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Sample records for 13co2 excretion tmax

  1. Field Measurements of Respiratory Del13CO2 and Photodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Asperen, H.; Sabbatini, S.; Nicolini, G.; Warneke, T.; Papale, D.; Notholt, J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon decomposition dynamics have been studied in a variety of ecosystems and its variation can mostly be explained in terms of environmental variables (e.g. temperature and precipitation). However, carbon dynamics in arid, water limited regions have shown to be very different and are still largely unknown. Several studies have indicated the importance of photodegradation, the direct breakdown of organic matter by sunlight, in these arid regions. A FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer) was set up to continuously measure concentrations of CO2, CH4, N2O, CO as well as del13C in CO2. The FTIR was connected to 2 different flux measurement systems: a Flux Gradient system and 2 flux chambers, providing a continuous data set of gas concentrations and biosphere-atmosphere gas fluxes at different heights and scales. Field measurements showed photodegradation induced carbon fluxes. Also, respiratory del13CO2 was determined by use of Keeling plots, and was determined to vary between -25‰ and -21‰. A clear diurnal pattern in respiratory del13CO2 was found, suggesting either different (dominant) respiratory processes between day and night or the effect of diffusive fractionation.

  2. Impact of oceanic circulation changes on atmospheric δ13CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menviel, L.; Mouchet, A.; Meissner, K. J.; Joos, F.; England, M. H.

    2015-11-01

    δ13CO2 measured in Antarctic ice cores provides constraints on oceanic and terrestrial carbon cycle processes linked with millennial-scale changes in atmospheric CO2. However, the interpretation of δ13CO2 is not straightforward. Using carbon isotope-enabled versions of the LOVECLIM and Bern3D models, we perform a set of sensitivity experiments in which the formation rates of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW), Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) are varied. We study the impact of these circulation changes on atmospheric δ13CO2 as well as on the oceanic δ13C distribution. In general, we find that the formation rates of AABW, NADW, NPDW, and AAIW are negatively correlated with changes in δ13CO2: namely, strong oceanic ventilation decreases atmospheric δ13CO2. However, since large-scale oceanic circulation reorganizations also impact nutrient utilization and the Earth's climate, the relationship between atmospheric δ13CO2 levels and ocean ventilation rate is not unequivocal. In both models atmospheric δ13CO2 is very sensitive to changes in AABW formation rates: increased AABW formation enhances the transport of low δ13C waters to the surface and decreases atmospheric δ13CO2. By contrast, the impact of NADW changes on atmospheric δ13CO2 is less robust and might be model dependent. This results from complex interplay between global climate, carbon cycle, and the formation rate of NADW, a water body characterized by relatively high δ13C.

  3. Measurement of 13CO2 in expired air as an index of compliance to a high carbohydrate diet naturally enriched in 13C.

    PubMed

    Gay, L J; Schutz, Y; DiVetta, V; Schneiter, P; Tappy, L; Jéquier, E

    1994-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether breath 13CO2 measurements could be used to assess the compliance to a diet containing carbohydrates naturally enriched in 13C. The study was divided into two periods: Period 1 (baseline of 4 days) with low 13C/12C ratio carbohydrates. Period 2 (5 days) isocaloric diet with a high 13C/12C ratio (corn, cane sugar, pineapple, millet) carbohydrates. Measurements were made of respiratory gas exchange by indirect calorimetry, urinary nitrogen excretion and breath 13CO2 every morning in post-absorptive conditions, both in resting state and during a 45-min low intensity exercise (walking on a treadmill). The subjects were 10 healthy lean women (BMI 20.4 +/- 1.7 kg/m2, % body fat 24.4 +/- 1.3%), the 13C enrichment of oxidized carbohydrate and breath 13CO2 were compared to the enrichment of exogenous dietary carbohydrates. At rest the enrichment of oxidized carbohydrate increased significantly after one day of 13C carbohydrate enriched diet and reached a steady value (103 +/- 16%) similar to the enrichment of exogenous carbohydrates. During exercise, the 13C enrichment of oxidized carbohydrate remained significantly lower (68 +/- 17%) than that of dietary carbohydrates. The compliance to a diet with a high content of carbohydrates naturally enriched in 13C may be assessed from the measurement of breath 13CO2 enrichment combined with respiratory gas exchange in resting, postabsorptive conditions. PMID:7812411

  4. 13CO2 recovery fraction in expired air of septic patients under mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Auxiliadora-Martins, M; Martins, M A; Coletto, F A; Martins-Filho, O A; Marchini, J S; Basile-Filho, A

    2008-07-01

    The continuous intravenous administration of isotopic bicarbonate (NaH13CO2) has been used for the determination of the retention of the 13CO2 fraction or the 13CO2 recovered in expired air. This determination is important for the calculation of substrate oxidation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in critically ill patients with sepsis under mechanical ventilation, the 13CO2 recovery fraction in expired air after continuous intravenous infusion of NaH13CO2 (3.8 micromol/kg diluted in 0.9% saline in ddH2O). A prospective study was conducted on 10 patients with septic shock between the second and fifth day of sepsis evolution (APACHE II, 25.9 +/- 7.4). Initially, baseline CO2 was collected and indirect calorimetry was also performed. A primer of 5 mL NaH13CO2 was administered followed by continuous infusion of 5 mL/h for 6 h. Six CO2 production (VCO2) measurements (30 min each) were made with a portable metabolic cart connected to a respirator and hourly samples of expired air were obtained using a 750-mL gas collecting bag attached to the outlet of the respirator. 13CO2 enrichment in expired air was determined with a mass spectrometer. The patients presented a mean value of VCO2 of 182 +/- 52 mL/min during the steady-state phase. The mean recovery fraction was 0.68 +/- 0.06%, which is less than that reported in the literature (0.82 +/- 0.03%). This suggests that the 13CO2 recovery fraction in septic patients following enteral feeding is incomplete, indicating retention of 13CO2 in the organism. The severity of septic shock in terms of the prognostic index APACHE II and the sepsis score was not associated with the 13CO2 recovery fraction in expired air. PMID:18719737

  5. New ice core records on the glacial/interglacial change in atmospheric δ13CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, H.; Schmitt, J.; Schneider, R.; Elsig, J.; Lourantou, A.; Leuenberger, M.; Stocker, T. F.; Koehler, P.; Lavric, J.; Raynaud, D. P.; Chappellaz, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    The reconstruction of δ13CO2 using Antarctic ice cores promises a deeper understanding on the causes of past atmospheric CO2 changes. Previous measurements on the Taylor Dome ice core over the last 30,000 years (Smith et al., 1999) indicated marine processes to be dominating the significant δ13CO2 changes over the transition, whereas glacial δ13CO2 was only slightly depleted relative to the Holocene (Leuenberger et al., 1992; Smith et al., 1999). However, significant uncertainty and the low temporal resolution of the Taylor Dome δ13CO2 data prevented a more detailed interpretation. Recently, substantial improvements have been made in the analysis and the resolution of ice core δ13CO2 records (Elsig et al., 2009; Lourantou et al., 2010). With these and new measurements presented here, three independent δ13CO2 data sets over the last glacial/interglacial transition have now been derived from the two EPICA and the Talos Dome ice cores. Two of the methods use traditional dry extraction techniques with a reproducibility of 0.07-0.1‰. The third method uses a novel sublimation technique with a reproducibility of 0.05‰. Here we compare the data sets, their analytical setups and discuss their joint information as well as their differences. The three records provide a more detailed picture on the temporal evolution of δ13CO2 and confirm two pronounced isotope minima between 18-12,000 years BP in parallel to the two major phases of CO2 increase (Lourantou et al., 2010; Smith et al., 1999) as also reflected in marine sediments (Marchitto et al., 2007; Skinner et al., 2010). Accordingly, a release of old carbon from the deep ocean is most likely responsible for a large part of the long-term increase in atmospheric CO2 in this time interval. However, the fast CO2 jumps at a round 12,000 and 14,000 years BP may be partly of terrestrial origin (Elsig, 2009; Köhler et al., 2010b). The new sublimation data set provides also unambiguous δ13CO2 data for clathrate ice in

  6. NMR determination of photorespiration in intact leaves using in vivo 13CO 2 labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegelski, Lynette; Schaefer, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Solid-state 13C NMR measurements of intact soybean leaves labeled by 13CO 2 lead to the conclusion that photorespiration is 17% of photosynthesis for a well-watered and fertilized plant. This is the first direct assessment of the level of photorespiration in a functioning plant. A 13C{ 31P} rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurement tracked the incorporation of 13C label into intermediates in the Calvin cycle as a function of time. For labeling times of 5 min or less, the isotopic enrichment of the Calvin cycle depends on the flux of labeled carbon from 13CO 2, relative to the flux of unlabeled carbon from glycerate returned from the photorespiratory cycle. Comparisons of these two rates for a fixed value of the 13CO 2 concentration indicate that the ratio of the rate of photosynthesis to the rate of photorespiration of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) in soybean leaves is 5.7. This translates into a photorespiratory CO 2 loss that is 21% of net CO 2 assimilation, about 80% of the value estimated from Rubisco kinetics parameters. The ratio of rates is reduced at low external CO 2 concentrations, as measured by net carbon assimilation rates. The carbon assimilation was determined from 13C-label spin counts converted into total carbon by the REDOR-determined isotopic enrichments of the Calvin cycle. The net carbon assimilation rates indicate that the rate of decarboxylation of glycine is not directly proportional to the oxygenase activity of Rubisco as is commonly assumed.

  7. 13CO2 breath tests in non-invasive hepatological diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Musialik, Joanna; Kasicka-Jonderko, Anna; Buschhaus, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    In liver diagnostics, a simple, non-invasive test with high sensitivity and specificity is permanently being sought in order to assess the degree of liver damage. In addition to liver biopsy, algorithms using blood parameters or elastometry are used in clinical practice. However, these methods do not provide information about the true liver reserve, so the liver breath test seem to be a promising diagnostic tool. The basis of this test depends on the ability of particular hepatocyte enzyme systems to metabolise a tested substance labelled with a stable carbon isotope. The kinetics of 13CO2 elimination with expiratory air then permits quantitative assessment of the functional liver reserve and the degree of organ damage. In this paper the most commonly used tests, grouped according to the main metabolic pathways, are described. The usefulness of liver breath tests in specific clinical situations, both as a diagnostic and prognostic tool, is presented. PMID:25960807

  8. Ecological and Molecular Study of Soil Chemoautotrophic Microorganisms via the Sequestration of Atmospheric 13CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, K. M.; Kelleher, B.; Allen, C.; Simpson, A.

    2009-05-01

    Soil Organic Matter (SOM) is the most complicated biomaterial on Earth and stores significantly more carbon than is currently present in the atmosphere [1]. It has been recently reported that humic material in SOM is a highly complex mixture of microbial and plant biopolymers and not a distinct chemical fraction as previously thought [2]. Furthermore, it has been reported that the microbial biomass contribution to SOM is not comprised of mainly humic materials and that in fact the contribution to SOM by soil microorganisms has been seriously underestimated [3]. Therefore, the question arises if we underestimate microbial biomass in soil do we also underestimate carbon sequestration by soil microbes? Soil microorganisms consist of a large range of diverse species with soil bacteria contributing a large proportion of the biomass content. Autotrophs are organisms that can produce organic compounds from CO2 as the sole carbon source, using either light (photoautotroph) or inorganic reactions (chemoautotroph) as the energy source. The aim of this project is to enrich chemoautotrophic soil microbes with carbon-13 (13C) sequestered as 13CO2. Once labeled, these target microbes can be differentiated from other microbes using techniques such as Stable Isotope Probing (SIP) and carbon NMR. This enrichment is facilitated via incubation in a custom built environmental chamber and the controlled introduction of 13CO2. Before introduction of 13CO2 the chambers capabilities had to be fully characterized to ensure that it was fit for purpose. Mixed cultures of soil chemoautotrophic microorganisms were propagated from different soils and data collected using the environmental chamber demonstrated that CO2 fluctuations mimicked the natural activity of actively growing chemoautotrophic cultures. Therefore using this soil slurry approach, a mixed culture of soil autotrophs will be exposed to 13CO2 prior to the harvesting of the microbial biomass. Ion chromatographic analysis of the

  9. Tracing photosynthetic carbon in leaves with nanoSIMS after 13CO2 labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannoura, Masako; Takeuchi, Miyuki; Kominami, Yuji; Takanashi, Satoru; Kenichi, Yoshimura; Ataka, Mioko

    2015-04-01

    To understand the carbon allocation of the tree and forest ecosystem, it is important to consider the residence time of carbon in different pools at suitable time scales. For example the carbon used for respiration will stay a few minutes to a few days in the tree, the carbon used for storage or structure of leaves will stay months to years, and the carbon used for wood structure, it will stay over the whole lifespan of the tree. The leaves are the entrance of carbon in trees where it can be used for foliage growth and maintenance or exported to the other organs or the other forest ecosystem compartments. Tracing carbon isotope using NanoSIMS technique is one of useful methods to estimate where and how long the carbon stay in the tree organs. In this study, 13CO2 pulse labelling were conducted and 13C was measured by IRMS to see the amount of C remaining in the leaves with time.NanoSIMS was used to localize where the labelled C remained within the leaf tissue. Twice labelling were done on branches of Quercus serrata at FFPRI(Forest and Forest Products research Institute) in Kyoto, Japan. The first labelling was in 30 April 2012 when the leaves start flushing and the second one was in 29 May 2012 when the leaves were completely deployed. For both labelling experiment, one branch was selected and covered with transparent plastic bag. CO2 concentration was recorded with IRGA and air temperature inside the chamber was monitored. Then 13CO2 was injected into the bag, and after 1 hour, the bag was removed and the branch was again exposed to ambient air. Leaves were collected before and 10-12 times after labelling and their isotope compositions were measured by IRMS. The leaf collected just after labelling and 6 days after labelling were used for NanoSIMS observation. Samples for nanoSIMS were preserved in glutaraldehyde and then embed in epoxy resin. The sliced sample were placed on the silicon wafer and observed by NanoSIMS 50L(Cameca, France). The 13C was highest just

  10. Terrestrial cycling of 13CO2 by photosynthesis, respiration, and biomass burning in SiBCASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velde, I. R.; Miller, J. B.; Schaefer, K.; van der Werf, G. R.; Krol, M. C.; Peters, W.

    2014-12-01

    We present an enhanced version of the SiBCASA terrestrial biosphere model that is extended with (a) biomass burning emissions from the SiBCASA carbon pools using remotely sensed burned area from the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED), (b) an isotopic discrimination scheme that calculates 13C signatures of photosynthesis and autotrophic respiration, and (c) a separate set of 13C pools to carry isotope ratios into heterotrophic respiration. We quantify in this study the terrestrial exchange of CO2 and 13CO2 as a function of environmental changes in humidity and biomass burning. The implementation of biomass burning yields similar fluxes as CASA-GFED both in magnitude and spatial patterns. The implementation of isotope exchange gives a global mean discrimination value of 15.2‰, ranges between 4 and 20‰ depending on the photosynthetic pathway in the plant, and compares favorably (annually and seasonally) with other published values. Similarly, the isotopic disequilibrium is similar to other studies that include a small effect of biomass burning as it shortens the turnover of carbon. In comparison to measurements, a newly modified starch/sugar storage pool propagates the isotopic discrimination anomalies to respiration much better. In addition, the amplitude of the drought response by SiBCASA is lower than suggested by the measured isotope ratios. We show that a slight increase in the stomatal closure for large vapor pressure deficit would amplify the respired isotope ratio variability. Our study highlights the importance of isotope ratio observations of 13C to assess and improve biochemical models like SiBCASA, especially with regard to the allocation and turnover of carbon and the responses to drought.

  11. Constraining Ecosystem Gross Primary Production and Transpiration with Measurements of Photosynthetic 13CO2 Discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blonquist, J. M.; Wingate, L.; Ogeé, J.; Bowling, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 (δ13Ca) can provide useful information on water use efficiency (WUE) dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems and potentially constrain models of CO2 and water fluxes at the land surface. This is due to the leaf-level relationship between photosynthetic 13CO2 discrimination (Δ), which influences δ13Ca, and the ratio of leaf intercellular to atmospheric CO2 mole fractions (Ci / Ca), which is related to WUE and is determined by the balance between C assimilation (CO2 demand) and stomatal conductance (CO2 supply). We used branch-scale Δ derived from tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy measurements collected in a Maritime pine forest to estimate Ci / Ca variations over an entire growing season. We combined Ci / Ca estimates with rates of gross primary production (GPP) derived from eddy covariance (EC) to estimate canopy-scale stomatal conductance (Gs) and transpiration (T). Estimates of T were highly correlated to T estimates derived from sapflow data (y = 1.22x + 0.08; r2 = 0.61; slope P < 0.001) and T predictions from an ecosystem model (MuSICA) (y = 0.88x - 0.05; r2 = 0.64; slope P < 0.001). As an alternative to estimating T, Δ measurements can be used to estimate GPP by combining Ci / Ca estimates with Gs estimates from sapflow data. Estimates of GPP were determined in this fashion and were highly correlated to GPP values derived from EC (y = 0.82 + 0.07; r2 = 0.61; slope P < 0.001) and GPP predictions from MuSICA (y = 1.10 + 0.42; r2 = 0.50; slope P < 0.001). Results demonstrate that the leaf-level relationship between Δ and Ci / Ca can be extended to the canopy-scale and that Δ measurements have utility for partitioning ecosystem-scale CO2 and water fluxes.

  12. Method for tracing simulated CO2 leak in terrestrial environment with a 13CO2 tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni, Christophe; Rasse, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Facilities for the geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) as part of carbon capture and storage (CCS) schemes will be designed to prevent any leakage from the defined 'storage complex'. However, developing regulations and guidance throughout the world (e.g. the EC Directive and the USEPA Vulnerability Evaluation Framework) recognize the importance of assessing the potential for environmental impacts from CO2 storage. RISCS, a European (FP7) project, aims to improve understanding of those impacts that could plausibly occur in the hypothetical case that unexpected leakage occurs. As part of the RISCS project the potential impacts that an unexpected CO2 leaks might have on a cropland ecosystems was investigated. A CO2 exposure field experiment based on CO2 injection at 85 cm depth under an oats culture was designed. To facilitate the characterization of the simulated leaking zone the gas used for injection was produced from natural gas and had a δ13C of -46‰. The aim of the present communication is to depict how the injected gas was traced within the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum using 13CO2 continuous cavity ring-down spectrometry (CRDS). Four subsurface experimental injection plots (6m x 3m) were set up. In order to test the effects of different intensity of leakage, the field experiment was designed as to create a longitudinal CO2 gradient for each plot. For this purpose gas supply pipes were inserted at one extremity of each plot at the base of a 45 cm thick layer of sand buried 40 cm below the surface under the clayey plough layer of Norwegian moraine soils. Soil CO2 concentration and isotopic signature were punctually recorded: 1) in the soil at 20 cm depth at 6 positions distributed on the central transect, 2) at the surface following a (50x50 cm) grid sampling pattern, and 3) in the canopy atmosphere at 10, 20, 30 cm along three longitudinal transects (seven sampling point per transect). Soil CO2 fluxes and isotopic signature were finally

  13. (13) CO2 /(12) CO2 exchange fluxes in a clamp-on leaf cuvette: disentangling artefacts and flux components.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiao Ying; Schäufele, Rudi; Feneis, Wolfgang; Schnyder, Hans

    2015-11-01

    Leaks and isotopic disequilibria represent potential errors and artefacts during combined measurements of gas exchange and carbon isotope discrimination (Δ). This paper presents new protocols to quantify, minimize, and correct such phenomena. We performed experiments with gradients of CO2 concentration (up to ±250 μmol mol(-1) ) and δ(13) CCO2 (34‰), between a clamp-on leaf cuvette (LI-6400) and surrounding air, to assess (1) leak coefficients for CO2 , (12) CO2 , and (13) CO2 with the empty cuvette and with intact leaves of Holcus lanatus (C3 ) or Sorghum bicolor (C4 ) in the cuvette; and (2) isotopic disequilibria between net photosynthesis and dark respiration in light. Leak coefficients were virtually identical for (12) CO2 and (13) CO2 , but ∼8 times higher with leaves in the cuvette. Leaks generated errors on Δ up to 6‰ for H. lanatus and 2‰ for S. bicolor in full light; isotopic disequilibria produced similar variation of Δ. Leak errors in Δ in darkness were much larger due to small biological : leak flux ratios. Leak artefacts were fully corrected with leak coefficients determined on the same leaves as Δ measurements. Analysis of isotopic disequilibria enabled partitioning of net photosynthesis and dark respiration, and indicated inhibitions of dark respiration in full light (H. lanatus: 14%, S. bicolor: 58%). PMID:25944155

  14. Raman spectroscopic investigation of 13CO 2 labeling and leaf dark respiration of Fagus sylvatica L. (European beech).

    PubMed

    Keiner, Robert; Gruselle, Marie-Cécile; Michalzik, Beate; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-03-01

    An important issue, in times of climate change and more extreme weather events, is the investigation of forest ecosystem reactions to these events. Longer drought periods stress the vitality of trees and promote mass insect outbreaks, which strongly affect ecosystem processes and services. Cavity-enhanced Raman gas spectrometry was applied for online multi-gas analysis of the gas exchange rates of O2 and CO2 and the labeling of Fagus sylvatica L. (European beech) seedlings with (13)CO2. The rapid monitoring of all these gases simultaneously allowed for the separation of photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by the beech seedlings and a constant (12)CO2 efflux via respiration and thus for a correction of the measured (12)CO2 concentrations in course of the labeling experiment. The effects of aphid infestation with the woolly beech aphid (Phyllaphis fagi L.) as well as the effect of a drought period on the respirational gas exchange were investigated. A slightly decreased respirational activity of drought-stressed seedlings in comparison to normally watered seedlings was found already for a low drought intensity. Cavity-enhanced Raman gas monitoring of O2, (12)CO2, and (13)CO2 was proven to be a powerful new tool for studying the effect of drought stress and aphid infestation on the respirational activity of European beech seedlings as an example of important forest species in Central Europe. PMID:25577365

  15. Vibration-Rotation Analysis of the 13CO_2 Asymmetric Stretch Fundamental Band in Ambient Air for the Physical Chemistry Teaching Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolson, David A.; Anders, Catherine B.

    2015-06-01

    The CO_2 asymmetric stretch fundamental band near 4.3 μm is one of the strongest infrared absorption transitions of all small molecules. This band is an undesired interference in most infrared spectra, but it also serves as a potential choice for a vibration-rotation analysis experiment in the physical chemistry teaching laboratory. Due to the strength of this band and the 1.1% natural abundance of carbon-13, the asymmetric stretch fundamental band of 13CO_2 is readily observable in a typical ambient air background spectrum and is shifted sufficiently from the stronger 12CO_2 fundamental such that the 13CO_2 P-branch lines are almost completely free of interferences and are easily assigned. All of the 13CO_2 R-branch lines appear within the 12CO_2 P-branch, which creates assignment challenges. Students in our program have analyzed the 13CO_2 fundamental asymmetric stretch band over a two-year period. Analyses of the P-branch line positions enabled the prediction of additional R-branch line positions, which guided line identification and measurements in the 13CO_2 R-branch. C=O bond lengths determined from analyses of the 13CO_2 spectra improved when R-branch lines were added to the initial P-branch data sets. Spectral appearance, analyses and results will be presented for spectra obtained at 0.5 cm-1 resolution and at 0.125 cm-1 resolution. The challenge of predicting and finding the 13CO_2 R-branch lines among other interfering lines adds an element of realism to this experiment that is not found in many student experiments of this type.

  16. Unraveling carbohydrate transport mechanisms in young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica f. purpurea) by 13CO2 efflux measurements from stem and soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoms, Ronny; Muhr, Jan; Keitel, Claudia; Kayler, Zachary; Gavrichkova, Olga; Köhler, Michael; Gessler, Arthur; Gleixner, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Transport mechanisms of soluble carbohydrates and diurnal CO2 efflux from tree stems and surrounding soil are well studied. However, the effect of transport carbohydrates on respiration and their interaction with storage processes is largely unknown. Therefore, we performed a set of 13CO2 pulse labeling experiments on young trees of European beech (Fagus sylvatica f. purpurea). We labeled the whole tree crowns in a closed transparent plastic chamber with 99% 13CO2 for 30 min. In one experiment, only a single branch was labeled and removed 36 hours after labeling. In all experiments, we continuously measured the 13CO2 efflux from stem, branch and soil and sampled leaf and stem material every 3 h for 2 days, followed by a daily sampling of leaves in the successive 5 days. The compound specific δ 13C value of extracted soluble carbohydrates from leaf and stem material was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography linked with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (HPLC-IRMS). The 13CO2 signal from soil respiration occurred only few hours after labeling indicating a very high transport rate of carbohydrates from leaf to roots and to the rhizosphere. The label was continuously depleted within the next 5 days. In contrast, we observed a remarkable oscillating pattern of 13CO2 efflux from the stem with maximum 13CO2 enrichment at noon and minima at night time. This oscillation suggests that enriched carbohydrates are respired during the day, whereas in the night the enriched sugars are not respired. The observed oscillation in stem 13CO2 enrichment remained unchanged even when only single branches were labelled and cut right afterwards. Thus, storage and conversion of carbohydrates only occurred within the stem. The δ13C patterns of extracted soluble carbohydrates showed, that a transformation of transitory starch to carbohydrates and vice versa was no driver of the oscillating 13CO2 efflux from the stem. Carbohydrates might have been transported in the phloem to

  17. Evaluating the Community Land Model in a pine stand with shading manipulations and 13CO2 labeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mao, Jiafu; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Thornton, Peter E.; Warren, Jeffrey M.; King, Anthony Wayne; Shi, Xiaoying; Iversen, Colleen M.; Norby, Richard J.

    2016-02-03

    Carbon partitioning and flow through ecosystems regulates land surface atmosphere CO2 exchange and thus is a key, albeit uncertain component of mechanistic models. The Partitioning in Trees and Soil (PiTS) experiment-model project tracked C partitioning through a young Pinus taeda stand following pulse-labeling with 13CO2 and two levels of shading. The field component of this project provided process-oriented data that was used to evaluate and improve terrestrial biosphere model simulations of rapid shifts in carbon partitioning and hydrological dynamics under varying environmental conditions. Here we tested the performance of the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) in capturing short-term carbonmore » and water dynamics in relation to manipulative shading treatments, and the timing and magnitude of carbon fluxes through various compartments of the ecosystem. To constrain CLM4 to closely simulate pretreatment conditions, we calibrated select model parameters with the pretreatment observational data. Compared to CLM4 simulations with default parameters, CLM4 with calibrated model parameters was better able to simulate pretreatment vegetation carbon pools, light response curves, and other initial states and fluxes of carbon and water. Over a 3-week treatment period, the calibrated CLM4 generally reproduced the impacts of shading on average soil moisture at 15-95 cm depth, transpiration, relative change in stem carbon, and soil CO2 efflux rate, although some discrepancies in the estimation of magnitudes and temporal evolutions existed. CLM4, however, was not able to track the progression of the 13CO2 label from the atmosphere through foliage, phloem, roots or surface soil CO2 efflux, even when optimized model parameters were used. This model bias arises, in part, from the lack of a short-term non-structural carbohydrate storage pool and progressive timing of within-plant transport, thus indicating a need for future work to improve the allocation routines in CLM4

  18. Evaluating the Community Land Model in a pine stand with 13CO2 labeling and shading manipulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mao, Jiafu; Ricciuto, Daniel M; Thornton, Peter E; Warren, Jeffrey M.; King, Anthony Wayne; Shi, Xiaoying; Iversen, Colleen M; Norby, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Carbon partitioning and flow through ecosystems regulates land surface atmosphere CO2 exchange and thus is a key, albeit uncertain component of mechanistic models. The Partitioning in Trees and Soil (PiTS) experiment-model project tracked C partitioning through a young Pinus taeda stand following pulse-labeling with 13CO2 and two levels of shading. The field component of this project provided process-oriented data that was used to evaluate and improve terrestrial biosphere model simulations of rapid shifts in carbon partitioning and hydrological dynamics under varying environmental conditions. Here we tested the performance of the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) in capturing short-term carbonmore » and water dynamics in relation to manipulative shading treatments, and the timing and magnitude of carbon fluxes through various compartments of the ecosystem. To constrain CLM4 to closely simulate pretreatment conditions, we calibrated select model parameters with the pretreatment observational data. Compared to CLM4 simulations with default parameters, CLM4 with calibrated model parameters was better able to simulate pretreatment vegetation carbon pools, light response curves, and other initial states and fluxes of carbon and water. Over a 3-week treatment period, the calibrated CLM4 generally reproduced the impacts of shading on average soil moisture at 15-95 cm depth, transpiration, relative change in stem carbon, and soil CO2 efflux rate, although some discrepancies in the estimation of magnitudes and temporal evolutions existed. CLM4, however, was not able to track the progression of the 13CO2 label from the atmosphere through foliage, phloem, roots or surface soil CO2 efflux, even when optimized model parameters were used. This model bias arises, in part, from the lack of a short-term non-structural carbohydrate storage pool and progressive timing of within-plant transport, thus indicating a need for future work to improve the allocation routines in CLM4

  19. Evaluating the Community Land Model in a pine stand with 13CO2 labeling and shading manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Jiafu; Ricciuto, Daniel M; Thornton, Peter E; Warren, Jeffrey M.; King, Anthony Wayne; Shi, Xiaoying; Iversen, Colleen M; Norby, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Carbon partitioning and flow through ecosystems regulates land surface atmosphere CO2 exchange and thus is a key, albeit uncertain component of mechanistic models. The Partitioning in Trees and Soil (PiTS) experiment-model project tracked C partitioning through a young Pinus taeda stand following pulse-labeling with 13CO2 and two levels of shading. The field component of this project provided process-oriented data that was used to evaluate and improve terrestrial biosphere model simulations of rapid shifts in carbon partitioning and hydrological dynamics under varying environmental conditions. Here we tested the performance of the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) in capturing short-term carbon and water dynamics in relation to manipulative shading treatments, and the timing and magnitude of carbon fluxes through various compartments of the ecosystem. To constrain CLM4 to closely simulate pretreatment conditions, we calibrated select model parameters with the pretreatment observational data. Compared to CLM4 simulations with default parameters, CLM4 with calibrated model parameters was better able to simulate pretreatment vegetation carbon pools, light response curves, and other initial states and fluxes of carbon and water. Over a 3-week treatment period, the calibrated CLM4 generally reproduced the impacts of shading on average soil moisture at 15-95 cm depth, transpiration, relative change in stem carbon, and soil CO2 efflux rate, although some discrepancies in the estimation of magnitudes and temporal evolutions existed. CLM4, however, was not able to track the progression of the 13CO2 label from the atmosphere through foliage, phloem, roots or surface soil CO2 efflux, even when optimized model parameters were used. This model bias arises, in part, from the lack of a short-term non-structural carbohydrate storage pool and progressive timing of within-plant transport, thus indicating a need for future work to improve the allocation routines in CLM4. Overall

  20. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Ngao, J.; Dannoura, M.; Bakker, M. R.; Zeller, B.; Bazot, S.; Bosc, A.; Plain, C.; Lata, J. C.; Priault, P.; Barthes, L.; Loustau, D.

    2011-05-01

    Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objective of our study was to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine) was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C) of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6-2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season), and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. It varied between 1 and 21 % of the amount of 13CO2 taken up by the crown, depending on the species and the season. While rainfall exclusion that moderately decreased soil water content did not affect the pattern of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux in beech, seasonal patterns of carbon allocation belowground differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with the strength of other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer) that were not observed in oak. We report a fast transfer of recent photosynthates to the mycorhizosphere and we conclude that the patterns of carbon

  1. Evaluating the Community Land Model in a pine stand with 13CO2 labeling and shading manipulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Thornton, P. E.; Warren, J. M.; King, A. W.; Shi, X.; Iversen, C. M.; Norby, R. J.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon allocation and flow through ecosystems regulate land surface-atmosphere CO2 exchange and thus is a key, albeit uncertain, component of mechanistic models. The Partitioning in Trees and Soil (PiTS) experiment-model project tracked carbon allocation through a young Pinus taeda stand following pulse-labeling with 13CO2 and two levels of shading. The field component of this project provided process-oriented data that was used to evaluate and improve terrestrial biosphere model simulations of rapid shifts in carbon allocation and hydrological dynamics under varying environmental conditions. Here we tested the performance of the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) in capturing short-term carbon and water dynamics in relation to manipulative shading treatments, and the timing and magnitude of carbon fluxes through various compartments of the ecosystem. For CLM4 to closely simulate pretreatment conditions, we calibrated select model parameters with pretreatment observational data. Compared to CLM4 simulations with default parameters, CLM4 with calibrated model parameters was able to better simulate pretreatment vegetation carbon pools, light response curves, and other initial states and fluxes of carbon and water. Over a 3 week treatment period, the calibrated CLM4 generally reproduced the impacts of shading on average soil moisture at 15-95 cm depth, transpiration, relative change in stem carbon, and soil CO2 efflux rate, although some discrepancies in the estimation of magnitudes and temporal evolutions existed. CLM4, however, was not able to track the progression of the 13CO2 label from the atmosphere through foliage, phloem, roots or surface soil CO2 efflux, even when optimized model parameters were used. This model bias arises, in part, from the lack of a short-term non-structural carbohydrate storage pool and progressive timing of within-plant transport, thus indicating a need for future work to improve the allocation routines in CLM4. Overall, these types

  2. 13C Tracking after 13CO2 Supply Revealed Diurnal Patterns of Wood Formation in Aspen1

    PubMed Central

    Mahboubi, Amir; Linden, Pernilla; Moritz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Wood of trees is formed from carbon assimilated in the photosynthetic tissues. Determining the temporal dynamics of carbon assimilation, subsequent transport into developing wood, and incorporation to cell walls would further our understanding of wood formation in particular and tree growth in general. To investigate these questions, we designed a 13CO2 labeling system to study carbon transport and incorporation to developing wood of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides). Tracking of 13C incorporation to wood over a time course using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed diurnal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis. The dark period had a differential effect on 13C incorporation to lignin and cell wall carbohydrates. No 13C was incorporated into aromatic amino acids of cell wall proteins in the dark, suggesting that cell wall protein biosynthesis ceased during the night. The results show previously unrecognized temporal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis, suggest diurnal cycle as a possible cue in the regulation of carbon incorporation to wood, and establish a unique 13C labeling method for the analysis of wood formation and secondary growth in trees. PMID:25931520

  3. Origin of monoterpene emissions from boreal tree species: Determination of de novo and pool emissions by 13CO2 labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, J.; Ghirardo, A.; Koch, K.; Taipale, R.; Zimmer, I.; Schnitzler, J.

    2009-12-01

    Boreal forests emit a large amount of monoterpenes into the atmosphere. Traditionally these emissions are assumed to originate as evaporation from large storage pools. Thus their diurnal cycle would depend mostly on temperature. However, there is indication that a significant part of the monoterpene emission would originate directly from de novo synthesis. By applying 13CO2 fumigation and analyzing the isotope fractions with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and classical GC-MS we studied the origin of monoterpene emissions from some major Eurasian boreal and alpine tree species. We determined the fractions originating from de novo biosynthesis and from large internal monoterpene storages for three coniferous tree species with specialized monoterpene storage structures and one dicotyledon species without such structures. The emission from dicotyledon species Betula pendula originated solely from the de novo synthesis. The origin of the emissions from coniferous species was mixed with varying fraction originating from de novo synthesis (Pinus sylvestris 58%, Picea abies 33.5%, Larix decidua 9.8%) and the rest from large internal monoterpene storage pools. Application of the observed fractions of emission originating from de novo synthesis and large storage pools in a hybrid emission algorithm resulted in a better description of ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest stand.

  4. Multivariate determination of 13CO2/12CO2 ratios in exhaled mouse breath with mid-infrared hollow waveguide gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Seichter, Felicia; Wilk, Andreas; Wörle, Katharina; Kim, Seong-Soo; Vogt, Josef A; Wachter, Ulrich; Radermacher, Peter; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2013-05-01

    The (12)CO2/(13)CO2 isotope ratio is a well-known marker in breath for a variety of biochemical processes and enables monitoring, e.g., of the glucose metabolism during sepsis. Using animal models-here, at a mouse intensive care unit-the simultaneous determination of (12)CO2 and (13)CO2 within small volumes of mouse breath was enabled by coupling a novel low-volume hollow waveguide gas cell to a compact Fourier transform infrared spectrometer combined with multivariate data evaluation based on partial least squares regression along with optimized data preprocessing routines. PMID:23503745

  5. Evaluating the Community Land Model in a pine stand with shading manipulations and 13CO2 labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Thornton, P. E.; Warren, J. M.; King, A. W.; Shi, X.; Iversen, C. M.; Norby, R. J.

    2016-02-01

    Carbon allocation and flow through ecosystems regulates land surface-atmosphere CO2 exchange and thus is a key, albeit uncertain, component of mechanistic models. The Partitioning in Trees and Soil (PiTS) experiment-model project tracked carbon allocation through a young Pinus taeda stand following pulse labeling with 13CO2 and two levels of shading. The field component of this project provided process-oriented data that were used to evaluate terrestrial biosphere model simulations of rapid shifts in carbon allocation and hydrological dynamics under varying environmental conditions. Here we tested the performance of the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) in capturing short-term carbon and water dynamics in relation to manipulative shading treatments and the timing and magnitude of carbon fluxes through various compartments of the ecosystem. When calibrated with pretreatment observations, CLM4 was capable of closely simulating stand-level biomass, transpiration, leaf-level photosynthesis, and pre-labeling 13C values. Over the 3-week treatment period, CLM4 generally reproduced the impacts of shading on soil moisture changes, relative change in stem carbon, and soil CO2 efflux rate. Transpiration under moderate shading was also simulated well by the model, but even with optimization we were not able to simulate the high levels of transpiration observed in the heavy shading treatment, suggesting that the Ball-Berry conductance model is inadequate for these conditions. The calibrated version of CLM4 gave reasonable estimates of label concentration in phloem and in soil surface CO2 after 3 weeks of shade treatment, but it lacks the mechanisms needed to track the labeling pulse through plant tissues on shorter timescales. We developed a conceptual model for photosynthate transport based on the experimental observations, and we discussed conditions under which the hypothesized mechanisms could have an important influence on model behavior in larger-scale applications

  6. Multiscale observations of CO2, 13CO2, and pollutants at Four Corners for emission verification and attribution

    PubMed Central

    Lindenmaier, Rodica; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Butterfield, Zachary T.; Herman, Jay R.; Rahn, Thom; Lee, Sang-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need to verify air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic fossil energy sources to enforce current and future regulations. We demonstrate the feasibility of using simultaneous remote sensing observations of column abundances of CO2, CO, and NO2 to inform and verify emission inventories. We report, to our knowledge, the first ever simultaneous column enhancements in CO2 (3–10 ppm) and NO2 (1–3 Dobson Units), and evidence of δ13CO2 depletion in an urban region with two large coal-fired power plants with distinct scrubbing technologies that have resulted in ∆NOx/∆CO2 emission ratios that differ by a factor of two. Ground-based total atmospheric column trace gas abundances change synchronously and correlate well with simultaneous in situ point measurements during plume interceptions. Emission ratios of ∆NOx/∆CO2 and ∆SO2/∆CO2 derived from in situ atmospheric observations agree with those reported by in-stack monitors. Forward simulations using in-stack emissions agree with remote column CO2 and NO2 plume observations after fine scale adjustments. Both observed and simulated column ∆NO2/∆CO2 ratios indicate that a large fraction (70–75%) of the region is polluted. We demonstrate that the column emission ratios of ∆NO2/∆CO2 can resolve changes from day-to-day variation in sources with distinct emission factors (clean and dirty power plants, urban, and fires). We apportion these sources by using NO2, SO2, and CO as signatures. Our high-frequency remote sensing observations of CO2 and coemitted pollutants offer promise for the verification of power plant emission factors and abatement technologies from ground and space. PMID:24843169

  7. Precise measurements of the total concentration of atmospheric CO2 and 13CO2/12CO2 isotopic ratio using a lead-salt laser diode spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Croizé, Laurence; Mondelain, Didier; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Delmotte, Marc; Schmidt, Martina

    2008-04-01

    We have developed a tunable diode laser spectrometer, called SIMCO (spectrometer for isotopic measurements of CO(2)), for determining the concentrations of (12)CO(2) and (13)CO(2) in atmospheric air, from which the total concentration of CO(2) and the isotopic composition (expressed in delta units) delta(13)CO(2) are calculated. The two concentrations are measured using a pair of lines around 2290.1 cm(-1), by fitting a line profile model, taking into account the confinement narrowing effect to achieve a better accuracy. Using the Allan variance, we have demonstrated (for an integration time of 25 s) a precision of 0.1 ppmv for the total CO(2) concentration and of 0.3[per thousand] for delta(13)CO(2). The performances on atmospheric air have been tested during a 3 days campaign by comparing the SIMCO instrument with a gas chromatograph (GC) for the measurement of the total CO(2) concentration and with an isotopic ratio mass spectrometer (MS) for the isotopic composition. The CO(2) concentration measurements of SIMCO are in very good agreement with the GC data with a mean difference of Delta(CO(2))=0.16+/-1.20 ppmv for a comparison period of 45 h and the linearity of the concentration between the two instruments is also very good (slope of correlation: 0.9996+/-0.0003) over the range between 380 and 415 ppmv. For delta(13)CO(2), the comparison with the MS data shows a larger mean difference of Delta(delta(13)CO(2))=(-1.9+/-1.2)[per thousand], which could be partly related to small residual fluctuations of the overall SIMCO instrument response. PMID:18447517

  8. Partitioning net ecosystem carbon exchange into net assimilation and respiration using 13CO2 measurements: A cost-effective sampling strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OgéE, J.; Peylin, P.; Ciais, P.; Bariac, T.; Brunet, Y.; Berbigier, P.; Roche, C.; Richard, P.; Bardoux, G.; Bonnefond, J.-M.

    2003-06-01

    The current emphasis on global climate studies has led the scientific community to set up a number of sites for measuring the long-term biosphere-atmosphere net CO2 exchange (net ecosystem exchange, NEE). Partitioning this flux into its elementary components, net assimilation (FA), and respiration (FR), remains necessary in order to get a better understanding of biosphere functioning and design better surface exchange models. Noting that FR and FA have different isotopic signatures, we evaluate the potential of isotopic 13CO2 measurements in the air (combined with CO2 flux and concentration measurements) to partition NEE into FR and FA on a routine basis. The study is conducted at a temperate coniferous forest where intensive isotopic measurements in air, soil, and biomass were performed in summer 1997. The multilayer soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model MuSICA is adapted to compute 13CO2 flux and concentration profiles. Using MuSICA as a "perfect" simulator and taking advantage of the very dense spatiotemporal resolution of the isotopic data set (341 flasks over a 24-hour period) enable us to test each hypothesis and estimate the performance of the method. The partitioning works better in midafternoon when isotopic disequilibrium is strong. With only 15 flasks, i.e., two 13CO2 nighttime profiles (to estimate the isotopic signature of FR) and five daytime measurements (to perform the partitioning) we get mean daily estimates of FR and FA that agree with the model within 15-20%. However, knowledge of the mesophyll conductance seems crucial and may be a limitation to the method.

  9. Carbon transfer, partitioning and residence time in the plant-soil system: a comparison of two 13CO2 labelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, M. S.; Siegwolf, R. T. W.; Abiven, S.

    2013-10-01

    Various 13CO2 labelling approaches exist to trace carbon (C) dynamics in plant-soil systems. However, it is not clear if the different approaches yield the same results. Moreover, there is no consistent way of data analysis to date. In this study we compare with the same experimental setup the two main techniques: the pulse and the continuous labelling. We evaluate how these techniques perform to estimate the C transfer velocity, the C partitioning along time and the C residence time in different plant-soil compartments. We used identical plant-soil systems (Populus deltoides x nigra, Cambisol soil) to compare the pulse labelling approach (exposure to 99 atom% 13CO2 for three hours, traced for eight days) with a continuous labelling (exposure to 10 atom% 13CO2, traced for 14 days). The experiments were conducted in climate chambers under controlled environmental conditions. Before label addition and at four successive sampling dates, the plant-soil systems were destructively harvested, separated into leaves, petioles, stems, cuttings, roots and soil and the microbial biomass was extracted from the soil. The soil CO2 efflux was sampled throughout the experiment. To model the C dynamics we used an exponential function to describe the 13C signal decline after pulse labelling. For the evaluation of the 13C distribution during the continuous labelling we suggest to use a logistic function. Pulse labelling is best suited to assess the maximum C transfer velocity from the leaves to other compartments. With continuous labelling, the mean transfer velocity through a compartment, including short-term storage pools, can be observed. The C partitioning between the plant-soil compartments was similar for both techniques, but the time of sampling had a large effect: shortly after labelling the allocation into leaves was overestimated and the soil 13CO2 efflux underestimated. The results of belowground C partitioning were consistent for the two techniques only after eight days of

  10. Carbon transfer, partitioning and residence time in the plant-soil system: a comparison of two 13CO2 labelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, M. S.; Siegwolf, R. T. W.; Abiven, S.

    2014-03-01

    Various 13CO2 labelling approaches exist to trace carbon (C) dynamics in plant-soil systems. However, it is not clear if the different approaches yield the same results. Moreover, there is no consistent way of data analysis to date. In this study we compare with the same experimental setup the two main techniques: pulse and continuous labelling. We evaluate how these techniques perform to estimate the C transfer time, the C partitioning along time and the C residence time in different plant-soil compartments. We used identical plant-soil systems (Populus deltoides × nigra, Cambisol soil) to compare the pulse labelling approach (exposure to 99 atom % 13CO2 for three hours, traced for eight days) with a continuous labelling (exposure to 10 atom % 13CO2, traced for 14 days). The experiments were conducted in climate chambers under controlled environmental conditions. Before label addition and at four successive sampling dates, the plant-soil systems were destructively harvested, separated into leaves, petioles, stems, cuttings, roots and soil and soil microbial biomass was extracted. The soil CO2 efflux was sampled throughout the experiment. To model the C dynamics we used an exponential function to describe the 13C signal decline after pulse labelling. For the evaluation of the 13C distribution during the continuous labelling we applied a logistic function. Pulse labelling is best suited to assess the minimum C transfer time from the leaves to other compartments, while continuous labelling can be used to estimate the mean transfer time through a compartment, including short-term storage pools. The C partitioning between the plant-soil compartments obtained was similar for both techniques, but the time of sampling had a large effect: shortly after labelling the allocation into leaves was overestimated and the soil 13CO2 efflux underestimated. The results of belowground C partitioning were consistent for the two techniques only after eight days of labelling, when the

  11. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emission of Scots pine under drought stress - a 13CO2 labeling study to determine de novo and pool emissions under different treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüpke, M.

    2015-12-01

    Plants emit biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) to e.g. communicate and to defend herbivores. Yet BVOCs also impact atmospheric chemistry processes, and lead to e.g. the built up of secondary organic aerosols. Abiotic stresses, such as drought, however highly influence plant physiology and subsequently BVOCs emission rates. In this study, we investigated the effect of drought stress on BVOCs emission rates of Scots pine trees, a de novo and pool emitter, under controlled climate chamber conditions within a dynamic enclosure system consisting of four plant chambers. Isotopic labeling with 13CO2 was used to detect which ratio of emissions of BVOCs derives from actual synthesis and from storage organs under different treatments. Additionally, the synthesis rate of the BVOCs synthesis can be determined. The experiment consisted of two campaigns (July 2015 and August 2015) of two control and two treated trees respectively in four controlled dynamic chambers simultaneously. Each campaign lasted for around 21 days and can be split into five phases: adaptation, control, dry-out, drought- and re-watering phase. The actual drought phase lasted around five days. During the campaigns two samples of BVOCs emissions were sampled per day and night on thermal desorption tubes and analyzed by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer and a flame ionization detector. Additionally, gas exchange of water and CO2, soil moisture, as well as leaf and chamber temperature was monitored continuously. 13CO2 labeling was performed simultaneously in all chambers during the phases control, drought and re-watering for five hours respectively. During the 13CO2 labeling four BVOCs emission samples per chamber were taken to identify the labeling rate on emitted BVOCs. First results show a decrease of BVOCs emissions during the drought phase and a recovery of emission after re-watering, as well as different strength of reduction of single compounds. The degree of labeling with 13

  12. 13CO2/12CO2 ratio analysis in exhaled air by lead-salt tunable diode lasers for noninvasive diagnostics in gastroenterology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Eugene V.; Zyrianov, Pavel V.; Miliaev, Valerii A.; Selivanov, Yurii G.; Chizhevskii, Eugene G.; Os'kina, Svetlana; Ivashkin, Vladimir T.; Nikitina, Elena I.

    1999-07-01

    An analyzer of 13CO2/12CO2 ratio in exhaled air based on lead-salt tunable diode lasers is presented. High accuracy of the carbon isotope ratio detection in exhaled carbon dioxide was achieved with help of very simple optical schematics. It was based on the use of MBE laser diodes operating in pulse mode and on recording the resonance CO2 absorption at 4.2 micrometers . Special fast acquisition electronics and software were applied for spectral data collection and processing. Developed laser system was tested in a clinical train aimed to assessment eradication efficiency in therapy of gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Data on the 13C-urea breath test used for P.pylori detection and obtained with tunable diode lasers in the course of the trail was compared with the results of Mass-Spectroscopy analysis and histology observations. The analyzer can be used also for 13CO2/12CO2 ratio detection in exhalation to perform gastroenterology breath test based on using other compounds labeled with stable isotopes.

  13. Effects of waterlogging on carbon assimilate partitioning in the Zoigê alpine wetlands revealed by 13CO2 pulse labeling

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun-Qin; Gao, Ju-Juan; Zhang, Xue-Wen; Xu, Xing-Liang; Deng, Zhao-Heng; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Waterlogging has been suggested to affect carbon (C) turnover in wetlands, but how it affects C allocation and stocks remains unclear in alpine wetlands. Using in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling, we investigated C allocation in both waterlogged and non-waterlogged sites in the Zoigê wetlands on the Tibetan Plateau in August 2011. More than 50% of total 13C fixed by photosynthesis was lost via shoot respiration. Shoots recovered about 19% of total 13C fixed by photosynthesis at both sites. Only about 26% of total fixed 13C was translocated into the belowground pools. Soil organic C pool accounted for 19% and roots recovered about 5–7% of total fixed 13C at both sites. Waterlogging significantly reduced soil respiration and very little 13C was lost via soil respiration in the alpine wetlands compared to that in grasslands. We conclude that waterlogging did not significantly alter C allocations among the C pools except the 13CO2 efflux derived from soil respiration and that shoots made similar contributions to C sequestration as the belowground parts in the Zoigê alpine wetlands. Therefore, changes in waterlogging due to climate change will not affect C assimilate partitioning but soil C efflux. PMID:25797457

  14. Riverine GHG emissions: one year of CO2, 13CO2 and CH4 flux measurements on Vistula river in Krakow, southern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasek, Alina; Wachniew, Przemyslaw; Zimnoch, Miroslaw

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial surface waters are generally considered to be sources of carbon dioxide and methane, because respiration of organic matter via aerobic and anaerobic pathways causes supersaturation of surface waters with respect to CO2 and CH4, respectively. In rivers, these processes are influenced by such anthropogenic factors as changes of land-use, wastewater and alteration of river channels. The research object is Vistula, the largest Polish river. It has the length of 1047 km and annual runoff of 6.2x1010m3. The urban section of Vistula in Krakow receives large amounts of organic matter from highly urbanized catchment and point discharges of urban waste waters within the city limits. The river was sampled regularly at three points: the entrance to the city, the center and the point where Vistula leaves the agglomeration. A floating chamber coupled with Picarro G2101-i analyzer was applied to quantify CO2, 13CO2 and CH4 fluxes leaving the surface of the river. A floating chamber was equipped with sensors to measure air pressure, temperature and humidity inside the chamber and the temperature of water. The chamber was equipped with a set of floats and an anchor. The measurements started in October 2011, and were repeated with approximately monthly frequency. Physicochemical properties of water (temperature, conductivity, pH, CO2 partial pressure over the water surface and alkalinity) were also measured during each measurement campaign. In addition, at each site short-term variability of the measured fluxes was also investigated. Additionally, short-term variability of the measured fluxes of CO2, 13CO2 and CH4 were performed in all three sites. The results indicate that fluxes of CO2 released from the river are comparable with the soil emissions of this gas measured in Krakow area. The δ13CO2 signature of riverine CO2 flux allowed to identify decomposition of C3 organic matter as the major source of this gas. No distinct seasonal variability of the CO2 emission and

  15. Precise 13CO2/12CO2 isotopic ratio measurements for breath diagnosis with a 2-μm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingguo; Ma, Hongliang; Cao, Zhensong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Guishi; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Gao, Xiaoming

    2014-11-01

    A laser spectrometer based on a distributed-feedback semiconductor diode laser at 2 μm is developed to measure the changes of 13CO2/12CO2 isotope ratio in exhaled breath sample with the CO2 concentration of ~4%. It is characterized by a simplified optical layout, in which a single detector and associated electronics are used to probe CO2 spectrum. The cell has 10 cm long base length with 26.4 m optical path length in total and 330 cm3 volume. The cell pressure and temperature are controlled at 50 Torr and 28°, respectively. The best 13δ precision of 0.06‰ was achieved by using wavelet denoising and Kalman filter.

  16. Determination of de novo and pool emissions of terpenes from four common boreal/alpine trees by 13CO2 labelling and PTR-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghirardo, Andrea; Koch, Kristine; Taipale, Risto; Zimmer, Ina; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Rinne, Janne

    2010-05-01

    Boreal forests emit a large amount of monoterpenes into the atmosphere. Traditionally these emissions are assumed to originate as evaporation from large storage pools. Thus, their diurnal cycle would depend mostly on temperature. However, there is indication that a significant part of the monoterpene emission would originate directly from de novo synthesis. By applying 13CO2 fumigation and analyzing the isotope fractions with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and classical GC-MS, we determined the fractions of monoterpene emissions originating from de novo biosynthesis in Pinus sylvestris (58%), Picea abies (33.5%), Larix decidua (9.8%) and Betula pendula (100%). Application of the observed split between de novo and pool emissions from P. sylvestris in a hybrid emission algorithm resulted in a better description of ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest stand. PMID:20040067

  17. Comparison of TTP and Tmax estimation techniques in perfusion-weighted MR datasets for tissue-at-risk definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkert, Nils Daniel; Kaesemann, Philipp; Fiehler, Jens; Thomalla, Götz

    2012-03-01

    Acute stroke is a major cause for death and disability among adults in the western hemisphere. Time-resolved perfusion-weighted (PWI) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) MR datasets are typically used for the estimation of tissue-at-risk, which is an important variable for acute stroke therapy decision-making. Although several parameters, which can be estimated based on PWI concentration curves, have been proposed for tissue-at-risk definition in the past, the time-to-peak (TTP) or time-to-max (Tmax) parameter is used most frequently in recent trials. Unfortunately, there is no clear consensus which method should be used for estimation of Tmax or TTP maps. Consequently, tissue-at-risk estimations and following treatment decision might vary considerably with the method used. In this work, 5 PWI datasets of acute stroke patients were used to calculate TTP or Tmax maps using 10 different estimation techniques. The resulting maps were segmented using a typical threshold of +4s and the corresponding PWI-lesions were calculated. The first results suggest that the TTP or Tmax method used has a major impact on the resulting tissue-at-risk volume. Numerically, the calculated volumes differed up to a factor of 3. In general, the deconvolution-based Tmax techniques estimate the ischemic penumbra rather smaller compared to direct TTP based techniques. In conclusion, the comparison of different methods for TTP or Tmax estimation revealed high variations regarding the resulting tissue-at-risk volume, which might lead to different therapy decisions. Therefore, a consensus how TTP or Tmax maps should be calculated seems necessary.

  18. Seasonal variations of the amount of carbon allocated to respiration after in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Dannoura, M.; Ngao, J.; Plain, C.; Berveller, D.; Chipeaux, C.; Gerant, D.; Bosc, A.; Maillard, P.; Loustau, D.; Damesin, C.; Cats Project (Anr-07-Blan-0109)

    2010-12-01

    Soil and trunk respiration are the major sources of carbon from forest ecosystems to the atmosphere and they account for a large fraction of total ecosystem respiration. The amount of photosynthate allocated to respiration affects the growth of the tree and the potential for carbon sequestration of forest ecosystems. This study, aiming at understanding patterns of carbon allocation to respiration among species and seasons, consisted in pure 13CO2 labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine) at distinct phenological stages between Sept 2008 and Feb 2010. 13C was then tracked for several weeks in soil and trunk CO2 efflux at high temporal resolution using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry (Plain et al. 2009). Recovery of 13C in trunk and soil CO2 efflux was observed a few couple of hours after the beginning of the labelling in oak and beech. There is a rapid transfer of 13C belowground with a maximum occurring within 2 to 4 days after labelling. Label was recovered at the same time in the respiration and in the biomass of both fine roots and microbes. Maximum recovery occurred earlier in beech and oak, while it happened later in Pine. Indeed, the velocity of phloem transport, calculated as the difference of time lags in 13C recovery in trunk respiration at different height, was around 0.10-0.2m/h in pine and around 0.2-1.2 m/h in oak and beech, reflecting difference in phloem anatomy between angiosperm and gymnosperm. The cumulated amount of label recovered in soil CO2 efflux 20 days after labelling varied among the seasons in all species, from 1 to 16% in beech, 2 to 11% in oak and 1 to 11% in pine. For all species, allocation to soil respiration was greater in early summer compared to spring, late summer and autumn. A compartmental analysis is further conducted to characterise functional pools of labelled substrates and storage compounds that contribute to both trunk and soil respiration. [Plain C, Gérant D

  19. 13CO2/12CO2 isotope ratio analysis in human breath using a 2 μm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingguo; Cao, Zhensong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Gao, Xiaoming; Chen, Weidong; Yinbo, Huang; Ruizhong, Rao

    2015-04-01

    The bacterium H. pylori is believed to cause peptic ulcer. H. pylori infection in the human stomach can be diagnosed through a CO2 isotope ratio measure in exhaled breath. A laser spectrometer based on a distributed-feedback semiconductor diode laser at 2 μm is developed to measure the changes of 13CO2/12CO2 isotope ratio in exhaled breath sample with the CO2 concentration of ~4%. It is characterized by a simplified optical layout, in which a single detector and associated electronics are used to probe CO2 spectrum. A new type multi-passes cell with 12 cm long base length , 29 m optical path length in total and 280 cm3 volume is used in this work. The temperature and pressure are well controlled at 301.15 K and 6.66 kPa with fluctuation amplitude of 25 mK and 6.7 Pa, respectively. The best 13δ precision of 0.06o was achieved by using wavelet denoising and Kalman filter. The application of denoising and Kalman filter not only improved the signal to noise ratio, but also shorten the system response time.

  20. IRAM 30 m large scale survey of {sup 12}CO(2-1) and {sup 13}CO(2-1) emission in the Orion molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Berné, O.; Cernicharo, J.; Marcelino, N.

    2014-11-01

    Using the IRAM 30 m telescope, we have surveyed a 1 × 0.°8 part of the Orion molecular cloud in the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO (2-1) lines with a maximal spatial resolution of ∼11'' and spectral resolution of ∼0.4 km s{sup –1}. The cloud appears filamentary, clumpy, and with a complex kinematical structure. We derive an estimated mass of the cloud of 7700 M {sub ☉} (half of which is found in regions with visual extinctions A{sub V} below ∼10) and a dynamical age for the nebula of the order of 0.2 Myr. The energy balance suggests that magnetic fields play an important role in supporting the cloud, at large and small scales. According to our analysis, the turbulent kinetic energy in the molecular gas due to outflows is comparable to turbulent kinetic energy resulting from the interaction of the cloud with the H II region. This latter feedback appears negative, i.e., the triggering of star formation by the H II region is inefficient in Orion. The reduced data as well as additional products such as the column density map are made available online (http://userpages.irap.omp.eu/∼oberne/Olivier{sub B}erne/Data).

  1. Combined FTIR-micrometeorological techniques for long term flux measurements of greenhouse gases and their applicability for 13CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, Thorsten; Caldow, Chris; Griffith, David

    2010-05-01

    Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometry has been deployed for continuous long term flux measurements on a flat, homogeneous circular grass paddock in New South Wales, Australia. The rationale for using FTIR spectrometry is its capability to measure many species simultaneously. The flux measurement techniques combined with FTIR - spectrometry in this study were Disjunct Eddy Accumulation (DEA) and Flux-Gradient (FG). The fluxes of CO2 derived from the FTIR-DEA and FTIR-FG measurements agree well and have been validated by Eddy Covariance Licor measurements. Variations in the observed fluxes could be attributed to temperature increase and water availability over the 5 months measurement period. In addition to CO2, CH4, CO and N2O FTIR-spectrometry is also capable to measure 13CO2. The isotopic fluxes of CO2 allow to separate net ecosystem exchange of CO2 into its gross one-way component fluxes, ecosystem respiration and photosynthesis. It has been shown that it is possible to measure the isoflux of CO2.

  2. IRAM 30 m Large Scale Survey of 12CO(2-1) and 13CO(2-1) Emission in the Orion Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berné, O.; Marcelino, N.; Cernicharo, J.

    2014-11-01

    Using the IRAM 30 m telescope, we have surveyed a 1 × 0.°8 part of the Orion molecular cloud in the 12CO and 13CO (2-1) lines with a maximal spatial resolution of ~11'' and spectral resolution of ~0.4 km s-1. The cloud appears filamentary, clumpy, and with a complex kinematical structure. We derive an estimated mass of the cloud of 7700 M ⊙ (half of which is found in regions with visual extinctions AV below ~10) and a dynamical age for the nebula of the order of 0.2 Myr. The energy balance suggests that magnetic fields play an important role in supporting the cloud, at large and small scales. According to our analysis, the turbulent kinetic energy in the molecular gas due to outflows is comparable to turbulent kinetic energy resulting from the interaction of the cloud with the H II region. This latter feedback appears negative, i.e., the triggering of star formation by the H II region is inefficient in Orion. The reduced data as well as additional products such as the column density map are made available online (http://userpages.irap.omp.eu/~oberne/Olivier_Berne/Data).

  3. Measuring and modelling the intra-day variability of the 13CO2 & 12CO2 vertical soil profile production in a Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longdoz, Bernard; Goffin, Stéphanie; Parent, Florian; Plain, Caroline; Epron, Daniel; Wylock, Christophe; Haut, Benoit; Aubinet, Marc; Maier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Vertical profile of CO2 production (Ps) and transport, as well as their isotopic discrimination (13CO2/12CO2) should be considered to improve the soil CO2 efflux (Fs) mechanistic understanding and especially its short-term temporal variations. In this context, we propose a new methodology able to measure continuously and simultaneously Fs, the vertical soil CO2 concentration ([CO2]) profile and their respective isotopic signature (δFs and δCO2) [1]. The Ps of the different soil layers and their isotopic signature (δPs) can then be determined from these measurements by an approach considering diffusion as the only gas transport. A field campaign was conducted with this device at the Scots Pine Hartheim forest (Germany). The results [2] show (i) a Ps dependence on local temperature specific for each layer, (ii) an enrichment of δPs with soil drought, (iii) Fs and [CO2] large intra-day fluctuations non explained by the soil temperature and moisture. These fluctuations can be generated by other processes creating Ps and/or transport variability. To investigate about the nature of these processes, some sensitivity analyses have been performed with a soil CO2 model simulating both production and transport. The impacts of the introduction of advection, dispersion and phloem pressure concentration wave (through dependence of Ps on vapour pressure deficit) on intra-day Fs and [CO2] variations have been quantified. We conclude that these variations are significantly better represented when the phloem pressure wave expression is included in the simulations. The study of the processes related to CO2 production seems to be a better option than an investigation about transport to explain the intra-day Fs variability.

  4. Rapid, Long-term Monitoring of CO2 Concentration and δ13CO2 at CCUS Sites Allows Discrimination of Leakage Patterns from Natural Background Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galfond, B.; Riemer, D. D.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    In order for Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS) to gain wide acceptance as a method for mitigating atmospheric CO2 concentrations, schemes must be devised to ensure that potential leakage is detected. New regulations from the US Environmental Protection Agency require monitoring and accounting for Class VI injection wells, which will remain a barrier to wide scale CCUS deployment until effective and efficient monitoring techniques have been developed and proven. Monitoring near-surface CO2 at injection sites to ensure safety and operational success requires high temporal resolution CO2 concentration and carbon isotopic (δ13C) measurements. The only technologies currently capable of this rapid measurement of δ13C are optical techniques such as Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS). We have developed a comprehensive remote monitoring approach using CRDS and a custom manifold system to obtain accurate rapid measurements from a large sample area over an extended study period. Our modified Picarro G1101-i CRDS allows for automated rapid and continuous field measurement of δ13CO2 and concentrations of relevant gas species. At our field site, where preparations have been underway for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) operations, we have been able to measure biogenic effects on a diurnal scale, as well as variation due to precipitation and seasonality. Taking these background trends into account, our statistical treatment of real data has been used to improve signal-to-noise ratios by an order of magnitude over published models. Our system has proven field readiness for the monitoring of sites with even modest CO2 fluxes.

  5. In situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of field-grown eucalypt trees revealed the effects of potassium nutrition and throughfall exclusion on phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon.

    PubMed

    Epron, Daniel; Cabral, Osvaldo Machado Rodrigues; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Dannoura, Masako; Packer, Ana Paula; Plain, Caroline; Battie-Laclau, Patricia; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze; Bouillet, Jean-Pierre; Gérant, Dominique; Nouvellon, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K) is an important limiting factor of tree growth, but little is known of the effects of K supply on the long-distance transport of photosynthetic carbon (C) in the phloem and of the interaction between K fertilization and drought. We pulse-labelled 2-year-old Eucalyptus grandis L. trees grown in a field trial combining K fertilization (+K and -K) and throughfall exclusion (+W and -W), and we estimated the velocity of C transfer by comparing time lags between the uptake of (13)CO2 and its recovery in trunk CO2 efflux recorded at different heights. We also analysed the dynamics of the labelled photosynthates recovered in the foliage and in the phloem sap (inner bark extract). The mean residence time of labelled C in the foliage was short (21-31 h). The time series of (13)C in excess in the foliage was affected by the level of fertilization, whereas the effect of throughfall exclusion was not significant. The velocity of C transfer in the trunk (0.20-0.82 m h(-1)) was twice as high in +K trees than in -K trees, with no significant effect of throughfall exclusion except for one +K -W tree labelled in the middle of the drought season that was exposed to a more pronounced water stress (midday leaf water potential of -2.2 MPa). Our results suggest that besides reductions in photosynthetic C supply and in C demand by sink organs, the lower velocity under K deficiency is due to a lower cross-sectional area of the sieve tubes, whereas an increase in phloem sap viscosity is more likely limiting phloem transport under drought. In all treatments, 10 times less (13)C was recovered in inner bark extracts at the bottom of the trunk when compared with the base of the crown, suggesting that a large part of the labelled assimilates has been exported out of the phloem and replaced by unlabelled C. This supports the 'leakage-retrieval mechanism' that may play a role in maintaining the pressure gradient between source and sink organs required to sustain high

  6. Investigating the impact of light and water status on the exchange of COS, 13CO2, CO18O and H218O from bryophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno, Teresa; Royles, Jessica; Ogee, Jerome; Jones, Samuel; Burlett, Regis; West, Jason; Sauze, Joana; Wohl, Steven; Genty, Bernard; Griffiths, Howard; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial surfaces are often covered by photoautotrophic communities that play a significant role in the biological fixation of C and N at the global scale. Bryophytes (mosses, liverworts and hornworts) are key members in these communities and are especially adapted to thrive in hostile environments, by growing slowly and surviving repeated dehydration events. Consequently, bryophyte communities can be extremely long-lived (>1500yrs) and can serve as valuable records of historic climate change. In particular the carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of mosses can be used as powerful proxies describing how growing season changes in atmospheric CO2 and rainfall have changed in the distant past over the land surface. Interpreting the climate signals of bryophyte biomass requires a robust understanding of how changes in photosynthetic activity and moisture status regulate the growth and isotopic composition of bryophyte biomass. Thus theoretical models predicting how changes in isotopic enrichment and CO2 discrimination respond to dehydration and rehydration are used to tease apart climatic and isotopic source signals. Testing these models with high resolution datasets obtained from new generation laser spectrometers can provide more information on how these plants that lack stomata cope with water loss. In addition novel tracers such as carbonyl sulfide (COS) can also be measured at high resolution and precision (<5ppt) and used to constrain understanding of diffusional and enzymatic limitations during dehydration and rehydration events in the light and the dark. Here, we will present for the first time simultaneous high-resolution chamber measurements of COS, 13CO2, CO18O and H218O fluxes by a bryophyte species (Marchantia sp.) in the light and during the dark, through complete desiccation cycles. Our measurements consistently reveal a strong enrichment dynamic in the oxygen isotope composition of transpired water over the dessication cycle that caused an increase

  7. Using eddy covariance of CO2, 13CO2 and CH4, continuous soil respiration measurements, and PhenoCams to constrain a process-based biogeochemical model for carbon market-funded wetland restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Knox, S. H.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Dronova, I.; Jenerette, D.; Poindexter, C.; Huang, Y. W.

    2015-12-01

    We use multiple data streams in a model-data fusion approach to reduce uncertainty in predicting CO2 and CH4 exchange in drained and flooded peatlands. Drained peatlands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California are a strong source of CO2 to the atmosphere and flooded peatlands or wetlands are a strong CO2 sink. However, wetlands are also large sources of CH4 that can offset the greenhouse gas mitigation potential of wetland restoration. Reducing uncertainty in model predictions of annual CO2 and CH4 budgets is critical for including wetland restoration in Cap-and-Trade programs. We have developed and parameterized the Peatland Ecosystem Photosynthesis, Respiration, and Methane Transport model (PEPRMT) in a drained agricultural peatland and a restored wetland. Both ecosystem respiration (Reco) and CH4 production are a function of 2 soil carbon (C) pools (i.e. recently-fixed C and soil organic C), temperature, and water table height. Photosynthesis is predicted using a light use efficiency model. To estimate parameters we use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach with an adaptive Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Multiple data streams are used to constrain model parameters including eddy covariance of CO2, 13CO2 and CH4, continuous soil respiration measurements and digital photography. Digital photography is used to estimate leaf area index, an important input variable for the photosynthesis model. Soil respiration and 13CO2 fluxes allow partitioning of eddy covariance data between Reco and photosynthesis. Partitioned fluxes of CO2 with associated uncertainty are used to parametrize the Reco and photosynthesis models within PEPRMT. Overall, PEPRMT model performance is high. For example, we observe high data-model agreement between modeled and observed partitioned Reco (r2 = 0.68; slope = 1; RMSE = 0.59 g C-CO2 m-2 d-1). Model validation demonstrated the model's ability to accurately predict annual budgets of CO2 and CH4 in a wetland system (within 14% and 1

  8. Urinary Adiponectin Excretion

    PubMed Central

    von Eynatten, Maximilian; Liu, Dan; Hock, Cornelia; Oikonomou, Dimitrios; Baumann, Marcus; Allolio, Bruno; Korosoglou, Grigorios; Morcos, Michael; Campean, Valentina; Amann, Kerstin; Lutz, Jens; Heemann, Uwe; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Humpert, Per M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Markers reliably identifying vascular damage and risk in diabetic patients are rare, and reports on associations of serum adiponectin with macrovascular disease have been inconsistent. In contrast to existing data on serum adiponectin, this study assesses whether urinary adiponectin excretion might represent a more consistent vascular damage marker in type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adiponectin distribution in human kidney biopsies was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and urinary adiponectin isoforms were characterized by Western blot analysis. Total urinary adiponectin excretion rate was measured in 156 patients with type 2 diabetes who had a history of diabetic nephropathy and 40 healthy control subjects using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Atherosclerotic burden was assessed by common carotid artery intima-media-thickness (IMT). RESULTS A homogenous staining of adiponectin was found on the endothelial surface of glomerular capillaries and intrarenal arterioles in nondiabetic kidneys, whereas staining was decreased in diabetic nephropathy. Low-molecular adiponectin isoforms (∼30–70 kDa) were detected in urine by Western blot analysis. Urinary adiponectin was significantly increased in type 2 diabetes (7.68 ± 14.26 vs. control subjects: 2.91 ± 3.85 μg/g creatinine, P = 0.008). Among type 2 diabetic patients, adiponectinuria was associated with IMT (r = 0.479, P < 0.001) and proved to be a powerful independent predictor of IMT (β = 0.360, P < 0.001) in multivariable regression analyses. In a risk prediction model including variables of the UK Prospective Diabetes Study coronary heart disease risk engine urinary adiponectin, but not the albumin excretion rate, added significant value for the prediction of increased IMT (P = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS Quantification of urinary adiponectin excretion appears to be an independent indicator of vascular damage potentially identifying an increased risk for vascular events. PMID:19509019

  9. Investigation of the spin-lattice relaxation of 13CO and 13CO2 adsorbed in the metal-organic frameworks Cu3(btc)2 and Cu3-xZnx(btc)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul-E-Noor, Farhana; Michel, Dieter; Krautscheid, Harald; Haase, Jürgen; Bertmer, Marko

    2013-07-01

    The 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time of 13CO and 13CO2 molecules adsorbed in the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) Cu2.97Zn0.03(btc)2 and Cu3(btc)2 is investigated over a wide range of temperatures at resonance frequencies of 75.468 and 188.62 MHz. In all cases a mono-exponential relaxation is observed, and the 13C spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) reveal minima within the temperature range of the measurements and both frequencies. This allows us to carry out a more detailed analysis of the 13C spin relaxation data and to consider the influence due to the spectral functions of the thermal motion. In a model-free discussion of the temperature dependence of the ratios T1 (T)/T1,min we observe a motional mechanism that can be described by a single correlation time. In relation to the discussion of the relaxation mechanisms this can be understood in terms of dominating translational motion with mean jump distance being larger than the minimum distances between neighboring adsorption sites in the MOFs. A more detailed discussion of the jump-like motion observed here might be carried out on the basis of self-diffusion coefficients. From the present spin relaxation measurements activation energies for the local motion of the adsorbed molecules in the MOFs can be estimated to be 3.3 kJ/mol and 2.2 kJ/mol, for CO and CO2 molecules, respectively. Finally, our findings are compared with our recent results derived from the 13C line shape analysis.

  10. Quantifying Protein Synthesis and Degradation in Arabidopsis by Dynamic 13CO2 Labeling and Analysis of Enrichment in Individual Amino Acids in Their Free Pools and in Protein1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis and degradation represent substantial costs during plant growth. To obtain a quantitative measure of the rate of protein synthesis and degradation, we supplied 13CO2 to intact Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Columbia-0 plants and analyzed enrichment in free amino acids and in amino acid residues in protein during a 24-h pulse and 4-d chase. While many free amino acids labeled slowly and incompletely, alanine showed a rapid rise in enrichment in the pulse and a decrease in the chase. Enrichment in free alanine was used to correct enrichment in alanine residues in protein and calculate the rate of protein synthesis. The latter was compared with the relative growth rate to estimate the rate of protein degradation. The relative growth rate was estimated from sequential determination of fresh weight, sequential images of rosette area, and labeling of glucose in the cell wall. In an 8-h photoperiod, protein synthesis and cell wall synthesis were 3-fold faster in the day than at night, protein degradation was slow (3%–4% d−1), and flux to growth and degradation resulted in a protein half-life of 3.5 d. In the starchless phosphoglucomutase mutant at night, protein synthesis was further decreased and protein degradation increased, while cell wall synthesis was totally inhibited, quantitatively accounting for the inhibition of growth in this mutant. We also investigated the rates of protein synthesis and degradation during leaf development, during growth at high temperature, and compared synthesis rates of Rubisco large and small subunits of in the light and dark. PMID:25810096

  11. Short-term carbon dynamics in a temperate heathland upon six years of exposure to elevated CO2 concentration, drought and warming: Evidence from an in-situ 13CO2 pulse-chase experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambus, P.; Reinsch, S.; Sárossy, Z.; Egsgaard, H.; Jakobsen, I.; Michelsen, A.; Schmidt, I.; Nielsen, P.

    2013-12-01

    An in-situ 13CO2 pulse-labeling experiment was carried out in a temperate heathland (8 oC MAT, 610 mm MAP) to study the impact on short-term carbon (C) allocation as affected by elevated CO2 concentration (+120 ppm), prolonged summer droughts (ca. -43 mm) and warming (+1 oC). The study was carried out six years after the climate treatments were initiated and took place in the early growing season in May in vegetation dominated by grasses, mainly Deschampsia flexuosa. Newly assimilated C (13C from the pulse-label) was traced into vegetation, soil and soil microorganisms and belowground respiration 1, 2 and 8 days after pulse-labeling. The importance of the microbial community in C utilization was investigated using 13C enrichment patterns in different microbial functional groups on the basis of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles. Climate treatments did not affect microorganism abundance in soil or rhizosphere fractions in terms of total PLFA-C concentration. Elevated CO2 significantly reduced the abundance of gram-negative bacteria (17:0cy), but did not affect the abundance of decomposers (fungi and actinomycetes) in rhizosphere fractions. Drought favored the bacterial community in rhizosphere fractions whereas warming reduced the abundance of gram-negative bacteria (19:0cy) and changed the actinomycetes community (10Me16:0, 10Me18:0). Fastest and highest utilization of recently assimilated C was observed in rhizosphere associated gram-negative bacteria followed by gram-positive bacteria. The utilization of recently assimilated C by the microbial community was faster under elevated CO2 conditions compared to ambient. The 13C assimilation by green plant tissue and translocation to roots was significantly reduced by the extended summer drought. Under elevated CO2 conditions we observed an increased amount of 13C in the litter fraction. The assimilation of 13C by vegetation was not changed when the climate factors were applied in combination. The total amount of

  12. Mathematical formulation of Tmax-Tstop method for LM-OSL and its experimental validation on α-Al2O3:C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Anuj; Mishra, D. R.

