similar to hexadecane at room temperature. /sup 13/C NMR shift analysis was applied to test the partitioning of cosurfactant between the surface and the interior of the droplet. For all three compositions significant fractions of the cosurfactant are present in the interior. This is corroborated by results obtained from T/sub 1/ relaxation-time analysis at different field strengths. The influence of the field strength on T/sub 1/ is explained in terms of a model based on a distribution of correlation times. In particular, the importance of taking into account slower rotational modes such as the tumbling of the whole microsphere is illustrated.

  2. High-resolution sup 13 C NMR study of the topography and dynamics of methionine residues in detergent-solubilized bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Seigneuret, M.; Neumann, J.M.; Levy, D.; Rigaud, J.L. )

    1991-04-23

    The proton transport membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin has been biosynthetically labeled with (methyl-{sup 13}C)methionine and studied by high-resolution {sup 13}C NMR after solubilization in the detergent Triton X-100. The nine methionine residues of bacteriorhodopsin give rise to four well-resolved {sup 13}C resonances, two of which are shifted upfield or downfield due to nearby aromatic residues. Methionine residues located on the hydrophilic surfaces, on the hydrophobic surface, and in the interior of the protein could be discriminated by studying the effects of papain proteolysis, glycerol-induced viscosity increase, and paramagnetic broadening by spin-labels on NMR spectra. Such data were used to evaluate current models of the bacteriorhodopsin transmembrane folding and tertiary structure. T{sub 2} and NOE measurements were performed to study the local dynamics of methionine residues in bacteriorhodopsin. For the detergent-solubilized protein, hydrophilic and hydrophobic external residues undergo a relatively large extent of side chain wobbling motion while most internal residues are less mobile. In the native purple membrane and in reconstituted bacteriorhodopsin liposomes, almost all methionine residues have their wobbling motion severely restricted, indicating a large effect of the membrane environment on the protein internal dynamics.

  3. Bonded Cumomer Analysis of Human Melanoma Metabolism Monitored by 13C NMR Spectroscopy of Perfused Tumor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Shestov, Alexander A.; Mancuso, Anthony; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Guo, Lili; Nelson, David S.; Roman, Jeffrey C.; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Leeper, Dennis B.; Blair, Ian A.; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2016-01-01

    A network model for the determination of tumor metabolic fluxes from 13C NMR kinetic isotopomer data has been developed and validated with perfused human DB-1 melanoma cells carrying the BRAF V600E mutation, which promotes oxidative metabolism. The model generated in the bonded cumomer formalism describes key pathways of tumor intermediary metabolism and yields dynamic curves for positional isotopic enrichment and spin-spin multiplets. Cells attached to microcarrier beads were perfused with 26 mm [1,6-13C2]glucose under normoxic conditions at 37 °C and monitored by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Excellent agreement between model-predicted and experimentally measured values of the rates of oxygen and glucose consumption, lactate production, and glutamate pool size validated the model. ATP production by glycolytic and oxidative metabolism were compared under hyperglycemic normoxic conditions; 51% of the energy came from oxidative phosphorylation and 49% came from glycolysis. Even though the rate of glutamine uptake was ∼50% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux, the rate of ATP production from glutamine was essentially zero (no glutaminolysis). De novo fatty acid production was ∼6% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux was 3.6% of glycolysis, and three non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway exchange fluxes were calculated. Mass spectrometry was then used to compare fluxes through various pathways under hyperglycemic (26 mm) and euglycemic (5 mm) conditions. Under euglycemic conditions glutamine uptake doubled, but ATP production from glutamine did not significantly change. A new parameter measuring the Warburg effect (the ratio of lactate production flux to pyruvate influx through the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier) was calculated to be 21, close to upper limit of oxidative metabolism. PMID:26703469

  4. Soil Organic Matter Characterization by 13C-NMR and Thermal Analysis in Deep Tropical Soil Profiles from the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, A. F.; Hockaday, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forest soils store large quantities of carbon (C) as soil organic matter (SOM), a substantial proportion of which is stored deep (> 30 cm) in the soil profile. Characterization of tropical SOM remains difficult, in part due to the analytical challenges associated high iron and low C concentrations. In this study, we combined solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with analytical thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry, DSC; evolved CO2 gas analysis, CO2-EGA) to explore patterns in SOM composition in deep soil profiles from two contrasting soil types at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO) in northeast Puerto Rico. Prior to 13C NMR, soils were repeatedly demineralized with hydrofluoric acid (HF) to remove paramagnetic compounds and concentrate organic matter. Given the scant information on tropical subsoil OM, we also sought to evaluate the effect of HF acid treatments on tropical subsoil SOM. HF treatments effectively enriched sample C and removed paramagnetic compounds, allowing us to obtain high-quality NMR spectra for low-C subsoils. C:N ratios before and after HF treatment were nearly identical (mean = 16.6 ± 0.8), suggesting that the SOM pool was not substantially fractionated, though C recoveries were low and variable. Thermal analyses confirmed the loss of a substantial fraction of the soil mineral matrix, however, retention of several endothermic regions in post-HF Inceptisol soils indicated that not all minerals were completely solubilized. In addition, important differences in the DSC and CO2-EGA thermograms were observed in comparing samples before versus after HF treatments. These results suggest that the organo-mineral associations were substantially altered, though it is not immediately clear the degree to which alterations in chemical composition versus binding association have changed. In addition to these qualitative changes, quantitative interpretations of 13C-NMR results from low-C and high

  5. Hydrocarbon type analysis of jet fuels by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.; Hunter, P.M.

    1981-05-01

    This report describes the application of NMR spectroscopy to the chemical characterization without prior chromatographic separation of jet fuels and various fuel blends containing varying amounts of paraffinic and aromatic constituents. Equations are derived by which the total percent paraffins and aromatics as well as percent monoaromatics and diaromatics can be calculated. Computer programs for the various calculations are included. The results obtained by NMR are compared to those obtained by MS.

  6. 13C NMR Relaxation Study of Segmental Motion of Poly(l-histidine) in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, Shinichi; Hiraoki, Toshifumi; Tsutsumi, Akihiro

    2004-05-01

    To study the segmental motion of poly (l-histidine) (PLH) in aqueous solution, the 13C spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) was measured at six resonance frequencies (ωC/2π) ranging from 15 to 100 MHz at temperatures from 10 to 80°C. For backbone Cα, plots of log(T1/ωC) against log(ωC) gave the well-superposed master curve, showing that the time-temperature reduction rule is realized. The shift factor obeyed the Arrhenius-type temperature dependence with the activation energy of 25.0 kJmol-1. Using this activation energy for the temperature dependence of the correlation time, the master curve was well reproduced by the Dejean-Lauprêtre-Monnerie (DLM) model. One of the parameters relating to the segmental motion was τ0/τ1=15, where τ0 and τ1 are the correlation times for the isolated single and correlated pair conformational transitions, respectively. It was found that the spectral density function J(ωC) has the exponent to the correlation time τ1 as ωCJ(ωC)˜(ωCτ1)0.71 in the region of ωCτ1≪ 1.

  7. 13C-NMR studies of the paramagnetic and charge-ordered states of the organic superconductor β''-(BEDT-TTF)3Cl2·2H2O under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Sanato; Ogura, Takashi; Kawamoto, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Hiromi

    2011-07-01

    β''-(BEDT-TTF)3Cl2·2H2O [BEDT-TTF: b̲is-(e̲thylened̲it̲hio)t̲etrat̲hiaf̲ulvalene] is superconductive under pressures, whereas the salt exhibits metal-insulator (MI) transition under ambient pressure. The insulator phase in the salt was examined using the charge density wave (CDW) phase that was obtained from band calculation. The charge-ordered (CO) state was recently proposed as the insulator phase of the salt, and the mechanism of superconductivity intermediated by charge fluctuation was suggested. We accessed 13C-NMR on β''-(BEDT-TTF)3Cl2·2H2O at ambient pressure and under pressure up to 1.6 GPa. At ambient pressure, the NMR spectrum changed at approximately 100 K. Three isolated peaks appeared at low temperatures, suggesting that the CO state exists below 100 K, and spin-gap behavior was observed. By analyzing the chemical shift, the charges on the three sites were estimated as ˜+0.4e, ˜+0.6e, and ˜+1.0e. The ratio of peak intensity and unsymmetrical peak position suggest the CO state with some symmetry breaking. When pressure is applied, the splitting of the NMR peaks in the CO state is reduced. The salt finally exhibits superconductivity at 1.6 GPa, spin-gap behavior observed at (T1T)-1 below 1.3 GPa suddenly disappears, whereas the NMR spectrum predicts that charge disproportionation coexists with superconductivity. The suppression of the spin-singlet formation observed in (T1T)-1 at 1.6 GPa suggests the metallic state with the charge disproportionation and the CO instability with some symmetry breaking.

  8. 13C-NMR Assessment of the Pattern of Organic Matter Transformation during Domestic Wastewater Treatment by Autothermal Aerobic Digestion (ATAD)

    PubMed Central

    Piterina, Anna V.; Barlett, John; Pembroke, J. Tony

    2009-01-01

    The pattern of biodegradation and the chemical changes occurring in the macromolecular fraction of domestic sludge during autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) was monitored and characterised via solid-state 13C-NMR CP-MAS. Major indexes such as aromaticity, hydrophobicity and alkyl/O-alkyl ratios calculated for the ATAD processed biosolids were compared by means of these values to corresponding indexes reported for sludges of different origin such as manures, soil organic matter and certain types of compost. Given that this is the first time that these techniques have been applied to ATAD sludge, the data indicates that long-chain aliphatics are easily utilized by the microbial populations as substrates for metabolic activities at all stages of aerobic digestion and serve as a key substrate for the temperature increase, which in turn results in sludge sterilization. The ATAD biosolids following treatment had a prevalence of O-alkyl domains, a low aromaticity index (10.4%) and an alkyl/O-alkyl ratio of 0.48 while the hydrophobicity index of the sludge decreased from 1.12 to 0.62 during the treatment. These results have important implications for the evolution of new ATAD modalities particularly in relation to dewatering and the future use of ATAD processed biosolids as a fertilizer, particularly with respect to hydrological impacts on the soil behaviour. PMID:19742161

  9. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for 13C NMR relaxation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of 15N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to 13C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and 13C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly 13C -labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  10. The Influence of Plant Litter on Soil Water Repellency: Insight from 13C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cesarano, Gaspare; Incerti, Guido; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR, i.e. reduced affinity for water owing to the presence of organic hydrophobic coatings on soil particles) has relevant hydrological implications because low rates of infiltration enhance water runoff, and untargeted diffusion of fertilizers and pesticides. Previous studies investigated the occurrence of SWR in ecosystems with different vegetation cover but did not clarify its relationships with litter biochemical quality. Here, we investigated the capability of different plant litter types to induce SWR by using fresh and decomposed leaf materials from 12 species, to amend a model sandy soil over a year-long microcosm experiment. Water repellency, measured by the Molarity of an Ethanol Droplet (MED) test, was tested for the effects of litter species and age, and compared with litter quality assessed by 13C-CPMAS NMR in solid state and elemental chemical parameters. All litter types were highly water repellent, with MED values of 18% or higher. In contrast, when litter was incorporated into the soil, only undecomposed materials induced SWR, but with a large variability of onset and peak dynamics among litter types. Surprisingly, SWR induced by litter addition was unrelated to the aliphatic fraction of litter. In contrast, lignin-poor but labile C-rich litter, as defined by O-alkyl C and N-alkyl and methoxyl C of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectral regions, respectively, induced a stronger SWR. This study suggests that biochemical quality of plant litter is a major controlling factor of SWR and, by defining litter quality with 13C-CPMAS NMR, our results provide a significant novel contribution towards a full understanding of the relationships between plant litter biochemistry and SWR.

  11. The Influence of Plant Litter on Soil Water Repellency: Insight from 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cesarano, Gaspare; Incerti, Guido; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR, i.e. reduced affinity for water owing to the presence of organic hydrophobic coatings on soil particles) has relevant hydrological implications because low rates of infiltration enhance water runoff, and untargeted diffusion of fertilizers and pesticides. Previous studies investigated the occurrence of SWR in ecosystems with different vegetation cover but did not clarify its relationships with litter biochemical quality. Here, we investigated the capability of different plant litter types to induce SWR by using fresh and decomposed leaf materials from 12 species, to amend a model sandy soil over a year-long microcosm experiment. Water repellency, measured by the Molarity of an Ethanol Droplet (MED) test, was tested for the effects of litter species and age, and compared with litter quality assessed by 13C-CPMAS NMR in solid state and elemental chemical parameters. All litter types were highly water repellent, with MED values of 18% or higher. In contrast, when litter was incorporated into the soil, only undecomposed materials induced SWR, but with a large variability of onset and peak dynamics among litter types. Surprisingly, SWR induced by litter addition was unrelated to the aliphatic fraction of litter. In contrast, lignin-poor but labile C-rich litter, as defined by O-alkyl C and N-alkyl and methoxyl C of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectral regions, respectively, induced a stronger SWR. This study suggests that biochemical quality of plant litter is a major controlling factor of SWR and, by defining litter quality with 13C-CPMAS NMR, our results provide a significant novel contribution towards a full understanding of the relationships between plant litter biochemistry and SWR. PMID:27022916

  12. Characterization of Acetate and Pyruvate Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Zea mays by 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Dennis J.; Lee, Rino Y.; Adams, Douglas O.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been applied to the direct observation of acetate and pyruvate metabolism in suspension cultures of Zea mays (var Black Mexican Sweet). Growth of the corn cells in the presence of 2 millimolar [2-13C]acetate resulted in a rapid uptake of the substrate from the medium and initial labeling (0-4 hours) of primarily the intracellular glutamate and malate pools. Further metabolism of these intermediates resulted in labeling of glutamine, aspartate, and alanine. With [1-13C]acetate as the substrate very little incorporation into intermediary metabolites was observed in the 13C NMR spectra due to loss of the label as 13CO2. Uptake of [3-13C]pyruvate by the cells was considerably slower than with [2-13C]acetate; however, the labelling patterns were similar with the exception of increased [3-13C] alanine generation with pyruvate as the substrate. Growth of the cells for up to 96 hours with 2 millimolar [3-13C]pyruvate ultimately resulted in labeling of valine, leucine, isoleucine, threonine, and the polyamine putrescine. PMID:16665721

  13. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and elemental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, S.M.; Chen, C.R.; Xu, Z.H.; Nelson, P.N.; Boyd, S.E.; Meszaros, I.; Chan, K.Y.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state {sup 13}C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  14. Nanostructural effects on polymer and water dynamics in cellulose biocomposites: (2)h and (13)c NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Terenzi, Camilla; Prakobna, Kasinee; Berglund, Lars A; Furó, István

    2015-05-11

    Improved moisture stability is desired in cellulose biocomposites. In order to clarify nanostructural effects, a new approach is presented where water and polymer matrix mobilities are characterized separately. Nanocomposites from cellulose nanofibers (CNF) in the xyloglucan (XG) biopolymer matrix are investigated at different hydration states. Films of XG, CNF, and CNF/XG composites are subjected to detailed (2)H and (13)C NMR relaxation studies. Since the (2)H NMR signal arises from heavy water and the (13)C signal from the polysaccharides, molecular water and polymer dynamics is for the first time investigated separately. In the neat components, (2)H transverse relaxation (T2) data are consistent with water clustering at the CNF fibril surfaces, but bulk spread of moisture in XG. The new method results in a description of water interaction with the nanoscale phases. At low hydration, water molecules at the CNF/XG interface exhibit higher water mobility than in neat CNF or XG, due to locally high water concentration. At the same time, CNF-associated interphase segments of XG show slower NMR-dynamics than that in neat XG.

  15. Area per lipid and cholesterol interactions in membranes from separated local-field (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leftin, Avigdor; Molugu, Trivikram R; Job, Constantin; Beyer, Klaus; Brown, Michael F

    2014-11-18

    Investigations of lipid membranes using NMR spectroscopy generally require isotopic labeling, often precluding structural studies of complex lipid systems. Solid-state (13)C magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy at natural isotopic abundance gives site-specific structural information that can aid in the characterization of complex biomembranes. Using the separated local-field experiment DROSS, we resolved (13)C-(1)H residual dipolar couplings that were interpreted with a statistical mean-torque model. Liquid-disordered and liquid-ordered phases were characterized according to membrane thickness and average cross-sectional area per lipid. Knowledge of such structural parameters is vital for molecular dynamics simulations, and provides information about the balance of forces in membrane lipid bilayers. Experiments were conducted with both phosphatidylcholine (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)) and egg-yolk sphingomyelin (EYSM) lipids, and allowed us to extract segmental order parameters from the (13)C-(1)H residual dipolar couplings. Order parameters were used to calculate membrane structural quantities, including the area per lipid and bilayer thickness. Relative to POPC, EYSM is more ordered in the ld phase and experiences less structural perturbation upon adding 50% cholesterol to form the lo phase. The loss of configurational entropy is smaller for EYSM than for POPC, thus favoring its interaction with cholesterol in raftlike lipid systems. Our studies show that solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy is applicable to investigations of complex lipids and makes it possible to obtain structural parameters for biomembrane systems where isotope labeling may be prohibitive.

  16. Biosynthesis, molecular structure, and domain architecture of potato suberin: a (13)C NMR study using isotopically labeled precursors.

    PubMed

    Yan, B; Stark, R E

    2000-08-01

    Although suberin in potato wound periderm is known to be a polyester containing long-chain fatty acids and phenolics embedded within the cell wall, many aspects of its molecular structure and polymer-polymer connectivities remain elusive. The present work combines biosynthetic incorporation of site-specifically (13)C-enriched acetates and phenylalanines with one- and two-dimensional solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopic methods to monitor the developing suberin polymer. Exogenous acetate is found to be incorporated preferentially at the carboxyl end of the aliphatic carbon chains, suggesting addition during the later elongation steps of fatty acid synthesis. Carboxyl-labeled phenylalanine precursors provide evidence for the concurrent development of phenolic esters and of monolignols typical of lignin. Experiments with ring-labeled phenylalanine precursors demonstrate a predominance of sinapyl and guaiacyl structures among suberin's phenolic moieties. Finally, the analysis of spin-exchange (solid-state NOESY) NMR experiments in ring-labeled suberin indicates distances of no more than 0.5 nm between pairs of phenolic and oxymethine carbons, which are attributed to the aromatic-aliphatic polyester and the cell wall polysaccharide matrix, respectively. These results offer direct and detailed molecular information regarding the insoluble intermediates of suberin biosynthesis, indicate probable covalent linkages between moieties of its polyester and polysaccharide domains, and yield a clearer overall picture of this agriculturally important protective material.

  17. Effect of chronic hypoglycaemia on glucose concentration and glycogen content in rat brain: a localized 13C NMR study

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hongxia; Gruetter, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    While chronic hypoglycaemia has been reported to increase unidirectional glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to increase GLUT1 expression at the endothelium, the effect on steady-state brain d-glucose and brain glycogen content is currently unknown. Brain glucose and glycogen concentrations were directly measured in vivo using localized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) following 12-14 days of hypoglycaemia. Brain glucose content was significantly increased by 48%, which is consistent with an increase in the maximal glucose transport rate, Tmax, by 58% compared with the sham-treated animals. The localized 13C NMR measurements of brain glucose were directly validated by comparison with biochemically determined brain glucose content after rapid focused microwave fixation (1.4 s at 4 kW). Both in vivo MRS and biochemical measurements implied that brain glycogen content was not affected by chronic hypoglycaemia, consistent with brain glucose being a major factor controlling brain glycogen content. We conclude that the increased glucose transporter expression in chronic hypoglycaemia leads to increased brain glucose content at a given level of glycaemia. Such increased brain glucose concentrations can result in a lowered glycaemic threshold of counter-regulation observed in chronic hypoglycaemia. PMID:16987249

  18. Observation by sup 13 C NMR of the EPSP synthase tetrahedral intermediate bound to the enzyme active site

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.S.; Sammons, R.D.; Leo, G.C.; Sikorski, J.A. ); Benesi, A.J.; Johnson, K.A. )

    1990-02-13

    Direct observation of the tetrahedral intermediate in the EPSP synthase reaction pathway was provided by {sup 13}C NMR by examining the species bound to the enzyme active site under internal equilibrium conditions and using (2-{sup 13}C)PEP as a spectroscopic probe. The tetrahedral center of the intermediate bound to the enzyme gave a unique signal appearing at 104 ppm. Separate signals were observed for free EPSP and EPSP bound to the enzyme in a ternary complex with phosphate. These peak assignments account for the quantitation of the species bound to the enzyme and liberated upon quenching with either triethylamine or base. A comparison of quenching with acid, base, or triethylamine was conducted. After long times of incubation during the NMR measurement, a signal at 107 ppm appeared. The compound giving rise to this resonance was isolated and identified as an EPSP ketal. The rate of formation of the EPSP ketal was very slow establishing that it is a side product of the normal enzymatic reaction. To look for additional signals that might arise from a covalent adduct which has been postulated to arise from reaction of enzyme with PEP, and NMR experiment was performed with an analogue of S3P lacking the 4- and 5-hydroxyl groups. All of these results reaffirm identification of the tetrahedral species as the only observable intermediate in the EPSP synthase reaction.

  19. A Discovery-Based Hydrochlorination of Carvone Utilizing a Guided-Inquiry Approach to Determine the Product Structure from [superscript 13]C NMR Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelter, Michael W.; Walker, Natalie M.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment describes a discovery-based method for the regio- and stereoselective hydrochlorination of carvone, appropriate for a 3-h second-semester organic chemistry laboratory. The product is identified through interpretation of the [superscript 13]C NMR and DEPT spectra are obtained on an Anasazi EFT-60 at 15 MHz as neat samples. A…

  20. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments and Z/E-stereoconfiguration determination of isomers of 1,4-diketone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guohua; Yin, Guodong; Guo, Wenbo; Wu, Anxin; Cui, Yanfang

    2008-01-01

    Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments and Z/E-stereoconfiguration determination for a series of new isomers of 1,4-diketone derivatives obtained via self-sorting tandem reaction were accomplished by means of one- and two-dimentional NMR experiments including 1H, 13C, gCOSY, gHSQC, gHMBC, and NOESY.

  1. Discovering [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR Spectroscopy in the General Chemistry Laboratory through a Sequence of Guided-Inquiry Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Justice, David; Brauer, Shari; Landis, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This sequence of three guided-inquiry labs is designed for a second-semester general chemistry course and challenges students to discover basic theoretical principles associated with [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR spectroscopy. Students learn to identify and explain basic concepts of magnetic resonance and vibrational…

  2. 1H and 13C NMR signal assignment of cucurbitacin derivatives from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrader and Ecballium elaterium L. (Cucurbitaceae).

    PubMed

    Seger, Christoph; Sturm, Sonja; Mair, Maria-Elisabeth; Ellmerer, Ernst P; Stuppner, Hermann

    2005-06-01

    2D NMR-derived 1H and 13C NMR signal assignments of six structurally closely related cucurbitacin derivatives are presented. The investigated 2-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylcucurbitacins I, J, K, and L were obtained from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrader whereas the aglyca cucurbitacin E and I were isolated from Ecballium elaterium L.

  3. Comparison of Kinetic Models for Analysis of Pyruvate-to-Lactate Exchange by Hyperpolarized 13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Crystal; Yang, Chendong; Jindal, Ashish; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Hooshyar, M.A.; Merritt, Matthew; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.

    2012-01-01

    The activity of specific enzyme-catalyzed reactions may be detected in vivo by 13C NMR of hyperpolarized (HP) substrates. The signal from HP substrates and products, acquired over time, have been fit to a number of different mathematical models to determine fluxes, but these models have not been critically compared. In this study, two-pool and three-pool first-order models were constructed to measure flux through lactate dehydrogenase in isolated glioblastoma cells by NMR detection of lactate and pyruvate following addition of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. Mass spectrometry (MS) was used to independently monitor 13C enrichment in intra- and extracellular lactate. Six models were evaluated using time dependent pyruvate C2 and lactate C1 HP NMR data acquired by use of selective excitation pulses plus 13C enrichment data from intracellular and extracellular lactate measured by MS. A three-pool bi-directional model provided the most accurate description of pyruvate metabolism in these cells. With computed values for the T1 of pyruvate and lactate as well as the effect of pulsing, the initial flux through lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was well-determined by both the two-pool bidirectional and unidirectional models when only HP data was available. The three-pool model was necessary to fit the combined data from both MS and HP, but the simpler two-pool exchange model was sufficient to determine the 13C lactate concentration when the lactate appearance was measured only by HP. PMID:22451442

  4. Stereoregularity of poly (lactic acid) and their model compounds as studied by NMR and quantum chemical calculations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to understand the origin of the tacticity splitting in the NMR spectrum of poly(lactic acid), monomer model compound and dimer model compounds (both isotactic and syndiotactic) were synthesized and their 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts observed. Two energetically stable conformations were o...

  5. Interaction between a recombinant prion protein and organo-mineral complexes as evidenced by CPMAS 13C-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, F.; Scotti, R.; Gianfreda, L.; Conte, P.; Rao, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    Prion proteins (PrP) are the main responsible for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE). The TSE etiological agent is a misfolded form of the normal cellular prion protein. The amyloidal aggregates accumulated in the brain of infected animals and mainly composed of PrPSc exhibit resistance to protease attack and many conventional inactivating procedures. The prion protein diseases cause an environmental issue because the environment and in particular the soil compartment can be contaminated and then become a potential reservoir and diffuser of TSEs infectivity as a consequence of (i) accidental dispersion from storage plants of meat and bone meal, (ii) incorporation of contaminated material in fertilizers, (iii) possible natural contamination of pasture soils by grazing herds, and (v) burial of carcasses. The environmental problem can be even more relevant because very low amounts of PrPSc are able to propagate the disease. Several studies evidenced that infectious prion protein remains active in soils for years. Contaminated soils result, thus, a possible critical route of TSE transmission in wild animals. Soil can also protect prion protein toward degradation processes due to the presence of humic substances and inorganic components such as clays. Mineral and organic colloids and the more common association between clay minerals and humic substances can contribute to the adsorption/entrapment of molecules and macromolecules. The polymerization of organic monomeric humic precursors occurring in soil in the presence of oxidative enzymes or manganese and iron oxides, is considered one of the most important processes contributing to the formation of humic substances. The process is very fast and produces a population of polymeric products of different molecular structures, sizes, shapes and complexity. Other molecules and possibly biomacromolecules such as proteins may be involved. The aim of the present work was to study by CPMAS 13C-NMR the interactions

  6. Characterization of organic matter in sediment cores of the Todos os Santos Bay, Bahia, Brazil, by elemental analysis and 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Costa, A B; Novotny, E H; Bloise, A C; de Azevedo, E R; Bonagamba, T J; Zucchi, M R; Santos, V L C S; Azevedo, A E G

    2011-08-01

    The impact of human activity on the sediments of Todos os Santos Bay in Brazil was evaluated by elemental analysis and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (13C NMR). This article reports a study of six sediment cores collected at different depths and regions of Todos os Santos Bay. The elemental profiles of cores collected on the eastern side of Frades Island suggest an abrupt change in the sedimentation regime. Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) analysis corroborates this result. The range of depths of the cores corresponds to about 50 years ago, coinciding with the implantation of major onshore industrial projects in the region. Principal Component Analysis of the 13C NMR spectra clearly differentiates sediment samples closer to the Subaé estuary, which have high contents of terrestrial organic matter, from those closer to a local oil refinery. The results presented in this article illustrate several important aspects of environmental impact of human activity on this bay.

  7. Mechanism of formation of humus coatings on mineral surfaces 3. Composition of adsorbed organic acids from compost leachate on alumina by solid-state 13C NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Llaguno, E.C.; Leenheer, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The adsorption of compost leachate DOC on alumina is used as a model for elucidation of the mechanism of formation of natural organic coatings on hydrous metal oxide surfaces in soils and sediments. Compost leachate DOC is composed mainly of organic acid molecules. The solid-state 13C NMR spectra of these organic acids indicate that they are very similar in composition to aquatic humic substances. Changes in the solid-state 13C NMR spectra of compost leachate DOC fractions adsorbed on alumina indicate that the DOC molecules are most likely adsorbed on metal oxide surfaces through a combination of polar and hydrophobic interaction mechanisms. This combination of polar and hydrophobic mechanism leads to the formation of bilayer coatings of the leachate molecules on the oxide surfaces.

  8. Solute-solvent interactions of acid-1,4-dioxane mixtures-By dielectric, FTIR, UV-vis and 13C NMR spectrometric methods.

    PubMed

    Arivazhagan, G; Parthipan, G; Thenappan, T

    2009-11-01

    Results of the dielectric studies carried out on the binary mixture of n-butyric and caprylic acids with 1,4-dioxane over the entire composition range and at temperatures 303K, 308K, 313K and 318K, and FTIR, UV-vis and 13C NMR spectral studies are presented in this paper. The excess permittivity and excess free energy were fitted with the Redlich-Kister polynomial. The variation of Kirkwood correlation factors, excess permittivity and excess free energy of mixing with the concentration and temperature has been investigated in view of understanding the ordering of dipoles of solute and solvent molecules. The FTIR, UV-vis and 13C NMR spectral analysis reveals the formation of complex between solute and solvent molecules. The parallel alignment of electric dipoles of the complex predicted by dielectric studies is well supported by UV-vis spectral analysis. The structure of the complex molecule present in the clusters has been deduced.

  9. Computer-assisted analysis of the structure of regular branched polysaccharides containing 2,3-disubstituted rhamnopyranose and mannopyranose residues on the basis of 13C NMR data.

    PubMed

    Lipkind, G M; Shashkov, A S; Nifant'ev, N E; Kochetkov, N K

    1992-12-31

    A computer-assisted approach to the analysis of the structure of branched polysaccharides that contain 2,3-di-O-glycosylated alpha-rhamnopyranose and alpha-mannopyranose residues is based on evaluation of the 13C NMR spectra, using glycosylation effects and their deviations from additivity (delta delta values) at the branch points. This approach, in combination with monosaccharide and methylation analysis data, has been verified on a series of bacterial polysaccharides of known structure.

  10. Effects of insulin on perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic and untreated rats: /sup 13/C NMR assay of pyruvate kinase flux

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.M.

    1987-01-27

    The effects of insulin in vitro on perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic rats and their untreated littermates during gluconeogenesis from either (3-/sup 13/C)alanine + ethanol or (2-/sup 13/C)pyruvate + NH/sub 4/Cl + ethanol were studied by /sup 13/C NMR. A /sup 13/C NMR determination of the rate of pyruvate kinase flux under steady-state conditions of active gluconeogenesis was developed; this assay includes a check on the reuse of recycled pyruvate. The preparations studied provided gradations of pyruvate kinase flux within the confines of the assay's requirement of active gluconeogenesis. By this determination, the rate of pyruvate kinase flux was 0.74 +/- 0.04 of the gluconeogenic rate in liver from 24-h-fasted controls; in liver from 12-h fasted controls, relative pyruvate kinase flux increased to 1.0 +/- 0.2. In diabetic liver, this flux was undetectable by the authors NMR method. Insulin's hepatic influence in vitro was greatest in the streptozotocin model of type 1 diabetes: upon treatment of diabetic liver with 7 nM insulin in vitro, a partial reversal of many of the differences noted between diabetic and control liver was demonstrated by /sup 13/C NMR. A major effect of insulin in vitro upon diabetic liver was the induction of a large increase in the rate of pyruvate kinase flux, bringing relative and absolute fluxes up to the levels measured in 24-h-fasted controls. By way of comparison, the effects of ischemia on diabetic liver were studied by /sup 13/C NMR to test whether changes in allosteric effectors under these conditions could also increase pyruvate kinase flux. A large increase in this activity was demonstrated in ischemic diabetic liver.

  11. 13C NMR and XPS characterization of anion adsorbent with quaternary ammonium groups prepared from rice straw, corn stalk and sugarcane bagasse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei; Wang, Zhenqian; Zeng, Qingling; Shen, Chunhua

    2016-12-01

    Despite amino groups modified crop straw has been intensively studied as new and low-cost adsorbent for removal of anionic species from water, there is still a lack of clear characterization for amino groups, especially quaternary ammonium groups in the surface of crop straw. In this study, we used 13C NMR and XPS technologies to characterize adsorbents with quaternary ammonium groups prepared from rice straw, corn stalk and sugarcane bagasse. 13C NMR spectra clearly showed the presence of quaternary ammonium groups in lignocelluloses structure of modified crop straw. The increase of nitrogen observed in XPS survey spectra also indicated the existence of quaternary ammonium group in the surface of the adsorbents. The curve fitting of high-resolution XPS N1s and C1s spectra were conducted to probe the composition of nitrogen and carbon contained groups, respectively. The results showed the proportion of quaternary ammonium group significantly increased in the prepared adsorbent's surface that was dominated by methyl/methylene, hydroxyl, quaternary ammonium, ether and carbonyl groups. This study proved that 13C NMR and XPS could be successfully utilized for characterization of quaternary ammonium modified crop straw adsorbents.

  12. Characterization of uniformly and atom-specifically 13C-labeled heparin and heparan sulfate polysaccharide precursors using 13C NMR spectroscopy and ESI mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao K. N.; Tran, Vy M.; Victor, Xylophone V.; Skalicky, Jack J.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2010-01-01

    The biological actions of heparin and heparan sulfate, two structurally related glycosaminoglycans, depend on the organization of the complex heparanome. Due to the structural complexity of the heparanome, the sequence of variably sulfonated uronic acid and glucosamine residues is usually characterized by the analysis of smaller oligosaccharide and disaccharide fragments. Even characterization of smaller heparin/heparan sulfate oligosaccharide or disaccharide fragments using simple 1D 1H NMR spectroscopy is often complicated by the extensive signal overlap. 13C NMR signals, on the other hand, overlap less and therefore, 13C NMR spectroscopy can greatly facilitate the structural elucidation of the complex heparanome and provide finer insights into the structural basis for biological functions. This is the first report of the preparation of anomeric carbon-specific 13C-labeled heparin/heparan sulfate precursors from the Escherichia coli K5 strain. Uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled precursors were also produced and characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis of enzymatically fragmented disaccharides revealed that anomeric carbon-specific labeling efforts resulted in a minor loss/scrambling of 13C in the precursor backbone, whereas uniform labeling efforts resulted in greater than 95% 13C isotope enrichment in the precursor backbone. These labeled precursors provided high-resolution NMR signals with great sensitivity and set the stage for studying the heparanome–proteome interactions. PMID:20832774

  13. Structure of uniaxially aligned 13C labeled silk fibroin fibers with solid state 13C-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demura, Makoto; Yamazaki, Yasunobu; Asakura, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Katsuaki

    1998-01-01

    Carbon-13 isotopic labeling of B. mori silk fibroin was achieved biosynthetically with [1- 13C] glycine in order to determine the carbonyl bond orientation angle of glycine sites with the silk fibroin. Angular dependence of 13C solid state NMR spectra of uniaxially oriented silk fibroin fiber block sample due to the carbonyl 13C chemical shift anisotropy was simulated according to the chemical shift transformation with Euler angles, αF and βF, from principal axis system (PAS) to fiber axis system (FAS). The another Euler angles, αDCO and βDCO, for transformation from PAS to the molecular symmetry axis were determined from the [1- 13C] glycine sequence model compounds for the silk fibroin. By the combination of these Euler angles, the carbonyl bond orientation angle with respect to FAS of the [1- 13C] glycine sites of the silk fibroin was determined to be 90 ± 5°. This value is in agreement with the X-ray diffraction and our previous solid state NMR data of B. mori silk fibroin fiber (a typical β-pleated sheet) within experimental error.

  14. Contribution of high-energy conformations to NMR chemical shifts, a DFT-BOMD study.

    PubMed

    Goursot, A; Mineva, T; Vásquez-Pérez, J M; Calaminici, P; Köster, A M; Salahub, D R

    2013-01-21

    This paper highlights the relevance of including the high-energy conformational states sampled by Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) in the calculation of time-averaged NMR chemical shifts. Our case study is the very flexible glycerol molecule that undergoes interconversion between conformers in a nonrandom way. Along the sequence of structures from one backbone conformer to another, transition states have been identified. The three (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were estimated by averaging their calculated values over a large set of BOMD snapshots. The simulation time needed to obtain a good agreement with the two signals present in the experimental spectrum is shown to be dependent on the atomic orbital basis set used for the dynamics, with a necessary longer trajectory for the most extended basis sets. The large structural deformations with respect to the optimized conformer geometries that occur along the dynamics are related to a kinetically driven conformer distribution. Calculated conformer type populations are in good agreement with experimental gas phase microwave results.

  15. Methionine bound to Pd/γ-Al2O3 catalysts studied by solid-state (13)C NMR.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert L; Schwartz, Thomas J; Dumesic, James A; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2015-11-01

    The chemisorption and breakdown of methionine (Met) adsorbed on Pd/γ-Al2O3 catalysts were investigated by solid-state NMR. (13)C-enriched Met (ca. 0.4mg) impregnated onto γ-Al2O3 or Pd/γ-Al2O3 gives NMR spectra with characteristic features of binding to γ-Al2O3, to Pd nanoparticles, and oxidative or reductive breakdown of Met. The SCH3 groups of Met showed characteristic changes in chemical shift on γ-Al2O3 (13ppm) vs. Pd (19ppm), providing strong evidence for preferential binding to Pd, while the NC carbon generates a small resonance at 96ppm assigned to a distinct nonprotonated species bound to O or Pd. Additionally, NMR shows that the SCH3 groups of Met are mobile on γ-Al2O3 but immobilized by binding to Pd particles; on small Pd particles (ca. 4nm), the NCH groups undergo large-amplitude motions. In a reducing environment, Met breaks down by C-S bond cleavage followed by formation of C2-C4 organic acids. The SCH3 signal shifts to 22ppm, which is likely the signature of the principal species responsible for strong catalyst inhibition. These experiments demonstrate that solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR of (13)C-enriched Met can be a sensitive probe to investigate catalyst surfaces and characterize catalyst inhibition both before reaction and postmortem.

  16. A 13C NMR spectrometric method for the determination of intramolecular δ13C values in fructose from plant sucrose samples.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Alexis; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Remaud, Gérald S

    2011-07-01

    Recent developments in (13) C NMR spectrometry have allowed the determination of intramolecular (13) C/(12) C ratios with high precision. However, the analysis of carbohydrates requires their derivatization to constrain the anomeric carbon. Fructose has proved to be particularly problematic because of a byproduct occurring during derivatization and the complexity of the NMR spectrum of the derivative. Here, we describe a method to determine the intramolecular (13) C/(12) C ratios in fructose by (13) C NMR analysis of the acetyl-isopropylidene derivative. We have applied this method to measure the intramolecular (13) C/(12) C distribution in the fructosyl moiety of sucrose and have compared this with that in the glucosyl moiety. Three prominent features stand out. First, in sucrose from both C(3) and C(4) plants, the C-1 and C-2 positions of the glucosyl and fructosyl moieties are markedly different. Second, these positions in C(3) and C(4) plants show a similar profile. Third, the glucosyl and fructosyl moieties of sucrose from Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) metabolism have a different profile. These contrasting values can be interpreted as a result of the isotopic selectivity of enzymes that break or make covalent bonds in glucose metabolism, whereas the distinctive (13) C pattern in CAM sucrose probably indicates a substantial contribution of gluconeogenesis to glucose synthesis.

  17. Dynamic pictures of membrane proteins in two-dimensional crystal, lipid bilayer and detergent as revealed by site-directed solid-state 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Saitô, Hazime

    2004-11-01

    We have compared site-directed 13C solid-state NMR spectra of [3-13C]Ala- and/or [1-13C]Val-labeled membrane proteins, including bacteriorhodopsin (bR), pharaonis phoborhodopin (ppR), its cognate transducer (pHtrII) and Escherichia coli diacylglycerol kinase (DGK), in two-dimensional (2D) crystal, lipid bilayers, and detergent. Restricted fluctuation motions of these membrane proteins due to oligomerization of bR by specific protein-protein interactions in the 2D crystalline lattice or protein complex between ppR and pHtrII provide the most favorable environment to yield well-resolved, fully visible 13C NMR signals for [3-13C]Ala-labeled proteins. In contrast, several signals from such membrane proteins were broadened or lost owing to interference of inherent fluctuation frequencies (10(4)-10(5)Hz) with frequency of either proton decoupling or magic angle spinning, if their 13C NMR spectra were recorded as a monomer in lipid bilayers at ambient temperature. The presence of such protein dynamics is essential for the respective proteins to achieve their own biological functions. Finally, spectral broadening found for bR and DGK in detergents were discussed.

  18. 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectral studies of some Schiff bases derived from 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole.

    PubMed

    Issa, Y M; Hassib, H B; Abdelaal, H E

    2009-11-01

    Heterocyclic Schiff bases derived from 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole and different substituted aromatic aldehydes are prepared and subjected to (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and mass spectral analyses. (1)H NMR spectra in DMSO exhibit a sharp singlet within the 9.35-8.90ppm region which corresponds to the azomethine proton. The position of this signal is largely dependent on the nature of the substituents on the benzal moiety. It is observed that the shape, position and the integration value of the signal of the aromatic proton of the triazole ring ((5)C) are clearly affected by the rate of exchange, relaxation time, concentration of solution as well as the solvent used. (13)C NMR is taken as substantial support for the results reached from (1)H NMR studies. The mass spectral results are taken as a tool to confirm the structure of the investigated compounds. The base peak (100%), mostly the M-1 peak, indicates the facile loss of hydrogen radical. The fragmentation pattern of the unsubstituted Schiff base is taken as the general scheme. Differences in the other schemes result from the effect of the electronegativity of the substituents attached to the aromatic ring.

  19. Molecular organization in the native state of woody tissue: Studies of tertiary structure using the Raman microprobe Solid State [sup 13]C NMR and biomimetic tertiary aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Atalla, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    A number of new approaches to the study of native wood tissue complementary to our earlier Raman spectroscopy including solid state [sup 13]C NMR and X-ray diffractometry. A wide variety of native cellulosic tissues were examined which led to the generation of biomimetic tertiary aggregates which simulate states of aggregation characteristic of cell walls. We have also explored charge transport characteristics of lignified tissue. Our Raman spectroscopic studies have advanced our understanding of key spectral features and confirmed the variability of the patterns of orientation of lignin reported earlier. A major effort was dedicated to assessing the contributions of electronic factors such as conjugation and the resonance Raman effect to enhancement of the spectra features associated with lignin. We have now established a solid foundation for spectral mapping of different regions in cell walls.

