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Sample records for 14-3-3 proteins play

  1. Neuroprotective Function of 14-3-3 Proteins in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Tadayuki; Fournier, Alyson E.; Yamagata, Kanato

    2013-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins are abundantly expressed adaptor proteins that interact with a vast number of binding partners to regulate their cellular localization and function. They regulate substrate function in a number of ways including protection from dephosphorylation, regulation of enzyme activity, formation of ternary complexes and sequestration. The diversity of 14-3-3 interacting partners thus enables 14-3-3 proteins to impact a wide variety of cellular and physiological processes. 14-3-3 proteins are broadly expressed in the brain, and clinical and experimental studies have implicated 14-3-3 proteins in neurodegenerative disease. A recurring theme is that 14-3-3 proteins play important roles in pathogenesis through regulating the subcellular localization of target proteins. Here, we review the evidence that 14-3-3 proteins regulate aspects of neurodegenerative disease with a focus on their protective roles against neurodegeneration. PMID:24364034

  2. Proteomics Profiling Reveals Carbohydrate Metabolic Enzymes and 14-3-3 Proteins Play Important Roles for Starch Accumulation during Cassava Root Tuberization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Tong, Zheng; Wang, Dongyang; Yin, Qi; Wang, Dan; Jin, Xiang; Yang, Qian; Wang, Liming; Sun, Yong; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava is one of the most important root crops as a reliable source of food and carbohydrates. Carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation in cassava storage root is a cascade process that includes large amounts of proteins and cofactors. Here, comparative proteomics were conducted in cassava root at nine developmental stages. A total of 154 identified proteins were found to be differentially expressed during starch accumulation and root tuberization. Many enzymes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism were significantly up-regulated, and functional classification of the differentially expressed proteins demonstrated that the majority were binding-related enzymes. Many proteins were took part in carbohydrate metabolism to produce energy. Among them, three 14-3-3 isoforms were induced to be clearly phosphorylated during storage root enlargement. Overexpression of a cassava 14-3-3 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana confirmed that the older leaves of these transgenic plants contained higher sugar and starch contents than the wild-type leaves. The 14-3-3 proteins and their binding enzymes may play important roles in carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root tuberization. These results not only deepened our understanding of the tuberous root proteome, but also uncovered new insights into carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root enlargement. PMID:26791570

  3. Proteomics Profiling Reveals Carbohydrate Metabolic Enzymes and 14-3-3 Proteins Play Important Roles for Starch Accumulation during Cassava Root Tuberization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Tong, Zheng; Wang, Dongyang; Yin, Qi; Wang, Dan; Jin, Xiang; Yang, Qian; Wang, Liming; Sun, Yong; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava is one of the most important root crops as a reliable source of food and carbohydrates. Carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation in cassava storage root is a cascade process that includes large amounts of proteins and cofactors. Here, comparative proteomics were conducted in cassava root at nine developmental stages. A total of 154 identified proteins were found to be differentially expressed during starch accumulation and root tuberization. Many enzymes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism were significantly up-regulated, and functional classification of the differentially expressed proteins demonstrated that the majority were binding-related enzymes. Many proteins were took part in carbohydrate metabolism to produce energy. Among them, three 14-3-3 isoforms were induced to be clearly phosphorylated during storage root enlargement. Overexpression of a cassava 14-3-3 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana confirmed that the older leaves of these transgenic plants contained higher sugar and starch contents than the wild-type leaves. The 14-3-3 proteins and their binding enzymes may play important roles in carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root tuberization. These results not only deepened our understanding of the tuberous root proteome, but also uncovered new insights into carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root enlargement. PMID:26791570

  4. 14-3-3 Proteins SGF14c and SGF14l Play Critical Roles during Soybean Nodulation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Osman; Wu, Xia; Govindarajulu, Manjula; Libault, Marc; Neece, David J.; Oh, Man-Ho; Berg, R. Howard; Stacey, Gary; Taylor, Christopher G.; Huber, Steven C.; Clough, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    The soybean (Glycine max) genome contains 18 members of the 14-3-3 protein family, but little is known about their association with specific phenotypes. Here, we report that the Glyma0529080 Soybean G-box Factor 14-3-3c (SGF14c) and Glyma08g12220 (SGF14l) genes, encoding 14-3-3 proteins, appear to play essential roles in soybean nodulation. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western-immunoblot analyses showed that SGF14c mRNA and protein levels were specifically increased in abundance in nodulated soybean roots 10, 12, 16, and 20 d after inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum. To investigate the role of SGF14c during soybean nodulation, RNA interference was employed to silence SGF14c expression in soybean roots using Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated root transformation. Due to the paleopolyploid nature of soybean, designing a specific RNA interference sequence that exclusively targeted SGF14c was not possible. Therefore, two highly similar paralogs (SGF14c and SGF14l) that have been shown to function as dimers were silenced. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses showed that mRNA and protein levels were significantly reduced in the SGF14c/SGF14l-silenced roots, and these roots exhibited reduced numbers of mature nodules. In addition, SGF14c/SGF14l-silenced roots contained large numbers of arrested nodule primordia following B. japonicum inoculation. Transmission electron microscopy further revealed that the host cytoplasm and membranes, except the symbiosome membrane, were severely degraded in the failed nodules. Altogether, transcriptomic, proteomic, and cytological data suggest a critical role of one or both of these 14-3-3 proteins in early development stages of soybean nodules. PMID:23060368

  5. 14-3-3 Proteins in Guard Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cotelle, Valérie; Leonhardt, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells are specialized cells located at the leaf surface delimiting pores which control gas exchanges between the plant and the atmosphere. To optimize the CO2 uptake necessary for photosynthesis while minimizing water loss, guard cells integrate environmental signals to adjust stomatal aperture. The size of the stomatal pore is regulated by movements of the guard cells driven by variations in their volume and turgor. As guard cells perceive and transduce a wide array of environmental cues, they provide an ideal system to elucidate early events of plant signaling. Reversible protein phosphorylation events are known to play a crucial role in the regulation of stomatal movements. However, in some cases, phosphorylation alone is not sufficient to achieve complete protein regulation, but is necessary to mediate the binding of interactors that modulate protein function. Among the phosphopeptide-binding proteins, the 14-3-3 proteins are the best characterized in plants. The 14-3-3s are found as multiple isoforms in eukaryotes and have been shown to be involved in the regulation of stomatal movements. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about 14-3-3 roles in the regulation of their binding partners in guard cells: receptors, ion pumps, channels, protein kinases, and some of their substrates. Regulation of these targets by 14-3-3 proteins is discussed and related to their function in guard cells during stomatal movements in response to abiotic or biotic stresses. PMID:26858725

  6. Determining novel functions of Arabidopsis 14-3-3 proteins in central metabolic processes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 14-3-3 proteins are considered master regulators of many signal transduction cascades in eukaryotes. In plants, 14-3-3 proteins have major roles as regulators of nitrogen and carbon metabolism, conclusions based on the studies of a few specific 14-3-3 targets. Results In this study, extensive novel roles of 14-3-3 proteins in plant metabolism were determined through combining the parallel analyses of metabolites and enzyme activities in 14-3-3 overexpression and knockout plants with studies of protein-protein interactions. Decreases in the levels of sugars and nitrogen-containing-compounds and in the activities of known 14-3-3-interacting-enzymes were observed in 14-3-3 overexpression plants. Plants overexpressing 14-3-3 proteins also contained decreased levels of malate and citrate, which are intermediate compounds of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. These modifications were related to the reduced activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase, which are key enzymes of TCA cycle. In addition, we demonstrated that 14-3-3 proteins interacted with one isocitrate dehydrogenase and two malate dehydrogenases. There were also changes in the levels of aromatic compounds and the activities of shikimate dehydrogenase, which participates in the biosynthesis of aromatic compounds. Conclusion Taken together, our findings indicate that 14-3-3 proteins play roles as crucial tuners of multiple primary metabolic processes including TCA cycle and the shikimate pathway. PMID:22104211

  7. Molecular evolution of the 14-3-3 protein family.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Shakes, D C

    1996-10-01

    Members of the highly conserved and ubiquitous 14-3-3 protein family modulate a wide variety of cellular processes. To determine the evolutionary relationships among specific 14-3-3 proteins in different plant, animal, and fungal species and to initiate a predictive analysis of isoform-specific differences in light of the latest functional and structural studies of 14-3-3, multiple alignments were constructed from forty-six 14-3-3 sequences retrieved from the GenBank and SwissProt databases and a newly identified second 14-3-3 gene from Caenorhabditis elegans. The alignment revealed five highly conserved sequence blocks. Blocks 2-5 correlate well with the alpha helices 3, 5, 7, and 9 which form the proposed internal binding domain in the three-dimensional structure model of the functioning dimer. Amino acid differences within the functional and structural domains of plant and animal 14-3-3 proteins were identified which may account for functional diversity amongst isoforms. Protein phylogenic trees were constructed using both the maximum parsimony and neighbor joining methods of the PHYLIP(3.5c) package; 14-3-3 proteins from Entamoeba histolytica, an amitochondrial protozoa, were employed as an outgroup in our analysis. Epsilon isoforms from the animal lineage form a distinct grouping in both trees, which suggests an early divergence from the other animal isoforms. Epsilons were found to be more similar to yeast and plant isoforms than other animal isoforms at numerous amino acid positions, and thus epsilon may have retained functional characteristics of the ancestral protein. The known invertebrate proteins group with the nonepsilon mammalian isoforms. Most of the current 14-3-3 isoform diversity probably arose through independent duplication events after the divergence of the major eukaryotic kingdoms. Divergence of the seven mammalian isoforms beta, zeta, gamma, eta, epsilon, tau, and sigma (stratifin/HME1) occurred before the divergence of mammalian and perhaps

  8. A fusicoccin binding protein belongs to the family of 14-3-3 brain protein homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Korthout, H A; de Boer, A H

    1994-01-01

    The fusicoccin binding protein (FCBP) is a highly conserved plasma membrane protein present in all higher plants tested thus far. It exhibits high- and low-affinity binding for the fungal toxin fusicoccin (FC). We purified the active FCBP from a fraction highly enriched in plasma membrane by selective precipitation and anion exchange chromatography. After SDS-PAGE, the two FCBP subunits of 30 and 31 kD were detected as major bands. Amino acid sequence analysis of the 31-kD polypeptide displayed a high degree of identity with so-called 14-3-3 proteins, a class of mammalian brain proteins initially described as regulators of neurotransmitter synthesis and protein kinase C inhibitors. Thereafter, we affinity purified the 30- and 31-kD FCBP subunits, using biotinylated FC in combination with a monomeric avidin column. Immunodecoration of these 30- and 31-kD FCBP subunits with polyclonal antibodies raised against a 14-3-3 homolog from yeast confirmed the identity of the FCBP as a 14-3-3 homolog. Similar to all 14-3-3 protein homologs, the FCBP seems to exist as a dimer in native form. Thus far, the FCBP is the only 14-3-3 homolog with a receptor-like function. The conserved structure of the 14-3-3 protein family is a further indication that the FCBP plays an important role in the physiology of higher plants. PMID:7827499

  9. 14-3-3 sigma and 14-3-3 zeta plays an opposite role in cell growth inhibition mediated by transforming growth factor-beta 1.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hye-Young; Jeon, Woo-Kwang; Bae, Eun-Jin; Kim, Shin-Tae; Lee, Ho-Jae; Kim, Seong-Jin; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2010-03-01

    The expression of 14-3-3 proteins is dysregulated in various types of cancer. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of 14-3-3 zeta and 14-3-3 sigma on cell growth inhibition mediated by transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Mouse mammary epithelial cells (Eph4) that are transformed with oncogenic c-H-Ras (EpRas) and no longer sensitive to TGF-beta1-mediated growth inhibition displayed increased expression of 14-3-3 zeta and decreased expression of 14-3-3 sigma compared with parental Eph4 cells. Using small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown and overexpression of 14-3-3 sigma or 14-3-3 zeta, we showed that 14-3-3 sigma is required for TGF-beta1-mediated growth inhibition whereas 14-3-3 zeta negatively modulates this growth inhibitory response. Notably, overexpression of 14-3-3 zeta increased the level of Smad3 protein that is phosphorylated at linker regions and cannot mediate the TGF-beta1 growth inhibitory response. Consistent with this finding, mutation of the 14-3-3 zeta phosphorylation sites in Smad3 markedly reduced the 14-3-3 zeta-mediated inhibition of TGF-beta1-induced p15 promoter-reporter activity and cell cycle arrest, suggesting that these residues are critical targets of 14-3-3 zeta in the suppression of TGF-beta1-mediated growth. Taken together, our findings indicate that dysregulation of 14-3-3 sigma or 14-3-3 zeta contributes to TGF-beta1 resistance in cancer cells. PMID:20082218

  10. Up-regulated 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ζ proteins in prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia: effect of psychotropic treatment.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Guadalupe; Gabilondo, Ane M; García-Sevilla, Jesús A; La Harpe, Romano; Morentín, Benito; Meana, J Javier

    2015-02-01

    14-3-3 is a family of conserved regulatory proteins that bind to a multitude of functionally diverse signalling proteins. Various genetic studies and gene expression and proteomic analyses have involved 14-3-3 proteins in schizophrenia (SZ). On the other hand, studies about the status of these proteins in major depressive disorder (MD) are still missing. Immunoreactivity values of cytosolic 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ζ proteins were evaluated by Western blot in prefrontal cortex (PFC) of subjects with schizophrenia (SZ; n=22), subjects with major depressive disorder (MD; n=21) and age-, gender- and postmortem delay-matched control subjects (n=52). The modulation of 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ζ proteins by psychotropic medication was also assessed. The analysis of both proteins in SZ subjects with respect to matched control subjects showed increased 14-3-3β (Δ=33±10%, p<0.05) and 14-3-3ζ (Δ=29±6%, p<0.05) immunoreactivity in antipsychotic-free but not in antipsychotic-treated SZ subjects. Immunoreactivity values of 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ζ were not altered in MD subjects. These results show the specific up-regulation of 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ζ proteins in PFC of SZ subjects and suggest a possible down-regulation of both proteins by antipsychotic treatment. PMID:25549848

  11. Alternations of 14-3-3 θ and β protein levels in brain during experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Memos, Nikolaos; Kataki, Agapi; Chatziganni, Emmy; Nikolopoulou, Marilena; Skoulakis, Euthimios; Consoulas, Christos; Zografos, George; Konstadoulakis, Manousos

    2011-09-01

    The 14-3-3 family members play a crucial role in the determination of cell fate, exerting their antiapoptotic activity through directly interfering with the critical function of the mitochondrial core proapoptotic machinery. Dimerization of 14-3-3 is vital for the interaction with many of its client proteins and is regulated by phosphorylation. In a previous study, we observed time-dependent neuronal apoptosis during sepsis. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to evaluate the expression of 14-3-3 θ and β isoforms in septic brain and their association with apoptosis. Sepsis was induced by a CLP model in Wistar rats that were sacrificed at predefined time points. Flow cytometric analysis showed a sepsis-induced, time-dependent alteration of 14-3-3 θ and β isoforms in both Neun(+) and GFAP(+) cells. 14-3-3 θ was linearly correlated with apoptosis, and stratified analysis for alive and apoptotic neuronal cells demonstrated a gradual down-regulation of θ isoform in alive neurons and astrocytes. The phospho-P38 (pP38) MAP kinase levels were altered in a time-dependent manner during sepsis, presenting a peak at 6 hr post-CLP. A significant correlation between the two isoforms of 14-3-3 was observed in septic rats, with the θ isoform predominant at all time points. The hippocampus, Purkinje cells, and glia-like cells showed intense immunohistochemical reactivity for 14-3-3 θ isoform, whereas the choroid plexus showed constantly increased β isoform expression. Our results showed that sepsis alters the expression of both 14-3-3 θ and β isoforms in a time-, cell-, and topography-dependent manner. PMID:21618583

  12. Involvement of 14-3-3 Proteins in Regulating Tumor Progression of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Ju; Jan, Yee-Jee; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Liang, Shu-Man; Liou, Jun-Yang

    2015-01-01

    There are seven mammalian isoforms of the 14-3-3 protein, which regulate multiple cellular functions via interactions with phosphorylated partners. Increased expression of 14-3-3 proteins contributes to tumor progression of various malignancies. Several isoforms of 14-3-3 are overexpressed and associate with higher metastatic risks and poorer survival rates of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ζ regulate HCC cell proliferation, tumor growth and chemosensitivity via modulating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 signal pathways. Moreover, 14-3-3ε suppresses E-cadherin and induces focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression, thereby enhancing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and HCC cell migration. 14-3-3ζ forms complexes with αB-crystallin, which induces EMT and is the cause of sorafenib resistance in HCC. Finally, a recent study has indicated that 14-3-3σ induces heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression, which increases HCC cell migration. These results suggest that selective 14-3-3 isoforms contribute to cell proliferation, EMT and cell migration of HCC by regulating distinct targets and signal pathways. Targeting 14-3-3 proteins together with specific downstream effectors therefore has potential to be therapeutic and prognostic factors of HCC. In this article, we will overview 14-3-3's regulation of its downstream factors and contributions to HCC EMT, cell migration and proliferation. PMID:26083935

  13. The role of the 14-3-3 protein family in health, disease, and drug development.

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh, Yasaman; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-02-01

    14-3-3 proteins regulate intracellular signaling pathways, such as signal transduction, protein trafficking, cell cycle, and apoptosis. In addition to the ubiquitous roles of 14-3-3 isoforms, unique tissue-specific functions are also described for each isoform. Owing to their role in regulating cell cycle, protein trafficking, and steroidogenesis, 14-3-3 proteins are prevalent in human diseases, such as cancer, neurodegeneration, and reproductive disorders, and, therefore, serve as valuable drug targets. In this review, we summarize the role of 14-3-3 proteins in normal and disease states, with a focus on 14-3-3γ and ɛ. We also discuss drug compounds targeting 14-3-3 proteins and their potential therapeutic uses. PMID:26456530

  14. 14-3-3 proteins regulate Tctp-Rheb interaction for organ growth in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Le, Thao Phuong; Vuong, Linh Thuong; Kim, Ah-Ram; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Choi, Kwang-Wook

    2016-01-01

    14-3-3 family proteins regulate multiple signalling pathways. Understanding biological functions of 14-3-3 proteins has been limited by the functional redundancy of conserved isotypes. Here we provide evidence that 14-3-3 proteins regulate two interacting components of Tor signalling in Drosophila, translationally controlled tumour protein (Tctp) and Rheb GTPase. Single knockdown of 14-3-3ɛ or 14-3-3ζ isoform does not show obvious defects in organ development but causes synergistic genetic interaction with Tctp and Rheb to impair tissue growth. 14-3-3 proteins physically interact with Tctp and Rheb. Knockdown of both 14-3-3 isoforms abolishes the binding between Tctp and Rheb, disrupting organ development. Depletion of 14-3-3s also reduces the level of phosphorylated S6 kinase, phosphorylated Thor/4E-BP and cyclin E (CycE). Growth defects from knockdown of 14-3-3 and Tctp are suppressed by CycE overexpression. This study suggests a novel mechanism of Tor regulation mediated by 14-3-3 interaction with Tctp and Rheb. PMID:27151460

  15. 14-3-3 proteins regulate Tctp–Rheb interaction for organ growth in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Le, Thao Phuong; Vuong, Linh Thuong; Kim, Ah-Ram; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Choi, Kwang-Wook

    2016-01-01

    14-3-3 family proteins regulate multiple signalling pathways. Understanding biological functions of 14-3-3 proteins has been limited by the functional redundancy of conserved isotypes. Here we provide evidence that 14-3-3 proteins regulate two interacting components of Tor signalling in Drosophila, translationally controlled tumour protein (Tctp) and Rheb GTPase. Single knockdown of 14-3-3ɛ or 14-3-3ζ isoform does not show obvious defects in organ development but causes synergistic genetic interaction with Tctp and Rheb to impair tissue growth. 14-3-3 proteins physically interact with Tctp and Rheb. Knockdown of both 14-3-3 isoforms abolishes the binding between Tctp and Rheb, disrupting organ development. Depletion of 14-3-3s also reduces the level of phosphorylated S6 kinase, phosphorylated Thor/4E-BP and cyclin E (CycE). Growth defects from knockdown of 14-3-3 and Tctp are suppressed by CycE overexpression. This study suggests a novel mechanism of Tor regulation mediated by 14-3-3 interaction with Tctp and Rheb. PMID:27151460

  16. Destabilisation of dimeric 14-3-3 proteins as a novel approach to anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Joanna M; Coolen, Carl; Goodwin, Katy L; Baek, Dong Jae; Bittman, Robert; Samuel, Michael S; Pitson, Stuart M; Lopez, Angel F

    2015-06-10

    14-3-3 proteins play a pivotal role in controlling cell proliferation and survival, two commonly dysregulated hallmarks of cancers. 14-3-3 protein expression is enhanced in many human cancers and correlates with more aggressive tumors and poor prognosis, suggesting a role for 14-3-3 proteins in tumorigenesis and/or progression. We showed previously that the dimeric state of 14-3-3 proteins is regulated by the lipid sphingosine, a physiological inducer of apoptosis. As the functions of 14-3-3 proteins are dependent on their dimeric state, this sphingosine-mediated 14-3-3 regulation provides a possible means to target dimeric 14-3-3 for therapeutic effect. However, sphingosine mimics are needed that are not susceptible to sphingolipid metabolism. We show here the identification and optimization of sphingosine mimetics that render dimeric 14-3-3 susceptible to phosphorylation at a site buried in the dimer interface and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Two such compounds, RB-011 and RB-012, disrupt 14-3-3 dimers at low micromolar concentrations and induce rapid down-regulation of Raf-MAPK and PI3K-Akt signaling in Jurkat cells. Importantly, both RB-011 and RB-012 induce apoptosis of human A549 lung cancer cells and RB-012, through disruption of MAPK signaling, reduces xenograft growth in mice. Thus, these compounds provide proof-of-principle for this novel 14-3-3-targeting approach for anti-cancer drug discovery. PMID:25971334

  17. 14-3-3 proteins interact with the insulin-like growth factor receptor but not the insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Furlanetto, R W; Dey, B R; Lopaczynski, W; Nissley, S P

    1997-01-01

    We have used a yeast two-hybrid system to identify proteins which bind to the cytosolic portion of the type 1 insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor (IGFIR) but not the insulin receptor (IR). This analysis identified 14-3-3beta and zeta proteins. 14-3-3beta also binds to the IGFIR but not the IR in vitro and 14-3-3-IGFIR complexes are present in insect cells overexpressing the IGFIR cytoplasmic domain. 14-3-3 proteins are substrates of the IGFIR in the yeast system and in vitro. The interaction of 14-3-3 with the IGFIR requires receptor-kinase activity and maps to the C-terminus of the receptor, but does not depend on tyrosine residues in this or the juxtamembrane regions. Instead, the binding maps to serine residue 1283 and requires phosphorylation of this residue. 14-3-3 proteins are phosphoserine-binding proteins which have been shown to interact directly with components of the mitogenic and apoptotic signalling pathways, suggesting that they participate in growth regulation. Our findings suggest that 14-3-3 proteins may play a role in IGFIR signal transduction and may contribute to the differences in IGF and IR signalling capabilities. PMID:9581554

  18. Differential neuroprotective effects of 14-3-3 proteins in models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoubian, T A; Slone, S R; Harrington, A J; Hamamichi, S; Schieltz, J M; Caldwell, K A; Caldwell, G A; Standaert, D G

    2010-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins are important negative regulators of cell death pathways. Recent studies have revealed alterations in 14-3-3s in Parkinson's disease (PD) and the ability of 14-3-3s to interact with alpha-synuclein (α-syn), a protein central to PD pathophysiology. In a transgenic α-syn mouse model, we found reduced expression of 14-3-3θ, ε, and γ. These same isoforms prevent α-syn inclusion formation in an H4 neuroglioma cell model. Using dopaminergic cell lines stably overexpressing each 14-3-3 isoform, we found that overexpression of 14-3-3θ, ε, or γ led to resistance to both rotenone and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), while other isoforms were not protective against both toxins. Inhibition of a single protective isoform, 14-3-3θ, by shRNA did not increase vulnerability to neurotoxic injury, but toxicity was enhanced by broad-based inhibition of 14-3-3 action with the peptide inhibitor difopein. Using a transgenic C. elegans model of PD, we confirmed the ability of both human 14-3-3θ and a C. elegans 14-3-3 homolog (ftt-2) to protect dopaminergic neurons from α-syn toxicity. Collectively, these data show a strong neuroprotective effect of enhanced 14-3-3 expression - particularly of the 14-3-3θ, ε, and γ isoforms - in multiple cellular and animal models of PD, and point to the potential value of these proteins in the development of neuroprotective therapies for human PD. PMID:21152247

  19. Hyperglycemia decreases expression of 14-3-3 proteins in an animal model of stroke.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seong-Jun; Sung, Jin-Hee; Koh, Phil-Ok

    2016-07-28

    Diabetes is a severe metabolic disorder and a major risk factor for stroke. Stroke severity is worse in patients with diabetes compared to the non-diabetic population. The 14-3-3 proteins are a family of conserved acidic proteins that are ubiquitously expressed in cells and tissues. These proteins are involved in many cellular processes including metabolic pathways, signal transduction, protein trafficking, protein synthesis, and cell cycle control. This study investigated 14-3-3 proteins expression in the cerebral cortex of animals with diabetes, cerebral ischemic injury and a combination of both diabetes and cerebral ischemic injury. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (40mg/kg) in adult male rats. After 4 weeks of treatment, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was performed for the induction of focal cerebral ischemia and cerebral cortex tissue was collected 24h after MCAO. We confirmed that diabetes increases infarct volume following MCAO compared to non-diabetic animals. In diabetic animals with MCAO injury, reduction of 14-3-3 β/α, 14-3-3 ζ/δ, 14-3-3 γ, and 14-3-3 ε isoforms was detected. The expression of these proteins was significantly decreased in diabetic animals with MCAO injury compared to diabetic-only and MCAO-only animals. Moreover, Western blot analysis ascertained the decreased expression of 14-3-3 family proteins in diabetic animals with MCAO injury, including β/α, ζ/δ, γ, ε, τ, and η isoforms. These results show the changes of 14-3-3 proteins expression in streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals with MCAO injury. Thus, these findings suggest that decreases in 14-3-3 proteins might be involved in the regulation of 14-3-3 proteins under the presence of diabetes following MCAO. PMID:27177727

  20. Identification of a redox-modulatory interaction between selenoprotein W and 14-3-3 protein.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yeong Ha; Ko, Kwan Young; Lee, Jea Hwang; Park, Ki Jun; Jang, Jun Ki; Kim, Ick Young

    2016-01-01

    Selenoprotein W (SelW) contains a selenocysteine (Sec, U) in a conserved CXXU motif corresponding to the CXXC redox motif of thioredoxin, suggesting a putative redox function of SelW. We have previously reported that the binding of 14-3-3 protein to its target proteins, including CDC25B, Rictor and TAZ, is inhibited by the interaction of 14-3-3 protein with SelW. However, the binding mechanism is unclear. In this study, we sought to determine the binding site of SelW to understand the regulatory mechanism of the interaction between SelW and 14-3-3 and its biological effects. Phosphorylated Ser(pS) or Thr(pT) residues in RSXpSXP or RXXXp(S/T)XP motifs are well-known common 14-3-3-binding sites, but Thr41, Ser59, and T69 of SelW, which are computationally predicted to serve are phosphorylation sites, were neither phosphorylation sites nor sites involved in the interaction. A mutant SelW in which Sec13 is changed to Ser (U13S) was unable to interact with 14-3-3 protein and thus did not inhibit the interaction of 14-3-3 to other target proteins. However, other Cys mutants of SelW(C10S, C33S and C37S) normally interacted with 14-3-3 protein. The interaction of SelW to 14-3-3 protein was enhanced by diamide or H2O2 and decreased by dithiothreitol (DTT). Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the Sec of SelW is involved in its interaction with 14-3-3 protein and that this interaction is increased under oxidative stress conditions. Thus, SelW may have a regulatory function in redox cell signaling by interacting with 14-3-3 protein. PMID:26474786

  1. Identification of 14-3-3zeta associated protein networks in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Matta, Ajay; Masui, Olena; Siu, K W Michael; Ralhan, Ranju

    2016-04-01

    Advancements in genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics have improved our understanding of gene/protein networks involved in intra- and intercellular communication and tumor-host interactions. Using proteomics integrated with bioinformatics, previously we reported overexpression of 14-3-3ζ in premalignant oral lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma tissues in comparison with normal oral epithelium. 14-3-3ζ emerged as a novel molecular target for therapeutics and a potential prognostic marker in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. However, the role of 14-3-3ζ in development and progression of oral cancer is not known yet. This study aimed to identify the 14-3-3ζ associated protein networks in oral cancer cell lines using IP-MS/MS and bioinformatics. A total of 287 binding partners of 14-3-3ζ were identified in metastatic (MDA1986) and nonmetastatic (SCC4) oral cancer cell lines including other 14-3-3 isoforms (2%), proteins involved in apoptosis (2%), cytoskeleton (9%), metabolism (16%), and maintenance of redox potential (2%). Our bioinformatics analysis revealed involvement of 14-3-3ζ in protein networks regulating cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, cellular trafficking, and endocytosis in oral cancer. In conclusion, our data revealed several novel protein interaction networks involving 14-3-3ζ in oral cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:26857332

  2. Regulation of starch accumulation by granule-associated plant 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Sehnke, P C; Chung, H J; Wu, K; Ferl, R J

    2001-01-16

    In higher plants the production of starch is orchestrated by chloroplast-localized biosynthetic enzymes, namely starch synthases, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, and starch branching and debranching enzymes. Diurnal regulation of these enzymes, as well as starch-degrading enzymes, influences both the levels and composition of starch, and is dependent in some instances upon phosphorylation-linked regulation. The phosphoserine/threonine-binding 14-3-3 proteins participate in environmentally responsive phosphorylation-related regulatory functions in plants, and as such are potentially involved in starch regulation. We report here that reduction of the epsilon subgroup of Arabidopsis 14-3-3 proteins by antisense technology resulted in a 2- to 4-fold increase in leaf starch accumulation. Dark-governed starch breakdown was unaffected in these "antisense plants," indicating an unaltered starch-degradation pathway and suggesting a role for 14-3-3 proteins in regulation of starch synthesis. Absorption spectra and gelatinization properties indicate that the starch from the antisense plants has an altered branched glucan composition. Biochemical characterization of protease-treated starch granules from both Arabidopsis leaves and maize endosperm showed that 14-3-3 proteins are internal intrinsic granule proteins. These data suggest a direct role for 14-3-3 proteins in starch accumulation. The starch synthase III family is a possible target for 14-3-3 protein regulation because, uniquely among plastid-localized starch metabolic enzymes, all members of the family contain the conserved 14-3-3 protein phosphoserine/threonine-binding consensus motif. This possibility is strengthened by immunocapture using antibodies to DU1, a maize starch synthase III family member, and direct interaction with biotinylated 14-3-3 protein, both of which demonstrated an association between 14-3-3 proteins and DU1 or DU1-like proteins. PMID:11149942

  3. Dual binding of 14-3-3 protein regulates Arabidopsis nitrate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Chi, Jen-Chih; Roeper, Juliane; Schwarz, Guenter; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin

    2015-03-01

    14-3-3 proteins represent a family of ubiquitous eukaryotic proteins involved in numerous signal transduction processes and metabolic pathways. One important 14-3-3 target in higher plants is nitrate reductase (NR), whose activity is regulated by different physiological conditions. Intra-molecular electron transfer in NR is inhibited following 14-3-3 binding to a conserved phospho-serine motif located in hinge 1, a surface exposed loop between the catalytic molybdenum and central heme domain. Here we describe a novel 14-3-3 binding site within the NR N-terminus, an acidic motif conserved in NRs of higher plants, which significantly contributes to 14-3-3-mediated inhibition of NR. Deletion or mutation of the N-terminal acidic motif resulted in a significant loss of 14-3-3 mediated inhibition of Ser534 phosphorylated NR-Mo-heme (residues 1-625), a previously established model of NR regulation. Co-sedimentation and crosslinking studies with NR peptides comprising each of the two binding motifs demonstrated direct binding of either peptide to 14-3-3. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy disclosed high-affinity binding of 14-3-3ω to the well-known phospho-hinge site and low-affinity binding to the N-terminal acidic motif. A binding groove-deficient 14-3-3ω variant retained interaction to the acidic motif, but lost binding to the phospho-hinge motif. To our knowledge, NR is the first enzyme that harbors two independent 14-3-3 binding sites with different affinities, which both need to be occupied by 14-3-3ω to confer full inhibition of NR activity under physiological conditions. PMID:25578809

  4. 14-3-3β protein expression in eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a parasite endemic in the Southeast Asian and Pacific regions. Humans are incidentally infected either by eating uncooked intermediate hosts or by consuming vegetables containing the living third-stage larvae. The 14-3-3β protein is a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) marker of neuronal damage during the development of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. In addition, increased 14-3-3β protein is also found in CSF from patients with a variety of neurological disorders. The goal of this study is to determine the roles of serum/CSF14-3-3β protein in patients with eosinophilic meningitis. Methods In a cohort study among nine Thai laborers with eosinophilic meningitis due to eating raw snails (Pomacea canaliculata), we examined the CSF weekly while patients were still hospitalized and followed up the serum for 6 months. The levels of 14-3-3β protein in CSF were analyzed by western blot and an in-house 14-3-3β enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measurement was established and tested in an animal model of eosinophilic meningitis. Results The elevated 14-3-3β level was detected in the CSF from eight out of nine (81%) patients After 2 weeks of treatment, all patients showed a declined level or cleared of 14-3-3β protein in the CSF. By developing an in-house ELISA for measurement of 14-3-3β protein, it was found that the serum 14-3-3β level was significantly increased in patients during initial visit. . This finding was consistent to the animal experiment result in which there was severe blood brain barrier damage three weeks after infection and increased 14-3-3β protein expression in the CSF and serum by western blot and in house ELISA. After treatment, the serum 14-3-3β level in meningitis patients was rapidly returned to normal threshold. There was a correlation between initial CSF 14-3-3β level with severity of headache (r = 0.692, p = 0.039), CSF pleocytosis (r = 0.807, p = 0.009) and eosinophilia (r = 0

  5. 14-3-3 protein targets misfolded chaperone-associated proteins to aggresomes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhe; Graham, Kourtney; Foote, Molly; Liang, Fengshan; Rizkallah, Raed; Hurt, Myra; Wang, Yanchang; Wu, Yuying; Zhou, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Summary The aggresome is a key cytoplasmic organelle for sequestration and clearance of toxic protein aggregates. Although loading misfolded proteins cargos to dynein motors has been recognized as an important step in the aggresome formation process, the molecular machinery that mediates the association of cargos with the dynein motor is poorly understood. Here, we report a new aggresome-targeting pathway that involves isoforms of 14-3-3, a family of conserved regulatory proteins. 14-3-3 interacts with both the dynein-intermediate chain (DIC) and an Hsp70 co-chaperone Bcl-2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3), thereby recruiting chaperone-associated protein cargos to dynein motors for their transport to aggresomes. This molecular cascade entails functional dimerization of 14-3-3, which we show to be crucial for the formation of aggresomes in both yeast and mammalian cells. These results suggest that 14-3-3 functions as a molecular adaptor to promote aggresomal targeting of misfolded protein aggregates and may link such complexes to inclusion bodies observed in various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23843611

  6. Interaction of a 14-3-3 protein with the plant microtubule-associated protein EDE1

    PubMed Central

    Pignocchi, Cristina; Doonan, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The cell cycle-regulated protein ENDOSPERM DEFECTIVE 1 (EDE1) is a novel plant microtubule-associated protein essential for plant cell division and for microtubule organization in endosperm. EDE1 is only present on microtubules at mitosis and its expression is highly cell cycle regulated both at the protein and the transcript levels. Methods To search for EDE1-interacting proteins, a yeast two-hybrid screen was used in which EDE1 was fused with GAL4 DNA binding domain and expressed in a yeast strain that was then mated with a strain carrying a cDNA library fused to the GAL4 transactivation domain. Candidate interacting proteins were identified and confirmed in vitro. Key Results 14-3-3 upsilon was isolated several times from the library screen. In in vitro tests, it also interacted with EDE1: 14-3-3 upsilon most strongly associates with EDE1 in its free form, but also weakly when EDE1 is bound to microtubules. This study shows that EDE1 is a cyclin-dependent kinase substrate but that phosphorylation is not required for interaction with 14-3-3 upsilon. Conclusions The results suggest that 14-3-3 proteins may play a role in cytoskeletal organization of plant cells. The potential role of this interaction in the dynamics of EDE1 during the cell cycle is discussed. PMID:21558460

  7. Molecular tweezers modulate 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Bier, David; Rose, Rolf; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Bartel, Maria; Ramirez-Anguita, Juan Manuel; Dutt, Som; Wilch, Constanze; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Schrader, Thomas; Ottmann, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has recently emerged as a promising way to modulate protein functions, but devising molecules that will interact with a protein in the desired manner is difficult as many competing interactions exist in a biological environment (with solvents, salts or different sites for the target biomolecule). We now show that lysine-specific molecular tweezers bind to a 14-3-3 adapter protein and modulate its interaction with partner proteins. The tweezers inhibit binding between the 14-3-3 protein and two partner proteins--a phosphorylated (C-Raf) protein and an unphosphorylated one (ExoS)--in a concentration-dependent manner. Protein crystallography shows that this effect arises from the binding of the tweezers to a single surface-exposed lysine (Lys214) of the 14-3-3 protein in the proximity of its central channel, which normally binds the partner proteins. A combination of structural analysis and computer simulations provides rules for the tweezers' binding preferences, thus allowing us to predict their influence on this type of protein-protein interactions. PMID:23422566

  8. Proteomic profiling of tandem affinity purified 14-3-3 protein complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ing-Feng; Curran, Amy; Woolsey, Rebekah; Quilici, David; Cushman, John; Mittler, Ron; Harmon, Alice; Harper, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 14-3-3 dimers regulate hundreds of functionally diverse proteins (clients), typically in phosphorylation-dependent interactions. To uncover new clients, a 14-3-3 omega (At1g78300) from Arabidopsis was engineered with a “tandem affinity purification” (TAP) tag and expressed in transgenic plants. Purified complexes were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Results indicate that 14-3-3 omega can dimerize with at least 10 of the 12 14-3-3 isoforms expressed in Arabidopsis. The identification here of 121 putative clients provides support for in vivo 14-3-3 interactions with a diverse array of proteins, including those involved in: (1) Ion transport, such as a K+ channel (GORK), a Cl− channel (CLCg), Ca2+ channels belonging to the glutamate receptor family (GLRs 1.2, 2.1, 2.9, 3.4, 3.7); (2) hormone signaling, such as ACC synthase (isoforms ACS-6, 7 and 8 involved in ethylene synthesis) and the brassinolide receptors BRI1 and BAK1; (3) transcription, such as 7 WRKY family transcription factors; (4) metabolism, such as phosphoenol pyruvate (PEP) carboxylase; and (5) lipid signaling, such as phospholipase D (β, and γ). More than 80% (101) of these putative clients represent previously unidentified 14-3-3 interactors. These results raise the number of putative 14-3-3 clients identified in plants to over 300. PMID:19452453

  9. Molecular tweezers modulate 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bier, David; Rose, Rolf; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Bartel, Maria; Ramirez-Anguita, Juan Manuel; Dutt, Som; Wilch, Constanze; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Schrader, Thomas; Ottmann, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has recently emerged as a promising way to modulate protein functions, but devising molecules that will interact with a protein in the desired manner is difficult as many competing interactions exist in a biological environment (with solvents, salts or different sites for the target biomolecule). We now show that lysine-specific molecular tweezers bind to a 14-3-3 adapter protein and modulate its interaction with partner proteins. The tweezers inhibit binding between the 14-3-3 protein and two partner proteins—a phosphorylated (C-Raf) protein and an unphosphorylated one (ExoS)—in a concentration-dependent manner. Protein crystallography shows that this effect arises from the binding of the tweezers to a single surface-exposed lysine (Lys214) of the 14-3-3 protein in the proximity of its central channel, which normally binds the partner proteins. A combination of structural analysis and computer simulations provides rules for the tweezers' binding preferences, thus allowing us to predict their influence on this type of protein-protein interactions.

  10. 14-3-3zeta is indispensable for aggregate formation of polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin protein.

    PubMed

    Omi, Kazuya; Hachiya, Naomi S; Tanaka, Mayumi; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kaneko, Kiyotoshi

    2008-01-24

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by polyglutamine (polyQ) expansions in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. A hallmark of HD is the presence of aggregates-predominantly composed of NH(2)-terminal fragments of polyQ-expanded Htt-in the nucleus and cytoplasm of affected neurons. We previously proposed that 14-3-3zeta might act as a sweeper of misfolded proteins by facilitating the formation of aggregates possibly for neuroprotection; these aggregates are referred to as inclusion bodies. However, evidence available in this regard is indirect and circumstantial. In this study, analysis of the aggregation-prone protein Htt encoded by HD gene exon 1 containing polyglutamine expansions (Htt86Q) revealed that 17 residues in the NH(2)-terminal of this protein are indispensable for its aggregate formation. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that 14-3-3beta, gamma, eta, and zeta interact with Htt86Q transfected in N2a cells. Interestingly, the small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) suppression of 14-3-3zeta exclusively abolished Htt86Q aggregate formation, whereas 14-3-3beta or eta siRNA suppression did not. This indicates that 14-3-3zeta participates in aggregate formation under nonnative conditions. Our data support a novel role for 14-3-3zeta in the aggregate formation of nonnative, aggregation-prone proteins. PMID:18078716

  11. Phosphoregulatory protein 14-3-3 facilitates SAC1 transport from the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj Pahuja, Kanika; Wang, Jinzhi; Blagoveshchenskaya, Anastasia; Lim, Lillian; Madhusudhan, M. S.; Mayinger, Peter; Schekman, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Most secretory cargo proteins in eukaryotes are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and actively exported in membrane-bound vesicles that are formed by the cytosolic coat protein complex II (COPII). COPII proteins are assisted by a variety of cargo-specific adaptor proteins required for the concentration and export of secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Adaptor proteins are key regulators of cargo export, and defects in their function may result in disease phenotypes in mammals. Here we report the role of 14-3-3 proteins as a cytosolic adaptor in mediating SAC1 transport in COPII-coated vesicles. Sac1 is a phosphatidyl inositol-4 phosphate (PI4P) lipid phosphatase that undergoes serum dependent translocation between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex and controls cellular PI4P lipid levels. We developed a cell-free COPII vesicle budding reaction to examine SAC1 exit from the ER that requires COPII and at least one additional cytosolic factor, the 14-3-3 protein. Recombinant 14-3-3 protein stimulates the packaging of SAC1 into COPII vesicles and the sorting subunit of COPII, Sec24, interacts with 14-3-3. We identified a minimal sorting motif of SAC1 that is important for 14-3-3 binding and which controls SAC1 export from the ER. This LS motif is part of a 7-aa stretch, RLSNTSP, which is similar to the consensus 14-3-3 binding sequence. Homology models, based on the SAC1 structure from yeast, predict this region to be in the exposed exterior of the protein. Our data suggest a model in which the 14-3-3 protein mediates SAC1 traffic from the ER through direct interaction with a sorting signal and COPII. PMID:26056309

  12. 14-3-3 Proteins regulate Akt Thr308 phosphorylation in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Suárez, M; Gutiérrez-Martínez, I Z; Hernández-Trejo, J A; Hernández-Ruiz, M; Suárez-Pérez, D; Candelario, A; Kamekura, R; Medina-Contreras, O; Schnoor, M; Ortiz-Navarrete, V; Villegas-Sepúlveda, N; Parkos, C; Nusrat, A; Nava, P

    2016-06-01

    Akt activation has been associated with proliferation, differentiation, survival and death of epithelial cells. Phosphorylation of Thr308 of Akt by phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) is critical for optimal stimulation of its kinase activity. However, the mechanism(s) regulating this process remain elusive. Here, we report that 14-3-3 proteins control Akt Thr308 phosphorylation during intestinal inflammation. Mechanistically, we found that IFNγ and TNFα treatment induce degradation of the PDK1 inhibitor, 14-3-3η, in intestinal epithelial cells. This mechanism requires association of 14-3-3ζ with raptor in a process that triggers autophagy and leads to 14-3-3η degradation. Notably, inhibition of 14-3-3 function by the chemical inhibitor BV02 induces uncontrolled Akt activation, nuclear Akt accumulation and ultimately intestinal epithelial cell death. Our results suggest that 14-3-3 proteins control Akt activation and regulate its biological functions, thereby providing a new mechanistic link between cell survival and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells during inflammation. PMID:26846144

  13. Diagnosing Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Accuracy of CSF 14-3-3 Protein Test of the Spinal Fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... JAKOB DISEASE: ACCURACY OF THE 14-3-3 PROTEIN TEST OF THE SPINAL FLUID This information sheet ... help you understand how the 14-3-3 protein test helps in diagnosing sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease ( ...

  14. 14-3-3 Proteins Buffer Intracellular Calcium Sensing Receptors to Constrain Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Michael P.; Cavanaugh, Alice; Breitwieser, Gerda E.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium sensing receptors (CaSR) interact with 14-3-3 binding proteins at a carboxyl terminal arginine-rich motif. Mutations identified in patients with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, pancreatitis or idiopathic epilepsy support the functional importance of this motif. We combined total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and biochemical approaches to determine the mechanism of 14-3-3 protein regulation of CaSR signaling. Loss of 14-3-3 binding caused increased basal CaSR signaling and plasma membrane levels, and a significantly larger signaling-evoked increase in plasma membrane receptors. Block of core glycosylation with tunicamycin demonstrated that changes in plasma membrane CaSR levels were due to differences in exocytic rate. Western blotting to quantify time-dependent changes in maturation of expressed wt CaSR and a 14-3-3 protein binding-defective mutant demonstrated that signaling increases synthesis to maintain constant levels of the immaturely and maturely glycosylated forms. CaSR thus operates by a feed-forward mechanism, whereby signaling not only induces anterograde trafficking of nascent receptors but also increases biosynthesis to maintain steady state levels of net cellular CaSR. Overall, these studies suggest that 14-3-3 binding at the carboxyl terminus provides an important buffering mechanism to increase the intracellular pool of CaSR available for signaling-evoked trafficking, but attenuates trafficking to control the dynamic range of responses to extracellular calcium. PMID:26317416

  15. A 14-3-3 Family Protein from Wild Soybean (Glycine Soja) Regulates ABA Sensitivity in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoli; Sun, Mingzhe; Jia, Bowei; Chen, Chao; Qin, Zhiwei; Yang, Kejun; Shen, Yang; Meiping, Zhang; Mingyang, Cong; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the 14-3-3 family proteins are key regulators of multiple stress signal transduction cascades. By conducting genome-wide analysis, researchers have identified the soybean 14-3-3 family proteins; however, until now, there is still no direct genetic evidence showing the involvement of soybean 14-3-3s in ABA responses. Hence, in this study, based on the latest Glycine max genome on Phytozome v10.3, we initially analyzed the evolutionary relationship, genome organization, gene structure and duplication, and three-dimensional structure of soybean 14-3-3 family proteins systematically. Our results suggested that soybean 14-3-3 family was highly evolutionary conserved and possessed segmental duplication in evolution. Then, based on our previous functional characterization of a Glycine soja 14-3-3 protein GsGF14o in drought stress responses, we further investigated the expression characteristics of GsGF14o in detail, and demonstrated its positive roles in ABA sensitivity. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses in Glycine soja seedlings and GUS activity assays in PGsGF14O:GUS transgenic Arabidopsis showed that GsGF14o expression was moderately and rapidly induced by ABA treatment. As expected, GsGF14o overexpression in Arabidopsis augmented the ABA inhibition of seed germination and seedling growth, promoted the ABA induced stomata closure, and up-regulated the expression levels of ABA induced genes. Moreover, through yeast two hybrid analyses, we further demonstrated that GsGF14o physically interacted with the AREB/ABF transcription factors in yeast cells. Taken together, results presented in this study strongly suggested that GsGF14o played an important role in regulation of ABA sensitivity in Arabidopsis. PMID:26717241

  16. Regulation of the Regulators: Post-Translational Modifications, Subcellular, and Spatiotemporal Distribution of Plant 14-3-3 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rashaun S.; Swatek, Kirby N.; Thelen, Jay J.

    2016-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind to and modulate the activity of phosphorylated proteins that regulate a variety of metabolic processes in eukaryotes. Multiple 14-3-3 isoforms are expressed in most organisms and display redundancy in both sequence and function. Plants contain the largest number of 14-3-3 isoforms. For example, Arabidopsis thaliana contains thirteen 14-3-3 genes, each of which is expressed. Interest in the plant 14-3-3 field has swelled over the past decade, largely due to the vast number of possibilities for 14-3-3 metabolic regulation. As the field progresses, it is essential to understand these proteins' activities at both the spatiotemporal and subcellular levels. This review summarizes current knowledge of 14-3-3 proteins in plants, including 14-3-3 interactions, regulatory functions, isoform specificity, and post-translational modifications. We begin with a historical overview and structural analysis of 14-3-3 proteins, which describes the basic principles of 14-3-3 function, and then discuss interactions and regulatory effects of plant 14-3-3 proteins in specific tissues and subcellular compartments. We conclude with a summary of 14-3-3 phosphorylation and current knowledge of the functional effects of this modification in plants. PMID:27242818

  17. Polycations Globally Enhance Binding of 14-3-3 omega to Target Proteins in Spinach Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The binding of 14-3-3' to phosphorylated NR (pNR) is stimulated by cations such as Mg2+ or spermine, and decreased by 5'-AMP. In order to determine whether binding to other cellular proteins is affected similarly, Far-Western overlays of extracts prepared from light- or dark-treated spinach (Spinac...

  18. 14-3-3 proteins restrain the Exo1 nuclease to prevent overresection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Kim, In-Kwon; Honaker, Yuchi; Paudyal, Sharad C; Koh, Won Kyun; Sparks, Melanie; Li, Shan; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Ellenberger, Tom; You, Zhongsheng

    2015-05-01

    The DNA end resection process dictates the cellular response to DNA double strand break damage and is essential for genome maintenance. Although insufficient DNA resection hinders homology-directed repair and ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related)-dependent checkpoint activation, overresection produces excessive single-stranded DNA that could lead to genomic instability. However, the mechanisms controlling DNA end resection are poorly understood. Here we show that the major resection nuclease Exo1 is regulated both positively and negatively by protein-protein interactions to ensure a proper level of DNA resection. We have shown previously that the sliding DNA clamp proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) associates with the C-terminal domain of Exo1 and promotes Exo1 damage association and DNA resection. In this report, we show that 14-3-3 proteins interact with a central region of Exo1 and negatively regulate Exo1 damage recruitment and subsequent resection. 14-3-3s limit Exo1 damage association, at least in part, by suppressing its association with PCNA. Disruption of the Exo1 interaction with 14-3-3 proteins results in elevated sensitivity of cells to DNA damage. Unlike Exo1, the Dna2 resection pathway is apparently not regulated by PCNA and 14-3-3s. Our results provide critical insights into the mechanism and regulation of the DNA end resection process and may have implications for cancer treatment. PMID:25833945

  19. Phosphorylation of Arabidopsis Ubiquitin Ligase ATL31 Is Critical for Plant Carbon/Nitrogen Nutrient Balance Response and Controls the Stability of 14-3-3 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Shigetaka; Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Aoyama, Shoki; Fukao, Yoichiro; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin ligase plays a fundamental role in regulating multiple cellular events in eukaryotes by fine-tuning the stability and activity of specific target proteins. We have previously shown that ubiquitin ligase ATL31 regulates plant growth in response to nutrient balance between carbon and nitrogen (C/N) in Arabidopsis. Subsequent study demonstrated that ATL31 targets 14-3-3 proteins for ubiquitination and modulates the protein abundance in response to C/N-nutrient status. However, the underlying mechanism for the targeting of ATL31 to 14-3-3 proteins remains unclear. Here, we show that ATL31 interacts with 14-3-3 proteins in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We identified Thr209, Ser247, Ser270, and Ser303 as putative 14-3-3 binding sites on ATL31 by motif analysis. Mutation of these Ser/Thr residues to Ala in ATL31 inhibited the interaction with 14-3-3 proteins, as demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation analyses. Additionally, we identified in vivo phosphorylation of Thr209 and Ser247 on ATL31 by MS analysis. A peptide competition assay showed that the application of synthetic phospho-Thr209 peptide, but not the corresponding unphosphorylated peptide, suppresses the interaction between ATL31 and 14-3-3 proteins. Moreover, Arabidopsis plants overexpressing mutated ATL31, which could not bind to 14-3-3 proteins, showed accumulation of 14-3-3 proteins and growth arrest in disrupted C/N-nutrient conditions similar to wild-type plants, although overexpression of intact ATL31 resulted in repression of 14-3-3 accumulation and tolerance to the conditions. Together, these results demonstrate that the physiological role of phosphorylation at 14-3-3 binding sites on ATL31 is to modulate the binding ability and stability of 14-3-3 proteins to control plant C/N-nutrient response. PMID:24722992

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Structural Analysis of Giardia duodenalis 14-3-3 Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Cau, Ylenia; Fiorillo, Annarita; Mori, Mattia; Ilari, Andrea; Botta, Maurizo; Lalle, Marco

    2015-12-28

    Giardiasis is a gastrointestinal diarrheal illness caused by the protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis, which affects annually over 200 million people worldwide. The limited antigiardial drug arsenal and the emergence of clinical cases refractory to standard treatments dictate the need for new chemotherapeutics. The 14-3-3 family of regulatory proteins, extensively involved in protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with pSer/pThr clients, represents a highly promising target. Despite homology with human counterparts, the single 14-3-3 of G. duodenalis (g14-3-3) is characterized by a constitutive phosphorylation in a region critical for target binding, thus affecting the function and the conformation of g14-3-3/clients interaction. However, to approach the design of specific small molecule modulators of g14-3-3 PPIs, structural elucidations are required. Here, we present a detailed computational and crystallographic study exploring the implications of g14-3-3 phosphorylation on protein structure and target binding. Self-Guided Langevin Dynamics and classical molecular dynamics simulations show that phosphorylation affects locally and globally g14-3-3 conformation, inducing a structural rearrangement more suitable for target binding. Profitable features for g14-3-3/clients interaction were highlighted using a hydrophobicity-based descriptor to characterize g14-3-3 client peptides. Finally, the X-ray structure of g14-3-3 in complex with a mode-1 prototype phosphopeptide was solved and combined with structure-based simulations to identify molecular features relevant for clients binding to g14-3-3. The data presented herein provide a further and structural understanding of g14-3-3 features and set the basis for drug design studies. PMID:26551337

  1. Discovery and structural characterization of a small molecule 14-3-3 protein-protein interaction inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jing; Du, Yuhong; Horton, John R.; Upadhyay, Anup K.; Lou, Bin; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Xing; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong; Wang, Binghe; Zhang, Lixin; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Cheng, Xiaodong; Fu, Haian

    2013-02-14

    The 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/threonine-recognition proteins engage multiple nodes in signaling networks that control diverse physiological and pathophysiological functions and have emerged as promising therapeutic targets for such diseases as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, small molecule modulators of 14-3-3 are much needed agents for chemical biology investigations and therapeutic development. To analyze 14-3-3 function and modulate its activity, we conducted a chemical screen and identified 4-[(2Z)-2-[4-formyl-6-methyl-5-oxo-3-(phosphonatooxymethyl)pyridin-2-ylidene]hydrazinyl]benzoate as a 14-3-3 inhibitor, which we termed FOBISIN (FOurteen-three-three BInding Small molecule INhibitor) 101. FOBISIN101 effectively blocked the binding of 14-3-3 with Raf-1 and proline-rich AKT substrate, 40 kD{sub a} and neutralized the ability of 14-3-3 to activate exoenzyme S ADP-ribosyltransferase. To provide a mechanistic basis for 14-3-3 inhibition, the crystal structure of 14-3-3{zeta} in complex with FOBISIN101 was solved. Unexpectedly, the double bond linking the pyridoxal-phosphate and benzoate moieties was reduced by X-rays to create a covalent linkage of the pyridoxal-phosphate moiety to lysine 120 in the binding groove of 14-3-3, leading to persistent 14-3-3 inactivation. We suggest that FOBISIN101-like molecules could be developed as an entirely unique class of 14-3-3 inhibitors, which may serve as radiation-triggered therapeutic agents for the treatment of 14-3-3-mediated diseases, such as cancer.

  2. Discovery and structural characterization of a small molecule 14-3-3 protein-protein interaction inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Du, Yuhong; Horton, John R; Upadhyay, Anup K; Lou, Bin; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Xing; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong; Wang, Binghe; Zhang, Lixin; Barbieri, Joseph T; Khuri, Fadlo R; Cheng, Xiaodong; Fu, Haian

    2011-09-27

    The 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/threonine-recognition proteins engage multiple nodes in signaling networks that control diverse physiological and pathophysiological functions and have emerged as promising therapeutic targets for such diseases as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, small molecule modulators of 14-3-3 are much needed agents for chemical biology investigations and therapeutic development. To analyze 14-3-3 function and modulate its activity, we conducted a chemical screen and identified 4-[(2Z)-2-[4-formyl-6-methyl-5-oxo-3-(phosphonatooxymethyl)pyridin-2-ylidene]hydrazinyl]benzoate as a 14-3-3 inhibitor, which we termed FOBISIN (FOurteen-three-three BInding Small molecule INhibitor) 101. FOBISIN101 effectively blocked the binding of 14-3-3 with Raf-1 and proline-rich AKT substrate, 40 kD(a) and neutralized the ability of 14-3-3 to activate exoenzyme S ADP-ribosyltransferase. To provide a mechanistic basis for 14-3-3 inhibition, the crystal structure of 14-3-3ζ in complex with FOBISIN101 was solved. Unexpectedly, the double bond linking the pyridoxal-phosphate and benzoate moieties was reduced by X-rays to create a covalent linkage of the pyridoxal-phosphate moiety to lysine 120 in the binding groove of 14-3-3, leading to persistent 14-3-3 inactivation. We suggest that FOBISIN101-like molecules could be developed as an entirely unique class of 14-3-3 inhibitors, which may serve as radiation-triggered therapeutic agents for the treatment of 14-3-3-mediated diseases, such as cancer. PMID:21908710

  3. A novel sphingosine-dependent protein kinase (SDK1) specifically phosphorylates certain isoforms of 14-3-3 protein.

    PubMed

    Megidish, T; Cooper, J; Zhang, L; Fu, H; Hakomori, S

    1998-08-21

    Protein kinases activated by sphingosine or N,N'-dimethylsphingosine, but not by other lipids, have been detected and are termed sphingosine-dependent protein kinases (SDKs). These SDKs were previously shown to phosphorylate endogenous 14-3-3 proteins (Megidish, T., White, T., Takio, K., Titani, K., Igarashi, Y., and Hakomori, S. (1995) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 216, 739-747). We have now partially purified one SDK, termed SDK1, from cytosol of mouse Balb/c 3T3(A31) fibroblasts. SDK1 is a serine kinase with molecular mass 50-60 kDa that is strongly activated by N, N'-dimethylsphingosine and sphingosine, but not by ceramide, sphingosine 1-phosphate, or other sphingo-, phospho-, or glycerolipids tested. Its activity is inhibited by the protein kinase C activator phosphatidylserine. Activity of SDK1 is clearly distinct from other types of serine kinases tested, including casein kinase II, the alpha and zeta isoforms of protein kinase C, extracellular signal-regulated mitogene-activated protein kinase 1 (Erk-1), Erk-2, and Raf-1. SDK1 specifically phosphorylates certain isoforms of 14-3-3 (eta, beta, zeta) but not others (sigma, tau). The phosphorylation site was identified as Ser* in the sequence Arg-Arg-Ser-Ser*-Trp-Arg in 14-3-3 beta. The sigma and tau isoforms of 14-3-3 lack serine at this position, potentially explaining their lack of phosphorylation by SDK1. Interestingly, the phosphorylation site is located on the dimer interface of 14-3-3. Phosphorylation of this site by SDK1 was studied in 14-3-3 mutants. Mutation of a lysine residue, located 9 amino acids N-terminal to the phosphorylation site, abolished 14-3-3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate an association between an SDK and 14-3-3 in situ. Exogenous N, N'-dimethylsphingosine stimulates 14-3-3 phosphorylation in Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts, suggesting that SDK1 may phosphorylate 14-3-3 in situ. These data support a biological role of SDK1 activation and consequent

  4. Ablation of the 14-3-3gamma Protein Results in Neuronal Migration Delay and Morphological Defects in the Developing Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Wachi, Tomoka; Cornell, Brett; Marshall, Courtney; Zhukarev, Vladimir; Baas, Peter W; Toyo-Oka, Kazuhito

    2016-06-01

    14-3-3 proteins are ubiquitously-expressed and multifunctional proteins. There are seven isoforms in mammals with a high level of homology, suggesting potential functional redundancy. We previously found that two of seven isoforms, 14-3-3epsilon and 14-3-3zeta, are important for brain development, in particular, radial migration of pyramidal neurons in the developing cerebral cortex. In this work, we analyzed the function of another isoform, the protein 14-3-3gamma, with respect to neuronal migration in the developing cortex. We found that in utero 14-3-3gamma-deficiency resulted in delays in neuronal migration as well as morphological defects. Migrating neurons deficient in 14-3-3gamma displayed a thicker leading process stem, and the basal ends of neurons were not able to reach the boundary between the cortical plate and the marginal zone. Consistent with the results obtained from in utero electroporation, time-lapse live imaging of brain slices revealed that the ablation of the 14-3-3gamma proteins in pyramidal neurons slowed down their migration. In addition, the 14-3-3gamma deficient neurons showed morphological abnormalities, including increased multipolar neurons with a thicker leading processes stem during migration. These results indicate that the 14-3-3gamma proteins play an important role in radial migration by regulating the morphology of migrating neurons in the cerebral cortex. The findings underscore the pathological phenotypes of brain development associated with the disruption of different 14-3-3 proteins and will advance the preclinical data regarding disorders caused by neuronal migration defects. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 600-614, 2016. PMID:26297819

  5. 14-3-3 proteins: Macro-regulators with great potential for improving abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Zhang, Shaohong; Liu, Bin

    2016-08-12

    14-3-3 proteins (14-3-3s) are highly conserved regulatory proteins that are uniquely eukaryotic, and deeply involved in protein-protein interactions that mediate diverse signaling pathways. In plants, 14-3-3s have been validated to regulate many biological processes, such as metabolism, light and hormone signaling, cell-cycle control and protein trafficking. Recent years we have also witnessed an increasing number of reports describing the functions of 14-3-3s in plant stress responses through interactions with key proteins in both biotic and abiotic stresses. In this review, we highlight the advances that have been made in investigating the roles of 14-3-3s in plant abiotic stress tolerance. These advances provide a framework for our understanding of how signals are integrated to perceive and respond to the abiotic stresses in plants. PMID:27233603

  6. 14-3-3 Proteins Bind to the Brassinosteroid Receptor Kinase, BRI1 and are Positive Regulators of Brassinosteroid Signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple members of the 14-3-3 protein family have been found in all eukaryotes, the biological functions of which are to interact physically with specific client proteins and thereby effect a change in the client. Thus, 14-3-3s are involved in many processes. The plant brassinosteroid (BR) recepto...

  7. Differential interaction and aggregation of 3-repeat and 4-repeat tau isoforms with 14-3-3{zeta} protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sadik, Golam; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Kato, Kiyoko; Yanagi, Kentaro; Kudo, Takashi; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2009-05-22

    Tau isoforms, 3-repeat (3R) and 4-repeat tau (4R), are differentially involved in neuronal development and in several tauopathies. 14-3-3 protein binds to tau and 14-3-3/tau association has been found both in the development and in tauopathies. To understand the role of 14-3-3 in the differential regulation of tau isoforms, we have performed studies on the interaction and aggregation of 3R-tau and 4R-tau, either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated, with 14-3-3{zeta}. We show by surface plasmon resonance studies that the interaction between unphosphorylated 3R-tau and 14-3-3{zeta} is {approx}3-folds higher than that between unphosphorylated 4R-tau and 14-3-3{zeta}. Phosphorylation of tau by protein kinase A (PKA) increases the affinity of both 3R- and 4R-tau for 14-3-3{zeta} to a similar level. An in vitro aggregation assay employing both transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed the aggregation of unphosphorylated 4R-tau to be significantly higher than that of unphosphorylated 3R-tau following the induction of 14-3-3{zeta}. The filaments formed from 3R- and 4R-tau were almost similar in morphology. In contrast, the aggregation of both 3R- and 4R-tau was reduced to a similar low level after phosphorylation with PKA. Taken together, these results suggest that 14-3-3{zeta} exhibits a similar role for tau isoforms after PKA-phosphorylation, but a differential role for unphosphorylated tau. The significant aggregation of 4R-tau by 14-3-3{zeta} suggests that 14-3-3 may act as an inducer in the generation of 4R-tau-predominant neurofibrillary tangles in tauopathies.

  8. Validation of 14-3-3 Protein as a Marker in Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Matthias; Ebert, Elisabeth; Stoeck, Katharina; Karch, André; Collins, Steven; Calero, Miguel; Sklaviadis, Theodor; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Golanska, Ewa; Baldeiras, Ines; Satoh, Katsuya; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Ladogana, Anna; Skinningsrud, Anders; Hammarin, Anna-Lena; Mitrova, Eva; Llorens, Franc; Kim, Yong Sun; Green, Alison; Zerr, Inga

    2016-05-01

    At present, the testing of 14-3-3 protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a standard biomarker test in suspected sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) diagnosis. Increasing 14-3-3 test referrals in CJD reference laboratories in the last years have led to an urgent need to improve established 14-3-3 test methods. The main result of our study was the validation of a commercially available 14-3-3 ELISA next to the commonly used Western blot method as a high-throughput screening test. Hereby, 14-3-3 protein expression was quantitatively analyzed in CSF of 231 sCJD and 2035 control patients. We obtained excellent sensitivity/specificity values of 88 and 96% that are comparable to the established Western blot method. Since standard protocols and preanalytical sample handling have become more important in routine diagnostic, we investigated in a further step the reproducibility and stability of 14-3-3 as a biomarker for human prion diseases. Ring trial data from 2009 to 2013 revealed an increase of Fleiss' kappa from 0.51 to 0.68 indicating an improving reliability of 14-3-3 protein detection. The stability of 14-3-3 protein under short-term and long-term storage conditions at various temperatures and after repeated freezing/thawing cycles was confirmed. Contamination of CSF samples with blood appears likely to be an important factor at a concentration of more than 2500 erythrocytes/μL. Hemolysis of erythrocytes with significant release of 14-3-3 protein started after 2 days at room temperature. We first define clear standards for the sample handling, short- and long-term storage of CSF samples as well as the handling of blood- contaminated samples which may result in artificially elevated CSF levels of 14-3-3. PMID:25947081

  9. Site-specific regulatory interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase and 14-3-3 proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; Athwal, G. S.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We report an Mg2+-dependent interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) and endogenous 14-3-3 proteins, as evidenced by co-elution during gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation. The content of 14-3-3s associated with an SPS immunoprecipitate was inversely related to activity, and was specifically reduced when tissue was pretreated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside, suggesting metabolite control in vivo. A synthetic phosphopeptide based on Ser-229 was shown by surface plasmon resonance to bind a recombinant plant 14-3-3, and addition of the phosphorylated SPS-229 peptide was found to stimulate the SPS activity of an SPS:14-3-3 complex. Taken together, the results suggest a regulatory interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with Ser-229 of SPS.