    2016-05-01

    A mathematical formulation and its experimental validation on α-Al2O3:C for evaluating the number of OSL components has been described. The method consists of various partial bleaching steps of LM-OSL curve and as a result, the peak position (Tmax) of the resultant curve shifts if the system contains multiple components. However, for single component system the peak position of the resultant curve doesn't change on partial bleaching for a phosphor obeying first order kinetics. The method has been theoretically formulated for single and multiple component system with different order of kinetics and validated experimentally on the commercial α-Al2O3:C OSL phosphor. The slope of the curve between shift in Tmax and bleaching time gives the number of the OSL components and measure of their closeness in terms of photoionization cross-section. Based on this result, the photoionization cross-section of the two embedded peaks in the LM-OSL curve of α-Al2O3:C were found to be 1.51 × 10-18 cm2 and 5.02 × 10-19 cm2 using CW-OSL and NL-OSL method.

  13. Quantifying the effect of Tmax extreme events on local adaptation to climate change of maize crop in Andalusia for the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabaldon, Clara; Lorite, Ignacio J.; Ines Minguez, M.; Lizaso, Jon; Dosio, Alessandro; Sanchez, Enrique; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Extreme events of Tmax can threaten maize production on Andalusia (Ruiz-Ramos et al., 2011). The objective of this work is to attempt a quantification of the effects of Tmax extreme events on the previously identified (Gabaldón et al., 2013) local adaptation strategies to climate change of irrigated maize crop in Andalusia for the first half of the 21st century. This study is focused on five Andalusia locations. Local adaptation strategies identified consisted on combinations of changes on sowing dates and choice of cultivar (Gabaldón et al., 2013). Modified cultivar features were the duration of phenological phases and the grain filling rate. The phenological and yield simulations with the adaptative changes were obtained from a modelling chain: current simulated climate and future climate scenarios (2013-2050) were taken from a group of regional climate models at high resolution (25 km) from the European Project ENSEMBLES (http://www.ensembles-eu.org/). After bias correcting these data for temperature and precipitation (Dosio and Paruolo, 2011; Dosio et al., 2012) crop simulations were generated by the CERES-maize model (Jones and Kiniry, 1986) under DSSAT platform, previously calibrated and validated. Quantification of the effects of extreme Tmax on maize yield was computed for different phenological stages following Teixeira et al. (2013). A heat stress index was computed; this index assumes that yield-damage intensity due to heat stress increases linearly from 0.0 at a critical temperature to a maximum of 1.0 at a limit temperature. The decrease of crop yield is then computed by a normalized production damage index which combines attainable yield and heat stress index for each location. Selection of the most suitable adaptation strategy will be reviewed and discussed in light of the quantified effect on crop yield of the projected change of Tmax extreme events. This study will contribute to MACSUR knowledge Hub within the Joint Programming Initiative on

  14. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of the novel antibacterial prodrug tedizolid phosphate.

    PubMed

    Ong, Voon; Flanagan, Shawn; Fang, Edward; Dreskin, Howard J; Locke, Jeffrey B; Bartizal, Kenneth; Prokocimer, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is a novel antibacterial prodrug with potent activity against Gram-positive pathogens. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that the prodrug is rapidly converted by nonspecific phosphatases to the biologically active moiety tedizolid. Single oral dose radiolabeled (14)C-tedizolid phosphate kinetic studies in human subjects (100 µCi in 204 mg tedizolid phosphate free acid) confirmed a rapid time to maximum tedizolid concentration (Tmax, 1.28 hours), a long terminal half-life (10.6 hours), and a Cmax of 1.99 µg/ml. Metabolite analysis of plasma, fecal, and urine samples from rats, dogs, and humans confirmed that tedizolid is the only measurable metabolite in plasma after intravenous (in animals only) or oral administration and that tedizolid sulfate is the major metabolite excreted from the body. Excellent mass balance recovery was achieved and demonstrated that fecal excretion is the predominant (80-90%) route of elimination across species, primarily as tedizolid sulfate. Urine excretion accounted for the balance of drug elimination but contained a broader range of minor metabolites. Glucuronidation products were not detected. Similar results were observed in rats and dogs after both intravenous and oral administration. The tedizolid metabolites showed less potent antibacterial activity than tedizolid. The observations from these studies support once daily dosing of tedizolid phosphate and highlight important metabolism and excretion features that differentiate tedizolid phosphate from linezolid. PMID:24875463

  15. Urinary MDMA, MDA, HMMA, and HMA Excretion Following Controlled MDMA Administration to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Tsadik T.; Barnes, Allan J.; Lowe, Ross H.; Spargo, Erin A. Kolbrich; Milman, Garry; Pirnay, Stephane O.; Gorelick, David A.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), or ecstasy, is excreted as unchanged drug, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), and free and glucuronidated/sulfated 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine (HMMA), and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyamphetamine (HMA) metabolites. The aim of this paper is to describe the pattern and timeframe of excretion of MDMA and its metabolites in urine. Placebo, 1.0 mg/kg, and 1.6 mg/kg oral MDMA doses were administered double-blind to healthy adult MDMA users on a monitored research unit. All urine was collected, aliquots were hydrolyzed, and analytes quantified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Median Cmax, Tmax, ratios, first and last detection times, and detection rates were determined. Sixteen participants provided 916 urine specimens. After 1.6 mg/kg, median Cmax were 21,470 (MDMA), 2229 (MDA), 20,793 (HMMA), and 876 ng/mL (HMA) at median Tmax of 13.9, 23.0, 9.2 and 23.3 h. In the first 24 h, 30.2–34.3% total urinary excretion occurred. HMMA last detection exceeded MDMA’s by more than 33 h after both doses. Identification of HMMA as well as MDMA increased the ability to identify positive specimens but required hydrolysis. These MDMA, MDA, HMMA, and HMA pharmacokinetic data may be useful for interpreting workplace, drug treatment, criminal justice, and military urine drug tests. Measurement of urinary HMMA provides the longest detection of MDMA exposure yet is not included in routine monitoring procedures. PMID:19874650

  16. Preparation of an amorphous sodium furosemide salt improves solubility and dissolution rate and leads to a faster Tmax after oral dosing to rats.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Gordon, Sarah; Holm, René; Selen, Arzu; Rades, Thomas; Müllertz, Anette

    2013-11-01

    crystalline free acid, respectively. The promising properties of the amorphous salt in vitro were further evaluated in an in vivo study, where solid dosage forms of the amorphous salt, amorphous and crystalline free acid and a solution of furosemide were administered orally to rats. The amorphous salt exhibited a significantly faster Tmax compared to the solution and amorphous and crystalline free acid. Cmax for the solution was significantly higher compared to the three furosemide forms. No significant difference was found in AUC and absolute bioavailability for the solution, crystalline free acid and the two amorphous forms of furosemide. It can be concluded that the higher IDR and higher apparent solubility of the amorphous salt resulted in a faster Tmax compared to the amorphous and crystalline free acid. PMID:24075980

  17. Ammonia excretion by Azobacter chroococcum

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, N.; Lakshminarayana, K.; Tauro, P.

    1981-02-01

    In recent years, research has focused attention on the development of biological systems for nitrogen fixation. In this report, two strains of Azotobacter chroococcum are identified which can excrete as much as 45 mg ammonia/ml of the culture broth in a sucrose supplemented synthetic medium.

  18. Human pharmacology of ayahuasca: subjective and cardiovascular effects, monoamine metabolite excretion, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Riba, Jordi; Valle, Marta; Urbano, Gloria; Yritia, Mercedes; Morte, Adelaida; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the South American psychotropic beverage ayahuasca on subjective and cardiovascular variables and urine monoamine metabolite excretion were evaluated, together with the drug's pharmacokinetic profile, in a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. This pharmacologically complex tea, commonly obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an orally labile psychedelic agent showing 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist activity, with monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids (harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine). Eighteen volunteers with prior experience in the use of psychedelics received single oral doses of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (0.6 and 0.85 mg of DMT/kg of body weight) and placebo. Ayahuasca produced significant subjective effects, peaking between 1.5 and 2 h, involving perceptual modifications and increases in ratings of positive mood and activation. Diastolic blood pressure showed a significant increase at the high dose (9 mm Hg at 75 min), whereas systolic blood pressure and heart rate were moderately and nonsignificantly increased. Cmax values for DMT after the low and high ayahuasca doses were 12.14 ng/ml and 17.44 ng/ml, respectively. Tmax (median) was observed at 1.5 h after both doses. The Tmax for DMT coincided with the peak of subjective effects. Drug administration increased urinary normetanephrine excretion, but, contrary to the typical MAO-inhibitor effect profile, deaminated monoamine metabolite levels were not decreased. This and the negligible harmine plasma levels found suggest a predominantly peripheral (gastrointestinal and liver) site of action for harmine. MAO inhibition at this level would suffice to prevent first-pass metabolism of DMT and allow its access to systemic circulation and the central nervous system. PMID:12660312

  19. Absolute bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, and urinary excretion of the novel antimigraine agent almotriptan in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Jansat, Josep M; Costa, Joan; Salvà, Pau; Fernandez, Francisco J; Martinez-Tobed, Antonio

    2002-12-01

    Absolute bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, and urinary excretion of almotriptan, a novel 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonist, were studied in 18 healthy males following single intravenous (i.v.) (3 mg), subcutaneous (s.c.) (6 mg), and oral (25 mg) doses. Volunteers received each dose in a randomized sequence separated by a 7-day washout. Blood and urine samples for pharmacokinetic evaluations were taken for up to 24 hours after dosing. The disposition kinetics of almotriptan after i.v. and s.c. administration showed biphasic decline described by a two-compartment model. The fastest disposition phase was well observed, although estimates of the rate constant showed high variability. After s.c. administration of almotriptan, the bioavailability was 100% with a time to maximum plasma concentration (tmax) of 5 to 15 minutes, whereas after oral administration, the bioavailability was about 70% with a tmax of 1.5 to 3.0 hours. No significant differences were observed between administration routes in the elimination half-life (t(1/2), obtaining mean values ranging from 3.4 to 3.6 hours. The volume of distribution, total clearance, and t(1/2) indicated that almotriptan was extensively distributed and rapidly cleared from the body irrespective of dose or route of administration. The primary route of elimination was renal clearance (approximately 50%-60% of total body clearance). About 65% of the i.v. and s.c. dose and 45% of the oral dose were excreted unchanged in urine in 24 hours, with nearly 90% of this in the first 12 hours. Renal clearance was approximately 2- to 3-fold that of the glomerular filtration rate in man, suggesting that almotriptan is eliminated in part by renal tubular secretion. PMID:12463724

  20. Predicting nitrogen excretion from cattle.

    PubMed

    Reed, K F; Moraes, L E; Casper, D P; Kebreab, E

    2015-05-01

    Manure nitrogen (N) from cattle production facilities can lead to negative environmental effects, such as contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, leaching and runoff to aqueous ecosystems leading to eutrophication, and acid rain. To mitigate these effects and to improve the efficiency of N use, accurate prediction of N excretion and secretions are required. A genetic algorithm was implemented to select models to predict fecal, urinary, and total manure N excretions, and milk N secretions from 3 classes of animals: lactating dairy cows, heifers and dry cows, and steers. Two tiers of model classes were developed for each category of animals based on model input requirements. A total of 6 models for heifers and dry cows and steers and an additional 2 models for lactating dairy cattle were developed. Evaluation of the models using K-fold cross validation based on all data and using the most recent 6 yr of data showed better prediction for total manure N and fecal N compared with urinary N excretion, which was the most variable response in the database. Compared with extant models from the literature, the models developed in this study resulted in a significant improvement in prediction error for fecal and urinary N excretions from lactating cows. For total manure production by lactating cows, extant and new models were comparable in their prediction ability. Both proposed and extant models performed better than the prediction methods used by the US Environmental Protection Agency for the national inventory of greenhouse gases. Therefore, the proposed models are recommended for use in estimation of manure N from various classes of animals. PMID:25747829

  1. Purine and pyrimidine excretion in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, H. A.; Bowyer, A.

    1974-01-01

    1 Urinary purine excretion has been investigated in two healthy controls and two patients with psoriasis, one a hyperuricaemic, one a normouricaemic. No difference was detected between the patients and controls. Therapy with allopurinol effectively lowered blood and urinary uric acid levels and produced a deficit in total urinary oxypurine excretion in both controls and patients with psoriasis. The concomitant increase in xanthine excretion was greater than the increase in hypoxanthine excretion and xanthine/hypoxanthine ratios (average 0.70 and 1.0 prior to therapy) were increased by allopurinol to an average of 3.0 and 3.8 respectively in the two groups. Allopurinol also reduced the excretion of 8-hydroxy-7-methyl guanine but no effect on the excretion levels of other minor purine bases was noted. 2 Allopurinol was metabolized similarly by both patients and controls, 84% of the administered allopurinol being accounted for as urinary metabolites. 74% of the drug in the urine was excreted as oxipurinol, 26% as unchanged allopurinol plus allopurinol riboside, the remainder being oxipurinol riboside. 3 Pseudouridine excretion in 25 healthy controls was 86.5 ± 17.8 mg/24 hours. Pseudouridine excretion was not excessive in the patients with psoriasis and was not altered by allopurinol therapy. 4 No abnormality or difference in purine or pyrimidine excretion in either patient was detected prior to or during therapy which could be related to the epidermal lesion. PMID:22454896

  2. Ferrioxamine excretion in iron-loaded man

    SciTech Connect

    Pippard, M.J.; Callender, S.T.; Finch, C.A.

    1982-08-01

    Factors affecting iron excretion after subcutaneous desferrioxamine infusion were evaluated in individuals with iron overload. Urinary iron varied directly, whereas stool iron varied inversely with the level of erythropoiesis. Ascorbic acid greatly enhanced urinary iron excretion but had a less constant effect on stool iron. Stool iron losses contributed a greater proportion of total iron excretion at higher chelator dosage. These studies indicate the importance of biliary iron excretion in monitoring the effectiveness of desferrioxamine. They also suggest that large chelator doses may remove established iron overload much more rapidly than has previously been realized.

  3. Vasopressin regulates renal calcium excretion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hanouna, Guillaume; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Baud, Laurent; Letavernier, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Antidiuretic hormone or arginine vasopressin (AVP) increases water reabsorption in the collecting ducts of the kidney. Three decades ago, experimental models have shown that AVP may increase calcium reabsorption in rat kidney. The objective of this study was to assess whether AVP modulates renal calcium excretion in humans. We analyzed calcium, potassium, and sodium fractional excretion in eight patients affected by insipidus diabetes (nephrogenic or central) under acute vasopressin receptor agonist action and in 10 patients undergoing oral water load test affected or not by inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Synthetic V2 receptor agonist (dDAVP) reduced significantly calcium fractional excretion from 1.71% to 0.58% (P < 0.05) in patients with central diabetes insipidus. In patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (resistant to AVP), calcium fractional excretion did not change significantly after injection (0.48–0.68%, P = NS). In normal subjects undergoing oral water load test, calcium fractional excretion increased significantly from 1.02% to 2.54% (P < 0.05). Patients affected by SIADH had a high calcium fractional excretion at baseline that remained stable during test from 3.30% to 3.33% (P = NS), possibly resulting from a reduced calcium absorption in renal proximal tubule. In both groups, there was a significant correlation between urine output and calcium renal excretion. In humans, dDAVP decreases calcium fractional excretion in the short term. Conversely, water intake, which lowers AVP concentration, increases calcium fractional excretion. The correlation between urine output and calcium excretion suggests that AVP-related antidiuresis increases calcium reabsorption in collecting ducts. PMID:26620256

  4. The effects of uphill vs. level-grade high-intensity interval training on VO2max, Vmax, V(LT), and Tmax in well-trained distance runners.

    PubMed

    Ferley, Derek D; Osborn, Roy W; Vukovich, Matthew D

    2013-06-01

    Uphill running represents a frequently used and often prescribed training tactic in the development of competitive distance runners but remains largely uninvestigated and unsubstantiated as a training modality. The purpose of this investigation included documenting the effects of uphill interval training compared with level-grade interval training on maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), the running speed associated with VO2max (Vmax), the running speed associated with lactate threshold (V(LT)), and the duration for which Vmax can be sustained (Tmax) in well-trained distance runners. Thirty-two well-trained distance runners (age, 27.4 ± 3.8 years; body mass, 64.8 ± 8.9 kg; height, 173.6 ± 6.4 cm; and VO2max, 60.9 ± 8.5 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1)) received assignment to an uphill interval training group (G(Hill) = 12), level-grade interval training group (G(Flat) = 12), or control group (G(Con) = 8). G(Hill) and G(Flat) completed 12 interval and 12 continuous running sessions over 6 weeks, whereas G(Con) maintained their normal training routine. Pre- and posttest measures of VO2max, Vmax, V(LT), and Tmax were used to assess performance. A 3 × 2 repeated measures analysis of variance was performed for each dependent variable and revealed a significant difference in Tmax in both G(Hill) and G(Flat) (p < 0.05). With regard to running performance, the results indicate that both uphill and level-grade interval training can induce significant improvements in a run-to-exhaustion test in well-trained runners at the speed associated with VO2max but that traditional level-grade training produces greater gains. PMID:22996027

  5. Vitamin C modulates lead excretion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lihm, Hoseob; Kim, Hyun; Chang, Heekyung; Yoon, Myunghee; Lee, Kayoung

    2013-01-01

    Lead, one of the most toxic heavy metals, takes longer time to be excreted from the body than other heavy metals. The purpose of this study is, by measuring lead excretion via urine and feces, to find out the effect of vitamin C in lead chelation. Thirty-six rats were randomly assorted into four groups. All 33 rats except for the control group were administered with lead, before orally administered with different doses of vitamin C per kilogram of body weight. The lead excretion levels in urine and feces as well as the survival rate were then measured for each group. The rats with lead administrations (10/13, 76.9%) with lead administrations only, 10/11 rats (90.9%) with lead administrations and low dose of vitamin C, 9/9 rats (100%) with lead administrations and high dose of vitamin C survived. Among the 29 surviving rats, low vitamin C intake group exhibited higher urinary excretion than the lead only group. The urinary excretion level in high dose vitamin C intakegroup was significantly higher than the lead only group. In addition, fecal lead excretion seemed to be increased in the high dose vitamin C intake group, compared to the group with lead administrations only with statistical significance. Through animal experiment, it was found out that administrating high dose of vitamin C accelerated the excretion of lead in body compared to low dose of vitamin C. PMID:24386596

  6. Urinary porphyrin excretion in hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Vogeser, M; Jacob, K; Zachoval, R

    1999-08-01

    A high prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in porphyria cutanea tarda in some populations suggests a close link between viral hepatitis and alteration of porphyrin metabolism. Moreover, there is evidence of a role of porphyrinopathies in hepatocarcinogenesis. The aim of our study was to obtain data on the prevalence and patterns of heme metabolism alterations in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Urinary porphyrin excretion was prospectively studied in 100 consecutive outpatients with chronic hepatitis C infection without signs of photosensitivity, using an ion-pair high-performance liquid chromatography method. Increased total porphyrin excretion was found in 41 patients, with predominant excretion of coproporphyrins (whole study group: mean 146 microg/g creatinine, interquartile range 76-186; normal < 150), in 10 patients excretion exceeded 300 microg/g creatinine. In the majority of all patients studied (75/100) an increased ratio of the relatively hydrophobic coproporphyrin isomer I to isomer III was found. In just one case, urinary porphyrin pattern characteristic for chronic hepatic porphyria was present (uroporphyrin > coproporphyrin, heptacarboxyporphyrin III increased) but the total porphyrin excretion was only slightly elevated in this case. In the whole group, total urinary porphyrin excretion correlated well with serum bilirubin and was inversely correlated with albumin and thrombin time. In conclusion, secondary coproporphyrinuria occurs frequently in heptatitis C infection, whereas in Germany, preclinical porphyria cutanea tarda seems to be rare in these patients. PMID:10536928

  7. Antidiuretic hormone excretion at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Harber, M J; Williams, J D; Morton, J J

    1981-01-01

    Urinary excretion of electrolytes, creatinine, urea, and antidiuretic hormone--measured as arginine vasopressin (AVP) by radioimmunoassay--was investigated in eight Himalayan mountaineers during ascent on foot from 1900- 5400 m. Specimens were collected from each individual whenever urine was voided, preserved with 1% boric acid, and subsequently pooled to give samples representative of 24-h collections. AVP was found to be reasonably stable under simulated conditions of storage. In all subjects, the observed AVP excretion rates were mostly in the lower region of the normal range and there was generally no correlation with altitude, urine osmolality, electrolyte excretion, or occurrence of AMS symptoms--even in a fatal case of cerebral oedema. It is concluded that AVP does not play a primary role in the changes in fluid balance which accompany either acclimatization to high altitude or the onset of AMS. PMID:7213286

  8. [Changes in plasma pharmacokinetics and urinary excretion characteristics before and after combined administration of Ephedrae Herba-Gypsum Fibrosum].

    PubMed

    Huo, Hui-ling; Li, Han-cheng; Wei, Ping; Song, Shuai; Luo, Jia-bo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, UPLC-MS/MS was adopted to determine the contents of five ephedrine alkaloids (Norephedrine, Norpseudoephedrine, Ephedrine, Pseudoephedrine, Methylephedrine) in plasma and urine in rats after the combined administration of Ephedrae Herba-Gypsum Fibrosum and calculate relevant pharmacokinetic parameters, in order to discuss the effect of the combined administration of Ephedrae Herba-Gypsum Fibrosum on plasma pharmacokinetics and urinary excretion characteristics. According to the results, after being combined with Gypsum, the five ephedrine alkaloids showed similar pharmacokinetic changes, such as shortened t(max), accelerated absorption rate, but reduced AUC(0-t) and V(z)/F, which may be related to the increase in urine excretion. Besides, Gypsum was added to enhance C(max) of Pseudoephedrine and prolong MRT(0-t) of Methylephedrine, so as to enhance the anti-asthmatic effect of Ephedrae Herba and resist the toxic effect of Norephedrine and Ephedrine. This study proved the scientific compatibility of Ephedrae Herba-Gypsum Fibrosum and provided a reference for studies on the prescription compatibility regularity and relevant practices. PMID:26087564

  9. Relation between creatinine and uric acid excretion.

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Y

    1992-01-01

    The relation between creatinine and uric acid metabolism was analysed in 77 male patients with primary gout and 62 healthy male subjects. Significant positive correlations between 24 hour urinary creatinine and uric acid excretion were shown in both groups. The mean urinary creatinine and uric acid excretions in the patients with gout were significantly increased as compared with those of normal male controls. These results suggest that there is a close correlation between creatinine and uric acid synthesis. In addition, it seems that accelerated uric acid synthesis seen in some patients with gout is due to increased creatinine synthesis. PMID:1540011

  10. Clinical study of urinary excretion of Ga-67

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Ibuka, K.; Hashizume, T.; Noguchi, A.; Kojima, J.; Sasakuma, F.; Ishigami, S. )

    1990-04-01

    Ga-67 urinary excretion was examined in 59 patients. The 72-hour urinary excretion rate ranged from 4.3 to 67.8% of the injected dose. Within the first 24 hours, 60.9% of the 72-hour urinary excretion was excreted. There was no significant difference in the Ga-67 urinary excretion rate between males and females, nor between the Ga-67 positive and negative cases. A significant negative correlation was found between the 72-hour Ga-67 urinary excretion rate and the unsaturated iron binding capacity. Notably, four patients with hyperferremia, which was considered secondary to leukemia and/or chemotherapy or liver cirrhosis, excreted more than 46.8% of Ga-67 within 72 hours. A significant negative correlation was also found between the 72-hour Ga-67 urinary excretion rate and age. Urinary excretion of Ga-67 may be related to the glomerular filtration rate, which decreases with age.

  11. Effects of methylxanthines on urinary prostaglandin E excretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Kogo, H; Aizawa, Y

    1981-04-01

    Effect of methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine and caffeine) on urinary prostaglandin E (PGE) excretion in male rats was studied. Oral administration of xanthines significantly increased the urinary excretion of PGE. Dose-response studies showed that the maximal excretion of urinary PGE and water was obtained by administration of theophylline (50 mg/kg), where the increase in PGE was about 20 times that of the control. The excretion of urinary sodium, potassium and chloride was also markedly increased by xanthines, particularly, theophylline. Increases in urinary PGE excretion, urine volume and electrolytes excretion were inhibited by 10 mg/kg of indomethacin administered prior to theophylline. The increase of urinary PGE excretion after theophylline administration (50 mg/kg) preceded increases in water and sodium excretion. These results suggest that renal PGE mediates, at least in part, the diuretic effect of theophylline. PMID:7311144

  12. Hippuric acid excretion after benzylamine ingestion in man.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S G; Al-Ani, M R; Lawson, A

    1978-01-01

    The fate of 14C-benzylamine after oral administration as the hydrochloride has been investigated in two male volunteers. Over 98% of the administered radiolabel was excreted in the urine as 14C-hippuric acid within 24 hours. The rate of urinary hippuric acid excretion was extremely rapid, with more than 90% of the dose excreted after three hours. PMID:698137

  13. Urinary excretion of arsenic following rice consumption.

    PubMed

    Meharg, A A; Williams, P N; Deacon, C M; Norton, G J; Hossain, M; Louhing, D; Marwa, E; Lawgalwi, Y; Taggart, M; Cascio, C; Haris, P

    2014-11-01

    Patterns of arsenic excretion were followed in a cohort (n = 6) eating a defined rice diet, 300 g per day d.wt. where arsenic speciation was characterized in cooked rice, following a period of abstinence from rice, and other high arsenic containing foods. A control group who did not consume rice were also monitored. The rice consumed in the study contained inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) at a ratio of 1:1, yet the urine speciation was dominated by DMA (90%). At steady state (rice consumption/urinary excretion) ∼40% of rice derived arsenic was excreted via urine. By monitoring of each urine pass throughout the day it was observed that there was considerable variation (up to 13-fold) for an individual's total arsenic urine content, and that there was a time dependent variation in urinary total arsenic content. This calls into question the robustness of routinely used first pass/spot check urine sampling for arsenic analysis. PMID:25145278

  14. Absorption, biotransformation, and excretion of environmental chemicals.

    PubMed

    Oehme, F W

    1980-08-01

    Foreign chemicals are continually present in the environment of man and animals. Mammalian systems are in a constant state of balance-the intake compensated for by the outflow. The intake is largely determined by the route of exposure and the chemical characteristics of the environmental compound. Under normal conditions of exposure to small or moderate amounts of environmental chemicals, the system is capable of biotransforming and detoxifying such materials into compounds more easily handled by the mammalian system. These are largely converted to more water-soluble materials and excreted in the urine, bile, and less commonly through other excretory routes. In situations of massive exposure to foreign materials, or when repeated exposure to moderate amounts of chemicals results in accumulation in body systems, toxicoses may result. These are essentially an overwhelming of the biological mechanisms for detoxifying and excreting such materials. The hazard associated with environmental chemicals is greatly increased if a preexisting disease modifies the normal biological detoxification processes. Therapy to assist intoxicated individuals is largely aimed at increasing excretory processes and maintaining or restoring the physiological balance between the amount of environmental chemical absorbed and the level capable of being excreted. PMID:7408430

  15. Chylomicrons enhance endotoxin excretion in bile.

    PubMed Central

    Read, T E; Harris, H W; Grunfeld, C; Feingold, K R; Calhoun, M C; Kane, J P; Rapp, J H

    1993-01-01

    Chylomicrons prevent endotoxin toxicity and increase endotoxin uptake by hepatocytes. As a consequence, less endotoxin is available to activate macrophages, thereby reducing tumor necrosis factor secretion. To determine whether the chylomicron-mediated increase in hepatocellular uptake of endotoxin results in increased endotoxin excretion into bile, we examined bile after endotoxin administration. A sublethal dose (7 micrograms/kg) of 125I-endotoxin was incubated with either rat mesenteric lymph containing nascent chylomicrons (500 mg of chylomicron triglyceride per kg of body weight) or an equal volume of normal saline (controls) for 3 h and then infused into male Sprague-Dawley rats. Bile samples were collected via a common bile duct catheter for 24 h. Infusion of endotoxin incubated with chylomicrons increased biliary excretion of endotoxin by 67% at 3 h (P < or = 0.006) and by 20% at 24 h (P < or = 0.01) compared with infusion of endotoxin incubated in saline. Endotoxin activity, as measured by the Limulus assay, was not detected in the bile of test animals. However, endotoxin activity was detected after hot phenol-water extraction of bile, demonstrating that endotoxin is inactive in the presence of bile but retains bioactivity after hepatic processing. Since the majority of an intravenous endotoxin load has been shown to be cleared by the liver, acceleration of hepatocyte clearance and biliary excretion of endotoxin may represent a component of the mechanism by which chylomicrons protect against endotoxin-induced lethality. PMID:8335381

  16. Ammonia excretion in aquatic and terrestrial crabs.

    PubMed

    Weihrauch, Dirk; Morris, Steve; Towle, David W

    2004-12-01

    The excretory transport of toxic ammonia across epithelia is not fully understood. This review presents data combined with models of ammonia excretion derived from studies on decapod crabs, with a view to providing new impetus to investigation of this essential issue. The majority of crabs preserve ammonotely regardless of their habitat, which varies from extreme hypersaline to freshwater aquatic environments, and ranges from transient air exposure to obligate air breathing. Important components in the excretory process are the Na+/K+(NH4+)-ATPase and other membrane-bound transport proteins identified in many species, an exocytotic ammonia excretion mechanism thought to function in gills of aquatic crabs such as Carcinus maenas, and gaseous ammonia release found in terrestrial crabs, such as Geograpsus grayi and Ocypode quadrata. In addition, this review presents evidence for a crustacean Rhesus-like protein that shows high homology to the human Rhesus-like ammonia transporter both in its amino acid sequence and in its predicted secondary structure. PMID:15579545

  17. Modeling single cell antibody excretion on a biosensor.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Ivan; Baumgartner, Wolfgang; van der Velden, Thomas J G; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Schasfoort, Richard B M

    2016-07-01

    We simulated, using Comsol Multiphysics, the excretion of antibodies by single hybridoma cells and their subsequent binding on a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) sensor. The purpose was to confirm that SPRi is suitable to accurately quantify antibody (anti-EpCAM) excretion. The model showed that antibody loss by diffusion away from the sensor was less than 1%. Unexpectedly, more than 99% of the excreted antibodies were captured on the sensor. These data prove the remarkable phenomenon that the SPRi output of cellular antibody excretion and its subsequent binding, performed under the conditions described here, is directly usable for quantification of single cell antibody production rates. PMID:27040182

  18. Systemic exposure to parabens: pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, excretion balance and plasma metabolites of [14C]-methyl-, propyl- and butylparaben in rats after oral, topical or subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Nicolas; Ameller, Thibault; Legrand, Jean-Jacques

    2012-03-01

    Parabens (PB) are preservatives used in food, drugs and personal care products preventing microbial and fungal contamination. We investigated ADME profiles of [14C]-methyl-, propyl- or butylparaben (MP, PP, BP) following single oral, dermal or subcutaneous (BP) doses at 100 mg/kg to Sprague-Dawley rats. Plasma Cmax and AUC values after oral or subcutaneous doses were 4- to 10-fold higher relative to respective values after dermal administration. tmax ranged from 0.5, 2 or 8 h after oral, subcutaneous or dermal administration, respectively. MP produced higher blood Cmax and AUC levels relative to those after PP or BP. Following oral or subcutaneous administration, urinary excretion was predominant (>70%, mainly during the first 24 h), less than 4% were eliminated in the feces, 2% were retained in the tissues and carcasses. Following dermal application, >50% of the dose was unabsorbed, 14-27% or <2% were respectively excreted in the urine or feces, respectively. Overall, parabens were well absorbed after oral and subcutaneous, and partially absorbed after dermal administration. All administration routes produced a single peak in the plasma, corresponding to that of para-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA) suggesting that PB produce no significant systemic exposure of mammalian organisms after oral, topical or subcutaneous administration. PMID:22265941

  19. Purine derivative excretion in dairy cows: endogenous excretion and the effect of exogenous nucleic acid supply.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ronquillo, M; Balcells, J; Guada, J A; Vicente, F

    2003-04-01

    An experiment was conducted with dairy cows to study the partitioning of excreted purine derivatives between urine and milk and to quantify the endogenous contribution following the isotopic labeling of microbial purine bases. Three lactating cows in their second lactation that had been cannulated in the rumen and the duodenum were fed a mixed diet (48:52, roughage/concentrate ratio) distributed in equal fractions every 2 h, and duodenal flow of purine bases was determined by the dual-phase marker system. Nitrogen-15 was infused continuously into the rumen to label microbial purine bases, and the endogenous fraction was determined from the isotopic dilution in urinary purine derivatives. Urinary and milk recovery of duodenal purine bases were estimated at early (wk 10) and late (wk 33) lactation by the duodenal infusion of incremental doses (75 and 150 mmol purine bases/d) of RNA from Torula yeast. Each period was 6 d, with RNA being infused during the last 4 d, followed by measurement of the flow of purine bases to the duodenum. The isotope dilution of purine derivatives in urine samples confirmed the presence of an endogenous fraction (512 +/- 36.43 micromol/W0.75 or 56.86 mmol/d) amounting to 26 +/- 3.8% of total renal excretion. Total excretion of purine derivatives in urine plus milk was linearly related to the duodenal input of purine bases, but the slopes differed (P < 0.005) between lactation stages resulting in a lower equimolar recovery in early (y = 58.86 (+/-3.89) +0.56 (+/-0.0164) x; r = 0.90) than late lactation (y = 58.86 (+/-3.89) + 0.70 (+/-0.046) x; r = 0.80). Excretion of purine derivatives through milk represented a minimum fraction of total excretion but responded significantly to the duodenal input of purine bases. No differences between lactation stages were detected, and variations in milk yield did modify significantly the amount of purine derivatives excreted through the milk. PMID:12741553

  20. Urinary excretion of meperidine and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Yeh, S Y; Krebs, H A; Changchit, A

    1981-08-01

    The urine of male and female mice, rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, cats, and dogs, given meperidine hydrochloride, 20--40 mg/kg ip, was analyzed by GLC for meperidine, normeperidine, p-hydroxymeperidine, and total (free and conjugated) meperidinic and normeperidinic acids. More than 90% of the excreted drugs was found in the 24-hr urine. Meperidine was observed in the urine of mice, rats, guinea pigs, and cats, but only a trace amount was observed in the urine of rabbits and dogs. Normeperidine, p-hydroxymeperidine (except in the mice), and total meperidinic and normeperidinic acids were observed in all species. All of the species studied have the capacity to N-demethylate meperidine to normeperidine and to hydrolyze meperidine and normeperidine to their respective acids. The male has a higher N-demethylating activity that the female with the exception of mice. Ester hydrolysis is a major metabolic pathway for meperidine metabolism. PMID:7310653

  1. Body Iron Excretion by Healthy Men and Women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Iron excretion measured by isotope dilution has been a primary basis for factorial derivation of recommendations for iron intake, but results have been available for men only. Objective: The objective of this study was to reproduce iron excretion measurements in healthy men and extend th...

  2. INTESTINAL EXCRETION OF ENDOGENOUS ZINC IN GUATEMALAN SCHOOL CHILDREN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The intestine is the major route of excretion of endogenous zinc and has a key role in maintaining zinc homeostasis. Phytate has been reported to increase these losses. Objective: To determine the rate of excretion of endogenous zinc in school-aged children in a poor rural community for ...

  3. 13C urea breath test (UBT) in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori: why does it work better with acid test meals?

    PubMed Central

    Pantoflickova, D; Scott, D R; Sachs, G; Dorta, G; Blum, A L

    2003-01-01

    Background: Acid test meals may improve the accuracy of the 13C urea breath test (UBT). This has been attributed to changes in gastric emptying rather than to the effects of gastric pH on Helicobacter pylori urease. Aims: To determine whether enhancement of 13CO2 excretion in the UBT in H pylori infected volunteers by acidification of a test meal is due to a delay in gastric emptying. Methods: Urease activity in vitro was measured in intact bacteria and in bacterial homogenates. Urease activity in vivo was assessed by means of the UBT. Eleven H pylori infected subjects underwent UBTs with neutral Ensure (pH 7.0), acidified Ensure (pH 3.0), and apple juice (pH 3.0). Gastric emptying was assessed by 13C sodium acetate breath test. Results: From pH 7 to pH 3, the in vitro urease activity of intact bacteria increased sixfold. In contrast, urease activity of bacterial homogenates was inactivated by low pH. In vivo, urease activity, as measured by the UBT 20 minutes after meal ingestion, was higher with apple juice (δ 13CO2=21.1; p=0.03) and acidified Ensure (δ 13CO2=25.5; p=0.01) than with neutral Ensure (δ 13CO2=12.5). Gastric emptying was faster with apple juice (Tmax=36.7 (8) minutes) but not with acidified Ensure (Tmax=63.3 (5) minutes; p=0.06) than with neutral Ensure (Tmax=65.0 (3) minutes; p=0.04). Conclusions: The higher UBT found with acidified compared with neutral test meals was independent of the emptying rates of the test meals but may have been due to medium acidity dependent activation of intra-bacterial urease in intact H pylori. PMID:12801946

  4. Excretion of drugs in human breast milk

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, R.M.; Findlay, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The present report briefly discusses some of the morphological, physiological, and compositional aspects of animal and human breast milk and how these characteristics might be important for the accumulation of drugs and foreign compounds. In addition, a study is described confirming the presence of caffeine, codeine, morphine, phenacetin, acetaminophen, and salicylic acid in the breast milk of a lactating mother following oral administration of a combination analgesic containing aspirin, phenacetin, caffeine, and codeine. Although the study is limited to one subject, it has provided critically needed data on the rates of appearance in, and elimination of these drugs from, breast milk. A similar amount of information is presented on phenacetin, also a component of the analgesic mixture, which has not been previously reported to enter human milk. The distribution of these drugs between the slightly more acidic breast milk and the relatively neutral plasma is consistent with their weakly basic, acidic, or relatively neutral properties. In general, the study shows that codeine and morphine milk concentrations are higher than, salicylic acid milk levels are much lower than, and phenacetin, caffeine, and acetaminophen milk concentrations are relatively similar to their respective plasma levels. It is projected, from estimated steady-state milk concentrations of the drugs and their metabolites studied, that very low percentages of the therapeutic dosages (less than 0.7%) would be excreted in mother's milk, too low an amount to be clinically significant to the infant.

  5. Excretion of biliary compounds during intrauterine life

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Rocio IR; Marin, Jose JG; Serrano, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    In adults, the hepatobiliary system, together with the kidney, constitute the main routes for the elimination of several endogenous and xenobiotic compounds into bile and urine, respectively. However, during intrauterine life the biliary route of excretion for cholephilic compounds, such as bile acids and biliary pigments, is very poor. Although very early in pregnancy the fetal liver produces bile acids, bilirubin and biliverdin, these compounds cannot be efficiently eliminated by the fetal hepatobiliary system, owing to the immaturity of the excretory machinery in the fetal liver. Therefore, the potentially harmful accumulation of cholephilic compounds in the fetus is prevented by their elimination across the placenta. Owing to the presence of detoxifying enzymes and specific transport systems at different locations of the placental barrier, such as the endothelial cells of chorionic vessels and trophoblast cells, this organ plays an important role in the hepatobiliary-like function during intrauterine life. The relevance of this excretory function in normal fetal physiology is evident in situations where high concentrations of biliary compounds are accumulated in the mother. This may result in oxidative stress and apoptosis, mainly in the placenta and fetal liver, which might affect normal fetal development and challenge the fate of the pregnancy. The present article reviews current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the hepatobiliary function of the fetal-placental unit and the repercussions of several pathological conditions on this tandem. PMID:19230042

  6. Excretion of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Sweat

    PubMed Central

    Huestis, Marilyn A.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Saito, Takeshi; Fortner, Neil; Abraham, Tsadik; Gustafson, Richard A.; Smith, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Sweat testing is a noninvasive technique for monitoring drug exposure over a 7-day period in treatment, criminal justice, and employment settings. We evaluated Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) excretion in 11 daily cannabis users after cessation of drug use. PharmChek® sweat patches worn for 7 days were analyzed for THC by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The limit of quantification (LOQ) for the method was 0.4 ng THC/patch. Sweat patches worn the first week of continuously monitored abstinence had THC above the United States Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration’s proposed cutoff concentration for federal workplace testing of 1 ng THC/patch. Mean ± S.E.M. THC concentrations were 3.85 ± 0.86 ng THC/patch. Eight of 11 subjects had negative patches the second week and one produced THC positive patches for four weeks of monitored abstinence. We also tested daily and weekly sweat patches from 7 subjects who were administered oral doses of up to 14.8 mg THC/day for five consecutive days. In this oral THC administration study, no daily or weekly patches had THC above the LOQ; concurrent plasma THC concentrations were all less than 6.1 μg/L. In conclusion, using proposed federal cutoff concentrations, most daily cannabis users will have a positive sweat patch in the first week after ceasing drug use and a negative patch after subsequent weeks, although patches may remain positive for four weeks or more. Oral ingestion of up to 14.8 mg THC daily does not produce a THC positive sweat patch test. PMID:17481836

  7. Cobalt excretion test for the assessment of body iron stores.

    PubMed

    Sorbie, J; Olatunbosun, D; Corbett, W E; Valberg, L S

    1971-05-01

    Iron absorption is under delicate control and the level of absorption is adjusted to comply with the body's need for iron. To measure the intestinal setting for iron absorption, and thereby indirectly assess body iron requirements, cobaltous chloride labelled with (57)Co or (60)Co was given by mouth and the percentage of the test dose excreted in the urine in 24 hours was measured in a gamma counter. Seventeen control subjects with normal iron stores excreted 18% (9-23%) of the dose. Increased excretion, 31% (23-42%), was found in 10 patients with iron deficiency anemia and in 15 patients with depleted iron stores in the absence of anemia. In contrast, 12 patients with anemia due to causes other than iron deficiency excreted amounts of radiocobalt within the normal control range. In patients with iron deficiency, replenishment of iron stores by either oral or parenteral iron caused the previously high results to return to normal.Excretion of the test dose was normal in portal cirrhosis with normal iron stores but it was markedly increased in patients with cirrhosis complicated by either iron deficiency or endogenous iron overload. It was also raised in primary hemochromatosis. Excretion of the dose was reduced in gluten-sensitive enteropathy. Gastrointestinal surgery and inflammatory disease of the lower small intestine had no effect on the results except that some patients with steatorrhea had diminished excretion.The cobalt excretion test provides the clinician with a tool for the assessment of iron absorption, the detection of a reduction in body iron stores below the level that is normal for the subject in question, the differentiation of iron deficiency anemia from anemia due to other causes, and the investigation of patients with iron-loading disorders. PMID:5578125

  8. Ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels is facilitated by ciliary beating.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, J; Himmerkus, N; Holland, N; Sartoris, F J; Bleich, M; Tresguerres, M

    2016-08-01

    The excretion of nitrogenous waste products in the form of ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4 (+)) is a fundamental process in aquatic organisms. For mytilid bivalves, little is known about the mechanisms and sites of excretion. This study investigated the localization and the mechanisms of ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels. An Rh protein was found to be abundantly expressed in the apical cell membrane of the plicate organ, which was previously described as a solely respiratory organ. The Rh protein was also expressed in the gill, although at significantly lower concentrations, but was not detectable in mussel kidney. Furthermore, NH3/NH4 (+) was not enriched in the urine, suggesting that kidneys are not involved in active NH3/NH4 (+) excretion. Exposure to elevated seawater pH of 8.5 transiently reduced NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates, but they returned to control values following 24 h acclimation. These mussels had increased abundance of V-type H(+)-ATPase in the apical membranes of plicate organ cells; however, NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates were not affected by the V-type H(+)-ATPase specific inhibitor concanamycin A (100 nmol l(-1)). In contrast, inhibition of ciliary beating with dopamine and increased seawater viscosity significantly reduced NH3 excretion rates under control pH (8.0). These results suggest that NH3/NH4 (+) excretion in mytilid mussels takes place by passive NH3 diffusion across respiratory epithelia via the Rh protein, facilitated by the water current produced for filter feeding, which prevents accumulation of NH3 in the boundary layer. This mechanism would be energy efficient for sessile organisms, as they already generate water currents for filter feeding. PMID:27489216

  9. Coordinacy of lysosomal enzyme excretion in human urine.

    PubMed Central

    Paigen, K; Peterson, J

    1978-01-01

    Assay conditions have been developed for the determination of urinary beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, alpha-galactosidase, and beta-hexosaminidase using fluorometric substrates. The assay conditions for beta-glucuronidase overcome interference by both low and high molecular weight inhibitors, a problem that has confused earlier studies of enzyme excretion. The four lysosomal enzymes are excreted corrdinately: although their absolute levels (in units per milligram of creatinine) vary during the day and from one day to the next, the ratio of one enzyme to another remains relatively constant. The lack of correlation betweem plasma and urine enzyme levels, together with the high molecular weights of these enzymes, suggests that the urinary enzymes are not derived by glomerular filtration. The lack of coordinacy with lactate dehydrogenase suggests they are not derived from exfoliated cells. by analogy with experimental animals, they may be derived from lysosomes extruded into the lumen of the proximal tubule by epithelial cells. There is considerable variation among a population of 125 healthy adult subjects for total enzyme excretion. Both total enzyme excretion and coordinacy ratios are log-normally distributed, suggesting that they are the resultants of many factors, each of which has a relative, or proportional, effect on enzyme excretion. About one-half the population variation resides in a process common to the excretion of all four enzymes (possibly the lysosome extrusion pathway), and about one-half resides in factors affecting each enzyme independently. PMID:25285

  10. Species differences in biliary excretion of benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, E.H.; Bevan, D.R.

    1986-05-01

    Biliary excretion of benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) was investigated in rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs following intratracheal administration. (/sup 3/H)-B(a)P, in amounts of approximately 150 ng or 350 ..mu..g, was instilled into lungs and amounts of radioactivity excreted in bile were monitored for six hrs following administration. Differences in biliary excretion of (/sup 3/H)-B(a)P and/or metabolites among species were observed at low doses but not at high doses. Six hours after instillation of a low dose of B(a)P, 70, 54, and 62% of the dose was excreted in bile of rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs, respectively. Upon administration of the higher dose of B(a)P, approximately 50% of the dose was excreted in bile in six hrs by all species. Thus, rats and guinea pigs exhibit differences in biliary excretion of low and high doses of B(a)P whereas hamsters do not. Profiles of phase II metabolites in rats and hamsters were similar at both low and high doses, with the majority of metabolites being glucuronides and thioether conjugates. However, differences in relative amounts of these conjugates were observed between the two doses, with a shift towards a greater proportion of glucuronides at the higher dose. Metabolites in bile from guinea pigs were primarily thioether conjugates, which accounted for 88% of metabolites at the low dose and 95% at the high dose.

  11. Homeostatic control of manganese excretion in the neonatal rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ballatori, N.; Miles, E.; Clarkson, T.W.

    1987-05-01

    Previous studies in neonatal and suckling animals showed that immature animals have a greatly diminished capacity to excrete manganese and therefore were considered to be unable to regulate tissue manganese concentrations. In contrast, the present studies indicate that suckling rats have the capacity to excrete excess manganese at rates nearly comparable to those of adults. Eight- to 10-day-old rats given a tracer dose of /sup 54/MnCl/sub 2/ (essentially carrier free), either via gavage or by intraperitoneal injection showed little elimination of the /sup 54/Mn until the 18-19th day of life, when there was an abrupt increase in the rate of the metal's excretion. However, when manganese was given in doses of 1 and 10 mg/kg, the young animals excreted from 30-70% of the dose in only 4 days, at which time a new rate of excretion was achieved. This enhanced rate of excretion remained constant until the 18-19th day of life, when it was again accelerated. Biliary excretion of manganese, the primary route for the elimination of the metal, was only 30-60% lower in 14-day-old rats compared with adults at doses ranging from tracer to 10 mg /sup 54/Mn/kg. For both the 14-day-old and adult rats, an apparent biliary transport maximum was reached at a dose of 10 mg Mn/kg. These studies indicate that the excretory pathways for manganese are well developed in the neonatal rat. The avid retention of tracer quantities of manganese by the neonate may be a consequence of the scarcity of this essential trace metal in its diet.

  12. Urinary calcium excretion in postmenopausal African American women

    PubMed Central

    Aloia, John F.; Shieh, Albert; Mikhail, Mageda; Islam, Shahidul

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to develop a reference range for urine calcium excretion (both 24-hour and fasting) for African American women compared to White women. In addition, the variables that determine urine calcium excretion were identified. Material: Data were analyzed for baseline studies of healthy postmenopausal volunteers who participated in seven separate studies conducted at one site. Methods: Some studies included fasting urine Ca/Cr and others 24-hour urine calcium excretion. 24-hour urine calcium was considered with and without correction for urinary creatinine excretion. Calcium was measured initially by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and more recently by an automated method (ADVIA 2400 Chemistry System). Results: Participants were considered healthy based on history and physical and routine laboratory studies. Those screened who had a history of nephrolithiasis were excluded. A reference range for 24-hour urine calcium and fasting urine calcium/creatinine was developed. Reference intervals of 11 – 197 mg/24-hour urine calcium excretion and of 0.007 – 0.222 of fasting Ca/Cr were found for African American women compared to 21 – 221 mg/24 hours and 0.019 – 0.264 in White women, respectively. Urine creatinine excretion was higher in African Americans consistent with their higher muscle mass. Conclusion: Urine calcium excretion is lower in postmenopausal African American than White women. The reference range developed should be considered in the diagnosis of hypocalciuric states and may also be useful in the diagnosis of hypercalciuria. PMID:26226948

  13. Contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. P.; Goodman, H. O.; Assimos, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amount of oxalate excreted in urine has a significant impact on calcium oxalate supersaturation and stone formation. Dietary oxalate is believed to make only a minor (10 to 20%) contribution to the amount of oxalate excreted in urine, but the validity of the experimental observations that support this conclusion can be questioned. An understanding of the actual contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion is important, as it is potentially modifiable. METHODS: We varied the amount of dietary oxalate consumed by a group of adult individuals using formula diets and controlled, solid-food diets with a known oxalate content, determined by a recently developed analytical procedure. Controlled solid-food diets were consumed containing 10, 50, and 250 mg of oxalate/2500 kcal, as well as formula diets containing 0 and 180 mg oxalate/2500 kcal. Changes in the content of oxalate and other ions were assessed in 24-hour urine collections. RESULTS: Urinary oxalate excretion increased as dietary oxalate intake increased. With oxalate-containing diets, the mean contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion ranged from 24.4 +/- 15.5% on the 10 mg/2500 kcal/day diet to 41.5 +/- 9.1% on the 250 mg/2500 kcal/day diet, much higher than previously estimated. When the calcium content of a diet containing 250 mg of oxalate was reduced from 1002 mg to 391 mg, urinary oxalate excretion increased by a mean of 28.2 +/- 4.8%, and the mean dietary contribution increased to 52.6 +/- 8.6%. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that dietary oxalate makes a much greater contribution to urinary oxalate excretion than previously recognized, that dietary calcium influences the bioavailability of ingested oxalate, and that the absorption of dietary oxalate may be an important factor in calcium oxalate stone formation.

  14. Urine excretion strategy for stem cell-generated embryonic kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Shinya; Matsunari, Hitomi; Iwai, Satomi; Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Uchikura, Ayuko; Fujimoto, Eisuke; Matsumoto, Kei; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    There have been several recent attempts to generate, de novo, a functional whole kidney from stem cells using the organogenic niche or blastocyst complementation methods. However, none of these attempts succeeded in constructing a urinary excretion pathway for the stem cell-generated embryonic kidney. First, we transplanted metanephroi from cloned pig fetuses into gilts; the metanephroi grew to about 3 cm and produced urine, although hydronephrosis eventually was observed because of the lack of an excretion pathway. Second, we demonstrated the construction of urine excretion pathways in rats. Rat metanephroi or metanephroi with bladders (developed from cloacas) were transplanted into host rats. Histopathologic analysis showed that tubular lumina dilation and interstitial fibrosis were reduced in kidneys developed from cloacal transplants compared with metanephroi transplantation. Then we connected the host animal’s ureter to the cloacal-developed bladder, a technique we called the “stepwise peristaltic ureter” (SWPU) system. The application of the SWPU system avoided hydronephrosis and permitted the cloacas to differentiate well, with cloacal urine being excreted persistently through the recipient ureter. Finally, we demonstrated a viable preclinical application of the SWPU system in cloned pigs. The SWPU system also inhibited hydronephrosis in the pig study. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the SWPU system may resolve two important problems in the generation of kidneys from stem cells: construction of a urine excretion pathway and continued growth of the newly generated kidney. PMID:26392557

  15. Short communication: Evaluation of nitrogen excretion equations from cattle.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A C B; Reed, K F; Kebreab, E

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen excretion in dairy manure is a precursor for N2O and NH3 formation in livestock housing, manure storage facilities, and after manure is applied to land. Nitrous oxide is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, and reducing N output from dairy production facilities can reduce the amount of anthropogenic N2O entering the atmosphere. The objective of the study was to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of extant prediction models for N excretion in feces and urine using extensive literature data. A total of 45 N excretion equations were evaluated for lactating cows, heifers, and nonlactating cows and steers. These equations were evaluated with 215 treatment means from 69 published studies collected over 20 yr from 1995 to 2015. Two evaluation methods were used: the root mean square prediction error and the concordance correlation coefficient. Equations constructed using a more rigorous development process fared better than older extant equations. Equations for heifers and nonlactating cows had greater error of prediction compared with equations used for lactating cows. This could be due to limited amount of data available for construction and evaluation of the equations. Urinary N equations had greater prediction errors than other forms of excretion, possibly due to high variability in urinary N excretion and challenges in urine collection. Fecal N equations had low error bias and reached an acceptable level of precision and accuracy. PMID:27320670

  16. Strongyloides stercoralis larvae excretion patterns before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Schär, F; Hattendorf, J; Khieu, V; Muth, S; Char, M C; Marti, H P; Odermatt, P

    2014-06-01

    The variability of larval excretion impedes the parasitological diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis in infected individuals. We assessed the number of larvae excreted per gram (LPG) stool in 219 samples from 38 infected individuals over 7 consecutive days before and in 470 samples from 44 persons for 21 consecutive days after ivermectin treatment (200 μg kg-1 BW). The diagnostic sensitivity of a single stool sample was about 75% for individuals with low-intensity infections (⩽1 LPG) and increased to 95% for those with high-intensity infections (⩾10 LPG). Doubling the number of samples examined per person increased sensitivity to more than 95%, even for low-intensity infections. There was no indication of a cyclic excretion of larvae. After treatment, all individuals stopped excreting larvae within 3 days. Larvae were not detected during any of the following 18 days (total 388 Baermann and 388 Koga Agar tests). Two stool samples, collected on consecutive days, are recommended in settings where low or heterogeneous infection intensities are likely. In this way, taking into account the possible biological variability in excretion, the efficacy of ivermectin treatment can be assessed as soon as 4 days after treatment. PMID:24534076

  17. Urine excretion strategy for stem cell-generated embryonic kidneys.

    PubMed

    Yokote, Shinya; Matsunari, Hitomi; Iwai, Satomi; Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Uchikura, Ayuko; Fujimoto, Eisuke; Matsumoto, Kei; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-10-20

    There have been several recent attempts to generate, de novo, a functional whole kidney from stem cells using the organogenic niche or blastocyst complementation methods. However, none of these attempts succeeded in constructing a urinary excretion pathway for the stem cell-generated embryonic kidney. First, we transplanted metanephroi from cloned pig fetuses into gilts; the metanephroi grew to about 3 cm and produced urine, although hydronephrosis eventually was observed because of the lack of an excretion pathway. Second, we demonstrated the construction of urine excretion pathways in rats. Rat metanephroi or metanephroi with bladders (developed from cloacas) were transplanted into host rats. Histopathologic analysis showed that tubular lumina dilation and interstitial fibrosis were reduced in kidneys developed from cloacal transplants compared with metanephroi transplantation. Then we connected the host animal's ureter to the cloacal-developed bladder, a technique we called the "stepwise peristaltic ureter" (SWPU) system. The application of the SWPU system avoided hydronephrosis and permitted the cloacas to differentiate well, with cloacal urine being excreted persistently through the recipient ureter. Finally, we demonstrated a viable preclinical application of the SWPU system in cloned pigs. The SWPU system also inhibited hydronephrosis in the pig study. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the SWPU system may resolve two important problems in the generation of kidneys from stem cells: construction of a urine excretion pathway and continued growth of the newly generated kidney. PMID:26392557

  18. Changes in parasite transmission stage excretion after pheasant release.

    PubMed

    Villanúa, D; Acevedo, P; Höfle, U; Rodríguez, O; Gortázar, C

    2006-09-01

    The production of parasite transmission stages was investigated in the faeces of 77 farm-bred ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). Coccidian oocysts (Eimeria sp.), and nematode eggs (Heterakis sp., and Capillaria-like eggs) were recovered before and after release but all birds were treated prior to release. Treatment with fenbendazole significantly reduced the abundance of transmission-stage excretion for all parasites, and reduced the prevalence in the case of Eimeria sp. and Heterakis sp. Nonetheless, a significant increase in the excretion abundance for all parasites and in the prevalence of Eimeria sp. and Heterakis sp. was found after release. Eggs of Ascaridia sp. were found only after releasing, suggesting infection ocurred in the wild. A negative relationship was found between the pheasant body condition and Heterakis excretion abundance and a higher abundance of Capillaria sp. eggs in female birds. No significant relationship was found between parasite excretion abundance and pheasant survival. Despite this, results suggest that an increase in the excretion of parasite transmission stages follows the release of captive pheasants into the wild. This can in part explain restocking failures, but also means that autochtonous free-living birds may become exposed to new and potentially harmful pathogens. To avoid these risks it is proposed that improved prophylactic measures should be taken. PMID:16923277

  19. [Predictors of bacterial excretion in patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Volchegorskiĭ, I A; Novoselov, P N; Bolotov, A A

    2009-01-01

    An association of bacterial excretion with the magnitude of the X-ray and clinical symptoms of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis, with the intensity of concomitant anxiety-depression disorders and the results of complex laboratory peripheral blood tests was studied in 100 patients with this condition. The fact that M. tuberculosis was present in the sputum was shown to be linked to the significant increase in the size of tuberculous infiltrates, the extent of decay in the latter, their connection with the root of the lung, the spread of excretion foci, and the intensity of cough and bloody expectoration. The similar trend was demonstrated in the degree of situational anxiety, depressive indecision, and pessimism, as well as in the values of leukocytosis and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The predictive informative value of a set of findings is illustrated by the discriminant function equation that allows the correct prediction of bacterial excretion in 76.8% of cases. PMID:20095373

  20. Quantitation of phosphorus excretion in sheep by compartmental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.M.; Boston, R.C.; Leaver, D.D.

    1987-04-01

    The control of phosphorus excretion in sheep has been examined by constructing a kinetic model that contains a mechanistic set of connections between blood and gastrointestinal tract. The model was developed using experimental data from chaff-fed sheep and gives an accurate description of the absorption and excretion of /sup 32/P phosphorus in feces and urine of the ruminating sheep. These results indicated the main control site for phosphorus excretion in the ruminating sheep was the gastrointestinal tract, whereas for the non-ruminating sheep fed the liquid diet, control was exerted by the kidney. A critical factor in the induction of adaptation of phosphorus reabsorption by the kidney was the reduction in salivation, and since this response occurred independently of marked changes in the delivery of phosphorus to the kidney, a humoral factor may be involved in this communication between salivary gland and kidney.

  1. Inverting 13CO2 for Terrestrial Carbon Fractionation in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alden, C. B.; White, J. W.; Miller, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    The stable isotope of Carbon, 13C, has been used globally to partition ocean from terrestrial CO2 fluxes, and regionally as an indicator of C3 plant discrimination and the relative abundances of C3 and C4 vegetation. In North America, the spatial and temporal density of atmospheric observations enables, for the first time, inversions of land surface fluxes of CO2 and the δ13C signature of those fluxes (multiplied together: isofluxes). We optimize North American isofluxes in a traditional Bayesian Inversion, and divide by CO2 fluxes optimized in an offline inversion. We are left with estimates of the isotopic signature of photosynthesis and related error. We generate influence functions (i.e. influence of surface fluxes on measurements made "downwind") with FLEXPART, driven by National Centers for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System meteorology. Prior isofluxes (CarbonTracker 2010 posterior net ecosystem exchange multiplied by biosphere δ13C from SiB) are of 3-hour, 1x1 degree resolution. Unoptimized fire and fossil fuel emissions are also from the CarbonTracker system, and background CO2 and δ13C values are taken from NOAA/ESRL marine boundary layer and aircraft data. We invert for isofluxes using quasi-daily observations from tall towers in Park Falls, Wisconsin (WLEF), Argyle, Maine (AMT), and Moody, Texas (WKT). At these sites the air is thought to be influenced predominately by corn production, C3 vegetation, and savannah vegetation, respectively. By investigating areas with varying degrees of C3 and C4 vegetation influences, and by examining multiple years of data from each site, in conjunction with crop yield and climate data, we propose to disentangle the competing influences of agriculture, drought, and other climatic stressors on spatial and temporal variability in atmospheric δ13C.

  2. Isotopic Labeling of Red Cabbage Anthocyanins with Atmospheric 13-CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isotopic labeling of plants provides a unique opportunity for understanding metabolic processes. A significant challenge of isotopic labeling during plant growth is that isotopes must be administered without disrupting plant development and at sufficient levels for mass spectral analysis. We describ...

  3. Time-resolved metabolomics of a novel trebouxiophycean alga using (13)CO2 feeding.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takuro; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Toya, Yoshihiro; Ano, Yoshitaka; Kurano, Norihide; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru

    2013-09-01

    Oil-rich algae are potentially promising as next-generation biofuel feedstock. However, the productivity of oil needs to be improved for industrial use. The biosynthesis of oil and its control mechanism have not been characterized in any algae, and understanding the metabolic network is vital to achieve the precise engineering of algae metabolic pathways. "Pseudochoricystis ellipsoidea" MBIC 11204, a novel microalgal strain, accumulates a large amount of lipids in nitrogen-deficient conditions. In this study, "P. ellipsoidea" was grown in flat flasks with continuous illumination and aeration with 1% CO2 at 25°C. During the exponential growth phase, CO2 was switched to (13)C-labeled CO2 and samples were collected for time-course experiments. Seventy-eight pairs of unlabeled and uniformly (13)C-labeled metabolites were quantified using a capillary electrophoresis- and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for ionic primary metabolites and lipids, respectively. The (13)C-exchange indices of the metabolites were calculated from a concentration of unlabeled and uniformly-labeled metabolites. A hierarchical clustering analysis of the dynamics of the indices revealed 4 characteristic clusters, two of which represented rapidly-labeled metabolites, mainly composed of primary metabolites, while the two other clusters represented slowly-labeled metabolites, mainly composed of lipids. Moreover, the labeling order of these clusters was mainly matched to the metabolic process of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a model organism of green algae. In TCA cycle, anomalistically different of the labeling order was found. To the author's knowledge, this study for the first time in literature, characterize the features of global metabolism in "P. ellipsoidea." PMID:23706992

  4. Manure Nutrient Excretion by Jersey and Holstein Cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to evaluate feces, urine, and nitrogen (N) excretion by Jersey and Holstein cows. Sixteen multiparous cows (n=8 per breed) were fed two experimental rations at calving in a switchback experimental design. Diets were 50% forage and based on corn meal (control) or whole cottonseed. H...

  5. The absorption and excretion of fluoride and arsenic in humans.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yujian; Wu, Jiyao; Ng, Jack C; Wang, Guoquan; Lian, Wu

    2002-07-01

    The absorption and excretion of fluoride and arsenic were measured in a group of healthy volunteers given drinking water with naturally high concentration of fluoride (F 2.3 mg/l)(,) or high concentration of arsenic (As 0.15 mg/l), or high concentrations of both fluoride and arsenic (F 2.25 mg/l, As 0.23 mg/l and F 4.05 mg/l, As 0.58 mg/l), respectively. The results indicated that, for arsenic, the absorption rate, the proportion of urinary excretion and the biological-half-life did not show statistically significant differences between drinking water containing high arsenic alone and drinking water containing different levels of high arsenic and fluoride. Excretion and retention of arsenic were positively correlated to the total arsenic intake. Similar results were observed for fluoride. This suggests that there are different metabolic processes for arsenic and fluoride in respect to absorption and excretion; and no joint action can be attributed by these two elements. PMID:12076512

  6. Excretion of depleted uranium by Gulf War veterans.

    PubMed

    Toohey, R E

    2003-01-01

    During the Persian Gulf War, in 1991, approximately 100 US military personnel had potential intakes of depleted uranium (DU), including shrapnel wounds. In 1993, the US government initiated a follow-up study of 33 Gulf War veterans who had been exposed to DU, many of whom contained embedded fragments of DU shrapnel in their bodies. The veterans underwent medical evaluation, whole-body counting, and urinalysis for uranium by kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA). Data are available from seven individuals who exceeded the detection limit for whole-body counting and also had elevated urinary uranium. Urinary excretion rates, in microg U g(-1) creatinine, were determined in 1997 and 1999. The body contents, in mg DU, were determined in 1997; it is assumed there were no significant decreases in total body content in the interim. For the 1997 data, the mean fractional excretion was (2.4 +/- 2.8) x 10(-5) g(-1) creatinine, and for the 1999 data, the mean was (1.1 +/- 0.6) x 10(-5) g(-1) creatinine. However, these means are not significantly different, nor is there any correlation of excretion rate with body content. Thus, human data available to date do not provide any basis for determining the effects of particle surface area, composition and solubility, and biological processes such as encapsulation, on the excretion rate. PMID:14526951

  7. INFLUENCE OF DIETARY ARSENIC ON URINARY ARSENIC METABOLITE EXCRETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of Dietary Arsenic on Urinary Arsenic Metabolite Excretion

    Cara L. Carty, M.S., Edward E. Hudgens, B.Sc., Rebecca L. Calderon, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., Richard Kwok, M.S.P.H., Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch/HSD, NHEERL/US EPA; David J. Thomas, Ph.D., Pharmacokinetics...

  8. Renal Regulation of Acid-Base Balance: Ammonia Excretion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, George A.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which demonstrates changes in ammonia excretion and urine pH that occur in response to metabolic acidosis (induced by ammonium chloride ingestion) or metabolic alkalosis (produced by sodium bicarbonate ingestion). List of materials needed and background information are included. Typical results are provided and discussed.…

  9. Urinary Albumin Excretion and Vascular Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with significant cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Increased urinary albumin excretion is a marker of CV risk. There are only few data on urinary albumin excretion in RA patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate urinary albumin excretion in RA patients and analyze, whether there is an association between urinary albumin excretion and vascular function as measured by the augmentation index (AIx). In a total of 341 participants (215 with RA, 126 without RA) urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was determined and the AIx was measured. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov-test was used to cluster patient groups whose distributions of ACR can be considered to be equal. A crude analysis showed a median ACR of 6.6 mg/g in the RA group and 5.7 mg/g in patients without RA (P > 0.05). In order to account for diabetes (DM) we formed 4 distinct patient groups. Group 1: RA-/DM- (n = 74); group 2: RA+/DM- (n = 195); group 3: RA-/DM+ (n = 52); group 4: RA+/DM+ (n = 20). Clustering of these groups revealed two distinct patient groups: those without RA and DM, and those with either RA or DM or both. The latter group showed statistically significant higher ACR (median 8.1 mg/g) as the former (median 4.5 mg/g). We found no significant correlation between AIx and ACR. Urinary albumin excretion in patients with RA or DM or both is higher than in subjects without RA and DM. This can be seen as a sign of vascular alteration and increased CV risk in these patients. PMID:26955238

  10. Elevated urinary excretion of aluminium and iron in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Mamutse, Godwin; Korchazhkina, Olga; Pye, Eleanor; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Polwart, Anthony; Hawkins, Clive

    2006-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, immune-mediated, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system of as yet unknown aetiology. A consensus of opinion has suggested that the disorder is the result of an interplay between environmental factors and susceptibility genes. We have used a battery of analytical techniques to determine if the urinary excretion of i) markers of oxidative damage; ii) iron and iii) the environmental toxin aluminium and its antagonist, silicon, are altered in relapsing-remitting (RRMS) and secondary progressive MS (SPMS). Urinary concentrations of oxidative biomarkers, MDA and TBARS, were not found to be useful indicators of inflammatory disease in MS. However, urinary concentrations of another potential marker for inflammation and oxidative stress, iron, were significantly increased in SPMS (P<0.01) and insignificantly increased in RRMS (P>0.05). Urinary concentrations of aluminium were also significantly increased in RRMS (P<0.001) and SPMS (P <0.05) such that the levels of aluminium excretion in the former were similar to those observed in individuals undergoing metal chelation therapy. The excretion of silicon was lower in MS and significantly so in SPMS (P<0.05). Increased excretion of iron in urine supported a role for iron dysmetabolism in MS. Levels of urinary aluminium excretion similar to those seen in aluminium intoxication suggested that aluminium may be a hitherto unrecognized environmental factor associated with the aetiology of MS. If aluminium is involved in MS then an increased dietary intake of its natural antagonist, silicon, might be a therapeutic option. PMID:17086897

  11. Decreased excretion of glycosaminoglycans in patients with primary glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Tencer, J; Torffvit, O; Björnsson, S; Thysell, H; Grubb, A; Rippe, B

    1997-10-01

    Urine glycosaminoglycans (GAG) concentrations were measured in 150 patients with primary glomerulonephritides: endocapillary glomerulonephritis, mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis, IgA nephropathy, membranous glomerulonephritis and minimal change nephropathy, and in 63 healthy controls and 19 patients with diabetes nephropathy. The urine GAG to creatinine ratios (GCR) were significantly reduced (p < 0.01) in all the glomerulonephritides investigated (0.20 mg/mmol in endocapillary glomerulonephritis, 1.60 mg/mmol in mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis, 1.74 mg/mmol in IgA nephropathy, 1.09 mg/mmol in membranous nephropathy, and 1.16 mg/mmol in minimal change nephropathy) compared to healthy controls (2.87 mg/mmol) but not compared to diabetes patients (1.17 mg/mmol). Also, the GCR in a group of 23 non-albuminuric glomerulonephritis patients (1.98 mg/mmol) was shown to be significantly decreased (p < 0.01) compared to healthy controls. Moreover, the GCR was significantly lower (p < 0.01) in endocapillary glomerulonephritis than in any of the other diseases studied. The GAG excretion per functioning glomerular area, calculated as fractional GAG excretion (FGE), was decreased in all the glomerulonephritides investigated compared to both healthy controls and diabetes nephropathy. The decreased GAG excretion in glomerulonephritides, obtained in the present study, might be a consequence of decreased synthesis or turnover of GAG in the functioning nephrons whereas the mechanisms for the reduced GAG excretion in diabetes nephropathy might be of a different nature. Urinary GAG excretion in this group of glomerular disorders and particularly in endocapillary glomerulonephritis, may lead to new approaches in non-invasive renal diagnostics and, particularly with regard to the differentiation of acute and chronic forms of glomerulonephritides. PMID:9352154

  12. Urinary Albumin Excretion and Vascular Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pieringer, Herwig; Brummaier, Tobias; Piringer, Bettina; Auer-Hackenberg, Lorenz; Hartl, Andreas; Puchner, Rudolf; Pohanka, Erich; Schmid, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with significant cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Increased urinary albumin excretion is a marker of CV risk. There are only few data on urinary albumin excretion in RA patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate urinary albumin excretion in RA patients and analyze, whether there is an association between urinary albumin excretion and vascular function as measured by the augmentation index (AIx). In a total of 341 participants (215 with RA, 126 without RA) urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was determined and the AIx was measured. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov-test was used to cluster patient groups whose distributions of ACR can be considered to be equal. A crude analysis showed a median ACR of 6.6 mg/g in the RA group and 5.7 mg/g in patients without RA (P > 0.05). In order to account for diabetes (DM) we formed 4 distinct patient groups. Group 1: RA-/DM- (n = 74); group 2: RA+/DM- (n = 195); group 3: RA-/DM+ (n = 52); group 4: RA+/DM+ (n = 20). Clustering of these groups revealed two distinct patient groups: those without RA and DM, and those with either RA or DM or both. The latter group showed statistically significant higher ACR (median 8.1 mg/g) as the former (median 4.5 mg/g). We found no significant correlation between AIx and ACR. Urinary albumin excretion in patients with RA or DM or both is higher than in subjects without RA and DM. This can be seen as a sign of vascular alteration and increased CV risk in these patients. PMID:26955238

  13. Increased Renal Solute Excretion in Rats Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Charles E.; Moore, A. L.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1995-01-01

    Following space flight a diuresis, due to an increase in free water clearance, has been suggested in humans. To assess the effects of space flight on renal function, rats were flown in space for 14 days. Rats were divided into three groups; vivarium controls (V;n=6; housed 2/shoe box cage), flight controls (FC;n=6; group housed in a flight cage), and flight animals (F;n=6). Upon landing all animals were placed into individual metabolic cages. Urine was collected daily for 7 days and every other day for 14 days. Urine output was increased (p less than 0.05; ANOVA) following flight for 3 days. On postflight day 1, flow rates were, V=6.8 plus or minus 0.9, FC=8.711.8 and F=16.6 plus or minus 2.7 microliter/min. Excretion rates of Na+ and K+ were increased, resulting in an increased osmotic excretion rate (V=7.9 plus or minus 0.9, FC=6.1 plus or minus 0.7 and F=13.5 plus or minus 0.7 uOsm/min). Creatinine excretion rate was increased over the first two postflight days. In the absence of changes in plasma creatinine, Na+, or K+ (samples obtained immediately post flight from similar rats compared to Day 14), GFR was increased following space flight. The increased excretion of solute was thus the result of increased delivery and decreased reabsorption. Osmotic clearance was increased (V=28, FC=27 and F=51 microliter/min), while free water clearance was decreased post flight (V=-21,FC=-18 and F=-34 microliter/min). In rats, the postflight diuresis is the result of an increase in solute (osmotic) excretion with an accompanying reduction in free water clearance.

  14. Impairment of renal sodium excretion in tropical residents - phenomenological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, S. K.; Aryee, P. A.; Amuasi, J.; Hesse, I. F. A.; Affram, R. K.

    There is evidence of impaired renal sodium excretion in salt-sensitive African Blacks. A decreased rate of renal sodium chloride (NaCl) excretion, low plasma renin activity and a tendency to elevated blood pressure are the hallmarks of salt sensitivity. Recent evidence indicates that increased proximal and distal tubular fluid reabsorption in some tropical residents may explain the impaired sodium excretion in these people. In this study of a cohort population, we speculated that subjects selected from that population might be salt-sensitive. We therefore measured the sodium balance in 10 normotensive male subjects over 10 consecutive days, after they had ingested a normal or a high amount of sodium, as NaCl (salt) in their diet. We quantified their renal sodium excretion rate by phenomenological analysis of their sodium balance data. We also measured plasma renin activity for 7 consecutive days in a separate group of 6 male and 4 female subjects in order to assess the state of their renin/angiotensin system. We selected all our subjects from a cohort population of 269 subjects randomly selected from a community known to have a high prevalence of primary hypertension. Our data on two separate groups of subjects from the same cohort population revealed delayed renal sodium excretion with t1/2 of about 5 days, compared to published data for normal individuals with t1/2 of less than 24 h. Also, plasma renin activity levels were low. Hence, our subjects are salt-sensitive. Quantification of their renal impairment is important for various reasons: it heightens one's appreciation of the problem of salt retention in African Blacks who are salt-sensitive and it also underlines the importance of the need for further research into the benefits of dietary salt restriction for reducing cardiovascular mortality in African populations, as has been done in some Western countries.

  15. Intake and urinary excretion of sodium chloride under varying conditions of effort and environment heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zohar, E.; Adar, R.; Tennenbaum, J.; Kesten, M.

    1982-01-01

    Intake and urinary excretion of sodium were investigated in a group of young, healthy and acclimated men. The sodium excretions of workers and of machinists in the engine rooms of a ship were also investigated.