  20. Structural characterization and molecular order of rodlike mesogens with three- and four-ring core by XRD and 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M Kesava; Reddy, K Subramanyam; Yoga, K; Prakash, M; Narasimhaswamy, T; Mandal, A B; Lobo, Nitin P; Ramanathan, K V; Rao, D S Shankar; Prasad, S Krishna

    2013-05-09

    Structural characterizations using XRD and (13)C NMR spectroscopy of two rodlike mesogens consisting of (i) three phenyl ring core with a polar cyano terminal and (ii) four phenyl ring core with flexible dodecyl terminal chain are presented. The three-ring-core mesogen with cyano terminal exhibits enantiotropic smectic A phase while the four-ring mesogen reveals polymesomorphism and shows enantiotropic nematic, smectic C, and tilted hexatic phases. The molecular organization in the three-ring mesogen is found to be partial bilayer smectic Ad type, and the interdigitation of the molecules in the neighboring layers is attributed to the presence of the polar terminal group. For the four-ring mesogen, the XRD results confirm the existence of the smectic C and the tilted hexatic mesophases. A thermal variation of the layer spacing across the smectic C phase followed by a discrete jump at the transition to the tilted hexatic phase is also observed. The tilt angles have been estimated to be about 45° in the smectic C phase and about 40° in tilted hexatic phase. (13)C NMR results indicate that in the mesophase the molecules are aligned parallel to the magnetic field. From the (13)C-(1)H dipolar couplings determined from the 2D experiments, the overall order parameter for the three-ring mesogen in its smectic A phase has been estimated to be 0.72 while values ranging from 0.88 to 0.44 have been obtained for the four-ring mesogen as it passes from the tilted hexatic to the nematic phase. The orientations of the different rings of the core unit with respect to each other and also with respect to the long axis of the molecule have also been obtained.

  1. Metabolic pathways for ketone body production. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of rat liver in vivo using /sup 13/C-multilabeled fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl-Wostl, C.; Seelig, J.

    1986-11-04

    The hormonal regulation of ketogenesis in the liver of living rat has been studied noninvasively with /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance. The spatial selection for the liver was better than 90%, with extrahepatic adipose tissue contribution only a very small amount of signal. The metabolic activities of the liver were investigated by infusion of /sup 13/C-labeled butyrate in the jugular vein of the anesthetized rat. The rate of butyrate infusion was chosen to be close to the maximum oxidative capacity of the rat liver, and the /sup 13/C signal intensities were enhanced by using doubly labeled (1,3-/sup 13/C)butyrate as a substrate. Different /sup 13/C NMR spectra and hence different metabolites were observed depending on the hormonal state of the animal. The /sup 13/C NMR studies demonstrate that even when rate of acetyl-CoA production are high, the disposal of this compound is not identical in fasted and diabetic animals. This supports previous suggestions that the redox state of the mitochondrion represents the most important factor in regulation. For a given metabolic state of the animal, different signal intensities were obtained depending on whether butyrate was labeled at C-1, C-3, or C-1,3. From the ratios of incorporation of /sup 13/C label into the carbons of 3-hydroxybutyrate, it could be estimated that a large fraction of butyrate evaded ..beta..-oxidation to acetyl-CoA but was converted directly to acetoacetyl-CoA. /sup 13/C-labeled glucose could be detected in vivo in the liver of diabetic rats.

  2. Determination of fructose metabolic pathways in normal and fructose-intolerant children: A sup 13 C NMR study using (U- sup 13 C)fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Gopher, A.; Lapidot, A. ); Vaisman, N. ); Mandel, H. )

    1990-07-01

    An inborn deficiency in the ability of aldolase B to split fructose 1-phosphate is found in humans with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). A stable isotope procedure to elucidate the mechanism of conversion of fructose to glucose in normal children and in HFI children has been developed. A constant infusion of D-(U-{sup 13}C)fructose was given nasogastrically to control and to HFI children. Hepatic fructose conversion to glucose was estimated by examination of {sup 13}C NMR spectra of plasma glucose. Significantly lower values ({approx}3-fold) for fructose conversion to glucose were obtained for the HFI patients as compared to the controls. A quantitative determination of the metabolic pathways of fructose conversion to glucose was derived from {sup 13}C NMR measurement of plasma ({sup 13}C)glucose isotopomer populations. The finding of isotopomer populations of three adjacent {sup 13}C atoms at glucose C-4 ({sup 13}C{sub 3}-{sup 13}C{sub 4}-{sup 13}C{sub 5}) suggests that there is a direct pathway from fructose, by-passing fructose-1-phosphate aldolase, to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The metabolism of fructose by fructose-1-phosphate aldolase activity accounts for only {approx}50% of the total amount of hepatic fructose conversion to glucose. In view of the marked decline by 67% in synthesis of glucose from fructose in HFI subjects found in this study, the extent of ({sup 13}C)glucose formation from a trace amount of (U-{sup 13}C)fructose infused into the patient can be used as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic test for inherent faulty fructose metabolism.

  3. Staphylococcal nuclease active-site amino acids: pH dependence of tyrosines and arginines by sup 13 C NMR and correlation with kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.G.; Markley, J.L. )

    1989-03-07

    The pH and temperature dependence of the kinetic parameters of staphylococcal nuclease have been examined with three p-nitrophenyl phosphate containing DNA analogues that vary as to 3'-substituent. With wild-type (Foggi variant) nuclease (nuclease wt) and the substrates thymidine 3'-phosphate 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdTp), thymidine 3'-methylphosphonate 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdTp Me), and thymidine 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdT), k{sub cat} remains nearly constant at 13 min{sup {minus}1}. However, k{sub cat}/k{sub m} with nuclease wt varies considerably. The data suggests that the inflection k{sub cat}/K{sub m} with pK{sub a} at 9.67 arises from ionization of tyrosine-85, which hydrogen bonds to the divalent 3'-phosphomonester of substrates with this substituent. The enthalpy of ionization of both deprotonation steps in the k{sub cat}/K{sub m} versus pH profile is 5 kcal/mol. {sup 13}C NMR has been used to determine the pK{sub a} values of the arginine and tyrosine residues. The results do not rule out arginine as a candidate for the acidic catalyst that protonates the 5'-ribose alkoxide prior to product release. The phenolic hydroxyl carbon of tyrosine-85 has been assigned by comparing the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum of nuclease wt and nuclease Y85F. This correlation between pK{sub a} values along with the absence of other candidates indicates that the ionization of tyrosine-85 is the pK{sub a} seen in the k{sub cat}/K{sub m} vs pH profile for substrates with a divalent 3'-phosphomonester. This conclusion is consistent with the proposed role of tyrosine-85 as a hydrogen-bond donor to the 3'-phosphomonoester of substrates poised for exonucleolytic hydrolysis.

  4. Chemical Shift Anisotropy Selective Inversion*

    PubMed Central

    Caporini, Marc. A.; Turner, Christopher. J.; Bielecki, Anthony; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) is used in solid-state NMR to remove the broadening effects of the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA). In this work we investigate a technique that can reintroduce the CSA in order to selectively invert transverse magnetization. The technique involves an amplitude sweep of the radio frequency field through a multiple of the spinning frequency. The selectivity of this inversion mechanism is determined by the size of the CSA. We develop a theoretical framework to describe this process and demonstrate the CSA selective inversion with numerical simulations and experimental data. We combine this approach with cross polarization (CP) for potential applications in multi-dimensional MAS NMR. PMID:19648036

  5. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ((13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 (13)C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited "hand-picked" data sets, we show that ~94% of the (13)C NMR data and almost all (15)N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6% of the (13)C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. -2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided

  6. Experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) and theoretical study of alkali metal syringates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, Renata

    2013-07-01

    In this work the influence of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium on the electronic system of the syringic acid (4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoic acid) was studied. This paper presents spectroscopic vibrations (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and NMR (1H and 13C) study of the series of alkali metal syringates from lithium to cesium syringates. Characteristic shifts of band wavenumbers and changes in band intensities along the metal series were observed. Optimized geometrical structures of the studied compounds were calculated by the B3LYP method using the 6-311++G∗∗ basis set. Aromaticity indices, atomic charges, dipole moments and energies were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR and NMR spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to experimental characteristics of studied compounds.

  7. Solid-state 13C NMR studies of a large fossil gymnosperm from the Yallourn Open Cut, Latrobe Valley, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    A series of samples taken from the cross section of a 3-m-diameter fossilized gymnospermous log (Araucariaceae) in the Yallourn Seam of the Australian brown coals was examined by solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate chemical changes related to the combined processes of peatification and coalification. The results show that cellulosic materials were degraded and lost on the periphery of the log, however, the degree of such degradation in the central core is substantially less. The lignin is uniformly altered by coalification reactions to a macromolecular substance displaying decreased aryl ether linkages but significantly greater amounts of carbon linkages compared to modern lignin. Changes in the methoxyl carbon contents of lignin in cross section reveal demethylation reactions, but these do not appear to be related to degree of carbon linking. Both the degredation of cellulosic materials and demethylation of lignin appear to be early diagenetic processes occurring during peatification independently of the coalification reactions. ?? 1989.

  8. Combined analysis of the essential oil of Chenopodium ambrosioides by GC, GC-MS and 13C-NMR spectroscopy: quantitative determination of ascaridole, a heat-sensitive compound.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Jean-François; Tomi, Félix; Bernardini, Antoine-François; Casanova, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A commercial sample of the essential oil of Chenopodium ambrosioides L. from Madagascar was analysed by GC, GC-MS and 13C-NMR. By GC analysis, the major constituents were found to be ascaridole (1) (41.8%), isoascaridole (2) (18.1%), p-cymene (16.2%), alpha-terpinene (9.7%) and limonene (3.8%). However, ascaridole undergoes a partial thermal isomerisation to 2 and hence the amount of 1 is under-estimated by GC analysis. The actual contents of 1 and 2 (55.3 and 4.6%, respectively) were obtained following combined analysis of the sample by GC and 13C-NMR. Several hydroxy- and polyhydroxy-menthanes were identified by 13C-NMR.

  9. UV/vis, 1H, and 13C NMR spectroscopic studies to determine mangiferin pKa values.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Zaleta, Berenice; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa; Gutiérrez, Atilano; González-Vergara, Enrique; Güizado-Rodríguez, Marisol; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto

    2006-07-01

    The acid constants of mangiferin (a natural xanthonoid) in aqueous solution were determined through an UV/vis spectroscopic study employing the SQUAD program as a computational tool. A NMR study complements the pK(a) values assignment and evidences a H-bridge presence on 1-C. The chemical model used was consistent with the experimental data obtained. The pK(a) values determined with this procedure were as follows: H(4)(MGF)=H(3)(MGF)(-)+H(+), pKa1 (6-H)=6.52+/-0.06; H(3)(MGF)(-)=H(2)(MGF)(2-)+H(+), pKa2 (3-H)=7.97+/-0.06; H(2)(MGF)(2-)=H(MGF)(3-)+H(+), pKa3 (7-H)=9.44+/-0.04; H(MGF)(3-)=(MGF)(4-)+H(+), pKa4 (1-H)=12.10+/-0.01; where it has been considered mangiferin C(19)H(18)O(11) as H(4)(MGF). Mangiferin UV/vis spectral behavior, stability study in aqueous solution as well as NMR spectroscopy studies: one-dimensional (1)H,(13)C, 2D correlated (1)H/(13)C performed by (g)-HSQC and (g)-HMBC methods; are also presented. pK(a) values determination of H(4)(MGF) in aqueous solution is a necessary contribution to subsequent pharmacokinetic study, and a step towards the understanding of its biological effects.

  10. Solid-state 13C NMR studies of dissolved organic matter in pore waters from different depositional environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in pore waters from sediments of a number of different depositional environments was isolated by ultrafiltration using membranes with a nominal molecular weight cutoff of 500. This > 500 molecular weight DOM represents 70-98% of the total DOM in these pore waters. We determined the gross chemical structure of this material using both solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Our results show that the DOM in these pore waters appears to exist as two major types: one type dominated by carbohydrates and paraffinic structures and the second dominated by paraffinic and aromatic structures. We suggest that the dominance of one or the other structural type of DOM in the pore water depends on the relative oxidizing/reducing nature of the sediments as well as the source of the detrital organic matter. Under dominantly anaerobic conditions carbohydrates in the sediments are degraded by bacteria and accumulate in the pore water as DOM. However, little or no degradation of lignin occurs under these conditions. In contrast, sediments thought to be predominantly aerobic in character have DOM with diminished carbohydrate and enhanced aromatic character. The aromatic structures in the DOM from these sediments are thought to arise from the degradation of lignin. The large amounts of paraffinic structures in both types of DOM may be due to the degradation of unidentified paraffinic materials in algal or bacterial remains. ?? 1987.

  11. A Short History of Three Chemical Shifts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    A short history of chemical shifts in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and Mossbauer spectroscopy, which are useful for chemical studies, is described. The term chemical shift is shown to have originated in the mistaken assumption that nuclei of a given element would all undergo resonance at the…

  12. Characterization of pyrogenic organic matter by 2-dimenstional HETeronucleus CORelation solid-state 13C NMR (HETCOR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    technique was used for monitoring the chemical changes occurring during charring of biomass derived from model compounds, fire-affected and unaffected NOM. The 2D 13C HETCOR NMR spectrum of the fire- unaffected soils revealed that most of the carboxyl C occurs as ester or amide. Aside from cross peaks typically seen in spectra of NOM, the spectrum of the respective fire-affected counterpart shows additional signals assignable to PyOM.

  13. Stability and biodegradability of humic substances from Arctic soils of Western Siberia: insights from 13C-NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejarque, E.; Abakumov, E.

    2015-11-01

    Arctic soils contain large amounts of organic matter which, globally, exceed the amount of carbon stored in vegetation biomass and in the atmosphere. Recent studies emphasize the potential sensitivity for this soil organic matter (SOM) to be mineralised when faced with increasing ambient temperatures. In order to better refine the predictions about the response of SOM to climate warming, there is a need to increase the spatial coverage of empirical data on SOM quantity and quality in the Arctic area. This study provides, for the first time, a characterisation of SOM from the Gydan Peninsula in the Yamal Region, Western Siberia, Russia. On the one hand, soil humic acids and their humification state were characterised by measuring the elemental composition and diversity of functional groups using solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Also, the total mineralisable carbon was measured. Our results show that there is a uniformity of SOM characteristics throughout the studied region, as well as within soil profiles. Such in-depth homogeneity, together with a predominance of aliphatic carbon structures, suggests the accumulation in soil of raw and slightly decomposed organic matter. Moreover, results on total mineralisable carbon suggest a high lability of these compounds. The mineralisation rate was found to be independent of SOM quality, and to be mainly explained solely by the total carbon content. Overall, our results provide further evidence on the fundamental role that the soils of Western Siberia may have on regulating the global carbon balance when faced with increasing ambient temperatures.

  14. Construction and 13C NMR signal-amplification efficiency of a dynamic nuclear polarizer at 6.4 T and 1.4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Taylor, David; McDonald, George; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a rapidly emerging technique in biomedical and metabolic imaging since it amplifies the liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and imaging (MRI) signals by >10,000-fold. Originally used in nuclear scattering experiments, DNP works by creating a non-Boltzmann nuclear spin distribution by transferring the high electron (γ = 28,000 MHz/T) thermal polarization to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation of the sample at high magnetic field and low temperature. A dissolution device is used to rapidly dissolve the frozen sample and consequently produces an injectable ``hyperpolarized'' liquid at physiologically-tolerable temperature. Here we report the construction and performance evaluation of a dissolution DNP hyperpolarizer at 6.4 T and 1.4 K using a continuous-flow cryostat. The solid and liquid-state 13C NMR signal enhancement levels of 13C acetate samples doped with trityl OX063 and 4-oxo-TEMPO free radicals will be discussed and compared with the results from the 3.35 T commercial hyperpolarizer. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  15. Development of a stability-indicating HPLC method of etifoxine with characterization of degradation products by LC-MS/TOF, 1H and 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Djabrouhou, Nadia; Guermouche, Moulay-Hassane

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes a new LC-MS/TOF method for the degradation products determination when Etifoxine (ETI) is submitted to different stress conditions. Chromatography is performed by using Kromasil C18 column (250mm×4.6mm, 5μm particle size). The selected mobile phase consists of formate buffer 0.02M, pH 3 and methanol (70/30, v/v). ETI is submitted to oxidative, acidic, basic, hydrolytic, thermal and UV light degradations. Detection is made at 254nm by photodiode array detector and mass spectrometry. A number of degradation products (DPs) called DPA, DPB, DPC and DPD are found depending on the stress; DPA with heat, DPA and DPB in acidic media or under UV-light; DPA, DPB and DPC under basic stress; DPA, DPB, DPC and DPD with oxidation. LC-MS/TOF is used to characterize the four DPs of ETI resulting from different stress conditions. (1)H and (13)C NMR are used to confirm the DP structures. The ETI fragmentation pathway is proposed. The method is validated with reference to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines and ETI are selectively determined in presence of its DPs, demonstrating its stability-indicating nature. Finally, for the validation step, specificity, linearity, accuracy and precision are determined for ETI and its DPs.

  16. Early estrogen-induced metabolic changes and their inhibition by actinomycin D and cycloheximide in human breast cancer cells: sup 31 P and sup 13 C NMR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Neeman, M.; Degani, H. )

    1989-07-01

    Metabolic changes following estrogen stimulation and the inhibition of these changes in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide were monitored continuously in perfused human breast cancer T47D clone 11 cells with {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C NMR techniques. The experiments were performed by estrogen rescue of tamoxifen-treated cells. Immediately after perfusion with estrogen-containing medium, a continuous enhancement in the rates of glucose consumption, lactate production by glycolysis, and glutamate synthesis by the Krebs cycle occurred with a persistent 2-fold increase at 4 hr. Pretreatment with either actinomycin D or cycloheximide, at concentrations known to inhibit mRNA and protein synthesis, respectively, and simultaneous treatment with estrogen and each inhibitor prevented the estrogen-induced changes in glucose metabolism. This suggested that the observed estrogen stimulation required synthesis of mRNA and protein. These inhibitors also modulated several metabolic activities that were not related to estrogen stimulation. The observed changes in the in vivo kinetics of glucose metabolism may provide a means for the early detection of the response of human breast cancer cells to estrogen versus tamoxifen treatment.

  17. Rapid adaptation of rat brain and liver metabolism to a ketogenic diet: an integrated study using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Maggie; Beauvieux, Marie-Christine; Naulin, Jérôme; El Hamrani, Dounia; Gallis, Jean-Louis; Cunnane, Stephen C; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2015-07-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective alternative treatment for refractory epilepsy in children, but the mechanisms by which it reduces seizures are poorly understood. To investigate how the KD modifies brain metabolism, we infused control (CT) and 7-day KD rats with either [1-(13)C]glucose (Glc) or [2,4-(13)C2]β-hydroxybutyrate (β-HB). Specific enrichments of amino acids (AAs) measured by (1)H- and (13)C-NMR in total brain perchloric acid extracts were similar between CT and KD rats after [1-(13)C]Glc infusion whereas they were higher in KD rats after [2,4-(13)C2]β-HB infusion. This suggests better metabolic efficiency of ketone body utilization on the KD. The relative rapid metabolic adaptation to the KD included (1) 11%-higher brain γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)/glutamate (Glu) ratio versus CT, (2) liver accumulation of the ketogenic branched-chain AAs (BCAAs) leucine (Leu) and isoleucine (ILeu), which were never detected in CT, and (3) higher brain Leu and ILeu contents. Since Glu and GABA are excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, respectively, higher brain GABA/Glu ratio could contribute to the mechanism by which the KD reduces seizures in epilepsy. Increased BCAA on the KD may also contribute to better seizure control.

  18. 13C NMR quantification of mono and diacylglycerols obtained through the solvent-free lipase-catalyzed esterification of saturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Jane Luiza Nogueira; de Souza, Rodrigo Octavio Mendonça Alves; de Vasconcellos Azeredo, Rodrigo Bagueira

    2012-06-01

    In the present investigation, we studied the enzymatic synthesis of monoacylglycerols (MAG) and diacylglycerols (DAG) via the esterification of saturated fatty acids (stearic, palmitic and an industrial residue containing 87% palmitic acid) and glycerol in a solvent-free system. Three immobilized lipases (Lipozyme RM IM, Lipozyme TL IM and Novozym 435) and different reaction conditions were evaluated. Under the optimal reaction conditions, esterifications catalyzed by Lipozyme RM IM resulted in a mixture of MAG and DAG at high conversion rates for all of the substrates. In addition, except for the reaction of industrial residue at atmospheric pressure, all of these products met the World Health Organization and European Union directives for acylglycerol mixtures for use in food applications. The products were quantified by (13)C NMR, with the aid of an external reference signal which was generated from a sealed coaxial tube filled with acetonitrile-d3. After calibrating the area of this signal using the classical external reference method, the same coaxial tube was used repeatedly to quantify the reaction products.

  19. Stability and biodegradability of organic matter from Arctic soils of Western Siberia: Insights from 13C-NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejarque, Elisabet; Abakumov, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    Arctic soils contain large amounts of organic matter which, globally, exceed the amount of carbon stored in vegetation biomass and in the atmosphere. Recent studies emphasize the potential sensitivity for this soil organic matter (SOM) to be mineralised when faced with increasing ambient temperatures. In order to better refine the predictions about the response of SOM to climate warming, there is a need to increase the spatial coverage of empirical data on SOM quantity and quality in the Arctic area. This study provides, for the first time, a characterisation of SOM from the Gydan Peninsula in the Yamal Region, Western Siberia, Russia. On the one hand, soil humic acids and their humification state were characterised by measuring the elemental composition and diversity of functional groups using solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Also, the total mineralisable carbon was measured. Our results show that there is a predominance of aliphatic carbon structures, with a distribution of functional groups that has a minimal variation both regionally and within soil depth. Such vertical homogeneity and low level of aromaticity reflects the accumulation in soil of lowly decomposed organic matter due to cold temperatures. Mineralisation rates were found to be independent of SOM quality, and to be mainly explained solely by the total carbon content. Overall, our results provide further evidence on the sensitivity that the soils of Western Siberia may have to increasing ambient temperatures and highlight the important role that this region can play in the global carbon balance under the effects of climate warming.

  20. In Situ Solid-State (13)C NMR Observation of Pore Mouth Catalysis in Etherification of β-Citronellene with Ethanol on Zeolite Beta.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Sambhu; Goossens, Pieter-Jan; Magusin, Pieter C M M; Sree, Sreeprasanth Pulinthanathu; Detavernier, Christophe; Breynaert, Eric; Martineau, Charlotte; Taulelle, Francis; Martens, Johan A

    2016-03-02

    The reaction mechanism of etherification of β-citronellene with ethanol in liquid phase over acid zeolite beta is revealed by in situ solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Comparison of (13)C Hahn-echo and (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization NMR characteristics is used to discriminate between molecules freely moving in liquid phase outside the zeolite and molecules adsorbed inside zeolite pores and in pore mouths. In the absence of ethanol, β-citronellene molecules enter zeolite pores and react to isomers. In the presence of ethanol, the concentration of β-citronellene inside zeolite pores is very low because of preferential adsorption of ethanol. The etherification reaction proceeds by adsorption of β-citronellene molecule from the external liquid phase in a pore opening where it reacts with ethanol from inside the pore. By competitive adsorption, ethanol prevents the undesired side reaction of β-citronellene isomerization inside zeolite pores. β-citronellene etherification on zeolite beta is suppressed by bulky base molecules (2,4,6-collidine and 2,6-ditertiarybutylpyridine) that do not enter the zeolite pores confirming the involvement of easily accessible acid sites in pore openings. The use of in situ solid-state NMR to probe the transition from intracrystalline catalysis to pore mouth catalysis depending on reaction conditions is demonstrated for the first time. The study further highlights the potential of this NMR approach for investigations of adsorption of multicomponent mixtures in general.

  1. Rapid adaptation of rat brain and liver metabolism to a ketogenic diet: an integrated study using 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Maggie; Beauvieux, Marie-Christine; Naulin, Jérôme; El Hamrani, Dounia; Gallis, Jean-Louis; Cunnane, Stephen C; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2015-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective alternative treatment for refractory epilepsy in children, but the mechanisms by which it reduces seizures are poorly understood. To investigate how the KD modifies brain metabolism, we infused control (CT) and 7-day KD rats with either [1-13C]glucose (Glc) or [2,4-13C2]β-hydroxybutyrate (β-HB). Specific enrichments of amino acids (AAs) measured by 1H- and 13C-NMR in total brain perchloric acid extracts were similar between CT and KD rats after [1-13C]Glc infusion whereas they were higher in KD rats after [2,4-13C2]β-HB infusion. This suggests better metabolic efficiency of ketone body utilization on the KD. The relative rapid metabolic adaptation to the KD included (1) 11%-higher brain γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)/glutamate (Glu) ratio versus CT, (2) liver accumulation of the ketogenic branched-chain AAs (BCAAs) leucine (Leu) and isoleucine (ILeu), which were never detected in CT, and (3) higher brain Leu and ILeu contents. Since Glu and GABA are excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, respectively, higher brain GABA/Glu ratio could contribute to the mechanism by which the KD reduces seizures in epilepsy. Increased BCAA on the KD may also contribute to better seizure control. PMID:25785828

  2. Using solid 13C NMR coupled with solution 31P NMR spectroscopy to investigate molecular species and lability of organic carbon and phosphorus from aquatic plants in Tai Lake, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquatic plants are involved in the storage and release capacity for organic matter and nutrients. In this study, solid 13C and solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the biomass samples of six aquatic plants. Solid 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the domin...

  3. Regio-selective detection of dynamic structure of transmembrane alpha-helices as revealed from (13)C NMR spectra of [3-13C]Ala-labeled bacteriorhodopsin in the presence of Mn2+ ion.

    PubMed

    Tuzi, S; Hasegawa, J; Kawaminami, R; Naito, A; Saitô, H

    2001-07-01

    13C Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of [3-(13)C]Ala-labeled bacteriorhodopsin (bR) were edited to give rise to regio-selective signals from hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helices by using NMR relaxation reagent, Mn(2+) ion. As a result of selective suppression of (13)C NMR signals from the surfaces in the presence of Mn(2+) ions, several (13)C NMR signals of Ala residues in the transmembrane alpha-helices were identified on the basis of site-directed mutagenesis without overlaps from (13)C NMR signals of residues located near the bilayer surfaces. The upper bound of the interatomic distances between (13)C nucleus in bR and Mn(2+) ions bound to the hydrophilic surface to cause suppressed peaks by the presence of Mn(2+) ion was estimated as 8.7 A to result in the signal broadening to 100 Hz and consistent with the data based on experimental finding. The Ala C(beta) (13)C NMR peaks corresponding to Ala-51, Ala-53, Ala-81, Ala-84, and Ala-215 located around the extracellular half of the proton channel and Ala-184 located at the kink in the helix F were successfully identified on the basis of (13)C NMR spectra of bR in the presence of Mn(2+) ion and site-directed replacement of Ala by Gly or Val. Utilizing these peaks as probes to observe local structure in the transmembrane alpha-helices, dynamic conformation of the extracellular half of bR at ambient temperature was examined, and the local structures of Ala-215 and 184 were compared with those elucidated at low temperature. Conformational changes in the transmembrane alpha-helices induced in D85N and E204Q and its long-range transmission from the proton release site to the site around the Schiff base in E204Q were also examined.

  4. Computed and experimental chemical shift parameters for rigid and flexible YAF peptides in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Tomasz; Trzeciak-Karlikowska, Katarzyna; Czernek, Jiri; Ciesielski, Wlodzimierz; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2012-02-16

    DFT methods were employed to compute the (13)C NMR chemical shift tensor (CST) parameters for crystals of YAF peptides (Tyr-Ala-Phe) with different stereochemistry for the Ala residue. Tyr-D-Ala-Phe 1 crystallizes in the C2 space group while Tyr-L-Ala-Phe crystallizes in either the P2(1)2(1)2 space group (2a) or the P6(5) space group (2b). PISEMA MAS measurements for samples with a natural abundance of (1)H and (13)C nuclei and (2)H QUADECHO experiments for samples with deuterium labeled aromatic rings were used to analyze the geometry and time scale of the molecular motion. At ambient temperature, the tyrosine ring of sample 1 is rigid and the phenylalanine ring undergoes a π-jump, both rings in sample 2a are static, and both rings in sample 2b undergo a fast regime exchange. The theoretical values of the CST were obtained for isolated molecules (IM) and clusters employing the ONIOM approach. The experimental (13)C δ(ii) parameters for all of the samples were measured via a 2D PASS sequence. Significant scatter of the computed versus the experimental (13)C CST parameters was observed for 1 and 2b, while the observed correlation was very good for 2a. In this report, we show that the quality of the (13)C σ(ii)/(13)C δ(ii) correlations, when properly interpreted, can be a source of important information about local molecular motions.

  5. Using solid (13)C NMR coupled with solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy to investigate molecular species and lability of organic carbon and phosphorus from aquatic plants in Tai Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; Meng, Wei; Wang, Hao; He, Zhongqi; Guo, Wenjing; Song, Fanhao; Giesy, John P

    2017-01-01

    Forms and labilities of plant-derived organic matters (OMs) including carbon (C) and phosphorus (P) were fundamental for understanding their release, degradation and environmental behaviour in lake ecosystems. Thus, solid (13)C and solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to characterize biomass of six aquatic plants in Tai Lake, China. The results showed that carbohydrates (61.2% of the total C) were predominant C functional group in the solid (13)C NMR spectra of plant biomass, which may indicate high lability and bioavailability of aquatic plants-derived organic matter in lakes. There was 72.6-103.7% of the total P in aquatic plant biomass extracted by NaOH-EDTA extracts. Solution (31)P NMR analysis of these NaOH-EDTA extracts further identified several molecular species of P including orthophosphate (50.1%), orthophosphate monoesters (46.8%), DNA (1.6%) and pyrophosphate (1.4%). Orthophosphate monoesters included β-glycerophosphate (17.7%), hydrolysis products of RNA (11.7%), α-glycerophosphate (9.2%) and other unknown monoesters (2.1%). Additionally, phytate, the major form of organic P in many lake sediments, was detected in floating plant water poppy. These inorganic P (e.g. orthophosphate and pyrophosphate) and organic P (e.g. diester and its degradation products) identified in plant biomass were all labile and bioavailable P, which would play an important role in recycling of P in lakes. These results increased knowledge of chemical composition and bioavailability of OMs derived from aquatic plants in lakes.

  6. Solid state 13C NMR analysis of shales and coals from Laramide Basins. Final report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.; Jiao, Z.S.; Zhao, Hanqing; Surdam, R.C.

    1998-12-31

    This Western Research Institute (WRI) jointly sponsored research (JSR) project augmented and complemented research conducted by the University of Wyoming Institute For Energy Research for the Gas Research Institute. The project, {open_quotes}A New Innovative Exploitation Strategy for Gas Accumulations Within Pressure Compartments,{close_quotes} was a continuation of a project funded by the GRI Pressure Compartmentalization Program that began in 1990. That project, {open_quotes}Analysis of Pressure Chambers and Seals in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana,{close_quotes} characterized a new class of hydrocarbon traps, the discovery of which can provide an impetus to revitalize the domestic petroleum industry. In support of the UW Institute For Energy Research`s program on pressure compartmentalization, solid-state {sup 13}C NMR measurements were made on sets of shales and coals from different Laramide basins in North America. NMR measurements were made on samples taken from different formations and depths of burial in the Alberta, Bighorn, Denver, San Juan, Washakie, and Wind River basins. The carbon aromaticity determined by NMR was shown to increase with depth of burial and increased maturation. In general, the NMR data were in agreement with other maturational indicators, such as vitrinite reflectance, illite/smectite ratio, and production indices. NMR measurements were also obtained on residues from hydrous pyrolysis experiments on Almond and Lance Formation coals from the Washakie Basin. These data were used in conjunction with mass and elemental balance data to obtain information about the extent of carbon aromatization that occurs during artificial maturation. The data indicated that 41 and 50% of the original aliphatic carbon in the Almond and Lance coals, respectively, aromatized during hydrous pyrolysis.

  7. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Meng, Wei; He, Zhongqi; Feng, Weiying; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P

    2016-02-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O-C-O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes.

  8. Characterization of the spherical intermediates and fibril formation of hCT in HEPES solution using solid-state 13C-NMR and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Itoh-Watanabe, Hikari; Kamihira-Ishijima, Miya; Kawamura, Izuru; Kondoh, Masashi; Nakakoshi, Masamichi; Sato, Michio; Naito, Akira

    2013-10-21

    Human calcitonin (hCT) is a 32-amino acid peptide hormone that contains an intrachain disulfide bridge between Cys1 and Cys7 and a proline amide at the C-terminus. hCT tends to associate to form a fibril precipitate of the same type as amyloid fibrils, and hence has been studied as a model of amyloid fibril formation. The fibrillation process in N-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) solution was examined using transmission electron microscopy. The rate of hCT fibrillation in HEPES solution was much lower than in phosphate buffer and acetic acid solution. Spherical intermediate aggregates (nuclei) were observed during the early stage of fibril formation. Short proto-fibrils appeared on the surface of the spherical intermediates. Subsequently, the spherical intermediates transformed directly into long proto-fibrils, which then elongated into mature hCT fibrils. The fibrillation process was also examined using solid-state (13)C-NMR spectroscopy, which indicated that the fibril structure was a β-sheet in the central region and a mixture of random coils and β-sheets at the C-terminus. The kinetics of fibril formation was examined in terms of a two-step autocatalytic reaction mechanism. The first-step nucleation rate (k1) was lower in HEPES solution than in phosphate buffer and acetic acid solution because the half-life of the intermediates is significantly longer in HEPES solution. In contrast, the second-step fibril elongation rate (k2) was similar in HEPES solution and acidic solutions. Specific interaction of HEPES molecules with hCT may stabilize the spherical intermediates and consequently inhibit the fibril elongation process of hCT.

  9. Solvent effect on pathways and mechanisms for D-fructose conversion to 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde: in situ 13C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Masaru; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2013-03-14

    Noncatalytic reactions of D-fructose were kinetically investigated in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), water, and methanol as a function of time at temperatures of 30-150 °C by applying in situ (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The products were quantitatively analyzed with distinction of isomeric species by taking advantage of site-selective (13)C labeling technique. In DMSO, D-fructose was converted first into 3,4-dihydroxy-2-dihydroxymethyl-5-hydroxymethyltetrahydrofuran having no double bond in the ring, subsequently into 4-hydroxy-5-hydroxymethyl-4,5-dihydrofuran-2-carbaldehyde having one double bond through dehydration, and finally into 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (5-HMF) having two double bonds. No other reaction pathways were involved, as shown from the carbon mass balance. In water, 5-HMF, the final product in DMSO, was generated with the precursors undetected and furthermore transformed predominantly into formic and levulinic acids and slightly into 1,2,4-benzenetriol accompanied by polymerization. D-glucose was also produced through the reversible transformation of the reactant D-fructose. In methanol, some kinds of anhydro-D-fructoses were generated instead of 5-HMF. The reaction pathways can thus be controlled by taking advantage of the solvent effect. The D-fructose conversion reactions are of the first order with respect to the concentration of D-fructose and proceed on the order of minutes in DMSO but on the order of hours in water and methanol. The rate constant was three orders of magnitude larger in DMSO than in water or methanol.

  10. 2H and 13C NMR studies on the temperature-dependent water and protein dynamics in hydrated elastin, myoglobin and collagen.

    PubMed

    Lusceac, Sorin A; Vogel, Michael R; Herbers, Claudia R

    2010-01-01

    (2)H NMR spin-lattice relaxation and line-shape analyses are performed to study the temperature-dependent dynamics of water in the hydration shells of myoglobin, elastin, and collagen. The results show that the dynamical behaviors of the hydration waters are similar for these proteins when using comparable hydration levels of h=0.25-0.43. Since water dynamics is characterized by strongly nonexponential correlation functions, we use a Cole-Cole spectral density for spin-lattice relaxation analysis, leading to correlation times, which are in nice agreement with results for the main dielectric relaxation process observed for various proteins in the literature. The temperature dependence can roughly be described by an Arrhenius law, with the possibility of a weak crossover in the vicinity of 220 K. Near ambient temperatures, the results substantially depend on the exact shape of the spectral density so that deviations from an Arrhenius behavior cannot be excluded in the high-temperature regime. However, for the studied proteins, the data give no evidence for the existence of a sharp fragile-to-strong transition reported for lysozyme at about 220 K. Line-shape analysis reveals that the mechanism for the rotational motion of hydration waters changes in the vicinity of 220 K. For myoglobin, we observe an isotropic motion at high temperatures and an anisotropic large-amplitude motion at low temperatures. Both mechanisms coexist in the vicinity of 220 K. (13)C CP MAS spectra show that hydration results in enhanced elastin dynamics at ambient temperatures, where the enhancement varies among different amino acids. Upon cooling, the enhanced mobility decreases. Comparison of (2)H and (13)C NMR data reveals that the observed protein dynamics is slower than the water dynamics.

  11. Acetate stimulates flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle in rabbit renal proximal tubules synthesizing glutamine from alanine: a 13C NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Dugelay, S; Chauvin, M F; Megnin-Chanet, F; Martin, G; Laréal, M C; Lhoste, J M; Baverel, G

    1999-01-01

    Although glutamine synthesis has a major role in the control of acid-base balance and ammonia detoxification in the kidney of herbivorous species, very little is known about the regulation of this process. We therefore studied the influence of acetate, which is readily metabolized by the kidney and whose metabolism is accompanied by the production of bicarbonate, on glutamine synthesis from variously labelled [(13)C]alanine and [(14)C]alanine molecules in isolated rabbit renal proximal tubules. With alanine as sole exogenous substrate, glutamine and, to a smaller extent, glutamate and CO(2), were the only significant products of the metabolism of this amino acid, which was removed at high rates. Absolute fluxes through the enzymes involved in alanine conversion into glutamine were assessed by using a novel model describing the corresponding reactions in conjunction with the (13)C NMR, and to a smaller extent, the radioactive and enzymic data. The presence of acetate (5 mM) led to a large stimulation of fluxes through citrate synthase and alpha-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. These effects were accompanied by increases in the removal of alanine, in the accumulation of glutamate and in flux through the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase. Acetate did not alter fluxes through glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase; as a result, acetate did not change the accumulation of ammonia, which was negligible under both experimental conditions. We conclude that acetate, which seems to be an important energy-provider to the rabbit renal proximal tubule, simultaneously traps as glutamate the extra nitrogen removed as alanine, thus preventing the release of additional ammonia by the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. PMID:10477267

  12. - and Cross-Polarization 13C NMR Evidence of Alterations in Molecular Composition of Humic Substances Following Afforestation with Eucalypt in Distinct Brazilian Biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, I. R.; Soares, E. M.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Novais, R.; Barros, N.; Fernandes, S.

    2010-12-01

    The effect of planting fast growing tree species on SOM quality in tropical regions has been overlooked. In the present study 13C-NMR approaches were used to evaluate the impact of eucalypt cultivation on humic and fulvic acids molecular composition. The results indicate that the replacement of native vegetation by eucalypt plantations increased the relative contribution of aliphatic groups in HA from soils previously under Atlantic Forest, Grassland, and the Cerrado (Curvelo site only). The same trend was observed for FA, except in the Curvelo site. A trend for degradation and smaller contribution of O-alkyl C (carbohydrates) in HA was observed in soils under eucalyptus in Atlantic Forest and Cerrado. For FA such decreases were seen in Cerrado and Grassland biomes after eucalypt planting. In the area cultivated with pasture in the Atlantic Forest biome and in the Grassland soil, the largest contributions of lignin-derived compounds were detected in HA. The HA from the Cerrado at the Curvelo site, where the woody vegetation is virtually devoid of grassy species, showed the lowest intensity of lignin signal then those from the Cerrado sensu stricto in Itacambira, where grass species are more abundant. At our study sites, charred material are most likely derived from burning of the native vegetation, as naturally occurs in the Cerrado region, or anthropogenic fires in the Grassland biome. Burning of harvest residues in eucalypt fields was also a common practice in the early rotations. The replacement of native vegetation by eucalypt plantations increases the relative contribution of nonpolar alkyl groups in HA from soils previously under Atlantic Forest, Grassland, and the Cerrado (Curvelo site only) biomes. There is evidence of substantial contribution of lignin-derived C to HA and FA, especially in sites planted with Brachiaria sp pastures. Eucalypt introduction decreases the relative contribution of carbohydrates in HA and FA. 13C DP/MAS NMR functional groups in

  13. 13C NMR and fluorescence analysis of tryptophan dynamics in wild-type and two single-Trp variants of Escherichia coli thioredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Kemple, M D; Yuan, P; Nollet, K E; Fuchs, J A; Silva, N; Prendergast, F G

    1994-01-01

    The rotational motion of tryptophan side chains in oxidized and reduced wild-type (WT) Escherichia coli thioredoxin and in two single-tryptophan variants of E. coli thioredoxin was studied in solution in the temperature range 20-50 degrees C from 13C-NMR relaxation rate measurements at 75.4 and 125.7 MHz and at 20 degrees C from steady-state and time-resolved trp fluorescence anisotropy measurements. Tryptophan enriched with 13C at the delta 1 and epsilon 3 sites of the indole ring was incorporated into WT thioredoxin and into two single-trp mutants, W31F and W28F, in which trp-28 or trp-31 of WT thioredoxin was replaced, respectively, with phenylalanine. The NMR relaxation data were interpreted using the Lipari and Szabo "model-free" approach (G. Lipari and A. Szabo. 1982. J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 104:4546-4559) with trp steady-state anisotropy data included for the variants at 20 degrees C. Values for the correlation time for the overall rotational motion (tau m) from NMR of oxidized and reduced WT thioredoxin at 35 degrees C agree well with those given by Stone et al. (Stone, M. J., K. Chandrasekhar, A. Holmgren, P. E. Wright, and H. J. Dyson. 1993. Biochemistry. 32:426-435) from 15N NMR relaxation rates, and the dependence of tau m on viscosity and temperature was in accord with the Stokes-Einstein relationship. Order parameters (S2) near 1 were obtained for the trp side chains in the WT proteins even at 50 degrees C. A slight increase in the amplitude of motion (decrease in S2) of trp-31, which is near the protein surface, but not of trp-28, which is partially buried in the protein matrix, was observed in reduced relative to oxidized WT thioredoxin. For trp-28 in W31F, order parameters near 1 (S2 > or = 0.8) at 20 degrees C were found, whereas trp-31 in W28F yielded the smallest order parameters (S2 approximately 0.6) of any of the cases. Analysis of time-resolved anisotropy decays in W28F and W31F yielded S2 values in good agreement with NMR, but gave tau m values

  14. Comparison of different theory models and basis sets in the calculations of structures and 13C NMR spectra of [Pt(en)(CBDCA-O, O')], an analogue of the antitumor drug carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongwei; Wei, Xiujuan; Liu, Xuting; Yan, Tingxia

    2010-03-25

    Comparisons of various density functional theory (DFT) methods at different basis sets in predicting the molecular structures and (13)C NMR spectra for [Pt(en)(CBDCA-O, O')], an analogue of the antitumor drug carboplatin, are reported. DFT methods including B3LYP, B3PW91, mPW1PW91, PBE1PBE, BPV86, PBEPBE, and LSDA are examined. Different basis sets including LANL2DZ, SDD, LANL2MB, CEP-4G, CEP-31G, and CEP-121G are also considered. It is remarkable that the LSDA/SDD level is clearly superior to all of the remaining density functional methods in predicting the structure of [Pt(en)(CBDCA-O, O')]. The results also indicate that the B3LYP/SDD level is the best to predict (13)C NMR spectra for [Pt(en)(CBDCA-O, O')] among all DFT methods.