  10. Small-Molecule Stabilization of the 14-3-3/Gab2 Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) Interface.

    PubMed

    Bier, David; Bartel, Maria; Sies, Katharina; Halbach, Sebastian; Higuchi, Yusuke; Haranosono, Yu; Brummer, Tilman; Kato, Nobuo; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-04-19

    Small-molecule modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the most promising new areas in drug discovery. In the vast majority of cases only inhibition or disruption of PPIs is realized, whereas the complementary strategy of targeted stabilization of PPIs is clearly under-represented. Here, we report the example of a semi-synthetic natural product derivative-ISIR-005-that stabilizes the cancer-relevant interaction of the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and Gab2. The crystal structure of ISIR-005 in complex with 14-3-3 and the binding motif of Gab2 comprising two phosphorylation sites (Gab2pS210pT391) showed how the stabilizing molecule binds to the rim-of-the-interface of the protein complex. Only in the direct vicinity of 14-3-3/Gab2pT391 site is a pre-formed pocket occupied by ISIR-005; binding of the Gab2pS210 motif to 14-3-3 does not create an interface pocket suitable for the molecule. Accordingly, ISIR-005 only stabilizes the binding of the Gab2pT391 but not the Gab2pS210 site. This study represents structural and biochemical proof of the druggability of the 14-3-3/Gab2 PPI interface with important implications for the development of PPI stabilizers. PMID:26644359

  11. Quantitative proteomic dissection of a native 14-3-3ε interacting protein complex associated with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chen; Tang, Siwei; Bai, Chen; Chen, Xian

    2014-04-01

    The 14-3-3 proteins regulate diverse biological processes that are implicated in cancer development, and seven 14-3-3 isoforms were identified with isoform-specific roles in different human tumors. In our previous work, we dissected the interactome of 14-3-3ε formed during the DNA damage response in a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell using an AACT/SILAC-based quantitative proteomic approach. In this study, we used a similar proteomic approach to profile/identify the 14-3-3ε interactome formed in native HCC cells. Functional categorization and data-dependent network analysis of the native HCC-specific 14-3-3ε interactome revealed that 14-3-3ε is involved in the regulation of multiple biological processes (BPs)/pathways, including cell cycle control, apoptosis, signal transduction, transport, cell adhesion, carbohydrate metabolism, and nucleic acid metabolism. Biological validation further supports that 14-3-3ε, via association with multiple BP/pathway-specific proteins, coordinates the regulation of proliferation, survival, and metastasis of HCC. The findings in this study, together with those of our previous study, provide an extensive profile of the 14-3-3ε interaction network in HCC cells, which should be valuable for understanding the pathology of HCC and HCC therapy. PMID:24363202

  12. Inhibition of the Arabidopsis Salt Overly Sensitive Pathway by 14-3-3 Proteins[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huapeng; Lin, Huixin; Chen, She; Becker, Katia; Yang, Yongqing; Zhao, Jinfeng; Kudla, Jörg; Schumaker, Karen S.; Guo, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The Salt Overly Sensitive (SOS) pathway regulates intracellular sodium ion (Na+) homeostasis and salt tolerance in plants. Until recently, little was known about the mechanisms that inhibit the SOS pathway when plants are grown in the absence of salt stress. In this study, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana 14-3-3 proteins λ and κ interact with SOS2 and repress its kinase activity. Growth in the presence of salt decreases the interaction between SOS2 and the 14-3-3 proteins, leading to kinase activation in planta. 14-3-3 λ interacts with the SOS2 junction domain, which is important for its kinase activity. A phosphorylation site (Ser-294) is identified within this domain by mass spectrometry. Mutation of Ser-294 to Ala or Asp does not affect SOS2 kinase activity in the absence of the 14-3-3 proteins. However, in the presence of 14-3-3 proteins, the inhibition of SOS2 activity is decreased by the Ser-to-Ala mutation and enhanced by the Ser-to-Asp exchange. These results identify 14-3-3 λ and κ as important regulators of salt tolerance. The inhibition of SOS2 mediated by the binding of 14-3-3 proteins represents a novel mechanism that confers basal repression of the SOS pathway in the absence of salt stress. PMID:24659330

  13. The alternative role of 14-3-3 zeta as a sweeper of misfolded proteins in disease conditions.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kiyotoshi; Hachiya, Naomi S

    2006-01-01

    Here, we propose a novel hypothesis that 14-3-3 zeta might act as a sweeper of misfolded proteins by facilitating the formation of aggregates, which are referred to as inclusion bodies. Studies on the localization of the 14-3-3 proteins in different types of inclusion bodies in the brain including neurofibrillary tangle in Alzheimer's disease, pick bodies in Pick's disease, Lewy body-like hyaline inclusions in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, prion/florid plaques in sporadic/variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, nuclear inclusions in spinocerebellar ataxia-1, and possibly Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease suggest a close association of these diseases with 14-3-3 zeta. The highly conserved hydrophobic surface of the amphipathic groove in 14-3-3 zeta represents a general mechanism with diverse cellular proteins, and it may also allow for the molecular recognition of misfolded proteins by hydrophobic interaction in disease conditions. When the abnormal processing of misfolded proteins overwhelms the quality control systems of the cell, it is likely that 14-3-3 zeta is recruited to form deposits of protein aggregates with nonnative, misfolded proteins in order to protect the cell against toxicity. Hence, 14-3-3 zeta may be considered as an auxiliary therapeutic tool in the protein aggregation disorders. PMID:16516399

  14. Proteomic analysis of media from lung cancer cells reveals role of 14-3-3 proteins in cachexia

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Julie B.; Moylan, Jennifer S.; Horrell, Erin M. W.; Andrade, Francisco H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: At the time of diagnosis, 60% of lung cancer patients present with cachexia, a severe wasting syndrome that increases morbidity and mortality. Tumors secrete multiple factors that contribute to cachectic muscle wasting, and not all of these factors have been identified. We used Orbitrap electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to identify novel cachexia-inducing candidates in media conditioned with Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LCM). Results: One-hundred and 58 proteins were confirmed in three biological replicates. Thirty-three were identified as secreted proteins, including 14-3-3 proteins, which are highly conserved adaptor proteins known to have over 200 binding partners. We confirmed the presence of extracellular 14-3-3 proteins in LCM via western blot and discovered that LCM contained less 14-3-3 content than media conditioned with C2C12 myotubes. Using a neutralizing antibody, we depleted extracellular 14-3-3 proteins in myotube culture medium, which resulted in diminished myosin content. We identified the proposed receptor for 14-3-3 proteins, CD13, in differentiated C2C12 myotubes and found that inhibiting CD13 via Bestatin also resulted in diminished myosin content. Conclusions: Our novel findings show that extracellular 14-3-3 proteins may act as previously unidentified myokines and may signal via CD13 to help maintain muscle mass. PMID:25972815

  15. Isoform-specific cleavage of 14-3-3 proteins in apoptotic JURL-MK1 cells.

    PubMed

    Kuzelová, Katerina; Grebenová, Dana; Pluskalová, Michaela; Kavan, Daniel; Halada, Petr; Hrkal, Zbynek

    2009-03-01

    The proteins of 14-3-3 family are substantially involved in the regulation of many biological processes including the apoptosis. We studied the changes in the expression of five 14-3-3 isoforms (beta, gamma, epsilon, tau, and zeta) during the apoptosis of JURL-MK1 and K562 cells. The expression level of all these proteins markedly decreased in relation with the apoptosis progression and all isoforms underwent truncation, which probably corresponds to the removal of several C-terminal amino acids. The observed 14-3-3 modifications were partially blocked by caspase-3 inhibition. In addition to caspases, a non-caspase protease is likely to contribute to 14-3-3's cleavage in an isoform-specific manner. While 14-3-3 gamma seems to be cleaved mainly by caspase-3, the alternative mechanism is essentially involved in the case of 14-3-3 tau, and a combined effect was observed for the isoforms epsilon, beta, and zeta. We suggest that the processing of 14-3-3 proteins could form an integral part of the programmed cell death or at least of some apoptotic pathways. PMID:19173300

  16. Phosphodiesterase 3A binds to 14-3-3 proteins in response to PMA-induced phosphorylation of Ser428

    PubMed Central

    Pozuelo Rubio, Mercedes; Campbell, David G.; Morrice, Nicholas A.; Mackintosh, Carol

    2005-01-01

    PDE3A (phosphodiesterase 3A) was identified as a phosphoprotein that co-immunoprecipitates with endogenous 14-3-3 proteins from HeLa cell extracts, and binds directly to 14-3-3 proteins in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Among cellular stimuli tested, PMA promoted maximal binding of PDE3A to 14-3-3 proteins. While p42/p44 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), SAPK2 (stress-activated protein kinase 2)/p38 and PKC (protein kinase C) were all activated by PMA in HeLa cells, the PMA-induced binding of PDE3A to 14-3-3 proteins was inhibited by the non-specific PKC inhibitors Ro 318220 and H-7, but not by PD 184352, which inhibits MAPK activation, nor by SB 203580 and BIRB0796, which inhibit SAPK2 activation. Binding of PDE3A to 14-3-3 proteins was also blocked by the DNA replication inhibitors aphidicolin and mimosine, but the PDE3A–14-3-3 interaction was not cell-cycle-regulated. PDE3A isolated from cells was able to bind to 14-3-3 proteins after in vitro phosphorylation with PKC isoforms. Using MS/MS of IMAC (immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography)-enriched tryptic phosphopeptides and phosphospecific antibodies, at least five sites on PDE3A were found to be phosphorylated in vivo, of which Ser428 was selectively phosphorylated in response to PMA and dephosphorylated in cells treated with aphidicolin and mimosine. Phosphorylation of Ser428 therefore correlated with 14-3-3 binding to PDE3A. Ser312 of PDE3A was phosphorylated in an H-89-sensitive response to forskolin, indicative of phosphorylation by PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase), but phosphorylation at this site did not stimulate 14-3-3 binding. Thus 14-3-3 proteins can discriminate between sites in a region of multisite phosphorylation on PDE3A. An additional observation was that the cytoskeletal cross-linker protein plectin-1 coimmunoprecipitated with PDE3A independently of 14-3-3 binding. PMID:16153182

  17. 14-3-3sigma is a cruciform DNA binding protein and associates in vivo with origins of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, David; Novac, Olivia; Callejo, Mario; Ruiz, Marcia T; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2002-01-01

    A human cruciform binding protein (CBP) was previously shown to bind to cruciform DNA in a structure-specific manner and be a member of the 14-3-3 protein family. CBP had been found to contain the 14-3-3 isoforms beta, gamma, epsilon, and zeta. Here, we show by Western blot analysis that the CBP-cruciform DNA complex eluted from band-shift polyacrylamide gels also contains the 14-3-3sigma isoform, which is present in HeLa cell nuclear extracts. An antibody specific for the 14-3-3sigma isoform was able to interfere with the formation of the CBP-cruciform DNA complex. The effect of the same anti-14-3-3sigma antibody in the in vitro replication of p186, a plasmid containing the minimal replication origin of the monkey origin ors8, was also analyzed. Pre-incubation of total HeLa cell extracts with this antibody decreased p186 in vitro replication to approximately 30% of control levels, while non-specific antibodies had no effect. 14-3-3sigma was found to associate in vivo with the monkey origins of DNA replication ors8 and ors12 in a cell cycle-dependent manner, as assayed by a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay that involved formaldehyde cross-linking, followed by immunoprecipitation with anti-14-3-3sigma antibody and quantitative PCR. The association of 14-3-3sigma with the replication origins was maximal at the G(1)/S phase. The results indicate that 14-3-3sigma is an origin binding protein involved in the regulation of DNA replication via cruciform DNA binding. PMID:12244572

  18. Identification of 14-3-3 Proteins Phosphopeptide-Binding Specificity Using an Affinity-Based Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 proteins are a highly conserved family of homodimeric and heterodimeric molecules, expressed in all eukaryotic cells. In human cells, this family consists of seven distinct but highly homologous 14-3-3 isoforms. 14-3-3σ is the only isoform directly linked to cancer in epithelial cells, which is regulated by major tumor suppressor genes. For each 14-3-3 isoform, we have 1,000 peptide motifs with experimental binding affinity values. In this paper, we present a novel method for identifying peptide motifs binding to 14-3-3σ isoform. First, we propose a sampling criteria to build a predictor for each new peptide sequence. Then, we select nine physicochemical properties of amino acids to describe each peptide motif. We also use auto-cross covariance to extract correlative properties of amino acids in any two positions. Finally, we consider elastic net to predict affinity values of peptide motifs, based on ridge regression and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). Our method tests on the 1,000 known peptide motifs binding to seven 14-3-3 isoforms. On the 14-3-3σ isoform, our method has overall pearson-product-moment correlation coefficient (PCC) and root mean squared error (RMSE) values of 0.84 and 252.31 for N–terminal sublibrary, and 0.77 and 269.13 for C–terminal sublibrary. We predict affinity values of 16,000 peptide sequences and relative binding ability across six permutated positions similar with experimental values. We identify phosphopeptides that preferentially bind to 14-3-3σ over other isoforms. Several positions on peptide motifs are in the same amino acid category with experimental substrate specificity of phosphopeptides binding to 14-3-3σ. Our method is fast and reliable and is a general computational method that can be used in peptide-protein binding identification in proteomics research. PMID:26828594

  19. Identification of 14-3-3 Proteins Phosphopeptide-Binding Specificity Using an Affinity-Based Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 proteins are a highly conserved family of homodimeric and heterodimeric molecules, expressed in all eukaryotic cells. In human cells, this family consists of seven distinct but highly homologous 14-3-3 isoforms. 14-3-3σ is the only isoform directly linked to cancer in epithelial cells, which is regulated by major tumor suppressor genes. For each 14-3-3 isoform, we have 1,000 peptide motifs with experimental binding affinity values. In this paper, we present a novel method for identifying peptide motifs binding to 14-3-3σ isoform. First, we propose a sampling criteria to build a predictor for each new peptide sequence. Then, we select nine physicochemical properties of amino acids to describe each peptide motif. We also use auto-cross covariance to extract correlative properties of amino acids in any two positions. Finally, we consider elastic net to predict affinity values of peptide motifs, based on ridge regression and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). Our method tests on the 1,000 known peptide motifs binding to seven 14-3-3 isoforms. On the 14-3-3σ isoform, our method has overall pearson-product-moment correlation coefficient (PCC) and root mean squared error (RMSE) values of 0.84 and 252.31 for N-terminal sublibrary, and 0.77 and 269.13 for C-terminal sublibrary. We predict affinity values of 16,000 peptide sequences and relative binding ability across six permutated positions similar with experimental values. We identify phosphopeptides that preferentially bind to 14-3-3σ over other isoforms. Several positions on peptide motifs are in the same amino acid category with experimental substrate specificity of phosphopeptides binding to 14-3-3σ. Our method is fast and reliable and is a general computational method that can be used in peptide-protein binding identification in proteomics research. PMID:26828594

  20. The 14-3-3 protein PAR-5 regulates the asymmetric localization of the LET-99 spindle positioning protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jui-Ching; Espiritu, Eugenel B; Rose, Lesilee S

    2016-04-15

    PAR proteins play important roles in establishing cytoplasmic polarity as well as regulating spindle positioning during asymmetric division. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the PAR proteins generate asymmetry in different cell types are still being elucidated. Previous studies in Caenorhabditis elegans revealed that PAR-3 and PAR-1 regulate the asymmetric localization of LET-99, which in turn controls spindle positioning by affecting the distribution of the conserved force generating complex. In wild-type embryos, LET-99 is localized in a lateral cortical band pattern, via inhibition at the anterior by PAR-3 and at the posterior by PAR-1. In this report, we show that the 14-3-3 protein PAR-5 is also required for cortical LET-99 asymmetry. PAR-5 associated with LET-99 in pull-down assays, and two PAR-5 binding sites were identified in LET-99 using the yeast two-hybrid assay. Mutation of these sites abolished binding in yeast and altered LET-99 localization in vivo: LET-99 was present at the highest levels at the posterior pole of the embryo instead of a band in par-5 embryos. Together the results indicate that PAR-5 acts in a mechanism with PAR-1 to regulate LET-99 cortical localization. PMID:26921457

  1. CSF Tau proteins reduce misdiagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease suspected cases with inconclusive 14-3-3 result.

    PubMed

    Leitão, M J; Baldeiras, I; Almeida, M R; Ribeiro, M H; Santos, A C; Ribeiro, M; Tomás, J; Rocha, S; Santana, I; Oliveira, C R

    2016-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 14-3-3 protein supports sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob (sCJD) diagnosis, but often leads to weak-positive results and lacks standardization. In this study, we explored the added diagnostic value of Total Tau (t-Tau) and phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau) in sCJD diagnosis, particularly in the cases with inconclusive 14-3-3 result. 95 definite sCJD and 287 patients without prion disease (non-CJD) were included in this study. CSF samples were collected in routine clinical diagnosis and analysed for 14-3-3 detection by Western blot (WB). CSF t-Tau and p-Tau were quantified by commercial ELISA kits and PRNP and APOE genotyping assessed by PCR-RFLP. In a regression analysis of the whole cohort, 14-3-3 protein revealed an overall accuracy of 82 % (sensitivity = 96.7 %; specificity = 75.6 %) for sCJD. Regarding 14-3-3 clear positive results, we observed no added value either of t-Tau alone or p-Tau/t-Tau ratio in the model. On the other hand, considering 14-3-3 weak-positive cases, t-Tau protein increased the overall accuracy of 14-3-3 alone from 91 to 94 % and specificity from 74 to 93 % (p < 0.05), with no sensitivity improvement. However, inclusion of p-Tau/t-Tau ratio did not significantly improve the first model (p = 0.0595). Globally, t-Tau protein allowed a further discrimination of 65 % within 14-3-3 inconclusive results. Furthermore, PRNP MV genotype showed a trend to decrease 14-3-3 sensitivity (p = 0.051), but such effect was not seen on t-Tau protein. In light of these results, we suggest that t-Tau protein assay is of significant importance as a second marker in identifying 14-3-3 false-positive results among sCJD probable cases. PMID:27357003

  2. Analysis of the cruciform binding activity of recombinant 14-3-3zeta-MBP fusion protein, its heterodimerization profile with endogenous 14-3-3 isoforms, and effect on mammalian DNA replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, David; Callejo, Mario; Shoucri, Rami; Boyer, Lee; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2003-06-17

    The human cruciform binding protein (CBP), a member of the 14-3-3 protein family, has been recently identified as an origin of DNA replication binding protein and involved in DNA replication. Here, pure recombinant 14-3-3zeta tagged with maltose binding protein (r14-3-3zeta-MBP) at its N-terminus was tested for binding to cruciform DNA either in the absence or presence of F(TH), a CBP-enriched fraction, by electromobility shift assay (EMSA), followed by Western blot analysis of the electroeluted CBP-cruciform DNA complex. The r14-3-3zeta-MBP was found to have cruciform binding activity only after preincubation with F(TH). Anti-MBP antibody immunoprecipitation of F(TH) preincubated with r14-3-3zeta-MBP, followed by Western blot analysis with antibodies specific to the beta, gamma, epsilon, zeta, and sigma 14-3-3 isoforms showed that r14-3-3zeta-MBP heterodimerized with the endogenous beta, epsilon, and zeta isoforms present in the F(TH) but not with the gamma or sigma isoforms. Immunoprecipitation of endogenous 14-3-3zeta from nuclear extracts (NE) of HeLa cells that were either serum-starved (s-s) or blocked at the G(1)/S or G(2)/M phases of the cell cycle revealed that at G(1)/S and G(2)/M, the zeta isoform heterodimerized only with the beta and epsilon isoforms, while in s-s extracts, the 14-3-3zeta/epsilon heterodimer was never detected, and the 14-3-3zeta/beta heterodimer was seldom detected. Furthermore, addition of r14-3-3zeta-MBP to HeLa cell extracts used in a mammalian in vitro replication system increased the replication level of p186, a plasmid bearing the minimal 186-bp origin of the monkey origin of DNA replication ors8, by approximately 3.5-fold. The data suggest that specific dimeric combinations of the 14-3-3 isoforms have CBP activity and that upregulation of this activity leads to an increase in DNA replication. PMID:12795617

  3. Modulation of GluK2a subunit-containing kainate receptors by 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changcheng; Qiao, Haifa; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Yan; Wu, Yuying; Zhou, Yi; Li, Yong

    2013-08-23

    Kainate receptors (KARs) are one of the ionotropic glutamate receptors that mediate excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) with characteristically slow kinetics. Although mechanisms for the slow kinetics of KAR-EPSCs are not totally understood, recent evidence has implicated a regulatory role of KAR-associated proteins. Here, we report that decay kinetics of GluK2a-containing receptors is modulated by closely associated 14-3-3 proteins. 14-3-3 binding requires PKC-dependent phosphorylation of serine residues localized in the carboxyl tail of the GluK2a subunit. In transfected cells, 14-3-3 binding to GluK2a slows desensitization kinetics of both homomeric GluK2a and heteromeric GluK2a/GluK5 receptors. Moreover, KAR-EPSCs at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses decay significantly faster in the 14-3-3 functional knock-out mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate that 14-3-3 proteins are an important regulator of GluK2a-containing KARs and may contribute to the slow decay kinetics of native KAR-EPSCs. PMID:23861400

  4. Interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with the Estrogen Receptor Alpha F domain provides a drug target interface

    PubMed Central

    De Vries-van Leeuwen, Ingrid J.; da Costa Pereira, Daniel; Flach, Koen D.; Piersma, Sander R.; Haase, Christian; Bier, David; Yalcin, Zeliha; Michalides, Rob; Feenstra, K. Anton; Jiménez, Connie R.; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian; Zwart, Wilbert; de Boer, Albertus H.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer. Breast cancer therapy is therefore currently directed at inhibiting the transcriptional potency of ERα, either by blocking estrogen production through aromatase inhibitors or antiestrogens that compete for hormone binding. Due to resistance, new treatment modalities are needed and as ERα dimerization is essential for its activity, interference with receptor dimerization offers a new opportunity to exploit in drug design. Here we describe a unique mechanism of how ERα dimerization is negatively controlled by interaction with 14-3-3 proteins at the extreme C terminus of the receptor. Moreover, the small-molecule fusicoccin (FC) stabilizes this ERα/14-3-3 interaction. Cocrystallization of the trimeric ERα/14-3-3/FC complex provides the structural basis for this stabilization and shows the importance of phosphorylation of the penultimate Threonine (ERα-T594) for high-affinity interaction. We confirm that T594 is a distinct ERα phosphorylation site in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 using a phospho-T594–specific antibody and by mass spectrometry. In line with its ERα/14-3-3 interaction stabilizing effect, fusicoccin reduces the estradiol-stimulated ERα dimerization, inhibits ERα/chromatin interactions and downstream gene expression, resulting in decreased cell proliferation. Herewith, a unique functional phosphosite and an alternative regulation mechanism of ERα are provided, together with a small molecule that selectively targets this ERα/14-3-3 interface. PMID:23676274

  5. Revealing the binding modes and the unbinding of 14-3-3σ proteins and inhibitors by computational methods

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guodong; Cao, Zanxia; Xu, Shicai; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    The 14-3-3σ proteins are a family of ubiquitous conserved eukaryotic regulatory molecules involved in the regulation of mitogenic signal transduction, apoptotic cell death, and cell cycle control. A lot of small-molecule inhibitors have been identified for 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions (PPIs). In this work, we carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) method to study the binding mechanism between a 14-3-3σ protein and its eight inhibitors. The ranking order of our calculated binding free energies is in agreement with the experimental results. We found that the binding free energies are mainly from interactions between the phosphate group of the inhibitors and the hydrophilic residues. To improve the binding free energy of Rx group, we designed the inhibitor R9 with group R9 = 4-hydroxypheny. However, we also found that the binding free energy of inhibitor R9 is smaller than that of inhibitor R1. By further using the steer molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations, we identified a new hydrogen bond between the inhibitor R8 and residue Arg64 in the pulling paths. The information obtained from this study may be valuable for future rational design of novel inhibitors, and provide better structural understanding of inhibitor binding to 14-3-3σ proteins. PMID:26568041

  6. Identification of a host 14-3-3 Protein that Interacts with Xanthomonas effector AvrRxv

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AvrRxv is a member of a family of pathogen effectors from both plant and mammalian pathogens. Using a yeast two hybrid screen, we identified a 14-3-3 protein from tomato that interacts with AvrRxv called AvrRxv Interactor 1 (ARI1). The interaction was confirmed in vitro with affinity chromatograph...

  7. Protein Modifications Regulate the Role of 14-3-3γ Adaptor Protein in cAMP-induced Steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Aghazadeh, Yasaman; Ye, Xiaoying; Blonder, Josip; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2014-01-01

    The 14-3-3 protein family comprises adaptors and scaffolds that regulate intracellular signaling pathways. The 14-3-3γ isoform is a negative regulator of steroidogenesis that is hormonally induced and transiently functions at the initiation of steroidogenesis by delaying maximal steroidogenesis in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells. Treatment of MA-10 cells with the cAMP analog 8-bromo-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP), which stimulates steroidogenesis, triggers the interaction of 14-3-3γ with the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) in the cytosol, limiting STAR activity to basal levels. Over time, this interaction ceases, allowing for a 2-fold induction in STAR activity and maximal increase in the rate of steroid formation. The 14-3-3γ/STAR pattern of interaction was found to be opposite that of the 14-3-3γ homodimerization pattern. Phosphorylation and acetylation of 14-3-3γ showed similar patterns to homodimerization and STAR binding, respectively. 14-3-3γ Ser58 phosphorylation and 14-3-3γ Lys49 acetylation were blocked using trans-activator of HIV transcription factor 1 peptides coupled to 14-3-3γ sequences containing Ser58 or Lys49. Blocking either one of these modifications further induced 8-Br-cAMP-induced steroidogenesis while reducing lipid storage, suggesting that the stored cholesterol is used for steroid formation. Taken together, these results indicate that Ser58 phosphorylation and Lys49 acetylation of 14-3-3γ occur in a coordinated time-dependent manner to regulate 14-3-3γ homodimerization. 14-3-3γ Ser58 phosphorylation is required for STAR interactions under control conditions, and 14-3-3γ Lys49 acetylation is important for the cAMP-dependent induction of these interactions. PMID:25086053

  8. Functional relationship between CABIT, SAM and 14-3-3 binding domains of GAREM1 that play a role in its subcellular localization

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, Tasuku; Matsunaga, Ryota; Konishi, Hiroaki

    2015-08-21

    GAREM1 (Grb2-associated regulator of Erk/MAPK1) is an adaptor protein that is involved in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway. The nuclear localization of GAREM1 depends on the nuclear localization sequence (NLS), which is located at the N-terminal CABIT (cysteine-containing, all in Themis) domain. Here, we identified 14-3-3ε as a GAREM-binding protein, and its binding site is closely located to the NLS. This 14-3-3 binding site was of the atypical type and independent of GAREM phosphorylation. Moreover, the binding of 14-3-3 had an effect on the nuclear localization of GAREM1. Unexpectedly, we observed that the CABIT domain had intramolecular association with the C-terminal SAM (sterile alpha motif) domain. This association might be inhibited by binding of 14-3-3 at the CABIT domain. Our results demonstrate that the mechanism underlying the nuclear localization of GAREM1 depends on its NLS in the CABIT domain, which is controlled by the binding of 14-3-3 and the C-terminal SAM domain. We suggest that the interplay between 14-3-3, SAM domain and CABIT domain might be responsible for the distribution of GAREM1 in mammalian cells. - Highlights: • 14-3-3ε regulated the nuclear localization of GAREM1 as its binding partner. • The atypical 14-3-3 binding site of GAREM1 is located near the NLS in CABIT domain. • The CABIT domain had intramolecular association with the SAM domain in GAREM1. • Subcellular localization of GAREM1 is affected with its CABIT-SAM interaction.

  9. Binding and Transcriptional Regulation by 14-3-3 (Bmh) Proteins Requires Residues Outside of the Canonical Motif

    PubMed Central

    Parua, Pabitra K.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionarily conserved 14-3-3 proteins have important functions as dimers in numerous cellular signaling processes, including regulation of transcription. Yeast 14-3-3 proteins, known as Bmh, inhibit a post-DNA binding step in transcription activation by Adr1, a glucose-regulated transcription factor, by binding to its regulatory domain, residues 226 to 240. The domain was originally defined by regulatory mutations, ADR1c alleles that alter activator-dependent gene expression. Here, we report that ADR1c alleles and other mutations in the regulatory domain impair Bmh binding and abolish Bmh-dependent regulation both directly and indirectly. The indirect effect is caused by mutations that inhibit phosphorylation of Ser230 and thus inhibit Bmh binding, which requires phosphorylated Ser230. However, several mutations inhibit Bmh binding without inhibiting phosphorylation and thus define residues that provide important interaction sites between Adr1 and Bmh. Our proposed model of the Adr1 regulatory domain bound to Bmh suggests that residues Ser238 and Tyr239 could provide cross-dimer contacts to stabilize the complex and that this might explain the failure of a dimerization-deficient Bmh mutant to bind Adr1 and to inhibit its activity. A bioinformatics analysis of Bmh-interacting proteins suggests that residues outside the canonical 14-3-3 motif might be a general property of Bmh target proteins and might help explain the ability of 14-3-3 to distinguish target and nontarget proteins. Bmh binding to the Adr1 regulatory domain, and its failure to bind when mutations are present, explains at a molecular level the transcriptional phenotype of ADR1c mutants. PMID:24142105

  10. Protein kinase B (AKT) regulates SYK activity and shuttling through 14-3-3 and importin 7.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Dara K; Nore, Beston F; Gustafsson, Manuela O; Mohamed, Abdalla J; Smith, C I Edvard

    2016-09-01

    The Protein kinase B (AKT) regulates a plethora of intracellular signaling proteins to fine-tune signaling of multiple pathways. Here, we found that following B-cell receptor (BCR)-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase SYK and the adaptor BLNK, the AKT/PKB enzyme strongly induced BLNK (>100-fold) and SYK (>100-fold) serine/threonine phosphorylation (pS/pT). Increased phosphorylation promoted 14-3-3 binding to BLNK (37-fold) and SYK (2.5-fold) in a pS/pT-concentration dependent manner. We also demonstrated that the AKT inhibitor MK2206 reduced pS/pT of both BLNK (3-fold) and SYK (2.5-fold). Notably, the AKT phosphatase, PHLPP2 maintained the activating phosphorylation of BLNK at Y84 and increased protein stability (8.5-fold). In addition, 14-3-3 was required for the regulation SYK's interaction with BLNK and attenuated SYK binding to Importin 7 (5-fold), thereby perturbing shuttling to the nucleus. Moreover, 14-3-3 proteins also sustained tyrosine phosphorylation of SYK and BLNK. Furthermore, substitution of S295 or S297 for alanine abrogated SYK's binding to Importin 7. SYK with S295A or S297A replacements showed intense pY525/526 phosphorylation, and BLNK pY84 phosphorylation correlated with the SYK pY525/526 phosphorylation level. Conversely, the corresponding mutations to aspartic acid in SYK reduced pY525/526 phosphorylation. Collectively, these and previous results suggest that AKT and 14-3-3 proteins down-regulate the activity of several BCR-associated components, including BTK, BLNK and SYK and also inhibit SYK's interaction with Importin 7. PMID:27381982

  11. Proteomic screen in the simple metazoan Hydra identifies 14-3-3 binding proteins implicated in cellular metabolism, cytoskeletal organisation and Ca2+ signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Barbara; Lasi, Margherita; MacKintosh, Carol; Morrice, Nick; Imhof, Axel; Regula, Jörg; Rudd, Stephen; David, Charles N; Böttger, Angelika

    2007-01-01

    Background 14-3-3 proteins have been implicated in many signalling mechanisms due to their interaction with Ser/Thr phosphorylated target proteins. They are evolutionarily well conserved in eukaryotic organisms from single celled protozoans and unicellular algae to plants and humans. A diverse array of target proteins has been found in higher plants and in human cell lines including proteins involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, cytoskeletal organisation, secretion and Ca2+ signalling. Results We found that the simple metazoan Hydra has four 14-3-3 isoforms. In order to investigate whether the diversity of 14-3-3 target proteins is also conserved over the whole animal kingdom we isolated 14-3-3 binding proteins from Hydra vulgaris using a 14-3-3-affinity column. We identified 23 proteins that covered most of the above-mentioned groups. We also isolated several novel 14-3-3 binding proteins and the Hydra specific secreted fascin-domain-containing protein PPOD. In addition, we demonstrated that one of the 14-3-3 isoforms, 14-3-3 HyA, interacts with one Hydra-Bcl-2 like protein in vitro. Conclusion Our results indicate that 14-3-3 proteins have been ubiquitous signalling components since the start of metazoan evolution. We also discuss the possibility that they are involved in the regulation of cell numbers in response to food supply in Hydra. PMID:17651497

  12. ISOFORM-SPECIFIC BINDING OF 14-3-3 PROTEINS TO NITRATE REDUCTASE AND THE BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 RECEPTOR KINASE SIGNALING COMPLEX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 14-3-3 proteins are known to bind many different soluble protein clients, but less is known about binding to integral membrane proteins, and in both cases the issue of isoform specificity remains largely unexplored. Using an array of anti-14-3-3 antibodies and 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE...

  13. Functions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14-3-3 proteins in response to DNA damage and to DNA replication stress.

    PubMed Central

    Lottersberger, Francisca; Rubert, Fabio; Baldo, Veronica; Lucchini, Giovanna; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2003-01-01

    Two members of the 14-3-3 protein family, involved in key biological processes in different eukaryotes, are encoded by the functionally redundant Saccharomyces cerevisiae BMH1 and BMH2 genes. We produced and characterized 12 independent bmh1 mutant alleles, whose presence in the cell as the sole 14-3-3 source causes hypersensitivity to genotoxic agents, indicating that Bmh proteins are required for proper response to DNA damage. In particular, the bmh1-103 and bmh1-266 mutant alleles cause defects in G1/S and G2/M DNA damage checkpoints, whereas only the G2/M checkpoint is altered by the bmh1-169 and bmh1-221 alleles. Impaired checkpoint responses correlate with the inability to maintain phosphorylated forms of Rad53 and/or Chk1, suggesting that Bmh proteins might regulate phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of these checkpoint kinases. Moreover, several bmh1 bmh2Delta mutants are defective in resuming DNA replication after transient deoxynucleotide depletion, and all display synthetic effects when also carrying mutations affecting the polalpha-primase and RPA DNA replication complexes, suggesting a role for Bmh proteins in DNA replication stress response. Finally, the bmh1-169 bmh2Delta and bmh1-170 bmh2Delta mutants show increased rates of spontaneous gross chromosomal rearrangements, indicating that Bmh proteins are required to suppress genome instability. PMID:14704161

  14. Transcription variants of the prostate-specific PrLZ gene and their interaction with 14-3-3 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruoxiang; He, Hui; Sun, Xiaojuan; Xu, Jianchun; Marshall, Fray F.; Zhau, Haiyen; Chung, Leland W.K.; Fu, Haian; He, Dalin

    2009-11-20

    We have reported isolation and characterization of the prostate-specific and androgen-regulated PrLZ gene abnormally expressed in prostate cancer. PrLZ is a potential biomarker for prostate cancer and a candidate oncogene promoting cell proliferation and survival in prostate cancer cells. A full delineation of the PrLZ gene and its gene products may provide clues to the mechanisms regulating its expression and function. In this report, we identified three additional exons in the PrLZ gene and recognized five transcript variants from alternative splicing that could be detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Structural comparison demonstrated that the PrLZ proteins are highly conserved among species. PrLZ contains multiple potential sites for interaction with other proteins. We used mammalian two-hybrid assays to demonstrate that PrLZ isoforms interact with 14-3-3 proteins, and multiple sites in the PrLZ may be involved in the interaction. Alternative splicing may contribute to abnormally enhanced PrLZ levels in prostate cancer, and interaction with 14-3-3 proteins may be a mechanism by which PrLZ promotes cell proliferation and survival during prostate cancer development and progression. This information is a valuable addition to the investigation of the oncogenic properties of the PrLZ gene.

  15. Spinach 14-3-3 protein interacts with the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase and nitrate reductase in response to excess nitrate stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huini; Zhao, Xiuling; Guo, Chuanlong; Chen, Limei; Li, Kunzhi

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the function of 14-3-3 protein in response to excess nitrate stress, a 14-3-3 protein, designated as So14-3-3, was isolated from spinach. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that So14-3-3 belongs to non-ε group of 14-3-3 superfamily. Real time-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis showed that So14-3-3 was induced by excess nitrate stress in spinach roots and leaves. After nitrate treatment, the phosphorylated H(+)-ATPase and nitrate reductase (NR) increased and decreased respectively. Co-Immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) suggested that the interaction of So14-3-3 with the phosphorylated H(+)-ATPase enhanced, but reduced with phosphorylated NR in spinach roots after nitrate treatment. Besides, 5 proteins interacted with So14-3-3 were found by Co-IP and LC-MS/MS analysis. So14-3-3 overexpressing transgenic tobacco plants showed enhanced tolerance to nitrate treatment at the germination and young seedlings stage. The transgenic plants showed longer root length, lower malondialdehyde (MDA), H2O2, protein carbonyl contents, relatively higher soluble sugar and protein contents, than the WT plants after nitrate treatment. The phosphorylation levels of H(+)-ATPase in transgenic plants were higher than the WT plants after nitrate treatment, whereas NR were lower. Additionally, in transgenic plants, the interaction of So14-3-3 with phosphorylated H(+)-ATPase and NR increased and decreased more than the WT plants under nitrate stress, leading to higher H(+)-ATPase and NR activities in transgenic plants. These data suggested that So14-3-3 might be involved in nitrate stress response by interacting with H(+)-ATPase and NR. PMID:27161584

  16. A Glycine soja 14-3-3 protein GsGF14o participates in stomatal and root hair development and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Luo, Xiao; Sun, Mingzhe; Chen, Chao; Ding, Xiaodong; Wang, Xuedong; Yang, Shanshan; Yu, Qingyue; Jia, Bowei; Ji, Wei; Cai, Hua; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that 14-3-3 proteins are key regulators of multiple stress signal transduction cascades. However, the biological functions of soybean 14-3-3 proteins, especially in plant drought response, are not yet known. In this study, we characterized a Glycine soja 14-3-3 gene, GsGF14o, which is involved in plant development and drought response. GsGF14o expression was greatly induced by drought stress, as evidenced by the quantitative real-time PCR and β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity analysis. GsGF14o overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in decreased drought tolerance during seed germination and seedling growth. Furthermore, silencing of AtGF14µ, the most homologous 14-3-3 gene of GsGF14o, led to enhanced drought tolerance at both the seed germination and seedling stage. Unexpectedly, GsGF14o transgenic lines showed reduced water loss and transpiration rates compared with wild-type plants, which was demonstrated to be the consequence of the decreased stomatal size. At the same time, the smaller stomata due to GsGF14o overexpression led to a relatively slow net photosynthesis rate, which led to a growth penalty under drought stress. We further demonstrated that GsGF14o overexpression caused deficits in root hair formation and development, and thereby reduced the water intake capacity of the transgenic root system. In addition, GsGF14o overexpression down-regulated the transcript levels of drought-responsive marker genes. Finally, we also investigated the tissue-specific accumulation of GsGF14o by using a GUS activity assay. Collectively, the results presented here confirm that GsGF14o plays a dual role in drought stress responses through its involvement in the regulation of stomatal size and root hair development. PMID:24272249

  17. Specificity of ε and Non-ε Isoforms of Arabidopsis 14-3-3 Proteins Towards the H+-ATPase and Other Targets

    PubMed Central

    Pallucca, Roberta; Visconti, Sabina; Camoni, Lorenzo; Cesareni, Giovanni; Melino, Sonia; Panni, Simona; Torreri, Paola; Aducci, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins are a family of ubiquitous dimeric proteins that modulate many cellular functions in all eukaryotes by interacting with target proteins. 14-3-3s exist as a number of isoforms that in Arabidopsis identifies two major groups named ε and non-ε. Although isoform specificity has been demonstrated in many systems, the molecular basis for the selection of specific sequence contexts has not been fully clarified. In this study we have investigated isoform specificity by measuring the ability of different Arabidopsis 14-3-3 isoforms to activate the H+-ATPase. We observed that GF14 isoforms of the non-ε group were more effective than ε group isoforms in the interaction with the H+-ATPase and in the stimulation of its activity. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the binding of GF14ε and GF14ω isoforms, representative of ε and non-ε groups respectively, with the H+-ATPase, have been determined by Surface Plasmon Resonance analysis demonstrating that the higher affinity of GF14ω is mainly due to slower dissociation. The role of the C-terminal region and of a Gly residue located in the loop 8 and conserved in all non-ε isoforms has also been studied by deletion and site-specific mutagenesis. The C-terminal domains, despite their high divergence, play an auto-inhibitory role in both isoforms and they, in addition to a specific residue located in the loop 8, contribute to isoform specificity. To investigate the generality of these findings, we have used the SPOT-synthesis technology to array a number of phosphopeptides matching known or predicted 14-3-3 binding sites present in a number of clients. The results of this approach confirmed isoform specificity in the recognition of several target peptides, suggesting that the isoform specificity may have an impact on the modulation of a variety of additional protein activities, as suggested by probing of a phosphopeptide array with members of the two 14-3-3 groups. PMID:24603559

  18. Phosphate differentially regulates 14-3-3 family members and GRF9 plays a role in Pi-starvation induced responses.

    PubMed

    Cao, Aiqin; Jain, Ajay; Baldwin, James C; Raghothama, Kashchandra G

    2007-10-01

    The 14-3-3s are phosphoserine-binding proteins that act as key regulators of many metabolic pathways. Several biotic and abiotic stresses have been shown to modulate the expression of 14-3-3 genes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, 15 genes are known to code for 14-3-3 isoforms belonging to epsilon and non-epsilon groups. Since phosphorus is one of the essential macronutrients for plants, we examined its role in the regulation of the expression of 14-3-3 isoforms belonging to epsilon (GRF9, GRF10, GRF11, GRF13) and non-epsilon (GRF1, GRF3, GRF6, GRF8) groups. The effect of Pi deprivation was differential on the members of non-epsilon group ranging from a significant reduction in the transcripts of GRF3 to non-perceptible changes in the transcripts of other members. Suppressive effect of Pi-deficiency was more pronounced on some of the members of epsilon group with transcripts levels of GRF9 and GRF13 barely detectable. A concurrent increase in the transcript levels of GRF9 with an increase in the Pi concentration suggested a correlation between gene expression and Pi availability. However, neither Pi deficiency at low temperature nor Fe and K deficiency failed to suppress GRF9 expression. In planta role of GRF9 was elucidated by the analysis of the loss-of-function mutant under Pi-replete condition. The analyses revealed exaggerated Pi-starvation responses in the form of starch accumulation in the leaves and modulated root system architecture (RSA). An inverse relationship between the abundance of GRF9 transcripts and accumulation of starch in transgenic lines over-expressing this gene provided further evidence towards the role of GRF9 in modulation of metabolic pathways during Pi-starvation responses. PMID:17598127

  19. Overexpression of the 14-3-3gamma protein in embryonic mice results in neuronal migration delay in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Brett; Wachi, Tomoka; Zhukarev, Vladimir; Toyo-Oka, Kazuhito

    2016-08-15

    The 14-3-3 protein family is a group of multifunctional proteins that are highly expressed in the brain; however, their functions in brain development are largely unknown. Williams Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a deletion in the 7q11.23 chromosome locus, including the gene encoding 14-3-3gamma, resulting in developmental delay, intellectual disabilities and epilepsy. We have previously shown that knocking down the 14-3-3gamma protein in utero in mice results in delays in neuronal migration of pyramidal neurons in the cortex. Importantly, there is a reciprocal duplication syndrome to Williams Syndrome where the 7q11.23 locus is duplicated, resulting in epilepsy and intellectual disabilities. Thus, the deletion or the duplication of the 7q11.23 chromosome locus results in epilepsy. Taken together with the fact that defects in neuronal migration are one of main causes for epilepsy, we analyzed if the overexpression of 14-3-3gamma causes neuronal migration defects. In this work, we found that the overexpression of 14-3-3gamma in utero in the developing mouse cortex results in delays in pyramidal neuron migration, similar to what was previously observed when 14-3-3gamma was knocked down. These results, in conjunction with our previous research, indicate that a balance of 14-3-3gamma expression is required during cortical development to prevent delays in neuronal migration. This work provides clear evidence as to the involvement of 14-3-3gamma in neurodevelopmental disorders and how a disruption in 14-3-3gamma expression may contribute to the neurodevelopmental disorders that manifest when the 7q11.23 locus is altered. PMID:27288018

  20. 14-3-3 proteins sequester a pool of soluble TRIM32 ubiquitin ligase to repress autoubiquitylation and cytoplasmic body formation.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Tohru; Taoka, Masato; Shoji, Ikuo; Kato, Hiroki; Sato, Tomonobu; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Isobe, Toshiaki; Hachiya, Naomi

    2013-05-01

    Deregulated expression of tripartite motif-containing protein 32 (TRIM32, an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase) contributes to various diseases. Here we report, using quantitative proteomics and biochemistry, that 14-3-3 proteins bind to phosphorylated TRIM32 and prevent TRIM32 autoubiquitylation and the formation of TRIM32-containing cytoplasmic bodies, which are potential autoregulatory mechanisms that can reduce the concentration of soluble free TRIM32. The 14-3-3-TRIM32 interaction is dependent on protein-kinase-A-catalyzed phosphorylation of TRIM32 at Ser651. We found that the inhibitory effect of 14-3-3 is, in part, a consequence of disrupting the propensity of TRIM32 to undergo higher-order self-association without affecting its dimerization. Consequently, dimerized TRIM32 bound to 14-3-3 was sequestered in a distinct cytoplasmic pool away from the microtubule network, whereas a TRIM32 mutant that cannot bind 14-3-3 underwent multimerization and was unavailable to facilitate cell growth. Our results reveal a novel connection between ubiquitylation and phosphorylation pathways, which could modulate a variety of cell events by stimulating the formation of the 14-3-3-TRIM32 signaling complex. PMID:23444366

  1. Association of 14-3-3 Proteins to β1-Adrenergic Receptors Modulates Kv11.1 K+ Channel Activity in Recombinant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tutor, Antonio S.; Delpón, Eva; Caballero, Ricardo; Gómez, Ricardo; Núñez, Lucía; Vaquero, Miguel; Tamargo, Juan; Penela, Petronila

    2006-01-01

    We identify a new mechanism for the β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR)-mediated regulation of human ether-a-go-go–related gene (HERG) potassium channel (Kv11.1). We find that the previously reported modulatory interaction between Kv11.1 channels and 14-3-3ε proteins is competed by wild type β1AR by means of a novel interaction between this receptor and 14-3-3ε. The association between β1AR and 14-3-3ε is increased by agonist stimulation in both transfected cells and heart tissue and requires cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity. The β1AR/14-3-3ε association is direct, since it can be recapitulated using purified 14-3-3ε and β1AR fusion proteins and is abolished in cells expressing β1AR phosphorylation–deficient mutants. Biochemical and electrophysiological studies of the effects of isoproterenol on Kv11.1 currents recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp demonstrated that β1AR phosphorylation–deficient mutants do not recruit 14-3-3ε away from Kv11.1 and display a markedly altered agonist-mediated modulation of Kv11.1 currents compared with wild-type β1AR, increasing instead of inhibiting current amplitudes. Interestingly, such differential modulation is not observed in the presence of 14-3-3 inhibitors. Our results suggest that the dynamic association of 14-3-3 proteins to both β1AR and Kv11.1 channels is involved in the adrenergic modulation of this critical regulator of cardiac repolarization and refractoriness. PMID:16914520

  2. Identification of 14-3-3 proteins as a target of ATL31 ubiquitin ligase, a regulator of the C/N response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Yasuda, Shigetaka; Domeki, Yukie; Sueyoshi, Kuni; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Fukao, Yoichiro; Goto, Derek B; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2011-10-01

    The balance between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) availability is an important determinant for various phases of plant growth; however, the detailed mechanisms regulating the C/N response are not well understood. We previously described two related ubiquitin ligases, ATL31 and ATL6, that function in the C/N response in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we used FLAG tag affinity purification and MS analysis to identify proteins targeted by ATL31, and thus likely to be involved in regulating the phase transition checkpoint based on C/N status. This analysis revealed that 14-3-3 proteins were associated with ATL31, and one of these, 14-3-3χ, was selected for detailed characterization. The interaction between ATL31 and 14-3-3χ was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation analyses. In vitro assays showed that ubiquitination of 14-3-3χ is catalyzed by ATL31. Degradation of 14-3-3χin vivo was shown to be correlated with ATL31 activity, and to occur in a proteasome-dependent manner. Furthermore, 14-3-3 protein accumulation was induced by a shift to high-C/N stress conditions in Arabidopsis seedlings, and this regulated response required both ATL31 and ATL6. It was also shown that over-expression of 14-3-3χ leads to hypersensitivity of Arabidopsis seedlings to C/N stress conditions. These results indicate that ATL31 targets and ubiquitinates 14-3-3 proteins for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system during the response to cellular C/N status. PMID:21668537

  3. Phosphorylation of Thr-948 at the C terminus of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase creates a binding site for the regulatory 14-3-3 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Svennelid, F; Olsson, A; Piotrowski, M; Rosenquist, M; Ottman, C; Larsson, C; Oecking, C; Sommarin, M

    1999-01-01

    The plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase is activated by the binding of 14-3-3 protein to the C-terminal region of the enzyme, thus forming an H(+)-ATPase-14-3-3 complex that can be stabilized by the fungal toxin fusicoccin. A novel 14-3-3 binding motif, QQXYpT(948)V, at the C terminus of the H(+)-ATPase is identified and characterized, and the protein kinase activity in the plasma membrane fraction that phosphorylates this threonine residue in the H(+)-ATPase is identified. A synthetic peptide that corresponds to the C-terminal 16 amino acids of the H(+)-ATPase and that is phosphorylated on Thr-948 prevents the in vitro activation of the H(+)-ATPase that is obtained in the presence of recombinant 14-3-3 and fusicoccin. Furthermore, binding of 14-3-3 to the H(+)-ATPase in the absence of fusicoccin is absolutely dependent on the phosphorylation of Thr-948, whereas binding of 14-3-3 in the presence of fusicoccin occurs independently of phosphorylation but still involves the C-terminal motif YTV. Finally, by complementing yeast that lacks its endogenous H(+)-ATPase with wild-type and mutant forms of the Nicotiana plumbaginifolia H(+)-ATPase isoform PMA2, we provide physiological evidence for the importance of the phosphothreonine motif in 14-3-3 binding and, hence, in the activation of the H(+)-ATPase in vivo. Indeed, replacing Thr-948 in the plant H(+)-ATPase with alanine is lethal because this mutant fails to functionally replace the yeast H(+)-ATPase. Considering the importance of the motif QQXYpTV for 14-3-3 binding and yeast growth, this motif should be of vital importance for regulating H(+)-ATPase activity in the plant and thus for plant growth. PMID:10590165

  4. Characterization of 14-3-3 isoforms expressed in the Echinococcus granulosus pathogenic larval stage.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Aline; Vargas, Daiani M; Monteiro, Karina M; Meneghetti, Bruna V; Dutra, Cristine S; Paredes, Rodolfo; Galanti, Norbel; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2015-04-01

    The 14-3-3 protein family of eukaryotic regulators was studied in Echinococcus granulosus, the causative agent of cystic hydatid disease. These proteins mediate important cellular processes in eukaryotes and are expected to play important roles in parasite biology. Six isoforms of E. granulosus 14-3-3 genes and proteins (Eg14-3-3.1-6) were analyzed, and their phylogenetic relationships were established with bona fide 14-3-3 orthologous proteins from eukaryotic species. Eg14-3-3 isoforms with previous evidence of expression (Eg14-3-3.1-4) in E. granulosus pathogenic larval stage (metacestode) were cloned, and recombinant proteins were used for functional studies. These protein isoforms were detected in different components of E. granulosus metacestode, including interface components with the host. The roles that are played by Eg14-3-3 proteins in parasite biology were inferred from the repertoires of interacting proteins with each isoform, as assessed by gel overlay, cross-linking, and affinity chromatography assays. A total of 95 Eg14-3-3 protein ligands were identified by mass spectrometry. Eg14-3-3 isoforms have shared partners (44 proteins), indicating some overlapping functions; however, they also bind exclusive partners (51 proteins), suggesting Eg14-3-3 functional specialization. These ligand repertoires indicate the involvement of Eg14-3-3 proteins in multiple biochemical pathways in the E. granulosus metacestode and note some degree of isoform specialization. PMID:25748451

  5. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family.

    PubMed

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems. PMID:27195976

  6. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family

    PubMed Central

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems. PMID:27195976

  7. 14-3-3 isoforms bind directly exon B of the 5′-UTR of human surfactant protein A2 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Noutsios, Georgios T.; Ghattas, Paul; Bennett, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Human surfactant protein (SP) A (SP-A), an innate immunity molecule, is encoded by two genes, SFTPA1 and SFTPA2. The 5′-untranslated splice variant of SP-A2 (ABD), but not SP-A1 (AD), contains exon B (eB). eB is an enhancer for transcription and translation and contains cis-regulatory elements. Specific trans-acting factors, including 14-3-3, bind eB. The 14-3-3 protein family contains seven isoforms that have been found by mass spectrometry in eB electromobility shift assays (Noutsios et al. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 304: L722–L735, 2013). We used four different approaches to investigate whether 14-3-3 isoforms bind directly to eB. 1) eB RNA pulldown assays showed that 14-3-3 isoforms specifically bind eB. 2) RNA electromobility shift assay complexes were formed using purified 14-3-3 isoforms β, γ, ε, η, σ, and τ, but not isoform ζ, with wild-type eB RNA. 3 and 4) RNA affinity chromatography assays and surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that 14-3-3 isoforms β, γ, ε, η, σ, and τ, but not isoform ζ, specifically and directly bind eB. Inhibition of 14-3-3 isoforms γ, ε, η, and τ/θ with shRNAs in NCI-H441 cells resulted in downregulation of SP-A2 levels but did not affect SP-A1 levels. However, inhibition of 14-3-3 isoform σ was correlated with lower levels of SP-A1 and SP-A2. Inhibition of 14-3-3 isoform ζ/δ, which does not bind eB, had no effect on expression levels of SP-A1 and SP-A2. In conclusion, the 14-3-3 protein family affects differential regulation of SP-A1 and SP-A2 by binding directly to SP-A2 5′-UTR mRNA. PMID:26001776

  8. Properties of the monomeric form of human 14-3-3ζ protein and its interaction with tau and HspB6.

    PubMed

    Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Sudnitsyna, Maria V; Seit-Nebi, Alim S; Antson, Alfred A; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2011-11-15

    Dimers formed by seven isoforms of the human 14-3-3 protein participate in multiple cellular processes. The dimeric form has been extensively characterized; however, little is known about the structure and properties of the monomeric form of 14-3-3. The monomeric form is involved in the assembly of homo- and heterodimers, which could partially dissociate back into monomers in response to phosphorylation at Ser58. To obtain monomeric forms of human 14-3-3ζ, we produced four protein constructs with different combinations of mutated (M) or wild-type (W) segments E(5), (12)LAE(14), and (82)YREKIE(87). Under a wide range of expression conditions in Escherichia coli, the MMM and WMM mutants were insoluble, whereas WMW and MMW mutants were soluble, highly expressed, and purified to homogeneity. WMW and MMW mutants remained monomeric over a wide range of concentrations while retaining the α-helical structure characteristic of wild-type 14-3-3. However, WMW and MMW mutants were highly susceptible to proteolysis and had much lower thermal stabilities than the wild-type protein. Using WMW and MMW mutants, we show that the monomeric form interacts with the tau protein and with the HspB6 protein, in both cases forming complexes with a 1:1 stoichiometry, in contrast to the 2:1 and/or 2:2 complexes formed by wild-type 14-3-3. Significantly, this interaction requires phosphorylation of tau protein and HspB6. Because of minimal changes in structure, MMW and especially WMW mutant proteins are promising candidates for analyzing the effect of monomerization on the physiologically important properties of 14-3-3ζ. PMID:21978388

  9. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14-3-3 proteins are required for the G1/S transition, actin cytoskeleton organization and cell wall integrity.

    PubMed

    Lottersberger, Francisca; Panza, Andrea; Lucchini, Giovanna; Piatti, Simonetta; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2006-06-01

    14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved polypeptides that participate in many biological processes by binding phosphorylated target proteins. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae BMH1 and BMH2 genes, whose concomitant deletion is lethal, encode two functionally redundant 14-3-3 isoforms. To gain insights into the essential function(s) shared by these proteins, we searched for high-dosage suppressors of the growth defects of temperature-sensitive bmh mutants. Both the protein kinase C1 (Pkc1) and its upstream regulators Wsc2 and Mid2 were found to act as high dosage suppressors of bmh mutants' temperature sensitivity, indicating a functional interaction between 14-3-3 and Pkc1. Consistent with a role of 14-3-3 proteins in Pkc1-dependent cellular processes, shift to the restrictive temperature of bmh mutants severely impaired initiation of DNA replication, polarization of the actin cytoskeleton, and budding, as well as cell wall integrity. Because Pkc1 acts in concert with the Swi4-Swi6 (SBF) transcriptional activator to control all these processes, the defective G(1)/S transition of bmh mutants might be linked to impaired SBF activity. Indeed, the levels of the G(1) cyclin CLN2 transcripts, which are positively regulated by SBF, were dramatically reduced in bmh mutants. Remarkably, budding and DNA replication defects of bmh mutants were suppressed by CLN2 expression from an SBF-independent promoter, suggesting that 14-3-3 proteins might contribute to regulating the late G(1) transcriptional program. PMID:16648583

  10. Observation of interaction between bid and 14-3-3 proteins by FRET in living cell during TNF-a-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinjun; Chen, Tongsheng; Xing, Da; Wang, Fang

    2005-01-01

    Caspase8 is activated and cleaves Bid into two fragments when cells are exposed to death-inducing molecules such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Then the C-terminal fragment relocates from cytosol to mitochondria and promotes the release of cytochrome c, in the final cellular apoptosis is induced. Despite recent progress in the study of Bid during apoptosis induction, it remains unclear how C-terminal fragment of Bid cleaved moves to mitochondria and then induces the release of cytochrome c and so on. The 14-3-3 proteins are known to sequester certain pro-apoptotic members of Bcl-2 family. In order to further study the biological action of Bid during apoptosis, especially under physiological condition of living cell, the plasmids pBid-CFP and pYFP-14-3-3 were constructed. By the transient transfection of pBid-CFP and pYFP-14-3-3, the dynamic process of interaction of Bid and 14-3-3 protein in individual living cell during the apoptosis was primarily investigated with FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer) technique by the use of fluorescence microscopy.

  11. Protein Kinase CK2 Interacts at the Neuromuscular Synapse with Rapsyn, Rac1, 14-3-3γ, and Dok-7 Proteins and Phosphorylates the Latter Two*

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Dustin; Straubinger, Marion; Hashemolhosseini, Said

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CK2 associates with and phosphorylates the receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK (muscle specific receptor tyrosine kinase) at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), thereby preventing fragmentation of the NMJs (Cheusova, T., Khan, M. A., Schubert, S. W., Gavin, A. C., Buchou, T., Jacob, G., Sticht, H., Allende, J., Boldyreff, B., Brenner, H. R., and Hashemolhosseini, S. (2006) Genes Dev. 20, 1800–1816). Here, we asked whether CK2 interacts with other proteins involved in processes at the NMJ, which would be consistent with the previous observation that CK2 appears enriched at the NMJ. We identified the following proteins to interact with protein kinase CK2: (a) the α and β subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with weak interaction, (b) dishevelled (Dsh), and (c) another four proteins, Rapsyn, Rac1, 14-3-3γ, and Dok-7, with strong interaction. CK2 phosphorylated 14-3-3γ at serine residue 235 and Dok-7 at several serine residues but does not phosphorylate Rapsyn or Rac1. Furthermore, phosphomimetic Dok-7 mutants aggregated nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in C2C12 myotubes with significantly higher frequency than wild type Dok-7. Additionally, we mapped the interacting epitopes of all four binding partners to CK2 and thereby gained insights into the potential role of the CK2/Rapsyn interaction. PMID:26198629

  12. Proteomic analysis of human norepinephrine transporter complexes reveals associations with protein phosphatase 2A anchoring subunit and 14-3-3 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Uhna; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Link, Andrew J.; Blakely, Randy D.; E-mail: andy.blakely@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-08-05

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) terminates noradrenergic signals by clearing released NE at synapses. NET regulation by receptors and intracellular signaling pathways is supported by a growing list of associated proteins including syntaxin1A, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit (PP2A-C), PICK1, and Hic-5. In the present study, we sought evidence for additional partnerships by mass spectrometry-based analysis of proteins co-immunoprecipitated with human NET (hNET) stably expressed in a mouse noradrenergic neuroblastoma cell line. Our initial proteomic analyses reveal multiple peptides derived from hNET, peptides arising from the mouse PP2A anchoring subunit (PP2A-Ar) and peptides derived from 14-3-3 proteins. We verified physical association of NET with PP2A-Ar via co-immunoprecipitation studies using mouse vas deferens extracts and with 14-3-3 via a fusion pull-down approach, implicating specifically the hNET NH{sub 2}-terminus for interactions. The transporter complexes described likely support mechanisms regulating transporter activity, localization, and trafficking.

  13. Rapid antidepressants stimulate the decoupling of GABAB receptors from GIRK/Kir3 channels through increased protein stability of 14-3-3η

    PubMed Central

    Workman, E R; Haddick, P C G; Bush, K; Dilly, G A; Niere, F; Zemelman, B V; Raab-Graham, K F

    2015-01-01

    A single injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists produces a rapid antidepressant response. Lasting changes in the synapse structure and composition underlie the effectiveness of these drugs. We recently discovered that rapid antidepressants cause a shift in the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABABR) signaling pathway, such that GABABR activation shifts from opening inwardly rectifiying potassium channels (Kir/GIRK) to increasing resting dendritic calcium signal and mammalian Target of Rapamycin activity. However, little is known about the molecular and biochemical mechanisms that initiate this shift. Herein, we show that GABABR signaling to Kir3 (GIRK) channels decreases with NMDAR blockade. Blocking NMDAR signaling stabilizes the adaptor protein 14-3-3η, which decouples GABABR signaling from Kir3 and is required for the rapid antidepressant efficacy. Consistent with these results, we find that key proteins involved in GABABR signaling bidirectionally change in a depression model and with rapid antidepressants. In socially defeated rodents, a model for depression, GABABR and 14-3-3η levels decrease in the hippocampus. The NMDAR antagonists AP5 and Ro-25-6981, acting as rapid antidepressants, increase GABABR and 14-3-3η expression and decrease Kir3.2. Taken together, these data suggest that the shift in GABABR function requires a loss of GABABR-Kir3 channel activity mediated by 14-3-3η. Our findings support a central role for 14-3-3η in the efficacy of rapid antidepressants and define a critical molecular mechanism for activity-dependent alterations in GABABR signaling. PMID:25560757

  14. Anchoring of both PKA-RIIα and 14-3-3θ regulates retinoic acid induced 16 mediated phosphorylation of heat shock protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hai-Lin; Zhu, Shi-Ying; Zhao, Lan-Juan; Ren, Hao; Zhao, Ping; Qi, Zhong-Tian; Wang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study reported that retinoic acid induced 16 (RAI16) could enhance tumorigenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the cellular functions of RAI16 are still unclear. In this study, by immunoprecipitation and tandem (MS/MS) mass spectrometry analysis, we identified that RAI16 interacted with the type II regulatory subunit of PKA (PKA-RIIα), acting as a novel protein kinase A anchoring protein (AKAP). In addition, RAI16 also interacted with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and 14-3-3θ. Further studies indicated that RAI16 mediated PKA phosphorylation of HSP70 at serine 486, resulting in anti-apoptosis events. RAI16 was also phosphorylated by the anchored PKA at serine 325, which promoted the recruitment of 14-3-3θ, which, in turn, inhibited RAI16 mediated PKA phosphorylation of HSP70. These findings offer mechanism insight into RAI16 mediated anti-apoptosis signaling in HCC. PMID:25900241

  15. A rare case of rapidly progressive dementia with elevated RT-QuIC and negative 14-3-3 and tau proteins.

    PubMed

    Trikamji, Bhavesh; Hamlin, Clive; Baldwin, Kelly J

    2016-05-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is characterized by rapidly progressing dementia with death usually occurring within 6 months. There is no verified disease-specific pre-mortem diagnostic test besides brain biopsy. We describe a 66 y old previously high functioning male who presented with a 5 month history of rapidly progressive dementia. Neurological examination revealed a score of 19/30 on MOCA testing. An extensive workup into various causes of dementia including electroencephalography and imaging studies was unremarkable. The cerebrospinal fluid was sent to National Prion Disease Center and it revealed elevated RT-QuIC levels with negative 14-3-3 and T tau proteins. Based on literature review, our case is one of few living subjects with elevated RT-QuIC levels and negative 14-3-3 and tau proteins. PMID:27249661

  16. 14-3-3 and aggresome formation

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Baohui; Wu, Yuying; Zhou, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation underlie the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to chaperone-mediated refolding and proteasomal degradation, the aggresome-macroautophagy pathway has emerged as another defense mechanism for sequestration and clearance of toxic protein aggregates in cells. Previously, the 14-3-3 proteins were shown to be indispensable for the formation of aggresomes induced by mutant huntingtin proteins. In a recent study, we have determined that 14-3-3 functions as a molecular adaptor to recruit chaperone-associated misfolded proteins to dynein motors for transport to aggresomes. This molecular complex involves a dimeric binding of 14-3-3 to both the dynein-intermediate chain (DIC) and an Hsp70 co-chaperone Bcl-2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3). As 14-3-3 has been implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases, our findings may provide mechanistic insights into its role in managing misfolded protein stress during the process of neurodegeneration. PMID:24549097

  17. The EFF-1A Cytoplasmic Domain Influences Hypodermal Cell Fusions in C. elegans But Is Not Dependent on 14-3-3 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shinn-Thomas, Jessica H.; del Campo, Jacob J.; Wang, Jianjun; Mohler, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Regulatory and biophysical mechanisms of cell-cell fusion are largely unknown despite the fundamental requirement for fused cells in eukaryotic development. Only two cellular fusogens that are not of clear recent viral origin have been identified to date, both in nematodes. One of these, EFF-1, is necessary for most cell fusions in Caenorhabditis elegans. Unregulated EFF-1 expression causes lethality due to ectopic fusion between cells not developmentally programmed to fuse, highlighting the necessity of tight fusogen regulation for proper development. Identifying factors that regulate EFF-1 and its paralog AFF-1 could lead to discovery of molecular mechanisms that control cell fusion upstream of the action of a membrane fusogen. Bioinformatic analysis of the EFF-1A isoform’s predicted cytoplasmic domain (endodomain) previously revealed two motifs that have high probabilities of interacting with 14-3-3 proteins when phosphorylated. Mutation of predicted phosphorylation sites within these motifs caused measurable loss of eff-1 gene function in cell fusion in vivo. Moreover, a human 14-3-3 isoform bound to EFF-1::GFP in vitro. We hypothesized that the two 14-3-3 proteins in C. elegans, PAR-5 and FTT-2, may regulate either localization or fusion-inducing activity of EFF-1. Methodology/Principal Findings Timing of fusion events was slightly but significantly delayed in animals unable to produce full-length EFF-1A. Yet, mutagenesis and live imaging showed that phosphoserines in putative 14-3-3 binding sites are not essential for EFF-1::GFP accumulation at the membrane contact between fusion partner cells. Moreover, although the EFF-1A endodomain was required for normal rates of eff-1-dependent epidermal cell fusions, reduced levels of FTT-2 and PAR-5 did not visibly affect the function of wild-type EFF-1 in the hypodermis. Conclusions/Significance Deletion of the EFF-1A endodomain noticeably affects the timing of hypodermal cell fusions in vivo. However

  18. Regulation of the Yeast Hxt6 Hexose Transporter by the Rod1 α-Arrestin, the Snf1 Protein Kinase, and the Bmh2 14-3-3 Protein.

    PubMed

    Llopis-Torregrosa, Vicent; Ferri-Blázquez, Alba; Adam-Artigues, Anna; Deffontaines, Emilie; van Heusden, G Paul H; Yenush, Lynne

    2016-07-15

    Cell viability requires adaptation to changing environmental conditions. Ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis plays a crucial role in this process, because it provides a mechanism to remove transport proteins from the membrane. Arrestin-related trafficking proteins are important regulators of the endocytic pathway in yeast, facilitating selective ubiquitylation of target proteins by the E3 ubiquitin ligase, Rsp5. Specifically, Rod1 (Art4) has been reported to regulate the endocytosis of both the Hxt1, Hxt3, and Hxt6 glucose transporters and the Jen1 lactate transporter. Also, the AMP kinase homologue, Snf1, and 14-3-3 proteins have been shown to regulate Jen1 via Rod1. Here, we further characterized the role of Rod1, Snf1, and 14-3-3 in the signal transduction route involved in the endocytic regulation of the Hxt6 high affinity glucose transporter by showing that Snf1 interacts specifically with Rod1 and Rog3 (Art7), that the interaction between the Bmh2 and several arrestin-related trafficking proteins may be modulated by carbon source, and that both the 14-3-3 protein Bmh2 and the Snf1 regulatory domain interact with the arrestin-like domain containing the N-terminal half of Rod1 (amino acids 1-395). Finally, using both co-immunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation, we demonstrated the interaction of Rod1 with Hxt6 and showed that the localization of the Rod1-Hxt6 complex at the plasma membrane is affected by carbon source and is reduced upon overexpression of SNF1 and BMH2. PMID:27261460

  19. Involvement of 14-3-3 protein GRF9 in root growth and response under polyethylene glycol-induced water stress.

    PubMed

    He, Yuchi; Wu, Jingjing; Lv, Bing; Li, Jia; Gao, Zhiping; Xu, Weifeng; Baluška, František; Shi, Weiming; Shaw, Pang Chui; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-04-01

    Plant 14-3-3 proteins are phosphoserine-binding proteins that regulate a wide array of targets via direct protein-protein interactions. In this study, the role of a 14-3-3 protein, GRF9, in plant response to water stress was investigated. Arabidopsis wild-type, GRF9-deficient mutant (grf9), and GRF9-overexpressing (OE) plants were treated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to induce mild water stress. OE plant showed better whole-plant growth and root growth than the wild type under normal or water stress conditions while the grf9 mutant showed worse growth. In OE plants, GRF9 favours the allocation of shoot carbon to roots. In addition, GRF9 enhanced proton extrusion, mainly in the root elongation zone and root hair zone, and maintained root growth under mild water stress. Grafting among the wild type, OE, and grf9 plants showed that when OE plants were used as the scion and GRF9 was overexpressed in the shoot, it enhanced sucrose transport into the root, and when OE plants were used as rootstock and GRF9 was overexpressed in the root, it caused more release of protons into the root surface under water stress. Taken together, the results suggest that under PEG-induced water stress, GRF9 is involved in allocating more carbon from the shoot to the root and enhancing proton secretion in the root growing zone, and this process is important for root response to mild water stress. PMID:25873671

  20. Chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC4 (p64H1) binds directly to brain dynamin I in a complex containing actin, tubulin and 14-3-3 isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Suginta, W; Karoulias, N; Aitken, A; Ashley, R H

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) (p64-related) proteins are widely expressed, with an unusual dual localization as both soluble and integral membrane proteins. The molecular basis for their cellular localization and ion channel activity remains unclear. To help in addressing these problems, we identified novel rat brain CLIC4 (p64H1) binding partners by affinity chromatography, mass spectrometric analysis and microsequencing. Brain CLIC4 binds dynamin I, alpha-tubulin, beta-actin, creatine kinase and two 14-3-3 isoforms; the interactions are confirmed in vivo by immunoprecipitation. Gel overlay and reverse pull-down assays indicate that the binding of CLIC4 to dynamin I and 14-3-3zeta is direct. In HEK-293 cells, biochemical and immunofluorescence analyses show partial co-localization of recombinant CLIC4 with caveolin and with functional caveolae, which is consistent with a dynamin-associated role for CLIC4 in caveolar endocytosis. We speculate that brain CLIC4 might be involved in the dynamics of neuronal plasma membrane microdomains (micropatches) containing caveolin-like proteins and might also have other cellular roles related to membrane trafficking. Our results provide the basis for new hypotheses concerning novel ways in which CLIC proteins might be associated with cell membrane remodelling, the control of cell shape, and anion channel activity. PMID:11563969

  1. Involvement of 14-3-3 protein GRF9 in root growth and response under polyethylene glycol-induced water stress

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuchi; Wu, Jingjing; Lv, Bing; Li, Jia; Gao, Zhiping; Xu, Weifeng; Baluška, František; Shi, Weiming; Shaw, Pang Chui; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Plant 14-3-3 proteins are phosphoserine-binding proteins that regulate a wide array of targets via direct protein–protein interactions. In this study, the role of a 14-3-3 protein, GRF9, in plant response to water stress was investigated. Arabidopsis wild-type, GRF9-deficient mutant (grf9), and GRF9-overexpressing (OE) plants were treated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to induce mild water stress. OE plant showed better whole-plant growth and root growth than the wild type under normal or water stress conditions while the grf9 mutant showed worse growth. In OE plants, GRF9 favours the allocation of shoot carbon to roots. In addition, GRF9 enhanced proton extrusion, mainly in the root elongation zone and root hair zone, and maintained root growth under mild water stress. Grafting among the wild type, OE, and grf9 plants showed that when OE plants were used as the scion and GRF9 was overexpressed in the shoot, it enhanced sucrose transport into the root, and when OE plants were used as rootstock and GRF9 was overexpressed in the root, it caused more release of protons into the root surface under water stress. Taken together, the results suggest that under PEG-induced water stress, GRF9 is involved in allocating more carbon from the shoot to the root and enhancing proton secretion in the root growing zone, and this process is important for root response to mild water stress. PMID:25873671

  2. Positive 14-3-3 and tau proteins in a sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease case and a brief perspective of prion diseases in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Escandón-Vargas, Kevin; Zorrilla-Vaca, Andrés; Corral-Prado, Raúl Heli

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are rare neurodegenerative disorders occurring worldwide and affecting both humans and animals. Herein, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with definite sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in Cali, Colombia. Besides neurological examination, 14-3-3 and tau proteins were valuable tools supporting the diagnosis. We also present a brief perspective of the prion diseases reported in Colombia to date. Although the incidence of prion diseases is unknown in Colombia, our literature review revealed that one case of scrapie in 1981 and 29 human sporadic cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have been documented and published in our country. PMID:27622622

  3. Phospho-specific recognition by 14-3-3 proteins and antibodies monitored by a high throughput label-free optical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng; Coblitz, Brian; Shikano, Sojin; Long, Shunyou; Spieker, Matt; Frutos, Anthony G; Mukhopadhyay, Sunil; Li, Min

    2006-10-16

    Label-free detection of molecular interactions has considerable potential in facilitating assay development. When combined with high throughput capability, it may be applied to small molecule screens for drug candidates. Phosphorylation is a key posttranslational process that confers diverse regulation in biological systems involving specific protein-protein interactions recognizing the phosphorylated motifs. Using a resonant waveguide grating biosensor, the Epic mark System, we have developed a generic assay to quantitatively measure phospho-specific interactions between a trafficking signal-phosphorylated SWTY peptide and 14-3-3 proteins or anti-phosphopeptide antibodies. Compared with a solution-based fluorescence anisotropy assay, our results support that the high throughput resonant waveguide grating biosensor system has favorable technical profiles in detecting protein-protein interactions that recognize phosphorylated motifs. Hence it provides a new generic HTS platform for phospho-detection. PMID:17011553

  4. A calcium and free fatty acid-modulated protein kinase as putative effector of the fusicoccin 14-3-3 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    van der Hoeven, P C; Siderius, M; Korthout, H A; Drabkin, A V; de Boer, A H

    1996-01-01

    A protein kinase that is activated by calcium and cis-unsaturated fatty acids has been characterized from oat (Avena sativa L.) root plasma membranes. The kinase phosphorylates a synthetic peptide with a motif (-R-T-L-S-) that can be phosphorylated by both protein kinase C (PKC) and calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK)-type kinases. Calphostin C and chelerythrine, two PKC inhibitors, completely inhibited the kinase activity with values of inhibitor concentration for 50% inhibition of 0.7 and 30 microns, respectively. At low Ca2+ concentrations cis-unsaturated fatty acids (linolenic acid, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, and oleic acid) stimulated the kinase activity almost 10-fold. The two inhibitors of the kinase, calphostin C and chelerythrin, strongly reduced the fusicoccin (FC)-induced H+ extrusion, and the activators of the kinase, the cis-unsaturated fatty acids, prevented [3H]FC binding to the FC 14-3-3 receptor. CDPK antibodies cross-reacted with a 43-kD band in the plasma membrane and in a purified FC receptor fraction. A polypeptide with the same apparent molecular mass was recognized by a synthetic peptide that has a sequence homologous to the annexin-like domain from barely 14-3-3. The possibility of the involvement of a kinase, with properties from both CDPK and PKC, and a phospholipase A2 in the FC Signal transduction pathway is discussed. PMID:8754686

  5. 14-3-3-Pred: improved methods to predict 14-3-3-binding phosphopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Fábio; Tinti, Michele; Murugesan, Gavuthami; Berrett, Emily; Stafford, Margaret; Toth, Rachel; Cole, Christian; MacKintosh, Carol; Barton, Geoffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The 14-3-3 family of phosphoprotein-binding proteins regulates many cellular processes by docking onto pairs of phosphorylated Ser and Thr residues in a constellation of intracellular targets. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop new prediction methods that use an updated set of 14-3-3-binding motifs for the identification of new 14-3-3 targets and to prioritize the downstream analysis of >2000 potential interactors identified in high-throughput experiments. Results: Here, a comprehensive set of 14-3-3-binding targets from the literature was used to develop 14-3-3-binding phosphosite predictors. Position-specific scoring matrix, support vector machines (SVM) and artificial neural network (ANN) classification methods were trained to discriminate experimentally determined 14-3-3-binding motifs from non-binding phosphopeptides. ANN, position-specific scoring matrix and SVM methods showed best performance for a motif window spanning from −6 to +4 around the binding phosphosite, achieving Matthews correlation coefficient of up to 0.60. Blind prediction showed that all three methods outperform two popular 14-3-3-binding site predictors, Scansite and ELM. The new methods were used for prediction of 14-3-3-binding phosphosites in the human proteome. Experimental analysis of high-scoring predictions in the FAM122A and FAM122B proteins confirms the predictions and suggests the new 14-3-3-predictors will be generally useful. Availability and implementation: A standalone prediction web server is available at http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/1433pred. Human candidate 14-3-3-binding phosphosites were integrated in ANIA: ANnotation and Integrated Analysis of the 14-3-3 interactome database. Contact: cmackintosh@dundee.ac.uk or gjbarton@dundee.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25735772

  6. Akirin interacts with Bap60 and 14-3-3 proteins to regulate the expression of antimicrobial peptides in the kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Xian-Wei; Sun, Jie-Jie; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-02-01

    Akirin is a recently discovered nuclear factor that plays important roles in innate immune responses. Akirin is a positive regulator of the NF-κB factor of the Drosophila immune deficiency (IMD) pathway, which shares extensive similarities with the mammalian tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) signaling pathway. However, some studies found that the NF-κB transcriptional targets were also strongly repressed in akirin2 knockout mice following TLR, IL-1β and TNFα treatment. Therefore, the function of Akirin in the immune response requires further clarification. In this study, an Akirin homolog in the kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus) was identified. It was mainly expressed in hemocytes, heart and intestines. The expression of Akirin was upregulated by challenge with the Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio anguillarum, but was not significantly influenced by challenge with the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Knockdown of Akirin suppressed the expression of several IMD-Relish target effectors (antimicrobial peptides, AMPs). The limited regulating spectrum of Akirin might be associated with Bap60, a component of the Brahma (SWI/SNF) ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex. In addition, Akirin also interacts with 14-3-3, which inhibited the expression of Akirin-target AMPs. The results suggested that Akirin is involved in the IMD-Relish pathway by interacting with Relish. The interaction of Akirin with Bap60 positively regulated the Akirin-Relish function, and its interaction with 14-3-3 negatively regulated the Akirin-Relish function. PMID:26493016

  7. 14-3-3σ Gene Loss Leads to Activation of the Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition Due to the Stabilization of c-Jun Protein.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Kumarkrishna; Chaudhary, Neelam; Gurjar, Mansa; D'Souza, Roseline; Limzerwala, Jazeel; Maddika, Subbareddy; Dalal, Sorab N

    2016-07-29

    Loss of 14-3-3σ has been observed in multiple tumor types; however, the mechanisms by which 14-3-3σ loss leads to tumor progression are not understood. The experiments in this report demonstrate that loss of 14-3-3σ leads to a decrease in the expression of epithelial markers and an increase in the expression of mesenchymal markers, which is indicative of an induction of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). The EMT was accompanied by an increase in migration and invasion in the 14-3-3σ(-/-) cells. 14-3-3σ(-/-) cells show increased stabilization of c-Jun, resulting in an increase in the expression of the EMT transcription factor slug. 14-3-3σ induces the ubiquitination and degradation of c-Jun in an FBW7-dependent manner. c-Jun ubiquitination is dependent on the presence of an intact nuclear export pathway as c-Jun is stabilized and localized to the nucleus in the presence of a nuclear export inhibitor. Furthermore, the absence of 14-3-3σ leads to the nuclear accumulation and stabilization of c-Jun, suggesting that 14-3-3σ regulates the subcellular localization of c-Jun. Our results have identified a novel mechanism by which 14-3-3σ maintains the epithelial phenotype by inhibiting EMT and suggest that this property of 14-3-3σ might contribute to its function as a tumor suppressor gene. PMID:27261462