  16. The effect of surgery on the renal excretion of beta 2-microglobulin.

    PubMed

    Walenkamp, G H; Vree, T B; Guelen, P J; Jongman-Nix, B

    1983-03-28

    Surgical trauma causes an increase in the renal excretion rate of beta 2-microglobulin whilst creatinine excretion is not influenced. The increase in the renal excretion rate of beta 2-microglobulin is probably the result of an increased release of beta 2-microglobulin by the cells which exceeds a maximum in the active tubular reabsorption of the compound by the proximal tubule cell. The renal excretion of beta 2-microglobulin is proportional to the relative clinical trauma score. PMID:6189646

  17. Salivary excretion of rabies virus by healthy vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Setien, A; Loza-Rubio, E; Salas-Rojas, M; Brisseau, N; Cliquet, F; Pastoret, P P; Rojas-Dotor, S; Tesoro, E; Kretschmer, R

    2005-06-01

    Salivary excretion of rabies virus was evaluated in 14 adult vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) intramuscularly injected with a large dose (10(6) MICLD50) of vampire rabies virus variant CASS88. Saliva samples were obtained from surviving bats every other day for 30 days, then weekly for 2 months, and finally 1 and 2 years later. Rabies virus was isolated in murine neuroblastoma cells and in randomly selected cases by PCR. Rabies virus was not detected in the saliva of any of the 11 animals that succumbed (somewhat early) to rabies challenge, nor in the control bats. In contrast, virus was detected early, and only once (days 6, 6 and 21) in each of the three animals that survived rabies challenge and remained healthy for at least 2 years after challenge. At that time even vigorous dexamethasone and cyclosporine administration failed to provoke further viral excretion. PMID:15966107

  18. Salivary excretion of rabies virus by healthy vampire bats.

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Setien, A.; Loza-Rubio, E.; Salas-Rojas, M.; Brisseau, N.; Cliquet, F.; Pastoret, P. P.; Rojas-Dotor, S.; Tesoro, E.; Kretschmer, R.

    2005-01-01

    Salivary excretion of rabies virus was evaluated in 14 adult vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) intramuscularly injected with a large dose (10(6) MICLD50) of vampire rabies virus variant CASS88. Saliva samples were obtained from surviving bats every other day for 30 days, then weekly for 2 months, and finally 1 and 2 years later. Rabies virus was isolated in murine neuroblastoma cells and in randomly selected cases by PCR. Rabies virus was not detected in the saliva of any of the 11 animals that succumbed (somewhat early) to rabies challenge, nor in the control bats. In contrast, virus was detected early, and only once (days 6, 6 and 21) in each of the three animals that survived rabies challenge and remained healthy for at least 2 years after challenge. At that time even vigorous dexamethasone and cyclosporine administration failed to provoke further viral excretion. PMID:15966107

  19. Uric acid excretion predicts increased aggression in urban adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mrug, Sylvie; Mrug, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Elevated levels of uric acid have been linked with impulsive and disinhibited behavior in clinical and community populations of adults, but no studies have examined uric acid in relation to adolescent aggression. This study examined the prospective role of uric acid in aggressive behavior among urban, low income adolescents, and whether this relationship varies by gender. A total of 84 adolescents (M age 13.36years; 50% male; 95% African American) self-reported on their physical aggression at baseline and 1.5years later. At baseline, the youth also completed a 12-h (overnight) urine collection at home which was used to measure uric acid excretion. After adjusting for baseline aggression and age, greater uric acid excretion predicted more frequent aggressive behavior at follow up, with no significant gender differences. The results suggest that lowering uric acid levels may help reduce youth aggression. PMID:27180134

  20. Metabolism and excretion of [14C] verruculogen in a sheep.

    PubMed

    Perera, K P; Mantle, P G; Penny, R H

    1982-05-01

    [14C] Verruculogen (75 micrograms/kg) was given intravenously to a sheep under barbiturate anaesthesia to prevent the severe tremor and convulsions which would otherwise have occurred. Two hours later 28 per cent of the tremorgenic mycotoxin was detected in the liver, bile and small intestine. Approximately 0.5 per cent was excreted in the urine. Trace amounts of radiolabel were detected in the cortex and corpus striatum of the brain. Verruculogen was metabolised by the liver and converted completely to four more polar products, including two isomeric forms of desoxy-verruculogen and the weakly tremorgenic mycotoxin TR-2. The principal and most polar metabolite excreted is probably an isomer of TR-2. PMID:7100651

  1. Blood pressure, sodium intake, insulin resistance, and urinary nitrate excretion.

    PubMed

    Facchini, F S; DoNascimento, C; Reaven, G M; Yip, J W; Ni, X P; Humphreys, M H

    1999-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships among various humoral factors thought to be involved in the regulation of blood pressure during high NaCl intake. Nineteen healthy subjects underwent sequential 5-day periods ingesting a low-sodium (25 mmol/d) or high-sodium (200 mmol/d) diet. Insulin resistance was assessed by the steady-state plasma glucose concentration at the end of a 3-hour insulin suppression test. Insulin resistance correlated inversely with natriuresis (P=0.04) and directly with increase in weight (P=0.03). The increase in mean arterial pressure associated with the high-sodium diet correlated directly with the gain in weight (P<0.05) and inversely with the increase in urinary nitrate excretion (P<0.0001). In a multiple regression model, more than 2/3 of the variance in mean arterial pressure was accounted for by the gain in weight and change in urinary nitrate excretion. The steady-state plasma glucose concentrations obtained with the 2 diets were similar, indicating that insulin resistance was unaffected by sodium intake. During high sodium intake, plasma renin activity and aldosterone decreased and plasma atrial natriuretic peptide increased; these changes did not correlate with the change in mean arterial pressure, insulin resistance, or change in urinary nitrate excretion. To the extent that urinary nitrate excretion reflects activity of the endogenous nitric oxide system, these results suggest that the salt sensitivity of mean arterial pressure may be related to blunted generation of endogenous nitric oxide. The results also demonstrate that insulin-resistant individuals have an impaired natriuretic response to high sodium intake. PMID:10205239

  2. Factors affecting urinary excretion of testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Andreu; Marcos, Josep; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa; Pozo, Oscar J

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of the athlete steroidal passport in doping control analysis aims to detect intra-individual changes in the steroid profile related to the abuse of anabolic steroids. In this context, the study of intrinsic variations associated with each marker is of utmost importance. In the present work, the influence of several factors in the excretion of the recently reported testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine (Δ(1) -AED; 1,4-androstadien-3,17-dione, Δ(6) -AED; 4,6-androstadien-3,17-dione, Δ(6) -T; 4,6-androstadien-17β-ol-3-one, and Δ(15) -AD; 15-androsten-3,17-dione) is evaluated for the first time. Degradation experiments at 37 °C proved that, although the cysteinyl moiety is released, the variation for urinary Δ(1) -AED/Δ(6) -AED, Δ(1) -AED/Δ(6) -T ratios is less than 30%. Moreover, freeze/thaw cycle testing resulted in RSDs values below 15% for all the analytes. Regarding infradian variability, moderate variations (below 40%) were observed. Additionally, notable alterations in the excretion of these compounds have been observed in the earliest stages of pregnancy. UGT2B17 polymorphism, responsible for the low T/E ratio found in some population, does not influence the excretion of cysteinyl compounds whereas the intake of exogenous substances (alcohol or 5α-reductase inhibitors) dramatically affects their excretion. The urinary concentrations of Δ(1) -AED, Δ(6) -AED, and Δ(15) -AD decreased (<50 %) after the ethanol intake, whereas after the administration of dutasteride, an important increase was observed for the concentrations of Δ(6) -AED, Δ(6) -T and Δ(15) -AD. Overall, the presented data describes the stability of the urinary cysteinyl steroids under the influence of many factors, proving their potential as suitable parameters to be included in the steroidal module of the athlete's biological passport. PMID:25917157

  3. Airborne arsenic exposure and excretion of methylated arsenic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, T J; Crecelius, E A; Reading, J C

    1977-01-01

    First void urine samples were collected from copper smelter workers exposed to inorganic arsenic and from unexposed controls. Arsenic compounds (As (III), As (V), methylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid) in these samples were analyzed by selective volatilization as arsines with determination of arsenic by plasma excitation emission spectrometry. On the day preceding the urine sample collection a breathing zone measurement was made of respirable arsenic particulates for each subject. It was found that all of the subjects, including the controls excreted arsenic primarily as methylated species. Approximately 50% of the total arsenic was excreted as dimethylarsinic acid and 20% as methylarsonic acid. Slight differences in the proportion of various arsenic compounds were observed with varying levels of inorganic arsenic exposure. Amounts of arsenic species were all closely correlated with each other and with exposure. Irrespirable particulate exposures were measured on a subset of high exposure workers. Irrespirable arsenic was found to be more closely correlated with excretion of arsenic compounds than was respirable arsenic. PMID:908318

  4. Biliary and renal excretions of cefpiramide in Eisai hyperbilirubinemic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, I; Hasegawa, T; Nadai, M; Wang, L; Haghgoo, S; Tagaya, O; Nabeshima, T

    1995-01-01

    Eisai hyperbilirubinemic mutant rats (EHBRs) with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia were recently derived from Sprague-Dawley rats (SDRs). The pharmacokinetic characteristics of the beta-lactam antibiotic cefpiramide (CPM), which is mainly excreted into bile, were investigated in 10- and 20-week-old EHBRs and were compared with those in 20-week-old healthy SDRs. The pharmacokinetic parameters of CPM after an intravenous administration of 20 mg/kg of body weight were estimated for each rat by noncompartmental methods. When compared with age-matched healthy SDRs, significant decreases (by approximately 30%) in the systemic clearance of CPM were observed in 20-week-old EHBRs. The biliary clearance of CPM in 20-week-old EHBRs markedly decreased to less than 10% of that in age-matched healthy SDRs, while total urinary recovery of unchanged CPM increased to threefold and renal clearance doubled. However, no significant differences in any of the pharmacokinetic parameters of CPM were observed between the two groups of EHBRs. There were no significant differences among the three groups in the steady-state volume of distribution of CPM. The present study indicates that hyperbilirubinemia induces an increase in the urinary excretion ability of CPM in return for a reduction in the biliary excretion. PMID:7695332

  5. Urinary 3-methylhistidine excretion increases with repeated weight training exercise.

    PubMed

    Pivarnik, J M; Hickson, J F; Wolinsky, I

    1989-06-01

    This investigation examines the effect of progressive resistance weight training exercise on urinary 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) excretions in untrained subjects. For 19 consecutive days, 11 males were fed a weight maintenance, lactovegetarian diet which contained the Recommended Dietary Allowance (0.8g.kg-1.d-1) for protein. No exercise was performed for the first 7 d of the study. Subjects were strength tested on day 8 and performed upper and lower body weight training exercises from days 9-19. Complete, 24-h urine collections were obtained from each subject on a daily basis. Samples were assayed for creatinine and 3-MH. Stable baseline 3-MH values were present during the pre-exercise control period. Significant increases in 3-MH occurred by study day 11, which was the third day of weight training exercise. This was true regardless of whether the data were expressed by daily excretions (microM.d-1; P less than 0.01), per unit of body weight (microM.kg-1.d-1; P less than 0.005), or per unit of creatinine excretion (microM.g Creat-1.d-1; P less than 0.001). Since urinary 3-MH is an index of actin and myosin catabolism, these data support the hypothesis that the rate of skeletal muscle degradation is increased during strength building exercises. PMID:2733577

  6. Excreted Cytoplasmic Proteins Contribute to Pathogenicity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Patrick; Rinker, Janina; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Popella, Peter; Nega, Mulugeta; Luqman, Arif; Schittek, Birgit; Di Marco, Moreno; Stevanovic, Stefan; Götz, Friedrich

    2016-06-01

    Excretion of cytoplasmic proteins in pro- and eukaryotes, also referred to as "nonclassical protein export," is a well-known phenomenon. However, comparatively little is known about the role of the excreted proteins in relation to pathogenicity. Here, the impact of two excreted glycolytic enzymes, aldolase (FbaA) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), on pathogenicity was investigated in Staphylococcus aureus Both enzymes bound to certain host matrix proteins and enhanced adherence of the bacterial cells to host cells but caused a decrease in host cell invasion. FbaA and GAPDH also bound to the cell surfaces of staphylococcal cells by interaction with the major autolysin, Atl, that is involved in host cell internalization. Surprisingly, FbaA showed high cytotoxicity to both MonoMac 6 (MM6) and HaCaT cells, while GAPDH was cytotoxic only for MM6 cells. Finally, the contribution of external FbaA and GAPDH to S. aureus pathogenicity was confirmed in an insect infection model. PMID:27001537

  7. Evaluation of aldosterone excretion in very low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Abdel Mohsen, Abdel Hakeem; Taha, Gamal; Kamel, Bothina A; Maksood, Mohamed Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Data about aldosterone production and excretion in the neonatal period are still few and controversial. Our objectives are to assess urinary aldosterone excretion (UAE) in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants and to identify clinical and biochemical variables that may influence this excretion. Thirty VLBW infants (14 males and 16 females), their gestational age <32 weeks and body weight <1500 g, were included in the study. Demographic and clinical data were recorded, within the first 72 h of life and urine and blood samples were collected for the measurement of urinary aldosterone and serum potassium, sodium, and chloride. The mean UAE value was 0.176 ± 0.05 μg/24 h and the mean absolute UAE was 1906 ± 271 pg/mL. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between UAE and gestational age and birth weight; also, infants with respiratory distress syndrome had higher urinary aldosterone levels than infants without respiratory distress. Only plasma sodium was a significant independent factor that negatively influenced UAE on linear regression analysis. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system of VLBW infants seems to be able, even immediately after birth, to respond to variations of plasma sodium concentrations; measurement of UAE constitutes an interesting method to determine aldosterone production in VLBW infants. PMID:27424689

  8. Biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in idiopathic hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hultcrantz, R.; Angelin, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.E.; Ewerth, S.; Einarsson, K.

    1989-06-01

    The role of biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in iron overload was studied and evaluated. Ten patients with idiopathic hemochromatosis and two groups of controls (14 gallstone patients and 16 healthy subjects) were included. Liver tissue (obtained by percutaneous or operative biopsy) was investigated with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy in combination with x-ray microanalysis. Fasting bile samples were obtained through duodenal aspiration or at cholecystectomy. Iron was determined in liver tissue and bile using atomic absorption spectroscopy, and ferritin was determined in serum and bile with a radioimmunoassay technique. All patients with hemochromatosis had iron-positive staining as seen in light microscopy. Electron microscopy showed iron-containing proteins in the lysosomes and cytosol of liver parenchymal cells, and this observation was supported by x-ray microanalysis. Hepatic iron concentration was increased about eightfold in the patients with hemochromatosis (p less than 0.001). Biliary iron concentration, expressed per millimole of bile acid, was increased about twofold (p less than 0.05) and biliary ferritin concentration about fivefold (p less than 0.001) in hemochromatosis. Four of the patients with hemochromatosis were reexamined after completed treatment with venesection; this resulted in normalized biliary concentrations of iron and ferritin. We conclude that biliary secretion of ferritin occurs in humans and that both iron and ferritin excretion are enhanced in hepatic iron overload. The apparently limited capacity of biliary iron excretion may be of importance for the hepatic iron accumulation in hemochromatosis.

  9. Diurnal nitrogen excretion rhythm of the functionally ureogenic gobiid fish Mugilogobius abei.

    PubMed

    Kajimura, Makiko; Iwata, Katsuya; Numata, Hideharu

    2002-02-01

    This study was performed to determine the daily periodicity of urea excretion in the ureogenic gobiid fish Mugilogobius abei. In 20% seawater, urea excretion of all the fish examined showed daily periodic changes under a 12-h light-dark cycle, and some showed a free-running rhythm under constant darkness. This is the first report of a circadian rhythm in urea excretion in fishes. Daily variations in urea excretion under light-dark cycles were also observed under various conditions, i.e. exposure to water ammonia, confinement/non-confinement and solitary/group. Due to the daily variations in urea excretion, urea contents in tissues changed periodically, whereas enzyme activities related to urea synthesis did not change significantly. The index of urea permeability as determined by changes in body urea contents after 2-h immersion of 25 mM urea solution was high during the peak of daily variation in urea excretion. Locomotor activity and urea excretion showed clear daily variations under light-dark cycles, both of which were diurnal. Furthermore, daily variations in urea excretion were maintained even when the diurnal pattern in the locomotor activity was disturbed. These results suggest that periodic urea excretion was mediated by periodic enhancement of permeability for urea at excretion sites. PMID:11818244

  10. Radiation dosimetry from breast milk excretion of radioiodine and pertechnetate

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, W.R.; Di Simone, R.N.; Keen, R.L.

    1986-10-01

    Measurements were made of the activity in samples of breast milk obtained from a patient with postpartum thyroiditis following administration of (/sup 123/I)sodium iodide and subsequently (99mTc)pertechnetate 24 hr later. Both /sup 123/I and 99mTc were found to be excreted exponentially with an effective half-life of 5.8 hr and 2.8 hr, respectively. Less than 10% of the activity was incorporated into breast-milk protein. After administration of (/sup 123/I)sodium iodide breast feeding should be discontinued for 24-36 hr to reduce the absorbed dose to the child's thyroid.

  11. [The effect of aldosterone A on renal potassium excretion].

    PubMed

    Winther, Signe Abitz; Egfjord, Martin

    2011-01-10

    Recent studies have shown expression of the following regulatory WNK kinases in the kidney: the full-length WNK1 (L-WNK1), the shorter kidney specific WNK1 transcript (KS-WNK1), formed by alternative splicing, and WNK4. Aldosterone activates expression of KS-WNK1 and inhibits WNK4 via SGK1 - both leading to stimulation of ENaC and activation of ROMK, and increased potassium excretion. Thus, further characterization of the WNK system may lead to elucidation of the dual anti-natriuretic and kaliuretic effects of aldosterone, in situations where only activation of one of these effects is needed. PMID:21219845

  12. Testosterone urinary excretion rate increases during hypergravity in male monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strollo, F.; Barger, L.; Fuller, C.

    2000-01-01

    Real and simulated microgravity impairs T secretion both in animals and in the human. To verify whether hypergravity might enhance T secretion as a consequence of an opposite mechanical effect, 6 male monkeys were centrifuged at 2 G for 3 weeks after a 1 G stabilization period lasting 3 weeks and then taken back to 1 G for 1 week and urine were collected daily for T excretion measurement. Significantly higher level were observed during the initial 2 G phase as compared to pre- and post centrifugation periods and the trend was the same during the remaining 2 G period. This may reflect changes in testicular perfusion rather than endocrine adaptation per se.

  13. Pharmacokinetics: metabolism and renal excretion of quinolones in man.

    PubMed

    Vree, T B; Wijnands, W J; Guelen, P J; Baars, A M; Hekster, Y A

    1986-02-21

    The quinolones are relatively poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. The elimination proceeds mainly by renal excretion. The half-life of elimination depends on the molecular structure and varies between 2 and 10 h. Impaired kidney function is expected to increase the half-life of elimination, though this effect is not always observed. Since the 4-oxo-metabolites show a higher renal clearance than the parent drug, renal impairment will result in a cumulation of the metabolites in the body. PMID:3960691

  14. Effects of opiates on sodium excretion in the isolated perfused rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Ellis, A G; Adam, W R

    1991-12-01

    1. A rat isolated perfused kidney preparation was utilized to define clearly a renal site of action. The variables measured were perfusate pressure and flow, glomerular filtration rate, urine volume, sodium excretion and potassium excretion. 2. Dextromethorphan (3 nmol/L) and dextrorphan (10 nmol/L) reduced sodium excretion in kidneys from rats on either control or high K+ diet, in the absence of any other measured renal effects. Dextromethorphan (10 nmol/L) produced a decrease in glomerular filtration rate as well as a decrease in sodium excretion. Naloxone (1 mumol/L) inhibited the effect of dextromethorphan on sodium excretion but had no effect when administered alone. 3. The levorotatory opiates levorphanol and levomethorphan, the kappa agonist ketocyclazocine and a range of other opiates had no effect on sodium excretion. 4. The results suggest a renal action specific for dextrorotatory opiates. This renal action is consistent with earlier binding studies suggesting preferential recognition of dextrorotatory opiates. PMID:1797448

  15. Rapid Hepatobiliary Excretion of Micelle-Encapsulated/Radiolabeled Upconverting Nanoparticles as an Integrated Form

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyo Jung; Nam, Sang Hwan; Im, Hyung-Jun; Park, Ji-yong; Lee, Ji Youn; Yoo, Byeongjun; Lee, Yun-Sang; Jeong, Jae Min; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Who Kim, Ji; Lee, Jae Sung; Jang, In-Jin; Cho, Joo-Youn; Hwang, Do Won; Suh, Yung Doug; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    In the field of nanomedicine, long term accumulation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) such as liver is the major hurdle in clinical translation. On the other hand, NPs could be excreted via hepatobiliary excretion pathway without overt tissue toxicity. Therefore, it is critical to develop NPs that show favorable excretion property. Herein, we demonstrated that micelle encapsulated 64Cu-labeled upconverting nanoparticles (micelle encapsulated 64Cu-NOTA-UCNPs) showed substantial hepatobiliary excretion by in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) and also upconversion luminescence imaging (ULI). Ex vivo biodistribution study reinforced the imaging results by showing clearance of 84% of initial hepatic uptake in 72 hours. Hepatobiliary excretion of the UCNPs was also verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination. Micelle encapsulated 64Cu-NOTA-UCNPs could be an optimal bimodal imaging agent owing to quantifiability of 64Cu, ability of in vivo/ex vivo ULI and good hepatobiliary excretion property. PMID:26494465

  16. The significance of nitrate in the nitrogenous excretion of carcinus maenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaargaren, D. H.

    Total inorganic-N and NH 4+-N were measured in blood and external media of shore crabs, Carcinus maenas (L.), exposed to various salinities at low (4°C) and high (20°C) temperatures. Total inorganic-N and NH 4+-N were both excreted in larger amounts at lower salinities and at the higher temperature. Nitrate excretion is highest in brackish water and decreases in both higher and lower salinities. Nitrate excretion (0.11-0.72 μmol -1·h -1) was of the same order of magnitude as NH 4 + excretion, but in brackish water NO 3 - excretion predominated, whereas at lower salinities NH 4 + excretion predominated. NO 3 - formation may serve in the detoxification of NH 4 + and the maintenance of electroneutrality. Blood NO 3 - concentrations, like blood NH 4 + concentrations, are strongly stabilized, independent of either temperature or salinity.

  17. [Basic mechanisms: absorption and excretion of cholesterol and other sterols].

    PubMed

    Cofan Pujol, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is of vital importance for vertebrate cell membrane structure and function. It is obvious that adequate regulation of cholesterol homeostasis is essential. Hypercholesterolemia promotes atherosclerosis and thereby represents a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The liver has been considered the major site of control in maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. The liver facilitates clearance of (very) low density lipoprotein particles and cholesterol-containing chylomicron remnants, synthesizes cholesterol, synthesizes and secretes (nascent) high density lipoprotein particles, secretes cholesterol and bile salts to bile, and is involved in reverse cholesterol transport. In recent years, however, the importance of the intestine in many aspects of cholesterol physiology is increasingly recognized. It has become apparent that direct secretion of cholesterol from the blood compartment into the intestine, or transintestinal cholesterol excretion, plays a major role in disposal of cholesterol via the feces. This review will discuss current knowledge on the physiology of cholesterol homeostasis, with emphasis on cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and fecal excretion, and therapeutic options for hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24461630

  18. Enhancement of anammox by the excretion of diel vertical migrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Daniele; Babbin, Andrew R.; Galbraith, Eric D.

    2014-11-01

    Measurements show that anaerobic ammonium oxidation with nitrite (anammox) is a major pathway of fixed nitrogen removal in the anoxic zones of the open ocean. Anammox requires a source of ammonium, which under anoxic conditions could be supplied by the breakdown of sinking organic matter via heterotrophic denitrification. However, at many locations where anammox is measured, denitrification rates are small or undetectable. Alternative sources of ammonium have been proposed to explain this paradox, for example through dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium and transport from anoxic sediments. However, the relevance of these sources in open-ocean anoxic zones is debated. Here, we bring to attention an additional source of ammonium, namely, the daytime excretion by zooplankton and micronekton migrating from the surface to anoxic waters. We use a synthesis of acoustic data to show that, where anoxic waters occur within the water column, most migrators spend the daytime within them. Although migrators export only a small fraction of primary production from the surface, they focus excretion within a confined depth range of anoxic water where particle input is small. Using a simple biogeochemical model, we suggest that, at those depths, the source of ammonium from organisms undergoing diel vertical migrations could exceed the release from particle remineralization, enhancing in situ anammox rates. The contribution of this previously overlooked process, and the numerous uncertainties surrounding it, call for further efforts to evaluate the role of animals in oxygen minimum zone biogeochemistry.

  19. Retention and excretion of 95Zr-95Nb in humans.

    PubMed

    Thind, K S

    1995-12-01

    This note describes the retention and excretion of 95Zr-95Nb in humans based on a recent CANDU experience and a literature survey of reported cases. Two data bases, QUEST and INIS were used for the survey. Three reported cases were discovered: two for occupational exposures and one for public exposure from nuclear weapons fallout. Human lung retention from these three cases, plus whole body retention and some limited fecal excretion data from a recently occurred exposure at a CANDU station, were reviewed and tested against predictions based on ICRP Publication 30 model. Based on the fits of this model to the reported data it seems that the three occupational exposures exhibit class Y behavior while the public exposure exhibits class W behavior. For only one case is the chemical compound known with certainty: ZrO2. Zirconium oxides are currently classified as class W in ICRP Publications 30 and 54. This work confirms a suggestion that oxides of zirconium be classified as class Y and should be taken into account by the ICRP in its future publications. PMID:7493813

  20. [Hepatoduodenal circulation and excretion of the new GABA derivative citrocard].

    PubMed

    Tiurenkov, I N; Perfilova, V N; Smirnova, L A; Riabukha, A F; Suchkov, E A; Lebedeva, S A

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic investigation of a new gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) derivative cirtocard showed that, upon the intravenous introduction, the drug is determined in high concentrations in organs of elimination--the liver and kidneys. The tissue accessibility amounts to 1.341 for the liver and 4.053 for the kidneys and the separation factor is 1.041 for the liver and 4.486 for the kidneys. The study of drug excretion showed that cirtocard is determined in the urine for 48 h, its nephritic clearance being 0.047 L/h and extra-nephritic clearance, 0.33 L/h. For the unchanged substance, a large significance ofhepatoduodenal circulation is low probable, since no more than 1 - 2% of the introduced dose was isolated with bile over entire experiment. It is established that the removal of the unchanged substance does not exceed 10% of the introduced dose. There is high probability of hepatoduodenal circulation and excretion of the preparation in the form of metabolites. PMID:23767103

  1. High Salt Diet Affects Renal Sodium Excretion and ERRα Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys regulate the balance of water and sodium and therefore are related to blood pressure. It is unclear whether estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), an orphan nuclear receptor and transcription factor highly expressed in kidneys, affects the reabsorption of water and sodium. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in the expressions of ERRα, Na+/K+-ATPase and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) proteins affected the reabsorption of water and sodium in kidneys of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. SS.13BN rats, 98% homologous to the DS rats, were used as a normotensive control group. The 24 h urinary sodium excretion of the DS and SS.13BN rats increased after the 6-week high salt diet intervention, while sodium excretion was increased in DS rats with daidzein (agonist of ERRα) treatment. ERRα expression was decreased, while β- and γ-ENaC mRNA expressions were increased upon high sodium diet treatment in the DS rats. In the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay, positive PCR signals were obtained in samples treated with anti-ERRα antibody. The transcriptional activity of ERRα was decreased upon high salt diet intervention. ERRα reduced the expressions of β- and γ-ENaC by binding to the ENaC promoter, thereby increased Na+ reabsorption. Therefore, ERRα might be one of the factors causing salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:27043552

  2. Excretion and metabolism of flunarizine in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Meuldermans, W; Hendrickx, J; Hurkmans, R; Swysen, E; Woestenborghs, R; Lauwers, W; Heykants, J

    1983-01-01

    The excretion and metabolism of (E)-1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-(3-phenyl-2-propenyl)piperazine dihydrochloride (flunarizine hydrochloride, R 14 950, Sibelium) were studied after single oral doses in rats and dogs, using tritium-labelled as well as 14C-labelled drug. Flunarizine was well absorbed in both species. The mass balance for the unchanged drug and its major metabolites in urine, bile and faeces, as estimated with radio-HPLC, ALLOWED an explanation of the differences observed for the excretion pattern of the radioactivity in flunarizine-14C and flunarizine-3H dosed rats, and in male and female rats. Main metabolic pathway in male rats was the oxidative N-dealkylation resulting in bis(4-fluorophenyl)methanol and a number of complementary metabolites of the cinnamylpiperazine moiety, of which hippuric acid was the main one. In female rats and male dogs, however, hydroxy-flunarizine was the main metabolite, resulting from the aromatic hydroxylation of the phenyl ring of the cinnamyl moiety. Enterohepatic circulation of bis(4-fluorophenyl)methanol and hydroxy-flunarizine was proved by "donor-acceptor" coupling in rats; in bile and urine, these two metabolites were present mainly as glucuronides. The glucuronide of hydroxy-flunarizine was also the main plasma metabolite in dogs. PMID:6685491

  3. Metabolism and Excretion of Trichloroethylene after Inhalation by Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bartoníček, V.

    1962-01-01

    Eight volunteers were exposed to trichloroethylene vapour (1,042 μg./l.) for five hours; 51 to 64% of the inhaled trichloroethylene was retained. The concentration of trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid in the urine was studied daily for a three-week period; on the third day both metabolites were determined in faeces, sweat, and saliva. The concentration of trichloroacetic acid in plasma and red blood cells was studied on alternate days. Of the trichloroethylene retained, 38·0 to 49·7% was excreted in the urine as trichloroethanol and 27·4 to 35·7% as trichloroacetic acid. Of both metabolites 8·4% was excreted in the faeces. Sweat collected on the third day of the experiment contained 0·10 to 1·92 mg./100 ml. trichloroethanol and 0·15 to 0·35 mg./100 ml. trichloroacetic acid. In saliva the concentrations were 0·09 to 0·32 mg./100 ml. trichloroethanol and 0·10 to 0·15 mg./100 ml. trichloroacetic acid. The value of the expression trichloroethanol/trichloroacetic acid calculated in the urine within 22 days was within the range 1·15 to 1·81. PMID:13865497

  4. Possible parameters in the urinary excretion of tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Cawley, C.N.; Lewis, B.A.; Cannon, L.A.

    1985-11-01

    Because of its mobility in both physical and biological systems, tritium is interesting both as a tracer and as an issue in health physics. Because tritium is extremely difficult to contain, it is one of the major radionuclides of concern if released to the environment from nuclear facilities. Relatively very large releases are tolerated because the beta particle has low energy and, therefore, the radioisotope is not a health hazard unless deposited internally. Moreover, on release to the environment, tritium enters the hydrologic cycle and is diluted and dispersed widely through the hydrosphere. It is likely that tritium uptake and loss in humans is more complex than generally believed and may be more functionally related to physiological processes, such as the bicarbonate and electrolyte balances, than to ambient environmental conditions such as temperature. Despite the many uncertainties in the analyses of experimental data on tritium contamination and excretion, it is likely that further investigations will establish both a better understanding of the tritium health hazard and the physiological processes governing excretion and, perhaps, its indefinite recycling through metabolic pools.

  5. Effects of feeding and confinement on nitrogen metabolism and excretion in the gulf toadfish Opsanus beta

    PubMed

    Walsh; Milligan

    1995-01-01

    In order to elucidate further the cues for, and the biochemical mechanisms of, the transition to ureogenesis in the gulf toadfish Opsanus beta, experiments on the effects of feeding (i.e. nitrogen loading) were carried out. Baseline nitrogen excretion rates were first measured on solitary toadfish in large water volumes (i.e. unconfined conditions). These nitrogen excretion rates were higher, and had a higher proportion as ammonia (61 %), than previously published 'control' measurements. Feeding of unconfined toadfish elevated total nitrogen excretion approximately threefold, with little change in the proportion of urea versus ammonia. During the first 24 h of confinement of unfed toadfish, absolute levels of urea excretion remained constant while ammonia excretion rates fell to near zero, so that toadfish became 90 % ureotelic. When fed prior to confinement, urea excretion rates remained constant for the first 24 h, and the bulk of the nitrogen was excreted as ammonia (80 %); excretion of the excess dietary nitrogen took up to 48 h to complete. If pre-adapted to confinement and then fed, toadfish excreted only about 55 % of their nitrogenous waste as ammonia, and excretion of excess dietary nitrogen was completed by 24 h. Elevations of hepatic glutamine synthetase (GNS) activities accompanied confinement and were shown to be almost exclusively in the cytosolic compartment and to be correlated with a decrease in the ratio of hepatic levels of glutamate:glutamine. These GNS activity increases also appear to account in part for the decrease in the percentage of ammoniotely in toadfish under conditions of nitrogen loading after confinement. However, additional means of regulating total nitrogen excretion (e.g. changes in protein turnover rates) and the degree of ureogenesis versus ammoniogenesis (e.g. N-acetylglutamate stimulation of carbamoylphosphate synthetase) must be postulated to account fully for changes in nitrogen excretion rates and activation of ureogenesis

  6. [SKIERS URINARY CATECHOLAMINES EXCRETION AT REST AND BY COMPETITIVE LOADS LENGTH VARIETY].

    PubMed

    Chinkin, A S

    2015-11-01

    While night sleeps urinary noradrenaline excretion of skilled skiers less than their untrained peers, but the difference in excretion of adrenaline is not revealed. By increasing the distance and time to overcome it during skiing catecholamine excretion is increased both - totally and per minute. Most urinary catecholamines detected at a distance of 50 km in low sliding: increased excretion of adrenaline - 84 times, and noradrenaline -95 times. These results shows that high qualificated skier's functional reserve of the sympathoadrenal system, is mobilize at long competitions for ten times higher than in rest. PMID:26995960

  7. Comparison of endogenous and radiolabeled bile acid excretion in patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, L.R.; Bilhartz, L.E.; Santa Ana, C.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Fecal recovery of radioactivity after ingestion of a bolus of radiolabeled bile acid is abnormally high in most patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea. To evaluate the significance of this malabsorption, concurrent fecal excretion of both exogenous radiolabeled bile acid and endogenous (unlabeled) bile acid were measured in patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea. Subjects received a 2.5-microCi oral dose of taurocholic acid labeled with 14C in the 24th position of the steroid moiety. Endogenous bile acid excretion was measured by a hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase assay on a concurrent 72-h stool collection. Both radiolabeled and endogenous bile acid excretion were abnormally high in most patients with chronic diarrhea compared with normal subjects, even when equivoluminous diarrhea was induced in normal subjects by ingestion of osmotically active solutions. The correlation between radiolabeled and endogenous bile acid excretion was good. However, neither radiolabeled nor endogenous bile acid excretion was as abnormal as is typically seen in patients with ileal resection, and none of these diarrhea patients responded to treatment with cholestyramine with stool weights less than 200 g. These results suggest (a) that this radiolabeled bile acid excretion test accurately reflects excess endogenous bile acid excretion; (b) that excess endogenous bile acid excretion is not caused by diarrhea per se; (c) that spontaneously occurring idiopathic chronic diarrhea is often associated with increased endogenous bile acid excretion; and (d) that bile acid malabsorption is not likely to be the primary cause of diarrhea in most of these patients.

  8. Variability of urinary salt excretion estimated by spot urine in treated hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Kimika; Sakaki, Minako; Sakata, Satoko; Oniki, Hideyuki; Tominaga, Mitsuhiro; Tsuchihashi, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Among the several methods used to assess salt intake, estimating 24 h urinary salt excretion by spot urine seems appropriate for clinical practice. In this study, we investigated variability in urinary salt excretion using spot urine in hypertensive outpatients. Participants included 200 hypertensive patients who underwent spot urinary salt excretion at least three times during the observation period. Mean urinary salt excretion and the coefficient of the variation were 8.62 ± 1.96 g/day and 19.0 ± 10.2%, respectively. In the analysis of participants who underwent assessment of urinary salt excretion at least eight times (n = 54), a significant reduction in mean urinary salt excretion was found at the 5th measurement. On the contrary, the coefficient of the variation of urinary salt excretion continued to increase until the 5th measurement, and became stable thereafter. Mean urinary salt excretion was positively correlated with mean clinic diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.27, p < 0.05). Clinic diastolic blood pressure in the high urinary salt excretion group (≥ 10 g/day) was significantly higher than that of the low group (76.2 ± 7.5 vs 73.4 ± 8.3 mmHg, p < 0.05). Mean urinary salt excretion in summer was significantly lower than that of the other seasons (7.75 ± 1.94 vs 9.09 ± 2.68 (spring), 8.72 ± 2.12 (autumn), 8.92 ± 2.17 (winter) g/day, p < 0.01). In conclusion, repeated measurements of urinary salt excretion using spot urine are required to assess daily salt intake of hypertensive patients. PMID:26395949

  9. Excretion of artifactual endogenous digitalis-like factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.A.

    1986-07-01

    Radioimmunoassays have been used to detect digoxin-like immunoreactive factors (DLF) in the plasma and urine of hypertensive patients and rats with deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertension. DLF, partially purified from DOCA-HS urine by antidigoxin antibody immunoaffinity chromatography, was found to have a molecular weight <2000. When DOCA-HS rats were switched to the low-sodium chow, DLF excretion dropped precipitously. No measurable DLF was detected in the plasma of rats eating either chow. However, >95% of the urinary DLF could be attributed to a contaminant in the standard laboratory chow. These data document the importance of excluding nonspecific compounds and exogenous sources of DLF when sensitive radioligand and biologic assays are used to detect endogenous inhibitors of the sodium pump.

  10. Impact of Aging on Urinary Excretion of Iron and Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Pfrimer, Karina; Micheletto, Rutinéia Fátima; Marchini, Julio Sergio; Padovan, Gilberto João; Moriguti, Julio Cesar; Ferriolli, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    PROJECT Data about the influence of aging on urinary excretion of iron and zinc are scarce. The objective of the present study was to compare the concentration of zinc and iron in the urine of healthy elderly subjects and younger adults. PROCEDURE Seven healthy elderly subjects and seven younger adults were selected and submitted to biochemical, clinical, and nutritional tests. After a fasting period, 12-hour urine was collected for the determination of iron and zinc concentrations by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. RESULTS Urinary zinc and iron concentrations of the elderly subjects were not significantly different from that of younger adults. However, the total zinc and iron urinary clearance in 24 hours for the elderly was significantly higher compared with that of younger adults. CONCLUSION There is an increase in urinary iron and zinc clearance with aging. The values reported in this manuscript may be used as references in future studies. PMID:24932105

  11. Urinary 6 beta-hydroxycortisol excretion in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, C; Frey, B M; Bird, H A

    1997-01-01

    The objective was to analyse whether the activity of the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4 is altered by disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Urinary 6 beta-hydroxycortisol excretion, expressed as a fraction of the urinary creatinine output, was measured in 21 patients with RA treated with three different disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) over 24 weeks. There were no correlations between urinary 6 beta-hydroxycortisol/creatinine (6 beta-OHC/Creat) ratio and measurements of disease activity such as plasma viscosity, Ritchie articular index and early morning stiffness. In addition, the three DMARDs sulphasalazine, sodium aurothiomalate and D-penicillamine, smoking and the intake of various CYP3A4 substrates had no consistent detectable effect on the 6 beta-OHC/Creat ratio. There is no evidence that the dosage of drugs metabolized by the CYP3A4 isoenzyme needs to be adjusted for disease activity in RA. PMID:9117175

  12. Alkali absorption and citrate excretion in calcium nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Williams, R. H.; Oh, M. S.; Padalino, P.; Adams-Huet, B.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of net gastrointestinal (GI) alkali absorption in the development of hypocitraturia was investigated. The net GI absorption of alkali was estimated from the difference between simple urinary cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and anions (Cl and P). In 131 normal subjects, the 24 h urinary citrate was positively correlated with the net GI absorption of alkali (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). In 11 patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), urinary citrate excretion was subnormal relative to net GI alkali absorption, with data from most patients residing outside the 95% confidence ellipse described for normal subjects. However, the normal relationship between urinary citrate and net absorbed alkali was maintained in 11 patients with chronic diarrheal syndrome (CDS) and in 124 stone-forming patients devoid of RTA or CDS, half of whom had "idiopathic" hypocitraturia. The 18 stone-forming patients without RTA or CDS received potassium citrate (30-60 mEq/day). Both urinary citrate and net GI alkali absorption increased, yielding a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001), with the slope indistinguishable from that of normal subjects. Thus, urinary citrate was normally dependent on the net GI absorption of alkali. This dependence was less marked in RTA, confirming the renal origin of hypocitraturia. However, the normal dependence was maintained in CDS and in idiopathic hypocitraturia, suggesting that reduced citrate excretion was largely dietary in origin as a result of low net alkali absorption (from a probable relative deficiency of vegetables and fruits or a relative excess of animal proteins).

  13. Ammonia Production, Excretion, Toxicity, and Defense in Fish: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Yuen K.; Chew, Shit F.

    2010-01-01

    Many fishes are ammonotelic but some species can detoxify ammonia to glutamine or urea. Certain fish species can accumulate high levels of ammonia in the brain or defense against ammonia toxicity by enhancing the effectiveness of ammonia excretion through active NH4+transport, manipulation of ambient pH, or reduction in ammonia permeability through the branchial and cutaneous epithelia. Recent reports on ammonia toxicity in mammalian brain reveal the importance of permeation of ammonia through the blood–brain barrier and passages of ammonia and water through transporters in the plasmalemma of brain cells. Additionally, brain ammonia toxicity could be related to the passage of glutamine through the mitochondrial membranes into the mitochondrial matrix. On the other hand, recent reports on ammonia excretion in fish confirm the involvement of Rhesus glycoproteins in the branchial and cutaneous epithelia. Therefore, this review focuses on both the earlier literature and the up-to-date information on the problems and mechanisms concerning the permeation of ammonia, as NH3, NH4+ or proton-neutral nitrogenous compounds, across mitochondrial membranes, the blood–brain barrier, the plasmalemma of neurons, and the branchial and cutaneous epithelia of fish. It also addresses how certain fishes with high ammonia tolerance defend against ammonia toxicity through the regulation of the permeation of ammonia and related nitrogenous compounds through various types of membranes. It is hoped that this review would revive the interests in investigations on the passage of ammonia through the mitochondrial membranes and the blood–brain barrier of ammonotelic fishes and fishes with high brain ammonia tolerance, respectively. PMID:21423375

  14. Increased Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Excretion in Rats with Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Somayeh; Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Shahsavari, Fatemeh; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Grayesh-Nejad, Siyavash; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2015-11-01

    Increased nitric oxide (NO) formation is mechanistically linked to pathophysiology of the extrahepatic complications of cirrhosis. NO is formed by either enzymatic or non-enzymatic pathways. Enzymatic production is catalyzed by NO synthase (NOS) while entero-salivary circulation of nitrate and nitrite is linked to non-enzymatic formation of NO under acidic pH in the stomach. There is no data on salivary excretion of nitrate and nitrite in cirrhosis. This study was aimed to investigate salivary levels of nitrate and nitrite in a rat model of biliary cirrhosis. Cirrhosis was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Four weeks after the operation, submandibular ducts of anesthetized BDL and control rats were cannulated with polyethylene microtube for saliva collection. Assessment of pH, nitrite and nitrate levels was performed in our research. We also investigated NOS expression by real time RT-PCR to estimate eNOS, nNOS and iNOS mRNA levels in the submandibular glands. Salivary pH was significantly lower in BDL rats in comparison to control animals. We also observed a statistically significant increase in salivary levels of nitrite as well as nitrate in BDL rats while there was no elevation in the mRNA expression of nNOS, eNOS, and iNOS in submandibular glands of cirrhotic groups. This indicates that an increased salivary level of nitrite/nitrate is less likely to be linked to increased enzymatic production of NO in the salivary epithelium. It appears that nitrate/nitrite can be transported from the blood stream by submandibular glands and excreted into saliva as entero-salivary circulation, and this mechanism may have been exaggerated during cirrhosis. PMID:26786986

  15. Fecal Calprotectin Excretion in Preterm Infants during the Neonatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Rougé, Carole; Butel, Marie-José; Piloquet, Hugues; Ferraris, Laurent; Legrand, Arnaud; Vodovar, Michel; Voyer, Marcel; de la Cochetière, Marie-France; Darmaun, Dominique; Rozé, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Background Fecal calprotectin has been proposed as a non-invasive marker of intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease in adults and children. Fecal calprotectin levels have been reported to be much higher in both healthy full-term and preterm infants than in children and adults. Objective To determine the time course of fecal calprotectin (f-calprotectin) excretion in preterm infants from birth until hospital discharge and to identify factors influencing f-calprotectin levels in the first weeks of life, including bacterial establishment in the gut. Methodology F-calprotectin was determined using an ELISA assay in 147 samples obtained prospectively from 47 preterm infants (gestational age, and birth-weight interquartiles 27–29 weeks, and 880–1320 g, respectively) at birth, and at 2-week intervals until hospital discharge. Principal Findings Although median f-calprotectin excretion was 138 µg/g, a wide range of inter- and intra-individual variation in f-calprotectin values (from day 3 to day 78) was observed (86% and 67%, respectively). In multivariate regression analysis, f-calprotectin correlated negatively with ante and per natal antibiotic treatment (p = 0.001), and correlated positively with the volume of enteral feeding (mL/kg/d) (p = 0.009), the need to interrupt enteral feeding (p = 0.001), and prominent gastrointestinal colonization by Clostridium sp (p = 0.019) and Staphylococcus sp (p = 0.047). Conclusion During the first weeks of life, the high f-calprotectin values observed in preterm infants could be linked to the gut bacterial establishment. PMID:20552029

  16. Mechanism of maltose uptake and glucose excretion in Lactobacillus sanfrancisco.

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, H; Glaasker, E; Hammes, W P; Poolman, B; Konings, W N

    1994-01-01

    Lactobacillus sanfrancisco LTH 2581 can use only glucose and maltose as sources of metabolic energy. In maltose-metabolizing cells of L. sanfrancisco, approximately half of the internally generated glucose appears in the medium. The mechanisms of maltose (and glucose) uptake and glucose excretion have been investigated in cells and in membrane vesicles of L. sanfrancisco in which beef heart cytochrome c oxidase had been incorporated as a proton-motive-force-generating system. In the presence of ascorbate, N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD), and cytochrome c, the hybrid membranes facilitated maltose uptake against a concentration gradient, but accumulation of glucose could not be detected. Similarly, in intact cells of L. sanfrancisco, the nonmetabolizable glucose analog alpha-methylglucoside was taken up only to the equilibration level. Selective dissipation of the components of the proton and sodium motive force in the hybrid membranes indicated that maltose is transported by a proton symport mechanism. Internal [14C]maltose could be chased with external unlabeled maltose (homologous exchange), but heterologous maltose/glucose exchange could not be detected. Membrane vesicles of L. sanfrancisco also catalyzed glucose efflux and homologous glucose exchange. These activities could not be detected in membrane vesicles of glucose-grown cells. The results indicate that maltose-grown cells of L. sanfrancisco express a maltose-H+ symport and glucose uniport system. When maltose is the substrate, the formation of intracellular glucose can be more rapid than the subsequent metabolism, which leads to excretion of glucose via the uniport system. PMID:8188601

  17. QSAR analysis of drug excretion into human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Meskin, M S; Lien, E J

    1985-09-01

    Breast feeding has increased by approximately 25% in the United States during the past decade and this trend appears to be continuing. The number of drugs available to lactating women is also growing at a rapid pace. The excretion of drugs into breast-milk presents a potential danger to infants. In spite of this, little is known about the excretion of drugs into breast-milk. The ability to predict which drugs are potential hazards would be very useful in the clinical setting. This study quantitatively correlates the human milk to plasma concentration ratio of various basic and acidic drugs (log M/P) with the square root of the molecular weight, the partition coefficient (log P) and the degree of dissociation (log U/D). For basic drugs there is a negative-dependence on both log P and log U/D. High lipophilicity favours protein binding and reduces the amount of drug available for diffusion into milk. Therefore, as log P increases, the log M/P decreases. The negative-dependence on log U/D indicates that the higher the degree of dissociation of the base in plasma, the greater the log M/P will be. This fits well with the concept of ion-trapping. A strong base is more likely to be transferred and then trapped in milk which has a lower pH than plasma. For acidic drugs there is a negative-dependence on both square root (MW) and log P. The negative-dependence on square root (MW) suggests that large molecules are less likely to be able to diffuse into the milk. A negative-dependence on log P appears to hold true for bases and acids. Log M/P decreases as log P increases. This is probably due to increased protein binding by lipophilic drugs through non-specific hydrophobic interaction with plasma protein. PMID:4066977

  18. Interaction of calcium and phytate in broiler diets: 2. Effects on total and soluble phosphorus excretion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary calcium (Ca) can influence the amount of phytate excreted from broilers and therefore change the solubility of phosphorus (P) in manures. We investigate the effects of dietary Ca and phytate on P excretion in broilers by feeding 12 dietary treatments to broilers from 16 to 20 days of age. T...

  19. Finding the cause of acute kidney injury: which index of fractional excretion is better?

    PubMed

    Gotfried, Jonathan; Wiesen, Jonathan; Raina, Rupesh; Nally, Joseph V

    2012-02-01

    The fractional excretion of urea (FEU) is a useful index for differentiating the main categories of causes of acute kidney injury, ie, prerenal causes and intrinsic causes. It may be used in preference to the more widely used fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) in situations in which the validity of the latter is limited, such as in patients taking a diuretic. PMID:22301562

  20. Urinary angiotensinogen excretion is associated with blood pressure in obese young adults.

    PubMed

    Sato, Emiko; Mori, Takefumi; Satoh, Michihiro; Fujiwara, Mutsuko; Nakamichi, Yoshimi; Oba, Ikuko; Ogawa, Susumu; Kinouchi, Yoshitaka; Sato, Hiroshi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Hida, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Intrarenal RAS has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. It was recently reported that urinary angiotensinogen excretion levels are associated with intrarenal RAS. However, few markers predicting intrarenal RAS have been investigated in obese young subjects. The present study evaluated the association between blood pressure and intrarenal RAS activity, inflammation and oxidative stress in obese young adults. Urinary angiotensinogen excretion and urinary monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, and urinary thiobarbituric acid reaction substance (TBARS) as markers of intrarenal RAS activity, inflammation, and oxidative stress, respectively, were determined from morning urine of 111 young male adults. Participants were divided into two groups based on the body mass index (BMI). Natural log-transformed urinary angiotensinogen excretion level was significantly associated with blood pressure, MCP-1 excretion, and TBARS excretion elevation in the obese group (BMI ≥25 kg/m(2)). Multivariable analyses showed that every 1 standard deviation increase in natural-log transformed urinary angiotensinogen and MCP-1 excretion, but not TBARS excretion level was associated with elevated blood pressure in the obese group. These results indicate that urinary angiotensinogen and MCP-1 excretion were associated with blood pressure elevation in this population of obese young adults. It suggested that inappropriate RAS activity and inflammation precedes hypertension in obese young subjects and urinary angiotensinogen could be a screening maker for hypertension in young obese subjects. PMID:26825581

  1. 10 CFR 35.190 - Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies. 35.190 Section 35.190 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Not Required § 35.190 Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies. Except as provided in § 35.57,...

  2. 10 CFR 35.190 - Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies. 35.190 Section 35.190 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Not Required § 35.190 Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies. Except as provided in § 35.57,...

  3. 10 CFR 35.190 - Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies. 35.190 Section 35.190 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Not Required § 35.190 Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies. Except as provided in § 35.57,...

  4. 10 CFR 35.190 - Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies. 35.190 Section 35.190 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Not Required § 35.190 Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies. Except as provided in § 35.57,...

  5. 10 CFR 35.190 - Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies. 35.190 Section 35.190 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Unsealed Byproduct Material-Written Directive Not Required § 35.190 Training for uptake, dilution, and excretion studies. Except as provided in § 35.57,...

  6. Reduction in fecal excretion of Giardia cysts: effect of cholestasis and diet.

    PubMed

    Erlandsen, Stanley

    2005-12-01

    Bile is a major growth factor for the proliferation of Giardia spp. trophozoites in the small intestine and, at high concentrations, stimulates encystment of trophozoites. This report demonstrates that surgical cholestasis to interrupt the flow of bile from liver to intestine or the use of bile-binding resins in the diet can both dramatically decrease the fecal excretion of Giardia muris cysts. Cholestasis produced a 3 log reduction in excretion of G. muris cysts within 24 hr of surgery and a 4 log reduction after 3 days. Sham controls showed no difference in cyst excretion from presurgical control values. Two isocaloric diets were studied: a control diet (N) of Purina mouse chow containing 5% celufil and an experimental diet (CR) containing 5% cholestyramine, a resin that binds bile. Compared with the N diet, the CR diet was associated with reductions in cyst excretion of 3 logs within 1 day. Despite lowered excretion of G. muris cysts in mice fed the cholestyramine diet, the trophozoite recovery from the duodenum was similar with both diets. Cyclic feeding of the CR diet and the N diet at 3-day intervals produced significant oscillations (changes of 3-4 logs) in fecal cyst shedding. The significant reductions in fecal excretion of cysts observed with agents that bind bile suggests that diets capable of binding bile might be a therapeutic means to minimize the fecal excretion of cysts and thereby may help to reduce the risk of spreading giardiasis through fecal-oral contamination. PMID:16539036

  7. Urinary dopamine in man and rat: effects of inorganic salts on dopamine excretion.

    PubMed

    Ball, S G; Oats, N S; Lee, M R

    1978-08-01

    1. Plasma and urine free dopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine) were measured in six normal male volunteer subjects and the urinary clearance of dopamine was calculated for each subject. 2. The excretion rates for free dopamine in man were greater than could be explained by simple renal clearance. It was concluded that free dopamine must, therefore, be formed in the kidney. 3. Changes in urinary dopamine excretion were studied in four groups of rats initially maintained on low sodium diet and then given equimolar dietary supplements of NaCl, NaHCO3, KCl or NH4Cl, to study the specificity of the previously observed increase in dopamine excretion after increased dietary NaCl. 4. The mean dopamine excretion increased significantly in rats given NaCl, KCl and NH4Cl, whereas dopamine excretion decreased in those given NaHCO3. 5. The failure of dopamine excretion to rise in response to loading with NaHCO3 was unexpected, and argues against a simple effect of volume expansion by the sodium ion. The increase in dopamine excretion with KCl and NH4Cl showed that this response was not specific to the sodium ion. PMID:28196

  8. Organic Acid Excretion in Penicillium ochrochloron Increases with Ambient pH

    PubMed Central

    Vrabl, Pamela; Fuchs, Viktoria; Pichler, Barbara; Schinagl, Christoph W.; Burgstaller, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Despite being of high biotechnological relevance, many aspects of organic acid excretion in filamentous fungi like the influence of ambient pH are still insufficiently understood. While the excretion of an individual organic acid may peak at a certain pH value, the few available studies investigating a broader range of organic acids indicate that total organic acid excretion rises with increasing external pH. We hypothesized that this phenomenon might be a general response of filamentous fungi to increased ambient pH. If this is the case, the observation should be widely independent of the organism, growth conditions, or experimental design and might therefore be a crucial key point in understanding the function and mechanisms of organic acid excretion in filamentous fungi. In this study we explored this hypothesis using ammonium-limited chemostat cultivations (pH 2–7), and ammonium or phosphate-limited bioreactor batch cultivations (pH 5 and 7). Two strains of Penicillium ochrochloron were investigated differing in the spectrum of excreted organic acids. Confirming our hypothesis, the main result demonstrated that organic acid excretion in P. ochrochloron was enhanced at high external pH levels compared to low pH levels independent of the tested strain, nutrient limitation, and cultivation method. We discuss these findings against the background of three hypotheses explaining organic acid excretion in filamentous fungi, i.e., overflow metabolism, charge balance, and aggressive acidification hypothesis. PMID:22493592

  9. Faecal excretion dynamic during subacute oral exposure to different Pb species in Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Cadková, Zuzana; Száková, Jiřina; Miholová, Daniela; Válek, Petr; Pacáková, Zuzana; Vadlejch, Jaroslav; Langrová, Iva; Jankovská, Ivana

    2013-05-01

    Faecal excretion is a basic means of detoxification upon ingestion of Pb-contaminated feed. In order to determine a time course of Pb elimination after oral exposure to two different forms of this heavy metal (lead acetate vs. phyto-bound Pb), a feeding study was carried out in experimental rats using the Pb phyto-hyperaccumulator Pistia stratiotes as a model diet. The effect of starvation on Pb excretion was further studied in rats that were fed plant material. Twelve Pb doses (7 μg Pb/1 g BW) were administered orally over a 5-week period. Faeces samples were collected 24 and 72 h post-exposure. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and electrothermal absorption spectrometry methods were used for determination of heavy metal concentrations. Up to 53 % of ingested Pb was rapidly eliminated from the exposed rats via faeces within 24 h after exposure. Faecal excretion in exposed rats differed significantly when compared to that of the control group. Fasting before exposure reduced Pb excretion by up to 50 %. Faecal excretions of both examined Pb forms exhibited almost identical patterns. Considerable differences were revealed concerning total excretion levels; lead acetate was excreted in amount greater extent than those of phytobound Pb. Results of our study suggest that Pb forms occurring in the P. stratiotes tissues are absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract to a greater extent than Pb from lead acetate. Therefore, higher portions of ingested Pb can be available for potential accumulation in tissues of exposed subjects. PMID:23408261

  10. [Either calcium carbonate or sevelamer decreases urinary oxalate excretion in chronic renal failure patients].

    PubMed

    Caravaca, F; Ruiz, A B; Escola, J M; Hernández Gallego, R; Cerezo, I; Fernández, N; Barroso, S; Martín, M V

    2007-01-01

    The rate of oxalate absorbed from intestine is highly influenced by calcium intake in healthy subjects. It is unknown whether commonly used phosphate binders modify intestinal absorption and renal excretion of oxalate in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This study aims to determine if calcium carbonate or sevelamer influences on urinary oxalate excretion. Twenty patients with CKD (stage 4 and 5 pre-dialysis) were included. Two treatment (1500 mg of calcium carbonate or 2400 mg of sevelamer), two-period (21 days each), crossover study with balanced assignment of the order of administration, and two washout periods were the main characteristics of this study design. Laboratory analyses in each phase included: serum creatinine, calcium, phosphorus, bicarbonate, total cholesterol, and 24 h urinary excretion of oxalate, creatinine, and urea. Creatinine clearance, protein catabolic rate (PNNA), total urinary oxalate excretion, and urinary oxalate / creatinine ratio were determined. Seventeen patients completed both treatment sequences. Total urinary oxalate excretion and urinary oxalate / creatinine ratios decreased significantly with respect to washout periods either after sevelamer or calcium carbonate treatment. The decrease in urinary oxalate excretion was greater after calcium carbonate (41.2+/-17.4%) than after sevelamer treatment (30.4+/-23.8%). There were not significant changes in renal function or PNNA values throughout the study periods. In conclusion, either calcium carbonate or sevelamer significantly reduces urinary oxalate excretion in CKD patients. Further studies will be needed to ascertain whether the type of phosphate binder influences on the accumulation of oxalate in CKD patients. PMID:17944584

  11. Estimation of biliary excretion of foreign compounds using properties of molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Mohsen; Ghafourian, Taravat

    2014-01-01

    Biliary excretion is one of the main elimination pathways for drugs and/or their metabolites. Therefore, an insight into the structural profile of cholephilic compounds through accurate modelling of the biliary excretion is important for the estimation of clinical pharmacokinetics in early stages of drug discovery. The aim of this study was to develop quantitative structure-activity relationships as computational tools for the estimation of biliary excretion and identification of the molecular properties controlling this process. The study used percentage of dose excreted intact into bile measured in vivo in rat for a diverse dataset of 217 compounds. Statistical techniques were multiple linear regression analysis, regression trees, random forest and boosted trees. A simple regression tree model generated using the CART algorithm was the most accurate in the estimation of the percentage of bile excretion of compounds, and this outperformed the more sophisticated boosted trees and random forest techniques. Analysis of the outliers indicated that the models perform best when lipophilicity is not too extreme (log P < 5.35) and for compounds with molecular weight above 280 Da. Molecular descriptors selected by all these models including the top ten incorporated in boosted trees and random forest indicated a higher biliary excretion for relatively hydrophilic compounds especially if they are anionic or cationic, and have a large molecular size. A statistically validated molecular weight threshold for potentially significant biliary excretion was above 348 Da. PMID:24202722

  12. Variation of ²¹⁰Po daily urinary excretion for male subjects at environmental level.

    PubMed

    Hölgye, Z; Hýža, M; Mihalík, J; Rulík, P; Škrkal, J

    2015-05-01

    (210)Po was determined in 24-h urine of seven healthy males from Prague, Czech Republic, for ten consecutive days. The results show that for each volunteer, the urinary excretion of (210)Po changed only little from day to day in the studied time period. For two volunteers, the difference in the daily excreted (210)Po activity for two consecutive days was not significant, given the 95% confidence interval (two sigma) of the activity measurements. The same is valid for the excretion data of the other volunteers, except for some days where the differences were slightly higher. The range of daily urinary excretion of (210)Po of each volunteer in the studied time period was quite narrow. Among the volunteers, the maximum daily urinary excretion value of (210)Po was at most about a factor of 2.5 higher than the lowest excretion value. An attempt to explain the observed small inter-individual variability of (210)Po excretion in daily urine is made. PMID:25712002

  13. Persistence of urinary excretion products of benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Uziel, M.; Haglund, R.; White, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Persistence of DNA-adducts has been observed in a variety of experimental circumstances and has been suggested as one potential mechanism for explaining the long-term delay before expression of proliferative disease. In this concept, a stable DNA-adduct, which is a remnant of a prior exposure in a nondividing cell, would not express the genotoxic effect until the cells were stimulated to divide, and thus explain the long-term delay in expression of cancer. An alternative view of the observation of persistent DNA-adducts, described in this communication, is the continuing replenishment of DNA adducts by formation and turnover of these adducts from exposure to a constant supply of the ultimate carcinogenic species derived from a prior exposure. It is of interest to note that virtually all experiments where ''persistent'' adducts have been observed have been high dose exposures. During the course of experiments designed to develop improved methods for detection of DNA adducts and related derivatives derived from polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), we observed that there was a continuous excretion of urinary derivatives of the injected benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) beyond the initial burst of detoxification. This report describes the time dependent distribution of those derivatives in blood, urine, feces, and at the site of injection. 11 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Excretion of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy Infectivity in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Gregori, Luisa; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Alexeeva, Irina; Budka, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The route of transmission of most naturally acquired transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) infections remains speculative. To investigate urine as a potential source of TSE exposure, we used a sensitive method for detection and quantitation of TSE infectivity. Pooled urine collected from 22 hamsters showing clinical signs of 263K scrapie contained 3.8 ± 0.9 infectious doses/mL of infectivity. Titration of homogenates of kidneys and urinary bladders from the same animals gave concentrations 20,000-fold greater. Histologic and immunohistochemical examination of these same tissues showed no indications of inflammatory or other pathologic changes except for occasional deposits of disease-associated prion protein in kidneys. Although the source of TSE infectivity in urine remains unresolved, these results establish that TSE infectivity is excreted in urine and may thereby play a role in the horizontal transmission of natural TSEs. The results also indicate potential risk for TSE transmission from human urine–derived hormones and other medicines. PMID:18760007

  15. Urinary excretion of amphetamine after termination of drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Smith-Kielland, A; Skuterud, B; Mørland, J

    1997-09-01

    Important issues in urinary drug testing are the variability between consecutive urine specimens, the duration of positive specimens after last intake, and the usefulness of creatinine concentration to correct for variability in urine concentration. These issues were addressed in the present study with amphetamine as the drug of abuse. Drug users who were starting their sentences in prison participated in the study. Urine specimens were collected 1 to 5 times per day. Screening was performed by EMIT d.a.u. (cutoff, 0.30 microgram/mL) and EMIT II (cutoff, 1.00 microgram/mL), and confirmation was performed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Creatinine and pH were recorded. Amphetamine was demonstrated in seven subjects. The highest concentration was 135 micrograms/mL. The last positive-screened specimen was observed by EMIT d.a.u. after almost 9 days of imprisonment and by EMIT II after 3 days. Large concentration differences could be found between consecutive specimens, accompanied by considerable differences in creatinine and pH. The individual curves were generally smoother after creatinine correction of concentrations. As expected, urinary pH was observed to influence the excretion. PMID:9288582

  16. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of procyanidins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Wang, Yijun; Li, Daxiang; Ho, Chi-Tang; Li, Junsong; Wan, Xiaochun

    2016-03-16

    Procyanidins (PAs) are polyphenols in plant food that have many health benefits, including cancer prevention, cardiovascular protection and diabetes prevention. PAs have been known to have low oral bioavilability. In this review, we summarize the published results on the ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) of PAs in vivo and in vitro. After oral administration, in the stomach the decomposition of PAs is highly dependent on the pH value of gastric juice, which is also affected by food intake. In the small intestine, PA polymers and oligomers with DP > 4 are not directly absorbed in vivo, but minor PA monomers and dimers could be detected in the plasma. Methylated and glucuronidated PA dimers and monomers are the main metabolites of PAs in plasma. In the colon, PAs are catabolized by colonic microflora into a series of low molecular weight phenolic acids, such as phenyl valerolactone, phenylacetic acids and phenylpropionic acids. We reviewed the degradation of PAs in gastric digestion, the absorption of PAs in the small intestine and the metabolic pathway of PAs by colonic microflora. To clearly explain the in vivo pharmacokinetics of PAs, a systematic comparative analysis on previously published data on PAs was conducted. PMID:26814915

  17. Intersalt: an international study of electrolyte excretion and blood pressure. Results for 24 hour urinary sodium and potassium excretion. Intersalt Cooperative Research Group.

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The relations between 24 hour urinary electrolyte excretion and blood pressure were studied in 10,079 men and women aged 20-59 sampled from 52 centres around the world based on a highly standardised protocol with central training of observers, a central laboratory, and extensive quality control. Relations between electrolyte excretion and blood pressure were studied in individual subjects within each centre and the results of these regression analyses pooled for all 52 centres. Relations between population median electrolyte values and population blood pressure values were also analysed across the 52 centres. Sodium excretion ranged from 0.2 mmol/24 h (Yanomamo Indians, Brazil) to 242 mmol/24 h (north China). In individual subjects (within centres) it was significantly related to blood pressure. Four centres found very low sodium excretion, low blood pressure, and little or no upward slope of blood pressure with age. Across the other 48 centres sodium was significantly related to the slope of blood pressure with age but not to median blood pressure or prevalence of high blood pressure. Potassium excretion was negatively correlated with blood pressure in individual subjects after adjustment for confounding variables. Across centres there was no consistent association. The relation of sodium to potassium ratio to blood pressure followed a pattern similar to that of sodium. Body mass index and heavy alcohol intake had strong, significant independent relations with blood pressure in individual subjects. PMID:3416162

  18. Association of Sodium Excretion With Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance, and Body Fat.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Won; Han, Kum Hyun; Han, Sang Youb; Koo, Ho Seok; Kim, Suhnggwon; Chin, Ho Jun

    2015-09-01

    Sodium intake was reported to be related to metabolic syndrome (MS). Although a strong association between sodium intake and blood pressure (BP) has been reported, the relationship between sodium intake and other components of MS is unknown. An observational study of 18,146 adults in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV-V databases (2008-2011) was performed. Estimates of 24-h sodium excretion were made from a single fasting urine sample. A significant positive association was found between sodium excretion and systolic BP and between sodium excretion and diastolic BP in participants with and without hypertension after adjusting for multiple covariates (P < 0.001 for trend). The relationship between triglyceride or glucose levels and sodium excretion was linear (P < 0.005). In both men and women, a positive relationship between sodium excretion and waist circumference and an inverse relationship between sodium excretion and high-density lipoprotein were found (P ≤ 0.001). Body fat percentage, body fat mass, and insulin level were positively related to sodium excretion (P ≤ 0.001), and HOMA-IR was significantly associated with sodium excretion (P < 0.05). The risk of MS was elevated 1.279-fold in the second quartile of sodium excretion (95% CI, 1.088-1.504, P = 0.003), 1.479-fold in the third quartile (95% CI, 1.262-1.734; P < 0.001), and 1.929-fold in the highest quartile (95% CI 1.654-2.249, P <  .001) compared with the lowest quartile. Sodium intake is significantly associated with all components of MS, body fat, and insulin resistance. Therefore, a high-salt diet is a significant risk factor for MS. PMID:26426658

  19. Association of Sodium Excretion With Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance, and Body Fat

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se Won; Han, Kum Hyun; Han, Sang Youb; Koo, Ho Seok; Kim, Suhnggwon; Chin, Ho Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sodium intake was reported to be related to metabolic syndrome (MS). Although a strong association between sodium intake and blood pressure (BP) has been reported, the relationship between sodium intake and other components of MS is unknown. An observational study of 18,146 adults in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV-V databases (2008–2011) was performed. Estimates of 24-h sodium excretion were made from a single fasting urine sample. A significant positive association was found between sodium excretion and systolic BP and between sodium excretion and diastolic BP in participants with and without hypertension after adjusting for multiple covariates (P < 0.001 for trend). The relationship between triglyceride or glucose levels and sodium excretion was linear (P < 0.005). In both men and women, a positive relationship between sodium excretion and waist circumference and an inverse relationship between sodium excretion and high-density lipoprotein were found (P ≤ 0.001). Body fat percentage, body fat mass, and insulin level were positively related to sodium excretion (P ≤ 0.001), and HOMA-IR was significantly associated with sodium excretion (P < 0.05). The risk of MS was elevated 1.279-fold in the second quartile of sodium excretion (95% CI, 1.088–1.504, P = 0.003), 1.479-fold in the third quartile (95% CI, 1.262–1.734; P < 0.001), and 1.929-fold in the highest quartile (95% CI 1.654–2.249, P < 0.001) compared with the lowest quartile. Sodium intake is significantly associated with all components of MS, body fat, and insulin resistance. Therefore, a high-salt diet is a significant risk factor for MS. PMID:26426658

  20. Systematic review focusing on the excretion and protection roles of sweat in the skin.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yan; Cui, Xiao; Liu, Yanhua; Li, Yaoyin; Liu, Jian; Cheng, Biao

    2014-01-01

    The skin excretes substances primarily through sweat glands. Several conditions have been demonstrated to be associated with diminished sweating. However, few studies have concentrated on the metabolism and excretion of sweat. This review focuses on the relationship between temperature and the thermoregulatory efficacy of sweat, and then discusses the excretion of sweat, which includes the metabolism of water, minerals, proteins, vitamins as well as toxic substances. The potential role of sweat secretion in hormone homeostasis and the effects on the defense system of the skin are also clarified. PMID:24577280

  1. Short communication: Individual cow variation in urinary excretion of phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Løvendahl, Peter; Sehested, Jakob

    2016-06-01

    Some dairy cows excrete large amounts of P through their urine; thus, it was speculated that a genetic defect related to their efficiency in uptake of P or recirculation of P could cause such an effect. This speculation was pursued in a cross sectional study on 139 cows (103 Holstein and 36 Jersey) from an experimental herd using repeated sampling of urine (301 samples) to investigate sources of variation in urinary P concentration (Pu). Urine samples were taken on 6 testing sessions spread over 2 mo. Each sample was obtained by mild manual stimulation of the rear udder escutcheon area. The samples were immediately assayed for pH, stored frozen, and assayed for inorganic P and creatinine. Concentrations of P and creatinine in urine, the ratio of Pu to creatinine, and pH were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The model included fixed effects of breed, parity number, and sampling session. Stage of lactation was fitted as Wilmink-type lactation curves. Random effects included additive polygenic ancestry, permanent animal effects, and residual. The distribution of Pu approximated normality except for a single sample with very high Pu and very low pH. This sample came from a cow diagnosed independently with ketosis. For the remaining samples, it was shown that Pu has low to moderate heritability (0.12) and is only moderately repeatable (0.21). Based on a small data set, it is tentatively concluded that individual differences between cows exist in their Pu, and individual differences presumably result from genetic differences. However, it remains unclear if cows with genetically lower or higher Pu will perform better on a low-P diet. PMID:26995137

  2. Pharmacokinetics of biliary excretion of N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPA) in animals of different species.

    PubMed

    Atawodi, S E; Maduagwu, E N

    1990-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic investigations into the biliary excretion of N-nitrosodiphenylamine given as an i.p. dose of 50 mg/kg were conducted and results compared in three animal species; rat, guinea pig and rabbit following bile duct cannulation and collection of bile in vitro. The guinea pig excreted NDPA into bile fastest while the rabbit, which excreted it slowest, eliminated it fastest. Both appearance and disappearance of the nitrosamine were comparatively slow in the rat. NDPA elimination half-life values in the animal species were 510, 240 and 95 min respectively, while cumulative excretions amounted to 12, 3 and 0.3 percent. The toxicological implications of these species differences are highlighted. PMID:2384114

  3. Effect of iron poly (sorbitolgluconic acid) complex on urinary cellular excretion.

    PubMed

    Elliott, H L; Lawrence, J R; Campbell, B C; Goldberg, A; Smart, L E

    1981-01-01

    The intramuscular injection of 250 mg iron poly (sorbitol-gluconic acid) complex caused no increase in urinary cellular or bacterial excretion in 8 patients with chronic pyelonephritis, 4 patients with non-infective renal disease, and 4 controls. However, in 4 patients with chronic infective disease of the renal tract given 500 g there was a significant increase in cellular excretion. This response was not seen in 2 control patients, nor in 2 patients with non-infective renal disease. Using a differential staining technique, this increase in urinary cellular excretion was found to be due, not to leucocytes, but to renal tubular cells. The precise significance of this is unclear, but there would be concern that the high concentration of excreted iron was providing a 'toxic' insult to susceptible, infection-damaged cells. PMID:7226874

  4. Biliary excretion of foreign compounds. Benzene and its derivatives in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Abou-El-Makarem, M. M.; Millburn, P.; Smith, R. L.; Williams, R. T.

    1967-01-01

    1. The extent of the excretion in the bile of the rat of benzene and 21 of its simple derivatives was studied. 2. Some 16 compounds of molecular weight less than 200, and including neutral molecules (benzene and toluene), aromatic acids, aromatic amines and phenols, were injected in solution intraperitoneally into biliary-cannulated rats. Metabolites in the bile were identified and estimated. The extent of biliary excretion of these compounds was low, i.e. 0–10% of the dose in 24hr., and most appeared in the bile mainly as conjugates. 3. The biliary excretion of six conjugates of molecular weight less than 300, including three glycine conjugates, one sulphate conjugate, one glucuronic acid conjugate and two acetyl derivatives, was low (less than 3% of the dose). 4. It is concluded that simple benzene derivatives of molecular weight less than about 300 are poorly excreted in rat bile. PMID:16742555

  5. Evidence that auxin-induced growth of soybean hypocotyls involves proton excretion

    SciTech Connect

    Rayle, D.L.; Cleland, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    The role of H/sup +/ excretion in auxin-induced growth of soybean hypocotyl tissues has been investigated, using tissues whose cuticle was rendered permeable to protons or buffers by scarification (scrubbing). Indoleacetic acid induces both elongation and H/sup +/ excretion after a lag of 10 to 12 minutes. Cycloheximide inhibits growth and causes the tissues to remove protons from the medium. Neutral buffers (pH 7.0) inhibit auxin-induced growth of scrubbed but not intact sections; the inhibition increases as the buffers strength is increased. Both live and frozen-thawed sections, in the absence of auxin, extend in response to exogenously supplied protons. Fusicoccin induces both elongation and H/sup +/ excretion at rates greater than does auxin. These results indicate that H/sup +/ excretion is involved in the initiation of auxin-induced elongation in soybean hypocotyl tissue.

  6. Urinary excretion of phenolic acids in rats fed cranberry, blueberry, or black raspberry powder.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Ramesh; Howard, Luke R; Prior, Ronald L

    2014-05-01

    Dietary polyphenolics can be converted into smaller phenolic acids (PA) by microorganisms in the colon and may contribute to health benefits associated with the parent polyphenolics. Urinary excretion of 18 PA and their conjugates was studied, using HPLC-MS/MS, in rats fed AIN93G-based diets containing 5% (dry weight basis) of either cranberry (CB), blueberry (BB), or black raspberry (BRB). Hippuric, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylacetic, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids were excreted in greatest quantity in the urine over a 24 h period in all diets. Primary PA excreted in the berry diets were 4-hydroxycinnamic acid for CB; chlorogenic, ferulic, and 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acids for BB; and 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic, 3-hydroxybenzoic, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acids for BRB. PA were present in conjugated form with cinnamic acid derivatives being 50-70% and phenylacetic acid derivatives conjugated <10%. Conjugated, and not just the free, PA are significant contributors to total urinary excretion. PMID:24180593

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT OF PHARMACEUTICALS - THE SIGNIFICANCE OF FACTORS BEYOND DIRECT EXCRETION TO SEWERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The combined excretion of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) via urine and feces is considered the primary route by which APIs from human pharmaceuticals enter the environment. Disposal of unwanted, leftover medications by flushing into sewers has been considered a secondar...