  15. Successful combination of computationally inexpensive GIAO 13C NMR calculations and artificial neural network pattern recognition: a new strategy for simple and rapid detection of structural misassignments.

    PubMed

    Sarotti, Ariel M

    2013-08-07

    GIAO NMR chemical shift calculations coupled with trained artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been shown to provide a powerful strategy for simple, rapid and reliable identification of structural misassignments of organic compounds using only one set of both computational and experimental data. The geometry optimization, usually the most time-consuming step in the overall procedure, was carried out using computationally inexpensive methods (MM+, AM1 or HF/3-21G) and the NMR shielding constants at the affordable mPW1PW91/6-31G(d) level of theory. As low quality NMR prediction is typically obtained with such protocols, the decision making was foreseen as a problem of pattern recognition. Thus, given a set of statistical parameters computed after correlation between experimental and calculated chemical shifts the classification was done using the knowledge derived from trained ANNs. The training process was carried out with a set of 200 molecules chosen to provide a wide array of chemical functionalities and molecular complexity, and the results were validated with a set of 26 natural products that had been incorrectly assigned along with their 26 revised structures. The high prediction effectiveness observed makes this method a suitable test for rapid identification of structural misassignments, preventing not only the publication of wrong structures but also avoiding the consequences of such a mistake.

  16. Use of {sup 13}C NMR to assess the biodegradation of 1-{sup 13}C-labeled acenaphthene in the presence of creosote polynuclear hydrocarbons (PAHs) and naphthalene by mixed bacterial cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Selifonov, S.A.; Bortiatynski, J.M.; Nanny, M.A.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1996-10-01

    1-{sup 13}C-acenaphthene mixed with creosote PAH`s or naphthalene was incubated with bacterial strains known to degrade naphthalene, phenanthrene and acenaphthene. After incubation, the reaction mixtures were extracted with organic solvent, and the biodegradation products were identified by {sup 13}C NMR. An accumulation of intermediate degradation products was identified and attributed to the non-specific action of naphthalene catabolic pathways of the mixed bacterial cultures. An acenaphthene degrading strain, Pseudomonas sp. strain A2279 was added to the nixed bacterial cultures to minimize the formation of the observed dead-end products. The {sup 13}C NMR spectra obtained from the experiments in which strain A2279 was present clearly showed the complete biodegradation of 1-{sup 13}C-acenaphthene without the accumulation of {sup 13}C-labeled products. This set of experiments clearly demonstrates the utility of {sup 13}C NMR as an effective tool for the assessment of the biodegradation of PAH`s such as 1-{sup 13}C-acenaphthene by various microbial strains.

  17. Dipolar-dephasing 13C NMR studies of decomposed wood and coalified xylem tissue: Evidence for chemical structural changes associated with defunctionalization of lignin structural units during coalification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    A series of decomposed and coalified gymnosperm woods was examined by conventional solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and by dipolar-dephasing NMR techniques. The results of these NMR studies for a histologically related series of samples provide clues as to the nature of codification reactions that lead to the defunctionalization of lignin-derived aromatic structures. These reactions sequentially involve the following: (1) loss of methoxyl carbons from guaiacyl structural units with replacement by hydroxyls and increased condensation; (2) loss of hydroxyls or aryl ethers with replacement by hydrogen as rank increases from lignin to high-volatile bituminous coal; (3) loss of alkyl groups with continued replacement by hydrogen. The dipolar-dephasing data show that the early stages of coalification in samples examined (lignin to lignite) involve a decreasing degree of protonation on aromatic rings and suggest that condensation is significant during coalification at this early stage. An increasing degree of protonation on aromatic rings is observed as the rank of the sample increases from lignite to anthracite.

  18. Chemical shift prediction for denatured proteins.

    PubMed

    Prestegard, James H; Sahu, Sarata C; Nkari, Wendy K; Morris, Laura C; Live, David; Gruta, Christian

    2013-02-01

    While chemical shift prediction has played an important role in aspects of protein NMR that include identification of secondary structure, generation of torsion angle constraints for structure determination, and assignment of resonances in spectra of intrinsically disordered proteins, interest has arisen more recently in using it in alternate assignment strategies for crosspeaks in (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of sparsely labeled proteins. One such approach involves correlation of crosspeaks in the spectrum of the native protein with those observed in the spectrum of the denatured protein, followed by assignment of the peaks in the latter spectrum. As in the case of disordered proteins, predicted chemical shifts can aid in these assignments. Some previously developed empirical formulas for chemical shift prediction have depended on basis data sets of 20 pentapeptides. In each case the central residue was varied among the 20 amino common acids, with the flanking residues held constant throughout the given series. However, previous choices of solvent conditions and flanking residues make the parameters in these formulas less than ideal for general application to denatured proteins. Here, we report (1)H and (15)N shifts for a set of alanine based pentapeptides under the low pH urea denaturing conditions that are more appropriate for sparse label assignments. New parameters have been derived and a Perl script was created to facilitate comparison with other parameter sets. A small, but significant, improvement in shift predictions for denatured ubiquitin is demonstrated.

  19. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for new heterocyclic TAM leuco dyes, (2Z,2'E)-2,2'-(2-phenyl propane-1,3-diylidene) bis(1,3,3-trimethylindoline) derivatives. Part II.

    PubMed

    Keum, Sam-Rok; Roh, Se-Jung; Lee, Min-Hyung; Sauriol, Francoise; Buncel, Erwin

    2008-09-01

    The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of the novel heterocyclic Leuco-TAM dyes, (2Z, 2'E)-2,2'-(2-phenyl propane-1,3-diylidene) bis(1,3,3-trimethylindoline) derivatives 1-4 as precursors of triarylmethane (TAM)(+) (Malachite Green FB-analog) dyes were completely assigned by 1D and 2D NMR experiments, including DEPT, COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY. Especially, the diastereotopic gem-dimethyl protons at the C3 and C3' positions of the FB rings were definitively assigned. The (Z,E) isomers adopt the energetically favored three-bladed propeller conformation in solution.

  20. 1H and 13C NMR Assignments of Cytotoxic 3S-1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic Acid from the Leaves of Cichorium endivia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-Xin; Deng, An-Jun; Wei, Jin-Feng; Qin, Hai-Lin; Wang, Ai-Ping

    2012-01-01

    An amino acid, 3S-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic acid, was isolated for the first time from the leaves of Cichorium endivia. The complete assignment of its 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic data was carried out also for the first time based on extensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments. Cytotoxicity of this isolated compound against HCT-8 and HepG2 human cancer cell lines was evaluated for the first time, with moderate activities being found. PMID:23304641

  1. Crystal structure and theoretical study of IR and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of cordatin, a natural product with antiulcerogenic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasil, Davi S. B.; Alves, Cláudio N.; Guilhon, Giselle M. S. P.; Muller, Adolfo H.; Secco, Ricardo De S.; Peris, Gabriel; Llusar, Rosa

    Cordatin is a furan diterpenoid with a clerodane skeleton isolated from Croton palanostigma Klotzsch (Euphorbiaceae). This natural product shows significant antiulcerogenic activity, similar to cimetidine (Tagamet®), a compound used for the treatment of peptic ulcers. The crystal structure of cordatin was obtained by X-ray diffraction and its geometrical parameters were compared with theoretical calculations at the B3LYP theory level. The IR and NMR (1H and 13C chemical shifts and coupling constants) spectra were obtained and compared with the theoretical calculations. The B3LYP theory level, with the 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis set, provided IR absorption values close to the experimental data. Moreover, theoretical NMR parameters obtained in both gas phase and chloroform solvent at the B3PW91/DGDZVP, B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p), and B3PW91/6-311+G(2d,p) levels showed good correlations with the experimental results.

  2. Prediction of carbon-13 NMR chemical shift of alkanes with rooted path vector.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L P; Sun, L L; Yu, Y; Lu, W; Li, Z L

    2006-11-01

    Systematic studies were further made on graph theory in quantitative structure-spectrum relationships (QSSR) for various areas of spectroscopies. Chemical shifts (CS) in alkanes for carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) were well correlated with a set of novel molecular graph indices, called the rooted path vector of various lengths, as several multivariate regression equations as following:CS=3.022+5.336P1+7.356P2-1.648P3+0.83859P4+0.210P5-0.138P6-0.506P7+2.486P8-1.669P9; n=402, m=9, R=0.944, RCV=0.9413, S.D.=3.333, F=358.343, U=35833.211, Q=4355.422 for all types (primary, secondly, tertiary, quaternary as well as methane) of carbon atoms CS=0.983+6.811P1+7.584P2-2.029P3+0.809P4+0.106P5+0.043P6-0.124P7+1.715P8-1.101P9; n=374, m=9, R=0.975, RCV=0.9737, S.D.=2.303, F=773.372, U=36912.109, Q=1930.363 for primary, secondly, tertiary (including methane) carbon atoms; and CS=27.819+2.351P2+0.549P3-0.440P4+0.170P5-0.050P6; n=27, m=5, R=0.992, RCV=0.9674, S.D.=0.324, F=265.418, U=138.891, Q=2.198 for quaternary carbon atoms, respectively. Quite good estimation and prediction results were obtained from the quantitative molecular modeling and the performance of multiple linear regression (MLR) equations were tested to work well through cross-validation (CV) with the leave-one-out (LOO) procedure.

  3. Behavior of liquid crystals confined to mesoporous materials as studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy of methyl iodide and methane as probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Tallavaara, Pekka; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2008-01-24

    The behavior of thermotropic nematic liquid crystals (LCs) Merck Phase 4 and ZLI 1115 confined to mesoporous controlled pore glass materials was investigated using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of probe molecules methyl iodide and methane. The average pore diameters of the materials varied from 81 to 375 A, and the temperature series measurements were performed on solid, nematic, and isotropic phases of bulk LCs. Chemical shift, intensity, and line shape of the resonance signals in the spectra contain lots of information about the effect of confinement on the state of the LCs. The line shape of the 13C resonances of the CH3I molecules in LCs confined into the pores was observed to be even more sensitive to the LC orientation distribution than, for example, that of 2H spectra of deuterated LCs or 129Xe spectra of dissolved xenon gas. The effect of the magnetic field on the orientation of LC molecules inside the pores was examined in four different magnetic fields varying from 4.70 to 11.74 T. The magnetic field was found to have significant effect on the orientation of LC molecules in the largest pores and close to the nematic-isotropic phase transition temperature. The theoretical model of shielding of noble gases dissolved in LCs based on pairwise additivity approximation was utilized in the analysis of CH4 spectra. For the first time, a first-order nematic-isotropic phase transition was detected to take place inside such restrictive hosts. In the larger pores a few degrees below the nematic-isotropic phase transition of bulk LC the 13C quartet of CH3I changes as a powder pattern. Results are compared to those derived from 129Xe NMR measurements of xenon gas in similar environments.

  4. Conformational analysis, spectroscopic study (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR), molecular orbital energy and NLO properties of 5-iodosalicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaca, Caglar; Atac, Ahmet; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2015-02-01

    In this study, 5-iodosalicylic acid (5-ISA, C7H5IO3) is structurally characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR and UV spectroscopies. There are eight conformers, Cn, n = 1-8 for this molecule therefore the molecular geometry for these eight conformers in the ground state are calculated by using the ab-initio density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method approach with the aug-cc-pVDZ-PP basis set for iodine and the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set for the other elements. The computational results identified that the most stable conformer of 5-ISA is the C1 form. The vibrational spectra are calculated DFT method invoking the same basis sets and fundamental vibrations are assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method with PQS program. Total density of state (TDOS) and partial density of state (PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (COOP or OPDOS) diagrams analysis for C1 conformer were calculated using the same method. The energy and oscillator strength are calculated by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complement with the experimental findings. Besides, charge transfer occurring in the molecule between HOMO and LUMO energies, frontier energy gap, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) are calculated and presented. The NMR chemical shifts (1H and 13C) spectra are recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Mulliken atomic charges of the title molecule are also calculated, interpreted and compared with salicylic acid. The optimized bond lengths, bond angles and calculated NMR and UV, vibrational wavenumbers showed the best agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Conformational analysis, spectroscopic study (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR), molecular orbital energy and NLO properties of 5-iodosalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Caglar; Atac, Ahmet; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2015-02-05

    In this study, 5-iodosalicylic acid (5-ISA, C7H5IO3) is structurally characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR and UV spectroscopies. There are eight conformers, Cn, n=1-8 for this molecule therefore the molecular geometry for these eight conformers in the ground state are calculated by using the ab-initio density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method approach with the aug-cc-pVDZ-PP basis set for iodine and the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set for the other elements. The computational results identified that the most stable conformer of 5-ISA is the C1 form. The vibrational spectra are calculated DFT method invoking the same basis sets and fundamental vibrations are assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method with PQS program. Total density of state (TDOS) and partial density of state (PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (COOP or OPDOS) diagrams analysis for C1 conformer were calculated using the same method. The energy and oscillator strength are calculated by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complement with the experimental findings. Besides, charge transfer occurring in the molecule between HOMO and LUMO energies, frontier energy gap, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) are calculated and presented. The NMR chemical shifts ((1)H and (13)C) spectra are recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Mulliken atomic charges of the title molecule are also calculated, interpreted and compared with salicylic acid. The optimized bond lengths, bond angles and calculated NMR and UV, vibrational wavenumbers showed the best agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Protein structure determination from NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Andrea; Salvatella, Xavier; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2007-06-05

    NMR spectroscopy plays a major role in the determination of the structures and dynamics of proteins and other biological macromolecules. Chemical shifts are the most readily and accurately measurable NMR parameters, and they reflect with great specificity the conformations of native and nonnative states of proteins. We show, using 11 examples of proteins representative of the major structural classes and containing up to 123 residues, that it is possible to use chemical shifts as structural restraints in combination with a conventional molecular mechanics force field to determine the conformations of proteins at a resolution of 2 angstroms or better. This strategy should be widely applicable and, subject to further development, will enable quantitative structural analysis to be carried out to address a range of complex biological problems not accessible to current structural techniques.

  7. Ground-fire effects on the composition of dissolved and total organic matter in forest floor and soil solutions from Scots pine forests in Germany: new insights from solid state 13C NMR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näthe, Kerstin; Michalzik, Beate; Levia, Delphis; Steffens, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Fires represent an ecosystem disturbance and are recognized to seriously pertubate the nutrient budgets of forested ecosystems. While the effects of fires on chemical, biological, and physical soil properties have been intensively studied, especially in Mediterranean areas and North America, few investigations examined the effects of fire-induced alterations in the water-bound fluxes and the chemical composition of dissolved and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC, POC, DN, PN). The exclusion of the particulate organic matter fraction (0.45 μm < POM < 500 μm) potentially results in misleading inferences and budgeting gaps when studying the effects of fires on nutrient and energy fluxes. To our best knowledge, this is the first known study to present fire-induced changes on the composition of dissolved and total organic matter (DOM, TOM) in forest floor (FF) and soil solutions (A, B horizon) from Scots pine forests in Germany. In relation to control sites, we test the effects of low-severity fires on: (1) the composition of DOM and TOM in forest floor and soil solutions; and (2) the translocated amount of particulate in relation to DOC and DN into the subsoil. The project aims to uncover the mechanisms of water-bound organic matter transport along an ecosystem profile and its compositional changes following a fire disturbance. Forest floor and soil solutions were fortnightly sampled from March to December 2014 on fire-manipulated and control plots in a Scots pine forest in Central Germany. Shortly after the experimental duff fire in April 2014 pooled solutions samples were taken for solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy to characterize DOM (filtered solution < 0.8μm pore size) and TOM in unfiltered solutions. Independent from fire manipulation, the composition of TOM was generally less aromatic (aromaticity index [%] according to Hatcher et al., 1981) with values between 18 (FF) - 25% (B horizon) than the DOM fraction with 23 (FF) - 27% (B horizon). For DOM

  8. Combined experimental and theoretical studies on the X-ray crystal structure, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Vis spectra, NLO behavior and antimicrobial activity of 2-hydroxyacetophenone benzoylhydrazone.

    PubMed

    Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Ebrahimipour, S Yousef; Sheikhshoaie, Mahdeyeh; Rudbari, Hadi Amiri; Khaleghi, Moj; Bruno, Giuseppe

    2014-04-24

    A Schiff base ligand, 2-hydroxyacetophenone benzoylhydrazone (HL) was synthesized and fully characterized with FT-IR, elemental analyses, UV-Vis, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. DFT calculations using B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) and PW91/DZP are performed to optimize the molecular geometry. Optimized structures are used to calculate FT-IR, UV-Vis, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra of the compound. Also the energies of the frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) have been determined. The results obtained from the optimization and spectral analyses are in good agreement with the experimental data. To investigate non-linear optical properties, the electric dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α) and molecular first hyperpolarizability (β) were computed. The linear polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecule indicate that the compound can be a good candidate of nonlinear optical materials. In addition, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of this compound against Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans was determined.

  9. Configuration at C-25 in 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha,25,26-pentol excreted by patients with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis: circular dichroism and 13C-NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Dayal, B; Salen, G; Toome, V; Tint, G S

    1986-12-01

    The configuration at C-25 in 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha, 7 alpha, 12 alpha,25,26-pentol isolated from the bile and feces of patients with cerebrotendinous xanthomtosis (CTX) was determined from the lanthanide-induced circular dichroism (CD) Cotton effects and 13C-NMR measurements. Under anhydrous conditions, CD spectra of 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha, 7 alpha, 12 alpha,25,26-pentol in the presence of Eu(fod)3 exhibited a large induced negative Cotton effect at 320 nm. On the basis of the empirical rule (primary-tertiary-alpha-diols) in which R compounds have positive Cotton effects and S compounds have negative Cotton effects at 320 nm, it was concluded that 25,26-pentol has the 1,2,glycol structure with C-25 having the S-configuration. This assignment was based upon comparison with model compounds, 25(R and S),26-dihydroxy cholesterols and 25(R and S),26-dihydroxy cholecalciferols whose single-crystal X-ray structure and 13C-NMR studies have been performed. It is suggested that these data may be helpful to clarify the stereospecificity of the hydroxylation of the terminal methyl group of the cholesterol side chain in CTX.

  10. Synthesis, spectroscopic and X-ray structural characterization, quantum chemical studies and investigation of gama-irradiated effects of the novel hydrazone compound: [(E)-3-(2-nitrophenyl)-(E)-1-(2-phenylhydrazono)]-1-phenylallylidene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakalı, Gül; Çakıcı, Abban; Eke, Canel; Cin, Günseli Turgut; Aygün, Muhittin

    2017-04-01

    The novel hydrazone compound, [(E)-3-(2-nitrophenyl)-(E)-1-(2-phenylhydrazono)]-1-phenylallylidene (2), has been synthesized, characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR techniques, elemental analysis, X-ray structure analysis and has been investigated gama-irradiated effect. Additionally, the molecular geometrical parameters, frontier molecular orbital energies (HOMO, LUMO), their energy gap (Δ E) , molecular electrostatic potential analysis of the compound have been calculated by using DFT/B3LYP with 6-311G (d, p) level. Also, IR frequencies, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the compound were calculated by using DFT calculations at the same level basis and changing in lattice parameters, unit cell volume and density of the compound are observed after gama irradiated at XRD data. Unirradiated state of the title compound (C21H17N3O2) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/n with a = 9.1782(7) Å, b = 16.1359(12) Å, c = 11.9709(12) Å, β = 101.022(8)o, V = 1740.2(3) Å3, Dcalc = 1.3106 g/cm3 and Z = 4 while irradiated state of title compound showed significant changes in lattice parameters, crystal volume and density. In contrast, the crystal system is found to be the same at after and before irradiation. The calculated geometrical parameters, IR frequencies, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the compound were in good agreement with the observed single crystal- XRD data, IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectra.

  11. Partitioning of main and side-chain units between different phases: a solid-state 13C NMR inversion-recovery cross-polarization study on a homogeneous, metallocene-based, ethylene-1-octene copolymer.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Victor M; Mathot, Vincent B F

    2002-01-01

    13C NMR inversion-recovery cross-polarization experiments are used to study the phase structure and partitioning of main and side-chain groups in a homogeneous, metallocene-based, ethylene-1-octene copolymer. The results provide strong evidence for a three-phase model, i.e. a rigid, (imperfect) crystalline phase, which is mainly composed of long sequences of methylene carbon atoms of the main chain, a semi-rigid, amorphous interphase (also denoted as 'rigid amorphous'), which is enriched by chain segments bearing methylene and methine carbon atoms of the main chain, and a soft fraction of the amorphous phase (also denoted as 'mobile amorphous'), which is largely composed of side chains and short methylene sequences of the main chain.

  12. Static and dynamic interaction between π and d electrons in organic superconductor β″-(BEDT-TTF)4[(H3O ) Fe (C2O4)3] .C6H5Br studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Y.; Futami, Y.; Kawamoto, A.; Matsui, K.; Goto, T.; Sasaki, T.; Benmansour, S.; Gómez-García, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of 13C NMR experiments in an organic superconductor with localized Fe spins β″-(BEDT-TTF) 4[(H3O ) Fe (C2O4)3] .C6H5Br . We reveal the antiferromagnetic coupling between Fe d spins and π spins, which creates an exchange field antiparallel to the external field direction at the π electrons. In addition to the static effects of Fe spins, we show from the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate measurement that the magnetic fluctuations generated by Fe spins are suppressed at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. These conditions are suitable to stabilize the field-induced superconductivity by the field compensation mechanism. After the suppression of Fe-spin dynamics by a magnetic field of 19 T, we observed the underlying π -electron contribution. We discuss a possible anomaly in the π -electron system.

  13. Comparison of the grignard deacylation TLC and HPLC methods and high resolution 13C-NMR for the sn-2 positional analysis of triacylglycerols containing gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Redden, P R; Lin, X; Horrobin, D F

    1996-01-25

    There is increasing evidence that the fatty acid, gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) is the effective component found in evening primrose oil (EPO) which has been shown to bring about clinical improvement in a number of disease conditions. The two major triacylglycerols (TAGs) in EPO are trilinolein (LLL) and a TAG species containing one GLA and two linoleic (LA) fatty acid chains. This latter TAG, called dilinoleoyl-mono-gamma-linolenin (DLMG or Oenotheral), makes up about 15% by weight of EPO and accounts for over one-half of the total amount of GLA present in EPO. Although DLMG is comprised of three possible isomers, the abbreviation is used to represent the naturally occurring mixture of these isomers. We have isolated DLMG from EPO and also prepared its three possible isomers, sn-GLL, sn-LGL and sn-LLG, and carried out the sn-2 positional analysis using three different approaches, namely, Grignard deacylation TLC and HPLC methods and high resolution 13C-NMR spectroscopy. The results of the sn-2 positional analysis for both the natural and synthetic TAGs containing LA and GLA in this study using the three approaches are all in very good agreement. This indicates that the three positional analysis methods are valid within their acceptable error margin and can be used with confidence in determining the fatty acid composition of the sn-2 position. Given the increased availability of NMR spectrometers this method might prove to be the easiest and most convenient in determining the sn-2 position for oil or TAG samples that contain a small number of different fatty acids providing all the 13C-NMR carbonyl resonances are well resolved.

  14. Synthesis and NMR Spectral Analysis of Amine Heterocycles: The Effect of Asymmetry on the [superscript 1]H and [superscript 13]C NMR Spectra of N,O-Acetals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saba, Shahrokh; Ciaccio, James A.; Espinal, Jennifer; Aman, Courtney E.

    2007-01-01

    The stereochemical investigation is conducted to give students the combined experience of chemical synthesis of amines and N-heterocycles and structural stereochemical analysis using NMR spectroscopy. Students are introduced to the concept of topicity-stereochemical relationships between ligands within a molecule by synthesizing N,O-acetals.

  15. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopic studies of hexane-extractable lipids from soils under shelterbelts of different age and composition of plants.

    PubMed

    Szajdak, Lech Wojciech; Maryganova, Victoria; Skakovskii, Eugene; Tychinskaya, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Comparative study of the composition of lipids extracted with n-hexane from soils under shelterbelts of different age and composition of plants and adjoining cultivated fields in agrolandscape has been carried out with the application of (1)Н and (13)С NMR spectroscopy. The lipid content correlates with the organic carbon content in soils and is the highest in the soil under the 200-years old shelterbelt. The data received indicate that hexane-extractable lipids from the soil under the 200-years old shelterbelt have undergone the most significant biochemical and chemical transformations (oxidation, hydrolysis, polymerization) with the accumulation of resistant compounds and destruction of esters of o-phthalic acid as anthropogenic contaminants compared to the lipids from the soil under the 14-years old shelterbelt and soils of adjoining arable fields.

  16. Use of 13C NMR and ftir for elucidation of degradation pathways during natural litter decomposition and composting I. early stage leaf degradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Leenheer, J.A.; Kennedy, K.R.; Noyes, T.I.

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative degradation of plant tissue leads to the formation of natural dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and humus. Infrared (IR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry have been used to elucidate the chemical reactions of the early stages of degradation that give rise to DOC derived from litter and compost. The results of this study indicate that oxidation of the lignin components of plant tissue follows the sequence of O-demethylation, and hydroxylation followed by ring-fission, chain-shortening, and oxidative removal of substituents. Oxidative ring-fission leads to the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the cleaved ends of the rings and, in the process, transforms phenolic groups into aliphatic alcoholic groups. The carbohydrate components are broken down into aliphatic hydroxy acids and aliphatic alcohols.

  17. Mapping of protein structural ensembles by chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Kumaran; Brunner, Konrad; Munte, Claudia E; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2010-10-01

    Applying the chemical shift prediction programs SHIFTX and SHIFTS to a data base of protein structures with known chemical shifts we show that the averaged chemical shifts predicted from the structural ensembles explain better the experimental data than the lowest energy structures. This is in agreement with the fact that proteins in solution occur in multiple conformational states in fast exchange on the chemical shift time scale. However, in contrast to the real conditions in solution at ambient temperatures, the standard NMR structural calculation methods as well chemical shift prediction methods are optimized to predict the lowest energy ground state structure that is only weakly populated at physiological temperatures. An analysis of the data shows that a chemical shift prediction can be used as measure to define the minimum size of the structural bundle required for a faithful description of the structural ensemble.

  18. Solid-state 13C NMR study of the mobility of polysaccharides in the cell walls of two apple cultivars of different firmness.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jovyn K T; Zujovic, Zoran D; Smith, Bronwen G; Johnston, Jason W; Schröder, Roswitha; Melton, Laurence D

    2014-03-11

    Solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to compare differences in mobility of the cell wall polysaccharides of 'Scifresh' and 'Royal Gala' apples after 20 weeks of storage. The texture of 'Scifresh' apples was markedly firmer than that of 'Royal Gala' at the end of storage. In a novel approach Two Pulse Phase Modulation (TPPM) decoupling was combined with cross polarisation (CP) and single pulse excitation (SPE) experiments. The resulting high resolution solid-state SPE spectra, unprecedented for apple cell walls, allowed a detailed insight into the physical and chemical properties of very mobile polysaccharides such as the arabinan and galactan side chains of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I). NMR showed that the cellulose rigidity was the same in the two cultivars, while arabinans were more mobile than galactans in both. Unexpectedly, arabinans in 'Scifresh' cell walls were more mobile than those in 'Royal Gala' which was unforeseen considering the greater firmness of the 'Scifresh' cultivar.

  19. Effect of organic carbon chemistry on sorption of atrazine and metsulfuron-methyl as determined by (13)C-NMR and IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban; Mandal, Abhishek; Manna, Suman; Singh, S B; Berns, Anne E; Singh, Neera

    2015-10-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) content is the major soil component affecting pesticide sorption. However, recent studies have highlighted the fact that it is not the total carbon content of the organic matter, but its chemical structure which have a profound effect on the pesticide's sorption. In the present study, sorption of atrazine and metsulfuron-methyl herbicides was studied in four SOM fractions viz. commercial humic acid, commercial lignin, as well as humic acid and humin extracted from a compost. Sorption data was fitted to the Freundlich adsorption equation. In general, the Freundlich slope (1/n) values for both the herbicides were <1. Except for atrazine sorption on commercial humic acid, metsulfuron-methyl was more sorbed. Desorption results suggested that atrazine was more desorbed than metsulfuron-methyl. Lignin, which showed least sorption of both the herbicides, showed minimum desorption. Sorption of atrazine was best positively correlated with the alkyl carbon (adjusted R (2) = 0.748) and carbonyl carbon (adjusted R (2) = 0.498) but, their effect was statistically nonsignificant (P = 0.05). Metsulfuron-methyl sorption showed best positive correlation with carbonyl carbon (adjusted R (2) = 0.960; P = 0.05) content. Sorption of both the herbicides showed negative correlation with O/N-alkyl carbon. Correlation of herbicide's sorption with alkyl and carbonyl carbon content of SOM fractions suggested their contribution towards herbicide sorption. But, sorption of metsulfuron-methyl, relatively more polar than atrazine, was mainly governed by the polar groups in SOM. IR spectra showed that H-bonds and charge-transfer bonds between SOM fraction and herbicides probably operated as mechanisms of adsorption.

  20. Application of DRIFTS, (13)C NMR, and py-MBMS to Characterize the Effects of Soil Science Oxidation Assays on Soil Organic Matter Composition in a Mollic Xerofluvent.

    PubMed

    Margenot, Andrew J; Calderón, Francisco J; Magrini, Kimberly A; Evans, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Chemical oxidations are routinely employed in soil science to study soil organic matter (SOM), and their interpretation could be improved by characterizing oxidation effects on SOM composition with spectroscopy. We investigated the effects of routinely employed oxidants on SOM composition in a Mollic Xerofluvent representative of intensively managed agricultural soils in the California Central Valley. Soil samples were subjected to oxidation by potassium permanganate (KMnO4), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Additionally, non-oxidized and oxidized soils were treated with hydrofluoric acid (HF) to evaluate reduction of the mineral component to improve spectroscopy of oxidation effects. Oxidized non-HF and HF-treated soils were characterized by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS), and for particle size distribution (PSD) using laser diffractometry (LD). Across the range of soil organic carbon (OC) removed by oxidations (14-72%), aliphatic C-H stretch at 3000-2800 cm(-1) (DRIFTS) decreased with OC removal, and this trend was enhanced by HF treatment due to significant demineralization in this soil (70%). Analysis by NMR spectroscopy was feasible only after HF treatment, and did not reveal trends between OC removal and C functional groups. Pyrolysis-MBMS did not detect differences among oxidations, even after HF treatment of soils. Hydrofluoric acid entailed OC loss (13-39%), and for H2O2 oxidized soils increased C:N and substantially decreased mean particle size. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using HF to improve characterizations of SOM composition following oxidations as practiced in soil science, in particular for DRIFTS. Since OC removal by oxidants, mineral removal by HF, and the interaction of oxidants and HF observed for this soil

  1. Using chemical shift perturbation to characterise ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Mike P

    2013-08-01

    Chemical shift perturbation (CSP, chemical shift mapping or complexation-induced changes in chemical shift, CIS) follows changes in the chemical shifts of a protein when a ligand is added, and uses these to determine the location of the binding site, the affinity of the ligand, and/or possibly the structure of the complex. A key factor in determining the appearance of spectra during a titration is the exchange rate between free and bound, or more specifically the off-rate koff. When koff is greater than the chemical shift difference between free and bound, which typically equates to an affinity Kd weaker than about 3μM, then exchange is fast on the chemical shift timescale. Under these circumstances, the observed shift is the population-weighted average of free and bound, which allows Kd to be determined from measurement of peak positions, provided the measurements are made appropriately. (1)H shifts are influenced to a large extent by through-space interactions, whereas (13)Cα and (13)Cβ shifts are influenced more by through-bond effects. (15)N and (13)C' shifts are influenced both by through-bond and by through-space (hydrogen bonding) interactions. For determining the location of a bound ligand on the basis of shift change, the most appropriate method is therefore usually to measure (15)N HSQC spectra, calculate the geometrical distance moved by the peak, weighting (15)N shifts by a factor of about 0.14 compared to (1)H shifts, and select those residues for which the weighted shift change is larger than the standard deviation of the shift for all residues. Other methods are discussed, in particular the measurement of (13)CH3 signals. Slow to intermediate exchange rates lead to line broadening, and make Kd values very difficult to obtain. There is no good way to distinguish changes in chemical shift due to direct binding of the ligand from changes in chemical shift due to allosteric change. Ligand binding at multiple sites can often be characterised, by

  2. Analysis of commercial proanthocyanidins. Part 4: solid state (13)C NMR as a tool for in situ analysis of proanthocyanidin tannins, in heartwood and bark of quebracho and acacia, and related species.

    PubMed

    Reid, David G; Bonnet, Susan L; Kemp, Gabre; van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2013-10-01

    (13)C NMR is an effective method of characterizing proanthocyanidin (PAC) tannins in quebracho (Schinopsis lorentzii) heartwood and black wattle (Acacia mearnsii) bark, before and after commercial extraction. The B-rings of the constituent flavan-3-ols, catechols (quebracho) or pyrogallols (wattle), are recognized in unprocessed source materials by "marker" signals at ca. 118 or 105ppm, respectively. NMR allows the minimum extraction efficiency to be calculated; ca. 30%, and ca. 80%, for quebracho heartwood and black wattle bark, respectively. NMR can also identify PAC tannin (predominantly robinetinidin), and compare tannin content, in bark from other acacia species; tannin content decreases in the order A. mearnsii, Acacia pycnantha (87% of A. mearnsii), Acacia dealbata and Acacia decurrens (each 74%) and Acacia karroo (30%). Heartwood from an underexploited PAC tannin source, Searsia lancea, taxonomically close to quebracho, shows abundant profisetinidin and catechin PACs. NMR offers the advantage of being applicable to source materials in their native state, and has potential applications in optimizing extraction processes, identification of tannin sources, and characterization of tannin content in cultivar yield improvement programmes.

  3. Powder X-ray diffraction, infrared and (13)C NMR spectroscopic studies of the homologous series of some solid-state zinc(II) and sodium(I) n-alkanoates.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Peter N; Taylor, Richard A

    2015-03-05

    A comparative study of the room temperature molecular packing and lattice structures for the homologous series of zinc(II) and sodium(I) n-alkanoates adduced from Fourier transform infrared and solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopic data in conjunction with X-ray powder diffraction measurements is carried out. For zinc carboxylates, metal-carboxyl bonding is via asymmetric bridging bidentate coordination whilst for the sodium adducts, coordination is via asymmetric chelating bidentate bonding. All compounds are packed in a monoclinic crystal system. Furthermore, the fully extended all-trans hydrocarbon chains are arranged as lamellar bilayers. For zinc compounds, there is bilayer overlap, for long chain adducts (nc>8) but not for sodium compounds where methyl groups from opposing layers in the lamellar are only closely packed. Additionally, the hydrocarbon chains are extended along the a-axis of the unit cell for zinc compounds whilst for sodium carboxylates they are extended along the c-axis. These packing differences are responsible for different levels of Van der Waals effects in the lattices of these two series of compounds, hence, observed odd-even alternation is different. The significant difference in lattice packing observed for these two series of compounds is proposed to be due to the difference in metal-carboxyl coordination mode, arising from the different electronic structure of the central metal ions.

  4. Development and validation of a RP-HPLC method for stability-indicating assay of gemifloxacin mesylate including identification of related substances by LC-ESI-MS/MS, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Nageswara; Naidu, Ch Gangu; Prasad, K Guru; Narasimha, R

    2011-11-01

    A validated stability indicating RP-HPLC assay of gemifloxacin mesylate was developed by separating its related substances on an Inertsil-ODS3V-C18 (4.6 × 250 mm; 5 μm) column using 0.1% trifluoroaceticacid (pH 2.5) and methanol as a mobile phase in a gradient elution mode at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min at 27°C. The column effluents were monitored by a photodiode array detector set at 287 nm. The method was validated in terms of accuracy, precision and linearity as per ICH guidelines. Forced degradation of gemifloxacin (GFX) was carried out under acidic, basic, thermal, photolysis and peroxide conditions and the degradation products were separated and characterized by ESI-MS/MS, (1) H and (13) C NMR spectroscopy. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of bulk drugs and the recoveries of gemifloxacin and impurities were in the range of 97.60-102.90 and 96.99-102.10%, respectively. No previous reports were found in the literature on identification of degradation products of gemifloxacin.

  5. Empirical NMR Chemical Shift Correlations for Methyl and Methylene Protons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrich, Edwin C.; Runkle, Katherine Gates

    1984-01-01

    Presents an internally consistent set of 63 substituent constants developed for use with the Schoolery Relationship to predict the chemical shifts of methylene protons of acyclic compounds. Chemical shift data used in deriving the constants were taken mainly from primary sources of HNMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectra. (JN)

  6. Relative Configuration of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By comparing calculated with experimental NMR chemical shifts, we were able to determine the relative configurations of three monoterpene diastereomers produced by the walkingstick Anisomorpha buprestoides. The combined RMSDs of both 1H and 13C quantum chemically calculated shifts were able to predi...

  7. An isotropic chemical shift-chemical shift anisotropic correlation experiment using discrete magic angle turning.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jesse A; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hoyt, David W; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H F

    2009-05-01

    An isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectroscopy is introduced that combines the advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) technologies. In this new approach, denoted DMAT for "discrete magic angle turning", the sample rotates clockwise followed by an anticlockwise rotation of exactly the same amount with each rotation less or equal than 360 degrees but greater than 240 degrees , with the rotation speed being constant only for times related to the evolution dimension. This back and forth rotation is repeated and synchronized with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. For any spin-interaction of rank-2 such as chemical shift anisotropy, isotropic magnetic susceptibility interaction, and residual homo-nuclear dipolar interaction in biological fluid samples, the projection along the isotropic dimension is a high resolution spectrum. Since a less than 360 degrees sample rotation is involved, the design potentially allows for in situ control over physical parameters such as pressure, flow conditions, feed compositions, and temperature so that true in situ NMR investigations can be carried out.

  8. Coordination Modes in the Formation of Ternary Complexes of Am(III), Cm(III) and Eu(III) with EDTA and NTA: TRLFS, 13C NMR, EXAFS, and Thermodynamics of the complexation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur,J.; Thakur, P.; Dodge, C.; Francis, A.; Choppin, G.

    2006-01-01

    The formation and the structure of the ternary complexes of trivalent Am, Cm, and Eu with mixtures of EDTA+NTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetate and nitrilotriacetate) have been studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy, {sup 13}C NMR, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and two-phase metal ion equilibrium distribution at 6.60 m (NaClO{sub 4}) and a hydrogen ion concentration value (pcH) between 3.60 and 11.50. In the ternary complexes, EDTA binds via four carboxylates and two nitrogens, while the binding of the NTA varies with the hydrogen ion concentration, pcH, and the concentration ratios of the metal ion and the ligand. When the concentration ratios of the metal to ligand is low (1:1:1-1:1:2), two ternary complexes, M(EDTA)(NTAH){sup 3-} and M(EDTA)(NTA){sup 4-}, are formed at pcH ca. 9.00 in which NTA binds via three carboxylates, via two carboxylates and one nitrogen, or via two carboxylates and a H{sub 2}O. At higher ratios (1:1:20 and 1:10:10) and pcH's of ca. 9.00 and 11.50, one ternary complex, M(EDTA)(NTA){sup 4-}, is formed in which NTA binds via three carboxylates and not via nitrogen. The two-phase equilibrium distribution studies at tracer concentrations of Am, Cm, and Eu have also confirmed the formation of the ternary complex M(EDTA)(NTA){sup 4-} at temperatures between 0 and 60 {sup o}C. The stability constants (log{beta}{sub 111}) for these metal ions increase with increasing temperature. The endothermic enthalpy and positive entropy indicated a significant effect of cation dehydration in the formation of the ternary complexes at high ionic strength.

  9. Flexibility at a glycosidic linkage revealed by molecular dynamics, stochastic modeling, and (13)C NMR spin relaxation: conformational preferences of α-L-Rhap-α-(1 → 2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe in water and dimethyl sulfoxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Pendrill, Robert; Engström, Olof; Volpato, Andrea; Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Widmalm, Göran

    2016-01-28

    The monosaccharide L-rhamnose is common in bacterial polysaccharides and the disaccharide α-L-Rhap-α-(1 → 2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe represents a structural model for a part of Shigella flexneri O-antigen polysaccharides. Utilization of [1'-(13)C]-site-specific labeling in the anomeric position at the glycosidic linkage between the two sugar residues facilitated the determination of transglycosidic NMR (3)JCH and (3)JCC coupling constants. Based on these spin-spin couplings the major state and the conformational distribution could be determined with respect to the ψ torsion angle, which changed between water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as solvents, a finding mirrored by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with explicit solvent molecules. The (13)C NMR spin relaxation parameters T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOE of the probe were measured for the disaccharide in DMSO-d6 at two magnetic field strengths, with standard deviations ≤1%. The combination of MD simulation and a stochastic description based on the diffusive chain model resulted in excellent agreement between calculated and experimentally observed (13)C relaxation parameters, with an average error of <2%. The coupling between the global reorientation of the molecule and the local motion of the spin probe is deemed essential if reproduction of NMR relaxation parameters should succeed, since decoupling of the two modes of motion results in significantly worse agreement. Calculation of (13)C relaxation parameters based on the correlation functions obtained directly from the MD simulation of the solute molecule in DMSO as solvent showed satisfactory agreement with errors on the order of 10% or less.

  10. Is the Lamb shift chemically significant?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Schwenke, David W.; Pyykko, Pekka; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The contribution of the Lamb shift to the atomization energies of some prototype molecules, BF3, AlF3, and GaF3, is estimated by a perturbation procedure. It is found to be in the range of 3-5% of the one-electron scalar relativistic contribution to the atomization energy. The maximum absolute value is 0.2 kcal/mol for GaF3. These sample calculations indicate that the Lamb shift is probably small enough to be neglected for energetics of molecules containing light atoms if the target accuracy is 1 kcal/mol, but for higher accuracy calculations and for molecules containing heavy elements it must be considered.