  8. Development of a dot blot assay with antibodies to recombinant “core” 14-3-3 protein: Evaluation of its usefulness in diagnosis of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sarada; Mahadevan, Anita; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Shankar, Susarla Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Definitive diagnosis of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) requires demonstration of infective prion protein (PrPSc) in brain tissues by immunohistochemistry or immunoblot, making antemortem diagnosis of CJD difficult. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends detection of 14-3-3 protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in cases of dementia, with clinical correlation, as a useful diagnostic marker for CJD, obviating the need for brain biopsy. This facility is currently available in only a few specialized centers in the West and no commercial kit is available for clinical diagnostic use in India. Hence the objective of this study was to develop an in-house sensitive assay for quantitation of 14-3-3 protein and to evaluate its diagnostic potential to detect 14-3-3 proteins in CSF as a biomarker in suspected cases of CJD. Materials and Methods: A minigene expressing the “core” 14-3-3 protein was synthesized by overlapping polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the recombinant protein was produced by employing a bacterial expression system. Polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbit against the purified recombinant protein were used for developing a dot blot assay with avidin-biotin technology for signal amplification and quantitation of 14-3-3 protein in CSF. Results: The results in the present study suggest the diagnostic potential of the dot blot method with about 10-fold difference (P< 0.001) in the CSF levels of 14-3-3 protein between the CJD cases (N= 50) and disease controls (N= 70). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the results suggested an optimal cutoff value of 2 ng/mL. Conclusions: We have developed an indigenous, economical, and sensitive dot blot method for the quantitation of 14-3-3 protein in CSF. PMID:27293331

  9. The Hsp70 homolog Ssb and the 14-3-3 protein Bmh1 jointly regulate transcription of glucose repressed genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hübscher, Volker; Mudholkar, Kaivalya; Chiabudini, Marco; Fitzke, Edith; Wölfle, Tina; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Drepper, Friedel; Warscheid, Bettina; Rospert, Sabine

    2016-07-01

    Chaperones of the Hsp70 family interact with a multitude of newly synthesized polypeptides and prevent their aggregation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking the Hsp70 homolog Ssb suffer from pleiotropic defects, among others a defect in glucose-repression. The highly conserved heterotrimeric kinase SNF1/AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) is required for the release from glucose-repression in yeast and is a key regulator of energy balance also in mammalian cells. When glucose is available the phosphatase Glc7 keeps SNF1 in its inactive, dephosphorylated state. Dephosphorylation depends on Reg1, which mediates targeting of Glc7 to its substrate SNF1. Here we show that the defect in glucose-repression in the absence of Ssb is due to the ability of the chaperone to bridge between the SNF1 and Glc7 complexes. Ssb performs this post-translational function in concert with the 14-3-3 protein Bmh, to which Ssb binds via its very C-terminus. Raising the intracellular concentration of Ssb or Bmh enabled Glc7 to dephosphorylate SNF1 even in the absence of Reg1. By that Ssb and Bmh efficiently suppressed transcriptional deregulation of Δreg1 cells. The findings reveal that Ssb and Bmh comprise a new chaperone module, which is involved in the fine tuning of a phosphorylation-dependent switch between respiration and fermentation. PMID:27001512

  10. Influence of the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis 14-3-3 and gp43 proteins on the induction of apoptosis in A549 epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Vicentim, Juliana; de Oliveira, Haroldo Cesar; Marcos, Caroline Maria; Assato, Patricia Akemi; Andreotti, Patrícia Ferrari; da Silva, Juliana Leal Monteiro; Soares, Christiane Pienna; Benard, Gil; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2015-01-01

    The fungal strain Paracoccidioides brasiliensis remains viable inside of epithelial cells and can induce apoptosis in this population. However, until now, the molecules that participate in this process remained unknown. Thus, this study evaluated the contribution of two P. brasiliensis molecules, the 14-3-3 and glycoprotein of 43 kDa proteins, which had been previously described as extracellular matrix adhesins and apoptosis inductors in human pneumocytes. Accordingly, epithelial cells were treated with these molecules for different periods of time and the expression of the apoptosis regulating-proteins Bak, Bax, Bcl-2, p53 and caspases were evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling, flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Our results demonstrated that treatment with these molecules induces apoptosis signalling in pulmonary epithelial cells, showing the same pattern of programmed cell-death as that observed during infection with P. brasiliensis. Thus, we could conclude that P. brasiliensis uses these molecules as virulence factors that participate not only in the fungal adhesion process to host cells, but also in other important cellular mechanisms such as apoptosis. PMID:26038961

  11. The Hsp70 homolog Ssb and the 14-3-3 protein Bmh1 jointly regulate transcription of glucose repressed genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hübscher, Volker; Mudholkar, Kaivalya; Chiabudini, Marco; Fitzke, Edith; Wölfle, Tina; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Drepper, Friedel; Warscheid, Bettina; Rospert, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones of the Hsp70 family interact with a multitude of newly synthesized polypeptides and prevent their aggregation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking the Hsp70 homolog Ssb suffer from pleiotropic defects, among others a defect in glucose-repression. The highly conserved heterotrimeric kinase SNF1/AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) is required for the release from glucose-repression in yeast and is a key regulator of energy balance also in mammalian cells. When glucose is available the phosphatase Glc7 keeps SNF1 in its inactive, dephosphorylated state. Dephosphorylation depends on Reg1, which mediates targeting of Glc7 to its substrate SNF1. Here we show that the defect in glucose-repression in the absence of Ssb is due to the ability of the chaperone to bridge between the SNF1 and Glc7 complexes. Ssb performs this post-translational function in concert with the 14-3-3 protein Bmh, to which Ssb binds via its very C-terminus. Raising the intracellular concentration of Ssb or Bmh enabled Glc7 to dephosphorylate SNF1 even in the absence of Reg1. By that Ssb and Bmh efficiently suppressed transcriptional deregulation of Δreg1 cells. The findings reveal that Ssb and Bmh comprise a new chaperone module, which is involved in the fine tuning of a phosphorylation-dependent switch between respiration and fermentation. PMID:27001512

  12. The chaperone-like protein 14-3-3η interacts with human α-synuclein aggregation intermediates rerouting the amyloidogenic pathway and reducing α-synuclein cellular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Plotegher, Nicoletta; Kumar, Dhruv; Tessari, Isabella; Brucale, Marco; Munari, Francesca; Tosatto, Laura; Belluzzi, Elisa; Greggio, Elisa; Bisaglia, Marco; Capaldi, Stefano; Aioanei, Daniel; Mammi, Stefano; Monaco, Hugo L; Samo, Bruno; Bubacco, Luigi

    2014-11-01

    Familial and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with the abnormal neuronal accumulation of α-synuclein (aS) leading to β-sheet-rich aggregates called Lewy Bodies (LBs). Moreover, single point mutation in aS gene and gene multiplication lead to autosomal dominant forms of PD. A connection between PD and the 14-3-3 chaperone-like proteins was recently proposed, based on the fact that some of the 14-3-3 isoforms can interact with genetic PD-associated proteins such as parkin, LRRK2 and aS and were found as components of LBs in human PD. In particular, a direct interaction between 14-3-3η and aS was reported when probed by co-immunoprecipitation from cell models, from parkinsonian brains and by surface plasmon resonance in vitro. However, the mechanisms through which 14-3-3η and aS interact in PD brains remain unclear. Herein, we show that while 14-3-3η is unable to bind monomeric aS, it interacts with aS oligomers which occur during the early stages of aS aggregation. This interaction diverts the aggregation process even when 14-3-3η is present in sub-stoichiometric amounts relative to aS. When aS level is overwhelmingly higher than that of 14-3-3η, the fibrillation process becomes a sequestration mechanism for 14-3-3η, undermining all processes governed by this protein. Using a panel of complementary techniques, we single out the stage of aggregation at which the aS/14-3-3η interaction occurs, characterize the products of the resulting processes, and show how the processes elucidated in vitro are relevant in cell models. Our findings constitute a first step in elucidating the molecular mechanism of aS/14-3-3η interaction and in understanding the critical aggregation step at which 14-3-3η has the potential to rescue aS-induced cellular toxicity. PMID:24895406

  13. Dysregulated 14-3-3 Family in Peripheral Blood Leukocytes of Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Ying; Sun, Liya; Yang, Chao; Jiang, Jie; Yang, Xuhan; Hu, Xiaowen; Cui, Donghong; Xu, Yifeng; He, Lin; Han, Dongmei; Wan, Chunling

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 family, which is composed of seven distinct members in humans, plays important roles in the cell cycle, apoptosis, synaptic plasticity and neuronal differentiation and migration. Previous genetic and post-mortem gene expression studies have linked this family to schizophrenia. However, the direction of gene expression changes in these studies has been inconsistent, and reports of 14-3-3 gene expression in living schizophrenic patients are still lacking. Here, we assessed 14-3-3 gene and protein expression levels in peripheral blood leukocytes from drug-naïve first-episode schizophrenic patients and matched controls. mRNA and protein expression levels were quantified by qRT-PCR and UPLC-MRM/MS, respectively. Expression analysis revealed four downregulated and one upregulated mRNA transcripts as well as five downregulated protein levels of 14-3-3 isoforms in schizophrenia. Moreover, significant positive correlations between 14-3-3 mRNA and protein expression levels were found in schizophrenia, and we also identified negative correlations between ε, θ and ζ isoform expression levels and positive symptoms of schizophrenia. Our results suggest that gene and protein expression levels for the 14-3-3 family are dysregulated in schizophrenia, perhaps owing to specific regulatory mechanisms, and we also suggest that expression of the 14-3-3ε, θ and ζ isoform genes could be useful indicators of disease severity. PMID:27030512

  14. Differential expression of 14-3-3 isoforms in human alcoholic brain

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Rachel K.; Colson, Natalie J.; Dodd, Peter R.; Lewohl, Joanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuropathological damage due to chronic alcohol abuse often results in impairment of cognitive function. The damage is particularly marked in the frontal cortex. The 14-3-3 protein family consists of 7 proteins, β, γ, ε, ζ, η, θ and σ, encoded by 7 distinct genes. They are highly conserved molecular chaperones with roles in regulation of metabolism, signal transduction, cell-cycle control, protein trafficking, and apoptosis. They may also play an important role in neurodegeneration in chronic alcoholism. Methods We used Real-Time PCR to measure the expression of 14-3-3 mRNA transcripts in both the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and motor cortex of human brains obtained at autopsy. Results We found significantly lower 14-3-3β, γ and θ expression in both cortical areas of alcoholics; but no difference in 14-3-3η expression, and higher expression of 14-3-3σ, in both areas. Levels of 14-3-3ζ and ε transcripts were significantly lower only in alcoholic motor cortex. Conclusions Altered 14-3-3 expression could contribute to synaptic dysfunction and altered neurotransmission in chronic alcohol misuse by human subjects. PMID:21332526

  15. 14-3-3ζ coordinates adipogenesis of visceral fat

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Gareth E.; Albrecht, Tobias; Piske, Micah; Sarai, Karnjit; Lee, Jason T. C; Ramshaw, Hayley S.; Sinha, Sunita; Guthridge, Mark A.; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Lopez, Angel F.; Clee, Susanne M.; Nislow, Corey; Johnson, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The proteins that coordinate complex adipogenic transcriptional networks are poorly understood. 14-3-3ζ is a molecular adaptor protein that regulates insulin signalling and transcription factor networks. Here we report that 14-3-3ζ-knockout mice are strikingly lean from birth with specific reductions in visceral fat depots. Conversely, transgenic 14-3-3ζ overexpression potentiates obesity, without exacerbating metabolic complications. Only the 14-3-3ζ isoform is essential for adipogenesis based on isoform-specific RNAi. Mechanistic studies show that 14-3-3ζ depletion promotes autophagy-dependent degradation of C/EBP-δ, preventing induction of the master adipogenic factors, Pparγ and C/EBP-α. Transcriptomic data indicate that 14-3-3ζ acts upstream of hedgehog signalling-dependent upregulation of Cdkn1b/p27Kip1. Indeed, concomitant knockdown of p27Kip1 or Gli3 rescues the early block in adipogenesis induced by 14-3-3ζ knockdown in vitro. Adipocyte precursors in 14-3-3ζKO embryos also appear to have greater Gli3 and p27Kip1 abundance. Together, our in vivo and in vitro findings demonstrate that 14-3-3ζ is a critical upstream driver of adipogenesis. PMID:26220403

  16. Characterization of the Interactome of the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nonstructural Protein 2 Reveals the Hyper Variable Region as a Binding Platform for Association with 14-3-3 Proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yihong; Wu, Weining; Gao, Jiming; Smith, Nikki; Burkard, Christine; Xia, Dong; Zhang, Minxia; Wang, Chengbao; Archibald, Alan; Digard, Paul; Zhou, En-Min; Hiscox, Julian A

    2016-05-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to the swine industry worldwide and hence global food security, exacerbated by a newly emerged highly pathogenic (HP-PRRSV) strain from China. PRRSV nonstructural protein 2 (nsp2) is a multifunctional polypeptide with strain-dependent influences on pathogenicity. A number of discrete functional regions have been identified on the protein. Quantitative label free proteomics was used to identify cellular binding partners of nsp2 expressed by HP-PRRSV. This allowed the identification of potential cellular interacting partners and the discrimination of nonspecific interactions. The interactome data were further investigated and validated using biological replicates and also compared with nsp2 from a low pathogenic (LP) strain of PRRSV. Validation included both forward and reverse pulldowns and confocal microscopy. The data indicated that nsp2 interacted with a number of cellular proteins including 14-3-3, CD2AP, and other components of cellular aggresomes. The hyper-variable region of nsp2 protein was identified as a binding platform for association with 14-3-3 proteins. PMID:26709850

  17. Sphingosine induces apoptosis in hippocampal neurons and astrocytes by activating caspase-3/-9 via a mitochondrial pathway linked to SDK/14-3-3 protein/Bax/cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2011-09-01

    The present study examined sphingosine-induced apoptosis in cultured rat hippocampal neurons and astrocytes. Sphingosine induced apoptosis in a concentration (1-100 µM)-dependent manner, that is inhibited by the PKC-δ inhibitor rottlerin, and a similar effect was obtained with the sphingosine kinase inhibitors, to raise intracellular sphingosine concentrations. Sphingosine increased presence of sphingosine-dependent protein kinase (SDK), and the effect was suppressed by rottlerin. Sphingosine increased phosphorylated 14-3-3 protein, thereby transforming the protein from a dimeric structure into a monomeric structure. Sphingosine accumulated Bax in the mitochondria and stimulated cytochrome c release into the cytosol, and those effects were inhibited by rottlerin. Sphingosine disrupted mitochondrial membrane potentials, that was abolished by silencing the PKC-δ-targeted gene. Moreover, sphingosine activated caspase-9 and the effector caspase-3 in a PKC-δ-dependent manner. Taken together, the results of the present study indicate that sphingosine activates SDK, produced through proteolytic processing of an active form of PKC-δ, to phosphorylate 14-3-3 protein and transform into a monomeric structure, causing Bax dissociation from 14-3-3 protein and accumulation in the mitochondria, which perturbs mitochondrial membrane potentials allowing cytochrome c release into the cytosol, to activate caspase-9 and the effector caspase-3, responsible for apoptosis in hippocampal neurons and astrocytes. PMID:21660956

  18. Characteristics of Korean patients with suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with 14-3-3 protein in cerebrospinal fluid: Preliminary study of the Korean Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease active surveillance program

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae-Sung; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Jang, Jae-Won; Ju, Young-Ran; Kim, SuYeon; Park, Young Ho; Park, So Young; Kim, SangYun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although Korea had a national surveillance system for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), it was mainly dependent on attending physician's reports. Thus, little prospective data about the epidemiology, characteristics, and final diagnoses of suspected patients were available. We have established a nationwide network for the active surveillance of patients with suspected CJD. When the requested cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples tested positive for 14-3-3 protein, we investigated the clinical characteristics of the corresponding patients and followed them until their final diagnoses were confirmed. A total of 218 samples were requested for CSF assays from May 2010 to August 2012, and 106 (48.6%) were positive for 14-3-3 protein. In 89 patients with complete clinical data, 38 (42.7%) were diagnosed with probable CJD and the estimated annual occurrence of CJD was 16.3 persons-per-year. The most common diagnoses of the remainder were central nervous system infection and any-cause encephalopathy. Non-CJD subjects showed worse initial consciousness levels than CJD patients. This preliminary study showed that the number of reported cases of CJD and the true positivity rates of CSF 14-3-3 protein assays were both low in Korea. An active surveillance system is urgently needed to provide the latest nationwide epidemiological data of CJD. PMID:25996401

  19. Exon B of human surfactant protein A2 mRNA, alone or within its surrounding sequences, interacts with 14-3-3; role of cis-elements and secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Noutsios, Georgios T.; Silveyra, Patricia; Bhatti, Faizah

    2013-01-01

    Human surfactant protein A, an innate immunity molecule, is encoded by two genes: SFTPA1 (SP-A1) and SFTPA2 (SP-A2). The 5′ untranslated (5′UTR) splice variant of SP-A2 (ABD), but not of SP-A1 (AD), contains exon B (eB), which is an enhancer for transcription and translation. We investigated whether eB contains cis-regulatory elements that bind trans-acting factors in a sequence-specific manner as well as the role of the eB mRNA secondary structure. Binding of cytoplasmic NCI-H441 proteins to wild-type eB, eB mutant, AD, and ABD 5′UTR mRNAs were studied by RNA electromobility shift assays (REMSAs). The bound proteins were identified by mass spectroscopy and specific antibodies (Abs). We found that 1) proteins bind eB mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, with two cis-elements identified within eB to be important; 2) eB secondary structure is necessary for binding; 3) mass spectroscopy and specific Abs in REMSAs identified 14-3-3 proteins to bind (directly or indirectly) eB and the natural SP-A2 (ABD) splice variant but not the SP-A1 (AD) splice variant; 4) other ribosomal and cytoskeletal proteins, and translation factors, are also present in the eB mRNA-protein complex; 5) knockdown of 14-3-3 β/α isoform resulted in a downregulation of SP-A2 expression. In conclusion, proteins including the 14-3-3 family bind two cis-elements within eB of hSP-A2 mRNA in a sequence- and secondary structure-specific manner. Differential regulation of SP-A1 and SP-A2 is mediated by the 14-3-3 protein family as well as by a number of other proteins that bind UTRs with or without eB mRNA. PMID:23525782

  20. The Pseudomonas syringae Effector HopQ1 Promotes Bacterial Virulence and Interacts with Tomato 14-3-3 Proteins in a Phosphorylation-Dependent Manner1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yadeta, Koste A.; Elmore, James Mitch; Coaker, Gitta

    2013-01-01

    A key virulence strategy of bacterial pathogens is the delivery of multiple pathogen effector proteins into host cells during infection. The Hrp outer protein Q (HopQ1) effector from Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pto) strain DC3000 is conserved across multiple bacterial plant pathogens. Here, we investigated the virulence function and host targets of HopQ1 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Transgenic tomato lines expressing dexamethasone-inducible HopQ1 exhibited enhanced disease susceptibility to virulent Pto DC3000, the Pto ΔhrcC mutant, and decreased expression of a pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered marker gene after bacterial inoculation. HopQ1-interacting proteins were coimmunoprecipitated and identified by mass spectrometry. HopQ1 can associate with multiple tomato 14-3-3 proteins, including TFT1 and TFT5. HopQ1 is phosphorylated in tomato, and four phosphorylated peptides were identified by mass spectrometry. HopQ1 possesses a conserved mode I 14-3-3 binding motif whose serine-51 residue is phosphorylated in tomato and regulates its association with TFT1 and TFT5. Confocal microscopy and fractionation reveal that HopQ1 exhibits nucleocytoplasmic localization, while HopQ1 dephosphorylation mimics exhibit more pronounced nuclear localization. HopQ1 delivered from Pto DC3000 was found to promote bacterial virulence in the tomato genotype Rio Grande 76R. However, the HopQ1(S51A) mutant delivered from Pto DC3000 was unable to promote pathogen virulence. Taken together, our data demonstrate that HopQ1 enhances bacterial virulence and associates with tomato 14-3-3 proteins in a phosphorylation-dependent manner that influences HopQ1’s subcellular localization and virulence-promoting activities in planta. PMID:23417089

  1. Phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of Cdc42 GEF Gef1 by 14-3-3 protein Rad24 spatially regulates Cdc42 GTPase activity and oscillatory dynamics during cell morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Maitreyi; Nuñez, Illyce; Rodriguez, Marbelys; Wiley, David J.; Rodriguez, Juan; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Buchwald, Peter; Verde, Fulvia

    2015-01-01

    Active Cdc42 GTPase, a key regulator of cell polarity, displays oscillatory dynamics that are anticorrelated at the two cell tips in fission yeast. Anticorrelation suggests competition for active Cdc42 or for its effectors. Here we show how 14-3-3 protein Rad24 associates with Cdc42 guanine exchange factor (GEF) Gef1, limiting Gef1 availability to promote Cdc42 activation. Phosphorylation of Gef1 by conserved NDR kinase Orb6 promotes Gef1 binding to Rad24. Loss of Rad24–Gef1 interaction increases Gef1 protein localization and Cdc42 activation at the cell tips and reduces the anticorrelation of active Cdc42 oscillations. Increased Cdc42 activation promotes precocious bipolar growth activation, bypassing the normal requirement for an intact microtubule cytoskeleton and for microtubule-dependent polarity landmark Tea4-PP1. Further, increased Cdc42 activation by Gef1 widens cell diameter and alters tip curvature, countering the effects of Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein Rga4. The respective levels of Gef1 and Rga4 proteins at the membrane define dynamically the growing area at each cell tip. Our findings show how the 14-3-3 protein Rad24 modulates the availability of Cdc42 GEF Gef1, a homologue of mammalian Cdc42 GEF DNMBP/TUBA, to spatially control Cdc42 GTPase activity and promote cell polarization and cell shape emergence. PMID:26246599

  2. Identification of a functional splice variant of 14-3-3E1 in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 14-3-3 proteins are a family of regulatory proteins involved in diverse cellular processes. The presence of 14-3-3 isoforms and the diversity of cellular processes regulated by 14-3-3 isoforms suggest functional specificity of the isoforms. In this study, we report the identification and charact...

  3. Identification of 14-3-3 Family in Common Bean and Their Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dhaubhadel, Sangeeta; Bian, Shaomin; Li, Xuyan

    2015-01-01

    14-3-3s are a class of conserved regulatory proteins ubiquitously found in eukaryotes, which play important roles in a variety of cellular processes including response to diverse stresses. Although much has been learned about 14-3-3s in several plant species, it remains unknown in common bean. In this study, 9 common bean 14-3-3s (PvGF14s) were identified by exhaustive data mining against the publicly available common bean genomic database. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that each predicted PvGF14 was clustered with two GmSGF14 paralogs from soybean. Both epsilon-like and non-epsilon classes of PvGF14s were found in common bean, and the PvGF14s belonging to each class exhibited similar gene structure. Among 9 PvGF14s, only 8 are transcribed in common bean. Expression patterns of PvGF14s varied depending on tissue type, developmental stage and exposure of plants to stress. A protein-protein interaction study revealed that PvGF14a forms dimer with itself and with other PvGF14 isoforms. This study provides a first comprehensive look at common bean 14-3-3 proteins, a family of proteins with diverse functions in many cellular processes, especially in response to stresses. PMID:26599110

  4. Tomato 14-3-3 protein 7 (TFT7) positively regulates immunity-associated programmed cell death by enhancing accumulation and signaling ability of MAPKKKalpha

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is triggered when Pto, a serine-threonine protein kinase recognizes either the AvrPto or AvrPtoB effector from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. This PCD requires MAPKKKalpha as a positive regulator in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana. To examine how PCD-eliciting activi...

  5. 14-3-3ε and ζ Regulate Neurogenesis and Differentiation of Neuronal Progenitor Cells in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wachi, Tomoka; Hunt, Robert F.; Baraban, Scott C.; Taya, Shinichiro; Ramshaw, Hayley; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Schwarz, Quenten P.; Lopez, Angel F.

    2014-01-01

    During brain development, neural progenitor cells proliferate and differentiate into neural precursors. These neural precursors migrate along the radial glial processes and localize at their final destination in the cortex. Numerous reports have revealed that 14-3-3 proteins are involved in many neuronal activities, although their functions in neurogenesis remain unclear. Here, using 14-3-3ε/ζ double knock-out mice, we found that 14-3-3 proteins are important for proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells in the cortex, resulting in neuronal migration defects and seizures. 14-3-3 deficiency resulted in the increase of δ-catenin and the decrease of β-catenin and αN-catenin. 14-3-3 proteins regulated neuronal differentiation into neurons via direct interactions with phosphorylated δ-catenin to promote F-actin formation through a catenin/Rho GTPase/Limk1/cofilin signaling pathway. Conversely, neuronal migration defects seen in the double knock-out mice were restored by phosphomimic Ndel1 mutants, but not δ-catenin. Our findings provide new evidence that 14-3-3 proteins play important roles in neurogenesis and neuronal migration via the regulation of distinct signaling cascades. PMID:25186760

  6. 14-3-3ε and ζ regulate neurogenesis and differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Toyo-oka, Kazuhito; Wachi, Tomoka; Hunt, Robert F; Baraban, Scott C; Taya, Shinichiro; Ramshaw, Hayley; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Schwarz, Quenten P; Lopez, Angel F; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    During brain development, neural progenitor cells proliferate and differentiate into neural precursors. These neural precursors migrate along the radial glial processes and localize at their final destination in the cortex. Numerous reports have revealed that 14-3-3 proteins are involved in many neuronal activities, although their functions in neurogenesis remain unclear. Here, using 14-3-3ε/ζ double knock-out mice, we found that 14-3-3 proteins are important for proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells in the cortex, resulting in neuronal migration defects and seizures. 14-3-3 deficiency resulted in the increase of δ-catenin and the decrease of β-catenin and αN-catenin. 14-3-3 proteins regulated neuronal differentiation into neurons via direct interactions with phosphorylated δ-catenin to promote F-actin formation through a catenin/Rho GTPase/Limk1/cofilin signaling pathway. Conversely, neuronal migration defects seen in the double knock-out mice were restored by phosphomimic Ndel1 mutants, but not δ-catenin. Our findings provide new evidence that 14-3-3 proteins play important roles in neurogenesis and neuronal migration via the regulation of distinct signaling cascades. PMID:25186760

  7. Genetic variations of 14-3-3E1 isoform in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The highly conserved family of 14-3-3 proteins functions in the regulation of a wide variety of cellular processes. The presence of 14-3-3 isoforms and the diversity of cellular processes regulated by 14-3-3 isoforms suggest functional specificity of the isoforms. Several studies have observed diffe...

  8. 14-3-3 family members act coordinately to regulate mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Sorab N; Yaffe, Michael B; DeCaprio, James A

    2004-05-01

    The mitosis promoting phosphatase, cdc25C, is a target of both the DNA replication and DNA damage checkpoint pathways. These pathways regulate cdc25C function, in part, by promoting the association of cdc25C with 14-3-3 proteins, which results in the retention of cdc25C in the cytoplasm. To determine which 14-3-3 proteins were required to regulate cdc25C function, we tested the ability of various 14-3-3 family members to form a complex with and negatively regulate cdc25C in human cells. Two 14-3-3 family members, 14-3-3epsilon and 14-3-3gamma specifically formed a complex with cdc25C but not with the 14-3-3 binding defective cdc25C mutant, S216A. In addition, 14-3-3epsilon and 14-3-3gamma inhibited the ability of cdc25C, but not the S216A mutant, to induce premature chromatin condensation (PCC) in U-2OS cells. These results suggested that the reduction in PCC by 14-3-3epsilon and 14-3-3gamma was due to inhibition of cdc25C function. In contrast, 14-3-3sigma was unable to form a complex with cdc25C, but was able to inhibit the ability of both wild type cdc25C and S216A to induce PCC. This suggests that 14-3-3sigma regulates entry into mitosis independently of cdc25C and 14-3-3epsilon and 14-3-3gamma. Thus, specific members of the 14-3-3 family of proteins may act coordinately to maintain the DNA replication checkpoint by regulating the activity of different cell cycle proteins. PMID:15107609

  9. 14-3-3 in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Swain, Mamuni; Willard, Belinda; Scholtz, Jaclyn; Svensson, Lars G.; Roselli, Eric E.; Pettersson, Gosta; Johnston, Douglas R.; Soltesz, Edward G.; Yamashita, Michifumi; Stuehr, Dennis; Daly, Thomas M.; Hoffman, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Large vessel vasculitides (LVV) are a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by injury to and anatomic modifications of large vessels, including the aorta and its branch vessels. Disease etiology is unknown. This study was undertaken to identify antigen targets within affected vessel walls in aortic root, ascending aorta, and aortic arch surgical specimens from patients with LVV, including giant cell arteritis, Takayasu arteritis, and isolated focal aortitis. Methods Thoracic aortic aneurysm specimens and autologous blood were acquired from consenting patients who underwent aorta reconstruction procedures. Aorta proteins were extracted from both patients with LVV and age-, race-, and sex-matched disease controls with noninflammatory aneurysms. A total of 108 serum samples from patients with LVV, matched controls, and controls with antinuclear antibodies, different forms of vasculitis, or sepsis were tested. Results Evaluation of 108 serum samples and 22 aortic tissue specimens showed that 78% of patients with LVV produced antibodies to 14-3-3 proteins in the aortic wall (93.7% specificity), whereas controls were less likely to do so (6.7% produced antibodies). LVV patient sera contained autoantibody sufficient to immunoprecipitate 14-3-3 protein(s) from aortic lysates. Three of 7 isoforms of 14-3-3 were found to be up-regulated in aorta specimens from patients with LVV, and 2 isoforms (ε and ζ) were found to be antigenic in LVV. Conclusion This is the first study to use sterile, snap-frozen thoracic aorta biopsy specimens to identify autoantigens in LVV. Our findings indicate that 78% of patients with LVV have antibody reactivity to 14-3-3 protein(s). The precise role of these antibodies and 14-3-3 proteins in LVV pathogenesis deserves further study. PMID:25917817

  10. 14-3-3ζ promotes hepatocellular carcinoma venous metastasis by modulating hypoxia-inducible factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jie; Yu, Hongming; Zhang, Long; Wang, Kang; Liu, Shangrong; Cheng, Shuqun

    2016-01-01

    Portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) is a type of intrahepatic metastasis arising from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is highly correlated with a poor prognosis. Hypoxia is common in solider tumors, including HCC, where it alters the behavior of HCC cells. We asked whether and how hypoxia contributes to PVTT formation. We demonstrated that increased intratumoral hypoxia is strongly associated with PVTT formation in HCC. We also showed that 14-3-3ζ is induced by hypoxia in HCC cells and correlates with PVTT formation in clinical HCC samples. In addition, 14-3-3ζ up-regulates HIF-1α expression by recruiting HDAC4, which prevents HIF-1α acetylation, thereby stabilizing the protein. Under hypoxic conditions in vitro, 14-3-3ζ knockdown inhibits hypoxia-induced HCC invasion by the HIF-1α/EMT pathway. Blockade of 14-3-3ζ in HCC cells reduces PVTT formation and distant lung metastasis in vivo. Moreover, a combination of 14-3-3ζ and HIF-1α expression is more prognostic for HCC patients than either protein alone. These results suggest that the hypoxia/14-3-3ζ/HIF-1α pathway plays an important role in PVTT formation and HCC metastasis. PMID:26910835

  11. Phosphorylation and Interaction with the 14-3-3 Protein of the Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase are Involved in the Regulation of Magnesium-Mediated Increases in Aluminum-Induced Citrate Exudation in Broad Bean (Vicia faba. L).

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Kan, Qi; Wang, Ping; Yu, Wenqian; Yu, Yuzhen; Zhao, Yan; Yu, Yongxiong; Li, Kunzhi; Chen, Limei

    2015-06-01

    Several studies have shown that external application of micromolar magnesium (Mg) can increase the resistance of legumes to aluminum (Al) stress by enhancing Al-induced citrate exudation. However, the exact mechanism underlying this regulation remains unknown. In this study, the physiological and molecular mechanisms by which Mg enhances Al-induced citrate exudation to alleviate Al toxicity were investigated in broad bean. Micromolar concentrations of Mg that alleviated Al toxicity paralleled the stimulation of Al-induced citrate exudation and increased the activity of the plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase. Northern blot analysis shows that a putative MATE-like gene (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) was induced after treatment with Al for 4, 8 and 12 h, whereas the mRNA abundance of the MATE-like gene showed no significant difference between Al plus Mg and Al-only treatments during the entire treatment period. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot analyses suggest that the transcription and translation of the PM H(+)-ATPase were induced by Al but not by Mg. In contrast, immunoprecipitation suggests that Mg enhanced the phosphorylation levels of VHA2 and its interaction with the vf14-3-3b protein under Al stress. Taken together, our results suggest that micromolar concentrations of Mg can alleviate the Al rhizotoxicity by increasing PM H(+)-ATPase activity and Al-induced citrate exudation in YD roots. This enhancement is likely to be attributable to Al-induced increases in the expression of the MATE-like gene and vha2 and Mg-induced changes in the phosphorylation levels of VHA2, thus changing its interaction with the vf14-3-3b protein. PMID:25745032

  12. The role of 14-3-3{beta} in transcriptional activation of estrogen receptor {alpha} and its involvement in proliferation of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoonseo; Kim, Hyungjin; Jang, Sung-Wuk; Ko, Jesang

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} 14-3-3{beta} interacts with ER{alpha} and the interaction is Akt-dependent. {yields} 14-3-3{beta} regulates the transcriptional activity of ER{alpha} in a ligand-dependent manner. {yields} 14-3-3{beta} increases expressions of ER{alpha} target genes. {yields} 14-3-3{beta} increases breast cancer cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The estrogen receptor (ER) functions as a transcription factor that mediates the effects of estrogen. ER{alpha}, which plays a crucial role in the development and progression of breast cancer, is activated by estrogen binding, leading to receptor phosphorylation, dimerization, and recruitment of co-activators and chaperons to the estrogen-bound receptor complex. The 14-3-3 proteins bind to target proteins via phosphorylation and influence many cellular events by altering their subcellular localization or acting as a chaperone. However, regulation of ER{alpha} expression and transactivation by the 14-3-3 proteins has not been reported. We demonstrate that 14-3-3{beta} functions as a positive regulator of ER{alpha} through a direct protein-protein interaction in an estrogen-dependent manner. Ectopic expression of 14-3-3{beta} stimulated ER{alpha}-mediated transcriptional activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Enhanced ER{alpha} transcriptional activity due to 14-3-3{beta} increased the expressions of the endogenous ER{alpha} target genes, leading to proliferation of breast cancer cells. We suggest that 14-3-3{beta} has oncogenic potential in breast cancer via binding to ER{alpha} and activation of the transcriptional activity of ER{alpha}.

  13. A dual phosphorylation switch controls 14-3-3-dependent cell surface expression of TASK-1

    PubMed Central

    Kilisch, Markus; Lytovchenko, Olga; Arakel, Eric C.; Bertinetti, Daniela; Schwappach, Blanche

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transport of the K+ channels TASK-1 and TASK-3 (also known as KCNK3 and KCNK9, respectively) to the cell surface is controlled by the binding of 14-3-3 proteins to a trafficking control region at the extreme C-terminus of the channels. The current model proposes that phosphorylation-dependent binding of 14-3-3 sterically masks a COPI-binding motif. However, the direct effects of phosphorylation on COPI binding and on the binding parameters of 14-3-3 isoforms are still unknown. We find that phosphorylation of the trafficking control region prevents COPI binding even in the absence of 14-3-3, and we present a quantitative analysis of the binding of all human 14-3-3 isoforms to the trafficking control regions of TASK-1 and TASK-3. Surprisingly, the affinities of 14-3-3 proteins for TASK-1 are two orders of magnitude lower than for TASK-3. Furthermore, we find that phosphorylation of a second serine residue in the C-terminus of TASK-1 inhibits 14-3-3 binding. Thus, phosphorylation of the trafficking control region can stimulate or inhibit transport of TASK-1 to the cell surface depending on the target serine residue. Our findings indicate that control of TASK-1 trafficking by COPI, kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins is highly dynamic. PMID:26743085

  14. A dual phosphorylation switch controls 14-3-3-dependent cell surface expression of TASK-1.

    PubMed

    Kilisch, Markus; Lytovchenko, Olga; Arakel, Eric C; Bertinetti, Daniela; Schwappach, Blanche

    2016-02-15

    The transport of the K(+) channels TASK-1 and TASK-3 (also known as KCNK3 and KCNK9, respectively) to the cell surface is controlled by the binding of 14-3-3 proteins to a trafficking control region at the extreme C-terminus of the channels. The current model proposes that phosphorylation-dependent binding of 14-3-3 sterically masks a COPI-binding motif. However, the direct effects of phosphorylation on COPI binding and on the binding parameters of 14-3-3 isoforms are still unknown. We find that phosphorylation of the trafficking control region prevents COPI binding even in the absence of 14-3-3, and we present a quantitative analysis of the binding of all human 14-3-3 isoforms to the trafficking control regions of TASK-1 and TASK-3. Surprisingly, the affinities of 14-3-3 proteins for TASK-1 are two orders of magnitude lower than for TASK-3. Furthermore, we find that phosphorylation of a second serine residue in the C-terminus of TASK-1 inhibits 14-3-3 binding. Thus, phosphorylation of the trafficking control region can stimulate or inhibit transport of TASK-1 to the cell surface depending on the target serine residue. Our findings indicate that control of TASK-1 trafficking by COPI, kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins is highly dynamic. PMID:26743085

  15. Functional identification of a novel 14-3-3 epsilon splicing variant suggests dimerization is not necessary for 14-3-3 epsilon to inhibit UV-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Dingding; Ye, Guangming; Liu, Tingting; Chen, Cong; Yang, Xianmei; Wan, Bo; Pan, Yuanwang; Yu, Long

    2010-05-28

    14-3-3 proteins function as a dimer and have been identified to involve in diverse signaling pathways. Here we reported the identification of a novel splicing variant of human 14-3-3 epsilon (14-3-3 epsilon sv), which is derived from a novel exon 1' insertion. The insertion contains a stop codon and leads to a truncated splicing variant of 14-3-3 epsilon. The splicing variant is translated from the exon 2 and results in the deletion of an N-terminal {alpha}-helix which is crucial for the dimerization. Therefore, the 14-3-3 epsilon sv could not form a dimer with 14-3-3 zeta. However, after UV irradiation 14-3-3 epsilon sv could also support cell survival, suggesting monomer of 14-3-3 epsilon is sufficient to protect cell from apoptosis.

  16. Analysis of 14-3-3 Family Member Function in Xenopus Embryos by Microinjection of Antisense Morpholino Oligos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Jeffrey M. C.; Muslin, Anthony J.

    The 14-3-3 intracellular phosphoserine/threonine-binding proteins are adapter molecules that regulate signal transduction, cell cycle, nutrient sensing, apoptotic, and cytoskeletal pathways. There are seven 14-3-3 family members, encoded by separate genes, in vertebrate organisms. To evaluate the role of individual 14-3-3 proteins in vertebrate embryonic development, we utilized an antisense morpholino oligo microinjection technique in Xenopus laevis embryos. By use of this method, we showed that embryos lacking specific 14-3-3 proteins displayed unique phenotypic abnormalities. Specifically, embryos lacking 14-3-3 τ exhibited gastrulation and axial patterning defects, but embryos lacking 14-3-3 γ exhibited eye defects without other abnormalities, and embryos lacking 14-3-3 ζ appeared completely normal. These and other results demonstrate the power and specificity of the morpholino antisense oligo microinjection technique.

  17. Locomotor hyperactivity in 14-3-3ζ KO mice is associated with dopamine transporter dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, H; Xu, X; Jaehne, E J; McCarthy, P; Greenberg, Z; Saleh, E; McClure, B; Woodcock, J; Kabbara, S; Wiszniak, S; Wang, Ting-Yi; Parish, C; van den Buuse, M; Baune, B T; Lopez, A; Schwarz, Q

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission requires a complex series of enzymatic reactions that are tightly linked to catecholamine exocytosis and receptor interactions on pre- and postsynaptic neurons. Regulation of dopaminergic signalling is primarily achieved through reuptake of extracellular DA by the DA transporter (DAT) on presynaptic neurons. Aberrant regulation of DA signalling, and in particular hyperactivation, has been proposed as a key insult in the presentation of schizophrenia and related neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently identified 14-3-3ζ as an essential component of neurodevelopment and a central risk factor in the schizophrenia protein interaction network. Our analysis of 14-3-3ζ-deficient mice now shows that baseline hyperactivity of knockout (KO) mice is rescued by the antipsychotic drug clozapine. 14-3-3ζ KO mice displayed enhanced locomotor hyperactivity induced by the DA releaser amphetamine. Consistent with 14-3-3ζ having a role in DA signalling, we found increased levels of DA in the striatum of 14-3-3ζ KO mice. Although 14-3-3ζ is proposed to modulate activity of the rate-limiting DA biosynthesis enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), we were unable to identify any differences in total TH levels, TH localization or TH activation in 14-3-3ζ KO mice. Rather, our analysis identified significantly reduced levels of DAT in the absence of notable differences in RNA or protein levels of DA receptors D1–D5. Providing insight into the mechanisms by which 14-3-3ζ controls DAT stability, we found a physical association between 14-3-3ζ and DAT by co-immunoprecipitation. Taken together, our results identify a novel role for 14-3-3ζ in DA neurotransmission and provide support to the hyperdopaminergic basis of pathologies associated with schizophrenia and related disorders. PMID:24301645

  18. 14-3-3ζ Interacts with Stat3 and Regulates Its Constitutive Activation in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenliang; Xiong, Qian; Yang, Mingkun; Zheng, Peng; Li, Chongyang; Pei, Jianfeng; Ge, Feng

    2012-01-01

    The 14-3-3 proteins are a family of regulatory signaling molecules that interact with other proteins in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and function as adapter or scaffold proteins in signal transduction pathways. One family member, 14-3-3ζ, is believed to function in cell signaling, cycle control, and apoptotic death. A systematic proteomic analysis done in our laboratory has identified signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (Stat3) as a novel 14-3-3ζ interacting protein. Following our initial finding, in this study, we provide evidence that 14-3-3ζ interacts physically with Stat3. We further demonstrate that phosphorylation of Stat3 at Ser727 is vital for 14-3-3ζ interaction and mutation of Ser727 to Alanine abolished 14-3-3ζ/Stat3 association. Inhibition of 14-3-3ζ protein expression in U266 cells inhibited Stat3 Ser727 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, and decreased both Stat3 DNA binding and transcriptional activity. Moreover, 14-3-3ζ is involved in the regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) activity and 14-3-3ζ binding to Stat3 protects Ser727 dephosphorylation from protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Taken together, our findings support the model that multiple signaling events impinge on Stat3 and that 14-3-3ζ serves as an essential coordinator for different pathways to regulate Stat3 activation and function in MM cells. PMID:22279540

  19. Clinical implication of 14-3-3 epsilon expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Demachki, Sâmia; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Chammas, Roger; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate for the first time the protein and mRNA expression of 14-3-3ε in gastric carcinogenesis. METHODS: 14-3-3ε protein expression was determined by western blotting, and mRNA expression was examined by real-time quantitative RT-PCR in gastric tumors and their matched non-neoplastic gastric tissue samples. RESULTS: Authors observed a significant reduction of 14-3-3ε protein expression in gastric cancer (GC) samples compared to their matched non-neoplastic tissue. Reduced levels of 14-3-3ε were also associated with diffuse-type GC and early-onset of this pathology. Our data suggest that reduced 14-3-3ε may have a role in gastric carcinogenesis process. CONCLUSION: Our results reveal that the reduced 14-3-3ε expression in GC and investigation of 14-3-3ε interaction partners may help to elucidate the carcinogenesis process. PMID:22509086

  20. Ywhaz/14-3-3ζ Deletion Improves Glucose Tolerance Through a GLP-1-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lim, Gareth E; Piske, Micah; Lulo, James E; Ramshaw, Hayley S; Lopez, Angel F; Johnson, James D

    2016-07-01

    Multiple signaling pathways mediate the actions of metabolic hormones to control glucose homeostasis, but the proteins that coordinate such networks are poorly understood. We previously identified the molecular scaffold protein, 14-3-3ζ, as a critical regulator of in vitro β-cell survival and adipogenesis, but its metabolic roles in glucose homeostasis have not been studied in depth. Herein, we report that Ywhaz gene knockout mice (14-3-3ζKO) exhibited elevated fasting insulin levels while maintaining normal β-cell responsiveness to glucose when compared with wild-type littermate controls. In contrast with our observations after an ip glucose bolus, glucose tolerance was significantly improved in 14-3-3ζKO mice after an oral glucose gavage. This improvement in glucose tolerance was associated with significantly elevated fasting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels. 14-3-3ζ knockdown in GLUTag L cells elevated GLP-1 synthesis and increased GLP-1 release. Systemic inhibition of the GLP-1 receptor attenuated the improvement in oral glucose tolerance that was seen in 14-3-3ζKO mice. When taken together these findings demonstrate novel roles of 14-3-3ζ in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and suggest that modulating 14-3-3ζ levels in intestinal L cells may have beneficial metabolic effects through GLP-1-dependent mechanisms. PMID:27167773

  1. FTICR-MS analysis of 14-3-3 isoform substrate selection.

    PubMed

    Cardasis, Helene L; Sehnke, Paul C; Laughner, Beth; Eyler, John R; Powell, David H; Ferl, Robert J

    2007-07-01

    The 14-3-3s are a ubiquitous class of eukaryotic proteins that participate in a second regulatory step in many phosphorylation-based signal transduction systems. The Arabidopsis family of 14-3-3 proteins represents a rather large 14-3-3 gene family. The biological motive for such diversity within a single protein family is not yet completely understood. The work presented here utilizes 14-3-3 micro-affinity chromatography in conjunction with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to survey the substrate sequence selectivity of two Arabidopsis 14-3-3 isoforms that represent the two major subclasses of this protein family. A method was developed to compare the relative binding of eight synthetic phosphopeptide sequences. The degree to which each phosphopeptide bound to either isoform was assigned a relative value, defined here as the binding ratio. The method provided a simple means for visualizing differences in substrate sequence selection among different 14-3-3 isoforms. A reproducible preference for specific phosphopeptide sequences was measured for both isoforms. This binding preference was consistent among the two classes of isoforms, suggesting that any pressure for isoform selectivity must reside outside the central core that interacts with the phosphopeptide sequence of the client. PMID:17569603

  2. 14-3-3ζ: A numbers game in adipocyte function?

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Gareth E.; Johnson, James D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Molecular scaffolds are often viewed as passive signaling molecules that facilitate protein-protein interactions. However, new evidence gained from the use of loss-of-function or gain-of-function models is dispelling this notion. Our own recent discovery of 14-3-3ζ as an essential regulator of adipogenesis highlights the complex roles of this member of the 14-3-3 protein family. Depletion of the 14-3-3ζ isoform affected parallel pathways that drive adipocyte development, including pathways controlling the stability of key adipogenic transcription factors and cell cycle progression. Going beyond adipocyte differentiation, this study opens new avenues of research in the context of metabolism, as 14-3-3ζ binds to a variety of well-established metabolic proteins that harbor its canonical phosphorylation binding motifs. This suggests that 14-3-3ζ may contribute to key metabolic signaling pathways, such as those that facilitate glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism. Herein, we discuss these novel areas of research, which will undoubtedly shed light onto novel roles of 14-3-3ζ, and perhaps its related family members, on glucose homeostasis. PMID:27386155

  3. Decreased expression of 14-3-3 in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis confirms its involvement in fungal pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Caroline Maria; Silva, Julhiany de Fátima ds; Oliveira, Haroldo Cesar de; Assato, Patrícia Akemi; Singulani, Junya de Lacorte; Lopez, Angela Maria; Tamayo, Diana Patricia; Hernandez-Ruiz, Orville; McEwen, Juan G; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between the fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and host cells is usually mediated by specific binding events between adhesins on the fungal surface and receptors on the host extracellular matrix or cell surface. One molecule implicated in the P. brasiliensis-host interaction is the 14-3-3 protein. The 14-3-3 protein belongs to a family of conserved regulatory molecules that are expressed in all eukaryotic cells and are involved in diverse cellular functions. Here, we investigated the relevance of the 14-3-3 protein to the virulence of P. brasiliensis. Using antisense RNA technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, we generated a 14-3-3-silenced strain (expression reduced by ˜55%). This strain allowed us to investigate the interaction between 14-3-3 and the host and to correlate the functions of P. brasiliensis 14-3-3 with cellular features, such as morphological characteristics and virulence, that are important for pathogenesis. PMID:26646480

  4. Characterization and subcellular localization of two 14-3-3 genes and their response to abiotic stress in wheat.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaodan; Chen, Xin; Wang, Yaying; Xiao, Ruixia; Liu, Hailun; Wang, Xinguo; Ren, Jiangping; Li, Yongchun; Niu, Hongbin; Wang, Xiang; Yin, Jun

    2014-02-01

    In order to investigate biological functions of the 14-3-3 genes and their response to abiotic stress, two cDNAs (designated as Ta14R1 and Ta14R2) encoding putative 14-3-3 proteins were isolated from wheat by PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) technique. The cDNA of Ta14R1 is 999bp and encodes a protein of 262 amino acids, while the cDNA of Ta14R2 is 897bp in length and encodes a protein of 261 amino acids. Transient expression assays using Ta14R1/Ta14R2-GFP fusion constructs indicated that Ta14R1 and Ta14R2 were located in cytoplasm and cell membrane but not in chloroplasts. Real-time quantitative (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that Ta14R1 and Ta14R2 were differentially expressed in wheat tissues and significantly up-regulated in roots and shoots 1d after germination, indicating they may play a role in process of seed germination. The expression of the two genes in roots and leaves were significantly induced by plant hormone ABA, as well as heat, cold and drought treatments, suggesting that the two 14-3-3 genes in wheat may be involved in ABA dependent stress-responding pathway and response to heat, cold and drought stress. PMID:24941745

  5. Identification and expression analysis of four 14-3-3 genes during fruit ripening in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group, cv. Brazilian).

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Ying; Xu, Bi-Yu; Liu, Ju-Hua; Yang, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Jia, Cai-Hong; Ren, Li-Cheng; Jin, Zhi-Qiang

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the regulation of 14-3-3 proteins in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group, cv. Brazilian) fruit postharvest ripening, four cDNAs encoding 14-3-3 proteins were isolated from banana and designated as Ma-14-3-3a, Ma-14-3-3c, Ma-14-3-3e, and Ma-14-3-3i, respectively. Amino acid sequence alignment showed that the four 14-3-3 proteins shared a highly conserved core structure and variable C-terminal as well as N-terminal regions with 14-3-3 proteins from other plant species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the four 14-3-3 genes belong to the non-ε groups. They were differentially and specifically expressed in various tissues. Real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that these four genes function differentially during banana fruit postharvest ripening. Three genes, Ma-14-3-3a, Ma-14-3-3c, and Ma-14-3-3e, were significantly induced by exogenous ethylene treatment. However, gene function differed in naturally ripened fruits. Ethylene could induce Ma-14-3-3c expression during postharvest ripening, but expression patterns of Ma-14-3-3a and Ma-14-3-3e suggest that these two genes appear to be involved in regulating ethylene biosynthesis during fruit ripening. No obvious relationship emerged between Ma-14-3-3i expression in naturally ripened and 1-MCP (1-methylcyclopropene)-treated fruit groups during fruit ripening. These results indicate that the 14-3-3 proteins might be involved in various regulatory processes of banana fruit ripening. Further studies will mainly focus on revealing the detailed biological mechanisms of these four 14-3-3 genes in regulating banana fruit postharvest ripening. PMID:22009053

  6. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the 14-3-3 Family Genes in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Cheng; Cheng, Linming; Shen, Jingqin; Zhang, Yunhong; Cao, Huimin; Lu, Dan; Shen, Chenjia

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 gene family, which is conserved in eukaryotes, is involved in protein-protein interactions and mediates signal transduction. However, detailed investigations of the 14-3-3 gene family in Medicago truncatula are largely unknown. In this study, the identification and study of M. truncatula 14-3-3-family genes were performed based on the latest M. truncatula genome. In the M. truncatula genome, 10 14-3-3 family genes were identified, and they can be grouped into ε and non-ε groups. An exon-intron analysis showed that the gene structures are conserved in the same group. The protein structure analysis showed that 14-3-3 proteins in M. truncatula are composed of nine typical antiparallel α-helices. The expression patterns of Mt14-3-3 genes indicated that they are expressed in all tissues. Furthermore, the gene expression levels of Mt14-3-3 under hormone treatment and Sinorhizobium meliloti infection showed that the Mt14-3-3 genes were involve in nodule formation. Our findings lay a solid foundation for further functional studies of 14-3-3 in M. truncatula. PMID:27047505

  7. The pro-inflammatory cytokine 14-3-3ε is a ligand of CD13 in cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Nefla, Meriam; Sudre, Laure; Denat, Guillaume; Priam, Sabrina; Andre-Leroux, Gwenaëlle; Berenbaum, Francis; Jacques, Claire

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteoarthritis is a whole-joint disease characterized by the progressive destruction of articular cartilage involving abnormal communication between subchondral bone and cartilage. Our team previously identified 14-3-3ε protein as a subchondral bone soluble mediator altering cartilage homeostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of CD13 (also known as aminopeptidase N, APN) in the chondrocyte response to 14-3-3ε. After identifying CD13 in chondrocytes, we knocked down CD13 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) and blocking antibodies in articular chondrocytes. 14-3-3ε-induced MMP-3 and MMP-13 was significantly reduced with CD13 knockdown, which suggests that it has a crucial role in 14-3-3ε signal transduction. Aminopeptidase N activity was identified in chondrocytes, but the activity was unchanged after stimulation with 14-3-3ε. Direct interaction between CD13 and 14-3-3ε was then demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance. Using labeled 14-3-3ε, we also found that 14-3-3ε binds to the surface of chondrocytes in a manner that is dependent on CD13. Taken together, these results suggest that 14-3-3ε might directly bind to CD13, which transmits its signal in chondrocytes to induce a catabolic phenotype similar to that observed in osteoarthritis. The 14-3-3ε–CD13 interaction could be a new therapeutic target in osteoarthritis. PMID:26208633

  8. The pro-inflammatory cytokine 14-3-3ε is a ligand of CD13 in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Nefla, Meriam; Sudre, Laure; Denat, Guillaume; Priam, Sabrina; Andre-Leroux, Gwenaëlle; Berenbaum, Francis; Jacques, Claire

    2015-09-01

    Osteoarthritis is a whole-joint disease characterized by the progressive destruction of articular cartilage involving abnormal communication between subchondral bone and cartilage. Our team previously identified 14-3-3ε protein as a subchondral bone soluble mediator altering cartilage homeostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of CD13 (also known as aminopeptidase N, APN) in the chondrocyte response to 14-3-3ε. After identifying CD13 in chondrocytes, we knocked down CD13 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) and blocking antibodies in articular chondrocytes. 14-3-3ε-induced MMP-3 and MMP-13 was significantly reduced with CD13 knockdown, which suggests that it has a crucial role in 14-3-3ε signal transduction. Aminopeptidase N activity was identified in chondrocytes, but the activity was unchanged after stimulation with 14-3-3ε. Direct interaction between CD13 and 14-3-3ε was then demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance. Using labeled 14-3-3ε, we also found that 14-3-3ε binds to the surface of chondrocytes in a manner that is dependent on CD13. Taken together, these results suggest that 14-3-3ε might directly bind to CD13, which transmits its signal in chondrocytes to induce a catabolic phenotype similar to that observed in osteoarthritis. The 14-3-3ε-CD13 interaction could be a new therapeutic target in osteoarthritis. PMID:26208633

  9. The 14-3-3 Gene Function of Cryptococcus neoformans Is Required for its Growth and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingbo; Chang, Yun C; Wu, Chun-Hua; Liu, Jennifer; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Huang, Sheng-He; Shimada, Hiro; Fante, Rob; Fu, Xiaowei; Jong, Ambrose

    2016-05-28

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a life-threatening pathogenic yeast that causes devastating meningoencephalitis. The mechanism of cryptococcal brain invasion is largely unknown, and recent studies suggest that its extracellular microvesicles may be involved in the invasion process. The 14-3-3 protein is abundant in the extracellular microvesicles of C. neoformans, and the 14-3-3-GFP fusion has been used as the microvesicle's marker. However, the physiological role of 14-3-3 has not been explored. In this report, we have found that C. neoformans contains a single 14-3-3 gene that apparently is an essential gene. To explore the functions of 14-3-3, we substituted the promoter region of the 14-3-3 with the copper-controllable promoter CTR4. The CTR4 regulatory strain showed an enlarged cell size, drastic changes in morphology, and a decrease in the thickness of the capsule under copper-enriched conditions. Furthermore, the mutant cells produced a lower amount of total proteins in their extracellular microvesicles and reduced adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro. Proteomic analyses of the protein components under 14-3-3-overexpressed and -suppressed conditions revealed that the 14-3-3 function(s) might be associated with the microvesicle biogenesis. Our results support that 14-3-3 has diverse pertinent roles in both physiology and pathogenesis in C. neoformans. Its gene functions are closely relevant to the pathogenesis of this fungus. PMID:26437944

  10. 14-3-3σ regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by modulating Yap1 cellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Sumitha A.T.; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Xue, Lei; Dean, Douglas C.; Lu, Qingxian; Li, Qiutang

    2015-01-01

    The homozygous repeated epilation (Er/Er) mouse mutant of the gene encoding 14-3-3σ displays an epidermal phenotype characterized by hyperproliferative keratinocytes and undifferentiated epidermis. Heterozygous Er/+ mice develop spontaneous skin tumors and are highly sensitive to tumor-promoting DMBA/TPA induction. The molecular mechanisms underlying 14-3-3σ regulation of epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and tumor formation have not been well elucidated. In the present study, we found that Er/Er keratinocytes failed to sequester Yap1 in the cytoplasm, leading to its nuclear localization during epidermal development in vivo and under differentiation-inducing culture conditions in vitro. In addition, enhanced Yap1 nuclear localization was also evident in DMBA/TPA-induced tumors from Er/+ skin. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of Yap1 expression in Er/Er keratinocytes inhibited their proliferation, suggesting that YAP1 functions as a downstream effector of 14-3-3σ controlling epidermal proliferation. We then demonstrated that keratinocytes express all seven 14-3-3 protein isoforms, some of which form heterodimers with 14-3-3σ, either full-length WT or the mutant form found in Er/Er mice. However Er 14-3-3σ does not interact with Yap1, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. We conclude that Er 14-3-3σ disrupts the interaction between 14-3-3 and Yap1, thus fails to block Yap1 nuclear transcriptional function, causing continued progenitor expansion and inhibition of differentiation in Er/Er epidermis. PMID:25668240

  11. Regulation of Molecular Chaperone Gene Transcription Involves the Serine Phosphorylation, 14-3-3ɛ Binding, and Cytoplasmic Sequestration of Heat Shock Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XiaoZhe; Grammatikakis, Nicholas; Siganou, Aliki; Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2003-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) regulates the transcription of molecular chaperone hsp genes. However, the cellular control mechanisms that regulate HSF1 activity are not well understood. In this study, we have demonstrated for the first time that human HSF1 binds to the essential cell signaling protein 14-3-3ɛ. Binding of HSF1 to 14-3-3ɛ occurs in cells in which extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) is activated and blockade of the ERK pathway by treatment with the specific ERK pathway inhibitor PD98059 in vivo strongly suppresses the binding. We previously showed that ERK1 phosphorylates HSF1 on serine 307 and leads to secondary phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) on serine 303 within the regulatory domain and that these phosphorylation events repress HSF1. We show here that HSF1 binding to 14-3-3ɛ requires HSF1 phosphorylation on serines 303 and 307. Furthermore, the serine phosphorylation-dependent binding of HSF1 to 14-3-3ɛ results in the transcriptional repression of HSF1 and its sequestration in the cytoplasm. Leptomycin B, a specific inhibitor of nuclear export receptor CRM1, was found to reverse the cytoplasmic sequestration of HSF1 mediated by 14-3-3ɛ, suggesting that CRM1/14-3-3ɛ directed nuclear export plays a major role in repression of HSF1 by the ERK/GSK3/14-3-3ɛ pathway. Our experiments indicate a novel pathway for HSF1 regulation and suggest a mechanism for suppression of its activity during cellular proliferation. PMID:12917326

  12. Dynamic interaction between 14-3-3zeta and bax during TNF-α-induced apoptosis in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xuejuan; Xing, Da; Chen, Tongsheng

    2006-09-01

    Bax, a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, localizes largely in the cytoplasm but redistributes to mitochondria and undergoes oligomerization to induce the release of apoptogenic factors such as cytochrome c in response to apoptotic stimuli. Cytoplasmic protein 14-3-3zeta binds to Bax and, upon apoptotic stimulation, releases Bax by a caspase-independent mechanism. However, the direct interaction of the cytoplasmic 14-3-3zeta and Bax in living cells has not been observed. In present study, to monitor the dynamic interaction between 14-3-3zeta and Bax in living cells in real time during apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), DsRed-14-3-3zeta plasmid is constructed. By cotransfecting DsRed- 14-3-3zeta and GFP-Bax plasmids into human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1), we observe the dynamic interaction between Bax and 14-3-3zeta using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique on laser scanning confocal microscope. The results show that 14-3-3zeta remains in the cytoplasm but GFP-Bax translocates to mitochondria completely after TNF-α stimulation. These results reveal that 14-3-3zeta binds directly to Bax in healthy cells, and that 14-3-3zeta negatively regulates Bax translocation to mitochondria during TNF-α-induced apoptosis.

  13. Play down protein to play up metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Timo D.; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2014-01-01

    Who among us hasn’t fantasized about a diet that allows ingestion of a surfeit of calories that are burned off effortlessly by ramping up energy expenditure? In this issue of the JCI, research led by Christopher Morrison suggests that this dream may become a reality; however, a complete understanding of the molecular interface that connects nutrient choices with our cellular metabolism will be required. Laeger et al. show that the expression and secretion of the weight-reducing hormone fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is regulated by dietary proteins and not, as has been heretofore assumed, simply triggered by reduced caloric intake. This study not only sheds new light on the role of FGF21 in systems metabolism, but also on the ways our bodies cope with the ever-changing availability of different dietary macronutrients. PMID:25133420

  14. 14-3-3, an integrator of cell mechanics and cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Douglas N

    2010-11-01

    One of the goals of understanding cytokinesis is to uncover the molecular regulation of the cellular mechanical properties that drive cell shape change. Such regulatory pathways are likely to be used at multiple stages of a cell's life, but are highly featured during cell division. Recently, we demonstrated that 14-3-3 (encoded by a single gene in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum) serves to integrate key cytoskeletal components-microtubules, Rac and myosin II-to control cell mechanics and cytokinesis. As 14-3-3 proteins are frequently altered in a variety of human tumors, we extend these observations to suggest possible additional roles for how 14-3-3 proteins may contribute to tumorigenesis. PMID:21686271

  15. 14-3-3ζ Mediates Tau Aggregation in Human Neuroblastoma M17 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Paudel, Hemant K.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs) associated with the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tau in the normal brain binds and stabilizes microtubules. Tau isolated from PHFs is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents it from binding to microtubules. Tau phosphorylation has been suggested to be involved in the development of NFT pathology in the AD brain. Recently, we showed that 14-3-3ζ is bound to tau in the PHFs and when incubated in vitro with 14-3-3ζ, tau formed amorphous aggregates, single-stranded straight filaments, double stranded ribbon-like filaments and PHF-like filaments that displayed close resemblance with corresponding ultrastructures of AD brain. Surprisingly however, phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated tau aggregated in a similar manner, indicating that tau phosphorylation does not affect in vitro tau aggregation (Qureshi et al (2013) Biochemistry 52, 6445–6455). In this study, we have examined the role of tau phosphorylation in tau aggregation in cellular level. We have found that in human M17 neuroblastoma cells, tau phosphorylation by GSK3β or PKA does not cause tau aggregation, but promotes 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation by destabilizing microtubules. Microtubule disrupting drugs also promoted 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation without changing tau phosphorylation in M17 cell. In vitro, when incubated with 14-3-3ζ and microtubules, nonphosphorylated tau bound to microtubules and did not aggregate. Phosphorylated tau on the other hand did not bind to microtubules and aggregated. Our data indicate that microtubule-bound tau is resistant to 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation and suggest that tau phosphorylation promotes tau aggregation in the brain by detaching tau from microtubules and thus making it accessible to 14-3-3ζ. PMID:27548710

  16. 14-3-3ζ Mediates Tau Aggregation in Human Neuroblastoma M17 Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Paudel, Hemant K

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs) associated with the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau in the normal brain binds and stabilizes microtubules. Tau isolated from PHFs is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents it from binding to microtubules. Tau phosphorylation has been suggested to be involved in the development of NFT pathology in the AD brain. Recently, we showed that 14-3-3ζ is bound to tau in the PHFs and when incubated in vitro with 14-3-3ζ, tau formed amorphous aggregates, single-stranded straight filaments, double stranded ribbon-like filaments and PHF-like filaments that displayed close resemblance with corresponding ultrastructures of AD brain. Surprisingly however, phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated tau aggregated in a similar manner, indicating that tau phosphorylation does not affect in vitro tau aggregation (Qureshi et al (2013) Biochemistry 52, 6445-6455). In this study, we have examined the role of tau phosphorylation in tau aggregation in cellular level. We have found that in human M17 neuroblastoma cells, tau phosphorylation by GSK3β or PKA does not cause tau aggregation, but promotes 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation by destabilizing microtubules. Microtubule disrupting drugs also promoted 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation without changing tau phosphorylation in M17 cell. In vitro, when incubated with 14-3-3ζ and microtubules, nonphosphorylated tau bound to microtubules and did not aggregate. Phosphorylated tau on the other hand did not bind to microtubules and aggregated. Our data indicate that microtubule-bound tau is resistant to 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation and suggest that tau phosphorylation promotes tau aggregation in the brain by detaching tau from microtubules and thus making it accessible to 14-3-3ζ. PMID:27548710

  17. 14-3-3θ is a binding partner of rat Eag1 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po-Hao; Miaw, Shi-Chuen; Chuang, Chau-Ching; Chang, Pei-Yu; Fu, Ssu-Ju; Jow, Guey-Mei; Chiu, Mei-Miao; Jeng, Chung-Jiuan

    2012-01-01

    The ether-à-go-go (Eag) potassium (K(+)) channel belongs to the superfamily of voltage-gated K(+) channel. In mammals, the expression of Eag channels is neuron-specific but their neurophysiological role remains obscure. We have applied the yeast two-hybrid screening system to identify rat Eag1 (rEag1)-interacting proteins from a rat brain cDNA library. One of the clones we identified was 14-3-3θ, which belongs to a family of small acidic protein abundantly expressed in the brain. Data from in vitro yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down assays suggested that the direct association with 14-3-3θ was mediated by both the N- and the C-termini of rEag1. Co-precipitation of the two proteins was confirmed in both heterologous HEK293T cells and native hippocampal neurons. Electrophysiological studies showed that over-expression of 14-3-3θ led to a sizable suppression of rEag1 K(+) currents with no apparent alteration of the steady-state voltage dependence and gating kinetics. Furthermore, co-expression with 14-3-3θ failed to affect the total protein level, membrane trafficking, and single channel conductance of rEag1, implying that 14-3-3θ binding may render a fraction of the channel locked in a non-conducting state. Together these data suggest that 14-3-3θ is a binding partner of rEag1 and may modulate the functional expression of the K(+) channel in neurons. PMID:22911758

  18. Ischemia preconditioning protects astrocytes from ischemic injury through 14-3-3γ.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ying; Chai, Chao Rui; Gao, Kai; Jia, Xi Hua; Kong, Jin Ge; Chen, Xiao Qian; Vatcher, Greg; Chen, Jian Guo; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi

    2015-10-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and new strategies are required to reduce neuronal injury and improve prognosis. Ischemia preconditioning (IPC) is an intrinsic phenomenon that protects cells from subsequent ischemic injury and might provide promising mechanisms for clinical treatment. In this study, primary astrocytes exhibited significantly less cell death than control when exposed to different durations of IPC (15, 30, 60, or 120 min). A 15-min duration was the most effective IPC to protect astrocytes from 8-hr-ischemia injury. The protective mechanisms of IPC involve the upregulation of protective proteins, including 14-3-3γ, and attenuation of malondialdehyde (MDA) content and ATP depletion. 14-3-3γ is an antiapoptotic intracellular protein that was significantly upregulated for up to 84 hr after IPC. In addition, IPC promoted activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)-1/2, p38, and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways. When JNK was specifically inhibited with SP600125, the upregulation of 14-3-3γ induced by IPC was almost completely abolished; however, there was no effect on ATP or MDA levels. This suggests that, even though both energy preservation and 14-3-3γ up-regulation were turned on by IPC, they were controlled by different pathways. The ERK1/2, p38, and Akt signaling pathways were not involved in the 14-3-3γ upregulation and energy preservation. These results indicate that IPC could protect astrocytes from ischemia injury by inducing 14-3-3γ and by alleviating energy depletion through different pathways, suggesting multiple protection of IPC and providing new insights into potential stroke therapies. PMID:25711139

  19. Possible additional roles in mating for Ustilago maydis Rho1 and 14-3-3 homologues

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Cau D

    2010-01-01

    Both the Rho GTPases and 14-3-3 proteins each belong to ubiquitous families of proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell polarity, cellular differentiation and apoptosis. In fungi, these components of signaling pathways are involved in cell cycle regulation, cytokinesis and virulence. We study cellular differentiation and pathogenesis for Ustilago maydis, the dimorphic fungal pathogen of maize. We have reported on the interactions of Pdc1, a U. maydis homologue of human 14-3-3ɛ, with Rho1, a small GTP binding protein; these proteins participate in cell polarity and filamentation pathways that include another small G protein, Rac1, and its effector PAK kinase, Cla4. Here we describe additional experiments that explore possible relationships of Pdc1 and Rho1 with another PAK-like kinase pathway and with the a matingtype locus. PMID:20539785

  20. Modulation of 14-3-3 interaction with phosphorylated histone H3 by combinatorial modification patterns

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Stefan; Fischle, Wolfgang; Seiser, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histones are determining factors in the global and local regulation of genome activity. Phosphorylation of histone H3 is globally associated with mitotic chromatin compaction but occurs in a much more restricted manner during interphase transcriptional regulation of a limited subset of genes. In the course of gene regulation, serine 10 phosphorylation at histone H3 is targeted to a very small fraction of nucleosomes that is highly susceptible to additional acetylation events. Recently, we and others have identified 14-3-3 as a binding protein that recognizes both phosphorylated serine 10 and phosphorylated serine 28 on histone H3. In vitro, the affinity of 14-3-3 for phosphoserine 10 is weak but becomes significantly increased by additional acetylation of either lysine 9 or lysine 14 on the same histone tail. In contrast, the histone H3S28 site matches elements of 14-3-3 high affinity consensus motifs. This region mediates an initial stronger interaction that is less susceptible to modulation by “auxiliary” modifications. Here we discuss the binding of 14-3-3 proteins to histone H3 in detail and putative biological implications of these interactions. PMID:18418070

  1. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease diagnostic accuracy is improved by a new CSF ELISA 14-3-3γ assay.