  8. Specific IgA Enhances the Transcytosis and Excretion of Hepatitis A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Counihan, Natalie A.; Anderson, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) replicates in the liver, and is excreted from the body in feces. However, the mechanisms of HAV transport from hepatocytes to the gastrointestinal tract are poorly understood, mainly due to lack of suitable in vitro models. Here, we use a polarized hepatic cell line and in vivo models to demonstrate vectorial transport of HAV from hepatocytes into bile via the apical cell membrane. Although this transport is specific for HAV, the rate of fecal excretion in inefficient, accounting for less than 1% of input virus from the bloodstream per hour. However, we also found that the rate of HAV excretion was enhanced in the presence of HAV-specific IgA. Using mice lacking the polymeric IgA receptor (pIgR−/−), we show that a proportion of HAV:IgA complexes are transported via the pIgR demonstrating a role for specific antibody in pathogen excretion. PMID:26911447

  9. Action of steroids on H+ and NH+4 excretion in the toad urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Frazier, L W; Zachariah, N Y

    1979-09-14

    This study was done to determine if steroid compounds will stimulate the urinary bladder of the toad to increase its capacity to acidify the urine and excrete NH+4. Aldosterone, 17 beta-estradiol, dexamethasone, pregnenolone, and cholesterol were tested on the bladder. All compounds tested were found to stimulate the rate of acidification by the bladder, above that of a paired control hemibladder. In contrast, only the steroids aldosterone and 17 beta-estradiol were found to stimulate NH+4 excretion in the bladder. Cycloheximide was found to block the action of aldosterone on the NH+4 excretion, but did not have a significant effect on the stimulation of acidification by aldosterone. We conclude that steroids stimulate H+ and NH+4 excretion in the toad urinary bladder. In addition, the NH+4 excretory system seems to be more specific to this effect than is the H+ excretory system. PMID:113550

  10. Excretion masses and environmental occurrence of antibiotics in typical swine and dairy cattle farms in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Jun; Ying, Guang-Guo; Liu, Shan; Zhang, Rui-Quan; Lai, Hua-Jie; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Pan, Chang-Gui

    2013-02-01

    This paper evaluated the excretion masses and environmental occurrence of 11 classes of 50 antibiotics in six typical swine and dairy cattle farms in southern China. Animal feeds, wastewater and solid manure samples as well as environmental samples (soil, stream and well water) were collected in December 2010 from these farms. Twenty eight antibiotics, including tetracyclines, bacitracin, lincomycin, sulfonamides, fluoroquinolones, ceftiofur, trimethoprim, macrolides, and florfenicol, were detected in the feeds, animal wastes and receiving environments. The normalized daily excretion masses per swine and cattle were estimated to be 18.2mg/day/swine and 4.24 mg/day/cattle. Chlortetracycline (11.6 mg/day/swine), bacitracin (3.81 mg/day/swine), lincomycin (1.19 mg/day/swine) and tetracycline (1.04 mg/day/swine) were the main contributors to the normalized daily excretion masses of antibiotics per swine, while chlortetracycline (3.66 mg/day/cattle) contributed 86% of the normalized daily excretion masses of antibiotics per cattle. Based on the survey of feeds and animal wastes from the swine farms and interview with the farmers, antibiotics excreted by swine were mainly originated from the feeds, while antibiotics excreted by dairy cattle were mainly from the injection route. If we assume that the swine and cattle in China excrete the same masses of antibiotics as the selected livestock farms, the total excretion mass by swine and cattle per annum in China could reach 3,080,000 kg/year and 164,000 kg/year. Various antibiotics such as sulfonamides, tetracyclines, fluroquinolones, macrolides, trimethoprim, lincomycin and florfenicol were detected in well water, stream and field soil, suggesting that livestock farms could be an important pollution source of various antibiotics to the receiving environments. PMID:23268145

  11. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions.

    PubMed

    Guessous, Idris; Pruijm, Menno; Ponte, Belén; Ackermann, Daniel; Ehret, Georg; Ansermot, Nicolas; Vuistiner, Philippe; Staessen, Jan; Gu, Yumei; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Vogt, Bruno; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Pechère-Berstchi, Antoinette; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Burnier, Michel; Eap, Chin B; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-03-01

    Intake of caffeinated beverages might be associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality possibly via the lowering of blood pressure. We estimated the association of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolites in a population-based sample. Families were randomly selected from the general population of Swiss cities. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted using validated devices. Urinary caffeine, paraxanthine, theophylline, and theobromine excretions were measured in 24 hours urine using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We used mixed models to explore the associations of urinary excretions with blood pressure although adjusting for major confounders. The 836 participants (48.9% men) included in this analysis had mean age of 47.8 and mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 120.1 and 78.0 mm Hg. For each doubling of caffeine excretion, 24-hour and night-time systolic blood pressure decreased by 0.642 and 1.107 mm Hg (both P values <0.040). Similar inverse associations were observed for paraxanthine and theophylline. Adjusted night-time systolic blood pressure in the first (lowest), second, third, and fourth (highest) quartile of paraxanthine urinary excretions were 110.3, 107.3, 107.3, and 105.1 mm Hg, respectively (P trend <0.05). No associations of urinary excretions with diastolic blood pressure were generally found, and theobromine excretion was not associated with blood pressure. Anti-hypertensive therapy, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol consumption modify the association of caffeine urinary excretion with systolic blood pressure. Ambulatory systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with urinary excretions of caffeine and other caffeine metabolites. Our results are compatible with a potential protective effect of caffeine on blood pressure. PMID:25489060

  12. Behavioral and Perceived Stressor Effects on Urinary Catecholamine Excretion in Adult Samoans

    PubMed Central

    Bergey, Meredith R.; Steele, Matthew S.; Bereiter, David A.; Viali, Satupaitea; McGarvey, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The effects of perceptions and behaviors related to culturally-patterned socioeconomic obligations on catecholamine excretion rates were studied in a cross-sectional sample of Samoan adults. Methods 378 participants, ages 29-62 years, from 9 villages throughout Samoa, provided timed overnight urine specimens, and self-reported perceptions and behaviors associated with contributions to one's family, aiga, and chief, matai, and communal gift exchanges, fa'alavelave. Urinary norepinephrine and epinephrine excretion rates were measured by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Age (≤40 vs. >40 years) and gender-specific regression models were estimated to detect associations with catecholamine excretion. Results Young women who contribute more to their matai, who consider fa'alavelave to be a financial strain, and who view their contribution to their matai to be ‘just right’, had significantly higher residence-adjusted norepinephrine excretion. Young women who contribute more to their matai, who consider fa'alavelave to be a financial strain, and who consider their contribution to their aiga not to be a burden, had higher epinephrine excretion. Older men who contribute more to their aiga and who perceive their contribution to their aiga to be ‘just right’ had increased residence-adjusted epinephrine excretion. Conclusions Individual-level perceptions and behaviors related to traditional socioeconomic obligations are a significant correlate of increased overnight catecholamine excretion rates. Higher excretion rates may be attributed to psychosocial stress arousal associated with a discordance between personal desires for upward social mobility, and family and community-based socioeconomic obligations. Changes in patterns of individual-level psychosocial stress arousal may contribute to cardiovascular disease risk in modernizing Samoans. PMID:21793091

  13. Urinary excretion of diazepam metabolites in healthy volunteers and drug users.

    PubMed

    Smith-Kielland, A; Skuterud, B; Olsen, K M; Mørland, J

    2001-05-01

    Urinary excretion profiles of diazepam metabolites were investigated. The subjects were healthy volunteers receiving one single 10-mg dose of diazepam or drug abusers starting a prison sentence. Urinary excretion of metabolites was analysed by immunological screening, liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Relating the metabolite concentration to creatinine concentration in the specimens decreased sample-to-sample variations. In some cases such correction could protect a subject from erroneous accusations of a new intake. PMID:11386610

  14. The association of bile acid excretion and atherosclerotic coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Charach, Gideon; Grosskopf, Itamar; Rabinovich, Alexander; Shochat, Michael; Weintraub, Moshe; Rabinovich, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Background: Excess cholesterol is usually eliminated from the body by conversion to bile acids excreted in feces as bile salts. The excretion of large amounts of bile protects against atherosclerosis, while diminished excretion may lead to coronary artery disease (CAD). Objective: To investigate a relationship between CAD and bile acid excretion. Methods: Bile acid excretion was compared between 36 patients with proven CAD and 37 CAD-free individuals (controls). The groups were comparable for demographics and selected risk factors. All subjects received a 4-day standard diet that included ∼500 mg of cholesterol. Fecal bile acids from 24-hour stool collections were measured by gas liquid chromatography. Results: CAD patients excreted lower amounts of total bile acids (358 ± 156 mg) than controls (617 ± 293 mg; p < 0.01) and less deoxycholic acid (188.29 ± 98.12 mg versus 325.96 ± 198.57 mg; p < 0.0001) and less lithocholic acid (115.43 ± 71.89 mg versus 197.27 ± 126.87 mg; p < 0.01). Advanced age, male gender, left ventricular ejection fraction and total bile acid levels were significant independent factors that predicted CAD (p < 0.05). Mortality, CAD and cerebrovascular accident development rates were significantly lower for the controls at the 13-year follow up. Conclusion: CAD patients have significantly decreased bile acid excretion levels than non-CAD patients. An impaired ability to excrete cholesterol may be an additional risk factor for CAD development. PMID:21694811

  15. Effect of disturbance of the gastrointestinal microflora on the faecal excretion of Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A.

    PubMed

    Smith, G R; Thornton, E A

    1993-04-01

    Oral pretreatment of mice with either a mixture of kanamycin and erythromycin or metronidazole to modify the gut microflora greatly enhanced the faecal excretion of Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A given by mouth. This lends support to the suggestion that disturbance of the gastrointestinal microflora in animals such as cattle, which often carry the organism in the rumen, may lead to intestinal multiplication and faecal excretion, thereby providing a source of infection that may lead to necrobacillosis of the body surface. PMID:8472777

  16. K+ Excretion: The Other Purpose for Puddling Behavior in Japanese Papilio Butterflies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the purpose of butterfly puddling, we measured the amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ that were absorbed or excreted during puddling by male Japanese Papilio butterflies through a urine test. All of the butterflies that sipped water with a Na+ concentration of 13 mM absorbed Na+ and excreted K+, although certain butterflies that sipped solutions with high concentrations of Na+ excreted Na+. According to the Na+ concentrations observed in naturally occurring water sources, water with a Na+ concentration of up to 10 mM appears to be optimal for the health of male Japanese Papilio butterflies. The molar ratio of K+ to Na+ observed in leaves was 43.94 and that observed in flower nectars was 10.93. The Na+ amount in 100 g of host plant leaves ranged from 2.11 to 16.40 mg, and the amount in 100 g of flower nectar ranged from 1.24 to 108.21 mg. Differences in host plants did not explain the differences in the frequency of puddling observed for different Japanese Papilio species. The amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in the meconium of both male and female butterflies were also measured, and both males and females excreted more K+ than the other three ions. Thus, the fluid that was excreted by butterflies at emergence also had a role in the excretion of the excessive K+ in their bodies. The quantities of Na+ and K+ observed in butterfly eggs were approximately 0.50 μg and 4.15 μg, respectively; thus, female butterflies required more K+ than male butterflies. Therefore, female butterflies did not puddle to excrete K+. In conclusion, the purpose of puddling for male Papilio butterflies is not only to absorb Na+ to correct deficiencies but also to excrete excessive K+. PMID:25955856

  17. Excretion of copper complexed with thiomolybdate into the bile and blood in LEC rats.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Y; Sadakata, I; Ogra, Y; Suzuki, K T

    2000-02-01

    Copper (Cu) accumulating in a form bound to metallothionein (MT) in the liver of Long-Evans rats with a cinnamon-like coat color (LEC rats), an animal model of Wilson disease, was removed with ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (TTM), and the fate of the Cu complexed with TTM and mobilized from the liver was determined. TTM was injected intravenously as a single dose of 2, 10 or 50 mg TTM/kg body weight into LEC and Wistar (normal Cu metabolism) rats, and then the concentrations of Cu and molybdenum (Mo) in the bile and plasma were monitored with time after the injection. In Wistar rats, most of the Mo was excreted into the urine, only a small quantity being excreted into the bile, while Cu excreted into the urine decreased. However, in LEC rats, Cu and Mo were excreted into the bile and blood, and the bile is recognized for the first time as the major route of excretion. The Cu excreted into both the bile and plasma was accompanied by an equimolar amount of Mo. The relative ratio of the amounts of Cu excreted into the bile and plasma was 40/60 for the low and high dose groups, and 70/30 for the medium dose group. The systemic dispositions of the Cu mobilized from the liver and the Mo complexed with the Cu were also determined for the kidneys, spleen and brain together with their urinal excretion. Although Mo in the three organs and Cu in the kidneys and spleen were increased or showed a tendency to increase, Cu in the brain was not increased at all doses of TTM. PMID:10728780

  18. K+ excretion: the other purpose for puddling behavior in Japanese Papilio butterflies.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takashi A; Ito, Tetsuo; Hagiya, Hiroshi; Hata, Tamako; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Yokohari, Fumio; Niihara, Kinuko

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the purpose of butterfly puddling, we measured the amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ that were absorbed or excreted during puddling by male Japanese Papilio butterflies through a urine test. All of the butterflies that sipped water with a Na+ concentration of 13 mM absorbed Na+ and excreted K+, although certain butterflies that sipped solutions with high concentrations of Na+ excreted Na+. According to the Na+ concentrations observed in naturally occurring water sources, water with a Na+ concentration of up to 10 mM appears to be optimal for the health of male Japanese Papilio butterflies. The molar ratio of K+ to Na+ observed in leaves was 43.94 and that observed in flower nectars was 10.93. The Na+ amount in 100 g of host plant leaves ranged from 2.11 to 16.40 mg, and the amount in 100 g of flower nectar ranged from 1.24 to 108.21 mg. Differences in host plants did not explain the differences in the frequency of puddling observed for different Japanese Papilio species. The amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in the meconium of both male and female butterflies were also measured, and both males and females excreted more K+ than the other three ions. Thus, the fluid that was excreted by butterflies at emergence also had a role in the excretion of the excessive K+ in their bodies. The quantities of Na+ and K+ observed in butterfly eggs were approximately 0.50 μg and 4.15 μg, respectively; thus, female butterflies required more K+ than male butterflies. Therefore, female butterflies did not puddle to excrete K+. In conclusion, the purpose of puddling for male Papilio butterflies is not only to absorb Na+ to correct deficiencies but also to excrete excessive K+. PMID:25955856

  19. Additional short-term plutonium urinary excretion data from the 1945-1947 plutonium injection studies

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W.D.; Gautier, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The amount of plutonium excreted per day following intravenous injection was shown to be significantly higher than predicted by the Langham power function model. Each of the Los Alamos National Laboratory notebooks used to record the original analytical data was studied for details that could influence the findings. It was discovered there were additional urine excretion data for case HP-3. This report presents the additional data, as well as data on case HP-6. (ACR)

  20. Short-term starvation effects on nitrogen and phosphorus excretion by the chaetognath Sagitta enflata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyper, James P.

    1981-12-01

    Freshly captured Sagitta enflata exhibited specific excretion rates of ammonium and phosphate (expressed as percentage body content of N or P per hour) that were not significantly related to the size of individual animals. The degree of crowding in experimental vessels was positively correlated with specific excretion rates of ammonium. Excretion rates, under conditions that precluded feeding, decreased sharply during the first several hours' incubation time, approaching the rates exhibited by animals starved overnight. The practice of holding freshly captured zooplankton for a time before determining excretion rates may seriously affect those rates, if the animals are unable to feed. Animals captured during the day in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, having no food items in their guts, had mean specific excretion rates (± S.D.) of 0·81±0·51% body content of N h -1 for ammonium, and 1·29±1·24% body content of P h -1 for phosphate. Minimal estimates of natural excretion rates, made from the first hour of incubation in further experiments, were 1·19±0·47% h -1 for nitrogen and 3·8±3·95% h -1 for phosphorus. Sagitta is not a large contributor to nutrient regeneration in Kaneohe Bay.

  1. Controlled exercise effects on chromium excretion of trained and untrained runners consuming a constant diet

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Bryden, N.A.; Polansky, M.M.; Deuster, P.A.

    1986-03-05

    To determine if degree of training effects urinary Cr losses, Cr excretion of 8 adult trained and 5 untrained runners was determined on rest days and following exercise at 90% of maximal oxygen uptake on a treadmill to exhaustion with 30 second exercise and 30 second rest periods. Subjects were fed a constant daily diet containing 9 ..mu..g of Cr per 1000 calories to minimize changes due to diet. Maximal oxygen consumption of the trained runners was in the good or above range based upon their age and that of the untrained runners was average or below. While consuming the control diet, basal urinary Cr excretion of subjects who exercise regularly was significantly lower than that of the sedentary control subjects, 0.09 +/- 0.01 and 0.21 +/- 0.03 ..mu..g/day (mean +/- SEM), respectively. Daily urinary Cr excretion of trained subjects was significantly higher on the day of a single exercise bout at 90% of maximal oxygen consumption compared to nonexercise days, 0.12 +/- 0.02 and 0.09 +/- 0.01 ..mu..g/day, respectively. Urinary Cr excretion of 5 untrained subjects was not altered following controlled exercise. These data demonstrate that basal urinary Cr excretion and excretion in response to exercise are related to maximal oxygen consumption and therefore degree of fitness.

  2. Diel variation in ammonia excretion, glutamine levels, and hydration status in two species of terrestrial isopods.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jonathan C; Peña-Peralta, Mariasol

    2005-01-01

    Terrestrial isopods (suborder Oniscidea) excrete most nitrogen diurnally as volatile ammonia, and ammonia-loaded animals accumulate nonessential amino acids, which may constitute the major nocturnal nitrogen pool. This study explored the relationship between ammonia excretion, glutamine storage/mobilization, and water balance, in two sympatric species Ligidium lapetum (section Diplocheta), a hygric species; and Armadillidium vulgare (Section Crinocheta), a xeric species capable of water-vapor absorption (WVA). Ammonia excretion (12-h), tissue glutamine levels, and water contents were measured following field collection of animals at dusk and dawn. In both species, diurnal ammonia excretion exceeded nocturnal excretion four- to fivefold while glutamine levels increased four- to sevenfold during the night. Most glutamine was accumulated in the somatic tissues ("body wall"). While data support the role of glutamine in nocturnal nitrogen storage, potential nitrogen mobilization from glutamine breakdown (162 micromol g(-1) in A. vulgare) exceeds measured ammonia excretion (2.5 micromol g(-1)) over 60-fold. This may serve to generate the high hemolymph ammonia concentrations (and high P(NH3)) seen during volatilization. The energetic cost of ammonia volatilization is discussed in the light of these findings. Mean water contents were similar at dusk and dawn in both species, indicating that diel cycles of water depletion and replenishment were not occurring. PMID:15578188

  3. Excretion of 14C-labeled cyanide in rats exposed to chronic intake of potassium cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Okoh, P.N.

    1983-09-15

    The excretion of an acute dose of 14C-labeled cyanide in urine, feces, and expired air was studied in rats exposed to daily intake of unlabeled KCN in the diet for 6 weeks. Urinary excretion was the main route of elimination of cyanide carbon in these rats, accounting for 83% of the total excreted radioactivity in 12 hr and 89% of the total excreted radioactivity in 24 hr. The major excretion metabolite of cyanide in urine was thiocyanate, and this metabolite accounted for 71 and 79% of the total urinary activity in 12 hr and 24 hr, respectively. The mean total activity excreted in expired air after 12 hr was only 4%, and this value did not change after 24 hr. Of the total activity in expired air in 24 hr, 90% was present as carbon dioxide and 9% as cyanide. When these results were compared with those observed for control rats, it was clear that the mode of elimination of cyanide carbon in both urine and breath was not altered by the chronic intake of cyanide.

  4. Abnormal catecholamine urinary excretion after emotional stimulus in patients with cerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Stoica, E; Enulescu, O

    1981-01-01

    The epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) urinary excretion before and after a mild "emotional stimulus" (ES) was determined in 22 patients with cerebral infarction and 30 patients with cerebral hemorrhage, as well as in 18 normotensive and 18 hypertensive controls. In patients with cerebral infarction, the majority normotensive, the "emotional stimulus" induced a significant increase in NE excretion, but non-significant alterations in E excretion. Similar changes were noted in normotensive controls. In patients with cerebral hemorrhage, almost all hypertensive, and in hypertensive controls, ES brought about a consistent rise in E excretion without influencing significantly the NE excretion. The presence of a constant increase in E excretion after a mild emotion not only in patients with cerebral hemorrhage but also in subjects with uncomplicated essential hypertension, suggests that the E release found in patients with cerebral hemorrhage is related to the hypertensive state pre-existing the stroke rather than to hemorrhagic stroke itself. The pattern of catecholamine discharge in hypertensive patients might play a part in the occurrence of cerebral hemorrhagic accidents. The epinephrine discharges induce sudden increases in systolic blood pressure which could lead to the rupture of cerebral vessels with hyalinotic or atherosclerotic alterations. PMID:7245303

  5. Hyperuricemia in acute gastroenteritis is caused by decreased urate excretion via ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Ooyama, Keiko; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Tappei; Nakashima, Akio; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Higashino, Toshihide; Wakai, Kenji; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Hokari, Ryota; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Inui, Ayano; Fujimori, Shin; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the physiological and pathophysiological roles of intestinal urate excretion via ABCG2 in humans, we genotyped ABCG2 dysfunctional common variants, Q126X (rs72552713) and Q141K (rs2231142), in end-stage renal disease (hemodialysis) and acute gastroenteritis patients, respectively. ABCG2 dysfunction markedly increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels in 106 hemodialysis patients (P = 1.1 × 10(-4)), which demonstrated the physiological role of ABCG2 for intestinal urate excretion because their urate excretion almost depends on intestinal excretion via ABCG2. Also, ABCG2 dysfunction significantly elevated SUA in 67 acute gastroenteritis patients (P = 6.3 × 10(-3)) regardless of the degree of dehydration, which demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ABCG2 in acute gastroenteritis. These findings for the first time show ABCG2-mediated intestinal urate excretion in humans, and indicates the physiological and pathophysiological importance of intestinal epithelium as an excretion pathway besides an absorption pathway. Furthermore, increased SUA could be a useful marker not only for dehydration but also epithelial impairment of intestine. PMID:27571712

  6. Twenty-four hour urinary excretion of vitamins, minerals and nitrogen by Eskimos.

    PubMed

    Ellestad-Sayed, J; Hildes, J A; Schaefer, O; Lobban, M C

    1975-12-01

    In 1971-1972, urines were collected over 24 hours from ambulatory Iglooligmiut who ranged in age from 6 to 76 years. Collections were made every 3-4 months over a calendar year. The mean of each individual's two to four collections was used as the best estimate of that person's average daily excretion for nitrogen, thiamin, riboflavin, N'-methylnicotinamide, calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium. The excretion of the three B vitamins by all age groups was high when compared with interpretive standards. Urea nitrogen comprised 80-90% of total nitrogen excreted by all age groups. Twenty-four-hour mineral excretions did not differ with age and sex group except that adult men excreted significantly more phosphorus. Urinary urea nitrogen and phosphorus were linearly related, suggesting that they have a common source; namely, meat. Winter was generally the season of lowest excretion of the nutrients assayed. Since these nutrients are available from imported foods, particularly during the winter, it would appear that even in the winter the Iglooligmiut are more dependent on hunting and fishing for sources of these nutrients than on the well-stocked commercial grocery outlets. PMID:803002

  7. Proton-facilitated ammonia excretion by ionocytes of medaka (Oryzias latipes) acclimated to seawater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sian-Tai; Tsung, Lin; Horng, Jiun-Lin; Lin, Li-Yih

    2013-08-01

    The proton-facilitated ammonia excretion is critical for a fish's ability to excrete ammonia in freshwater. However, it remains unclear whether that mechanism is also critical for ammonia excretion in seawater (SW). Using a scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET) to measure H(+) gradients, an acidic boundary layer was detected at the yolk-sac surface of SW-acclimated medaka (Oryzias latipes) larvae. The H(+) gradient detected at the surface of ionocytes was higher than that of keratinocytes in the yolk sac. Treatment with Tricine buffer or EIPA (a NHE inhibitor) reduced the H(+) gradient and ammonia excretion of larvae. In situ hybridization and immunochemistry showed that slc9a2 (NHE2) and slc9a3 (NHE3) were expressed in the same SW-type ionocytes. A real-time PCR analysis showed that transfer to SW downregulated branchial mRNA expressions of slc9a3 and Rhesus glycoproteins (rhcg1, rhcg2, and rhbg) but upregulated that of slc9a2. However, slc9a3, rhcg1, rhcg2, and rhbg expressions were induced by high ammonia in SW. This study suggests that SW-type ionocytes play a role in acid and ammonia excretion and that the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and Rh glycoproteins are involved in the proton-facilitated ammonia excretion mechanism. PMID:23678031

  8. Hyperuricemia in acute gastroenteritis is caused by decreased urate excretion via ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Ooyama, Keiko; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Tappei; Nakashima, Akio; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Higashino, Toshihide; Wakai, Kenji; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Hokari, Ryota; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Inui, Ayano; Fujimori, Shin; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the physiological and pathophysiological roles of intestinal urate excretion via ABCG2 in humans, we genotyped ABCG2 dysfunctional common variants, Q126X (rs72552713) and Q141K (rs2231142), in end-stage renal disease (hemodialysis) and acute gastroenteritis patients, respectively. ABCG2 dysfunction markedly increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels in 106 hemodialysis patients (P = 1.1 × 10−4), which demonstrated the physiological role of ABCG2 for intestinal urate excretion because their urate excretion almost depends on intestinal excretion via ABCG2. Also, ABCG2 dysfunction significantly elevated SUA in 67 acute gastroenteritis patients (P = 6.3 × 10−3) regardless of the degree of dehydration, which demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ABCG2 in acute gastroenteritis. These findings for the first time show ABCG2-mediated intestinal urate excretion in humans, and indicates the physiological and pathophysiological importance of intestinal epithelium as an excretion pathway besides an absorption pathway. Furthermore, increased SUA could be a useful marker not only for dehydration but also epithelial impairment of intestine. PMID:27571712

  9. Influence of C4 vegetation on 13CO2 discrimination and isoforcing in the upper Midwest, United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural crops with a C4 photosynthetic pathway rapidly expanded across North America as early as 800 A.D. Their distribution continues to expand globally as demands for food and biofuel production increase. These systems are highly productive, having a significant impact on carbon and water exc...

  10. Influence of C4 Vegetation on 13CO2 Descrimination and Isoforcing in the Upper Midwest, United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural crops with a C4 photosynthetic 3 pathway rapidly expanded across North America as early as 800 A.D. Their distribution continues to expand globally as demands for food and biofuel production increase. These systems are highly productive, having a significant impact on carbon and water e...

  11. Evaluating calibration strategies for isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy for atmospheric 13CO2/12CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, X.-F.; Meng, Y.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Sun, X.-M.; Lee, X.

    2013-01-01

    Isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) provides an in-situ technique for measuring δ13C in atmospheric CO2. A number of methods have been proposed for calibrating the IRIS measurements, but few studies have systematically evaluated their accuracy for atmospheric applications. In this study, we carried out laboratory and ambient measurements with two commercial IRIS analyzers and compared the accuracy of four calibration strategies. We found that calibration based on the 12C and 13C mixing ratios (Bowling et al., 2003) and that based on linear interpolation of the measured delta using the mixing ratio of the major isotopologue (Lee et al., 2005) yielded accuracy better than 0.06‰. Over a 7-day atmospheric measurement in Beijing, the two analyzers differed by 9.44 ± 1.65‰ (mean ± 1 standard deviation of hourly values) before calibration and agreed to within -0.02 ± 0.18‰ after properly calibration. However, even after calibration the difference between the two analyzers showed a slight correlation with concentration, and this concentration dependence propagated through the Keeling analysis resulting in a much larger difference of 2.44‰ for the Keeling intercept. The high sensitivity of the Keeling analysis to the concentration dependence underscores the challenge of IRIS for atmospheric research.

  12. Evaluating calibration strategies for isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy for atmospheric 13CO2 / 12CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, X.-F.; Meng, Y.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Sun, X.-M.; Lee, X.

    2013-06-01

    Isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS) provides an in situ technique for measuring δ13C in atmospheric CO2. A number of methods have been proposed for calibrating the IRIS measurements, but few studies have systematically evaluated their accuracy for atmospheric applications. In this study, we carried out laboratory and ambient measurements with two commercial IRIS analyzers and compared the accuracy of four calibration strategies. We found that calibration based on the 12C and 13C mixing ratios (Bowling et al., 2003) and on linear interpolation of the measured delta using the mixing ratio of the major isotopologue (Lee et al., 2005) yielded accuracy better than 0.06‰. Over a 7-day atmospheric measurement in Beijing, the two analyzers agreed to within -0.02 ± 0.18‰ after proper calibration. However, even after calibration the difference between the two analyzers showed a slight correlation with concentration, and this concentration dependence propagated through the Keeling analysis, resulting in a much larger difference of 2.44‰ for the Keeling intercept. The high sensitivity of the Keeling analysis to the concentration dependence underscores the challenge of IRIS for atmospheric research.

  13. Association of Urinary Calcium Excretion with Serum Calcium and Vitamin D Levels

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Anita; Bonny, Olivier; Guessous, Idris; Suter, Paolo M.; Conen, David; Erne, Paul; Binet, Isabelle; Gabutti, Luca; Gallino, Augusto; Muggli, Franco; Hayoz, Daniel; Péchère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Paccaud, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Population-based data on urinary calcium excretion are scarce. The association of serum calcium and circulating levels of vitamin D [25(OH)D2 or D3] with urinary calcium excretion in men and women from a population-based study was explored. Design, settings, participants, & measurements Multivariable linear regression was used to explore factors associated with square root–transformed 24-hour urinary calcium excretion (milligrams per 24 hours) taken as the dependent variable with a focus on month-specific vitamin D tertiles and serum calcium in the Swiss Survey on Salt Study. Results In total, 624 men and 669 women were studied with mean ages of 49.2 and 47.0 years, respectively (age range=15–95 years). Mean urinary calcium excretion was higher in men than in women (183.05 versus 144.60 mg/24 h; P<0.001). In adjusted models, the association (95% confidence interval) of square root urinary calcium excretion with protein–corrected serum calcium was 1.78 (95% confidence interval, 1.21 to 2.34) mg/24 h per milligram per deciliter in women and 0.59 (95% confidence interval, −0.11 to 1.29) mg/24 h per milligram per deciliter in men. Men in the third 25(OH)D3 tertile had higher square root urinary calcium excretion than men in the first tertile (0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.36 to 1.63 mg/24 h per nanogram per milliliter), and the corresponding association was 0.32 (95% confidence interval, −0.22 to 0.85) mg/24 h per nanogram per milliliter in women. These sex differences were more marked under conditions of high urinary sodium or urea excretions. Conclusions There was a positive association of serum calcium with urinary calcium excretion in women but not men. Vitamin 25(OH)D3 was associated with urinary calcium excretion in men but not women. These results suggest important sex differences in the hormonal and dietary control of urinary calcium excretion. PMID:25518946

  14. Geographical and temporal differences in the urinary excretion of inorganic arsenic: a Belgian population study.

    PubMed Central

    Buchet, J P; Staessen, J; Roels, H; Lauwerys, R; Fagard, R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This Belgian study assessed the geographical and temporal differences in the exposure of the population to inorganic arsenic, a known carcinogen. METHODS: In the CadmiBel study (1985-9) the 24 h urinary arsenic excretion was measured, as an index of recent exposure, in industrialised cities (Liège: n = 664, Charleroi: n = 291), in a rural control area (Hechtel-Eksel: n = 397), and in rural districts in which the population had possibly been exposed through the drinking water or the emissions of nonferrous smelters (Wezel: n = 93, Lommel: n = 111, and Pelt: n = 133). In the PheeCad study, in 1991-5, the rural areas (n = 609) were re-examined together with an urban control area (Leuven: n = 152). RESULTS: The CadmiBel results showed that after adjustment for sex, age, and body mass index, the 24 h arsenic excretion was on average low in Liège (91 nmol), Charleroi (155 nmol), Hechtel-Eksel (144 nmol), and Wezel (158 nmol), whereas the highest excretions were found in Lommel (570 nmol) and Pelt (373 nmol). During the PheeCad study, the mean 24 h arsenic excretion in the rural areas ranged from 81 to 111 nmol. This was lower than six years earlier and similar to the excretion in the control town (108 nmol). Longitudinal studies in 529 people living in the rural areas confirmed that their 24 h arsenic excretion had decreased (P < 0.001) from 222 to 100 nmol. As well as the drinking water, industry was likely to be a source of the increased exposure in Lommel and Pelt in 1985-9, because at that time the urinary arsenic excretion did not follow the regional differences in the arsenic content of the drinking water, because the fall in the arsenic excretion over time coincided with the implementation by industry of stricter environmental regulations, because in individual subjects the urinary arsenic excretion was inversely correlated with the distance to the nearest smelter, and because an increased arsenic excretion was only found downwind from the main

  15. Absorption, metabolism and excretion of flavanones from single portions of orange fruit and juice and effects of anthropometric variables and contraceptive pill use on flavanone excretion

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Gary M.; Hollands, Wendy; Needs, Paul W.; Teucher, Birgit; Dainty, Jack R.; Davis, Barry D.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Kroon, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Oranges are rich sources of flavonoids that are bioactive and may protect against age-related diseases. The absorption of orange flavanones may be affected by factors such as processing and subject anthropometric variables, and the bioactivity of the absorbed phytochemicals depends on how they are metabolised during absorption. In a randomised cross-over study, twenty subjects consumed a single portion of orange fruit (150 g) or juice (300 g) that contained the flavanones narirutin and hesperidin, and an additional 109 subjects across a broad age range (18–80 years) consumed the juice. Flavanone metabolites were measured in regularly collected samples of plasma and urine. After consumption of fruit or juice, flavanone conjugates, but not the aglycones, were detected in plasma and urine. The flavanone conjugates were shown to include the 7- and 4′-O-monoglucuronides of naringenin, the 7- and 3′-O-monoglucuronides of hesperetin, two hesperetin diglucuronides and a hesperetin sulfo-glucuronide, but no aglycones or rutinosides. Analysis of the plasma pharmacokinetic and urinary excretion data on a dose-adjusted basis indicated no difference in absorption or excretion of either flavanone between the fruit and juice matrices. In the extended urinary excretion dataset the individual variation was very large (range 0–59 % urinary yield). There was a small but significant (P<0·05) decrease in the excretion of hesperetin (but not naringenin) with increasing age (P<0·05), but the effects of sex, BMI and contraceptive pill use were shown not to be associated with the variation in flavanone excretion. PMID:18710603

  16. Involvement of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in the biliary excretion mechanism of fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Ando, Tomohiro; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Merino, Gracia; Alvarez, Ana I; Schinkel, Alfred H; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2007-10-01

    Fluoroquinolones are effective antibiotics for the treatment of bile duct infections. It has been shown that the biliary excretion of grepafloxacin is partly accounted for by multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2), whereas neither MRP2 nor P-glycoprotein is involved in the biliary excretion of ulifloxacin. In the present study, we examined the involvement of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in the biliary excretion of fluoroquinolones (grepafloxacin, ulifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin). In Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells expressing human BCRP or mouse Bcrp, the basal-to-apical transport of grepafloxacin and ulifloxacin was greater than that of the mock control, which was inhibited by a BCRP inhibitor, 3-(6-isobutyl-9-methoxy-1,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12a-octahydropyrazino[1',2':1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indol-3-yl)-propionic acid tert-butyl ester (Ko143). Plasma and bile concentrations of fluoroquinolones were determined in wild-type and Bcrp(-/-) mice after i.v. bolus injection. The cumulative biliary excretion of fluoroquinolones was significantly reduced in Bcrp(-/-) mice, resulting in a reduction of the biliary excretion clearances to 86, 50, 40, and 16 of the control values, for ciprofloxacin, grepafloxacin, ofloxacin, and ulifloxacin, respectively. Preinfusion of sulfobromophthalein significantly inhibited the biliary excretion of grepafloxacin in Bcrp(-/-) mice. There was no change in the tissue/plasma concentration ratios of fluoroquinolones in the liver or brain, whereas those in the kidney were increased 3.6- and 1.5-fold for ciprofloxacin and grepafloxacin, respectively, in Bcrp(-/-) mice but were unchanged for ofloxacin and ulifloxacin. The present study shows that BCRP mediates the biliary excretion of fluoroquinolones and suggests that it is also involved in the tubular secretion of ciprofloxacin and grepafloxacin. PMID:17639028

  17. Effects of kaliuretic peptide on sodium and water excretion in persons with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Nasser, A; Dietz, J R; Siddique, M; Patel, H; Khan, N; Antwi, E K; San Miguel, G I; McCormick, M T; Schocken, D D; Vesely, D L

    2001-07-01

    Kaliuretic peptide, a 20-amino acid peptide hormone synthesized in the heart, enhances urine flow twofold, whereas atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) enhances urine flow four- to 11-fold in healthy persons. The present investigation was designed to (1) determine whether kaliuretic peptide may have beneficial diuretic effects in persons with congestive heart failure (CHF), and (2) compare its beneficial effects with ANP in the treatment of CHF. Kaliuretic peptide (100 ng/kg body weight/min) given intravenously for 60 minutes to subjects with New York Heart Association class III CHF increased urine flow fourfold (p <0.001), which was maximal 212 hours after its infusion was stopped. Kaliuretic peptide enhanced sodium excretion threefold in subjects with CHF (p <0.01). Kaliuretic peptide increased the urinary excretion rate of potassium ion and fractional excretion of potassium 3.5- and twofold (p <0.05), respectively. ANP (same concentration) did not significantly enhance urine flow. ANP enhanced sodium excretion two- to sixfold in half of the CHF subjects, whereas it had no effect on sodium excretion in the other half. ANP did not significantly increase fractional excretion of sodium but did increase fractional excretion of potassium (p <0.05) during the first 20 minutes of its infusion. ANP-infused patients with CHF became hypotensive. None became hypotensive secondary to kaliuretic peptide. These data indicate that the diuretic properties of kaliuretic peptide in persons with CHF, as opposed to those of ANP, are not diminished (but rather are increased) compared with their effects in healthy persons. In patients with CHF, kaliuretic peptide causes a natriuresis-a feature not observed in those without sodium retention. PMID:11423053

  18. Evaluation of urinary porphyrin excretion in neonates born to mothers exposed to airborne hexachlorobenzene.

    PubMed Central

    Ozalla, Dolores; Herrero, Carmen; Ribas-Fitó, Núria; To-Figueras, Jordi; Toll, Agustí; Sala, Maria; Grimalt, Joan; Basagaña, Xavier; Lecha, Màrius; Sunyer, Jordi

    2002-01-01

    The existence of a link between hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and porphyria cutanea tarda has been known for a long time. However, the epidemiologic data on effects on health caused by prenatal exposure have not provided convincing evidence that HCB alters porphyrin metabolism. Our objectives were to analyze urinary porphyrin excretion and HCB in maternal serum and fetal cord blood in neonates born in a village (Flix) near a chlorinated solvent factory, to detect possible adverse effects in urinary porphyrin excretion caused by prenatal exposure, and to assess their relationship with HCB blood levels. We conducted a cross-sectional study in the Porphyria Unit at a tertiary care facility in Barcelona, Spain, and the Pediatric Unit of the Móra d'Ebre Hospital, the reference hospital of the study area. We included in the study all neonates (n = 68) born in Móra d'Ebre Hospital 1997-1999 and their mothers. We obtained 68 urine specimens of singleton neonates on the third day after birth to test for urinary porphyrin excretion. We obtained 52 fetal cord blood and 56 maternal serum samples for HCB analysis. Total urinary porphyrins were quantified using spectrofluorometry. Porphyrin profile was determined by HPLC. Serum HCB was analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detection. In total population, median HCB levels were 1.08 ng/mL in cord blood and 3.31 ng/mL in maternal serum. Total urinary porphyrin concentration was 37.87 micromol/mol creatinine. Coproporphyrin I and coproporphyrin III were the major porphyrins excreted. We found no positive relationship between urinary porphyrin excretion and HCB levels. However, we observed an association between maternal smoking and coproporphyrin excretion. Although high environmental levels of HCB are reported in the town of Flix, we found no alteration in urinary porphyrin excretion. PMID:11836151

  19. Factors Altering Pyruvate Excretion in a Glycogen Storage Mutant of the Cyanobacterium, Synechococcus PCC7942.

    PubMed

    Benson, Phoebe J; Purcell-Meyerink, Diane; Hocart, Charles H; Truong, Thy T; James, Gabriel O; Rourke, Loraine; Djordjevic, Michael A; Blackburn, Susan I; Price, G D

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the production of carbon commodities from photosynthetically fixed CO2 has focused attention on cyanobacteria as a target for metabolic engineering and pathway investigation. We investigated the redirection of carbon flux in the model cyanobacterial species, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, under nitrogen deprivation, for optimized production of the industrially desirable compound, pyruvate. Under nitrogen limited conditions, excess carbon is naturally stored as the multi-branched polysaccharide, glycogen, but a block in glycogen synthesis, via knockout mutation in the gene encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (glgC), results in the accumulation of the organic acids, pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate, as overflow excretions into the extracellular media. The ΔglgC strain, under 48 h of N-deprivation was shown to excrete pyruvate for the first time in this strain. Additionally, by increasing culture pH, to pH 10, it was possible to substantially elevate excretion of pyruvate, suggesting the involvement of an unknown substrate/proton symporter for export. The ΔglgC mutant was also engineered to express foreign transporters for glucose and sucrose, and then grown photomixotrophically with exogenous organic carbon supply, as added 5 mM glucose or sucrose during N- deprivation. Under these conditions we observed a fourfold increase in extracellular pyruvate excretion when glucose was added, and a smaller increase with added sucrose. Although the magnitude of pyruvate excretion did not correlate with the capacity of the ΔglgC strain for bicarbonate-dependent photosynthetic O2 evolution, or with light intensity, there was, however, a positive correlation observed between the density of the starter culture prior to N-deprivation and the final extracellular pyruvate concentration. The factors that contribute to enhancement of pyruvate excretion are discussed, as well as consideration of whether the source of carbon for pyruvate excretion might be derived from

  20. Factors Altering Pyruvate Excretion in a Glycogen Storage Mutant of the Cyanobacterium, Synechococcus PCC7942

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Phoebe J.; Purcell-Meyerink, Diane; Hocart, Charles H.; Truong, Thy T.; James, Gabriel O.; Rourke, Loraine; Djordjevic, Michael A.; Blackburn, Susan I.; Price, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the production of carbon commodities from photosynthetically fixed CO2 has focused attention on cyanobacteria as a target for metabolic engineering and pathway investigation. We investigated the redirection of carbon flux in the model cyanobacterial species, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, under nitrogen deprivation, for optimized production of the industrially desirable compound, pyruvate. Under nitrogen limited conditions, excess carbon is naturally stored as the multi-branched polysaccharide, glycogen, but a block in glycogen synthesis, via knockout mutation in the gene encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (glgC), results in the accumulation of the organic acids, pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate, as overflow excretions into the extracellular media. The ΔglgC strain, under 48 h of N-deprivation was shown to excrete pyruvate for the first time in this strain. Additionally, by increasing culture pH, to pH 10, it was possible to substantially elevate excretion of pyruvate, suggesting the involvement of an unknown substrate/proton symporter for export. The ΔglgC mutant was also engineered to express foreign transporters for glucose and sucrose, and then grown photomixotrophically with exogenous organic carbon supply, as added 5 mM glucose or sucrose during N- deprivation. Under these conditions we observed a fourfold increase in extracellular pyruvate excretion when glucose was added, and a smaller increase with added sucrose. Although the magnitude of pyruvate excretion did not correlate with the capacity of the ΔglgC strain for bicarbonate-dependent photosynthetic O2 evolution, or with light intensity, there was, however, a positive correlation observed between the density of the starter culture prior to N-deprivation and the final extracellular pyruvate concentration. The factors that contribute to enhancement of pyruvate excretion are discussed, as well as consideration of whether the source of carbon for pyruvate excretion might be derived from

  1. Urine sodium excretion increased slightly among U.S. adults between 1988 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Christine M; Hughes, Jeffery P; Cogswell, Mary E; Burt, Vicki L; Lacher, David A; Lavoie, Donna J; Rabinowitz, Daniel J; Johnson, Clifford L; Pirkle, James L

    2014-05-01

    Little information is available on temporal trends in sodium intake in the U.S. population using urine sodium excretion as a biomarker. Our aim was to assess 1988-2010 trends in estimated 24-h urine sodium (24hUNa) excretion among U.S. adults (age 20-59 y) participating in the cross-sectional NHANES. We used subsamples from a 1988-1994 convenience sample, a 2003-2006 one-third random sample, and a 2010 one-third random sample to comply with resource constraints. We estimated 24hUNa excretion from measured sodium concentrations in spot urine samples by use of calibration equations (for men and women) derived from the International Cooperative Study on Salt, Other Factors, and Blood Pressure study. Estimated 24hUNa excretion increased over the 20-y period [1988-1994, 2003-2006, and 2010; means ± SEMs (n): 3160 ± 38.4 mg/d (1249), 3290 ± 29.4 mg/d (1235), and 3290 ± 44.4 mg/d (525), respectively; P-trend = 0.022]. We observed significantly higher mean estimated 24hUNa excretion in each survey period (P < 0.001) for men compared with women (31-33%) and for persons with a higher body mass index (BMI; 32-35% for obese vs. normal weight) or blood pressure (17-26% for hypertensive vs. normal blood pressure). After adjusting for age, sex, and race-ethnicity, temporal trends in mean estimated 24hUNa excretion remained significant (P-trend = 0.004). We observed no temporal trends in mean estimated 24hUNa excretion among BMI subgroups, nor after adjusting for BMI. Although several limitations apply to this analysis (the use of a convenience sample in 1988-1994 and using estimated 24hUNa excretion as a biomarker of sodium intake), these first NHANES data suggest that mean estimated 24hUNa excretion increased slightly in U.S. adults over the past 2 decades, and this increase may be explained by a shift in the distribution of BMI. PMID:24623847

  2. Excretion of Host DNA in Feces Is Associated with Risk of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Vivian G.; Dewar, Ken; Manges, Amee R.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is intricately linked to the health of the gastrointestinal tract and its indigenous microbiota. In this study, we assessed whether fecal excretion of host DNA is associated with CDI development. Assuming that shedding of epithelial cell increases in the inflamed intestine, we used human DNA excretion as a marker of intestinal insult. Whole-genome shotgun sequencing was employed to quantify host DNA excretion and evaluate bacterial content in fecal samples collected from patients with incipient CDI, hospitalized controls, and healthy subjects. Human DNA excretion was significantly increased in patients admitted to the hospital for a gastrointestinal ailment, as well as prior to an episode of CDI. In multivariable analyses, human read abundance was independently associated with CDI development. Host DNA proportions were negatively correlated with intestinal microbiota diversity. Enterococcus and Escherichia were enriched in patients excreting high quantities of human DNA, while Ruminococcus and Odoribacter were depleted. These findings suggest that intestinal inflammation can occur prior to CDI development and may influence patient susceptibility to CDI. The quantification of human DNA in feces could serve as a simple and noninvasive approach to assess bowel inflammation and identify patients at risk of CDI. PMID:26090486

  3. Effect of dietary caffeine and theophylline on urinary calcium excretion in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Whiting, S J; Whitney, H L

    1987-07-01

    The chronic effects of dietary caffeine or theophylline on urinary calcium excretion were investigated in the adult male rat. When caffeine was added at two concentrations, 0.75 and 1.50 g/kg diet, 24-h urinary calcium excretion rose 300 and 450% on d 7, and 200 and 330% on d 14, respectively. There were no changes in the 24-h urinary excretion of phosphate, sulfate, sodium and cAMP nor did urine volume change. The high dose of caffeine was compared to an equimolar dose of theophylline (1.39 g/kg diet) in both Wistar and Sprague-Dawley rats. Urinary calcium excretion in theophylline-treated rats was significantly greater than in caffeine-treated rats on all sampling days and in both strains of rat; the calciuric effect lasted at least 22 d. When rats were given indomethacin (3.3 mg/kg diet) the calciuria induced by caffeine and theophylline was abolished, and sodium excretion in all groups was reduced by 35-50%, but urine volume was unchanged. The calciuria of methylxanthine feeding may result from a prostaglandin-mediated process distinct from diuresis. PMID:3612301

  4. Absorption, distribution and excretion of the colour fraction of Caramel Colour IV in the rat.

    PubMed

    Selim, S; Chappel, C I; Schoenig, G P

    1992-05-01

    Caramel Colour IV prepared from [U-14C]glucose was ultrafiltered in order to isolate the high molecular weight colour fraction (HMCF). The colour fraction that was non-permeable to a 10,000-Da porosity membrane, contained 84% of the colour, 22% of the solids and 24% of the radioactivity of the [14C]Caramel Colour IV. The absorption, distribution and excretion of [14C]HMCF were evaluated in male rats after administration of single or multiple oral doses of the material at a dosage level of 2.5 g/kg body weight. Rats on the multiple oral dosage regimen were given unlabelled HMCF in their drinking water for 13 days before the administration of a bolus dose of [14C]HMCF on day 14. On both dosage regimens, the predominant route of excretion was by way of the faeces. Less than 3% of the administered radioactivity was excreted in the urine and only a negligible amount was found in the expired air. More than 99% of the administered radioactivity was excreted within 96 hr. The principal tissues in which radioactivity was found were the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, kidney and tissues of the gastro-intestinal tract. No major differences were observed in the absorption, distribution or excretion patterns between the single and multiple oral dose regimens. PMID:1644386

  5. Investment in boney defensive traits alters organismal stoichiometry and excretion in fish.

    PubMed

    El-Sabaawi, Rana W; Warbanski, Misha L; Rudman, Seth M; Hovel, Rachel; Matthews, Blake

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how trait diversification alters ecosystem processes is an important goal for ecological and evolutionary studies. Ecological stoichiometry provides a framework for predicting how traits affect ecosystem function. The growth rate hypothesis of ecological stoichiometry links growth and phosphorus (P) body composition in taxa where nucleic acids are a significant pool of body P. In vertebrates, however, most of the P is bound within bone, and organisms with boney structures can vary in terms of the relative contributions of bones to body composition. Threespine stickleback populations have substantial variation in boney armour plating. Shaped by natural selection, this variation provides a model system to study the links between evolution of bone content, elemental body composition, and P excretion. We measure carbon:nitrogen:P body composition from stickleback populations that vary in armour phenotype. We develop a mechanistic mass-balance model to explore factors affecting P excretion, and measure P excretion from two populations with contrasting armour phenotypes. Completely armoured morphs have higher body %P but excrete more P per unit body mass than other morphs. The model suggests that such differences are driven by phenotypic differences in P intake as well as body %P composition. Our results show that while investment in boney traits alters the elemental composition of vertebrate bodies, excretion rates depend on how acquisition and assimilation traits covary with boney trait investment. These results also provide a stoichiometric hypothesis to explain the repeated loss of boney armour in threespine sticklebacks upon colonizing freshwater ecosystems. PMID:27075487

  6. Urinary Excretion of Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Arellano-Buendía, Abraham Said; García-Arroyo, Fernando Enrique; Cristóbal-García, Magdalena; Loredo-Mendoza, María Lilia; Tapia-Rodríguez, Edilia; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Osorio-Alonso, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that tubular damage precedes glomerular damage in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, we evaluated oxidative stress and urinary excretion of tubular proteins as markers of tubular dysfunction. Methods. Diabetes was induced in rats by streptozotocin administration (50 mg/kg). Oxidative stress was assessed by measuring the activity of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD); additionally, expression levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), and oxidized protein (OP) were quantified. Whole glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was measured. Urinary excretion of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL), osteopontin (uOPN), and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (uNAG) was also determined. Results. Diabetic rats showed an increase in uNGAL excretion 7 days following induction of diabetes. Diuresis, proteinuria, albuminuria, creatinine clearance, and GFR were significantly increased by 30 days after induction. Furthermore, there was an increase in both CAT and SOD activity, in addition to 3-NT, 4-HNE, and OP expression levels. However, GPx activity was lower. Serum levels of NGAL and OPN, as well as excretion levels of uNGAL, uOPN, and uNAG, were increased in diabetics. Tubular damage was observed by 7 days after diabetes induction and was further aggravated by 30 days after induction. Conclusion. The tubular dysfunction evidenced by urinary excretion of NGAL precedes oxidative stress during diabetes. PMID:25243053

  7. Ecological and sociodemographic effects on urinary catecholamine excretion in adult Samoans

    PubMed Central

    Bergey, Meredith R.; Steele, Matthew S.; Bereiter, David A.; Viali, Satupaitea; McGarvey, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ecological and sociodemographic correlates of stress may contribute to cardiovascular disease risk in modernizing Samoans. Aim The effects of peri-urban vs rural residence, education, occupation, caffeine intake and cigarette consumption on urinary catecholamine excretion were studied in Samoan adults. Subjects and methods Five hundred and seven participants, aged 29–69 years, were randomly selected from nine villages throughout Samoa. Sociodemographic and lifestyle factors were assessed by questionnaire. Epinephrine and norepinephrine excretion rates were measured by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection in overnight urine samples. Age (≤40 vs >40 years) and gender-specific regression models were estimated to detect associations with BMI-adjusted catecholamine excretion. Results Norepinephrine was significantly higher in peri-urban young men and older women. Epinephrine was significantly higher in peri-urban older men. Adjustment for caffeine attenuated the relationship between residence and norepinephrine in young women. Conclusion General residential exposure to modernization in urban villages is a significant correlate of increased overnight catecholamine excretion rates and is consistent with past studies. Caffeine consumption in younger women plays a complex role in stress-related catecholamine excretion. Further studies of individual level attitudinal and behavioural factors in Samoans are needed to understand psychosocial stress, physiologic arousal and health. PMID:20836724

  8. Urinary isoflavonoid excretion as a biomarker of dietary soy intake during two randomized soy trials.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yukiko; Beckford, Fanchon; Franke, Adrian A; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated urinary isoflavonoid excretion as a biomarker of dietary isoflavone intake during two randomized soy trials (13-24 months) among 256 premenopausal women with a total of 1,385 repeated urine samples. Participants consumed a high-soy diet (2 servings/day) and a low-soy diet (<3 servings/week), completed 7 unannounced 24-hour dietary recalls, and donated repeated urine samples, which were analyzed for isoflavonoid excretion by liquid chromatography methods. We computed Spearman correlation coefficients and applied logistic regression to estimate the area under the curve. Median overall daily dietary isoflavone intakes at baseline, during low- and high-soy diet were 2.3, 0.2, and 60.4 mg aglycone equivalents, respectively. The corresponding urinary isoflavonoid excretion values were 0.4, 1.0, and 32.4 nmol/mg creatinine. Across diets, urinary isoflavonoid excretion was significantly associated with dietary isoflavone intake (rs=0.51, AUC=0.85; p<0.0001) but not within diet periods (rs=0.05-0.06, AUC=0.565-0.573). Urinary isoflavonoid excretion is an excellent biomarker to discriminate between low- and high-soy diets across populations, but the association with dietary isoflavone intake is weak when the range of soy intake is small. PMID:24901088

  9. Comparison of celecoxib metabolism and excretion in mouse, rabbit, dog, cynomolgus monkey and rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Paulson, S K; Zhang, J Y; Jessen, S M; Lawal, Y; Liu, N W; Dudkowski, C M; Wang, Y F; Chang, M; Yang, D; Findlay, J W; Berge, M A; Markos, C S; Breau, A P; Hribar, J D; Yuan, J

    2000-07-01

    1. The metabolism and excretion of celecoxib, a specific cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitor, was investigated in mouse, rabbit, the EM (extensive) and PM (poor metabolizer) dog, and rhesus and cynomolgus monkey. 2. Some sex and species differences were evident in the disposition of celecoxib. After intravenous (i.v.) administration of [14C]celecoxib, the major route of excretion of radioactivity in all species studied was via the faeces: EM dog (80.0%), PM dog (83.4%), cynomolgus monkey (63.5%), rhesus monkey (83.1%). After oral administration, faeces were the primary route of excretion in rabbit (72.2%) and the male mouse (71.1%), with the remainder of the dose excreted in the urine. After oral administration of [14C]celecoxib to the female mouse, radioactivity was eliminated equally in urine (45.7%) and faeces (46.7%). 3. Biotransformation of celecoxib occurs primarily by oxidation of the aromatic methyl group to form a hydroxymethyl metabolite, which is further oxidized to the carboxylic acid analogue. 4. An additional phase I metabolite (phenyl ring hydroxylation) and a glucuronide conjugate of the carboxylic acid metabolite was produced by rabbit. 5. The major excretion product in urine and faeces of mouse, rabbit, dog and monkey was the carboxylic acid metabolite of celecoxib. PMID:10963063

  10. 15NH4+ excretion test: a new method for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, J C; Liu, G L; Zhang, Z H; Mou, Y L; Chen, Q A; Wu, J C; Yang, S L

    1992-01-01

    A noninvasive test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection that uses [15N]urea as a tracer has been established. The principle the test is based on is the strong urease activity of H. pylori. After oral ingestion, [15N]urea is broken down into ammonia and carbon dioxide by H. pylori urease in the stomach. The ammonia is absorbed into the blood and excreted in the urine. The amount of [15N]urea, reflecting the magnitude of H. pylori infection, is evaluated by measuring the abundance and excretion rate of 15N in ammonia in the urine. Thirty-six patients were examined in our study. The 15N excretion rates in urine ammonia of patients who were H. pylori positive were significantly higher than those of H. pylori-negative patients (P less than 0.05). Twenty-three patients were H. pylori positive by Gram stain and culture. The sensitivity of the 15NH4 excretion test compared with these techniques was 96%, and no false positives were obtained. The 15NH4+ excretion rates of 13 H. pylori-negative subjects were all in the normal range (less than 0.3%). This method is a simple, precise, highly sensitive, noninvasive, nonradioactive test. It could be used for diagnosis as well as for the followup of patients receiving H. pylori eradication therapy, especially children and pregnant women. It could also be used in epidemiological investigation of H. pylori infection in a general population. PMID:1734051

  11. Renal dopamine excretion in healthy volunteers after oral ingestion of L-dopa.

    PubMed

    Barthelmebs, M; Mbou, P; Stephan, D; Grima, M; Imbs, J L

    1993-01-01

    L-Dopa is converted to dopamine by aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). In the kidney, proximal tubular epithelial cells are rich in AADC and urinary free dopamine excretion is a marker for endorenal extraneuronal dopamine synthesis. The urinary free dopamine excretion was analysed in a double-blind cross-over study after oral ingestion of L-Dopa or a placebo in five healthy volunteers. The drug ingestions were separated by one week's wash-out. Since in a preliminary study, two volunteers ingesting a single L-Dopa dose of 500 mg with breakfast experienced nausea, the five volunteers of the present study were given 300 mg L-Dopa (50 mg at 9 am with breakfast, 100 mg before lunch and 150 mg before dinner) without any adverse effects. L-Dopa induced an increase in 24-h urinary dopamine excretion (HPLC with electrochemical detection). Free urinary dopamine (1900 micrograms/24 h) accounted for 0.8% of the daily oral L-Dopa dose and represented 10% of total urinary dopamine excretion. L-Dopa treatment had no significant effect on mean ambulatory arterial blood pressure and heart rate measured from 9 am to 6 pm (Spacelabs) or on 24 h urinary water and sodium excretion. PMID:8458598

  12. Urinary glucaric acid excretion in rheumatoid arthritis: influence of disease activity and disease modifying drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Addyman, R; Beyeler, C; Astbury, C; Bird, H A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if a correlation exists between cytochrome P-450 enzyme induction and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), measuring urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid (GA) as an index of phase II drug metabolism. METHODS: Patients with RA were treated with sulphasalazine, sodium aurothiomalate, or D-penicillamine in standard dose regimens, for 24 weeks. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or non-inflammatory arthritis (NIA) acted as controls. The urinary GA:creatinine ratio was measured at 0, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment. RESULTS: Patients with RA had a slightly greater urinary GA:creatinine ratio than patients with AS or NIA at baseline; this increased during treatment with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Sulphasalazine treatment had a greater effect on GA excretion than sodium aurothiomalate or D-penicillamine; this difference was statistically significant between weeks 0 and 12 (p = 0.01). Gamma glutamyltranspeptidase concentration showed a weak correlation with GA excretion between weeks 0 and 12 (p = 0.03), but all other measurements of changes in disease activity (plasma viscosity, C reactive protein, platelets, and articular index) were found not to correlate with GA excretion between weeks 0-12 or 0-24. CONCLUSION: The increased excretion of GA in patients with RA receiving DMARD treatment is probably the result of an indirect effect on hepatic metabolism bearing no relationship to disease activity. PMID:8774168

  13. Coupling between chloride absorption and base excretion in isolated skin of Rana esculenta.

    PubMed

    Ehrenfeld, J; Garcia-Romeu, F

    1978-07-01

    The net excretory fluxes of base (HCO3- or OH-) and the unidirectional fluxes of chloride were measured and their relationship examined in isolated frog skin maintained in open- or short-circuit (OC and SC) conditions. When the mucosal solution was a 2 mM choline chloride solution and the serosal solution a Ringer solution buffered with a HCO3-/CO2 mixture, the rate of base excretion was -105 +/- 10 in OC and -60 +/- 7 neq h-1 cm-2 in SC. A highly significant correlation was observed between the influx of chloride and the excretion of base. As a function of external chloride both these parameters followed saturation kinetics, Vmax being obtained for a chloride concentration below 2 mM. The removal of chloride in the external solution was followed by a 70 or 100% inhibition of base excretion in OC and SC conditions, respectively. Chloride transport is dependent on the presence of a HCO3-/CO2 mixture in the internal or the external medium. This transport, as well as base excretion, is inhibited to a considerable extent by removal of HCO3-/CO2 or by acetazolamide (10(-3) M). This investigation characterizes a saturable transport system in which chloride absorption and base excretion are coupled. PMID:307916

  14. Longitudinal gonadal steroid excretion in free-living male and female meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Moss, A M; Clutton-Brock, T H; Monfort, S L

    2001-05-01

    Slender-tailed meerkats (Suricata suricatta) are small, diurnal, cooperatively breeding mongooses of the family Herpestidae. A prerequisite to fully understanding the mating system of meerkats is the development of a normative reproductive-endocrine database. This study examined longitudinal gonadal steroid excretion in all adult and juvenile individuals of both sexes within a social group of free-living meerkats sampled across an entire breeding season. The specific objectives of this study were to (1) validate noninvasive (fecal and urinary) gonadal steroid hormone monitoring techniques in male (testosterone) and female (estrogens, progestagens) meerkats; (2) test the feasibility of using these noninvasive methods under field conditions; (3) characterize the endocrine correlates associated with the female reproductive cycle, including estrus, gestation, and postpartum estrus; (4) examine longitudinal androgen excretion in males; and (5) determine whether social status (i.e., dominant versus subordinate) affected gonadal steroid excretion. In females, the results demonstrated the physiological validity of noninvasive monitoring in meerkats by corresponding excretory hormone concentrations to major reproductive events (i.e., estrous, pregnancy, parturition). Hormone excretory patterns during estrous intervals suggested possible mechanisms whereby reproductive suppression may operate in female meerkats. In males, androgen excretion did not correspond to changes in reproductive and aggressive behaviors, suggesting that dominance, and hence breeding access to females, was not regulated strictly by gonadal steroid production. The consistency in androgen excretion among male meerkats indicated that reproductive suppression may be mediated by behavioral (i.e., intermale aggression) rather than physiological (i.e., depressed spermatogenesis) mechanisms. PMID:11316421

  15. Plasma disappearance, urine excretion, and tissue distribution of ribavirin in rats and rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrara, E.A.; Oishi, J.S.; Wannemacher, R.W. Jr.; Stephen, E.L.

    1981-06-01

    Ribavirin has been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral. To study its tissue distribution and disappearance rate, a single dose of 10 mg/kg which contained 10 microCi of (14C)ribavirin was injected intravenously into rhesus monkeys and intramuscularly into monkeys and rats. Except for peak plasma concentrations and the initial phases of the plasma disappearance and urine excretion curves, no significant difference was observed between plasma, tissue, or urine values for intramuscularly or intravenously injected monkeys. Plasma disappearance curves were triphasic; plasma concentrations of ribavirin were similar for both monkeys and rats. Rats excreted ribavirin in the urine more rapidly and to a greater extent (82% excreted in 24 h) than did monkeys (60% excreted in 72 h). In the rat, only 3% of the injected (14C)ribavirin was detected in expired CO2. Therefore, for both species, urine was the major route for the elimination of labeled ribavirin and its metabolites from the body. In monkeys, the amount of parent drug in blood cells increased through 48 h and remained stable for 72 h, whereas in rats, ribavirin decreased at a rate similar to the plasma disappearance curve. Concentrations of ribavirin at 8 h were consistently higher in monkeys than in rats for all tissues except the brain. Thus, these differences in blood cellular components and organ content and in urine excretion suggested that there was greater tissue retention of ribavirin in monkeys than in rats.

  16. The variability and dietary dependence of urinary oxalate excretion in recurrent calcium stone formers.

    PubMed

    Brown, J M; Stratmann, G; Cowley, D M; Mottram, B M; Chalmers, A H

    1987-07-01

    Twenty-two recurrent calcium stone formers had 24-h urinary oxalate excretions on their home diets which were significantly greater than those of 30 normal subjects (0.48 +/- 0.23 mmol/d; mean +/- SD compared with 0.31 +/- 0.11; P less than 0.01). The stone formers also demonstrated marked day to day variability in oxalate excretion indicating that a single normal urinary oxalate measurement did not exclude significant hyperoxaluria at other times. On a hospital diet containing 1000 mg calcium per day, urinary oxalate excretion fell significantly from 0.48 +/- 0.23 mmol/d to 0.32 +/- 0.12; P less than 0.01. As the urinary calcium excretion in and out of hospital was similar, it seems unlikely that low calcium intake at home was responsible for the hyperoxaluria. All patients had recurrent symptomatic stone disease and had been advised to avoid foods rich in oxalate. Whilst poor compliance is a possible explanation for the variability in oxalate excretion, we believe it is more likely that there is an inadvertent intake of oxalogenic precursors in their diet. As normal subjects do not demonstrate hyperoxaluria on similar home diets, stone formers may have a metabolic defect in the handling of these precursors. PMID:3662388

  17. Effects of supplemental dietary calcium on quantitative and qualitative fecal fat excretion in man.

    PubMed

    Welberg, J W; Monkelbaan, J F; de Vries, E G; Muskiet, F A; Cats, A; Oremus, E T; Boersma-van Ek, W; van Rijsbergen, H; van der Meer, R; Mulder, N H

    1994-01-01

    Oral calcium supplementation is thought to be a useful interventional agent to decrease colon cancer risk. This is supposedly due, at least in part, to the binding of bile acids and fatty acids by calcium in the colon, thus prohibiting the damaging effects of these substances to the epithelium. To determine the effects of calcium supplementation on fecal fat excretion, 24 subjects kept a fat and calcium constant diet for one week and were supplemented with either 0, 2 or 4 g elemental calcium as calcium carbonate in a double-blind fashion. At the end of the week 72-hour feces was collected, and total fat, neutral fat, fatty acids and the ratio of polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids (P/S ratio) were measured. Calcium dose-dependently increased the percentual excretion of total fat as related to fat intake: 6.8 +/- 0.9% during 0 g, 7.4 +/- 1.0% during 2 g and 10.2 +/- 1.4% during 4 g, r = 0.44, p = 0.03. This was due to increased fatty acid excretion, excretion of neutral fat was not affected, nor was the P/S ratio. It is concluded that calcium supplementation modestly increases fecal fatty acid excretion. No adverse metabolic effects are to be expected from this in case of long-term calcium supplementation in subjects at increased risk for colon cancer. PMID:7832578

  18. Water intake and excretion, urinary solute excretion and some stress indicators in mink (Mustela vison): effect of ambient temperature and quantitative water supply to lactating females.

    PubMed

    Tauson, A H

    1998-12-01

    Lactation is a physiologically demanding period in mink production, during which kit and dam losses may occur. Ambient temperature and quantitative water supply are thought to affect animal performance and well-being, but conclusive data in the literature are sparse. Therefore, effects of ambient temperature (Ta; low, about 5 degrees; medium, about 15 degrees; high, average 20-25 degrees) and water supply (ad libitum (N), or 10% extra supplementation in the food (E)) were investigated regarding effects on quantitative water intake and excretion, urine osmolality and solute excretion, and urinary cortisol and catecholamines as stress indicators in an experiment with twelve lactating mink with litters of three to seven kits in three consecutive periods, lasting 3, 3 and 2 d respectively. Kit ages ranged from 15 to 20 d at the end of the experiment. Water requirement for milk production (factorial calculations) and water available for evaporation (balance component) were estimated. Period, and hence mainly Ta, had a significant influence on intake of metabolizable energy, quantitative water intake and excretion, but there was less effect of water supply. The total water intake and excretion were very high in relation to the weight of the animals as an effect of lactation. Water intake and excretion, and urinary Na excretion, seemed to be less accurately regulated compared with corresponding functions in non-lactating animals. Rectal temperature increased with increasing Ta, possibly as a means of decreasing evaporative water loss. Water output in milk was estimated to increase from 118 g/d at low Ta to 134 g/d at high Ta. The amounts of water available for evaporation were estimated to be 42, 58 and 69 g/kg0.75 at low, medium and high Ta. Cortisol data did not indicate that the animals experienced negative stress. It was concluded that prolonged periods of high Ta may be hazardous for lactating mink because of decreased intake of metabolizable energy resulting in

  19. Effect of 14 days of bed rest on urine metabolite excretion and plasma enzyme levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Grunbaum, B. W.; Kodama, A. M.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Newsom, B. D.

    1974-01-01

    After 1 week of ambulatory base-line measurement, a group of 8 men 19-26 years of age remained continuously recumbent for 14 days. Studies were continued for 1 week following the prolonged recumbency. Urine excretion rates for a number of constituents were determined 2 days before bed rest, on day 14 of bed rest, and day 6 after bed rest. Blood plasma samples were also obtained at these times, and analyzed for several enzymes. On day 14 of bed rest significant increases were observed in urine excretion of total osmotically-active substances, magnesium, calcium, phosphate, creatinine, hydroxyproline, and 17-OH corticosteroids. A decrease occurred in urinary glucose excretion. Plasma levels of alkaline phosphatase and LDH-3 were depressed, while plasma GPT was elevated. Many of these changes persisted on day 6 after bed rest, and are interpreted as concomitants of the disuse atrophy of the musculoskeletal system that characterizes prolonged bed rest and weightlessness.

  20. Ammonium excretion and oxygen respiration of tropical copepods and euphausiids exposed to oxygen minimum zone conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiko, Rainer; Hauss, Helena; Buchholz, Friedrich; Melzner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Calanoid copepods and euphausiids are key components of marine zooplankton communities worldwide. Most euphausiids and several copepod species perform diel vertical migrations (DVMs) that contribute to the export of particulate and dissolved matter to midwater depths. In vast areas of the global ocean, and in particular in the eastern tropical Atlantic and Pacific, the daytime distribution depth of many migrating organisms corresponds to the core of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). At depth, the animals experience reduced temperature and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and an increased carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) compared to their near-surface nighttime habitat. Although it is well known that low oxygen levels can inhibit respiratory activity, the respiration response of tropical copepods and euphausiids to relevant pCO2, pO2, and temperature conditions remains poorly parameterized. Further, the regulation of ammonium excretion at OMZ conditions is generally not well understood. It was recently estimated that DVM-mediated ammonium supply could fuel bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation - a major loss process for fixed nitrogen in the ocean considerably. These estimates were based on the implicit assumption that hypoxia or anoxia in combination with hypercapnia (elevated pCO2) does not result in a down-regulation of ammonium excretion. We exposed calanoid copepods from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA; Undinula vulgaris and Pleuromamma abdominalis) and euphausiids from the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP; Euphausia mucronata) and the ETNA (Euphausia gibboides) to different temperatures, carbon dioxide and oxygen levels to study their survival, respiration and excretion rates at these conditions. An increase in temperature by 10 °C led to an approximately 2-fold increase of the respiration and excretion rates of U. vulgaris (Q10, respiration = 1.4; Q10, NH4-excretion = 1.6), P. abdominalis (Q10, respiration = 2.0; Q10, NH4-excretion = 2.4) and

  1. A novel description of FDG excretion in the renal system: application to metformin-treated models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbarino, S.; Caviglia, G.; Sambuceti, G.; Benvenuto, F.; Piana, M.

    2014-05-01

    This paper introduces a novel compartmental model describing the excretion of 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) in the renal system and a numerical method based on the maximum likelihood for its reduction. This approach accounts for variations in FDG concentration due to water re-absorption in renal tubules and the increase of the bladder’s volume during the FDG excretion process. From the computational viewpoint, the reconstruction of the tracer kinetic parameters is obtained by solving the maximum likelihood problem iteratively, using a non-stationary, steepest descent approach that explicitly accounts for the Poisson nature of nuclear medicine data. The reliability of the method is validated against two sets of synthetic data realized according to realistic conditions. Finally we applied this model to describe FDG excretion in the case of animal models treated with metformin. In particular we show that our approach allows the quantitative estimation of the reduction of FDG de-phosphorylation induced by metformin.

  2. Interaction between the renal excretion rates of beta 2-microglobulin and tobramycin in man.

    PubMed

    Vree, T B; Zweens, K; Huige, P J; Guelen, P J; Jongman-Nix, B

    1984-03-27

    The renal excretion rate of beta 2-microglobulin in man is 127 +/- 98 ng/min at alkaline urine pH (pH 7). Tobramycin, up to intravenous doses of 160 mg (2 mg/kg) does not increase the renal excretion rate of beta 2-microglobulin. Tobramycin must have less affinity than gentamicin for the tubular system for active reabsorption of amino groups containing organic compounds. Due to this reduced affinity tobramycin will be absorbed less by the proximal tubular cells, which may be one of the reasons for tobramycin being less toxic than gentamicin. beta 2-Microglobulin excretion can be used as a parameter for the relative binding affinity of aminoglycosides. PMID:6370509

  3. Excretion of urinary cadmium, copper, and zinc in cadmium-exposed and nonexposed subjects, with special reference to urinary excretion of beta2-microglobulin and metallothionein.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Maki; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Suwazono, Yasushi; Uetani, Mirei; Oishi, Mitsuhiro; Inaba, Takeya; Kido, Teruhiko; Shaikh, Zahir A; Nogawa, Koji

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the association between urinary excretion of cadmium (U-Cd), copper (U-Cu), and zinc (U-Zn) and the severity of two different indicators of renal toxicity (urinary excretion of beta2-microglobulin [U-beta2-MG] and metallothionein [U-MT]) in Cd-exposed subjects compared to controls, and to assess the physiologic mechanisms by which the exposure to environmental Cd affects U-Cd, U-Cu, and U-Zn. The target population included 3508 Cd-exposed and 294 nonexposed participants who received a health survey conducted among the population of the Kakehashi River basin. Increases of U-Cd, U-beta2-MG, and U-MT in the Cd-exposed population were observed relative to excretion of these substances in controls. Regression analysis using a general linear model revealed that the correlations between U-Cd or U-Cu, and U-beta2-MG and between U-Cd, U-Cu or U-Zn, and U-MT were statistically significant in both sexes, but the correlation between U-Zn and U-beta2-MG excretion was significant only in men. These results suggest U-Cd and U-Cu is affected by dysfunction in renal tubular absorption (indicated by U-beta2-MG), whereas not only U-Cd and U-Cu but also U-Zn appear to be a function of renal cellular desquamation (indicated by U-MT). PMID:16327056

  4. Modelling phosphorus intake, digestion, retention and excretion in growing and finishing pigs: model description.

    PubMed

    Symeou, V; Leinonen, I; Kyriazakis, I

    2014-10-01

    Low phosphorus (P) digestibility combined with intensive pig production can increase P diffuse pollution and environmental load. The aim of this paper was to develop a deterministic, dynamic model able to represent P digestion, retention and ultimately excretion in growing and finishing pigs of different genotypes, offered access to diets of different composition. The model represented the limited ability of pig endogenous phytase activity to dephosphorylate phytate as a linear function of dietary calcium (Ca). Phytate dephosphorylation in the stomach by exogenous microbial phytase enzymes was expressed by a first order kinetics relationship. The absorption of non-phytate P from the lumen of the small intestine into the blood stream was set at 0.8 and the dephosphorylated phytate from the large intestine was assumed to be indigestible. The net efficiency of using digested P was set at 0.94 and assumed to be independent of BW, and constant across genotype and sex. P requirements for both maintenance and growth were made simple functions of body protein mass, and hence functions of animal genotype. Undigested P was assumed to be excreted in the feaces in both soluble and insoluble forms. If digestible P exceeded the requirements for P then the excess digestible P was excreted through the urinary flow; thus the model represented both forms of P excretion (soluble and insoluble) into the environment. Using a UK industry standard diet, model behaviour was investigated for its predictions of P digestibility, retention and excretion under different levels of inclusion of microbial phytase and dietary Ca, and different non-phytate P : phytate ratios in the diet, thus covering a broad space of potential diet compositions. Model predictions were consistent with our understanding of P digestion, metabolism and excretion. Uncertainties associated with the underlying assumptions of the model were identified. Their consequences on model predictions, as well as the model

  5. 24h Urinary Sodium Excretion and Subsequent Change in Weight, Waist Circumference and Body Composition

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Sofus C.; Ängquist, Lars; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Heitmann, Berit L.