  11. Solid-state 13C NMR study of banana liquid crystals - 3: Alkyl-tail-group packing environments of an acute-angle bent-core molecule in the hexagonal columnar and cubic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosu, Hiromichi; Endo, Yumi; Kimura, Saori; Hashimoto, Tomoko; Harada, Motoi; Lee, Eun-Woo; Sone, Masato; Watanabe, Junji; Kang, Sungmin

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements were performed on the hexagonal columnar and cubic phases of an acute-angle banana-shaped molecule, N(1,7)-S30. In the hexagonal columnar phase, three peaks appear at the NMR chemical shifts assigned to the internal methylene carbons of alkyl tails, indicating that the two alkyl tails have different packing structures, and one of the tails has two different conformations within a single molecule. Combined cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning and pulse saturation transfer/magic-angle spinning measurements show that one of the alkyl chains is located inside and the other is located outside the columnar structure. In the cubic phase, pulse saturation transfer/magic-angle spinning measurement shows that only one peak appears at the NMR chemical shifts assigned to the internal methylene carbons of alkyl tails, indicating that both of the alkyl chains are located outside the cubic structure.

  12. Crystal structure and anomalous chemical shift of 10-(prop-1-yn-1-yl)-10H-phenothiazine 5,5-dioxide: Intramolecular S⋯N transannular effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezono, Satoru; Okuno, Tsunehisa

    2013-10-01

    The novel ynamine compounds, 10-(prop-1-yn-1-yl)-10H-phenothiazine 5-oxide (2) and 10-(prop-1-yn-1-yl)-10H-phenothiazine 5,5-dioxide (3), were prepared by MCPBA oxidation of 10-(prop-1-yn-1-yl)-10H-phenothiazine (1). These compounds were characterized successfully by crystallographical analyses, 1H and 13C NMR. The 1H NMR signals of 2 showed downfield shifts compared with 1 as expected. However two kinds of signals, methyl and 1,9-position of 3, indicated upfield shifts compared with 2. These anomalous upfield shifts were reasonably explained by trans-annular S⋯N interaction and by increase of electron density on the nitrogen atom.

  13. Solid state 13C-NMR, infrared, X-ray powder diffraction and differential thermal studies of the homologous series of some mono-valent metal (Li, Na, K, Ag) n-alkanoates: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter N.; Ellis, Henry A.; White, Nicole A. S.

    2015-06-01

    A comparative study of the molecular packing, lattice structures and phase behaviors of the homologous series of some mono-valent metal carboxylates (Li, Na, K and Ag) is carried out via solid state FT-infrared and 13C-NMR spectroscopes, X-rays powder diffraction, density measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing light microscopy and variable temperature infrared spectroscopy. It is proposed that, for lithium, sodium and potassium carboxylates, metal-carboxyl coordination is via asymmetric chelating bidentate bonding with extensive intermolecular interactions to form tetrahedral metal centers, irrespective of chain length. However, for silver n-alkanoates, carboxyl moieties are bound to silver ions via syn-syn type bridging bidentate coordination to form dimeric units held together by extensive head group inter-molecular interactions. Furthermore, the fully extended hydrocarbon chains which are crystallized in the all-trans conformation are tilted at ca. 30°, 27°, 15° and 31° with respect to a normal to the metal plane, for lithium, sodium, silver and potassium carboxylates, respectively. All compounds are packed as lamellar bilayer structures, however, lithium compounds are crystallized in a triclinic crystal system whilst silver, sodium and potassium n-alkanoates are all monoclinic with possible P1 bravais lattice. Odd-even alternation observed in various physical features is associated with different inter-planar spacing between closely packed layers in the bilayer which are not in the same plane; a phenomenon controlled by lattice packing symmetry requirements. All compounds, except silver carboxylates, show partially reversibly first order pre-melting transitions; the number of which increases with increasing chain length. These transitions are associated, for the most part, with lamellar collapse followed by increased gauche-trans isomerism in the methylene group assembly, irrespective of chain length. It is proposed that the absence of

  14. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data.

    PubMed

    Bratholm, Lars A; Christensen, Anders S; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model, and a bias is introduced which might result in incorrect structures. In the inferential structure determination framework, both the unknown structure and the disagreement between experimental and back-calculated data are formulated as a joint probability distribution, thus utilizing the full information content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term, the simulations suggests that sampling both the structure and the uncertainties in chemical shift prediction leads more accurate structures compared to conventional methods using empirical determined weights. The Cauchy distribution, using either sampled uncertainties or predetermined weights, did, however, result in overall better convergence to the native fold, suggesting that both types of distribution might be useful in different aspects of the protein structure prediction.

  15. Counterion influence on chemical shifts in strychnine salts

    SciTech Connect

    Metaxas, Athena E.; Cort, John R.

    2013-05-01

    The highly toxic plant alkaloid strychnine is often isolated in the form of the anion salt of its protonated tertiary amine. Here we characterize the relative influence of different counterions on 1H and 13C chemical shifts in several strychnine salts in D2O, methanol-d4 (CD3OD) and chloroform-d (CDCl3) solvents. In organic solvents, but not in water, substantial variation in chemical shifts of protons near the tertiary amine was observed among different salts. These secondary shifts reveal differences in the way each anion influences electronic structure within the protonated amine. The distributions of secondary shifts allow salts to be easily distinguished from each other as well as from the free base form. The observed effects are much greater in organic solvents than in water. Slight concentration-dependence in chemical shifts of some protons near the amine was observed for two salts in CDCl3, but this effect is small compared to the influence of the counterion. Distinct chemical shifts in different salt forms of the same compound may be useful as chemical forensic signatures for source attribution and sample matching of alkaloids such as strychnine and possibly other organic acid and base salts.

  16. NMR analysis and chemical shift calculations of poly(lactic acid) dimer model compounds with different tacticities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, PLA dimer model compounds with different tacticities were synthesized and studied in detail by 1H and 13C NMR in three solvents, CDCl3/CCl4 (20/80 v/v), CDCl3 and DMSO-d6. All the peaks in the 1H and 13C NMR spectra were assigned with the help of two-dimensional NMR. Although the solve...

  17. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported.

  18. NMR Chemical Shifts in Hard Carbon Nitride Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Y.; Yoon, Y.; Pfrommer, B.G.; Pfrommer, B.G.; Louie, S.G.; Louie, S.G.; Mauri, F.

    1998-04-01

    We show that NMR chemical shift spectroscopy could help to identify the crystalline phases of hard carbon nitride compounds. To this purpose we compute the NMR chemical shifts of defect zinc-blende, cubic, {alpha}{minus} , {beta}{minus} , and graphitic C{sub 3}N{sub 4} with a newly developed {ital ab initio} method. The C shifts can be used to identify the CN bonds and to characterize C hybridization. The N shifts distinguish the {alpha}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} from the {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} phases, and indicate the presence of the graphitic phase. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. {sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for carbonate ions in cement minerals and the use of {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR in studies of Portland cement including limestone additions

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Herfort, Duncan

    2013-10-15

    {sup 13}C isotropic chemical shifts and chemical shift anisotropy parameters have been determined for a number of inorganic carbonates relevant in cement chemistry from slow-speed {sup 13}C MAS or {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR spectra (9.4 T or 14.1 T) for {sup 13}C in natural abundance. The variation in the {sup 13}C chemical shift parameters is relatively small, raising some doubts that different carbonate species in Portland cement-based materials may not be sufficiently resolved in {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectra. However, it is shown that by combining {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR carbonate anions in anhydrous and hydrated phases can be distinguished, thereby providing valuable information about the reactivity of limestone in cement blends. This is illustrated for three cement pastes prepared from an ordinary Portland cement, including 0, 16, and 25 wt.% limestone, and following the hydration for up to one year. For these blends {sup 29}Si MAS NMR reveals that the limestone filler accelerates the hydration for alite and also results in a smaller fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated Al incorporated in the C-S-H phase. The latter result is more clearly observed in {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra of the cement–limestone blends and suggests that dissolved aluminate species in the cement–limestone blends readily react with carbonate ions from the limestone filler, forming calcium monocarboaluminate hydrate. -- Highlights: •{sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for inorganic carbonates from {sup 13}C MAS NMR. •Narrow {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift range (163–171 ppm) for inorganic carbonates. •Anhydrous and hydrated carbonate species by {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR. •Limestone accelerates the hydration for alite in Portland – limestone cements. •Limestone reduces the amount of aluminium incorporated in the C-S-H phase.

  20. Protein Structure Refinement Using 13Cα Chemical Shift Tensors

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Oldfield, Eric; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2009-01-01

    We have obtained the 13Cα chemical shift tensors for each amino acid in the protein GB1. We then developed a CST force field and incorporated this into the Xplor-NIH structure determination program. GB1 structures obtained by using CST restraints had improved precision over those obtained in the absence of CST restraints, and were also more accurate. When combined with isotropic chemical shifts, distance and vector angle restraints, the root-mean squared error with respect to existing x-ray structures was better than ~1.0 Å. These results are of broad general interest since they show that chemical shift tensors can be used in protein structure refinement, improving both structural accuracy and precision, opening up the way to accurate de novo structure determination. PMID:19123862

  1. Molecular dynamics averaging of Xe chemical shifts in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; Sears, Devin N.; Murad, Sohail

    2004-11-01

    The Xe nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift differences that afford the discrimination between various biological environments are of current interest for biosensor applications and medical diagnostic purposes. In many such environments the Xe signal appears close to that in water. We calculate average Xe chemical shifts (relative to the free Xe atom) in solution in eleven liquids: water, isobutane, perfluoro-isobutane, n-butane, n-pentane, neopentane, perfluoroneopentane, n-hexane, n-octane, n-perfluorooctane, and perfluorooctyl bromide. The latter is a liquid used for intravenous Xe delivery. We calculate quantum mechanically the Xe shielding response in Xe-molecule van der Waals complexes, from which calculations we develop Xe (atomic site) interpolating functions that reproduce the ab initio Xe shielding response in the complex. By assuming additivity, these Xe-site shielding functions can be used to calculate the shielding for any configuration of such molecules around Xe. The averaging over configurations is done via molecular dynamics (MD). The simulations were carried out using a MD technique that one of us had developed previously for the simulation of Henry's constants of gases dissolved in liquids. It is based on separating a gaseous compartment in the MD system from the solvent using a semipermeable membrane that is permeable only to the gas molecules. We reproduce the experimental trends in the Xe chemical shifts in n-alkanes with increasing number of carbons and the large chemical shift difference between Xe in water and in perfluorooctyl bromide. We also reproduce the trend for a given solvent of decreasing Xe chemical shift with increasing temperature. We predict chemical shift differences between Xe in alkanes vs their perfluoro counterparts.

  2. Chemical shift and coupling constant analysis of dibenzyloxy disulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoutenburg, Eric G.; Gryn'ova, Ganna; Coote, Michelle L.; Priefer, Ronny

    2015-02-01

    Dialkoxy disulfides have found applications in the realm of organic synthesis as an S2 or alkoxy donor, under thermal and photolytic decompositions conditions, respectively. Spectrally, dibenzyloxy disulfides possess an ABq in the 1H NMR, which can shift by over 1.1 ppm depending on the substituents present on the aromatic ring, as well as the solvent employed. The effect of the said substituents and solvent were analyzed and compared to the center of the ABq, geminal coupling, and the differences in chemical shifts of the individual doublets. Additionally, quantum-chemical calculations demonstrated the intramolecular H-bonding arrangement, found within the dibenzyloxy disulfides.

  3. A new chalcone structure of (E)-1-(4-Bromophenyl)-3-(napthalen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one: Synthesis, structural characterizations, quantum chemical investigations and biological evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanigaimani, Kaliyaperumal; Arshad, Suhana; Khalib, Nuridayanti Che; Razak, Ibrahim Abdul; Arunagiri, C.; Subashini, A.; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza; Hashim, Nurul Shafiqah; Ooi, Kheng Leong

    2015-10-01

    The structure of (E)-1-(4-Bromophenyl)-3-(napthalen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (C19H13BrO) crystallized in the triclinic system of P-1 space group. The unit cell dimensions are: a = 5.8944 (9) Å, b = 7.8190 (12) Å, c = 16.320 (2) Å, α = 102.4364 (19)°, β = 95.943 (2)°, γ = 96.274 (2)° and Z = 2. The physical properties of this compound was determined by the spectroscopic methods (FTIR and 1H and 13C NMR). Quantum chemical investigations have been employed to investigate the structural and spectral properties. The molecular structure, vibrational assignments, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift values, non-linear optical (NLO) effect, HOMO-LUMO analysis and natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis were calculated using HF and DFT/B3LYP methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in the ground state. The results show that the theoretical calculation of the geometrical parameters, vibrational frequencies and chemical shifts are comparable with the experimental data. The crystal structure is influenced and stabilized by weak C-H⋯π interactions connecting the molecules into infinite supramolecular one dimensional ladder-like arrangement. Additionally, this compound is evaluated for their antibacterial activities against gram positive and gram negative strains using a micro dilution procedure and shows activities against a panel of microorganisms.

  4. A new chalcone structure of (E)-1-(4-Bromophenyl)-3-(napthalen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one: Synthesis, structural characterizations, quantum chemical investigations and biological evaluations.

    PubMed

    Thanigaimani, Kaliyaperumal; Arshad, Suhana; Khalib, Nuridayanti Che; Razak, Ibrahim Abdul; Arunagiri, C; Subashini, A; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza; Hashim, Nurul Shafiqah; Ooi, Kheng Leong

    2015-01-01

    The structure of (E)-1-(4-Bromophenyl)-3-(napthalen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (C19H13BrO) crystallized in the triclinic system of P-1 space group. The unit cell dimensions are: a=5.8944 (9)Å, b=7.8190 (12)Å, c=16.320 (2)Å, α=102.4364 (19)°, β=95.943 (2)°, γ=96.274 (2)° and Z=2. The physical properties of this compound was determined by the spectroscopic methods (FTIR and (1)H and (13)C NMR). Quantum chemical investigations have been employed to investigate the structural and spectral properties. The molecular structure, vibrational assignments, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift values, non-linear optical (NLO) effect, HOMO-LUMO analysis and natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis were calculated using HF and DFT/B3LYP methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in the ground state. The results show that the theoretical calculation of the geometrical parameters, vibrational frequencies and chemical shifts are comparable with the experimental data. The crystal structure is influenced and stabilized by weak C-H⋯π interactions connecting the molecules into infinite supramolecular one dimensional ladder-like arrangement. Additionally, this compound is evaluated for their antibacterial activities against gram positive and gram negative strains using a micro dilution procedure and shows activities against a panel of microorganisms.

  5. Synthesis and 1H and 13C NMR spectral study of some r(2),c(4)-bis(isopropylcarbonyl)-c(5)-hydroxy-t(5)-methyl-t(3)-substituted phenyl, cyclohexanones and their oximes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachander, R.; Sameera, S. A.; Mohan, R. T. Sabapathy

    2016-07-01

    All the synthesized compounds have been characterized by 1H, 13C, 2D NMR and mass spectral studies. The spectral data suggest that compounds 2, 3, 5 and 6 exist in chair conformation with axial orientation of the hydroxyl group and equatorial orientations of all the other substituent. Long-range coupling is observed between OH proton to H-6a proton should be in a W arrangement. Compounds 1 and 4 diamagnetic anisotropic effect of the furyl group is not pronounced and absence of long-rang coupling between OH proton to H-6a proton. The oximation effects were discussed to all synthesized compounds using 1H and 13C chemical shifts.

  6. Estimation of optical chemical shift in nuclear spin optical rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Yao, Guo-hua; He, Tian-jing; Chen, Dong-ming; Liu, Fan-chen

    2014-05-01

    A recently proposed optical chemical shift in nuclear spin optical rotation (NSOR) is studied by theoretical comparison of NSOR magnitude between chemically non-equivalent or different element nuclei in the same molecule. Theoretical expressions of the ratio R between their NSOR magnitudes are derived by using a known semi-empirical formula of NSOR. Taking methanol, tri-ethyl-phosphite and 2-methyl-benzothiazole as examples, the ratios R are calculated and the results approximately agree with the experiments. Based on those, the important influence factors on R and chemical distinction by NSOR are discussed.

  7. The spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies of 3,4-difluoroaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kose, Etem; Karabacak, Mehmet; Atac, Ahmet

    2015-05-01

    Spectroscopic and structural investigations of 3,4-difluoroaniline molecule are presented by using experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR, and UV-Vis) techniques and theoretical (DFT approach) calculations. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 3,4-difluoroaniline molecule are recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and 3500-10 cm-1 in the liquid phase, respectively. The NMR chemical shifts (1H and 13C) are recorded in chloroform-d solution. The UV absorption spectra of 3,4-difluoroaniline dissolved in ethanol and water are recorded in the range of 200-400 nm. Experimental results are supported with the following theoretical calculations; the optimized geometry and vibrational (FT-IR and FT-Raman) spectra are carried out by DFT (B3LYP)/6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (1H and 13C NMR) are obtained by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital method. Moreover, electronic characteristics, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, density of state diagrams, and molecular electrostatic potential surface are investigated. Nonlinear optical properties and thermodynamic features are also outlined theoretically. An excellent correlation of theoretical and experimental results provides a detailed description of the structural and physicochemical properties of the molecule. Thus, this work leads to a deep understanding of the characteristics of di-substituted aniline derivatives.

  8. Molecular structure, spectroscopic properties and quantum chemical calculations of 8-t-buthyl-4-methyl-2H-chromen-2-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koparir, Pelin; Sarac, Kamiran; Orek, Cahit; Koparir, Metin

    2016-11-01

    This study acquaints the 8-t-buthyl-4-methyl-2H-chromen 2-one (II) of by quantum chemical calculations and spectral ways. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies and gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift values of II in the ground state have been calculated utilizing the density functional method (B3LYP) with the 6-31G(d) basis set. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and chemical shift values display well agreement with experimental values. On the other hand, DFT calculations of molecular electrostatic potentials and frontier molecular orbitals of II were implemented at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory.

  9. Quantum mechanical and spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman,1H,13C NMR, UV-Vis) studies, NBO, NLO, HOMO, LUMO and Fukui function analysis of 5-Methoxy-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-2(3H)-thione by DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manju; Muthu, S.; Nanje Gowda, N. M.

    2017-02-01

    Theoretical analysis of the molecular structure, spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR, UV-Vis) studies, and thermodynamic characteristics of 5-Methoxy-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-2(3H)-thione (5MBIT) molecule were done by DFT/B3LYP using 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. Theoretical parameters were compared with experimental data. The dipole moment (μ), polarizability (Δα) and first order hyperpolarizability (β) of the molecule were calculated. Thermodynamic properties, HOMO and LUMO energies were determined. Global reactivity parameters and Fukui function of the 5MBIT molecule were predicted.

  10. Ligand binding analysis and screening by chemical denaturation shift.

    PubMed

    Schön, Arne; Brown, Richard K; Hutchins, Burleigh M; Freire, Ernesto

    2013-12-01

    The identification of small molecule ligands is an important first step in drug development, especially drugs that target proteins with no intrinsic activity. Toward this goal, it is important to have access to technologies that are able to measure binding affinities for a large number of potential ligands in a fast and accurate way. Because ligand binding stabilizes the protein structure in a manner dependent on concentration and binding affinity, the magnitude of the protein stabilization effect elicited by binding can be used to identify and characterize ligands. For example, the shift in protein denaturation temperature (Tm shift) has become a popular approach to identify potential ligands. However, Tm shifts cannot be readily transformed into binding affinities, and the ligand rank order obtained at denaturation temperatures (≥60°C) does not necessarily coincide with the rank order at physiological temperature. An alternative approach is the use of chemical denaturation, which can be implemented at any temperature. Chemical denaturation shifts allow accurate determination of binding affinities with a surprisingly wide dynamic range (high micromolar to sub nanomolar) and in situations where binding changes the cooperativity of the unfolding transition. In this article, we develop the basic analytical equations and provide several experimental examples.

  11. Chemical-shift MRI of exogenous lipoid pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.E.; Choplin, R.H.; Chiles, C.

    1996-05-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia results from the aspiration or inhalation of fatty substances, such as mineral oil found in laxatives or nasal medications containing liquid paraffin. We present standard and lipid-sensitive (chemical-shift) MR findings in a patient with histologically confirmed lipoid pneumonia. The loss of signal intensity in an area of airspace disease on opposed-phase imaging was considered specific for the presence of lipid. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Heuristic overlap-exchange model of noble gas chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, Frank J.

    2004-05-01

    It is now generally recognized that overlap-exchange interactions are the primary cause of the medium-dependent magnetic shielding (chemical shift) in all noble gases except helium, although the attractive electrostatic-dispersion (van der Waals) interactions play an indirect role in determining the penetration of the interacting species into the repulsive overlap-exchange region. The short-range nature of these overlap-exchange interactions, combined with the fact that they often can be approximated by simple functions of the overlap of the wave functions of the interacting species, suggests a useful semiempirical model of these chemical shifts. In it the total shielding is the sum of shieldings due to pairwise interactions of the noble gas atom with the individual atoms of the medium, with the "atomic" shielding terms either estimated by simple functions of the atomic overlap integrals averaged over their Boltzmann-weighted separations, or determined by fits to experimental data in systems whose complexity makes the former procedure impractical. Results for 129Xe chemical shifts in the noble gases and in a variety of molecular and condensed systems, including families of n-alkanes, straight-chain alcohols, and the endohedral compounds Xe@C60 and Xe@C70 are encouraging for the applicability of the model to systems of technical and biomedical interest.

  13. Solvent Effects on Oxygen-17 Chemical Shifts in Amides. Quantitative Linear Solvation Shift Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díez, Ernesto; Fabián, Jesús San; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P.; Esteban, Angel L.; Abboud, José-Luis M.; Contreras, Ruben H.; de Kowalewski, Dora G.

    1997-01-01

    A multiple-linear-regression analysis (MLRA) has been carried out using the Kamlet-Abboud-Taft (KAT) solvatochromic parameters in order to elucidate and quantify the solvent effects on the17O chemical shifts ofN-methylformamide (NMF),N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF),N-methylacetamide (NMA), andN,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA). The chemical shifts of the four molecules show the same dependence (in ppm) on the solvent polarity-polarizability, i.e., -22π*. The influence of the solvent hydrogen-bond-donor (HBD) acidities is slightly larger for the acetamides NMA and DMA, i.e., -48α, than for the formamides NMF and DMF, i.e., -42α. The influence of the solvent hydrogen-bond-acceptor (HBA) basicities is negligible for the nonprotic molecules DMF and DMA but significant for the protic molecules NMF and NMA, i.e., -9β. The effect of substituting the N-H hydrogen by a methyl group amounts to -5.9 ppm in NMF and 5.4 ppm in NMA. The effect of substituting the O=C-H hydrogen amounts to 5.5 ppm in NMF and 16.8 ppm in DMF. The model of specific hydration sites of amides by I. P. Gerothanassis and C. Vakka [J. Org. Chem.59,2341 (1994)] is settled in a more quantitative basis and the model by M. I. Burgar, T. E. St. Amour, and D. Fiat [J. Phys. Chem.85,502 (1981)] is critically evaluated.17O hydration shifts have been calculated for formamide (FOR) by the ab initio LORG method at the 6-31G* level. For a formamide surrounded by the four in-plane molecules of water in the first hydration shell, the calculated17O shift change due to the four hydrogen bonds, -83.2 ppm, is smaller than the empirical hydration shift, -100 ppm. The17O shift change from each out-of-plane water molecule hydrogen-bonded to the amide oxygen is -18.0 ppm. These LORG results support the conclusion that no more than four water molecules are hydrogen-bonded to the amide oxygen in formamide.

  14. Synthesis, crystal structure analysis, spectral characterization, quantum chemical calculations, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-3a,4,7,7a-tetrahydro-4,7-methanobenzo[d]isoxazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eryılmaz, Serpil; Gül, Melek; İnkaya, Ersin; İdil, Önder; Özdemir, Namık

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-3a,4,7,7a-tetrahydro-4,7-methanobenzo[d]isoxazole was synthesized via 1,3 dipolar cycloaddition, characterized by spectroscopic analysis such as FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Vis, LC-MS/MS, Elemental Analysis, and X-ray Single Crystal diffraction technique. The Density Functional Theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311G(d,p) basis set in the ground state was applied for quantum chemical calculations and molecular geometric parameters of the compound were compared with the X-ray analysis results. FT-IR, NMR and UV-Vis spectral analysis were analysed to determine the compliance with the vibrational frequencies, 1H NMR and 13C NMR chemical shifts and absorption wavelength values. The frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), some global reactivity descriptors, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), thermodynamic properties, non-linear optical (NLO) behaviour of the compound were examined with the same method in gas phase, theoretically. Moreover, antioxidant activity was determined with three different methods - DPPH radical scavenging, reducing and metal chelating, antimicrobial activity were carried out with Gram positive, Gram negative and Eukaryote for the title compound.

  15. pH-responsive fluorescence chemical sensor constituted by conjugated polymers containing pyridine rings.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Naoya; Kaneko, Yuki; Sekiguchi, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Sugeno, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Poly(p-pyridinium phenylene ethynylene)s (PPyPE) functionalized with alternating donor-acceptor repeat units were synthesized by a Pd-catalyzed Sonogashira coupling reaction between diethynyl monomer and di-iodopyridine for use as a pH-responsive fluorescence chemical sensor. The synthesized PPyPE, containing pyridine units, was characterized by FT-IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopies. We investigated the relationship between changes of optical properties and protonation/deprotonation of PPyPE containing pyridine units in solution. Addition of HCl decreased and red-shifted the fluorescence intensity of the conjugated polymers that contained pyridine rings; fluorescence intensity of the polymers increased upon addition of NaOH solution. The synthesized PPyPE was found to be an effective and reusable chemical sensor for pH sensing.

  16. Ultrahigh resolution protein structures using NMR chemical shift tensors

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Franks, W. Trent; Oldfield, Eric; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-01-01

    NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs) in proteins, as well as their orientations, represent an important new restraint class for protein structure refinement and determination. Here, we present the first determination of both CST magnitudes and orientations for 13Cα and 15N (peptide backbone) groups in a protein, the β1 IgG binding domain of protein G from Streptococcus spp., GB1. Site-specific 13Cα and 15N CSTs were measured using synchronously evolved recoupling experiments in which 13C and 15N tensors were projected onto the 1H-13C and 1H-15N vectors, respectively, and onto the 15N-13C vector in the case of 13Cα. The orientations of the 13Cα CSTs to the 1H-13C and 13C-15N vectors agreed well with the results of ab initio calculations, with an rmsd of approximately 8°. In addition, the measured 15N tensors exhibited larger reduced anisotropies in α-helical versus β-sheet regions, with very limited variation (18 ± 4°) in the orientation of the z-axis of the 15N CST with respect to the 1H-15N vector. Incorporation of the 13Cα CST restraints into structure calculations, in combination with isotropic chemical shifts, transferred echo double resonance 13C-15N distances and vector angle restraints, improved the backbone rmsd to 0.16 Å (PDB ID code 2LGI) and is consistent with existing X-ray structures (0.51 Å agreement with PDB ID code 2QMT). These results demonstrate that chemical shift tensors have considerable utility in protein structure refinement, with the best structures comparable to 1.0-Å crystal structures, based upon empirical metrics such as Ramachandran geometries and χ1/χ2 distributions, providing solid-state NMR with a powerful tool for de novo structure determination. PMID:21969532

  17. Combined NMR analysis of huge residual dipolar couplings and pseudocontact shifts in terbium(III)-phthalocyaninato single molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Damjanovic, Marko; Katoh, Keiichi; Yamashita, Masahiro; Enders, Markus

    2013-09-25

    Several small paramagnetic complexes combine large hyperfine NMR shifts with large magnetic anisotropies. The latter are a prerequisite for single molecule magnet (SMM) behavior. We choose the SMM tris(octabutoxyphthalocyaninato) diterbium (1) for a high resolution NMR study where we combined for the first time a comprehensive (1)H and (13)C chemical shift analysis of a SMM with the evaluation of large residual dipolar couplings (RDCs). The latter are a consequence of partial alignment of SMM 1 in the strong magnetic field of the NMR spectrometer. To the best of our knowledge RDCs in SMMs have never been reported before. We measured RDCs between -78 and +99 Hz for the (13)C-(1)H vectors of CH bonds and up to -109 Hz for (1)H-(1)H vectors of geminal hydrogen atoms (magnetic field of 14.09 T, temperature 295 K). Considerable negative Fermi contact shifts (up to -60 ppm) were determined for (13)C atoms at the phthalocyaninato core. Paramagnetic (13)C NMR shifts of the butoxy chains as well as all (1)H NMR chemical shifts are a result of pseudocontact shifts (pcs), and therefore it is easily possible to determine the positions of the respective nuclei in solution. Measurements of CH and HH vectors by RDC analysis are in accordance with the geometry as determined by the pseudocontact shifts, but in addition to that, RDCs give information about internal mobility. The axial component of the magnetic susceptibility tensor has been determined independently by pcs and by RDC.

  18. Systemic bone marrow disorders: Characterization with proton chemical shift imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gueckel, F.B.; Brix, G.; Semmler, W.; Zuna, I.; Knauf, W.; Ho, A.D.; van Kaick, G. )

    1990-07-01

    In a prospective clinical study, 26 patients (22 with malignant lymphoma and 4 with myelofibrosis) and 9 healthy volunteers were examined by conventional magnetic resonance and proton chemical shift imaging (CSI; modified Dixon method). On the basis of the CSI data, a quantitative evaluation of the relative fat and water signal fractions in regions of interest of the femur, pelvis, and spine was performed. In 16 of 17 patients with biopsy-proven bone marrow disorders, CSI revealed a significant reduction in the fat fraction of the bone marrow relative to that of normal volunteers. The visual assessment could detect only 14 of the 17 pathological cases.

  19. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  20. Vicinal deuterium perturbations on hydrogen NMR chemical shifts in cyclohexanes.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Daniel J; Allis, Damian G; Hudson, Bruce S; James, Shelly; Morgera, Katherine B; Baldwin, John E

    2008-10-15

    The substitution of a deuterium for a hydrogen is known to perturb the NMR chemical shift of a neighboring hydrogen atom. The magnitude of such a perturbation may depend on the specifics of bonding and stereochemical relationships within a molecule. For deuterium-labeled cyclohexanes held in a chair conformation at -80 degrees C or lower, all four possible perturbations of H by D as H-C-C-H is changed to D-C-C-H have been determined experimentally, and the variations seen, ranging from 6.9 to 10.4 ppb, have been calculated from theory and computational methods. The predominant physical origins of the NMR chemical shift perturbations in deuterium-labeled cyclohexanes have been identified and quantified. The trends defined by the Delta delta perturbation values obtained through spectroscopic experiments and by theory agree satisfactorily. They do not match the variations typically observed in vicinal J(H-H) coupling constants as a function of dihedral angles.

  1. Influence of N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds on the (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensors in crystalline acetaminophen: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Behzadi, Hadi; Hadipour, Nasser L

    2007-06-01

    A computational investigation was carried out to characterize the (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensors in crystalline acetaminophen. We found that N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds around the acetaminophen molecule in the crystal lattice have different influences on the calculated (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding eigenvalues and their orientations in the molecular frame of axes. The calculations were performed with the B3LYP method and 6-311++G(d, p) and 6-311+G(d) standard basis sets using the Gaussian 98 suite of programs. Calculated chemical shielding tensors were used to evaluate the (17)O, (15)N, and (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors in crystalline acetaminophen, which are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The difference between the calculated NMR parameters of the monomer and molecular clusters shows how much hydrogen-bonding interactions affect the chemical shielding tensors of each nucleus. The computed (17)O chemical shielding tensor on O(1), which is involved in two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, shows remarkable sensitivity toward the choice of the cluster model, whereas the (17)O chemical shielding tensor on O(2) involved in one N-H...O hydrogen bond, shows smaller improvement toward the hydrogen-bonding interactions. Also, a reasonably good agreement between the experimentally obtained solid-state (15)N and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) calculations is achievable only in molecular cluster model where a complete hydrogen-bonding network is considered. Moreover, at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) level of theory, the calculated (17)O, (15)N and (13)C chemical shielding tensor orientations are able to reproduce the experimental values to a reasonably good degree of accuracy.

  2. Chemical shift-based water/fat separation in the presence of susceptibility-induced fat resonance shift

    PubMed Central

    Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; Yu, Huanzhou; Shimakawa, Ann; Link, Thomas M.; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2011-01-01

    Chemical shift-based water/fat separation methods have been emerging due to the growing clinical need for fat quantification in different body organs. Accurate quantification of proton-density fat fraction requires the assessment of many confounding factors, including the need of modeling the presence of multiple peaks in the fat spectrum. Most recent quantitative chemical shift-based water/fat separation approaches rely on a multi-peak fat spectrum with pre-calibrated peak locations and pre-calibrated or self-calibrated peak relative amplitudes. However, water/fat susceptibility differences can induce fat spectrum resonance shifts depending on the shape and orientation of the fatty inclusions. The effect is of particular interest in the skeletal muscle due to the anisotropic arrangement of extracellular lipids. In the present work, the effect of susceptibility-induced fat resonance shift on the fat fraction is characterized in a conventional complex-based chemical shift-based water/fat separation approach that does not model the susceptibility-induced fat resonance shift. A novel algorithm is then proposed in order to quantify the resonance shift in a complex-based chemical shift-based water/fat separation approach that considers the fat resonance shift in the signal model, aiming to extract information about the orientation/geometry of lipids. The technique is validated in a phantom and preliminary in vivo results are shown in the calf musculature of healthy and diabetic subjects. PMID:22247024

  3. Using chemical shifts to determine structural changes in proteins upon complex formation.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Andrea; Montalvao, Rinaldo W; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2011-08-04

    Methods for determining protein structures using only chemical shift information are progressively becoming more accurate and reliable. A major problem, however, in the use of chemical shifts for the determination of the structures of protein complexes is that the changes in the chemical shifts upon binding tend to be rather limited and indeed often smaller than the standard errors made in the predictions of chemical shifts corresponding to given structures. We present a procedure that, despite this problem, enables one to use of chemical shifts to determine accurately the conformational changes that take place upon complex formation.

  4. Determination of amyloid core structure using chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Skora, Lukasz; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2012-12-01

    Amyloid fibrils are the pathological hallmark of a large variety of neurodegenerative disorders. The structural characterization of amyloid fibrils, however, is challenging due to their non-crystalline, heterogeneous, and often dynamic nature. Thus, the structure of amyloid fibrils of many proteins is still unknown. We here show that the structure calculation program CS-Rosetta can be used to obtain insight into the core structure of amyloid fibrils. Driven by experimental solid-state NMR chemical shifts and taking into account the polymeric nature of fibrils CS-Rosetta allows modeling of the core of amyloid fibrils. Application to the Y145X stop mutant of the human prion protein reveals a left-handed β-helix.

  5. A Simple and Fast Approach for Predicting 1H and 13C Chemical Shifts: Toward Chemical Shift-Guided Simulations of RNA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a simple and fast approach for predicting RNA chemical shifts from interatomic distances that performs with an accuracy similar to existing predictors and enables the first chemical shift-restrained simulations of RNA to be carried out. Our analysis demonstrates that the applied restraints can effectively guide conformational sampling toward regions of space that are more consistent with chemical shifts than the initial coordinates used for the simulations. As such, our approach should be widely applicable in mapping the conformational landscape of RNAs via chemical shift-guided molecular dynamics simulations. The simplicity and demonstrated sensitivity to three-dimensional structure should also allow our method to be used in chemical shift-based RNA structure prediction, validation, and refinement. PMID:25255209

  6. Spectroscopic (vibrational, NMR and UV-vis.) and quantum chemical investigations on 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ashgar; Gökce, Halil; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2016-01-05

    In this study, the 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde compound as one of the derivatives of vanillin which is a well known flavoring agent, C14H20O3, has been investigated by experimentally and extensively utilizing density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. In this context, the optimized geometry, vibrational frequencies, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts, UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra, HOMO-LUMO analysis, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), thermodynamic parameters and atomic charges of 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde have been calculated. In addition, theoretically predicted IR, Raman and UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra of the mentioned molecule have been constructed. The results calculated were compared with the experimental data.

  7. Spectroscopic (vibrational, NMR and UV-vis.) and quantum chemical investigations on 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Ashgar; Gökce, Halil; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde compound as one of the derivatives of vanillin which is a well known flavoring agent, C14H20O3, has been investigated by experimentally and extensively utilizing density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. In this context, the optimized geometry, vibrational frequencies, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts, UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra, HOMO-LUMO analysis, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), thermodynamic parameters and atomic charges of 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde have been calculated. In addition, theoretically predicted IR, Raman and UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra of the mentioned molecule have been constructed. The results calculated were compared with the experimental data.

  8. Theoretical Modeling of 99 Tc NMR Chemical Shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Gabriel B.; Andersen, Amity; Washton, Nancy M.; Chatterjee, Sayandev; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2016-09-06

    Technetium (Tc) displays a rich chemistry due to the wide range of oxidation states (from -I to +VII) and ability to form coordination compounds. Determination of Tc speciation in complex mixtures is a major challenge, and 99Tc NMR spec-troscopy is widely used to probe chemical environments of Tc in odd oxidation states. However interpretation of the 99Tc NMR data is hindered by the lack of reference compounds. DFT computations can help fill this gap, but to date few com-putational studies have focused on 99Tc NMR of compounds and complexes. This work systematically evaluates the inclu-sion small percentages of Hartree-Fock exchange correlation and relativistic effects in DFT computations to support in-terpretation of the 99Tc NMR spectra. Hybrid functionals are found to perform better than their pure GGA counterparts, and non-relativistic calculations have been found to generally show a lower mean absolute deviation from experiment. Overall non-relativistic PBE0 and B3PW91 calculations are found to most accurately predict 99Tc NMR chemical shifts.

  9. Natural Linewidth Chemical Shift Imaging (NL-CSI)

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Adil; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.

    2007-01-01

    The discrete Fourier transform (FT) is a conventional method for spatial reconstruction of chemical shifting imaging (CSI) data. Due to point spread function (PSF) effects, FT reconstruction leads to intervoxel signal leakage (Gibbs ringing). Spectral localization by imaging (SLIM) reconstruction was previously proposed to overcome this intervoxel signal contamination. However, the existence of magnetic field inhomogeneities creates an additional source of intervoxel signal leakage. It is demonstrated herein that even small field inhomogeneities substantially amplify intervoxel signal leakage in both FT and SLIM reconstruction approaches. A new CSI data acquisition strategy and reconstruction algorithm (natural linewidth (NL) CSI) is presented that eliminates effects of magnetic field inhomogeneity-induced intervoxel signal leakage and intravoxel phase dispersion on acquired data. The approach is based on acquired CSI data, high-resolution images, and magnetic field maps. The data are reconstructed based on the imaged object structure (as in the SLIM approach) and a reconstruction matrix that takes into account the inhomogeneous field distribution inside anatomically homogeneous compartments. Phantom and in vivo results show that the new method allows field inhomogeneity effects from the acquired MR signal to be removed so that the signal decay is determined only by the “natural”R2 relaxation rate constant (hence the term “natural linewidth” CSI). PMID:16721752

  10. Chemical shift assignments of the connexin37 carboxyl terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanjun; Spagnol, Gaelle; Pontifex, Tasha K; Burt, Janis M; Sorgen, Paul L

    2017-03-01

    Connexin37 (Cx37) is a gap junction protein involved in cell-to-cell communication in the vasculature and other tissues. Cx37 suppresses proliferation of vascular cells involved in tissue development and repair in vivo, as well as tumor cells. Global deletion of Cx37 in mice leads to enhanced vasculogenesis in development, as well as collateralgenesis and angiogenesis in response to injury, which together support improved tissue remodeling and recovery following ischemic injury. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C resonance assignments for an important regulatory domain of Cx37, the carboxyl terminus (CT; C233-V333). The predicted secondary structure of the Cx37CT domain based on the chemical shifts is that of an intrinsically disordered protein. In the (1)H-(15)N HSQC, N-terminal residues S254-Y259 displayed a second weaker peak and residues E261-Y266 had significant line broadening. These residues are flanked by prolines (P250, P258, P260, and P268), suggesting proline cis-trans isomerization. Overall, these assignments will be useful for identifying the binding sites for intra- and inter-molecular interactions that affect Cx37 channel activity.

  11. Applications of Chemical Shift Imaging to Marine Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haakil; Tikunov, Andrey; Stoskopf, Michael K.; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    The successful applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in medicine are mostly due to the non-invasive and non-destructive nature of MRI techniques. Longitudinal studies of humans and animals are easily accomplished, taking advantage of the fact that MRI does not use harmful radiation that would be needed for plain film radiographic, computerized tomography (CT) or positron emission (PET) scans. Routine anatomic and functional studies using the strong signal from the most abundant magnetic nucleus, the proton, can also provide metabolic information when combined with in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). MRS can be performed using either protons or hetero-nuclei (meaning any magnetic nuclei other than protons or 1H) including carbon (13C) or phosphorus (31P). In vivo MR spectra can be obtained from single region of interest (ROI or voxel) or multiple ROIs simultaneously using the technique typically called chemical shift imaging (CSI). Here we report applications of CSI to marine samples and describe a technique to study in vivo glycine metabolism in oysters using 13C MRS 12 h after immersion in a sea water chamber dosed with [2-13C]-glycine. This is the first report of 13C CSI in a marine organism. PMID:20948912

  12. Identifying secondary structures in proteins using NMR chemical shift 3D correlation maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Amrita; Dorai, Kavita

    2013-06-01

    NMR chemical shifts are accurate indicators of molecular environment and have been extensively used as aids in protein structure determination. This work focuses on creating empirical 3D correlation maps of backbone chemical shift nuclei for use as identifiers of secondary structure elements in proteins. A correlated database of backbone nuclei chemical shifts was constructed from experimental structural data gathered from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) as well as isotropic chemical shift values from the RefDB database. Rigorous statistical analysis of the maps led to the conclusion that specific correlations between triplets of backbone chemical shifts are best able to differentiate between different secondary structures such as α-helices, β-strands and turns. The method is compared with similar techniques that use NMR chemical shift information as aids in biomolecular structure determination and performs well in tests done on experimental data determined for different types of proteins, including large multi-domain proteins and membrane proteins.