    PubMed

    Leitão, M J; Baldeiras, I; Almeida, M R; Ribeiro, M H; Santos, A C; Ribeiro, M; Tomás, J; Rocha, S; Santana, I; Oliveira, C R

    2016-05-13

    Protein 14-3-3 is a reliable marker of rapid neuronal damage, specifically increased in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients. Its detection is usually performed by Western Blot (WB), prone to methodological issues. Our aim was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of a recently developed quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assay for 14-3-3γ, in comparison with WB and other neurodegeneration markers. CSF samples from 145 patients with suspicion of prion disease, later classified as definite sCJD (n=72) or Non-prion diseases (Non-CJD; n=73) comprised our population. 14-3-3 protein was determined by WB and ELISA. Total Tau (t-Tau) and phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau) were also evaluated. Apolipoprotein E gene (ApoE) and prionic protein gene (PRNP) genotyping was assessed. ELISA 14-3-3γ levels were significantly increased in sCJD compared to Non-CJD patients (p<0.001), showing very good accuracy (AUC=0.982; sensitivity=97%; specificity=94%), and matching WB results in 81% of all cases. It strongly correlated with t-Tau and p-Tau (p<0.0001), showing slightly higher specificity (14-3-3 WB - 63%; Tau - 90%; p-Tau/t-Tau ratio - 88%). From WB inconclusive results (n=44), ELISA 14-3-3γ correctly classified 41 patients. Additionally, logistic regression analysis selected ELISA 14-3-3γ as the best single predictive marker for sCJD (overall accuracy=93%). ApoE and PRNP genotypes did not influence ELISA 14-3-3γ levels. Despite specificity for 14-3-3γ isoform, ELISA results not only match WB evaluation but also help discrimination of inconclusive results. Our results therefore reinforce this assay as a single screening test, allowing higher sample throughput and unequivocal results. PMID:26940479

  2. 14-3-3σ is an independent prognostic biomarker for gastric cancer and is associated with apoptosis and proliferation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Liang; Liu, Lihua; Xiao, Yang; Zeng, Tao; Zeng, Chao

    2015-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins participate in various cellular processes, including apoptosis, proliferation and malignant transformation. 14-3-3σ, a member of the 14-3-3 protein family, is important in several types of cancer; however, little is known about the clinical significance and biological roles of 14-3-3σ in gastric cancer. The present study analyzed the expression pattern of 14-3-3σ in gastric cancer and investigated its correlation with the prognosis of gastric cancer patients. Furthermore, the association of 14-3-3σ with Ki-67, Bcl-2 and Bax was evaluated. 14-3-3σ was expressed at higher level in gastric cancer tissue compared with healthy gastric tissue, and 14-3-3σ expression was significantly correlated with tumor size and tumor node metastasis stage (P<0.05). To the best of our knowledge, the present study data are the first to suggest that 14-3-3σ expression has been significantly associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer. Additionally, 14-3-3σ overexpression was positively correlated with Ki-67 and Bcl-2 expression levels. Thus, 14-3-3σ is a potential prognostic marker for gastric cancer patients, and may be involved in regulating the apoptosis and proliferation of gastric cancer cells. PMID:25435977

  3. The 14-3-3σ/GSK3β/β-catenin/ZEB1 regulatory loop modulates chemo-sensitivity in human tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yan; Yin, Jiang; Li, Nan; Deng, Yingen; Luo, Kai; Zhang, Qiong; Wang, Chengkun; Zhang, Zhijie; Zheng, Guopei; He, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrated that chemotherapy induced 14-3-3σ expression in tongue cancer (TC) cells and overexpressed 14-3-3σ sensitized TC cells to chemotherapy especially in multidrug resistant TC (MDR-TC) cells. In agreement, 14-3-3σ knockdown enhanced resistance of TC cells to chemotherapy. Mechanically, we found 14-3-3σ physically bound to GSK3β in protein level and the binding inhibited β-catenin signaling. Coincidentally, chemotherapy as well as 14-3-3σ overexpression led to increase of GSK3β protein level. Increased GSK3β protein sensitized TC cells to chemotherapy. Moreover, deregulation of 14-3-3σ/GSK3β/β-catenin axis led to overexpressed ZEB1 in TC cells, especially in MDR-TC cells. As a negative feedback loop, ZEB1 bond to 14-3-3σ promoter to enhance promoter hypermethylation in TC cells. Promoter hypermethylation resulted into the decrease of 14-3-3σ expression. Importantly, a positive correlation was observed between 14-3-3σ and GSK3β protein expression in TC tissues from patients receiving chemotherapy. High levels of 14-3-3σ and GSK3β were associated with better prognosis in TC patients. PMID:26036631

  4. Verteporfin inhibits YAP function through up-regulating 14-3-3σ sequestering YAP in the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Zhu, Xiaoyong; Feng, Weiwei; Yu, Yinhua; Jeong, Kangjin; Guo, Wei; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B

    2016-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP), the central mediator of Hippo pathway, not only regulates a diversity of cellular processes during development but also plays a pivotal role in tumorigenesis. YAP is overexpressed in many types of human cancers with its expression level being associated with patient outcomes. Thus, inhibiting YAP function could provide a novel therapeutic approach. Verteporfin, a photosensitizer, which has been used in photodynamic therapy (PDT), was recently identified as an inhibitor of the interaction of YAP with TEAD, which, in turn, blocks transcriptional activation of targets downstream of YAP. However, the mechanism by which Verteporfin inhibits YAP activity remains to be elucidated. We demonstrate that overexpression of YAP stimulates cell proliferation whereas knocking down YAP or treating cells with Verteporfin inhibited cell proliferation, even in the presence of growth factors. Protoporphyrin IX, another photosensitizer, did not have similar activity demonstrating specificity to Verteporfin. Verteporfin induced sequestration of YAP in cytoplasm through increasing levels of 14-3-3σ, a YAP chaperon protein that retains YAP in cytoplasm and targets it for degradation in the proteosome. Interestingly, while knockdown of YAP had no effect on the ability of Verteporfin to induce 14-3-3σ, p53 is required for this effect of Verteporfin. This provides potential approaches to select patients likely to benefit from Verteporfin. PMID:27073720

  5. Loss of the 14-3-3σ is essential for LASP1-mediated colorectal cancer progression via activating PI3K/AKT signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Ziyun; Cai, Yanjun; Xu, Lijun; Yao, Xueqing; Shi, Jiaolong; Zhang, Feifei; Luo, Yuhao; Zheng, Kehong; Liu, Jian; Deng, Fengliu; Li, Rui; Zhang, Lanzhi; Wang, Hui; Li, Mingyi; Ding, Yanqing; Zhao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    LIM and SH3 protein 1 (LASP1) can promote colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and metastasis, but the direct evidence that elucidates the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, our proteomic data showed that LASP1 interacted with 14-3-3σ and decreased the expression of 14-3-3σ in CRC. Deletion of 14-3-3σ was required for LASP1-mediated CRC cell aggressiveness. In vitro gain- and loss-of-function assays showed that 14-3-3σ suppressed the ability of cell migration and decreased the phosphorylation of AKT in CRC cells. We further observed clearly co-localization between AKT and 14-3-3σ in CRC cells. Treatment of PI3K inhibitor LY294002 markedly prevented phosphorylation of AKT and subsequently counteract aggressive phenotype mediated by siRNA of 14-3-3σ. Clinically, 14-3-3σ is frequently down-regulated in CRC tissues. Down-regulation of 14-3-3σ is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis of patients with CRC. Multivariate analysis confirmed low expression of 14-3-3σ as an independent prognostic factor for CRC. A combination of low 14-3-3σ and high LASP1 expression shows a worse trend with overall survival of CRC patients. Our research paves the path to future investigation of the LASP1-14-3-3σ axis as a target for novel anticancer therapies of advanced CRC. PMID:27156963

  6. 14-3-3ζ up-regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in hepatocellular carcinoma via activation of PI3K/Akt/NF-кB signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yufu; Lv, Pengfei; Sun, Zhongyi; Han, Lei; Luo, Bichao; Zhou, Wenping

    2015-01-01

    14-3-3ζ protein, a member of 14-3-3 family, plays important roles in multiple cellular processes. Our previous study showed that 14-3-3ζ could bind to regulate the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which is induced by hypoxia and a crucial factor for induction of tumor metastasis. Moreover, we also have confirmed the response of 14-3-3ζ to hypoxia in our unpublished data as well. Thus, in the present study, we attempted to reveal that whether the regulation effect of 14-3-3ζ on HIF-1α functioned in a similar pattern as hypoxia. Stable regulation of 14-3-3ζ in human HCC cell line SMMC-772 and HCC-LM3 was achieved. The regulation of 14-3-3ζ on HIF-1α mRNA transcription was evaluated by luciferase activity assay and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The effect of 14-3-3ζ on the production of HIF-1α and pathways determining HIF-1α’s response to hypoxia was assessed using western blotting assay. Our results showed that regulation of 14-3-3ζ expression influenced the activity of HIF-1α, phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-кB). Blocking of these pathways using indicated inhibitors revealed that 14-3-3ζ enhanced the production of HIF-1α via the activation of PI3K/Akt/NF-кB pathway, which was identical to hypoxia induced HIF-1α expression. For the first time, our study described the key role of 14-3-3ζ in the HIF-1α production in HCC cells. And the molecule exerted its function on HIF-1α both by directly binding to it and via PI3K/Akt/NF-кB signal transduction pathway. PMID:26884855

  7. Transcriptional increase and misexpression of 14-3-3 epsilon in sea urchin embryos exposed to UV-B

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Roberta; Zito, Francesca; Costa, Caterina; Bonaventura, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Members of the 14-3-3 protein family are involved in many important cellular events, including stress response, survival and apoptosis. Genes of the 14-3-3 family are conserved from plants to humans, and some members are responsive to UV radiation. Here, we report the isolation of the complete cDNA encoding the 14-3-3 epsilon isoform from Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin embryos, referred to as Pl14-3-3ε, and the phylogenetic relationship with other homologues described in different phyla. Pl14-3-3ε mRNA levels were measured by QPCR during development and found to increase from the mesenchyme blastula to the prism stage. In response to UV-B (312 nm) exposure, early stage embryos collected 2 h later showed a 2.3-fold (at 400 J/m2) and a 2.7-fold (at 800 J/m2) increase in Pl14-3-3ε transcript levels compared with controls. The spatial expression of Pl14-3-3ε mRNA, detected by whole mount in situ hybridization in both control and UV-B exposed embryos, harvested at late developmental stages, showed transcripts to be located in the archenteron of gastrula stage and widely distributed in all germ layers, respectively. The Pl14-3-3ε mRNA delocalization parallels the failure in archenteron elongation observed morphologically, as well as the lack of specific endoderm markers, investigated by indirect immuno-fluorescence on whole mount embryos. Results confirm the involvement of 14-3-3ε in the stress response elicited by UV-B and demonstrate, for the first time, its contribution at the transcriptional level in the sea urchin embryo. PMID:20607471

  8. The Silencing of a 14-3-3ɛ Homolog in Tenebrio molitor Leads to Increased Antimicrobial Activity in Hemocyte and Reduces Larval Survivability.

    PubMed

    Seo, Gi Won; Jo, Yong Hun; Seong, Jeong Hwan; Park, Ki Beom; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Tindwa, Hamisi; Kim, Sun-Am; Lee, Yong Seok; Kim, Yu Jung; Han, Yeon Soo

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 family of phosphorylated serine-binding proteins acts as signaling molecules in biological processes such as metabolism, division, differentiation, autophagy, and apoptosis. Herein, we report the requirement of 14-3-3ɛ isoform from Tenebrio molitor (Tm14-3-3ɛ) in the hemocyte antimicrobial activity. The Tm14-3-3ɛ transcript is 771 nucleotides in length and encodes a polypeptide of 256 amino acid residues. The protein has the typical 14-3-3 domain, the nuclear export signal (NES) sequence, and the peptide binding residues. The Tm14-3-3ɛ transcript shows a significant three-fold expression in the hemocyte of T. molitor larvae when infected with Escherichia coli Tm14-3-3ɛ silenced larvae show significantly lower survival rates when infected with E. coli. Under Tm14-3-3ɛ silenced condition, a strong antimicrobial activity is elicited in the hemocyte of the host inoculated with E. coli. This suggests impaired secretion of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) into the hemolymph. Furthermore, a reduction in AMP secretion under Tm14-3-3ɛ silenced condition would be responsible for loss in the capacity to kill bacteria and might explain the reduced survivability of the larvae upon E. coli challenge. This shows that Tm14-3-3ɛ is required to maintain innate immunity in T. molitor by enabling antimicrobial secretion into the hemolymph and explains the functional specialization of the isoform. PMID:27556493

  9. The Silencing of a 14-3-3ɛ Homolog in Tenebrio molitor Leads to Increased Antimicrobial Activity in Hemocyte and Reduces Larval Survivability

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Gi Won; Jo, Yong Hun; Seong, Jeong Hwan; Park, Ki Beom; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Tindwa, Hamisi; Kim, Sun-Am; Lee, Yong Seok; Kim, Yu Jung; Han, Yeon Soo

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 family of phosphorylated serine-binding proteins acts as signaling molecules in biological processes such as metabolism, division, differentiation, autophagy, and apoptosis. Herein, we report the requirement of 14-3-3ɛ isoform from Tenebrio molitor (Tm14-3-3ɛ) in the hemocyte antimicrobial activity. The Tm14-3-3ɛ transcript is 771 nucleotides in length and encodes a polypeptide of 256 amino acid residues. The protein has the typical 14-3-3 domain, the nuclear export signal (NES) sequence, and the peptide binding residues. The Tm14-3-3ɛ transcript shows a significant three-fold expression in the hemocyte of T. molitor larvae when infected with Escherichia coli Tm14-3-3ɛ silenced larvae show significantly lower survival rates when infected with E. coli. Under Tm14-3-3ɛ silenced condition, a strong antimicrobial activity is elicited in the hemocyte of the host inoculated with E. coli. This suggests impaired secretion of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) into the hemolymph. Furthermore, a reduction in AMP secretion under Tm14-3-3ɛ silenced condition would be responsible for loss in the capacity to kill bacteria and might explain the reduced survivability of the larvae upon E. coli challenge. This shows that Tm14-3-3ɛ is required to maintain innate immunity in T. molitor by enabling antimicrobial secretion into the hemolymph and explains the functional specialization of the isoform. PMID:27556493

  10. 14-3-3{sigma} controls corneal epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation through the Notch signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Ying; Lu, Qingxian; Li, Qiutang

    2010-02-19

    14-3-3{sigma} (also called stratifin) is specifically expressed in the stratified squamous epithelium and its function was recently shown to be linked to epidermal stratification and differentiation in the skin. In this study, we investigated its role in corneal epithelium cell proliferation and differentiation. We showed that the 14-3-3{sigma} mutation in repeated epilation (Er) mutant mice results in a dominant negative truncated protein. Primary corneal epithelial cells expressing the dominant negative protein failed to undergo high calcium-induced cell cycle arrest and differentiation. We further demonstrated that blocking endogenous 14-3-3{sigma} activity in corneal epithelial cells by overexpressing dominative negative 14-3-3{sigma} led to reduced Notch activity and Notch1/2 transcription. Significantly, expression of the active Notch intracellular domain overcame the block in epithelial cell differentiation in 14-3-3{sigma} mutant-expressing corneal epithelial cells. We conclude that 14-3-3{sigma} is critical for regulating corneal epithelial proliferation and differentiation by regulating Notch signaling activity.

  11. A Characterization of the expression of 14-3-3 isoforms in psoriasis, basal cell carcinoma, atopic dermatitis and contact dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Raaby, Line; Otkjær, Kristian; Salvskov-Iversen, Maria Luise; Johansen, Claus; Iversen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    14-3-3 is a highly conserved protein involved in a number of cellular processes including cell signalling, cell cycle regulation and gene transcription. Seven isoforms of the protein have been identified; β, γ, ε, ζ η σ and τ. The expression profile of the various isoforms in skin diseases is unknown. To investigate the expression of the seven 14-3-3 isoforms in involved and uninvolved skin from psoriasis, basal cell carcinoma (BCC), atopic dermatitis and nickel induced allergic contact dermatitis. Punch biopsies from involved and uninvolved skin were analyzed with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to determine the mRNA expression of the 14-3-3 isoforms. The protein level of 14-3-3 isoforms was measured by Western blot technique in keratome biopsies from patients with psoriasis. Evaluation of dermal and epidermal protein expression was performed by immunofluorescence staining. Increased 14-3-3τ mRNA levels were detected in involved skin from patients with psoriasis, contact dermatitis and BCC. 14-3-3σ mRNA expression was increased in psoriasis and contact dermatitis, but not in BCC. In atopic dermatitis no significant difference between involved and uninvolved skin was found. The expression of the 14-3-3 isoforms was also studied at the protein level in psoriasis. Only 14-3-3τ expression was significantly increased in involved psoriatic skin compared with uninvolved skin. Immunofluorescence staining with 14-3-3τ- and 14-3-3σ-specific antibodies showed localization of both isoforms to the cytoplasm of the keratinocytes in the various skin sections. These results demonstrate a disease specific expression profile of the 14-3-3τ and 14-3-3σ iso-forms. PMID:25386251

  12. Phosphoproteomic analysis identifies the tumor suppressor PDCD4 as a RSK substrate negatively regulated by 14-3-3

    PubMed Central

    Galan, Jacob A.; Geraghty, Kathryn M.; Lavoie, Geneviève; Kanshin, Evgeny; Tcherkezian, Joseph; Calabrese, Viviane; Jeschke, Grace R.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Blenis, John; Thibault, Pierre; Roux, Philippe P.

    2014-01-01

    The Ras/MAPK signaling cascade regulates various biological functions, including cell growth and proliferation. As such, this pathway is frequently deregulated in several types of cancer, including most cases of melanoma. RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) is a MAPK-activated protein kinase required for melanoma growth and proliferation, but relatively little is known about its exact function and the nature of its substrates. Herein, we used a quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to define the signaling networks regulated by RSK in melanoma. To more accurately predict direct phosphorylation substrates, we defined the RSK consensus phosphorylation motif and found significant overlap with the binding consensus of 14-3-3 proteins. We thus characterized the phospho-dependent 14-3-3 interactome in melanoma cells and found that a large proportion of 14-3-3 binding proteins are also potential RSK substrates. Our results show that RSK phosphorylates the tumor suppressor PDCD4 (programmed cell death protein 4) on two serine residues (Ser76 and Ser457) that regulate its subcellular localization and interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. We found that 14-3-3 binding promotes PDCD4 degradation, suggesting an important role for RSK in the inactivation of PDCD4 in melanoma. In addition to this tumor suppressor, our results suggest the involvement of RSK in a vast array of unexplored biological functions with relevance in oncogenesis. PMID:25002506

  13. 14-3-3-dependent inhibition of the deubiquitinating activity of UBPY and its cancellation in the M phase

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Emi; Kitamura, Naomi; Komada, Masayuki

    2007-10-01

    The deubiquitinating enzyme UBPY, also known as USP8, regulates cargo sorting and membrane traffic at early endosomes. Here we demonstrate the regulatory mechanism of the UBPY catalytic activity. We identified 14-3-3 {epsilon}, {gamma}, and {zeta} as UBPY-binding proteins using co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric analysis. The 14-3-3 binding of UBPY was inhibited by mutating the consensus 14-3-3-binding motif RSYS{sup 680}SP, by phosphatase treatment, and by competition with the Ser{sup 680}-phosphorylated RSYS{sup 680}SP peptide. Metabolic labeling with [{sup 32}P]orthophosphate and immunoblotting using antibody against the phosphorylated 14-3-3-binding motif showed that Ser{sup 680} is a major phosphorylation site in UBPY. These results indicated that 14-3-3s bind to the region surrounding Ser{sup 680} in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The mutation at Ser{sup 680} led to enhanced ubiquitin isopeptidase activity of UBPY toward poly-ubiquitin chains and a cellular substrate, epidermal growth factor receptor, in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, addition of 14-3-3{epsilon} inhibited the UBPY activity in vitro. Finally, UBPY was dephosphorylated at Ser{sup 680} and dissociated from 14-3-3s in the M phase, resulting in enhanced activity of UBPY during cell division. We conclude that UBPY is catalytically inhibited in a phosphorylation-dependent manner by 14-3-3s during the interphase, and this regulation is cancelled in the M phase.

  14. miR-451 protects against erythroid oxidant stress by repressing 14-3-3zeta.

    PubMed

    Yu, Duonan; dos Santos, Camila O; Zhao, Guowei; Jiang, Jing; Amigo, Julio D; Khandros, Eugene; Dore, Louis C; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Zhang, Zhe; Ghaffari, Saghi; Choi, John; Friend, Sherree; Tong, Wei; Orange, Jordan S; Paw, Barry H; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2010-08-01

    The bicistronic microRNA (miRNA) locus miR-144/451 is highly expressed during erythrocyte development, although its physiological roles are poorly understood. We show that miR-144/451 ablation in mice causes mild erythrocyte instability and increased susceptibility to damage after exposure to oxidant drugs. This phenotype is deeply conserved, as miR-451 depletion synergizes with oxidant stress to cause profound anemia in zebrafish embryos. At least some protective activities of miR-451 stem from its ability to directly suppress production of 14-3-3zeta, a phospho-serine/threonine-binding protein that inhibits nuclear accumulation of transcription factor FoxO3, a positive regulator of erythroid anti-oxidant genes. Thus, in miR-144/451(-/-) erythroblasts, 14-3-3zeta accumulates, causing partial relocalization of FoxO3 from nucleus to cytoplasm with dampening of its transcriptional program, including anti-oxidant-encoding genes Cat and Gpx1. Supporting this mechanism, overexpression of 14-3-3zeta in erythroid cells and fibroblasts inhibits nuclear localization and activity of FoxO3. Moreover, shRNA suppression of 14-3-3zeta protects miR-144/451(-/-) erythrocytes against peroxide-induced destruction, and restores catalase activity. Our findings define a novel miRNA-regulated pathway that protects erythrocytes against oxidant stress, and, more generally, illustrate how a miRNA can influence gene expression by altering the activity of a key transcription factor. PMID:20679398

  15. Class-Specific Evolution and Transcriptional Differentiation of 14-3-3 Family Members in Mesohexaploid Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Chandna, Ruby; Augustine, Rehna; Kanchupati, Praveena; Kumar, Roshan; Kumar, Pawan; Arya, Gulab C; Bisht, Naveen C

    2016-01-01

    14-3-3s are highly conserved, multigene family proteins that have been implicated in modulating various biological processes. The presence of inherent polyploidy and genome complexity has limited the identification and characterization of 14-3-3 proteins from globally important Brassica crops. Through data mining of Brassica rapa, the model Brassica genome, we identified 21 members encoding 14-3-3 proteins namely, BraA.GRF14.a to BraA.GRF14.u. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that B. rapa contains both ε (epsilon) and non-ε 14-3-3 isoforms, having distinct intron-exon structural organization patterns. The non-ε isoforms showed lower divergence rate (Ks < 0.45) compared to ε protein isoforms (Ks > 0.48), suggesting class-specific divergence pattern. Synteny analysis revealed that mesohexaploid B. rapa genome has retained 1-5 orthologs of each Arabidopsis 14-3-3 gene, interspersed across its three fragmented sub-genomes. qRT-PCR analysis showed that 14 of the 21 BraA.GRF14 were expressed, wherein a higher abundance of non-ε transcripts was observed compared to the ε genes, indicating class-specific transcriptional bias. The BraA.GRF14 genes showed distinct expression pattern during plant developmental stages and in response to abiotic stress, phytohormone treatments, and nutrient deprivation conditions. Together, the distinct expression pattern and differential regulation of BraA.GRF14 genes indicated the occurrence of functional divergence of B. rapa 14-3-3 proteins during plant development and stress responses. PMID:26858736

  16. Class-Specific Evolution and Transcriptional Differentiation of 14-3-3 Family Members in Mesohexaploid Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Chandna, Ruby; Augustine, Rehna; Kanchupati, Praveena; Kumar, Roshan; Kumar, Pawan; Arya, Gulab C.; Bisht, Naveen C.

    2016-01-01

    14-3-3s are highly conserved, multigene family proteins that have been implicated in modulating various biological processes. The presence of inherent polyploidy and genome complexity has limited the identification and characterization of 14-3-3 proteins from globally important Brassica crops. Through data mining of Brassica rapa, the model Brassica genome, we identified 21 members encoding 14-3-3 proteins namely, BraA.GRF14.a to BraA.GRF14.u. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that B. rapa contains both ε (epsilon) and non-ε 14-3-3 isoforms, having distinct intron-exon structural organization patterns. The non-ε isoforms showed lower divergence rate (Ks < 0.45) compared to ε protein isoforms (Ks > 0.48), suggesting class-specific divergence pattern. Synteny analysis revealed that mesohexaploid B. rapa genome has retained 1–5 orthologs of each Arabidopsis 14-3-3 gene, interspersed across its three fragmented sub-genomes. qRT-PCR analysis showed that 14 of the 21 BraA.GRF14 were expressed, wherein a higher abundance of non-ε transcripts was observed compared to the ε genes, indicating class-specific transcriptional bias. The BraA.GRF14 genes showed distinct expression pattern during plant developmental stages and in response to abiotic stress, phytohormone treatments, and nutrient deprivation conditions. Together, the distinct expression pattern and differential regulation of BraA.GRF14 genes indicated the occurrence of functional divergence of B. rapa 14-3-3 proteins during plant development and stress responses. PMID:26858736

  17. Phosphorylation Dependence and Stoichiometry of the Complex Formed by Tyrosine Hydroxylase and 14-3-3γ*

    PubMed Central

    Kleppe, Rune; Rosati, Sara; Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Alvira, Sara; Ghorbani, Sadaf; Haavik, Jan; Valpuesta, José María; Heck, Albert J. R.; Martinez, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) can form complexes with 14-3-3 proteins, resulting in enzyme activation and stabilization. Although TH was among the first binding partners identified for these ubiquitous regulatory proteins, the binding stoichiometry and the activation mechanism remain unknown. To address this, we performed native mass spectrometry analyses of human TH (nonphosphorylated or phosphorylated on Ser19 (TH-pS19), Ser40 (TH-pS40), or Ser19 and Ser40 (TH-pS19pS40)) alone and together with 14-3-3γ. Tetrameric TH-pS19 (224 kDa) bound 14-3-3γ (58.3 kDa) with high affinity (Kd = 3.2 nM), generating complexes containing either one (282.4 kDa) or two (340.8 kDa) dimers of 14-3-3. Electron microscopy also revealed one major population of an asymmetric complex, consistent with one TH tetramer and one 14-3-3 dimer, and a minor population of a symmetric complex of one TH tetramer with two 14-3-3 dimers. Lower phosphorylation stoichiometries (0.15–0.54 phosphate/monomer) produced moderate changes in binding kinetics, but native MS detected much less of the symmetric TH:14-3-3γ complex. Interestingly, dephosphorylation of [32P]-TH-pS19 was mono-exponential for low phosphorylation stoichiometries (0.18–0.52), and addition of phosphatase accelerated the dissociation of the TH-pS19:14-3-3γ complex 3- to 4-fold. All together this is consistent with a model in which the pS19 residues in the TH tetramer contribute differently in the association to 14-3-3γ. Complex formation between TH-pS40 and 14-3-3γ was not detected via native MS, and surface plasmon resonance showed that the interaction was very weak. Furthermore, TH-pS19pS40 behaved similarly to TH-pS19 in terms of binding stoichiometry and affinity (Kd = 2.1 nM). However, we found that 14-3-3γ inhibited the phosphorylation rate of TH-pS19 by PKA (3.5-fold) on Ser40. We therefore conclude that Ser40 does not significantly contribute to the binding of 14-3-3γ, and rather has reduced accessibility in

  18. Characterization and small-molecule stabilization of the multisite tandem binding between 14-3-3 and the R domain of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Stevers, Loes M; Lam, Chan V; Leysen, Seppe F R; Meijer, Femke A; van Scheppingen, Daphne S; de Vries, Rens M J M; Carlile, Graeme W; Milroy, Lech G; Thomas, David Y; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a fatal genetic disease, most frequently caused by the retention of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The binding of the 14-3-3 protein to the CFTR regulatory (R) domain has been found to enhance CFTR trafficking to the plasma membrane. To define the mechanism of action of this protein-protein interaction, we have examined the interaction in vitro. The disordered multiphosphorylated R domain contains nine different 14-3-3 binding motifs. Furthermore, the 14-3-3 protein forms a dimer containing two amphipathic grooves that can potentially bind these phosphorylated motifs. This results in a number of possible binding mechanisms between these two proteins. Using multiple biochemical assays and crystal structures, we show that the interaction between them is governed by two binding sites: The key binding site of CFTR (pS768) occupies one groove of the 14-3-3 dimer, and a weaker, secondary binding site occupies the other binding groove. We show that fusicoccin-A, a natural-product tool compound used in studies of 14-3-3 biology, can stabilize the interaction between 14-3-3 and CFTR by selectively interacting with a secondary binding motif of CFTR (pS753). The stabilization of this interaction stimulates the trafficking of mutant CFTR to the plasma membrane. This definition of the druggability of the 14-3-3-CFTR interface might offer an approach for cystic fibrosis therapeutics. PMID:26888287

  19. The 14-3-3 gene expression specificity in response to stress is promoter-dependent.

    PubMed

    Aksamit, Anna; Korobczak, Alina; Skala, Jacek; Lukaszewicz, Marcin; Szopa, Jan

    2005-10-01

    Genomic clone coding for the 16R isoform of 14-3-3 proteins from potato plants has recently been described. This paper reports on 20R-gene isolation and analysis, and compares two isoforms. The northern blot analysis of mRNA of the 20R 14-3-3 isoform suggests its similarity to 16R. Vascular tissue-specific expression and age-dependent synthesis in potato leaves has been detected in both promoters. Screening of the potato genomic library using 20R cDNA isoform resulted in identification and isolation of the corresponding gene. This gene contains four exons and three introns. Inspecting the promoter sequence of the 20R isoform revealed several boxes important for the regulation of gene expression. The strongest GUS expression in transgenic potato plants transformed with the uidA reporter gene under the 20R promoter has been found in young leaf and stem vascular tissue, root tips, pollen and ovules. Mature fragments exhibit a significant decrease in GUS staining, which suggests age-dependent promoter activity. The analysis of transgenic plants transformed with 20R-GUS in contrast to 16R-GUS has revealed strong activation of the 20R promoter by metal ions and NaCl. Instead the 16R promoter is strongly affected by virus and salicylic acid treatments. The only factor, which strongly induced both promoters, was abscisic acid. It is thus suggested that promoter domain composition is the main factor differentiating the appearance of 14-3-3 isoforms. PMID:16081528

  20. Role for the PP2A/B56delta phosphatase in regulating 14-3-3 release from Cdc25 to control mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Seth S.; Perry, Jennifer A.; Forester, Craig M.; Nutt, Leta K.; Guo, Yanxiang; Jardim, Melanie J.; Thomenius, Michael J.; Freel, Christopher D.; Darbandi, Rashid; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck; Arroyo, Jason D.; Wang, Xiao-Fan; Shenolikar, Shirish; Nairn, Angus C.; Dunphy, William G.; Hahn, William C.; Virshup, David M.; Kornbluth, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Summary DNA-responsive checkpoints prevent cell cycle progression following DNA damage or replication inhibition. The mitotic activator Cdc25 is suppressed by checkpoints through inhibitory phosphorylation at Ser287 (Xenopus numbering) and docking of 14-3-3. S287 phosphorylation is a major locus of G2/M checkpoint control, though several checkpoint-independent kinases can phosphorylate this site. We reported previously that mitotic entry requires 14-3-3 removal and S287 dephosphorylation. We show here that DNA-responsive checkpoints activate PP2A/B56δ phosphatase complexes to dephosphorylate Cdc25 at a site (T138) whose phosphorylation is required for 14-3-3 release. However, phosphorylation of T138 is not sufficient for 14-3-3 release from Cdc25. Rather, our data suggest that creation of a 14-3-3 “sink”, consisting of phosphorylated 14-3-3-binding intermediate filament proteins, coupled with reduced Cdc25-14-3-3 affinity, contribute to Cdc25 activation. These observations identify PP2A/B56δ as a central checkpoint effector, and suggest a mechanism for controlling 14-3-3 interactions to promote mitosis. PMID:17110335

  1. Regional rescue of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 phenotypes by 14-3-3epsilon haploinsufficiency in mice underscores complex pathogenicity in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Jafar-Nejad, Paymaan; Ward, Christopher S; Richman, Ronald; Orr, Harry T; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2011-02-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat encoding a polyglutamine tract in Ataxin-1 (ATXN1). Both WT and mutant ATXN1 interact with 14-3-3 proteins, and 14-3-3 overexpression stabilizes ATXN1 levels in cells and increases ATXN1 toxicity in flies. To determine whether reducing 14-3-3 levels might mitigate SCA1 pathogenesis, we bred Sca1(154Q/+) mice to mice lacking one allele of 14-3-3ε. 14-3-3ε haploinsufficiency rescued cerebellar pathology and motor phenotypes but, surprisingly, not weight loss, respiratory dysfunction, or premature lethality. Biochemical studies revealed that reducing 14-3-3ε levels exerted different effects in two brain regions especially vulnerable in SCA1: Although diminishing levels of both WT and mutant ATXN1 in the cerebellum, 14-3-3ε haploinsufficiency did not alter ATXN1 levels in the brainstem. Furthermore, 14-3-3ε haploinsufficiency decreased the incorporation of expanded ATXN1 into its large toxic complexes in the cerebellum but not in the brainstem, and the distribution of ATXN1's small and large native complexes differed significantly between the two regions. These data suggest that distinct pathogenic mechanisms operate in different vulnerable brain regions, adding another level of complexity to SCA1 pathogenesis. PMID:21245341

  2. Multiple elements regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of FOXO1: characterization of phosphorylation- and 14-3-3-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiangshan; Gan, Lixia; Pan, Haiyun; Kan, Donghui; Majeski, Michael; Adam, Stephen A; Unterman, Terry G

    2004-01-01

    FOXO1, a Forkhead transcription factor, is an important target of insulin and growth factor action. Phosphorylation of Thr-24, Ser-256 and Ser-319 promotes nuclear exclusion of FOXO1, yet the mechanisms regulating nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of FOXO1 are poorly understood. Previous studies have identified an NLS (nuclear localization signal) in the C-terminal basic region of the DBD (DNA-binding domain), and a leucine-rich, leptomycin-B sensitive NES (nuclear export signal) located further downstream. Here, we find that other elements in the DBD also contribute to nuclear localization, and that multiple mechanisms contribute to nuclear exclusion of FOXO1. Phosphorylation of Ser-319 and a cluster of nearby residues (Ser-322, Ser-325 and Ser-329) functions co-operatively with the nearby NES to promote nuclear exclusion. The N-terminal region of FOXO1 (amino acids 1-149) also is sufficient to promote nuclear exclusion, and does so through multiple mechanisms. Amino acids 1-50 are sufficient to promote nuclear exclusion of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins, and the phosphorylation of Thr-24 is required for this effect. A leucine-rich, leptomycin B-sensitive export signal is also present nearby. Phosphorylated FOXO1 binds 14-3-3 proteins, and co-precipitation studies with tagged proteins indicate that 14-3-3 binding involves co-operative interactions with both Thr-24 and Ser-256. Ser-256 is located in the C-terminal region of the DBD, where 14-3-3 proteins may interfere both with DNA-binding and with nuclear-localization functions. Together, these studies demonstrate that multiple elements contribute to nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of FOXO1, and that phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding regulate the cellular distribution and function of FOXO1 through multiple mechanisms. The presence of these redundant mechanisms supports the concept that the regulation of FOXO1 function plays a critical role in insulin and growth factor action. PMID:14664696

  3. Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding of Arabidopsis trehalose-phosphate synthase 5 in response to 2-deoxyglucose.

    PubMed

    Harthill, Jean E; Meek, Sarah E M; Morrice, Nick; Peggie, Mark W; Borch, Jonas; Wong, Barry H C; Mackintosh, Carol

    2006-07-01

    Trehalose-6-phosphate is a 'sugar signal' that regulates plant metabolism and development. The Arabidopsis genome encodes trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) and trehalose-6-phosphatase (TPP) enzymes. It also encodes class II proteins (TPS isoforms 5-11) that contain both TPS-like and TPP-like domains, although whether these have enzymatic activity is unknown. In this paper, we show that TPS5, 6 and 7 are phosphoproteins that bind to 14-3-3 proteins, by using 14-3-3 affinity chromatography, 14-3-3 overlay assays, and by co-immunoprecipitating TPS5 and 14-3-3 isoforms from cell extracts. GST-TPS5 bound to 14-3-3s after in vitro phosphorylation at Ser22 and Thr49 by either mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) or partially purified plant Snf1-related protein kinase 1 (SnRK1s). Dephosphorylation of TPS5, or mutation of either Ser22 or Thr49, abolished binding to 14-3-3s. Ser22 and Thr49 are both conserved in TPS5, 7, 9 and 10. When GST-TPS5 was expressed in human HEK293 cells, Thr49 was phosphorylated in response to 2-deoxyglucose or phenformin, stimuli that activate the AMPK via the upstream kinase LKB1. 2-deoxyglucose stimulated Thr49 phosphorylation of endogenous TPS5 in Arabidopsis cells, whereas phenformin did not. Moreover, extractable SnRK1 activity was increased in Arabidopsis cells in response to 2-deoxyglucose. The plant kinase was inactivated by dephosphorylation and reactivated by phosphorylation with human LKB1, indicating that elements of the SnRK1/AMPK pathway are conserved in Arabidopsis and human cells. We hypothesize that coordinated phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding of nitrate reductase (NR), 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (F2KP) and class II TPS isoforms mediate responses to signals that activate SnRK1. PMID:16771775

  4. Regulation of Aldo-keto-reductase family 1 B10 by 14-3-3ε and their prognostic impact of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Jhu; Liang, Shu-Man; Liu, Chia-Chia; Chen, Shyh-Chang; Wang, John; Shyue, Song-Kun; Liou, Jun-Yang

    2015-01-01

    14-3-3ε is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its expression significantly associates with a poor prognostic outcome. To uncover how 14-3-3ε contributes to the tumor progression of HCC, we investigated the potential downstream targets regulated by 14-3-3ε. We found that 14-3-3ε increases expression and nuclear translocation of β-catenin and that 14-3-3ε-induced cell proliferation is attenuated by β-catenin silencing in HCC cells. Moreover, 14-3-3ε induces aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) expression through the activation of β-catenin signaling. Knockdown of AKR1B10 by siRNAs abolished 14-3-3ε-induced in vitro cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth as well as in vivo tumor growth. Furthermore, AKR1B10 silencing increased retinoic acid (RA) levels in the serum of tumor-bearing mice and RA treatment attenuated 14-3-3ε-induced HCC cell proliferation. We further examined 14-3-3ε and AKR1B10 expression and clinicopathological characteristics of HCC tumors. Although the expression of AKR1B10 was significantly correlated with 14-3-3ε, an increase of AKR1B10 expression in 14-3-3ε positive patients paradoxically had better overall survival and disease-free survival rates as well as lower metastatic incidence than those without an AKR1B10 increase. Finally, we found a loss of AKR1B10 expression in cells exhibiting a high capacity of invasiveness. Silencing of AKR1B10 resulted in inducing snail and vimentin expression in HCC cells. These results indicate that AKR1B10 may play a dual role during HCC tumor progression. Our results also indicate that 14-3-3ε regulates AKR1B10 expression by activating β-catenin signaling. A combination of 14-3-3ε with AKR1B10 is a potential therapeutic target and novel prognostic biomarker of HCC. PMID:26516929

  5. 14-3-3ζ deficient mice in the BALB/c background display behavioural and anatomical defects associated with neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiangjun; Jaehne, Emily J.; Greenberg, Zarina; McCarthy, Peter; Saleh, Eiman; Parish, Clare L.; Camera, Daria; Heng, Julian; Haas, Matilda; Baune, Bernhard T.; Ratnayake, Udani; Buuse, Maarten van den; Lopez, Angel F.; Ramshaw, Hayley S.; Schwarz, Quenten

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing and expression analyses implicate 14-3-3ζ as a genetic risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In support of this notion, we recently found that 14-3-3ζ−/− mice in the Sv/129 background display schizophrenia-like defects. As epistatic interactions play a significant role in disease pathogenesis we generated a new congenic strain in the BALB/c background to determine the impact of genetic interactions on the 14-3-3ζ−/− phenotype. In addition to replicating defects such as aberrant mossy fibre connectivity and impaired spatial memory, our analysis of 14-3-3ζ−/− BALB/c mice identified enlarged lateral ventricles, reduced synaptic density and ectopically positioned pyramidal neurons in all subfields of the hippocampus. In contrast to our previous analyses, 14-3-3ζ−/− BALB/c mice lacked locomotor hyperactivity that was underscored by normal levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT) and dopamine signalling. Taken together, our results demonstrate that dysfunction of 14-3-3ζ gives rise to many of the pathological hallmarks associated with the human condition. 14-3-3ζ-deficient BALB/c mice therefore provide a novel model to address the underlying biology of structural defects affecting the hippocampus and ventricle, and cognitive defects such as hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. PMID:26207352

  6. Dissection of Binding between a Phosphorylated Tyrosine Hydroxylase Peptide and 14-3-3ζ: A Complex Story Elucidated by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Hritz, Jozef; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Krzysiak, Troy; Martinez, Aurora; Sklenar, Vladimir; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Human tyrosine hydroxylase activity is regulated by phosphorylation of its N-terminus and by an interaction with the modulator 14-3-3 proteins. We investigated the binding of singly or doubly phosphorylated and thiophosphorylated peptides, comprising the first 50 amino acids of human tyrosine hydroxylase, isoform 1 (hTH1), that contain the critical interaction domain, to 14-3-3ζ, by 31P NMR. Single phosphorylation at S19 generates a high affinity 14-3-3ζ binding epitope, whereas singly S40-phosphorylated peptide interacts with 14-3-3ζ one order-of-magnitude weaker than the S19-phosphorylated peptide. Analysis of the binding data revealed that the 14-3-3ζ dimer and the S19- and S40-doubly phosphorylated peptide interact in multiple ways, with three major complexes formed: 1), a single peptide bound to a 14-3-3ζ dimer via the S19 phosphate with the S40 phosphate occupying the other binding site; 2), a single peptide bound to a 14-3-3ζ dimer via the S19 phosphorous with the S40 free in solution; or 3), a 14-3-3ζ dimer with two peptides bound via the S19 phosphorous to each binding site. Our system and data provide information as to the possible mechanisms by which 14-3-3 can engage binding partners that possess two phosphorylation sites on flexible tails. Whether these will be realized in any particular interacting pair will naturally depend on the details of each system. PMID:25418103

  7. 14-3-3γ Prevents Centrosome Amplification and Neoplastic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Sehgal, Lalit; Bose, Arunabha; Gulvady, Anushree; Senapati, Parijat; Thorat, Rahul; Basu, Srikanta; Bhatt, Khyati; Hosing, Amol S.; Balyan, Renu; Borde, Lalit; Kundu, Tapas K.; Dalal, Sorab N.

    2016-01-01

    More than 80% of malignant tumors show centrosome amplification and clustering. Centrosome amplification results from aberrations in the centrosome duplication cycle, which is strictly coordinated with DNA-replication-cycle. However, the relationship between cell-cycle regulators and centrosome duplicating factors is not well understood. This report demonstrates that 14-3-3γ localizes to the centrosome and 14-3-3γ loss leads to centrosome amplification. Loss of 14-3-3γ results in the phosphorylation of NPM1 at Thr-199, causing early centriole disjunction and centrosome hyper-duplication. The centrosome amplification led to aneuploidy and increased tumor formation in mice. Importantly, an increase in passage of the 14-3-3γ-knockdown cells led to an increase in the number of cells containing clustered centrosomes leading to the generation of pseudo-bipolar spindles. The increase in pseudo-bipolar spindles was reversed and an increase in the number of multi-polar spindles was observed upon expression of a constitutively active 14-3-3-binding-defective-mutant of cdc25C (S216A) in the 14-3-3γ knockdown cells. The increase in multi-polar spindle formation was associated with decreased cell viability and a decrease in tumor growth. Our findings uncover the molecular basis of regulation of centrosome duplication by 14-3-3γ and inhibition of tumor growth by premature activation of the mitotic program and the disruption of centrosome clustering. PMID:27253419

  8. 14-3-3γ Prevents Centrosome Amplification and Neoplastic Progression.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Sehgal, Lalit; Bose, Arunabha; Gulvady, Anushree; Senapati, Parijat; Thorat, Rahul; Basu, Srikanta; Bhatt, Khyati; Hosing, Amol S; Balyan, Renu; Borde, Lalit; Kundu, Tapas K; Dalal, Sorab N

    2016-01-01

    More than 80% of malignant tumors show centrosome amplification and clustering. Centrosome amplification results from aberrations in the centrosome duplication cycle, which is strictly coordinated with DNA-replication-cycle. However, the relationship between cell-cycle regulators and centrosome duplicating factors is not well understood. This report demonstrates that 14-3-3γ localizes to the centrosome and 14-3-3γ loss leads to centrosome amplification. Loss of 14-3-3γ results in the phosphorylation of NPM1 at Thr-199, causing early centriole disjunction and centrosome hyper-duplication. The centrosome amplification led to aneuploidy and increased tumor formation in mice. Importantly, an increase in passage of the 14-3-3γ-knockdown cells led to an increase in the number of cells containing clustered centrosomes leading to the generation of pseudo-bipolar spindles. The increase in pseudo-bipolar spindles was reversed and an increase in the number of multi-polar spindles was observed upon expression of a constitutively active 14-3-3-binding-defective-mutant of cdc25C (S216A) in the 14-3-3γ knockdown cells. The increase in multi-polar spindle formation was associated with decreased cell viability and a decrease in tumor growth. Our findings uncover the molecular basis of regulation of centrosome duplication by 14-3-3γ and inhibition of tumor growth by premature activation of the mitotic program and the disruption of centrosome clustering. PMID:27253419

  9. The cell cycle regulator 14-3-3σ opposes and reverses cancer metabolic reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Liem; Chou, Ping-Chieh; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Samudio, Ismael; Parreno, Kenneth; Huang, Yaling; Tseng, Chieh; Vu, Thuy; Gully, Chris; Su, Chun-Hui; Wang, Edward; Chen, Jian; Choi, Hyun-Ho; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Shin, Ji-Hyun; Shiang, Christine; Grabiner, Brian; Blonska, Marzenna; Skerl, Stephen; Shao, Yiping; Cody, Dianna; Delacerda, Jorge; Kingsley, Charles; Webb, Douglas; Carlock, Colin; Zhou, Zhongguo; Hsieh, Yun-Chih; Lee, Jaehyuk; Elliott, Andrew; Ramirez, Marc; Bankson, Jim; Hazle, John; Wang, Yongxing; Li, Lei; Weng, Shaofan; Rizk, Nibal; Wen, Yu Ye; Lin, Xin; Wang, Hua; Wang, Huamin; Zhang, Aijun; Xia, Xuefeng; Wu, Yun; Habra, Mouhammed; Yang, Wei; Pusztai, Lajos; Yeung, Sai-Ching; Lee, Mong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Summary Extensive reprogramming of cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. Despite its importance, the molecular mechanism controlling this tumour metabolic shift remains not fully understood. Here we show that 14-3-3σ regulates cancer metabolic reprogramming and protects cells from tumourigenic transformation. 14-3-3σ opposes tumour-promoting metabolic programs by enhancing c-Myc poly-ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. 14-3-3σ demonstrates the suppressive impact on cancer glycolysis, glutaminolysis, mitochondrial biogenesis and other major metabolic processes of tumours. Importantly, 14-3-3σ expression levels predict overall and recurrence-free survival rates, tumour glucose uptake and metabolic gene expression in breast cancer patients. Thus, these results highlight that 14-3-3σ is an important regulator of tumour metabolism, and loss of 14-3-3σ expression is critical for cancer metabolic reprogramming. We anticipate that pharmacologically elevating the function of 14-3-3σ in tumours could be a promising direction for targeted anti-cancer metabolism therapy development in future. PMID:26179207

  10. 14-3-3γ regulates cell viability and milk fat synthesis in lipopolysaccharide-induced dairy cow mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LIXIN; ZHANG, LI; LIN, YE; BIAN, YANJIE; GAO, XUEJUN; QU, BO; LI, QINGZHANG

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that 14-3-3γ overexpression was able to inhibit the production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokines in dairy cow mammary epithelial cells (DCMECs) by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways. However, the association between 14-3-3γ overexpression and milk fat synthesis in LPS-induced DCMECs remains unclear. Therefore, the present study investigated the effect of 14-3-3γ on cell viability and milk fat synthesis in LPS-induced DCMECs. The results of the MTT assay and lactate dehydrogenase activity assay demonstrated that 14-3-3γ overexpression was able to attenuate LPS-induced cytotoxicity in DCMECs, and increase the viability of the cells. In addition, the results of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction suggested that mRNA expression levels of genes associated with milk fat synthesis, including sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG), cluster of differentiation 36, acetyl-coA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and fatty acid binding protein-3, were significantly upregulated in cells overexpressing the 14-3-3γ protein. In addition, as compared with the LPS-treated group, the activities of FAS and ACC were significantly increased. Furthermore, western blotting demonstrated that 14-3-3γ overexpression enhanced the protein expression levels of phosphorylated SREBP1 and PPARG. These results suggested that high levels of 14-3-3γ protein were able to attenuate LPS-induced cell damage and promote milk fat synthesis in LPS-induced DCMECs by increasing the cell viability and upregulating the expression levels of transcription factors associated with milk fat synthesis. PMID:27073437

  11. 14-3-3 eta isoform colocalizes TDP-43 on the coarse granules in the anterior horn cells of patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Umahara, Takahiko; Uchihara, Toshiki; Shibata, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Ayako; Hanyu, Haruo

    2016-09-01

    The immunolocalization of the 14-3-3 eta isoform in the anterior horn cells (AHCs) of patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and controls was examined. Compared with the immunolocalization of other 14-3-3 isoforms, the immunolocalization of the 14-3-3 eta isoform was either synaptic at the periphery of AHCs, spindle-shaped in neurites, or granular in the cytoplasm. By double labeling with phosphorylated (p-)TDP-43, the transactivation response DNA binding protein of 43kDa (TDP-43) demonstrated frequent colocalization of the 14-3-3 eta isoform in granular structures (90%) and spindle-shaped structures (85.4%), but not in p-TDP-43-positive round inclusions. It is speculated that the 14-3-3 eta isoform is associated with not only a synaptic pathology of ALS but also TDP-positive small lesions in the cytoplasm and neurites. The absence of eta-like immunoreactivity in p-TDP-43-positive large inclusions suggests the restricted relevance of the 14-3-3 eta isoform during ALS pathogenesis to some phases of the p-TDP pathology. PMID:27256400

  12. Oxidative damage of 14-3-3 zeta and gamma isoforms in Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Santpere, G; Puig, B; Ferrer, I

    2007-06-01

    Previous studies have shown oxidative damage resulting from amyloid Abeta exposure to cultured cells and in murine models. A target of oxidation is 14-3-3 which comprises a group of proteins involved in kinase activation and chaperone activity. The present study shows glycoxidative damage, as revealed with mono and bi-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western blotting, followed by in-gel digestion and mass spectrometry, in the frontal cortex in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), a neurodegenerative disease with deposition of Abeta in cerebral blood vessels and in diffuse plaques unaccompanied by intraneuronal hyper-phosphorylated tau deposition. malondialdehyde-lysine (MDA-Lys)-, but not 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE)-immunoreactive adducts, and N-carboxyethyl-lysine (CEL), but not N-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML)-products, were present in 14-3-3 involving zeta and gamma isoforms in both AD and CAA. These findings demonstrate that 14-3-3 glyco- and lipoxidation occurs in AD and CAA, probably as a direct consequence of Abeta deposition. PMID:17445990

  13. Identification of 14-3-3β Gene as a Novel miR-152 Target Using a Proteome-based Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Jasinski-Bergner, Simon; Stehle, Franziska; Gonschorek, Evamaria; Kalich, Jana; Schulz, Kristin; Huettelmaier, Stefan; Braun, Juliane; Seliger, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that miR-152 overexpression down-regulates the nonclassical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecule HLA-G in human tumors thereby contributing to their immune surveillance. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, the protein expression profile of HLA-G+, miR-152low cells, and their miR-152-overexpressing (miRhigh) counterparts was compared leading to the identification of 24 differentially expressed proteins. These were categorized according to their function and localization demonstrating for most of them an important role in the initiation and progression of tumors. The novel miR-152 target 14-3-3 protein β/α/YWHAB (14-3-3β) is down-regulated upon miR-152 overexpression, although its overexpression was often found in tumors of distinct origin. The miR-152-mediated reduction of the 14-3-3β expression was accompanied by an up-regulation of BAX protein expression resulting in a pro-apoptotic phenotype. In contrast, the reconstitution of 14-3-3β expression in miR-152high cells increased the expression of the anti-apoptotic BCL2 gene, enhances the proliferative activity in the presence of the cytostatic drug paclitaxel, and causes resistance to apoptosis induced by this drug. By correlating clinical microarray data with the patients' outcome, a link between 14-3-3β and HLA-G expression was found, which could be associated with poor prognosis and overall survival of patients with tumors. Because miR-152 controls both the expression of 14-3-3β and HLA-G, it exerts a dual role in tumor cells by both altering the immunogenicity and the tumorigenicity. PMID:25228695

  14. Effects of physical exercise on the P38MAPK/REDD1/14-3-3 pathways in the myocardium of diet-induced obesity rats.

    PubMed

    Pieri, B L S; Souza, D R; Luciano, T F; Marques, S O; Pauli, J R; Silva, A S R; Ropelle, E R; Pinho, R A; Lira, F S; De Souza, C T

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is associated with myocardial insulin resistance and impairment of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. The activation of the mTOR cascade by exercise has been largely shown in skeletal muscle, but insufficiently analyzed in myocardial tissue. In addition, little is known regarding the mTOR upstream molecules in the hearts of obese animals and even less about the role of exercise in this process. Thus, the present study was aimed to evaluate the effects of physical exercise on P38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (P38MAPK) phosphorylation and the REDD1 (regulated in development and DNA damage responses 1) and 14-3-3 protein levels in the myocardium of diet-induced obesity (DIO) rats. After achievement of DIO and insulin resistance, Wistar rats were divided in 2 groups: sedentary obese rats and obese rats performed treadmill running (50-min/day, 5 days per week velocity of 1.0 km/h for 2 months). Forty-eight hours after the final physical exercise, the rats were killed, and the myocardial tissue was removed for Western blot analysis. DIO increased the REDD1 protein levels and reduced the 14-3-3 protein levels and P38MAPK, mTOR, P70S6k (p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase), and 4EBP1 (4E-binding protein-1) phosphorylation. Interestingly, physical exercise reduced the REDD1 protein levels and increased the 14-3-3 protein levels and P38MAPK, mTOR, P70S6k, and 4EBP1 phosphorylation. Moreover, exercise increased the REDD1/14-3-3 association in the heart. Our results indicate that the phospho-P38MAPK, REDD1, and 14-3-3 protein levels were reduced in the myocardium of obese rats and that physical exercise increased the protein levels of these molecules. PMID:24691733

  15. Loss of ypk1 function causes rapamycin sensitivity, inhibition of translation initiation and synthetic lethality in 14-3-3-deficient yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Gelperin, Daniel; Horton, Lynn; DeChant, Anne; Hensold, Jack; Lemmon, Sandra K

    2002-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind to phosphorylated proteins and regulate a variety of cellular activities as effectors of serine/threonine phosphorylation. To define processes requiring 14-3-3 function in yeast, mutants with increased sensitivity to reduced 14-3-3 protein levels were identified by synthetic lethal screening. One mutation was found to be allelic to YPK1, which encodes a Ser/Thr protein kinase. Loss of Ypk function causes hypersensitivity to rapamycin, similar to 14-3-3 mutations and other mutations affecting the TOR signaling pathway in yeast. Similar to treatment with rapamycin, loss of Ypk function disrupted translation, at least in part by causing depletion of eIF4G, a central adaptor protein required for cap-dependent mRNA translation initiation. In addition, Ypk1 as well as eIF4G protein levels were rapidly depleted upon nitrogen starvation, but not during glucose starvation, even though both conditions inhibit translation initiation. These results suggest that Ypk regulates translation initiation in response to nutrient signals, either through the TOR pathway or in a functionally related pathway parallel to TOR. PMID:12196392

  16. Klotho Regulates 14-3-3ζ Monomerization and Binding to the ASK1 Signaling Complex in Response to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Brobey, Reynolds K.; Dheghani, Mehdi; Foster, Philip P.; Kuro-o, Makoto; Rosenblatt, Kevin P

    2015-01-01

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) signaling complex is a key regulator of p38 MAPK activity, a major modulator of stress-associated with aging disorders. We recently reported that the ratio of free ASK1 to the complex-bound ASK1 is significantly decreased in Klotho-responsive manner and that Klotho-deficient tissues have elevated levels of free ASK1 which coincides with increased oxidative stress. Here, we tested the hypothesis that: 1) covalent interactions exist among three identified proteins constituting the ASK1 signaling complex; 2) in normal unstressed cells the ASK1, 14-3-3ζ and thioredoxin (Trx) proteins simultaneously engage in a tripartite complex formation; 3) Klotho’s stabilizing effect on the complex relied solely on 14-3-3ζ expression and its apparent phosphorylation and dimerization changes. To verify the hypothesis, we performed 14-3-3ζ siRNA knock-down experiments in conjunction with cell-based assays to measure ASK1-client protein interactions in the presence and absence of Klotho, and with or without an oxidant such as rotenone. Our results show that Klotho activity induces posttranslational modifications in the complex targeting 14-3-3ζ monomer/dimer changes to effectively protect against ASK1 oxidation and dissociation. This is the first observation implicating all three proteins constituting the ASK1 signaling complex in close proximity. PMID:26517365

  17. 14-3-3-zeta participates in TLR3-mediated TICAM-1 signal-platform formation.

    PubMed

    Funami, Kenji; Matsumoto, Misako; Obuse, Chikashi; Seya, Tsukasa

    2016-05-01

    Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) is important in innate immune signaling. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are well-characterized PRRs and are pivotal in antiviral and antitumor host defense. TIR domain-containing adaptor molecule 1 (TICAM-1, also called TRIF) is an adapter molecule in TLR3- and TLR4-mediated IRF3 activation, late-phase NF-κB activation and MAPK-mediated AP-1 activation. When a TLR3 ligand is added to TLR3-positive cells, TICAM-1 transiently interacts with TLR3 and forms multimers in the cytosol. However, the precise mechanism of TICAM-1 multimer formation remains unknown. In this study, we identified 14-3-3-zeta as a molecule that functions in TLR3-mediated signaling. Knockdown of 14-3-3-zeta reduced production of type I interferon and inflammatory cytokines, nuclear translocation of IRF3 and phosphorylation of IκB via the TLR3-TICAM-1 pathway. Furthermore, TICAM-1 multimerization by ligand stimulation was prohibited by 14-3-3-zeta knockdown. These results suggest that 14-3-3-zeta is involved in the TLR3-TICAM-1 pathway in promoting multimerization of TICAM-1 for the formation of a TICAM-1 signalosome. PMID:27058640

  18. Cyclin Y phosphorylation- and 14-3-3-binding-dependent activation of PCTAIRE-1/CDK16

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Saifeldin N.; Deak, Maria; Morrice, Nicholas A.; Ohta, Eriko; Hunter, Roger W.; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Sakamoto, Kei

    2015-01-01

    PCTAIRE-1 [also known as cyclin-dependent kinase 16 (CDK16)] is implicated in various physiological processes such as neurite outgrowth and vesicle trafficking; however, its molecular regulation and downstream targets are largely unknown. Cyclin Y has recently been identified as a key interacting/activating cyclin for PCTAIRE-1; however, the molecular mechanism by which it activates PCTAIRE-1 is undefined. In the present study, we initially performed protein sequence analysis and identified two candidate phosphorylation sites (Ser12 and Ser336) on cyclin Y that might be catalysed by PCTAIRE-1. Although in vitro peptide analysis favoured Ser12 as the candidate phosphorylation site, immunoblot analysis of cell lysates that had been transfected with wild-type (WT) or kinase-inactive (KI) PCTAIRE-1 together with WT or phospho-deficient mutants of cyclin Y suggested Ser336, but not Ser12, as a PCTAIRE-1-dependent phosphorylation site. Monitoring phosphorylation of Ser336 may provide a useful read-out to assess cellular activity of PCTAIRE-1 in vivo; however, a phospho-deficient S336A mutant displayed normal interaction with PCTAIRE-1. Unbiased mass spectrometry and targeted mutagenesis analysis of cyclin Y identified key phosphorylation sites (Ser100 and Ser326) required for 14-3-3 binding. Recombinant WT cyclin Y, but not a S100A/S326A mutant, prepared in COS-1 cells co-purified with 14-3-3 and was able to activate bacterially expressed recombinant PCTAIRE-1 in cell-free assays. Finally, we observed that recently identified PCTAIRE-1 variants found in patients with intellectual disability were unable to interact with cyclin Y, and were inactive enzymes. Collectively, the present work has revealed a new mechanistic insight into activation of PCTAIRE-1, which is mediated through interaction with the phosphorylated form of cyclin Y in complex with 14-3-3. PMID:26205494

  19. Cyclin Y phosphorylation- and 14-3-3-binding-dependent activation of PCTAIRE-1/CDK16.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Saifeldin N; Deak, Maria; Morrice, Nicholas A; Ohta, Eriko; Hunter, Roger W; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Sakamoto, Kei

    2015-08-01

    PCTAIRE-1 [also known as cyclin-dependent kinase 16 (CDK16)] is implicated in various physiological processes such as neurite outgrowth and vesicle trafficking; however, its molecular regulation and downstream targets are largely unknown. Cyclin Y has recently been identified as a key interacting/activating cyclin for PCTAIRE-1; however, the molecular mechanism by which it activates PCTAIRE-1 is undefined. In the present study, we initially performed protein sequence analysis and identified two candidate phosphorylation sites (Ser(12) and Ser(336)) on cyclin Y that might be catalysed by PCTAIRE-1. Although in vitro peptide analysis favoured Ser(12) as the candidate phosphorylation site, immunoblot analysis of cell lysates that had been transfected with wild-type (WT) or kinase-inactive (KI) PCTAIRE-1 together with WT or phospho-deficient mutants of cyclin Y suggested Ser(336), but not Ser(12), as a PCTAIRE-1-dependent phosphorylation site. Monitoring phosphorylation of Ser(336) may provide a useful read-out to assess cellular activity of PCTAIRE-1 in vivo; however, a phospho-deficient S336A mutant displayed normal interaction with PCTAIRE-1. Unbiased mass spectrometry and targeted mutagenesis analysis of cyclin Y identified key phosphorylation sites (Ser(100) and Ser(326)) required for 14-3-3 binding. Recombinant WT cyclin Y, but not a S100A/S326A mutant, prepared in COS-1 cells co-purified with 14-3-3 and was able to activate bacterially expressed recombinant PCTAIRE-1 in cell-free assays. Finally, we observed that recently identified PCTAIRE-1 variants found in patients with intellectual disability were unable to interact with cyclin Y, and were inactive enzymes. Collectively, the present work has revealed a new mechanistic insight into activation of PCTAIRE-1, which is mediated through interaction with the phosphorylated form of cyclin Y in complex with 14-3-3. PMID:26205494

  20. Down-regulation of 14-3-3β exerts anti-cancer effects through inducing ER stress in human glioma U87 cells: Involvement of CHOP–Wnt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Lei; Lei, Hui; Chang, Ming-Ze; Liu, Zhi-Qin; Bie, Xiao-Hua

    2015-07-10

    We previously identified 14-3-3β as a tumor-specific isoform of 14-3-3 protein in astrocytoma, but its functional role in glioma cells and underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 14-3-3β inhibition in human glioma U87 cells using specific targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results showed that 14-3-3β is highly expressed in U87 cells but not in normal astrocyte SVGp12 cells. Knockdown of 14-3-3β by Si-14-3-3β transfection significantly decreased the cell viability but increased the LDH release in a time-dependent fashion in U87 cells, and these effects were accompanied with G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In addition, 14-3-3β knockdown induced ER stress in U87 cells, as evidenced by ER calcium release, increased expression of XBP1S mRNA and induction of ER related pro-apoptotic factors. Down-regulation of 14-3-3β significantly decreased the nuclear localization of β-catenin and inhibited Topflash activity, which was shown to be reversely correlated with CHOP. Furthermore, Si-CHOP and sFRP were used to inhibit CHOP and Wnt, respectively. The results showed that the anti-cancer effects of 14-3-3β knockdown in U87 cells were mediated by increased expression of CHOP and followed inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In summary, the remarkable efficiency of 14-3-3β knockdown to induce apoptotic cell death in U87 cells may find therapeutic application for the treatment of glioma patients. - Highlights: • Knockdown of 14-3-3β leads to cytotoxicity in human glioma U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β results in ER stress in U87 cells. • Knockdown of 14-3-3β inhibits Wnt/β-catenin pathway via CHOP activation.

  1. An unusual arrangement of two 14-3-3-like domains in the SMG5–SMG7 heterodimer is required for efficient nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Stefanie; Weichenrieder, Oliver; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway triggers the rapid degradation of aberrant mRNAs containing premature translation termination codons (PTCs). In metazoans, NMD requires three 14-3-3-like proteins: SMG5, SMG6, and SMG7. These proteins are recruited to PTC-containing mRNAs through the interaction of their 14-3-3-like domains with phosphorylated UPF1, the central NMD effector. Recruitment of SMG5, SMG6, and SMG7 causes NMD target degradation. In this study, we report the crystal structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans SMG5–SMG7 complex. The 14-3-3-like phosphopeptide recognition domains of SMG5 and SMG7 heterodimerize in an unusual perpendicular back-to-back orientation in which the peptide-binding sites face opposite directions. Structure-based mutants and functional assays indicate that the SMG5–SMG7 interaction is conserved and is crucial for efficient NMD in human cells. Notably, we demonstrate that heterodimerization increases the affinity of the SMG5–SMG7 complex for UPF1. Furthermore, we show that the degradative activity of the SMG5–SMG7 complex resides in SMG7 and that the SMG5–SMG7 complex and SMG6 play partially redundant roles in the degradation of aberrant mRNAs. We propose that the SMG5–SMG7 complex binds to phosphorylated UPF1 with high affinity and recruits decay factors to the mRNA target through SMG7, thus promoting target degradation. PMID:23348841

  2. 14-3-3γ Regulates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses and Lactation in Dairy Cow Mammary Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting NF-κB and MAPKs and Up-Regulating mTOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lixin; Lin, Ye; Liu, Lili; Bian, Yanjie; Zhang, Li; Gao, Xuejun; Li, Qingzhang

    2015-01-01

    As a protective factor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced injury, 14-3-3γ has been the subject of recent research. Nevertheless, whether 14-3-3γ can regulate lactation in dairy cow mammary epithelial cells (DCMECs) induced by LPS remains unknown. Here, the anti-inflammatory effect and lactation regulating ability of 14-3-3γ in LPS-induced DCMECs are investigated for the first time, and the molecular mechanisms responsible for their effects are explored. The results of qRT-PCR showed that 14-3-3γ overexpression significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis revealed that 14-3-3γ overexpression also suppressed the production of TNF-α and IL-6 in cell culture supernatants. Meanwhile, CASY-TT Analyser System showed that 14-3-3γ overexpression clearly increased the viability and proliferation of cells. The results of kit methods and western blot analysis showed that 14-3-3γ overexpression promoted the secretion of triglycerides and lactose and the synthesis of β-casein. Furthermore, the expression of genes relevant to nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) and lactation-associated proteins were assessed by western blot, and the results suggested that 14-3-3γ overexpression inactivated the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways by down-regulating extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) phosphorylation levels, as well as by inhibiting NF-κB translocation. Meanwhile, 14-3-3γ overexpression enhanced the expression levels of β-casein, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1), serine/threonine protein kinase Akt 1 (AKT1), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR

  3. Molecular Characterization of the 14-3-3 Gene Family in Brachypodium distachyon L. Reveals High Evolutionary Conservation and Diverse Responses to Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hui; Xu, Yuxing; Yuan, Linlin; Bian, Yanwei; Wang, Lihui; Zhen, Shoumin; Hu, Yingkao; Yan, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 gene family identified in all eukaryotic organisms is involved in a wide range of biological processes, particularly in resistance to various abiotic stresses. Here, we performed the first comprehensive study on the molecular characterization, phylogenetics, and responses to various abiotic stresses of the 14-3-3 gene family in Brachypodium distachyon L. A total of seven 14-3-3 genes from B. distachyon and 120 from five main lineages among 12 species were identified, which were divided into five well-conserved subfamilies. The molecular structure analysis showed that the plant 14-3-3 gene family is highly evolutionarily conserved, although certain divergence had occurred in different subfamilies. The duplication event investigation revealed that segmental duplication seemed to be the predominant form by which the 14-3-3 gene family had expanded. Moreover, seven critical amino acids were detected, which may contribute to functional divergence. Expression profiling analysis showed that BdGF14 genes were abundantly expressed in the roots, but showed low expression in the meristems. All seven BdGF14 genes showed significant expression changes under various abiotic stresses, including heavy metal, phytohormone, osmotic, and temperature stresses, which might play important roles in responses to multiple abiotic stresses mainly through participating in ABA-dependent signaling and reactive oxygen species-mediated MAPK cascade signaling pathways. In particular, BdGF14 genes generally showed upregulated expression in response to multiple stresses of high temperature, heavy metal, abscisic acid (ABA), and salicylic acid (SA), but downregulated expression under H2O2, NaCl, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) stresses. Meanwhile, dynamic transcriptional expression analysis of BdGF14 genes under longer treatments with heavy metals (Cd2+, Cr3+, Cu2+, and Zn2+) and phytohormone (ABA) and recovery revealed two main expression trends in both roots and leaves: up-down and up

  4. Tipping the balance between good and evil: aberrant 14-3-3ζ expression drives oncogenic TGF-β signaling in metastatic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Chevaun D; Schiemann, William P

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) readily suppresses the development of early-stage breast cancers, an activity that gives way to tumor promotion in their late-stage counterparts. The molecular mechanisms underlying this mysterious switch in TGF-β function remain murky. In addressing this conundrum, Xu et al. observed aberrant 14-3-3ζ expression to prevent the formation of tumor-suppressive Smad2/3:p53 complexes, while simultaneously driving the generation of oncogenic Smad2/3:Gli2 complexes. Once formed, Smad2/3:Gli2 complexes stimulate the expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein necessary for breast cancer metastasis to bone. This viewpoint highlights 14-3-3ζ as an essential driver of oncogenic signaling by Smad2/3 and TGF-β in metastatic breast cancers. PMID:26160166

  5. Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Fred; Sharapan, Hedda

    1993-01-01

    Contends that, in childhood, work and play seem to come together. Says that for young children their play is their work, and the more adults encourage children to play, the more they emphasize important lifelong resource. Examines some uses of children's play, making and building, artwork, dramatic play, monsters and superheroes, gun play, and…

  6. Arsenite Stress Down-regulates Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 Binding of Leucine-rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2), Promoting Self-association and Cellular Redistribution*

    PubMed Central

    Mamais, Adamantios; Chia, Ruth; Beilina, Alexandra; Hauser, David N.; Hall, Christine; Lewis, Patrick A.; Cookson, Mark R.; Bandopadhyay, Rina

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are a common genetic cause of Parkinson disease, but the mechanisms whereby LRRK2 is regulated are unknown. Phosphorylation of LRRK2 at Ser910/Ser935 mediates interaction with 14-3-3. Pharmacological inhibition of its kinase activity abolishes Ser910/Ser935 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding, and this effect is also mimicked by pathogenic mutations. However, physiological situations where dephosphorylation occurs have not been defined. Here, we show that arsenite or H2O2-induced stresses promote loss of Ser910/Ser935 phosphorylation, which is reversed by phosphatase inhibition. Arsenite-induced dephosphorylation is accompanied by loss of 14-3-3 binding and is observed in wild type, G2019S, and kinase-dead D2017A LRRK2. Arsenite stress stimulates LRRK2 self-association and association with protein phosphatase 1α, decreases kinase activity and GTP binding in vitro, and induces translocation of LRRK2 to centrosomes. Our data indicate that signaling events induced by arsenite and oxidative stress may regulate LRRK2 function. PMID:24942733

  7. p38- and MK2-dependent signalling promotes stress-induced centriolar satellite remodelling via 14-3-3-dependent sequestration of CEP131/AZI1

    PubMed Central

    Tollenaere, Maxim A. X.; Villumsen, Bine H.; Blasius, Melanie; Nielsen, Julie C.; Wagner, Sebastian A.; Bartek, Jiri; Beli, Petra; Mailand, Niels; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Centriolar satellites (CS) are small granular structures that cluster in the vicinity of centrosomes. CS are highly susceptible to stress stimuli, triggering abrupt displacement of key CS factors. Here we discover a linear p38-MK2-14-3-3 signalling pathway that specifically targets CEP131 to trigger CS remodelling after cell stress. We identify CEP131 as a substrate of the p38 effector kinase MK2 and pinpoint S47 and S78 as critical MK2 phosphorylation sites in CEP131. Ultraviolet-induced phosphorylation of these residues generates direct binding sites for 14-3-3 proteins, which sequester CEP131 in the cytoplasm to block formation of new CS, thereby leading to rapid depletion of these structures. Mutating S47 and S78 in CEP131 is sufficient to abolish stress-induced CS reorganization, demonstrating that CEP131 is the key regulatory target of MK2 and 14-3-3 in these structures. Our findings reveal the molecular mechanism underlying dynamic CS remodelling to modulate centrosome functions on cell stress. PMID:26616734

  8. 14-3-3σ confers cisplatin resistance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells via regulating DNA repair molecules.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kenneth K Y; Chan, Kin Tak; Choi, Mei Yuk; Wang, Hector K; Fung, Eva Y M; Lam, Ho Yu; Tan, Winnie; Tung, Lai Nar; Tong, Daniel K H; Sun, Raymond W Y; Lee, Nikki P; Law, Simon

    2016-02-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant type of esophageal cancer in Asia. Cisplatin is commonly used in chemoradiation for unresectable ESCC patients. However, the treatment efficacy is diminished in patients with established cisplatin resistance. To understand the mechanism leading to the development of cisplatin resistance in ESCC, we compared the proteomes from a cisplatin-resistant HKESC-2R cell line with its parental-sensitive counterpart HKESC-2 to identify key molecule involved in this process. Mass spectrometry analysis detected 14-3-3σ as the most abundant molecule expressed exclusively in HKESC-2R cells, while western blot result further validated it to be highly expressed in HKESC-2R cells when compared to HKESC-2 cells. Ectopic expression of 14-3-3σ increased cisplatin resistance in HKESC-2 cells, while its suppression sensitized SLMT-1 cells to cisplatin. Among the molecules involved in drug detoxification, drug transportation, and DNA repair, the examined DNA repair molecules HMGB1 and XPA were found to be highly expressed in HKESC-2R cells with high 14-3-3σ expression. Subsequent manipulation of 14-3-3σ by both overexpression and knockdown approaches concurrently altered the expression of HMGB1 and XPA. 14-3-3σ, HMGB1, and XPA were preferentially expressed in cisplatin-resistant SLMT-1 cells when compared to those more sensitive to cisplatin. In ESCC patients with poor response to cisplatin-based chemoradiation, their pre-treatment tumors expressed higher expression of HMGB1 than those with response to such treatment. In summary, our results demonstrate that 14-3-3σ induces cisplatin resistance in ESCC cells and that 14-3-3σ-mediated cisplatin resistance involves DNA repair molecules HMGB1 and XPA. Results from this study provide evidences for further work in researching the potential use of 14-3-3σ and DNA repair molecules HMGB1 and XPA as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for ESCC. PMID:26346170

  9. Development of a polymerase chain reaction assay for the diagnosis of neosporosis using the Neospora caninum 14-3-3 gene.

    PubMed

    Lally, N C; Jenkins, M C; Dubey, J P

    1996-01-01

    Neospora caninum is a recently described apicomplexan parasite which causes neuromuscular disease in dogs, and abortion and neonatal morbidity in cattle, sheep and horses. Morphological similarities and serological cross-reactivity between N. caninum and the closely related parasite Toxoplasma gondii, have resulted in the frequent misdiagnosis of neosporosis as toxoplasmosis. This report describes the isolation and characterization of an N. caninum cDNA clone encoding a 14-3-3 protein homologue. The 14-3-3 proteins are a class of proteins which show a high degree of amino acid sequence conservation across several eukaryotic taxa. Using less conserved regions of the N. caninum cDNA clone, nested primers were designed for the amplification of a 614-bp N. caninum DNA fragment by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The DNA fragment was amplified from N. caninum genomic DNA, but not from T. gondii, Sarcocystis muris, Sarcocystis tenella, or Sarcocystis cruzi genomic DNA. Additionally, the fragment was amplified from DNA prepared from the brains of N. caninum-infected mice, but not from the brain of a mouse infected with T. gondii. These results suggest that this PCR assay may be useful for the diagnosis of neosporosis. PMID:8992315

  10. Suppression of 14-3-3γ-mediated surface expression of ANO1 inhibits cancer progression of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sun; Lee, Jae Kwang; Bae, Yeonju; Lee, Bok-Soon; Kim, Eunju; Cho, Chang-Hoon; Ryoo, Kanghyun; Yoo, Jiyun; Kim, Chul-Ho; Yi, Gwan-Su; Lee, Seok-Geun; Lee, C Justin; Kang, Sang Soo; Hwang, Eun Mi; Park, Jae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Anoctamin-1 (ANO1) acts as a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel in various normal tissues, and its expression is increased in several different types of cancer. Therefore, understanding the regulation of ANO1 surface expression is important for determining its physiological and pathophysiological functions. However, the trafficking mechanism of ANO1 remains elusive. Here, we report that segment a (N-terminal 116 amino acids) of ANO1 is crucial for its surface expression, and we identified 14-3-3γ as a binding partner for anterograde trafficking using yeast two-hybrid screening. The surface expression of ANO1 was enhanced by 14-3-3γ, and the Thr9 residue of ANO1 was critical for its interaction with 14-3-3γ. Gene silencing of 14-3-3γ and/or ANO1 demonstrated that suppression of ANO1 surface expression inhibited migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells. These findings provide novel therapeutic implications for glioblastomas, which are associated with poor prognosis. PMID:27212225

  11. Suppression of 14-3-3γ-mediated surface expression of ANO1 inhibits cancer progression of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sun; Lee, Jae Kwang; Bae, Yeonju; Lee, Bok-Soon; Kim, Eunju; Cho, Chang-Hoon; Ryoo, Kanghyun; Yoo, Jiyun; Kim, Chul-Ho; Yi, Gwan-Su; Lee, Seok-Geun; Lee, C. Justin; Kang, Sang Soo; Hwang, Eun Mi; Park, Jae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Anoctamin-1 (ANO1) acts as a Ca2+-activated Cl− channel in various normal tissues, and its expression is increased in several different types of cancer. Therefore, understanding the regulation of ANO1 surface expression is important for determining its physiological and pathophysiological functions. However, the trafficking mechanism of ANO1 remains elusive. Here, we report that segment a (N-terminal 116 amino acids) of ANO1 is crucial for its surface expression, and we identified 14-3-3γ as a binding partner for anterograde trafficking using yeast two-hybrid screening. The surface expression of ANO1 was enhanced by 14-3-3γ, and the Thr9 residue of ANO1 was critical for its interaction with 14-3-3γ. Gene silencing of 14-3-3γ and/or ANO1 demonstrated that suppression of ANO1 surface expression inhibited migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells. These findings provide novel therapeutic implications for glioblastomas, which are associated with poor prognosis. PMID:27212225

  12. Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    Designing a game with a serious purpose involves considering the worlds of Reality and Meaning yet it is undeniably impossible to create a game without a third world, one that is specifically concerned with what makes a game a game: the play elements. This third world, the world of people like designers and artists, and disciplines as computer science and game design, I call the world of Play and this level is devoted to it. The level starts off with some of the misperceptions people have of play. Unlike some may think, we play all the time, even when we grow old—this was also very noticeable in designing the game Levee Patroller as the team exhibited very playful behavior at many occasions. From there, I go into the aspects that characterize this world. The first concerns the goal of the game. This relates to the objectives people have to achieve within the game. This is constituted by the second aspect: the gameplay. Taking actions and facing challenges is subsequently constituted by a gameworld, which concerns the third aspect. And all of it is not possible without the fourth and final aspect, the type of technology that creates and facilitates the game. The four aspects together make up a “game concept” and from this world such a concept can be judged on the basis of three closely interrelated criteria: engagement, immersion, and fun.