    2013-01-01

    Background In the same period as the increasing obesity epidemic, there has been an increased consumption of highly processed foods with a high salt content, and a few studies have suggested that a diet with a high salt content may be associated with obesity. Objective To investigate the association between 24 h urinary sodium excretion and subsequent change in body weight (BW), waist circumference (WC), body fat (BF) and fat free mass (FFM) among adults. Design A longitudinal population study based on the Danish part of the MONICA project, with examinations in 1987–1988 and 1993–1994. Complete information on 24 h urinary sodium excretion along with repeated measures of obesity, as well as on potential confounders, was obtained from 215 subjects. Linear regression was used to examine the association between sodium excretion, as a measure of salt consumption, and subsequent changes in BW, WC, BF and FFM, and further evaluated by restricted cubic splines. Stepwise adjustments were made for selected covariates. Results Neither the crude nor the adjusted models showed any statistically significant associations between sodium excretion and change in BW or WC. Likewise, we found no significant association between sodium excretion and change in BF and FFM in the unadjusted models. However, after adjusting for potential baseline confounders and the concurrent BW change, we found a significant increase in BF of 0.24 kg (P = 0.015, CI: 0.05 to 0.43) per 100 mmol increase in 24 h urinary sodium excretion (equivalent to 6 g of salt), during the 6-year study period. Moreover, during the same period, we found a significant association with FFM of −0.21 kg (P = 0.041, CI: −0.40 to −0.01). Conclusions These results suggest that a diet with a high salt content may have a negative influence on development in body composition by expanding BF and reducing FFM. PMID:23936079

  6. Dissipation of Antimicrobials in Feedlot Manure Compost after Oral Administration versus Fortification after Excretion.

    PubMed

    Amarakoon, Inoka D; Zvomuya, Francis; Sura, Srinivas; Larney, Francis J; Cessna, Allan J; Xu, Shanwei; McAllister, Tim A

    2016-03-01

    Fortification of manure with antimicrobials is one approach to studying their dissipation. However, fortified antimicrobials may not accurately model dissipation that occurs after antimicrobials have been administered to livestock in feed and excreted in manure. This study examined the dissipation of antimicrobials excreted in manure versus those added directly to manure (fortified). Steers were fed a diet containing (kg feed) (i) 44 mg chlortetracycline, (ii) 44 mg each of chlortetracycline and sulfamethazine, (iii) 11 mg tylosin, and (iv) no antimicrobials (control). Fortified antimicrobial treatments were prepared by adding antimicrobials to control manure. Manure was composted for 30 d, sampled every 2 to 3 d, and analyzed for antimicrobials and compost properties. Antimicrobial dissipation followed first-order kinetics. The dissipation rate constant was significantly greater (based on 95% confidence limit) for excreted (0.29-0.54 d) than for fortified chlortetracycline (0.11-0.13 d). In contrast, dissipation rate constants were significantly greater for fortified sulfamethazine (0.47 d) and tylosin (0.31 d) than when the same antimicrobials were excreted (0.08 and 0.07 d, respectively). On average, 85 to 99% of the initial antimicrobial concentrations in manure were dissipated after 30 d of composting. The degree of dissipation was greater ( < 0.0001) for fortified (99%) than for excreted tylosin (85%). Composting can be used to reduce environmental loading of antimicrobials before field application of beef cattle manure. Dissipation rates of fortified antimicrobials during manure composting may not accurately reflect those of antimicrobials that are consumed and excreted by cattle. PMID:27065397

  7. Nitrogen excretion factors of livestock in the European Union: a review.

    PubMed

    Velthof, Gerard L; Hou, Yong; Oenema, Oene

    2015-12-01

    Livestock manures are major sources of nutrients, used for the fertilisation of cropland and grassland. Accurate estimates of the amounts of nutrients in livestock manures are required for nutrient management planning, but also for estimating nitrogen (N) budgets and emissions to the environment. Here we report on N excretion factors for a range of animal categories in policy reports by member states of the European Union (EU). Nitrogen excretion is defined in this paper as the total amount of N excreted by livestock per year as urine and faeces. We discuss the guidelines and methodologies for the estimation of N excretion factors by the EU Nitrates Directive, the OECD/Eurostat gross N balance guidebook, the EMEP/EEA Guidebook and the IPCC Guidelines. Our results show that N excretion factors for dairy cattle, other cattle, pigs, laying hens, broilers, sheep, and goats differ significantly between policy reports and between countries. Part of these differences may be related to differences in animal production (e.g. production of meat, milk and eggs), size/weight of the animals, and feed composition, but partly also to differences in the aggregation of livestock categories and estimation procedures. The methodologies and data used by member states are often not well described. There is a need for a common, harmonised methodology and procedure for the estimation of N excretion factors, to arrive at a common basis for the estimation of the production of manure N and N balances, and emissions of ammonia (NH3 ) and nitrous oxide (N2 O) across the EU. PMID:25959675

  8. Assessment of urinary excretion of antimalarial drugs in large-scale chemotherapeutic eradication projects.

    PubMed

    BRUCE-CHWATT, L J

    1959-01-01

    Assessment of the urinary excretion of an antimalarial drug is a useful means of checking the amount of drug administered and the regularity of intake. The author describes the various methods available for the qualitative and quantitative estimation of antimalarial drugs in urine and discusses their relative merits, with special reference to their suitability for use in the field. He points out the difficulties involved in estimating the urinary excretion of antimalarials in large-scale chemotherapeutic eradication projects and stress the importance of simplifying testing techniques as far as possible. PMID:13805135

  9. Urinary excretion of dietary Maillard reaction products in healthy adult female cats.

    PubMed

    van Rooijen, C; Bosch, G; Butré, C I; van der Poel, A F B; Wierenga, P A; Alexander, L; Hendriks, W H

    2016-01-01

    During processing of foods, the Maillard reaction occurs, resulting in the formation of advanced Maillard reaction products (MRP). Varying amounts of MRP have been found in commercially processed pet foods. Dietary MRP can be absorbed and contribute to the endogenous pool of MRP and possibly the etiology of age-related diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine urinary excretion of dietary MRP in cats fed commercial moist and dry foods. A pilot study with 10 cats, conducted to determine the adaptation time required for stable urinary excretion of MRP when changing to a diet with contrasting MRP content, showed an adaptation time of 1 d for all components. In the main study, 6 commercially processed dry and 6 moist diets were fed to 12 adult female cats in 2 parallel randomized, 36-d Latin square designs. The 24-h urine was collected quantitatively using modified litter boxes, and fructoselysine (FL), carboxymethyllysine (CML), and lysinoalanine (LAL) were analyzed using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) - mass spectrometer. Daily urinary excretion of FL and CML showed a positive relationship with daily intake in the dry ( = 0.03 and < 0.01, respectively) and moist ( < 0.01) foods. For LAL, no significant relationship was observed. Urinary recovery (% ingested) showed a negative relationship with daily intake for FL, CML, and LAL in the dry foods ( < 0.01, < 0.01, and = 0.08, respectively) and for CML and LAL in the moist foods ( < 0.01). The observed increase in urinary excretion with increasing dietary intake indicates that dietary MRP were absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract of cats and excreted in the urine. The adaptation time with change in diet indicates a likely effective excretion of MRP. Minimum apparent absorption of FL, CML, and LAL was found to range between 8% and 23%, 25% and 73%, and 6% and 19%, respectively. The observed decrease in urinary recovery suggests a limiting factor in digestion, absorption, metabolism

  10. Clinical usefulness of urinary 3-methylhistidine excretion in indicating muscle protein breakdown.

    PubMed Central

    Elia, M; Carter, A; Bacon, S; Winearls, C G; Smith, R

    1981-01-01

    Urinary excretion of the post-translationally modified amino-acid 3-methylhistidine, derived from the contractile proteins actin and myosin, was measured in patients with conditions associated with nitrogen loss. The ratio of 3-methylhistidine:creatinine excretion, a measure of the fractional catabolic rate of myofibrillar protein was increased in severe injury, thyrotoxicosis, neoplastic disease, prednisolone administration, and sometimes Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In myxoedema, osteomalacia, and hypothermia the ratio was decreased; and starvation, elective operations, and rheumatoid arthritis had little effect. Provided that the diet is meat free, measurement of urinary 3-methylhistidine may provide useful information on the cause of protein loss. PMID:6780020

  11. Effect of metal chelators on excretion and tissue levels of essential trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, S.K.; Jain, V.K.; Mathur, A.K.

    1984-10-01

    The influence of one, three, and six doses of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and triethylenetetramine (TETA) on the urinary excretion of Ca, Cu, Fe, and Zn, and on their levels in liver, kidneys, heart, and serum in rats, was investigated to ascertain their suitability in amelioration of metal intoxication. While excretion of all the essential trace metals examined was enhanced significantly, the tissue and serum levels of some of them either increased or decreased after administration of the chelators. The results suggest depletion of some of the endogenous trace metals from the body and their intertissue redistribution following treatment with these chelating agents.

  12. The Excretion of Renal Cells Following Necrosis of the Distal Segment of the Nephron by Hexadi-Methrine Bromide

    PubMed Central

    Davies, D. J.; Kennedy, A.; Roberts, C.

    1969-01-01

    The rate of excretion of renal cells was determined in rats with necrosis of the distal convoluted tubules and broad ascending limbs of the loops of Henle caused by injection of hexadimethrine bromide. The magnitude and the duration of abnormal cell excretion were correlated both with the dose of hexadimethrine and with the degree of damage that was evident on histological examination of the kidney. In general cell excretion studies provided a satisfactory indication of the degree of renal damage but the smallest lesions did not cause a significant increase in cell excretion and occasionally a rat with a very large lesion failed to show an increase in cell excretion rate. The changes in excretion rates observed in the present experiments were less than those found previously in animals with necrosis of proximal convoluted tubules caused by mercuric chloride. This is probably due firstly to the smaller number of cells in the distal nephron and secondly to the toxin causing disintegration of many of the cells. These findings have implications for the investigation of analgesic nephrotoxicity by measurement of urinary cell excretion rates. In order to appreciate the significance of increases in renal cell excretion following administration of various substances their site of action and the type of cell damage that they cause must first be established. ImagesFigs. 1-4 PMID:5792904

  13. Phytate utilization and phosphorus excretion by broiler chickens fed diets containing cereal grains varying in phytate and phytase content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poor digestibility of phytate P by poultry leads to supplementation of poultry diets with inorganic P thereby increasing feed costs and also increasing the excretion of P by the birds. In order to quantify phytate utilization and P excretion by poultry, eighty, 12 day-old, male broiler chicks, weig...

  14. Refining the excretion factors of methadone and codeine for wastewater analysis - Combining data from pharmacokinetic and wastewater studies.

    PubMed

    Thai, Phong K; Lai, Foon Yin; Bruno, Raimondo; van Dyken, Emma; Hall, Wayne; O'Brien, Jake; Prichard, Jeremy; Mueller, Jochen F

    2016-09-01

    Analysing drug residues in wastewater (wastewater analysis) to monitor the consumption of those drugs in the population has become a complementary method to epidemiological surveys. In this method, the excretion factor of a drug (or the percentage of drug metabolites excreted through urine) is a critical parameter for the back-estimation of the consumption of a drug. However, this parameter is usually derived from a small database of human pharmacokinetic studies. This is true for methadone and codeine, the two most commonly used opioids and also common substances of abuse. Therefore, we aimed to refine the current excretion factors used for estimating methadone and codeine by analysing published data from the literature on the excretion of methadone, its main metabolite, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), and codeine. Our review included both human drug pharmacokinetic studies and wastewater analysis studies. We found that while the commonly used excretion factor of methadone (~27.5%) was relatively accurate, the excretion factor of EDDP, a better biomarker for methadone consumption in sewer epidemiology, should be twice that of methadone (i.e. 55%) instead of the current equal or half values. For codeine, the excretion factor should be ~30% instead of 63.5% or 10% as previously used in wastewater analysis studies. Data from wastewater analysis studies could be used in this way to refine the excretion factors of the drugs of interest. PMID:27295047

  15. Prediction of nitrogen excretion by beef cattle: a meta-analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reliable estimates of nitrogen (N) excretion in the urine and feces of beef cattle are essential for developing cost-effective and environmentally sound nutrient management plans. A meta-analysis dataset was compiled that included data for starting live BW, DMI, N intake, dietary CP concentration, u...

  16. Urinary trimethylselenonium excretion by the rat: effect of level and source of selenium-75

    SciTech Connect

    Nahapetian, A.T.; Janghorbani, M.; Young, V.R.

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore in rats the urinary metabolites of selenium (Se), by using (/sup 75/Se)selenomethionine, (/sup 75/Se)selenocystine, and (/sup 75/Se)selenite, and to assess the effects of low and high levels of Se intake on trimethylselenonium ion (TMSe) excretion in urine. Male adult rats were adapted for 6 weeks to a commercial rat laboratory stock diet (0.25 ppm Se). They were then starved for 24 hours and given an oral dose of either low (16 micrograms Se/kg body weight) or high (1500 micrograms Se/kg body weight) Se as the test Se compounds. Appearance of radioactivity in TMSe and non-TMSe Se metabolites in urine was monitored for 48 hours. About 40% of the /sup 75/Se dose was excreted in urine. TMSe was the major urinary Se metabolite at high, and a minor urinary Se metabolite at low dose levels of Se and for all three Se test compounds. At least 80% of urinary /sup 75/Se and 26-42% of the orally administered /sup 75/Se were excreted as non-TMSe Se metabolites in urine under the latter condition. It is hypothesized that at a requirement intake of Se either a trace or no TMSe is excreted in urine, and it becomes a major excretory metabolite of Se when the dietary trace mineral intake exceeds a requirement level, probably serving as a means of detoxification.

  17. Increased urinary excretion of platelet activating factor in mice with lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Macconi, D.; Noris, M.; Benfenati, E.; Quaglia, R.; Pagliarino, G. ); Remuzzi, G. Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo )

    1991-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is present in urine from humans and experimental animals in normal conditions. Very little is known about changes in PAF urinary excretion under pathologic conditions and no data are available about the origin of PAF in the urine. In the present study we explored the possibility that immunologic renal disease is associated with an increase in PAF urinary excretion using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. To clarify the renal or extrarenal origin of urinary PAF we evaluated whether exogenously administered PAF (1-(1{prime},2{prime}-{sup 3}H)alkyl) is filtered through the glomerulus and excreted in the urine. The results show that: (1) urine from mice with lupus nephritis in the early phase of the disease contained amounts of PAF comparable to those excreted in normal mouse urine, (2) PAF levels increased when animals started to develop high grade proteinuria, (3) after intravenous injection of ({sup 3}H) PAF In nephritic mice, a negligible amount of ({sup 3}H) ether lipid, corresponding to ({sup 3}H)1-alkyl -2-acyl-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-2-acyl-GPC), was recovered from the 24 h urine extract.

  18. Cultivable alginate lyase-excreting bacteria associated with the Arctic brown alga Laminaria.

    PubMed

    Dong, Sheng; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Shi, Mei; Song, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2012-11-01

    Although some alginate lyases have been isolated from marine bacteria, alginate lyases-excreting bacteria from the Arctic alga have not yet been investigated. Here, the diversity of the bacteria associated with the brown alga Laminaria from the Arctic Ocean was investigated for the first time. Sixty five strains belonging to nine genera were recovered from six Laminaria samples, in which Psychrobacter (33/65), Psychromonas (10/65) and Polaribacter (8/65) were the predominant groups. Moreover, 21 alginate lyase-excreting strains were further screened from these Laminaria-associated bacteria. These alginate lyase-excreting strains belong to five genera. Psychromonas (8/21), Psedoalteromonas (6/21) and Polaribacter (4/21) are the predominant genera, and Psychrobacter, Winogradskyella, Psychromonas and Polaribacter were first found to produce alginate lyases. The optimal temperatures for the growth and algiante lyase production of many strains were as low as 10–20 °C, indicating that they are psychrophilic bacteria. The alginate lyases produced by 11 strains showed the highest activity at 20–30 °C, indicating that these enzymes are cold-adapted enzymes. Some strians showed high levels of extracellular alginate lyase activity around 200 U/mL. These results suggest that these algiante lyase-excreting bacteria from the Arctic alga are good materials for studying bacterial cold-adapted alginate lyases. PMID:23203272

  19. Urinary excretion of glycosaminoglycans in malignant diseases of the haemopoietic and lymphatic tissues.

    PubMed

    Friman, C; Juvani, M

    1975-01-01

    A study has been made of the urinary excretion of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) in 50 patients with malignancies, including 6 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), 11 with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), 10 with chronic lymphatic leukaemia (CLL), 10 with multiple myeloma (MM), 7 with Hodgkin's disease and 6 with mycosis fungoides (MF). The total urinary GAG were isolated by precipitation with cetyltrimethyl-ammoniumbromide (CTAB), and assayed in terms of their hexuronic acid content. A statistically highly significant increase in the excretion of total GAG was observed in all the disorders studied, except Hodgkin's disease, the highest value being seen in myeloid leukaemia (ML). Constant amounts of non-dialysable urinary GAG were electrophoresed in 0.5 M lithium acetate on cellulose acetate strips, and stained with alcian blue. The densitometric tracing derived from the electrophoresis strips were analysed with a Du Pont Curve Resolver. The electrophoretic data suggested the existence of a qualitative deviation in GAG excretion in CLL and in MF, in that patients with these diseases excreted on an average larger than normal amounts of slowly migrating GAG fractions. Pooled crude urinary GAG material from patients with CLL, MF, AML and CML and from control subjects was further purified and subjected to analytical studies. These indicated that a similar qualitative urinary GAG distribution exists in ML and in controls, whereas the urinary GAG in CLL and MF patients contained relatively more dermatan sulphate (DS, in terms of iduronate) than those of the controls. PMID:126635

  20. Nutrient Excretion and Odorant Production in Manure from Cattle Fed Corn Wet Distillers Grains With Solubles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-four cross bred steers (BW 452. 5 ± 15.5 kg) were used to evaluate nutrient excretion and odorous compounds in urine and feces of feedlot steers fed diets containing corn wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS). Cattle were weighed, blocked by weight, and assigned randomly to one of four ...

  1. Feed management practices to reduce manure phosphorus excretion in dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential mineral that needs to be supplied in sufficient quantities for maintenance and growth and milk production in dairy cattle. However, over 60% of the P consumed can be excreted in faeces with a potential to cause environmental pollution. Concern over higher levels of P i...

  2. Treatment with Potassium Bicarbonate Lowers Calcium Excretion and Bone Resorption in Older Men and Women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bicarbonate has been implicated in bone health in older subjects on acid-producing diets in short-term studies. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of potassium bicarbonate and its components on changes in bone resorption and calcium excretion over 3 months in older men and wom...

  3. The kinetics of urinary fumonisin B1 excretion in humans consuming maize-based diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins (FB) are mycotoxins found in maize. The purpose of this study was to 1) determine the relationship between FB1, FB2, and FB3 intake and urinary excretion in humans, 2) validate a method to isolate urinary FB on C18-SPE cartridges for international shipment, and 3) test the method using s...

  4. Lanthanum Carbonate Reduces Urine Phosphorus Excretion: Evidence of High-Capacity Phosphate Binding

    PubMed Central

    Pennick, Michael; Poole, Lynne; Dennis, Kerry; Smyth, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of phosphate binders can be assessed by evaluating urinary phosphorus excretion in healthy volunteers, which indicates the ability of the phosphate binder to reduce gastrointestinal phosphate absorption. Healthy volunteers were enrolled into one of five separate randomized trials; four were open label and one double blind. Following a screening period of <28 days, participants received differing tablets containing lanthanum carbonate [LC, 3000 mg/day of elemental lanthanum (in one study other doses were also used)]. Participants received a standardized phosphate diet and remained in the relevant study center throughout the duration of each treatment period. The end point in all studies was the reduction in urinary phosphorus excretion. Reductions in mean 24-h urinary phosphorus excretion in volunteers receiving a lanthanum dose of 3000 mg/day were between 236 and 468 mg/day over the five separate studies. These data in healthy volunteers can be used to estimate the amount of reduction of dietary phosphate absorption by LC. The reduction in 24-h urinary phosphorus excretion per tablet was compared with published data on other phosphate binders. Although there are limitations, evidence suggests that LC is a very effective phosphate binder in terms of binding per tablet. PMID:22250993

  5. Excretion of Morroniside in Rat Urine After Single Oral and Intravenous Administration.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shan; Li, Jinglai; Zhang, Zhenqing

    2016-07-01

    This study was designed to develop a sensitive, simple and rapid method for the quantitation of morroniside in rat urine using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) and to investigate the excretion of morroniside in rat urine. The mobile phase consisted of water-acetonitrile (gradient elution) at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. Detection was performed using positive-ion electrospray ionization in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) modes. And the detection of morroniside in rat urine by the LC-MS-MS was accurate and precise from 1.0 to 2,500 ng/mL (a correlation coefficient of 0.9953). The recoveries and matrix effects were all in line with the biological sample measurement requirements. The intraday accuracy was 88.68-105.78% with precision of 6.50-11.19% and the interday accuracy was 95.77-102.43% with precision of 7.08-10.40%. Excretion data of morroniside in rat urine indicated that 21.43‰ (i.g.) and 100.35% (i.v.) of the dose administered was excreted as unconverted form, respectively. And the maximal excretion rate was 27.57 and 482.42 μg/h after oral and intravenous administration, respectively. These results indicated that the developed method has satisfactory sensitivity, accuracy and precision for the quantification of morroniside in rat urine. PMID:26896349

  6. ESTIMATES OF AGE-SPECIFIC URINARY EXCRETION RATES FOR CREATININE AMONG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of this study suggest that naïve adjustment by creatinine concentration, without consideration of the age-dependence of the physiological mechanisms controlling its excretion, may introduce sizeable error and is inappropriate when comparing metabolite concentrations a...

  7. EFFECT OF DOSE ON THE EXCRETION AND METABOLISM OF MONOMETHYLARSONIC ACID IN THE MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECT OF DOSE ON THE EXCRETION AND METABOLISM OF MONOMETHYLARSONIC ACID IN THE MOUSE
    M F Hughes1, V Devesa2, B C Edwards1, C T Mitchell1, E M Kenyon1, and D J Thomas1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC; 2UNC-CH, CEMALB, Chapel Hill, NC

    Monomethylar...

  8. Daily uranium excretion in German peacekeeping personnel serving on the Balkans compared to ICRP model prediction.

    PubMed

    Oeh, U; Li, W B; Höllriegl, V; Giussani, A; Schramel, P; Roth, P; Paretzke, H G

    2007-01-01

    An investigation was performed to assess a possible health risk of depleted uranium (DU) for residents and German peacekeeping personnel serving on the Balkans. In order to evaluate a possible DU intake, the urinary uranium excretions of volunteers were collected and analysed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). In total, more than 1300 urine samples from soldiers, civil servants and unexposed controls of different genders and ages were analysed to determine uranium excretion parameters. All participating volunteers, aged 3-92 y, were grouped according to their gender and age for evaluation. The results of the investigation revealed no significant difference between the unexposed controls and the peacekeeping personnel. In addition, the geometric means of the daily urinary excretion in peacekeeping personnel, ranging from 3 to 23 ng d(-1) for different age groups, fall toward the lower end of renal uranium excretion values published for unexposed populations in literature. The measured data were compared with the International Commission on Radiological Protection prediction for the intake of natural uranium by unexposed members of the public. The two data sets are in good agreement, indicating that no relevant intake of additional uranium, either natural or DU, has appeared for German peacekeeping personnel serving on the Balkans. PMID:17567762

  9. Partition of nitrogen excretion in urine and the feces of holstein replacement heifers.

    PubMed

    Marini, J C; Van Amburgh, M E

    2005-05-01

    Increasing public concern has been focused on animal production systems as a major nonpoint source of pollution. These studies were conducted to further our understanding of whole-animal N metabolism, N excretion, and its partition between feces and urine in growing dairy heifers. Isocaloric diets [2.31 Mcal of metabolizable energy (ME)/kg of dry matter (DM)], ranging from 12.4 to 34.2 g of N/kg of DM, were fed to Holstein heifers in 2 experiments at approximately 1.8 times maintenance. Diets were formulated to provide 54 to 143% of the ruminal ammonia requirements as predicted by the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System. Increasing the N content of the diet increased urinary N excretion and N balance, but did not affect fecal N excretion. Holstein heifers fed low N diets were able to maintain growth rates consistent with current recommendations while at the same time reducing N excretion, in particular nitrogenous compounds that are readily converted to ammonia. However, more research is needed before this type of diet is recommended for growing heifers because of possible changes in body composition that may affect future milk production and performance. PMID:15829671

  10. UREA PRODUCTION, RECYCLING AND EXCRETION IN FORAGE-FED BEEF STEERS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments with growing beef steers fed hays of warm season (gamagrass and switchgrass) or cool season (tall fescue) grasses showed a strong linear relationship between urea production by the animal and urinary urea excretion as functions of nitrogen (crude protein) intake. The nature of the r...

  11. Study of the Assessment Method for N Excretion in Sustainable Heavy Pigs Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kaijun; Liu, Fenghua; Xu, Xiaolong; Xu, Jianqin; Zoccarato, Ivo

    Italian heavy pigs, with an average slaughtering body weight of 150-170 kg, are world-wide famous for its Parma ham production. Because the requirement of market diversity, producers are interested in ham production following the procedure of Italian pork industry. However, with ever growing public concern about nitrogen (N) pollution in the environment, it is necessary to determine a suitable method to measure N excretion from heavy pig production. The N retention was calculated by factorial method and compared with estimations of other methods available in literature. The results showed that the N percentage of heavy pigs is 2.43% ± 0.07% on body weight basis and the percentage of N excretion was approximately 69.62% ± 0.20 of N intake. Regarding the N excretion of estimation methods, the proposal of Xiccato et al. was closer to reality of the heavy pig production than other methods and could be used as a standard way to calculate the N excretion. Besides the overall standard, it is opportune to make a N balance sheet for every individual farm under specific conditions. Only in this way, the farmers can realize their deficiencies and will voluntarily follow the Good Management Practice (GMP) indications so as to guarantee a sustainable development of pig production.

  12. What Dairy Cows are Fed Impacts Manure N Excretions and Cycling in Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Availability of manure nitrogen (N) to crops is mitigated by many factors, including manure type and composition. Whereas relationships between dairy diets, milk production, manure N excretion, and urine N losses as ammonia have been documented, very little information exists on how diets impact fec...

  13. Bioaccessibility and excretion of arsenic in Niu Huang Jie Du Pian pills

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Iris; Sylvester, Steven; Lai, Vivian W.-M.; Owen, Andrew; Reimer, Kenneth J. Cullen, William R.

    2007-08-01

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) often contain significant levels of potentially toxic elements, including arsenic. Niu Huang Jie Du Pian pills were analyzed to determine the concentration, bioaccessibility (arsenic fraction soluble in the human gastrointestinal system) and chemical form (speciation) of arsenic. Arsenic excretion in urine (including speciation) and facial hair were studied after a one-time ingestion. The pills contained arsenic in the form of realgar, and although the total arsenic that was present in a single pill was high (28 mg), the low bioaccessibility of this form of arsenic predicted that only 4% of it was available for absorption into the bloodstream (1 mg of arsenic per pill). The species of arsenic that were solubilized were inorganic arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) but DMAA and MMAA were detected in urine. Two urinary arsenic excretion peaks were observed: an initial peak several (4-8) hours after ingestion corresponding to the excretion of predominantly As(III), and a larger peak at 14 h corresponding predominantly to DMAA and MMAA. No methylated As(III) species were observed. Facial hair analysis revealed that arsenic concentrations did not increase significantly as a result of the ingestion. Arsenic is incompletely soluble under human gastrointestinal conditions, and is metabolized from the inorganic to organic forms found in urine. Bioaccessible arsenic is comparable to the quantity excreted. Facial hair as a bio-indicator should be further tested.

  14. SALT LOADING INCREASES URINARY EXCRETION OF LINOLEIC ACID DIOLS AND TRIOLS IN HEALTHY HUMAN SUBJECTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urinary linoleate (LA) metabolite excretion was investigated in subjects exposed to a salt loading/salt depletion regimen. Twelve healthy subjects were recruited from the New Orleans population (pre-Katrina) and admitted to Tulane-LSU Charity Hospital GCRC after a 5-day outpatient lead in phase on a...

  15. Corticosterone excretion patterns and affiliative behavior over development in ravens (Corvus corax)

    PubMed Central

    Stöwe, Mareike; Bugnyar, Thomas; Schloegl, Christian; Heinrich, Bernd; Kotrschal, Kurt; Möstl, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Averse effects of social stress may be buffered by the presence of social allies, which mainly has been demonstrated in mammals and recently also in birds. However, effects of socio-positive behavior prior to fledging in relation to corticosterone excretion in altricial birds have not been investigated yet. We here monitored corticosterone excretion patterns in three groups of hand raised juvenile ravens (n=5, 6 and 11) in the nest, post-fledging (May–July) and when ravens would be independent from their parents (September–November). We related these corticosterone excretion patterns to socio-positive behavior. Behavioral data were collected via focal sampling in each developmental period considered. We analyzed amounts of excreted immunoreactive corticosterone metabolites (CM) using enzyme immuno assays. We collected fecal samples in each developmental period considered and evaluated the most appropriate assay via an isolation stress experiment. Basal CM was significantly higher during the nestling period than post-fledging or when birds were independent. The time nestlings spent allopreening correlated negatively with mean CM. Post-fledging, individuals with higher CM levels sat close to (distance <50 cm) conspecifics more frequently and tended to preen them longer. When birds were independent and a stable rank hierarchy was established, dominant individuals were preened significantly longer than subordinates. These patterns observed in ravens parallel those described for primates, which could indicate that animal species living in a complex social environment may deal with social problems in a similar way that is not restricted to mammals or primates. PMID:18022623

  16. EFFECT OF SUPPLEMENTING RUMEN-PROTECTED METHIONINE ON PRODUCTION AND NITROGEN EXCRETION IN LACTATING DAIRY COWS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two 4 x 4 Latin square trials (4-week periods; 16 weeks total) were conducted to see if supplementing rumen-protected Met (RPM; fed as Mepron®) would allow feeding less crude protein (CP), thereby reducing urinary N excretion, but without losing production. In trial 1, 24 Holsteins were fed 4 diets ...

  17. Visualization of Noncalcified Gallstones on CT Due to Vicarious Excretion of Intravenous Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Krauthamer, Andres; Maldjian, Pierre D.

    2008-01-01

    We present a case where low attenuation gallstones are visible on CT only on delayed imaging secondary to gallbladder opacification from vicarious excretion of contrast. We discuss heterotopic accumulation of contrast in the gallbladder and its potential diagnostic utilization in the detection of occult pathology. PMID:22470586

  18. Methods to Evaluate Biliary Excretion of Drugs in Humans: an Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghibellini, Giulia; Leslie, Elaine M.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2008-01-01

    Determining the biliary clearance of drugs in humans is very challenging because bile in not readily accessible due to the anatomy of the hepatobiliary tract. The collection of bile usually is limited to post-surgical patients with underlying hepatobiliary disease. In healthy subjects, feces typically are used as a surrogate to quantify the amount of drug excreted via non-urinary pathways. Nevertheless, it is very important to characterize hepatobiliary elimination because this is a potential site of drug interactions that might result in significant alterations in systemic or hepatic exposure. In addition to the determination of in vivo biliary clearance values of drugs, the availability of in vitro models that can predict the extent of biliary excretion of drugs in humans may be a powerful tool in the pre-clinical stages of drug development. In this review, recent advances in the most commonly used in vivo methods to estimate biliary excretion of drugs in humans are outlined. Additionally, in vitro models that can be employed to investigate the molecular processes involved in biliary excretion are discussed to present an updated picture of the new tools and techniques that are available to study the complex processes involved in hepatic drug transport. PMID:16749853

  19. Saliva versus plasma pharmacokinetics: theory and application of a salivary excretion classification system.

    PubMed

    Idkaidek, Nasir; Arafat, Tawfiq

    2012-08-01

    The aims of this work were to study pharmacokinetics of randomly selected drugs in plasma and saliva samples in healthy human volunteers, and to introduce a Salivary Excretion Classification System. Saliva and plasma samples were collected for 3-5 half-life values of sitagliptin, cinacalcet, metformin, montelukast, tolterodine, hydrochlorothiazide (HCT), lornoxicam, azithromycin, diacerhein, rosuvastatin, cloxacillin, losartan and tamsulosin after oral dosing. Saliva and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by noncompartmental analysis using the Kinetica program. Effective intestinal permeability (Peff) values were estimated by the Nelder-Mead algorithm of the Parameter Estimation module using the SimCYP program. Peff values were optimized to predict the actual average plasma profile of each drug. All other physicochemical factors were kept constant during the minimization processes. Sitagliptin, cinacalcet, metformin, tolterodine, HCT, azithromycin, rosuvastatin and cloxacillin had salivary excretion with correlation coefficients of 0.59-0.99 between saliva and plasma concentrations. On the other hand, montelukast, lornoxicam, diacerhein, losartan and tamsulosin showed no salivary excretion. Estimated Peff ranged 0.16-44.16 × 10(-4) cm/s, while reported fraction unbound to plasma proteins (fu) ranged 0.01-0.99 for the drugs under investigation. Saliva/plasma concentrations ratios ranged 0.11-13.4, in agreement with drug protein binding and permeability. A Salivary Excretion Classification System (SECS) was suggested based on drug high (H)/low (L) permeability and high (H)/low (L) fraction unbound to plasma proteins, which classifies drugs into 4 classes. Drugs that fall into class I (H/H), II (L/H) or III (H/L) are subjected to salivary excretion, while those falling into class IV (L/L) are not. Additional data from literature was also analyzed, and all results were in agreement with the suggested SECS. Moreover, a polynomial relationship with

  20. [Excretion of zinc in lactating cows receiving various supply of zinc].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, W A; Kirchgessner, M

    1975-12-01

    Studies were carried out with 5 lactating cows receiving a semisynthetic diet to trace the pattern of zinc excretion in the faeces, urine and milk under conditions of Zn depletion and repletion. Faecal Zn concentrations were found to be drastically reduced during a 6-week period of Zn depletion. The Zn supply to the animals at different levels of Zn repletion (varying between 22 mg and 436 mg Zn per kg) was well reflected in the corresponding faecal Zn concentrations. Similarly, faecal Zn excretion expressed as the percentage of Zn supplied with the diet was shown to change with the level of Zn supply. In the range between 6 mg and 54 m Zn per kg of dietary dry matter the level of relative faecal Zn excretion increased from 42% to 56% whereas with higher Zn supplements (up to 436 mg/kg) only slight increases (up to 60%) were observed. This indicates that the organism exhibits a strong tendency to maintain a physiological balance; this tendency is all the more pronounced with increasing Zn depletion; thus after 19 weeks of Zn depletion as little as 25% of the administered amount of Zn was excreted in the faeces. The average minimum of urinary Zn concentrations was 0.25 mg Zn per litre. The Zn concentrations in urine were not found to be dependent on the Zn supply. The level of relative Zn excretion in the milk was markedly increased despite the reduced concentrations of milk Zn during the periods of Zn deficiency. At the beginning of Zn depletion rather more zinc was released with the milk than was taken up with the Zn deficient diet. The mean proportion of milk Zn in the total amount of dietary Zn over the 6-week depletion period was 91%. With Zn amounts of 22 mg, 54 mg, 87 mg, 108 mg, 130 mg and 436 mg per kg of diet 23.7%, 13.1%, 12.9%, 5.7%, 4.3%, and 1.7% of the dietary Zn were excreted with the milk. Thus, a relative decrease of Zn excretion in the milk was observed, i.e. relative to the level of Zn supplementation. PMID:1241940

  1. Uptake and excretion of ( UC)methyl bromide as influenced by exposure concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Dutcher, J.S.; Bond, J.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; Snipes, M.B.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Cheng, Y.S.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    Uptake of methyl bromide and pathways for excretion of UC were investigated in male Fischer-344 rats after nose-only inhalation of 50, 300, 5700, or 10,400 nmol (1.6 to 310 ppm) of ( UC)methyl bromide/liter of air for 6 hr. Fractional uptake of methyl bromide decreased at the highest concentrations, 5700 and 10,400 nmol/liter, with 37 and 27% of the inhaled methyl bromide absorbed, respectively, compared to 48% at the lower levels. Total methyl bromide absorbed was 9 or 40 mol/kg body wt after exposure to 50 or 300 nmol/liter, respectively. Elimination of UC was linearly related to the amount of methyl bromide absorbed as determined from urine, feces, expired CO2, and parent compound collected for 66 hr after the end of exposure. Exhaled UCO2 was the dominant route of excretion, with from 1.2 to 110 mol (50% of amount absorbed) exhaled, and was described by a two-component negative exponential function; 85% was exhaled with t1/2 of 4 hr, and the remaining 15% was exhaled with a t1/2 of 17 hr. The rate of exhalation of UCO2 was not affected by the amount of ( UC)methyl bromide absorbed. From 0.4 to 54 mol was excreted in urine (20% of amount absorbed). The half-time for excretion of UC in urine was approximately 10 hr, and the rate of excretion was not dependent on the amount of ( UC)methyl bromide absorbed. Little UC was exhaled as methyl bromide (<4% of the dose) or excreted in feces (<2%). At the end of 66 hr, 25% of the UC absorbed remained in the rats. Liver, kidneys, adrenals, lungs, thymus, and turbinates (maxilloturbinates, ethmoturbinates, and nasal epithelial membrane) contained the highest concentrations of UC. Results indicated that uptake of inhaled methyl bromide could be saturated. Any ( UC)methyl bromide equivalents absorbed, however, would be excreted by concentration-independent mechanisms. 20 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  2. [Acceleration of the excretion of monomeric 239Pu-citrate from the body as effected by pentacyne encapsulated in liposomes].

    PubMed

    Il'in, L A; Smirnov, A A; Ivannikov, A T; Parfenova, I M

    1983-01-01

    Liposomes, obtained by a modified procedure involving reverse phases, contained 2-3-times more 14C-pentacyne than the multilayer Banchem;s liposomes. Efficiency of pentacyne encapsulated in liposomes was higher, as compared with a non-encapsulated preparation in studies of urinary excretion of monomeric 239Pu-citrate in rats. Liposomal pentacyne increased most effectively the rate of the radionuclide excretion from liver tissue and skeleton as compared with the action of non-encapsulated complex-forming agent; as a result of which the radionuclide was excreted from liver tissue at a 1.6-2-times and from skeleton--with the 1.4-times higher rates. The both preparations increased the 239Pu excretion with urine and feces. The liposomal pentacyne accelerated an additional excretion of the nuclide with urine. PMID:6353751

  3. Urinary sodium excretion in patients with nephrotic syndrome, and its circadian variation.

    PubMed

    Koopman, M G; Koomen, G C; van Acker, B A; Arisz, L

    1994-02-01

    We analysed sodium excretion and its circadian variation in 70 patients with nephrotic syndrome and 19 healthy controls over 1-3 days, with a regimen of bed rest and constant sodium intake around the clock. We sampled urine and blood and took their blood pressure every 3 h. We also scored 60 renal biopsies for presence of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. Peripheral oedema was estimated in 37 patients. Fifty-nine patients excreted > 10 mmol sodium per 24 h, in equilibrium with dietary intake. In group A (n = 24), sodium excretion followed a normal circadian rhythm, with a daytime peak. In group B (n = 35), 29 had reversed circadian rhythm with a night-time peak, and 6 had no apparent rhythm. Nephrotic syndrome was more severe in group B than in A (serum albumin 19.5 vs. 24.1 g/l, p < 0.05; oedema 7.0 vs. 3.8 kg, p < 0.01). Group B also had signs of more advanced renal disease (GFR 49 vs. 99 ml/min; number of biopsies with tubulo-interstitial damage: 20/28 vs. 4/23; p < 0.001). Reversed sodium rhythm was associated with reversed circadian rhythms for GFR, effective renal plasma flow and urine flow, and blunting or reversal of the day-night differences in blood pressure and plasma renin activity. Eleven patients had urinary sodium excretion < 1 mmol/24 h. With respect to severity of nephrosis, they resembled group B, but GFR and incidence of tubulointerstitial lesions were like group A. Half of the patients with nephrotic syndrome had reversed circadian rhythm for sodium excretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8153287

  4. Excretion pathways and ruminal disappearance of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    von Soosten, D; Meyer, U; Hüther, L; Dänicke, S; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, M; Schafft, H; Spolders, M; Breves, G

    2016-07-01

    From 6 balance experiments with total collection of feces and urine, samples were obtained to investigate the excretion pathways of glyphosate (GLY) in lactating dairy cows. Each experiment lasted for 26d. The first 21d served for adaptation to the diet, and during the remaining 5d collection of total feces and urine was conducted. Dry matter intake and milk yield were recorded daily and milk and feed samples were taken during the sampling periods. In 2 of the 6 experiments, at the sampling period for feces and urine, duodenal contents were collected for 5d. Cows were equipped with cannulas at the dorsal sac of the rumen and the proximal duodenum. Duodenal contents were collected every 2h over 5 consecutive days. The daily duodenal dry matter flow was measured by using chromium oxide as a volume marker. All samples (feed, feces, urine, milk and duodenal contents were analyzed for GLY and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA). Overall, across the 6 experiments (n=32) the range of GLY intake was 0.08 to 6.67mg/d. The main proportion (61±11%; ±SD) of consumed GLY was excreted with feces; whereas excretion by urine was 8±3% of GLY intake. Elimination via milk was negligible. The GLY concentrations above the limit of quantification were not detected in any of the milk samples. A potential ruminal degradation of GLY to AMPA was derived from daily duodenal GLY flow. The apparent ruminal disappearance of GLY intake was 36 and 6%. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that the gastrointestinal absorption of GLY is of minor importance and fecal excretion represents the major excretion pathway. A degradation of GLY to AMPA by rumen microbes or a possible retention in the body has to be taken into account. PMID:27108173

  5. Absorption and excretion of undegradable peptides: role of lipid solubility and net charge.

    PubMed

    Pappenheimer, J R; Karnovsky, M L; Maggio, J E

    1997-01-01

    Absorption and excretion of undegradable peptides were investigated with use of octapeptides synthesized from D-amino acids. D-Tyrosine was included in each peptide to permit labeling with 125I, D-glutamic acid or D-lysine were included to vary net electric charge and D-serine or D-leucine were included to vary lipid solubility. Peptides were administered parenterally or orally to normal rats drinking 5% glucose or maltose. Forty-five percent of a lipid-insoluble, negatively charged octapeptide added to the drinking fluid in milligram quantities was absorbed from the intestine and excreted intact in urine; 90% of this peptide was recovered in urine after parenteral injection. In contrast, lipophilic D-octapeptides were largely excreted in feces, even after subcutaneous injection; the amounts excreted in feces were correlated with oil/aqueous partition coefficients. Evidence is presented that lipophilic peptides entering liver cells combine with bile salts to form hydrophilic complexes that are secreted rapidly at high concentration in bile. At physiological concentrations of bile salts (5-40 mM) and nanomolar concentrations of peptide the binding is so complete that these undegradable peptides are rapidly cleared from liver to duodenal fluid in association with the bile salts. After reaching the ileum the bile salts are reabsorbed to blood, leaving the original lipophilic peptides to be excreted in the feces from which they can be extracted, purified and identified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. These mechanisms are discussed in relation to a) the paracellular absorption of peptides and other solutes by solvent drag and b) the delivery and fate of biologically active peptides. PMID:8996209

  6. Roles of urea production, ammonium excretion, and amino acid oxidation in acid-base balance.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, W

    1986-02-01

    Atkinson and colleagues recently proposed several concepts that contrast with traditional views: first, that acid-base balance is regulated chiefly by the reactions leading to urea production in the liver; second, that ammonium excretion by the kidney plays no role in acid-base homeostasis; and third, that ammonium does not stimulate ureagenesis (except indirectly). To examine these concepts, plasma ions other than bicarbonate are categorized as 1) fixed cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, symbolized M+) and anions (Cl-), 2) buffer anions (A-), 3) other anions (X-), and 4) ammonium plus charged amino groups (N+). Since electroneutrality dictates that M+ + N+ = Cl- + HCO3- + A- + X-, it follows that delta HCO3- = delta(M+ - Cl-) - delta A- - delta X- + delta N+. Therefore acid-base disturbances (changes in HCO3-) can be categorized as to how they affect bodily content and hence plasma concentration of each of these four types of ions. The stoichiometry of ureagenesis, glutamine hydrolysis, ammonium and titratable acid excretion, oxidation of neutral, acidic, and basic amino acids, and oxidation of methionine, phosphoserine, and protein are examined to see how they alter these quantities. It is concluded that 1) although ureagenesis is pH dependent and also counteracts a tendency of amino acid oxidation to cause alkalosis, this tendency is inherently limited by the hyperammonemia (delta N+) that necessarily accompanies it, 2) ammonium excretion is equivalent to hydrogen excretion in its effects on acid-base balance if, and only if, it occurs in exchange for sodium or is accompanied by chloride excretion and only when the glutamate generated by glutamine hydrolysis is oxidized.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3511732

  7. Q Fever in Pregnant Goats: Pathogenesis and Excretion of Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    Roest, Hendrik-Jan; van Gelderen, Betty; Dinkla, Annemieke; Frangoulidis, Dimitrios; van Zijderveld, Fred; Rebel, Johanna; van Keulen, Lucien

    2012-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes Q fever. Infected pregnant goats are a major source of human infection. However, the tissue dissemination and excretion pathway of the pathogen in goats are still poorly understood. To better understand Q fever pathogenesis, we inoculated groups of pregnant goats via the intranasal route with a recent Dutch outbreak C. burnetii isolate. Tissue dissemination and excretion of the pathogen were followed for up to 95 days after parturition. Goats were successfully infected via the intranasal route. PCR and immunohistochemistry showed strong tropism of C. burnetii towards the placenta at two to four weeks after inoculation. Bacterial replication seemed to occur predominantly in the trophoblasts of the placenta and not in other organs of goats and kids. The amount of C. burnetii DNA in the organs of goats and kids increased towards parturition. After parturition it decreased to undetectable levels: after 81 days post-parturition in goats and after 28 days post-parturition in kids. Infected goats gave birth to live or dead kids. High numbers of C. burnetii were excreted during abortion, but also during parturition of liveborn kids. C. burnetii was not detected in faeces or vaginal mucus before parturition. Our results are the first to demonstrate that pregnant goats can be infected via the intranasal route. C. burnetii has a strong tropism for the trophoblasts of the placenta and is not excreted before parturition; pathogen excretion occurs during birth of dead as well as healthy animals. Besides abortions, normal deliveries in C. burnetii-infected goats should be considered as a major zoonotic risk for Q fever in humans. PMID:23152826

  8. Biliary excretion of pravastatin and taurocholate in rats with bile salt export pump (Bsep) impairment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yaofeng; Freeden, Chris; Zhang, Yueping; Abraham, Pamela; Shen, Hong; Wescott, Debra; Humphreys, W Griffith; Gan, Jinping; Lai, Yurong

    2016-07-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP) is expressed on the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes regulating liver bile salt excretion, and impairment of BSEP function may lead to cholestasis in humans. This study explored drug biliary excretion, as well as serum chemistry, individual bile acid concentrations and liver transporter expressions, in the SAGE Bsep knockout (KO) rat model. It was observed that the Bsep protein in KO rats was decreased to 15% of that in the wild type (WT), as quantified using LC-MS/MS. While the levels of Ntcp and Mrp2 were not significantly altered, Mrp3 expression increased and Oatp1a1 decreased in KO animals. Compared with the WT rats, the KO rats had similar serum chemistry and showed normal liver transaminases. Although the total plasma bile salts and bile flow were not significantly changed in Bsep KO rats, individual bile acids in plasma and liver demonstrated variable changes, indicating the impact of Bsep KO. Following an intravenous dose of deuterium labeled taurocholic acid (D4-TCA, 2 mg/kg), the D4-TCA plasma exposure was higher and bile excretion was delayed by approximately 0.5 h in the KO rats. No differences were observed for the pravastatin plasma concentration-time profile or the biliary excretion after intravenous administration (1 mg/kg). Collectively, the results revealed that these rats have significantly lower Bsep expression, therefore affecting the biliary excretion of endogenous bile acids and Bsep substrates. However, these rats are able to maintain a relatively normal liver function through the remaining Bsep protein and via the regulation of other transporters. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27059119

  9. Understanding Measurements of Intestinal Permeability in Healthy Humans with Urine Lactulose and Mannitol Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Nadeau, Ashley; Lamsam, Jesse; Nord, Sara Linker; Ryks, Michael; Burton, Duane; Sweetser, Seth; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Singh, Ravinder

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to understand the information from differential two-sugar excretion (2-SE) in measuring intestinal permeability. In a crossover study in 12 healthy volunteers, we compared urinary excretion ratios of lactulose (L) to mannitol [(M) LMR] after ingestion in liquid formulation (LF) or in delayed-release, methacrylate-coated capsules (CAP). Both formulations were radiolabeled. Urine was collected every 2 hours from 0–8h, and from 8–24h. Two hours after LF, gastric residual was 15.9 ± 6.2 % (SEM), and the percentage in colon was 49.6 ± 7.8 %; in 11/12 participants, liquid had entered colon within 2h. Average CAP arrival time in colon was 5.16 ± 0.46h (mode 6 h). After LF, mannitol was extensively absorbed in the first 8h; lactulose absorption was low thoughout the 24h. After the LF, the LMR (geometric mean, 95% CI/hour) in the 0–2h urine was 0.08 [0.05, 0.11]), which was lower than in 8–24h urine (0.32,[0.16, 0.46]; p<0.05). Urine LMRs at 8–24h were similar after LF or CAP. We concluded that, after LF, sugar excretion in 0–2h urine may reflect both SI and colon permeability. Colonic permeability is reflected by urine sugar excretion between 6 and 24h. CAP delivery reduces mannitol excreted at 0–6h, compared to LF. The 0 to 5 or 6h 2-SE urine likely reflects both SI and colon permeability; the higher LMR in the 8–24h urine relative to 0–2h urine should be interpreted with caution and does not mean that colon is more permeable than SI. PMID:19614866

  10. The effect of phenobarbital on the metabolism and excretion of thyroxine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, R.M.; Levin, A.A.; Posch, R.; Downing, J.C.

    1989-06-15

    The effect of phenobarbital on thyroid function and the metabolism and biliary excretion of thyroxine in rats was determined. Phenobarbital, administered for 2 weeks at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day, resulted in an increase in hepatic and thyroid gland weights, decreased circulating levels of T4, T3 and rT3, and increased TSH levels in male and female rats. After 3 months of treatment liver and thyroid weights were still increased; however, hormone values were not as markedly affected indicating that the rats had partially compensated for the effect on thyroid function. In thyroidectomized rats the plasma clearance of thyroxine was increased with phenobarbital. In bile duct cannulated phenobarbital-treated male rats the hepatic uptake at 4 hr was markedly increased. Bile flow was increased and the 4-hr cumulative biliary excretion of administered radioactivity was increased by 42%. Most of the increase in the excretion (76%) was accounted for by an increase in the excretion of thyroxine-glucuronide in phenobarbital-treated rats. Hepatic thyroxine-glucuronyltransferase activity in phenobarbital-treated rats expressed as picomoles per milligram of protein was increased by 40%; enzyme activity per gram of liver was increased by about twofold which, coupled with increased hepatic weight, resulted in about a threefold increase in total hepatic thyroxine-glucuronyltransferase activity in phenobarbital-treated rats as compared to that of controls. Qualitatively similar effects on metabolism, excretion, and enzyme induction were noted in female rats; however, the magnitude of increase was less than that observed in male rats. It is concluded that the effect of phenobarbital on thyroid function in rats is primarily a result of its effects on the hepatic disposition of thyroid hormone.

  11. Urinary excretion of mevalonic acid as an indicator of cholesterol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lindenthal, B; Simatupang, A; Dotti, M T; Federico, A; Lütjohann, D; von Bergmann, K

    1996-10-01

    Urinary excretion of mevalonic acid was investigated as an indicator of cholesterol synthesis. In normolipemic volunteers, excretion of mevalonic acid averaged 3.51 +/- 0.59 (SD) micrograms/kg x day1; (n = 24) and was not different from patients with hypercholesterolemia (3.30 +/- 0.92 micrograms/kg x day1; n = 24). In patients with cerebrotendineous xanthomatosis, the excretion was significantly higher (8.55 +/- 1.92 micrograms/kg x day1; n = 6, P < 0.001) but comparable to volunteers treated with cholestyramine (6.69 +/- 2.6 micrograms/kg x day1; n = 5). A significant correlation was found between 24-h excretion of mevalonic acid and cholesterol synthesis (r = 0.835; n = 35; P < 0.001). The coefficient of variation of excretion of mevalonic acid during 3 consecutive days was small (9.8%; n = 7). However, urinary output of mevalonic acid was significantly higher during the night (164 +/- 14 micrograms/12-h) than during the day (129 +/- 9 micrograms/12-h; n = 11; P < 0.05). In patients treated with simvastatin (40 mg/day) for 6 weeks, the ratio of mevalonic acid to creatinine in a morning urine sample decreased significantly compared to pretreatment values (110 +/- 25 micrograms/g vs. 66 +/- 25 micrograms/g; P < 0.001). Furthermore, the ratio of mevalonic acid to creatinine in a morning urine sample correlated with the ratio from the 24-h collection period (r = 0.714; n = 34; P < 0.001). The results indicate that the analysis of urinary mevalonic acid, either in 24-h collection or in a single morning sample, is an attractive method for evaluation of long and very short term changes of the rates of cholesterol synthesis. PMID:8906596

  12. Predictors of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced reduction of urinary albumin excretion in nondiabetic patients.

    PubMed

    van de Wal, Ruud M A; Gansevoort, Ron T; van der Harst, Pim; Boomsma, Frans; Thijs Plokker, H W; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; de Jong, Paul E; van Gilst, Wiek H; Voors, Adriaan A

    2006-11-01

    Urinary albumin excretion is a predictor for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. We investigated which parameters determine baseline urinary albumin excretion in nondiabetic subjects, without renal disease. In addition, we evaluated the parameters that predict the albuminuria-lowering efficacy of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. In this substudy of the Prevention of Renal and Vascular Endstage Disease Intervention Trial, 384 microalbuminuric patients were included. Patient and biochemical characteristics were obtained at baseline and after 3 months of double-blinded, randomized treatment (fosinopril 20 mg or placebo). Mean age was 51.1+/-11.5 years, and 65.6% were male. Median urinary albumin excretion was 22.2 mg per 24 hours. At baseline, mean arterial pressure (beta(standardized)=0.161; P=0.006), urinary sodium excretion (beta(standardized)=0.154; P=0.011), and estimated renal function were independently associated with albumin excretion. In these predominantly normotensive to prehypertensive subjects, fosinopril reduced albumin excretion by 18.5% versus a 6.1% increase on placebo after 3 months (P<0.001). Fosinopril use and blood pressure reduction independently predicted the change in urinary albumin excretion. Baseline urinary albumin excretion independently predicted the antialbuminuric effect of fosinopril (beta(standardized)=-0.303; P<0.001). In conclusion, at baseline, sodium intake and blood pressure were positively associated with urinary albumin excretion. Fosinopril reduced albuminuria more than might be expected from its blood pressure-lowering effect alone, and this effect was more outspoken in subjects with higher baseline albumin excretion. Based on our data, we hypothesize that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition may result in superior cardiovascular protection when compared with other blood pressure-lowering agents in subjects with higher baseline levels of albuminuria. PMID:17000930

  13. Excretion is Faster Than Diagenesis for Nutrient Recycling in Lake Michigan Benthos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, C.; Cuhel, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Regeneration of phytoplankton growth nutrients including ammonium (NH4+) and phosphate (HPO4=) occurs in aquatic systems worldwide through biogeochemical processes of diagenesis. Organic matter falling to the bottom accumulates in sediments, and bacterial decomposition removes oxygen from the sub-surface. Anaerobic metabolism is energetically inefficient, and bacteria a few cm below the surface respire or ferment organic matter into carbon dioxide or organic acids, excreting nitrogen (NH4+) or phosphorus inorganic 'waste'. Subsurface production of bacterial metabolic products often leads to sharp gradients in porewater concentrations of NH4+ and HPO4=, which drive diffusive flux out of the sediments into overlying water. Aquatic systems with totally aerobic water overlying anoxic sediment (e.g., Lake Michigan) have muted efflux of certain inorganic nutrients arising from organic matter decomposition. For example, NH4+ is oxidized to nitrate in the upper few mm of surficial sediments by nitrifying bacteria. Strong subsurface porewater gradients, especially of redox- or geochemically-reactive compounds, often decline to low values well below the sediment-water interface, indicating transformation by sediment bacterial populations, or by purely geochemical processes such as calcium hydroxyphosphate (apatite) precipitation. For these, little flux to the water column occurs. In Lake Michigan, neither NH4+ nor HPO4= escapes substantially from the biogeochemical barriers between their diagenetic sources and overlying waters, either before or after ecosystem alteration by invasive quagga mussels (QM). Silicate and total CO2 evade unimpeded in the same cores. The organic matter deposited from the water column is also the nutrition of benthic bivalve filter feeders such as QM in Lake Michigan, or the Asian Clam in San Francisco Bay. In animal metabolism for energy production, only the carbon component is oxidized through respiration, with NH4+ (from protein) and HPO4= (from

  14. Potassium citrate decreases urine calcium excretion in patients with hypocitraturic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Hernandez, Natalia; Shoag, Jonathan; Goldfarb, David S; Eisner, Brian H

    2016-04-01

    Two previous studies (<10 patients each) have demonstrated that alkali therapy may reduce urine calcium excretion in patients with calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. The hypothesized mechanisms are (1) a decrease in bone turnover due to systemic alkalinization by the medications; (2) binding of calcium by citrate in the gastrointestinal tract; (3) direct effects on TRPV5 activity in the distal tubule. We performed a retrospective review of patients on potassium citrate therapy to evaluate the effects of this medication on urinary calcium excretion. A retrospective review was performed of a metabolic stone database at a tertiary care academic hospital. Patients were identified with a history of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and hypocitraturia who were on potassium citrate therapy for a minimum of 3 months. 24-h urine composition was assessed prior to the initiation of potassium citrate therapy and after 3 months of therapy. Patients received 30-60 mEq potassium citrate by mouth daily. Inclusion criterion was a change in urine potassium of 20 mEq/day or greater, which suggests compliance with potassium citrate therapy. Paired t test was used to compare therapeutic effect. Twenty-two patients were evaluated. Mean age was 58.8 years (SD 14.0), mean BMI was 29.6 kg/m(2) (SD 5.9), and gender prevalence was 36.4% female:63.6% male. Mean pre-treatment 24-h urine values were as follows: citrate 280.0 mg/day, potassium 58.7 mEq/day, calcium 216.0 mg/day, pH 5.87. Potassium citrate therapy was associated with statistically significant changes in each of these parameters-citrate increased to 548.4 mg/day (p < 0.0001), potassium increased to 94.1 mEq/day (p < 0.0001), calcium decreased to 156.5 mg/day (p = 0.04), pH increased to 6.47 (p = 0.001). Urine sodium excretion was not different pre- and post-therapy (175 mEq/day pre-therapy versus 201 mEq/day post-therapy, p = NS). Urinary calcium excretion decreased by a mean of 60 mg/day on potassium citrate therapy-a nearly 30

  15. Association of Urinary Sodium Excretion With Insulin Resistance in Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Yoon Hong; Han, Kyungdo; Kim, Do Hoon; Park, Yong Gyu; Cho, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Youn Seon; Kim, Seon Mee; Kim, Yang Hyun; Nam, Ga Eun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High sodium intake is a well-known risk factor for elevated blood pressure and is responsible for a higher incidence of cardiovascular events. Reports have suggested an association of sodium intake with insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults. However, evidence on an association between sodium intake assessed on the basis of urinary sodium excretion and IR in adolescents is scarce. The present study aimed at investigating the association between urinary sodium excretion and IR among South Korean adolescents. This population-based, cross-sectional study analyzed the data obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2009 to 2010. The data of a total of 1353 adolescents (779 boys and 574 girls) were included in the final analysis. Spot urine samples were collected, and urinary sodium excretion was estimated by using the urinary sodium concentration (U[Na+]), U[Na+] to urinary creatinine ratio (U[Na+]/Cr), and U[Na+] to specific gravity unit (SGU) ratio (U[Na+]/SGU). IR was assessed by using the homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR). Hierarchical multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the risk for a high HOMA-IR according to urinary sodium excretion. The mean levels of U[Na+], U[Na+]/Cr, and U[Na+]/SGU were significantly higher in subjects in the highest HOMA-IR quartile (Q4) than in subjects in the lowest, second, or third quartiles (Q1–3) of HOMA-IR. The mean values of HOMA-IR and several cardiometabolic parameters tended to progressively increase with the U[Na+], U[Na+]/Cr, and U[Na+]/SGU quartiles. Q3 of U[Na+] was at a significantly higher risk than Q1 of U[Na+] of an association with Q4 of HOMA-IR, after adjustment for confounding variables. Q3 and Q4 of U[Na+]/Cr and U[Na+]/SGU, respectively, had significantly higher risks, than the respective Q1s, of an association with Q4 of HOMA-IR. The risk of an association with Q4 of HOMA-IR demonstrated significantly

  16. Urinary isoflavonoid and lignan excretion on a Western diet: relation to soy, vegetable, and fruit intake.

    PubMed

    Lampe, J W; Gustafson, D R; Hutchins, A M; Martini, M C; Li, S; Wähälä, K; Grandits, G A; Potter, J D; Slavin, J L

    1999-08-01

    Dietary isoflavone and lignan phytoestrogens are potential chemopreventive agents. This has led to a need to monitor exposure to these compounds in human populations and to determine which components of a mixed diet contribute to the exposure. Typically, urinary isoflavonoid excretion is associated with soy consumption and that of lignans is associated with whole grains. However, other plant foods are known to contain phytoestrogen precursors. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between urinary isoflavonoid and lignan excretion and intakes of vegetables and fruits (V&F). Isoflavonoids (genistein, daidzein, O-desmethylangolensin, and equol) and lignans (enterolactone, enterodiol, and matairesinol) were measured in urine collected for 3 days from 49 male and 49 female volunteers (age, 18-37 years) reporting a wide range of habitual V&F intakes. Dietary intakes were assessed using 5-day diet records and a food frequency questionnaire. V&F groupings (total V&F, total V, total F, soyfoods, and V&F grouped by botanical families) were used to assess the relationship between V&F intake and urinary isoflavonoid and lignan excretion. Pearson correlations were performed. Intake of soyfoods was correlated significantly with urinary genistein (r = 0.40; P = 0.0001), O-desmethylangolensin (r = 0.37; P = 0.0002), daidzein (r = 034; P = 0.0007), and the sum of isoflavonoids (r = 0.39; P = 0.0001). There was no association between equol excretion and soy intake or between the isoflavonoids and any other V&F groupings. In addition, isoflavonoid excretion was correlated positively with intake of high-fat and processed meats, particularly among men who did not consume soy. This suggests that, even in the United States, on a Western diet, soyfoods are the primary contributors to isoflavone intake; however, additional "hidden sources" of soy may also contribute to exposure. In contrast, a variety of fiber-containing foods contributed to lignan excretion; the sum of

  17. Diurnal fluctuations in nematode egg excretion in naturally and in experimentally infected chickens.

    PubMed

    Wongrak, Kalyakorn; Gauly, Matthias; Daş, Gürbüz

    2015-03-15

    We investigated whether nematode egg excretion through feces of naturally or experimentally infected chickens follow certain patterns within a day, which may allow determining the most appropriate sampling time for the highest parasite egg concentration. Feces samples (n=864) from chickens (n=36) with naturally occurring mixed nematode infections (trials N1, N2) or with an experimental Ascaridia galli infection (E) were collected quantitatively every 4h for four consecutive days. Number of eggs per gram of feces (EPG) was determined, and accumulative egg output (AEO) at each sampling time as well as total number of eggs excreted within 24h (eggs per day, EPD) were then estimated. At the end of the collection period, the hens were necropsied and their worm burdens determined. Naturally infected hens harbored Heterakis gallinarum (100%), Capillaria spp. (95.7%) and A. galli (91.3%). The experimental A. galli infection produced patent infections in all the birds. In general, both fecal egg concentration (EPG) and the amount of feces increased (P<0.05) sharply from the early morning to early-noon (10:00 a.m.) and remained at a high level until evenings which thereafter decreased to their initial levels during the night both in naturally and experimentally infected birds. This resulted in a more apparent increase or a decrease in AEO at the corresponding time points, respectively, and led to much higher egg excretions during the daytime than the nights. Despite the apparent within day fluctuations in egg excretion, neither EPG (P=0.704) nor AEO (P=0.499) nor EPD (P=0.149) was significantly different among the four collection days. Similarly, there was no significant interaction (P>0.05) between effects of sampling hours and days on EPG and AEO, suggesting the existence of repeatable diurnal fluctuations within each day. Although an association between climatic parameters (e.g., ambient temperature and relative humidity) and the nematode egg excretion was quantified, a

  18. 40 CFR Table Jj-3 to Subpart Jj of... - State-Specific Volatile Solids (VS) and Nitrogen (N) Excretion Rates for Cattle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2015-07-01

    ...) and Nitrogen (N) Excretion Rates for Cattle JJ Table JJ-3 to Subpart JJ of Part 98 Protection of... Volatile Solids (VS) and Nitrogen (N) Excretion Rates for Cattle State Volatile solids excretion rate (kg VS/day/1000 kg animal mass) Dairy cows Dairy heifers Feedlot steer Feedlot heifers Nitrogen...

  19. Fecapentaene excretion and fecal mutagenicity in relation to nutrient intake and fecal parameters in humans on omnivorous and vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    de Kok, T M; van Faassen, A; Bausch-Goldbohm, R A; ten Hoor, F; Kleinjans, J C

    1992-02-14

    Fecapentaenes are strong fecal mutagenic compounds presumably occurring in the majority of Western human individuals, and are possibly essential initiators of colon carcinogenesis. Dietary factors have been shown to influence colorectal cancer risk and to modulate both fecal mutagenicity and fecapentaene concentrations. Therefore, in this study, excretion of fecapentaenes is determined in humans consuming either vegetarian or omnivorous diets. The results show that the most predominant fecapentaene forms are excreted in higher concentrations by vegetarians. Consumption of cereal fiber, calcium and carotene as well as fecal concentrations of iso-lithocholic acid were found to correlate positively with excreted concentrations of one or more fecapentaene analogues. On average, 22% of excreted fecapentaene concentrations was found to be related to nutrient intake in stepwise regression models. Dietary calcium intake was found to be the most significant factor positively correlating with excreted fecapentaene concentrations. Intake of mono-unsaturated fatty acids or fiber from vegetables and fruit could be shown to correlate with fecapentaene excretion to a lesser degree. Despite high fecapentaene concentrations in fecal dichloromethane extracts, only 1 out of 20 samples revealed significant mutagenic activity in Salmonella typhimurium TA 100. Further, aqueous extracts of feces from omnivores appeared to be equally mutagenic as feces from vegetarians and contained non-detectable concentrations of fecapentaenes. It is concluded that dietary factors do affect excreted fecapentaene levels, but only to a relatively minor extent. Since vegetarians at low risk for colorectal cancer excrete higher concentrations of fecapentaenes, it could be hypothesized that relatively increased fecapentaene excretion in combination with antimutagenic compounds in feces represents colon cancer prevention. PMID:1540928

  20. D-penicillamine does not increase urinary bismuth excretion in patients treated with tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate.

    PubMed Central

    Nwokolo, C U; Pounder, R E

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four urinary bismuth excretion was measured in five patients who had been treated with tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate, before and after single 1 g oral dose of D-penicillamine. Before dosing with D-penicillamine, the median 24 h urinary bismuth output was 55 micrograms 24 h-1 (range 17-156 micrograms 24 h-1) and following dosing with D-penicillamine the median 24 h urinary bismuth output was 53 micrograms 24 h-1 (range 12-156 micrograms 24 h-1). D-penicillamine does not facilitate the urinary excretion of bismuth, hence it is unsuitable for use as an oral chelator in patients with bismuth intoxication. PMID:2291879

  1. Microsporidia in exotic birds: intermittent spore excretion of Encephalitozoon spp. in naturally infected budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Sak, Bohumil; Kasicková, Denisa; Kvác, Martin; Kvetonová, Dana; Ditrich, Oleg

    2010-03-25

    Nine naturally infected asymptomatic budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) were screened daily for microsporidia spore excretion during a 30-day period and the localization of infection was evaluated using microscopy and molecular methods. While the microscopic examination revealed 2.4% positivity out of all fecal samples, using PCR the positivity was 10x higher (24.6%). All nine budgerigars excreted microsporidial spores intermittently in irregular intervals with 1-11-day long interruptions. Most of the birds were infected simultaneously with Encephalitozoon cuniculi and Encephalitozoon hellem. While histological and TEM examination failed to confirm the presence of microsporidial spores in tissues, the PCR detected microsporidial DNA mostly in the small intestine, liver and lungs of four selected budgerigars dissected. Despite the chronic infection proved using molecular methods, no clinical signs of disease were observed during monitoring and no pathological findings were found during dissection. PMID:20006443

  2. The effects of repeated parenteral administration of chelating agents on the distribution and excretion of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, J.L.; Ortega, A.; Llobet, J.M.; Paternain, J.L.; Corbella, J.

    1989-04-01

    The effects of repeated ip administration of gallic acid, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-AS) on the distribution and excretion of uranium were assessed in male Swiss mice. Only Tiron significantly increased the amount of uranium excreted into urine and feces. A significant decrease in the concentration of uranium in liver, spleen and bone was observed after administration of Tiron, whereas injection of gallic acid or DTPA resulted in a significant decrease in the concentration of the metal in the liver. The results show that Tiron was consistently the most effective chelator of those tested in the treatment of uranium poisoning after repeated daily administration of the metal.

  3. Renal excretion capacity in hydrated desert rodents (Jaculus orientalis and Jaculus deserti).

    PubMed

    Baddouri, K; el Hilali, M; Marchetti, J; Menard, J

    1987-01-01

    The capacity to excrete a water load was studied in rats and in two desert rodents (Jaculus orientalis and Jaculus deserti) adapted to either 5 or 30 degrees C ambient temperature. The rat is able to eliminate the entire water load regardless of thermal adaptation. Cold-adapted J. orientalis and J. deserti excreted 60% of the water load in comparison to 20-30% in warm-adapted jerboas. At both adaptation temperatures, antidiuretic hormone (ADH) concentration was estimated at maximum diuresis in the two desert species. Though hydration induced a significant decrease in ADH concentration in both species, its level in the plasma remained relatively high. The decrease was more pronounced in J. orientalis than J. deserti. PMID:3571573

  4. A new model of reverse cholesterol transport: enTICEing strategies to stimulate intestinal cholesterol excretion.

    PubMed

    Temel, Ryan E; Brown, J Mark

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the largest cause of mortality in most developed countries. Although recent failed clinical trials and Mendelian randomization studies have called into question the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) hypothesis, it remains well accepted that stimulating the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) can prevent or even regress atherosclerosis. The prevailing model for RCT is that cholesterol from the artery wall must be delivered to the liver where it is secreted into bile before leaving the body through fecal excretion. However, many studies have demonstrated that RCT can proceed through a non-biliary pathway known as transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE). The goal of this review is to discuss the current state of knowledge of the TICE pathway, with emphasis on points of therapeutic intervention. PMID:25930707

  5. A New Model of Reverse Cholesterol Transport: EnTICEing Strategies to Stimulate Intestinal Cholesterol Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Temel, Ryan E.; Brown, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the largest cause of mortality in most developed countries. Although recent failed clinical trials and Mendelian randomization studies have called into question the high density lipoprotein (HDL) hypothesis, it remains well accepted that stimulating the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) can prevent or even regress atherosclerosis. The prevailing model for RCT is that cholesterol from the artery wall must be delivered to the liver where it is secreted into bile before leaving the body through fecal excretion. However, many studies have demonstrated that RCT can proceed through a non-biliary pathway known as transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE). The goal of this review is to discuss the current state of knowledge of the TICE pathway, with emphasis on points of therapeutic intervention. PMID:25930707

  6. Enhancement in fecal excretion of dioxin isomer in mice by several dietary fibers.

    PubMed

    Aozasa, O; Ohta, S; Nakao, T; Miyata, H; Nomura, T

    2001-10-01

    The effect of increased nutrients (protein, lipid, vitamins and minerals) on dioxin-induced toxic manifestations such as immune suppression, hepatic hypertrophy, splenic atrophy and enzyme induction was investigated in mice after oral administration of 1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDD (HxCDD) as one of a representative compound of dioxin isomers. Consequently, it appeared that increased minerals and vitamins in the diet prevented immune suppression by HxCDD. In addition, to clarify the additive effect of nutrients and the ability to hasten the excretion of dioxins by dietary fiber, the adsorbing of dioxins by 16 dietary fibers was investigated by in vitro experiment. Among 16 dietary fibers, locust bean gum, pectin, alginic acid, guar gum, chitin and cellulose were effective in binding dioxin isomers. These dietary fibers also enhanced the fecal excretion of HxCDD in mice. PMID:11572611

  7. Increased Klk9 Urinary Excretion Is Associated to Hypertension-Induced Cardiovascular Damage and Renal Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Blázquez-Medela, Ana M.; García-Sánchez, Omar; Quirós, Yaremi; Blanco-Gozalo, Victor; Prieto-García, Laura; Sancho-Martínez, Sandra M.; Romero, Miguel; Duarte, Juan M.; López-Hernández, Francisco J.; López-Novoa, José M.; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Early detection of hypertensive end-organ damage and secondary diseases are key determinants of cardiovascular prognosis in patients suffering from arterial hypertension. Presently, there are no biomarkers for the detection of hypertensive target organ damage, most outstandingly including blood vessels, the heart, and the kidneys. We aimed to validate the usefulness of the urinary excretion of the serine protease kallikrein-related peptidase 9 (KLK9) as a biomarker of hypertension-induced target organ damage. Urinary, plasma, and renal tissue levels of KLK9 were measured by the Western blot in different rat models of hypertension, including angiotensin-II infusion, DOCA-salt, L-NAME administration, and spontaneous hypertension. Urinary levels were associated to cardiovascular and renal injury, assessed by histopathology. The origin of urinary KLK9 was investigated through in situ renal perfusion experiments. The urinary excretion of KLK9 is increased in different experimental models of hypertension in rats. The ACE inhibitor trandolapril significantly reduced arterial pressure and the urinary level of KLK9. Hypertension did not increase kidney, heart, liver, lung, or plasma KLK9 levels. Hypertension-induced increased urinary excretion of KLK9 results from specific alterations in its tubular reabsorption, even in the absence of overt nephropathy. KLK9 urinary excretion strongly correlates with cardiac hypertrophy and aortic wall thickening. KLK9 appears in the urine in the presence of hypertension as a result of subtle renal handling alterations. Urinary KLK9 might be potentially used as an indicator of hypertensive cardiac and vascular damage. PMID:26469898

  8. Tissue dosimetry, metabolism and excretion of pentavalent and trivalent dimethylated arsenic in mice after oral administration

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Michael F. Devesa, Vicenta; Adair, Blakely M.; Conklin, Sean D.; Creed, John T.; Styblo, Miroslav; Kenyon, Elaina M.; Thomas, David J.

    2008-02-15

    Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) is a rat bladder carcinogen and the major urinary metabolite of administered inorganic arsenic in most mammals. This study examined the disposition of pentavalent and trivalent dimethylated arsenic in mice after acute oral administration. Adult female mice were administered [{sup 14}C]-DMA(V) (0.6 or 60 mg As/kg) and sacrificed serially over 24 h. Tissues and excreta were collected for analysis of radioactivity. Other mice were administered unlabeled DMA(V) (0.6 or 60 mg As/kg) or dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) (0.6 mg As/kg) and sacrificed at 2 or 24 h. Tissues (2 h) and urine (24 h) were collected and analyzed for arsenicals. Absorption, distribution and excretion of [{sup 14}C]-DMA(V) were rapid, as radioactivity was detected in tissues and urine at 0.25 h. For low dose DMA(V) mice, there was a greater fractional absorption of DMA(V) and significantly greater tissue concentrations of radioactivity at several time points. Radioactivity distributed greatest to the liver (1-2% of dose) and declined to less than 0.05% in all tissues examined at 24 h. Urinary excretion of radioactivity was significantly greater in the 0.6 mg As/kg DMA(V) group. Conversely, fecal excretion of radioactivity was significantly greater in the high dose group. Urinary metabolites of DMA(V) included DMA(III), trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO), dimethylthioarsinic acid and trimethylarsine sulfide. Urinary metabolites of DMA(III) included TMAO, dimethylthioarsinic acid and trimethylarsine sulfide. DMA(V) was also excreted by DMA(III)-treated mice, showing its sensitivity to oxidation. TMAO was detected in tissues of the high dose DMA(V) group. The low acute toxicity of DMA(V) in the mouse appears to be due in part to its minimal retention and rapid elimination.