  13. Synthesis, X-ray crystallography, spectroscopic (FT-IR, 1H &13C NMR and UV), computational (DFT/B3LYP) and enzymes inhibitory studies of 7-hydroximinocholest-5-en-3-ol acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Faheem; Parveen, Mehtab; Alam, Mahboob; Azaz, Shaista; Malla, Ali Mohammed; Alam, Mohammad Jane; Lee, Dong-Ung; Ahmad, Shabbir

    2016-07-01

    The present study reports the synthesis of 7-Hydroximinocholest-5-en-3-ol acetate (syn. 3β-acetoxycholest-5-en-7-one oxime; in general, steroidal oxime). The identity of steroidal molecule was confirmed by NMR, FT-IR, MS, CHN microanalysis and X-ray crystallography. DFT calculations on the titled molecule have been performed. The molecular structure and spectra interpreted by Gaussian hybrid computational analysis theory (B3LYP) are found to be in good correlation with the experimental data obtained from the various spectrophotometric techniques. The vibrational bands appearing in the FTIR are assigned with great accuracy using harmonic frequencies along with intensities and animated modes. Molecular properties like HOMO-LUMO analysis, chemical reactivity descriptors, MEP mapping, dipole moment and natural atomic charges have been presented at the same level of theory. Moreover, the Hirshfeld analysis was carried out to ascertain the secondary interactions and associated 2D fingerprint plots. The percentages of various interactions are pictorialized by fingerprint plots of Hirshfeld surface. Steroidal oxime exhibited promising inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as compared to the reference drug, tacrine. Molecular docking was performed to introduce steroidal molecules into the X-ray crystal structures of acetylcholinesterase at the active site to find out the probable binding mode. The results of molecular docking admitted that steroidal oxime may exhibit enzyme inhibitor activity.

  14. Tendencies of 31P chemical shifts changes in NMR spectra of nucleotide derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, A V; Rezvukhin, A I

    1984-01-01

    31P NMR chemical shifts of the selected mono- and oligonucleotide derivatives, including the compounds with P-N, P-C, P-S bonds and phosphite nucleotide analogues have been presented. The influence of substituents upon 31P chemical shifts has been discussed. The concrete examples of 31P chemical shifts data application in the field of nucleotide chemistry have been considered. PMID:6087290

  15. Quantum Chemical Study of the Solvent Effect on the Anticancer Active Molecule of Iproplatin: Structural, Electronic, and Spectroscopic Properties (IR, 1H NMR, UV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, N.; Ghiasi, R.; Fazaeli, R.; Jamehbozorgi, S.

    2017-01-01

    The structural, electronic, and spectroscopic properties of the anticancer active molecule of iproplatin were investigated in the gas and liquid phases. Based on the polarizable continuum model (PCM), the solvent effect on the structural parameters, frontier orbitals, and spectroscopic parameters of the complex was investigated. The results indicate that the polarity of solvents plays a significant role in the structure and pro perties of the complex. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the Gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Pt-Cl and Pt-OH bonds were investigated through a vibrational analysis. Moreover, time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) was used to calculate the energy, oscillatory strength, and wavelength absorption maximum (λmax) of electronic transitions and its nature within the complex.

  16. sup 13 C NMR investigation of crosslinking in organic aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R. L.; Pekala, R. W.

    1989-09-15

    Organic aerogels are a special type of low density foam produced from the supercritical drying of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gels. These aerogels have continuous porosity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes (<1000 {angstrom}), and a microstructure composed of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters ranging from 30-175 {angstrom}. The particle size, surface area, density, and mechanical properties of the aerogels are largely determined by the catalysts concentration used in the sol-gel polymerization. In order to gain some insight into the crosslinks between RF particles, aerogels were labeled with C-13 formaldehyde at various times in the polymerization. CPMAS and IRCP techniques were used to correlate the relaxation behavior of the C-13 enriched aerogels with their different microstructures. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. A robust algorithm for optimizing protein structures with NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Berjanskii, Mark; Arndt, David; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David S

    2015-11-01

    Over the past decade, a number of methods have been developed to determine the approximate structure of proteins using minimal NMR experimental information such as chemical shifts alone, sparse NOEs alone or a combination of comparative modeling data and chemical shifts. However, there have been relatively few methods that allow these approximate models to be substantively refined or improved using the available NMR chemical shift data. Here, we present a novel method, called Chemical Shift driven Genetic Algorithm for biased Molecular Dynamics (CS-GAMDy), for the robust optimization of protein structures using experimental NMR chemical shifts. The method incorporates knowledge-based scoring functions and structural information derived from NMR chemical shifts via a unique combination of multi-objective MD biasing, a genetic algorithm, and the widely used XPLOR molecular modelling language. Using this approach, we demonstrate that CS-GAMDy is able to refine and/or fold models that are as much as 10 Å (RMSD) away from the correct structure using only NMR chemical shift data. CS-GAMDy is also able to refine of a wide range of approximate or mildly erroneous protein structures to more closely match the known/correct structure and the known/correct chemical shifts. We believe CS-GAMDy will allow protein models generated by sparse restraint or chemical-shift-only methods to achieve sufficiently high quality to be considered fully refined and "PDB worthy". The CS-GAMDy algorithm is explained in detail and its performance is compared over a range of refinement scenarios with several commonly used protein structure refinement protocols. The program has been designed to be easily installed and easily used and is available at http://www.gamdy.ca.

  18. Stereospecific assignment of the asparagine and glutamine sidechain amide protons in proteins from chemical shift analysis.

    PubMed

    Harsch, Tobias; Schneider, Philipp; Kieninger, Bärbel; Donaubauer, Harald; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2017-02-01

    Side chain amide protons of asparagine and glutamine residues in random-coil peptides are characterized by large chemical shift differences and can be stereospecifically assigned on the basis of their chemical shift values only. The bimodal chemical shift distributions stored in the biological magnetic resonance data bank (BMRB) do not allow such an assignment. However, an analysis of the BMRB shows, that a substantial part of all stored stereospecific assignments is not correct. We show here that in most cases stereospecific assignment can also be done for folded proteins using an unbiased artificial chemical shift data base (UACSB). For a separation of the chemical shifts of the two amide resonance lines with differences ≥0.40 ppm for asparagine and differences ≥0.42 ppm for glutamine, the downfield shifted resonance lines can be assigned to H(δ21) and H(ε21), respectively, at a confidence level >95%. A classifier derived from UASCB can also be used to correct the BMRB data. The program tool AssignmentChecker implemented in AUREMOL calculates the Bayesian probability for a given stereospecific assignment and automatically corrects the assignments for a given list of chemical shifts.

  19. An Improved Experiment to Illustrate the Effect of Electronegativity on Chemical Shift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boggess, Robert K.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a method for using nuclear magnetic resonance to observe the effect of electronegativity on the chemical shift of protons in similar compounds. Suggests the use of 1,3-dihalopropanes as samples. Includes sample questions. (MVL)

  20. Calculation of NMR chemical shifts in organic solids: accounting for motional effects.

    PubMed

    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Pickard, Chris J

    2009-03-14

    NMR chemical shifts were calculated from first principles for well defined crystalline organic solids. These density functional theory calculations were carried out within the plane-wave pseudopotential framework, in which truly extended systems are implicitly considered. The influence of motional effects was assessed by averaging over vibrational modes or over snapshots taken from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. It is observed that the zero-point correction to chemical shifts can be significant, and that thermal effects are particularly noticeable for shielding anisotropies and for a temperature-dependent chemical shift. This study provides insight into the development of highly accurate first principles calculations of chemical shifts in solids, highlighting the role of motional effects on well defined systems.

  1. A new approach to NMR chemical shift additivity parameters using simultaneous linear equation method.

    PubMed

    Shahab, Yosif A; Khalil, Rabah A

    2006-10-01

    A new approach to NMR chemical shift additivity parameters using simultaneous linear equation method has been introduced. Three general nitrogen-15 NMR chemical shift additivity parameters with physical significance for aliphatic amines in methanol and cyclohexane and their hydrochlorides in methanol have been derived. A characteristic feature of these additivity parameters is the individual equation can be applied to both open-chain and rigid systems. The factors that influence the (15)N chemical shift of these substances have been determined. A new method for evaluating conformational equilibria at nitrogen in these compounds using the derived additivity parameters has been developed. Conformational analyses of these substances have been worked out. In general, the results indicate that there are four factors affecting the (15)N chemical shift of aliphatic amines; paramagnetic term (p-character), lone pair-proton interactions, proton-proton interactions, symmetry of alkyl substituents and molecular association.

  2. AFNMR: automated fragmentation quantum mechanical calculation of NMR chemical shifts for biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Swails, Jason; Zhu, Tong; He, Xiao; Case, David A

    2015-10-01

    We evaluate the performance of the automated fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach (AF-QM/MM) on the calculation of protein and nucleic acid NMR chemical shifts. The AF-QM/MM approach models solvent effects implicitly through a set of surface charges computed using the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and it can also be combined with an explicit solvent model through the placement of water molecules in the first solvation shell around the solute; the latter substantially improves the accuracy of chemical shift prediction of protons involved in hydrogen bonding with solvent. We also compare the performance of AF-QM/MM on proteins and nucleic acids with two leading empirical chemical shift prediction programs SHIFTS and SHIFTX2. Although the empirical programs outperform AF-QM/MM in predicting chemical shifts, the differences are in some cases small, and the latter can be applied to chemical shifts on biomolecules which are outside the training set employed by the empirical programs, such as structures containing ligands, metal centers, and non-standard residues. The AF-QM/MM described here is implemented in version 5 of the SHIFTS software, and is fully automated, so that only a structure in PDB format is required as input.

  3. Errors in the Calculation of 27Al Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianlong; Wang, Chengfei; Zhao, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Computational chemistry is an important tool for signal assignment of 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance spectra in order to elucidate the species of aluminum(III) in aqueous solutions. The accuracy of the popular theoretical models for computing the 27Al chemical shifts was evaluated by comparing the calculated and experimental chemical shifts in more than one hundred aluminum(III) complexes. In order to differentiate the error due to the chemical shielding tensor calculation from that due to the inadequacy of the molecular geometry prediction, single-crystal X-ray diffraction determined structures were used to build the isolated molecule models for calculating the chemical shifts. The results were compared with those obtained using the calculated geometries at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The isotropic chemical shielding constants computed at different levels have strong linear correlations even though the absolute values differ in tens of ppm. The root-mean-square difference between the experimental chemical shifts and the calculated values is approximately 5 ppm for the calculations based on the X-ray structures, but more than 10 ppm for the calculations based on the computed geometries. The result indicates that the popular theoretical models are adequate in calculating the chemical shifts while an accurate molecular geometry is more critical. PMID:23203134

  4. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  5. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), (1)H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong (1)H-(1)H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow (1)H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) (1)H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about (1)H-(1)H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical

  6. Measurement of large /sup 19/F chemical shifts with the RYa-2305 spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Iorga, E.V.; Kucheryaev, A.G.; Lebedev, V.A.; Leont'eva, I.N.

    1985-06-01

    In order to extend the range of F-19 resonant frequencies in the RYa-2305 high-resolution NMR spectrometer, the authors have replaced the generator 9 by a tunable generator. This allows recording of the spectra together or to measure the chemical shifts exactly. The chemical shifts for MeF/sub 6/ in solutions of the hexafluorides of Mo, W, and U in organic solvents are shown, as measured at +20 degrees C. The upgrades in the RYa-2305 not only extend the range of measurable F-19 chemical shifts, but also enable one to measure large shifts with high accuracy. This principle for recording and measuring can be applied to other nuclides with the RYa2305 spectrometer.

  7. 29Si NMR Chemical Shift Calculation for Silicate Species by Gaussian Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, S. N.; Rostami, A. A.; Godarzian, A.

    2005-05-01

    Hartree-Fock self-consistent-field (HF-SCF) theory and the Gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO) methods are used in the calculation of 29Si NMR chemical shifts for ABOUT 90 units of 19 compounds of various silicate species of precursors for zeolites. Calculations have been performed at geometries optimized at the AM1 semi-empirical method. The GIAO-HF-SCF calculations were carried out with using three different basis sets: 6-31G*, 6-31+G** and 6-311+G(2d,p). To demonstrate the quality of the calculations the calculated chemical shifts, δ, were compared with the corresponding experimental values for the compounds in study. The results, especially with 6-31+g** are in excellent agreement with experimental values. The calculated chemical shifts, in practical point of view, appear to be accurate enough to aid in experimental peak assignments. The difference between the experimental and calculated 29Si chemical shift values not only depends on the Qn units but also it seems that basis set effects and the level of theory is more important. For the series of molecules studied here, the standard deviations and mean absolute errors for 29Si chemical shifts relative to TMS determined using Hartree--Fock 6-31+G** basis is nearly in all cases smaller than the errors for shifts determined using HF/6-311+G(2d,p).

  8. Chemical shift prediction for protein structure calculation and quality assessment using an optimally parameterized force field.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jakob T; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2012-01-01

    The exquisite sensitivity of chemical shifts as reporters of structural information, and the ability to measure them routinely and accurately, gives great import to formulations that elucidate the structure-chemical-shift relationship. Here we present a new and highly accurate, precise, and robust formulation for the prediction of NMR chemical shifts from protein structures. Our approach, shAIC (shift prediction guided by Akaikes Information Criterion), capitalizes on mathematical ideas and an information-theoretic principle, to represent the functional form of the relationship between structure and chemical shift as a parsimonious sum of smooth analytical potentials which optimally takes into account short-, medium-, and long-range parameters in a nuclei-specific manner to capture potential chemical shift perturbations caused by distant nuclei. shAIC outperforms the state-of-the-art methods that use analytical formulations. Moreover, for structures derived by NMR or structures with novel folds, shAIC delivers better overall results; even when it is compared to sophisticated machine learning approaches. shAIC provides for a computationally lightweight implementation that is unimpeded by molecular size, making it an ideal for use as a force field.

  9. Magnetic couplings in the chemical shift of paramagnetic NMR.

    PubMed

    Vaara, Juha; Rouf, Syed Awais; Mareš, Jiří

    2015-10-13

    We apply the Kurland-McGarvey (J. Magn. Reson. 1970, 2, 286) theory for the NMR shielding of paramagnetic molecules, particularly its special case limited to the ground-state multiplet characterized by zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction of the form S·D·S. The correct formulation for this problem was recently presented by Soncini and Van den Heuvel (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 054113). With the effective electron spin quantum number S, the theory involves 2S+1 states, of which all but one are low-lying excited states, between which magnetic couplings take place by Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. We investigate these couplings as a function of temperature, focusing on both the high- and low-temperature behaviors. As has been seen in work by others, the full treatment of magnetic couplings is crucial for a realistic description of the temperature behavior of NMR shielding up to normal measurement temperatures. At high temperatures, depending on the magnitude of ZFS, the effect of magnetic couplings diminishes, and the Zeeman and hyperfine interactions become effectively averaged in the thermally occupied states of the multiplet. At still higher temperatures, the ZFS may be omitted altogether, and the shielding properties may be evaluated using a doublet-like formula, with all the 2S+1 states becoming effectively degenerate at the limit of vanishing magnetic field. We demonstrate these features using first-principles calculations of Ni(II), Co(II), Cr(II), and Cr(III) complexes, which have ZFS of different sizes and signs. A non-monotonic inverse temperature dependence of the hyperfine shift is predicted for axially symmetric integer-spin systems with a positive D parameter of ZFS. This is due to the magnetic coupling terms that are proportional to kT at low temperatures, canceling the Curie-type 1/kT prefactor of the hyperfine shielding in this case.

  10. Correlation between the covalency and the thallium-205 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift in oxides and halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouini, N.

    1986-07-01

    205Tl chemical shift measurements were carried out on thallium(I) oxides and halides. A correlation between the chemical shift and the stereochemical activity of the 6 s2 lone pair of Tl I was established; the greater this activity, the greater the absolute value of the chemical shift. For the halides, optical and chemical shift measurements gave access to the Tl- X bond ionicity via Ramsey's equation. In thallium(I) halides the absolute value of the chemical shift increases with the covalency. The work of Glaser on thallium(III) halides showed the chemical shift to decrease with increasing covalency. An explication of this difference is proposed. The hyperfine coupling constant A of the paramagnetic compound Tl 4MnI 6 was determined by the study of the chemical shift as a function of the susceptibility. This constant A is seen to be weak (-7 KG/μ B).

  11. Correlation between the covalency and the thallium-205 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift in oxides and halides

    SciTech Connect

    Jouini, N.

    1986-07-15

    /sup 205/Tl chemical shift measurements were carried out on thallium(I) oxides and halides. A correlation between the chemical shift and the stereochemical activity of the 6s/sup 2/ lone pair of Tl/sup I/ was established; the greater this activity, the greater the absolute value of the chemical shift. For the halides, optical and chemical shift measurements gave access to the Tl-X bond ionicity via Ramsey's equation. In thallium(I) halides the absolute value of the chemical shift increases with the covalency. The work of Glaser on thallium(III) halides showed the chemical shift to decrease with increasing covalency. An explication of this difference is proposed. The hyperfine coupling constant A of the paramagnetic compound Tl/sub 4/MnI/sub 6/ was determined by the study of the chemical shift as a function of the susceptibility. This constant A is seen to be weak (-7 KG/..mu../sub B/).

  12. Can Holo NMR Chemical Shifts be Directly Used to Resolve RNA-Ligand Poses?

    PubMed

    Frank, Aaron T

    2016-02-22

    Using a set of machine learning based predictors that are capable of predicting ligand-induced shielding effects on (1)H and (13)C nonexchangeable nuclei, it was discovered that holo NMR chemical shifts can be used to resolve RNA-ligand poses. This was accomplished by quantitatively comparing measured and predicted holo chemical shifts in conformationally diverse "decoy" pools for three test cases and then, for each, comparing the native pose to the pose in the decoy pool that exhibited the lowest error. For three test cases, the poses in the decoy pools that exhibited the best agreement between measured and predicted holo chemical shifts were within 0.28, 1.12, and 2.38 Å of the native poses. Interestingly, the predictors used in this study were trained on a database containing, only, apo RNA data. The agreement between the chemical shift-selected poses and the native NMR poses suggests that the predictors used in this study were able to "learn" general chemical shift-structure relationships from apo RNA data that could be used to account for ligand-induced shielding effects on RNA nuclei for the test cases studied.

  13. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Labudde, D; Leitner, D; Krüger, M; Oschkinat, H

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  14. Equilibrium simulations of proteins using molecular fragment replacement and NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, Wouter; Tian, Pengfei; Frellsen, Jes; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Hamelryck, Thomas; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2014-09-23

    Methods of protein structure determination based on NMR chemical shifts are becoming increasingly common. The most widely used approaches adopt the molecular fragment replacement strategy, in which structural fragments are repeatedly reassembled into different complete conformations in molecular simulations. Although these approaches are effective in generating individual structures consistent with the chemical shift data, they do not enable the sampling of the conformational space of proteins with correct statistical weights. Here, we present a method of molecular fragment replacement that makes it possible to perform equilibrium simulations of proteins, and hence to determine their free energy landscapes. This strategy is based on the encoding of the chemical shift information in a probabilistic model in Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. First, we demonstrate that with this approach it is possible to fold proteins to their native states starting from extended structures. Second, we show that the method satisfies the detailed balance condition and hence it can be used to carry out an equilibrium sampling from the Boltzmann distribution corresponding to the force field used in the simulations. Third, by comparing the results of simulations carried out with and without chemical shift restraints we describe quantitatively the effects that these restraints have on the free energy landscapes of proteins. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the molecular fragment replacement strategy can be used in combination with chemical shift information to characterize not only the native structures of proteins but also their conformational fluctuations.

  15. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anders S; Linnet, Troels E; Borg, Mikael; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts--sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94). ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift-based structural refinements, starting from high-resolution X-ray structures of Protein G, ubiquitin, and SMN Tudor Domain, result in average chemical shifts, hydrogen bond geometries, and trans-hydrogen bond ((h3)J(NC')) spin-spin coupling constants that are in excellent agreement with experiment. We show that the structural sensitivity of the QM-based amide proton chemical shift predictions is needed to obtain this agreement. The ProCS method thus offers a powerful new tool for refining the structures of hydrogen bonding networks to high accuracy with many potential applications such as protein flexibility in ligand binding.

  16. Protein Structure Validation and Refinement Using Amide Proton Chemical Shifts Derived from Quantum Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Anders S.; Linnet, Troels E.; Borg, Mikael; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94). ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift-based structural refinements, starting from high-resolution X-ray structures of Protein G, ubiquitin, and SMN Tudor Domain, result in average chemical shifts, hydrogen bond geometries, and trans-hydrogen bond (h3JNC') spin-spin coupling constants that are in excellent agreement with experiment. We show that the structural sensitivity of the QM-based amide proton chemical shift predictions is needed to obtain this agreement. The ProCS method thus offers a powerful new tool for refining the structures of hydrogen bonding networks to high accuracy with many potential applications such as protein flexibility in ligand binding. PMID:24391900

  17. Modeling 15N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence.

  18. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-30

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between "static" and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N-. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles.

  19. Modeling (15)N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure.

    PubMed

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-28

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence.

  20. (1)H chemical shift differences of Prelog-Djerassi lactone derivatives: DFT and NMR conformational studies.

    PubMed

    Aímola, Túlio J; Lima, Dimas J P; Dias, Luiz C; Tormena, Cláudio F; Ferreira, Marco A B

    2015-02-21

    This work reports an experimental and theoretical study of the conformational preferences of several Prelog-Djerassi lactone derivatives, to elucidate the (1)H NMR chemical shift differences in the lactonic core that are associated with the relative stereochemistry of these derivatives. The boat-like conformation of explains the anomalous (1)H chemical shift between H-5a and H-5b, in which the two methyl groups (C-8 and C-9) face H-5b, leading to its higher shielding effect.

  1. Structure determination of noncanonical RNA motifs guided by 1H NMR chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Sripakdeevong, Parin; Cevec, Mirko; Chang, Andrew T.; Erat, Michèle C.; Ziegeler, Melanie; Zhao, Qin; Fox, George E.; Gao, Xiaolian; Kennedy, Scott D.; Kierzek, Ryszard; Nikonowicz, Edward P.; Schwalbe, Harald; Sigel, Roland K. O.; Turner, Douglas H.; Das, Rhiju

    2014-01-01

    Structured non-coding RNAs underline fundamental cellular processes, but determining their 3D structures remains challenging. We demonstrate herein that integrating NMR 1H chemical shift data with Rosetta de novo modeling can consistently return high-resolution RNA structures. On a benchmark set of 23 noncanonical RNA motifs, including 11 blind targets, Chemical-Shift-ROSETTA for RNA (CS-ROSETTA-RNA) recovered the experimental structures with high accuracy (0.6 to 2.0 Å all-heavy-atom rmsd) in 18 cases. PMID:24584194

  2. Work function shifts of catalytic metals under hydrogen gas visualized by terahertz chemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kiwa, Toshihiko; Hagiwara, Takafumi; Shinomiya, Mitsuhiro; Sakai, Kenji; Tsukada, Keiji

    2012-05-21

    Terahertz chemical microscopy (TCM) was applied to visualize the distribution of the work function shift of catalytic metals under hydrogen gas. TCM measures the chemical potential on the surface of a SiO(2)/Si/sapphire sensing plate without any contact with the plate. By controlling the bias voltage between an electrode on the SiO(2)/ surface and the Si layer, the relationship between the voltage and the THz amplitude from the sensing plate can be obtained. As a demonstration, two types of structures were fabricated on the sensing plate, and the work function shifts due to catalytic reactions were visualized.

  3. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of the distribution and chemical shifts of xenon in the cages of zeolite NaA. I. Distribution and 129Xe chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; Jameson, A. Keith; Baello, Bernoli I.; Lim, Hyung-Mi

    1994-04-01

    The equilibrium distribution of the Xe atoms among the alpha cages of the zeolite NaA have been measured directly by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in ten samples ranging from very low xenon loading up to saturation. These distributions are simulated by a grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) method which reproduces the experimental data quantitatively for all ten samples at 296 K and also at 360 K. The adsorption isotherm of the high loading samples has been determined directly from the chemical shift of the gas in equilibrium with the adsorbed xenon. The data compare favorably with the adsorption isotherms resulting from the simulations. The previously reported 129Xe chemical shifts of the individual Xen clusters and their temperature dependences in the range 188-420 K are reproduced quantitatively by the GCMC simulation which makes use of pairwise additive ab initio intermolecular shielding functions. These cluster shifts and their temperature dependence encode the distribution of configurations for a given Xen cluster in an alpha cage. Quantitative agreement with the three experimental measures of the distribution of Xe atoms in NaA (partitioning between the adsorbed phase and the gas phase, distribution of the intrazeolitic atoms among the alpha cages, and the distribution of Xe atoms within an alpha cage containing Xen) as a function of temperature has been achieved for the first time.

  4. Sequential nearest-neighbor effects on computed 13Calpha chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Vila, Jorge A; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt; Scheraga, Harold A

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate sequential nearest-neighbor effects on quantum-chemical calculations of (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts, we selected the structure of the nucleic acid binding (NAB) protein from the SARS coronavirus determined by NMR in solution (PDB id 2K87). NAB is a 116-residue alpha/beta protein, which contains 9 prolines and has 50% of its residues located in loops and turns. Overall, the results presented here show that sizeable nearest-neighbor effects are seen only for residues preceding proline, where Pro introduces an overestimation, on average, of 1.73 ppm in the computed (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts. A new ensemble of 20 conformers representing the NMR structure of the NAB, which was calculated with an input containing backbone torsion angle constraints derived from the theoretical (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts as supplementary data to the NOE distance constraints, exhibits very similar topology and comparable agreement with the NOE constraints as the published NMR structure. However, the two structures differ in the patterns of differences between observed and computed (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts, Delta(ca,i), for the individual residues along the sequence. This indicates that the Delta(ca,i)-values for the NAB protein are primarily a consequence of the limited sampling by the bundles of 20 conformers used, as in common practice, to represent the two NMR structures, rather than of local flaws in the structures.

  5. Computation of Chemical Shifts for Paramagnetic Molecules: A Laboratory Experiment for the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Benjamin P.; Simpson, Scott; Zurek, Eva; Autschbach, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    A computational experiment investigating the [superscript 1]H and [superscript 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of molecules with unpaired electrons has been developed and implemented. This experiment is appropriate for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory course in computational, physical, or inorganic chemistry. The…

  6. Magnetic Shift of the Chemical Freeze-out and Electric Charge Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the effect of a strong magnetic field on the chemical freeze-out points in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. As a result of inverse magnetic catalysis or magnetic inhibition, the crossover onset to hot and dense matter out of quarks and gluons should be shifted to a lower temperature. To quantify this shift we employ the hadron resonance gas model and an empirical condition for the chemical freeze-out. We point out that the charged particle abundances are significantly affected by the magnetic field so that the electric charge fluctuation is largely enhanced, especially at high baryon density. The charge conservation partially cancels the enhancement, but our calculation shows that the electric charge fluctuation could serve as a magnetometer. We find that the fluctuation exhibits a crossover behavior rapidly increased for e B ≳(0.4 GeV )2, while the charge chemical potential has smoother behavior with an increasing magnetic field.

  7. Characteristic chemical shifts of quasicrystalline Zn-Mg-Zr alloys studied by EELS and SXES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshiya, S.; Terauchi, M.; Ohhashi, S.; Tsai, A. P.

    2013-06-01

    Chemical shifts of the constituent atoms of primitive icosahedral quasicrystal (P-QC), face-centred icosahedral quasicrystal (F-QC) and 1/1-approximant (1/1-AP) of F-QC Zn-Mg-Zr alloys were investigated for the first time using high energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES). Among Zn M-shell and Mg L-shell excitation EELS spectra of P-QC, F-QC and 1/1-AP alloys, only the quasicrystalline alloys showed a chemical shift towards the larger binding energy side. In Zn-L and Zr-L emission SXES spectra, the P-QC and F-QC alloys showed a chemical shift towards larger binding energy side. The magnitudes of the shifts in the Zn-L emission spectra of the quasicrystalline alloys were almost the same as for ZnO. These results strongly suggest a decrease in valence charge in quasicrystalline states. Therefore, it should be concluded that bonding in quasicrystalline states involves a characteristic increase in covalency compared with bonding in corresponding approximant and standard metal crystals.

  8. Carbon 13 chemical shift tensors in aromatic compounds. 3. Phenanthrene and triphenylene

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, A.; Hughes, C.D.; Horton, W.J.; Facelli, J.C.; Grant, D.M.

    1992-04-08

    Measurements of the principal values of the {sup 13}C chemical shift tensor are presented for the three carbons in triphenylene and for three different {alpha} carbons in phenanthrene. The measurements in triphenylene were made in natural abundance samples at room temperature, while the phenanthrene tensors were obtained from selectively labeled compounds (99% {sup 13}C) at low temperatures ({approx} 25 K). The principal values of the shift tensors were oriented in the molecular frame using ab initio LORG calculations. The steric compression at C{sub 4} in phenanthrene and in corresponding positions in triphenylene is manifested in sizable upfield shift in the {sigma} 33 component relative to the corresponding {sigma} 33 values at C{sub 1} and C{sub 9} in phenanthrene. The upfield shift in {sigma} 33 is mainly responsible for the well-known upfield shift of the isotropic chemical shifts of such sterically perturbed carbons. In phenanthrene c{sub 9} exhibits a unique {sigma} 22 value reflecting the greater localization of {pi}-electrons in the c{sub 9}-C{sub 10} bond. This localization of the {pi}-electrons at the C{sub 9}-C{sub 10} bond in the central ring of phenanthrene also corresponds with the most likely ordering of electrons described by the various Kekule structures in phenanthrene. The analysis of the {sup 13}C chemical shieldings of the bridgehead carbons in the triphenylene provides significant experimental information on bonding between rings in polycyclic aromatic compounds. 39 refs., 8 fig., 3 tab.

  9. Distal and proximal ligand interactions in heme proteins: correlations between C-O and Fe-C vibrational frequencies, oxygen-17 and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts, and oxygen-17 nuclear quadrupole coupling constants in C17O- and 13CO-labeled species.

    PubMed

    Park, K D; Guo, K M; Adebodun, F; Chiu, M L; Sligar, S G; Oldfield, E

    1991-03-05

    We have obtained the oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of a variety of C17O-labeled heme proteins, including sperm whale (Physeter catodon) myoglobin, two synthetic sperm whale myoglobin mutants (His E7----Val E7; His E7----Phe E7), adult human hemoglobin, rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) hemoglobin, horseradish (Cochlearia armoracia) peroxidase (E.C. 1.11.1.7) isoenzymes A and C, and Caldariomyces fumago chloroperoxidase (E.C. 1.11.1.10), in some cases as a function of pH, and have determined their isotropic 17O NMR chemical shifts, delta i, and spin-lattice relaxation times, T1. We have also obtained similar results on a picket fence prophyrin, [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(alpha, alpha, alpha, alpha, alpha-pivalamidophenyl)porphyrinato]iron(II) (1-MeIm)CO, both in solution and in the solid state. Our results show an excellent correlation between the infrared C-O vibrational frequencies, v(C-O), and delta i, between v(C-O) and the 17O nuclear quadrupole coupling constant (e2qQ/h, derived from T1), and as expected between e2qQ/h and delta i. Taken together with the work of others on the 13C NMR of 13CO-labeled proteins, where we find an excellent correlation between delta i(13C) and v(Fe-C), our results suggest that IR and NMR measurements reflect the same interaction, which is thought to be primarily the degree of pi-back-bonding from Fe d to CO pi* orbitals, as outlined previously [Li, X.-Y., & Spiro, T.G. (1988) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 110, 6024]. The modulation of this interaction by the local charge field of the distal heme residue (histidine, glutamine, arginine, and possibly lysine) in a variety of species and mutants, as reflected in the NMR and IR measurements, is discussed, as is the effect of cysteine as the proximal heme ligand.

  10. A sensitive, high resolution magic angle turning experiment for measuring chemical shift tensor principal values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderman, D. W.

    1998-12-01

    A sensitive, high-resolution 'FIREMAT' two-dimensional (2D) magic-angle-turning experiment is described that measures chemical shift tensor principal values in powdered solids. The spectra display spinning-sideband patterns separated by their isotropic shifts. The new method's sensitivity and high resolution in the isotropic-shift dimension result from combining the 5pi magic-angle-turning pulse sequence, an extension of the pseudo-2D sideband-suppression data rearrangement, and the TIGER protocol for processing 2D data. TPPM decoupling is used to enhance resolution. The method requires precise synchronization of the pulses and sampling to the rotor position. It is shown that the technique obtains 35 natural-abundance 13C tensors from erythromycin in 19 hours, and high quality naturalabundance 15N tensors from eight sites in potassium penicillin V in three days on a 400MHz spectrometer.

  11. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Weontae; Markley, John L

    2012-10-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  12. Nonlinear detection of secondary isotopic chemical shifts in NMR through spin noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Rodin, Victor V.; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Müller, Norbert; Desvaux, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    The detection of minor species in the presence of large amounts of similar main components remains a key challenge in analytical chemistry, for instance, to obtain isotopic fingerprints. As an alternative to the classical NMR scheme based on coherent excitation and detection, here we introduce an approach based on spin-noise detection. Chemical shifts and transverse relaxation rates are determined using only the detection circuit. Thanks to a nonlinear effect in mixtures with small chemical shift dispersion, small signals on top of a larger one can be observed with increased sensitivity as bumps on a dip; the latter being the signature of the main magnetization. Experimental observations are underpinned by an analytical theory: the coupling between the magnetization and the coil provides an amplified detection capability of both small static magnetic field inhomogeneities and small NMR signals. This is illustrated by two-bond 12C/13C isotopic measurements.

  13. Nonlinear detection of secondary isotopic chemical shifts in NMR through spin noise

    PubMed Central

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Rodin, Victor V.; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Müller, Norbert; Desvaux, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    The detection of minor species in the presence of large amounts of similar main components remains a key challenge in analytical chemistry, for instance, to obtain isotopic fingerprints. As an alternative to the classical NMR scheme based on coherent excitation and detection, here we introduce an approach based on spin-noise detection. Chemical shifts and transverse relaxation rates are determined using only the detection circuit. Thanks to a nonlinear effect in mixtures with small chemical shift dispersion, small signals on top of a larger one can be observed with increased sensitivity as bumps on a dip; the latter being the signature of the main magnetization. Experimental observations are underpinned by an analytical theory: the coupling between the magnetization and the coil provides an amplified detection capability of both small static magnetic field inhomogeneities and small NMR signals. This is illustrated by two-bond 12C/13C isotopic measurements. PMID:28067218

  14. Modeling proteins using a super-secondary structure library and NMR chemical shift information.

    PubMed

    Menon, Vilas; Vallat, Brinda K; Dybas, Joseph M; Fiser, Andras

    2013-06-04

    A remaining challenge in protein modeling is to predict structures for sequences with no sequence similarity to any experimentally solved structure. Based on earlier observations, the library of protein backbone supersecondary structure motifs (Smotifs) saturated about a decade ago. Therefore, it should be possible to build any structure from a combination of existing Smotifs with the help of limited experimental data that are sufficient to relate the backbone conformations of Smotifs between target proteins and known structures. Here, we present a hybrid modeling algorithm that relies on an exhaustive Smotif library and on nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift patterns without any input of primary sequence information. In a test of 102 proteins, the algorithm delivered 90 homology-model-quality models, among them 24 high-quality ones, and a topologically correct solution for almost all cases. The current approach opens a venue to address the modeling of larger protein structures for which chemical shifts are available.

  15. Two-Dimensional Proton Chemical-Shift Imaging of Human Muscle Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiani; Willcott, M. Robert; Moore, Gregory J.

    1997-06-01

    Large lipid signals and strong susceptibility gradients introduced by muscle-bone interfaces represent major technical challenges forin vivoproton MRS of human muscle. Here, the demonstration of two-dimensional proton chemical-shift imaging of human muscle metabolites is presented. This technique utilizes a chemical-shift-selective method for water and lipid suppression and automatic shimming for optimal homogeneity of the magnetic field. The 2D1H CSI technique described facilitates the acquisition of high-spatial-resolution spectra, and allows one to acquire data from multiple muscle groups in a single experiment. A preliminary investigation utilizing this technique in healthy adult males (n= 4) revealed a highly significant difference in the ratio of the creatine to trimethylamine resonance between the fast and slow twitch muscle groups examined. The technique is robust, can be implemented on a commercial scanner with relative ease, and should prove to be a useful tool for both clinical and basic investigators.

  16. Protein backbone and sidechain torsion angles predicted from NMR chemical shifts using artificial neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2013-01-01

    A new program, TALOS-N, is introduced for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts. The program relies far more extensively on the use of trained artificial neural networks than its predecessor, TALOS+. Validation on an independent set of proteins indicates that backbone torsion angles can be predicted for a larger, ≥ 90% fraction of the residues, with an error rate smaller than ca 3.5%, using an acceptance criterion that is nearly two-fold tighter than that used previously, and a root mean square difference between predicted and crystallographically observed (φ,ψ) torsion angles of ca 12°. TALOS-N also reports sidechain χ1 rotameric states for about 50% of the residues, and a consistency with reference structures of 89%. The program includes a neural network trained to identify secondary structure from residue sequence and chemical shifts. PMID:23728592

  17. Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways: Identifying Metabolic Pathways Directly from a Single 2D NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Pal, Debnath; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2015-12-15

    Identifying cellular processes in terms of metabolic pathways is one of the avowed goals of metabolomics studies. Currently, this is done after relevant metabolites are identified to allow their mapping onto specific pathways. This task is daunting due to the complex nature of cellular processes and the difficulty in establishing the identity of individual metabolites. We propose here a new method: ChemSMP (Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways), which facilitates rapid analysis by identifying the active metabolic pathways directly from chemical shifts obtained from a single two-dimensional (2D) [(13)C-(1)H] correlation NMR spectrum without the need for identification and assignment of individual metabolites. ChemSMP uses a novel indexing and scoring system comprised of a "uniqueness score" and a "coverage score". Our method is demonstrated on metabolic pathways data from the Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) and chemical shifts from the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Benchmarks show that ChemSMP has a positive prediction rate of >90% in the presence of decluttered data and can sustain the same at 60-70% even in the presence of noise, such as deletions of peaks and chemical shift deviations. The method tested on NMR data acquired for a mixture of 20 amino acids shows a success rate of 93% in correct recovery of pathways. When used on data obtained from the cell lysate of an unexplored oncogenic cell line, it revealed active metabolic pathways responsible for regulating energy homeostasis of cancer cells. Our unique tool is thus expected to significantly enhance analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data by reducing existing impediments.

  18. Energy landscapes of a hairpin peptide including NMR chemical shift restraints.

    PubMed

    Carr, Joanne M; Whittleston, Chris S; Wade, David C; Wales, David J

    2015-08-21

    Methods recently introduced to improve the efficiency of protein structure prediction simulations by adding a restraint potential to a molecular mechanics force field introduce additional input parameters that can affect the performance. Here we investigate the changes in the energy landscape as the relative weight of the two contributions, force field and restraint potential, is systematically altered, for restraint functions constructed from calculated nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts. Benchmarking calculations were performed on a 12-residue peptide, tryptophan zipper 1, which features both secondary structure (a β-hairpin) and specific packing of tryptophan sidechains. Basin-hopping global optimization was performed to assess the efficiency with which lowest-energy structures are located, and the discrete path sampling approach was employed to survey the energy landscapes between unfolded and folded structures. We find that inclusion of the chemical shift restraints improves the efficiency of structure prediction because the energy landscape becomes more funnelled and the proportion of local minima classified as native increases. However, the funnelling nature of the landscape is reduced as the relative contribution of the chemical shift restraint potential is increased past an optimal value.

  19. Evaluation of cerebral 31-P chemical shift images utilizing statistical parametric mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehemann, Stefan; Gaser, Christian; Volz, Hans-Peter; Sauer, Heinrich

    1999-05-01

    We present an evaluation technique of two dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift images (CSI) to analyze spatial differences of metabolite distributions and/or concentrations between groups of probands. Thus, chemical shift imaging is not only used as localization technique for NMR-spectroscopy, but the information of the complete spectroscopic image is used for the evaluation process. 31P CSI of the human brain were acquired with a Philips Gyroscan ACSII whole-body scanner at 1.5 T. CSI for different phosphorus metabolites were generated, all representing the same anatomical location. For each metabolite the CSI of two groups of subjects were compared with each other using the general linear model implemented in the widely distributed SPM96 software package. With this approach, even covariates or confounding variables like age or medication can be considered. As an example for the application of this technique, variations in the distribution of the 31P metabolite phosphocreatin between unmedicated schizophrenic patients and healthy controls were visualized. To our knowledge, this is the first approach to analyze spatial variations in metabolite concentrations between groups of subjects on the basis of chemical shift images. The presented technique opens a new perspective in the evaluation of 2D NMR spectroscopic data.

  20. Investigation of 1H NMR chemical shifts of organic dye with hydrogen bonds and ring currents.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Soo; Won, Yong Sun; Lee, Woojin; Kim, Jae Hong

    2011-04-07

    The (1)H NMR chemical shifts were theoretically computed for the organic dyes 2-(2,6-dimethyl-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-malononitrile (1), cyano-(2,6-dimethyl-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-acetic acid methyl ester (2), 2-(2,6-bis(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-malononitrile (3), and methyl 2-(2,6-bis(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-2-cyanoacetate (4) at the GIAO/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Moreover, the intramolecular rotational barriers of the molecules were calculated to evaluate the internal flexibility with respect to the torsional degrees of freedom, and the nuclear-independent chemical shifts (NICS) were employed to analyze the ring currents. The difference was explained in terms of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and ring currents of the molecules. The (1)H NMR spectra were reproduced by experiments for the comparison with computationally constructed data. Our results suggest a good guideline in interpreting (1)H NMR chemical shifts using computational methods and furthermore a reliable perspective for designing molecular structures.

  1. Temperature dependence of contact and dipolar NMR chemical shifts in paramagnetic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bob; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-02-07

    Using a recently proposed equation for NMR nuclear magnetic shielding for molecules with unpaired electrons [A. Soncini and W. Van den Heuvel, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 021103 (2013)], equations for the temperature (T) dependent isotropic shielding for multiplets with an effective spin S equal to 1/2, 1, 3/2, 2, and 5/2 in terms of electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian parameters are derived and then expanded in powers of 1/T. One simplifying assumption used is that a matrix derived from the zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensor and the Zeeman coupling matrix (g-tensor) share the same principal axis system. The influence of the rhombic ZFS parameter E is only investigated for S = 1. Expressions for paramagnetic contact shielding (from the isotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) and pseudo-contact or dipolar shielding (from the anisotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) are considered separately. The leading order is always 1/T. A temperature dependence of the contact shielding as 1/T and of the dipolar shielding as 1/T{sup 2}, which is sometimes assumed in the assignment of paramagnetic chemical shifts, is shown to arise only if S ≥ 1 and zero-field splitting is appreciable, and only if the Zeeman coupling matrix is nearly isotropic (Δg = 0). In such situations, an assignment of contact versus dipolar shifts may be possible based only on linear and quadratic fits of measured variable-temperature chemical shifts versus 1/T. Numerical data are provided for nickelocene (S = 1). Even under the assumption of Δg = 0, a different leading order of contact and dipolar shifts in powers of 1/T is not obtained for S = 3/2. When Δg is not very small, dipolar and contact shifts both depend in leading order in 1/T in all cases, with sizable contributions in order 1/T{sup n} with n = 2 and higher.