  13. HERG Protein Plays a Role in Moxifloxacin-Induced Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hai-Yan; Yuan, Sha-Sha; Yang, Fang-Yuan; Shi, Ting-Ting; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of moxifloxacin on HERG channel protein and glucose metabolism. HERG expression was investigated using immunohistochemistry. The whole-cell patch clamp method was used to examine the effect of moxifloxacin on HERG channel currents. A glucose tolerance test was used to analyze the effects of moxifloxacin on blood glucose and insulin concentrations in mice. Results show that HERG protein was expressed in human pancreatic β-cells. Moxifloxacin inhibited HERG time-dependent and tail currents in HEK293 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC50 of moxifloxacin inhibition was 36.65 μmol/L. Moxifloxacin (200 mg/kg) reduced blood glucose levels and increased insulin secretion in wild-type mice at 60 min after the start of the glucose tolerance test. In contrast, moxifloxacin did not significantly alter blood glucose and insulin levels in HERG knockout mice. Serum glucose levels increased and insulin concentrations decreased in HERG knockout mice when compared to wild-type mice. The moxifloxacin-induced decrease in blood glucose and increase in insulin secretion occurred via the HERG protein; thus, HERG protein plays a role in insulin secretion. PMID:26649323

  14. Wig-1 regulates cell cycle arrest and cell death through the p53 targets FAS and 14-3-3σ

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, C; Xu, L-D; Vilborg, A; Lui, W-O; Wiman, K G

    2014-01-01

    Wig-1, also known as ZMAT3, is a p53 target gene that encodes an RNA-binding zinc-finger protein involved in the regulation of mRNA stability through binding to AU-rich elements (AREs). We have used microarray analysis to identify novel Wig-1 target mRNAs. We identified 2447 transcripts with >fourfold differential expression between Wig-1 and control small interfering (si)RNA-treated HCT116 cells. Several p53 target genes were among the deregulated transcripts. We found that Wig-1 regulates FAS and 14-3-3σ mRNA independently of p53. We show that Wig-1 binds to FAS mRNA 3′-UTR and decreases its stability through an ARE in the 3′-UTR. Depletion of Wig-1 was associated with increased cell death and reduced cell cycle arrest upon DNA damage. Our results suggest a role of Wig-1 as a survival factor that directs the p53 stress response toward cell cycle arrest rather than apoptosis through the regulation of FAS and 14-3-3σ mRNA levels. PMID:24469038

  15. Echinococcus multilocularis proliferation in mice and respective parasite 14-3-3 gene expression is mainly controlled by an αβ+ CD4+ T-cell-mediated immune response

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wen Juan; Waldvogel, Andreas; Siles-Lucas, Mar; Gottstein, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    The role of specific B lymphocytes and T-cell populations in the control of experimental Echinococus multilocularis infection was studied in µMT, nude, T-cell receptor (TCR)-β–/–, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I–/– and MHC-II–/– mice. At 2 months postinfection, the parasite mass was more than 10 times higher in nude, TCR-β–/– and MHC-II–/– mice than in infected C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice, and these T-cell-deficient mice started to die of the high parasite load at this time-point. In contrast, MHC-I–/– and µMT mice exhibited parasite growth rates similar to those found in WT controls. These findings clearly point to the major role that CD4+ αβ+ T cells play in limiting the E. multilocularis proliferation, while CD8+ T and B cells appeared to play a minor role in the control of parasite growth. In the absence of T cells, especially CD4+ or αβ+ T cells, the cellular immune response to infection was impaired, as documented by the lack of hepatic granuloma formation around the parasite and by a decreased splenocyte responsiveness to concanavalin A (Con A) and parasite antigen stimulation. Surprisingly, in T-cell-deficient mice, the ex vivo expression of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and other inflammatory cytokines (except for interleukin-6) were increased in association with a high parasite load. Thus, the relative protection mediated by CD4+ αβ+ T cells against E. multilocularis infection seemed not be IFN-γ dependent, but rather to rely on the effector's function of CD4+ αβ+ T cells. The local restriction of parasite germinal cell proliferation was reflected by a regulatory effect on the expression of 14-3-3 protein within the parasite tissue in T-cell-deficient mice. These results provide a strong indication that the CD4+ αβ+ T-cell-mediated immune response contributes to the control of the parasite growth and to the regulation of production of the parasite 14-3-3 protein in metacestode tissues. PMID:15196217

  16. Decreased expression of 14-3-3σ is predictive of poor prognosis for patients with human uterine papillary serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Fumihiko; Nagase, Satoru; Suzuki, Kichiya; Oba, Etsuko; Hiroki, Eri; Matsuda, Yukika; Akahira, Jun-Ichi; Nishigori, Hidekazu; Sugiyama, Takashi; Otsuki, Takeo; Yoshinaga, Kousuke; Takano, Tadao; Niikura, Hitoshi; Ito, Kiyoshi; Sasano, Hironobu; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) morphologically resembles ovarian serous carcinoma and is categorized as a type II endometrial cancer. UPSC comprises about 10% of all types of endometrial cancer and has an aggressive clinical course and a poor prognosis. The 14-3-3σ gene was originally discovered as a p53-inducible gene; its expression is induced by DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner, which leads to G2 arrest and repair of damaged DNA. Moreover, it has been reported that expression of 14-3-3σ is frequently lost in various types of human cancer, including ovarian cancer. We therefore examined the association between 14-3-3σ expression determined by immunohistochemistry and clinical outcomes of 51 patients with UPSC. UPSC was considered positive for 14-3-3σ when > 30% of tumor cells were stained with a specific antibody. Of these patients, 29 (58.7%) showed positive immunoreactivity for 14-3-3σ and 22 (41.3%) had decreased 14-3-3σ staining. Decreased immunoreactivity for 14-3-3σ was associated with stage (P = 0.001) and lymphovascular space involvement (P = 0.005). Moreover, decreased 14-3-3σ expression was an independent risk factor for reduced overall survival (P = 0.0416) in multivariate analysis. Direct bisulfite sequencing was performed to evaluate the methylation status of the 27 CpG islands in the promoter region and first exon of the 14-3-3σ gene. These CpG islands were hypermethylated in 30% of 14-3-3σ-positive UPSC and 80% of 14-3-3σ-negative UPSC, although the difference was not statistically significant. These findings suggest that decreased expression of immunoreactive 14-3-3σ may be a predictor of poor prognosis in patients with UPSC. PMID:24201220

  17. A Negative Regulatory Mechanism Involving 14-3-3ζ Limits Signaling Downstream of ROCK to Regulate Tissue Stiffness in Epidermal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kular, Jasreen; Scheer, Kaitlin G; Pyne, Natasha T; Allam, Amr H; Pollard, Anthony N; Magenau, Astrid; Wright, Rebecca L; Kolesnikoff, Natasha; Moretti, Paul A; Wullkopf, Lena; Stomski, Frank C; Cowin, Allison J; Woodcock, Joanna M; Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Pitson, Stuart M; Timpson, Paul; Ramshaw, Hayley S; Lopez, Angel F; Samuel, Michael S

    2015-12-21

    ROCK signaling causes epidermal hyper-proliferation by increasing ECM production, elevating dermal stiffness, and enhancing Fak-mediated mechano-transduction signaling. Elevated dermal stiffness in turn causes ROCK activation, establishing mechano-reciprocity, a positive feedback loop that can promote tumors. We have identified a negative feedback mechanism that limits excessive ROCK signaling during wound healing and is lost in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Signal flux through ROCK was selectively tuned down by increased levels of 14-3-3ζ, which interacted with Mypt1, a ROCK signaling antagonist. In 14-3-3ζ(-/-) mice, unrestrained ROCK signaling at wound margins elevated ECM production and reduced ECM remodeling, increasing dermal stiffness and causing rapid wound healing. Conversely, 14-3-3ζ deficiency enhanced cutaneous SCC size. Significantly, inhibiting 14-3-3ζ with a novel pharmacological agent accelerated wound healing 2-fold. Patient samples of chronic non-healing wounds overexpressed 14-3-3ζ, while cutaneous SCCs had reduced 14-3-3ζ. These results reveal a novel 14-3-3ζ-dependent mechanism that negatively regulates mechano-reciprocity, suggesting new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26702834

  18. Decreased expression of 14-3-3 σ, an early event of malignant transformation of respiratory epithelium, also facilitates progression of squamous cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Nan; Wu, Yongkai; Huang, Bo; Liu, Qian; Dong, Yinan; Ding, Jianqiao; Liu, Yongyu

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been shown that 14-3-3 σ serves as a tumor suppressor gene, and is downregulated in various tumor tissues. However, the role of 14-3-3 σ during the initiation and progression of lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) is not well understood. Methods The expression status of 14-3-3 σ in archival tissue samples from 40 lung SqCC patients (36 with normal bronchia, 19 squamous metaplasia, and 17 dysplasia/carcinoma in situ, in their tissue samples) was examined by immunohistochemical analysis. The proliferation rate and tumor formation ability of the H520 cell transfected with 14-3-3 σ was tested with methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and nude mice subcutaneous injection, respectively. Results In the normal bronchial epithelia, 14-3-3 σ was highly expressed, whereas it was significantly decreased in precancerous and cancerous tissues. Compared with matched invasive cancer tissues, the expression level of 14-3-3 σ in squamous metaplasia was significantly higher (P = 0.049), while that in dysplasia/carcinoma in situ showed no significant changes (P = 0.135). Statistical analysis showed that the expression level of 14-3-3 σ in tumor tissue was associated with the differentiation grade of the tumor (P = 0.001) and the prognosis of the patient (P = 0.003). The overexpression of 14-3-3 σ significantly suppressed the proliferation of H520 cells in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion The inactivation of 14-3-3 σ may be a very early event in tumorigenesis and could facilitate the initiation and progression of lung SqCC in a sustainable way. PMID:26557909

  19. PI 3-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of Plk1–Ser99 promotes association with 14-3-3γ and is required for metaphase–anaphase transition

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Kousuke; Goto, Hidemasa; Izawa, Ichiro; Kiyono, Tohru; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Elowe, Sabine; Nigg, Erich A; Inagaki, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) controls multiple aspects of mitosis and is activated through its phosphorylation at Thr210. Here we identify Ser99 on Plk1 as a novel mitosis-specific phosphorylation site, which operates independently of Plk1–Thr210 phosphorylation. Plk1–Ser99 phosphorylation creates a docking site for 14-3-3γ, and this interaction stimulates the catalytic activity of Plk1. Knockdown of 14-3-3γ or replacement of wild-type (WT) Plk1 by a Ser99-phospho-blocking mutant leads to a prometaphase/metaphase-like arrest due to the activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt significantly reduces the level of Plk1–Ser99 phosphorylation and delays metaphase to anaphase transition. Plk1–Ser99 phosphorylation requires not only Akt activity but also protein(s) associated with Plk1 in a mitosis-specific manner. Therefore, mitotic Plk1 activity is regulated not only by Plk1–Thr210 phosphorylation, but also by Plk1 binding to 14-3-3γ following Plk1–Ser99 phosphorylation downstream of the PI3K–Akt signalling pathway. This novel Plk1 activation pathway controls proper progression from metaphase to anaphase. PMID:23695676

  20. DNABII proteins play a central role in UPEC biofilm structure

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, Aishwarya; Justice, Sheryl S.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Goodman, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Most chronic and recurrent bacterial infections involve a biofilm component, the foundation of which is the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a conserved and key component of the EPS of pathogenic biofilms. The DNABII protein family includes integration host factor (IHF) and Histone-like protein (HU); both are present in the extracellular milieu. We have shown previously that the DNABII proteins are often found in association with eDNA and are critical for the structural integrity of bacterial communities that utilize eDNA as a matrix component. Here, we demonstrated that Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strain UTI89 incorporates eDNA within its biofilm matrix and that the DNABII proteins are not only important for biofilm growth, but are limiting; exogenous addition of these proteins promotes biofilm formation that is dependent on eDNA. In addition, we show that both subunits of IHF, yet only one subunit of HU (HupB), are critical for UPEC biofilm development. We discuss the roles of these proteins in context of the UPEC EPS. PMID:25757804

  1. 14-3-3σ regulation of and interaction with YAP1 in acquired gemcitabine resistance via promoting ribonucleotide reductase expression

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li; Dong, Zizheng; Zhang, Jian-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Gemcitabine is an important anticancer therapeutics approved for treatment of several human cancers including locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Its clinical effectiveness, however, is hindered by existence of intrinsic and development of acquired resistances. Previously, it was found that 14-3-3σ expression associates with poor clinical outcome of PDAC patients. It was also found that 14-3-3σ expression is up-regulated in gemcitabine resistant PDAC cells and contributes to the acquired gemcitabine resistance. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of 14-3-3σ function in gemcitabine resistance and found that 14-3-3σ up-regulates YAP1 expression and then binds to YAP1 to inhibit gemcitabine-induced caspase 8 activation and apoptosis. 14-3-3σ association with YAP1 up-regulates the expression of ribonucleotide reductase M1 and M2, which may mediate 14-3-3σ/YAP1 function in the acquired gemcitabine resistance. These findings suggest a possible role of YAP1 signaling in gemcitabine resistance. PMID:26894857

  2. Playing biology's name game: identifying protein names in scientific text.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Daniel; Fluck, Juliane; Mevissen, Heinz-Theodor; Zimmer, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    A growing body of work is devoted to the extraction of protein or gene interaction information from the scientific literature. Yet, the basis for most extraction algorithms, i.e. the specific and sensitive recognition of protein and gene names and their numerous synonyms, has not been adequately addressed. Here we describe the construction of a comprehensive general purpose name dictionary and an accompanying automatic curation procedure based on a simple token model of protein names. We designed an efficient search algorithm to analyze all abstracts in MEDLINE in a reasonable amount of time on standard computers. The parameters of our method are optimized using machine learning techniques. Used in conjunction, these ingredients lead to good search performance. A supplementary web page is available at http://cartan.gmd.de/ProMiner/. PMID:12603045

  3. Genetic and physical interaction of Ssp1 CaMKK and Rad24 14-3-3 during low pH and osmotic stress in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Silja I.; Wong, Jimson; Young, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The Ssp1 calmodulin kinase kinase (CaMKK) is necessary for stress-induced re-organization of the actin cytoskeleton and initiation of growth at the new cell end following division in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In addition, it regulates AMP-activated kinase and functions in low glucose tolerance. ssp1− cells undergo mitotic delay at elevated temperatures and G2 arrest in the presence of additional stressors. Following hyperosmotic stress, Ssp1-GFP forms transient foci which accumulate at the cell membrane and form a band around the cell circumference, but not co-localizing with actin patches. Hyperosmolarity-induced localization to the cell membrane occurs concomitantly with a reduction of its interaction with the 14-3-3 protein Rad24, but not Rad25 which remains bound to Ssp1. The loss of rad24 in ssp1− cells reduces the severity of hyperosmotic stress response and relieves mitotic delay. Conversely, overexpression of rad24 exacerbates stress response and concomitant cell elongation. rad24− does not impair stress-induced localization of Ssp1 to the cell membrane, however this response is almost completely absent in cells overexpressing rad24. PMID:24451546

  4. 14-3-3ɛ/ζ Affects the stability of δ-catenin and regulates δ-catenin-induced dendrogenesis.

    PubMed

    He, Yongfeng; Han, Jeong Ran; Chang, Ockyoung; Oh, Minsoo; James, Sarah E; Lu, Qun; Seo, Young-Woo; Kim, Hangun; Kim, Kwonseop

    2013-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that aberrant regulation of δ-catenin leads to pathological consequences such as mental retardation and cognitive dysfunction. This study revealed that 14-3-3ɛ/ζ stabilizes δ-catenin, with different binding regions involved in the interaction. Furthermore, the specific inhibition of the interaction of 14-3-3 with δ-catenin reduced levels of δ-catenin and significantly impaired the capacity of δ-catenin to induce dendritic branching in both NIH3T3 fibroblasts and primary hippocampal neurons. However, the S1094A δ-catenin mutant, which cannot interact with 14-3-3ζ, still retained the capability of inducing dendrogenesis. Taken together, these results elucidate the underlying events that regulate the stability of δ-catenin and δ-catenin-induced dendrogenesis. PMID:23772369

  5. Induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase-targeting adaptor 14-3-3γ is mediated by NF-κB-dependent recruitment of CFP1 to the 5'-CpG-3'-rich 14-3-3γ promoter and is sustained by E2A.

    PubMed

    Mai, Thach; Pone, Egest J; Li, Guideng; Lam, Tonika S; Moehlman, J'aime; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-08-15

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) crucially diversifies Ab biologic effector functions. 14-3-3γ specifically binds to the 5'-AGCT-3' repeats in the IgH locus switch (S) regions. By interacting directly with the C-terminal region of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), 14-3-3γ targets this enzyme to S regions to mediate CSR. In this study, we showed that 14-3-3γ was expressed in germinal center B cells in vivo and induced in B cells by T-dependent and T-independent primary CSR-inducing stimuli in vitro in humans and mice. Induction of 14-3-3γ was rapid, peaking within 3 h of stimulation by LPSs, and sustained over the course of AID and CSR induction. It was dependent on recruitment of NF-κB to the 14-3-3γ gene promoter. The NF-κB recruitment enhanced the occupancy of the CpG island within the 14-3-3γ promoter by CFP1, a component of the COMPASS histone methyltransferase complex, and promoter-specific enrichment of histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), which is indicative of open chromatin state and marks transcription-competent promoters. NF-κB also potentiated the binding of B cell lineage-specific factor E2A to an E-box motif located immediately downstream of the two closely-spaced transcription start sites for sustained 14-3-3γ expression and CSR induction. Thus, 14-3-3γ induction in CSR is enabled by the CFP1-mediated H3K4me3 enrichment in the promoter, dependent on NF-κB and sustained by E2A. PMID:23851690

  6. Amifostine alleviates radiation-induced lethal small bowel damage via promotion of 14-3-3σ-mediated nuclear p53 accumulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Eng-Yen; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Min; Chen, Yi-Fan; Wang, Chung-Chi; Lin, I-Hui; Huang, Yu-Jie; Yang, Kuender D

    2014-10-30

    Amifostine (AM) is a radioprotector that scavenges free radicals and is used in patients undergoing radiotherapy. p53 has long been implicated in cell cycle arrest for cellular repair after radiation exposure. We therefore investigated the protective p53-dependent mechanism of AM on small bowel damage after lethal whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI). AM increased both the survival rate of rats and crypt survival following lethal 18 Gy WAI. The p53 inhibitor PFT-α compromised AM-mediated effects when administered prior to AM administration. AM significantly increased clonogenic survival in IEC-6 cells expressing wild type p53 but not in p53 knockdown cells. AM significantly increased p53 nuclear accumulation and p53 tetramer expression before irradiation through the inhibition of p53 degradation. AM inhibited p53 interactions with MDM2 but enhanced p53 interactions with 14-3-3σ. Knockdown of 14-3-3σ also compromised the effect of AM on clonogenic survival and p53 nuclear accumulation in IEC-6 cells. For the first time, our data reveal that AM alleviates lethal small bowel damage through the induction of 14-3-3σ and subsequent accumulation of p53. Enhancement of the p53/14-3-3σ interaction results in p53 tetramerization in the nucleus that rescues lethal small bowel damage. PMID:25230151

  7. Factorial combinations of protein interactions generate a multiplicity of florigen activation complexes in wheat and barley.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengxia; Lin, Huiqiong; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2015-10-01

    The FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) protein is a central component of a mobile flowering signal (florigen) that is transported from leaves to the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Two FT monomers and two DNA-binding bZIP transcription factors interact with a dimeric 14-3-3 protein bridge to form a hexameric protein complex. This complex, designated as the 'florigen activation complex' (FAC), plays a critical role in flowering. The wheat homologue of FT, designated FT1 (= VRN3), activates expression of VRN1 in the leaves and the SAM, promoting flowering under inductive long days. In this study, we show that FT1, other FT-like proteins, and different FD-like proteins, can interact with multiple wheat and barley 14-3-3 proteins. We also identify the critical amino acid residues in FT1 and FD-like proteins required for their interactions, and demonstrate that 14-3-3 proteins are necessary bridges to mediate the FT1-TaFDL2 interaction. Using in vivo bimolecular fluorescent complementation (BiFC) assays, we demonstrate that the interaction between FT1 and 14-3-3 occurs in the cytoplasm, and that this complex is then translocated to the nucleus, where it interacts with TaFDL2 to form a FAC. We also demonstrate that a FAC including FT1, TaFDL2 and Ta14-3-3C can bind to the VRN1 promoter in vitro. Finally, we show that relative transcript levels of FD-like and 14-3-3 genes vary among tissues and developmental stages. Since FD-like proteins determine the DNA specificity of the FACs, variation in FD-like gene expression can result in spatial and temporal modulation of the effects of mobile FT-like signals. PMID:26252567

  8. Protein Oxidation in Aging: Does It Play a Role in Aging Progression?

    PubMed Central

    Reeg, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A constant accumulation of oxidized proteins takes place during aging. Oxidation of proteins leads to a partial unfolding and, therefore, to aggregation. Protein aggregates impair the activity of cellular proteolytic systems (proteasomes, lysosomes), resulting in further accumulation of oxidized proteins. In addition, the accumulation of highly crosslinked protein aggregates leads to further oxidant formation, damage to macromolecules, and, finally, to apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, protein oxidation seems to play a role in the development of various age-related diseases, for example, neurodegenerative diseases. Recent Advances: The highly oxidized lipofuscin accumulates during aging. Lipofuscin formation might cause impaired lysosomal and proteasomal degradation, metal ion accumulation, increased reactive oxygen species formation, and apoptosis. Critical Issues: It is still unclear to which extent protein oxidation is involved in the progression of aging and in the development of some age-related diseases. Future Directions: An extensive knowledge of the effects of protein oxidation on the aging process and its contribution to the development of age-related diseases could enable further strategies to reduce age-related impairments. Strategies aimed at lowering aggregate formation might be a straightforward intervention to reduce age-related malfunctions of organs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 239–255. PMID:25178482

  9. The FAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Giardia duodenalis: an unconventional enzyme that interacts with the g14-3-3 and it is a target of the antitumoral compound NBDHEX

    PubMed Central

    Lalle, Marco; Camerini, Serena; Cecchetti, Serena; Finelli, Renata; Sferra, Gabriella; Müller, Joachim; Ricci, Giorgio; Pozio, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    The flagellated protozoan Giardia duodenalis is a worldwide parasite causing giardiasis, an acute and chronic diarrheal disease. Metabolism in G. duodenalis has a limited complexity thus making metabolic enzymes ideal targets for drug development. However, only few metabolic pathways (i.e., carbohydrates) have been described so far. Recently, the parasite homolog of the mitochondrial-like glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gG3PD) has been identified among the interactors of the g14-3-3 protein. G3PD is involved in glycolysis, electron transport, glycerophospholipids metabolism, and hyperosmotic stress response, and is emerging as promising target in tumor treatment. In this work, we demonstrate that gG3PD is a functional flavoenzyme able to convert glycerol-3-phosphate into dihydroxyacetone phosphate and that its activity and the intracellular glycerol level increase during encystation. Taking advantage of co-immunoprecipitation assays and deletion mutants, we provide evidence that gG3PD and g14-3-3 interact at the trophozoite stage, the intracellular localization of gG3PD is stage dependent and it partially co-localizes with mitosomes during cyst development. Finally, we demonstrate that the gG3PD activity is affected by the antitumoral compound 6-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-ylthio)hexanol, that results more effective in vitro at killing G. duodenalis trophozoites than the reference drug metronidazole. Overall, our results highlight the involvement of gG3PD in processes crucial for the parasite survival thus proposing this enzyme as target for novel antigiardial interventions. PMID:26082764

  10. The usefulness of S100P, mesothelin, fascin, prostate stem cell antigen, and 14-3-3 sigma in diagnosing pancreatic adenocarcinoma in cytological specimens obtained by endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Dim, Daniel C; Jiang, Feng; Qiu, Qi; Li, Ting; Darwin, Peter; Rodgers, William H; Peng, Hong Qi

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of the pancreas is an efficient and minimally invasive procedure for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Because of some limitations of EUS-FNA in diagnosis of well-differentiated or early stage cancers, the purpose of this study is to assess the added benefit of immunohistochemistry. We studied five proteins overexpressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, namely, prostate stem cell antigen, fascin, 14-3-3 sigma, mesothelin and S100P utilizing immunohistochemistry on paraffin sections from cellblocks obtained by EUS-FNA. Sixty-two cases of EUS-FNA of the pancreas that had follow-up histological and/or clinical diagnosis and sufficient material in cell blocks were included. Using histological diagnosis and/or clinical outcome as the reference standard, EUS-FNA shows the highest sensitivity (95%) and specificity (91%) and is superior to any marker in this study. Among five antibodies, S100P reveals the best diagnostic characters showing 90% of sensitivity and 67% of specificity. Fascin shows high specificity (92%) but low sensitivity (38%). Mesothelin has a moderate sensitivity (74%) and low specificity (33%), PSCA and 14-3-3 show high sensitivity but zero specificity. S100P and mesothelin were useful in nine indeterminate cases. S100P correctly predicted six of seven cancers and one of one without cancer and mesothelin correctly diagnosed five of seven cancers and one of two noncancers in this group. EUS-FNA cytomorphology is superior to any of the immunohistochemical markers used in this study. Use of S100P and mesothelin in cytologically borderline cases can increase the diagnostic accuracy in this group. PMID:21538952

  11. Three Members of the 6-cys Protein Family of Plasmodium Play a Role in Gamete Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahid M.; van Dooren, Maaike W.; Ramesar, Jai; Kaczanowski, Szymon; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; Kroeze, Hans; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Eling, Wijnand M.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Waters, Andrew P.; Janse, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    The process of fertilization is critically dependent on the mutual recognition of gametes and in Plasmodium, the male gamete surface protein P48/45 is vital to this process. This protein belongs to a family of 10 structurally related proteins, the so called 6-cys family. To identify the role of additional members of this family in Plasmodium fertilisation, we performed genetic and functional analysis on the five members of the 6-cys family that are transcribed during the gametocyte stage of P. berghei. This analysis revealed that in addition to P48/45, two members (P230 and P47) also play an essential role in the process of parasite fertilization. Mating studies between parasites lacking P230, P48/45 or P47 demonstrate that P230, like P48/45, is a male fertility factor, consistent with the previous demonstration of a protein complex containing both P48/45 and P230. In contrast, disruption of P47 results in a strong reduction of female fertility, while males remain unaffected. Further analysis revealed that gametes of mutants lacking expression of p48/45 or p230 or p47 are unable to either recognise or attach to each other. Disruption of the paralog of p230, p230p, also specifically expressed in gametocytes, had no observable effect on fertilization. These results indicate that the P. berghei 6-cys family contains a number of proteins that are either male or female specific ligands that play an important role in gamete recognition and/or attachment. The implications of low levels of fertilisation that exist even in the absence of these proteins, indicating alternative pathways of fertilisation, as well as positive selection acting on these proteins, are discussed in the context of targeting these proteins as transmission blocking vaccine candidates. PMID:20386715

  12. Aqueous Extract from Hibiscus sabdariffa Linnaeus Ameliorate Diabetic Nephropathy via Regulating Oxidative Status and Akt/Bad/14-3-3γ in an Experimental Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shou-Chieh; Lee, Shiow-Fen; Wang, Chau-Jong; Lee, Chao-Hsin; Lee, Wen-Chin; Lee, Huei-Jane

    2011-01-01

    Several studies point out that oxidative stress maybe a major culprit in diabetic nephropathy. Aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (HSE) has been demonstrated as having beneficial effects on anti-oxidation and lipid-lowering in experimental studies. This study aimed at investigating the effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. on diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin induced type 1 diabetic rats. Our results show that HSE is capable of reducing lipid peroxidation, increasing catalase and glutathione activities significantly in diabetic kidney, and decreasing the plasma levels of triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and increasing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) value. In histological examination, HSE improves hyperglycemia-caused osmotic diuresis in renal proximal convoluted tubules (defined as hydropic change) in diabetic rats. The study also reveals that up-regulation of Akt/Bad/14-3-3γ and NF-κB-mediated transcription might be involved. In conclusion, our results show that HSE possesses the potential effects to ameliorate diabetic nephropathy via improving oxidative status and regulating Akt/Bad/14-3-3γ signaling. PMID:19965962

  13. Akt and 14-3-3 control a PACS-2 homeostatic switch that integrates membrane traffic with TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Joseph E.; You, Huihong; Williamson, Danielle M.; Endig, Jessica; Youker, Robert T.; Thomas, Laurel; Shu, Hongjun; Du, Yuhong; Milewski, Robert L.; Brush, Matthew H.; Possemato, Anthony; Sprott, Kam; Fu, Haian; Greis, Kenneth D.; Runckel, Douglas N.; Vogel, Arndt; Thomas, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Summary TRAIL selectively kills diseased cells in vivo, spurring interest in this death ligand as a potential therapeutic. However, many cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL suggesting the mechanism mediating TRAIL-induced apoptosis is complex. Here we identify PACS-2 as an essential TRAIL effector, required for killing tumor cells in vitro and virally infected hepatocytes in vivo. PACS-2 is phosphorylated at Ser437 in vivo and pharmacologic and genetic studies demonstrate Akt is an in vivo Ser437 kinase. Akt cooperates with 14-3-3 to regulate the homeostatic and apoptotic properties of PACS-2 that mediate TRAIL action. Phosphorylated Ser437 binds 14-3-3 with high affinity, which represses PACS-2 apoptotic activity and is required for PACS-2 to mediate trafficking of membrane cargo. TRAIL triggers dephosphorylation of Ser437, reprogramming PACS-2 to promote apoptosis. Together, these studies identify the phosphorylation state of PACS-2 Ser437 as a molecular switch that integrates cellular homeostasis with TRAIL-induced apoptosis. PMID:19481529

  14. Akt and 14-3-3 control a PACS-2 homeostatic switch that integrates membrane traffic with TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Joseph E; You, Huihong; Williamson, Danielle M; Endig, Jessica; Youker, Robert T; Thomas, Laurel; Shu, Hongjun; Du, Yuhong; Milewski, Robert L; Brush, Matthew H; Possemato, Anthony; Sprott, Kam; Fu, Haian; Greis, Kenneth D; Runckel, Douglas N; Vogel, Arndt; Thomas, Gary

    2009-05-14

    TRAIL selectively kills diseased cells in vivo, spurring interest in this death ligand as a potential therapeutic. However, many cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL, suggesting the mechanism mediating TRAIL-induced apoptosis is complex. Here we identify PACS-2 as an essential TRAIL effector, required for killing tumor cells in vitro and virally infected hepatocytes in vivo. PACS-2 is phosphorylated at Ser437 in vivo, and pharmacologic and genetic studies demonstrate Akt is an in vivo Ser437 kinase. Akt cooperates with 14-3-3 to regulate the homeostatic and apoptotic properties of PACS-2 that mediate TRAIL action. Phosphorylated Ser437 binds 14-3-3 with high affinity, which represses PACS-2 apoptotic activity and is required for PACS-2 to mediate trafficking of membrane cargo. TRAIL triggers dephosphorylation of Ser437, reprogramming PACS-2 to promote apoptosis. Together, these studies identify the phosphorylation state of PACS-2 Ser437 as a molecular switch that integrates cellular homeostasis with TRAIL-induced apoptosis. PMID:19481529

  15. The Shroom family proteins play broad roles in the morphogenesis of thickened epithelial sheets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chanjae; Le, Minh-Phuong; Wallingford, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Thickened epithelial sheets are found in most organ systems, but the mechanisms governing their morphogenesis remain poorly defined. We show here that Shroom family proteins are broadly involved in generating thickened epithelial sheets. Through in situ hybridization, we report temporal and spatial expression patterns of the four Shroom family members during early Xenopus development from oocytes to tadpole stages. Shroom1 and 2 mRNAs are maternally expressed, while Shroom3 and Shroom4 are zygotic transcripts. During later development, all four Shroom family proteins are broadly expressed in developing epithelial organs, and the epithelial cells that express Shrooms are elongated. Moreover, we show that ectopic expression of Shroom2, like Shroom3, is able to increase cell height and that loss of Shroom2 function results in a failure of cell elongation in the neural epithelium. These data suggest that Shroom family proteins play an important role in the morphogenesis of several different embryonic epithelial tissues. PMID:19384856

  16. The Nonstructural Proteins of Nipah Virus Play a Key Role in Pathogenicity in Experimentally Infected Animals

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Misako; Guillaume, Vanessa; Sato, Hiroki; Fujita, Kentaro; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Ikeda, Fusako; Omi, Mio; Muto-Terao, Yuri; Wild, T. Fabian; Kai, Chieko

    2010-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) P gene encodes P protein and three accessory proteins (V, C and W). It has been reported that all four P gene products have IFN antagonist activity when the proteins were transiently expressed. However, the role of those accessory proteins in natural infection with NiV remains unknown. We generated recombinant NiVs lacking V, C or W protein, rNiV(V−), rNiV(C−), and rNiV(W−), respectively, to analyze the functions of these proteins in infected cells and the implications in in vivo pathogenicity. All the recombinants grew well in cell culture, although the maximum titers of rNiV(V−) and rNiV(C−) were lower than the other recombinants. The rNiV(V−), rNiV(C−) and rNiV(W−) suppressed the IFN response as well as the parental rNiV, thereby indicating that the lack of each accessory protein does not significantly affect the inhibition of IFN signaling in infected cells. In experimentally infected golden hamsters, rNiV(V−) and rNiV(C−) but not the rNiV(W−) virus showed a significant reduction in virulence. These results suggest that V and C proteins play key roles in NiV pathogenicity, and the roles are independent of their IFN-antagonist activity. This is the first report that identifies the molecular determinants of NiV in pathogenicity in vivo. PMID:20856799

  17. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:27166948

  18. The Salmonella effector protein SifA plays a dual role in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weidong; Moest, Thomas; Zhao, Yaya; Guilhon, Aude-Agnès; Buffat, Christophe; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Méresse, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    The virulence of Salmonella relies on the expression of effector proteins that the bacterium injects inside infected cells. Salmonella enters eukaryotic cells and resides in a vacuolar compartment on which a number of effector proteins such as SifA are found. SifA plays an essential role in Salmonella virulence. It is made of two distinct domains. The N-terminal domain of SifA interacts with the host protein SKIP. This interaction regulates vacuolar membrane dynamics. The C-terminal has a fold similar to other bacterial effector domains having a guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity. Although SifA interacts with RhoA, it does not stimulate the dissociation of GDP and the activation of this GTPase. Hence it remains unknown whether the C-terminal domain contributes to the function of SifA in virulence. We used a model of SKIP knockout mice to show that this protein mediates the host susceptibility to salmonellosis and to establish that SifA also contributes to Salmonella virulence independently of its interaction with SKIP. We establish that the C-terminal domain of SifA mediates this SKIP-independent contribution. Moreover, we show that the two domains of SifA are functionally linked and participate to the same signalling cascade that supports Salmonella virulence. PMID:26268777

  19. A Host Small GTP-binding Protein ARL8 Plays Crucial Roles in Tobamovirus RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Nishikiori, Masaki; Mori, Masashi; Dohi, Koji; Okamura, Hideyasu; Katoh, Etsuko; Naito, Satoshi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), like other eukaryotic positive-strand RNA viruses, replicates its genomic RNA in replication complexes formed on intracellular membranes. Previous studies showed that a host seven-pass transmembrane protein TOM1 is necessary for efficient ToMV multiplication. Here, we show that a small GTP-binding protein ARL8, along with TOM1, is co-purified with a FLAG epitope-tagged ToMV 180K replication protein from solubilized membranes of ToMV-infected tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells. When solubilized membranes of ToMV-infected tobacco cells that expressed FLAG-tagged ARL8 were subjected to immunopurification with anti-FLAG antibody, ToMV 130K and 180K replication proteins and TOM1 were co-purified and the purified fraction showed RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity that transcribed ToMV RNA. From uninfected cells, TOM1 co-purified with FLAG-tagged ARL8 less efficiently, suggesting that a complex containing ToMV replication proteins, TOM1, and ARL8 are formed on membranes in infected cells. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ARL8 consists of four family members. Simultaneous mutations in two specific ARL8 genes completely inhibited tobamovirus multiplication. In an in vitro ToMV RNA translation-replication system, the lack of either TOM1 or ARL8 proteins inhibited the production of replicative-form RNA, indicating that TOM1 and ARL8 are required for efficient negative-strand RNA synthesis. When ToMV 130K protein was co-expressed with TOM1 and ARL8 in yeast, RNA 5′-capping activity was detected in the membrane fraction. This activity was undetectable or very weak when the 130K protein was expressed alone or with either TOM1 or ARL8. Taken together, these results suggest that TOM1 and ARL8 are components of ToMV RNA replication complexes and play crucial roles in a process toward activation of the replication proteins' RNA synthesizing and capping functions. PMID:22174675

  20. A host small GTP-binding protein ARL8 plays crucial roles in tobamovirus RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Nishikiori, Masaki; Mori, Masashi; Dohi, Koji; Okamura, Hideyasu; Katoh, Etsuko; Naito, Satoshi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2011-12-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), like other eukaryotic positive-strand RNA viruses, replicates its genomic RNA in replication complexes formed on intracellular membranes. Previous studies showed that a host seven-pass transmembrane protein TOM1 is necessary for efficient ToMV multiplication. Here, we show that a small GTP-binding protein ARL8, along with TOM1, is co-purified with a FLAG epitope-tagged ToMV 180K replication protein from solubilized membranes of ToMV-infected tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells. When solubilized membranes of ToMV-infected tobacco cells that expressed FLAG-tagged ARL8 were subjected to immunopurification with anti-FLAG antibody, ToMV 130K and 180K replication proteins and TOM1 were co-purified and the purified fraction showed RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity that transcribed ToMV RNA. From uninfected cells, TOM1 co-purified with FLAG-tagged ARL8 less efficiently, suggesting that a complex containing ToMV replication proteins, TOM1, and ARL8 are formed on membranes in infected cells. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ARL8 consists of four family members. Simultaneous mutations in two specific ARL8 genes completely inhibited tobamovirus multiplication. In an in vitro ToMV RNA translation-replication system, the lack of either TOM1 or ARL8 proteins inhibited the production of replicative-form RNA, indicating that TOM1 and ARL8 are required for efficient negative-strand RNA synthesis. When ToMV 130K protein was co-expressed with TOM1 and ARL8 in yeast, RNA 5'-capping activity was detected in the membrane fraction. This activity was undetectable or very weak when the 130K protein was expressed alone or with either TOM1 or ARL8. Taken together, these results suggest that TOM1 and ARL8 are components of ToMV RNA replication complexes and play crucial roles in a process toward activation of the replication proteins' RNA synthesizing and capping functions. PMID:22174675

  1. Turnip vein clearing virus movement protein nuclear activity: Do Tobamovirus movement proteins play a role in immune response suppression?

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Plant viruses' cell-to-cell movement requires the function of virally encoded movement proteins (MPs). The Tobamovirus, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has served as the model virus to study the activities of single MPs. However, since TMV does not infect the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana I have used a related Tobamovirus, Turnip vein-clearing virus (TVCV). I recently showed that, despite belonging to the same genus, the behavior of the 2 viruses MPs differ significantly during infection. Most notably, MPTVCV, but not MPTMV, targets the nucleus and induces the formation of F actin-containing filaments that associate with chromatin. Mutational analyses showed that nuclear localization of MPTVCV was necessary for TVCV local and systemic infection in both Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis. In this addendum, I propose possible targets for the MPTVCV nuclear activity, and suggest viewing MPs as viral effector-like proteins, playing a role in the inhibition of plant defense. PMID:26237173

  2. ErbB2, FoxM1 and 14-3-3ζ prime breast cancer cells for invasion in response to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kambach, DM; Sodi, VL; Lelkes, PI; Azizkhan-Clifford, J; Reginato, MJ

    2014-01-01

    ErbB2 is frequently highly expressed in premalignant breast cancers, including ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS); however, little is known about the signals or pathways it contributes to progression into the invasive/malignant state. Radiotherapy is often used to treat early premalignant lesions regardless of ErbB2 status. Here, we show that clinically relevant doses of ionizing radiation (IR)-induce cellular invasion of ErbB2-expressing breast cancer cells, as well as MCF10A cells overexpressing ErbB2. ErbB2-negative breast cancer cells, such as MCF7 and T47D, do not invade following treatment with IR nor do MCF10A cells overexpressing epidermal growth factor receptor. ErbB2 becomes phosphorylated at tyrosine 877 in a dose- and time- dependent manner following exposure to X-rays, and activates downstream signaling cascades including PI3K/Akt. Inhibition of these pathways, as well as inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with antioxidants, prevents IR-induced invasion. Activation of ErbB2-dependent signaling results in upregulation of the forkhead family transcription factor, FoxM1, and its transcriptional targets, including matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). Inhibition of FoxM1 by RNA interference prevented induction of invasion by IR, and overexpression of FoxM1 in MCF10A cells was sufficient to promote IR-induced invasion. Moreover, we found that 14-3-3ζ is also upregulated by IR in cancer cells in a ROS-dependent manner, is required for IR-induced invasion in ErbB2-positive breast cancer cells and together with FoxM1 is sufficient for invasion in ErbB2-negative breast cancer cells. Thus, our data show that IR-mediated activation of ErbB2 and induction of 14-3-3ζ collaborate to regulate FoxM1 and promote invasion of breast cancer cells and furthermore, may serve as therapeutic targets to enhance radiosensitivity of breast cancers. PMID:23318431

  3. Oligouridylate Binding Protein 1b Plays an Integral Role in Plant Heat Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cam Chau; Nakaminami, Kentaro; Matsui, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Kurihara, Yukio; Toyooka, Kiminori; Tanaka, Maho; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs), which are formed in the plant cytoplasm under stress conditions, are transient dynamic sites (particles) for mRNA storage. SGs are actively involved in protecting mRNAs from degradation. Oligouridylate binding protein 1b (UBP1b) is a component of SGs. The formation of microscopically visible cytoplasmic foci, referred to as UBP1b SG, was induced by heat treatment in UBP1b-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants (UBP1b-ox). A detailed understanding of the function of UBP1b, however, is still not clear. UBP1b-ox plants displayed increased heat tolerance, relative to control plants, while ubp1b mutants were more sensitive to heat stress than control plants. Microarray analysis identified 117 genes whose expression was heat-inducible and higher in the UBP1b-ox plants. RNA decay analysis was performed using cordycepin, a transcriptional inhibitor. In order to determine if those genes serve as targets of UBP1b, the rate of RNA degradation of a DnaJ heat shock protein and a stress-associated protein (AtSAP3) in UBP1b-ox plants was slower than in control plants; indicating that the mRNAs of these genes were protected within the UBP1b SG granule. Collectively, these data demonstrate that UBP1b plays an integral role in heat stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27379136

  4. The shroom family proteins play broad roles in the morphogenesis of thickened epithelial sheets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chanjae; Le, Minh-Phuong; Wallingford, John B

    2009-06-01

    Thickened epithelial sheets are found in a wide variety of organ systems and the mechanisms governing their morphogenesis remain poorly defined. We show here, through expression patterns and functional studies, that Shroom family proteins are broadly involved in generating thickened epithelial sheets. Through in situ hybridization, we report the temporal and spatial expression patterns of the four Shroom family members during early Xenopus development, from oocytes to tadpole stage embryos. Further, we show that Shroom1 and 2 mRNAs are maternally expressed, while Shroom3 and Shroom4 are zygotic transcripts. In addition, maternal Shroom1 and 2 mRNAs localize in the animal hemisphere of the Xenopus egg and early blastula. During later development, all four Shroom family proteins are broadly expressed in developing epithelial organs, and the epithelial cells that express Shrooms are elongated. Moreover, we show that ectopic expression of Shroom2, like Shroom3, is able to increase cell height and that loss of Shroom2 function results in a failure of cell elongation in the neural epithelium. Together, these data suggest that Shroom family proteins play an important role in the morphogenesis of several different epithelial tissues during development. Developmental Dynamics 238:1480-1491, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19384856

  5. Oligouridylate Binding Protein 1b Plays an Integral Role in Plant Heat Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cam Chau; Nakaminami, Kentaro; Matsui, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Kurihara, Yukio; Toyooka, Kiminori; Tanaka, Maho; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs), which are formed in the plant cytoplasm under stress conditions, are transient dynamic sites (particles) for mRNA storage. SGs are actively involved in protecting mRNAs from degradation. Oligouridylate binding protein 1b (UBP1b) is a component of SGs. The formation of microscopically visible cytoplasmic foci, referred to as UBP1b SG, was induced by heat treatment in UBP1b-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants (UBP1b-ox). A detailed understanding of the function of UBP1b, however, is still not clear. UBP1b-ox plants displayed increased heat tolerance, relative to control plants, while ubp1b mutants were more sensitive to heat stress than control plants. Microarray analysis identified 117 genes whose expression was heat-inducible and higher in the UBP1b-ox plants. RNA decay analysis was performed using cordycepin, a transcriptional inhibitor. In order to determine if those genes serve as targets of UBP1b, the rate of RNA degradation of a DnaJ heat shock protein and a stress-associated protein (AtSAP3) in UBP1b-ox plants was slower than in control plants; indicating that the mRNAs of these genes were protected within the UBP1b SG granule. Collectively, these data demonstrate that UBP1b plays an integral role in heat stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27379136

  6. Pneumococcal Surface Protein A Plays a Major Role in Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Saumyaa; Pujanauski, Lindsey; Colino, Jesus; Flora, Michael; Torres, Raul M; Tuomanen, Elaine; Snapper, Clifford M

    2016-05-01

    Intact, inactivated Streptococcus pneumoniae [including the unencapsulated S. pneumoniae, serotype 2 strain (R36A)] markedly inhibits the humoral immune response to coimmunized heterologous proteins, a property not observed with several other intact Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we determined the nature of this immunosuppressive property. Because phosphorylcholine (PC), a major haptenic component of teichoic acid in the S. pneumoniae cell wall, and lipoteichoic acid in the S. pneumoniae membrane were previously reported to be immunosuppressive when derived from filarial parasites, we determined whether R36A lacking PC (R36A(pc-)) was inhibitory. Indeed, although R36A(pc-) exhibited a markedly reduced level of inhibition of the IgG response to coimmunized chicken OVA (cOVA), no inhibition was observed when using several other distinct PC-expressing bacteria or a soluble, protein-PC conjugate. Further, treatment of R36A with periodate, which selectively destroys PC residues, had no effect on R36A-mediated inhibition. Because R36A(pc-) also lacks choline-binding proteins (CBPs) that require PC for cell wall attachment, and because treatment of R36A with trypsin eliminated its inhibitory activity, we incubated R36A in choline chloride, which selectively strips CBPs from its surface. R36A lacking CBPs lost most of its inhibitory property, whereas the supernatant of choline chloride-treated R36A, containing CBPs, was markedly inhibitory. Coimmunization studies using cOVA and various S. pneumoniae mutants, each genetically deficient in one of the CBPs, demonstrated that only S. pneumoniae lacking the CBP pneumococcal surface protein A lost its ability to inhibit the IgG anti-cOVA response. These results strongly suggest that PspA plays a major role in mediating the immunosuppressive property of S. pneumoniae. PMID:27029587

  7. Membrane associated protein flotillin-2 in Litopenaeus vannamei plays a role in WSSV infection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong; Guo, Guangran; Liu, Rongdiao; Wang, Chuanqi; Xu, Xun; Ruan, Lingwei

    2016-07-01

    Flotillin-2, an important protein of vesicular endocytosis, plays an essential role in a large number of cellular processes, including viruses and pathogen infection. In the present study, a flotillin-2 homolog in Litopenaeus vannamei, designed as Lvflotillin-2, was cloned and characterized. To analyze the putative role of Lvflotillin-2 during white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection, real-time quantitative PCR was performed. The result showed that the transcriptional level of Lvflotillin-2 was up-regulated significantly after virus challenge. Furthermore, upon WSSV stimulation, Lvflotillin-2 in shrimp cells could translocate from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments, and unexpectedly, also into nucleus. Additionally, depletion of Lvflotillin-2 inhibited WSSV gene ie1 transcription. It suggested that Lvflotillin-2 could be hijacked by WSSV. These observations indicated that Lvflotillin-2 was involved in WSSV infection, and presented here should be useful for gaining insight into shrimp immunity and WSSV pathogenesis. PMID:27079424

  8. The Arabidopsis cytosolic Acyl-CoA-binding proteins play combinatory roles in pollen development.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, An-Shan; Yeung, Edward C; Ye, Zi-Wei; Chye, Mee-Len

    2015-02-01

    In Arabidopsis, six acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) have been identified and they have been demonstrated to function in plant stress responses and development. Three of these AtACBPs (AtACBP4-AtACBP6) are cytosolic proteins and all are expressed in floral organs as well as in other tissues. The roles of cytosolic AtACBPs in floral development were addressed in this study. To this end, a T-DNA insertional knockout mutant of acbp5 was characterized before use in crosses with the already available acbp4 and acbp6 T-DNA knockout mutants to examine their independent and combinatory functions in floral development. The single-gene knockout mutations did not cause any significant phenotypic changes, while phenotypic deficiencies affecting siliques and pollen were observed in the double mutants (acbp4acbp6 and acbp5acbp6) and the acbp4acbp5acbp6 triple mutant. Vacuole accumulation in the acbp4acbp6, acbp5acbp6 and acbp4acbp5acbp6 pollen was the most severe abnormality occurring in the double and triple mutants. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed exine and oil body defects in the acbp4acbp5acbp6 mutant, which also displayed reduced ability in in vitro pollen germination. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing β-glucuronidase (GUS) driven from the various AtACBP promoters indicated that AtACBP6pro::GUS expression overlapped with AtACBP4pro::GUS expression in pollen grains and with AtACBP5pro::GUS expression in the microspores and tapetal cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the three cytosolic AtACBPs play combinatory roles in acyl-lipid metabolism during pollen development. PMID:25395473

  9. The T. brucei TRM5 methyltransferase plays an essential role in mitochondrial protein synthesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Zdeněk; Horáková, Eva; Rubio, Mary Anne T.; Sample, Paul; Fleming, Ian M.C.; Armocida, Stephanie; Lukeš, Julius; Alfonzo, Juan D.

    2013-01-01

    All tRNAs undergo post-transcriptional chemical modifications as part of their natural maturation pathway. Some modifications, especially those in the anticodon loop, play important functions in translational efficiency and fidelity. Among these, 1-methylguanosine, at position 37 (m1G37) of the anticodon loop in several tRNAs, is evolutionarily conserved and participates in translational reading frame maintenance. In eukaryotes, the tRNA methyltransferase TRM5 is responsible for m1G formation in nucleus-encoded as well as mitochondria-encoded tRNAs, reflecting the universal importance of this modification for protein synthesis. However, it is not clear what role, if any, mitochondrial TRM5 serves in organisms that do not encode tRNAs in their mitochondrial genomes. These organisms may easily satisfy the m1G37 requirement through their robust mitochondrial tRNA import mechanisms. We have explored this possibility in the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei and show that down-regulation of TRM5 by RNAi leads to the expected disappearance of m1G37, but with surprisingly little effect on cytoplasmic translation. On the contrary, lack of TRM5 causes a marked growth phenotype and a significant decrease in mitochondrial functions, including protein synthesis. These results suggest mitochondrial TRM5 may be needed to mature unmethylated tRNAs that reach the mitochondria and that could pose a problem for translational fidelity. This study also reveals an unexpected lack of import specificity between some fully matured and potentially defective tRNA species. PMID:23520175

  10. GPR55, a G-protein coupled receptor for lysophosphatidylinositol, plays a role in motor coordination.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Shan; Chen, Hongmei; Sun, Hao; Zhu, Jie; Jew, Chris P; Wager-Miller, James; Straiker, Alex; Spencer, Corinne; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is activated by lysophosphatidylinositols and some cannabinoids. Recent studies found prominent roles for GPR55 in neuropathic/inflammatory pain, cancer and bone physiology. However, little is known about the role of GPR55 in CNS development and function. To address this question, we performed a detailed characterization of GPR55 knockout mice using molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays. Quantitative PCR studies found that GPR55 mRNA was expressed (in order of decreasing abundance) in the striatum, hippocampus, forebrain, cortex, and cerebellum. GPR55 deficiency did not affect the concentrations of endocannabinoids and related lipids or mRNA levels for several components of the endocannabinoid system in the hippocampus. Normal synaptic transmission and short-term as well as long-term synaptic plasticity were found in GPR55 knockout CA1 pyramidal neurons. Deleting GPR55 function did not affect behavioral assays assessing muscle strength, gross motor skills, sensory-motor integration, motor learning, anxiety or depressive behaviors. In addition, GPR55 null mutant mice exhibited normal contextual and auditory-cue conditioned fear learning and memory in a Pavlovian conditioned fear test. In contrast, when presented with tasks requiring more challenging motor responses, GPR55 knockout mice showed impaired movement coordination. Taken together, these results suggest that GPR55 plays a role in motor coordination, but does not strongly regulate CNS development, gross motor movement or several types of learned behavior. PMID:23565223

  11. Retinoblastoma Protein Plays Multiple Essential Roles in the Terminal Differentiation of Sertoli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nalam, Roopa L.; Andreu-Vieyra, Claudia; Braun, Robert E.; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    Retinoblastoma protein (RB) plays crucial roles in cell cycle control and cellular differentiation. Specifically, RB impairs the G1 to S phase transition by acting as a repressor of the E2F family of transcriptional activators while also contributing towards terminal differentiation by modulating the activity of tissue-specific transcription factors. To examine the role of RB in Sertoli cells, the androgen-dependant somatic support cell of the testis, we created a Sertoli cell-specific conditional knockout of Rb. Initially, loss of RB has no gross effect on Sertoli cell function because the mice are fertile with normal testis weights at 6 wk of age. However, by 10–14 wk of age, mutant mice demonstrate severe Sertoli cell dysfunction and infertility. We show that mutant mature Sertoli cells continue cycling with defective regulation of multiple E2F1- and androgen-regulated genes and concurrent activation of apoptotic and p53-regulated genes. The most striking defects in mature Sertoli cell function are increased permeability of the blood-testis barrier, impaired tissue remodeling, and defective germ cell-Sertoli cell interactions. Our results demonstrate that RB is essential for proper terminal differentiation of Sertoli cells. PMID:19819985

  12. Understanding Protein Synthesis: A Role-Play Approach in Large Undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Cole, Oladipo

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of role play in a large undergraduate science class. The targeted population consisted of 298 students enrolled in 2 sections of an undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course taught by the same instructor. The section engaged in the role-play activity served as the study group, whereas the section…

  13. Combinatorial H3K9acS10ph histone modification in IgH locus S regions targets 14-3-3 adaptors and AID to specify antibody class-switch DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Li, Guideng; White, Clayton A; Lam, Tonika; Pone, Egest J; Tran, Daniel C; Hayama, Ken L; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-11-14

    Class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the antibody response, in that it changes the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) constant region, thereby diversifying biological effector functions of antibodies. The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-centered CSR machinery excises and rejoins DNA between an upstream (donor) and a downstream (acceptor) S region, which precede the respective constant region DNA. AID is stabilized on S regions by 14-3-3 adaptors. These adaptors display a high affinity for 5'-AGCT-3' repeats, which recur in all S regions. However, how 14-3-3, AID, and the CSR machinery target exclusively the donor and acceptor S regions is poorly understood. Here, we show that histone methyltransferases and acetyltransferases are induced by CD40 or Toll-like receptor signaling and catalyze H3K4me3 and H3K9ac/K14ac histone modifications, which are enriched in S regions but do not specify the S region targets of CSR. By contrast, the combinatorial H3K9acS10ph modification specifically marks the S regions set to recombine and directly recruits 14-3-3 adaptors for AID stabilization there. Inhibition of the enzymatic activity of GCN5 and PCAF histone acetyltransferases reduces H3K9acS10ph in S regions, 14-3-3 and AID stabilization, and CSR. Thus, H3K9acS10ph is a histone code that is "written" specifically in S regions and is "read" by 14-3-3 adaptors to target AID for CSR as an important biological outcome. PMID:24209747

  14. ClpB N-terminal domain plays a regulatory role in protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Rina; Farber, Patrick; Velyvis, Algirdas; Rennella, Enrico; Latham, Michael P.; Kay, Lewis E.

    2015-01-01

    ClpB/Hsp100 is an ATP-dependent disaggregase that solubilizes and reactivates protein aggregates in cooperation with the DnaK/Hsp70 chaperone system. The ClpB–substrate interaction is mediated by conserved tyrosine residues located in flexible loops in nucleotide-binding domain-1 that extend into the ClpB central pore. In addition to the tyrosines, the ClpB N-terminal domain (NTD) was suggested to provide a second substrate-binding site; however, the manner in which the NTD recognizes and binds substrate proteins has remained elusive. Herein, we present an NMR spectroscopy study to structurally characterize the NTD–substrate interaction. We show that the NTD includes a substrate-binding groove that specifically recognizes exposed hydrophobic stretches in unfolded or aggregated client proteins. Using an optimized segmental labeling technique in combination with methyl-transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) NMR, the interaction of client proteins with both the NTD and the pore-loop tyrosines in the 580-kDa ClpB hexamer has been characterized. Unlike contacts with the tyrosines, the NTD–substrate interaction is independent of the ClpB nucleotide state and protein conformational changes that result from ATP hydrolysis. The NTD interaction destabilizes client proteins, priming them for subsequent unfolding and translocation. Mutations in the NTD substrate-binding groove are shown to have a dramatic effect on protein translocation through the ClpB central pore, suggesting that, before their interaction with substrates, the NTDs block the translocation channel. Together, our findings provide both a detailed characterization of the NTD–substrate complex and insight into the functional regulatory role of the ClpB NTD in protein disaggregation. PMID:26621746

  15. Botrytis cinerea Protein O-Mannosyltransferases Play Critical Roles in Morphogenesis, Growth, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    González, Mario; Brito, Nélida; Frías, Marcos; González, Celedonio

    2013-01-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is crucial in determining the structure and function of numerous secreted and membrane-bound proteins. In fungi, this process begins with the addition of a mannose residue by protein O-mannosyltransferases (PMTs) in the lumen side of the ER membrane. We have generated mutants of the three Botrytis cinerea pmt genes to study their role in the virulence of this wide-range plant pathogen. B. cinerea PMTs, especially PMT2, are critical for the stability of the cell wall and are necessary for sporulation and for the generation of the extracellular matrix. PMTs are also individually required for full virulence in a variety of hosts, with a special role in the penetration of intact plant leaves. The most significant case is that of grapevine leaves, whose penetration requires the three functional PMTs. Furthermore, PMT2 also contributes significantly to fungal adherence on grapevine and tobacco leaves. Analysis of extracellular and membrane proteins showed significant changes in the pattern of protein secretion and glycosylation by the pmt mutants, and allowed the identification of new protein substrates putatively glycosylated by specific PMTs. Since plants do no possess these enzymes, PMTs constitute a promising target in the development of novel control strategies against B. cinerea. PMID:23762450

  16. PRKX, a Novel cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Member, Plays an Important Role in Development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sizhou; Li, Qian; Alberts, Ian; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-03-01

    The human protein kinase X gene (PRKX) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are both c-AMP-dependent serine/threonine protein kinases within the protein kinase AGC subgroup. Of all the protein kinases in this group, PRKX is the least studied. PRKX has been isolated from patients with chondrodysplasia punctate and is involved in numerous processes, including sexual differentiation and fertilization, normal kidney development and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), blood maturation, neural development, and angiogenesis in vitro. Although the role of PRKX in development and disease has been reported recently, the underlying mechanism of PRKX activity is largely unknown. In addition, based on the expression pattern of PRKX and the extensive role of PKA in disease and development, PRKX might have additional crucial functions that have not been addressed in the literature. In this review, we summarize the characteristics and developmental functions of PRKX that have been reported by recent studies. In particular, we elucidate the structural and functional differences between PRKX and PKA, as well as the possible roles of PRKX in development and related diseases. Finally, we propose future studies that could lead to important discoveries of more PRKX functions and the underlying mechanisms involved. PMID:26252946

  17. A Bemisia tabaci midgut protein interacts with begomoviruses and plays a role in virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Rana, Vipin Singh; Popli, Sonam; Saurav, Gunjan Kumar; Raina, Harpreet Singh; Chaubey, Rahul; Ramamurthy, V V; Rajagopal, R

    2016-05-01

    Begomoviruses are a major group of plant viruses, transmitted exclusively by Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) in a persistent circulative non-propagative manner. The information regarding molecular and cellular basis underlying Begomovirus - whitefly interaction is very scarce. Evidences have suggested that the insect gut possesses some crucial protein receptors that allow specific entry of virus into the insect haemolymph. We have performed yeast two hybrid gut cDNA expression library screening against coat protein of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCV) and Cotton leaf curl Rajasthan virus (CLCuV) as bait. Midgut protein (MGP) was the common protein found interacting with both ToLCV and CLCuV. MGP was localized in whole mount B. tabaci as well as in dissected guts through confocal microscopy. Pull down and dot blot assays confirmed in vitro interaction between ToLCV/CLCuV coat protein and MGP. Immunolocalization analysis also showed colocalization of ToLCV/CLCuV particles and MGP within insect's gut. Finally, anti-MGP antibody fed B. tabaci, exhibited 70% reduction in ToLCV transmission, suggesting a supportive role for MGP in virus transmission. PMID:26488331

  18. Cooperative hydration effect causes thermal unfolding of proteins and water activity plays a key role in protein stability in solutions.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Osato; Dozen, Michiko; Hirota, Kaede

    2016-08-01

    The protein unfolding process observed in a narrow temperature range was clearly explained by evaluating the small difference in the enthalpy of hydrogen-bonding between amino acid residues and the hydration of amino acid residue separately. In aqueous solutions, the effect of cosolute on the protein stability is primarily dependent on water activity, aw, the role of which has been long neglected in the literature. The effect of aw on protein stability works as a power law so that a small change in aw is amplified substantially through the cooperative hydration effect. In the present approach, the role of hydrophobic interaction stands behind. This affects protein stability indirectly through the change in solution structure caused by the existence of cosolute. PMID:26896315

  19. Responses of two protein-protein complexes to solvent stress: does water play a role at the interface?

    PubMed Central

    Kornblatt, J A; Kornblatt, M J; Hoa, G H; Mauk, A G

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed the stability of the cytochrome c-cytochrome b5 and cytochrome c-cytochrome c oxidase complexes as a function of solvent stress. High concentrations of glycerol were used to displace the two equilibria. Glycerol promotes complex formation between cytochrome c and cytochrome b5 but inhibits that between cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase. The results with cytochrome b5 and cytochrome c were expected; the association of this complex is largely entropy driven. Our interpretation is that the cytochrome c-cytochrome b5 complex excludes water. The results with the cytochrome c oxidase and cytochrome c couple were not expected. We interpret them to mean that either glycerol is binding to the oxidase, thereby displacing the cytochrome c, or that water is required at this protein-protein interface. A requirement for substantial quantities of water at the interface of some protein complexes is logical but has been reported only once. PMID:8241386

  20. Septate Junction Proteins Play Essential Roles in Morphogenesis Throughout Embryonic Development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sonia; Ward, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    The septate junction (SJ) is the occluding junction found in the ectodermal epithelia of invertebrate organisms, and is essential to maintain chemically distinct compartments in epithelial organs, to provide the blood–brain barrier in the nervous system, and to provide an important line of defense against invading pathogens. More than 20 genes have been identified to function in the establishment or maintenance of SJs in Drosophila melanogaster. Numerous studies have demonstrated the cell biological function of these proteins in establishing the occluding junction, whereas very few studies have examined further developmental roles for them. Here we examined embryos with mutations in nine different core SJ genes and found that all nine result in defects in embryonic development as early as germ band retraction, with the most penetrant defect observed in head involution. SJ genes are also required for cell shape changes and cell rearrangements that drive the elongation of the salivary gland during midembryogenesis. Interestingly, these developmental events occur at a time prior to the formation of the occluding junction, when SJ proteins localize along the lateral membrane and have not yet coalesced into the region of the SJ. Together, these observations reveal an underappreciated role for a large group of SJ genes in essential developmental events during embryogenesis, and suggest that the function of these proteins in facilitating cell shape changes and rearrangements is independent of their role in the occluding junction. PMID:27261004

  1. Septate Junction Proteins Play Essential Roles in Morphogenesis Throughout Embryonic Development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sonia; Ward, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The septate junction (SJ) is the occluding junction found in the ectodermal epithelia of invertebrate organisms, and is essential to maintain chemically distinct compartments in epithelial organs, to provide the blood-brain barrier in the nervous system, and to provide an important line of defense against invading pathogens. More than 20 genes have been identified to function in the establishment or maintenance of SJs in Drosophila melanogaster Numerous studies have demonstrated the cell biological function of these proteins in establishing the occluding junction, whereas very few studies have examined further developmental roles for them. Here we examined embryos with mutations in nine different core SJ genes and found that all nine result in defects in embryonic development as early as germ band retraction, with the most penetrant defect observed in head involution. SJ genes are also required for cell shape changes and cell rearrangements that drive the elongation of the salivary gland during midembryogenesis. Interestingly, these developmental events occur at a time prior to the formation of the occluding junction, when SJ proteins localize along the lateral membrane and have not yet coalesced into the region of the SJ. Together, these observations reveal an underappreciated role for a large group of SJ genes in essential developmental events during embryogenesis, and suggest that the function of these proteins in facilitating cell shape changes and rearrangements is independent of their role in the occluding junction. PMID:27261004

  2. Outer membrane Protein A plays a role in pathogenesis of Acinetobacter nosocomialis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Woo; Oh, Man Hwan; Jun, So Hyun; Jeon, Hyejin; Kim, Seung Il; Kim, Kwangho; Lee, Yoo Chul; Lee, Je Chul

    2016-05-18

    Acinetobacter nosocomialis is an important nosocomial pathogen that causes a variety of human infections. However, the specific virulence factors of this microorganism have not yet been determined. We investigated the role of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) in the pathogenesis of A. nosocomialis. A ΔompA mutant of the A. nosocomialis ATCC 17903(T) strain was constructed using markerless gene deletion. The ΔompA mutant displayed reduced biofilm formation in polystyrene tubes and reduced adherence to A549 cells in comparison to the wild-type strain. These virulence traits of the ΔompA mutant strain were restored when the ompA gene was complemented. Cytotoxicity was not significantly different between the wild-type strain and the ΔompA mutant when A549 cells were infected with bacteria or treated with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). However, OMVs from the wild-type strain induced cytotoxicity in HEp-2 cells, whereas OMVs from the ΔompA mutant did not induce cytotoxicity. Proteomic analysis of OMVs revealed that OmpA influenced the distribution of envelope and periplasmic proteins. Overall, this study is the first report that links OmpA to A. nosocomialis pathogenesis, and highlights OmpA as a putative target to develop anti-virulence agents or vaccines against A. nosocomialis infection. PMID:26759990

  3. Cockayne syndrome group B protein (CSB) plays a general role in chromatin maintenance and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John C.; Bailey, Arnold D.; Weiner, Alan M.

    2006-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is an inherited neurodevelopmental disorder with progeroid features. Although the genes responsible for CS have been implicated in a variety of DNA repair- and transcription-related pathways, the nature of the molecular defect in CS remains mysterious. Using expression microarrays and a unique method for comparative expression analysis called L2L, we sought to define this defect in cells lacking a functional CS group B (CSB) protein, the SWI/SNF-like ATPase responsible for most cases of CS. Remarkably, many of the genes regulated by CSB are also affected by inhibitors of histone deacetylase and DNA methylation, as well as by defects in poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase function and RNA polymerase II elongation. Moreover, consistent with these microarray expression data, CSB-null cells are sensitive to inhibitors of histone deacetylase or poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase. Our data indicate a general role for CSB protein in maintenance and remodeling of chromatin structure and suggest that CS is a disease of transcriptional deregulation caused by misexpression of growth-suppressive, inflammatory, and proapoptotic pathways. PMID:16772382

  4. IRE1/bZIP60-Mediated Unfolded Protein Response Plays Distinct Roles in Plant Immunity and Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Francisca; Boatwright, Jon Lucas; Moreno, Ignacio; Jordan, Melissa R.; Chen, Yani; Brandizzi, Federica; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated protein secretion and quality control have been shown to play an important role in immune responses in both animals and plants. In mammals, the ER membrane-located IRE1 kinase/endoribonuclease, a key regulator of unfolded protein response (UPR), is required for plasma cell development to accommodate massive secretion of immunoglobulins. Plant cells can secrete the so-called pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins with antimicrobial activities upon pathogen challenge. However, whether IRE1 plays any role in plant immunity is not known. Arabidopsis thaliana has two copies of IRE1, IRE1a and IRE1b. Here, we show that both IRE1a and IRE1b are transcriptionally induced during chemically-induced ER stress, bacterial pathogen infection and treatment with the immune signal salicylic acid (SA). However, we found that IRE1a plays a predominant role in the secretion of PR proteins upon SA treatment. Consequently, the ire1a mutant plants show enhanced susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen and are deficient in establishing systemic acquired resistance (SAR), whereas ire1b is unaffected in these responses. We further demonstrate that the immune deficiency in ire1a is due to a defect in SA- and pathogen-triggered, IRE1-mediated cytoplasmic splicing of the bZIP60 mRNA, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the expression of UPR-responsive genes. Consistently, IRE1a is preferentially required for bZIP60 splicing upon pathogen infection, while IRE1b plays a major role in bZIP60 processing upon Tunicamycin (Tm)-induced stress. We also show that SA-dependent induction of UPR-responsive genes is altered in the bzip60 mutant resulting in a moderate susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen. These results indicate that the IRE1/bZIP60 branch of UPR is a part of the plant response to pathogens for which the two Arabidopsis IRE1 isoforms play only partially overlapping roles and that IRE1 has both bZIP60-dependent and bZIP60-independent functions in

  5. Gravity Plays an Important Role in Muscle Development and the Differentiation of Contractile Protein Phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory A.; Haddad, Fadia; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    2003-01-01

    Several muscles in the body exist mainly to work against gravity. Whether gravity is important in the development of these muscles is not known. By examining the basic proteins that compose muscle, questions about the role of gravity in muscle development can be answered. Myosin heavy chains (MHCs) are a family of proteins critically important for muscle contraction. Several types of MHCs exist (e.g., neonatal, slow, fast), and each type is produced by a particular gene. Neonatal MHCs are produced early in life. Slow MHCs are important in antigravity muscles, and fast MHCs are found in fast-twitch power muscles. The gene that is turned on or expressed will determine which MHC is produced. Early in development, antigravity skeletal muscles (muscles that work against gravity) normally produce a combination of the neonatal/embryonic MHCs. The expression of these primitive MHCs is repressed early in development; and the adult slow and fast MHC genes become fully expressed. We tested the hypothesis that weightbearing activity is critical for inducing the normal expression of the slow MHC gene typically expressed in adult antigravity muscles. Also, we hypothesized that thyroid hormone, but not opposition to gravity, is necessary for expressing the adult fast IIb MHC gene essential for high-intensity muscle performance. Groups of normal thyroid and thyroid-deficient neonatal rats were studied after their return from the 16-day Neurolab mission and compared to matched controls. The results suggest: (1) Weightlessness impaired body and limb skeletal muscle growth in both normal and thyroid-deficient animals. Antigravity muscles were impaired more than those used primarily for locomotion andor nonweightbearing activity. (2) Systemic and muscle expression of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), an important body and tissue growth factor, was depressed in flight animals. (3) Normal slow, type I MHC gene expression was markedly repressed in the normal thyroid flight group. (4

  6. Inner nuclear envelope protein SUN1 plays a prominent role in mammalian mRNA export

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Noegel, Angelika A.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear export of messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) can be roughly classified into two forms: bulk and specific export, involving an nuclear RNA export factor 1 (NXF1)-dependent pathway and chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent pathway, respectively. SUN proteins constitute the inner nuclear envelope component of the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Here, we show that mammalian cells require SUN1 for efficient nuclear mRNP export. The results indicate that both SUN1 and SUN2 interact with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) F/H and hnRNP K/J. SUN1 depletion inhibits the mRNP export, with accumulations of both hnRNPs and poly(A)+RNA in the nucleus. Leptomycin B treatment indicates that SUN1 functions in mammalian mRNA export involving the NXF1-dependent pathway. SUN1 mediates mRNA export through its association with mRNP complexes via a direct interaction with NXF1. Additionally, SUN1 associates with the NPC through a direct interaction with Nup153, a nuclear pore component involved in mRNA export. Taken together, our results reveal that the inner nuclear envelope protein SUN1 has additional functions aside from being a central component of the LINC complex and that it is an integral component of the mammalian mRNA export pathway suggesting a model whereby SUN1 recruits NXF1-containing mRNP onto the nuclear envelope and hands it over to Nup153. PMID:26476453

  7. Two Class A High-Molecular-Weight Penicillin-Binding Proteins of Bacillus subtilis Play Redundant Roles in Sporulation

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Derrell C.; Driks, Adam; Popham, David L.