  9. Urinary corticosteroid excretion predicts left ventricular mass and proteinuria in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Emily P; Freel, E Marie; Mark, Patrick B; Fraser, Robert; Patel, Rajan K; Dargie, Henry G; Connell, John M C; Jardine, Alan G

    2012-09-01

    Blockade of the MR (mineralocorticoid receptor) in CKD (chronic kidney disease) reduces LVMI [LV (left ventricular) mass index] and proteinuria. The MR can be activated by aldosterone, cortisol and DOC (deoxycorticosterone). The aim of the present study was to explore the influence of mineralocorticoids on LVMI and proteinuria in patients with CKD. A total of 70 patients with CKD and 30 patients with EH (essential hypertension) were recruited. Patients underwent clinical phenotyping; biochemical assessment and 24 h urinary collection for THAldo (tetrahydroaldosterone), THDOC (tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone), cortisol metabolites (measured using GC-MS), and urinary electrolytes and protein [QP (proteinuira quantification)]. LVMI was measured using CMRI (cardiac magnetic resonance imaging). Factors that correlated significantly with LVMI and proteinuria were entered into linear regression models. In patients with CKD, significant predictors of LVMI were male gender, SBP (systolic blood pressure), QP, and THAldo and THDOC excretion. Significant independent predictors on multivariate analysis were THDOC excretion, SBP and male gender. In EH, no association was seen between THAldo or THDOC and LVMI; plasma aldosterone concentration was the only significant independent predictor. Significant univariate determinants of proteinuria in patients with CKD were THAldo, THDOC, USod (urinary sodium) and SBP. Only THAldo excretion and SBP were significant multivariate determinants. Using CMRI to determine LVMI we have demonstrated that THDOC is a novel independent predictor of LVMI in patients with CKD, differing from patients with EH. Twenty-four hour THAldo excretion is an independent determinant of proteinuria in patients with CKD. These findings emphasize the importance of MR activation in the pathogenesis of the adverse clinical phenotype in CKD. PMID:22397469

  10. Occupational cadmium exposure and calcium excretion, bone density, and osteoporosis in men.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Tim; Geusens, Piet; Nulens, Tom S; Nemery, Benoit

    2010-06-01

    Exposure to cadmium has been associated with osteoporosis and fracture risk in women and the elderly, but studies in middle-aged men are lacking. In 83 male (ex)workers (mean age 45 years; range 24 to 64 years) in a radiator factory using cadmium-containing solder, we investigated the association between urinary cadmium excretion (as an index of lifetime body burden); bone mineral density (BMD) in the distal forearm, hip, and lumbar spine (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry); and urinary calcium excretion. Geometric mean urinary cadmium concentration was 1.02 microg/g of creatinine (5th to 95th percentile 0.17 to 5.51 microg/g). BMD was negatively correlated with urinary exposure to cadmium. The partial correlation coefficients (r) adjusted for age, body-mass index, and current smoking were -0.30 (p = .008) for BMD in the forearm, -0.27 (p = .017) in the hip, and -0.17 (p = .15) in the spine. Urinary calcium correlated positively (r = 0.23, p = .044) with the urinary cadmium excretion. Adjusted for the same covariates, the risk of osteoporosis (defined as a T-score below -2.5 in at least one measured bone site) increased dose dependently. Compared with the lowest tertile of urinary cadmium, the risks were 4.8- and 9.9-fold higher in the middle and highest tertiles, respectively. Only four (5%) men had evidence of renal tubular dysfunction (beta(2)-microglobulin > 300 microg/g of creatinine). Even in the absence of renal tubular dysfunction, occupational exposure to cadmium is associated in men with lower BMD values, a higher risk of having osteoporosis, and a higher urinary calcium excretion, suggesting a direct osteotoxic effect of cadmium. PMID:20200937

  11. The influence of neuropeptides on Malpighian tubule writhing and its significance for excretion.

    PubMed

    Coast, G M

    1998-01-01

    Diuretic peptides (locustakinin and Locusta-DH) increase the spontaneous contractile activity of visceral muscle fibers associated with Malpighian tubules from the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) at concentrations that increase urine production. Muscle activity is shown to assist the flow of material in the tubule lumen, but is not essential for diuresis. Tubule writhing also serves to reduce unstirred layers (USLs) at the basolateral surface of the epithelium and thereby facilitates the excretion of solutes entering the lumen by passive diffusion. PMID:9533634

  12. Genetic variation in GPBAR1 predisposes to quantitative changes in colonic transit and bile acid excretion

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Andrea; Busciglio, Irene; Carlson, Paula; Acosta, Andres; Bharucha, Adil E.; Burton, Duane; Lamsam, Jesse; Lueke, Alan; Donato, Leslie J.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    The pathobiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is multifaceted. We aimed to identify candidate genes predisposing to quantitative traits in IBS. In 30 healthy volunteers, 30 IBS-constipation, and 64 IBS-diarrhea patients, we measured bowel symptoms, bile acid (BA) synthesis (serum 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one and FGF19), fecal BA and fat, colonic transit (CT by scintigraphy), and intestinal permeability (IP by 2-sugar excretion). We assessed associations of candidate genes controlling BA metabolism (KLB rs17618244 and FGFR4 rs351855), BA receptor (GPBAR1 rs11554825), serotonin (5-HT) reuptake (SLC6A4 through rs4795541 which encodes for the 44-bp insert in 5HTTLPR), or immune activation (TNFSF15 rs4263839) with three primary quantitative traits of interest: colonic transit, BA synthesis, and fecal BA excretion. There were significant associations between fecal BA and CT at 48 h (r = 0.43; P < 0.001) and IP (r = 0.23; P = 0.015). GPBAR1 genotype was associated with CT48 (P = 0.003) and total fecal BA [P = 0.030, false detection rate (FDR) P = 0.033]. Faster CT48 observed with both CC and TT GPBAR1 genotypes was due to significant interaction with G allele of KLB, which increases BA synthesis and excretion. Other univariate associations (P < 0.05, without FDR correction) observed between GPBAR1 and symptom phenotype and gas sensation ratings support the role of GPBAR1 receptor. Associations between SLC6A4 and stool consistency, ease of passage, postprandial colonic tone, and total fecal BA excretion provide data in support of future hypothesis-testing studies. Genetic control of GPBAR1 receptor predisposing to pathobiological mechanisms in IBS provides evidence from humans in support of the importance of GPBAR1 to colonic motor and secretory functions demonstrated in animal studies. PMID:25012842

  13. Active tumor-targeting luminescent gold clusters with efficient urinary excretion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; He, Hua; Wang, Yanan; Wang, Junying; Sun, Xing; Xu, Hai; Nau, Werner M; Zhang, Xiaodong; Huang, Fang

    2016-07-28

    We present novel active targeting luminescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs), which are prepared through a one-pot procedure by using a pentapeptide (CRGDS) for stabilization and tumor recognition. CRGDS-AuNCs exhibit a high tumor-specific retention with an exceptionally high tumor-to-liver uptake ratio of 9.3. Their small hydrodynamic diameter and zwitterionic surface facilitate urinary excretion, which reaches 82% within 24 h after injection. PMID:27354156

  14. Infection and excretion of Salmonella Enteritidis in two different chicken lines with concurrent Ascaridia galli infection.

    PubMed

    Eigaard, N M; Schou, T W; Permin, A; Christensen, J P; Ekstrøm, C T; Ambrosini, F; Cianci, D; Bisgaard, M

    2006-12-01

    Studies on the impact of interaction of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and the parasitic nematode Ascaridia galli with the avian host were undertaken with particular emphasis on infection and excretion of these pathogens in two different layer lines. A total of 148 salmonella-free 1-day-old chickens (73 Hellevad and 75 Lohmann Brown) were randomly divided into five groups for each line. Group 1 served as an uninoculated control group. Groups 2 and 3 were infected with A. galli and S. Enteritidis, respectively. Group 4 was first infected with S. Enteritidis and subsequently with A. galli, and vice versa for group 5. The number of chickens excreting S. Enteritidis was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the groups infected with both S. Enteritidis and A. galli compared with those only infected with S. Enteritidis over time. Furthermore, excretion of S. Enteritidis over time was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the group first infected with S. Enteritidis and subsequently with A. galli compared with the group infected in the reverse order. No significant differences were observed between the two lines concerning excretion of S. Enteritidis over time in any group (P = 0.61 (group 3), P = 0.73 (group 4), P = 0.31 (group 5)). A. galli established itself significantly better (P = 0.02) in the group first infected with A. galli and subsequently with S. Enteritidis compared with the group infected in the reverse order. Furthermore, the A. galli infection rate was significantly higher (P = 0.02) in Hellevad chickens compared with Lohmann Brown chickens at the end of the experiment. PMID:17121738

  15. Sodium and potassium urinary excretion and dietary intake: a cross-sectional analysis in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Carla; Abreu, Sandra; Padrão, Patrícia; Pinho, Olívia; Graça, Pedro; Breda, João; Santos, Rute; Moreira, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension is the leading cause for heart disease and stroke, for mortality and morbidity worldwide, and a high sodium-to-potassium intake ratio is considered a stronger risk factor for hypertension than sodium alone. Objective This study aims to evaluate sodium and potassium urinary excretion, and assess the food sources of these nutrients in a sample of Portuguese adolescents. Design A cross-sectional study with a sample of 250 Portuguese adolescents. Sodium and potassium excretion were measured by one 24-h urinary collection, and the coefficient of creatinine was used to validate completeness of urine collections. Dietary sources of sodium and potassium were assessed using a 24-h dietary recall. Results Valid urine collections were provided by 200 adolescents (118 girls) with a median age of 14.0 in both sexes (p=0.295). Regarding sodium, the mean urinary excretion was 3,725 mg/day in boys and 3,062 mg/day in girls (p<0.01), and 9.8% of boys and 22% of girls met the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations for sodium intake. Concerning potassium, the mean urinary excretion was 2,237 mg/day in boys and 1,904 mg/day in girls (p<0.01), and 6.1% of boys and 1.7% of girls met the WHO recommendations for potassium intake. Major dietary sources for sodium intake were cereal and cereal products (41%), meat products (16%), and milk and milk products (11%); and for potassium intake, main sources were milk and milk products (21%), meat products (17%), and vegetables (15%). Conclusions Adolescents had a high-sodium and low-potassium diet, well above the WHO recommendations. Health promotion interventions are needed in order to decrease sodium and increase potassium intake. PMID:27072344

  16. Discontinuous ammonia excretion and glutamine storage in littoral Oniscidea (Crustacea: Isopoda): testing tidal and circadian models.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Maya; Wright, Jonathan C

    2013-01-01

    A key evolutionary development facilitating land colonization in terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscidea) is the intermittent liberation of waste nitrogen as volatile ammonia. Intermittent ammonia release exploits glutamine (Gln) as an intermediary nitrogen store. Here, we explore the relationship between temporal patterns of ammonia release and Gln accumulation in three littoral oniscideans from Southern California. Results are interpreted in terms of water availability, habitat, activity patterns, and ancestry. A two-way experimental design was used to test whether ammonia excretion and Gln accumulation follow a tidal or diel periodicity. Ammonia excretion was studied in the laboratory using chambers with or without available seawater and using an acid trap to collect volatile ammonia. Ligia occidentalis releases ammonia directly into seawater and accumulates Gln during low tide (48.9 ± 6.5 μmol g⁻¹ at low tide, 24.1 ± 3.0 μmol g⁻¹ at high tide), indicating that excretion is tidally constrained. Alloniscus perconvexus and Tylos punctatus can excrete ammonia directly into seawater or utilize volatilization. Both species burrow in sand by day and show a diel excretory pattern, accumulating Gln nocturnally (31.8 ± 2.7 μmol g⁻¹ at dawn and 21.8 ± 2.3 μmol g⁻¹ at dusk for A. perconvexus; 85.7 ± 15.1 μmol g⁻¹ at dawn and 25.4 ± 2.9 μmol g⁻¹ at dusk for T. punctatus) and liberating ammonia diurnally. Glutaminase shows higher activity in terrestrial (0.54-0.86 U g⁻¹) compared to intertidal (0.25-0.31 U g⁻¹) species, consistent with the need to generate high PNH₃ for volatilization. The predominant isoform in Armadillidium vulgare is phosphate dependent and maleate independent; phosphate is a plausible regulator in vivo. PMID:22836297

  17. History of Inuit community excretion of polychlorinated biphenyls recorded in sewage lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Hermanson, Mark H; Jackson, Danielle S; Johnson, Glenn W

    2010-03-01

    Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is high among the Inuit resulting from ingestion of contaminated wild "country" foods. These contaminants originate in urban/industrial areas and reach the Arctic by long-range atmospheric transport. Ingested PCBs eventually equilibrate into various body components, including feces, which become an indication of body burden. Bulk domestic sewage residue from a community will accumulate PCBs from feces; long-term accumulated sediments from a sewage treatment system are a historical indicator of changes in community-wide PCB excretion. In this study, sediment cores were collected from the domestic sewage treatment lake, known as Annak, for the Inuit Hamlet of Sanikiluaq, Canada (established 1967), and were dated (Pb-210, Cs-137) and analyzed for 127 PCB congeners. We focused our attention on the 47 congeners that were observed consistently. Atmospheric and local inputs to a nearby lake accounted for local background. PCB inputs from sewage grew rapidly from the late 1960s until 1990. The maximum 47 congener SigmaPCB excretion occurred in approximately 1989 (11116 ng person(-1)d(-1)); all sewage PCB inputs were dominated by PCB 153, PCB 138 and PCB 180. PCB ingestion from a Sanikiluaq food survey in 1989 for 11 of the most highly concentrated PCB congeners (7270 ng person(-1)d(-1)) was the same as our excretion estimate for the same congeners (7348 ng person(-1)d(-1)) that year, suggesting that by the late 1980s, the ingested amount of PCB was similar to what was excreted every day, although the latter is a reflection of body burden and not short-term exposure. PMID:20138643

  18. Effects of dairy cow diet forage proportion on duodenal nutrient supply and urinary purine derivative excretion.

    PubMed

    Moorby, J M; Dewhurst, R J; Evans, R T; Danelón, J L

    2006-09-01

    Four mature Holstein-Friesian dairy cows were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square change-over design experiment made up of four 4-wk periods to investigate the relationship between microbial protein flow to the duodenum and excretion of purine derivatives (PD) in the urine. Four dietary treatments based on ad libitum access to ryegrass silage were offered, with a standard dairy concentrate included at different forage:concentrate (F:C) ratios, calculated on a dry matter basis: 80:20, 65:35, 50:50, and 35:65. Feed intakes increased as the proportion of concentrate in the diet increased, despite a concurrent decrease in silage intake. Increased feed intake led to increased nutrient flow to the duodenum. Milk yields increased as the diet F:C ratio decreased, with cows offered the 35:65 diet yielding nearly 8 kg/d more milk than cows offered the 80:20 diet; the concentrations of milk fat decreased and milk protein increased with a decreasing F:C ratio. Purine derivative excretion in the urine increased with an increasing proportion of concentrate in the diet, and there was a strong linear relationship between total PD excretion (allantoin and uric acid) and microbial N flow to the duodenum: microbial N (g/d) = 19.9 + 0.689 x total PD (mmol/d); R = 0.887. This strengthens the case for using PD excretion as a noninvasive marker of microbial protein flow from the rumen in dairy cows. PMID:16899691

  19. Absorption, distribution and excretion of 14C-pilocarpine following oral administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Omori, Yasuhiro; Endo, Takuro; Hara, Yoshiki; Nishiyama, Masahiko; Midgley, Ian; Smart, Clair I; John, Alexandra J; Chasseaud, Leslie F; McBurney, Alan; John, Brian A

    2004-01-01

    The absorption, distribution and excretion of pilocarpine (CAS 92-13-7) were studied after single oral doses of 14C-pilocarpine hydrochloride (CAS 54-71-7) to the Sprague-Dawley rat, administered in aqueous solution mainly at a dose level of 0.3 mg/kg. Rats also received single intravenous doses at 0.3 mg/kg so as to compare 14C pharmacokinetics and excretion. The oral 14C-dose was rapidly and almost completely absorbed from the duodenum and small intestine within 30 min in the male rat and 14C concentrations in plasma declined biexponentially with a terminal half-life of about 9 h. Over the oral dosage range studied, i.e. 0.1-1.0 mg/kg, there was no evidence of significant non-proportionality for Cmax of 14C, whereas there was some such evidence for AUG24. Tissue 14C concentrations in male and pregnant female (Day 18) rats peaked at 0.5 h and mostly declined in parallel with those in the plasma. Excluding tissues concerned with drug absorption and elimination, 14C concentrations in most tissues were similar to, or lower than, those in the plasma. The extent of placental transfer of 14C was small and less than 0.09% of a maternal dose reached a foetus. 14C diffused into maternal milk at concentrations similar to those in the plasma. The 14C-dose was rapidly excreted in male rats, mostly in the urine (about 80%) during 6 h post dose. Recoveries of 14C in mass balance (excretion) studies were in the range 96-100%. There were no apparent gender differences in the disposition of 14C-pilocarpine in the rat. PMID:15112864

  20. Urinary iron excretion induced by intravenous infusion of deferoxamine in beta-thalassemia homozygous patients.

    PubMed

    Boturao-Neto, E; Marcopito, L F; Zago, M A

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify noninvasive methods to evaluate the severity of iron overload in transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia and the efficiency of intensive intravenous therapy as an additional tool for the treatment of iron-overloaded patients. Iron overload was evaluated for 26 beta-thalassemia homozygous patients, and 14 of them were submitted to intensive chelation therapy with high doses of intravenous deferoxamine (DF). Patients were classified into six groups of increasing clinical severity and were divided into compliant and non-compliant patients depending on their adherence to chronic chelation treatment. Several methods were used as indicators of iron overload. Total gain of transfusion iron, plasma ferritin, and urinary iron excretion in response to 20 to 60 mg/day subcutaneous DF for 8 to 12 h daily are useful to identify iron overload; however, urinary iron excretion in response to 9 g intravenous DF over 24 h and the increase of urinary iron excretion induced by high doses of the chelator are more reliable to identify different degrees of iron overload because of their correlation with the clinical grades of secondary hemochromatosis and the significant differences observed between the groups of compliant and non-compliant patients. Finally, the use of 3-9 g intravenous DF for 6-12 days led to a urinary iron excretion corresponding to 4.1 to 22.4% of the annual transfusion iron gain. Therefore, continuous intravenous DF at high doses may be an additional treatment for these patients, as a complement to the regular subcutaneous infusion at home, but requires individual planning and close monitoring of adverse reactions. PMID:12426631

  1. Urinary trimethylselenonium excretion by the rat: effect of level and source of /sup 75/Se

    SciTech Connect

    Nahapetian, A.T.; Janghorbani, M.; Young, V.R.

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore in rats the urinary metabolites of selenium (Se), by using (/sup 75/Se)selenomethionine, (/sup 75/Se)selenocystine, and (/sup 75/Se)selenite, and to assess the effects of low and high levels of Se intake on trimethylselenonium ion (TMSe) excretion in urine. Male adult rats were adapted for 6 weeks to a commercial rat laboratory stock diet (0.25 ppm Se). They were then starved for 24 hours and given an oral dose of either low (16 micrograms Se/kg body weight) or high (1500 micrograms Se/kg body weight) Se as the test Se compounds. Appearance of radioactivity in TMSe and non-TMSe Se metabolites in urine was monitored for 48 hours. About 40% of the /sup 75/Se dose was excreted in urine. TMSe was the major urinary Se metabolite (57-69% of urinary /sup 75/Se and 16-25% of oral /sup 75/Se dose) at high, and a minor urinary Se metabolite (10% of urinary /sup 75/Se and 3-4% of oral /sup 75/Se dose) at low dose levels of Se and for all three Se test compounds. At least 80% of urinary /sup 75/Se and 26-42% of the orally administered /sup 75/Se were excreted as non-TMSe Se metabolites in urine under the latter condition. It is hypothesized that at a requirement intake of Se either a trace or no TMSe is excreted in urine, and it becomes a major excretory metabolite of Se when the dietary trace mineral intake exceeds a requirement level, probably serving as a means of detoxification.

  2. Mechanism of Effect of Prostaglandin E1 on Renal Water Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Berl, T.; Schrier, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) on renal water excretion in the anesthetized dog. Renal perfusion pressure was kept constant by adjustment of a suprarenal aortic clamp. In seven experiments the intravenous administration of PGE1 (7 μg/min) significantly increased urinary osmolality from 76 to 381 mosmol (P < 0.001) and decreased free water clearance from 2.2 to - 0.02 ml/min (P < 0.001). These effects promptly were reversed with cessation of the infusion. This antidiuretic effect occurred both in innervated and denervated kidneys and was not associated with changes in glomerular filtration rate, renal vascular resistance, or solute excretion rate. In 10 experiments in hypophysectomized dogs no effect of intravenous PGE1 on free water clearance and urinary osmolality was observed. The intrarenal administration of PGE1 (1 μg/min) to six water-loaded and two hypophysectomized dogs caused no systemic vascular changes and increased rather than decreased free water clearance (2.83 to 4.08 ml/min, P < 0.001). No significant change in urinary osmolality occurred. Glomerular filtration rate was not altered by the intrarenal infusion, but reversible changes in solute excretion rate and renal vascular resistance occurred. These results thus indicate that the antidiuresis associated with intravenous PGE1 is mediated primarily by the release of vasopressin rather than alterations in renal hemodynamics or solute excretion. The diuretic effect of intrarenal PGE1 occurs in the absence of vasopressin and is most likely mediated primarily by increased distal delivery of tubular fluid to the diluting segment of the nephron rather than changes in water permeability of the renal tubular epithelium. PMID:4683884

  3. Urinary excretion of cortisol from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) habituated to restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, C. E.; Ortiz, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    Use of monkeys in research has often required that they be restrained in a chair. However, chair restraint can elicit an initial neuroendocrine stress response. Also, inactivity associated with restraint can induce muscular atrophy. We proposed that prior habituation of monkeys to chair restraint would attenuate these neuroendocrine responses without causing substantial muscle wasting. Four rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained and habituated to a restraint chair specifically designed for spaceflight. During the study, monkeys were placed in metabolic cages for 7 days (prerestraint, Phase I), placed in a chair restraint for 18 days (Phase II), and then returned to their metabolic cages for 5 days (postrestraint, Phase III). Urine was collected between 0700-1100 daily, and measurements of cortisol, creatinine, and electrolyte concentrations were adjusted for hourly excretion rates. Body weights of the monkeys did not change between start of the prerestraint and postrestraint phases (10.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 10.3 +/- 0.9 kg, respectively). During the 3 phases, mean excretion rate of cortisol did not change (24.1 +/- 10.3, 26.7 +/- 7.7, and 19.3 +/- 5.8 microg/h, respectively). Mean excretion rate of creatinine (37.3 +/- 7.5, 37.5 +/- 12.2, and 36.9 +/- 17.1 mg/h, respectively), Na+ (3.3 +/- 1.2, 3.2 +/- 1.2, 2.2 +/- 1.8 mmol/h, respectively), and K+ (5.3 +/- 1.8, 5.4 +/- 1.6, and 4.3 +/- 2.8 mmol/h, respectively) were also not altered. Lack of an increase in excreted urinary cortisol suggested that prior habituation to chair restraint attenuated neuroendocrine responses reported previously. Also, the chair restraint method used appeared to allow adequate activity, because the monkeys did not have indices of muscle wasting.

  4. Comparative effects of chelating agents on distribution, excretion, and renal toxicity of inorganic mercury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, S.; Shimada, H.; Kiyozumi, M. )

    1989-06-01

    The effects of three chelating agents, sodium N-benzyl-D-glucamine dithiocarbamate(NBG-DTC), 2,3-dimercaptopropanol(BAL), and D-penicillamine(D-PEN), on the distribution, excretion, and renal toxicity of inorganic mercury were compared in rats exposed to HgCl2. Rats were injected i.p. with 203HgCl2 (300 micrograms of Hg and 2 microCi of 203Hg/kg) and 30 min or 24 h later they were injected with a chelating agent (a quarter of an LD50). The injection of the chelating agents significantly enhanced the biliary and urinary excretions of mercury. BAL was the most effective for removal of mercury from the body at 30 min after mercury treatment. The extent of enhancing effect of the chelating agents for removal of mercury at 24 h after mercury was in the order NBG-DTC = BAL greater than D-PEN. The injection of BAL at 24 h after mercury treatment caused the redistribution of mercury to the heart and lung. NBG-DTC did not result in the redistribution of mercury to the heart, lung, and brain. Urinary excretion of protein and AST significantly increased 24-48 h after mercury treatment and decreased to the control values 72 h after mercury. The injection of the chelating agents at 30 min after mercury treatment significantly decreased the urinary excretion of protein and AST. In rats pretreated with mercury 24 h earlier, the chelating agents significantly decreased the urinary protein at 48 h after mercury treatment, but did not decrease the urinary AST. The results of this study indicate that the chelating agents are effective in removing mercury from the body, resulting in the protective effect against the mercury-induced renal damage.

  5. Urinary excretion of uranium in adult inhabitants of the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Malátová, Irena; Bečková, Věra; Kotík, Lukáš

    2016-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine and evaluate urinary excretion of uranium in the general public of the Czech Republic. This value should serve as a baseline for distinguishing possible increase in uranium content in population living near legacy sites of mining and processing uranium ores and also to help to distinguish the proportion of the uranium content in urine among uranium miners resulting from inhaled dust. The geometric mean of the uranium concentration in urine of 74 inhabitants of the Czech Republic was 0.091 mBq/L (7.4 ng/L) with the 95% confidence interval 0.071-0.12 mBq/L (5.7-9.6 ng/L) respectively. The geometric mean of the daily excretion was 0.15 mBq/d (12.4 ng/d) with the 95% confidence interval 0.12-0.20 mBq/d (9.5-16.1 ng/d) respectively. Despite the legacy of uranium mines and plants processing uranium ore in the Czech Republic, the levels of uranium in urine and therefore, also human body content of uranium, is similar to other countries, esp. Germany, Slovenia and USA. Significant difference in the daily urinary excretion of uranium was found between individuals using public supply and private water wells as a source of drinking water. Age dependence of daily urinary excretion of uranium was not found. Mean values and their range are comparable to other countries, esp. Germany, Slovenia and USA. PMID:26650830

  6. Side effects in the neonate from psychotropic agents excreted through breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Ananth, J

    1978-07-01

    Neuroleptics, antidepressants, lithium, anxiolytics, and hypnotics may be excreted in breast milk. Because of the danger to the neonate, drugs such as diazepam, lithium, bromides, reserpine, and opium alkaloids should not be given to lactating women, and barbiturates, haloperidol, and penfluridol should be administered with caution. The side effects produced as a result of breast-feeding of the infant by mothers consuming psychotropic drugs are reviewed and possible preventive measures are discussed. PMID:665791

  7. Hyperaldosteronism after decreased renal K+ excretion in KCNMB2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Casper K; Jensen, Iben S; Sorensen, Mads V; de Bruijn, Pauline I; Bleich, Markus; Praetorius, Helle A; Leipziger, Jens

    2016-05-15

    The kidney is the primary organ ensuring K(+) homeostasis. K(+) is secreted into the urine in the distal tubule by two mechanisms: by the renal outer medullary K(+) channel (Kir1.1) and by the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (KCa1.1). Here, we report a novel knockout mouse of the β2-subunit of the KCa1.1 channel (KCNMB2), which displays hyperaldosteronism after decreased renal K(+) excretion. KCNMB2(-/-) mice displayed hyperaldosteronism, normal plasma K(+) concentration, and produced dilute urine with decreased K(+) concentration. The normokalemia indicated that hyperaldosteronism did not result from primary aldosteronism. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system was also ruled out as renal renin mRNA expression was reduced in KCNMB2(-/-) mice. Renal K(+) excretion rates were similar in the two genotypes; however, KCNMB2(-/-) mice required elevated plasma aldosterone to achieve K(+) balance. Blockade of the mineralocorticoid receptor with eplerenone triggered mild hyperkalemia and unmasked reduced renal K(+) excretion in KCNMB2(-/-) mice. Knockout mice for the α-subunit of the KCa1.1 channel (KCNMA1(-/-) mice) have hyperaldosteronism, are hypertensive, and lack flow-induced K(+) secretion. KCNMB2(-/-) mice share the phenotypic traits of normokalemia and hyperaldosteronism with KCNMA1(-/-) mice but were normotensive and displayed intact flow-induced K(+) secretion. Despite elevated plasma aldosterone, KNCMB2(-/-) mice did not display salt-sensitive hypertension and were able to decrease plasma aldosterone on a high-Na(+) diet, although plasma aldosterone remained elevated in KCNMB2(-/-) mice. In summary, KCNMB2(-/-) mice have a reduced ability to excrete K(+) into the urine but achieve K(+) balance through an aldosterone-mediated, β2-independent mechanism. The phenotype of KCNMB2 mice was similar but milder than the phenotype of KCNMA1(-/-) mice. PMID:26962098

  8. Model for antiorthostatic hypokinesia - Head-down tilt effects on water and salt excretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deavers, D. R.; Musacchia, X. J.; Meininger, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    Water and electrolyte excretion was investigated in antiorthostatic hypokinetic and orthostatic hypokinetic and control rats in metabolic cages. Significant (t test, P less than 0.05) diuresis, natriuresis, and kaliuresis occurred in the antiorthostatic hypokinetic subjects but did not occur in either the orthostatic hypokinetic or controls. Recovery from antiorthostatic hypokinesia was characterized by retention of water, sodium, and potassium. Patterns of changes in body weight and food and water consumption were virtually identical in antiorthostatic and orthostatic hypokinetic rats and thus could not account for the differences in renal handling of water and electrolytes. Also, differences in ingestion of food and water in controls could not account for differences in excretion of water and electrolytes between these and antiorthostatic hypokinetic rats. It was concluded that the antiorthostatic position was responsible for the diuresis and natriuresis and that the antiorthostatic hypokinetic rat appears to be a good model for the study of water and elecrolyte excretion during conditions such as bed rest, water immersion, and exposure to weightlessness.

  9. Nutrition and feed management strategies to reduce nutrient excretions and odors from swine manure.

    PubMed

    Sutton, A L; Richert, B T

    2004-01-01

    Manipulation of the pig's diet to reduce nutrient excretions and odors is feasible and practical. Avoiding excessive dietary protein, using high quality protein sources, and feeding low protein, amino acid supplemented diets are practices that will reduce the N in excreta. Avoiding excessive overages of dietary P, balancing diets on an available P basis, and use of phytase as a dietary supplement offers potential for further reducing the P in manure. Use of reduced or organic forms of Cu, Zn, Fe and Mg will reduce excretion of these nutrients in manure. Feeding management technologies that will enhance feed efficiencies and reduce nutrient excretion include feeding for phase, sex and genetic ability of the animal. Reducing the intact protein levels in diets and balancing with synthetic amino acids, use of low levels of specific non-starch polysaccharides (NSP; soybean hulls, sugar beet pulp), and maintaining the proper acid-base balance and buffering in the diet can significantly reduce odorous compounds. Greater nutrient reductions may be possible through the development of specialty feed ingredients that will be used for specific animal diets. Research to fine-tune the diets for production systems is needed. PMID:15137450

  10. High-performance liquid chromatography-based determination of nicarbazin excretion in waterfowl.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Randal S; Johnston, John J

    2002-07-25

    A method for the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) determination of nicarbazin uptake and excretion in ducks is presented. The method uses few clean-up steps and provides a rapid assessment of nicarbazin excretion by measuring the analyte 4,4'-dinitrocarbanalide (DNC). During method development the effect of extraction volume, number of extractions, mobile phase composition, column temperature, and injection volume were varied to optimize sensitivity and achieve as short a run time as possible. For our purposes, a 2 x 5.0 ml 1:1 dimethyl formamide (DMF):acetonitrile (ACN) extraction injected (40 ml) into an HPLC system equipped with a Keystone octadecylsilyl (ODS) C18 column and a UV variable wavelength detector (lambda=347 nm) with a mobile phase of 60:40 (v/v) ACN-H2O, at a flow-rate of 1.0 ml/min at a column temperature of 35 degrees C provided adequate resolution and an acceptable total run time. Studies conducted during method development for inter-day recovery efficiencies for 0.46, 1.8 and 88.5 microg fortified samples (n=3) had mean recoveries of 91, 94 and 97% and intra-day (n=3) recoveries at the same fortification levels of 103, 94, and 92%. The method has been used successfully in excretion studies of nicarbazin in ducks. PMID:12101066

  11. Oral intake of ranitidine increases urinary excretion of N-nitrosodimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Teng; Mitch, William A

    2016-06-01

    The H2-receptor antagonist, ranitidine, is among the most widely used pharmaceuticals to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease and peptic ulcers. While previous studies have demonstrated that amines can form N-nitrosamines when exposed to nitrite at stomach-relevant pH, N-nitrosamine formation from ranitidine, an amine-based pharmaceutical, has not been demonstrated under these conditions. In this work, we confirmed the production of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a potent carcinogen, by nitrosation of ranitidine under stomach-relevant pH conditions in vitro We also evaluated the urinary NDMA excretion attributable to ingestion of clinically used ranitidine doses. Urine samples collected from five female and five male, healthy adult volunteers over 24-h periods before and after consumption of 150mg ranitidine were analyzed for residual ranitidine, ranitidine metabolites, NDMA, total N-nitrosamines and dimethylamine. Following ranitidine intake, the urinary NDMA excreted over 24h increased 400-folds from 110 to 47 600ng, while total N-nitrosamines increased 5-folds. NDMA excretion rates after ranitidine intake equaled or exceeded those observed previously in patients with schistosomiasis, a disease wherein N-nitrosamines are implicated as the etiological agents for bladder cancer. Due to metabolism within the body, urinary NDMA measurements represent a lower-bound estimate of systemic NDMA exposure. Our results suggest a need to evaluate the risks attributable to NDMA associated with chronic consumption of ranitidine, and to identify alternative treatments that minimize exposure to N-nitrosamines. PMID:26992900

  12. Cystatin C as a potential biomarker for dosing of renally excreted drugs

    PubMed Central

    Brou, Nguessan Aimé; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Zhao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to review the available pharmacokinetic evidence for the utility of cystatin C (CysC) as a marker of renal function to predict the dose of renally excreted drugs.The bibliographic search used PubMed and EMBASE databases, from its inception through to January 2014, with the following keywords ‘pharmacokinetics’ and ‘cystatin C’.Sixteen pharmacokinetic publications were identified and seven drugs primarily excreted by the kidney were studied. Among them, only one study was performed in children, the others were performed in adults and/or elderly subjects, either healthy volunteers or patients with variable clinical conditions, such as cystic fibrosis and cancer. Most of studies (n = 13/16) demonstrated that CysC was better correlated with clearance/trough concentration of evaluated drugs compared with creatinine.Our review supports that CysC is a good marker of renal function to predict dose of renally excreted drugs. Efforts should be made to evaluate the impact of CysC in special populations in order to define its clinical value in dosing optimization. PMID:25655191

  13. Recent advances in understanding trans-epithelial acid-base regulation and excretion mechanisms in cephalopods

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Marian Y; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Tseng, Yung-Che

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods have evolved complex sensory systems and an active lifestyle to compete with fish for similar resources in the marine environment. Their highly active lifestyle and their extensive protein metabolism has led to substantial acid-base regulatory abilities enabling these organisms to cope with CO2 induced acid-base disturbances. In convergence to teleost, cephalopods possess an ontogeny-dependent shift in ion-regulatory epithelia with epidermal ionocytes being the major site of embryonic acid-base regulation and ammonia excretion, while gill epithelia take these functions in adults. Although the basic morphology and excretory function of gill epithelia in cephalopods were outlined almost half a century ago, modern immunohistological and molecular techniques are bringing new insights to the mechanistic basis of acid-base regulation and excretion of nitrogenous waste products (e.g. NH3/NH4+) across ion regulatory epithelia of cephalopods. Using cephalopods as an invertebrate model, recent findings reveal partly conserved mechanisms but also novel aspects of acid-base regulation and nitrogen excretion in these exclusively marine animals. Comparative studies using a range of marine invertebrates will create a novel and exciting research direction addressing the evolution of pH regulatory and excretory systems. PMID:26716070

  14. Extremely low level of Ag nanoparticle excretion from mice brain in in vivo experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antsiferova, A.; Buzulukov, Yu; Demin, V.; Kashkarov, P.; Kovalchuk, M.; Petritskaya, E.

    2015-11-01

    Silver nanoparticle accumulation in mice organs as well as the excretion processes from them were studied. The investigation included a one-time oral administration of silver nanoparticles and a series of prolonged oral administrations of the same nanoparticles to study the long-term impact of the nanoparticles. In these experiments, the mice had been fed with colloid silver and in these prolonged experiments, administrations lasted for 2 months. The nanoparticle administration was then cancelled for one month. The elemental composition of tissue samples was studied by Nuclear Physical technique, which allowed us to obtain the masses of the key element, namely silver. It was demonstrated that silver concentrations in tissues were redistributed with time. The main result of this work was the discovery of extremely low level of silver nanoparticle excretion from mice brain (just 6% per month) following the cancellation of NP administration. However, the rates of excretion from blood and liver appeared to be rather high (about 80% per month). Thus, the accumulation effect of silver nanoparticles in the mice brain was observed, which is of great practical importance. It changes the approach to the toxicity assessment of silver nanoparticles as a result of the prolonged injection of colloidal silver.

  15. Decreased nocturnal catecholamine excretion: parameter for an overtraining syndrome in athletes?

    PubMed

    Lehmann, M; Schnee, W; Scheu, R; Stockhausen, W; Bachl, N

    1992-04-01

    The effectiveness of high performance training should be examined at short intervals in order to recognize overtraining promptly. Field or laboratory tests can usually not be performed with such frequency. Easy-to-measure biological, training-relevant parameters are being sought to use in their place. Since the importance of the sympathetic nervous system for adaptation of stress and the relationship between physical training and the activity of the sympathetic nervous system are well accepted, and since an impairment of the sympathetic nervous system is assumed in an overtraining syndrome, we examined the relevance of nocturnal "basal" urinary excretion of free catecholamines with respect to its practical application: 1. during a pilot study (training of road and track cyclists before the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul), 2. through a 4-week prospective, experimental study in 1989 and 1990 (middle- and long-distance runners), 3. during the competitive season and winter break of a soccer team between August 1990 and April 1991. The following hypothesis was made: An overtraining or exhaustion syndrome in athletes may usually be accompanied by at least a 50% decrease in basal dopamine, noradrenaline and adrenaline excretion. When training is effective or the athletes are not exhausted, the decrease of the excretion rate--with the exception of dopamine--is more likely to be lower (noradrenaline, adrenaline). Generalization of these results requires further expansion of the experimental basis. PMID:1601559

  16. Ingestion and excretion of arsenic compounds present in edible brown algae, Hijikia fusiforme, by mice.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Satoshi; Nozawa, Shihoko; Hanaoka, Ken'ichi; Kaise, Toshikazu

    2010-02-01

    The element arsenic is a carcinogen and toxic for humans and other living organisms. Some seaweeds contain high amounts of inorganic arsenic (iAs). In particular, Hijikia fusiforme has a high iAs content of approximately 50%. In this study, we examined the absorption, metabolism, excretion, and accumulation of arsenic compounds in mice after the administration of Hijiki. The single-dose experiment, wherein a single dose of cooked Hijiki was administered to the mice, revealed that the urinary and fecal excretion of arsenic compounds was the highest on the first day of dosing, and it became clear that 66-92% of arsenic was excreted within 3 days after administration of the first dose. The repeated-dose experiment, wherein repeated doses of cooked or dried Hijiki were administered to the mice, arsenic was detected in all the tissues, but only approximately 5% of the administered dose of arsenic was detected as residual arsenic. These results suggest that the arsenic present in cooked Hijiki is accumulated in very small amounts in mice. PMID:19808076

  17. Turnover and urinary excretion of free and acetylated MS-222 rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, J.B.; Schoettger, R.A.; Willford, W.A.

    1968-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) anesthetized in 100 mg/liter of M.S. 222 at 12 C excreted the drug in free and acetylated forms via the urine during a 24-hr recovery period in freshwater. Of the M.S. 222 excreted, 77-96% was acetylated. Blood levels of free drug in anesthetized trout approximated 75% of the anesthetic concentration, but the amount of acetylated M.S. 222 was relatively insignificant. The blood and urine were cleared of the two fractions of M.S. 222 in 8 and 24 hr respectively. Low levels of aromatic amines of natural origin occurred in blood and urine and were subtracted from measurements of M.S. 222. Intraperitoneal injections of 10-100 mg/kg of M.S. 222 did not induce anesthesia; however, the 24-hr pattern of drug excretion was similar to that observed after anesthesia by immersion. Only 15-21 % of the injected dose was found in the urine, suggesting a second route of drug elimination.

  18. Recent advances in understanding trans-epithelial acid-base regulation and excretion mechanisms in cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Hu, Marian Y; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Tseng, Yung-Che

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods have evolved complex sensory systems and an active lifestyle to compete with fish for similar resources in the marine environment. Their highly active lifestyle and their extensive protein metabolism has led to substantial acid-base regulatory abilities enabling these organisms to cope with CO2 induced acid-base disturbances. In convergence to teleost, cephalopods possess an ontogeny-dependent shift in ion-regulatory epithelia with epidermal ionocytes being the major site of embryonic acid-base regulation and ammonia excretion, while gill epithelia take these functions in adults. Although the basic morphology and excretory function of gill epithelia in cephalopods were outlined almost half a century ago, modern immunohistological and molecular techniques are bringing new insights to the mechanistic basis of acid-base regulation and excretion of nitrogenous waste products (e.g. NH3/NH4 (+)) across ion regulatory epithelia of cephalopods. Using cephalopods as an invertebrate model, recent findings reveal partly conserved mechanisms but also novel aspects of acid-base regulation and nitrogen excretion in these exclusively marine animals. Comparative studies using a range of marine invertebrates will create a novel and exciting research direction addressing the evolution of pH regulatory and excretory systems. PMID:26716070

  19. Naloxone increases water and electrolyte excretion after water loading in patients with cirrhosis and ascites.

    PubMed

    Leehey, D J; Gollapudi, P; Deakin, A; Reid, R W

    1991-11-01

    Endogenous opioids may be involved in the pathogenesis of ascites and edema in patients with liver cirrhosis. We administered the opioid antagonist naloxone (5 mg bolus followed by a 0.06 mg/min infusion) to eight male patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and ascites and to five healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects and determined the effects of naloxone on water and electrolyte excretion after a nonsustained water load (20 ml/kg). In comparison with saline vehicle infusion carried out in the same subjects, naloxone administration resulted in a 50% increase in urine output and creatinine clearance and twofold increases in sodium and potassium excretion in patients with cirrhosis. Fractional sodium and potassium excretion, minimal urinary osmolality, plasma vasopressin and aldosterone levels, arterial blood pressure, and heart rate were not affected by naloxone treatment. The diuretic effect of naloxone was not observed in control subjects. Plasma naloxone levels were about six times higher in patients with cirrhosis than in control subjects (probably because of impaired metabolism of the drug) but only a weak correlation was found between drug levels and the degree of diuresis observed. The diuretic effect of naloxone may be related to an increase in glomerular filtration rate, possibly in conjunction with altered tubular reabsorption. PMID:1940589

  20. Biliary excretion of radioactivity after intravenous administration of (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in man

    SciTech Connect

    Ledger, J.E.; Watson, G.J.; Compston, J.E.

    1986-04-01

    The biliary excretion of radioactivity after intravenous (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was studied in nine patients with T-tube bile drainage. The mean +/- SD 24-hr radioactivity excretion in T-tube bile expressed as a percentage of the administered dose was 6.7 +/- 2.9%; after correction for incomplete bile collection, the value obtained was 16.0 +/- 11.1%. Chloroform solubility of biliary radioactivity increased from 27.4 +/- 8.9% to 72.9 +/- 10.1% following incubation with beta-glucuronidase. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of chloroform extracts of bile revealed that most of the eluted radioactivity was more polar than (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3. No free (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was demonstrated. Thus in man, most of the biliary radioactivity excreted following (3H)25-hydroxyvitamin D3 is in the form of water-soluble compounds, mainly glucuronides. However, our results suggest that glucuronides of metabolites other than 25-OHD3 are predominantly formed.

  1. Plutonium fecal and urinary excretion functions: Derivation from a systematic whole-body retention function

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C. . Dept. of Advanced Technology); Lee, D. . Regulatory Research, Nuclear Safety Technology Div.)

    1999-06-01

    Liver-bile secretion directly influences the content of plutonium in feces. To assess the reliability of plutonium metabolic models and to improve the accuracy of interpreting plutonium fecal data, the authors developed a compartmental model that simulates the metabolism of plutonium in humans. With this model, they can describe the transport of plutonium contaminants in the systemic organs and tissues of the body, including fecal and urine excretions, without using elaborate kinetic information. The parameter values of the models, which describe the translocation rates and recycling of plutonium in the body, can be derived from a multi-term exponential systemic function for whole-body retention. The analytical derivations and algorithms for solving translocation parameter values are established for the model and illustrated by applying them to the biokinetics and bioassay of plutonium. This study describes how to (1) design a physiological model for incorporating liver biliary secretion and for obtaining a fecal-excretion function, (2) develop an analytical solution for identifying the translocation-parameter values incorporating the recycling of plutonium in the body, and (3) derive a set of urinary and fecal excretion-functions from a published systemic whole-body retention function, generally acknowledged to be accurate, as a real and practical example.

  2. Absorption, metabolism, and excretion of fermented orange juice (poly)phenols in rats.

    PubMed

    Escudero-López, Blanca; Calani, Luca; Fernández-Pachón, María-Soledad; Ortega, Angeles; Brighenti, Furio; Crozier, Alan; Del Rio, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Two milliliters of a fermented, pasteurized orange juice containing ~1% alcohol and 2.3 μmol of (poly)phenolic compounds was fed to rats by gavage after which plasma and urine collected over a 36 h period were analyzed by UHPLC-mass spectrometry. The main constituents in the juice were hesperetin and naringenin-O-glycosides, apigenin-6,8-C-diglucoside, and ferulic acid-4'-O-glucoside. Plasma contained seven flavanone glucuronides, with the principal metabolites, naringenin-7-O-glucuronide, naringenin-4'-O-glucuronide, and an isosakuranetin-O-glucuronide, peaking 6 h after intake at concentrations of ~10 nmol/L. Urinary excretion of four hesperetin glucuronides was equivalent to 0.28% of intake while that of the two naringenin glucuronides was 2.8% of intake. The plasma and urine data suggest that while some absorption occurred in the small intestine, the main site of uptake was the colon. Urine also contained dihydroferulic acid-4'-O-glucuronide and dihydroferulic acid-4'-O-sulfate which were excreted in quantities corresponding to 48.2% of the ingested ferulic acid-4'-glucoside. This indicates that the hydroxycinnamate is much more bioavailable than the flavanones in the rat model. Conversion of the ferulic acid glucoside to the dihydroferulic acid metabolites involves the action of colonic microbial glycosidases and reductases/hydrogenases followed by postabsorption phase II metabolism before renal excretion. PMID:24255025

  3. Phytoplankton uptake and excretion of assimilated nitrate in a small Canadian shield lake.

    PubMed

    Chan, H K; Campbell, N E

    1978-06-01

    Nitrate uptake in the epilemnetic waters of a small eutrophic Canadian Shield lake was studied by using a 15N method during summer stratification. Concurrent with inhibition of primary production, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea inhibited NO3- assimilation. Nitrate up to 1 mg of N/liter did not affect the rate of primary production during 3 h of incubation. The NO3- fertilizer added to the lake weekly was consumed through algal assimilation in about 3 days. Excretion of the photoassimilated NO3- as dissolved organic nitrogen represented a significant portion of the nutrient incorporated by the cells. Only 40% of the NO3- -15N which disappeared could be accounted for in the particulate fraction. Although the rest was presumably excreted, only 15% of the 15N label was accounted for as cationic dissolved organic nitrogen by isotope assays. These excreted organic forms were predominantly serine and glycine in the dissolved free amino acid fraction. Bacteria as well as algae might be expected to contribute to and modify the extracellular nitrogen pool. PMID:677872

  4. Metabolism, excretion and avoidance of cyanogenic glucosides in insects with different feeding specialisations.

    PubMed

    Pentzold, Stefan; Zagrobelny, Mika; Bjarnholt, Nanna; Kroymann, Juergen; Vogel, Heiko; Olsen, Carl Erik; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Bak, Søren

    2015-11-01

    Cyanogenic glucosides (CNglcs) are widespread plant defence compounds releasing toxic hydrogen cyanide when hydrolysed by specific β-glucosidases after plant tissue damage. In contrast to specialist herbivores that have mechanisms to avoid toxicity from CNglcs, it is generally assumed that non-adapted herbivores are negatively affected by CNglcs. Recent evidence, however, implies that the defence potential of CNglcs towards herbivores may not be as effective as previously anticipated. Here, performance, metabolism and excretion products of insects not adapted to CNglcs were analysed, including species with different degrees of dietary specialisation (generalists, specialists) and different feeding modes (leaf-snipping lepidopterans, piercing-sucking aphids). Insects were reared either on cyanogenic or acyanogenic plants or on an artificial cyanogenic diet. Lepidopteran generalists (Spodoptera littoralis, Spodoptera exigua, Mamestra brassicae) were compared to lepidopteran glucosinolate-specialists (Pieris rapae, Pieris brassicae, Plutella xylostella), and a generalist aphid (Myzus persicae) was compared to an aphid glucosinolate-specialist (Lipaphis erysimi). All insects were tolerant to cyanogenic plants; in lepidopterans tolerance was mainly due to excretion of intact CNglcs. The two Pieris species furthermore metabolized aromatic CNglcs to amino acid conjugates (Cys, Gly, Ser) and derivatives of these, which is similar to the metabolism of benzylglucosinolates in these species. Aphid species avoided uptake of CNglcs during feeding. Our results imply that non-adapted insects tolerate plant CNglcs either by keeping them intact for excretion, metabolizing them, or avoiding uptake. PMID:26483288

  5. Collagen cross-link excretion during space flight and bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.; Nillen, J. L.; Leblanc, A.; Lipton, A.; Demers, L. M.; Lane, H. W.; Leach, C. S.; LeBlanc, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Extended exposure to weightlessness results in bone loss. However, little information exists as to the precise nature or time course of this bone loss. Bone resorption results in the release of collagen breakdown products, including N-telopeptide and the pyridinium (PYD) cross-links, pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline. Urinary pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline are known to increase during bed rest. We assessed excretion of PYD cross-links and N-telopeptide before, during, and after long (28-day, 59-day, and 84-day) Skylab missions, as well as during short (14-day) and long (119-day) bed-rest studies. During space flight, the urinary cross-link excretion level was twice those observed before flight. Urinary excretion levels of the collagen breakdown products were also 40-50% higher, during short and long bed rest, than before. These results clearly show that the changes in bone metabolism associated with space flight involve increased resorption. The rate of response (i.e. within days to weeks) suggests that alterations in bone metabolism are an early effect of weightlessness. These studies are important for a better understanding of bone metabolism in space crews and in those who are bedridden.

  6. Acute Sterol O-Acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) Knockdown Rapidly Mobilizes Hepatic Cholesterol for Fecal Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Stephanie M.; Gromovsky, Anthony D.; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Davis, Matthew A.; Wilson, Martha D.; Lee, Richard G.; Crooke, Rosanne M.; Graham, Mark J.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    The primary risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is LDL cholesterol, which can be reduced by increasing cholesterol excretion from the body. Fecal cholesterol excretion can be driven by a hepatobiliary as well as a non-biliary pathway known as transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE). We previously showed that chronic knockdown of the hepatic cholesterol esterifying enzyme sterol O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) increased fecal cholesterol loss via TICE. To elucidate the initial events that stimulate TICE, C57Bl/6 mice were fed a high cholesterol diet to induce hepatic cholesterol accumulation and were then treated for 1 or 2 weeks with an antisense oligonucleotide targeting SOAT2. Within 2 weeks of hepatic SOAT2 knockdown (SOAT2HKD), the concentration of cholesteryl ester in the liver was reduced by 70% without a reciprocal increase in hepatic free cholesterol. The rapid mobilization of hepatic cholesterol stores resulted in a ∼2-fold increase in fecal neutral sterol loss but no change in biliary cholesterol concentration. Acute SOAT2HKD increased plasma cholesterol carried primarily in lipoproteins enriched in apoB and apoE. Collectively, our data suggest that acutely reducing SOAT2 causes hepatic cholesterol to be swiftly mobilized and packaged onto nascent lipoproteins that feed cholesterol into the TICE pathway for fecal excretion. PMID:24901470

  7. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kouji H.; Tanaka, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Imanaka, Mie; Niisoe, Tamon; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Inoue, Sumiko; Kusakawa, Koichi; Oshima, Masayo; Watanabe, Kiyohiko; Yasojima, Makoto; Takasuga, Takumi; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Background Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid) microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53–3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake. PMID:26731104

  8. Urinary nitrate excretion is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and reduced by prednisolone.

    PubMed Central

    Stichtenoth, D O; Fauler, J; Zeidler, H; Frölich, J C

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine daily production of nitric oxide (NO) measured as urinary nitrate excretion, and the effect of prednisolone in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS--Twenty four hour urinary nitrate was measured by gas chromatography in 10 patients with RA, before and two to four weeks after commencement of prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg body weight, and in 18 healthy controls. RESULTS--Before the start of prednisolone treatment the urinary nitrate excretion in patients with RA was 2.7-fold greater (p < 0.001) than that in healthy volunteers. After prednisolone it decreased significantly, by 28%, at which time inflammatory activity (as indicated by C reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, joint count, and early morning stiffness) was also reduced considerably. Despite this decrease, the urinary nitrate excretion in patients with RA remained twice that in the control group (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS--Our data suggest that the endogenous production of NO is enhanced in patients with RA. Furthermore, the results indicate that, in parallel with suppression of inflammation, this increased NO synthesis could be reduced by prednisolone treatment. PMID:7492221

  9. Pyridoxic acid excretion during low vitamin B-6 intake, total fasting, and bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coburn, S. P.; Thampy, K. G.; Lane, H. W.; Conn, P. S.; Ziegler, P. J.; Costill, D. L.; Mahuren, J. D.; Fink, W. J.; Pearson, D. R.; Schaltenbrand, W. E.

    1995-01-01

    Vitamin B-6 metabolism in 10 volunteers during 21 d of total fasting was compared with results from 10 men consuming a diet low only in vitamin B-6 (1.76 mumol/d) and with men consuming a normal diet during bed rest. At the end of the fast mean plasma concentrations of vitamin B-6 metabolites and urinary excretion of 4-pyridoxic acid tended to be higher in the fasting subjects than in the low-vitamin B-6 group. The fasting subjects lost approximately 10% of their total vitamin B-6 pool and approximately 13% of their body weight. The low-vitamin B-6 group lost only approximately 4% of their vitamin B-6 pool. Compared with baseline, urinary excretion of pyridoxic acid was significantly increased during 17 wk of bed rest. There was no increase in pyridoxic acid excretion during a second 15-d bed rest study. These data suggest the possibility of complex interactions between diet and muscle metabolism that may influence indexes that are frequently used to assess vitamin B-6 status.

  10. Identifying plasma glycerol concentration associated with urinary glycerol excretion in trained humans.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jeff L; Harmon, Molly E; Robergs, Robert A

    2011-11-01

    Glycerol has been used as a means to legitimately hyperhydrate the body in an attempt to offset the deleterious effects of dehydration. It has the potential to mask blood doping practices and as a result has been added to the WADA prohibited substance list. The purpose of this study was to identify the plasma glycerol concentration coinciding with urinary glycerol excretion. Twelve healthy, trained male subjects completed five separate trials under resting conditions. For each trial, subjects consumed a different glycerol dose (0.025, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, or 0.20 g glycerol/kg LBM) of a 5% glycerol solution in order to determine at what plasma glycerol concentration an increase in urine glycerol concentration becomes apparent. Based on regression analysis, plasma glycerol concentrations > 0.327 ± 0.190 mmol/L and a glycerol dose > 0.032 ± 0.010 g glycerol/kg LBM would be associated with urinary glycerol excretion. There were significant linear relationships between peak plasma glycerol concentration and time to reach peak plasma glycerol concentration to the ingested glycerol doses. Our findings illustrate the importance of considering the effect of urinary glycerol excretion on legitimate hyperhydration regimens as well as suggesting that it is possible to detect surreptitious use of glycerol as a masking agent through urinary analysis. PMID:22080901

  11. The loss of circadian rhythmicity of urinary solute excretion in idiopathic stone formers.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, H; Vaidyanathan, S; Wangoo, D; Thind, S K; Nath, R; Malakondaiah, G C; Krishan, K

    1989-10-01

    Circadian rhythmicity in urinary volume and excretion of creatinine, calcium, oxalate, uric acid and phosphate was studied in 15 idiopathic stone formers and in 17 control subjects who were age-matched, related adult males, living in the same house and engaged in similar occupations to those of the stone patients, but who had no clinically obvious stone disease. Three-hourly urine samples were collected and creatinine, calcium, oxalate, uric acid and inorganic phosphate were estimated. The time series of data were analysed by cosinor rhythmometry. Circadian rhythmicity has been described in urinary volume and urinary excretion of creatinine, calcium, oxalate, uric acid and inorganic phosphate in normal subjects, but it was not detected in the stone formers. The control subjects exhibited a circadian rhythmicity only in urinary volume and creatinine excretion. Thus they occupied a position midway between healthy adults, who exhibit circadian rhythmicity in all of the above parameters, and the stone formers, who appear to have lost it altogether. PMID:2819381

  12. Pharmacokinetics of oral 6-mercaptopurine: relationship between plasma levels and urine excretion of parent drug.

    PubMed

    Endresen, L; Lie, S O; Storm-Mathisen, I; Rugstad, H E; Stokke, O

    1990-05-01

    Plasma levels and cumulative urine excretion of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) were measured using a specific and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic assay in seven children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) as well as in one healthy volunteer. The dose of 6-MP varied in the range of 25-75 mg/m2 of body surface area and was administered with a standard breakfast. A 4- to 11-fold variation between individuals was found in the pharmacokinetic parameters: peak concentration, time to reach peak, area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), and fraction of dose excreted in the urine. Three repeated determinations in one individual revealed that AUC also varied more than sixfold following an overnight fast. In three individuals, the reducing agents glutathione (10 mg/kg) and ascorbic acid (15 mg/kg) were coadministered with 6-MP to evaluate their possible role in the protection of 6-MP from oxidation and degradation in the intestinal lumen. No consistent effect was observed, however, on the AUCs of either of these agents. A clear relationship was found between AUCs and the 24-h urinary excretion of unchanged drug (r = 0.9381), indicating that determinations of 6-MP in the urine may replace the painful procedure of repeated blood sampling. Further studies are necessary to determine the factors contributing to the unpredictable plasma levels following oral doses of 6-MP and to determine the value of pharmacokinetic monitoring in ALL patients. PMID:2349605

  13. Cortisol-mediated synchronization of circadian rhythm in urinary potassium excretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore-Ede, M. C.; Schmelzer, W. S.; Kass, D. A.; Herd, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Conscious chair-acclimatized squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) studied with lights on (600 lx) from 0800 to 2000 hr daily (LD 12:12) display a prominent circadian rhythm in renal potassium excretion. The characteristics of this rhythm were reproduced in adrenalectomized monkeys by infusing 5 mg cortisol and 0.001 mg aldosterone, or 5 mg cortisol alone, between 0800 and 0900 kr daily. When the timing of cortisol administration (with or without aldosterone) was phase-delayed by 8 hr, the urinary potassium rhythm resynchronized by 80% of the cortisol phase shift, but only after a transient response lasting 3-4 days. With the same daily dose of adrenal steroids given as a continuous infusion throughout each 24 hr, urinary potassium excretion showed free-running oscillations no longer synchronized to the light-dark cycle. These results indicate that the circadian rhythm of plasma cortisol concentration acts as an internal mediator in the circadian timing system, synchronizing a potentially autonomous oscillation in renal potassium excretion to environmental time cues and to other circadian rhythms within the animal.

  14. Identification of Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion (ADME) Genes Relevant to Steatosis Using a Differential Gene Expression Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) parameters represent important connections between exposure to chemicals and the activation of molecular initiating events of Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) in cellular, tissue, and organ level targets. ADME parameters u...

  15. DISPOSITION AND EXCRETION OF INTRAVENOUS 2,3,7,8-TETRABROMODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TBDD) IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans are of toxicologic interest due to potential occupational and environmental exposure and because of their structural similarity to the highly toxic chlorinated analogues. he excretion and terminal tissue distribution of 3H-TBDD was ...

  16. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and excretion of nomegestrol acetate in female rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qingbiao; Chen, Xiaoke; Zhu, Yan; Cao, Lin; Riviere, Jim E

    2015-12-01

    Nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC), a synthetic progestogen derived from 19-norprogesterone, is an orally active drug with a strong affinity for the progesterone receptor. NOMAC inhibits ovulation and is devoid of undesirable androgenic and estrogenic activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and excretion of NOMAC in female rats. Sprague-Dawley female rats were orally administered a single dose of NOMAC (10, 20 or 40 mg/kg) and drug plasma concentrations at different times were determined by RP-HPLC. Tissue distribution at 1, 2, and 4 h and excretion of NOMAC into bile, urine, and feces after dosing were investigated. The results showed that NOMAC was rapidly absorbed after oral administration, with [Formula: see text] of 1-2 h. The plasma concentration-time curves were fitted in a two-compartment model. The exposure to NOMAC ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) increased dose proportionally from 10 to 40 mg/kg. The average CL and [Formula: see text] were 5.58 L/(h·kg) and 10.8 h, respectively. The highest concentrations of NOMAC in ovary, liver, kidney, lung, heart, brain, spleen, muscle, and uterus were observed at 2 h, whereas the highest concentrations in stomach, pituitary, and hypothalamus appeared at 1 h. The total cumulative excretion of NOMAC in feces (0-72 h), urine (0-72 h), and bile (0-48 h) was ~1.06, 0.03, and 0.08 % of the oral administered dose, respectively. This study indicated that NOMAC had a widespread distribution in tissues, including ovary, pituitary, and hypothalamus, which are main target tissues where NOMAC inhibits ovulation. NOMAC was excreted via both feces and urine with few unchanged NOMAC excreted. Enterohepatic circulation was found in the drug elimination; however, it did not significantly affect [Formula: see text]. PMID:25168884

  17. Factors Associated With High Sodium Intake Based on Estimated 24-Hour Urinary Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although reducing dietary salt consumption is the most cost-effective strategy for preventing progression of cardiovascular and renal disease, policy-based approaches to monitor sodium intake accurately and the understanding factors associated with excessive sodium intake for the improvement of public health are lacking. We investigated factors associated with high sodium intake based on the estimated 24-hour urinary sodium excretion, using data from the 2009 to 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Among 21,199 adults (≥19 years of age) who participated in the 2009 to 2011 KNHANES, 18,000 participants (weighted n = 33,969,783) who completed urinary sodium and creatinine evaluations were analyzed in this study. The 24-hour urinary sodium excretion was estimated using Tanaka equation. The mean estimated 24-hour urinary sodium excretion level was 4349 (4286–4413) mg per day. Only 18.5% (weighted n = 6,298,481/3,396,973, unweighted n = 2898/18,000) of the study participants consumed less the 2000 mg sodium per day. Female gender (P < 0.001), older age (P < 0.001), total energy intake ≥50 percentile (P < 0.005), and obesity (P < 0.001) were associated with high sodium intake, even after adjusting for potential confounders. Senior high school/college graduation in education and managers/professionals in occupation were associated with lower sodium intake (P < 0.001). According to hypertension management status, those who had hypertension without medication consumed more sodium than those who were normotensive. However, those who receiving treatment for hypertension consumed less sodium than those who were normotensive (P < 0.001). The number of family members, household income, and alcohol drinking did not affect 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. The logistic regression analysis for the highest estimated 24-hour urinary sodium excretion quartile (>6033 mg/day) using the

  18. Excretion of sterols from the skin of normal and hypercholesterolemic humans

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Ashim K.; Connor, William E.; Spector, Arthur A.

    1972-01-01

    The 24 hr sterol excretion from the entire skin surface was determined in six normal and five hypercholesterolemic (Type II) patients fed a controlled, eucaloric diet containing 400 mg of plant sterols. All subjects received radiolabeled cholesterol intravenously in order to measure cholesterol turnover and exchange. The 24 hr skin surface lipids were collected subsequently at intervals of 7-10 days. Sterols were quantified and identified by a combination of thin-layer and gas-liquid chromatographic methods. The mean 24 hr excretion of cholesterol in milligrams was 82.6 in the normal subjects and 82.7 in the hypercholesterolemic patients. Cholesterol constituted 89% of the total sterol excretion through the skin surface in both groups. The specific radioactivity of cholesterol in the skin surface lipids increased gradually after the intravenous administration of the isotope. Within 4-5 wk the specific activity equaled and then remained higher than that of the plasma up to 10 wk. These specific activity curves suggested that, for at least some of skin surface cholesterol, there was a precursor-product relationship between the plasma cholesterol and the skin cholesterol. The presence of plant sterols, β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol in the skin surface lipids of man has not been reported previously. We identified these sterols in the skin surface lipids of all of our subjects. They constituted about 7% of the total skin surface sterols. The occurrence of plant sterols in the skin surface lipids suggested that plasma sterols were transferred from the plasma into the skin. 1-2% of the skin surface sterols were tentatively identified as lathosterol and lanosterol. The present study documented that a significant amount of cholesterol was excreted from the skin surface and that probably there was a net transfer of plasma cholesterol into the skin surface lipids. Both normal subjects and hypercholesterolemic patients excreted similar amounts of cholesterol per

  19. Bicarbonate promotes BK-α/β4-mediated K excretion in the renal distal nephron

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Ryan J.; Wen, Donghai; Hatcher, Lori I.

    2012-01-01

    Ca-activated K channels (BK), which are stimulated by high distal nephron flow, are utilized during high-K conditions to remove excess K. Because BK predominantly reside with BK-β4 in acid/base-transporting intercalated cells (IC), we determined whether BK-β4 knockout mice (β4KO) exhibit deficient K excretion when consuming a high-K alkaline diet (HK-alk) vs. high-K chloride diet (HK-Cl). When wild type (WT) were placed on HK-alk, but not HK-Cl, renal BK-β4 expression increased (Western blot). When WT and β4KO were placed on HK-Cl, plasma K concentration ([K]) was elevated compared with control K diets; however, K excretion was not different between WT and β4KO. When HK-alk was consumed, the plasma [K] was lower and K clearance was greater in WT compared with β4KO. The urine was alkaline in mice on HK-alk; however, urinary pH was not different between WT and β4KO. Immunohistochemical analysis of pendrin and V-ATPase revealed the same increases in β-IC, comparing WT and β4KO on HK-alk. We found an amiloride-sensitive reduction in Na excretion in β4KO, compared with WT, on HK-alk, indicating enhanced Na reabsorption as a compensatory mechanism to secrete K. Treating mice with an alkaline, Na-deficient, high-K diet (LNaHK) to minimize Na reabsorption exaggerated the defective K handling of β4KO. When WT on LNaHK were given NH4Cl in the drinking water, K excretion was reduced to the magnitude of β4KO on LNaHK. These results show that WT, but not β4KO, efficiently excretes K on HK-alk but not on HK-Cl and suggest that BK-α/β4-mediated K secretion is promoted by bicarbonaturia. PMID:22993067

  20. Quantitative immunological determination of 12 plasma proteins excreted in human urine collected before and after exercise

    PubMed Central

    Poortmans, Jacques; Jeanloz, Roger W.

    1968-01-01

    Urine was collected from 6 healthy male adults at rest and from 20 male adults after a marathon race (25 miles). The concentrated urines were quantitatively analyzed, by single radial immunodiffusion, for their content in 12 different plasma proteins: tryptophan-rich prealbumin, albumin, α1-acid glycoprotein, α1-antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, Gc-globulin, transferrin, hemopexin, β2-glycoprotein I, γA-globulin, and γG-globulin. Albumin, γA-globulin, and γG-globulin represent the major part of the plasma proteins detected in normal urine excreted by humans at rest (12, 0.5, and 2.5 mg respectively, out of a total excretion of 17.5 mg of plasma proteins per 24 hr). The other plasma proteins were excreted at a lower rate (< 0.4 mg/24 hr). The relative content of tryptophan-rich prealbumin, α1-antitrypsin, Gc-globulin, transferrin, and γG-globulin was lower in normal urine than in normal serum, whereas that of α1-acid glycoprotein, β2-glycoprotein I, and γA-globulin was higher. The ratio of γG-globulin to γA-globulin was 4.9:1. When plotted on a logarithmic scale, no direct relationship between the molecular weight of a protein and the value of its renal clearance could be observed. Strenuous exercise increased (up to 50-fold) the excretion of plasma proteins which represent 82% of the total proteins found in urine, instead of 57% in urine collected from humans at rest. There was particularly a significant rise of tryptophan-rich albumin, albumin, α1-acid glycoprotein, transferrin, γA-globulin, and γG-globulin (0.26, 127, 11.8, 3.3, 1.2, and 2.0 μg respectively, out of a total excretion of 167 μg of plasma proteins per min). The ratio of γG-globulin to γA-globulin was 16:1. After exercise, the renal clearance of proteins increased from 2 to 40 times, but, as for the urine of normal subjects at rest, no direct relationship between molecular weight and renal clearance could be observed. Images PMID:4170390

  1. Urinary sodium or potassium excretion and blood pressure in adults of Shandong province, China: preliminary results of the SMASH project.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Guo, Xiaolei; Ma, Jixiang; Zhang, Jiyu; Tang, Junli; Yan, Liuxia; Xu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Xiaofei; Ren, Jie; Lu, Zilong; Zhang, Gaohui; Dong, Jing; Xu, Aiqiang

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the urinary electrolyte excretion and assess the relationship between dietary sodium or potassium intake and blood pressure within a population of 18-69 adults in Shandong province, China. Random samples of 2184 adults enrolled in the Shandong and Ministry of Health Action on Salt reduction and Hypertension project were collected from 20 countries or districts. Electrolyte intake was estimated by 24-hour urine collections, and urinary volume or creatinine was measured to estimate the accuracy of the collection. Anthropometry was measured with standard procedures. Regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between electrolyte excretion and blood pressure. The mean sodium excretion was 241.8 ± 7.9 mmol among men and 222.3 ± 7.9 mmol among women, respectively. The 24-hour average potassium excretion was 39.9 ± 0.9 and 41.8 ± 1.1 mmol, respectively. Some resident and geographic differences were found for 24-hour urinary electrolyte. Regression analysis showed increments of 1.15 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure and 0.67 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure per gram increment in urinary sodium excretion. For each increment of 1-g potassium excretion per day, there was a decrement of 0.81 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure and 0.76 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure. The highest blood pressure was observed in the group with lowest potassium and the highest sodium excretion, which was 13.6 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure and 7.3 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure difference from group with highest potassium excretion and lowest sodium excretion (P < .0001 for interaction). The Shandong and Ministry of Health Action on Salt reduction and Hypertension project results show a substantially higher sodium excretion and a lower potassium excretion than recommended in Shandong adults. The sodium or potassium intake is positively association with blood pressure. These results support the recommended approaches to lower the risk of

  2. Validation and Assessment of Three Methods to Estimate 24-h Urinary Sodium Excretion from Spot Urine Samples in Chinese Adults.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yaguang; Li, Wei; Wang, Yang; Chen, Hui; Bo, Jian; Wang, Xingyu; Liu, Lisheng

    2016-01-01

    24-h urinary sodium excretion is the gold standard for evaluating dietary sodium intake, but it is often not feasible in large epidemiological studies due to high participant burden and cost. Three methods-Kawasaki, INTERSALT, and Tanaka-have been proposed to estimate 24-h urinary sodium excretion from a spot urine sample, but these methods have not been validated in the general Chinese population. This aim of this study was to assess the validity of three methods for estimating 24-h urinary sodium excretion using spot urine samples against measured 24-h urinary sodium excretion in a Chinese sample population. Data are from a substudy of the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study that enrolled 120 participants aged 35 to 70 years and collected their morning fasting urine and 24-h urine specimens. Bias calculations (estimated values minus measured values) and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess the validity of the three estimation methods. 116 participants were included in the final analysis. Mean bias for the Kawasaki method was -740 mg/day (95% CI: -1219, 262 mg/day), and was the lowest among the three methods. Mean bias for the Tanaka method was -2305 mg/day (95% CI: -2735, 1875 mg/day). Mean bias for the INTERSALT method was -2797 mg/day (95% CI: -3245, 2349 mg/day), and was the highest of the three methods. Bland-Altman plots indicated that all three methods underestimated 24-h urinary sodium excretion. The Kawasaki, INTERSALT and Tanaka methods for estimation of 24-h urinary sodium excretion using spot urines all underestimated true 24-h urinary sodium excretion in this sample of Chinese adults. Among the three methods, the Kawasaki method was least biased, but was still relatively inaccurate. A more accurate method is needed to estimate the 24-h urinary sodium excretion from spot urine for assessment of dietary sodium intake in China. PMID:26895296

  3. Estimated human excretion rates of natural estrogens calculated from their concentrations in raw municipal wastewater and its application.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze-Hua; Lu, Gui-Ning; Yin, Hua; Dang, Zhi

    2015-06-01

    Natural estrogens are important endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), which may pose adverse effects on our environment. To avoid time-consuming sample preparation and chemical analysis, estimation of their concentrations in municipal wastewater based on their human urine/feces excretion rates has been generally adopted. However, the data of excretion rates available are very limited and show significant difference among countries. In the context of increasing reporting on the concentrations of natural estrogens in municipal wastewater around the world, this study presented a simple method to estimate their human excretion rates based on the concentrations of natural estrogens in raw sewage. The estimated human excretion rates of natural estrogens among ten countries were obtained, which totally covered over 33 million population. Among these, Brazilians had the largest excretion rates with estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2) as 236.9 and 60 μg/day/P, respectively, while Iran had the lowest value of 2 μg/day/P for E1 and 0.5 μg/day/P for E2. The average estimated human excretion rates of E1, E2, and estriol (E3) are 17.3, 6.4, and 39.7 μg/day/P, respectively. When the estimated human excretion rates obtained were applied for prediction, the predicted results showed better accuracies than those based on human urinary/feces excretion rates. The method in this study is simple, cost-effective and time-saving, which may be widely applied. PMID:25801372

  4. Validation and Assessment of Three Methods to Estimate 24-h Urinary Sodium Excretion from Spot Urine Samples in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yaguang; Li, Wei; Wang, Yang; Chen, Hui; Bo, Jian; Wang, Xingyu; Liu, Lisheng

    2016-01-01

    24-h urinary sodium excretion is the gold standard for evaluating dietary sodium intake, but it is often not feasible in large epidemiological studies due to high participant burden and cost. Three methods—Kawasaki, INTERSALT, and Tanaka—have been proposed to estimate 24-h urinary sodium excretion from a spot urine sample, but these methods have not been validated in the general Chinese population. This aim of this study was to assess the validity of three methods for estimating 24-h urinary sodium excretion using spot urine samples against measured 24-h urinary sodium excretion in a Chinese sample population. Data are from a substudy of the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study that enrolled 120 participants aged 35 to 70 years and collected their morning fasting urine and 24-h urine specimens. Bias calculations (estimated values minus measured values) and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess the validity of the three estimation methods. 116 participants were included in the final analysis. Mean bias for the Kawasaki method was -740 mg/day (95% CI: -1219, 262 mg/day), and was the lowest among the three methods. Mean bias for the Tanaka method was -2305 mg/day (95% CI: -2735, 1875 mg/day). Mean bias for the INTERSALT method was -2797 mg/day (95% CI: -3245, 2349 mg/day), and was the highest of the three methods. Bland-Altman plots indicated that all three methods underestimated 24-h urinary sodium excretion. The Kawasaki, INTERSALT and Tanaka methods for estimation of 24-h urinary sodium excretion using spot urines all underestimated true 24-h urinary sodium excretion in this sample of Chinese adults. Among the three methods, the Kawasaki method was least biased, but was still relatively inaccurate. A more accurate method is needed to estimate the 24-h urinary sodium excretion from spot urine for assessment of dietary sodium intake in China. PMID:26895296

  5. Unbalance of L-lysine flux in Corynebacterium glutamicum and its use for the isolation of excretion-defective mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Vrljic, M; Kronemeyer, W; Sahm, H; Eggeling, L

    1995-01-01

    We found that the simple addition of L-methionine to the wild type of Corynebacterium glutamicum results in excretion of the cellular building block L-lysine up to rates of 2.5 nmol/min/mg (dry weight). Biochemical analyses revealed that L-methionine represses the homoserine dehydrogenase activity and reduces the intracellular L-threonine level from 7 to less than 2 mM. Since L-lysine synthesis is regulated mainly by L-threonine (plus L-lysine) availability, the result is enhanced flux towards L-lysine. This indicates a delicate and not well controlled type of flux control at the branch point of aspartate semialdehyde conversion to either L-lysine or L-threonine, probably due to the absence of isoenzymes in C. glutamicum. The inducible system of L-lysine excretion discovered was used to isolate mutants defective in the excretion of this amino acid. One such mutant characterized in detail accumulated 174 mM L-lysine in its cytosol without extracellular excretion of L-lysine, whereas the wild type accumulated 53 mM L-lysine in the cytosol and 5.9 mM L-lysine in the medium. The mutant was unaffected in L-lysine uptake or L-isoleucine or L-glutamate excretion, and also the membrane potential was unaltered. This mutant therefore represents a strain with a defect in an excretion system for the primary metabolite L-lysine. PMID:7608075

  6. [The effect of dopaminergic stimulation and inhibition on the urinary excretion of aldosterone and kallikrein in spontaneously hypertensive rats].