  2. Temperature dependence of contact and dipolar NMR chemical shifts in paramagnetic molecules.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bob; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-02-07

    Using a recently proposed equation for NMR nuclear magnetic shielding for molecules with unpaired electrons [A. Soncini and W. Van den Heuvel, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 021103 (2013)], equations for the temperature (T) dependent isotropic shielding for multiplets with an effective spin S equal to 1/2, 1, 3/2, 2, and 5/2 in terms of electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian parameters are derived and then expanded in powers of 1/T. One simplifying assumption used is that a matrix derived from the zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensor and the Zeeman coupling matrix (g-tensor) share the same principal axis system. The influence of the rhombic ZFS parameter E is only investigated for S = 1. Expressions for paramagnetic contact shielding (from the isotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) and pseudo-contact or dipolar shielding (from the anisotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) are considered separately. The leading order is always 1/T. A temperature dependence of the contact shielding as 1/T and of the dipolar shielding as 1/T(2), which is sometimes assumed in the assignment of paramagnetic chemical shifts, is shown to arise only if S ≥ 1 and zero-field splitting is appreciable, and only if the Zeeman coupling matrix is nearly isotropic (Δg = 0). In such situations, an assignment of contact versus dipolar shifts may be possible based only on linear and quadratic fits of measured variable-temperature chemical shifts versus 1/T. Numerical data are provided for nickelocene (S = 1). Even under the assumption of Δg = 0, a different leading order of contact and dipolar shifts in powers of 1/T is not obtained for S = 3/2. When Δg is not very small, dipolar and contact shifts both depend in leading order in 1/T in all cases, with sizable contributions in order 1/T(n) with n = 2 and higher.

  3. Sequence correction of random coil chemical shifts: correlation between neighbor correction factors and changes in the Ramachandran distribution.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming M

    2011-06-01

    Random coil chemical shifts are necessary for secondary chemical shift analysis, which is the main NMR method for identification of secondary structure in proteins. One of the largest challenges in the determination of random coil chemical shifts is accounting for the effect of neighboring residues. The contributions from the neighboring residues are typically removed by using neighbor correction factors determined based on each residue's effect on glycine chemical shifts. Due to its unusual conformational freedom, glycine may be particularly unrepresentative for the remaining residue types. In this study, we use random coil peptides containing glutamine instead of glycine to determine the random coil chemical shifts and the neighbor correction factors. The resulting correction factors correlate to changes in the populations of the major wells in the Ramachandran plot, which demonstrates that changes in the conformational ensemble are an important source of neighbor effects in disordered proteins. Glutamine derived random coil chemical shifts and correction factors modestly improve our ability to predict (13)C chemical shifts of intrinsically disordered proteins compared to existing datasets, and may thus improve the identification of small populations of transient structure in disordered proteins.

  4. Spinning sidebands from chemical shift anisotropy in 13C MAS imaging.

    PubMed

    Scheler, U; Blümich, B; Spiess, H W

    1993-07-01

    Solid state imaging by 13C MAS imaging is described. The spinning sidebands occurring at moderate spinning speeds, which disturb the images, can be suppressed by TOSS. For rigid solids the spatial resolution that can be achieved in this way is better than that of 1H images at the same spinning speed. Spatially resolved spectra with or without spinning sidebands can likewise be recorded providing information about the isotropic and the anisotropic chemical shifts which can be exploited for the study of structure, order and dynamics. The techniques are demonstrated on a phantom made with 13C-labelled glycine.

  5. Three model space experiments on chemical reactions. [Gibbs adsorption, equilibrium shift and electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P.; Facemire, B.

    1977-01-01

    Three investigations conducted aboard Skylab IV and Apollo-Soyuz involved phenomena that are of interest to the biochemistry community. The formaldehyde clock reaction and the equilibrium shift reaction experiments conducted aboard Apollo Soyuz demonstrate the effect of low-g foams or air/liquid dispersions on reaction rate and chemical equilibrium. The electrodeposition reaction experiment conducted aboard Skylab IV demonstrate the effect of a low-g environment on an electrochemical displacement reaction. The implications of the three space experiments for various applications are considered.

  6. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Görling, Benjamin; Bräse, Stefan; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored. PMID:27598217

  7. Sclerosing liposarcoma of epididymis: Role of chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Subramaniyan; Raghu, Vineetha; Kumar, Devendra; Sempiege, Venkata R P

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing liposarcoma of epididymis is a rare extratesticular scrotal tumor with variable prognosis. Ultrasonography is the initial imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of scrotal mass and helps to differentiate testicular and extratesticular masses, thereby narrowing down the differential diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging with its excellent soft tissue resolution can help in the further characterization of the nature of the tumor. In this case report, we highlight the role of chemical shift imaging in making a confident preoperative diagnosis of liposarcoma thereby guiding optimal and timely management. PMID:27857462

  8. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Görling, Benjamin; Bräse, Stefan; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-09-02

    Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored.

  9. Calculation of NMR chemical shifts. 7. Gauge-invariant INDO method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, H.; Miura, K.; Hirai, A.

    A gauge-invariant INDO method based on the coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory is presented and applied to the calculation of 1H and 13C chemical shifts of hydrocarbons including ring compounds. Invariance of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic shieldings with respect to displacement of the coordinate origin is discussed. Comparison between calculated and experimental results exhibits fairly good agreement, provided that the INDO parameters of Ellis et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.94, 4069 (1972)) are used with the inclusion of all multicenter one-electron integrals.

  10. Deuterium isotope effect on 13C chemical shifts of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rozwadowski, Z

    2006-09-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shift of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases, derivatives of amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-methionine) and various ortho-hydroxyaldehydes in CDCl3 have been measured. The results have shown that the tetrabutylammonium salts of the Schiff bases amino acids, being derivatives of 2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde and 3,5-dibromosalicylaldehyde, exist in the NH-form, while in the derivatives of salicylaldehyde and 5-bromosalicylaldehyde a proton transfer takes place. The interactions between COO- and NH groups stabilize the proton-transferred form through a bifurcated intramolecular hydrogen bond.

  11. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brian A; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D; Stafford, R Jason

    2009-03-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz-McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (< or equal 16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > or =5 for echo train lengths (ETLs) > or =4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and/or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with > or =4 echoes and for T2*(<1.0%) with > or =7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire < or =16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo

  12. Experimental and quantum chemical studies of a novel synthetic prenylated chalcone

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chalcones are ubiquitous natural compounds with a wide variety of reported biological activities, including antitumoral, antiviral and antimicrobial effects. Furthermore, chalcones are being studied for its potential use in organic electroluminescent devices; therefore the description of their spectroscopic properties is important to elucidate the structure of these molecules. One of the main techniques available for structure elucidation is the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR). Accordingly, the prediction of the NMR spectra in this kind of molecules is necessary to gather information about the influence of substituents on their spectra. Results A novel substituted chalcone has been synthetized. In order to identify the functional groups present in the new synthesized compound and confirm its chemical structure, experimental and theoretical 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectra were analyzed. The theoretical molecular structure and NMR spectra were calculated at both the Hartree-Fock and Density Functional (meta: TPSS; hybrid: B3LYP and PBE1PBE; hybrid meta GGA: M05-2X and M06-2X) levels of theory in combination with a 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The structural parameters showed that the best method for geometry optimization was DFT:M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p), whereas the calculated bond angles and bond distances match experimental values of similar chalcone derivatives. The NMR calculations were carried out using the Gauge-Independent Atomic Orbital (GIAO) formalism in a DFT:M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) optimized geometry. Conclusion Considering all HF and DFT methods with GIAO calculations, TPSS and PBE1PBE were the most accurate methods used for calculation of 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR chemical shifts, which was almost similar to the B3LYP functional, followed in order by HF, M05-2X and M06-2X methods. All calculations were done using the Gaussian 09 software package. Theoretical calculations can be used to predict and confirm the structure of substituted chalcones

  13. New insights on the nature of the chemical species involved during the process of dopamine deprotonation in aqueous solution: theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Corona-Avendaño, Silvia; Alarcón-Angeles, Georgina; Rosquete-Pina, Giselle A; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto; Gutierrez, Atilano; Ramírez-Silva, M Teresa; Romero-Romo, Mario; Palomar-Pardavé, Manuel

    2007-02-22

    Due to dopamine's chemical structure and the fact that it has three pKa values, its deprotonation process, in aqueous solution, may involve different chemical species. For instance, the first deprotonation step, from the fully protonated dopamine molecule (H3DA+) to the neutral one (H2DA), will result in zwitterionic species if a proton from one of the OH groups in the catechol ring is lost or into a neutral species if the proton is lost from the amino group. Given that the interaction of such a product with its environment will be quite different depending on its nature, it is very important, therefore, to have an accurate knowledge of which is the dopamine chemical species that results after each deprotonation step. In order to gain a better understanding of dopamine chemistry and to establish a plausible dopamine deprotonation pathway, the optimized geometries of the aforementioned species were calculated in this work by means of the density functionals theory (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p)) in both cases: in vacuo and with solvent effect, to assess, among other theoretical criteria, the proton affinities of the different dopamine species. This permitted us to propose the following reaction pathway: [reaction in text]. Moreover, the calculations of the chemical shift (NMR-GIAO) modeling the effect of the solvent with a continuum method (PCM) was in agreement with the 13C NMR experimental spectra, which confirmed even further the proposed deprotonation pathway.

  14. Attainable entanglement of unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with the chemical shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Yukihiro; Mikami, Shuji; Yoshida, Motoyuki; Ohba, Ichiro

    2007-11-01

    Yu, Brown and Chuang investigated the entanglement attainable from unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Their research gave insight into the role of entanglement in a liquid-state NMR quantum computer. However, they assumed that the Zeeman energy of each nuclear spin which corresponds to a qubit takes a common value for all; there is no chemical shift. In this paper, we research a model with chemical shifts and analytically derive the physical parameter region where unitary transformed thermal states are entangled, by employing the positive partial transposition (PPT) criterion with respect to any bipartition. The analysis taking account of the chemical shift reveals how the difference between quantum gates reflects on the physical parameter region where unitary transformed thermal states are entangled. In addition, we examine the distillability of unitary transformed thermal states and the effect of the chemical shifts on the boundary between the separability and the nonseparability.

  15. Characterization of the conformational equilibrium between the two major substates of RNase A using NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Camilloni, Carlo; Robustelli, Paul; De Simone, Alfonso; Cavalli, Andrea; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2012-03-07

    Following the recognition that NMR chemical shifts can be used for protein structure determination, rapid advances have recently been made in methods for extending this strategy for proteins and protein complexes of increasing size and complexity. A remaining major challenge is to develop approaches to exploit the information contained in the chemical shifts about conformational fluctuations in native states of proteins. In this work we show that it is possible to determine an ensemble of conformations representing the free energy surface of RNase A using chemical shifts as replica-averaged restraints in molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of this surface indicates that chemical shifts can be used to characterize the conformational equilibrium between the two major substates of this protein.

  16. Noninvasive temperature mapping with MRI using chemical shift water-fat separation.

    PubMed

    Soher, Brian J; Wyatt, Cory; Reeder, Scott B; MacFall, James R

    2010-05-01

    Tissues containing both water and lipids, e.g., breast, confound standard MR proton reference frequency-shift methods for mapping temperatures due to the lack of temperature-induced frequency shift in lipid protons. Generalized Dixon chemical shift-based water-fat separation methods, such as GE's iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation method, can result in complex water and fat images. Once separated, the phase change over time of the water signal can be used to map temperature. Phase change of the lipid signal can be used to correct for non-temperature-dependent phase changes, such as amplitude of static field drift. In this work, an image acquisition and postprocessing method, called water and fat thermal MRI, is demonstrated in phantoms containing 30:70, 50:50, and 70:30 water-to-fat by volume. Noninvasive heating was applied in an Off1-On-Off2 pattern over 50 min, using a miniannular phased radiofrequency array. Temperature changes were referenced to the first image acquisition. Four fiber optic temperature probes were placed inside the phantoms for temperature comparison. Region of interest (ROI) temperature values colocated with the probes showed excellent agreement (global mean +/- standard deviation: -0.09 +/- 0.34 degrees C) despite significant amplitude of static field drift during the experiments.

  17. Qualitative study of substituent effects on NMR (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I; Bustamante, Manuel G; Pasqualini, Enrique E; Melo, Juan I; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2009-09-10

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-beta substituent effects on both (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and sigma-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds.

  18. Predicting Pt-195 NMR chemical shift using new relativistic all-electron basis set.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, D; Guerra, C Fonseca; de Oliveira, M A L; Ramalho, T C; Dos Santos, H F

    2016-10-05

    Predicting NMR properties is a valuable tool to assist the experimentalists in the characterization of molecular structure. For heavy metals, such as Pt-195, only a few computational protocols are available. In the present contribution, all-electron Gaussian basis sets, suitable to calculate the Pt-195 NMR chemical shift, are presented for Pt and all elements commonly found as Pt-ligands. The new basis sets identified as NMR-DKH were partially contracted as a triple-zeta doubly polarized scheme with all coefficients obtained from a Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) second-order scalar relativistic calculation. The Pt-195 chemical shift was predicted through empirical models fitted to reproduce experimental data for a set of 183 Pt(II) complexes which NMR sign ranges from -1000 to -6000 ppm. Furthermore, the models were validated using a new set of 75 Pt(II) complexes, not included in the descriptive set. The models were constructed using non-relativistic Hamiltonian at density functional theory (DFT-PBEPBE) level with NMR-DKH basis set for all atoms. For the best model, the mean absolute deviation (MAD) and the mean relative deviation (MRD) were 150 ppm and 6%, respectively, for the validation set (75 Pt-complexes) and 168 ppm (MAD) and 5% (MRD) for all 258 Pt(II) complexes. These results were comparable with relativistic DFT calculation, 200 ppm (MAD) and 6% (MRD). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Determination of secondary structure populations in disordered states of proteins using nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Camilloni, Carlo; De Simone, Alfonso; Vranken, Wim F; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2012-03-20

    One of the major open challenges in structural biology is to achieve effective descriptions of disordered states of proteins. This problem is difficult because these states are conformationally highly heterogeneous and cannot be represented as single structures, and therefore it is necessary to characterize their conformational properties in terms of probability distributions. Here we show that it is possible to obtain highly quantitative information about particularly important types of probability distributions, the populations of secondary structure elements (α-helix, β-strand, random coil, and polyproline II), by using the information provided by backbone chemical shifts. The application of this approach to mammalian prions indicates that for these proteins a key role in molecular recognition is played by disordered regions characterized by highly conserved polyproline II populations. We also determine the secondary structure populations of a range of other disordered proteins that are medically relevant, including p53, α-synuclein, and the Aβ peptide, as well as an oligomeric form of αB-crystallin. Because chemical shifts are the nuclear magnetic resonance parameters that can be measured under the widest variety of conditions, our approach can be used to obtain detailed information about secondary structure populations for a vast range of different protein states.

  20. The Effects of Dissolved Oxygen upon Amide Proton Relaxation and Chemical Shift in a Perdeuterated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Tobias S.; Campbell, Iain D.; Boyd, Jonathan

    2002-08-01

    The effects of dissolved molecular oxygen upon amide proton ( 1H N) longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and chemical shifts were studied for a small protein domain, the second type 2 module of fibronectin ( 2F2)—isotopically enriched to 99% 2H, 98% 15N. Longitudinal relaxation rate enhancements, R O 2( 1H N), of individual backbone 1H N nuclei varied up to 14 fold between a degassed and oxygenated (1 bar) solution, indicating that the oxygen distribution within the protein is inhomogeneous. On average, smaller relaxation rate enhancements were observed for 1H N nuclei associated with the core of the protein compared to 1H N nuclei closer to the surface, suggesting restricted oxygen accessibility to some regions. In agreement with an O 2- 1H N hyperfine interaction in the extreme narrowing limit, the 1H N transverse relaxation rates showed no significant change, up to an oxygen pressure of 9.5 bar (the maximum pressure used in this study). For most 1H N resonances, small Δδ O 2( 1H N) hyperfine chemical shifts could be detected between oxygen pressures of 1 bar and 9.5 bar.

  1. Solvation effects on chemical shifts by embedded cluster integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Frach, Roland; Kast, Stefan M

    2014-12-11

    The accurate computational prediction of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters like chemical shifts represents a challenge if the species studied is immersed in strongly polarizing environments such as water. Common approaches to treating a solvent in the form of, e.g., the polarizable continuum model (PCM) ignore strong directional interactions such as H-bonds to the solvent which can have substantial impact on magnetic shieldings. We here present a computational methodology that accounts for atomic-level solvent effects on NMR parameters by extending the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) integral equation theory to the prediction of chemical shifts of N-methylacetamide (NMA) in aqueous solution. We examine the influence of various so-called closure approximations of the underlying three-dimensional RISM theory as well as the impact of basis set size and different treatment of electrostatic solute-solvent interactions. We find considerable and systematic improvement over reference PCM and gas phase calculations. A smaller basis set in combination with a simple point charge model already yields good performance which can be further improved by employing exact electrostatic quantum-mechanical solute-solvent interaction energies. A larger basis set benefits more significantly from exact over point charge electrostatics, which can be related to differences of the solvent's charge distribution.

  2. Cuticular hydrocarbon divergence in the jewel wasp Nasonia: Evolutionary shifts in chemical communication channels?

    PubMed Central

    Buellesbach, Jan; Gadau, Jürgen; Beukeboom, Leo W.; Echinger, Felix; Raychoudhury, Rhitoban; Werren, John H.; Schmitt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The evolution and maintenance of intraspecific communication channels constitutes a key feature of chemical signaling and sexual communication. However, how divergent chemical communication channels evolve while maintaining their integrity for both sender and receiver is poorly understood. In the present study, we compare male and female cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles in the jewel wasp genus Nasonia, analyze their chemical divergence, and investigate their role as species-specific sexual signaling cues. Males and females of all four Nasonia species showed unique, non-overlapping CHC profiles unambiguously separating them. Surprisingly, male and female phylogenies based on the chemical distances between their CHC profiles differed dramatically, where only male CHC divergence parallels the molecular phylogeny of Nasonia. In particular, N. giraulti female CHC profiles were the most divergent from all other species and very different from its most closely related sibling species N. oneida. Furthermore, although our behavioural assays indicate that female CHC can generally be perceived as sexual cues attracting males in Nasonia, this function has apparently been lost in the highly divergent female N. giraulti CHC profiles. Curiously, N. giraulti males are still attracted to heterospecific, but not to conspecific female CHC profiles. We suggest that this striking discrepancy has been caused by an extensive evolutionary shift in female N. giraulti CHC profiles, which are no longer used as conspecific recognition cues. Our study constitutes the first report of an apparent abandonment of a sexual recognition cue that the receiver did not adapt to. PMID:24118588

  3. Chemical potential shift in organic field-effect transistors identified by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamura, Naoka Kitada, Yuta; Honma, Itaru; Tsurumi, Junto; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun; Horiba, Koji; Oshima, Masaharu

    2015-06-22

    A chemical potential shift in an organic field effect transistor (OFET) during operation has been revealed by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy analysis performed using a three-dimensional nanoscale electron-spectroscopy chemical analysis system. OFETs were fabricated using ultrathin (3 ML or 12 nm) single-crystalline C10-DNBDT-NW films on SiO{sub 2} (200 nm)/Si substrates with a backgate electrode and top source/drain Au electrodes, and C 1s line profiles under biasing at the backgate and drain electrodes were measured. When applying −30 V to the backgate, there is C 1s core level shift of 0.1 eV; this shift can be attributed to a chemical potential shift corresponding to band bending by the field effect, resulting in p-type doping.

  4. 125Te NMR chemical-shift trends in PbTe-GeTe and PbTe-SnTe alloys.

    PubMed

    Njegic, B; Levin, E M; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2013-01-01

    Complex tellurides, such as doped PbTe, GeTe, and their alloys, are among the best thermoelectric materials. Knowledge of the change in (125)Te NMR chemical shift due to bonding to dopant or "solute" atoms is useful for determination of phase composition, peak assignment, and analysis of local bonding. We have measured the (125)Te NMR chemical shifts in PbTe-based alloys, Pb1-xGexTe and Pb1-xSnxTe, which have a rocksalt-like structure, and analyzed their trends. For low x, several peaks are resolved in the 22-kHz MAS (125)Te NMR spectra. A simple linear trend in chemical shifts with the number of Pb neighbors is observed. No evidence of a proposed ferroelectric displacement of Ge atoms in a cubic PbTe matrix is detected at low Ge concentrations. The observed chemical shift trends are compared with the results of DFT calculations, which confirm the linear dependence on the composition of the first-neighbor shell. The data enable determination of the composition of various phases in multiphase telluride materials. They also provide estimates of the (125)Te chemical shifts of GeTe and SnTe (+970 and +400±150 ppm, respectively, from PbTe), which are otherwise difficult to access due to Knight shifts of many hundreds of ppm in neat GeTe and SnTe.

  5. Relationship between nonlinear pressure-induced chemical shift changes and thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Beck Erlach, Markus; Koehler, Joerg; Moeser, Beate; Horinek, Dominik; Kremer, Werner; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2014-05-29

    NMR chemical shift analysis is a powerful method to investigate local changes in the environment of the observed nuclear spin of a polypeptide that are induced by application of high hydrostatic pressure. Usually, in the fast exchange regime, the pressure dependence of chemical shifts is analyzed by a second order Taylor expansion providing the first- and second-order pressure coefficient B1 and B2. The coefficients then are interpreted in a qualitative manner. We show here that in a two-state model, the ratio of B2/B1 is related to thermodynamic parameters, namely the ratio of the difference of compressibility factors Δβ' and partial molar volumes ΔV. The analysis is applied to the random-coil model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2, with Xxx being one of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids. The analysis gives an average Δβ'/ΔV ratio of 1.6 GPa(-1) provided the condition |ΔG(0)| ≪ 2RT holds for the difference of the Gibbs free energies (ΔG(0)) of the two states at the temperature (T0) and the pressure (p0). The amide proton and nitrogen B2/B1 of a given amino acid Xxx are strongly correlated, indicating that their pressure-dependent chemical shift changes are due to the same thermodynamic process. As a possible physical mechanism providing a two-state model, the hydrogen bonding of water with the corresponding amide protein was simulated for isoleucine in position Xxx. The obtained free energy could satisfy the relation |ΔG(0)| ≪ 2RT. The derived relation was applied to the β-amyloid peptide Aβ and the phosphocarrier protein HPr from S. carnosus. For the transition of state 1 to state 2' of Aβ, the derived relation of B2/B1 to Δβ'/ΔV can be confirmed experimentally. The HPr protein is characterized by substantially higher negative B2/B1 values than those found in the tetrapeptides with an average value of approximately -5.1 GPa(-1) (Δβ'/ΔV of 5.1 GPa(-1) provided |ΔG(0)| ≪ 2RT holds). Qualitatively, the B2/B1 ratio can be used to predict

  6. Reassigning the Structures of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts Computed with Quantum Mechanics: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palazzo, Teresa A.; Truong, Tiana T.; Wong, Shirley M. T.; Mack, Emma T.; Lodewyk, Michael W.; Harrison, Jason G.; Gamage, R. Alan; Siegel, Justin B.; Kurth, Mark J.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    An applied computational chemistry laboratory exercise is described in which students use modern quantum chemical calculations of chemical shifts to assign the structure of a recently isolated natural product. A pre/post assessment was used to measure student learning gains and verify that students demonstrated proficiency of key learning…

  7. Identify five kinds of simple super-secondary structures with quadratic discriminant algorithm based on the chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Kou, Gaoshan; Feng, Yonge

    2015-09-07

    The biological function of protein is largely determined by its spatial structure. The research on the relationship between structure and function is the basis of protein structure prediction. However, the prediction of super secondary structure is an important step in the prediction of protein spatial structure. Many algorithms have been proposed for the prediction of protein super secondary structure. However, the parameters used by these methods were primarily based on amino acid sequences. In this paper, we proposed a novel model for predicting five kinds of protein super secondary structures based on the chemical shifts (CSs). Firstly, we analyzed the statistical distribution of chemical shifts of six nuclei in five kinds of protein super secondary structures by using the analysis of variance (ANOVA). Secondly, we used chemical shifts of six nuclei as features, and combined with quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) to predict five kinds of protein super secondary structures. Finally, we achieved the averaged sensitivity, specificity and the overall accuracy of 81.8%, 95.19%, 82.91%, respectively in seven-fold cross-validation. Moreover, we have performed the prediction by combining the five different chemical shifts as features, the maximum overall accuracy up to 89.87% by using the C,Cα,Cβ,N,Hα of Hα chemical shifts, which are clearly superior to that of the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) algorithm by using 20 amino acid compositions (AAC) as feature in the seven-fold cross-validation. These results demonstrated that chemical shifts (CSs) are indeed an outstanding parameter for the prediction of five kinds of super secondary structures. In addition, we compared the prediction of the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) with that of support vector machine (SVM) by using the same six CSs as features. The result suggested that the quadratic discriminant analysis method by using chemical shifts as features is a good predictor for protein super

  8. Predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional classification analysis of NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2016-09-01

    A tool for predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional analyses of different combinations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts has been developed. A data set of cysteine [Formula: see text], (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (1)H(α), (1)H(N), and (15)N(H) chemical shifts was created, classified according to redox state and secondary structure, using a library of 540 re-referenced BioMagResBank (BMRB) entries. Multi-dimensional analyses of three, four, five, and six chemical shifts were used to derive rules for predicting the structural states of cysteine residues. The results from 60 BMRB entries containing 122 cysteines showed that four-dimensional analysis of the C(α), C(β), H(α), and N(H) chemical shifts had the highest prediction accuracy of 100 and 95.9 % for the redox state and secondary structure, respectively. The prediction of secondary structure using 3D, 5D, and 6D analyses had the accuracy of ~90 %, suggesting that H(N) and [Formula: see text] chemical shifts may be noisy and made the discrimination worse. A web server (6DCSi) was established to enable users to submit NMR chemical shifts, either in BMRB or key-in formats, for prediction. 6DCSi displays predictions using sets of 3, 4, 5, and 6 chemical shifts, which shows their consistency and allows users to draw their own conclusions. This web-based tool can be used to rapidly obtain structural information regarding cysteine residues directly from experimental NMR data.

  9. 129Xe chemical shift in human blood and pulmonary blood oxygenation measurement in humans using hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR

    PubMed Central

    Norquay, Graham; Leung, General; Stewart, Neil J.; Wolber, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dependency of the 129Xe‐red blood cell (RBC) chemical shift on blood oxygenation, and to use this relation for noninvasive measurement of pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo with hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR. Methods Hyperpolarized 129Xe was equilibrated with blood samples of varying oxygenation in vitro, and NMR was performed at 1.5 T and 3 T. Dynamic in vivo NMR during breath hold apnea was performed at 3 T on two healthy volunteers following inhalation of hyperpolarized 129Xe. Results The 129Xe chemical shift in RBCs was found to increase nonlinearly with blood oxygenation at 1.5 T and 3 T. During breath hold apnea, the 129Xe chemical shift in RBCs exhibited a periodic time modulation and showed a net decrease in chemical shift of ∼1 ppm over a 35 s breath hold, corresponding to a decrease of 7–10 % in RBC oxygenation. The 129Xe‐RBC signal amplitude showed a modulation with the same frequency as the 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift. Conclusion The feasibility of using the 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift to measure pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo has been demonstrated. Correlation between 129Xe‐RBC signal and 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift modulations in the lung warrants further investigation, with the aim to better quantify temporal blood oxygenation changes in the cardiopulmonary vascular circuit. Magn Reson Med 77:1399–1408, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27062652

  10. Synthesis, spectral analysis and quantum chemical studies on molecular geometry, chemical reactivity of 7-chloro-9-(2‧-chlorophenyl)-2,3-dihydroacridin-4(1H)-one and 7-chloro-9-(2‧-fluorophenyl)-2,3-dihydroacridin-4(1H)-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheeshkumar, Rajendran; Sayin, Koray; Kaminsky, Werner; Rajendra Prasad, Karnam Jayarampillai

    2017-01-01

    7-Chloro-9-(2'-chlorophenyl)-2,3-dihydroacridin-4(1H)-one (3a) and 7-chloro-9-(2'-fluorophenyl)-2,3-dihydroacridin-4-(1H)-one (3b) were synthesized from 2-amino-2‧,5-dichlorobenzophenone (1a) and 2-amino-5-chloro-2'-fluorobenzophenone (1b) respectively with 1,2-cyclohexanedione (2) in the presence of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate and InCl3 condition. The synthesized compounds have been recorded of FT-IR, NMR spectra and the structure was further confirmed by using single crystal X-ray diffraction. The synthesized compounds have been further checked the photo physical properties like UV, emission and fluorescent quantum yields were calculated. FT-NMR spectra and 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts have been measured and computational calculations of compounds 3 are done by using B3LYP method with 6-311G basis set in gas phase. Similarly calculated vibrational frequencies were found in good agreement with experimental findings. The optimized geometry of molecules 3 was compared with experimental XRD values. DFT calculations of the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and HOMO - LUMO frontier orbitals identified chemically active sites of compounds 3 responsible for its chemical reactivity.

  11. Experimental study of resolution of proton chemical shifts in solids: Combined multiple pulse NMR and magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.; Taylor, R.E.; Paff, A.J.; Gerstein, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of protons in rigid, randomly oriented solids have been measured using combined homonuclear dipolar decoupling (via multiple pulse techniques) and attenuation of chemical shift anisotropies (via magic-angle sample spinning). Under those conditions, isotropic proton chemical shifts were recorded for a variety of chemical species, with individual linewidths varying from about 55 to 110 Hz (1--2 ppm). Residual line broadening was due predominately to (i) magnetic-field instability and inhomogeneity, (ii) unresolved proton--proton spin couplings, (iii) chemical shift dispersion, (iv) residual dipolar broadening, and (v) lifetime broadening under the multiple pulse sequences used. The magnitudes of those effects and the current limits of resolution for this experiment in our spectrometer have been investigated. The compounds studied included organic solids (4, 4'-dimethylbenzophenone, 2, 6-dimethylbenzoic acid, and aspirin), polymers (polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate), and the vitrain portion of a bituminous coal.

  12. Backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments of apolipophorin III from Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Crowhurst, Karin A; Horn, James V C; Weers, Paul M M

    2016-04-01

    Apolipophorin III, a 163 residue monomeric protein from the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella (abbreviated as apoLp-IIIGM), has roles in upregulating expression of antimicrobial proteins as well as binding and deforming bacterial membranes. Due to its similarity to vertebrate apolipoproteins there is interest in performing atomic resolution analysis of apoLp-IIIGM as part of an effort to better understand its mechanism of action in innate immunity. In the first step towards structural characterization of apoLp-IIIGM, 99 % of backbone and 88 % of side chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts were assigned. TALOS+ analysis of the backbone resonances has predicted that the protein is composed of five long helices, which is consistent with the reported structures of apolipophorins from other insect species. The next stage in the characterization of apoLp-III from G. mellonella will be to utilize these resonance assignments in solving the solution structure of this protein.

  13. Earth field NMR with chemical shift spectral resolution: theory and proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Katz, Itai; Shtirberg, Lazar; Shakour, Gubrail; Blank, Aharon

    2012-06-01

    A new method for obtaining an NMR signal in the Earth's magnetic field (EF) is presented. The method makes use of a simple pulse sequence with only DC fields which is much less demanding than previous approaches in terms of the pulses' rise and fall times. Furthermore, it offers the possibility of obtaining NMR data with enough spectral resolution to allow retrieving high resolution molecular chemical shift (CS) information - a capability that was not considered possible in EF NMR until now. Details of the pulse sequence, the experimental system, and our specially tailored EF NMR probe are provided. The experimental results demonstrate the capability to differentiate between three types of samples made of common fluorine compounds, based on their CS data.

  14. Sequential acquisition of multi-dimensional heteronuclear chemical shift correlation spectra with 1H detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellstedt, Peter; Ihle, Yvonne; Wiedemann, Christoph; Kirschstein, Anika; Herbst, Christian; Görlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2014-03-01

    RF pulse schemes for the simultaneous acquisition of heteronuclear multi-dimensional chemical shift correlation spectra, such as {HA(CA)NH & HA(CACO)NH}, {HA(CA)NH & H(N)CAHA} and {H(N)CAHA & H(CC)NH}, that are commonly employed in the study of moderately-sized protein molecules, have been implemented using dual sequential 1H acquisitions in the direct dimension. Such an approach is not only beneficial in terms of the reduction of experimental time as compared to data collection via two separate experiments but also facilitates the unambiguous sequential linking of the backbone amino acid residues. The potential of sequential 1H data acquisition procedure in the study of RNA is also demonstrated here.

  15. Sequential acquisition of multi-dimensional heteronuclear chemical shift correlation spectra with 1H detection

    PubMed Central

    Bellstedt, Peter; Ihle, Yvonne; Wiedemann, Christoph; Kirschstein, Anika; Herbst, Christian; Görlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2014-01-01

    RF pulse schemes for the simultaneous acquisition of heteronuclear multi-dimensional chemical shift correlation spectra, such as {HA(CA)NH & HA(CACO)NH}, {HA(CA)NH & H(N)CAHA} and {H(N)CAHA & H(CC)NH}, that are commonly employed in the study of moderately-sized protein molecules, have been implemented using dual sequential 1H acquisitions in the direct dimension. Such an approach is not only beneficial in terms of the reduction of experimental time as compared to data collection via two separate experiments but also facilitates the unambiguous sequential linking of the backbone amino acid residues. The potential of sequential 1H data acquisition procedure in the study of RNA is also demonstrated here. PMID:24671105

  16. Protein dynamics from chemical shift and dipolar rotational spin-echo sup 15 N NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Garbow, J.R.; Jacob, G.S.; Stejskal, E.O.; Schaefer, J. )

    1989-02-07

    The partial collapse of dipolar and chemical shift tensors for peptide NH and for the amide NH at cross-link sites in cell wall peptidoglycan, of intact lyophilized cells of Aerococcus viridans, indicates NH vector root-mean-square fluctuations of 23{degree}. This result is consistent with the local mobility calculated in typical picosecond regime computer simulations of protein dynamics in the solid state. The experimental root-mean-square angular fluctuations for both types of NH vectors increase to 37{degree} for viable wet cells at 10{degree}C. The similarity in mobilities for both general protein and cell wall peptidoglycan suggests that one additional motion in wet cells involves cooperative fluctuations of segments of cell walls, attached proteins, and associated cytoplasmic proteins.

  17. Study of wavelength-shifting chemicals for use in large-scale water Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sweany, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dunmore, J; Felde, J; Svoboda, R; Tripathi, S M

    2011-09-21

    Cherenkov detectors employ various methods to maximize light collection at the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). These generally involve the use of highly reflective materials lining the interior of the detector, reflective materials around the PMTs, or wavelength-shifting sheets around the PMTs. Recently, the use of water-soluble wavelength-shifters has been explored to increase the measurable light yield of Cherenkov radiation in water. These wave-shifting chemicals are capable of absorbing light in the ultravoilet and re-emitting the light in a range detectable by PMTs. Using a 250 L water Cherenkov detector, we have characterized the increase in light yield from three compounds in water: 4-Methylumbelliferone, Carbostyril-124, and Amino-G Salt. We report the gain in PMT response at a concentration of 1 ppm as: 1.88 {+-} 0.02 for 4-Methylumbelliferone, stable to within 0.5% over 50 days, 1.37 {+-} 0.03 for Carbostyril-124, and 1.20 {+-} 0.02 for Amino-G Salt. The response of 4-Methylumbelliferone was modeled, resulting in a simulated gain within 9% of the experimental gain at 1 ppm concentration. Finally, we report an increase in neutron detection performance of a large-scale (3.5 kL) gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector at a 4-Methylumbelliferone concentration of 1 ppm.

  18. On the stability of perfluoroalkyl-substituted singlet carbenes: a coupled-cluster quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Rozhenko, Alexander B; Schoeller, Wolfgang W; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-02-27

    A series of trifluoromethyl-substituted carbenes R-C(:)-CF3 (R = NMe2, OMe, F, PMe2, P(NMe2)2, P(N(Pr-i)2)2, SMe, Cl); (dimethylamino)(perfluoroalkyl)carbenes Me2N-C(:)-R (R = CF3, C2F5, n-C3F7, i-C3F7, and t-C4F9) and symmetrically substituted carbenes R-C(:)-R (R = NMe2, OMe, F, PMe2, SMe, Cl) have been investigated by means of quantum chemistry methods. Different levels of approximation were used, including the CCSD(T) approach also known in quantum chemistry as the "golden standard", in combination with three different basis sets (TZVP, cc-pVDZ, cc-pVTZ). Relative stabilities of carbenes have been estimated using the differences between the singlet and triplet ground state energies (ΔEST) and energies of the hydrogenation reaction for the singlet and triplet ground states of the carbenes. The latter seem to correlate better with stability of carbenes than the ΔEST values. The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the methylidene carbon indicate the more high-field chemical shift values in the known, isolable carbenes compared to the unstable ones. This is the first report on the expected chemical shifts in the highly unstable singlet carbenes. Using these criteria, some carbene structures from the studied series (as, for instance, Me2N-C(:)-CF3, Me2N-C(:)-C3F7-i) are proposed as good candidates for the experimental preparation.

  19. Rates and Mechanisms of Oil Shale Pyrolysis: A Chemical Structure Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Thomas; Pugmire, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Three pristine Utah Green River oil shale samples were obtained and used for analysis by the combined research groups at the University of Utah and Brigham Young University. Oil shale samples were first demineralized and the separated kerogen and extracted bitumen samples were then studied by a host of techniques including high resolution liquid-state carbon-13 NMR, solid-state magic angle sample spinning 13C NMR, GC/MS, FTIR, and pyrolysis. Bitumen was extracted from the shale using methanol/dichloromethane and analyzed using high resolution 13C NMR liquid state spectroscopy, showing carbon aromaticities of 7 to 11%. The three parent shales and the demineralized kerogens were each analyzed with solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. Carbon aromaticity of the kerogen was 23-24%, with 10-12 aromatic carbons per cluster. Crushed samples of Green River oil shale and its kerogen extract were pyrolyzed at heating rates from 1 to 10 K/min at pressures of 1 and 40 bar and temperatures up to 1000°C. The transient pyrolysis data were fit with a first-order model and a Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM). The demineralized kerogen was pyrolyzed at 10 K/min in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure at temperatures up to 525°C, and the pyrolysis products (light gas, tar, and char) were analyzed using 13C NMR, GC/MS, and FTIR. Details of the kerogen pyrolysis have been modeled by a modified version of the chemical percolation devolatilization (CPD) model that has been widely used to model coal combustion/pyrolysis. This refined CPD model has been successful in predicting the char, tar, and gas yields of the three shale samples during pyrolysis. This set of experiments and associated modeling represents the most sophisticated and complete analysis available for a given set of oil shale samples.

  20. Exploring new 129Xe chemical shift ranges in HXeY compounds: hydrogen more relativistic than xenon.

    PubMed

    Lantto, Perttu; Standara, Stanislav; Riedel, Sebastian; Vaara, Juha; Straka, Michal

    2012-08-21

    Among rare gases, xenon features an unusually broad nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift range in its compounds and as a non-bonded Xe atom introduced into different environments. In this work we show that (129)Xe NMR chemical shifts in the recently prepared, matrix-isolated xenon compounds appear in new, so far unexplored (129)Xe chemical shift ranges. State-of-the-art theoretical predictions of NMR chemical shifts in compounds of general formula HXeY (Y = H, F, Cl, Br, I, -CN, -NC, -CCH, -CCCCH, -CCCN, -CCXeH, -OXeH, -OH, -SH) as well as in the recently prepared ClXeCN and ClXeNC species are reported. The bonding situation of Xe in the studied compounds is rather different from the previously characterized cases as Xe appears in the electronic state corresponding to a situation with a low formal oxidation state, between I and II in these compounds. Accordingly, the predicted (129)Xe chemical shifts occur in new NMR ranges for this nucleus: ca. 500-1000 ppm (wrt Xe gas) for HXeY species and ca. 1100-1600 ppm for ClXeCN and ClXeNC. These new ranges fall between those corresponding to the weakly-bonded Xe(0) atom in guest-host systems (δ < 300 ppm) and in the hitherto characterized Xe molecules (δ > 2000 ppm). The importance of relativistic effects is discussed. Relativistic effects only slightly modulate the (129)Xe chemical shift that is obtained already at the nonrelativistic CCSD(T) level. In contrast, spin-orbit-induced shielding effects on the (1)H chemical shifts of the H1 atom directly bonded to the Xe center largely overwhelm the nonrelativistic deshielding effects. This leads to an overall negative (1)H chemical shift in the range between -5 and -25 ppm (wrt CH(4)). Thus, the relativistic effects induced by the heavy Xe atom appear considerably more important for the chemical shift of the neighbouring, light hydrogen atom than that of the Xe nucleus itself. The predicted NMR parameters facilitate an unambiguous experimental identification of

  1. Handling the influence of chemical shift in amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basse, Kristoffer; Shankar, Ravi; Bjerring, Morten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Nielsen, Anders B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of chemical shifts on amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The method is demonstrated using the Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRrAdiaTION mediated Cross-Polarization (RESPIRATIONCP) experiment as an example. By going into the pulse sequence rf interaction frame and employing a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach, we describe how chemical shift offset and anisotropic chemical shift affect the efficiency of heteronuclear polarization transfer. In this description, it becomes transparent that the main attribute leading to non-ideal performance is a fictitious field along the rf field axis, which is generated from second-order cross terms arising mainly between chemical shift tensors and themselves. This insight is useful for the development of improved recoupling experiments. We discuss the validity of this approach and present quaternion calculations to determine the effective resonance conditions in a combined rf field and chemical shift offset interaction frame transformation. Based on this, we derive a broad-banded version of the RESPIRATIONCP experiment. The new sequence is experimentally verified using SNNFGAILSS amyloid fibrils where simultaneous 15N → 13CO and 15N → 13Cα coherence transfer is demonstrated on high-field NMR instrumentation, requiring great offset stability.

  2. Characteristic chemical shift of quasicrystalline alloy Al53Si27Mn20 studied by EELS and SXES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshiya, S.; Terauchi, M.; Tsai, A. P.

    2011-06-01

    Chemical shifts of all constituent atoms for amorphous (Am), quasicrystalline (QC) and crystalline (Cryst) alloys of Al53Si27Mn20 were investigated for the first time by high energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES). Among Al L-shell excitation EELS spectra of Am, QC and Cryst alloys, only QC alloy showed an apparent chemical shift to the larger binding energy side by 0.4 eV. In Al-Kα and Si-Kα emission SXES spectra of these alloys, only QC alloy showed a chemical shift to the larger binding energy side by 4 eV for Al-Kα and 6 eV for Si-Kα. These chemical shift values are comparable to those of corresponding metal oxides. This indicates a smaller amount of valence charge at Al and Si atomic sites in QC alloy. On the other hand, Mn-L SXES spectra did not show any chemical shift. Therefore, the decreased charge from Al and Si sites should be distributed between atomic sites, indicating the presence of covalent bonding nature for QC ordered alloy.