    2001-01-01

    The four class A penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of Bacillus subtilis appear to play functionally redundant roles in polymerizing the peptidoglycan (PG) strands of the vegetative-cell and spore walls. The ywhE product was shown to bind penicillin, so the gene and gene product were renamed pbpG and PBP2d, respectively. Construction of mutant strains lacking multiple class A PBPs revealed that, while PBP2d plays no obvious role in vegetative-wall synthesis, it does play a role in spore PG synthesis. A pbpG null mutant produced spore PG structurally similar to that of the wild type; however, electron microscopy revealed that in a significant number of these spores the PG did not completely surround the spore core. In a pbpF pbpG double mutant this spore PG defect was apparent in every spore produced, indicating that these two gene products play partially redundant roles. A normal amount of spore PG was produced in the double mutant, but it was frequently produced in large masses on either side of the forespore. The double-mutant spore PG had structural alterations indicative of improper cortex PG synthesis, including twofold decreases in production of muramic δ-lactam and l-alanine side chains and a slight increase in cross-linking. Sporulation gene expression in the pbpF pbpG double mutant was normal, but the double-mutant spores failed to reach dormancy and subsequently degraded their spore PG. We suggest that these two forespore-synthesized PBPs are required for synthesis of the spore germ cell wall, the first layer of spore PG synthesized on the surface of the inner forespore membrane, and that in the absence of the germ cell wall the cells lack a template needed for proper synthesis of the spore cortex, the outer layers of spore PG, by proteins on the outer forespore membrane. PMID:11567005

  8. Mitochondrial antiviral-signalling protein plays an essential role in host immunity against human metapneumovirus

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Junfang; Chen, Yu; Liu, Guangliang; Ren, Junping; Go, Caroline; Ivanciuc, Teodora; Deepthi, Kolli; Casola, Antonella; Garofalo, Roberto P.

    2015-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a common cause of respiratory tract infection in the paediatrics population. Recently, we and others have shown that retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) are essential for hMPV-induced cellular antiviral signalling. However, the contribution of those receptors to host immunity against pulmonary hMPV infection is largely unexplored. In this study, mice deficient in mitochondrial antiviral-signalling protein (MAVS), an adaptor of RLRs, were used to investigate the role(s) of these receptors in pulmonary immune responses to hMPV infection. MAVS deletion significantly impaired the induction of antiviral and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the recruitment of immune cells to the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by hMPV. Compared with WT mice, mice lacking MAVS demonstrated decreased abilities to activate pulmonary dendritic cells (DCs) and abnormal primary T-cell responses to hMPV infection. In addition, mice deficient in MAVS had a higher peak of viral load at day 5 post-infection (p.i.) than WT mice, but were able to clear hMPV by day 7 p.i. similarly to WT mice. Taken together, our data indicate a role of MAVS-mediated pathways in the pulmonary immune responses to hMPV infection and the early control of hMPV replication. PMID:25953917

  9. Heat shock protein 27 and gross cystic disease fluid protein 15 play critical roles in molecular apocrine breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Feng, Changyun; Liu, Junjun; Zhao, Lin; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Ning; Niu, Yun

    2016-06-01

    Molecular apocrine breast cancer (MABC) has a distinct hormonal profile, being estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) negative but androgen receptor (AR) positive. The clinical significance of MABC and its relative variables have not been absolutely clarified and remain to be determined. Five hundred cases of invasive breast carcinoma were randomly selected in this study, including 158 MABC cases and 342 nonMABC cases. Expression of ER, PR, epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), Ki67, AR, gross cystic disease fluid protein 15 (GCDFP15), and heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Differences of continuous variables between MABC and nonMABC subgroups were evaluated by the chi-square test. The Kaplan-Meier method was performed to evaluate disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). The MABC subgroup had higher histological grade, bigger tumor size, more lymph node metastasis, and higher pTNM stage than the nonMABC subgroup (P < 0.05), and patients with MABC had poorer prognosis than those of the nonMABC subgroup (P < 0.05). Both GCDFP15 and HSP27 were expressed differently in the MABC and nonMABC subgroups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, in the MABC subgroup, positive HSP27 expression indicated higher risk of recurrence (P < 0.05) and positive GCDFP15 expression was also a poor marker for patient outcome (P < 0.05). MABC patients with HSP27 and GCDFP15 co-expression had worse outcome (P < 0.05). Our data suggested that MABC had a high risk of recurrence. Positive expression of both GCDFP15 and HSP27 were correlated with MABC malignancy. Targeting AR and HSP27 at the same time might offer a useful strategy to MABC. PMID:26711786

  10. A complex of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein with mammalian verprolins plays an important role in monocyte chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Shigeru

    2006-06-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) is a product of the gene defective in an Xid disorder, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. WASP expression is limited to hemopoietic cells, and WASP regulates the actin cytoskeleton. It has been reported that monocytes/macrophages from WASP-deficient Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome patients are severely defective in chemotaxis, resulting in recurrent infection. However, the molecular basis of such chemotactic defects is not understood. Recently, the WASP N-terminal region was found to bind to the three mammalian verprolin homologs: WASP interacting protein (WIP); WIP and CR16 homologous protein (WICH)/WIP-related protein (WIRE); and CR16. Verprolin was originally found to play an important role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton in yeast. We have shown that WASP, WIP, and WICH/WIRE are expressed predominantly in the human monocyte cell line THP-1 and that WIP and WICH/WIRE are involved in monocyte chemotaxis. When WASP binding to verprolins was blocked, chemotactic migration of monocytes was impaired in both THP-1 cells and primary human monocytes. Increased expression of WASP and WIP enhanced monocyte chemotaxis. Blocking WASP binding to verprolins impaired cell polarization but not actin polymerization. These results indicate that a complex of WASP with mammalian verprolins plays an important role in chemotaxis of monocytes. Our results suggest that WASP and mammalian verprolins function as a unit in monocyte chemotaxis and that the activity of this unit is critical to establish cell polarization. In addition, our results also indicate that the WASP-verprolin complex is involved in other functions such as podosome formation and phagocytosis. PMID:16709815

  11. Highly Conserved Histidine Plays a Dual Catalytic Role in Protein Splicing: a pKa Shift Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhenming; Shemella, Philip T.; Liu, Yangzhong; McCallum, Scott A.; Pereira, Brian; Nayak, Saroj K.; Belfort, Georges; Belfort, Marlene; Wang, Chunyu

    2009-01-01

    Protein splicing is a precise auto-catalytic process in which an intein excises itself from a precursor with the concomitant ligation of the flanking sequences. Protein splicing occurs through acid-base catalysis in which the ionization states of active site residues are crucial to the reaction mechanism. In inteins, several conserved histidines have been shown to play important roles in protein splicing, including the most conserved “B-block” histidine. In this study, we have combined NMR pKa determination with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) modeling to study engineered inteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtu) RecA intein. We demonstrate a dramatic pKa shift for the invariant B-block histidine, the most conserved residue among inteins. The B-block histidine has a pKa of 7.3 ± 0.6 in a precursor and a pKa of < 3.5 in a spliced intein. The pKa values and QM/MM data suggest that the B-block histidine has a dual role in the acid-base catalysis of protein splicing. This histidine likely acts as a general base to initiate splicing with an acyl shift and then as a general acid to cause the breakdown of the scissile bond. The proposed pKa shift mechanism accounts for the biochemical data supporting the essential role for the B-block histidine and for the absolute sequence conservation of this residue. PMID:19630416

  12. The Sec1/Munc18 Protein Groove Plays a Conserved Role in Interaction with Sec9p/SNAP-25.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Chernov, Konstantin G; Aro, Nina; Wohlfahrt, Gerd; Olkkonen, Vesa M; Jäntti, Jussi

    2016-02-01

    The Sec1/Munc18 (SM) proteins constitute a conserved family with essential functions in SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. Recently, a new protein-protein interaction site in Sec1p, designated the groove, was proposed. Here, we show that a sec1 groove mutant yeast strain, sec1(w24), displays temperature-sensitive growth and secretion defects. The yeast Sec1p and mammalian Munc18-1 grooves were shown to play an important role in the interaction with the SNAREs Sec9p and SNAP-25b, respectively. Incubation of SNAP-25b with the Munc18-1 groove mutant resulted in a lag in the kinetics of SNARE complex assembly in vitro when compared with wild-type Munc18-1. The SNARE regulator SRO7 was identified as a multicopy suppressor of sec1(w24) groove mutant and an intact Sec1p groove was required for the plasma membrane targeting of Sro7p-SNARE complexes. Simultaneous inactivation of Sec1p groove and SRO7 resulted in reduced levels of exocytic SNARE complexes. Our results identify the groove as a conserved interaction surface in SM proteins. The results indicate that this structural element is important for interactions with Sec9p/SNAP-25 and participates, in concert with Sro7p, in the initial steps of SNARE complex assembly. PMID:26572066

  13. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in the lymphoid organ of Vibrio harveyi-infected Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Chaikeeratisak, Vorrapon; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Wang, Hao-Ching; Lo, Chu Fang; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2012-05-01

    The protein expression profiles of the lymphoid organ, taken from mock and systemic Vibrio harveyi-infected Penaeus monodon at 6 and 48 h post infection, were revealed. The considerable changes in the expression level of several proteins were observed between the mock and V. harveyi-infected shrimps. From 30 analyzed protein spots with 27 differentially expressed, 21 were known proteins with the most common of these being cytoskeleton proteins (33%) which were all down-regulated upon systemic bacterial infection. Other six proteins including four proteins that are involved in the shrimp immunity (alpha-2-macroglobulin, transglutaminase, heat shock protein 1 and hemocyanin subunit Y), and two proteins that are involved in metabolism (triosephosphate isomerase) and cell signaling (14-3-3 like protein), displayed significantly decreased expression levels. There was, however, an increase in the expression level of the ATP synthase beta subunit, a protein involved in energy balance. Transcription levels of ATP synthase beta subunit and 14-3-3 like protein were up- and down-regulated, respectively, in accord with the observed protein expression levels, but the alpha-2-macroglobulin transcript levels were significantly increased in contrast to the decreased protein expression levels. Interestingly, partial gene silencing of ATP synthase beta subunit revealed a high cumulative mortality of the knockdown shrimps (73.3%) and a dramatic reduction of the total hemocyte numbers in the survival shrimps. These altered proteins are likely to play essential roles in shrimp defense against the pathogenic bacterium V. harveyi. PMID:22302389

  14. Chitinase-like protein CTL1 plays a role in altering root system architecture in response to multiple environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Christian; Porco, Silvana; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Bush, Daniel R

    2010-02-01

    Plant root architecture is highly responsive to changes in nutrient availability. However, the molecular mechanisms governing the adaptability of root systems to changing environmental conditions is poorly understood. A screen for abnormal root architecture responses to high nitrate in the growth medium was carried out for a population of ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The growth and root architecture of the arm (for anion altered root morphology) mutant described here was similar to wild-type plants when grown on low to moderate nitrate concentrations, but on high nitrate, arm exhibited reduced primary root elongation, radial swelling, increased numbers of lateral roots, and increased root hair density when compared to the wild-type control. High concentrations of chloride and sucrose induced the same phenotype. In contrast, hypocotyl elongation in the dark was decreased independently of nitrate availability. Positional cloning identified a point mutation in the AtCTL1 gene that encodes a chitinase-related protein, although molecular and biochemical analysis showed that this protein does not possess chitinase enzymatic activity. CTL1 appears to play two roles in plant growth and development based on the constitutive effect of the arm mutation on primary root growth and its conditional impact on root architecture. We hypothesize that CTL1 plays a role in determining cell wall rigidity and that the activity is differentially regulated by pathways that are triggered by environmental conditions. Moreover, we show that mutants of some subunits of the cellulose synthase complex phenocopy the conditional effect on root architecture under nonpermissive conditions, suggesting they are also differentially regulated in response to a changing environment. PMID:20007445

  15. A Lotus japonicus Cochaperone Protein Interacts With the Ubiquitin-Like Domain Protein CIP73 and Plays a Negative Regulatory Role in Nodulation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heng; Xiao, Aifang; Huang, Xiaoqin; Gao, Xioumei; Yu, Haixiang; He, Xingxing; Zhu, Hui; Hong, Zonglie; Zhang, Zhongming

    2015-05-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase CCaMK forms a complex with its phosphorylation target CIP73 (CCaMK-interacting protein of 73 kDa). In this work, a homolog of the animal HSC/HSP70 interacting protein (HIP) was identified as an interacting partner of CIP73 in Lotus japonicus. L. japonicus HIP contains all functional domains characteristic of animal HIP proteins. The C-terminal STI1-like domain of L. japonicus HIP was found to be necessary and sufficient for interaction with CIP73. The interaction between CIP73 and HIP occurred in both the nuclei and cytoplasm in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells. The interactions between CIP73 and HIP and between CIP73 and CCaMK could take place simultaneously in the same nuclei. HIP transcripts were detected in all plant tissues tested. As nodule primordia developed into young nodules, the expression of HIP was down-regulated and the HIP transcript level became very low in mature nodules. More nodules were formed in transgenic hairy roots of L. japonicus expressing HIP RNA interference at 16 days postinoculation as compared with the control hairy roots expressing the empty vector. It appears that HIP may play a role as a negative regulator for nodulation. PMID:25761207

  16. Interaction of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and depsipeptide on antineoplastic activity and activation of 14-3-3sigma, E-cadherin and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 expression in human breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Jacynthe; Shaker, Sepideh; Primeau, Mélanie; Hurtubise, Annie; Momparler, Richard L

    2003-03-01

    Genes that suppress tumorigenesis can be silenced by epigenetic events, such as aberrant DNA methylation and modification of chromatin structure. Inhibitors of DNA methylase and histone deacetylase (HDAC) can potentially reverse these events. The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro antineoplastic activity of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZA-CdR), a potent inhibitor of DNA methylase, in combination with depsipeptide (depsi), an inhibitor of HDAC, on human breast carcinoma cells. We observed a synergistic antineoplastic interaction between 5-AZA-CdR and depsi in their capacity to inhibit colony formation of Hs578T and MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of this interaction, we investigated the effect of these drugs on the activation of the 14-3-3sigma, E-cadherin and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) cancer-related genes, which were reported to be silenced by aberrant methylation in many breast tumor cell lines. 14-3-3sigma was reported to produce G cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. E-cadherin and TIMP3 function as suppressors of tumor metastasis. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine the effect of the co-administration of 5-AZA-CdR and depsi on four breast carcinoma cell lines for the reactivation of these genes. We observed a synergistic activation of E-cadherin by the combination in Hs578T, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 tumor cells. For 14-3-3sigma, we demonstrated an additive to synergistic activation by the combination for Hs578T and MDA-MB-435 tumor cells, respectively. In the MCF-7 tumor cells, the drug combination produced a synergistic activation of TIMP3. The association between the synergistic antineoplastic activity and the synergistic activation of the target genes in this study suggests that the mechanism of anticancer activity of 5-AZA-CdR, in combination with depsi, is probably related to their enhanced activation of different types of tumor suppressor genes that have been

  17. Light-induced phosphorylation of a membrane protein plays an early role in signal transduction for phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reymond, P.; Short, T. W.; Briggs, W. R.; Poff, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Blue light is known to cause rapid phosphorylation of a membrane protein in etiolated seedlings of several plant species, a protein that, at least in etiolated pea seedlings and maize coleoptiles, has been shown to be associated with the plasma membrane. The light-driven phosphorylation has been proposed on the basis of correlative evidence to be an early step in the signal transduction chain for phototropism. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant JK224, the sensitivity to blue light for induction of first positive phototropism is known to be 20- to 30-fold lower than in wild type, whereas second positive curvature appears to be normal. While light-induced phosphorylation can be demonstrated in crude membrane preparations from shoots of the mutant, the level of phosphorylation is dramatically lower than in wild type, as is the sensitivity to blue light. Another A. thaliana mutant, JK218, that completely lacks any phototropic responses to up to 2 h of irradiation, shows a normal level of light-induced phosphorylation at saturation. Since its gravitropic sensitivity is normal, it is presumably blocked in some step between photoreception and the confluence of the signal transduction pathways for phototropism and gravitropism. We conclude from mutant JK224 that light-induced phosphorylation plays an early role in the signal transduction chain for phototropism in higher plants.

  18. Hemp, an mbt domain-containing protein, plays essential roles in hematopoietic stem cell function and skeletal formation

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Hiroaki; Takubo, Keiyo; Oda, Hideaki; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Tazaki, Tatsuya; Yamasaki, Norimasa; Miyazaki, Kazuko; Moore, Kateri A.; Honda, Zen-ichiro; Suda, Toshio; Lemischka, Ihor R.

    2011-01-01

    To clarify the molecular pathways governing hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development, we screened a fetal liver (FL) HSC cDNA library and identified a unique gene, hematopoietic expressed mammalian polycomb (hemp), encoding a protein with a zinc-finger domain and four malignant brain tumor (mbt) repeats. To investigate its biological role, we generated mice lacking Hemp (hemp−/−). Hemp−/− mice exhibited a variety of skeletal malformations and died soon after birth. In the FL, hemp was preferentially expressed in the HSC and early progenitor cell fractions, and analyses of fetal hematopoiesis revealed that the number of FL mononuclear cells, including HSCs, was reduced markedly in hemp−/− embryos, especially during early development. In addition, colony-forming and competitive repopulation assays demonstrated that the proliferative and reconstitution abilities of hemp−/− FL HSCs were significantly impaired. Microarray analysis revealed alterations in the expression levels of several genes implicated in hematopoietic development and differentiation in hemp−/− FL HSCs. These results demonstrate that Hemp, an mbt-containing protein, plays essential roles in HSC function and skeletal formation. It is also hypothesized that Hemp might be involved in certain congenital diseases, such as Klippel-Feil anomaly. PMID:21252303

  19. Light-induced phosphorylation of a membrane protein plays an early role in signal transduction for phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Reymond, P; Short, T W; Briggs, W R; Poff, K L

    1992-01-01

    Blue light is known to cause rapid phosphorylation of a membrane protein in etiolated seedlings of several plant species, a protein that, at least in etiolated pea seedlings and maize coleoptiles, has been shown to be associated with the plasma membrane. The light-driven phosphorylation has been proposed on the basis of correlative evidence to be an early step in the signal transduction chain for phototropism. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant JK224, the sensitivity to blue light for induction of first positive phototropism is known to be 20- to 30-fold lower than in wild type, whereas second positive curvature appears to be normal. While light-induced phosphorylation can be demonstrated in crude membrane preparations from shoots of the mutant, the level of phosphorylation is dramatically lower than in wild type, as is the sensitivity to blue light. Another A. thaliana mutant, JK218, that completely lacks any phototropic responses to up to 2 h of irradiation, shows a normal level of light-induced phosphorylation at saturation. Since its gravitropic sensitivity is normal, it is presumably blocked in some step between photoreception and the confluence of the signal transduction pathways for phototropism and gravitropism. We conclude from mutant JK224 that light-induced phosphorylation plays an early role in the signal transduction chain for phototropism in higher plants. Images PMID:11537679

  20. FmvB: A Francisella tularensis Magnesium-Responsive Outer Membrane Protein that Plays a Role in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojun; Ren, Guoping; Gunning, William T; Weaver, David A; Kalinoski, Andrea L; Khuder, Sadik A; Huntley, Jason F

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of the lethal disease tularemia. Despite decades of research, little is understood about why F. tularensis is so virulent. Bacterial outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are involved in various virulence processes, including protein secretion, host cell attachment, and intracellular survival. Many pathogenic bacteria require metals for intracellular survival and OMPs often play important roles in metal uptake. Previous studies identified three F. tularensis OMPs that play roles in iron acquisition. In this study, we examined two previously uncharacterized proteins, FTT0267 (named fmvA, for Francisella metal and virulence) and FTT0602c (fmvB), which are homologs of the previously studied F. tularensis iron acquisition genes and are predicted OMPs. To study the potential roles of FmvA and FmvB in metal acquisition and virulence, we first examined fmvA and fmvB expression following pulmonary infection of mice, finding that fmvB was upregulated up to 5-fold during F. tularensis infection of mice. Despite sequence homology to previously-characterized iron-acquisition genes, FmvA and FmvB do not appear to be involved iron uptake, as neither fmvA nor fmvB were upregulated in iron-limiting media and neither ΔfmvA nor ΔfmvB exhibited growth defects in iron limitation. However, when other metals were examined in this study, magnesium-limitation significantly induced fmvB expression, ΔfmvB was found to express significantly higher levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in magnesium-limiting medium, and increased numbers of surface protrusions were observed on ΔfmvB in magnesium-limiting medium, compared to wild-type F. tularensis grown in magnesium-limiting medium. RNA sequencing analysis of ΔfmvB revealed the potential mechanism for increased LPS expression, as LPS synthesis genes kdtA and wbtA were significantly upregulated in ΔfmvB, compared with wild-type F. tularensis. To provide further evidence for the potential role of FmvB in

  1. FmvB: A Francisella tularensis Magnesium-Responsive Outer Membrane Protein that Plays a Role in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaojun; Ren, Guoping; Gunning, William T.; Weaver, David A.; Kalinoski, Andrea L.; Khuder, Sadik A.; Huntley, Jason F.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of the lethal disease tularemia. Despite decades of research, little is understood about why F. tularensis is so virulent. Bacterial outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are involved in various virulence processes, including protein secretion, host cell attachment, and intracellular survival. Many pathogenic bacteria require metals for intracellular survival and OMPs often play important roles in metal uptake. Previous studies identified three F. tularensis OMPs that play roles in iron acquisition. In this study, we examined two previously uncharacterized proteins, FTT0267 (named fmvA, for Francisella metal and virulence) and FTT0602c (fmvB), which are homologs of the previously studied F. tularensis iron acquisition genes and are predicted OMPs. To study the potential roles of FmvA and FmvB in metal acquisition and virulence, we first examined fmvA and fmvB expression following pulmonary infection of mice, finding that fmvB was upregulated up to 5-fold during F. tularensis infection of mice. Despite sequence homology to previously-characterized iron-acquisition genes, FmvA and FmvB do not appear to be involved iron uptake, as neither fmvA nor fmvB were upregulated in iron-limiting media and neither ΔfmvA nor ΔfmvB exhibited growth defects in iron limitation. However, when other metals were examined in this study, magnesium-limitation significantly induced fmvB expression, ΔfmvB was found to express significantly higher levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in magnesium-limiting medium, and increased numbers of surface protrusions were observed on ΔfmvB in magnesium-limiting medium, compared to wild-type F. tularensis grown in magnesium-limiting medium. RNA sequencing analysis of ΔfmvB revealed the potential mechanism for increased LPS expression, as LPS synthesis genes kdtA and wbtA were significantly upregulated in ΔfmvB, compared with wild-type F. tularensis. To provide further evidence for the potential role of FmvB in

  2. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) plays a key role in ovarian cancer cell adhesion and motility

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Renquan; Sun, Xinghui; Xiao, Ran; Zhou, Lei; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Lin

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated stable transduced HE4 overexpression and knockdown cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 was associated with EOC cell adhesion and motility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 might have some effects on activation of EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 play an important role in EOC tumorigenicity. -- Abstract: Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a novel and specific biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We previously demonstrated that serum HE4 levels were significantly elevated in the majority of EOC patients but not in subjects with benign disease or healthy controls. However, the precise mechanism of HE4 protein function is unknown. In this study, we generated HE4-overexpressing SKOV3 cells and found that stably transduced cells promoted cell adhesion and migration. Knockdown of HE4 expression was achieved by stable transfection of SKOV3 cells with a construct encoding a short hairpin DNA directed against the HE4 gene. Correspondingly, the proliferation and spreading ability of HE4-expressed cells were inhibited by HE4 suppression. Mechanistically, impaired EGFR and Erk1/2 phosphorylation were observed in cells with HE4 knockdown. The phosphorylation was restored when the knockdown cells were cultured in conditioned medium containing HE4. Moreover, in vivo tumorigenicity showed that HE4 suppression markedly inhibited the growth of tumors. This suggests that expression of HE4 is associated with cancer cell adhesion, migration and tumor growth, which can be related to its effects on the EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. Our results provide evidence of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that may underlie the motility-promoting role of HE4 in EOC progression. The role of HE4 as a target for gene-based therapy might be considered in future studies.

  3. Unique N-terminal Arm of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP Protein Plays an Unusual Role in Its Regulatory Function*

    PubMed Central

    Das, Arijit Kumar; Kumar, Vijjamarri Anil; Sevalkar, Ritesh Rajesh; Bansal, Roohi; Sarkar, Dibyendu

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP, a master regulator involved in complex lipid biosynthesis and expression of unknown virulence determinants, is composed of an N-terminal receiver domain and a C-terminal effector domain. The two experimentally characterized PhoP orthologs, from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, display vastly different regulatory capabilities. Here, we demonstrate that the 20-residue-long N-terminal arm unique to M. tuberculosis PhoP plays an essential role in the expanded regulatory capabilities of this important regulator. Although the arm is not required for overall structural stability and/or phosphorylation of the PhoP N-domain, strikingly it is essential for phosphorylation-coupled transcription regulation of target genes. Consistent with this view, arm truncation of PhoP is accompanied by a conformational change of the effector domain, presenting a block in activation subsequent to phosphorylation. These results suggest that presence of the arm, unique to this regulator that shares an otherwise highly conserved domain structure with members of the protein family, contributes to the mechanism of inter-domain interactions. Thus, we propose that the N-terminal arm is an adaptable structural feature of M. tuberculosis PhoP, which evolved to fine-tune regulatory capabilities of the transcription factor in response to the changing physiology of the bacilli within its host. PMID:23963455

  4. Plant Ribosomal Proteins, RPL12 and RPL19, Play a Role in Nonhost Disease Resistance against Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Satish; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Ramu, Vemanna S; Wang, Keri; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the molecular mechanism involved in nonhost disease resistance is important to understand the adaptations of plant-pathogen interactions. In this study, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS)-based forward genetics screen was utilized to identify genes involved in nonhost resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana. Genes encoding ribosomal proteins, RPL12 and RPL19, were identified in the screening. These genes when silenced in N. benthamiana caused a delay in nonhost bacteria induced hypersensitive response (HR) with concurrent increase in nonhost bacterial multiplication. Arabidopsis mutants of AtRPL12 and AtRPL19 also compromised nonhost resistance. The studies on NbRPL12 and NbRPL19 double silenced plants suggested that both RPL12 and RPL19 act in the same pathway to confer nonhost resistance. Our work suggests a role for RPL12 and RPL19 in nonhost disease resistance in N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis. In addition, we show that these genes also play a minor role in basal resistance against virulent pathogens. PMID:26779226

  5. Plant Ribosomal Proteins, RPL12 and RPL19, Play a Role in Nonhost Disease Resistance against Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Satish; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Ramu, Vemanna S.; Wang, Keri; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the molecular mechanism involved in nonhost disease resistance is important to understand the adaptations of plant-pathogen interactions. In this study, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS)-based forward genetics screen was utilized to identify genes involved in nonhost resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana. Genes encoding ribosomal proteins, RPL12 and RPL19, were identified in the screening. These genes when silenced in N. benthamiana caused a delay in nonhost bacteria induced hypersensitive response (HR) with concurrent increase in nonhost bacterial multiplication. Arabidopsis mutants of AtRPL12 and AtRPL19 also compromised nonhost resistance. The studies on NbRPL12 and NbRPL19 double silenced plants suggested that both RPL12 and RPL19 act in the same pathway to confer nonhost resistance. Our work suggests a role for RPL12 and RPL19 in nonhost disease resistance in N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis. In addition, we show that these genes also play a minor role in basal resistance against virulent pathogens. PMID:26779226

  6. Outdoor Play and Play Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Heather

    1985-01-01

    Discusses aspects of the play environment and its effect on children's play behavior. Indoor and outdoor play spaces are considered along with factors affecting the use of outdoor environments for play. Children's preferences for different outdoor play environments and for various play structures are explored. Guides for choosing play equipment…

  7. Ubiquitination of tombusvirus p33 replication protein plays a role in virus replication and binding to the host Vps23p ESCRT protein

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Daniel; Nagy, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Post-translational modifications of viral replication proteins could be widespread phenomena during the replication of plus-stranded RNA viruses. In this paper, we identify two lysines in the tombusvirus p33 replication co-factor involved in ubiquitination and show that the same lysines are also important for the p33 to interact with the host Vps23p ESCRT-I factor. We find that the interaction of p33 with Vps23p is also affected by a "late-domain"-like sequence in p33. The combined mutations of the two lysines and the late-domain-like sequences in p33 reduced replication of a replicon RNA of Tomato bushy stunt virus in yeast model host, in plant protoplasts and plant leaves, suggesting that p33-Vps23p ESCRT protein interaction affects tombusvirus replication. Using ubiquitin-mimicking p33 chimeras, we demonstrate that high level of p33 ubiquitination is inhibitory for TBSV replication. These findings argue that optimal level of p33 ubiquitination plays a regulatory role during tombusvirus infections. PMID:20004458

  8. Sphingosine kinase 1 dependent protein kinase C-δ activation plays an important role in acute liver failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yan-Chang; Yang, Ling-Ling; Li, Wen; Luo, Pan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of protein kinase C (PKC)-δ activation in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure (ALF) in a well-characterized mouse model of D-galactosamine (D-GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALF. METHODS: BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to five groups, and ALF was induced in mice by intraperitoneal injection of D-GaIN (600 mg/kg) and LPS (10 μg/kg). Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels at different time points within one week were determined using a multiparameteric analyzer. Serum levels of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 as well as nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hepatic morphological changes at 36 h after ALF induction were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Expression of PKC-δ in liver tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was analyzed by Western blot. RESULTS: The expression and activation of PKC-δ were up-regulated in liver tissue and PBMCs of mice with D-GalN/LPS-induced ALF. Inhibition of PKC-δ activation with rottlerin significantly increased the survival rates and decreased serum ALT/AST levels at 6, 12 and 24 h compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Rottlerin treatment also significantly decreased serum levels of HMGB1 at 6, 12, and 24 h, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1 β at 12 h compared with the control group (P < 0.01). The inflammatory cell infiltration and necrosis in liver tissue were also decreased in the rottlerin treatment group. Furthermore, sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) dependent PKC-δ activation played an important role in promoting NF-κB activation and inflammatory cytokine production in ALF. CONCLUSION: SphK1 dependent PKC-δ activation plays an important role in promoting NF-κB activation and inflammatory response in ALF, and inhibition of PKC-δ activation might be

  9. Protein kinase C-alpha and -beta play antagonistic roles in the differentiation process of THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Dieter, P; Schwende, H

    2000-05-01

    The roles of protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes in the differentiation process of THP-1 cells are investigated. Inhibition of PKC by RO 31-8220 reduces the phagocytosis of latex particles and the release of superoxide, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. The proliferation of THP-1 cells is slightly enhanced by RO 31-8220. Stable transfection of THP-1 cells with asPKC-alpha, and incubation of THP-1 cells with antisense (as) PKC-alpha oligodeoxynucleotides reduces PKC-alpha levels and PKC activity. asPKC-alpha-transfected THP-1 cells show a decreased phagocytosis and a decreased release of superoxide, PGE(2) and TNF-alpha. The proliferation of asPKC-alpha-transfected THP-1 cells is enhanced. Stable transfection of THP-1 cells with asPKC-beta, and incubation of THP-1 cells with asPKC-beta oligodeoxynucleotides, reduces PKC-beta levels and PKC activity. asPKC-beta-transfected THP-1 cells show a decreased phagocytosis, a decreased TNF-alpha release, and a decreased proliferation. However, no difference is measured in the release of superoxide and PGE(2). These results suggest that: (1) PKC-alpha but not PKC-beta is involved in the release of superoxide and PGE(2); (2) TNF-alpha release and the phagocytosis of latex particles are mediated by PKC-alpha, PKC-beta, and other PKC isoenzymes; and (3) PKC-alpha and PKC-beta play antagonistic roles in the differentiation process of THP-1 cells. PKC-alpha promotes the differentiation process of THP-1 cells, PKC-beta retards the differentiation of THP-1 cells into macrophage-like cells. PMID:10822170

  10. The Drosophila pumilio gene encodes two functional protein isoforms that play multiple roles in germline development, gonadogenesis, oogenesis and embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, M; Lin, H

    1999-01-01

    The pumilio (pum) gene plays an essential role in embryonic patterning and germline stem cell (GSC) maintenance during oogenesis in Drosophila. Here we report on a phenotypic analysis using pum(ovarette) mutations, which reveals multiple functions of pum in primordial germ cell proliferation, larval ovary formation, GSC division, and subsequent oogenic processes, as well as in oviposition. Specifically, by inducing pum(-) GSC clones at the onset of oogenesis, we show that pum is directly involved in GSC division, a function that is distinct from its requirement in primordial germ cells. Furthermore, we show that pum encodes 156- and 130-kD proteins, both of which are functional isoforms. Among pum(ovarette) mutations, pum(1688) specifically eliminates the 156-kD isoform but not the 130-kD isoform, while pum(2003) and pum(4277) specifically affect the 130-kD isoform but not the 156-kD isoform. Normal doses of both isoforms are required for the zygotic function of pum, yet either isoform alone at a normal dose is sufficient for the maternal effect function of pum. A pum cDNA transgene that contains the known open reading frame encodes only the 156-kD isoform and rescues the phenotype of both pum(1688) and pum(2003) mutants. These observations suggest that the 156- and 130-kD isoforms can compensate for each other's function in a dosage-dependent manner. Finally, we present molecular evidence suggesting that the two PUM isoforms share some of their primary structures. PMID:10471709

  11. New Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lersten, Kenneth C.

    There have been many theories and hypotheses about play, one of which is the equation of play with "transcendence." Play may have the ingredients to allow us to transcend and, for a moment, remythologize life. There have been recent authors who have given play the status of theology, indicating that play contains elements also found in religion.…

  12. Playful Gaming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makedon, Alexander

    A philosophical analysis of play and games is undertaken in this paper. Playful gaming, which is shown to be a synthesis of play and games, is utilized as a category for undertaking the examination of play and games. The significance of playful gaming to education is demonstrated through analyses of Plato's, Dewey's, Sartre's, and Marcuse's…

  13. Metabolite Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Carbohydrate-response Element-binding Protein (ChREBP): ROLE OF AMP AS AN ALLOSTERIC INHIBITOR.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shogo; Jung, Hunmin; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Pawlosky, Robert; Takeshima, Tomomi; Lee, Wan-Ru; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Laxman, Sunil; Wynn, R Max; Tu, Benjamin P; MacMillan, John B; De Brabander, Jef K; Veech, Richard L; Uyeda, Kosaku

    2016-05-13

    The carbohydrate-response element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-responsive transcription factor that plays an essential role in converting excess carbohydrate to fat storage in the liver. In response to glucose levels, ChREBP is regulated by nuclear/cytosol trafficking via interaction with 14-3-3 proteins, CRM-1 (exportin-1 or XPO-1), or importins. Nuclear localization of ChREBP was rapidly inhibited when incubated in branched-chain α-ketoacids, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide. Here, we discovered that protein-free extracts of high fat-fed livers contained, in addition to ketone bodies, a new metabolite, identified as AMP, which specifically activates the interaction between ChREBP and 14-3-3. The crystal structure showed that AMP binds directly to the N terminus of ChREBP-α2 helix. Our results suggest that AMP inhibits the nuclear localization of ChREBP through an allosteric activation of ChREBP/14-3-3 interactions and not by activation of AMPK. AMP and ketone bodies together can therefore inhibit lipogenesis by restricting localization of ChREBP to the cytoplasm during periods of ketosis. PMID:26984404

  14. The MDM2 RING domain and central acidic domain play distinct roles in MDM2 protein homodimerization and MDM2-MDMX protein heterodimerization.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Patrick L; Ke, Hengming; Zhang, Yanping

    2015-05-15

    The oncoprotein murine double minute 2 (MDM2) is an E3 ligase that plays a prominent role in p53 suppression by promoting its polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In its active form, MDM2 forms homodimers as well as heterodimers with the homologous protein murine double minute 4 (MDMX), both of which are thought to occur through their respective C-terminal RING (really interesting new gene) domains. In this study, using multiple MDM2 mutants, we show evidence suggesting that MDM2 homo- and heterodimerization occur through distinct mechanisms because MDM2 RING domain mutations that inhibit MDM2 interaction with MDMX do not affect MDM2 interaction with WT MDM2. Intriguingly, deletion of a portion of the MDM2 central acidic domain selectively inhibits interaction with MDM2 while leaving intact the ability of MDM2 to interact with MDMX and to ubiquitinate p53. Further analysis of an MDM2 C-terminal deletion mutant reveals that the C-terminal residues of MDM2 are required for both MDM2 and MDMX interaction. Collectively, our results suggest a model in which MDM2-MDMX heterodimerization requires the extreme C terminus and proper RING domain structure of MDM2, whereas MDM2 homodimerization requires the extreme C terminus and the central acidic domain of MDM2, suggesting that MDM2 homo- and heterodimers utilize distinct MDM2 domains. Our study is the first to report mutations capable of separating MDM2 homo- and heterodimerization. PMID:25809483

  15. Analysis of self-association of West Nile virus capsid protein and the crucial role played by Trp 69 in homodimerization.

    PubMed

    Bhuvanakantham, Raghavan; Ng, Mah-Lee

    2005-04-01

    The understanding of capsid (C) protein interactions with itself would provide important data on how the core is organized in flaviviruses during assembly. In this study, West Nile (WN) virus C protein was shown to form homodimers using yeast two-hybrid analysis in conjunction with mammalian two-hybrid and in vivo co-immunoprecipitation assays. To delineate the region on the C protein which mediates C-C dimerization, truncation studies were carried out. The results obtained clearly showed that the internal hydrophobic segment flanked by helix I and helix III of WN virus C protein is essential for the self-association of C protein. The crucial role played by Trp 69 in stabilizing the self-association of C protein was also demonstrated by mutating Trp to Gly/Arg/Phe. Substitution of the Trp residue with Gly/Arg abolished the dimerization, whereas substitution with Phe decreased the self-association significantly. The results of this study pinpoint a critical residue in the C protein that potentially plays a role in stabilizing the homotypic interaction. PMID:15721300

  16. Specific Subunits of Heterotrimeric G Proteins Play Important Roles during Nodulation in Soybean1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Pandey, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits regulate many fundamental growth and development processes in all eukaryotes. Plants possess a relatively limited number of G-protein components compared with mammalian systems, and their detailed functional characterization has been performed mostly in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the presence of single Gα and Gβ proteins in both these species has significantly undermined the complexity and specificity of response regulation in plant G-protein signaling. There is ample pharmacological evidence for the role of G proteins in regulation of legume-specific processes such as nodulation, but the lack of genetic data from a leguminous species has restricted its direct assessment. Our recent identification and characterization of an elaborate G-protein family in soybean (Glycine max) and the availability of appropriate molecular-genetic resources have allowed us to directly evaluate the role of G-protein subunits during nodulation. We demonstrate that all G-protein genes are expressed in nodules and exhibit significant changes in their expression in response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum infection and in representative supernodulating and nonnodulating soybean mutants. RNA interference suppression and overexpression of specific G-protein components results in lower and higher nodule numbers, respectively, validating their roles as positive regulators of nodule formation. Our data further show preferential usage of distinct G-protein subunits in the presence of an additional signal during nodulation. Interestingly, the Gα proteins directly interact with the soybean nodulation factor receptors NFR1α and NFR1β, suggesting that the plant G proteins may couple with receptors other than the canonical heptahelical receptors common in metazoans to modulate signaling. PMID:23569109

  17. Hul5 HECT Ubiquitin Ligase Plays A Major Role in The Ubiquitylation and Turn Over of Cytosolic Misfolded Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Nancy N.; Ng, Alex H.M.; Measday, Vivien; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-01-01

    Cellular toxicity introduced by protein misfolding threatens cell fitness and viability. Failure to eliminate these polypeptides is associated with numerous aggregation diseases. Several protein quality control mechanisms degrade non-native proteins by the ubiquitin proteasome system. Here, we use quantitative mass spectrometry to demonstrate that heat-shock triggers a large increase of ubiquitylation associated with misfolding of cytosolic proteins. We discover that the Hul5 HECT ubiquitin ligase participates in this heat-shock stress response. Hul5 is required to maintain cell fitness after heat-shock and to degrade short-lived misfolded proteins. In addition, localization of Hul5 in the cytoplasm is important for its quality control function. We identify potential Hul5 substrates in heat-shock and physiological conditions to reveal that Hul5 is required for ubiquitylation of low solubility cytosolic proteins including the Pin3 prion-like protein. These findings indicate that Hul5 is involved in a cytosolic protein quality control pathway that targets misfolded proteins for degradation. PMID:21983566

  18. Plastid ribosomal protein S5 plays a critical role in photosynthesis, plant development, and cold stress tolerance in arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plastid ribosomal proteins (RPs) are essential components for protein synthesis machinery and exert diverse roles in plant growth and development. Mutations in plastid RPs lead to a range of developmental phenotypes in plants. However, how they regulate these processes is not fully understood and th...

  19. The amphiphilic hydrophobin Vmh2 plays a key role in one step synthesis of hybrid protein-gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Politi, Jane; De Stefano, Luca; Longobardi, Sara; Giardina, Paola; Rea, Ilaria; Methivier, Christophe; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Casale, Sandra; Spadavecchia, Jolanda

    2015-12-01

    We report a simple and original method to synthesize gold nanoparticles in which a fungal protein, the hydrophobin Vmh2 from Pleurotus ostreatus and dicarboxylic acid-terminated polyethylene-glycol (PEG) has been used as additional components in a one step process, leading to hybrid protein-metal nanoparticles (NPs). The nanoparticles have been characterized by ultra-violet/visible, infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, dynamic light scattering and also by electron microscopy imaging. The results of these analytical techniques highlight nanometric sized, stable, hybrid complexes of about 12 nm, with outer surface rich in functional chemical groups. Interaction with protein and antibodies has also been exploited. PMID:26402419

  20. Adult Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, John M.

    In its broadest context, play can be interpreted as any pleasurable use of discretionary time. Playfulness is an intrinsic feature of being human, and should be viewed in the light of a total lifestyle, not as an occurrence in an isolated time of life. Adult play appears to be an indefinable and controversial concept. A holistic approach should be…

  1. Wanna Play?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenfeld, Mimi Brodsky

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the importance of play in the lives of children and describes how games and imaginative play contribute to the development of children. From her decades-old collection of countless incidents demonstrating children's love for self-directed, informal, imaginative play, the author shares three incidents that…

  2. City Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dargan, Amanda; Zeitlin, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Today, fewer city blocks preserve the confidence of lifestyle and urban geography that sustain traditional games and outdoor play. Large groups of children choosing sides and organizing Red Rover games are no longer commonplace. Teachers must encourage free play; urban planners must build cities that are safe play havens. (MLH)

  3. The protein transportation pathway from Golgi to vacuoles via endosomes plays a role in enhancement of methylmercury toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gi-Wook; Murai, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Naganuma, Akira

    2014-07-01

    Methylmercury causes serious damage to the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms of methylmercury toxicity are only marginally understood. In this study, we used a gene-deletion mutant library of budding yeast to conduct genome-wide screening for gene knockouts affecting the sensitivity of methylmercury toxicity. We successfully identified 31 genes whose deletions confer resistance to methylmercury in yeast, and 18 genes whose deletions confer hypersensitivity to methylmercury. Yeast genes whose deletions conferred resistance to methylmercury included many gene encoding factors involved in protein transport to vacuoles. Detailed examination of the relationship between the factors involved in this transport system and methylmercury toxicity revealed that mutants with loss of the factors involved in the transportation pathway from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the endosome, protein uptake into the endosome, and endosome-vacuole fusion showed higher methylmercury resistance than did wild-type yeast. The results of our genetic engineering study suggest that this vesicle transport system (proteins moving from the TGN to vacuole via endosome) is responsible for enhancing methylmercury toxicity due to the interrelationship between the pathways. There is a possibility that there may be proteins in the cell that enhance methylmercury toxicity through the protein transport system.

  4. Nucleolin interacts with the dengue virus capsid protein and plays a role in formation of infectious virus particles.

    PubMed

    Balinsky, Corey A; Schmeisser, Hana; Ganesan, Sundar; Singh, Kavita; Pierson, Theodore C; Zoon, Kathryn C

    2013-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus that can cause severe disease in humans and is considered a reemerging pathogen of significant importance to public health. The DENV capsid (C) protein functions as a structural component of the infectious virion; however, it may have additional functions in the virus replicative cycle. Here, we show that the DENV C protein interacts and colocalizes with the multifunctional host protein nucleolin (NCL). Furthermore, we demonstrate that this interaction can be disrupted by the addition of an NCL binding aptamer (AS1411). Knockdown of NCL with small interfering RNA (siRNA) or treatment of cells with AS1411 results in a significant reduction of viral titers after DENV infection. Western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed no differences in viral RNA or protein levels at early time points postinfection, suggesting a role for NCL in viral morphogenesis. We support this hypothesis by showing that treatment with AS1411 alters the migration characteristics of the viral capsid, as visualized by native electrophoresis. Here, we identify a critical interaction between DENV C protein and NCL that represents a potential new target for the development of antiviral therapeutics. PMID:24027323

  5. Nucleolin Interacts with the Dengue Virus Capsid Protein and Plays a Role in Formation of Infectious Virus Particles

    PubMed Central

    Balinsky, Corey A.; Schmeisser, Hana; Ganesan, Sundar; Singh, Kavita; Pierson, Theodore C.

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus that can cause severe disease in humans and is considered a reemerging pathogen of significant importance to public health. The DENV capsid (C) protein functions as a structural component of the infectious virion; however, it may have additional functions in the virus replicative cycle. Here, we show that the DENV C protein interacts and colocalizes with the multifunctional host protein nucleolin (NCL). Furthermore, we demonstrate that this interaction can be disrupted by the addition of an NCL binding aptamer (AS1411). Knockdown of NCL with small interfering RNA (siRNA) or treatment of cells with AS1411 results in a significant reduction of viral titers after DENV infection. Western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed no differences in viral RNA or protein levels at early time points postinfection, suggesting a role for NCL in viral morphogenesis. We support this hypothesis by showing that treatment with AS1411 alters the migration characteristics of the viral capsid, as visualized by native electrophoresis. Here, we identify a critical interaction between DENV C protein and NCL that represents a potential new target for the development of antiviral therapeutics. PMID:24027323

  6. The tobacco salicylic acid-binding protein 3 (SABP3) is the chloroplast carbonic anhydrase, which exhibits antioxidant activity and plays a role in the hypersensitive defense response.

    PubMed

    Slaymaker, David H; Navarre, Duroy A; Clark, Daniel; del Pozo, Olga; Martin, Gregory B; Klessig, Daniel F

    2002-09-01

    In plants, salicylic acid (SA) plays an important role in signaling both local and systemic defense responses. Previous efforts to identify SA effector proteins in tobacco have led to the isolation of two soluble cytoplasmic SA-binding proteins (SABPs): catalase, SABP, and an approximately 25-kDa protein, SABP2. Here we describe the identification of an SA-binding protein, SABP3, in the stroma of tobacco chloroplasts. SABP3 bound SA with an apparent dissociation constant (K(d)) of 3.7 microM and exhibited much greater affinity for biologically active than inactive analogs. Purification and partial sequencing of SABP3 indicated that it is the chloroplast carbonic anhydrase (CA). Confirming this finding, recombinant tobacco chloroplast CA exhibited both CA enzymatic and SA-binding activities. Expression of this protein in yeast also demonstrated that CA/SABP3 has antioxidant activity. A second gene encoding CA was also cloned, and its encoded protein was shown to behave similarly to that purified as SABP3. Finally, silencing of CA gene expression in leaves suppressed the Pto:avrPto-mediated hypersensitive response in disease resistance. These results demonstrate that SA may act through multiple effector proteins in plants and shed further light on the function of CA in chloroplasts. PMID:12185253

  7. THE MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUPSPECIES PARATUBERCULOSIS 35 KDA PROTEIN PLAYS A ROLE IN INVASION OF BOVINE EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) enters intestinal epithelial cells of cattle and other ruminants via a mechanism that remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we observed that a gene encoding the M. paratuberculosis 35-kDa major membrane protein (MMP) is ...

  8. Opioid modulation of Fos protein expression and olfactory circuitry plays a pivotal role in what neonates remember

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Tania L.; Moriceau, Stephanie; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2006-01-01

    Paradoxically, fear conditioning (odor–0.5 mA shock) yields a learned odor preference in the neonate, presumably due to a unique learning and memory circuit that does not include apparent amygdala participation. Post-training opioid antagonism with naltrexone (NTX) blocks consolidation of this odor preference and instead yields memory of a learned odor aversion. Here we characterize the neural circuitry underlying this switch during memory consolidation. Experiment 1 assessed post-training opioid modulation of Fos protein expression within olfactory circuitry (olfactory bulb, piriform cortex, amygdala). Odor–shock conditioning with no post-training treatment (odor preference) induced significant changes in Fos protein expression in the granule cell layer of the olfactory bulb and anterior piriform cortex. Post-training opioid receptor antagonism (odor aversion) prevented the learning-induced changes in the anterior piriform cortex and also induced significant changes in Fos protein expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala. Experiment 2 assessed intra-amygdala opioid modulation of neonate memory consolidation. Post-training infusion of NTX within the amygdala permitted consolidation of an odor aversion, while vehicle-infused pups continued to demonstrate an odor preference. Overall, results demonstrate that opioids modulate memory consolidation in the neonate via modulating Fos protein expression in olfactory circuitry. Furthermore, these results suggest that opioids are instrumental in suppressing neonate fear behavior via modulating the amygdala. PMID:17015856

  9. Pretend play.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Deena Skolnick

    2015-01-01

    Pretend play is a form of playful behavior that involves nonliteral action. Although on the surface this activity appears to be merely for fun, recent research has discovered that children's pretend play has connections to important cognitive and social skills, such as symbolic thinking, theory of mind, and counterfactual reasoning. The current article first defines pretend play and then reviews the arguments and evidence for these three connections. Pretend play has a nonliteral correspondence to reality, hence pretending may provide children with practice with navigating symbolic relationships, which may strengthen their language skills. Pretend play and theory of mind reasoning share a focus on others' mental states in order to correctly interpret their behavior, hence pretending and theory of mind may be mutually supportive in development. Pretend play and counterfactual reasoning both involve representing nonreal states of affairs, hence pretending may facilitate children's counterfactual abilities. These connections make pretend play an important phenomenon in cognitive science: Studying children's pretend play can provide insight into these other abilities and their developmental trajectories, and thereby into human cognitive architecture and its development. PMID:26263228

  10. A Golgi-localized Mannosidase (MAN1B1) Plays a Non-enzymatic Gatekeeper Role in Protein Biosynthetic Quality Control*

    PubMed Central

    Iannotti, Michael J.; Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna M.; Sifers, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Conformation-based disorders are manifested at the level of protein structure, necessitating an accurate understanding of how misfolded proteins are processed by the cellular proteostasis network. Asparagine-linked glycosylation plays important roles for protein quality control within the secretory pathway. The suspected role for the MAN1B1 gene product MAN1B1, also known as ER mannosidase I, is to function within the ER similar to the yeast ortholog Mns1p, which removes a terminal mannose unit to initiate a glycan-based ER-associated degradation (ERAD) signal. However, we recently discovered that MAN1B1 localizes to the Golgi complex in human cells and uncovered its participation in ERAD substrate retention, retrieval to the ER, and subsequent degradation from this organelle. The objective of the current study was to further characterize the contribution of MAN1B1 as part of a Golgi-based quality control network. Multiple lines of experimental evidence support a model in which neither the mannosidase activity nor catalytic domain is essential for the retention or degradation of the misfolded ERAD substrate Null Hong Kong. Instead, a highly conserved, vertebrate-specific non-enzymatic decapeptide sequence in the luminal stem domain plays a significant role in controlling the fate of overexpressed Null Hong Kong. Together, these findings define a new functional paradigm in which Golgi-localized MAN1B1 can play a mannosidase-independent gatekeeper role in the proteostasis network of higher eukaryotes. PMID:24627495

  11. Shadow Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Hilson, Margilee P.

    2012-01-01

    A bunny rabbit playfully hops across the wall. Then hands realign and fingers shift to make a hawk soar toward the ceiling. Most children have enjoyed the delightful experience of playing with shadow puppets. The authors build on this natural curiosity to help students link shadows to complex astronomical concepts such as seasons. The…

  12. Gliding Associated Proteins Play Essential Roles during the Formation of the Inner Membrane Complex of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Matthew; Jiménez-Ruiz, Elena; Ferguson, David J. P.; Meissner, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The inner membrane complex (IMC) of apicomplexan parasites is a specialised structure localised beneath the parasite’s plasma membrane, and is important for parasite stability and intracellular replication. Furthermore, it serves as an anchor for the myosin A motor complex, termed the glideosome. While the role of this protein complex in parasite motility and host cell invasion has been well described, additional roles during the asexual life cycle are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that core elements of the glideosome, the gliding associated proteins GAP40 and GAP50 as well as members of the GAPM family, have critical roles in the biogenesis of the IMC during intracellular replication. Deletion or disruption of these genes resulted in the rapid collapse of developing parasites after initiation of the cell cycle and led to redistribution of other glideosome components. PMID:26845335

  13. Gliding Associated Proteins Play Essential Roles during the Formation of the Inner Membrane Complex of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Harding, Clare R; Egarter, Saskia; Gow, Matthew; Jiménez-Ruiz, Elena; Ferguson, David J P; Meissner, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The inner membrane complex (IMC) of apicomplexan parasites is a specialised structure localised beneath the parasite's plasma membrane, and is important for parasite stability and intracellular replication. Furthermore, it serves as an anchor for the myosin A motor complex, termed the glideosome. While the role of this protein complex in parasite motility and host cell invasion has been well described, additional roles during the asexual life cycle are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that core elements of the glideosome, the gliding associated proteins GAP40 and GAP50 as well as members of the GAPM family, have critical roles in the biogenesis of the IMC during intracellular replication. Deletion or disruption of these genes resulted in the rapid collapse of developing parasites after initiation of the cell cycle and led to redistribution of other glideosome components. PMID:26845335

  14. Arabidopsis Small Rubber Particle Protein Homolog SRPs Play Dual Roles as Positive Factors for Tissue Growth and Development and in Drought Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Yu; Park, Ki Youl; Seo, Young Sam; Kim, Woo Taek

    2016-04-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) act as repositories for fatty acids and sterols, which are used for various cellular processes such as energy production and membrane and hormone synthesis. LD-associated proteins play important roles in seed development and germination, but their functions in postgermination growth are not well understood. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains three SRP homologs (SRP1, SRP2, and SRP3) that share sequence identities with small rubber particle proteins of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). In this report, the possible cellular roles of SRPs in postgermination growth and the drought tolerance response were investigated. Arabidopsis SRPs appeared to be LD-associated proteins and displayed polymerization properties in vivo and in vitro. SRP-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants (35S:SRP1, 35S:SRP2, and 35S:SRP3) exhibited higher vegetative and reproductive growth and markedly better tolerance to drought stress than wild-type Arabidopsis. In addition, constitutive over-expression of SRPs resulted in increased numbers of large LDs in postgermination seedlings. In contrast, single (srp1, 35S:SRP2-RNAi, and srp3) and triple (35S:SRP2-RNAi/srp1srp3) loss-of-function mutant lines exhibited the opposite phenotypes. Our results suggest that Arabidopsis SRPs play dual roles as positive factors in postgermination growth and the drought stress tolerance response. The possible relationships between LD-associated proteins and the drought stress response are discussed. PMID:26903535

  15. Arabidopsis Small Rubber Particle Protein Homolog SRPs Play Dual Roles as Positive Factors for Tissue Growth and Development and in Drought Stress Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Yu; Park, Ki Youl; Seo, Young Sam; Kim, Woo Taek

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) act as repositories for fatty acids and sterols, which are used for various cellular processes such as energy production and membrane and hormone synthesis. LD-associated proteins play important roles in seed development and germination, but their functions in postgermination growth are not well understood. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains three SRP homologs (SRP1, SRP2, and SRP3) that share sequence identities with small rubber particle proteins of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). In this report, the possible cellular roles of SRPs in postgermination growth and the drought tolerance response were investigated. Arabidopsis SRPs appeared to be LD-associated proteins and displayed polymerization properties in vivo and in vitro. SRP-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants (35S:SRP1, 35S:SRP2, and 35S:SRP3) exhibited higher vegetative and reproductive growth and markedly better tolerance to drought stress than wild-type Arabidopsis. In addition, constitutive over-expression of SRPs resulted in increased numbers of large LDs in postgermination seedlings. In contrast, single (srp1, 35S:SRP2-RNAi, and srp3) and triple (35S:SRP2-RNAi/srp1srp3) loss-of-function mutant lines exhibited the opposite phenotypes. Our results suggest that Arabidopsis SRPs play dual roles as positive factors in postgermination growth and the drought stress tolerance response. The possible relationships between LD-associated proteins and the drought stress response are discussed. PMID:26903535

  16. Protein Inhibitor of NOS1 Plays a Central Role in the Regulation of NOS1 Activity in Human Dilated Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Tarazón, Estefanía; Ortega, Ana; Gil-Cayuela, Carolina; Carnicer, Ricardo; Lago, Francisca; González-Juanatey, Jose Ramón; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    An essential factor for the production of nitric oxide by nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1), major modulator of cardiac function, is the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). BH4 is regulated by GTP cyclohydrolase 1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BH4 biosynthesis which catalyses the formation of dihydroneopterin 3′triphosfate from GTP, producing BH4 after two further steps catalyzed by 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin synthase and sepiapterin reductase. However, there are other essential factors involved in the regulation of NOS1 activity, such as protein inhibitor of NOS1 (PIN), calmodulin, heat shock protein 90, and NOS interacting protein. All these molecules have never been analysed in human non-ischemic dilated hearts (DCM). In this study we demonstrated that the upregulation of cardiac NOS1 is not accompanied by increased NOS1 activity in DCM, partly due to the elevated PIN levels and not because of alterations in biopterin biosynthesis. Notably, the PIN concentration was significantly associated with impaired ventricular function, highlighting the importance of this NOS1 activity inhibitor in Ca2+ homeostasis. These results take a central role in the current list of targets for future studies focused on the complex cardiac dysfunction processes through more efficient harnessing of NOS1 signalling. PMID:27481317

  17. Identification of a Conserved Non-Protein-Coding Genomic Element that Plays an Essential Role in Alphabaculovirus Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kikhno, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Highly homologous sequences 154–157 bp in length grouped under the name of “conserved non-protein-coding element” (CNE) were revealed in all of the sequenced genomes of baculoviruses belonging to the genus Alphabaculovirus. A CNE alignment led to the detection of a set of highly conserved nucleotide clusters that occupy strictly conserved positions in the CNE sequence. The significant length of the CNE and conservation of both its length and cluster architecture were identified as a combination of characteristics that make this CNE different from known viral non-coding functional sequences. The essential role of the CNE in the Alphabaculovirus life cycle was demonstrated through the use of a CNE-knockout Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) bacmid. It was shown that the essential function of the CNE was not mediated by the presumed expression activities of the protein- and non-protein-coding genes that overlap the AcMNPV CNE. On the basis of the presented data, the AcMNPV CNE was categorized as a complex-structured, polyfunctional genomic element involved in an essential DNA transaction that is associated with an undefined function of the baculovirus genome. PMID:24740153

  18. Ubiquitin ligase gene neurl3 plays a role in spermatogenesis of half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) by regulating testis protein ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenteng; Li, Hailong; Dong, Zhongdian; Cui, Zhongkai; Zhang, Ning; Meng, Liang; Zhu, Ying; Liu, Yang; Li, Yangzhen; Guo, Hua; Ma, Jialu; Wei, Zhanfei; Zhang, Nianwei; Yang, Yingming; Chen, Songlin

    2016-10-30

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are a large gene family that plays a diversity of roles in spermatogenesis. In this study, the functional characterization of a neuralized E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 3 (neurl3) revealed its potential participation in spermatogenesis. Firstly, we found that neurl3 exhibited male-biased transcription and that its translation was predominant in testis germ cells. The knockdown of neurl3 by RNA interference caused increased transcription of spermatogenesis-related genes. These results corroborate previous studies indicating a role for neurl3 in spermatogenesis. Moreover, the levels of neurl3 transcription and testis protein ubiquitination were closely correlated. Based on these findings, we speculate that neurl3 modulates testis protein ubiquitination in a dosage-dependent manner and that this influences spermatogenesis. PMID:27480167

  19. Proline 235 plays a key role in the regulation of the oligomeric states of Thermotoga maritima Arginine Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Giovanni; Vigorita, Marilisa; Ruggiero, Alessia; Balasco, Nicole; Dattelbaum, Jonathan D; D'Auria, Sabato; Del Vecchio, Pompea; Graziano, Giuseppe; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    The Arginine Binding Protein isolated from Thermotoga maritima (TmArgBP) is a protein endowed with several peculiar properties. We have previously shown that TmArgBP dimerization is a consequence of the swapping of the C-terminal helix. Here we explored the structural determinants of TmArgBP domain swapping and oligomerization. In particular, we report a mutational analysis of the residue Pro235, which is located in the hinge region of the swapping dimer. This residue was either replaced with a Gly-Lys dipeptide (TmArgBP(P235GK)) or a Gly residue (TmArgBP(P235G)). Different forms of these mutants were generated and extensively characterized using biophysical techniques. For both TmArgBP(P235GK) and TmArgBP(P235G) mutants, the occurrence of multiple oligomerization states (monomers, dimers and trimers) was detected. The formation of well-folded monomeric forms for these mutants indicates that the dimerization through C-terminal domain swapping observed in wild-type TmArgBP is driven by conformational restraints imposed by the presence of Pro235 in the hinge region. Molecular dynamics studies corroborate this observation by showing that Gly235 assumes conformational states forbidden for Pro residues in the TmArgBP(P235G) monomer. Unexpectedly, the trimeric forms present: (a) peculiar circular dichroism spectra, (b) a great susceptibility to heating, and (c) the ability to bind the Thioflavin T dye. The present findings clearly demonstrate that single-point mutations have an important impact on the TmArgBP oligomerization process. In a wider context, they also indicate that proteins endowed with an intrinsic propensity to swap have an easy access to states with altered structural and, possibly, functional properties. PMID:27087545

  20. Self-interaction of the cucumber mosaic virus 2b protein plays a vital role in the suppression of RNA silencing and the induction of viral symptoms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aixia; Zhao, Zhijing; Chen, Wenhu; Zhang, Hengmu; Liao, Qiansheng; Chen, Jishuang; Carr, John P; Du, Zhiyou

    2013-10-01

    The cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) 2b protein is an RNA silencing suppressor protein that can also play direct and indirect roles in symptom induction. Previous work has shown that a hybrid virus, FRad35(2b) -CMV (renamed here as CMV-FRad2b-Pro), generated by replacement of the 2b gene of strain Fny-CMV with that from Rad35-CMV, displays markedly lower pathogenicity than Fny-CMV on Nicotiana species. However, the replacement of proline with leucine at position 55 of the 2b protein of CMV-FRad2b-Pro (protein Rad2b-Pro) created a virus (CMV-FRad2b-Leu) that induced severe symptoms. Infection of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in the expression of DICER-like (DCL) endoribonucleases 2 and 4, which mediate antiviral RNA silencing, as well as of dcl3 and dcl2/3/4 triple-mutant plants, indicated that Rad2b-Pro was a weaker RNA silencing suppressor than the protein Rad2b-Leu. This was confirmed in Nicotiana benthamiana using agroinfiltration assays, showing that, compared with either Rad2b-Leu or the Fny2b protein, Rad2b-Pro was ineffective at inhibiting local or systemic silencing of expression of a green fluorescent protein reporter gene. Transgenic expression of Rad2b-Leu, but not of Rad2b-Pro, in Arabidopsis induced symptom-like phenotypes and rescued the accumulation of the 2b-deletion mutant Fny-CMVΔ2b. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation indicated that, in planta, Rad2b-Leu, but not Rad2b-Pro, self-interacts. Thus, self-interaction is crucial to the ability of the 2b protein to suppress silencing and induce a symptom-like phenotype, and is dependent on the properties of the residue at position 55. PMID:23782515

  1. A plant kinase plays roles in defense response against geminivirus by phosphorylation of a viral pathogenesis protein

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qingtang; Bao, Min; Zhou, Xueping

    2012-01-01

    The plant SNF1-related kinase (SnRK1) is the α-subunit of the SnRK1 heterotrimeric compleses. Although SnRK1 is widely known as a key regulator of plant response to various physiological processes including nutrient- and energy-sensing, regulation of global metabolism, and control of cell cycle, development, as well as abiotics stress, less is known about the function of SnRK1 during pathogen infection. Our previous work has demonstrated that a tomato SNF1-related kinase (SlSnRK1) can interact with and phosphorylate βC1, a pathogenesis protein encoded by tomato yellow leaf curl China betasatellite. Our results also showed that the plant SnRK1 can affect genimivirus infection in plant and reduce viral DNA accumulation. Phosphorylation of βC1 protein negatively impacts its function as a pathogenicity determinant. Here we provide more information on interaction between βC1 and SlSnRK1 and propose a mechanistic model for the SlSnRK1-mediated defense responses against geminiviruses and the potential role of SnRK1 in plant resistance to geminivirus. PMID:22751295

  2. The Kar3-interacting protein Cik1p plays a critical role in passage through meiosis I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, R M; Kamieniecki, R J; Dawson, D S

    2001-01-01

    Meiosis I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is dependent upon the motor protein Kar3. Absence of Kar3p in meiosis results in an arrest in prophase I. Cik1p and Vik1p are kinesin-associated proteins known to modulate the function of Kar3p in the microtubule-dependent processes of karyogamy and mitosis. Experiments were performed to determine whether Cik1p and Vik1p are also important for the function of Kar3p during meiosis. The meiotic phenotypes of a cik1 mutant were found to be similar to those of kar3 mutants. Cells without Cik1p exhibit a meiotic defect in homologous recombination and synaptonemal complex formation. Most cik1 mutant cells, like kar3 mutants, arrest in meiotic prophase; however, in cik1 mutants this arrest is less severe. These data are consistent with the model that Cik1p is necessary for some, but not all, of the roles of Kar3p in meiosis I. vik1 mutants sporulate at wild-type levels, but have reduced spore viability. This loss in viability is partially attributable to vegetative chromosome loss in vik1 diploids. Cellular localization experiments reveal that Kar3p, Cik1p, and Vik1p are present throughout meiosis and are consistent with Cik1p and Vik1p having different meiotic roles. PMID:11729143

  3. The protein kinase A regulatory subunit R1A (Prkar1a) plays critical roles in peripheral nerve development.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Lee, Audrey A; Rizvi, Tilat A; Ratner, Nancy; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2013-11-13

    Signaling through cAMP has been implicated in Schwann cell (SC) proliferation and myelination, but the signaling pathway components downstream of cAMP required for SC function remain unknown. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a potential downstream effector of cAMP. Here, we induced loss of Prkar1a, the gene encoding the type 1A regulatory subunit of PKA, in SC to study its role in nerve development; loss of Prkar1a is predicted to elevate PKA activity. Conditional Prkar1a knock-out in mouse SC (Prkar1a-SCKO) resulted in a dramatic and persistent axonal sorting defect, and unexpectedly decreased SC proliferation in Prkar1a-SCKO nerves in vivo. Effects were cell autonomous as they were recapitulated in vitro in Prkar1a-SCKO SC, which showed elevated PKA activity. In the few SCs sorted into 1:1 relationships with axons in vivo, SC myelination was premature in Prkar1a-SCKO nerves, correlating with global increase in the cAMP-regulated transcription factor Oct-6 and expression of myelin basic protein. These data reveal a previously unknown role of PKA in axon sorting, an unexpected inhibitory role of PKA on SC cell proliferation in vivo and define the importance of Prkar1a in peripheral nerve development. PMID:24227708

  4. Anti-myelin antibodies play an important role in the susceptibility to develop proteolipid protein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Marín, N; Eixarch, H; Mansilla, M J; Rodríguez-Martín, E; Mecha, M; Guaza, C; Álvarez-Cermeño, J C; Montalban, X; Villar, L M; Espejo, C

    2014-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It is an autoimmune disorder in which activated T cells cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to initiate an inflammatory response that leads to demyelination and axonal damage. The key mechanisms responsible for disease initiation are still unknown. We addressed this issue in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of MS. It is widely known that EAE manifests only in certain strains when immunized with myelin proteins or peptides. We studied the differential immune responses induced in two mouse strains that are susceptible or resistant to EAE induction when they are immunized with the 139-151 peptide of proteolipid protein, an encephalitogenic peptide capable of inducing EAE in the susceptible strain. The adequate combination of major histocompatibility complex alleles and myelin peptides triggered in susceptible mice a T helper type 17 (Th17) response capable of inducing the production of high-affinity anti-myelin immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies. These were not detected in resistant mice, despite immunization with the encephalitogenic peptide in junction with complete Freund's adjuvant and pertussis toxin, which mediate BBB disruption. These data show the pivotal role of Th17 responses and of high-affinity anti-myelin antibodies in EAE induction and that mechanisms that prevent their appearance can contribute to resistance to EAE. PMID:24188195

  5. Anti-myelin antibodies play an important role in the susceptibility to develop proteolipid protein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Marín, N; Eixarch, H; Mansilla, M J; Rodríguez-Martín, E; Mecha, M; Guaza, C; Álvarez-Cermeño, J C; Montalban, X; Villar, L M; Espejo, C

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It is an autoimmune disorder in which activated T cells cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) to initiate an inflammatory response that leads to demyelination and axonal damage. The key mechanisms responsible for disease initiation are still unknown. We addressed this issue in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of MS. It is widely known that EAE manifests only in certain strains when immunized with myelin proteins or peptides. We studied the differential immune responses induced in two mouse strains that are susceptible or resistant to EAE induction when they are immunized with the 139–151 peptide of proteolipid protein, an encephalitogenic peptide capable of inducing EAE in the susceptible strain. The adequate combination of major histocompatibility complex alleles and myelin peptides triggered in susceptible mice a T helper type 17 (Th17) response capable of inducing the production of high-affinity anti-myelin immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies. These were not detected in resistant mice, despite immunization with the encephalitogenic peptide in junction with complete Freund's adjuvant and pertussis toxin, which mediate BBB disruption. These data show the pivotal role of Th17 responses and of high-affinity anti-myelin antibodies in EAE induction and that mechanisms that prevent their appearance can contribute to resistance to EAE. PMID:24188195

  6. Nucleolin Interacts with the Feline Calicivirus 3′ Untranslated Region and the Protease-Polymerase NS6 and NS7 Proteins, Playing a Role in Virus Replication ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cancio-Lonches, Clotilde; Yocupicio-Monroy, Martha; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Galvan-Mendoza, Iván; Ureña, Luis; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian; Salas-Benito, Juan; Gutiérrez-Escolano, Ana Lorena

    2011-01-01

    Cellular proteins play many important roles during the life cycle of all viruses. Specifically, host cell nucleic acid-binding proteins interact with viral components of positive-stranded RNA viruses and regulate viral translation, as well as RNA replication. Here, we report that nucleolin, a ubiquitous multifunctional nucleolar shuttling phosphoprotein, interacts with the Norwalk virus and feline calicivirus (FCV) genomic 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs). Nucleolin can also form a complex in vitro with recombinant Norwalk virus NS6 and -7 (NS6/7) and can be copurified with the analogous protein from feline calicivirus (p76 or NS6/7) from infected feline kidney cells. Nucleolin RNA levels or protein were not modified during FCV infection; however, as a consequence of the infection, nucleolin was seen to relocalize from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm, as well as to the perinuclear area where it colocalizes with the feline calicivirus NS6/7 protein. In addition, antibodies to nucleolin were able to precipitate viral RNA from feline calicivirus-infected cells, indicating a direct or indirect association of nucleolin with the viral RNA during virus replication. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of nucleolin resulted in a reduction of the cytopathic effect and virus yield in CrFK cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that nucleolin is a nucleolar component that interacts with viral RNA and NS6/7 and is required for feline calicivirus replication. PMID:21680514

  7. Nucleolin interacts with the feline calicivirus 3' untranslated region and the protease-polymerase NS6 and NS7 proteins, playing a role in virus replication.