    PubMed

    Minuz, P; Gangi, F; Degan, M; Lechi, C; Delva, P; Lechi, A

    1983-10-30

    The effect on the electrolyte balance of a dopaminergic agonist (bromocriptine) and an antagonist (metoclopramide) and their effect on renal aldosterone and kallikrein excretion were investigated. Ten normotensive Wistar rats and ten spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-Wistar Kioto) were treated with BCR (4 mg/Kg weight b.i.d.) for 4 days; after a week of pharmacological wash-out they received MCP (0,5 mg/Kg weight b.i.d.) for 4 days. Before and after treatment and at the 2nd and 4th day of each treatment diuresis, urinary excretion of aldosterone, kallikrein, sodium, potassium and proteins were measured. During the 24-hour urine collections the rats were kept in separate metabolic cages with free access to food and water. Kallikrein urinary excretion was lower in SHR than in normotensive rats under basal conditions (p 0.05); urinary sodium, potassium, proteins and sodium/potassium rate were also reduced in SHR. After treatment with bromocriptine a further reduction in urinary kallikrein excretion was observed in SHR. After MCP all the parameters were unchanged both in normotensive rats and in SHR, but SHR showed a significant correlation between aldosterone and kallikrein excretion (p less than 0,001); in this condition it seems that in SHR the control exerted by aldosterone on kallikrein excretion is greater than the one exerted by dopamine. It may indicate a defect of the natriuretic and vasodilator dopaminergic system in spontaneously hypertensive rats. PMID:6559080

  7. Inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometric determination of platinum in excretion products of client-owned pet dogs.

    PubMed

    Janssens, T; Brouwers, E E M; de Vos, J P; de Vries, N; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H

    2015-06-01

    Residues of antineoplastic drugs in canine excretion products may represent exposure risks to veterinary personnel, owners of pet dogs and other animal care-takers. The aim of this study was to measure the extent and duration of platinum (Pt) excretion in pet dogs treated with carboplatin. Samples were collected before and up to 21 days after administration of carboplatin. We used validated, ultra-sensitive, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry assays to measure Pt in canine urine, faeces, saliva, sebum and cerumen. Results showed that urine is the major route of elimination of Pt in dogs. In addition, excretion occurs via faeces and saliva, with the highest amounts eliminated during the first 5 days. The amount of excreted Pt decreased over time but was still quantifiable at 21 days after administration of carboplatin. In conclusion, increased Pt levels were found in all measured excretion products up to 21 days after administration of carboplatin to pet dogs, with urine as the main route of excretion. These findings may be used to further adapt current veterinary guidelines on safe handling of antineoplastic drugs and treated animals. PMID:23714139

  8. Human urinary excretion profile after smoking and oral administration of ( sup 14 C)delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, E.; Gillespie, H.K.; Halldin, M.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The urinary excretion profiles of delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 1-THC) metabolites have been evaluated in two chronic and two naive marijuana users after smoking and oral administration of ({sup 14}C)delta 1-THC. Urine was collected for five days after each administration route and analyzed for total delta 1-THC metabolites by radioactivity determination, for delta 1-THC-7-oic acid by high-performance liquid chromatography, and for cross-reacting cannabinoids by the EMIT d.a.u. cannabinoid assay. The average urinary excretion half-life of {sup 14}C-labeled delta 1-THC metabolites was calculated to be 18.2 +/- 4.9 h (+/- SD). The excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings were similar to the excretion profile of {sup 14}C-labeled metabolites in the naive users. However, in the chronic users the excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings did not resemble the radioactive excretion due to the heavy influence from previous Cannabis use. Between 8-14% of the radioactive dose was recovered in the urine in both user groups after oral administration. Lower urinary recovery was obtained both in the chronic and naive users after smoking--5 and 2%, respectively.

  9. Ammonia excretion in Caenorhabditis elegans: Physiological and molecular characterization of the rhr-2 knock-out mutant.

    PubMed

    Adlimoghaddam, Aida; O'Donnell, Michael J; Kormish, Jay; Banh, Sheena; Treberg, Jason R; Merz, David; Weihrauch, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown the free living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (N2 strain) to be ammonotelic. Ammonia excretion was suggested to take place partially via the hypodermis, involving the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), V-ATPase (VAT), carbonic anhydrase, NHX-3 and a functional microtubule network and at least one Rh-like ammonia transporter RHR-1. In the current study, we show that a second Rh-protein, RHR-2, is highly expressed in the hypodermis, here also in the apical membrane of that tissue. To further characterize the role of RHR-2 in ammonia excretion, a knock-out mutant rhr-2 (ok403), further referred to as ∆rhr-2, was employed. Compared to wild-type worms (N2), this mutant showed a lower rate of ammonia excretion and a lower hypodermal H(+) excretion rate. At the same time rhr-1, nka, vat, and nhx-3 showed higher mRNA expression levels when compared to N2. Also, in contrast to N2 worms, ∆rhr-2 did not show enhanced ammonia excretion rates when exposed to a low pH environment, suggesting that RHR-2 represents the apical NH3 pathway that allows ammonia trapping via the hypodermis in N2 worms. A hypothetical model for the mechanism of hypodermal ammonia excretion is proposed on the basis of data in this and previous investigations. PMID:26872996

  10. Amorphous Silica Based Nanomedicine with Safe Carrier Excretion and Enhanced Drug Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Silu

    With recent development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, a great amount of efforts have been devoted to nanomedicine development. Among various nanomaterials, silica nanoparticle (NP) is generally accepted as non-toxic, and can provide a versatile platform for drug loading. In addition, the surface of the silica NP is hydrophilic, being favorable for cellular uptake. Therefore, it is considered as one of the most promising candidates to serve as carriers for drugs. The present thesis mainly focuses on the design of silica based nanocarrier-drug systems, aiming at achieving safe nanocarrier excretion from the biological system and enhanced drug efficacy, which two are considered as most important issues in nanomedicine development. To address the safe carrier excretion issue, we have developed a special type of selfdecomposable SiO2-drug composite NPs. By creating a radial concentration gradient of drug in the NP, the drug release occurred simultaneously with the silica carrier decomposition. Such unique characteristic was different from the conventional dense SiO2-drug NP, in which drug was uniformly distributed and can hardly escape the carrier. We found that the controllable release of the drug was primarily determined by diffusion, which was caused by the radial drug concentration gradient in the NP. Escape of the drug molecules then triggered the silica carrier decomposition, which started from the center of the NP and eventually led to its complete fragmentation. The small size of the final carrier fragments enabled their easy excretion via renal systems. Apart from the feature of safe carrier excretion, we also found the controlled release of drugs contribute significantly to the drug efficacy enhancement. By loading an anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox) to the decomposable SiO 2-methylene blue (MB) NPs, we achieved a self-decomposable SiO 2(MB)-Dox nanomedicine. The gradual escape of drug molecules from NPs and their enabled cytosolic release by optical

  11. Nocturnal 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate excretion in female workers exposed to magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Juutilainen, J; Stevens, Richard G. ); Anderson, Larry E. ); Hansen, Norman H.; Kilpelainen, M; Kumlin, T; Laitinen, J T.; Sobell, Eugene; Wilson, Bary W. )

    2000-03-15

    The objective of this study was to determine whether daytime occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (MFs) suppresses nocturnal melatonin production. Sixty female volunteers were recruited. Thirty-nine worked in a garment factory, and 21 office workers served as a reference group. Exposure assessment was based on the type of sewing machine used and MF measurements around each type of machine. Eye-level MF flux density was used to classify the operators to higher (> 1 microT) and lower (0.3-1 microT) exposure categories. A third group of factory workers had diverse MF exposures from other sources. The reference group had average exposure of about 0.15 microT. Urine samples were collected on Friday and Monday for three consecutive weeks. Melatonin production was assessed as urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate (6-OHMS) excretion. The ratio of Friday morning/Monday morning 6-OHMS was used to test the hypothesis that melatonin production is suppressed after 4 days of occupational MF exposure with significant recovery during the weekend. Possible chronic suppression of melatonin production was evaluated by studying exposure-related differences in the Friday values by multivariate regression analysis. The Monday/Friday ratios were close to 1.0, suggesting that there is no increase in melatonin production over the weekend. The average 6-OHMS excretion on Friday was lower among the factory workers than in the reference group, but no monotonous dose-response was observed. Multivariate regression analysis identified MF exposure, smoking, and age as significant explanatory variables associated with decreased 6-OHMS excretion.

  12. The excretion of NaCl and KCl loads in mosquitoes. 1. Control data.

    PubMed

    Hine, Rebecca M; Rouhier, Matthew F; Park, Seokhwan Terry; Qi, Zhijun; Piermarini, Peter M; Beyenbach, Klaus W

    2014-10-01

    The handling of Na(+) and K(+) loads was investigated in isolated Malpighian tubules and in whole mosquitoes of Aedes aegypti. Isolated Malpighian tubules bathed in Na(+)-rich Ringer solution secreted Na(+)-rich fluid, and tubules bathed in K(+)-rich Ringer solution secreted K(+)-rich fluid. Upon Na(+) loading the hemolymph, the mosquito removed 77% the injected Na(+) within the next 30 min. The rapid onset and magnitude of this diuresis and the excretion of more Na(+) than can be accounted for by tubular secretion in vitro is consistent with the release of the calcitonin-like diuretic hormone in the mosquito to remove the Na(+) load from the hemolymph. Downstream, K(+) was reabsorbed with water in the hindgut, which concentrated Na(+) in excreted urine hyperosmotic to the hemolymph. Upon K(+) loading the hemolymph, the mosquito took 2 h to remove 100% of the injected K(+) from the hemolymph. The excretion of K(+)-rich isosmotic urine was limited to clearing the injected K(+) from the hemolymph with a minimum of Cl(-) and water. As a result, 43.3% of the injected Cl(-) and 48.1% of the injected water were conserved. The cation retained in the hemolymph with Cl(-) was probably N-methyl-d-glucamine, which replaced Na(+) in the hemolymph injection of the K(+) load. Since the tubular secretion of K(+) accounts for the removal of the K(+) load from the hemolymph, the reabsorption of K(+), Na(+), Cl(-), and water must be inhibited in the hindgut. The agents mediating this inhibition are unknown. PMID:25056103

  13. Ammonium excretion and oxygen respiration of tropical copepods and euphausiids exposed to oxygen minimum zone conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiko, R.; Hauss, H.; Buchholz, F.; Melzner, F.

    2015-10-01

    Calanoid copepods and euphausiids are key components of marine zooplankton communities worldwide. Most euphausiids and several copepod species perform diel vertical migrations (DVMs) that contribute to the export of particulate and dissolved matter to midwater depths. In vast areas of the global ocean, and in particular in the eastern tropical Atlantic and Pacific, the daytime distribution depth of many migrating organisms corresponds to the core of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). At depth, the animals experience reduced temperature and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and an increased carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) compared to their near-surface nighttime habitat. Although it is well known that low oxygen levels can inhibit respiratory activity, the respiration response of tropical copepods and euphausiids to relevant pCO2, pO2 and temperature conditions remains poorly parameterized. Further, the regulation of ammonium excretion at OMZ conditions is generally not well understood. It was recently estimated that DVM-mediated ammonium supply considerably fuels bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation - a major loss process for fixed nitrogen in the ocean. These estimates were based on the implicit assumption that hypoxia or anoxia in combination with hypercapnia (elevated pCO2) does not result in a downregulation of ammonium excretion. Here we show that exposure to OMZ conditions can result in strong depression of respiration and ammonium excretion in calanoid copepods and euphausiids from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic and the Eastern Tropical South Pacific. These physiological responses need to be taken into account when estimating DVM-mediated fluxes of carbon and nitrogen into OMZs.

  14. Manipulation of dietary methionine+cysteine and threonine in broilers significantly decreases environmental nitrogen excretion.

    PubMed

    Donato, D C Z; Sakomura, N K; Silva, E P; Troni, A R; Vargas, L; Guagnoni, M A N; Meda, B

    2016-06-01

    The intensification of livestock have increased the emission of pollutants to the environment, leading to a growing interest in seeking strategies that minimise these emissions. Studies have shown that it is possible to manipulate diets by reducing CP levels and thus reducing nitrogen (N) excretion, without compromising performance. However, there is no knowledge of any study that has focused on reducing N excretion and relating this reduction to individual amino acids. This study investigated the effect of dietary methionine+cysteine (MC) and threonine (THR), the two most limiting amino acids for broiler production, on nitrogen excretion (NE) and nitrogen deposition (ND) and determined the efficiency of utilisation of both amino acids for protein deposition. Six trials were conducted to measure the NE and ND in broiler chickens during three rearing phases in response to dietary amino acid. The efficiency of utilisation of the amino acids was calculated by linear regression of body protein deposition and the amino acid intake. Despite the differences between sexes and phases, the efficiency of utilisation was the same, being 0.60 and 0.59 for MC and THR, respectively. The rate of NE behaved exponentially, increasing with amino acid intake, and can exceed 50% of N intake, being higher than ND. On average, for a reduction in intake of each unit of MC or THR (mg) there is a reduction of 0.5% of NE. Although this reduction seems low, considering that it corresponds to changes in one amino acid only, the impact on a large scale would be significant. Knowledge of how animals respond to NE and ND/protein deposition according to amino acid dietary content may represent new efforts towards reducing the impact on environment. PMID:27076031

  15. The excretion and environmental effects of amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline residues in layer chicken manure.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ping-cai; Wang, Yan; Liu, Long-yong; Zou, Yong-de; Liao, Xin-di; Liang, Juan-boo; Wu, Yin-bao

    2016-05-01

    The excretion rates and ecological risk to the environment of three commonly used veterinary antibiotics (VAs), amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline, in layer hen manure during the application and withdrawal periods were investigated in a study consisting of a control group fed with VA-free basal diet and nine treatment groups consisted of three levels (200 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, and 50 mg/kg) of amoxicillin (AMX), ciprofloxacin (CIP), or doxycycline (DOC). Each treatment group was replicated seven times with three layer hens per replication. Results of the study showed that the average excretion rates of AMX in the 200, 100, and 50 mg/kg groups were 67.88, 55.82, and 66.15%, respectively, while those for CIP and DOC were 47.84, 51.85, and 44.87% and 82.67, 94.39, and 95.72%, respectively. The concentrations of the above veterinary drugs in manure decreased sharply in the withdrawal period (7, 28, and 10 d, respectively), for AMX, DOC, and CIP. Neither AMX nor DOC was detected in the manure after the withdrawal period. In contrast to AMX and DOC, the excretion rate of CIP was significantly lower and thus had a longer residence time. Ecological risk study, estimated using hazard quotient values, showed that AMX in the 100 and 50 mg/kg groups posed no risk to the environment after d 1 of withdrawal, while CIP in the 50 mg/kg group posed no risk to the environment from d 5 of withdrawal. CIP in the 200 and 100 mg/kg groups required 10 d withdrawal in order to pose no risk to the environment. In contrast, DOC residue during withdrawal in the manure posed no risk to the environment, thus making it more environmentally safe. PMID:26944981

  16. The association of knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to salt with 24-hour urinary sodium excretion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aim Salt reduction efforts usually have a strong focus on consumer education. Understanding the association between salt consumption levels and knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards salt should provide insight into the likely effectiveness of education-based programs. Methods A single 24-hour urine sample and a questionnaire describing knowledge, attitudes and behaviours was obtained from 306 randomly selected participants and 113 volunteers from a regional town in Australia. Results Mean age of all participants was 55 years (range 20–88), 55% were women and mean 24-hour urinary salt excretion was 8.8(3.6) g/d. There was no difference in salt excretion between the randomly selected and volunteer sample. Virtually all participants (95%) identified that a diet high in salt can cause serious health problems with the majority of participants (81%) linking a high salt diet to raised blood pressure. There was no difference in salt excretion between those who did 8.7(2.1) g/d and did not 7.5(3.3) g/d identify that a diet high in salt causes high blood pressure (p = 0.1). Nor was there a difference between individuals who believed they consumed “too much” 8.9(3.3) g/d “just the right amount” 8.4(2.6) g/d or “too little salt” 9.1(3.7) g/d (p = 0.2). Likewise, individuals who indicated that lowering their salt intake was important 8.5(2.9) g/d vs. not important 8.8(2.4) g/d did not have different consumption levels (p = 0.4). Conclusion The absence of a clear association between knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards salt and actual salt consumption suggests that interventions focused on knowledge, attitudes and behaviours alone may be of limited efficacy. PMID:24708561

  17. Modelling phosphorus intake, digestion, retention and excretion in growing and finishing pig: model evaluation.

    PubMed

    Symeou, V; Leinonen, I; Kyriazakis, I

    2014-10-01

    A deterministic, dynamic model was developed, to enable predictions of phosphorus (P) digested, retained and excreted for different pig genotypes and under different dietary conditions. Before confidence can be placed on the predictions of the model, its evaluation was required. A sensitivity analysis of model predictions to ±20% changes in the model parameters was undertaken using a basal UK industry standard diet and a pig genotype characterized by British Society Animal Science as being of 'intermediate growth'. Model outputs were most sensitive to the values of the efficiency of digestible P utilization for growth and the non-phytate P absorption coefficient from the small intestine into the bloodstream; all other model parameters influenced model outputs by <10%, with the majority of the parameters influencing outputs by <5%. Independent data sets of published experiments were used to evaluate model performance based on graphical comparisons and statistical analysis. The literature studies were selected on the basis of the following criteria: they were within the BW range of 20 to 120 kg, pigs grew in a thermo-neutral environment; and they provided information on P intake, retention and excretion. In general, the model predicted satisfactorily the quantitative pig responses, in terms of P digested, retained and excreted, to variation in dietary inorganic P supply, Ca and phytase supplementation. The model performed well with 'conventional', European feed ingredients and poorly with 'less conventional' ones, such as dried distillers grains with solubles and canola meal. Explanations for these inconsistencies in the predictions are offered in the paper and they are expected to lead to further model development and improvement. The latter would include the characterization of the origin of phytate in pig diets. PMID:24923282

  18. Effects of sodium N-methyl-N-dithiocarboxyglucamine on cadmium distribution and excretion

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, G.R.; Shinobu, L.A.; Jones, M.M.; Atkins, L.M.; Smith, A.B.

    1984-12-17

    Sodium N-methyl-N-dithiocarboxyglucamine (MDCG) was evaluated for its efficacy in mobilizing and promoting excretion of metallothionein-bound /sup 109/Cd using mice which had received 0.03 mg of CdCl/sub 2/.2.5H/sub 2/O along with 1.0 ..mu..Ci of /sup 109/CdCl/sub 2/ three weeks earlier. The MDCG-induced change in the fecal excretion of Cd ranged from a 15-fold increase over the control rate at the lowest dose level used (2.2 mmol/kg; 684 mg/kg) up to a 72-fold increase at the highest dose (8.8 mmol/kg; 2736 mg/kg) following three daily injections. The latter treatment administered Cd over a 3-day period of observation. Urinary Cd excretion was insignificant in both the control and treated groups. The whole body burden of Cd was reduced by over 50% following seven thrice-weekly i.p. injections of MDCG at 8.8 mmol/kg. There was a 60-65% reduction in both the liver and kidney Cd levels following the same treatment regimen. Radioassay of ten other organs and tissues revealed only modest changes. Testicular Cd was decreased slightly at the highest dose level, and heart tissue from each treated group contained slightly more Cd than controls. Results indicated a rather marked specificity of MDCG in lowering the Cd content of two organs most susceptible to Cd-induced toxicity.

  19. Urinary isothiocyanate excretion, brassica consumption, and gene polymorphisms among women living in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Fowke, Jay H; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Dai, Qi; Shintani, Ayumi; Conaway, C Clifford; Chung, Fung-Lung; Cai, Qiuyin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2003-12-01

    Alternative measures of Brassica vegetable consumption (e.g., cabbage) may clarify the association between Brassica and cancer risk. Brassica isothiocyanates (ITCs) are excreted in urine and may provide a sensitive and food-specific dietary biomarker. However, the persistence of ITCs in the body may be brief and dependent on the activity of several Phase II enzymes, raising questions about the relationship between a single ITC measure and habitual dietary patterns. This study investigates the association between urinary ITC excretion and habitual Brassica consumption, estimated by a food frequency questionnaire, among healthy Chinese women enrolled in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. Participants (n = 347) completed a validated food frequency questionnaire querying habitual dietary intake during the prior 5 years and provided a fasting first-morning urine specimen. Genetic deletion of glutathione S-transferases (GSTM1/GSTT1), and single nucleotide substitutions in GSTP1 (A313G) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1: C609T), were identified from blood DNA. Urinary ITC excretion levels were marginally higher with the GSTT1-null or GSTP1-G/G genotypes (P = 0.07, P = 0.05, respectively). Mean habitual Brassica intake was 98.3 g/day, primarily as bok choy, and Brassica intake significantly increased across quartile categories of ITC levels. The association between habitual Brassica intake and urinary ITC levels was stronger among women with GSTT1-null or GSTP1-A/A genotypes, or NQO1 T-allele, and the interaction was statistically significant across GSTP1 genotype. In conclusion, a single urinary ITC measure, in conjunction with markers of Phase II enzyme activity, provides a complementary measure of habitual Brassica intake among Shanghai women. PMID:14693750

  20. Hydrogen peroxide excretion by oral streptococci and effect of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, J; Iwami, Y; Yamada, T

    1983-01-01

    Approved type strains of Streptococcus sanguis, S. mitis, S. mutans, and S. salivarius were grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The rate of hydrogen peroxide excretion, oxygen uptake, and acid production from glucose by washed-cell suspensions of these strains were studied, and the levels of enzymes in cell-free extracts which reduced oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, or hypothiocyanite (OSCN-) in the presence of NADH or NADPH were assayed. The effects of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide on the rate of acid production and oxygen uptake by intact cells, the activity of glycolytic enzymes in cell-free extracts, and the levels of intracellular glycolytic intermediates were also studied. All strains consumed oxygen in the presence of glucose. S. sanguis, S. mitis, and anaerobically grown S. mutans excreted hydrogen peroxide. There was higher NADH oxidase and NADH peroxidase activity in aerobically grown cells than in anaerobically grown cells. NADPH oxidase activity was low in all species. Acid production, oxygen uptake, and, consequently, hydrogen peroxide excretion were inhibited in all the strains by lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide. S. sanguis and S. mitis had a higher capacity than S. mutans and S. salivarius to recover from this inhibition. Higher activity in the former strains of an NADH-OSCN oxidoreductase, which converted OSCN- into thiocyanate, explained this difference. The change in levels of intracellular glycolytic intermediates after inhibition of glycolysis by OSCN- and the actual activity of glycolytic enzymes in cell-free extracts in the presence of OSCN- indicated that the primary target of OSCN- in the glycolytic pathway was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. PMID:6832837

  1. Pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, tissue distribution, excretion, and metabolite identification of methoxyflavones in Kaempferia parviflora extract in rats.

    PubMed

    Mekjaruskul, Catheleeya; Jay, Michael; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2012-12-01

    Kaempferia parviflora (KP) is an herbal plant in the family of Zingiberaceae. KP mainly contains methoxyflavones, especially 5,7-dimethoxyflavone (DMF), 5,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone (TMF), and 3,5,7,3',4'-pentamethoxyflavone (PMF). The present study was designed to characterize the pharmacokinetics, including bioavailability, distribution, excretion, and identification of metabolites after administration of a KP ethanolic extract. Male rats were orally or intravenously administered a 250 mg/kg concentration of a KP extract, and blood samples were obtained at selected times to determine pharmacokinetic parameters of PMF, TMF, and DMF. For distribution and excretion studies, the organs, urine, and feces samples were collected at various times after oral administration of a larger (750 mg/kg) dose of KP extract. Methoxyflavones in the biological samples were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography-UV, and the metabolites in urine and feces were further identified by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. After oral administration, concentrations of the three methoxyflavones quickly approached their maximal concentration, ranging from 0.55 to 0.88 μg/ml within 1 to 2 h after administration, and then were gradually excreted with half-lives of 3 to 6 h. The methoxyflavones showed low oral bioavailability of 1 to 4%. Three methoxyflavones were detected at their highest levels in liver followed by kidney. They were also found in lung, testes, and brain. After absorption, organ distribution, and metabolism, the components of KP were mainly eliminated through urine in the forms of demethylated, sulfated, and glucuronidated products and as demethylated metabolites in the feces. The parent compounds were found to have 0.79, 1.76, and 3.10% dose recovery in urine and 1.06, 1.77, and 0.96% dose recovery in feces for PMF, TMF, and DMF, respectively. These studies are the first to describe the pharmacokinetics of KP extract to provide the information on

  2. Excretion of (3H)prednisolone in clinically normal and experimentally infected bovine udders

    SciTech Connect

    Geleta, J.N.; Shimoda, W.; Mercer, H.D.

    1984-08-01

    The excretion rate of (3H)prednisolone from clinically normal and experimentally infected udders of 10 lactating cows was studied. Each quarter of 6 cows was injected with a single dose of (3H)prednisolone mixed with non-radioactive prednisolone equivalent to 10 mg in 10 ml of peanut oil base. Each of the remaining 4 cows was given 40 mg of nonradioactive prednisolone and (3H)prednisolone in 60% ethanol IV. Control and postadministration samples of blood, milk, and urine were examined for radioactivity. The effects of (3H)prednisolone were evaluated in the same cows, first in clinically normal udders, then 2 weeks later in udders experimentally infected with Streptococcus agalactiae. Absorption and elimination of prednisolone were the same before and after induced infection. Within 3 hours after intramammary injection, 95% of the labeled prednisolone was absorbed systemically, less than 5% of this dose was recovered in milk, and 29% was excreted in urine. After IV injection of (3H)prednisolone, less than 0.2% of the total radioactivity was recovered in milk and less than 46% was excreted in urine. Clinical mastitis induced by S agalactiae was moderate. Circulating blood leukocytes and somatic cells in the milk of normal cows remained essentially unchanged. The leukocyte response to induced infection was rapid in blood and milk. Large numbers of leukocytes were noticed in the milk and a severe leukopenia occurred. Prednisolone treatment did not alter the number of somatic cells in milk or reduce the inflammatory response of experimentally infected cows.

  3. Urine synaptopodin excretion is an important marker of glomerular disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon Kil; Kim, Seung Jung; Kim, Hye-Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Podocytes play an important role in maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and in formation of the slit diaphragm. Podocyte loss is associated with chronic kidney disease progression, but it is not clear whether urinary podocyte proteins in urine reflect the clinical extent of glomerular damage. We investigated the correlation between the amounts of urinary podocyte proteins and renal function and albuminuria. Methods: The study enrolled 33 patients with diabetic kidney disease or glomerular disease and measured urinary podocytes proteins using Western blotting. Urinary podocyte proteins were measured according to the density of the bands on Western blotting. We measured serum creatinine and the spot urine albumin/creatinine ratio as markers of renal damage, and compared the correlation of urinary podocyte protein in the glomerular disease patients. Results: The mean patient age was 49.3 ± 16.5 years, the mean serum creatinine level was 2.30 ± 1.76 mg/dL, and the mean albumin/creatinine ratio was 4.85 ± 3.52. Among the podocyte proteins, urine synaptopodin showed strong correlation with serum creatinine by multivariate regression analysis (p < 0.001) and showed linear correlation (r = 0.429, p < 0.01). Urine podocyte proteins were increased in patients with diabetes, and synaptopodin showed the greatest significant difference (7.68 ± 5.61 vs. 2.56 ± 3.11, p < 0.001), but this might be associated with renal impairment. The urine albumin excretion did not differ between the diabetics and non-diabetics (p = 0.73). Conclusions: Urine synaptopodin is associated with serum creatinine elevation in the patients with glomerulonephritis including diabetic kidney disease regardless of urine albumin excretion. We suggest that the urine synaptopodin level can predict glomerular damage independently of the urine albumin excretion. PMID:27604800

  4. Impact of supervised cardiac rehabilitation on urinary albumin excretion in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Sahika; Ueda, Yuka; Ise, Takayuki; Yagi, Shusuke; Iwase, Takashi; Nishikawa, Koji; Yamaguchi, Koji; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Soeki, Takeshi; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Katoh, Shinsuke; Akaike, Masashi; Yasui, Natsuo; Sata, Masataka

    2015-01-01

    Urinary albumin excretion is a predictor of cardiovascular death. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) with exercise training (ET) has been shown to improve exercise capacity and prognosis in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, it remains unclear whether CR reduces urinary albumin excretion in CVD patients. We performed a retrospective, observational study using data obtained from 98 male CVD patients without macroalbuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 30 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) who participated in CR with ET during hospitalization. Twenty-three patients continued supervised ET for 6 months (supervised group) and 75 patients quit supervised ET (non-supervised group). The supervised ET program consisted of 60 minutes of supervised sessions 1-3 times a week and 30-60 minutes of home exercise at least twice a week. Urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) was significantly decreased in the supervised group at 6 months after enrollment (43 ± 71 mg/g to 17 ± 20 mg/g creatinine, P < 0.05) but not in the non-supervised group. eGFR was unchanged in the supervised group but was significantly decreased in the non-supervised group (72 ± 18 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) to 67 ± 17 mL/minute/1.73 m(2), P < 0.001). The results of multiple regression analysis showed that only supervised ET was an independent contributor to ΔACR. CR with supervised ET decreased urinary albumin excretion without deterioration of renal function. These findings suggest that continuation of a supervised ET program is associated with reduction in the development of CVD and reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in CVD patients. PMID:25742947

  5. Effects of combined treatment with diethyldithiocarbamate and diethylenetriaminepentaacetate on organ distribution and excretion of cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, G.R.; Atkins, L.M.; Walker, E.M. Jr.; Smith, A.B.

    1983-09-01

    Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) were assessed to determine if combination treatment with these two chelators of different chemical classes would enhance mobilization and excretion of metallothionein-bound cadmium (Cd) from selected organs of mice which had earlier received 0.03 mg of CdCl/sub 2/ . 2.5 H/sub 2/O along with 1.0 microCi of /sup 109/Cd. In addition to measuring individual organ radioactivity after seven and after 13 injections of each compound individually as well as in combination, whole body Cd burden was measured, and the routes and rates of Cd excretion were determined. When used alone, DDTC was effective in mobilizing Cd from kidney, liver, intestine, and spleen. The DTPA when used alone was not consistently effective in reducing Cd burdens in any of the organs assessed. Co-administration of DDTC and DTPA promoted an enhancement of Cd mobilization from liver, kidney, spleen, and intestine over that which was observed with DDTC alone. When DTPA was administered with DDTC, it did not prevent accumulation of Cd in lung and brain which was observed upon treatment with DDTC alone. Combined treatment did produce a more marked depletion of total body /sup 109/Cd burden than did the administration of DDTC alone. A more rapid rate of both fecal and urinary excretion of Cd was observed when the chelators were co-administered. It was concluded that at least an additive or possibly supraadditive effect may be obtained by combining a dithiocarbamate chelator with one of the aminocarboxylate class in total body Cd decorporation.

  6. The effect of phototherapy on urinary calcium excretion in term neonates.

    PubMed

    Asl, Afshin Safaei; Zarkeshl, Marjaneh; Heidarzadeh, Abtin; Maleknejad, Shohreh; Hagikhani, Kaveh

    2016-05-01

    Phototherapy is the most common, most effective, and least dangerous treatment method for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and is the treatment of the first choice for neonatal icterus. Hypocalcemia is one of the lesser-known complications of phototherapy. Some studies have shown a relationship between increased urinary calcium excretion and phototherapy-induced hypocalcemia. We aimed to assess the effect of phototherapy on urinary calcium excretion in term neonates. This before-after study was performed on 80 term neonates having hyper- bilirubinemia referred to the 17(th) Shahrivar Hospital, Rasht, Guilan Province, Northern Iran, over a one-year period from May 2013 to May 2014. Electrocardiography was performed to measure QTc in all neonates at admission and 48 h after phototherapy. Blood and urine samples were taken from all neonates before and 48 h after phototherapy. Phototherapy was performed using four lamps with similar wavelengths from a distance of 20 cm. The serum and urinary calcium and sodium levels and urinary creatinine level before and after phototherapy were measured and compared. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 16. The mean age of the study subjects was 7.01 ± 4.13 days. We did not find any significant difference between urinary calcium levels (P = 0.0001), urinary creatinine levels (P = 0.954), or the calcium/creatinine ratio (P = 0.086) before and after phototherapy. The neonates' mean ± standard deviation plasma as well as urinary sodium levels differed before and after phototherapy; the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.658). Phototherapy might increase urinary calcium excretion although it does not cause hypocalcemia. PMID:27215239

  7. Urinary Sodium Excretion and Dietary Sources of Sodium Intake in Chinese Postmenopausal Women with Prehypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao-min; Ho, Suzanne C.; Tang, Nelson; Chan, Ruth; Chen, Yu-ming; Woo, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Background Reducing salt intake in communities is one of the most effective and affordable public health strategies to prevent hypertension, stroke and renal disease. The present study aimed to determine the sodium intake in Hong Kong Chinese postmenopausal women and identify the major food sources contributing to sodium intake and urine excretion. Methods This was a cross-sectional study among 655 Chinese postmenopausal women with prehypertension who were screened for a randomized controlled trial. Data collection included 24 h urine collection for the measurement of sodium, potassium and creatinine, 3-day dietary records, anthropometric measures and questionnaire survey on demographic data and dietary habits. Results The average salt intake estimated from urinary excretion was 7.8±3.2 g/d with 82.1% women above WHO recommendation of 5 g/day. Food groups as soup (21.6%), rice and noodles (13.5%), baked cereals (12.3%), salted/preserved foods (10.8%), Chinese dim sum (10.2%) and sea foods (10.1%) were the major contributors of non-discretionary salt. Discretionary salt use in cooking made a modest contribution to overall intake. Vegetable and fruit intake, age, sodium intake from salted foods, sea foods and soup were the independent determinants of urinary sodium excretion. Conclusions Our data revealed a significant room for reduction of the sodium intake. Efforts to reduce sodium from diets in Hong Kong Chinese postmenopausal women should focus on both processed foods and discretionary salt during cooking. Sodium reduction in soup and increase in fruit intake would be potentially effective strategy for reducing sodium. PMID:25083775

  8. SN2-Palmitate Reduces Fatty Acid Excretion in Chinese Formula-fed Infants

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Yoseph, Fabiana; Lifshitz, Yael; Cohen, Tzafra; Malard, Patrice; Xu, Chungdi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: Palmitic acid (PA) comprises 17% to 25% of human milk fatty acids, of which 70% to 75% are esterified to the SN2 position of the triglyceride (SN2-palmitate). In vegetable oils, which are commonly used in infant formulas, palmitate is primarily esterified to other positions, resulting in reduced calcium and fat absorption and hard stools. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of SN2-palmitate on nutrient excretion. Methods: In total, 171 Chinese infants were included (within 14 days of birth) in this multicenter study. Formula-fed infants were randomly assigned to receive either SN2-palmitate formula (INFAT, n = 57) or control formula (n = 57). The formulas (Biostime, China) differed only in their SN2 PA proportions. Stool was collected at 6 postnatal weeks. Results: The stool dry weight and fat content of the SN2-palmitate group were lower compared with the control group (dry weight 4.25 g vs 7.28 g, P < 0.05; fat 0.8 g vs 1.2 g, P < 0.05). The lipid component was also significantly lower for the SN2-palmitate group (0.79 g vs 1.19 g, P < 0.05). PA, representing ∼50% of the saponified fatty acids, was significantly lower in the SN2-palmitate group compared with the control group (0.3 g vs 0.7 g, P < 0.01). Breast-fed infants had a significantly lower stool dry weight, fat content, and saponified fat excretion compared with formula-fed infants (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Similar to breast milk, the SN2-palmitate infant formula primarily reduced calcium-saponified fat excretion. The results of this study further emphasize the nutritional importance of SN2-palmitate structured fat for infants. PMID:26334255

  9. Oil and PCB interactions on the uptake and excretion in midges

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, P.G.; Rediske, R.R.

    1984-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of sediment oil contamination on the bioaccumulation and excretion of Aroclor 1242 by the chironomid larvae Glyptotendipes barbipes Staeger. This dipteran was chosen as the test organism because it is an important fish food, and also the larva can tolerate a wide range of sediment PCB and oil concentrations. Experiments were conducted under laboratory conditions where midges were exposed to varying concentrations of Aroclor 1242 and mineral oil mixtures. An artificial substrate was chosen over natural sediment because it could be easily prepared in large quantities and accurately contaminated with both PCB and oil.

  10. The release, tissue distribution and excretion of mercury from experimental amalgam tattoos.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, S. W.; Eley, B. M.

    1986-01-01

    Following the subcutaneous implantation of powdered dental amalgam in guinea pigs, there was an initial extrusion of material from the healing implantation wounds. Longer-term release of mercury from the lesions was demonstrated by linear regression analysis of the mercury contents of implant sites removed after time periods of up to 2 years. Raised mercury levels were detected in the blood, bile, kidneys, liver, spleen and lungs of implanted animals; by far the highest concentrations were found in the renal cortex. Mercury was excreted with the urine and, to a lesser extent, the faeces. The pattern of mercury redistribution resembled that seen following chronic exposure to mercuric compounds. PMID:3801303

  11. Effects of pyrazinamide, probenecid, and benzbromarone on renal excretion of oxypurinol.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Moriwaki, Y; Takahashi, S; Suda, M; Higashino, K

    1991-01-01

    The effects of pyrazinamide, probenecid, and benzbromarone on renal excretion of oxypurinol were investigated. Pyrazinamide decreased the mean (SEM) fractional clearance of oxypurinol from 19.2 (2.1) to 8.8 (1.5). Probenecid increased the fractional clearance of oxypurinol from 14.1 (3.5) to 24.8 (4.1). Benzbromarone increased the fractional clearance of oxypurinol from 15.6 (2.3) to 33.8 (2.8). These results suggest that oxypurinol may be secreted by 'an organic acid system' and that oxypurinol is reabsorbed at a putative postsecretory site of the renal tubules. PMID:1929586

  12. Urinary excretion of hydroxylysine and its glycosides as an index of collagen degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Krane, S M; Kantrowitz, F G; Byrne, M; Pinnell, S R; Singer, F R

    1977-01-01

    Urimary excretion of hydroxyprolin (Hyp) is one index of total collagen degradation, from all sources. Since some of the Hyp released from collagen may be further metabolized before it is excreted, other markers are necessary to measure collagen breakdown. Excretion of the glycosides of hydroxylysine (Hyl), glucosyl galactosyl hydroxylysine (Hy1[Gl)cGa1]), and galactosyl hydroxylysine (Hyl[Ga)]), more accurately reflects collagen metabolism since these products occur in specificratios in different tissue collagens and are themselves metabolized only to a minor degree. The ratios of total Hy1/Hyp and Hyl(GlcGal)/Hyl(Ga1) were measured in the urine of norma. subjects and of patients with Paget's disease of bone, hyperphosphatasia, and extensive thermal burns. In patients with extensive thermal burns the pattern of urinary Hy1 and its glycosides was consistent with degradation of collagen in dermis and fascia. When bone collagen degradation was dominant, the pattern of urinary metabolites reflected that source. Pagetic bone collagen has an amino acid composition similar to normal bone and Hy1(G1cGa1/Hyl(G1) of 0.396-0.743,vs. normal of 0.474+/-0.088. In untreated patients with severe Paget's disease of bone or hyperphosphatasia (urinary Hyp greater than 2.0 micronmol/mg creatinine) urinary Hyl/Hyp averaged 0.052+/-0.042 (0.042+/-0.009 in normal bone) and Hy1(G1cGa1)/Hy1(Ga1) 0.601+/-0.017 (0.47+/-0.009 in normal bone). When bone resorption was decreased sufficiently with calcitonin or disodium etidronate in these patients, both the urinary ratios of Hy1/Hyp and Hy1(G1cGa1)/Hyl(Gal) rose. In normal subjects treated with calcitonin and excreting relatively little Hyp, the ratio of Hy1/H)P approached 0.7 and Hy1(G1ycGa1)/Hy1(Ga1) approached 3.5. There increased ratios reveal the existence of a source of collagen breakdown other than skin or bone. The first subcompoent of complement, Clq, which has collagen-like sequences, relatively high amounts of Hy1, and most of the

  13. [LH excretion during the ovulatory cycle and during therapy with various estrogen-gestagen combinations].

    PubMed

    Göretzlehner, G; Wilken, H

    1972-11-01

    Immunochemical determination of urinary LH was carried out in 7 normally ovulating women and in 25 women treated with various combined, sequential, and depot hormonal contraceptives. In ovulatory cycles without hormone treatment an LH peak was always observed at midcycle. During treatment with Ovosiston, OZN, and Quinestrol-norethisterone acetate, no LH peak was seen. In women receiving sequential preparations (mestranol-chlormadinone acetate, estrone cyanate-chlormadinone acetate), elevated LH levels were observed during estrogen medication. LH excretion was suppressed after administration of chlormadinone acetate. LH levels were also slightly elevated before and after medication with Quinestrol-chlormadinone acatate (1 pill per month). PMID:4121480

  14. The effect of zinc supplementation on the urinary excretion of elements in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Eskici, Gunay; Gunay, Mehmet; Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim; Mogulkoc, Rasim

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to find out how oral zinc supplementation to elite athletes affects the element changes in the urine. The study registered 10 female athletes who were on the women's volleyball team of Gazi University Sports Club and whose mean age, weight, and height were 14.2±0.42 years, 59.8±7.79kg and 173.6±6.15 cm. The study protocol was approved by the local ethics committee. The athletes who continued their daily routine training sessions (6 days/week) were supplemented with 220mg/day oral zinc sulfate for 4 weeks. In order to induce exhaustion, the subjects were put to a 20-meter shuttle run test before and after supplementation. A total, 7 times urine samples were collected follows as pre and post exercise before the start of the experiment and at the end (4 times), at the end of first, second and third week (3 times). Urinary levels of magnesium, phosphorus, and calcium (mg/dl), as well as zinc, copper, and selenium (μg/dl) were analyzed in the atomic emission device (ICP-MS). Arithmetic means and standard errors of the data were calculated. Kruskal Wallis test was used to determine differences between weeks. Values for which p<0,05 were considered significant. When compared to resting values, urinary excretion of copper and selenium decreased in exercise (p<0,05), but increased with zinc supplementation (p<0,05). Pre- and post-supplementation exercise resulted in reduced urinary zinc excretion (p<0,05). Zinc supplementation increased urinary zinc excretion in one-week intervals over the course of 4 weeks (p<0,05), and reduced selenium levels (p<0,05). When zinc is supplemented to athletes, the relation between the duration and dose of supplementation is important. The results of the study indicated that zinc does not have any negative effect on the urinary excretion of the concerned elements. It can thus be concluded that athletes may benefit from zinc support. PMID:26826808

  15. Two Cases of Hypophosphatemia with Increased Renal Phosphate Excretion in Legionella Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shuhei; Kono, Keiji; Fujii, Hideki; Nakai, Kentaro; Goto, Shunsuke; Nishi, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    We encountered 2 cases of hypophosphatemia due to Legionella pneumonia. Both cases showed increased urinary phosphate excretion and renal tubular dysfunction, which ameliorated with recovery from Legionella pneumonia. Serum fibroblast growth factor-23 level was suppressed, whereas serum 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels were normal. Delayed elevation of serum 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D levels was observed with improvement in renal tubular function. These findings suggested hypophosphatemia might be mediated by renal tubular dysfunction. PMID:27066493

  16. Use of In Vitro Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion (ADME) Data in Bioaccumulation Assessments for Fish

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, John W.; Erhardt, Susan; Dyer, Scott; James, Margaret O.; Moore, Margo; Plotzke, Kathleen; Segner, Helmut; Schultz, Irvin R.; Thomas, Karluss; Vasiluk, Luba; Weisbrod, Anne V.

    2007-11-01

    A scientific workshop was held in 2006 to discuss the use of in vitro Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion (ADME) data in chemical bioaccumulation assessments for fish. Computer-based (in silico) modeling tools are widely used to estimate chemical bioaccumulation. These in silico methods have inherent limitations that result in inaccurate estimates for many compounds. Based on a review of the science workshop participants concluded that two factors, absorption and metabolism, represent the greatest sources of uncertainty in current bioaccumulation models. Both factors can be investigated experimentally using in vitro test systems.

  17. Reduction in faecal excretion of Salmonella typhimurium strain F98 in chickens vaccinated with live and killed S. typhimurium organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, P. A.; Hassan, J. O.; Berchieri, A.

    1990-01-01

    Chickens given orally at 4 days of age a smooth spectinomycin resistant mutant (Spcr) of Salmonella typhimurium strain F98 excreted the organism in their faeces for approximately 4 weeks. Following oral administration of a nalidixic acid resistant (Nalr) mutant of the same strain 4 weeks later when the chickens had virtually cleared themselves of the first infection, these chickens excreted far fewer salmonella organisms and for a shorter time than did a previously uninfected control group of chickens which were infected at the same time with the Nalr mutant. Chickens inoculated intramuscularly at 4 days developed a similar immunity to challenge and also excreted the immunizing strain in their faeces. In contrast intramuscular inoculation or incorporation into the food of formalin-killed S. typhimurium organisms had little lasting effect on the faecal excretion of the challenge strain. Two attenuated mutants of strain F98 Nalr were produced: one was a rough strain produced by lytic bacteriophage and the other was an aro A auxotrophic mutant which had been cured of the 85 kilobase-pair virulence-associated plasmid. These mutants were avirulent for chickens, mice, calves and man and when ingested by human volunteers did not persist in the faeces. When inoculated intramuscularly into chickens they produced an early reduction in faecal excretion of the challenge strain (Spcr) which was not maintained. Oral administration of both strains produced reductions in faecal excretion of the challenge strain. This was much more noticeable with the rough strain which was itself excreted for a much longer period than the parent strain. PMID:2189743

  18. Urinary excretion of LH and testosterone from male rats during exposure to increased gravity: post-spaceflight and centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, R. M.; Wade, C. E.; Morey-Holton, E.

    2000-01-01

    A dissociation between plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone (T) appears to exist during exposure to altered gravity. The pulsatile nature of LH release and the diurnal variability of T secretion may mask or bias the effects of altered gravity on the pituitary-gonadal axis when analyzing plasma concentrations. Therefore, we examined the relationship between the excretion of urinary LH and T in male Sprague-Dawley rats during exposure to increased gravity upon return to Earth following a 14-day spaceflight (n = 6) and by 12 days of centrifugation at 2g (n = 8). Excreted LH and T were elevated on the first 3 days postflight. Excreted T was elevated between Days 1 and 8 of centrifugation; however, excreted LH was reduced on Days 2 and 3 compared with control animals. Excreted LH and T were significantly correlated (R = 0.731 and 0.706, respectively) in postspaceflight and centrifuged animals. Correlation curves had similar slopes (0.0213 and 0.023, respectively), but different y-intercepts (-1.43 and 3.32, respectively). The sustained increase in excreted T during centrifugation suggests that the pituitary-gonadal axis in postspaceflight animals may adapt quicker to increased gravity. The upward shift in the correlation curve exhibited by the centrifuged animals suggests that the sensitivity of LH-induced T release is increased in these animals. The previous dissociation between plasma LH and T during altered gravity was not observed in the present study in which excreted LH and T were measured.

  19. Decreased urinary glycosaminoglycan excretion following alfuzosin treatment on ureteral stent-related symptoms: a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shucheng; Yu, Ying; Gao, Yang; Yang, Xiong; Pang, Zili

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate changes in ureteral stent-related symptoms and urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) excretion after alfuzosin treatment, and to further investigate the relationship between stent-related symptoms and loss of urinary GAGs. Seventy consecutive patients scheduled for unilateral retrograde ureteroscopy with stent placement were recruited. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment with alfuzosin 10 mg/day or placebo for 3 weeks starting on the third postoperative day. The ureteral stent was removed when treatment stopped. International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), visual analog scale (VAS) score, and urinary GAG excretion were determined before treatment at 1, 2, and 3 weeks after treatment, and at 3 weeks after stent removal. Fifty-nine patients completed the study. IPSS, VAS score, and urinary GAG excretion were significantly lower in the alfuzosin group, compared with the placebo group, at 1, 2, and 3 weeks after treatment (P < 0.01). In both groups, IPSS, VAS score, and urinary GAG excretion were significantly lower at 3 weeks after stent removal compared with those before stent removal. No significant differences in IPSS, VAS score, or urinary GAG excretion were observed between the two groups at baseline and 3 weeks after stent removal (P > 0.05). Positive correlations were found between urinary GAG excretion (R (2) = 0.65, P < 0.001) and IPSS and between urinary GAG excretion and VAS score (R (2) = 0.33, P < 0.001). Stent placement contributes to loss of urinary GAGs. However, alfuzosin effectively reduces such loss and improves ureteral stent-related symptoms. Loss of urinary GAGs plays a role in these symptoms. PMID:26242466

  20. Effect of dietary supplementation of essential oils mixture on performance, eggshell quality, hatchability, and mineral excretion in quail breeders.

    PubMed

    Olgun, Osman; Yıldız, Alp Önder

    2014-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of six different levels (0, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 600 mg/kg) of phytogenic feed additive containing a mixture essential oils from thyme, black cumin, fennel, anise and rosemary on performance, eggshell quality, reproductive traits, and mineral excretion in quail breeders. In this trial, a total of 60 male and 120 female quails, 91 days old, were randomly distributed in six experimental groups. During the 60-day experiment period, birds were fed with six treatment diets. Performances, eggshell qualities, hatchability, and mineral excretion data were evaluated at the end of the experiment. Results showed that the different dietary levels of essential oil mixture had no significant effect on performance parameters, damaged eggs, eggshell weight, fertility, hatchability of fertile eggs, hatchability of set eggs, and lead and boron excretion. On the other hand, 50 mg/kg supplementation of essential oil mixture (EOM) significantly improved egg-breaking strength and eggshell thickness, and ash, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, zinc, and cadmium excretion was significantly depressed in quail breeders supplemented with the two higher doses (400 or 600 mg/kg) of EOM. These results concluded that supplementing diets with EOM improved egg-breaking strength and decreased excretion of minerals in breeder quails. PMID:25012208

  1. [Effect of methylxanthines on urinary prostaglandin E excretion of rats acutely loaded with salt and water (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Kogo, H; Aizawa, Y

    1981-04-01

    The effect of methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine, caffeine) on urinary prostaglandin E (PGE) excretion in rats was investigated. Male rats, weighing 270-300g only were used. Food was withdrawn 3 hr before the experiment and water intake was free during the test period. In saline or water loaded experiments, 0.9%, 9% NaCl solution or water containing each drug was administered orally in a volume of 2.5 ml/100g. The urinary PGE was measured by bioassay using rat stomach fundus strip. In rats loaded with isotonic saline, the urinary PGE excretion was increased by methylxanthines and the greatest effect was seen with theophylline. The effect of theophylline on PGE excretion was evident in non-loaded and isotonic saline-loaded rats. In particular, the percentages of PGE, sodium and chloride in the urine were remarkably increased, as compared with findings in the control. In non-loaded and isotonic saline-loaded rats, the urinary PGE excretion induced by theophylline correlated significantly with the sodium and chloride excretion. These results suggest the participation of renal PGE in the effects of theophylline on kidney function. PMID:7286846

  2. The effect of feeding diets containing permitted antibiotics on the faecal excretion of Salmonella typhimurium by experimentally infected chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H. W.; Tucker, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Groups of 45 chickens were fed continuously on diets containing 10 or 100 mg./kg. of different 'growth-promoting' antibiotics and infected orally with a nalidixic acid-resistant mutant of Salmonella typhimurium. The amount of S. typhimurium organisms excreted in their faeces was estimated by culturing them at weekly intervals and in a standard manner on plates of brilliant green agar containing sodium nalidixate, both direct and after enrichment in selenite broth. All of four groups fed diets containing 100 mg./kg. of nitrovin in three different experiments excreted much larger amounts of S. typhimurium than did groups fed antibiotic-free diets. In some, but not all, experiments, larger amounts were also excreted by groups fed diets containing 10 mg./kg. of nitrovin or 10 or 100 mg./kg. of flavomycin or tylosin. Feeding diets containing 10 or 100 mg./kg. of virginiamycin or bacitracin either did not influence or slightly increased the amount of S. typhimiurium excreted. Two groups fed continuously on diets containing 100 or 500 mg./kg. of sulphaquinoxaline for 44 days excreted smaller amounts of the S. typhimurium organisms that did groups fed antibiotic-free diets; no sulphonamide-resistant organisms of the S. typhimurium strain were isolated from the faeces. PMID:1100715

  3. The comparative effects of feeding ammonium carbonate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium chloride on urinary calcium excretion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Whiting, S J; Cole, D E

    1987-11-01

    When either sulfate or chloride is added to the diet, the resulting acid load causes a rise in urinary calcium excretion. There is, however, the possibility that sulfate, which has been shown to complex renal tubular calcium, will further decrease renal calcium reabsorption and thus produce a greater calciuria than chloride. Because addition of a fixed cation (e.g., sodium) to the diet may also stimulate calciuresis, experiments were conducted using metabolizable ammonium to minimize cation effects. Ammonium salts of sulfate, chloride, and carbonate (control) were added to the diets of male rats at 0.3 mequiv./g weight of diet. Twenty-four hour excretion rates of calcium, sulfate, chloride, and net acid were measured at various intervals up to 1 month. As expected, the chloride and sulfate diets were both associated with significantly elevated urine calcium and net acid excretion as compared with controls. However, those fed sulfate exhibited significantly less calcium and acid excretion and absorbed a smaller proportion of the anion load than those given chloride. In a second experiment, the amounts of supplemental sulfate and chloride were adjusted so that total absorptions were similar. At 2 weeks, both calcium and acid excretions in the fixed anion groups were no longer significantly different. Thus, in chronic feeding trials, there appears to be no measurable difference in the calciuretic properties of sulfate and chloride anions. PMID:3449184

  4. Excretion of N-mononitrosopiperazine after low level exposure to piperazine in air: effects of dietary nitrate and ascorbate

    SciTech Connect

    Bellander, T.; Osterdahl, B.G.; Hagmar, L.

    1988-04-01

    The secondary amine piperazine may be nitrosated in vivo, following oral intake or occupational exposure by inhalation. The suspected carcinogen N-mononitrosopiperazine could be formed in the human stomach, and in part excreted in the urine. In this study, 0.4 microgram N-mononitrosopiperazine, determined by gas chromatography-Thermal Energy Analysis, was observed in the urine in one of four volunteers, at an experimental exposure by inhalation of 0.3 mg piperazine/m3. The intake of spinach and beetroot caused an increased nitrosation of piperazine, and up to 1.7 microgram N-mononitrosopiperazine was excreted in the urine in the four individuals. This excretion indicates that about 5% of the absorbed piperazine dose was converted to N-mononitrosopiperazine. With the same nitrate-rich diet, but with the addition of citrus fruits and fresh vegetables, the highest excretion was 0.6 microgram N-mononitrosopiperazine. The excretion was significantly correlated with the ratio between the maximum level of nitrite in saliva and the ascorbate level in plasma. There was also a significant interindividual variation. N,N'-Dinitrosopiperazine was not found in any sample of urine.

  5. Respiratory gas exchange, nitrogenous waste excretion, and fuel usage during starvation in juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Lauff, R F; Wood, C M

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen consumption, CO2 excretion, and nitrogenous waste excretion (75% ammonia-N and 25% urea-N) were measured daily in 4-g rainbow trout over a 15-day starvation period. Oxygen consumption and CO2 excretion declined while N excretion increased transiently in the mid-part of the starvation period but was unchanged from control levels at the end. Component losses (as percentage of total fuel used) of protein, lipid, and carbohydrate were 66.5, 31.1, and 2.4% respectively, as measured from changes in body weight and body composition, the latter relative to a control group at day 0. Instantaneous fuel use, as calculated from the respiratory quotients and nitrogen quotients, indicated that relative protein use rose during starvation, but contributed at most 24% of the aerobic fuel (as carbon). Lipid metabolism fell from about 68 to 37%, and was largely replaced by carbohydrate metabolism which rose from 20 to 37%. We conclude that the two approaches measure different processes, and that the instantaneous method is preferred for physiological studies. The compositional method is influenced by greater error, and measures the fuels depleted, not necessarily burned, because of possible interconversion and excretion of fuels. PMID:8617891

  6. Tissue accumulation and urinary excretion of Cr in chromium picolinate (CrPic)-supplemented lambs.

    PubMed

    Dallago, Bruno Stéfano Lima; Lima, Bárbara Alcântara Ferreira; Braz, Shélida Vasconcelos; Mustafa, Vanessa da Silva; McManus, Concepta; Paim, Tiago do Prado; Campeche, Aline; Gomes, Edgard Franco; Louvandini, Helder

    2016-05-01

    Chromium (Cr) concentrations in liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lymph node, skeletal muscle, bone, testis and urine of lambs were measured to trace the biodistribution and bioaccumulation of Cr after oral supplementation with chromium picolinate (CrPic). Twenty-four Santa Inês lambs were treated with four different concentrations of CrPic: placebo, 0.250, 0.375 and 0.500 mg of CrPic/animal/day for 84 days. The basal diet consisted of Panicum maximum cv Massai hay and concentrate. Cr concentrations were measured by ICP-MS measuring (52)Cr as collected mass. There was a positive linear relationship between dose administered and the accumulation of Cr in the heart, lungs and testis. Urinary excretion of Cr occurred in a time and dose-dependent manner, so the longer or more dietary Cr provided, the greater excretion of the element. As some non-carcass components (such as lungs or heart) are added to bone and visceral meal to feed animals, there is a risk of bioaccumulation and biomagnification due to Cr offered as CrPic in the diet. PMID:27049124

  7. Association between consumption of cruciferous vegetables and condiments and excretion in urine of isothiocyanate mercapturic acids.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Martijn; van den Berg, Robin; Freidig, Andreas P; van Bladeren, Peter J; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2006-07-26

    A high intake of cruciferous vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. This protective effect has been linked to isothiocyanates, enzymatic hydrolysis products of glucosinolates. In this study, the metabolic fate of glucosinolates and isothiocyanates after ingestion of 19 different cruciferous vegetables was studied in three male subjects. After the consumption of 13 cruciferous vegetables (glucosinolate content, 0.01-0.94 mmol/kg) and six condiments (isothiocyanate content, 0.06-49.3 mmol/kg), eight different isothiocyanate mercapturic acids were determined in urine samples. Excretion levels after the consumption of raw vegetables and condiments were higher (bioavailability, 8.2-113%) as compared to cooked vegetables (bioavailability, 1.8-43%), but the excretion rate was similar (t1/2=2.1-3.9 h). Isothiocyanates in urine remain longer at a nonzero level after the consumption of glucosinolates from cooked vegetables, as compared to raw vegetables and condiments, and maximal levels in urine were reached about 4 h later. Isothiocyanate mercapturic acids can be used as a biomarker to reflect the active dose of isothiocyanates absorbed. PMID:16848516

  8. Preliminary Estimation of Deoxynivalenol Excretion through a 24 h Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Carrasco, Yelko; Mañes, Jordi; Berrada, Houda; Font, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    A duplicate diet study was designed to explore the occurrence of 15 Fusarium mycotoxins in the 24 h-diet consumed by one volunteer as well as the levels of mycotoxins in his 24 h-collected urine. The employed methodology involved solvent extraction at high ionic strength followed by dispersive solid phase extraction and gas chromatography determination coupled to mass spectrometry in tandem. Satisfactory results in method performance were achieved. The method’s accuracy was in a range of 68%–108%, with intra-day relative standard deviation and inter-day relative standard deviation lower than 12% and 15%, respectively. The limits of quantitation ranged from 0.1 to 8 µg/Kg. The matrix effect was evaluated and matrix-matched calibrations were used for quantitation. Only deoxynivalenol (DON) was quantified in both food and urine samples. A total DON daily intake amounted to 49.2 ± 5.6 µg whereas DON daily excretion of 35.2 ± 4.3 µg was determined. DON daily intake represented 68.3% of the established DON provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI). Valuable preliminary information was obtained as regards DON excretion and needs to be confirmed in large-scale monitoring studies. PMID:25723325

  9. Biliary excretion and intestinal metabolism of progesterone and estrogens in man.

    PubMed

    Adlercreutz, H; Martin, F

    1980-02-01

    The biliary excretion and intestinal metabolism (including intestinal mucosa and small intestine and bowel) of progesterone and estrogens in humans are reviewed here along with presentation of experimental results from other mammalian systems. In general, the biliary excretion of estrogens and the enterohepatic circulation of estrogen metabolites are more extensive than for progesterone. These processes may be of greater physiological importance because of the possible reformation of biologically active estrogens in the intestine, which occurs 2 ways: 1) by hydrolysis of biliary estrogen conjugates and absorption of the unconjugated estrogens which may partly reach general circulation, and 2) by production of biologically active estrogens from neutral steroids or less active estrogens in the intestinal tract, followed by absorption. Here, the kidneys also play a significant role in estrogen metabolism and conjugation. The quantitative contribution of liver, kidneys, and intestine to estrogen metabolism cannot be accurately assessed at present, but the liver and intestines probably play the most significant role, followed by the kidneys. Progesterone (from orally administered doses) and its metabolites are extensively metabolized in the intestine to compounds with less progestational activity; hence, synthetic progestins may alter the intestinal flora which in turn may influence the plasma levels of these compounds. On these subjects more research in indicated. PMID:6991820

  10. Urinary guanidinoacetic acid excretion as an indicator of gentamicin nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kiyatake, Ikuo; Nakamura, Tsukasa; Koide, Hikaru

    2004-07-01

    The kidney is the main site of guanidinoacetic acid synthesis and excretion. The aim of this study was to examine whether urinary guanidinoacetic acid is a sensitive indicator for diagnosis of early-stage gentamicin nephrotoxicity. Early-stage renal injury was induced in rats by a single intravenous injection of 5, 10, or 30 mg/kg body weight gentamicin. Twenty-four hours after injection all rats were killed. Blood, urine and tissue guanidino compound concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Glycine amidinotransferase activity in tissues was assayed according to the method of Pilsum. Urinary guanidinoacetic acid excretion was decreased in 5 mg/kg gentamicin-treated rats in comparison to that in control rats, whereas urine N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity and beta2-microglobulin were unchanged. Guanidinoacetic acid concentration and glycine amidinotransferase activity in the kidney were significantly decreased in 5, 10, and 30 mg/kg gentamicin-treated rats; the decreases were dose-dependent. These results suggest that the urine guanidinoacetic acid concentration is a more sensitive indicator of renal injury than conventional indicators such as urine N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase and beta2-microglobulin. PMID:15462098

  11. Metabolism and excretion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in rat and in human.

    PubMed

    Jacob, J; Grimmer, G

    1996-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have shown to be an important class of environmental and occupational carcinogens. By balancing the carcinogenic potential PAH were found to predominantly contribute to the biological activity of environmental matter such as vehicle exhaust, used motor oil, and hard-coal combustion effluents. Due to the individual ratio of toxifying and detoxifying processes PAH-exposure measurements are not appropriate to be used for risk assessment without any further information on their metabolic fate. Accordingly, metabolite profiles of phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene, benz(a)anthracene and fluoranthene have been recorded in both tar-pitch exposed Wistar rats and coke plant workers. The results show that metabolite profiles are invariant individual parameters which, however, vary from one individual to another. Significant differences with regard to the ratio of k-region and non-k-region hydroxylation of phenanthrene have been observed in a greater number of coke plant workers. This ratio might be helpful for risk assessment studies since it reflects the various cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase isoforms participating in the metabolism of PAH. Studies of this kind can only be carried out with substrates possessing several nonequivalent double bonds (phenanthrene, chrysene) whereas pyrene--commonly used for biomonitoring--does not satisfy this condition. The excretion rate (excretion versus exposure) seems to be an individual parameter. PMID:9167056

  12. Evaluating the enantioselective distribution, degradation and excretion of epoxiconazole in mice following a single oral gavage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dezhen; Qiu, Jing; Zhu, Wentao; Zhang, Ping; Deng, Nian; Wang, Xinru; Wang, Yao; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    1. The enantiomeric enrichment or degradation of epoxiconazole has been reported in grape, soil, tubifex and mealworm beetle. But, little is known about its enantioselective behaviors in mammals. 2. To further understand differences in the distribution, degradation and excretion of epoxiconazole enantiomers in vivo, male CD-1 mice were selected as the test model to investigate the enantioselective behaviors after a single oral gavage. Mice were sacrificed after 1 h, 3 h, 7 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h treatment, blood, tissues and excretions were collected for epoxiconazole analysis by LC-MS/MS. 3. On the Lux-Cellulose-1 chiral column, an enrichment of the second eluting (+)-epoxiconazole was generally observed, and feces and urine showed similar EF with major tissues. 4. To elucidate the potential role of intestinal bacterial flora in stereospecific degradation of epoxiconazole, mice fecal flora were cultured in vitro and incubated with epoxiconazole for 48 h. Results showed that (-)-epoxiconazole was preferentially degraded by intestinal bacterial. 5. These results may provide useful information for risk assessment of epoxiconazole on non-target animals. PMID:26108358

  13. Bioassay data and a retention-excretion model for systemic plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.W.

    1984-05-01

    The estimation of systemic burdens from urinalyses has been the most common and useful method of quantifying occupational exposures to plutonium. Problems arise in using this technique, however, because of inadequate modeling of human retention, translocation, and excretion of this element. Present methods for estimating the systemic burden from urinalyses were derived to a large extent from patterns observed in the first few months after exposure, but there is now evidence that these same patterns do not persist over long periods. In this report we collect and discuss data needed for the interpretation of bioassay results for Pu. These data are used to develop a model that describes the movement, retention, and excretion of systemic Pu in the human body in terms of explicitly identified anatomical compartments. This model may be used in conjunction with existing models and/or case-specific information concerning the translocation of Pu from the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract or from wounds to the bloodstream. Attention is restricted to the behavior of Pu after it has gained access to the bloodstream. There remain significant uncertainties concerning some aspects of the movement of Pu, particularly its translocation from the liver. An attempt has been made to construct the model in such a way as to elucidate those areas needing further attention. 98 references, 18 figures, 16 tables.

  14. Feeding, respiration, and excretion of the Black Sea Noctiluca scintillans MacCartney in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drits, A. V.; Nikishina, A. B.; Sergeeva, V. M.; Solov'ev, K. A.

    2013-07-01

    Studies were conducted at the end of June 2011 in the coastal region of the northeastern part of the Black Sea. The bulk of the Noctiluca scintillans population was observed in the thermocline and reached a density of 40000 ind./m3. Analysis of digestive vacuoles content showed that Noctiluca could consume cells of Neoceratium tripos and N. furca, which had been considered inedible for Black Sea zooplankton, as well as temporary cysts of dinoflagellates, presumably of the toxic genus Alexandrium. The Noctiluca population consumed in total 10-30% of the abundance of temporary cysts, 2-29% of primary production, and 2-9% of potential Calanus euxinus egg production. For the first time, the excretion rates of ammonium nitrogen and mineral phosphorus were measured for N. scintillans. Our calculations showed that in summer, excretion by Noctiluca contributed from 4 to 18% and from 15 to 53% of phytoplankton total nitrogen and phosphorus requirements, respectively. The specific growth rate of Noctiluca (0.17-0.35) in summer, estimated from data on the daily food intake and respiration rate, was close to the values obtained in spring.

  15. Excessive excretion of cyclic beta-(1,2)-glucan by Rhizobium trifolii TA-1.

    PubMed Central

    Breedveld, M W; Zevenhuizen, L P; Zehnder, A J

    1990-01-01

    At 25 degrees C, the optimal temperature for growth of Rhizobium trifolii TA-1, extracellular and capsular polysaccharide (EPS and CPS) were the main carbohydrate products synthesized in mannitol-rich medium (10 g of mannitol and 1 g of glutamic acid per liter). In the same medium at 33 degrees C, EPS and CPS production was inhibited, and up to 3.9 g of cyclic beta-(1,2)-glucan was produced during an incubation period of 20 days with a total biomass of 0.55 g of protein. In a medium containing 50 g of mannitol and 10 g of glutamic acid per liter, high cell densities (3.95 g of protein) were obtained at 25 degrees C. This biomass excreted 10.9 g of cyclic beta-(1,2)-glucan within 10 days. Concomitantly, 4.8 g of EPS were synthesized, while CPS production was strongly suppressed. The excreted cyclic beta-(1,2)-glucans were neutral and had degrees of polymerization ranging from 17 to 25, with a degree of polymerization of 19 as the major glucan cycle. PMID:2117876

  16. Nod2 deficiency protects mice from cholestatic liver disease by increasing renal excretion of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lirui; Hartmann, Phillipp; Haimerl, Michael; Bathena, Sai P.; Sjöwall, Christopher; Almer, Sven; Alnouti, Yazen; Hofmann, Alan F.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Chronic liver disease is characterized by fibrosis that may progress to cirrhosis. Nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (Nod2), a member of the Nod-like receptor (NLR) family of intracellular immune receptors, plays an important role in the defense against bacterial infection through binding to the ligand muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Here, we investigated the role of Nod2 in the development of liver fibrosis. Methods We studied experimental cholestatic liver disease induced by bile duct ligation or toxic liver disease induced by carbon tetrachloride in wild type and Nod2−/− mice. Results Nod2 deficiency protected mice from cholestatic but not toxin-induced liver injury and fibrosis. Most notably, the hepatic bile acid concentration was lower in Nod2−/− mice than wild type mice following bile duct ligation for 3 weeks. In contrast to wild type mice, Nod2−/− mice had increased urinary excretion of bile acids, including sulfated bile acids, and an upregulation of the bile acid efflux transporters MRP2 and MRP4 in tubular epithelial cells of the kidney. MRP2 and MRP4 were downregulated by IL-1β in a Nod2 dependent fashion. Conclusions Our findings indicate that Nod2 deficiency protects mice from cholestatic liver injury and fibrosis through enhancing renal excretion of bile acids that in turn contributes to decreased concentration of bile acids in the hepatocyte. PMID:24560660

  17. Effect of hyperosmotic solutions on salt excretion and thirst in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoorlemmer, G. H.; Johnson, A. K.; Thunhorst, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated urinary changes and thirst induced by infusion of hyperosmotic solutions in freely moving rats. Intracarotid infusions of 0.3 M NaCl (4 ml/20 min, split between both internal carotid arteries) caused a larger increase in excretion of Na(+) and K(+) than intravenous infusions, indicating that cephalic sensors were involved in the response to intracarotid infusions. Intravenous and intracarotid infusions of hyperosmotic glycerol or urea (300 mM in 150 mM NaCl) had little or no effect, suggesting the sensors were outside the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Intracarotid infusion of hypertonic mannitol (300 mM in 150 mM NaCl) was more effective than intravenous infusion, suggesting that cell volume rather than Na(+) concentration of the blood was critical. Similarly, intracarotid infusion (2 ml/20 min, split between both sides), but not intravenous infusion of hypertonic NaCl or mannitol caused thirst. Hyperosmotic glycerol, infused intravenously or into the carotid arteries, did not cause thirst. We conclude that both thirst and electrolyte excretion depend on a cell volume sensor that is located in the head, but outside the BBB.

  18. Differences in protein binding and excretion of Triapine and its Fe(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Pelivan, Karla; Miklos, Walter; van Schoonhoven, Sushilla; Koellensperger, Gunda; Gille, Lars; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra; Kowol, Christian R; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2016-07-01

    Triapine has been investigated as anticancer drug in multiple clinical phase I/II trials. Although promising anti-leukemic activity was observed, Triapine was ineffective against solid tumors. The reasons are currently widely unknown. The biological activity of Triapine is strongly connected to its iron complex (Fe-Triapine) which is pharmacologically not investigated. Here, novel analytical tools for Triapine and Fe-Triapine were developed and applied for cell extracts and body fluids of treated mice. Triapine and its iron complex showed a completely different behavior: for Triapine, low protein binding was observed in contrast to fast protein adduct formation of Fe-Triapine. Notably, both drugs were rapidly cleared from the body (serum half-life time <1h). Remarkably, in contrast to Triapine, where (in accordance to clinical data) basically no renal excretion was found, the iron complex was effectively excreted via urine. Moreover, no Fe-Triapine was detected in serum or cytosolic extracts after Triapine treatment. Taken together, our study will help to further understand the biological behavior of Triapine and its Fe-complex and allow the development of novel thiosemicarbazones with pronounced activity against solid tumor types. PMID:26507768

  19. Urinary Excretion of Phenolic Acids by Infants and Children: A Randomised Double-Blind Clinical Assay

    PubMed Central

    Uberos, J.; Fernández-Puentes, V.; Molina-Oya, M.; Rodríguez-Belmonte, R.; Ruíz-López, A.; Tortosa-Pinto, P.; Molina-Carballo, A.; Muñoz-Hoyos, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The present study, which is part of the ISRCTN16968287 clinical assay, is aimed at determining the effects of cranberry syrup or trimethoprim treatment for UTI. Methods: This Phase III randomised clinical trial was conducted at the San Cecilio Clinical Hospital (Granada, Spain) with a study population of 192 patients, aged between 1 month and 13 years. Criteria for inclusion were a background of recurrent UTI, associated or otherwise with vesico-ureteral reflux of any degree, or renal pelvic dilatation associated with urinary infection. Each child was randomly given 0.2 mL/Kg/day of either cranberry syrup or trimethoprim (8 mg/mL). The primary and secondary objectives, respectively, were to determine the risk of UTI and the levels of phenolic acids in urine associated with each intervention. Results: With respect to UTI, the cranberry treatment was non-inferior to trimethoprim. Increased urinary excretion of ferulic acid was associated with a greater risk of UTI developing in infants aged under 1 year (RR 1.06; CI 95% 1.024–1.1; P = 0.001). Conclusions: The results obtained show the excretion of ferulic acid is higher in infants aged under 1 year, giving rise to an increased risk of UTI, for both treatment options. PMID:23641168

  20. Temporal dynamics of seed excretion by wild ungulates: implications for plant dispersal.

    PubMed

    Picard, Mélanie; Papaïx, Julien; Gosselin, Frédéric; Picot, Denis; Bideau, Eric; Baltzinger, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    Dispersal is a key process in metapopulation dynamics as it conditions species' spatial responses to gradients of abiotic and biotic conditions and triggers individual and gene flows. In the numerous plants that are dispersed through seed consumption by herbivores (endozoochory), the distance and effectiveness of dispersal is determined by the combined effects of seed retention time in the vector's digestive system, the spatial extent of its movements, and the ability of the seeds to germinate once released. Estimating these three parameters from experimental data is therefore crucial to calibrate mechanistic metacommunity models of plant-herbivore interactions. In this study, we jointly estimated the retention time and germination probability of six herbaceous plants transported by roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), red deer (Cervus elaphus), and wild boar (Sus scrofa) through feeding experiments and a Bayesian dynamic model. Retention time was longer in the nonruminant wild boar (>36 h) than in the two ruminant species (roe deer: 18-36 h, red deer: 3-36 h). In the two ruminants, but not in wild boar, small and round seeds were excreted faster than large ones. Low germination probabilities of the excreted seeds reflected the high cost imposed by endozoochory on plant survival. Trait-mediated variations in retention time and germination probability among animal and plant species may impact plant dispersal distances and interact with biotic and abiotic conditions at the release site to shape the spatial patterns of dispersed plant species. PMID:26257875

  1. Absorption, tissue distribution, and excretion of tritium-labeled ivermectin in cattle, sheep, and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Shuething Lee; Green, M.L.; Baylis, F.P.; Eline, D.; Rosegay, A.; Meriwether, H.; Jacob, T.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Tritium-labeled ivermectin was studied in cattle, sheep, and rat for absorption, tissue residue distribution, and excretion at doses of 0.3 mg/kg of body weight. The drug was absorbed by various dosing routes. By intraruminal and subcutaneous dosing routes, highest tissue residues were present in fat and liver of cattle, with half-lives of 6-8 and 4-5 days, respectively. Shorter half-lives (1-2 days) were observed in sheep and rat. The tissue residue distribution pattern was essentially the same for all species studied and similar in male and female rats. With doses of tritium-labeled avermectin B{sub 1a} ranging from 0.06 to 7.5 mg/kg of body weight, plasma and tissue residue concentrations increased proportionally with the dose. When ivermectin was administered by various routes (ip, sc, iv, oral, and intraruminal), blood residue levels converged to 20-50 ppb 4 h after dosing and then depleted at similar rate regardless of the dosing route. Ivermectin was excreted primarily in the feces, with only less than 2% of the doses being eliminated in the urine in all three species studied.