  3. Chemical amplification--cavity attenuated phase shift spectroscopy measurements of atmospheric peroxy radicals.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ezra C; Charest, John R

    2014-10-21

    We describe a new instrument for the quantification of atmospheric peroxy radicals (HO2, CH3O2, C2H5O2, etc.) using the chemical amplification method. Peroxy radicals are mixed with high concentrations of NO and CO, causing a chain reaction that produces a measurable increase in NO2 which is quantified by cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) spectroscopy, a highly sensitive spectroscopic detection technique. The instrument utilizes two identical reaction chambers, each with a dedicated CAPS NO2 sensor. Similar to all dual-channel chemical amplifiers, one reaction chamber operates in amplification or "ROx" mode and the other in background or "Ox" mode. The peroxy radical mixing ratio is determined by the difference between the two channels' NO2 readings divided by a laboratory-determined chain length. Each reaction chamber alternates between ROx and Ox mode on an anti-synchronized schedule, eliminating the effect of CAPS baseline offsets on the calculated peroxy radical concentrations. The chain length is determined by a new calibration method: peroxyacetyl and methyl peroxy radicals are produced by the photolysis of acetone and quantified as NO2 following reaction with excess NO. We demonstrate the performance of the instrument with results from ambient sampling in Amherst and several diagnostics of its precision. The detection limit while sampling ambient air at a relative humidity (RH) of 40% is 0.6 ppt (1 min average, signal-to-noise ratio =2), with an estimated accuracy of 25% (2σ).

  4. Fragment-based {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals: An alternative to planewave methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Joshua D.; Beran, Gregory J. O.; Monaco, Stephen; Schatschneider, Bohdan

    2015-09-14

    We assess the quality of fragment-based ab initio isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shift predictions for a collection of 25 molecular crystals with eight different density functionals. We explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, combined cluster/fragment, and the planewave gauge-including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) models relative to experiment. When electrostatic embedding is employed to capture many-body polarization effects, the simple and computationally inexpensive two-body fragment model predicts both isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shifts and the chemical shielding tensors as well as both cluster models and the GIPAW approach. Unlike the GIPAW approach, hybrid density functionals can be used readily in a fragment model, and all four hybrid functionals tested here (PBE0, B3LYP, B3PW91, and B97-2) predict chemical shifts in noticeably better agreement with experiment than the four generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals considered (PBE, OPBE, BLYP, and BP86). A set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided based on these benchmark calculations. Statistical cross-validation procedures are used to demonstrate the robustness of these fits.

  5. Combined experimental and quantum chemical studies on spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis, and NMR) and structural characteristics of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumru, Mustafa; Altun, Ahmet; Kocademir, Mustafa; Küçük, Vesile; Bardakçı, Tayyibe; Şaşmaz, İbrahim

    2016-12-01

    Comparative experimental and theoretical studies have been performed on the structure and spectral (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis and NMR) features of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde. Quantum chemical calculations have been carried out at Hartree-Fock and density functional B3LYP levels with the triple-zeta 6-311++G** basis set. Two stable conformers of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde arising from the orientation of the carboxaldehyde moiety have been located at the room temperature. The energetic separation of these conformers is as small as 2.5 kcal/mol with a low transition barrier (around 9 kcal/mol). Therefore, these conformers are expected to coexist at the room temperature. Several molecular characteristics of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde obtained through B3LYP and time-dependent B3LYP calculations, such as conformational stability, key geometry parameters, vibrational frequencies, IR and Raman intensities, UV-Vis vertical excitation energies and the corresponding oscillator strengths have been analyzed. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of quinoline-5-carboxaldehyde were also investigated.

  6. Hydrogen-bonding and the dissolution mechanism of uracil in an acetate ionic liquid: new insights from NMR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Araújo, João M M; Pereiro, Ana B; Canongia Lopes, José N; Rebelo, Luís P N; Marrucho, Isabel M

    2013-04-18

    The dissolution of uracil-a pyrimidine nucleic acid base-in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][CH3COO]) has been investigated by methods of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, (1)H-(1)H NOESY NMR spectroscopy, and quantum chemical calculations. The uracil-[C2mim][CH3COO] interactions that define the dissolution mechanism comprise the hydrogen bonds between the oxygen atoms of the acetate anion and the hydrogen atoms of the N1-H and N3-H groups of uracil and also the hydrogen bonds between the most acidic aromatic hydrogen atom (H2) of the imidazolium cation and the oxygen atoms of the carbonyl groups of uracil. The bifunctional solvation nature of the ionic liquid can be inferred from the presence of interactions between both ions of the ionic liquid and the uracil molecule. The location of such interaction sites was revealed using NMR data ((1)H and (13)C chemical shifts both in the IL and in the uracil molecule), complemented by DFT calculations. NOESY experiments provided additional evidence concerning the cation-uracil interactions.

  7. Chemical shift tensor determination using magnetically oriented microcrystal array (MOMA): 13C solid-state CP NMR without MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumi, R.; Kimura, F.; Song, G.; Kimura, T.

    2012-10-01

    Chemical shift tensors for the carboxyl and methyl carbons of L-alanine crystals were determined using a magnetically oriented microcrystal array (MOMA) prepared from a microcrystalline powder sample of L-alanine. A MOMA is a single-crystal-like composite in which microcrystals are aligned three-dimensionally in a matrix resin. The single-crystal rotation method was applied to the MOMA to determine the principal values and axes of the chemical shift tensors. The result showed good agreement with the literature data for the single crystal of L-alanine. This demonstrates that the present technique is a powerful tool for determining the chemical shift tensor of a crystal from a microcrystal powder sample.

  8. Correlation of Electronic Effects in N-Alkylnicotinamides with NMR Chemical Shifts and Hydride Transfer Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Burke, James R.; Frey, Perry A.

    1996-01-26

    The (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shifts for ring atoms of a series of N-alkylnicotinamides are shown to be correlated with their reduction potentials and reactivities toward NaBH(3)CN. The nicotinamide compounds include N-ethyl-N-benzyl-N-[p-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-, N-(p-cyanobenzyl)-, N-(carbomethoxymethyl)-, and N-(cyanomethyl)nicotinamides. The values of delta()13(C) for all the ring carbons increase with increasing electron-withdrawing power of the N-alkyl substituent. The value for C-4 increases the most, a range of 2.4 ppm in this series, whereas those for other atoms increase on the order of 1 ppm. The value of delta()15(N) for N-1 decreases with increasing electron-withdrawing power over a range of 20 ppm. The NMR data indicate that inductive electron withdrawal by N-alkyl substituents polarizes the pi-electron system to decrease electron density on ring carbons and increase electron density on the ring nitrogen. The values of log k (second order) for reduction of these compounds by NaBH(3)CN are proportional to the values of delta()13(C) for C-4 and inversely proportional to delta()15(N) for N-1. The reduction potentials are proportional to delta()13(C). The substituent effects are qualitatively similar to the substrate-induced electrostatic effects on the nicotinamide ring of NAD(+) at the active site of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase (Burke, J. R.; Frey, P. A. Biochemistry 1993, 32, 13220-13230). However, they differ quantitatively in that the upfield perturbation at N-1 is smaller in the enzyme and the signal for C-6 is also shifted upfield. The substrate-induced enzymatic perturbation of electron density at C-4 of NAD(+) quantitatively accounts for its increase in reactivity at the active site, but the perturbation at N-1 is less closely correlated with reactivity.

  9. Multiparametric fat–water separation method for fast chemical-shift imaging guidance of thermal therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jonathan S.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Jackson, Edward F.; Hazle, John D.; Jason Stafford, R.; Taylor, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A k-means-based classification algorithm is investigated to assess suitability for rapidly separating and classifying fat/water spectral peaks from a fast chemical shift imaging technique for magnetic resonance temperature imaging. Algorithm testing is performed in simulated mathematical phantoms and agar gel phantoms containing mixed fat/water regions. Methods: Proton resonance frequencies (PRFs), apparent spin-spin relaxation (T2*) times, and T1-weighted (T1-W) amplitude values were calculated for each voxel using a single-peak autoregressive moving average (ARMA) signal model. These parameters were then used as criteria for k-means sorting, with the results used to determine PRF ranges of each chemical species cluster for further classification. To detect the presence of secondary chemical species, spectral parameters were recalculated when needed using a two-peak ARMA signal model during the subsequent classification steps. Mathematical phantom simulations involved the modulation of signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), maximum PRF shift (MPS) values, analysis window sizes, and frequency expansion factor sizes in order to characterize the algorithm performance across a variety of conditions. In agar, images were collected on a 1.5T clinical MR scanner using acquisition parameters close to simulation, and algorithm performance was assessed by comparing classification results to manually segmented maps of the fat/water regions. Results: Performance was characterized quantitatively using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), sensitivity, and specificity. The simulated mathematical phantom experiments demonstrated good fat/water separation depending on conditions, specifically high SNR, moderate MPS value, small analysis window size, and low but nonzero frequency expansion factor size. Physical phantom results demonstrated good identification for both water (0.997 ± 0.001, 0.999 ± 0.001, and 0.986 ± 0.001 for DSC, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively

  10. Study of molecular structure, vibrational, electronic and NMR spectra of oncocalyxone A using DFT and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhawani Datt; Srivastava, Anubha; Honorato, Sara Braga; Tandon, Poonam; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia Loiola; Fechine, Pierre Basílio Almeida; Ayala, Alejandro Pedro

    2013-09-01

    Oncocalyxone A (C17H18O5) is the major secondary metabolite isolated from ethanol extract from the heartwood of Auxemma oncocalyx Taub popularly known as “pau branco”. Oncocalyxone A (Onco A) has many pharmaceutical uses such as: antitumor, analgesic, antioxidant and causative of inhibition of platelet activation. We have performed the optimized geometry, total energy, conformational study, molecular electrostatic potential mapping, frontier orbital energy gap and vibrational frequencies of Onco A employing ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and/or charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. UV-vis spectrum of the compound was recorded in DMSO and MeOH solvent. The TD-DFT calculations have been performed to explore the influence of electronic absorption spectra in the gas phase, as well as in solution environment using IEF-PCM and 6-31G basis set. The 13C NMR chemical shifts have been calculated with the B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) basis set and compared with the experimental values. These methods have been used as tools for structural characterization of Onco A.

  11. Study of molecular structure, vibrational, electronic and NMR spectra of oncocalyxone A using DFT and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Bhawani Datt; Srivastava, Anubha; Honorato, Sara Braga; Tandon, Poonam; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia Loiola; Fechine, Pierre Basílio Almeida; Ayala, Alejandro Pedro

    2013-09-01

    Oncocalyxone A (C17H18O5) is the major secondary metabolite isolated from ethanol extract from the heartwood of Auxemma oncocalyx Taub popularly known as "pau branco". Oncocalyxone A (Onco A) has many pharmaceutical uses such as: antitumor, analgesic, antioxidant and causative of inhibition of platelet activation. We have performed the optimized geometry, total energy, conformational study, molecular electrostatic potential mapping, frontier orbital energy gap and vibrational frequencies of Onco A employing ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and/or charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. UV-vis spectrum of the compound was recorded in DMSO and MeOH solvent. The TD-DFT calculations have been performed to explore the influence of electronic absorption spectra in the gas phase, as well as in solution environment using IEF-PCM and 6-31G basis set. The (13)C NMR chemical shifts have been calculated with the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set and compared with the experimental values. These methods have been used as tools for structural characterization of Onco A.

  12. Chemical-shift-selective filter for the in vivo detection of J-coupled metabolites at 3T.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Rolf F; Trabesinger, Andreas H; Boesiger, Peter

    2005-02-01

    A chemical-shift-selective filter (CSSF) was applied to the detection of J-coupled metabolites in the human brain. This filter is an acquisition-based technique that requires the chemical shifts (CS's) of different metabolites, but not their whole multiplet structures, to be resolved. The sequence is based on the 2D constant-time spin-echo experiment, which yields pure CS spectra in the indirect dimension. Localization is achieved through point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS). The method enables unequivocal detection of glutamate and myo-inositol, both in vitro and in vivo in the human brain, at 3T.

  13. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M.; Exner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3–0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r2) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  14. Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kime, Ryotaro; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27±1 year, height 169.4±4.1 cm, weight 65.9±8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p<0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise.

  15. Recoupling of chemical shift anisotropy by R-symmetry sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangjin; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2012-10-01

    13C and 15N chemical shift (CS) interaction is a sensitive probe of structure and dynamics in a wide variety of biological and inorganic systems, and in the recent years several magic angle spinning NMR approaches have emerged for residue-specific measurements of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors in uniformly and sparsely enriched proteins. All of the currently existing methods are applicable to slow and moderate magic angle spinning (MAS) regime, i.e., MAS frequencies below 20 kHz. With the advent of fast and ultrafast MAS probes capable of spinning frequencies of 40-100 kHz, and with the superior resolution and sensitivity attained at such high frequencies, development of CSA recoupling techniques working under such conditions is necessary. In this work, we present a family of R-symmetry based pulse sequences for recoupling of 13C/15N CSA interactions that work well in both natural abundance and isotopically enriched systems. We demonstrate that efficient recoupling of either first-rank (σ1) or second-rank (σ2) spatial components of CSA interaction is attained with appropriately chosen γ-encoded RNnv symmetry sequences. The advantage of these γ-encoded RNnv-symmetry based CSA (RNCSA) recoupling schemes is that they are suitable for CSA recoupling under a wide range of MAS frequencies, including fast MAS regime. Comprehensive analysis of the recoupling properties of these RNnv symmetry sequences reveals that the σ1-CSA recoupling symmetry sequences exhibit large scaling factors; however, the partial homonuclear dipolar Hamiltonian components are symmetry allowed, which makes this family of sequences suitable for CSA measurements in systems with weak homonuclear dipolar interactions. On the other hand, the γ-encoded symmetry sequences for σ2-CSA recoupling have smaller scaling factors but they efficiently suppress the homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Therefore, the latter family of sequences is applicable for measurements of CSA parameters in

  16. Atmospheric Peroxy Radical Measurements by Chemical Amplification - Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, E. C.; Charest, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new chemical amplifier for the detection of peroxy radicals using Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift spectroscopy (CAPS) detection of NO2. The amplification scheme is similar to other chemical amplifiers and involves addition of CO (8%) and NO (3 ppm) to air sampled in a PFA tube. The chain length is quantified by amplification of a known concentration of methyl peroxy radicals (CH3O2) and peroxyacetyl radicals (CH3COO2) sampled by the instrument's reactor. The CH3O2 and CH3COO2 radicals are produced by photolysis of acetone at 254 nm and quantified by conversion to NO2 by reaction with excess NO. The chain length (CL) in dry air is over 200 and constant at RO2 concentrations under 500 ppt. The CL decreases by 55% at a relative humidity of 50%. A 0.95 cm (3/8') ID PFA tube, a 0.32 cm (1/8' ID) PFA tube, and a 0.48 cm ID quartz reactor give near-identical chain lengths and RH dependence, demonstrating the small importance of wall reactions (for clean tubing) as radical termination steps. The instrument comprises two independent inlets and CAPS detectors, allowing for simultaneous measurements in ROx mode (= NO2 + O3 + RO2 + HO2) and Ox mode (= NO2 + O3) thereby greatly reducing the effect of variations in background [Ox]. The 1σ precision of the instrument at constant background [Ox] and 0% relative humidity is 0.2 ppt ROx with 100 second averaging and increases to 0.3 ppt at an RH of 50%. The absolute uncertainty of the measurements is estimated as 20% and is affected by the accuracy of the NO2 calibration, the precision of the CAPS when calibrating at low RO2 concentrations, and the uncertainty in the photolysis quantum yield for the CH3CO + CH3 channel of acetone photolysis.

  17. Effects of Irritant Chemicals on Aedes aegypti Resting Behavior: Is There a Simple Shift to Untreated "Safe Sites"?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-26

    Effects of Irritant Chemicals on Aedes aegypti Resting Behavior: Is There a Simple Shift to Untreated ‘‘Safe Sites’’? Hortance Manda*, Luana M. Arce... aegypti to irritant and repellent chemicals that can be exploited to reduce man-vector contact. Maximum efficacy of interventions based on irritant...overall impact. Methods: Using a laboratory box assay, resting patterns of two population strains of female Ae. aegypti (THAI and PERU) were evaluated

  18. C-13 NMR chemical shifts and visible absorption spectra of unsymmetrical fluoran dye by MO calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshiba, T.; Ida, T.; Mizuno, M.; Otsuka, T.; Takaoka, K.; Endo, K.

    2002-01-01

    An unsymmetrical fluoran dye, 3-diethylamino-6-methyl-7-chlorofluoran (DEAMCF) is one of the leuco dyes which shows the coloring-to-decoloring reversible reaction with acidity. We calculated the 13C chemical shieldings of the DEAMCF with the frame model compounds using ab initio gauge invariant atomic orbital methods, and compared it with the experimental shifts. The calculated values of the frame compounds are in good agreement with the experimental ones in the error range of -4.9-16.7 ppm. The calculated ones for the decolored-form of the DEAMCF reflected the observed ones, although the errors range from -13.4 to 23.1 ppm. Furthermore, we analyzed the UV-Visible absorption spectra of the decolored and colored forms of DEAMCF by a semiempirical ZINDO MO method. For the colored form, the observed absorption peaks at 550 and 510 nm correspond to the excitation from π-bonding HOMO (π-electrons which conjugated in xanthene ring) and π-bonding nearest HOMO (π-electrons concentrated in benzene-ring with methyl and Cl groups of xanthene) to π ∗-antibonding LUMO (π ∗-electrons of xanthene), respectively.

  19. Solid-state NMR chemical shift assignments for AL-09 VL immunoglobulin light chain fibrils.

    PubMed

    Piehl, Dennis W; Blancas-Mejía, Luis M; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Rienstra, Chad M

    2017-04-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a systemic disease characterized by the formation of immunoglobulin light-chain fibrils in critical organs of the body. The light-chain protein AL-09 presents one severe case of cardiac AL amyloidosis, which contains seven mutations in the variable domain (VL) relative to its germline counterpart, κI O18/O8 VL. Three of these mutations are non-conservative-Y87H, N34I, and K42Q-and previous work has shown that they are responsible for significantly reducing the protein's thermodynamic stability, allowing fibril formation to occur with fast kinetics and across a wide-range of pH conditions. Currently, however, there is extremely limited structural information available which explicitly describes the residues that are involved in supporting the misfolded fibril structure. Here, we assign the site-specific (15)N and (13)C chemical shifts of the rigid residues of AL-09 VL fibrils by solid-state NMR, reporting on the regions of the protein involved in the fibril as well as the extent of secondary structure.

  20. Chemical shift anisotropy and offset effects in cross polarization solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shekar, Srinivasan C; Lee, Dong-Kuk; Ramamoorthy, A

    2002-08-01

    The effect of an offset term in the cross-polarization (CP) Hamiltonian of a heteronuclear spin-12 pair due to off-resonant radio frequency (rf) irradiation and/or chemical shift anisotropy on one of the rf channels is investigated. Analytical solutions, simulations, and experimental results are presented. Formulating the CP spin dynamics in terms of an explicit unitary evolution operator enables the CP period to be inserted as a module in a given pulse scheme regardless of the initial density matrix present. The outcome of post-CP manipulation via pulses can be calculated on the resulting density matrix as the phases and amplitudes of all coherence modes are available. Using these tools it is shown that the offset can be used to reduce the rf power on that channel and the performance is further improved by a post-CP pulse whose flip angle matches and compensates the tilt of the effective field on the offset channel. Experimental investigations on single crystalline and polycrystalline samples of peptides confirm the oscillatory nature of CP dynamics and prove the slowing down of the dynamics under offset and/or mismatch conditions.

  1. Carbon-13 chemical shift anisotropy in DNA bases from field dependence of solution NMR relaxation rates.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jinfa; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad

    2006-03-01

    Knowledge of (13)C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) in nucleotide bases is important for the interpretation of solution-state NMR relaxation data in terms of local dynamic properties of DNA and RNA. Accurate knowledge of the CSA becomes particularly important at high magnetic fields, prerequisite for adequate spectral resolution in larger oligonucleotides. Measurement of (13)C relaxation rates of protonated carbons in the bases of the so-called Dickerson dodecamer, d(CGCGAATTCGCG)(2), at 500 and 800 MHz (1)H frequency, together with the previously characterized structure and diffusion tensor yields CSA values for C5 in C, C6 in C and T, C8 in A and G, and C2 in A that are closest to values previously reported on the basis of solid-state FIREMAT NMR measurements, and mostly larger than values obtained by in vacuo DFT calculations. Owing to the noncollinearity of dipolar and CSA interactions, interpretation of the NMR relaxation rates is particularly sensitive to anisotropy of rotational diffusion, and use of isotropic diffusion models can result in considerable errors.

  2. Effects of side-chain orientation on the 13C chemical shifts of antiparallel beta-sheet model peptides.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Myriam E; Vila, Jorge A; Scheraga, Harold A

    2007-02-01

    The dependence of the (13)C chemical shift on side-chain orientation was investigated at the density functional level for a two-strand antiparallel beta-sheet model peptide represented by the amino acid sequence Ac-(Ala)(3)-X-(Ala)(12)-NH(2) where X represents any of the 17 naturally occurring amino acids, i.e., not including alanine, glycine and proline. The dihedral angles adopted for the backbone were taken from, and fixed at, observed experimental values of an antiparallel beta-sheet. We carried out a cluster analysis of the ensembles of conformations generated by considering the side-chain dihedral angles for each residue X as variables, and use them to compute the (13)C chemical shifts at the density functional theory level. It is shown that the adoption of the locally-dense basis set approach for the quantum chemical calculations enabled us to reduce the length of the chemical-shift calculations while maintaining good accuracy of the results. For the 17 naturally occurring amino acids in an antiparallel beta-sheet, there is (i) good agreement between computed and observed (13)C(alpha) and (13)C(beta) chemical shifts, with correlation coefficients of 0.95 and 0.99, respectively; (ii) significant variability of the computed (13)C(alpha) and (13)C(beta) chemical shifts as a function of chi(1) for all amino acid residues except Ser; and (iii) a smaller, although significant, dependence of the computed (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts on chi(xi) (with xi > or = 2) compared to chi(1) for eleven out of seventeen residues. Our results suggest that predicted (13)C(alpha) and (13)C(beta) chemical shifts, based only on backbone (phi,psi) dihedral angles from high-resolution X-ray structure data or from NMR-derived models, may differ significantly from those observed in solution if the dihedral-angle preferences for the side chains are not taken into account.

  3. Analysis of the contributions of ring current and electric field effects to the chemical shifts of RNA bases.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-02-21

    Ring current and electric field effects can considerably influence NMR chemical shifts in biomolecules. Understanding such effects is particularly important for the development of accurate mappings between chemical shifts and the structures of nucleic acids. In this work, we first analyzed the Pople and the Haigh-Mallion models in terms of their ability to describe nitrogen base conjugated ring effects. We then created a database (DiBaseRNA) of three-dimensional arrangements of RNA base pairs from X-ray structures, calculated the corresponding chemical shifts via a hybrid density functional theory approach and used the results to parametrize the ring current and electric field effects in RNA bases. Next, we studied the coupling of the electric field and ring current effects for different inter-ring arrangements found in RNA bases using linear model fitting, with joint electric field and ring current, as well as only electric field and only ring current approximations. Taken together, our results provide a characterization of the interdependence of ring current and electric field geometric factors, which is shown to be especially important for the chemical shifts of non-hydrogen atoms in RNA bases.

  4. Generalized k-space decomposition with chemical shift correction for non-Cartesian water-fat imaging.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Ethan K; Holmes, James H; Yu, Huanzhou; Reeder, Scott B

    2008-05-01

    Chemical-shift artifacts associated with non-Cartesian imaging are more complex to model and less clinically acceptable than the bulk fat shift that occurs with conventional spin-warp Cartesian imaging. A novel k-space based iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation (IDEAL) approach is introduced that decomposes multiple species while simultaneously correcting distortion of off-resonant species. The new signal model accounts for the additional phase accumulated by off-resonant spins at each point in the k-space acquisition trajectory. This phase can then be corrected by adjusting the decomposition matrix for each k-space point during the final IDEAL processing step with little increase in reconstruction time. The technique is demonstrated with water-fat decomposition using projection reconstruction (PR)/radial, spiral, and Cartesian spin-warp imaging of phantoms and human subjects, in each case achieving substantial correction of chemical-shift artifacts. Simulations of the point-spread-function (PSF) for off-resonant spins are examined to show the nature of the chemical-shift distortion for each acquisition. Also introduced is an approach to improve the signal model for species which have multiple resonant peaks. Many chemical species, including fat, have multiple resonant peaks, although such species are often approximated as a single peak. The improved multipeak decomposition is demonstrated with water-fat imaging, showing a substantial improvement in water-fat separation.

  5. Stereospecific assignment of 1H resonances through chemical shift calculation and their use in structure determination by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Timothy S.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    1995-04-01

    Understanding of the factors which influence proton chemical shifts in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of proteins has advanced steadily as the number of proteins, for which assignments in conjunction with high resolution structures have been obtained, has increased. Progress has been made in both the calculation of chemical shifts from given coordinates, both empirically for 1H (Williamson & Asakura J. Magn. Reson. (1991) 94, 557) and using ab initio approaches for calculation of 13C (De Dios et al. Science (1993) 260, 1491). Concomitantly Wishart et al. (J. Mol. Biol. (1992) 222, 311), using statistical methods have clarified the relationship between Hα chemical shift and regular secondary structure in proteins to a high degree of accuracy. We recently demonstrated the significant amount of structural information present in the Hα chemical shift through the use of chemical shift restrained molecular dynamics simulations (Harvey & van Gunsteren Techniques in Protein Chemistry IV (1993) 615, Academic Press). Here we apply a similar methodology to the stereospecific assignment of methylene and methyl proton resonances in proteins. Stereospecific assignment of such 1H resonances dramatically increases the degree of precision of ensembles of structures derived from NMR data. However, this is often a cumbersome process, requiring detailed analysis of large amounts of data. Furthermore, experimental considerations such as poor signal-to-noise ratios, spectral overlap and spin diffusion combine to make this process somewhat unreliable. We present calculations of the chemical shifts for the known structures of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (Mw 6.5 kDa) and the α-amylase inhibitor tendamistat (Mw 8 kDa), for which stereospecific assignments and high resolution structures from both NMR and crystallographic studies are available. The methods described are also applied to the ensemble of structures obtained for protein S (Mw 19 kDa) for both structure

  6. Detection of methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring (13)C chemical-shift changes: A quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Garay, Pablo G; Martin, Osvaldo A; Scheraga, Harold A; Vila, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins expand the diversity of the proteome by several orders of magnitude and have a profound effect on several biological processes. Their detection by experimental methods is not free of limitations such as the amount of sample needed or the use of destructive procedures to obtain the sample. Certainly, new approaches are needed and, therefore, we explore here the feasibility of using (13)C chemical shifts of different nuclei to detect methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring the deviation of the (13)C chemical shifts from the expected (mean) experimental value of the non-modified residue. As a proof-of-concept, we used (13)C chemical shifts, computed at the DFT-level of theory, to test this hypothesis. Moreover, as a validation test of this approach, we compare our theoretical computations of the (13)Cε chemical-shift values against existing experimental data, obtained from NMR spectroscopy, for methylated and acetylated lysine residues with good agreement within ∼1 ppm. Then, further use of this approach to select the most suitable (13)C-nucleus, with which to determine other modifications commonly seen, such as methylation of arginine and glycosylation of serine, asparagine and threonine, shows encouraging results.

  7. Ab initio calculations of the intermolecular chemical shift in nuclear magnetic resonance in the gas phase and for adsorbed species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; de Dios, Angel C.

    1992-07-01

    The chemical shifts observed in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments are the differences in shielding of the nuclear spin in different electronic environments. These are known to depend on intermolecular interactions as evidenced by density-dependent chemical shifts in the gas phase, gas-to-liquid shifts, and adsorption shifts on surfaces. We present the results of the first ab initio intermolecular chemical shielding function calculated for a pair of interacting atoms for a wide range of internuclear separations. We used the localized orbital local origin (LORG) approach of Hansen and Bouman and also investigated the second-order electron correlation contributions using second-order LORG (SOLO). The 39Ar shielding in Ar2 passes through zero at some very short distance, going through a minimum, and asymptotically approaches zero at larger separations. The 21Ne shielding function in Ne2 has a similar shape. The Drude model suggests a method of scaling that portion of the shielding function that is weighted most heavily by exp[-V(R)/kT]. The scaling factors, which have been verified in the comparison of 21Ne in Ne2 against 39Ar in Ar2 ab initio results, allows us to project out from the same 39Ar in Ar2 ab initio values the appropriate 129Xe shielding functions in the Xe-Ar, Xe-Kr, and Xe-Xe interacting pairs. These functions lead to temperature-dependent second virial coefficients of chemical shielding which agree with experiments in the gas phase. Ab initio calculations of 39Ar shielding in clusters of argon are used to model the observed 129Xe chemical shifts of Xe, Xe2,...,Xe8 trapped in the cages of zeolite NaA.

  8. Ab initio studies of the nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of a rare gas atom in a zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; Lim, Hyung-Mi

    1995-09-01

    The intermolecular chemical shift of a rare gas atom inside a zeolite cavity is calculated by ab initio analytical derivative theory using gauge-including atomic orbitals (GIAO) at the Ar atom and the atoms of selected neutral clusters each of which is a 4-, 6-, or 8-ring fragment of the zeolite cage. The Si, Al, O atoms and the charge-balancing counterions (Na+, K+, Ca2+) of the clusters (from 24 to 52 atoms) are at coordinates taken from the refined single crystal x-ray structure of the NaA, KA, and CaA zeolites. Terminating OH groups place the H atom at an appropriate O-H distance along the bond to the next Si or Al atom in the crystal. The chemical shift of the Ar atom located at various positions relative to the cluster is calculated using Boys-Bernardi counterpoise correction at each position. The dependence of the rare gas atom chemical shift on the Al/Si ratio of the clusters is investigated. The resulting shielding values are fitted to a pairwise additive form to elicit effective individual Ar-O, Ar-Na, Ar-K, Ar-Ca intermolecular shielding functions of the form σ(39Ar, Ar...Ozeol)= a6r-6+a8r-8+a10r-10+a12r -12, where r is the distance between the Ar and the O atom. A similar form is used for the counterions. The dependence of the Ar shielding on the Al/Si ratio is established (the greater the Al content, the higher the Ar chemical shift), which is in agreement with the few experimental cases where the dependence of the 129Xe chemical shift on the Al/Si ratio of the zeolite has been observed.

  9. Toward Relatively General and Accurate Quantum Chemical Predictions of Solid-State (17)O NMR Chemical Shifts in Various Biologically Relevant Oxygen-Containing Compounds.

    PubMed

    Rorick, Amber; Michael, Matthew A; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-03

    Oxygen is an important element in most biologically significant molecules, and experimental solid-state (17)O NMR studies have provided numerous useful structural probes to study these systems. However, computational predictions of solid-state (17)O NMR chemical shift tensor properties are still challenging in many cases, and in particular, each of the prior computational works is basically limited to one type of oxygen-containing system. This work provides the first systematic study of the effects of geometry refinement, method, and basis sets for metal and nonmetal elements in both geometry optimization and NMR property calculations of some biologically relevant oxygen-containing compounds with a good variety of XO bonding groups (X = H, C, N, P, and metal). The experimental range studied is of 1455 ppm, a major part of the reported (17)O NMR chemical shifts in organic and organometallic compounds. A number of computational factors toward relatively general and accurate predictions of (17)O NMR chemical shifts were studied to provide helpful and detailed suggestions for future work. For the studied kinds of oxygen-containing compounds, the best computational approach results in a theory-versus-experiment correlation coefficient (R(2)) value of 0.9880 and a mean absolute deviation of 13 ppm (1.9% of the experimental range) for isotropic NMR shifts and an R(2) value of 0.9926 for all shift-tensor properties. These results shall facilitate future computational studies of (17)O NMR chemical shifts in many biologically relevant systems, and the high accuracy may also help the refinement and determination of active-site structures of some oxygen-containing substrate-bound proteins.

  10. The Relationship between NMR Chemical Shifts of Thermally Polarized and Hyperpolarized (89) Y Complexes and Their Solution Structures.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yixun; Jindal, Ashish K; Regueiro-Figueroa, Martín; Le Fur, Mariane; Kervarec, Nelly; Zhao, Piyu; Kovacs, Zoltan; Valencia, Laura; Pérez-Lourido, Paulo; Tripier, Raphaël; Esteban-Gómez, David; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Sherry, A Dean

    2016-11-07

    Recently developed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technology offers the potential of increasing the NMR sensitivity of even rare nuclei for biological imaging applications. Hyperpolarized (89) Y is an ideal candidate because of its narrow NMR linewidth, favorable spin quantum number (I=1/2 ), and long longitudinal relaxation times (T1 ). Strong NMR signals were detected in hyperpolarized (89) Y samples of a variety of yttrium complexes. A dataset of (89) Y NMR data composed of 23 complexes with polyaminocarboxylate ligands was obtained using hyperpolarized (89) Y measurements or (1) H,(89) Y-HMQC spectroscopy. These data were used to derive an empirical equation that describes the correlation between the (89) Y chemical shift and the chemical structure of the complexes. This empirical correlation serves as a guide for the design of (89) Y sensors. Relativistic (DKH2) DFT calculations were found to predict the experimental (89) Y chemical shifts to a rather good accuracy.

  11. Use of solid waste for chemical stabilization: Adsorption isotherms and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR study of hazardous organic compounds sorbed on coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.; Lane, D.C.; Rovani, J.F.; Cox, J.D.; Clark, J.A.; Miknis, F.P.

    1993-09-01

    Adsorption of hazardous organic compounds on the Dave Johnston plant fly ash is described. Fly ash from Dave Johnston and Laramie River power plants were characterized using elemental, x-ray, and {sup 29}Si NMR; the Dave Johnston (DJ) fly ash had higher quartz contents, while the Laramie River fly ash had more monomeric silicate anions. Adsorption data for hydroaromatics and chlorobenzenes indicate that the adsorption capacity of DJ coal fly ash is much less than that of activated carbon by a factor of >3000; but it is needed to confirm that solid-gas and solid-liquid equilibrium isotherms can indeed be compared. However, for pyridine, pentachlorophenol, naphthalene, and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, the DJ fly ash appears to adsorb these compounds nearly as well as activated carbon. {sup 13}C NMR was used to study the adsorption of hazardous org. cpds on coal fly ash; the nuclear spin relaxation times often were very long, resulting in long experimental times to obtain a spectrum. Using a jumbo probe, low concentrations of some hazardous org. cpds could be detected; for pentachlorophenol adsorbed onto fly ash, the chemical shift of the phenolic carbon was changed. Use of NMR to study the adsorption needs further study.

  12. Structure analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid with experimental (FT-IR, Raman, NMR and XRD) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Özgür; Dikmen, Gökhan

    2016-03-01

    Possible stable conformers, geometrical molecular structures, vibrational properties as well as band assignments, nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid (2F3MP5BA) were studied experimentally and theoretically using FT-IR, Raman, (CP/MAS) NMR and XRD spectroscopic methods. FT-IR and Raman spectra were evaluated in the region of 3500-400 cm-1, and 3200-400 cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometric structures, vibrational wavenumbers and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors were examined using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional theory method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. 1H, 13C, APT and HETCOR NMR experiments of title molecule were carried out in DMSO solution. 13C CP/MAS NMR measurement was done with 4 mm zirconium rotor and glycine was used as an external standard. Single crystal of 2F3MP5BA was also prepared for XRD measurements. Assignments of vibrational wavenumbers were also strengthened by calculating the total energy distribution (TED) values using scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method.

  13. Female sea lamprey shift orientation toward a conspecific chemical cue to escape a sensory trap

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brant, Cory O.; Johnson, Nicholas; Li, Ke; Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    The sensory trap model of signal evolution hypothesizes that signalers adapt to exploit a cue used by the receiver in another context. Although exploitation of receiver biases can result in conflict between the sexes, deceptive signaling systems that are mutually beneficial drive the evolution of stable communication systems. However, female responses in the nonsexual and sexual contexts may become uncoupled if costs are associated with exhibiting a similar response to a trait in both contexts. Male sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) signal with a mating pheromone, 3-keto petromyzonol sulfate (3kPZS), which may be a match to a juvenile cue used by females during migration. Upstream movement of migratory lampreys is partially guided by 3kPZS, but females only move toward 3kPZS with proximal accuracy during spawning. Here, we use in-stream behavioral assays paired with gonad histology to document the transition of female preference for juvenile- and male-released 3kPZS that coincides with the functional shift of 3kPZS as a migratory cue to a mating pheromone. Females became increasingly biased toward the source of synthesized 3kPZS as their maturation progressed into the reproductive phase, at which point, a preference for juvenile odor (also containing 3kPZS naturally) ceased to exist. Uncoupling of female responses during migration and spawning makes the 3kPZS communication system a reliable means of synchronizing mate search. The present study offers a rare example of a transition in female responses to a chemical cue between nonsexual and sexual contexts, provides insights into the origins of stable communication signaling systems.

  14. A theoretical interpretation of the chemical shift of 29Si NMR peaks in alkali borosilicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanba, Tokuro; Nishimura, Mitsunori; Miura, Yoshinari

    2004-12-01

    In 29Si-NMR, it has so far been accepted that the chemical shifts of Q n species (SiO 4 units containing n bridging oxygens) were equivalent between alkali borosilicate and boron-free alkali silicate glasses. In the sodium borosilicate glasses with low sodium content, however, a contradiction was confirmed in the estimation of alkali distribution; 11B NMR suggested that Na ions were entirely distributed to borate groups to form BO 4 units, whereas a -90 ppm component was also observed in 29Si-NMR spectra, which has been attributed to Q 3 species associated with a nonbridging oxygen (NBO). Then, cluster molecular orbital calculations were performed to interpret the -90 ppm component in the borosilicate glasses. It was found that a silicon atom which had two tetrahedral borons (B4) as its second nearest neighbors was similar in atomic charge and Si2p energy to the Q 3 species in boron-free alkali silicates. Unequal distribution of electrons in Si-O-B4 bridging bonds was also found, where much electrons were localized on the Si-O bonds. It was finally concluded that the Si-O-B4 bridges with narrow bond angle were responsible for the -90 ppm 29Si component in the borosilicate glasses. There still remained another interpretation; the Q 3 species were actually present in the glasses, and NBOs in the Q 3 species were derived from the tricluster groups, such as (O 3Si)O(BO 3) 2. In the glasses with low sodium content, however, it was concluded that the tricluster groups were not so abundant to contribute to the -90 ppm component.

  15. Determination of 15N chemical shift anisotropy from a membrane-bound protein by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Ahuja, Shivani; Pichumani, Kumar; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2012-06-21

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors are essential in the structural and dynamic studies of proteins using NMR spectroscopy. Results from relaxation studies in biomolecular solution and solid-state NMR experiments on aligned samples are routinely interpreted using well-characterized CSA tensors determined from model compounds. Since CSA tensors, particularly the (15)N CSA, highly depend on a number of parameters including secondary structure, electrostatic interaction, and the amino acid sequence, there is a need for accurately determined CSA tensors from proteins. In this study, we report the backbone amide-(15)N CSA tensors for a 16.7-kDa membrane-bound and paramagnetic-heme containing protein, rabbit Cytochrome b(5) (cytb(5)), determined using the (15)N CSA/(15)N-(1)H dipolar transverse cross-correlation rates. The mean values of (15)N CSA determined for residues in helical, sheet, and turn regions are -187.9, -166.0, and -161.1 ppm, respectively, with an overall average value of -171.7 ppm. While the average CSA value determined from this study is in good agreement with previous solution NMR experiments on small globular proteins, the CSA value determined for residues in helical conformation is slightly larger, which may be attributed to the paramagnetic effect from Fe(III) of the heme unit in cytb(5). However, like in previous solution NMR studies, the CSA values reported in this study are larger than the values measured from solid-state NMR experiments. We believe that the CSA parameters reported in this study will be useful in determining the structure, dynamics, and orientation of proteins, including membrane proteins, using NMR spectroscopy.

  16. Temperature effects on chemical structure and motion in coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maciel, G.E.

    1996-09-30

    The objective of this project was to apply recently developed, state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to examine in situ changes in the chemical structure and molecular/macromolecular motion in coal as the temperature is increased above room temperature. Although alterations in the chemical structure of coal have been studied previously by {sup 13}C NMR, using quenched samples, the goal of this project was to examine these chemical structural changes, and changes in molecular/macromolecular mobility that may precede or accompany the chemical changes, at elevated temperatures, using modern {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR techniques, especially {sup 1}H dipolar-dephasing techniques and related experiments pioneered in the laboratory for examining pyridine-saturated coals. This project consisted of the following four primary segments and related efforts on matters relevant to the first four tasks. (1) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure and mobility as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (2) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure, mobility and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (3) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure/mobility as a function of temperature over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (4) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure, dynamics and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (5) Related matters relevant to the first four tasks: (a) {sup 1}H CRAMPS NMR characterization of oil shales and their kerogen concentrates; and (b) improved quantitation in {sup 13}C MAS characterization of coals.

  17. Distribution and Xe129 NMR chemical shifts of Xen clusters in the alpha cages of zeolite AgA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; Lim, Hyung-Mi

    1997-09-01

    The distributions and 129Xe NMR chemical shifts of xenon in zeolite AgA have been measured in a series of experiments by Moudrakovski, Ratcliffe, and Ripmeester [Proc. Internat. Zeolite Conference, Quebec, 1995; unpublished]. We carry out grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations of xenon in a rigid zeolite AgA lattice to provide the average Xen cluster shifts, and the distributions Pn for comparison with their experiments. The GCMC results for the distributions, the fraction Pn of the alpha cages containing n Xe atoms, are compared with the experimental distributions in 12 samples and the agreement is excellent. The distributions in NaA and in AgA are very similar, as can be established from the comparison of the dispersion of the distributions, {-2}, and both are different from the idealized hypergeometric distribution, in which the component atoms occupy eight lattice sites per cage under mutual exclusion. The calculated chemical shift increments [σ(Xen)-σ(Xen-1)]AgA are in good agreement with experiment. The differences between these and the increments in zeolite NaA, {[σ(Xen)-σ(Xen-1)]AgA-[σ(Xen)-σ(Xen-1)]NaA}, are fairly small and are in good agreement with experiment. The absolute 129Xe chemical shifts of Xen in the alpha cages of AgA are nearly uniformly shifted by about 40 ppm compared to the Xen clusters in NaA. This is attributed to the Fermi contact shifts arising from the Ag0 metal atoms that form the linear Ag32+ complexes that are found within the beta cages of AgA.