    PubMed

    Cancio-Lonches, Clotilde; Yocupicio-Monroy, Martha; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Galvan-Mendoza, Iván; Ureña, Luis; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian; Salas-Benito, Juan; Gutiérrez-Escolano, Ana Lorena

    2011-08-01

    Cellular proteins play many important roles during the life cycle of all viruses. Specifically, host cell nucleic acid-binding proteins interact with viral components of positive-stranded RNA viruses and regulate viral translation, as well as RNA replication. Here, we report that nucleolin, a ubiquitous multifunctional nucleolar shuttling phosphoprotein, interacts with the Norwalk virus and feline calicivirus (FCV) genomic 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). Nucleolin can also form a complex in vitro with recombinant Norwalk virus NS6 and -7 (NS6/7) and can be copurified with the analogous protein from feline calicivirus (p76 or NS6/7) from infected feline kidney cells. Nucleolin RNA levels or protein were not modified during FCV infection; however, as a consequence of the infection, nucleolin was seen to relocalize from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm, as well as to the perinuclear area where it colocalizes with the feline calicivirus NS6/7 protein. In addition, antibodies to nucleolin were able to precipitate viral RNA from feline calicivirus-infected cells, indicating a direct or indirect association of nucleolin with the viral RNA during virus replication. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of nucleolin resulted in a reduction of the cytopathic effect and virus yield in CrFK cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that nucleolin is a nucleolar component that interacts with viral RNA and NS6/7 and is required for feline calicivirus replication. PMID:21680514

  8. The Transfer-Messenger RNA-Small Protein B System Plays a Role in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiaohui; Huan, Haixia; Xu, Huiqing; Gao, Qingqing; Xiong, Liping; Gao, Ruxia; Liu, Xiufan

    2013-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is capable of colonizing outside of the intestinal tract and evolving into a systemic infection. Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) is a member of the ExPEC group and causes avian colibacillosis. Transfer-mRNA-small protein B (tmRNA-SmpB)-mediated trans-translation is a bacterial translational control system that directs the modification and degradation of proteins, the biosynthesis of which has stalled or has been interrupted, facilitating the rescue of ribosomes stalled at the 3′ ends of defective mRNAs that lack a stop codon. We found that disruption of one, or both, of the smpB or ssrA genes significantly decreased the virulence of the APEC strain E058, as assessed by chicken infection assays. Furthermore, the mutants were obviously attenuated in colonization and persistence assays. The results of quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that the transcription levels of the transcriptional regulation gene rfaH and the virulence genes kpsM, chuA, and iss were significantly decreased compared to those of the wild-type strain. Macrophage infection assays showed that the mutant strains reduced the replication and/or survival ability in the macrophage HD11 cell line compared to that of the parent strain, E058. However, no significant differences were observed in ingestion by macrophages and in chicken serum resistance between the mutant and the wild-type strains. These data indicate that the tmRNA-SmpB system is important in the pathogenesis of APEC O2 strain E058. PMID:24013628

  9. The transfer-messenger RNA-small protein B system plays a role in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaohui; Huan, Haixia; Xu, Huiqing; Gao, Qingqing; Xiong, Liping; Gao, Ruxia; Gao, Song; Liu, Xiufan

    2013-11-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is capable of colonizing outside of the intestinal tract and evolving into a systemic infection. Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) is a member of the ExPEC group and causes avian colibacillosis. Transfer-mRNA-small protein B (tmRNA-SmpB)-mediated trans-translation is a bacterial translational control system that directs the modification and degradation of proteins, the biosynthesis of which has stalled or has been interrupted, facilitating the rescue of ribosomes stalled at the 3' ends of defective mRNAs that lack a stop codon. We found that disruption of one, or both, of the smpB or ssrA genes significantly decreased the virulence of the APEC strain E058, as assessed by chicken infection assays. Furthermore, the mutants were obviously attenuated in colonization and persistence assays. The results of quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that the transcription levels of the transcriptional regulation gene rfaH and the virulence genes kpsM, chuA, and iss were significantly decreased compared to those of the wild-type strain. Macrophage infection assays showed that the mutant strains reduced the replication and/or survival ability in the macrophage HD11 cell line compared to that of the parent strain, E058. However, no significant differences were observed in ingestion by macrophages and in chicken serum resistance between the mutant and the wild-type strains. These data indicate that the tmRNA-SmpB system is important in the pathogenesis of APEC O2 strain E058. PMID:24013628

  10. IL-10 plays a central regulatory role in the cytokines induced by hepatitis C virus core protein and polyinosinic acid:polycytodylic acid.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaoli; Wang, Zhaoxia; Zhai, Naicui; Zhang, Qianqian; Song, Hongxiao; Zhang, Yujiao; Li, Tianyang; Li, Haijun; Su, Lishan; Niu, Junqi; Tu, Zhengkun

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can cause persistent infection and chronic liver disease, and viral factors are involved in HCV persistence. HCV core protein, a highly conserved viral protein, not only elicits an immunoresponse, but it also regulates it. In addition, HCV core protein interacts with toll-like receptors (TLRs) on monocytes, inducing them to produce cytokines. Polyinosinic acid:polycytodylic acid (polyI:C) is a synthetic analogue of double-stranded RNA that binds to TLR3 and can induce secretion of type I IFN from monocytes. Cytokine response against HCV is likely to affect the natural course of infection as well as HCV persistence. However, possible effects of cytokines induced by HCV core protein and polyI:C remain to be investigated. In this study, we isolated CD14(+) monocytes from healthy donors, cultured them in the presence of HCV core protein and/or polyI:C, and characterized the induced cytokines, phenotypes and mechanisms. We demonstrated that HCV core protein- and polyI:C-stimulated CD14(+) monocytes secreted tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-10, and type I interferon (IFN). Importantly, TNF-α and IL-1β regulated the secretion of IL-10, which then influenced the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) and subsequently the production of type I IFN. Interestingly, type I IFN also regulated the production of IL-10, which in turn inhibited the nuclear factor (NF)-κB subunit, reducing TNF-α and IL-1β levels. Therefore, IL-10 appears to play a central role in regulating the production of cytokines induced by HCV core protein and polyI:C. PMID:27337528

  11. The Unfolded Protein Response Plays a Predominant Homeostatic Role in Response to Mitochondrial Stress in Pancreatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Hsin-Yuan; Waldron, Richard T; Gong, Raymond; Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Pandol, Stephen J; Lugea, Aurelia

    2016-01-01

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PaSC) are key participants in the stroma of pancreatic cancer, secreting extracellular matrix proteins and inflammatory mediators. Tumors are poorly vascularized, creating metabolic stress conditions in cancer and stromal cells that necessitate adaptive homeostatic cellular programs. Activation of autophagy and the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR) have been described in hepatic stellate cells, but the role of these processes in PaSC responses to metabolic stress is unknown. We reported that the PI3K/mTOR pathway, which AMPK can regulate through multiple inputs, modulates PaSC activation and fibrogenic potential. Here, using primary and immortalized mouse PaSC, we assess the relative contributions of AMPK/mTOR signaling, autophagy and the UPR to cell fate responses during metabolic stress induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial uncoupler rottlerin at low doses (0.5-2.5 μM) was added to cells cultured in 10% FBS complete media. Mitochondria rapidly depolarized, followed by altered mitochondrial dynamics and decreased cellular ATP levels. This mitochondrial dysfunction elicited rapid, sustained AMPK activation, mTOR pathway inhibition, and blockade of autophagic flux. Rottlerin treatment also induced rapid, sustained PERK/CHOP UPR signaling. Subsequently, high doses (>5 μM) induced loss of cell viability and cell death. Interestingly, AMPK knock-down using siRNA did not prevent rottlerin-induced mTOR inhibition, autophagy, or CHOP upregulation, suggesting that AMPK is dispensable for these responses. Moreover, CHOP genetic deletion, but not AMPK knock-down, prevented rottlerin-induced apoptosis and supported cell survival, suggesting that UPR signaling is a major modulator of cell fate in PaSC during metabolic stress. Further, short-term rottlerin treatment reduced both PaSC fibrogenic potential and IL-6 mRNA expression. In contrast, expression levels of the angiogenic factors HGF and VEGF

  12. The Unfolded Protein Response Plays a Predominant Homeostatic Role in Response to Mitochondrial Stress in Pancreatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hsin-Yuan; Waldron, Richard T.; Gong, Raymond; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Pandol, Stephen J.; Lugea, Aurelia

    2016-01-01

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PaSC) are key participants in the stroma of pancreatic cancer, secreting extracellular matrix proteins and inflammatory mediators. Tumors are poorly vascularized, creating metabolic stress conditions in cancer and stromal cells that necessitate adaptive homeostatic cellular programs. Activation of autophagy and the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR) have been described in hepatic stellate cells, but the role of these processes in PaSC responses to metabolic stress is unknown. We reported that the PI3K/mTOR pathway, which AMPK can regulate through multiple inputs, modulates PaSC activation and fibrogenic potential. Here, using primary and immortalized mouse PaSC, we assess the relative contributions of AMPK/mTOR signaling, autophagy and the UPR to cell fate responses during metabolic stress induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial uncoupler rottlerin at low doses (0.5–2.5 μM) was added to cells cultured in 10% FBS complete media. Mitochondria rapidly depolarized, followed by altered mitochondrial dynamics and decreased cellular ATP levels. This mitochondrial dysfunction elicited rapid, sustained AMPK activation, mTOR pathway inhibition, and blockade of autophagic flux. Rottlerin treatment also induced rapid, sustained PERK/CHOP UPR signaling. Subsequently, high doses (>5 μM) induced loss of cell viability and cell death. Interestingly, AMPK knock-down using siRNA did not prevent rottlerin-induced mTOR inhibition, autophagy, or CHOP upregulation, suggesting that AMPK is dispensable for these responses. Moreover, CHOP genetic deletion, but not AMPK knock-down, prevented rottlerin-induced apoptosis and supported cell survival, suggesting that UPR signaling is a major modulator of cell fate in PaSC during metabolic stress. Further, short-term rottlerin treatment reduced both PaSC fibrogenic potential and IL-6 mRNA expression. In contrast, expression levels of the angiogenic factors HGF and VEGF

  13. Starch Binding Domain-containing Protein 1 Plays a Dominant Role in Glycogen Transport to Lysosomes in Liver.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Yi, Haiqing; Yang, Chunyu; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2016-08-01

    A small portion of cellular glycogen is transported to and degraded in lysosomes by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) in mammals, but it is unclear why and how glycogen is transported to the lysosomes. Stbd1 has recently been proposed to participate in glycogen trafficking to lysosomes. However, our previous study demonstrated that knockdown of Stbd1 in GAA knock-out mice did not alter lysosomal glycogen storage in skeletal muscles. To further determine whether Stbd1 participates in glycogen transport to lysosomes, we generated GAA/Stbd1 double knock-out mice. In fasted double knock-out mice, glycogen accumulation in skeletal and cardiac muscles was not affected, but glycogen content in liver was reduced by nearly 73% at 3 months of age and by 60% at 13 months as compared with GAA knock-out mice, indicating that the transport of glycogen to lysosomes was suppressed in liver by the loss of Stbd1. Exogenous expression of human Stbd1 in double knock-out mice restored the liver lysosomal glycogen content to the level of GAA knock-out mice, as did a mutant lacking the Atg8 family interacting motif (AIM) and another mutant that contains only the N-terminal 24 hydrophobic segment and the C-terminal starch binding domain (CBM20) interlinked by an HA tag. Our results demonstrate that Stbd1 plays a dominant role in glycogen transport to lysosomes in liver and that the N-terminal transmembrane region and the C-terminal CBM20 domain are critical for this function. PMID:27358407

  14. The Methyl-CpG Binding Proteins Mecp2, Mbd2 and Kaiso Are Dispensable for Mouse Embryogenesis, but Play a Redundant Function in Neural Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Martín Caballero, Isabel; Hansen, Janne; Leaford, Donna; Pollard, Steven; Hendrich, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Background The precise molecular changes that occur when a neural stem (NS) cell switches from a programme of self-renewal to commit towards a specific lineage are not currently well understood. However it is clear that control of gene expression plays an important role in this process. DNA methylation, a mark of transcriptionally silent chromatin, has similarly been shown to play important roles in neural cell fate commitment in vivo. While DNA methylation is known to play important roles in neural specification during embryonic development, no such role has been shown for any of the methyl-CpG binding proteins (Mecps) in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore the role of DNA methylation in neural cell fate decisions, we have investigated the function of Mecps in mouse development and in neural stem cell derivation, maintenance, and differentiation. In order to test whether the absence of phenotype in singly-mutant animals could be due to functional redundancy between Mecps, we created mice and neural stem cells simultaneously lacking Mecp2, Mbd2 and Zbtb33. No evidence for functional redundancy between these genes in embryonic development or in the derivation or maintenance of neural stem cells in culture was detectable. However evidence for a defect in neuronal commitment of triple knockout NS cells was found. Conclusions/Significance Although DNA methylation is indispensable for mammalian embryonic development, we show that simultaneous deficiency of three methyl-CpG binding proteins genes is compatible with apparently normal mouse embryogenesis. Nevertheless, we provide genetic evidence for redundancy of function between methyl-CpG binding proteins in postnatal mice. PMID:19177165

  15. The glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase-like proteins SHV3 and its homologs play important roles in cell wall organization.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shimpei; Ishii, Tadashi; Matsunaga, Toshiro; Tominaga, Rumi; Kuromori, Takashi; Wada, Takuji; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Hirayama, Takashi

    2008-10-01

    Despite the importance of extracellular events in cell wall organization and biogenesis, the mechanisms and related factors are largely unknown. We isolated an allele of the shaven3 (shv3) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which exhibits ruptured root hair cells during tip growth. SHV3 encodes a novel protein with two tandemly repeated glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase-like domains and a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor, and several of its paralogs are found in Arabidopsis. Here, we report the detailed characterization of mutants of SHV3 and one of its paralogs, SVL1. The shv3 and svl1 double mutant exhibited additional defects, including swollen guard cells, aberrant expansion of the hypocotyl epidermis and ectopic lignin deposits, suggesting decreased rigidity of the cell wall. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and measurement of the cell wall components indicated an altered cellulose content and pectin modification with cross-linking in the double mutant. Furthermore, we found that the ruptured root hair phenotype of shv3 was suppressed by increasing the amount of borate, which is supposed to be involved in pectic polysaccharide cross-linking, in the medium. These findings indicate that SHV3 and its paralogs are novel important factors involved in primary cell wall organization. PMID:18718934

  16. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Play a Phylogenetically Conserved Role in Endocrine Pancreas Morphogenesis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Serafimidis, Ioannis; Heximer, Scott; Beis, Dimitris; Gavalas, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    During development pancreatic endocrine cells migrate in a coordinated fashion. This migration is necessary to form fully functional islets, but the mechanisms involved remain unknown. Therapeutic strategies to restore β-cell mass and islet functionality by reprogramming endogenous exocrine cells would be strengthened from simultaneous treatments that enhance endocrine cell clustering. We found that endocrine progenitors respond to and regulate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in order to cluster in islets. Rgs4, a dedicated regulator of GPCR signaling, was specifically expressed in early epithelial endocrine progenitors of both zebrafish and mouse, and its expression in the mouse endocrine progenitors was strictly dependent upon Ngn3, the key specification gene of the endocrine lineage. Rgs4 loss of function resulted in defects in islet cell aggregation. By genetically inactivating Gαi-mediated GPCR signaling in endocrine progenitors, we established its role in islet cell aggregation in both mouse and zebrafish. Finally, we identified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) as a ligand mediating islet cell aggregation in both species acting through distinct but closely related receptors. PMID:21911471

  17. Playing RNase P Evolution: Swapping the RNA Catalyst for a Protein Reveals Functional Uniformity of Highly Divergent Enzyme Forms

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Christoph; Hartig, Andreas; Hartmann, Roland K.; Rossmanith, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The RNase P family is a diverse group of endonucleases responsible for the removal of 5′ extensions from tRNA precursors. The diversity of enzyme forms finds its extremes in the eukaryal nucleus where RNA-based catalysis by complex ribonucleoproteins in some organisms contrasts with single-polypeptide enzymes in others. Such structural contrast suggests associated functional differences, and the complexity of the ribonucleoprotein was indeed proposed to broaden the enzyme's functionality beyond tRNA processing. To explore functional overlap and differences between most divergent forms of RNase P, we replaced the nuclear RNase P of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a 10-subunit ribonucleoprotein, with Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP3, a single monomeric protein. Surprisingly, the RNase P-swapped yeast strains were viable, displayed essentially unimpaired growth under a wide variety of conditions, and, in a certain genetic background, their fitness even slightly exceeded that of the wild type. The molecular analysis of the RNase P-swapped strains showed a minor disturbance in tRNA metabolism, but did not point to any RNase P substrates or functions beyond that. Altogether, these results indicate the full functional exchangeability of the highly dissimilar enzymes. Our study thereby establishes the RNase P family, with its combination of structural diversity and functional uniformity, as an extreme case of convergent evolution. It moreover suggests that the apparently gratuitous complexity of some RNase P forms is the result of constructive neutral evolution rather than reflecting increased functional versatility. PMID:25101763

  18. Staphylococcus aureus Protein A Plays a Critical Role in Mediating Bone Destruction and Bone Loss in Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Widaa, Amro; Claro, Tania; Foster, Timothy J.; O’Brien, Fergal J.; Kerrigan, Steven W.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequent causative organism of osteomyelitis. It is characterised by widespread bone loss and bone destruction. Previously we demonstrated that S. aureus protein A (SpA) is capable of binding to tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 expressed on pre-osteoblastic cells, which results in signal generation that leads to cell apoptosis resulting in bone loss. In the current report we demonstrate that upon S. aureus binding to osteoblasts it also inhibits de novo bone formation by preventing expression of key markers of osteoblast growth and division such as alkaline phosphatase, collagen type I, osteocalcin, osteopontin and osteocalcin. In addition, S. aureus induces secretion of soluble RANKL from osteoblasts which in turn recruits and activates the bone resorbing cells, osteoclasts. A strain of S. aureus defective in SpA failed to affect osteoblast growth or proliferation and most importantly failed to recruit or activate osteoclasts. These results suggest that S. aureus SpA binding to osteoblasts provides multiple coordinated signals that accounts for bone loss and bone destruction seen in osteomyelitis cases. A better understanding of the mechanisms through which S. aureus leads to bone infection may improve treatment or lead to the development of better therapeutic agents to treat this notoriously difficult disease. PMID:22792377

  19. Far Upstream Element Binding Protein Plays a Crucial Role in Embryonic Development, Hematopoiesis, and Stabilizing Myc Expression Levels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weixin; Chung, Yang Jo; Parrilla Castellar, Edgardo R; Zheng, Ying; Chung, Hye-Jung; Bandle, Russell; Liu, Juhong; Tessarollo, Lino; Batchelor, Eric; Aplan, Peter D; Levens, David

    2016-03-01

    The transcription factor far upstream element binding protein (FBP) binds and activates the MYC promoter when far upstream element is via TFIIH helicase activity early in the transcription cycle. The fundamental biology and pathology of FBP are complex. In some tumors FBP seems pro-oncogenic, whereas in others it is a tumor suppressor. We generated an FBP knockout (Fubp1(-/-)) mouse to study FBP deficiency. FBP is embryo lethal from embryonic day 10.5 to birth. A spectrum of pathology is associated with FBP loss; besides cerebral hyperplasia and pulmonary hypoplasia, pale livers, hypoplastic spleen, thymus, and bone marrow, cardiac hypertrophy, placental distress, and small size were all indicative of anemia. Immunophenotyping of hematopoietic cells in wild-type versus knockout livers revealed irregular trilineage anemia, with deficits in colony formation. Despite normal numbers of hematopoietic stem cells, transplantation of Fubp1(-/-) hematopoietic stem cells into irradiated mice entirely failed to reconstitute hematopoiesis. In competitive transplantation assays against wild-type donor bone marrow, Fubp1(-/-) hematopoietic stem cells functioned only sporadically at a low level. Although cultures of wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts set Myc levels precisely, Myc levels of mouse varied wildly between fibroblasts harvested from different Fubp1(-/-) embryos, suggesting that FBP contributes to Myc set point fixation. FBP helps to hold multiple physiologic processes to close tolerances, at least in part by constraining Myc expression. PMID:26774856

  20. Adeno-Associated Virus Capsid Proteins May Play a Role in Transcription and Second-Strand Synthesis of Recombinant Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Salganik, Maxim; Aydemir, Fikret; Nam, Hyun-Joo; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2014-01-01

    A group of four interacting amino acids in adeno-associated virus type 8 (AAV8) called the pH quartet has been shown to undergo a structural change when subjected to acidic pH comparable to that seen in endosomal compartments. We examined the phenotypes of mutants with mutations in these amino acids as well as several nearby residues in the background of AAV2. We found that three of the mutations in this region (Y704A, E562A, and E564A) produce normal titers of mature capsids but are extremely defective for transduction (>107-fold). The remaining mutants were also defective for transduction, but the defect in these mutants (E563A, E561A, H526A, and R389A) is not as severe (3- to 22-fold). Two other mutants (Y700A and Y730A) were found to be defective for virus assembly. One of the extremely defective mutants (Y704A) was found to enter the cell, traffic to the nucleus, and uncoat its DNA nearly as efficiently as the wild type. This suggested that some step after nuclear entry and uncoating was defective. To see if the extremely defective mutants were impaired in second-strand synthesis, the Y704A, E562A, and E564A mutants containing self-complementary DNA were compared with virus containing single-stranded genomes. Two of the mutants (Y704A and E564A) showed 1-log and 3-log improvements in infectivity, respectively, while the third mutant (E562A) showed no change. This suggested that inhibition of second-strand synthesis was responsible for some but not most of the defect in these mutants. Comparison of Y704A mRNA synthesis with that of the wild-type capsid showed that accumulation of steady-state mRNA in the Y704A mutant was reduced 450-fold, even though equal genome numbers were uncoated. Our experiments have identified a novel capsid function. They suggest that AAV capsids may play a role in the initiation of both second-strand synthesis and transcription of the input genome. PMID:24198419

  1. Nod-Like Receptor Protein-3 Inflammasome Plays an Important Role during Early Stages of Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Weinheimer-Haus, Eileen M.; Mirza, Rita E.; Koh, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The Nod-like receptor protein (NLRP)-3 inflammasome/IL-1β pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory skin diseases, but its biological role in wound healing remains to be elucidated. Since inflammation is typically thought to impede healing, we hypothesized that loss of NLRP-3 activity would result in a downregulated inflammatory response and accelerated wound healing. NLRP-3 null mice, caspase-1 null mice and C57Bl/6 wild type control mice (WT) received four 8 mm excisional cutaneous wounds; inflammation and healing were assessed during the early stage of wound healing. Consistent with our hypothesis, wounds from NLRP-3 null and caspase-1 null mice contained lower levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α compared to WT mice and had reduced neutrophil and macrophage accumulation. Contrary to our hypothesis, re-epithelialization, granulation tissue formation, and angiogenesis were delayed in NLRP-3 null mice and caspase-1 null mice compared to WT mice, indicating that NLRP-3 signaling is important for early events in wound healing. Topical treatment of excisional wounds with recombinant IL-1β partially restored granulation tissue formation in wounds of NLRP-3 null mice, confirming the importance of NLRP-3-dependent IL-1β production during early wound healing. Despite the improvement in healing, angiogenesis and levels of the pro-angiogenic growth factor VEGF were further reduced in IL-1β treated wounds, suggesting that IL-1β has a negative effect on angiogenesis and that NLRP-3 promotes angiogenesis in an IL-1β-independent manner. These findings indicate that the NLRP-3 inflammasome contributes to the early inflammatory phase following skin wounding and is important for efficient healing. PMID:25793779

  2. Protein kinase R plays a pivotal role in oncostatin M and interleukin-1 signalling in bovine articular cartilage chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, S J; Blain, E J; Al-Sabah, A; Zhang, Y; Duance, V C; Mason, D J

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether treatment of articular cartilage chondrocytes with a combination of oncostatin M (OSM) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) could induce a degradative phenotype that was mediated through the protein kinase R (PKR) signalling pathway. High-density monolayer cultures of full depth, bovine chondrocytes were treated with a combination of OSM and IL-1 (OSM+IL-1) for 7 days. To inhibit the activation of PKR, a pharmacological inhibitor of PKR was added to duplicate cultures. Pro- and active matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) and MMP9 mRNA were significantly upregulated by OSM+IL-1 through a PKR dependent mechanism. ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5 mRNA were also upregulated by OSM+IL-1. The upregulation of ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5 were, in part, mediated through PKR. OSM+IL-1 resulted in a loss of type II collagen, which could not be rescued by PKR inhibition. OSM+IL-1 reduced the expression of COL2A1 (type II collagen), COL9A1 (type IX collagen), COL11A1 (type XI collagen), and ACAN (aggrecan) mRNAs. Expression of type II and XI collagen and aggrecan was reduced further when PKR was inhibited. OSM+IL-1 resulted in an 11-fold increase in TNFa mRNA which was, in part, mediated through the PKR pathway. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that a number of catabolic and pro-inflammatory effects known to be important in human arthritis and induced by OSM and IL-1, are mediated by the PKR signalling pathway. PMID:22287113

  3. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  4. Playing Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Juan E.

    The acceptance of animation technologies is increasing. Video games, such as Sony PlayStation (SONY, 2002), have become part of the culture for young people from kindergarten through undergraduate school. Animation technologies have been implemented into educational systems in the form of animated pedagogical agents (Johnson, 2000). The research…

  5. Game playing.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Christopher D

    2014-03-01

    Game playing has been a core domain of artificial intelligence research since the beginnings of the field. Game playing provides clearly defined arenas within which computational approaches can be readily compared to human expertise through head-to-head competition and other benchmarks. Game playing research has identified several simple core algorithms that provide successful foundations, with development focused on the challenges of defeating human experts in specific games. Key developments include minimax search in chess, machine learning from self-play in backgammon, and Monte Carlo tree search in Go. These approaches have generalized successfully to additional games. While computers have surpassed human expertise in a wide variety of games, open challenges remain and research focuses on identifying and developing new successful algorithmic foundations. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:193-205. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1278 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26304308

  6. Sweet Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Shuk-kwan S.; Lo, Jane-Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article features Sweet play math, a "math by the month" activity that involves decorating and making sugar cubes. Teachers may want to substitute straws, paper squares, alphabet blocks, or such commercially made manipulatives as Unifix[R] cubes for the real sweets. Given no allergy concerns, teachers and students alike would enjoy some sweet…

  7. LeCTR2, a CTR1-like protein kinase from tomato, plays a role in ethylene signalling, development and defence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhefeng; Alexander, Lucy; Hackett, Rachel; Grierson, Don

    2008-06-01

    Arabidopsis AtCTR1 is a Raf-like protein kinase that interacts with ETR1 and ERS and negatively regulates ethylene responses. In tomato, several CTR1-like proteins could perform this role. We have characterized LeCTR2, which has similarity to AtCTR1 and also to EDR1, a CTR1-like Arabidopsis protein involved in defence and stress responses. Protein-protein interactions between LeCTR2 and six tomato ethylene receptors indicated that LeCTR2 interacts preferentially with the subfamily I ETR1-type ethylene receptors LeETR1 and LeETR2, but not the NR receptor or the subfamily II receptors LeETR4, LeETR5 and LeETR6. The C-terminus of LeCTR2 possesses serine/threonine kinase activity and is capable of auto-phosphorylation and phosphorylation of myelin basic protein in vitro. Overexpression of the LeCTR2 N-terminus in tomato resulted in altered growth habit, including reduced stature, loss of apical dominance, highly branched inflorescences and fruit trusses, indeterminate shoots in place of determinate flowers, and prolific adventitious shoot development from the rachis or rachillae of the leaves. Expression of the ethylene-responsive genes E4 and chitinase B was upregulated in transgenic plants, but ethylene production and the level of mRNA for the ethylene biosynthetic gene ACO1 was unaffected. The leaves and fruit of transgenic plants also displayed enhanced susceptibility to infection by the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, which was associated with much stronger induction of pathogenesis-related genes such as PR1b1 and chitinase B compared with the wild-type. The results suggest that LeCTR2 plays a role in ethylene signalling, development and defence, probably through its interactions with the ETR1-type ethylene receptors of subfamily I. PMID:18346193

  8. The antioxidant protein PARK7 plays an important role in cell resistance to Cisplatin-induced apoptosis in case of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Rachana; Dihazi, Gry H; Eltoweissy, Marwa; Mishra, Durga P; Mueller, Gerhard A; Dihazi, Hassan

    2016-08-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most malignant tumor in the adult kidney. Many factors are responsible for the development and progression of this tumor. Increased reactive oxygen species accumulation and altered redox status have been observed in cancer cells and this biochemical property of cancer cells can be exploited for therapeutic benefits. In earlier work we identified and characterize Protein DJ-1 (PARK7) as an oxidative stress squevenger in renal cells exposed to oxidative stress. To investigate whether the PARK7 or other oxidative stress proteins play a role in the renal cell carcinoma and its sensitivity or resistance to cytostatic drug treatment, differential proteomics analysis was performed with a cell model for clear cell renal carcinoma (Caki-2 and A498). Caki-2 cells were treated with cisplatin and differentially expressed proteins were investigated. The cisplatin treatment resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species accumulation and ultimately apoptosis of Caki-2 and A498 cells. In parallel, the apoptotic effect was accompanied by a significant downregulation of antioxidant proteins especially PARK7. Knockdown of PARK7 using siRNA and overexpression using plasmid highlights the role of PARK7 as a key player in renal cell carcinoma response to cisplatin induced apoptosis. Overexpression of PARK7 resulted in significant decrease in apoptosis, whereas knockdown of the protein was accompanied by an increase in apoptosis in Caki-2 and A498 cells treated with cisplatin. These results highlights for the first time the important role of PARK7 in cisplatin induced apoptosis in clear renal cell carcinoma cells. PMID:27112662

  9. New insights into potential functions for the protein 4.1superfamily of proteins in kidney epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Calinisan, Venice; Gravem, Dana; Chen, Ray Ping-Hsu; Brittin,Sachi; Mohandas, Narla; Lecomte, Marie-Christine; Gascard, Philippe

    2005-06-17

    Members of the protein 4.1 family of adapter proteins are expressed in a broad panel of tissues including various epithelia where they likely play an important role in maintenance of cell architecture and polarity and in control of cell proliferation. We have recently characterized the structure and distribution of three members of the protein 4.1 family, 4.1B, 4.1R and 4.1N, in mouse kidney. We describe here binding partners for renal 4.1 proteins, identified through the screening of a rat kidney yeast two-hybrid system cDNA library. The identification of putative protein 4.1-based complexes enables us to envision potential functions for 4.1 proteins in kidney: organization of signaling complexes, response to osmotic stress, protein trafficking, and control of cell proliferation. We discuss the relevance of these protein 4.1-based interactions in kidney physio-pathology in the context of their previously identified functions in other cells and tissues. Specifically, we will focus on renal 4.1 protein interactions with beta amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP), 14-3-3 proteins, and the cell swelling-activated chloride channel pICln. We also discuss the functional relevance of another member of the protein 4.1 superfamily, ezrin, in kidney physiopathology.

  10. New insights into potential functions for the protein 4.1 superfamily of proteins in kidney epithelium.

    PubMed

    Calinisan, Venice; Gravem, Dana; Chen, Ray Ping-Hsu; Brittin, Sachi; Mohandas, Narla; Lecomte, Marie-Christine; Gascard, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Members of the protein 4.1 family of adapter proteins are expressed in a broad panel of tissues including various epithelia where they likely play an important role in maintenance of cell architecture and polarity and in control of cell proliferation. We have recently characterized the structure and distribution of three members of the protein 4.1 family, 4.1B, 4.1R and 4.1N, in mouse kidney. We describe here binding partners for renal 4.1 proteins, identified through the screening of a rat kidney yeast two-hybrid system cDNA library. The identification of putative protein 4.1-based complexes enables us to envision potential functions for 4.1 proteins in kidney: organization of signaling complexes, response to osmotic stress, protein trafficking, and control of cell proliferation. We discuss the relevance of these protein 4.1-based interactions in kidney physio-pathology in the context of their previously identified functions in other cells and tissues. Specifically, we will focus on renal 4.1 protein interactions with beta amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP), 14-3-3 proteins, and the cell swelling-activated chloride channel pICln. We also discuss the functional relevance of another member of the protein 4.1 superfamily, ezrin, in kidney physio-pathology. PMID:16368544

  11. A Sporozoite- and Liver Stage-expressed Tryptophan-rich Protein Plays an Auxiliary Role in Plasmodium Liver Stage Development and Is a Potential Vaccine Candidate*

    PubMed Central

    Jaijyan, Dabbu Kumar; Singh, Himanshu; Singh, Agam Prasad

    2015-01-01

    The liver stages of the malaria parasite are clinically silent and constitute ideal targets for causal prophylactic drugs and vaccines. Cellular and molecular events responsible for liver stage development are poorly characterized. Here, we show that sporozoite, liver stage tryptophan-rich protein (SLTRiP) forms large multimers. Mice immunized with a purified recombinant SLTRiP protein gave high antibody titers in both inbred and outbred mice. Immunized mice showed highly significant levels of protection upon challenge with sporozoites and exhibited 10,000-fold fewer parasite 18S-rRNA copy numbers in their livers. The protection offered by immunization with SLTRiP came mainly from T-cells, and antibodies had little role to play despite their high titers. Immunofluorescence assays showed that SLTRiP is expressed in the sporozoite and early to late liver stages of malaria parasites. SLTRiP protein is exported to the cytosol of infected host cells during the early hours of parasite infection. Parasites deficient in SLTRiP were moderately defective in liver stage parasite development. A transcriptome profile of SLTRiP-deficient parasite-infected hepatocytes highlighted that SLTRiP interferes with multiple pathways in the host cell. We have demonstrated a role for SLTRiP in sporozoites and the liver stage of malaria parasites. PMID:25960542

  12. Cbf11 and Cbf12, the fission yeast CSL proteins, play opposing roles in cell adhesion and coordination of cell and nuclear division

    SciTech Connect

    Prevorovsky, Martin; Grousl, Tomas; Stanurova, Jana; Rynes, Jan; Nellen, Wolfgang; Puta, Frantisek; Folk, Petr

    2009-05-01

    The CSL (CBF1/RBP-J{kappa}/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1) family is comprised of transcription factors essential for metazoan development, mostly due to their involvement in the Notch receptor signaling pathway. Recently, we identified two novel classes of CSL genes in the genomes of several fungal species, organisms lacking the Notch pathway. In this study, we characterized experimentally cbf11{sup +} and cbf12{sup +}, the two CSL genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in order to elucidate the CSL function in fungi. We provide evidence supporting their identity as genuine CSL genes. Both cbf11{sup +} and cbf12{sup +} are non-essential; they have distinct expression profiles and code for nuclear proteins with transcription activation potential. Significantly, we demonstrated that Cbf11 recognizes specifically the canonical CSL response element GTG{sup A}/{sub G}GAA in vitro. The deletion of cbf11{sup +} is associated with growth phenotypes and altered colony morphology. Furthermore, we found that Cbf11 and Cbf12 play opposite roles in cell adhesion, nuclear and cell division and their coordination. Disturbed balance of the two CSL proteins leads to cell separation defects (sep phenotype), cut phenotype, and high-frequency diploidization in heterothallic strains. Our data show that CSL proteins operate in an organism predating the Notch pathway, which should be of relevance to the understanding of (Notch-independent) CSL functions in metazoans.

  13. A Conserved Acidic Motif in the N-Terminal Domain of Nitrate Reductase Is Necessary for the Inactivation of the Enzyme in the Dark by Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 Binding1

    PubMed Central

    Pigaglio, Emmanuelle; Durand, Nathalie; Meyer, Christian

    1999-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the N-terminal domain of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) nitrate reductase (NR) is involved in the inactivation of the enzyme by phosphorylation, which occurs in the dark (L. Nussaume, M. Vincentz, C. Meyer, J.P. Boutin, and M. Caboche [1995] Plant Cell 7: 611–621). The activity of a mutant NR protein lacking this N-terminal domain was no longer regulated by light-dark transitions. In this study smaller deletions were performed in the N-terminal domain of tobacco NR that removed protein motifs conserved among higher plant NRs. The resulting truncated NR-coding sequences were then fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter and introduced in NR-deficient mutants of the closely related species Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. We found that the deletion of a conserved stretch of acidic residues led to an active NR protein that was more thermosensitive than the wild-type enzyme, but it was relatively insensitive to the inactivation by phosphorylation in the dark. Therefore, the removal of this acidic stretch seems to have the same effects on NR activation state as the deletion of the N-terminal domain. A hypothetical explanation for these observations is that a specific factor that impedes inactivation remains bound to the truncated enzyme. A synthetic peptide derived from this acidic protein motif was also found to be a good substrate for casein kinase II. PMID:9880364

  14. The Putative “Switch 2” Domain of the Ras-related GTPase, Rab1B, Plays an Essential Role in the Interaction with Rab Escort Protein

    PubMed Central

    Overmeyer, Jean H.; Wilson, Amy L.; Erdman, Robert A.; Maltese, William A.

    1998-01-01

    Posttranslational modification of Rab proteins by geranylgeranyltransferase type II requires that they first bind to Rab escort protein (REP). Following prenylation, REP is postulated to accompany the modified GTPase to its specific target membrane. REP binds preferentially to Rab proteins that are in the GDP state, but the specific structural domains involved in this interaction have not been defined. In p21 Ras, the α2 helix of the Switch 2 domain undergoes a major conformational change upon GTP hydrolysis. Therefore, we hypothesized that the corresponding region in Rab1B might play a key role in the interaction with REP. Introduction of amino acid substitutions (I73N, Y78D, and A81D) into the putative α2 helix of Myc-tagged Rab1B prevented prenylation of the recombinant protein in cell-free assays, whereas mutations in the α3 and α4 helices did not. Additionally, upon transient expression in transfected HEK-293 cells, the Myc-Rab1B α2 helix mutants were not efficiently prenylated as determined by incorporation of [3H]mevalonate. Metabolic labeling studies using [32P]orthophosphate indicated that the poor prenylation of the Rab1B α2 helix mutants was not directly correlated with major disruptions in guanine nucleotide binding or intrinsic GTPase activity. Finally, gel filtration analysis of cytosolic fractions from 293 cells that were coexpressing T7 epitope-tagged REP with various Myc-Rab1B constructs revealed that mutations in the α2 helix of Rab1B prevented the association of nascent (i.e., nonprenylated) Rab1B with REP. These data indicate that the Switch 2 domain of Rab1B is a key structural determinant for REP interaction and that nucleotide-dependent conformational changes in this region are largely responsible for the selective interaction of REP with the GDP-bound form of the Rab substrate. PMID:9437002

  15. The tomato floral homeotic protein FBP1-like gene, SlGLO1, plays key roles in petal and stamen development.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuhu; Hu, Zongli; Yin, Wencheng; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Jianling; Chen, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factors play important role in plant growth and development, especially floral organ identities. In our study, a MADS-box gene SlGLO1- tomato floral homeotic protein FBP1-like gene was isolated. Its tissue-specific expression profile analysis showed that SlGLO1 was highly expressed in petals and stamens. RNAi (RNA interference) repression of SlGLO1 resulted in floral organ abnormal phenotypes, including green petals with shorter size, and aberrant carpelloid stamens. SlGLO1-silenced lines are male sterile. Total chlorophyll content was increased and chlorophyll biosynthetic genes were significantly up-regulated in SlGLO1-silenced petals and stamens. Furthermore, B-class genes expression analysis indicated that the repressed function of SlGLO1 led to the enhanced expression of TAP3 and the down-regulation of TPI in the petals and stamens, while the expression of TM6 was reduced in petals and increased in stamens and carpels of SlGLO1-RNAi plants. Additionally, pollen grains of transgenic lines were aberrant and failed to germinate and tomato pollen-specific genes were down-regulated by more than 90% in SlGLO1-silenced lines. These results suggest that SlGLO1 plays important role in regulating plant floral organ and pollen development in tomato. PMID:26842499

  16. The tomato floral homeotic protein FBP1-like gene, SlGLO1, plays key roles in petal and stamen development

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuhu; Hu, Zongli; Yin, Wencheng; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Jianling; Chen, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factors play important role in plant growth and development, especially floral organ identities. In our study, a MADS-box gene SlGLO1- tomato floral homeotic protein FBP1-like gene was isolated. Its tissue-specific expression profile analysis showed that SlGLO1 was highly expressed in petals and stamens. RNAi (RNA interference) repression of SlGLO1 resulted in floral organ abnormal phenotypes, including green petals with shorter size, and aberrant carpelloid stamens. SlGLO1-silenced lines are male sterile. Total chlorophyll content was increased and chlorophyll biosynthetic genes were significantly up-regulated in SlGLO1-silenced petals and stamens. Furthermore, B-class genes expression analysis indicated that the repressed function of SlGLO1 led to the enhanced expression of TAP3 and the down-regulation of TPI in the petals and stamens, while the expression of TM6 was reduced in petals and increased in stamens and carpels of SlGLO1-RNAi plants. Additionally, pollen grains of transgenic lines were aberrant and failed to germinate and tomato pollen-specific genes were down-regulated by more than 90% in SlGLO1-silenced lines. These results suggest that SlGLO1 plays important role in regulating plant floral organ and pollen development in tomato. PMID:26842499

  17. Activation of the nimA protein kinase plays a unique role during mitosis that cannot be bypassed by absence of the bimE checkpoint.

    PubMed Central

    Osmani, A H; O'Donnell, K; Pu, R T; Osmani, S A

    1991-01-01

    Mutation of nimA reversibly arrests cells in late G2 and nimA overexpression promotes premature mitosis. Here we demonstrate that the product of nimA (designated NIMA) has protein kinase activity that can phosphorylate beta-casein but not histone proteins. NIMA kinase activity is cell cycle regulated being 20-fold higher at mitosis when compared to S-phase arrested cells. NIMA activation is normally required in G2 to initiate chromosome condensation, to nucleate spindle pole body microtubules, and to allow an MPM-2 specific mitotic phosphorylation. All three of these mitotic events can occur in the absence of activated NIMA when the bimE gene is mutated (bimE7). However, the bimE7 mutation cannot completely bypass the requirement for nimA during mitosis as entry into mitosis in the absence of NIMA activation results in major mitotic defects that affect both the organization of the nuclear envelope and mitotic spindle. Thus, although nimA plays an essential but limited role during mitosis, mutation of nimA arrests all of mitosis. We therefore propose that mutation of nimA prevents mitotic initiation due to a checkpoint arrest that is negatively mediated by bimE. The checkpoint ensures that mitosis is not initiated until NIMA is mitotically activated. Images PMID:1868838

  18. OsSNDP1, a Sec14-nodulin domain-containing protein, plays a critical role in root hair elongation in rice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Kim, Chul Min; Xuan, Yuan-hu; Park, Soon Ju; Piao, Hai Long; Je, Byoung Il; Liu, Jingmiao; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Bo-Kyeong; Han, Chang-Deok

    2013-05-01

    Rice is cultivated in water-logged paddy lands. Thus, rice root hairs on the epidermal layers are exposed to a different redox status of nitrogen species, organic acids, and metal ions than root hairs growing in drained soil. To identify genes that play an important role in root hair growth, a forward genetics approach was used to screen for short-root-hair mutants. A short-root-hair mutant was identified and isolated by using map-based cloning and sequencing. The mutation arose from a single amino acid substitution of OsSNDP1 (Oryza sativa Sec14-nodulin domain protein), which shows high sequence homology with Arabidopsis COW1/AtSFH1 and encodes a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITP). By performing complementation assays with Atsfh1 mutants, we demonstrated that OsSNDP1 is involved in growth of root hairs. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy was utilized to further characterize the effect of the Ossndp1 mutation on root hair morphology. Aberrant morphogenesis was detected in root hair elongation and maturation zones. Many root hairs were branched and showed irregular shapes due to bulged nodes. Many epidermal cells also produced dome-shaped root hairs, which indicated that root hair elongation ceased at an early stage. These studies showed that PITP-mediated phospholipid signaling and metabolism is critical for root hair elongation in rice. PMID:23456248

  19. ATP-binding motifs play key roles in Krp1p, kinesin-related protein 1, function for bi-polar growth control in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Dong Keun; Cho, Bon A; Kim, Hyong Bai . E-mail: hbkim5212@hotmail.com

    2005-06-03

    Kinesin is a microtubule-based motor protein with various functions related to the cell growth and division. It has been reported that Krp1p, kinesin-related protein 1, which belongs to the kinesin heavy chain superfamily, localizes on microtubules and may play an important role in cytokinesis. However, the function of Krp1p has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we overexpressed an intact form and three different mutant forms of Krp1p in fission yeast constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in two ATP-binding motifs or by truncation of the leucine zipper-like motif (LZiP). We observed hyper-extended microtubules and the aberrant nuclear shape in Krp1p-overexpressed fission yeast. As a functional consequence, a point mutation of ATP-binding domain 1 (G89E) in Krp1p reversed the effect of Krp1p overexpression in fission yeast, whereas the specific mutation in ATP-binding domain 2 (G238E) resulted in the altered cell polarity. Additionally, truncation of the leucine zipper-like domain (LZiP) at the C-terminal of Krp1p showed a normal nuclear division. Taken together, we suggest that krp1p is involved in regulation of cell-polarized growth through ATP-binding motifs in fission yeast.

  20. cDNA-AFLP analysis reveals heat shock proteins play important roles in mediating cold, heat, and drought tolerance in Ammopiptanthus mongolicus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiming; Li, Zhaochun; Zhou, Meiliang; Cheng, Hongmei

    2014-03-01

    Ammopiptanthus mongolicus (Maxim.ex kom.) Cheng F. is the only evergreen broadleaf shrub endemic to the desert of central Asian and it can survive at drought, salt, and alkali stress. It is believed that A. mongolicus is an important germplasm containing abiotic-tolerance genes. In order to identify drought-, cold-, and heat-responsive genes and to gain a better understanding of stress responses in A. mongolicus, genome-wide investigation of drought-, cold-, and heat-responsive genes was performed in A. mongolicus using cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism. Selective amplification with 240 primer combinations generated 5,000 differentially expressed transcript derived fragments (TDFs). Of these, 201 TDFs with differential expression patterns were excised from gels, reamplified by PCR, and sequenced. The gene expression patterns of 11 regulated genes were further investigated by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis. Sequencing and similarity analysis revealed that TDFs present homologies chiefly with proteins involved in various abiotic and biotic stress and developmental responses. The information presented in this study reveals that heat shock proteins play an active role in mediating drought, cold, and heat tolerance in A. mongolicus. PMID:24241624

  1. Member of the CREB/ATF protein family, but not CREB alpha plays an active role in BLV tax trans activation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss-Toth, E; Paca-uccaralertkun, S; Unk, I; Boros, I

    1993-01-01

    The trans activator protein of Bovine Leukaemia Virus (tax) increases the rate of transcription from the virus promoter through 21 bp sequences located in three tandem copies in the virus LTR. Based on data obtained by three different experimental approaches we concluded that the central CRE-like motif found in each of the BLV 21 bp repeats plays an important and indispensable role in tax mediated trans activation. These include (i) in vivo analysis of the function of mutant 21 bp sequences in transient transfection, (ii) gel mobility shift assay to show that CREB binds to BLV 21 bp repeats in vitro and (iii) the demonstration that the production of antisense CREB mRNA inhibits tax trans activation. Further studies with different deletion mutant CREB proteins suggest that although CREB alpha can interact with factors involved in BLV trans activation, it does not promote transcription initiation; consequently some other member/s of the CREB/ATF family must be involved. Images PMID:8396235

  2. Differential dissolved protein expression throughout the life cycle of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Lingdan, Li; Pengtao, Gong; Wenchao, Li; Jianhua, Li; Ju, Yang; Chengwu, Liu; He, Li; Guocai, Zhang; Wenzhi, Ren; Yujiang, Chen; Xichen, Zhang

    2012-12-01

    Giardia lamblia (G. lamblia) has a simple life cycle that alternates between a cyst and a trophozoite, and this parasite is an important human and animal pathogen. To increase our understanding of the molecular basis of the G. lamblia encystment, we have analyzed the soluble proteins expressed by trophozoites and cysts extracted from feces by quantitative proteomic analysis. A total of 63 proteins were identified by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling, and were categorized as cytoskeletal proteins, a cell-cycle-specific kinase, metabolic enzymes and stress resistance proteins. Importantly, we demonstrated that the expression of seven proteins differed significantly between trophozoites and cysts. In cysts, the expression of three proteins (one variable surface protein (VSP), ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC), β-tubulin) increased, whereas the expression of four proteins (14-3-3 protein, α-tubulin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), protein disulfide isomerase 2 (PDI-2)) decreased significantly when compared with the levels of these proteins in trophozoites. The mRNA expression patterns of four of these proteins (OTC, α-tubulin, GAPDH, VSP) were similar to the expression levels of the proteins. These seven proteins appear to play an important role in the completion of the life cycle of G. lamblia. PMID:23058231

  3. Fatty acid binding protein 4 and 5 play a crucial role in thermogenesis under the conditions of fasting and cold stress.

    PubMed

    Syamsunarno, Mas Rizky A A; Iso, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Putri, Mirasari; Obokata, Masaru; Sunaga, Hiroaki; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Matsui, Hiroki; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Endo, Keigo; Tsushima, Yoshito; Yokoyama, Tomoyuki; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Hypothermia is rapidly induced during cold exposure when thermoregulatory mechanisms, including fatty acid (FA) utilization, are disturbed. FA binding protein 4 (FABP4) and FABP5, which are abundantly expressed in adipose tissues and macrophages, have been identified as key molecules in the pathogenesis of overnutrition-related diseases, such as insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. We have recently shown that FABP4/5 are prominently expressed in capillary endothelial cells in the heart and skeletal muscle and play a crucial role in FA utilization in these tissues. However, the role of FABP4/5 in thermogenesis remains to be determined. In this study, we showed that thermogenesis is severely impaired in mice lacking both FABP4 and FABP5 (DKO mice), as manifested shortly after cold exposure during fasting. In DKO mice, the storage of both triacylglycerol in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and glycogen in skeletal muscle (SkM) was nearly depleted after fasting, and a biodistribution analysis using 125I-BMIPP revealed that non-esterified FAs (NEFAs) are not efficiently taken up by BAT despite the robustly elevated levels of serum NEFAs. In addition to the severe hypoglycemia observed in DKO mice during fasting, cold exposure did not induce the uptake of glucose analogue 18F-FDG by BAT. These findings strongly suggest that DKO mice exhibit pronounced hypothermia after fasting due to the depletion of energy storage in BAT and SkM and the reduced supply of energy substrates to these tissues. In conclusion, FABP4/5 play an indispensable role in thermogenesis in BAT and SkM. Our study underscores the importance of FABP4/5 for overcoming life-threatening environments, such as cold and starvation. PMID:24603714

  4. A Novel DNA-Binding Protein, PhaR, Plays a Central Role in the Regulation of Polyhydroxyalkanoate Accumulation and Granule Formation in the Haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shuangfeng; Cai, Lei; Zhao, Dahe; Liu, Guiming; Han, Jing; Zhou, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are synthesized and assembled as PHA granules that undergo well-regulated formation in many microorganisms. However, this regulation remains unclear in haloarchaea. In this study, we identified a PHA granule-associated regulator (PhaR) that negatively regulates the expression of both its own gene and the granule structural gene phaP in the same operon (phaRP) in Haloferax mediterranei. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR (ChIP-qPCR) assays demonstrated a significant interaction between PhaR and the phaRP promoter in vivo. Scanning mutagenesis of the phaRP promoter revealed a specific cis-element as the possible binding position of the PhaR. The haloarchaeal homologs of the PhaR contain a novel conserved domain that belongs to a swapped-hairpin barrel fold family found in AbrB-like proteins. Amino acid substitution indicated that this AbrB-like domain is critical for the repression activity of PhaR. In addition, the phaRP promoter had a weaker activity in the PHA-negative strains, implying a function of the PHA granules in titration of the PhaR. Moreover, the H. mediterranei strain lacking phaR was deficient in PHA accumulation and produced granules with irregular shapes. Interestingly, the PhaR itself can promote PHA synthesis and granule formation in a PhaP-independent manner. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the haloarchaeal PhaR is a novel bifunctional protein that plays the central role in the regulation of PHA accumulation and granule formation in H. mediterranei. PMID:25344243

  5. The PR/SET Domain Zinc Finger Protein Prdm4 Regulates Gene Expression in Embryonic Stem Cells but Plays a Nonessential Role in the Developing Mouse Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Bogani, Debora; Morgan, Marc A. J.; Nelson, Andrew C.; Costello, Ita; McGouran, Joanna F.; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2013-01-01

    Prdm4 is a highly conserved member of the Prdm family of PR/SET domain zinc finger proteins. Many well-studied Prdm family members play critical roles in development and display striking loss-of-function phenotypes. Prdm4 functional contributions have yet to be characterized. Here, we describe its widespread expression in the early embryo and adult tissues. We demonstrate that DNA binding is exclusively mediated by the Prdm4 zinc finger domain, and we characterize its tripartite consensus sequence via SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) and ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing) experiments. In embryonic stem cells (ESCs), Prdm4 regulates key pluripotency and differentiation pathways. Two independent strategies, namely, targeted deletion of the zinc finger domain and generation of a EUCOMM LacZ reporter allele, resulted in functional null alleles. However, homozygous mutant embryos develop normally and adults are healthy and fertile. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that Prdm4 functions redundantly with other transcriptional partners to cooperatively regulate gene expression in the embryo and adult animal. PMID:23918801

  6. The PR/SET domain zinc finger protein Prdm4 regulates gene expression in embryonic stem cells but plays a nonessential role in the developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Bogani, Debora; Morgan, Marc A J; Nelson, Andrew C; Costello, Ita; McGouran, Joanna F; Kessler, Benedikt M; Robertson, Elizabeth J; Bikoff, Elizabeth K

    2013-10-01

    Prdm4 is a highly conserved member of the Prdm family of PR/SET domain zinc finger proteins. Many well-studied Prdm family members play critical roles in development and display striking loss-of-function phenotypes. Prdm4 functional contributions have yet to be characterized. Here, we describe its widespread expression in the early embryo and adult tissues. We demonstrate that DNA binding is exclusively mediated by the Prdm4 zinc finger domain, and we characterize its tripartite consensus sequence via SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) and ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing) experiments. In embryonic stem cells (ESCs), Prdm4 regulates key pluripotency and differentiation pathways. Two independent strategies, namely, targeted deletion of the zinc finger domain and generation of a EUCOMM LacZ reporter allele, resulted in functional null alleles. However, homozygous mutant embryos develop normally and adults are healthy and fertile. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that Prdm4 functions redundantly with other transcriptional partners to cooperatively regulate gene expression in the embryo and adult animal. PMID:23918801

  7. β-Ketoacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Synthase I (KASI) Plays Crucial Roles in the Plant Growth and Fatty Acids Synthesis in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianquan; Xu, Ronghua; Chen, Jianghua; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids serve many functions in plants, but the effects of some key genes involved in fatty acids biosynthesis on plants growth and development are not well understood yet. To understand the functions of 3-ketoacyl-acyl-carrier protein synthase I (KASI) in tobacco, we isolated two KASI homologs, which we have designated NtKASI-1 and NtKASI-2. Expression analysis showed that these two KASI genes were transcribed constitutively in all tissues examined. Over-expression of NtKASI-1 in tobacco changed the fatty acid content in leaves, whereas over-expressed lines of NtKASI-2 exhibited distinct phenotypic features such as slightly variegated leaves and reduction of the fatty acid content in leaves, similar to the silencing plants of NtKASI-1 gene. Interestingly, the silencing of NtKASI-2 gene had no discernibly altered phenotypes compared to wild type. The double silencing plants of these two genes enhanced the phenotypic changes during vegetative and reproductive growth compared to wild type. These results uncovered that these two KASI genes had the partially functional redundancy, and that the KASI genes played a key role in regulating fatty acids synthesis and in mediating plant growth and development in tobacco. PMID:27509494

  8. β-Ketoacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Synthase I (KASI) Plays Crucial Roles in the Plant Growth and Fatty Acids Synthesis in Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianquan; Xu, Ronghua; Chen, Jianghua; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids serve many functions in plants, but the effects of some key genes involved in fatty acids biosynthesis on plants growth and development are not well understood yet. To understand the functions of 3-ketoacyl-acyl-carrier protein synthase I (KASI) in tobacco, we isolated two KASI homologs, which we have designated NtKASI-1 and NtKASI-2. Expression analysis showed that these two KASI genes were transcribed constitutively in all tissues examined. Over-expression of NtKASI-1 in tobacco changed the fatty acid content in leaves, whereas over-expressed lines of NtKASI-2 exhibited distinct phenotypic features such as slightly variegated leaves and reduction of the fatty acid content in leaves, similar to the silencing plants of NtKASI-1 gene. Interestingly, the silencing of NtKASI-2 gene had no discernibly altered phenotypes compared to wild type. The double silencing plants of these two genes enhanced the phenotypic changes during vegetative and reproductive growth compared to wild type. These results uncovered that these two KASI genes had the partially functional redundancy, and that the KASI genes played a key role in regulating fatty acids synthesis and in mediating plant growth and development in tobacco. PMID:27509494

  9. The Vaccine Candidate Substrate Binding Protein SBP2 Plays a Key Role in Arginine Uptake, Which Is Required for Growth of Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Taketo; Kirkham, Charmaine; Brauer, Aimee; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is an exclusively human pathogen that is an important cause of otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A vaccine to prevent M. catarrhalis infections would have an enormous global impact in reducing morbidity resulting from these infections. Substrate binding protein 2 (SBP2) of an ABC transporter system has recently been identified as a promising vaccine candidate antigen on the bacterial surface of M. catarrhalis. In this study, we showed that SBP1, -2, and -3 individually bind different basic amino acids with exquisite specificity. We engineered mutants that each expressed a single SBP from this gene cluster and showed in growth experiments that SBP1, -2, and -3 serve a nutritional function through acquisition of amino acids for the bacterium. SBP2 mediates uptake of arginine, a strict growth requirement of M. catarrhalis. Adherence and invasion assays demonstrated that SBP1 and SBP3 play a role in invasion of human respiratory epithelial cells, consistent with a nutritional role in intracellular survival in the human respiratory tract. This work demonstrates that the SBPs of an ABC transporter system function in the uptake of basic amino acids to support growth of M. catarrhalis. The critical role of SBP2 in arginine uptake may contribute to its potential as a vaccine antigen. PMID:26597985

  10. A Flucytosine-Responsive Mbp1/Swi4-Like Protein, Mbs1, Plays Pleiotropic Roles in Antifungal Drug Resistance, Stress Response, and Virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Hee; Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Min Su; Yoon, Ja-Kyung; White, Theodore C.; Floyd, Anna; Heitman, Joseph; Strain, Anna K.; Nielsen, Judith N.; Nielsen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcosis, caused by the basidiomycetous fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, is responsible for more than 600,000 deaths annually in AIDS patients. Flucytosine is one of the most commonly used antifungal drugs for its treatment, but its resistance and regulatory mechanisms have never been investigated at the genome scale in C. neoformans. In the present study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis by employing two-component system mutants (tco1Δ and tco2Δ) exhibiting opposing flucytosine susceptibility. As a result, a total of 177 flucytosine-responsive genes were identified, and many of them were found to be regulated by Tco1 or Tco2. Among these, we discovered an APSES-like transcription factor, Mbs1 (Mbp1- and Swi4-like protein 1). Expression analysis revealed that MBS1 was regulated in response to flucytosine in a Tco2/Hog1-dependent manner. Supporting this, C. neoformans with the deletion of MBS1 exhibited increased susceptibility to flucytosine. Intriguingly, Mbs1 played pleiotropic roles in diverse cellular processes of C. neoformans. Mbs1 positively regulated ergosterol biosynthesis and thereby affected polyene and azole drug susceptibility. Mbs1 was also involved in genotoxic and oxidative stress responses. Furthermore, Mbs1 promoted production of melanin and capsule and thereby was required for full virulence of C. neoformans. In conclusion, Mbs1 is considered to be a novel antifungal therapeutic target for treatment of cryptococcosis. PMID:22080454

  11. Alpha-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone and Agouti-Related Protein: Do They Play a Role in Appetite Regulation in Childhood Obesity?

    PubMed Central

    Vehapoğlu, Aysel; Türkmen, Serdar; Terzioğlu, Şule

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The hypothalamus plays a crucial role in the regulation of feeding behavior. The anorexigenic neuropeptide alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and the orexigenic neuropeptide agouti-related protein (AgRP) are among the major peptides produced in the hypothalamus. This study investigated the plasma concentrations of α-MSH and AgRP in underweight and obese children and their healthy peers. The associations between α-MSH and AgRP levels and anthropometric and nutritional markers of malnutrition and obesity were also assessed. Methods: Healthy sex-matched subjects aged 2 to 12 years were divided into 3 groups, as underweight (n=57), obese (n=61), and of normal weight (n=57). Plasma fasting concentrations of α-MSH and AgRP were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The differences between the three groups as to the relationships between plasma concentrations of α-MSH and AgRP and anthropometric data, serum biochemical parameters and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance were evaluated. Results: Obese children had significantly lower α-MSH levels than underweight (1194±865 vs. 1904±1312 ng/mL, p=0.006) and normal weight (1194±865 vs. 1762±1463 ng/mL, p=0.036) children; there were no significant differences in the α-MSH levels between the underweight and normal weight children (p=0.811). Also, no significant differences were observed between the underweight and obese children regarding the AgRP levels (742±352 vs. 828±417 ng/mL, p=0.125). We found a significant positive correlation between plasma α-MSH and AgRP levels across the entire sample. Conclusion: This study is the first to demonstrate body weight-related differences in α-MSH and AgRP levels in children. Circulating plasma α-MSH levels in obese children were markedly lower than those of underweight and normal-weight children. This suggests that α-MSH could play a role in appetite regulation. PMID:26758700

  12. Zinc-finger protein 91 plays a key role in LIGHT-induced activation of non-canonical NF-{kappa}B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hong Ri; Jin, Xuejun; Lee, Jung Joon

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} LIGHT induces ZFP91expression and nuclear translocation of p65, p52, and RelB in LT{beta}R signaling. {yields} ZFP91 knock-down abolishes DNA-binding activity of p52 and RelB but not of p65. {yields} ZFP91 regulates LIGHT-induced stabilization and activation of NIK. {yields} ZFP91 is required for the expression of non-canonical NF-{kappa}B target genes. -- Abstract: LIGHT is a member of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily, and its function is mediated through lymphotoxin-{beta} receptor (LT{beta}R), which is known to play important roles in inflammatory and immune responses through activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling pathways. However, molecular mechanism of LT{beta}R ligation-induced NF-{kappa}B signaling remains incompletely understood. In this report we demonstrate that a novel zinc-finger protein 91 (ZFP91) is a critical regulator in LIGHT-induced activation of non-canonical NF-{kappa}B pathway. ZFP91 appears to be required for NF-{kappa}B2 (p100) processing to p52, nuclear translocation of p52 and RelB, and DNA-binding activity of NF-{kappa}B in LIGHT-induced activation of non-canonical NF-{kappa}B pathway. Furthermore, ZFP91 knock-down by RNA interference blocks the LIGHT-induced accumulation of NIK and p100 processing, as well as the expression of non-canonical NF-{kappa}B target genes. These data clearly indicate that ZFP91 is a key regulator in LIGHT-induced activation of non-canonical NF-{kappa}B pathway in LT{beta}R signaling.

  13. G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR3) channels play a primary role in the antinociceptive effect of oxycodone, but not morphine, at supraspinal sites

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Fujita, Masahide; Ono, Hiroko; Hongo, Yoshie; Kanbara, Tomoe; Ogawa, Koichi; Morioka, Yasuhide; Nishiyori, Atsushi; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Mori, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Kato, Akira; Hasegawa, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Oxycodone and morphine are μ-opioid receptor agonists prescribed to control moderate-to-severe pain. Previous studies suggested that these opioids exhibit different analgesic profiles. We hypothesized that distinct mechanisms mediate the differential effects of these two opioids and investigated the role of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR3 also known as GIRK) channels in their antinociceptive effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Opioid-induced antinociceptive effects were assessed in mice, using the tail-flick test, by i.c.v. and intrathecal (i.t.) administration of morphine and oxycodone, alone and following inhibition of KIR3.1 channels with tertiapin-Q (30 pmol per mouse, i.c.v. and i.t.) and KIR3.1-specific siRNA. The antinociceptive effects of oxycodone and morphine were also examined after tertiapin-Q administration in the mouse femur bone cancer and neuropathic pain models. KEY RESULTS The antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, after both i.c.v. and i.t. administrations, were markedly attenuated by KIR3.1 channel inhibition. In contrast, the antinociceptive effects of i.c.v. morphine were unaffected, whereas those induced by i.t. morphine were attenuated, by KIR3.1 channel inhibition. In the two chronic pain models, the antinociceptive effects of s.c. oxycodone, but not morphine, were inhibited by supraspinal administration of tertiapin-Q. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS These results demonstrate that KIR3.1 channels play a primary role in the antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, but not those of morphine, at supraspinal sites and suggest that supraspinal KIR3.1 channels are responsible for the unique analgesic profile of oxycodone. PMID:24117458

  14. DR1769, a Protein with N-Terminal Beta Propeller Repeats and a Low-Complexity Hydrophilic Tail, Plays a Role in Desiccation Tolerance of Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S.

    2013-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes five putative quinoproteins. Among these, the Δdr2518 and Δdr1769 mutants became sensitive to gamma radiation. DR2518 with beta propeller repeats in the C-terminal domain was characterized as a radiation-responsive serine/threonine protein kinase in this bacterium. DR1769 contains beta propeller repeats at the N terminus, while its C-terminal domain is a proline-rich disordered structure and constitutes a low-complexity hydrophilic region with aliphatic-proline dipeptide motifs. The Δdr1769 mutant showed nearly a 3-log cycle sensitivity to desiccation at 5% humidity compared to that of the wild type. Interestingly, the gamma radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) resistance in mutant cells also dropped by ∼1-log cycle at 10 kGy and ∼1.5-fold, respectively, compared to those in wild-type cells. But there was no effect of UV (254 nm) exposure up to 800 J · m−2. These cells showed defective DNA double-strand break repair, and the average size of the nucleoid in desiccated wild-type and Δdr1769 cells was reduced by approximately 2-fold compared to that of respective controls. However, the nucleoid in wild-type cells returned to a size almost similar to that of the untreated control, which did not happen in mutant cells, at least up to 24 h postdesiccation. These results suggest that DR1769 plays an important role in desiccation and radiation resistance of D. radiodurans, possibly by protecting genome integrity under extreme conditions. PMID:23794625

  15. Identification of in vivo protein phosphorylation sites in human pathogen Schistosoma japonicum by a phosphoproteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rong; Zhou, Chunjing; Lin, Jiaojiao; Yang, Dehao; Shi, Yaojun; Cheng, Guofeng

    2012-01-01

    Schistosome is the causative agent of human schistosomiasis and related animal disease. Reversible protein phosphorylation plays a key role in signaling processing that are vital for a cell and organism. However, it remains to be undercharacterized in schistosomes. In the present study, we characterized in vivo protein phosphorylation events in different developmental stages (schistosomula and adult worms) of Schistosoma japonicum by using microvolume immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) pipette tips coupled to nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS. In total, 127 distinct phosphorylation sites were identified in 92 proteins in S. japonicum. A comparison of the phosphopeptides identified between the schistosomula and the adult worms revealed 30 phosphoproteins co-detected in both of the two worms. These proteins included several signal molecules and enzymes such as 14-3-3 protein, cysteine string protein, heat shock protein 90, epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8, proliferation-associated protein 2G4, peptidyl-prolyl isomerase G, phosphofructokinase and thymidylate kinase. Additionally, the phosphorylation sites were examined for phosphorylation specific motif and evolutionarily conservation. The study represents the first attempt to determine in vivo protein phosphorylation in S. japonicum by using a phosphoproteomic approach. The results by providing an inventory of phosphorylated proteins may facilitate to further understand the mechanisms involved in schistosome development and growth, and then may result in the development of novel vaccine candidates and drug targets for schistosomiasis control. PMID:22036931

  16. PLANT ACONITASE FUNCTIONS AS AN RNA-BINDING PROTEIN AND PLAYS A ROLE IN REGULATING RESISTANCE TO OXIDATIVE STRESS AND HYPERSENSITIVE CELL DEATH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In animals, aconitase is a bifunctional protein. When an iron-sulfur cluster is present in its catalytic center, aconitase displays enzymatic activity; when this cluster is lost it switches to an RNA-binding protein that regulates the translatability or stability of certain transcripts. Here, we sho...

  17. Protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Skwarczynska, Malgorzata; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly important in drug discovery and chemical biology. While a few years ago this 'target class' was deemed to be largely undruggable an impressing number of publications and success stories now show that targeting PPIs with small, drug-like molecules indeed is a feasible approach. Here, we summarize the current state of small-molecule inhibition and stabilization of PPIs and review the active molecules from a structural and medicinal chemistry angle, especially focusing on the key examples of iNOS, LFA-1 and 14-3-3. PMID:26510391

  18. The tomato DWD motif-containing protein DDI1 interacts with the CUL4–DDB1-based ubiquitin ligase and plays a pivotal role in abiotic stress responses

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Min; Zhu, Yunye; Qiao, Maiju; Tang, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Wei; Xiao, Fangming; Liu, Yongsheng

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • We identify DDI1 as a DAMAGED DNA BINDING PROTEIN1 (DDB1)-interacting protein. • DDI1 interacts with the CUL4–DDB1-based ubiquitin ligase in the nucleus. • DDI1 plays a positive role in regulating abiotic stress response in tomato. - Abstract: CULLIN4(CUL4)–DAMAGED DNA BINDING PROTEIN1 (DDB1)-based ubiquitin ligase plays significant roles in multiple physiological processes via ubiquitination-mediated degradation of relevant target proteins. The DDB1–CUL4-associated factor (DCAF) acts as substrate receptor in the CUL4–DDB1 ubiquitin ligase complex and determines substrate specificity. In this study, we identified a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) DDB1-interacting (DDI1) protein as a DCAF protein involved in response to abiotic stresses, including UV radiation, high salinity and osmotic stress. Co-immunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay indicated that DDI1 associates with CUL4–DDB1 in the nucleus. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated the DDI1 gene is induced by salt, mannitol and UV-C treatment. Moreover, transgenic tomato plants with overexpression or knockdown of the DDI1 gene exhibited enhanced or attenuated tolerance to salt/mannitol/UV-C, respectively. Thus, our data suggest that DDI1 functions as a substrate receptor of the CUL4–DDB1 ubiquitin ligase, positively regulating abiotic stress response in tomato.

  19. The tomato UV-damaged DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) plays a role in organ size control via an epigenetic manner

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epigenetic regulation, including various covalent modifications of histone proteins and methylation of cytosine bases in DNA, participates broadly in many fundamentally physiological and developmental processes. The repressed or active states of transcription resulted from epigenetic modifications a...