  2. Plutonium excretion in urine of residents living near the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, S A; Whicker, F W; Reuss, S K; Whicker, R D; Chapman, P L; Krahenbuhl, M P

    1999-04-01

    An assessment of current levels of 239Pu in individuals living near the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site was conducted. Long-term residents of areas adjacent to the Site, as well as people living well beyond any expected influence of the site, provided urine samples, which were analyzed by fission track analysis for the levels of 239Pu. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site vicinity participants were selected for maximum possible exposure to environmental plutonium by virtue of residence location, length of residence, age, and outdoor lifestyle. The mean 239Pu excretion rate in urine estimated for the entire Rocky Flats group was 1.1 microBq d(-1), in contrast to that estimated for the background group (0.85 microBq d(-1)). The estimated median 239Pu excretion rate for the Rocky Flats group was 1.1 microBq d(-1), compared to 0.54 microBq d(-1) for the background group. Both parametric and non-parametric tests indicated that these differences were not statistically significant (alpha = 0.05). Measured levels of 239Pu in urine from the Rocky Flats group were low and well within the range of reported "background" values, indicating small doses and low health risks. The fission track analysis technique may not be sufficiently accurate or precise to allow definitive comparisons between two groups of subjects with near-background levels of 239Pu in urine. PMID:10086597

  3. Excretion of ammonium by a nifL mutant of Azotobacter vinelandii fixing nitrogen.

    PubMed Central

    Bali, A; Blanco, G; Hill, S; Kennedy, C

    1992-01-01

    A mutation in the gene upstream of nifA in Azotobacter vinelandii was introduced into the chromosome to replace the corresponding wild-type region. The resulting mutant, MV376, produced nitrogenase constitutively in the presence of 15 mM ammonium. When introduced into a nifH-lacZ fusion strain, the mutation permitted beta-galactosidase production in the presence of ammonium. The gene upstream of nifA is therefore designated nifL because of its similarity to the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifL gene in proximity to nifA, in mutant phenotype, and in amino acid sequence of the gene product. The A. vinelandii nifL mutant MV376 excreted significant quantities of ammonium (approximately 10 mM) during diazotrophic growth. In contrast, ammonium excretion during diazotrophy was much lower in a K. pneumoniae nifL deletion mutant (maximum, 0.15 mM) but significantly higher than in NifL+ K. pneumoniae. The expression of the A. vinelandii nifA gene, unlike that of K. pneumoniae, was not repressed by ammonium. PMID:1622243

  4. Urinary excretion of mutagens, thioethers and D-glucaric acid in workers exposed to bitumen fumes.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, R; Monarca, S; Scassellati Sforzolini, G; Savino, A; Bauleo, F A; Angeli, G

    1989-01-01

    The authors carried out biological monitoring of the mutagenic/carcinogenic hazards associated with exposure to bitumen fumes during paving operations, analysing some biological parameters in the urine of a group of exposed workers. The urine samples were studied for mutagenicity by the Ames test and for thioethers concentration. D-Glucaric acid urine excretion was also determined to investigate the enzymatic induction potential of bitumens. Even though, in a previous environmental monitoring phase, a low content of mutagenic/carcinogenic compounds was found in bitumen and air samples, urinary mutagenicity data of exposed workers were statistically higher than those of a group of unexposed subjects. The urinary mutagenicity increased further if exposure to bitumens was associated with cigarette smoking. Thioethers were higher only in subjects exposed simultaneously to bitumens and cigarettes. D-Glucaric acid excretion did not increase significantly. The authors think that this type of coupled environmental and biological monitoring is a valid tool for a better evaluation of the mutagenic/carcinogenic exposure to bitumens or similar complex mixtures. PMID:2707871

  5. Effects of feeding outer bran fraction of rice on lipid accumulation and fecal excretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Ijiri, Daichi; Nojima, Tsutomu; Kawaguchi, Mana; Yamauchi, Yoko; Fujita, Yoshikazu; Ijiri, Satoru; Ohtsuka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Outer bran fraction of rice (OBFR) contains higher concentrations of crude fiber, γ-oryzanol, and phytic acid compared to whole rice bran (WRB). In this study, we examined the effects of feeding OBFR on lipid accumulation and fecal excretion in rats. Twenty-one male rats at seven-week-old were divided into a control group and two treatment groups. The control group was fed a control diet, and the treatment groups were fed OBFR- or WRB-containing diet for 21 days. There was no significant difference in growth performance. Feeding OBFR diet increased fecal number and weight accompanied by increased fecal lipid content, while it did not affect mRNA expressions encoding lipid metabolism-related protein in liver. In addition, feeding OBFR-diet decreased the abdominal fat tissue weight and improved plasma lipid profiles, while WRB-containing diet did not affect them. These results suggested that feeding OBFR-diet might prevent lipid accumulation via enhancing fecal lipid excretion in rats. PMID:25867004

  6. Development of an excretion care support robot with human cooperative characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yina Wang; Shuoyu Wang

    2015-08-01

    To support care giving in an aging society with a shrinking population, various life support robots are being developed. In the authors' laboratory, an excretion care support robot (ECSR) with human cooperative characteristic has been developed to relieve the burden of caregivers and improve the quality of life for bedridden persons. This robot consists of a portable toilet with storage tank and a mobile robot which can run autonomously to conduct the cooperative work with others. Our research is focused on how to improve the motion accuracy and how the robot can cooperate with users. In this paper, to enable the ECSR could precisely move in the indoor environment, a proper controller is proposed considering the center of gravity shift and load changes. Then, to perform the cooperative task, two acceleration sensors are used to recognize the users' intended posture and position when moving from bed to toilet. The robot's target angle and position are determined by the user's posture. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by a pseudo excretion support experiment. PMID:26737871

  7. Effect of penicillin on fatty acid synthesis and excretion in Streptococcus mutans BHT

    SciTech Connect

    Brissette, J.L.; Pieringer, R.A.

    1985-03-01

    Treatment of exponentially growing cultures of Streptococcus mutans BHT with growth-inhibitory concentrations (0.2 microgram/ml) of benzylpenicillin stimulates the incorporation of (2-/sup 14/C) acetate into lipids excreted by the cells by as much as 69-fold, but does not change the amount of /sup 14/C incorporated into intracellular lipids. At this concentration of penicillin cellular lysis does not occur. The radioactive label is incorporated exclusively into the fatty acid moieties of the glycerolipids. During a 4-hr incubation in the presence of penicillin, the extracellular fatty acid ester concentration increases 1.5 fold, even though there is no growth or cellular lysis. An indication of the relative rate of fatty acid synthesis was most readily obtained by placing S. mutans BHT in a buffer containing /sup 14/C-acetate. Under these nongrowing conditions free fatty acids are the only lipids labeled, a factor which simplifies the assay. The addition of glycerol to the buffer causes all of the nonesterified fatty acids to be incorporated into glycerolipid. The cells excrete much of the lipid whether glycerol is present or not. Addition of penicillin to the nongrowth supporting buffer system does not stimulate the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-acetate into fatty acids.

  8. Effects of season on the bathypelagic mysid Gnathophausia ingens: water content, respiration, and excretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller-Adams, Page; Childress, James J.

    1983-06-01

    Water contents, oxygen consumption rates and ammonia excretion rates of individuals of the large bathypelagic mysid Gnathophausia ingens were measured as a function of size and season (winter and summer). Individuals of the sizes studied live permanently beneath the euphotic zone. Water content, as a percent of wet weight, is higher in winter than in summer, suggesting seasonal variability in the midwater environment. Our data suggest that the seasonal change in water content increases with increasing size. We suggest that the changes are due in part to seasonal changes in food intake. Seasonal differences were not observed in wet-weight-specific rates of either respiration or ammonia excretion. Both rates decrease with increasing size. The constancy of the atomic O:N ratio and its high value (geometric mean = 44.3) indicate that the average proportions of lipid and protein metabolized by individuals were independent of size and season and that lipid stores were not sufficiently depleted, even in small animals, to cause a shift to predominantly protein metabolism in winter or summer. On the average, metabolic rates of individuals were unaffected by seasonal variation in the midwater environment.

  9. Importance of Residual Water Permeability on the Excretion of Water during Water Diuresis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheema-Dhadli, Surinder; Chong, Chee Keong; Kim, Namhee; Kamel, Kamel S

    2010-01-01

    When the concentration of sodium (Na+) in arterial plasma (PNa) declines sufficiently to inhibit the release of vasopressin, water will be excreted promptly when the vast majority of aquaporin 2 water channels (AQP2) have been removed from luminal membranes of late distal nephron segments. In this setting, the volume of filtrate delivered distally sets the upper limit on the magnitude of the water diuresis. Since there is an unknown volume of water reabsorbed in the late distal nephron, our objective was to provide a quantitative assessment of this parameter. Accordingly, rats were given a large oral water load, while minimizing non-osmotic stimuli for the release of vasopressin. The composition of plasma and urine were measured. The renal papilla was excised during the water diuresis to assess the osmotic driving force for water reabsorption in the inner medullary collecting duct. During water diuresis, the concentration of creatinine in the urine was 13-fold higher than in plasma, which implies that ~8% of filtered water was excreted. The papillary interstitial osmolality was 600 mOsm/L > the urine osmolality. Since 17% of filtered water is delivered to the earliest distal convoluted tubule micropuncture site, we conclude that half of the water delivered to the late distal nephron is reabsorbed downstream during water diuresis. The enormous osmotic driving force for the reabsorption of water in the inner medullary collecting duct may play a role in this reabsorption of water. Possible clinical implications are illustrated in the discussion of a case example. PMID:21468191

  10. Importance of Residual Water Permeability on the Excretion of Water during Water Diuresis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cheema-Dhadli, Surinder; Chong, Chee Keong; Kim, Namhee; Kamel, Kamel S; Halperin, Mitchell L

    2010-06-01

    When the concentration of sodium (Na(+)) in arterial plasma (P(Na)) declines sufficiently to inhibit the release of vasopressin, water will be excreted promptly when the vast majority of aquaporin 2 water channels (AQP2) have been removed from luminal membranes of late distal nephron segments. In this setting, the volume of filtrate delivered distally sets the upper limit on the magnitude of the water diuresis. Since there is an unknown volume of water reabsorbed in the late distal nephron, our objective was to provide a quantitative assessment of this parameter. Accordingly, rats were given a large oral water load, while minimizing non-osmotic stimuli for the release of vasopressin. The composition of plasma and urine were measured. The renal papilla was excised during the water diuresis to assess the osmotic driving force for water reabsorption in the inner medullary collecting duct. During water diuresis, the concentration of creatinine in the urine was 13-fold higher than in plasma, which implies that ~8% of filtered water was excreted. The papillary interstitial osmolality was 600 mOsm/L > the urine osmolality. Since 17% of filtered water is delivered to the earliest distal convoluted tubule micropuncture site, we conclude that half of the water delivered to the late distal nephron is reabsorbed downstream during water diuresis. The enormous osmotic driving force for the reabsorption of water in the inner medullary collecting duct may play a role in this reabsorption of water. Possible clinical implications are illustrated in the discussion of a case example. PMID:21468191

  11. Evaluation of external markers to estimate fecal excretion, intake, and digestibility in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Jonas; Batistel, Fernanda; Welter, Katieli Caroline; Silva, Mateus Mendes; Costa, Diogo Fleury; Portela Santos, Flávio Augusto

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the use of an external marker titanium dioxide (TiO₂) as an alternative to chromic oxide (Cr₂O₃) in dairy cows. Four dairy cows were allocated in individual pens and fed concentrate supplement and Pennisetum purpureum cv. Cameroon cut daily. Fecal excretion, forage and total dry matter (DM) intakes, and digestibility were measured and estimated with TiO₂ and Cr₂O₃. Chromic oxide overestimated and TiO₂ tended to overestimate fecal excretion compared with total fecal collection. Forage and total DM intakes were overestimated by Cr₂O₃. The apparent DM digestibility was underestimated by Cr₂O₃ and TiO₂. The organic matter (OM) digestibility was underestimated by both markers. There were greater mean bias, mean squared prediction error, and root of the mean squared prediction errors for all parameters estimated with Cr₂O₃. In conclusion, estimates using TiO₂ were more precise and accurate indicating that it can replace Cr₂O₃ as an external marker for grazing dairy cows. PMID:25245114

  12. Radioactive excretion in human milk following administration of /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Pittard, W.B.; Merkatz, R.; Fletcher, B.D.

    1982-08-01

    Albumin-tagged sodium pertechnetate (technetium) is routinely used in nuclear medicine for scanning procedures of the lung. The rate of excretion of this radionuclide into breast milk and the resultant potential radiation hazard to the nursing infant have received little attention. Therefore the milk from a nursing mother who required a lung scan because of suspected pulmonary emboli using an intravenous injection of 4 mCi of /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated human serum albumin was monitored. Albumin tagging severely limited the entrance of technetium into her milk and the radioactivity of the milk returned to base line by 24 hours. A total of 2.02 muCi of technetium was measured in the 24-hour milk collection after technetium injection and 94% of this amount was excreted by 15.5 hours. This amount of technetium administered orally to a newborn would deliver a total body radiation dose of .3 mrad. Therefore, an infant would receive trivial doses of radiation if breast-feeding were resumed 15.5 hours after administration of the radionuclide to the mother and nursing can clearly be resumed safely 24 hours after injection.

  13. Role of liver lysosomes in uptake and biliary excretion of manganese in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, H.; Wada, O.

    1981-12-01

    To determine the mechanism of manganese excretion from the liver into bile, manganese content in blood, bile, whole liver, and subcellular fractions of liver was measured following intraperitoneal injection of a single dose of manganese (49 mg Mn(OAc)/sub 2/. 4H/sub 2/O/kg body wt) in mice. Manganese in blood was rapidly incorporated into liver and appeared in bile within hours. Most of the absorbed manganese in liver was recovered in the mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction. Purified nuclei contained only one-tenth of the manganese found in the crude nuclear fraction. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed that lysosomes took up and released manganese more rapidly than mitochondria. Also, manganese content in the liver and bile decreased following pretreatment with trypan blue. These values returned to normal with simultaneous administration of cortisone. Manganese released in vitro from the mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction and manganese in bile were measured as manganese acetate by gel filtration. The results suggest that liver lysosomes play an important role in intrahepatic movement and affect biliary excretion of absorbed manganese.

  14. Excretion of ammonium by a nifL mutant of Azotobacter vinelandii fixing nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Bali, A; Blanco, G; Hill, S; Kennedy, C

    1992-05-01

    A mutation in the gene upstream of nifA in Azotobacter vinelandii was introduced into the chromosome to replace the corresponding wild-type region. The resulting mutant, MV376, produced nitrogenase constitutively in the presence of 15 mM ammonium. When introduced into a nifH-lacZ fusion strain, the mutation permitted beta-galactosidase production in the presence of ammonium. The gene upstream of nifA is therefore designated nifL because of its similarity to the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifL gene in proximity to nifA, in mutant phenotype, and in amino acid sequence of the gene product. The A. vinelandii nifL mutant MV376 excreted significant quantities of ammonium (approximately 10 mM) during diazotrophic growth. In contrast, ammonium excretion during diazotrophy was much lower in a K. pneumoniae nifL deletion mutant (maximum, 0.15 mM) but significantly higher than in NifL+ K. pneumoniae. The expression of the A. vinelandii nifA gene, unlike that of K. pneumoniae, was not repressed by ammonium. PMID:1622243

  15. Preliminary estimation of deoxynivalenol excretion through a 24 h pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carrasco, Yelko; Mañes, Jordi; Berrada, Houda; Font, Guillermina

    2015-03-01

    A duplicate diet study was designed to explore the occurrence of 15 Fusarium mycotoxins in the 24 h-diet consumed by one volunteer as well as the levels of mycotoxins in his 24 h-collected urine. The employed methodology involved solvent extraction at high ionic strength followed by dispersive solid phase extraction and gas chromatography determination coupled to mass spectrometry in tandem. Satisfactory results in method performance were achieved. The method's accuracy was in a range of 68%-108%, with intra-day relative standard deviation and inter-day relative standard deviation lower than 12% and 15%, respectively. The limits of quantitation ranged from 0.1 to 8 µg/Kg. The matrix effect was evaluated and matrix-matched calibrations were used for quantitation. Only deoxynivalenol (DON) was quantified in both food and urine samples. A total DON daily intake amounted to 49.2 ± 5.6 µg whereas DON daily excretion of 35.2 ± 4.3 µg was determined. DON daily intake represented 68.3% of the established DON provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI). Valuable preliminary information was obtained as regards DON excretion and needs to be confirmed in large-scale monitoring studies. PMID:25723325

  16. The relationship between exercise intensity and the sweat lactate excretion rate.

    PubMed

    Buono, Michael J; Lee, Nanette V L; Miller, Paul W

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of increases in exercise intensity on the sweat lactate concentration and lactate excretion rate. Eight healthy male volunteers complete a 90-min exercise bout of treadmill walking in a 35 degrees C and 40% relative humidity environmental chamber. During the exercise trial, the subjects performed three 30-min ordered exercise bouts at 60, 70, and 80% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate (HR(max)), with 10 min of rest outside the chamber between bouts. Sweat rate was measured volumetrically during each of the three exercise bouts on the flexor surface of the proximal half of the right forearm. Sweat lactate concentration ([lactate](sweat)) was measured in each sample and multiplied by the forearm sweat rate to calculate the lactate excretion rate (LER). There was a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in the [lactate](sweat) at the 70 and 80% HR(max) exercise intensities compared to the 60% HR(max) exercise intensity. Conversely, the LER increased significantly at the highest two exercise intensities compared to the 60% HR(max) exercise intensity. Such data suggest that increases in exercise intensity require an increase in lactate production, as measured by the LER. Furthermore, the decreased [lactate](sweat) at the higher exercise intensities is most likely the result of increased sweat production causing a dilution effect on the [lactate](sweat), thus limiting its ability to accurately indicate the metabolic activity of the sweat gland. PMID:20013328

  17. Temporal dynamics of seed excretion by wild ungulates: implications for plant dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Mélanie; Papaïx, Julien; Gosselin, Frédéric; Picot, Denis; Bideau, Eric; Baltzinger, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Dispersal is a key process in metapopulation dynamics as it conditions species’ spatial responses to gradients of abiotic and biotic conditions and triggers individual and gene flows. In the numerous plants that are dispersed through seed consumption by herbivores (endozoochory), the distance and effectiveness of dispersal is determined by the combined effects of seed retention time in the vector’s digestive system, the spatial extent of its movements, and the ability of the seeds to germinate once released. Estimating these three parameters from experimental data is therefore crucial to calibrate mechanistic metacommunity models of plant–herbivore interactions. In this study, we jointly estimated the retention time and germination probability of six herbaceous plants transported by roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), red deer (Cervus elaphus), and wild boar (Sus scrofa) through feeding experiments and a Bayesian dynamic model. Retention time was longer in the nonruminant wild boar (>36 h) than in the two ruminant species (roe deer: 18–36 h, red deer: 3–36 h). In the two ruminants, but not in wild boar, small and round seeds were excreted faster than large ones. Low germination probabilities of the excreted seeds reflected the high cost imposed by endozoochory on plant survival. Trait-mediated variations in retention time and germination probability among animal and plant species may impact plant dispersal distances and interact with biotic and abiotic conditions at the release site to shape the spatial patterns of dispersed plant species. PMID:26257875

  18. Chronic effects of lead on renin and renal sodium excretion. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, N.; Mouw, D.R.; Vander, A.J.

    1980-05-01

    Rats were chronically give 0.5 mg/ml Pb in drinking water. This produced blood and renal lead concentratoins of approximately 30 )g/dl and 20)g/gm, respectively, significant kidney swelling, but no change in body weight or hematocrit. After 6 weeks of Pb treatment and during ingestion of a sodium-free diet, plasma, renin activity (PRA) was elevated (controls: same diet, no lead), but there was no change in plasma resin substrate (PRS). After 5 months the PRA was significantly higher in the lead-treated group even on a 1% NaCl diet, but the difference between groups disappeared on an Na-free diet; that is, the renin response to sodium deprivation was blunted. As early as 6 weeks after beginning lead treatment, the treated group manifested reduced ability to decrease Na excretion following removal of NaCl from the diet; steady-state sodium excretion was normal on either the 1% NaCl or Na-free diet. We conclude that changes in the renin angiotensin system and renal sodium handling may be important toxic effects of low doses of lead on the kidneys of rats.

  19. Absorption, distribution, and excretion of 8-methoxypsoralen in HRA/Skh mice

    SciTech Connect

    Muni, I.A.; Schneider, F.H.; Olsson, T.A. III; King, M.

    1984-12-01

    The tissue distribution and excretion of (/sup 3/H)8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), a well-accepted therapeutic agent for the treatment of psoriasis, was studied in hairless HRA/Skh female mice. Mice were given single oral doses of 6 mg of (/sup 3/H)8-MOP or 5-(/sup 14/C)8-MOP/kg in corn oil. Radiochemical analyses of tissues and excreta were accomplished by liquid scintillation counting. The 8-MOP appeared to be rapidly absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract, where the tritium levels were highest, followed by skin, blood, and liver; levels were lowest in fat (adipose tissue). In female HRA/Skh mice which had not been irradiated with UVA (320-400 nm), 84% of the carbon-14 and 58% of the tritium were recovered in the urine and feces within 24 hours of oral administration of 5-(/sup 14/C)8-MOP or (/sup 3/H)8-MOP, respectively. Animals that were exposed to UVA and received (3H)8-MOP excreted approximately 12% less tritium in the urine and feces compared with the animals which received no UVA.

  20. Preventive obesity agent montmorillonite adsorbs dietary lipids and enhances lipid excretion from the digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pengfei; Dai, Shu; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jin; Wang, Fang; Zhai, Yonggong

    2016-01-01

    Western diets are typically high in fat and are associated with long-term complications such as obesity and hepatic steatosis. Because of the enjoyable taste of high-fat diets (HFDs), we are interested in determining how to decrease lipid absorption and enhance lipid excretion from the digestive tract after the consumption of eating fatty foods. Montmorillonite was initially characterized as a gastrointestinal mucosal barrier protective agent for the treatment of diarrhoea. Dietary lipid adsorbent- montmorillonite (DLA-M) was isolated and purified from Xinjiang montmorillonite clay via the water extraction method. Here, we show that DLA-M has an unexpected role in preventing obesity, hyperlipidaemia and hepatic steatosis in HFD-fed rats. Interestingly, combined application of polarized light microscopy and lipid staining analyses, showed that DLA-M crystals have dietary lipid-adsorbing ability in vitro and in vivo, which enhances lipid excretion via bowel movements. In summary, our results indicate that DLA-M prevent HFD-induced obesity. This novel dietary lipid-adsorbing agent can help prevent obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:26891902

  1. Enteric methane emission, diet digestibility, and nitrogen excretion from beef heifers fed sainfoin or alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y-H; Mc Geough, E J; Acharya, S; McAllister, T A; McGinn, S M; Harstad, O M; Beauchemin, K A

    2013-10-01

    Effects of plant-bound condensed tannin (CT)-containing sainfoin vs. CT-free alfalfa (or low-CT alfalfa-sainfoin mixture), plant stage of maturity, and their interaction on enteric methane (CH4) emissions, diet digestibility, and N excretion were studied, using 8 ruminally cannulated beef heifers in 2 sequential short-term experiments (Exp. 1 and 2). In Exp. 1, first growth legumes were harvested daily and offered fresh to heifers. Heifers were assigned to 100% sainfoin or 80% alfalfa:20% sainfoin (as-fed basis). Responses were measured at early (late vegetative to early bud; stage 2 to 3) and late (early flower; stage 5) stage of maturity. In Exp. 2, the same legumes were harvested from second growth (late bud; stage 4) and offered to heifers as hay; 100% sainfoin or 100% alfalfa. In both experiments, heifers were fed once daily at 1× maintenance. When fed as fresh forage (Exp. 1), sainfoin, compared with the alfalfa-sainfoin blend, had greater digestibility of OM (74.7 vs. 70.9%; P = 0.02), yet tended to have lower CP digestibility (73.2 vs. 77.1%; P = 0.059). There was no difference between fresh legumes for CH4 emissions [25.9 g/kg DMI ± 4.02 SE; 8.5% of gross energy intake (GEI) ± 1.26 SE; or 36.8 g/kg digested OM ± 1.75 SE]. The fresh legumes were more digestible at early, rather than at late, maturity and, consequently, enteric CH4 (27.4 vs. 24.4 g/kg DMI; P < 0.004; 8.9 vs. 8.1% GEI; P < 0.008) was greater at early, rather than at later, growth. When fed as hay (Exp. 2), sainfoin, compared with alfalfa, had greater digestibility of OM (60.5 vs. 50.3%; P = 0.007), lower digestibility of CP (64.2 vs. 68.8%; P = 0.004), yet there was no difference between the legume hays for CH4 emissions (22.4 g/kg DMI ± 1.29 SD and 7.1% GEI ± 0.40 SD). However, on the basis of OM digested, CH4 emissions were lower for sainfoin than alfalfa hay (44.3 vs. 59.0 g/kg; P = 0.008). Percentage of total N excretion in urine was less for sainfoin compared with alfalfa, both for

  2. Whole-body retention, and urinary and fecal excretion of mercury after subchronic oral exposure to mercuric chloride in rats.

    PubMed

    Morcillo, M A; Santamaria, J

    1995-10-01

    The effects of long-term daily intake of mercury on its urinary and fecal excretion, whole-body retention, and blood concentration in male rats were observed. The animals were exposed to mercuric, chloride labeled with 203Hg via drinking water for 8 weeks (5, 50 and 500 microM Hg). 203Hg in urine, feces and blood was quantified. The blood mercury concentration did not keep a linear relationship with the increasing dose. The percentage of the total amount of mercury intake which is excreted by the fecal route in rats exposed to 500 microM Hg was significantly lower than in those exposed to 5 and 50 microM. The daily dose percentage of mercury excreted in urine increased with dose size. The results show that the absorption fraction of mercury through the gastrointestinal tract (30-40%) was higher than values previously reported. PMID:7580050

  3. Stereoselectivity in the urinary excretion of the mercapturates of (R-) and (S-) alpha-bromoisovalerylurea in man.

    PubMed Central

    te Koppele, J M; Schipper, C; Breimer, D D; Mulder, G J

    1989-01-01

    1. alpha-Bromoisovalerylurea (BIU) is a racemic drug that is metabolized by glutathione conjugation. The urinary excretion of the separate diastereomeric mercapturates formed from (S)- and (R)-BIU in healthy young human volunteers was investigated. 2. A pronounced stereoselectivity was observed: the mercapturate formed from R-BIU was excreted with a t1/2 of 1.5 +/- 0.4 h, while that from S-BIU showed a t1/2 of 3.1 +/- 1.3 h. Moreover, 22.5 +/- 4.3 and 5.7 +/- 1.6% of the dose, respectively, was excreted as each mercapturate diastereomer in 24 h. 3. This is the first example of stereoselectivity in the elimination of a substrate for glutathione conjugation in man. PMID:2775620

  4. Comparison of isotope dilution and excretion methods for determining the half-life of ascorbic acid in the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, D.E.; Rivers, J.M.

    1984-08-01

    The half-life of ascorbic acid (AA) in guinea pigs was investigated by the isotope dilution and excretion methods. The dilution method measures (1-14C)AA disappearance from the plasma, whereas the excretion method measures the elimination of (1-14C)AA and the metabolites from the body. Two groups of animals underwent both isotope studies in reverse order. Animals were conditioned to the experimental procedures and fed 2.5 mg AA/100 g body weight orally to maintain a daily intake of the vitamin independent of food consumption. The two isotope procedures imposed similar stress on the animals, as determined by plasma cortisol levels and body weight changes. The AA half-life calculations of the rapidly exchangeable pool by the isotope dilution method yielded values of 1.23 and 0.34 hours for the two groups, respectively. The half-life of the slowly exchangeable pool for the two groups was 60.2 and 65.8 hours, respectively. The half-life of AA in the rapidly exchangeable pool, as measured by the excretion studies, was 4.57-8.75 hours. For the slowly exchangeable pool, it was 146-149 hours. The longer half-life of both pools obtained with the excretion method indicates that the isotope is disappearing from the plasma more rapidly than it is being excreted. This suggests that a portion of the (1-14C)AA leaving the plasma is removed to a body pool that is not sampled by the isotope excretion method.

  5. Twenty-four-hour urinary sodium and potassium excretion and associated factors in Japanese secondary school students.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Masayuki; Asakura, Keiko; Sasaki, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Keiko

    2016-07-01

    Data on the sodium and potassium intake using dietary records among schoolchildren are sorely lacking in the Japanese literature. Some evidence indicates that sodium and potassium intake has been correctly measured, but information concerning these associated factors is scarce. The 24-h urine samples and first morning voiding (overnight) samples were collected twice from 68 secondary schoolchildren in Suo-Oshima Town, Japan. Sodium, potassium and creatinine concentrations were analyzed. Body height and weight were measured, and menstruation and physical activity were assessed via questionnaires. We analyzed the 24-h samples with a >20-h collecting period and no missed voiding. The 24-h sodium excretion was 163.2±36.8 and 149.8±45.1 mmol per 24 h for the boys and girls, respectively. Considering daily habits and loss from sweat, intake was assumed to be 10.6±1.2 and 10.0±2.4 g per day for the boys and girls, respectively. The 24-h potassium excretion was 43.4±10.8 and 45.8±14.4 mmol per 24 h for the boys and girls, respectively. Estimated usual potassium intake was 2195±401 and 2330±630 mg per day for the boys and girls, respectively. Sodium excretion was associated with sodium and potassium concentrations in overnight urine samples and physical activity. Potassium excretion was associated with height and physical activity. We described daily sodium and potassium excretion in Japanese secondary schoolchildren. Excretion was associated more with physical activity than with bodyweight. Therefore, the estimation methods used in adults are not applicable for use in adolescents. PMID:26935040

  6. Excretion pattern of co-planar and non-planar tetra- and hexa-chlorobiphenyls in ovine milk and faeces

    SciTech Connect

    Vrecl, Milka . E-mail: milka.vrecl@vf.uni-lj.si; Ursic, Matjaz; Pogacnik, Azra; Zupancic-Kralj, Lucija; Jan, Janja

    2005-04-15

    This study employed the gas chromatography with electron capture detection to determine residual levels and excretion patterns of two pairs of structurally diverse polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (IUPAC Nos. 54, 80, 155, and 169) administered to lactating sheep by intramuscular injection. PCB levels and excretion patterns in blood, milk, and faeces were time-dependent and differed from the composition of PCB congeners administered. Lactational transfer substantially exceeded the faecal transfer. Between days 3 and 7, the amount of PCB congeners 54 and 169 excreted in milk was around 50- and 800-fold higher than the amount of these two congeners excreted via faeces. During the same period, the relative contribution of co-planar PCB congeners (80 and 169) in PCB pattern decreased in blood and increased in milk and faeces compared with non-planar PCBs (54 and 155). On day 3, the ratio PCB 169 to 54 was 7-fold higher in milk than in faeces. PCB congeners with log K{sub ow} values under 6.5 reached peaks of their excretion in milk within the first three days after administration, while the super-lipophilic PCB 169 congener with log K{sub ow} value of over 7 has not reached the plateau until day 10, but afterwards, its level remained relatively high throughout the observation period. During the 57-day follow-up period, the excretion of PCB 80, 155, and 169 in milk was 4.5-, 14-, and 46-fold greater compared with PCB 54. Differences in levels and patterns were explained with some physico-chemical properties of individual PCB congeners, such as lipophilicity, planarity, metabolic stability, sorption/diffusion properties.

  7. Diabetic Kidney Disease in FVB/NJ Akita Mice: Temporal Pattern of Kidney Injury and Urinary Nephrin Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae-Hyung; Paik, Seung-Yeol; Mao, Lan; Eisner, William; Flannery, Patrick J.; Wang, Liming; Tang, Yuping; Mattocks, Natalie; Hadjadj, Samy; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Ruiz, Phillip; Gurley, Susan B.; Spurney, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Akita mice are a genetic model of type 1 diabetes. In the present studies, we investigated the phenotype of Akita mice on the FVB/NJ background and examined urinary nephrin excretion as a marker of kidney injury. Male Akita mice were compared with non-diabetic controls for functional and structural characteristics of renal and cardiac disease. Podocyte number and apoptosis as well as urinary nephrin excretion were determined in both groups. Male FVB/NJ Akita mice developed sustained hyperglycemia and albuminuria by 4 and 8 weeks of age, respectively. These abnormalities were accompanied by a significant increase in systolic blood pressure in 10-week old Akita mice, which was associated with functional, structural and molecular characteristics of cardiac hypertrophy. By 20 weeks of age, Akita mice developed a 10-fold increase in albuminuria, renal and glomerular hypertrophy and a decrease in the number of podocytes. Mild-to-moderate glomerular mesangial expansion was observed in Akita mice at 30 weeks of age. In 4-week old Akita mice, the onset of hyperglycemia was accompanied by increased podocyte apoptosis and enhanced excretion of nephrin in urine before the development of albuminuria. Urinary nephrin excretion was also significantly increased in albuminuric Akita mice at 16 and 20 weeks of age and correlated with the albumin excretion rate. These data suggest that: 1. FVB/NJ Akita mice have phenotypic characteristics that may be useful for studying the mechanisms of kidney and cardiac injury in diabetes, and 2. Enhanced urinary nephrin excretion is associated with kidney injury in FVB/NJ Akita mice and is detectable early in the disease process. PMID:22496773

  8. [Stimulation of the fecal excretion of polychlorinated biphenyls (KC-600) by diets containing rice bran fiber and cholestyramine].

    PubMed

    Takenaka, S; Morita, K; Takahashi, K

    1991-05-01

    Among the eight kinds of dietary fiber tested, rice bran fiber (RBF) mostly bound Kanechlor 600 (PCB) in vitro. The PCB bound to dietary fiber was in proportion to the lignin content in dietary fiber. We investigated whether RBF, lignin, cholestyramine and their combination stimulate the fecal excretion of PCB in rats. In the group fed a diet containing 10% (w/w) RBF, fecal excretion of PCB was stimulated. In the group fed a diet containing 10% (w/w) RBF and 5% (w/w) cholestyramine, more PCB was excreted in the feces. However, the group fed a diet containing 10% (w/w) RBF and 5% (w/w) lignin excreted the same amount of PCB as the group fed a diet containing 10% (w/w) RBF. The total PCB excreted into the feces for 21 days in the groups fed 10% (w/w) RBF, 10% (w/w) RBF and 5% (w/w) lignin, 5% (w/w) cholestyramine and 10% (w/w) RBF and 5% (w/w) cholestyramine diet was 3.4, 3.8, 2.3 and 5.7 times, respectively, that of the control. The stool transit time of rats fed 10% (w/w) RBF and 5% (w/w) cholestyramine diet was one hour faster than that of rats fed a 5% (w/w) cholestyramine diet. Therefore, we concluded that RBF has the greatest effect when administered in combination with cholestyramine on the fecal excretion of PCB. PMID:1655599

  9. Excretion of malondialdehyde, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone in the urine of rats following acute and chronic administration of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Moser, J; Bagchi, D; Akubue, P I; Stohs, S J

    1993-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that xenobiotics which induce oxidative stress result in an increased production and excretion of acetaldehyde (ACT), formaldehyde (FA), acetone (ACON) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the urine of rats. We have therefore examined the effect of acute and chronic ethanol administration on the excretion of these four lipid metabolites in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Urine samples were collected over dry ice for 6 hr time periods. Aliquots of urine were derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine HCl, and extracted with n-pentane. High pressure lipid chromatogrpahy (HPLC) was used to quantitate and the hydrazones of the four lipid metabolite products. Following a single, oral, acute dose of 5 g ethanol/kg, urinary excretion of ACT increased approximately 5.8-fold from 6 to 12 hr posttreatment, and decreased thereafter. FA excretion decreased by approximately 50% from 0 to 12 hr, returned to control values in the 18-24 hr urine samples, and was 1.3-fold greater than control values at 42-48 hr. ACON increased 3.1-fold over control values from 0 to 30 hr and remained elevated throughout the remaining 18 hr of the study. The excretion of MDA increased approximately 1.5-fold from 18 to 36 hr, then remained constant through the 48 hr time point. In a separate series of experiments, a chronic oral dose of 0.5 g ethanol/kg was administered to rats for 10 consecutive days and the urinary excretion of the lipid metabolites MDA, FA, ACT and ACON was examined for 11 days, beginning with the first day of ethanol administration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8352840

  10. [Circadian variations of urinary excretions of microproteins and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) during the ordinary activity day].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Ikawa, S

    1990-06-01

    The present investigation was performed to confirm the relationship between the circadian variation of microproteinuria and physical activity. Urine samples from 10 normal male volunteers, collected during six consecutive 4-h periods, were examined for albumin, alpha 1-, beta 2-microglobulin, NAG, electrolytes and hormones. The fluctuations in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) over 24-h were measured at 30-min and 1-h intervals, respectively. Energy expenditure (EE) was calculated using the equation of regression between HR and oxygen uptake measured on another day. The variations of HR (delta HR) and EE (delta EE) based on a 24-h average (bpm and kcal/kg/h) were used as indices of change in physical activity during an ordinary day. The correlation coefficients between delta HR and the variations of albumin (delta Alb) and beta 2-microglobulin (delta beta 2M) from the 24-h average (micrograms/h.cr 1 mg) were 0.619 and 0.670 (p less than 0.001), respectively. Increased excretions of both glomerular and tubular proteins were correlated with the increase in HR and/or EE during daytime activity. During rest time at night, the variations in alpha 1M, beta 2M and NAG excretion were different from the variations in albumin. A temporary inhibition of tubular protein excretion was observed only in the early morning (04:00-08:00), although albumin excretion was inhibited throughout the nighttime. These findings suggested that physical activity may influence the diurnal variations in protein excretions, that albuminuria may be more sensitive to daytime activity, and that fluctuation of tubular protein excretion may be preferably controlled by an endogenous mechanism. Timed overnight or first-morning urine may be recommendable as a sample for determination of microalbuminuria for screening of clinical diabetic nephropathy. PMID:1699014

  11. Breathing Assistance by the Iron Lung Increases Sympathetic Tone and Modifies Fluid Excretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisch, F. J.; Gerzer, R.

    Adaptation to weightlessness is not accompanied by an increase in sodium- and urine- excretion in humans in contrast to the expectations and the bed rest model in use to simulate effects of weightlessness on earth. On earth the thorax remains compressed by gravity in the horizontal body position while its unloading in weightlessness reduces transmural pressure in the mediastinal walls and membranes. Thus, wall stretching. or the Henry-Gauer mechanism, is reduced and may even result in a reduced water and sodium excretion. We have therefore lowered the transmural mediastinal pressure by the principle of the "Iron Lung" in a terrestrial model, and have studied whether or not this principle might reduce body fluid loss seen during onset of head down tilt bed rest. Methods: Two experiment runs were performed in a cross over design: one run pure 6° head down tilt body position (HDT) and the other with iron lung assistance. Six male subjects (26.5 +/- 8.1 years old; 187+/- 5 cm tall; 84.0 +/- 6.6 kg body weight) participated. Lung pressure was modified by the iron lung where the whole body except the head is enclosed in a box. The air pressure inside the box was 5 cm H2O lower than ambient during activation of the iron lung. For inspiration negative pressure increased up to 15 cm H2O, roughly doubling resting breath tide. The counteracting lung pressure was 8.1 +/- 0.6 cm H2O for 4 hours in mean. Breathing rate was reduced under iron lung to avoid hyperventilation (10.2 +/- 0.6 bpm [iron lung] versus 14.0 +/- 1.2 Bpm [spontaneously]). The relationship between expiration and inspiration remained at 2:1 in both runs. End expiratory CO2 was measured breath by breath via a nose clip. Heart rate, peripheral oxygen saturation, and sphygmomanometric blood pressure were determined every half hour. Urine volume was measured hourly. sodium excretion and pH was determined. Ambient conditions were kept constant at thermoneutral conditions. Evaporative fluid loss was evaluated by a

  12. Quantifying the consequences of nutritional strategies aimed at decreasing phosphorus excretion from pig populations: a modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Symeou, V; Leinonen, I; Kyriazakis, I

    2016-04-01

    There is a global imperative to reduce phosphorous (P) excretion from pig systems. In this study, a previously validated deterministic model was modified to be stochastic, in order to investigate the consequences of different management strategies on P excretion by a group of growing pigs. The model predicts P digestion, retention and excretion from feed composition and growth parameters that describe a specified pig phenotype. Stochasticity was achieved by introducing random variation in the latter. The strategies investigated were: (1) changing feed composition frequently in order to match more closely pig digestible P (digP) requirements to feed composition (phase feeding) and (2) grouping pigs into light and heavy groups and feeding each group according to the requirements of their group average BW (sorting). Phase feeding reduced P excretion as the number of feeding phases increased. The effect was most pronounced as feeding phases increased from 1 to 2, with a 7.5% decrease achieved; the increase in phases from 2 to 3 was associated with a further 2.0% reduction. Similarly, the effect was more pronounced when the feed targeted the population requirements for digP at the average BW of the first third, rather than the average requirements at the mid-point BW of each feeding sequence plan. Increasing the number of feeding phases increased the percentage of pigs that met their digP requirements during the early stages of growth and reduced the percentage of pigs that were supplied <85% of their digP requirements at any stage of their growth; the latter may have welfare implications. Sorting of pigs reduced P excretion to a lesser extent; the reduction was greater as the percentage of pigs in the light group increased from 10% to 30% (from 1.5% to 3.0% reduction, respectively). This resulted from an increase in the P excreted by the light group, accompanied by a decrease in the P excreted by the remaining pigs. Sorting increased the percentage of light pigs that

  13. Urinary Excretion of N-Nitroso Compounds in Rats Fed Sodium Nitrite and/or Hot Dogs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite-treated meat is a reported risk factor for colon cancer. Mice that ingested sodium nitrite (NaNO2) or hot dogs (a nitrite-treated product) showed increased fecal excretion of apparent N-nitroso compounds (ANC). Here, we investigated for the first time whether rats excrete increased amounts of ANC in their urine after they are fed NaNO2 and/or hot dogs. Rats were treated for 7 days with NaNO2 in drinking water or were fed hot dogs. Their 24 h urine samples were analyzed for ANC by thermal energy analysis on days 1–4 after nitrite or hot dog treatment was stopped. For two rats fed 480 mg NaNO2/L drinking water, mean urinary ANC excretion on days 1–4 was 30, 5.2, 2.5, and 0.8 nmol/day, respectively. For two to eight rats/dose given varied NaNO2 doses, mean urinary ANC output on day 1 increased from 0.9 (for no nitrite) to 37 (for 1000 mg NaNO2/L drinking water) nmol ANC/day. Urine samples of four rats fed 40–60% hot dogs contained 12–13 nmol ANC on day 1. Linear regression analysis showed highly significant correlations between urinary ANC excretion on day 1 after stopping treatment and varied (a) NaNO2 level in drinking water for rats fed semipurified or commercials diet and (b) hot dog levels in the diet. Some correlations remained significant up to 4 days after nitrite treatment was stopped. Urinary output of ANC precursors (compounds that yield ANC after mild nitrosation) for rats fed semipurified or commercial diet was 11–17 or 23–48 μmol/day, respectively. Nitrosothiols and iron nitrosyls were not detected in urinary ANC and ANCP. Excretion of urinary ANC was about 60% of fecal ANC excretion for 1 to 2 days after NaNO2 was fed. Administered NaNO2 was not excreted unchanged in rat urine. We conclude that urinary ANC excretion in humans could usefully be surveyed to indicate exposure to N-nitroso compounds. PMID:25183213

  14. Effect of dietary phosphorus content on milk production and phosphorus excretion in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Phosphorus (P) supplementation is costly and can result in excess P excretion. This study investigated the effects of reducing dietary P on milk production and P excretion in dairy cows over a full lactation. Method Forty-five multiparous Holstein dairy cows were divided into 15 blocks according to expected calving date and previous milk yield, and assigned randomly to one of the three dietary treatments: 0.37, 0.47, and 0.57% P (DM basis); these P levels represent the NRC recommendations, Chinese recommendations, and the amount of dietary P commonly fed by Chinese dairy farmers, respectively. Average daily feed intake was calculated from monthly data on feed offered and refused. Milk yields of individual cows were recorded weekly, and milk samples were taken for analysis of protein, fat, solids-not-fat, lactose, and somatic cell count. Blood samples were collected on days −6, −3, 0, 3, 6 relative to calving, and then monthly throughout lactation, and analyzed for P and Ca concentrations. Spot samples of feces and urine were collected for 3 consecutive d during weeks 12, 24, and 36, and P concentrations were analyzed. Reproduction and health data were recorded. Results Dietary P did not affect dry matter intake or milk yield (P > 0.10). Milk fat content was slightly higher in cows fed 0.37% P than in cows fed 0.47% P (P = 0.05). Serum concentrations of P and Ca did not reflect dietary P content (P > 0.10). Fecal and urinary P both declined linearly (P < 0.05) as dietary P decreased from 0.57 to 0.37%. Fecal P content was 25% less when dietary P was 0.37% compared to 0.57%. Health events and reproductive performance were not associated with dietary P content (P > 0.05). Conclusions Lowering dietary P from 0.57 to 0.37% did not negatively affect milk production, but did significantly reduce P excretion into environment. PMID:24872881

  15. Human metabolism and excretion kinetics of aniline after a single oral dose.

    PubMed

    Modick, Hendrik; Weiss, Tobias; Dierkes, Georg; Koslitz, Stephan; Käfferlein, Heiko Udo; Brüning, Thomas; Koch, Holger Martin

    2016-06-01

    Aniline is an important source material in the chemical industry (e.g., rubber, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals). The general population is known to be ubiquitously exposed to aniline. Thus, assessment of aniline exposure is of both occupational and environmental relevance. Knowledge on human metabolism of aniline is scarce. We orally dosed four healthy male volunteers (two fast and two slow acetylators) with 5 mg isotope-labeled aniline, consecutively collected all urine samples over a period of 2 days, and investigated the renal excretion of aniline and its metabolites by LS-MS/MS and GC-MS. After enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, N-acetyl-4-aminophenol was the predominant urinary aniline metabolite representing 55.7-68.9 % of the oral dose, followed by the mercapturic acid conjugate of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol accounting for 2.5-6.1 %. Acetanilide and free aniline were found only in minor amounts accounting for 0.14-0.36 % of the dose. Overall, these four biomarkers excreted in urine over 48 h post-dose represented 62.4-72.1 % of the oral aniline dose. Elimination half-times were 3.4-4.3 h for N-acetyl-4-aminophenol, 4.1-5.5 h for the mercapturic acid conjugate, and 1.3-1.6 and 0.6-1.2 h for acetanilide and free aniline, respectively. Urinary maximum concentrations of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol were reached after about 4 h and maximum concentrations of the mercapturic acid conjugate after about 6 h, whereas concentrations of acetanilide and free aniline peaked after about 1 h. The present study is one of the first to provide reliable urinary excretion factors for aniline and its metabolites in humans after oral dosage, including data on the predominant urinary metabolite N-acetyl-4-aminophenol, also known as an analgesic under the name paracetamol/acetaminophen. PMID:26233686

  16. Prediction of manure nitrogen and organic matter excretion for young Holstein cattle fed on grass silage-based diets.

    PubMed

    Jiao, H P; Yan, T; McDowell, D A

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the effects of sex (steers vs. heifers) of young Holstein cattle on N and OM excretion in feces and urine and to use these data to develop prediction models for N and OM excretion. Data used were derived from a study with 20 autumn-born Holstein cattle (10 steers and 10 heifers) with N and OM intake and output measured at age of 6, 12, 18, and 22 mo, respectively. The cattle were offered a typical diet used on U.K. commercial farms containing a single grass silage mixed with concentrates. In each period, the cattle were housed as a single group in cubicle accommodation for the first 20 d, individually in metabolism units for the next 3 d, and then in calorimeter chambers for the final 5 d with feed intake, feces, and urine excretion measured during the final 4 d. Within each period, sex had no effect (P > 0.05) on N or OM intake or excretion or N utilization efficiency, with exceptions of steers having a greater intake of N (P = 0.036) and OM (P = 0.018) at age of 18 mo and a lower ratio of fecal N:N intake (P = 0.023) at age of 6 mo. A range of regression relationships (P < 0.05) were developed for prediction of N (g/d) and OM (kg/d) excretion in feces and urine. The present data were also used to calculate accumulated N and OM intake (kg) and excretion for the 2 sexes. Sex had no effects (P > 0.05) on accumulated N or OM intake or N or OM excretion in feces and urine or retained N and OM during the first or second year of life. On average for the 2 sexes at first and second year of age, the accumulated N excretions in feces were 11.4 and 21.1 kg and in urine 11.6 and 30.6 kg, respectively, and the corresponding values for accumulated OM excretions were respectively 241.5, 565.7, 30.3 and 81.5 kg. A number of equations were developed to predict accumulated N and OM excretion in feces and urine (kg) using BW (kg; P < 0.001, r(2) = 0.95 to 0.97). The accurate prediction of N and OM excretion in feces and urine is

  17. Urinary excretion values in 2-day food-deprived, unrestrained chimpanzees.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnew, J. J.; Sabbot, I. M.; Hoshizaki, T.; Mandell, A. J.; Spooner, C. E.; Marcus, I.; Adey, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the baseline 24-hr urinary excretion values in the young, unrestrained chimpanzee, and also changes in urinary values, if any, induced by the two-day food deprivation stress. Urine was analyzed for volume, osmolarity, creatinine, creatine, urea nitrogen, 17-hydroxycorticosteroids (17-OHCS), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxymandelic acid (VMA), calcium, and inorganic phosphorus. Significant increases due to food deprivation stress were observed for volume, creatine, urea nitrogen, 17-OHCS, VMA, and phosphorus values, with significant decreases in osmolarity and calcium. All values approached normal levels by the second poststress day. No significant changes were observed in creatinine. A comparison is drawn between human and chimpanzee adaptation to stress.

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi: circulating polysaccharide factors excreted in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Martín, U O; Afchain, D; Loyens, M; Maidana, C; Caprón, A

    1989-01-01

    An antigen factor (EF), thermostable and soluble in trichloroacetic acid was detected in the supernatant fluid of epimastigote cultures of Trypanosoma cruzi and in the sera of patients with acute Chagas disease. An hyperimmune antiserum to this antigenic factor was obtained in rabbits. The EF was revealed on the fibroblast surface membranes of rats infected with trypomastigotes, using the indirect immunofluorescence technique. The presence of EF in the sera of patients with acute Chagas disease as well as in the supernatant of epimastigotes culture at logarithmic phase, leads to its association with a process of parasite proliferation. Being EF a component of the parasite, its origin both in vitro and in vivo could be the result of an excretion-secretion of parasite or simply a result of the parasite's death. It can be postulated that the same as in other protozoic infection, EF could be used by T. cruzi in the process of cell penetration. PMID:2517138

  19. A severe phenotype of Gitelman syndrome with increased prostaglandin excretion and favorable response to indomethacin

    PubMed Central

    Larkins, Nicholas; Wallis, Mathew; McGillivray, Barbara; Mammen, Cherry

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of Gitelman syndrome (GS) and Bartter syndrome has continued to evolve with the use of genetic testing to more precisely define the tubular defects responsible. GS is caused by mutations in the SLC12A3 gene encoding the Na+–Cl− co-transporter of the distal convoluted tubule (NCCT) and tends to be associated with a milder salt-losing phenotype. We describe two female siblings presenting in infancy with a severe salt-losing tubulopathy and failure to thrive due to compound heterozygous mutations in the SLC12A3 gene encoding the NCCT. Both children were treated with indomethacin resulting in improved linear growth and polyuria. Some atypical biochemical findings in our cases are discussed including raised urinary prostaglandin (PGE2) excretion that normalized with intravenous fluid repletion. PMID:25852896

  20. Factors Affecting the Absorption, Metabolism, and Excretion of Cocoa Flavanols in Humans.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-Gomez, Tania; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Gonzalez-Salvador, Isidro; Alañon, María Elena; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2015-09-01

    Cocoa is rich in a subclass of flavonoids known as flavanols, the cardiovascular health benefits of which have been extensively reported. The appearance of flavanol metabolites in the systemic circulation after flavanol-rich food consumption is likely to mediate the physiological effects on the vascular system, and these levels are influenced by numerous factors, including food matrix, processing, intake, age, gender, or genetic polymorphisms, among others. This review will focus on our current understanding of factors affecting the absorption, metabolism, and excretion of cocoa flavanols in humans. Second, it will identify gaps in these contributing factors that need to be addressed to conclusively translate our collective knowledge into the context of public health, dietary guidelines, and evidence-based dietary recommendations. PMID:25711140

  1. Pilot CELSS based on a maltose-excreting Chlorella: Concept and overview on the technological developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brechignac, François; Schiller, Peter

    A typical ecosystem is composed of three compartments: photosynthetic producer (anabolizing processes), consumer and decomposer (catabolizing processes). It is still far too much complex, however, to form the basis on which establishing an engineered artificial ecosystem, dedicated to support life (of the consumer) in space. A simpler, two compartments, pilot model to start with has been selected. It is based on a symbiotic Chlorella (strain 241.80), which can be tuned, at low pH, to produce maltose. This feature prevents the accumulation of useless biomass, not readily edible by the consumer. Being excreted, maltose is easily recoverable, and constitutes a direct source of carbon suitable for many consumers. Since they will totally catabolize it back to CO2, the necessity for a decomposer compartment is avoided. The present status of the technological concept designed to support life of small consumers (animals, microorganisms) will be presented, taking into account the space compatibility of the technologies developed.

  2. Urinary excretion of enzymes following repeated parenteral administration of cadmium to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, F.W.; King, L.J.; Parke, D.V.

    1980-06-01

    The effect of daily parenteral administration of cadmium (0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 mg/kg) on the urinary excretion of enzymes has been studied in the young male rat. Aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, ..gamma..-glutamyl transpeptidase, and leucine aminopeptidase all showed an initial significant increase around the second day of dosage, the intensity of which was dose related. A second phase of enzymuria occurred later, the onset of which was dose related. High-dose-group animals (3.0 mg/kg) exhibited this increase around Day 15, while the median (1.5 mg/kg) and low- (0.75 mg/kg)dose-group animals developed enzymuria around Days 21 and 38, respectively. This second phase of elevated enzyme levels in the urine was persistent, and is believed to represent the development of renal damage.

  3. Lack of correlation between fecal elastase-1 levels and fecal nitrogen excretion in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Paoletti, Vittoria; Battistini, Barbara; Simoni, Patrizia; Faldella, Giacomo

    2008-10-01

    We measured fecal elastase-1 (FE1) levels in 34 preterm newborns (15 small-for-gestational-age and 19 appropriate-for-gestational-age) during the first 2 months of life and evaluated whether they were correlated with nitrogen loss in stools. FE1 increased over time, and values were similar in both groups of newborns. Fecal nitrogen was significantly higher in small-for-gestational-age infants. There was no correlation between FE1 levels and fecal nitrogen excretion. Pancreatic proteolytic function was efficient at an early stage in enterally fed preterm newborns. Despite the similar FE1 values, fecal nitrogen loss was significantly higher in small-for-gestational-age preterm infants than in appropriate-for-gestational-age preterm infants. PMID:18852648

  4. Effects of piretanide, bumetanide and frusemide on electrolyte and urate excretion in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C J; Homeida, M; Roberts, F; Bogie, W

    1978-08-01

    1. The pharmacological actions of a new short acting loop diuretic were investigated in nine healthy male subjects and compared with those of frusemide and bumetanide. Subjects received 6 mg piretanide/day, 40 mg frusemide/day or 1 mg bumetanide/day for a period of 1 week. 2. Comparison of effects following the first dose administered showed that 6 mg piretanide is of similar potency to 40 mg frusemide in terms of diuresis, natriuresis and kaliuresis but is less potent than 1 mg bumetanide. 3. All three diuretics caused a decrease in urate excretion and a rise in serum uric acid. 4. Piretanide was well tolerated. Further investigation is required to ascertain what clinical advantage it offers over frusemide and bumetanide. PMID:678389

  5. Continuous synthesis and excretion of the compatible solute ectoine by a transgenic, nonhalophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Torsten; Maskow, Thomas; Benndorf, Dirk; Harms, Hauke; Breuer, Uta

    2007-05-01

    The compatible solute 1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid (ectoine) acts in microorganisms as an osmotic counterweight against halostress and has attracted commercial attention as a protecting agent. Its production and application are restricted by the drawbacks of the discontinuous harvesting procedure involving salt shocks, which reduces volumetric yield, increases reactor corrosion, and complicates downstream processing. In order to synthesize ectoine continuously in less-aggressive media, we introduced the ectoine genes ectABC of the halophilic bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens into an Escherichia coli strain using the expression vector pASK-IBA7. Under the control of a tet promoter, the transgenic E. coli synthesized 6 g liter-1 ectoine with a space-time yield of 40 mg liter-1 h-1, with the vast majority of the ectoine being excreted. PMID:17369334

  6. Excretion of stable isotopes in man: A valuable source of information on trace metal kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Fennessey, P.V.; Miller, L.V.; Westcott, J.E.; Kindstrand, L.; Hambidge, K.M. )

    1991-03-15

    The analysis of individual fecal samples collected for at least ten days following an oral dose of {sup 70}Zn provides data on transit time, absorption and the excretion of isotope that has been absorbed and then secreted back into the lumen of the intestine. The analysis of data from more than 80 human studies where enriched Zn stable isotopes were given orally has provided a valuable data base on Zn kinetics. A plot of enrichment in the fecal samples as a function of time reveals the average time of maximum appearance as well as the time limit needed for elimination of unabsorbed isotope. A plot of cumulative enrichment as a function of time reveals information on both absorption and secretion rate of absorbed isotope. This data base provides investigators with new information that they can use to optimize their data collection schemes and serves as a model for the study of other trace metals.

  7. Leishmania infantum chagasi: A genome-based approach to identification of excreted/secreted proteins

    PubMed Central

    DebRoy, Sruti; Keenan, Alexandra B.; Ueno, Norikiyo; Jeronimo, Selma M. B.; Donelson, John E.; Wilson, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    The parasitic protozoan, Leishmania, survives in harsh environments within its mammalian and sand fly hosts. Secreted proteins likely play critical roles in the parasite’s interactions with its environment. As a preliminary identification of the spectrum of potential excreted/secreted (ES) proteins of Leishmania infantum chagasi (Lic), a causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis, we used standard algorithms to screen the annotated L. infantum genome for genes whose predicted protein products have an N-terminal signal peptide and lack transmembrane domains and membrane anchors. A suite of 181 candidate ES proteins were identified. These included several that were documented in the literature to be released by other Leishmania spp. Six candidate ES proteins were selected for further validation of their expression and release by different parasite stages. We found both amastigote-specific and promastigote-specific released proteins. The ES proteins of Lic are candidates for future studies of parasite virulence determinants and host protective immunity. PMID:20542033

  8. Seawater teleosts: evidence for a sodium-potassium exchange in the branchial sodium-excreting pump.

    PubMed

    Maetz, J

    1969-10-31

    The net sodium extrusion rate by the gill of the seawater-adapted euryhaline flounder is identical to the potassium influx. The excretion of sodium is blocked in K(+)-free seawater solutions. The instantaneous sodium outflux readjustment pattern of flounders transferred from seawater to solutions of various sodium chloride or potassium chloride concentrations is consistent with the hypothesis of a linkage between Na(+) outflux and K(+) influx through a common exchange carrier. External Na(+) and K(+) compete for this comnmonz carrier. It is suggested that the exchange diffusion mechanism (linkage of sodium influx and outflux) and the high internal sodium turnover rate which characterizes all seawater teleosts are the results of this competitive process. The sodium-potassium dependent adenosine triphosphatase system occurring in the gill of the seawater teleosts may play a central role in this sodium-potassium exchange pump. PMID:5823292

  9. Azolimine: a nonsteroidal antagonist of the effects of mineralocorticoids on renal electrolyte excretion.

    PubMed

    Gussin, R Z; Ronsberg, M A; Stokey, E H; Cummings, J R

    1975-10-01

    Azolimine, CL 90,748, an imidazolidinone, displayed the capacity to antagonize the effects of mineralocorticoids on renal electrolyte excretion in several animal models. Although large doses of azolimine produced natriuresis in adrenalectomized rats in the absence of exogenous mineralocorticoid, its effectiveness was greater in the presence of a steroid agonist. However, in conscious dogs given an infusion of saline plus dextrose, azolimine was only effective when desoxycorticosterone (DCA) was administered. The drug, therefore, may not be a pure competitive antagonist of mineralocorticoid, but its greater efficacy in the presence of mineralocorticoid distinguishes it from noncompetitive mineralocorticoid antagonists as amiloride and triamterene. Azolimine significantly improved the urinary Na/K ratio when used in combination with thiazides, furosemide and other classical diuretics both in adrenalectomized, desoxycorticosterone-treated rats and in sodium-deficient rats. PMID:1181406

  10. Reproductive activity in the peninsular pronghorn determined from excreted gonadal steroid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kersey, David C; Holland, Jeff; Eng, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Fecal hormone monitoring was employed to better define annual patterns of reproductive steroid metabolites from a breeding pair of peninsular pronghorn (Antilocapra americana peninsularis) maintained at the Los Angeles Zoo. Notably in the female, increased excretion of estrogen metabolites occurred during the breeding season (Jun-Aug), and a biphasic pattern in progestagen activity was measured during gestation. Of additional interest, a preterm increase in estrogen that continued for an additional 64 days post partum. Male androgen activity correlated with the female estrogen patterns, with a single successful copulation occurring during the breeding season; interestingly however, the male exhibited no reproductive behaviors during the female's preterm/post partum estrogen increase. These data are the first reproductive steroid profiles for the peninsular pronghorn and provide valuable insight that will aid efforts that link the species' reproductive physiology with conservation management. PMID:25652944

  11. Urinary excretion of glomerular basement membrane antigens in Alport's syndrome. A new diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Lubec, G; Balzar, E; Weissenbacher, G; Syré, G

    1978-05-01

    Alport's syndrome is defined by the combination of hereditary nephropathy and neurosensory deafness, and is diagnosed from the family history combined with renal electron microscopy. Immunoelectrophoresis of the urine of 8 of 12 children suspected of Alport's syndrome showed a precipitation line moving into the beta-zone, applying an antiglomerular basement membrane antibody derived from an immunised rabbit. All patients who showed the typical pattern of Alport's syndrome on renal electron microscopy were among the 8 cases whose urine gave this immunoelectrophoresis pattern. Additionally, 5 of the mothers of the 8 children excreted the same antigen in their urine. The urine of 30 healthy children and of 10 patients with the idiopathic nephrotic syndrome did not show the presence of this antigen. This characteristic sign of Alport's syndrome may therefore be useful for its detection. PMID:666354

  12. Excretion of 14C-edrophonium and its metabolites in bile

    PubMed Central

    Back, D. J.; Calvey, T. N.

    1972-01-01

    1. The metabolism and biliary excretion of 14C-edrophonium chloride was studied in Wistar rat. 2. Approximately 5% of the dose was recovered from bile in 6 hours. Most of the radioactivity was eliminated as 14C-edrophonium glucuronide. Small amounts of the unchanged drug were also detected in bile, particularly during the first hour after administration of the drug. 3. The concentration of 14C-edrophonium glucuronide in bile was approximately 15-20 times its concentration in plasma. 4. In contrast, the concentration of unchanged 14C-edrophonium was similar in bile and plasma. 5. Evidence is presented that unchanged 14C-edrophonium is transferred from plasma to bile via the peribiliary vascular plexus. PMID:5040663

  13. Moderate magnesium deprivation results in calcium retention and altered potassium and phosphorus excretion by postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Forrest H; Milne, David B; Gallagher, Sandra; Johnson, LuAnn; Hoverson, Bonita

    2007-03-01

    Enzyme and or hormone actions have not been shown to be consistently changed by consuming a low-magnesium diet similar to one that may occur in the general population. Thus, a human metabolic study was performed to determine whether deficient intakes of magnesium similar to those that occur naturally have pathophysiological effects through altering calcium retention and the metabolism of other minerals (sodium, potassium, phosphorus) involved in cellular ionic balance. Fifteen postmenopausal Caucasian women were recruited by advertisement throughout the United States. Eleven women (ages 49 to 71 years) completed the study as designed. The women resided in a metabolic research unit and consumed a basal Western-type diet that resulted in a mean intake of 4.40 mmol (107 mg) magnesium/d. The women were fed the basal diet supplemented with 9.05 mmol (220 mg) magnesium/d for 18 d (equilibration) before being assigned to one of two groups in an experiment with a double blind, crossover design. One group was fed the basal diet and supplemented with a lactose placebo while the other group continued consuming the basal diet supplemented with 9.05 mmol magnesium/d for 72 d, then each group switched to the other's diet, which they consumed for 72 d. Magnesium was supplemented as magnesium gluconate. Magnesium deprivation resulted in a non-positive magnesium balance (-0.21 mmol or -5 mg/d) that was highly positive during magnesium supplementation (+2.22 mmol or +54 mg/d). Magnesium deprivation decreased red blood cell membrane magnesium (2.5 versus 2.7 nmol or 0.061 versus 0.065 microg/mg protein; p < or = 0.05). Magnesium deprivation increased calcium balance (+0.82 mmol or +35 mg/d versus -0.02 or -1 mg/d; p < or = 0.009); decreased the fecal excretion of phosphorus (28.9% versus 32.3% of intake; p < or =0.0001); increased the urinary excretion of phosphorus (73.4% versus 71.0%; p < 0.003); and decreased the urinary excretion of potassium (40.4 mmol or 1.58 g/d versus 41

  14. Testing for designer stimulants: metabolic profiles of 16 synthetic cathinones excreted free in human urine.

    PubMed

    Uralets, Victor; Rana, Sumandeep; Morgan, Stewart; Ross, Wayne

    2014-06-01

    The study of 34,561 urine specimens, submitted for designer stimulant testing between February 2011 and January 2013, provided an opportunity: to estimate the range of synthetic cathinones (SC) abused in the USA, to observe multiple examples of metabolic profiles for each drug in various stages of excretion in human urine, to evaluate the extent of metabolism of specific SC and to select metabolites or parent drugs for routine testing. Sixteen SC were found in random patient samples: buphedrone; butylone; 3,4-dimethylmethcathinone; ethcathinone; N-ethylbuphedrone; ethylone; flephedrone; mephedrone; 4-methylbuphedrone; 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV); 4-methyl-N-ethylcathinone; methylone; pentedrone; pentylone; α-pyrrolidinobutiophenone (PBP) and α-pyrrolidinopentiophenone (PVP). After liquid/liquid extraction and trifluoroacetylation, specimens were screened by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for drugs and metabolites excreted free in urine. Each SC exhibited a characteristic metabolic profile, as shown by multiple examples. Metabolites' structures were postulated on the basis of their mass spectra. A large group of SC appears to metabolize extensively by carbonyl reduction into respective substituted ephedrines and further by N-dealkylation into norephedrines. Abundant metabolites in this group are essential markers of the parent drug use. Unchanged drugs are far less abundant or not found at all. SC with methylenedioxy attachment to the aromatic ring, metabolize by carbonyl reduction to a much lesser extent and are best detected as such in free urine fraction. PBP and PVP can be detected either unchanged or as metabolites, resulting from pyrrolidine ring degradation into primary amine followed by carbonyl reduction. MDPV appears in urine as such with no apparent free metabolites. PMID:24668489

  15. Breastfeeding: A Potential Excretion Route for Mothers and Implications for Infant Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Acids

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Debapriya; Weldon, Rosana Hernandez; Armstrong, Ben G.; Gibson, Lorna J.; Lopez-Espinosa, Maria-Jose; Shin, Hyeong-Moo

    2013-01-01

    Background: The presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in breast milk has been documented, but their lactational transfer has been rarely studied. Determination of the elimination rates of these chemicals during breastfeeding is important and critical for assessing exposure in mothers and infants. Objectives: We aimed to investigate the association between breastfeeding and maternal serum concentrations of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS). For a subset of the population, for whom we also have their infants’ measurements, we investigated associations of breastfeeding with infant serum PFAA concentrations. Methods: The present analysis included 633 women from the C8 Science Panel Study who had a child < 3.5 years of age and who provided blood samples and reported detailed information on breastfeeding at the time of survey. PFAA serum concentrations were available for all mothers and 8% (n = 49) of the infants. Maternal and infant serum concentrations were regressed on duration of breastfeeding. Results: Each month of breastfeeding was associated with lower maternal serum concentrations of PFOA (–3%; 95% CI: –5, –2%), PFOS (–3%; 95% CI: –3, –2%), PFNA (–2%; 95% CI: –2, –1%), and PFHxS (–1%; 95% CI: –2, 0%). The infant PFOA and PFOS serum concentrations were 6% (95% CI: 1, 10%) and 4% (95% CI: 1, 7%) higher per month of breastfeeding. Conclusions: Breast milk is the optimal food for infants, but is also a PFAA excretion route for lactating mothers and exposure route for nursing infants. Citation: Mondal D, Weldon RH, Armstrong BG, Gibson LJ, Lopez-Espinosa MJ, Shin HM, Fletcher T. 2014. Breastfeeding: a potential excretion route for mothers and implications for infant exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids. Environ Health Perspect 122:187–192; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306613 PMID:24280536

  16. Nifedipine lowers cocaine-induced brain and liver enzyme activity and cocaine urinary excretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Vitcheva, Vessela; Simeonova, Rumyana; Karova, Dima; Mitcheva, Mitka

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to see how nifedipine counters the effects of cocaine on hepatic and brain enzymatic activity in rats and whether it affects urinary excretion of cocaine. Male Wistar rats were divided in four groups of six: control, nifedipine group (5 mg kg-1i.p. a day for five days); cocaine group (15 mg kg-1i.p. a day for five days), and the nifedipine+cocaine group. Twenty-four hours after the last administration, we measured neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity in the brain and cytochrome P450 quantity, ethylmorphine-N-demethylase, and anilinehydroxylase activity in the liver. Urine samples were collected 24 h after the last cocaine and cocaine+nifedipine administration. Urinary cocaine concentration was determined using the GC/MS method.Cocaine administration increased brain nNOS activity by 55 % (p<0.05) in respect to control, which indicates the development of tolerance and dependence. In the combination group, nifedipine decreased the nNOS activity in respect to the cocaine-only group.In the liver, cocaine significantly decreased and nifedipine significantly increased cytochrome P450, ethylmorphine-N-demethylase, and anilinehydroxylase in respect to control. In combination, nifedipine successfully countered cocaine effects on these enzymes.Urine cocaine excretion in the cocaine+nifedipine group significantly dropped (by 35 %) compared to the cocaine-only group.Our results have confirmed the effects of nifedipine against cocaine tolerance and development of dependence, most likely due to metabolic interactions between them. PMID:21705300

  17. Does Replacing Sodium Excreted in Sweat Attenuate the Health Benefits of Physical Activity?

    PubMed

    Turner, Martin J; Avolio, Alberto P

    2016-08-01

    International guidelines suggest limiting sodium intake to 86-100 mmol/day, but average intake exceeds 150 mmol/day. Participants in physical activities are, however, advised to increase sodium intake before, during and after exercise to ensure euhydration, replace sodium lost in sweat, speed rehydration and maintain performance. A similar range of health benefits is attributable to exercise and to reduction in sodium intake, including reductions in blood pressure (BP) and the increase of BP with age, reduced risk of stroke and other cardiovascular diseases, and reduced risk of osteoporosis and dementia. Sweat typically contains 40-60 mmol/L of sodium, leading to approximately 20-90 mmol of sodium lost in one exercise session with sweat rates of 0.5-1.5 L/h. Reductions in sodium intake of 20-90 mmol/day have been associated with substantial health benefits. Homeostatic systems reduce sweat sodium as low as 3-10 mmol/L to prevent excessive sodium loss. "Salty sweaters" may be individuals with high sodium intake who perpetuate their "salty sweat" condition by continual replacement of sodium excreted in sweat. Studies of prolonged high intensity exercise in hot environments suggest that sodium supplementation is not necessary to prevent hyponatremia during exercise lasting up to 6 hr. We examine the novel hypothesis that sodium excreted in sweat during physical activity offsets a significant fraction of excess dietary sodium, and hence may contribute part of the health benefits of exercise. Replacing sodium lost in sweat during exercise may improve physical performance, but may attenuate the long-term health benefits of exercise. PMID:26841436

  18. Renal excretion of water in men under hypokinesia and physical exercise with fluid and salt supplementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Federenko, Youri F.; Togawa, Mitsui N.

    It has been suggested that under hypokinesia (reduced number of steps/day) and intensive physical exercise, the intensification of fluid excretion in men is apparently caused as a result of the inability of the body to retain optimum amounts of water. Thus, to evaluate this hypothesis, studies were performed with the use of fluid and sodium chloride (NaCl) supplements on 12 highly trained physically healthy male volunteers aged 19-24 years under 364 days of hypokinesis (HK) and a set of intensive physical exercises (PE). They were divided into two groups with 6 volunteers per group. The first group of subjects were submitted to HK and took daily fluid and salt supplements in very small doses and the second group of volunteers were subjected to intensive PE and fluid-salt supplements. For the simulation of the hypokinetic effect, both groups of subjects were kept under an average of 4000 steps/day. During the prehypokinetic period of 60 days and under the hypokinetic period of 364 days water consumed and eliminated in urine by the men, water content in blood, plasma volume, rate of glomerular filtration, renal blood flow, osmotic concentration of urine and blood were measured. Under HK, the rate of renal excretion of water increased considerably in both groups. The additional fluid and salt intake failed to normalize water balance adequately under HK and PE. It was concluded that negative water balance evidently resulted not from shortage of water in the diet but from the inability of the body to retain optimum amounts of fluid under HK and a set of intensive PEs.

  19. Association between Urinary Albumin Excretion and Intraocular Pressure in Type 2 Diabetic Patients without Renal Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin A.; Han, Kyungdo; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the relationship between urinary albumin excretion and intraocular pressure (IOP) in type 2 diabetes patients without renal impairment. Methods We explored the effects of albuminuria on high IOP in 402 non-glaucomatous type 2 diabetes without renal impairment who participated in the 2011 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between log-transformed albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) tertiles and an IOP of ≥18 mmHg after adjusting for age, gender, hypertension, body mass index, triglycerides, area of residence, and education level. Results Subjects with a high IOP ≥18 mmHg were more likely to be current smokers (P = 0.038), heavy drinkers (P = 0.006), and to have high systolic blood pressure (P = 0.016), triglycerides (P = 0.008), and a higher log-transformed ACR (P = 0.022).In multivariate regression analysis, ACR tertile was associated with the prevalence of high IOP significantly (P = 0.022). The associations between ACR tertiles and high IOP were significant in overweight patients and those with abdominal obesity (P = 0.003 and 0.003, respectively). In contrast, there were no associations in the subgroup of patients who were not overweight and those without abdominal obesity (P = 0.291 and 0.561, respectively). Conclusions Urinary albumin excretion is associated with high IOP in the type 2 diabetes population without renal insufficiency. The effect of the albuminuria on IOP was evident in a subgroup of patients with components of metabolic syndrome. PMID:24788677

  20. Chronic metabolic acidosis reduces urinary oxalate excretion and promotes intestinal oxalate secretion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Whittamore, Jonathan M; Hatch, Marguerite

    2015-11-01

    Urinary oxalate excretion is reduced in rats during a chronic metabolic acidosis, but how this is achieved is not clear. In this report, we re-examine our prior work on the effects of a metabolic acidosis on urinary oxalate handling [Green et al., Am J Physiol Ren Physiol 289(3):F536-F543, 2005], offering a more detailed analysis and interpretation of the data, together with new, previously unpublished observations revealing a marked impact on intestinal oxalate transport. Sprague-Dawley rats were provided with 0.28 M ammonium chloride in their drinking water for either 4 or 14 days followed by 24 h urine collections, blood-gas and serum ion analysis, and measurements of (14)C-oxalate fluxes across isolated segments of the distal colon. Urinary oxalate excretion was significantly reduced by 75% after just 4 days compared to control rats, and this was similarly sustained at 14 days. Oxalate:creatinine clearance ratios indicated enhanced net re-absorption of oxalate by the kidney during a metabolic acidosis, but this was not associated with any substantive changes to serum oxalate levels. In the distal colon, oxalate transport was dramatically altered from net absorption in controls (6.20 ± 0.63 pmol cm(-2) h(-1)), to net secretion in rats with a metabolic acidosis (-5.19 ± 1.18 and -2.07 ± 1.05 pmol cm(-2) h(-1) at 4 and 14 days, respectively). Although we cannot rule out modifications to bi-directional oxalate movements along the proximal tubule, these findings support a gut-kidney axis in the management of oxalate homeostasis, where this shift in renal handling during a metabolic acidosis is associated with compensatory adaptations by the intestine. PMID:26162424

  1. Formation and excretion of autophagic plastids (plastolysomes) in Brassica napus embryogenic microspores

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Vega, Verónica; Corral-Martínez, Patricia; Rivas-Sendra, Alba; Seguí-Simarro, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The change in developmental fate of microspores reprogrammed toward embryogenesis is a complex but fascinating experimental system where microspores undergo dramatic changes derived from the developmental switch. After 40 years of study of the ultrastructural changes undergone by the induced microspores, many questions are still open. In this work, we analyzed the architecture of DNA-containing organelles such as plastids and mitochondria in samples of B. napus isolated microspore cultures covering the different stages before, during, and after the developmental switch. Mitochondria presented a conventional oval or sausage-like morphology for all cell types studied, similar to that found in vivo in other cell types from vegetative parts. Similarly, plastids of microspores before induction and of non-induced cells showed conventional architectures. However, approximately 40% of the plastids of embryogenic microspores presented atypical features such as curved profiles, protrusions, and internal compartments filled with cytoplasm. Three-dimensional reconstructions confirmed that these plastids actually engulf cytoplasm regions, isolating them from the rest of the cell. Acid phosphatase activity was found in them, confirming the lytic activity of these organelles. In addition, digested plastid-like structures were found excreted to the apoplast. All these phenomena seemed transient, since microspore-derived embryos (MDEs) showed conventional plas