  18. Hydrophobic clustering in nonnative states of a protein: Interpretation of chemical shifts in NMR spectra of denatured states of lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, P.A.; Topping, K.D.; Woolfson, D.N.; Dobson, C.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Chemical shifts of resonances of specific protons in the 1H NMR spectrum of thermally denatured hen lysozyme have been determined by exchange correlation with assigned native state resonances in 2D NOESY spectra obtained under conditions where the two states are interconverting. There are subtle but widespread deviations of the measured shifts from the values which would be anticipated for a random coil; in the case of side chain protons these are virtually all net upfield shifts and it is shown that this may be the averaged effect of interactions with aromatic rings in a partially collapsed denatured state. In a very few cases, notably that of two sequential tryptophan residues, it is possible to interpret these effects in terms of specific, local interresidue interactions. Generally, however, there is no correlation with either native state shift perturbations or with sequence proximity to aromatic groups. Diminution of most of the residual shift perturbations on reduction of the disulfide cross-links confirms that they are not simply effects of residues adjacent in the sequence. Similar effects of chemical denaturants, with the disulfides intact, demonstrate that the shift perturbations reflect an enhanced tendency to side chain clustering in the thermally denatured state. The temperature dependences of the shift perturbations suggest that this clustering is noncooperative and is driven by small, favorable enthalpy changes. While the extent of conformational averaging is clearly much greater than that observed for a homologous protein, alpha-lactalbumin, in its partially folded molten globule state, the results clearly show that thermally denatured lysozyme differs substantially from a random coil, principally in that it is partially hydrophobically collapsed.

  19. Boric acid, “carbonic” acid, and N-containing oxyacids in aqueous solution: Ab initio studies of structure, pKa, NMR shifts, and isotopic fractionations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    B(OH) 3 and CO 2 are acidic species of considerable geochemical importance, yet the microscopic nature of the acid dissociation reactions for these B and C species is not well understood. Quantum mechanical methods have recently been applied to the direct ab initio calculation of p Ka values for many organic and inorganic weak acids, but the B and C acids have not yet been considered in detail. In the present study, p Ka values are calculated quantum mechanically for the oxyacids B(OH) 3, H 2CO 3 and HNO 3, which have experimental first p Ka values of 9.2, 6.4 and -1.3, respectively. We calculate the gas-phase reaction free energies at the highly accurate CBS-QB3 ab initio quantum mechanical level and reaction free energies of hydration using a polarizable continuum method. Using a thermodynamic cycle corresponding to the simple dissociation process HA A - + H +, in aqueous solution, we calculate p Ka values of 21.6, 3.8 to 2.2 and -0.8 for the three oxyacids mentioned above, closely matching experiment only for HNO 3. The discrepancies with experiment arise from the more complex nature of the acid dissociation process for B(OH) 3, which involves the addition of H 2O to B(OH) 3 and formation of the B(OH) 4- anion, and from the instability of hypothetical H 2CO 3 compared to the proper hydrated reactant complex CO 2. . . H 2O. When the proper microscopic description of the reactants and products is used the calculated p Ka values for the three acids become 11.1, 7.2 and -0.8, in considerably better agreement with experiment for B(OH) 3 and CO 2. . . H 2O. Thus p Ka calculations using this approach are accurate enough to give information on the actual acid species present in solution and the details of their acid dissociation processes at the microscopic level. 11B and 13C-NMR chemical shifts are also calculated for the various species and compared to experiment. By comparison of our calculations with experiment it is apparent that the 13C-NMR chemical shift has

  20. Assessing the accuracy of protein structures by quantum mechanical computations of 13C(alpha) chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Vila, Jorge A; Scheraga, Harold A

    2009-10-20

    Two major techniques have been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of proteins: X-ray diffraction and NMR spectroscopy. In particular, the validation of NMR-derived protein structures is one of the most challenging problems in NMR spectroscopy. Therefore, researchers have proposed a plethora of methods to determine the accuracy and reliability of protein structures. Despite these proposals, there is a growing need for more sophisticated, physics-based structure validation methods. This approach will enable us to (a) characterize the "quality" of the NMR-derived ensemble as a whole by a single parameter, (b) unambiguously identify flaws in the sequence at a residue level, and (c) provide precise information, such as sets of backbone and side-chain torsional angles, that we can use to detect local flaws. Rather than reviewing all of the existing validation methods, this Account describes the contributions of our research group toward a solution of the long-standing problem of both global and local structure validation of NMR-derived protein structures. We emphasize a recently introduced physics-based methodology that makes use of observed and computed (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts (at the density functional theory (DFT) level of theory) for an accurate validation of protein structures in solution and in crystals. By assessing the ability of computed (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts to reproduce observed (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts of a single structure or ensemble of structures in solution and in crystals, we accomplish a global validation by using the conformationally averaged root-mean-square deviation, ca-rmsd, as a scoring function. In addition, the method enables us to provide local validation by identifying a set of individual amino acid conformations for which the computed and observed (13)C(alpha) chemical shifts do not agree within a certain error range and may represent a nonreliable fold of the protein model. Although it is computationally

  1. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly 13C/15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D 13C–13C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of 13C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, 13C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS 13C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely used in

  2. Backbone chemical shifts assignments, secondary structure, and ligand binding of a family GH-19 chitinase from moss, Bryum coronatum.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Shoko; Nagata, Takuya; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Taira, Toki; Nishimura, Shigenori; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2012-10-01

    Family GH19 chitinases have been recognized as important in the plant defense against fungal pathogens. However, their substrate-recognition mechanism is still unknown. We report here the first resonance assignment of NMR spectrum of a GH19 chitinase from moss, Bryum coronatum (BcChi-A). The backbone signals were nearly completely assigned, and the secondary structure was estimated based on the chemical shift values. The addition of the chitin dimer to the enzyme solution perturbed the chemical shifts of HSQC resonances of the amino acid residues forming the putative substrate-binding cleft. Further NMR analysis of the ligand binding to BcChi-A will improve understanding of the substrate-recognition mechanism of GH-19 enzymes.

  3. NMR chemical shift study of the interaction of selected peptides with liposomal and micellar models of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Van Koninckxloo, Aurore; Henoumont, Céline; Laurent, Sophie; Muller, Robert N; Vander Elst, Luce

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between two peptides previously selected by phage display to target apoptotic cells and phospholipidic models of these cells (liposomes or micelles made of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and/or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (DPPS, phosphatidylserine analog) was studied by the simple analysis of the changes induced on the proton NMR chemical shifts of the peptides. Our approach which does not need healthy and/or apoptotic cells for assessing the affinity of different peptides is fast and efficient and requires small amounts of peptide to determine the association constant, the interacting protons, and the number of interaction sites. The micellar model gave more reliable results than the liposomal one. The preferential interaction of the peptide with DPPS was evidenced by the change of the chemical shifts of specific amino acids of the peptides. Our micellar model is thus well suited to mimic apoptotic cells.

  4. Determination of isoleucine side-chain conformations in ground and excited states of proteins from chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D Flemming; Neudecker, Philipp; Kay, Lewis E

    2010-06-09

    A simple method is presented for quantifying Ile chi(2) rotamer distributions in proteins based on the measurement of Ile (13)C(delta1) chemical shifts. The methodology is well suited for applications involving very high molecular weight protein complexes, where other NMR parameters such as side-chain scalar coupling constants that report on dihedral angles cannot be measured or for studies of invisible, excited protein states, where chemical shifts are obtained from analysis of CPMG relaxation dispersion profiles. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by an application to the folding reaction of a mutant Fyn SH3 domain, where Ile side-chain structure and dynamics of an on-folding pathway intermediate state are studied.

  5. The local order of supercooled water in solution with LiCl studied by NMR proton chemical shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, C.; Mallamace, D.; Vasi, S.; Cicero, N.; Dugo, G.; Mallamace, F.

    2016-05-01

    We study by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the local order of water molecules in solution with lithium chloride at eutectic concentration. In particular, by measuring the proton chemical shift as a function of the temperature in the interval 203{ K}chemical shift of water solvating lithium and chlorine individually. The thermal behavior of this quantity confirms previous results about the role of the temperature in the solvation mechanisms down to about 225K. This temperature coincides with that of the so-called Widom line for water supporting the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis.

  6. Towards the versatile DFT and MP2 computational schemes for 31P NMR chemical shifts taking into account relativistic corrections.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Sergey V; Rusakov, Yury Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2014-11-01

    The main factors affecting the accuracy and computational cost of the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts in the representative series of organophosphorous compounds are examined at the density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) levels. At the DFT level, the best functionals for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts are those of Keal and Tozer, KT2 and KT3. Both at the DFT and MP2 levels, the most reliable basis sets are those of Jensen, pcS-2 or larger, and those of Pople, 6-311G(d,p) or larger. The reliable basis sets of Dunning's family are those of at least penta-zeta quality that precludes their practical consideration. An encouraging finding is that basically, the locally dense basis set approach resulting in a dramatic decrease in computational cost is justified in the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts within the 1-2-ppm error. Relativistic corrections to (31)P NMR absolute shielding constants are of major importance reaching about 20-30 ppm (ca 7%) improving (not worsening!) the agreement of calculation with experiment. Further better agreement with the experiment by 1-2 ppm can be obtained by taking into account solvent effects within the integral equation formalism polarizable continuum model solvation scheme. We recommend the GIAO-DFT-KT2/pcS-3//pcS-2 scheme with relativistic corrections and solvent effects taken into account as the most versatile computational scheme for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts characterized by a mean absolute error of ca 9 ppm in the range of 550 ppm.

  7. Application of data mining tools for classification of protein structural class from residue based averaged NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun V; Ali, Rehana F M; Cao, Yu; Krishnan, V V

    2015-10-01

    The number of protein sequences deriving from genome sequencing projects is outpacing our knowledge about the function of these proteins. With the gap between experimentally characterized and uncharacterized proteins continuing to widen, it is necessary to develop new computational methods and tools for protein structural information that is directly related to function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides powerful means to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins in the solution state. However, translation of the NMR spectral parameters to even low-resolution structural information such as protein class requires multiple time consuming steps. In this paper, we present an unorthodox method to predict the protein structural class directly by using the residue's averaged chemical shifts (ACS) based on machine learning algorithms. Experimental chemical shift information from 1491 proteins obtained from Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) and their respective protein structural classes derived from structural classification of proteins (SCOP) were used to construct a data set with 119 attributes and 5 different classes. Twenty four different classification schemes were evaluated using several performance measures. Overall the residue based ACS values can predict the protein structural classes with 80% accuracy measured by Matthew correlation coefficient. Specifically protein classes defined by mixed αβ or small proteins are classified with >90% correlation. Our results indicate that this NMR-based method can be utilized as a low-resolution tool for protein structural class identification without any prior chemical shift assignments.

  8. Application of Data Mining Tools for Classification of Protein Structural Class from Residue Based Averaged NMR Chemical Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun. V.; Ali, Rehana F.M.; Cao, Yu; Krishnan, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    The number of protein sequences deriving from genome sequencing projects is outpacing our knowledge about the function of these proteins. With the gap between experimentally characterized and uncharacterized proteins continuing to widen, it is necessary to develop new computational methods and tools for protein structural information that is directly related to function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides powerful means to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins in the solution state. However, translation of the NMR spectral parameters to even low-resolution structural information such as protein class requires multiple time consuming steps. In this paper, we present an unorthodox method to predict the protein structural class directly by using the residue’s averaged chemical shifts (ACS) based on machine learning algorithms. Experimental chemical shift information from 1491 proteins obtained from Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) and their respective protein structural classes derived from structural classification of proteins (SCOP) were used to construct a data set with 119 attributes and 5 different classes. Twenty four different classification schemes were evaluated using several performance measures. Overall the residue based ACS values can predict the protein structural classes with 80 % accuracy measured by Matthew Correlation coefficient. Specifically protein classes defined by mixed αβ or small proteins are classified with > 90% correlation. Our results indicate that this NMR-based method can be utilized as a low-resolution tool for protein structural class identification without any prior chemical shift assignments. PMID:25758094

  9. Study on molecular structure, spectroscopic investigation (IR, Raman and NMR), vibrational assignments and HOMO-LUMO analysis of L-sodium folinate using DFT: a combined experimental and quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Linwei; Cai, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Zhixu; Geng, Yiding; Sun, Tiemin

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, an exhaustive conformational search of N-[4-[[(2-amino-5-formyl-(6S)-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-4-oxo-6-pteridinyl)methyl]amino]benzoyl]-L-glutamic acid disodium salt (L-SF) has been preformed. The optimized structure of the molecule, vibrational frequencies and NMR spectra studies have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with the 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. IR and FT-Raman spectra for L-SF have been recorded in the region of 400-4000 cm(-1) and 100-3500 cm(-1), respectively. 13C and 1H NMR spectra were recorded and 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated based on the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Finally all of the calculation results were applied to simulate IR, Raman, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectrum of the title compound which showed excellent agreement with observed spectrum. Furthermore, reliable vibrational assignments which have been made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) and characteristic vibratinonal absorption bands of the title compound in IR and Raman have been figured out. HOMO-LUMO energy and Mulliken atomic charges have been evaluated, either.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding and in vitro antimicrobial studies of a novel tetra-substituted N-isopropyl-N-(4-ferrocenylphenyl)-N‧-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N″-benzoylguanidine: Crystallographic structure and quantum chemical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Muhammad Khawar; Gul, Rukhsana; Rashid, Zahid; Badshah, Amin; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Shahid, Muhammad; Khan, Azim

    2015-02-01

    A novel tetra-substituted guanidine, N-isopropyl-N-(4-ferrocenylphenyl)-N‧-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N″-benzoylguanidine (1), [(CH3)2CH)(C5H5FeC5H4C6H4)NC(NHCOC6H5)(NHC6H3(CH2CH3)2] has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, multinuclear (1H, 13C) NMR spectroscopy, single crystal X-rays diffraction analysis and density functional theory based quantum chemical calculations. The torsion angles indicating that the guanidine moiety and carbonyl group are almost co-planar, due to the pseudo hexagonal ring formed by intramolecular Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The DNA interaction studies performed by cyclic voltammetry and UV-visible spectroscopy are in close agreement with the binding constants (K) 1.4 × 104 and 1.2 × 104 respectively. The shift in peak potential, current and absorption maxima of the studied ferrocenyl guanidine in the presence of DNA discovered that CV coupled with UV-vis spectroscopy could provide an opportunity to elaborate DNA interaction mechanism, a prerequisite for the design of new drug like agents and understanding the molecular basis of their action. The synthesized compound (1) has also been screened for their antibacterial and antifungal.

  11. Chemical composition of Melicope belahe (Baill.) T. G. Hartley (Rutaceae) leaf essential oil from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Rabehaja, Delphin J R; Garcia, Gabriel; Charmillon, Julie-Marie; Désiré, Odile; Paoli, Mathieu; Ramanoelina, Panja A R; Tomi, Félix

    2017-01-01

    Melicope belahe (Baill.) T.G. Hartley (Rutaceae) is an endemic species to Madagascar. The chemical composition of leaf essential oil is reported for the first time. A sample was extracted by hydrodistillation and analysis was carried out by combination of chromatographic (GC), spectroscopic and spectrometric (MS, (13)C NMR) techniques. In total, 56 compounds have been identified. The chemical composition was dominated by α-pinene (42.6%) followed by linalool (6.2%) and (E)-β-caryophyllene (5.2%).

  12. Toward calculations of the 129Xe chemical shift in Xe@C60 at experimental conditions: relativity, correlation, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Straka, Michal; Lantto, Perttu; Vaara, Juha

    2008-03-27

    We calculate the 129Xe chemical shift in endohedral Xe@C60 with systematic inclusion of the contributing physical effects to model the real experimental conditions. These are relativistic effects, electron correlation, the temperature-dependent dynamics, and solvent effects. The ultimate task is to obtain the right result for the right reason and to develop a physically justified methodological model for calculations and simulations of endohedral Xe fullerenes and other confined Xe systems. We use the smaller Xe...C6H6 model to calibrate density functional theory approaches against accurate correlated wave function methods. Relativistic effects as well as the coupling of relativity and electron correlation are evaluated using the leading-order Breit-Pauli perturbation theory. The dynamic effects are treated in two ways. In the first approximation, quantum dynamics of the Xe atom in a rigid cage takes advantage of the centrosymmetric potential for Xe within the thermally accessible distance range from the center of the cage. This reduces the problem of obtaining the solution of a diatomic rovibrational problem. In the second approach, first-principles classical molecular dynamics on the density functional potential energy hypersurface is used to produce the dynamical trajectory for the whole system, including the dynamic cage. Snapshots from the trajectory are used for calculations of the dynamic contribution to the absorption 129Xe chemical shift. The calculated nonrelativistic Xe shift is found to be highly sensitive to the optimized molecular structure and to the choice of the exchange-correlation functional. Relativistic and dynamic effects are significant and represent each about 10% of the nonrelativistic static shift at the minimum structure. While the role of the Xe dynamics inside of the rigid cage is negligible, the cage dynamics turns out to be responsible for most of the dynamical correction to the 129Xe shift. Solvent effects evaluated with a polarized

  13. ProCS15: a DFT-based chemical shift predictor for backbone and Cβ atoms in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Anders S.; Bratholm, Lars A.; Christensen, Anders S.; Channir, Maher

    2015-01-01

    We present ProCS15: a program that computes the isotropic chemical shielding values of backbone and Cβ atoms given a protein structure in less than a second. ProCS15 is based on around 2.35 million OPBE/6-31G(d,p)//PM6 calculations on tripeptides and small structural models of hydrogen-bonding. The ProCS15-predicted chemical shielding values are compared to experimentally measured chemical shifts for Ubiquitin and the third IgG-binding domain of Protein G through linear regression and yield RMSD values of up to 2.2, 0.7, and 4.8 ppm for carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen atoms. These RMSD values are very similar to corresponding RMSD values computed using OPBE/6-31G(d,p) for the entire structure for each proteins. These maximum RMSD values can be reduced by using NMR-derived structural ensembles of Ubiquitin. For example, for the largest ensemble the largest RMSD values are 1.7, 0.5, and 3.5 ppm for carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen. The corresponding RMSD values predicted by several empirical chemical shift predictors range between 0.7–1.1, 0.2–0.4, and 1.8–2.8 ppm for carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen atoms, respectively. PMID:26623185

  14. Ursodeoxycholic acid treatment of hepatic steatosis: a (13)C NMR metabolic study.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Patrícia M; Jones, John G; Rolo, Anabela P; Palmeira, Carlos M M; Carvalho, Rui A

    2011-11-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is commonly used for the treatment of hepatobiliary disorders. In this study, we tested whether a 4-week treatment with this bile acid (12-15 mg/kg/day) could improve hepatic fatty acid oxidation in obese Zucker rats - a model for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and steatosis. After 24 h of fasting, livers were perfused with physiological concentrations of [U-(13) C]nonesterified fatty acids and [3-(13) C]lactate/[3-(13) C]pyruvate. Steatosis was associated with abundant intracellular glucose, lactate, alanine and methionine, and low concentrations of choline and betaine. Steatotic livers also showed the highest output of glucose and lactate. Glucose and glycolytic products were mostly unlabeled, indicating active glycogenolysis and glycolysis after 24 h of fasting. UDCA treatment resulted in a general amelioration of liver metabolic abnormalities with a decrease in intracellular glucose and lactate, as well as their output. Hepatic betaine and methionine were also normalized after UDCA treatment, suggesting the amelioration of anti-oxidative defenses. Choline levels were not affected by the bile acid, which may indicate a deficient synthesis of very-low-density lipoproteins. The percentage contribution of [U-(13) C]nonesterified fatty acids to acetyl-coenzyme A entering the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was significantly lower in livers from Zucker obese rats relative to control rats: 23.1 ± 4.9% versus 44.1 ± 2.7% (p < 0.01). UDCA treatment did not alter significantly fatty acid oxidation in control rats, but improved significantly oxidation in Zucker obese rats to 46.0 ± 6.1% (p > 0.05), comparable with control group values. The TCA cycle activity subsequent to fatty acid oxidation was reduced in steatotic livers and improved when UDCA was administered (0.24 ± 0.04 versus 0.37 ± 0.05, p = 0.05). We further suggest that the mechanism of action of UDCA is either related to the activity of the farnesoid receptor, or to the amelioration of the anti-oxidative defenses and cell nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+) /NADH) ratio, favoring TCA cycle activity and β-oxidation.

  15. 15N and 13C NMR Determination of Allantoin Metabolism in Developing Soybean Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Coker, George T.; Schaefer, Jacob

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of allantoin by immature cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max L. cv Elf) grown in culture was investigated using solid state 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance. All of the nitrogens of allantoin were incorporated into protein in a manner similar to that of each other and to the amide nitrogen of glutamine. The C-2 of allantoin was not incorporated into cellular material; presumably it was lost as CO2. About 50% of the C-5 of allantoin was incorporated into cellular material as a methylene carbon; the other 50% was presumably also lost as CO2. The 13C-15N bonds of [5-13C;1-15N] and [2-13C;1,3-15N]allantoin were broken prior to the incorporation of the nitrogens into protein. These data are consistent with allantoin's degradation to two molecules of urea and one two-carbon fragment. Cotyledons grown on allantoin as a source of nitrogen accumulated 21% of the nitrogen of cotyledons grown on glutamine. Only 50% of the nitrogen of the degraded allantoin was incorporated into the cotyledon as organic nitrogen; the other 50% was recovered as NH4+ in the media in which the cotyledons had been grown. The latter results suggests that the lower accumulation of nitrogen by cotyledons grown on allantoin was in part due to failure to assimilate NH4+ produced from allantoin. The seed coats had a higher activity of glutamine synthetase and a higher rate of allantoin degradation than cotyledons indicating that seed coats play an important role in the assimilation and degradation of allantoin. PMID:16663995

  16. Plant Resources, (13)C-NMR Spectral Characteristic and Pharmacological Activities of Dammarane-Type Triterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jingya; Zheng, Chang; Qu, Lu; Liu, Yanxia; Han, Lifeng; Yu, Haiyang; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tao

    2016-08-12

    Dammarane-type triterpenoids (DTT) widely distribute in various medicinal plants. They have generated a great amount of interest in the field of new drug research and development. Generally, DTT are the main bioactive ingredients abundant in Araliaceae plants, such as Panax ginseng, P. japonicas, P. notoginseng, and P. quinquefolium. Aside from Araliaceae, DTT also distribute in other families, including Betulaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Meliaceae, Rhamnaceae, and Scrophulariaceae. Until now, about 136 species belonging to 46 families have been reported to contain DTT. In this article, the genus classifications of plant sources of the botanicals that contain DTT are reviewed, with particular focus on the NMR spectral features and pharmacological activities based on literature reports, which may be benefit for the development of new drugs or food additives.

  17. (1) H and (13) C NMR characterization of new cycloartane triterpenes from Mangifera indica.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Martínez, Carolina; Concepción Lozada, M; Hernández-Ortega, Simón; Villarreal, María Luisa; Gnecco, Dino; Enríquez, Raúl G; Reynolds, William

    2012-01-01

    From the stem bark of Mangifera indica, seven cycloartane-type secondary metabolites were isolated. Compound 1 has been isolated for the first time from M. indica, whereas compounds 2 (2a and 2b, as an epimeric mixture), 3, and 4 are new triterpenoid-type cycloartanes. Unambiguous (13) C and (1) H NMR assignments for these compounds and the known compounds mangiferonic acid (compound 5), isomangiferolic acid (compound 6), ambolic acid (compound 7), and friedelin (compound 8) are reported; the latter because full NMR data for these compounds are not available in the literature.

  18. Solid state (13)C NMR analysis of human gallstones from cancer and benign gall bladder diseases.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, K; Sonkar, Kanchan; Behari, Anu; Kapoor, V K; Sinha, Neeraj

    2009-09-01

    Natural abundance (13)C cross polarized (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of human gall bladder stones collected from patients suffering from malignant and benign gall bladder disease was carried out which revealed different polymorphs of cholesterol in these stones. All gall bladder stones in present study had cholesterol as their main constituent. (13)C CP-MAS NMR analysis revealed three forms of cholesterol molecules in these stones, which are anhydrous form, monohydrate crystalline with amorphous form and monohydrate crystalline form. Our study revealed that stones collected from patients associated with chronic cholecystitis (CC) disease have mostly different polymorph of cholesterol than stones collected from patients associated with gall bladder cancer (GBC). Such study will be helpful in understanding the mechanism of formation of gallstones which are associated with different gall bladder diseases. This is the first study by solid state NMR revealing different crystal polymorphism of cholesterol in human gallstones, extending the applicability of (13)C CP-MAS NMR technique for the routine study of gallstones.

  19. Continuous Flow 1H and 13C NMR Spectroscopy in Microfluidic Stripline NMR Chips

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidic stripline NMR technology not only allows for NMR experiments to be performed on small sample volumes in the submicroliter range, but also experiments can easily be performed in continuous flow because of the stripline’s favorable geometry. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of dual-channel operation of a microfluidic stripline NMR setup showing one- and two-dimensional 1H, 13C and heteronuclear NMR experiments under continuous flow. We performed experiments on ethyl crotonate and menthol, using three different types of NMR chips aiming for straightforward microfluidic connectivity. The detection volumes are approximately 150 and 250 nL, while flow rates ranging from 0.5 μL/min to 15 μL/min have been employed. We show that in continuous flow the pulse delay is determined by the replenishment time of the detector volume, if the sample trajectory in the magnet toward NMR detector is long enough to polarize the spin systems. This can considerably speed up quantitative measurement of samples needing signal averaging. So it can be beneficial to perform continuous flow measurements in this setup for analysis of, e.g., reactive, unstable, or mass-limited compounds. PMID:28194934

  20. Characterization of alkyl carbon in forest soils by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy and dipolar dephasing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kogel-Knabner, I.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Samples obtained from forest soils at different stages of decomposition were treated sequentially with chloroform/methanol (extraction of lipids), sulfuric acid (hydrolysis), and sodium chlorite (delignification) to enrich them in refractory alkyl carbon. As revealed by NMR spectroscopy, this treatment yielded residues with high contents of alkyl carbon. In the NMR spectra of residues obtained from litter samples, resonances for carbohydrates are also present, indicating that these carbohydrates are tightly bound to the alkyl carbon structures. During decomposition in the soils this resistant carbohydrate fraction is lost almost completely. In the litter samples the alkyl carbon shows a dipolar dephasing behavior indicative of two structural components, a rigid and a more mobile component. As depth and decomposition increase, only the rigid component is observed. This fact could be due to selective degradation of the mobile component or to changes in molecular mobility during decomposition, e.g., because of an increase in cross linking or contact with the mineral matter of the soil.

  1. Molecular motion of micellar solutes: a /sup 13/C NMR relaxation study

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, R.E.; Kasakevich, M.L.; Granger, J.W.

    1982-02-04

    A series of simple NMR relaxation experiments have been performed on nitrobenzene and aniline dissolved in the ionic detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Using /sup 13/C relaxation rates at various molecular sites, and comparing data obtained in organic media with those for micellar solutions, the viscosity at the solubilization site was estimated and a detailed picture of motional restrictions imposed by the micellar enviroment was derived. Viscosities of 8 to 17 cp indicate a rather fluid environment for solubilized nitrobenzene; both additives exhibit altered motional preferences in CTAB solutions only. As an aid in interpretation of the NMR data, quasi-elastic light scattering and other physical techniques have been used to evaluate the influence of organic solutes on micellar size and shape. The NMR methods are examined critically in terms of their general usefulness for studies of solubilization in detergent mice

  2. A (13)C NMR analysis of the effects of electron radiation on graphite/polyetherimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1989-01-01

    Initial investigations have been made into the use of high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the characterization of radiation effects in graphite and Kevlar fibers, polymers, and the fiber/matrix interface in graphite/polyetherimide composites. Sample preparation techniques were refined. Essential equipment has been procured. A new NMR probe was constructed to increase the proton signal-to-noise ratio. Problem areas have been identified and plans developed to resolve them.

  3. Recent applications of /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy to biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in conjunction with carbon-13 labelling, is a powerful new analytical technique for the study of metabolic pathways and structural components in intact organelles, cells, and tissues. The technique can provide, rapidly and non-destructively, unique information about: the architecture and dynamics of structural components; the nature of the intracellular environment; and metabolic pathways and relative fluxes of individual carbon atoms. With the aid of results recently obtained by us and those reported by a number of other laboratories, the problems and potentialities of the technique will be reviewed with emphasis on: the viscosities of intracellular fluids; the structure and dynamics of the components of membranes; and the primary and secondary metabolic pathways of carbon in microorganisms, plants, and mammalian cells in culture.

  4. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of six saponins from Sapindus trifoliatus.

    PubMed

    Grover, Rajesh K; Roy, Abhijeet D; Roy, Raja; Joshi, S K; Srivastava, Vandita; Arora, Sudershan K

    2005-12-01

    Complete 1H and 13C spectral assignments are reported for six saponins from the pericarp of Sapindus trifoliatus (Hindi name: Reetha) collected from Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra, India, using only 1D and 2D NMR methods. The structures of the compounds were elucidated as hederagenin 3-O-(3-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-2)-alpha-L-ara-binopyranoside, hederagenin 3-O-(4-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylop-yranosyl)-(1-3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-2)-alpha-L-arabinop-yranoside, hederagenin 3-O-(3,4-O-diacetyl-beta-D-xylopy-ranosyl)-(1-3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-2)-alpha-L-arabinopy-ranoside, hederagenin 3-O-(3,4-O-diacetyl-alpha-L-arabinop-yranosyl)-(1-3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-2)-alpha-L-arabinop-yranoside, hederagenin 3-O-(beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside and he-deragenin 3-O-(alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl)-(1-3)-alpha-L-rhamno-pyranosyl-(1-2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside. It is concluded that saponins of this complexity approach the limit of structural complexity, which can be solved by NMR alone, precisely and quickly.

  5. Continuous Flow (1)H and (13)C NMR Spectroscopy in Microfluidic Stripline NMR Chips.

    PubMed

    Oosthoek-de Vries, Anna Jo; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M; Janssen, Johannes W G; van Bentum, P Jan M; Gardeniers, Han J G E; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2017-02-21

    Microfluidic stripline NMR technology not only allows for NMR experiments to be performed on small sample volumes in the submicroliter range, but also experiments can easily be performed in continuous flow because of the stripline's favorable geometry. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of dual-channel operation of a microfluidic stripline NMR setup showing one- and two-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and heteronuclear NMR experiments under continuous flow. We performed experiments on ethyl crotonate and menthol, using three different types of NMR chips aiming for straightforward microfluidic connectivity. The detection volumes are approximately 150 and 250 nL, while flow rates ranging from 0.5 μL/min to 15 μL/min have been employed. We show that in continuous flow the pulse delay is determined by the replenishment time of the detector volume, if the sample trajectory in the magnet toward NMR detector is long enough to polarize the spin systems. This can considerably speed up quantitative measurement of samples needing signal averaging. So it can be beneficial to perform continuous flow measurements in this setup for analysis of, e.g., reactive, unstable, or mass-limited compounds.

  6. Comparison of Multistandard and TMS-Standard Calculated NMR Shifts for Coniferyl Alcohol and Application of the Multistandard Method to Lignin Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Heath D; Mohamed, M. Nasser Ali; Kubicki, James D

    2011-03-10

    statistical errors, compared with experiment. The correlation with experiment for 1H NMR was generally inferior to the {sup 13}C NMR results for the dimers.

  7. Water chemical shift in 1H NMR of red cells: effects of pH when transmembrane magnetic susceptibility differences are low.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Timothy J; Bubb, William A; Kuchel, Philip W

    2008-04-01

    The (1)H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectrum of water in erythrocyte suspensions shows peaks from each of the intracellular and extracellular water pools. The splitting is a true chemical shift and is brought about by the elimination of water exchange under MAS conditions due to physical separation of the two water populations. The size of the chemical shift difference is determined by the concentration of intracellular protein affecting the average extent of hydrogen bonding of water. We present here a model of the chemical shift behavior for water in erythrocytes under normal high-resolution NMR conditions based on results from MAS experiments on these cells exposed to different pH and osmotic conditions. The model accurately predicts the chemical shift of water for a static sample, and the results demonstrate that in high-resolution NMR experiments the chemical shift of water will appear to be invariant if differences in magnetic susceptibility across the cell membrane are minimal (<10% of the magnetic susceptibility of water). Thus, changes in the shape and chemical shift of the water resonance are not due to pH changes in the physiological range. The findings are fundamental to an interpretation of the mechanism of chemical shift effects on the water resonance that may occur in functional MRI.

  8. 13C and 15N—Chemical Shift Anisotropy of Ampicillin and Penicillin-V Studied by 2D-PASS and CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Lee, Young K.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1998-11-01

    The principal values of the chemical shift tensors of all13C and15N sites in two antibiotics, ampicillin and penicillin-V, were determined by 2-dimensionalphaseadjustedspinningsideband (2D-PASS) and conventional CP/MAS experiments. The13C and15N chemical shift anisotropies (CSA), and their confidence limits, were evaluated using a Mathematica program. The CSA values suggest a revised assignment of the 2-methyl13C sites in the case of ampicillin. We speculate on a relationship between the chemical shift principal values of many of the13C and15N sites and the β-lactam ring conformation.

  9. Phenylboronic acid-based (19)F MRI probe for the detection and imaging of hydrogen peroxide utilizing its large chemical-shift change.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; An, Qi; Sugihara, Fuminori; Doura, Tomohiro; Tsuchiya, Akira; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Sando, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report on a new (19)F MRI probe for the detection and imaging of H2O2. Our designed 2-fluorophenylboronic acid-based (19)F probe promptly reacted with H2O2 to produce 2-fluorophenol via boronic acid oxidation. The accompanying (19)F chemical-shift change reached 31 ppm under our experimental conditions. Such a large chemical-shift change allowed for the imaging of H2O2 by (19)F chemical-shift-selective MRI.

  10. Pressure dependence of backbone chemical shifts in the model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    PubMed

    Erlach, Markus Beck; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Kremer, Werner; Munte, Claudia E; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-01

    For a better understanding of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detected pressure responses of folded as well as unstructured proteins the availability of data from well-defined model systems are indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of chemical shifts of the backbone atoms (1)H(α), (13)C(α) and (13)C' in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2 (Xxx one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of these nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 are dependent on the type of amino acid studied. The coefficients of a given nucleus show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure are also weakly correlated.

  11. Predicting paramagnetic 1H NMR chemical shifts and state-energy separations in spin-crossover host-guest systems.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Zarra, Salvatore; Carlson, Rebecca K; Bilbeisi, Rana A; Ronson, Tanya K; Nitschke, Jonathan R; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J

    2014-06-14

    The behaviour of metal-organic cages upon guest encapsulation can be difficult to elucidate in solution. Paramagnetic metal centres introduce additional dispersion of signals that is useful for characterisation of host-guest complexes in solution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, paramagnetic centres also complicate spectral assignment due to line broadening, signal integration error, and large changes in chemical shifts, which can be difficult to assign even for known compounds. Quantum chemical predictions can provide information that greatly facilitates the assignment of NMR signals and identification of species present. Here we explore how the prediction of paramagnetic NMR spectra may be used to gain insight into the spin crossover (SCO) properties of iron(II)-based metal organic coordination cages, specifically examining how the structure of the local metal coordination environment affects SCO. To represent the tetrahedral metal-organic cage, a model system is generated by considering an isolated metal-ion vertex: fac-ML3(2+) (M = Fe(II), Co(II); L = N-phenyl-2-pyridinaldimine). The sensitivity of the (1)H paramagnetic chemical shifts to local coordination environments is assessed and utilised to shed light on spin crossover behaviour in iron complexes. Our data indicate that expansion of the metal coordination sphere must precede any thermal SCO. An attempt to correlate experimental enthalpies of SCO with static properties of bound guests shows that no simple relationship exists, and that effects are likely due to nuanced dynamic response to encapsulation.

  12. Influence of the chemical shift artifact on measurements of compact bone thickness in equine distal limb MR images.

    PubMed

    Dimock, Abigail N; Spriet, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the chemical shift artifact, resulting from misregistration or phase cancellation at the interface between compact and trabecular bone, on apparent bone thickness was quantified in six isolated equine limbs. Sagittal T1-weighted spin echo (SE) and in-phase three-dimensional spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) images were acquired twice with a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) unit, switching the frequency encoding direction between acquisitions. Out-of-phase SPGR images were also obtained. MR images with different frequency encoding directions were compared with each other and to radiographs made from corresponding 3-mm-bone sections. Compact bone thickness was significantly different when comparing images acquired with different frequency encoding directions for both SE and SPGR sequences. Significant differences were identified in the frequency but not the phase encoding direction when measurements of compact bone in MR images were compared with measurements obtained from thin section radiographs for the majority of surfaces studied (P < 0.05). Correction of MR measurements with the calculated chemical shift abolished these differences (P > 0.05). Measurements of compact bone from out-of-phase SPGR sequences were significantly different than from in-phase sequences (P < 0.001) with out-of-phase measurements greater than in-phase measurements by an average of 0.38mm. These results indicate that the chemical shift artifact results in errors in MR evaluation of compact bone thickness when measurements are performed in the frequency encoding direction or in out-of-phase images. For better accuracy, measurements should be performed parallel to the phase encoding direction and avoiding out-of-phase gradient echo sequences.

  13. Effects of hydrogen bonding on amide-proton chemical shift anisotropy in a proline-containing model peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichumani, Kumar; George, Gijo; Hebbar, Sankeerth; Chatterjee, Bhaswati; Raghothama, Srinivasarao

    2015-05-01

    Longitudinal relaxation due to cross-correlation between dipolar (1HN-1Hα) and amide-proton chemical shift anisotropy (1HN CSA) has been measured in a model tripeptide Piv-LPro-LPro-LPhe-OMe. The peptide bond across diproline segment is known to undergo cis/trans isomerization and only in the cis form does the lone Phe amide-proton become involved in intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The strength of the cross correlated relaxation interference is found to be significantly different between cis and trans forms, and this difference is shown as an influence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding on the amide-proton CSA.

  14. The Effect of Molecular Conformation on the Accuracy of Theoretical (1)H and (13)C Chemical Shifts Calculated by Ab Initio Methods for Metabolic Mixture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Shimbo, Yudai; Komatsu, Keiko; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-14

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analyzing metabolic mixtures. The information obtained from an NMR spectrum is in the form of physical parameters, such as chemical shifts, and construction of databases for many metabolites will be useful for data interpretation. To increase the accuracy of theoretical chemical shifts for development of a database for a variety of metabolites, the effects of sets of conformations (structural ensembles) and the levels of theory on computations of theoretical chemical shifts were systematically investigated for a set of 29 small molecules in the present study. For each of the 29 compounds, 101 structures were generated by classical molecular dynamics at 298.15 K, and then theoretical chemical shifts for 164 (1)H and 123 (13)C atoms were calculated by ab initio quantum chemical methods. Six levels of theory were used by pairing Hartree-Fock, B3LYP (density functional theory), or second order Møller-Plesset perturbation with 6-31G or aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The six average fluctuations in the (1)H chemical shift were ±0.63, ± 0.59, ± 0.70, ± 0.62, ± 0.75, and ±0.66 ppm for the structural ensembles, and the six average errors were ±0.34, ± 0.27, ± 0.32, ± 0.25, ± 0.32, and ±0.25 ppm. The results showed that chemical shift fluctuations with changes in the conformation because of molecular motion were larger than the differences between computed and experimental chemical shifts for all six levels of theory. In conclusion, selection of an appropriate structural ensemble should be performed before theoretical chemical shift calculations for development of an accurate database for a variety of metabolites.

  15. NMR chemical shift as analytical derivative of the Helmholtz free energy.

    PubMed

    Van den Heuvel, Willem; Soncini, Alessandro

    2013-02-07

    We present a theory for the temperature-dependent nuclear magnetic shielding tensor of molecules with arbitrary electronic structure. The theory is a generalization of Ramsey's theory for closed-shell molecules. The shielding tensor is defined as a second derivative of the Helmholtz free energy of the electron system in equilibrium with the applied magnetic field and the nuclear magnetic moments. This derivative is analytically evaluated and expressed as a sum over states formula. Special consideration is given to a system with an isolated degenerate ground state for which the size of the degeneracy and the composition of the wave functions are arbitrary. In this case, the paramagnetic part of the shielding tensor is expressed in terms of the g and A tensors of the electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian of the degenerate state. As an illustration of the proposed theory, we provide an explicit formula for the paramagnetic shift of the central lanthanide ion in endofullerenes Ln@C(60), with Ln = Ce(3+), Nd(3+), Sm(3+), Dy(3+), Er(3+), and Yb(3+), where the ground state can be a strongly spin-orbit coupled icosahedral sextet for which the paramagnetic shift cannot be described by previous theories.

  16. Using chemical shifts to generate structural ensembles for intrinsically disordered proteins with converged distributions of secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Ytreberg, F Marty; Borcherds, Wade; Wu, Hongwei; Daughdrill, Gary W

    2015-01-01

    A short segment of the disordered p53 transactivation domain (p53TAD) forms an amphipathic helix when bound to the E3 ubiquitin ligase, MDM2. In the unbound p53TAD, this short segment has transient helical secondary structure. Using a method that combines broad sampling of conformational space with re-weighting, it is shown that it is possible to generate multiple, independent structural ensembles that have highly similar secondary structure distributions for both p53TAD and a P27A mutant. Fractional amounts of transient helical secondary structure were found at the MDM2 binding site that are very similar to estimates based directly on experimental observations. Structures were identified in these ensembles containing segments that are highly similar to short p53 peptides bound to MDM2, even though the ensembles were re-weighted using unbound experimental data. Ensembles were generated using chemical shift data (alpha carbon only, or in combination with other chemical shifts) and cross-validated by predicting residual dipolar couplings. We think this ensemble generator could be used to predict the bound state structure of protein interaction sites in IDPs if there are detectable amounts of matching transient secondary structure in the unbound state.

  17. Ab initio and DFT study of 31P-NMR chemical shifts of sphingomyelin and dihydrosphingomyelin lipid molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimori, K.; Kawabe, H.; Nagao, H.; Nishikawa, K.

    One of the phospholipids, sphingomyelin (SM, N-acyl-sphingosine-1-phosphorylcholine) is the most abundant component of mammalian membranes in brain, nervous tissues, and human ocular lens. It plays an important role for apoptosis, aging, and signal transduction. Recently, Yappert and coworkers have shown that human lens sphi