  20. Physical interactions between Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins play an important role in their cooperative activation of the human immunodeficiency virus enhancer in T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bassuk, A G; Anandappa, R T; Leiden, J M

    1997-01-01

    The transcriptional regulatory elements of many inducible T-cell genes contain adjacent or overlapping binding sites for the Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT families of transcription factors. Similar arrays of functionally important NF-kappaB/NFAT and Ets binding sites are present in the transcriptional enhancers of human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2), suggesting that this pattern of nuclear protein binding sites reflects an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for regulating inducible T-cell gene expression that has been co-opted during HIV evolution. Despite these findings, the molecular mechanisms by which Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins cooperatively regulate inducible T-cell gene expression remained unknown. In the studies described in this report, we demonstrated a physical interaction between multiple Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins both in vitro and in activated normal human T cells. This interaction is mediated by the Ets domain of Ets proteins and the C-terminal region of the Rel homology domains of NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins. In addition, the Ets-NF-kappaB/NFAT interaction requires the presence of DNA binding sites for both proteins, as it is abolished by the DNA intercalating agents propidium iodide and ethidium bromide and enhanced by the presence of synthetic oligonucleotides containing binding sites for Ets and NF-kappaB proteins. A dominant-negative mutant of NF-kappaB p50 that binds DNA but fails to interact with Ets proteins inhibits the synergistic activation of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 enhancers by NF-kappaB (p50 + p65) and Ets-1, suggesting that physical interaction between Ets and NF-kappaB proteins is required for the transcriptional activity of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 enhancers. Taken together, these findings suggest that evolutionarily conserved physical interactions between Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins are important in regulating the inducible expression of T-cell genes and viruses. These interactions represent a potential target

  1. STAT5 plays a critical role in regulating the 5'-flanking region of the porcine whey acidic protein gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mi-Ran; Lee, Sang In; Jang, Ye-Jin; Jeon, Mi-Hyang; Kim, Jeom Sun; Kim, Kyung-Woon; Park, Jin-Ki; Yoo, Jae Gyu; Jeon, Ik-Soo; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Park, Choon-Keun; Byun, Sung June

    2015-12-01

    The mammary gland serves as a valuable bioreactor system for the production of recombinant proteins in lactating animals. Pharmaceutical-grade recombinant protein can be harvested from the milk of transgenic animals that carry a protein of interest under the control of promoter regions genes encoding milk proteins. Whey acidic protein (WAP), for example, is predominantly expressed in the mammary gland and is regulated by lactating hormones during pregnancy. We cloned the 5'-flanking region of the porcine WAP gene (pWAP) to confirm the sequence elements in its promoter that are required for gene-expression activity. In the present study, we investigated how lactogenic hormones--including prolactin, hydrocortisone, and insulin--contribute to the transcriptional activation of the pWAP promoter region in mammalian cells, finding that these hormones activate STAT5 signaling, which in turn induce gene expression via STAT5 binding sites in its 5'-flanking region. To confirm the expression and hormonal regulation of the 5'-flanking region of pWAP in vivo, we generated transgenic mice expressing human recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hCSF2) in the mammary gland under the control of the pWAP promoter. These mice secreted hCSF2 protein in their milk at levels ranging from 242 to 1,274.8 ng/ml. Collectively, our findings show that the pWAP promoter may be useful for confining the expression of foreign proteins to the mammary gland, where they can be secreted along with milk. PMID:26256125

  2. Glucose-regulated protein 78 may play a crucial role in promoting the pulmonary microvascular remodeling in a rat model of hepatopulmonary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiying; Lv, Minli; Zhao, Zhongfu; Jia, Jiantao; Zhang, Lili; Xiao, Peng; Wang, Limin; Li, Chen; Ji, Jingquan; Tian, Xiaoxia; Li, Xujiong; Fan, Yimin; Lai, Lina; Liu, Yan; Li, Baohong; Zhang, Cuiying; Liu, Mingshe; Guo, Jianhong; Han, Dewu; Ji, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study is to investigate the role of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) in the pulmonary microvascular remodeling during hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) development. Methods The rat models with liver cirrhosis and HPS were induced by multiple pathogenic factors for 4 to 8 wk. The concentrations of alanine transferase (ALT) and endotoxin in plasma were detected in the models, followed by the detection of GRP78 expression. RT-PCR, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were employed to assess the mRNA and protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), respectively. Immunohistochemistry staining was used to examine the expression of a specific vascular marker, factor VIII-related antigen (FVIII-RAg), and several cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related proteins, including CHOP/GADD153, caspase-12, Bcl-2 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Results The levels of endotoxin and ALT in plasma were gradually increased as the disease progressed, so did GRP78, which were in a positive correlation. The expression levels of VEGF (both mRNA and protein) and FVIII-RAg were significantly elevated in the HPS models, indicating active angiogenesis, which was also positively correlated with GRP78 expression. Furthermore, the expression levels of the pro-apoptotic proteins of CHOP/GADD153 and caspase-12 were dramatically decreased, while the anti-apoptotic proteins of Bcl-2 and NF-κB were significantly elevated, in the HPS models. There were also close correlations between these proteins and GRP78. Conclusions Over-expression of GRP78 in lungs may be the critical pathogenic factor for HPS. Through promoting cell proliferation and survival and inhibiting apoptosis, GRP78 may promote the pulmonary microvascular remodeling in HPS pathogenesis. Our results provide a potential therapeutic target for clinical prevention and treatment for HPS and related complications. PMID:24768185

  3. Play Therapy: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Maggie L.; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Jessee, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the current issues in play therapy and its implications for play therapists. A brief history of play therapy is provided along with the current play therapy approaches and techniques. This article also touches on current issues or problems that play therapists may face, such as interpreting children's play, implementing…

  4. Cyclic Nucleotide-dependent Protein Kinases Target ARHGAP17 and ARHGEF6 Complexes in Platelets.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zoltan; Wynne, Kieran; von Kriegsheim, Alexander; Gambaryan, Stepan; Smolenski, Albert

    2015-12-11

    Endothelial cells release prostacyclin (PGI2) and nitric oxide (NO) to inhibit platelet functions. PGI2 and NO effects are mediated by cyclic nucleotides, cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKA, PKG), and largely unknown PKA and PKG substrate proteins. The small G-protein Rac1 plays a key role in platelets and was suggested to be a target of cyclic nucleotide signaling. We confirm that PKA and PKG activation reduces Rac1-GTP levels. Screening for potential mediators of this effect resulted in the identification of the Rac1-specific GTPase-activating protein ARHGAP17 and the guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF6 as new PKA and PKG substrates in platelets. We mapped the PKA/PKG phosphorylation sites to serine 702 on ARHGAP17 using Phos-tag gels and to serine 684 on ARHGEF6. We show that ARHGAP17 binds to the actin-regulating CIP4 protein in platelets and that Ser-702 phosphorylation interferes with this interaction. Reduced CIP4 binding results in enhanced inhibition of cell migration by ARHGAP17. Furthermore, we show that ARHGEF6 is constitutively linked to GIT1, a GAP of Arf family small G proteins, and that ARHGEF6 phosphorylation enables binding of the 14-3-3 adaptor protein to the ARHGEF6/GIT1 complex. PKA and PKG induced rearrangement of ARHGAP17- and ARHGEF6-associated protein complexes might contribute to Rac1 regulation and platelet inhibition. PMID:26507661

  5. An inhibitor of yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase plays an important role in ensuring the genomic integrity of daughter cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nugroho, T T; Mendenhall, M D

    1994-01-01

    The gene encoding a 40-kDa protein, previously studied as a substrate and inhibitor of the yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase, Cdc28, has been cloned. The DNA sequence reveals that p40 is a highly charged protein of 32,187 Da with no significant homology to other proteins. Overexpression of the gene encoding p40, SIC1, produces cells with an elongated but morphology similar to that of cells with depleted levels of the CLB gene products, suggesting that p40 acts as an inhibitor of Cdc28-Clb complexes in vivo. A SIC1 deletion is viable and has highly increased frequencies of broken and lost chromosomes. The deletion strain segregates out many dead cells that are primarily arrested at the G2 checkpoint in an asymmetric fashion. Only daughters and young mothers display the lethal defect, while experienced mothers appear to grow normally. These results suggest that negative regulation of Cdc28 protein kinase activity by p40 is important for faithful segregation of chromosomes to daughter cells. Images PMID:8164683

  6. Colletotrichum higginsianum extracellular LysM proteins play dual roles in appressorial function and suppression of chitin-triggered plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Hiroyuki; Hacquard, Stéphane; Kombrink, Anja; Hughes, H Bleddyn; Halder, Vivek; Robin, Guillaume P; Hiruma, Kei; Neumann, Ulla; Shinya, Tomonori; Kombrink, Erich; Shibuya, Naoto; Thomma, Bart P H J; O'Connell, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    The genome of the hemibiotrophic anthracnose fungus, Colletotrichum higginsianum, encodes a large repertoire of candidate-secreted effectors containing LysM domains, but the role of such proteins in the pathogenicity of any Colletotrichum species is unknown. Here, we characterized the function of two effectors, ChELP1 and ChELP2, which are transcriptionally activated during the initial intracellular biotrophic phase of infection. Using immunocytochemistry, we found that ChELP2 is concentrated on the surface of bulbous biotrophic hyphae at the interface with living host cells but is absent from filamentous necrotrophic hyphae. We show that recombinant ChELP1 and ChELP2 bind chitin and chitin oligomers in vitro with high affinity and specificity and that both proteins suppress the chitin-triggered activation of two immune-related plant mitogen-activated protein kinases in the host Arabidopsis. Using RNAi-mediated gene silencing, we found that ChELP1 and ChELP2 are essential for fungal virulence and appressorium-mediated penetration of both Arabidopsis epidermal cells and cellophane membranes in vitro. The findings suggest a dual role for these LysM proteins as effectors for suppressing chitin-triggered immunity and as proteins required for appressorium function. PMID:27174033

  7. Host MicroRNA miR-197 Plays a Negative Regulatory Role in the Enterovirus 71 Infectious Cycle by Targeting the RAN Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wen-Fang; Huang, Ru-Ting; Chien, Kun-Yi; Huang, Jo-Yun; Lau, Kean-Seng; Jheng, Jia-Rong; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Wu, Tzong-Yuan; Chen, Chung-Yung

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a member of Picornaviridae, is associated with severe central nervous system complications. In this study, we identified a cellular microRNA (miRNA), miR-197, whose expression was downregulated by viral infection in a time-dependent manner. In miR-197 mimic-transfected cells, EV71 replication was inhibited, whereas the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity was decreased in EV71 strains with or without predicted miR-197 target sites, indicating that miR-197 targets host proteins to modulate viral replication. We thus used a quantitative proteomics approach, aided by the TargetScan algorithm, to identify putative target genes of miR-197. Among them, RAN was selected and validated as a genuine target in a 3′ untranslated region (UTR) reporter assay. Reduced production of RAN by RNA interference markedly reduced the synthesis of EV71-encoded viral proteins and virus titers. Furthermore, reintroduction of nondegradable RAN into these knockdown cells rescued viral protein synthesis. miR-197 levels were modulated by EV71 to maintain RAN mRNA translatability at late times postinfection since we demonstrated that cap-independent translation exerted by its intrinsic IRES activity was occurring at times when translation attenuation was induced by EV71. EV71-induced downregulation of miR-197 expression increased the expression of RAN, which supported the nuclear transport of the essential viral proteins 3D/3CD and host protein hnRNP K for viral replication. Our data suggest that downregulation of cellular miRNAs may constitute a newly identified mechanism that sustains the expression of host proteins to facilitate viral replication. IMPORTANCE Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a picornavirus with a positive-sense single-stranded RNA that globally inhibits the cellular translational system, mainly by cleaving cellular eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), which inhibits the association of the

  8. A Fungal Sarcolemmal Membrane-Associated Protein (SLMAP) Homolog Plays a Fundamental Role in Development and Localizes to the Nuclear Envelope, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Nordzieke, Steffen; Zobel, Thomas; Fränzel, Benjamin; Wolters, Dirk A.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcolemmal membrane-associated protein (SLMAP) is a tail-anchored protein involved in fundamental cellular processes, such as myoblast fusion, cell cycle progression, and chromosomal inheritance. Further, SLMAP misexpression is associated with endothelial dysfunctions in diabetes and cancer. SLMAP is part of the conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex required for specific signaling pathways in yeasts, filamentous fungi, insects, and mammals. In filamentous fungi, STRIPAK was initially discovered in Sordaria macrospora, a model system for fungal differentiation. Here, we functionally characterize the STRIPAK subunit PRO45, a homolog of human SLMAP. We show that PRO45 is required for sexual propagation and cell-to-cell fusion and that its forkhead-associated (FHA) domain is essential for these processes. Protein-protein interaction studies revealed that PRO45 binds to STRIPAK subunits PRO11 and SmMOB3, which are also required for sexual propagation. Superresolution structured-illumination microscopy (SIM) further established that PRO45 localizes to the nuclear envelope, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. SIM also showed that localization to the nuclear envelope requires STRIPAK subunits PRO11 and PRO22, whereas for mitochondria it does not. Taken together, our study provides important insights into fundamental roles of the fungal SLMAP homolog PRO45 and suggests STRIPAK-related and STRIPAK-unrelated functions. PMID:25527523

  9. The Denial of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Smith, Brian

    Well meaning parents and teachers often use children's play for the purposes of literacy and socialization. Yet, these attempts may deny play to children by subordinating play to some other concept. Evidence shows that even when parents play with their very young children they generally play games like shopping, cooking, and eating; whereas when…

  10. GsCML27, a Gene Encoding a Calcium-Binding Ef-Hand Protein from Glycine soja, Plays Differential Roles in Plant Responses to Bicarbonate, Salt and Osmotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Sun, Xiaoli; Duanmu, Huizi; Zhu, Dan; Yu, Yang; Cao, Lei; Liu, Ailin; Jia, Bowei; Xiao, Jialei; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Calcium, as the most widely accepted messenger, plays an important role in plant stress responses through calcium-dependent signaling pathways. The calmodulin-like family genes (CMLs) encode Ca2+ sensors and function in signaling transduction in response to environmental stimuli. However, until now, the function of plant CML proteins, especially soybean CMLs, is largely unknown. Here, we isolated a Glycine soja CML protein GsCML27, with four conserved EF-hands domains, and identified it as a calcium-binding protein through far-UV CD spectroscopy. We further found that expression of GsCML27 was induced by bicarbonate, salt and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, ectopic expression of GsCML27 in Arabidopsis enhanced plant tolerance to bicarbonate stress, but decreased the salt and osmotic tolerance during the seed germination and early growth stages. Furthermore, we found that ectopic expression of GsCML27 decreases salt tolerance through modifying both the cellular ionic (Na+, K+) content and the osmotic stress regulation. GsCML27 ectopic expression also decreased the expression levels of osmotic stress-responsive genes. Moreover, we also showed that GsCML27 localized in the whole cell, including cytoplasm, plasma membrane and nucleus in Arabidopsis protoplasts and onion epidermal cells, and displayed high expression in roots and embryos. Together, these data present evidence that GsCML27 as a Ca2+-binding EF-hand protein plays a role in plant responses to bicarbonate, salt and osmotic stresses. PMID:26550992

  11. Protein DJ-1 and its anti-oxidative stress function play an important role in renal cell mediated response to profibrotic agents.

    PubMed

    Eltoweissy, Marwa; Dihazi, Gry H; Müller, Gerhard A; Asif, Abdul R; Dihazi, Hassan

    2016-05-24

    In the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis, oxidative stress (OS) enhances the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to sustained cell growth, inflammation, excessive tissue remodelling and accumulation, which results in the development and acceleration of renal damage. In our previous work (Eltoweissy et al., 2011) we established protein DJ-1 (PARK7) as an important ROS scavenger and key player in renal cell response to OS. In the present study we investigated the impact of profibrogenic agonists on DJ-1 and shed light on the role of this protein in renal fibrosis. Treatment of renal fibroblasts and epithelial cells with the profibrogenic agonist ANG II or PDGF resulted in a significant up-regulation of DJ-1 expression parallel to an increase in the expression of fibrosis markers. Monitoring of DJ-1 expression in kidney extract and tissue sections from a renal fibrosis mouse model (Col4a3-deficient) revealed a disease grade dependent regulation of the protein. Overexpression of DJ-1 prompted cell resistance to OS in both fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Furthermore overexpression of DJ-1, involved in ROS scavenging, in which glutamic acid 18 (E18) is mutated to either to aspartic acid (D) or glutamine (Q) resulted in a significant increase in cell death under OS in the case of E18D mutation, whereas E18Q mutation did not impact significantly the cell response to OS, revealing the importance of the acidic group for the ROS scavenging activity of the DJ-1 protein more than the nature of the amino acid itself. Affinity precipitation of interaction partners of DJ-1 and its mutants revealed an important role of annexin A1 and A5 in the mechanism of action of DJ-1 in anti-oxidative stress response. PMID:27109140

  12. The LOV Protein of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Plays a Significant Role in the Counteraction of Plant Immune Responses during Citrus Canker

    PubMed Central

    Kraiselburd, Ivana; Daurelio, Lucas D.; Tondo, María Laura; Merelo, Paz; Cortadi, Adriana A.; Talón, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R.; Orellano, Elena G.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogens interaction with a host plant starts a set of immune responses that result in complex changes in gene expression and plant physiology. Light is an important modulator of plant defense response and recent studies have evidenced the novel influence of this environmental stimulus in the virulence of several bacterial pathogens. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is the bacterium responsible for citrus canker disease, which affects most citrus cultivars. The ability of this bacterium to colonize host plants is influenced by bacterial blue-light sensing through a LOV-domain protein and disease symptoms are considerably altered upon deletion of this protein. In this work we aimed to unravel the role of this photoreceptor during the bacterial counteraction of plant immune responses leading to citrus canker development. We performed a transcriptomic analysis in Citrus sinensis leaves inoculated with the wild type X. citri subsp. citri and with a mutant strain lacking the LOV protein by a cDNA microarray and evaluated the differentially regulated genes corresponding to specific biological processes. A down-regulation of photosynthesis-related genes (together with a corresponding decrease in photosynthesis rates) was observed upon bacterial infection, this effect being more pronounced in plants infected with the lov-mutant bacterial strain. Infection with this strain was also accompanied with the up-regulation of several secondary metabolism- and defense response-related genes. Moreover, we found that relevant plant physiological alterations triggered by pathogen attack such as cell wall fortification and tissue disruption were amplified during the lov-mutant strain infection. These results suggest the participation of the LOV-domain protein from X. citri subsp. citri in the bacterial counteraction of host plant defense response, contributing in this way to disease development. PMID:24260514

  13. Reduced Wall Acetylation Proteins Play Vital and Distinct Roles in Cell Wall O-Acetylation in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Yuzuki; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Gille, Sascha; Harholt, Jesper; Chong, Sun-Li; Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.; Tenkanen, Maija; Cheng, Kun; Pauly, Markus; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2013-01-01

    The Reduced Wall Acetylation (RWA) proteins are involved in cell wall acetylation in plants. Previously, we described a single mutant, rwa2, which has about 20% lower level of O-acetylation in leaf cell walls and no obvious growth or developmental phenotype. In this study, we generated double, triple, and quadruple loss-of-function mutants of all four members of the RWA family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In contrast to rwa2, the triple and quadruple rwa mutants display severe growth phenotypes revealing the importance of wall acetylation for plant growth and development. The quadruple rwa mutant can be completely complemented with the RWA2 protein expressed under 35S promoter, indicating the functional redundancy of the RWA proteins. Nevertheless, the degree of acetylation of xylan, (gluco)mannan, and xyloglucan as well as overall cell wall acetylation is affected differently in different combinations of triple mutants, suggesting their diversity in substrate preference. The overall degree of wall acetylation in the rwa quadruple mutant was reduced by 63% compared with the wild type, and histochemical analysis of the rwa quadruple mutant stem indicates defects in cell differentiation of cell types with secondary cell walls. PMID:24019426

  14. The quantitative assessment of the role played by basic amino acid clusters in the nuclear uptake of human ribosomal protein L7

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Lee, I-Fang; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we used a multiple copy (EGFP){sub 3} reporter system to establish a numeric nuclear index system to assess the degree of nuclear import. The system was first validated by a FRAP assay, and then was applied to evaluate the essential and multifaceted nature of basic amino acid clusters during the nuclear import of ribosomal protein L7. The results indicate that the sequence context of the basic cluster determines the degree of nuclear import, and that the number of basic residues in the cluster is irrelevant; rather the position of the pertinent basic residues is crucial. Moreover, it also found that the type of carrier protein used by basic cluster has a great impact on the degree of nuclear import. In case of L7, importin β2 or importin β3 are preferentially used by clusters with a high import efficiency, notwithstanding that other importins are also used by clusters with a weaker level of nuclear import. Such a preferential usage of multiple basic clusters and importins to gain nuclear entry would seem to be a common practice among ribosomal proteins in order to ensure their full participation in high rate ribosome synthesis. - Highlights: ► We introduce a numeric index system that represents the degree of nuclear import. ► The rate of nuclear import is dictated by the sequence context of the basic cluster. ► Importin β2 and β3 were mainly responsible for the N4 mediated nuclear import.

  15. Lysin Motif–Containing Proteins LYP4 and LYP6 Play Dual Roles in Peptidoglycan and Chitin Perception in Rice Innate Immunity[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bing; Li, Jian-Feng; Ao, Ying; Qu, Jinwang; Li, Zhangqun; Su, Jianbin; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Jun; Feng, Dongru; Qi, Kangbiao; He, Yanming; Wang, Jinfa; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Plant innate immunity relies on successful detection of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) of invading microbes via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) at the plant cell surface. Here, we report two homologous rice (Oryza sativa) lysin motif–containing proteins, LYP4 and LYP6, as dual functional PRRs sensing bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) and fungal chitin. Live cell imaging and microsomal fractionation consistently revealed the plasma membrane localization of these proteins in rice cells. Transcription of these two genes could be induced rapidly upon exposure to bacterial pathogens or diverse MAMPs. Both proteins selectively bound PGN and chitin but not lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro. Accordingly, silencing of either LYP specifically impaired PGN- or chitin- but not LPS-induced defense responses in rice, including reactive oxygen species generation, defense gene activation, and callose deposition, leading to compromised resistance against bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae and fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Interestingly, pretreatment with excess PGN dramatically attenuated the alkalinization response of rice cells to chitin but not to flagellin; vice versa, pretreatment with chitin attenuated the response to PGN, suggesting that PGN and chitin engage overlapping perception components in rice. Collectively, our data support the notion that LYP4 and LYP6 are promiscuous PRRs for PGN and chitin in rice innate immunity. PMID:22872757

  16. MglC, a Paralog of Myxococcus xanthus GTPase-Activating Protein MglB, Plays a Divergent Role in Motility Regulation

    PubMed Central

    McLoon, Anna L.; Wuichet, Kristin; Häsler, Michael; Keilberg, Daniela; Szadkowski, Dobromir

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to optimize interactions with their environment and one another, bacteria regulate their motility. In the case of the rod-shaped cells of Myxococcus xanthus, regulated motility is essential for social behaviors. M. xanthus moves over surfaces using type IV pilus-dependent motility and gliding motility. These two motility systems are coordinated by a protein module that controls cell polarity and consists of three polarly localized proteins, the small G protein MglA, the cognate MglA GTPase-activating protein MglB, and the response regulator RomR. Cellular reversals are induced by the Frz chemosensory system, and the output response regulator of this system, FrzZ, interfaces with the MglA/MglB/RomR module to invert cell polarity. Using a computational approach, we identify a paralog of MglB, MXAN_5770 (MglC). Genetic epistasis experiments demonstrate that MglC functions in the same pathway as MglA, MglB, RomR, and FrzZ and is important for regulating cellular reversals. Like MglB, MglC localizes to the cell poles asymmetrically and with a large cluster at the lagging pole. Correct polar localization of MglC depends on RomR and MglB. Consistently, MglC interacts directly with MglB and the C-terminal output domain of RomR, and we identified a surface of MglC that is necessary for the interaction with MglB and for MglC function. Together, our findings identify an additional member of the M. xanthus polarity module involved in regulating motility and demonstrate how gene duplication followed by functional divergence can add a layer of control to the complex cellular processes of motility and motility regulation. IMPORTANCE Gene duplication and the subsequent divergence of the duplicated genes are important evolutionary mechanisms for increasing both biological complexity and regulation of biological processes. The bacterium Myxococcus xanthus is a soil bacterium with an unusually large genome that carries out several social processes, including

  17. War, Conflict and Play. Debating Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyder, Tina

    2004-01-01

    Young refugees from many parts of the world are increasingly present in UK early years settings. This book explores the crucial importance of play for young refugee children's development. It considers the implications of war and conflict on young children and notes how opportunities for play are denied. It provides a framework for early years…

  18. Playing the Play: What the Children Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Jo Anne

    2006-01-01

    Playing the Play describes the experiences of a storyteller and teacher of literature who created a literature-based literacy program at Concourse House, a homeless shelter in Bronx, New York, for women and their young children. This program is based on the belief that pleasure is the primary reason children want to learn to read, and that where…

  19. Bibliography on Play Therapy and Children's Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Mary Brown; L'Abate, Luciano

    The references listed are: (1) journals, (2) dissertation abstracts, (3) books, (4) reports, and (5) monographs. The main subjects covered are: (1) children's play, (2) psychotherapy with disturbed children through the medium of play therapy, and (3) various aspects of child development, both normal and abnormal. The materials listed date from…

  20. The nuclear protein GmbZIP110 has transcription activation activity and plays important roles in the response to salinity stress in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhaolong; Ali, Zulfiqar; Xu, Ling; He, Xiaolan; Huang, Yihong; Yi, Jinxin; Shao, Hongbo; Ma, Hongxiang; Zhang, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Plant basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play important roles in many biological processes and are involved in the regulation of salt stress tolerance. Previously, our lab generated digital gene expression profiling (DGEP) data to identify differentially expressed genes in a salt-tolerant genotype of Glycine soja (STGoGS) and a salt-sensitive genotype of Glycine max (SSGoGM). This DGEP data revealed that the expression (log2 ratio) of GmbZIP110 was up-regulated 2.76-fold and 3.38-fold in SSGoGM and STGoGS, respectively. In the present study, the salt inducible gene GmbZIP110 was cloned and characterized through phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization and in silico transcript abundance analysis in different tissues. The functional role of this gene in salt tolerance was studied through transactivation analysis, DNA binding ability, expression in soybean composite seedlings and transgenic Arabidopsis, and the effect of GmbZIP110 on the expression of stress-related genes in transgenic Arabidopsis was investigated. We found that GmbZIP110 could bind to the ACGT motif, impact the expression of many stress-related genes and the accumulation of proline, Na+ and K+, and enhanced the salt tolerance of composite seedlings and transgenic Arabidopsis. Integrating all these results, we propose that GmbZIP110 plays a critical role in the response to salinity stress in soybean and has high potential usefulness in crop improvement. PMID:26837841

  1. The nuclear protein GmbZIP110 has transcription activation activity and plays important roles in the response to salinity stress in soybean.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaolong; Ali, Zulfiqar; Xu, Ling; He, Xiaolan; Huang, Yihong; Yi, Jinxin; Shao, Hongbo; Ma, Hongxiang; Zhang, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Plant basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play important roles in many biological processes and are involved in the regulation of salt stress tolerance. Previously, our lab generated digital gene expression profiling (DGEP) data to identify differentially expressed genes in a salt-tolerant genotype of Glycine soja (STGoGS) and a salt-sensitive genotype of Glycine max (SSGoGM). This DGEP data revealed that the expression (log2 ratio) of GmbZIP110 was up-regulated 2.76-fold and 3.38-fold in SSGoGM and STGoGS, respectively. In the present study, the salt inducible gene GmbZIP110 was cloned and characterized through phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization and in silico transcript abundance analysis in different tissues. The functional role of this gene in salt tolerance was studied through transactivation analysis, DNA binding ability, expression in soybean composite seedlings and transgenic Arabidopsis, and the effect of GmbZIP110 on the expression of stress-related genes in transgenic Arabidopsis was investigated. We found that GmbZIP110 could bind to the ACGT motif, impact the expression of many stress-related genes and the accumulation of proline, Na(+) and K(+), and enhanced the salt tolerance of composite seedlings and transgenic Arabidopsis. Integrating all these results, we propose that GmbZIP110 plays a critical role in the response to salinity stress in soybean and has high potential usefulness in crop improvement. PMID:26837841

  2. The Uses of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabaniss, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Teaching artists have techniques for keeping play alive and vital in their work. But how do they think of play as TAs? In this article, the author examines the role of play in the work and life of teaching artists.

  3. Cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 plays a role in prostate cancer cell invasion and affects expression of PSA and ANXA1.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Bhakti R; Breed, Ananya A; Apte, Snehal; Acharya, Kshitish; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3) is upregulated in prostate cancer as compared to the normal prostate tissue. Higher expression of CRISP-3 has been linked to poor prognosis and hence it has been thought to act as a prognostic marker for prostate cancer. It is proposed to have a role in innate immunity but its role in prostate cancer is still unknown. In order to understand its function, its expression was stably knocked down in LNCaP cells. CRISP-3 knockdown did not affect cell viability but resulted in reduced invasiveness. Global gene expression changes upon CRISP-3 knockdown were identified by microarray analysis. Microarray data were quantitatively validated by evaluating the expression of seven candidate genes in three independent stable clones. Functional annotation of the differentially expressed genes identified cell adhesion, cell motility, and ion transport to be affected among other biological processes. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA, also known as Kallikrein 3) was the top most downregulated gene whose expression was also validated at protein level. Interestingly, expression of Annexin A1 (ANXA1), a known anti-inflammatory protein, was upregulated upon CRISP-3 knockdown. Re-introduction of CRISP-3 into the knockdown clone reversed the effect on invasiveness and also led to increased PSA expression. These results suggest that overexpression of CRISP-3 in prostate tumor may maintain higher PSA expression and lower ANXA1 expression. Our data also indicate that poor prognosis associated with higher CRISP-3 expression could be due to its role in cell invasion. PMID:26369530

  4. microRNA-183 plays as oncogenes by increasing cell proliferation, migration and invasion via targeting protein phosphatase 2A in renal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Mingning Liu, Lei Chen, Lieqian Tan, Guobin Liang, Ziji Wang, Kangning Liu, Jianjun Chen, Hege

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • miR-183 was up-regulated in renal cancer tissues. • Inhibition of endogenous miR-183 suppressed renal cancer cell growth and metastasis. • miR-183 increased cell growth and metastasis. • miR-183 regulated renal cancer cell growth and metastasis via directly targeting tumor suppressor protein phosphatase 2A. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the function of miR-183 in renal cancer cells and the mechanisms miR-183 regulates this process. In this study, level of miR-183 in clinical renal cancer specimens was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. miR-183 was up- and down-regulated in two renal cancer cell lines ACHN and A498, respectively, and cell proliferation, Caspase 3/7 activity, colony formation, in vitro migration and invasion were measured; and then the mechanisms of miR-183 regulating was analyzed. We found that miR-183 was up-regulated in renal cancer tissues; inhibition of endogenous miR-183 suppressed in vitro cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion and stimulated Caspase 3/7 activity; up-regulated miR-183 increased cell growth and metastasis and suppressed Caspase 3/7 activity. We also found that miR-183 directly targeted tumor suppressor, specifically the 3′UTR of three subunits of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-Cα, PP2A-Cβ, and PP2A-B56-γ) transcripts, inhibiting their expression and regulated the downstream regulators p21, p27, MMP2/3/7 and TIMP1/2/3/4. These results revealed the oncogenes role of miR-183 in renal cancer cells via direct targeting protein phosphatase 2A.

  5. The light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding proteins Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 play complementary roles during state transitions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pietrzykowska, Malgorzata; Suorsa, Marjaana; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Tikkanen, Mikko; Boekema, Egbert J; Aro, Eva-Mari; Jansson, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Photosynthetic light harvesting in plants is regulated by phosphorylation-driven state transitions: functional redistributions of the major trimeric light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) to balance the relative excitation of photosystem I and photosystem II. State transitions are driven by reversible LHCII phosphorylation by the STN7 kinase and PPH1/TAP38 phosphatase. LHCII trimers are composed of Lhcb1, Lhcb2, and Lhcb3 proteins in various trimeric configurations. Here, we show that despite their nearly identical amino acid composition, the functional roles of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 are different but complementary. Arabidopsis thaliana plants lacking only Lhcb2 contain thylakoid protein complexes similar to wild-type plants, where Lhcb2 has been replaced by Lhcb1. However, these do not perform state transitions, so phosphorylation of Lhcb2 seems to be a critical step. In contrast, plants lacking Lhcb1 had a more profound antenna remodeling due to a decrease in the amount of LHCII trimers influencing thylakoid membrane structure and, more indirectly, state transitions. Although state transitions are also found in green algae, the detailed architecture of the extant seed plant light-harvesting antenna can now be dated back to a time after the divergence of the bryophyte and spermatophyte lineages, but before the split of the angiosperm and gymnosperm lineages more than 300 million years ago. PMID:25194026

  6. Orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR56 plays a role in cell transformation and tumorigenesis involving the cell adhesion pathway.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ning; Sundaram, Roshni; Liu, Guohong; Chionis, John; Fan, Wufang; Rogers, Cheryl; Awad, Tarif; Grifman, Mirta; Yu, Dehua; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Li, Qi-Xiang

    2007-06-01

    GPR56 is an orphan G protein - coupled receptor, mutations of which have recently been associated with bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria, a rare neurologic disease that has implications in brain development. However, no phenotype beyond central nervous system has yet been described for the GPR56-null mutations despite abundant GPR56 expression in many non - central nervous system adult tissues. In the present study, we show that higher GPR56 expression is correlated with the cellular transformation phenotypes of several cancer tissues compared with their normal counterparts, implying a potential oncogenic function. RNA interference-mediated GPR56 silencing results in apoptosis induction and reduced anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells via increased anoikis, whereas cDNA overexpression resulted in increased foci formation in mouse fibroblast NIH3T3 cell line. When GPR56 silencing was induced in vivo in several xenograft tumor models, significant tumor responses (including regression) were observed, suggesting the potential of targeting GPR56 in the development of tumor therapies. The expression profiling of GPR56-silenced A2058 melanoma cell line revealed several genes whose expression was affected by GPR56 silencing, particularly those in the integrin-mediated signaling and cell adhesion pathways. The potential role of GPR56 in cancer cell adhesion was further confirmed by the observation that GPR56 silencing also reduced cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, which is consistent with the observed increase in anoikis and reduction in anchorage-independent growth phenotypes. The oncogenic potential and apparent absence of physiologic defects in adult human tissues lacking GPR56, as well as the targetable nature of G protein - coupled receptor by small molecule or antibody, make GPR56 an attractive drug target for the development of cancer therapies. PMID:17575113

  7. The Arabidopsis homolog of human minor spliceosomal protein U11-48K plays a crucial role in U12 intron splicing and plant development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Kim, Bo Mi; Kwak, Kyung Jin; Jung, Hyun Ju; Kang, Hunseung

    2016-05-01

    The minor U12 introns are removed from precursor mRNAs by the U12 intron-specific minor spliceosome. Among the seven ribonucleoproteins unique to the minor spliceosome, denoted as U11/U12-20K, U11/U12-25K, U11/U12-31K, U11/U12-65K, U11-35K, U11-48K, and U11-59K, the roles of only U11/U12-31K and U11/U12-65K have been demonstrated in U12 intron splicing and plant development. Here, the functional role of the Arabidopsis homolog of human U11-48K in U12 intron splicing and the development of Arabidopsis thaliana was examined using transgenic knockdown plants. The u11-48k mutants exhibited several defects in growth and development, such as severely arrested primary inflorescence stems, formation of serrated leaves, production of many rosette leaves after bolting, and delayed senescence. The splicing of most U12 introns analyzed was impaired in the u11-48k mutants. Comparative analysis of the splicing defects and phenotypes among the u11/u12-31k, u11-48k, and u11/12-65k mutants showed that the severity of abnormal development was closely correlated with the degree of impairment in U12 intron splicing. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence that the Arabidopsis homolog of human U11-48K protein, as well as U11/U12-31K and U11/U12-65K proteins, is necessary for correct splicing of U12 introns and normal plant growth and development. PMID:27091878

  8. The Arabidopsis homolog of human minor spliceosomal protein U11-48K plays a crucial role in U12 intron splicing and plant development

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Kim, Bo Mi; Kwak, Kyung Jin; Jung, Hyun Ju; Kang, Hunseung

    2016-01-01

    The minor U12 introns are removed from precursor mRNAs by the U12 intron-specific minor spliceosome. Among the seven ribonucleoproteins unique to the minor spliceosome, denoted as U11/U12-20K, U11/U12-25K, U11/U12-31K, U11/U12-65K, U11-35K, U11-48K, and U11-59K, the roles of only U11/U12-31K and U11/U12-65K have been demonstrated in U12 intron splicing and plant development. Here, the functional role of the Arabidopsis homolog of human U11-48K in U12 intron splicing and the development of Arabidopsis thaliana was examined using transgenic knockdown plants. The u11-48k mutants exhibited several defects in growth and development, such as severely arrested primary inflorescence stems, formation of serrated leaves, production of many rosette leaves after bolting, and delayed senescence. The splicing of most U12 introns analyzed was impaired in the u11-48k mutants. Comparative analysis of the splicing defects and phenotypes among the u11/u12-31k, u11-48k, and u11/12-65k mutants showed that the severity of abnormal development was closely correlated with the degree of impairment in U12 intron splicing. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence that the Arabidopsis homolog of human U11-48K protein, as well as U11/U12-31K and U11/U12-65K proteins, is necessary for correct splicing of U12 introns and normal plant growth and development. PMID:27091878

  9. The C-terminal Region and SUMOylation of Cockayne Syndrome Group B Protein Play Critical Roles in Transcription-coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yooksil; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Saijo, Masafumi

    2016-01-15

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a recessive disorder that results in deficiencies in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER), a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair, and cells from CS patients exhibit hypersensitivity to UV light. CS group B protein (CSB), which is the gene product of one of the genes responsible for CS, belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 DNA-dependent ATPase family and has an ATPase domain and an ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) in the central region and the C-terminal region, respectively. The C-terminal region containing the UBD is essential for the functions of CSB. In this study, we generated several CSB deletion mutants and analyzed the functions of the C-terminal region of CSB in TC-NER. Not only the UBD but also the C-terminal 30-amino acid residues were required for UV light resistance and TC-NER. This region was needed for the interaction of CSB with RNA polymerase II, the translocation of CS group A protein to the nuclear matrix, and the association of CSB with chromatin after UV irradiation. CSB was modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier 2/3 in a UV light-dependent manner. This modification was abolished in a CSB mutant lacking the C-terminal 30 amino acid residues. However, the substitution of lysine residues in this region with arginine did not affect SUMOylation or TC-NER. By contrast, substitution of a lysine residue in the N-terminal region with arginine decreased SUMOylation and resulted in cells with defects in TC-NER. These results indicate that both the most C-terminal region and SUMOylation are important for the functions of CSB in TC-NER. PMID:26620705

  10. The mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway plays a critical role in regulating immunological properties of BRAF mutant cutaneous melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Whipple, Chery A; Boni, Andrea; Fisher, Jan L; Hampton, Thomas H; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Mellinger, Diane L; Yan, Shaofeng; Tafe, Laura J; Brinckerhoff, Constance E; Turk, Mary J; Mullins, David W; Fadul, Camilo E; Ernstoff, Marc S

    2016-06-01

    The advent of drugs targeting the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has markedly changed the treatment of advanced-stage melanoma harboring BRAF mutations. However, drug resistance, through mechanisms not well elucidated, often occurs. A better understanding of how melanoma-derived immunologically active molecules change in response to MAPK inhibition of BRAF mutated (BRAF) and BRAF wild type (BRAF) melanomas could help identify promising treatment combinations of small molecule inhibitors and immunotherapy. To this aim, we treated 13 BRAF and 13 BRAF mutated human melanoma cell lines with either a specific BRAF inhibitor or an MEK1/2 inhibitor and analyzed changes in the secretion of 42 selected cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. We also measured changes in the expression levels of immunologically relevant melanoma cell surface markers. The BRAF melanomas showed minimal changes in response to the inhibitors, whereas the BRAF cell lines showed, on average, a significant decrease in IFNα2, interleukin-7, Fractalkine, GCSF, GRO, TGFα2, interleukin-8, and VEGF, as well as a reduction in pERK and pMEK protein levels, upon MAPK pathway blockade. BRAF inhibition in BRAF cell lines also resulted in significant changes in the expression of several surface markers including upregulation of β2-microglobulin as well as a decrease in MIC A/B and TRAIL-R2. These results indicate that MAPK pathway inhibition leads to changes in the immunological properties of mutant BRAF melanoma cells and lends support for future studies aimed at designing effective treatment strategies that combine BRAF and MEK inhibition with immunotherapy. PMID:26974965

  11. The Play of Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews the role of play within psychotherapy. She does not discuss the formal play therapy especially popular for young children, nor play from the Jungian perspective that encourages the use of the sand tray with adults. Instead, she focuses on the informal use of play during psychotherapy as it is orchestrated intuitively. Because…

  12. Two people playing together: some thoughts on play, playing, and playfulness in psychoanalytic work.

    PubMed

    Vliegen, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Children's play and the playfulness of adolescents and adults are important indicators of personal growth and development. When a child is not able to play, or an adolescent/adult is not able to be playful with thoughts and ideas, psychotherapy can help to find a more playful and creative stance. Elaborating Winnicott's (1968, p. 591) statement that "psychotherapy has to do with two people playing together," three perspectives on play in psychotherapy are discussed. In the first point of view, the child gets in touch with and can work through aspects of his or her inner world, while playing in the presence of the therapist. The power of play is then rooted in the playful communication with the self In a second perspective, in play the child is communicating aspects of his or her inner world to the therapist as a significant other. In a third view, in "playing together" child and therapist are coconstructing new meanings. These three perspectives on play are valid at different moments of a therapy process or for different children, depending on the complex vicissitudes of the child's constitution, life experiences, development, and psychic structure. Concerning these three perspectives, a parallel can be drawn between the therapist's attitude toward the child's play and the way the therapist responds to the verbal play of an adolescent or adult. We illustrate this with the case of Jacob, a late adolescent hardly able to play with ideas. PMID:20578437

  13. Biogenesis of Fe/S proteins and pathogenicity: IscR plays a key role in allowing Erwinia chrysanthemi to adapt to hostile conditions.

    PubMed

    Rincon-Enriquez, Gabriel; Crété, Patrice; Barras, Frédéric; Py, Béatrice

    2008-03-01

    The Erwinia chrysanthemi genome is predicted to encode three systems, Nif, Isc and Suf, known to assist Fe/S cluster biogenesis and the CsdAE cysteine desulphurase. Single iscU, hscA and fdx mutants were found sensitive to paraquat and exhibited reduced virulence on both chicory leaves and Arabidopsis thaliana. Depletion of the whole Isc system led to a pleiotropic phenotype, including sensitivity to both paraquat and 2,2'-dipyridyl, auxotrophies for branched-chain amino acids, thiamine, nicotinic acid, and drastic alteration in virulence. IscR was able to suppress all of the phenotypes listed above in a sufC-dependent manner while depletion of the Isc system led to IscR-dependent activation of the suf operon. No virulence defects were found associated with csdA or nifS mutations. Surprisingly, we found that the sufC mutant was virulent against A. thaliana, whereas its virulence had been found altered in Saintpaulia. Collectively, these results lead us to propose that E. chrysanthemi possess the Fe/S biogenesis strategy suited to the physico-chemical conditions encountered in its host upon infection. In this view, the IscR regulator, which controls both Isc and Suf, is predicted to play a major role in the ability of E. chrysanthemi to colonize a wide array of different plants. PMID:18284573

  14. Child's Play: Therapist's Narrative

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Rajakumari P.; Hirisave, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Play has been recognized as an essential component to children's healthy development. Schools of play therapy differ philosophically and technically, but they all embrace the therapeutic and developmental properties of play. This case report is an illustration of how a 6-year-old child with emotional disorder was facilitated to express concerns in child-centered play therapy. The paper discusses the therapist's narration of the child's play. PMID:24860228

  15. Play: early and eternal.

    PubMed Central

    Mears, C E; Harlow, H F

    1975-01-01

    A systematic 12-week investigation of development of play behavior was conducted with eight socially reared rhesus monkey infants. A new, basic and primary play form termed self-motion play or peragration was identified and examined. This behavior follows a human model which includes a wide range of pleasurable activities involving motion of the body through space, e.g., rocking, swinging, running, leaping, and water or snow skiing. It can be argued that self-motion play is the initial primate play form and because of its persistence constitutes a reinforcing agent for maintaining many complex patterns and even pastimes. Monkey self-motion play in the present study was divided into five separate patterns in order to compare the relative importance of social and individual peragration play, the role of apparatus and the overall developmental relationships between the different individual and social self-motion play patterns. The data showed that from 90 to 180 days of age self-motion play was independent of other forms of play, that individual self-motion play appeared earlier and with significantly greater increases in frequency than did social self-motion play, and that apparatus was a necessary component for significant increases in social self-motion play. Other findings were that self-motion play existed independent of locomotion and, though initiated by exploration, was separate from it. Therapeutic implications of self-motion play were discussed. Images PMID:1057178

  16. N-terminal basic amino acid residues of Beet black scorch virus capsid protein play a critical role in virion assembly and systemic movement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Beet black scorch virus (BBSV) is a small single-stranded, positive-sense RNA plant virus belonging to the genus Necrovirus, family Tombusviridae. Its capsid protein (CP) contains a 13 amino acid long basic region at the N-terminus, rich in arginine and lysine residues, which is thought to interact with viral RNA to initiate virion assembly. Results In the current study, a series of BBSV mutants containing amino acid substitutions as well as deletions within the N-terminal region were generated and examined for their effects on viral RNA replication, virion assembly, and long distance spread in protoplasts and whole host plants of BBSV. The RNA-binding activities of the mutated CPs were also evaluated in vitro. These experiments allowed us to identify two key basic amino acid residues in this region that are responsible for initiating virus assembly through RNA-binding. Proper assembly of BBSV particles is in turn needed for efficient viral systemic movement. Conclusions We have identified two basic amino acid residues near the N-terminus of the BBSV CP that bind viral RNA with high affinity to initiate virion assembly. We further provide evidence showing that systemic spread of BBSV in infected plants requires intact virions. This study represents the first in-depth investigation of the role of basic amino acid residues within the N-terminus of a necroviral CP. PMID:23786675

  17. Identification of PGAM5 as a Mammalian Protein Histidine Phosphatase that Plays a Central Role to Negatively Regulate CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Panda, Saswati; Srivastava, Shekhar; Li, Zhai; Vaeth, Martin; Fuhs, Stephen R; Hunter, Tony; Skolnik, Edward Y

    2016-08-01

    Whereas phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine is exceedingly well characterized, the role of histidine phosphorylation in mammalian signaling is largely unexplored. Here we show that phosphoglycerate mutase family 5 (PGAM5) functions as a phosphohistidine phosphatase that specifically associates with and dephosphorylates the catalytic histidine on nucleoside diphosphate kinase B (NDPK-B). By dephosphorylating NDPK-B, PGAM5 negatively regulates CD4(+) T cells by inhibiting NDPK-B-mediated histidine phosphorylation and activation of the K(+) channel KCa3.1, which is required for TCR-stimulated Ca(2+) influx and cytokine production. Using recently developed monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize phosphorylation of nitrogens at the N1 (1-pHis) or N3 (3-pHis) positions of the imidazole ring, we detect for the first time phosphoisoform-specific regulation of histidine-phosphorylated proteins in vivo, and we link these modifications to TCR signaling. These results represent an important step forward in studying the role of histidine phosphorylation in mammalian biology and disease. PMID:27453048

  18. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade MKK7-MPK6 Plays Important Roles in Plant Development and Regulates Shoot Branching by Phosphorylating PIN1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Weiyan; Li, Baohua; Li, Shujia; Liang, Yan; Wu, Xiaowei; Ma, Mei; Wang, Jiyao; Gao, Jin; Cai, Yueyue; Zhang, Yuanya; Wang, Yingchun; Li, Jiayang; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidences exhibit that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/MPK) signaling pathways are connected with many aspects of plant development. The complexity of MAPK cascades raises challenges not only to identify the MAPK module in planta but also to define the specific role of an individual module. So far, our knowledge of MAPK signaling has been largely restricted to a small subset of MAPK cascades. Our previous study has characterized an Arabidopsis bushy and dwarf1 (bud1) mutant, in which the MAP Kinase Kinase 7 (MKK7) was constitutively activated, resulting in multiple phenotypic alterations. In this study, we found that MPK3 and MPK6 are the substrates for phosphorylation by MKK7 in planta. Genetic analysis showed that MKK7-MPK6 cascade is specifically responsible for the regulation of shoot branching, hypocotyl gravitropism, filament elongation, and lateral root formation, while MKK7-MPK3 cascade is mainly involved in leaf morphology. We further demonstrated that the MKK7-MPK6 cascade controls shoot branching by phosphorylating Ser 337 on PIN1, which affects the basal localization of PIN1 in xylem parenchyma cells and polar auxin transport in the primary stem. Our results not only specify the functions of the MKK7-MPK6 cascade but also reveal a novel mechanism for PIN1 phosphorylation, establishing a molecular link between the MAPK cascade and auxin-regulated plant development. PMID:27618482

  19. Heat Shock Protein 27 Plays a Pivotal Role in Myofibroblast Differentiation and in the Development of Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ah-Mee; Kanai, Kyosuke; Itoh, Tatsuki; Sato, Takao; Tsukui, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Yutaka; Selman, Moises; Matsushima, Kouji; Yoshie, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is a member of the small molecular weight HSP family. Upon treatment with transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), we observed upregulation of HSP27 along with that of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker of myofibroblast differentiation, in cultured human and mouse lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, by using siRNA knockdown, we demonstrated that HSP27 was involved in cell survival and upregulation of fibronectin, osteopontin (OPN) and type 1 collagen, all functional markers of myofibroblast differentiation, in TGF-β1-treated MRC-5 cells. In lung tissues of bleomycin-treated mice, HSP27 was strongly upregulated and substantially co-localized with α-SMA, OPN and type I collagen but not with proSP-C (a marker of type II alveolar epithelial cells), E-cadherin (a marker of epithelial cells) or F4/80 (a marker of macrophages). A similar co-localization of HSP27 and α-SMA was observed in lung tissues of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Furthermore, airway delivery of HSP27 siRNA effectively suppressed bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Collectively, our findings indicate that HSP27 is critically involved in myofibroblast differentiation of lung fibroblasts and may be a promising therapeutic target for lung fibrotic diseases. PMID:26859835

  20. The potato virus X TGBp2 protein association with the endoplasmic reticulum plays a role in but is not sufficient for viral cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, Ruchira; Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp1, TGBp2, TGBp3, and coat protein are required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP fused to TGBp2 were bombarded to leaf epidermal cells and GFP:TGBp2 moved cell to cell in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves but not in Nicotiana tabacum leaves. GFP:TGBp2 movement was observed in TGBp1-transgenic N. tabacum, indicating that TGBp2 requires TGBp1 to promote its movement in N. tabacum. In this study, GFP:TGBp2 was detected in a polygonal pattern that resembles the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed TGBp2 has two putative transmembrane domains. Two mutations separately introduced into the coding sequences encompassing the putative transmembrane domains within the GFP:TGBp2 plasmids and PVX genome, disrupted membrane binding of GFP:TGBp2, inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in N. benthamiana and TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum, and inhibited PVX movement. A third mutation, lying outside the transmembrane domains, had no effect on GFP:TGBp2 ER association or movement in N. benthamiana but inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum and PVX movement in either Nicotiana species. Thus, ER association of TGBp2 may be required but not be sufficient for virus movement. TGBp2 likely provides an activity for PVX movement beyond ER association.

  1. Heat Shock Protein 27 Plays a Pivotal Role in Myofibroblast Differentiation and in the Development of Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Ah-Mee; Kanai, Kyosuke; Itoh, Tatsuki; Sato, Takao; Tsukui, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Yutaka; Selman, Moises; Matsushima, Kouji; Yoshie, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is a member of the small molecular weight HSP family. Upon treatment with transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), we observed upregulation of HSP27 along with that of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker of myofibroblast differentiation, in cultured human and mouse lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, by using siRNA knockdown, we demonstrated that HSP27 was involved in cell survival and upregulation of fibronectin, osteopontin (OPN) and type 1 collagen, all functional markers of myofibroblast differentiation, in TGF-β1-treated MRC-5 cells. In lung tissues of bleomycin-treated mice, HSP27 was strongly upregulated and substantially co-localized with α-SMA, OPN and type I collagen but not with proSP-C (a marker of type II alveolar epithelial cells), E-cadherin (a marker of epithelial cells) or F4/80 (a marker of macrophages). A similar co-localization of HSP27 and α-SMA was observed in lung tissues of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Furthermore, airway delivery of HSP27 siRNA effectively suppressed bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Collectively, our findings indicate that HSP27 is critically involved in myofibroblast differentiation of lung fibroblasts and may be a promising therapeutic target for lung fibrotic diseases. PMID:26859835

  2. Protein kinase RNA- like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) signaling pathway plays a major role in reactive oxygen species (ROS)- mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress- induced apoptosis in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is considered one of the mechanisms contributing to reactive oxygen species (ROS)- mediated cell apoptosis. In diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), cell apoptosis is generally accepted as the etiological factor and closely related to cardiac ROS generation. ER stress is proposed the link between ROS and cell apoptosis; however, the signaling pathways and their roles in participating ER stress- induced apoptosis in DCM are still unclear. Methods In this study, we investigated the signaling transductions in ROS- dependent ER stress- induced cardiomocyte apoptosis in animal model of DCM. Moreover, in order to clarify the roles of IRE1 (inositol - requiring enzyme-1), PERK (protein kinase RNA (PKR)- like ER kinase) and ATF6 (activating transcription factor-6) in conducting apoptotic signal in ROS- dependent ER stress- induced cardiomocyte apoptosis, we further investigated apoptosis in high- glucose incubated cardiomyocytes with IRE1, ATF6 and PERK- knocked down respectively. Results we demonstrated that the ER stress sensors, referred as PERK, IRE1 and ATF6, were activated in ROS- mediated ER stress- induced cell apoptosis in rat model of DCM which was characterized by cardiac pump and electrical dysfunctions. The deletion of PERK in myocytes exhibited stronger protective effect against apoptosis induced by high- glucose incubation than deletion of ATF6 or IRE in the same myocytes. By subcellular fractionation, rather than ATF6 and IRE1, in primary cardiomyocytes, PERK was found a component of MAMs (mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes) which was the functional and physical contact site between ER and mitochondria. Conclusions ROS- stimulated activation of PERK signaling pathway takes the major responsibility rather than IRE1 or ATF6 signaling pathways in ROS- medicated ER stress- induced myocyte apoptosis in DCM. PMID:24180212

  3. Retinal Degeneration Slow (RDS) Glycosylation Plays a Role in Cone Function and in the Regulation of RDS·ROM-1 Protein Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Michael W; Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2015-11-13

    The photoreceptor-specific glycoprotein retinal degeneration slow (RDS, also called PRPH2) is necessary for the formation of rod and cone outer segments. Mutations in RDS cause rod and cone-dominant retinal disease, and it is well established that both cell types have different requirements for RDS. However, the molecular mechanisms for this difference remain unclear. Although RDS glycosylation is highly conserved, previous studies have revealed no apparent function for the glycan in rods. In light of the highly conserved nature of RDS glycosylation, we hypothesized that it is important for RDS function in cones and could underlie part of the differential requirement for RDS in the two photoreceptor subtypes. We generated a knockin mouse expressing RDS without the N-glycosylation site (N229S). Normal levels of RDS and the unglycosylated RDS binding partner rod outer segment membrane protein 1 (ROM-1) were found in N229S retinas. However, cone electroretinogram responses were decreased by 40% at 6 months of age. Because cones make up only 3-5% of photoreceptors in the wild-type background, N229S mice were crossed into the nrl(-/-) background (in which all rods are converted to cone-like cells) for biochemical analysis. In N229S/nrl(-/-) retinas, RDS and ROM-1 levels were decreased by ~60% each. These data suggest that glycosylation of RDS is required for RDS function or stability in cones, a difference that may be due to extracellular versus intradiscal localization of the RDS glycan in cones versus rods. PMID:26420485

  4. Protein kinase C-related kinase 1 and 2 play an essential role in thromboxane-mediated neoplastic responses in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Paula B.; Kinsella, B. Therese

    2015-01-01

    The prostanoid thromboxane (TX) A2 is increasingly implicated in neoplastic progression, including prostate cancer (PCa). Mechanistically, we recently identified protein kinase C-related kinase (PRK) 1 as a functional interactant of both the TPα and TPβ isoforms of the human T prostanoid receptor (TP). The interaction with PRK1 was not only essential for TPα/TPβ-induced PCa cell migration but also enabled the TXA2-TP axis to induce phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr11 (H3Thr11), an epigenetic marker both essential for and previously exclusively associated with androgen-induced chromatin remodelling and transcriptional activation. PRK1 is a member of a subfamily of three structurally related kinases comprising PRK1/PKNα, PRK2/PKNγ and PRK3/PKNβ that are widely yet differentially implicated in various cancers. Hence, focusing on the setting of prostate cancer, this study investigated whether TPα and/or TPβ might also complex with PRK2 and PRK3 to regulate their activity and neoplastic responses. While TPα and TPβ were found in immune complexes with PRK1, PRK2 and PRK3 to regulate their activation and signalling, they do so differentially and in a TP agonist-regulated manner dependent on the T-loop activation status of the PRKs but independent of their kinase activity. Furthermore, TXA2-mediated neoplastic responses in prostate adenocarcinoma PC-3 cells, including histone H3Thr11 phosphorylation, was found to occur through a PRK1- and PRK2-, but not PRK3-, dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that TXA2 acts as both a neoplastic and epigenetic regulator and provides a mechanistic explanation, at least in part, for the prophylactic benefits of Aspirin in reducing the risk of certain cancers. PMID:26296974

  5. Calcium and protein kinase C play an important role in Campylobacter jejuni-induced changes in Na+ and Cl- transport in rat ileum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, R K; Ganguly, N K; Kumar, L; Rakesh, J; Panigrahi, D; Walia, B N

    1995-04-24

    The pathophysiological mechanism of Campylobacter jejuni (enterotoxigenic) induced secretory diarrhoea remains least understood. To investigate the mechanism(s) involved, the unidirectional fluxes of Na+ and Cl- were measured across the C. jejuni live culture infected and control (non infected) rat ileum (unstriped), in vitro by Ussing technique under short circuit conditions, in the presence or absence of: Ca2+ ionophore A23187 (5 microM), 1-verapamil (100 microM), calmodulin (CaM) antagonist W-7 (100 microM), dantrolene (25 microM), protein kinase C (PKC) activator PMA (100 ng/ml) and H-7 (60 microM), selective inhibitor of PKC. There was net absorption of Na+ and enhanced Cl- secretion in infected animals while in control animals there was net absorption of Na+ and marginal secretion Cl-.Ca2+ ionophore A23187 mimicked the effects of C. jejuni infection whereas 1-verapamil had significant antisecretory effect on Na+ and Cl- secretion in infected animals. In vitro measurement of undirectional 45Ca fluxes in Ussing chamber experiments revealed net absorption of Ca2+ in infected rat ileum as compared to net secretion of Ca2+ in control rat ileum. These observations clearly indicate that there is increased stimulation of Ca2+ uptake from extracellular milieu to the enterocytes during C. jejuni-induced diarrhoea. The intracellular calcium levels (Ca2+]i (as measured by fluorescent probe Fura-2AM) were found to be raised significantly (P < 0.0001) in enterocytes isolated from C. jejuni infected ileum as compared to the enterocytes from control ileum. The observed increase in [Ca2+]i in enterocytes isolated from C. jejuni live culture supernatant treated rat ileum further shows the involvement of enterotoxin in diarrhoeal process. Dantrolene decreased significantly C. jejuni-induced net Na+ and Cl- secretion but it could not reverse it to absorption suggesting the partial involvement of Ca2+ mobilised from intracellular stores in mediating secretion. W-7 failed to

  6. Learning through Role Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Sandra

    2001-01-01

    Explains how role playing can provide enriching experiences that develop children's literacy and numeracy skills. Lists key ingredients of good role playing and suggests ways to plan them and prepare space for them. (SK)

  7. Adlerian Play Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottman, Terry; Warlick, Jayne

    1990-01-01

    Describes Adlerian method of play therapy. Claims Adlerian therapy represents an integration of the concepts and techniques of individual psychology into a method of using play to help troubled children. (Author/ABL)

  8. Role-Playing Mitosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Mark A.; Stegink, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a role playing activity that actively engages students in the learning process of mitosis. Students play either chromosomes carrying information, or cells in the cell membrane. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/YDS)

  9. Play, Policy & Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klugman, Edgar, Ed.

    In 1992, the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF), in conjunction with Wheelock College (Boston), sponsored its second workshop on children's play, entitled "Play and Cognitive Ability: The Cultural Context." This volume reflects the presentations and discussions held at the workshop, offering perspectives on children's play that, taken…

  10. The Pedagogy of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesbrecht, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    Play is important. Environmental educators Sobel and Louv write about the relationship between children and outside play and suggest that early transcendental experiences within nature allow children to develop empathetic orientations towards the natural world. Children who play out-of-doors develop an appreciation for the environment and…

  11. Play Is the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Steve; Sanderson, Rebecca Cornelli

    2012-01-01

    Historically, play has been viewed as a frivolous break from important endeavors like working and learning when, in fact, a child's ability to fully and freely engage in play is essential to their learning, productivity, and overall development. A natural drive to play is universal across all young mammals. Children from every society on earth…

  12. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  13. AtPPR2, an Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat protein, binds to plastid 23S rRNA and plays an important role in the first mitotic division during gametogenesis and in cell proliferation during embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuqing; Li, Cong; Wang, Hai; Chen, Hao; Berg, Howard; Xia, Yiji

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are mainly involved in regulating post-transcriptional processes in mitochondria and plastids, including chloroplasts. Mutations in the Arabidopsis PPR2 gene have previously been found to cause defects in seed development and reduced transmission through male and female gametophytes. However, the exact function of AtPPR2 has not been defined. We found that a loss-of-function mutation of AtPPR2 leads to arrest of the first mitotic division during both male and female gametogenesis. In addition, the Atppr2 mutation causes delayed embryogenesis, leading to embryonic lethality. Mutation in emb2750, which appears to be a weak mutant allele of the AtPPR2 locus, also results in defective seeds. However, a majority of emb2750 seeds were able to germinate, but their cotyledons were albino and often deformed, and growth of the emb2750 seedlings were arrested after germination. AtPPR2 is mainly expressed in plant parts that undergo cell division, and AtPPR2 protein was localized to chloroplasts. RNA immunoprecipitation and protein gel mobility shift assays showed that AtPPR2 binds to plastid 23S rRNA. Our study adds to a growing body of evidence that plastids and/or chloroplasts play a key role in cell division. AtPPR2 may modulate the translational process to fine-tune plastid function, thereby regulating cell division. PMID:21435048

  14. Modulation of NADH Levels by Arabidopsis Nudix Hydrolases, AtNUDX6 and 7, and the Respective Proteins Themselves Play Distinct Roles in the Regulation of Various Cellular Responses Involved in Biotic/Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takahisa; Muramoto, Kohei; Takada, Risa; Nakagawa, Shouya; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Yoshimura, Kazuya

    2016-06-01

    Arabidopsis Nudix hydrolases, AtNUDX6 and 7, exhibit pyrophosphohydrolase activities toward NADH and contribute to the modulation of various defense responses, such as the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PAR) reaction and salicylic acid (SA)-induced Nonexpresser of Pathogenesis-Related genes 1 (NPR1)-dependent defense pathway, against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the mechanisms by which these enzymes regulate such cellular responses remain unclear. To clarify the functional role(s) of AtNUDX6 and 7 and NADH metabolism, we examined the effects of the transient expression of the active and inactive forms of AtNUDX6 and 7 under the control of an estrogen (ES)-inducible system on various stress responses. The transient expression of active AtNUDX6 and 7 proteins suppressed NADH levels and induced PAR activity, whereas that of their inactive forms did not, indicating the involvement of NADH metabolism in the regulation of the PAR reaction. A transcriptome analysis using KO-nudx6, KO-nudx7 and double KO-nudx6/7 plants, in which intracellular NADH levels increased, identified genes (NADH-responsive genes, NRGs) whose expression levels positively and negatively correlated with NADH levels. Many NRGs did not overlap with the genes whose expression was reported to be responsive to various types of oxidants and reductants, suggesting a novel role for intracellular NADH levels as a redox signaling cue. The active and inactive AtNUDX6 proteins induced the expression of thioredoxin-h5, the activator of NPR1 and SA-induced NPR1-dependent defense genes, while the active and inactive AtNUDX7 proteins suppressed the accumulation of SA and subsequent gene expression, indicating that AtNUDX6 and 7 proteins themselves play distinct roles in stress responses. PMID:27095738

  15. The protein and lipid composition of the membrane of milk fat globules depends on their size.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Argov-Argaman, Nurit; Anggrek, Jeni; Boeren, Sjef; van Hooijdonk, Toon; Vervoort, Jacques; Hettinga, Kasper Arthur

    2016-06-01

    In bovine milk, fat globules (MFG) have a heterogeneous size distribution with diameters ranging from 0.1 to 15 µm. Although efforts have been made to explain differences in lipid composition, little is known about the protein composition of MFG membranes (MFGM) in different sizes of MFG. In this study, protein and lipid analyses were combined to study MFG formation and secretion. Two different sized MFG fractions (7.6±0.9 µm and 3.3±1.2 µm) were obtained by centrifugation. The protein composition of MFGM in the large and small MFG fractions was compared using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics techniques. The lipid composition and fatty acid composition of MFG was determined using HPLC-evaporative light-scattering detector and gas chromatography, respectively. Two frequently studied proteins in lipid droplet biogenesis, perilipin-2 and TIP47, were increased in the large and small MFG fractions, respectively. In the large MFG fraction, besides perilipin-2, cytoplasmic vesicle proteins (heat shock proteins, 14-3-3 proteins, and Rabs), microfilaments and intermediate filament-related proteins (actin and vimentin), host defense proteins (cathelicidins), and phosphatidylinositol were higher in concentration. On the other hand, cholesterol synthesis enzymes [lanosterol synthase and sterol-4-α-carboxylate 3-dehydrogenase (decarboxylating)], cholesterol, unsaturated fatty acids, and phosphatidylethanolamine were, besides TIP47, higher in concentration in the small MFG fraction. These results suggest that vesicle proteins, microfilaments and intermediate filaments, cholesterol, and specific phospholipids play an important role in lipid droplet growth, secretion, or both. The observations from this study clearly demonstrated the difference in protein and lipid composition between small and large MFG fractions. Studying the role of these components in more detail in future experiments may lead to a better understanding of fat globule formation and secretion. PMID

  16. CREB and CREB-binding proteins play an important role in the IE2 86-kilodalton protein-mediated transactivation of the human cytomegalovirus 2.2-kilobase RNA promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, R; Helmich, B; Spector, D H

    1996-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate-early region 2 86-kDa protein (IE2 86) is the major transactivator of the promoter for the 2.2-kb class of early RNAs (open reading frame UL 112-113). Previously, we reported that a DNA segment on this promoter between nucleotides (nt) -113 and -59 was critical for activation by IE2 86 in vivo and could be bound by IE2 86 in vitro (R. Schwartz, M. H. Sommer, A. Scully, and D. H. Spector, J. Virol. 68:5613-5622, 1994). With a set of site-specific mutations within nt -84 to -61, we have localized the essential cis-acting sequences to nt -72 to -61, which contain an ATF/CREB-binding site. The IE2 86-binding site between nt -113 and -85 is not essential for activation of the promoter by IE2 86 in transient-expression assays, but its presence can enhance the level of activation mediated through the sequences located between nt -84 and -59. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with a segment containing nt -84 to -59 and nuclear extracts from human cells permissive for the HCMV infection revealed a complex band pattern. However, by supershift analysis with specific antibodies, we were able to identify CREB as the major ATF/CREB family member in the protein-DNA complexes. Further evidence that CREB is a target for IE2 86-mediated induction, is provided by the finding that IE2 86 activates the somatostatin promoter to high levels. Although the binding of IE2 86 to nonphosphorylated full-length CREB or deltaCREB is minimal, IE2 86 does form complexes with p300 and the CREB-binding protein (CBP), which in turn bind to CREB and can serve as adaptor proteins for CREB function. In addition, the in vivo functional relevance of the interaction between IE2 86 and CBP is indicated by the ability of IE2 86 to enhance transcriptional activation mediated by a GAL4-CBP fusion protein brought to a promoter by GAL4-binding sites. PMID:8794339

  17. Play and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, James E.; Christie, James F.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines how play is affected by computers and digital toys. Research indicates that when computer software targeted at children is problem-solving oriented and open-ended, children tend to engage in creative play and interact with peers in a positive manner. On the other hand, drill-and-practice programs can be quite boring and limit…

  18. Let's Just Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Children have a right to play. The idea is so simple it seems self-evident. But a stroll through any toy superstore, or any half-hour of so-called "children's" programming on commercial TV, makes it clear that violence, not play, dominates what's being sold. In this article, the author discusses how teachers and parents share the responsibility in…

  19. Family Play Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Shlomo

    This paper examines a case study of family play therapy in Israel. The unique contributions of play therapy are evaluated including the therapy's accessibility to young children, its richness and flexibility, its exposure of covert patterns, its wealth of therapeutic means, and its therapeutic economy. The systematization of the therapy attempts…

  20. Clinical Intuition at Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2014-01-01

    A clinical psychologist and consulting psychotherapist discusses how elements of play, inherent in the intuition required in analysis, can provide a cornerstone for serious therapeutic work. She argues that many aspects of play--its key roles in human development, individual growth, and personal creativity, among others--can help therapists and…

  1. Intergenerational Learning through Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lindsay; Larkin, Elizabeth; Graves, Stephen B.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that shared play experiences are a good way to build mutually beneficial relationships among older and younger generations. Outlines why intergenerational play is important, focusing on its cognitive, social, physical, and emotional benefits for both older adults and young children. Describes toys, materials, and games conducive to positive…

  2. Poetry and Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Richard A.

    Philosophers and poets from classical times to the present have argued that playful and amiable discourse are conducive to teaching and learning. The play principle enhances reading and study and should be applied by teachers to benefit their students. Teachers should help their students see that it is fun to enliven the imagination with good…

  3. The Fear of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almon, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Real play--play that is initiated and directed by children and that bubbles up from within the child rather than being imposed by adults--has largely disappeared from the landscape of childhood in the United States. There are many reasons for this, such as the long hours spent in front of screens each day or in activities organized by adults. In…

  4. Return to Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Call it physical activity, call it games, or call it play. Whatever its name, it's a place we all need to return to. In the physical education, recreation, and dance professions, we need to redesign programs to address the need for and want of play that is inherent in all of us.

  5. Role Playing and Skits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letwin, Robert, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    Explores non-scripted role playing, dialogue role playing, sociodrama, and skits as variations of simulation techniques. Provides step-by-step guidelines for conducting such sessions. Successful Meetings, Bill Communications, Inc., 1422 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19102. Subscription Rates: yearly (US, Canada, Mexico) $14.00; elsewhere,…

  6. Play as Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henricks, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The author investigates what he believes one of the more important aspects of play--the experience it generates in its participants. He considers the quality of this experience in relation to five ways of viewing play--as action, interaction, activity, disposition, and within a context. He treats broadly the different forms of affect, including…

  7. Playing with Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casner, Mary W.; Marks, Susan F.

    The paper looks at the development of a play group for autistic children with descriptions of the autistic population, the daily program, the program's philosophy, the play group model, and actual lessons. Children, who ranged in age from 5 to 9 years, often chose activities which were self-stimulating and/or repetitive. The daily program included…

  8. Television at Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Leonard N.; Frazer, Charles F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses children as television viewers capable of manipulating the co-viewing setting by interpreting, constructing, and carrying out planned lines of play in relation to television and its content. Examples illustrate program-oriented and free-form improvisational play situations. (JMF)

  9. Structure of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron BT2081 at 2.05 Å resolution: the first structural representative of a new protein family that may play a role in carbohydrate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Andrew P.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Cai, Xiaohui; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    BT2081 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (GenBank accession code NP_810994.1) is a member of a novel protein family consisting of over 160 members, most of which are found in the different classes of Bacteroidetes. Genome-context analysis lends support to the involvement of this family in carbohydrate metabolism, which plays a key role in B. thetaiotaomicron as a predominant bacterial symbiont in the human distal gut microbiome. The crystal structure of BT2081 at 2.05 Å resolution represents the first structure from this new protein family. BT2081 consists of an N-terminal domain, which adopts a β-sandwich immunoglobulin-like fold, and a larger C-terminal domain with a β-sandwich jelly-roll fold. Structural analyses reveal that both domains are similar to those found in various carbohydrate-active enzymes. The C-terminal β-jelly-roll domain contains a potential carbohydrate-binding site that is highly conserved among BT2081 homologs and is situated in the same location as the carbohydrate-binding sites that are found in structurally similar glycoside hydrolases (GHs). However, in BT2081 this site is partially occluded by surrounding loops, which results in a deep solvent-accessible pocket rather than a shallower solvent-exposed cleft. PMID:20944224

  10. Differential Protein Expression in Honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) Larvae: Underlying Caste Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianke; Wu, Jing; Begna Rundassa, Desalegn; Song, Feifei; Zheng, Aijuan; Fang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Honeybee (Apis mellifera) exhibits divisions in both morphology and reproduction. The queen is larger in size and fully developed sexually, while the worker bees are smaller in size and nearly infertile. To better understand the specific time and underlying molecular mechanisms of caste differentiation, the proteomic profiles of larvae intended to grow into queen and worker castes were compared at 72 and 120 hours using two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), network, enrichment and quantitative PCR analysis. There were significant differences in protein expression between the two larvae castes at 72 and 120 hours, suggesting the queen and the worker larvae have already decided their fate before 72 hours. Specifically, at 72 hours, queen intended larvae over-expressed transketolase, aldehyde reductase, and enolase proteins which are involved in carbohydrate metabolism and energy production, imaginal disc growth factor 4 which is a developmental related protein, long-chain-fatty-acid CoA ligase and proteasome subunit alpha type 5 which metabolize fatty and amino acids, while worker intended larvae over-expressed ATP synthase beta subunit, aldehyde dehydrogenase, thioredoxin peroxidase 1 and peroxiredoxin 2540, lethal (2) 37 and 14-3-3 protein epsilon, fatty acid binding protein, and translational controlled tumor protein. This differential protein expression between the two caste intended larvae was more pronounced at 120 hours, with particular significant differences in proteins associated with carbohydrate metabolism and energy production. Functional enrichment analysis suggests that carbohydrate metabolism and energy production and anti-oxidation proteins play major roles in the formation of caste divergence. The constructed network and validated gene expression identified target proteins for further functional study. This new finding is in contrast to the existing notion that 72 hour old larvae has bipotential and can develop into either queen or worker based on

  11. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 plays a specific role in the insulin-dependent trafficking of the facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, L B; Shewan, A; Millar, C A; Gould, G W; James, D E

    1998-01-16

    Vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) has been implicated in the insulin-regulated trafficking of GLUT4 in adipocytes. It has been proposed that VAMP2 co-localizes with GLUT4 in a postendocytic storage compartment (Martin, S., Tellam, J., Livingstone, C., Slot, J. W., Gould, G. W., and James, D. E. (1996) J. Cell Biol. 134, 625-635), suggesting that it may play a role distinct from endosomal v-SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) such as cellubrevin that are also expressed in adipocytes. The present study examines the effects of recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins encompassing the entire cytoplasmic tails of VAMP1, VAMP2, and cellubrevin on insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in streptolysin O permeabilized 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GST-VAMP2 inhibited insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation by approximately 35%, whereas GST-VAMP1 and GST-cellubrevin were without effect. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the unique N terminus of VAMP2 also inhibited insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in a dose-dependent manner. This peptide had no effect on either guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate-stimulated GLUT4 translocation or on insulin-stimulated GLUT1 translocation. These results imply that GLUT4 and GLUT1 may undergo insulin-stimulated translocation to the cell surface from separate intracellular compartments. To confirm this, adipocytes were incubated with a transferrin-horseradish peroxidase conjugate to fill the itinerant endocytic system after which cells were incubated with H2O2 and diaminobenzidine. This treatment completely blocked insulin-stimulated movement of GLUT1, whereas in the case of GLUT4, movement to the surface was delayed but still reached similar levels to that observed in insulin-stimulated control cells after 30 min. These results suggest that the N terminus of VAMP2 plays a unique role in the insulin-dependent recruitment of GLUT4 from its intracellular storage compartment

  12. DNA-dependent protein kinase interacts functionally with the RNA polymerase II complex recruited at the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) long terminal repeat and plays an important role in HIV gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Shilpi; Ochem, Alex; Tyagi, Mudit

    2011-07-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a nuclear protein kinase that specifically requires association with DNA for its kinase activity, plays important roles in the regulation of different DNA transactions, including transcription, replication and DNA repair, as well as in the maintenance of telomeres. Due to its large size, DNA-PK is also known to facilitate the activities of other factors by providing the docking platform at their site of action. In this study, by running several chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate the parallel distribution of DNA-PK with RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) along the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) provirus before and after activation with tumour necrosis factor alpha. The association between DNA-PK and RNAP II is also long-lasting, at least for up to 4 h (the duration analysed in this study). Knockdown of endogenous DNA-PK using specific small hairpin RNAs expressed from lentiviral vectors resulted in significant reduction in HIV gene expression and replication, demonstrating the importance of DNA-PK for HIV gene expression. Sequence analysis of the HIV-1 Tat protein revealed three potential target sites for phosphorylation by DNA-PK and, by using kinase assays, we confirmed that Tat is an effective substrate of DNA-PK. Through peptide mapping, we found that two of these three potential phosphorylation sites are recognized and phosphorylated by DNA-PK. Mutational studies on the DNA-PK target sites of Tat further demonstrated the functional significance of the Tat-DNA-PK interaction. Thus, overall our results clearly demonstrate the functional interaction between DNA-PK and RNAP II during HIV transcription. PMID:21450944

  13. The Scottish Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheat, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Recounts an episode when, as young schoolboys, Prince Charles and classmates presented "Macbeth" as an end-of-term-play. Traces the events at school that took on different meanings when viewed from maturity. (NH)

  14. The School Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathan, P. D.

    1977-01-01

    Offers a defense of the school play as a vastly underrated educational tool. Available from: Speech and Drama, Elizabeth Gradwell, Distribution Manager, The White Cottage, Allington, Chippenham, Wilts. (MH)

  15. Play Spaces in Denmark.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Edna; Anderson, Robert T.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the variety of play spaces found in urban areas in Denmark: in banks, stores and individual businesses, neighborhood parks and small pocket playgrounds, specialized adventure and traffic playgrounds with supervised activities, and commercial amusement parks. (CM)

  16. Play the Mosquito Game

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the Cell Cycle Diabetes and Insulin DNA - RNA - Protein DNA - the Double Helix Ear Pages ECG/ ... About the games Malaria is one of the world's most common diseases, caused by a parasite that ...

  17. Playing It Safe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Provides tips on how to avoid accidents and injuries on school playgrounds. Tips include removing of old, dangerous equipment; relocating play areas to safer ground; choosing the right surface; factoring in long-term costs for replenishing and redistributing loose materials; and considering Americans with Disabilities Act issues. (GR)

  18. Predicting elections: child's play!

    PubMed

    Antonakis, John; Dalgas, Olaf

    2009-02-27

    In two experiments, children and adults rated pairs of faces from election races. Naïve adults judged a pair on competence; after playing a game, children chose who they would prefer to be captain of their boat. Children's (as well as adults') preferences accurately predicted actual election outcomes. PMID:19251621

  19. Want to Play Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, Matthew L.; Bomer, Megan A.; Powell, Nancy Norem

    2009-01-01

    Students enter the geometry classroom with a strong concept of fairness and a sense of what it means to "play by the rules," yet many students have difficulty understanding the postulates, or rules, of geometry and their implications. Although they may never have articulated the properties of an axiomatic system, they have gained a practical…

  20. Statistics at Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Lyn D.

    2014-01-01

    An exciting event had occurred for the grade 3 classes at Woodlands State School. A new play space designated for the older grades had now been opened to the third graders. In sharing their excitement over this "real treat, real privilege," the teachers invited the children to find out more about playgrounds and, in particular, their new…

  1. "Playing" with Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dave

    2012-01-01

    When faced with a multitude of tasks, any opportunity to "kill two birds with one stone" is welcome. Drama has always excited the author: as a child performing in plays, later as a student and now as a teacher directing performances and improvising within lessons. The author was lucky enough to have inspirational teachers during his primary and…

  2. Abstraction through Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avraamidou, Antri; Monaghan, John; Walker, Aisha

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the computer game play of an 11-year-old boy. In the course of building a virtual house he developed and used, without assistance, an artefact and an accompanying strategy to ensure that his house was symmetric. We argue that the creation and use of this artefact-strategy is a mathematical abstraction. The discussion…

  3. Who's Calling the Plays?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    1990-01-01

    Without an enforceable policy, school athletics programs are beset by politics, high finance, and public sentiment. The most nettlesome problems include loss of instructional time to sports and extracurricular activities; the appropriateness and effectiveness of no-pass/no-play rules; lack of sportsmanship; proliferation of interstate competition;…

  4. Playing with danger.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    Young people who sit still for hours playing computer games can double their risk of potentially fatal blood clots. The charity Lifeblood is alerting nurses to 'e-thrombosis'. It is calling on them to ensure young people are aware of the risks of prolonged immobility and the need to take regular breaks from gaming or using a computer. PMID:23061127

  5. The Games Children Play